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Sample records for air bubbles entrained

  1. Maximal air bubble entrainment at liquid-drop impact.

    PubMed

    Bouwhuis, Wilco; van der Veen, Roeland C A; Tran, Tuan; Keij, Diederik L; Winkels, Koen G; Peters, Ivo R; van der Meer, Devaraj; Sun, Chao; Snoeijer, Jacco H; Lohse, Detlef

    2012-12-28

    At impact of a liquid drop on a solid surface, an air bubble can be entrapped. Here, we show that two competing effects minimize the (relative) size of this entrained air bubble: for large drop impact velocity and large droplets, the inertia of the liquid flattens the entrained bubble, whereas for small impact velocity and small droplets, capillary forces minimize the entrained bubble. However, we demonstrate experimentally, theoretically, and numerically that in between there is an optimum, leading to maximal air bubble entrapment. For a 1.8 mm diameter ethanol droplet, this optimum is achieved at an impact velocity of 0.25  m/s. Our results have a strong bearing on various applications in printing technology, microelectronics, immersion lithography, diagnostics, or agriculture.

  2. Air entrainment and bubble statistics in three-dimensional breaking waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deike, Luc; Melville, W. K.; Popinet, Stephane

    2015-11-01

    Wave breaking in the ocean is of fundamental importance in order to quantify wave dissipation and air-sea interaction, including gas and momentum exchange, and to improve parametrizationsfor weather and climate models. Here, we investigate air entrainment and bubble statistics in three-dimensional breaking waves through direct numerical simulations of the two-phase air-water flow using the Open Source solver Gerris. As in previous 2D simulations, the dissipation due to breaking is found to be in good agreement with previous experimental observations and inertial-scaling arguments. For radii larger than the Hinze scale, the bubble size distribution, is found to follow a power law of the radius, r-3and to scale linearly with the time dependent turbulent dissipation rate during the active breaking stages. The time-averaged bubble size distribution is found to follow the same power law of the radius and to scale linearly with the wave dissipation rate per unit length of breaking crest. We propose a phenomenological turbulent bubble break-up model that describes the numerical results and existing experimental results.

  3. The effect of water temperature on air entrainment, bubble plumes, and surface foam in a laboratory breaking-wave analog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callaghan, A. H.; Stokes, M. D.; Deane, G. B.

    2014-11-01

    Air-entraining breaking waves form oceanic whitecaps and play a key role in climate regulation through air-sea bubble-mediated gas transfer, and sea spray aerosol production. The effect of varying sea surface temperature on air entrainment, subsurface bubble plume dynamics, and surface foam evolution intrinsic to oceanic whitecaps has not been well studied. By using a breaking wave analog in the laboratory over a range of water temperatures (Tw = 5°C to Tw = 30°C) and different source waters, we have examined changes in air entrainment, subsurface bubble plumes, and surface foam evolution over the course of a breaking event. For filtered seawater, air entrainment was estimated to increase by 6% between Tw = 6°C and Tw = 30°C, driven by increases of about 43% in the measured surface roughness of the plunging water sheet. After active air entrainment, the rate of loss of air through bubble degassing was more rapid at colder water temperatures within the first 0.5 s of plume evolution. Thereafter, the trend reversed and bubbles degassed more quickly in warmer water. The largest observed temperature-dependent differences in subsurface bubble distributions occurred at radii greater than about 700 μm. Temperature-dependent trends observed in the subsurface bubble plume were mirrored in the temporal evolution of the surface whitecap foam area demonstrating the intrinsic link between surface whitecap foam and the subsurface bubble plume. Differences in foam and plume characteristics due to different water sources were greater than the temperature dependencies for the filtered seawater examined.

  4. Effect of an entrained air bubble on the acoustics of an ink channel.

    PubMed

    Jeurissen, Roger; de Jong, Jos; Reinten, Hans; van den Berg, Marc; Wijshoff, Herman; Versluis, Michel; Lohse, Detlef

    2008-05-01

    Piezo-driven inkjet systems are very sensitive to air entrapment. The entrapped air bubbles grow by rectified diffusion in the ink channel and finally result in nozzle failure. Experimental results on the dynamics of fully grown air bubbles are presented. It is found that the bubble counteracts the pressure buildup necessary for the droplet formation. The channel acoustics and the air bubble dynamics are modeled. For good agreement with the experimental data it is crucial to include the confined geometry into the model: The air bubble acts back on the acoustic field in the channel and thus on its own dynamics. This two-way coupling limits further bubble growth and thus determines the saturation size of the bubble.

  5. Size distribution of oceanic air bubbles entrained in sea-water by wave-breaking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Resch, F.; Avellan, F.

    1982-01-01

    The size of oceanic air bubbles produced by whitecaps and wave-breaking is determined. The production of liquid aerosols at the sea surface is predicted. These liquid aerosols are at the origin of most of the particulate materials exchanged between the ocean and the atmosphere. A prototype was designed and built using an optical technique based on the principle of light scattering at an angle of ninety degrees from the incident light beam. The output voltage is a direct function of the bubble diameter. Calibration of the probe was carried out within a range of 300 microns to 1.2 mm. Bubbles produced by wave-breaking in a large air-sea interaction simulating facility. Experimental results are given in the form of size spectrum.

  6. Airborne & SAR Synergy Reveals the 3D Structure of Air Bubble Entrainment in Internal Waves and Frontal Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, J. C. B.; Magalhaes, J. M.; Batista, M.; Gostiaux, L.; Gerkema, T.; New, A. L.

    2013-03-01

    Internal waves are now recognised as an important mixing mechanism in the ocean. Mixing at the base of the mixed layer and in the seasonal thermocline affects the properties of those water masses which define the exchange of heat and freshwater between the atmosphere and ocean. The breaking of Internal Solitary Waves (ISWs) contributes significantly to turbulent mixing in the near-surface layers, through the continual triggering of instabilities as they propagate and shoal towards the coast or shallow topography. Here we report some results of the EU funded project A.NEW (Airborne observations of Nonlinear Evolution of internal Waves generated by internal tidal beams). The airborne capabilities to observe small scale structure of breaking internal waves in the near-shore zone has been demonstrated in recent studies (e.g. Marmorino et al., 2008). In particular, sea surface thermal signatures of shoaling ISWs have revealed the turbulent character of these structures in the form of surface “boil” features. On the other hand, some in situ measurements of internal waves and theoretical work suggest subsurface entrainment of air bubbles in the convergence zones of ISWs (Serebryany and Galybin, 2009; Grimshaw et al., 2010). We conducted airborne remote sensing observations in the coastal zone off the west Iberian Peninsula (off Lisbon, Portugal) using high resolution imaging sensors: LiDAR (Light Detection And Ranging), hyperspectral cameras (Eagle and Hawk) and thermal infrared imaging (TABI-320). These measurements were planned based on previous SAR observations in the region, which included also near-real time SAR overpasses (ESA project AOPT-2423 and TerraSAR-X project OCE-0056). The airborne measurements were conducted from board the NERC (Natural Environmental Research Centre) Do 228 aircraft in the summer of 2010. The TABI-320 thermal airborne broadband imager can distinguish temperature differences as small as one-twentieth of a degree and operates in the

  7. Air entrainment in hairy surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasto, Alice; Regli, Marianne; Brun, P.-T.; Alvarado, José; Clanet, Christophe; Hosoi, A. E.

    2016-07-01

    Motivated by diving semiaquatic mammals, we investigate the mechanism of dynamic air entrainment in hairy surfaces submerged in liquid. Hairy surfaces are cast out of polydimethylsiloxane elastomer and plunged into a fluid bath at different velocities. Experimentally, we find that the amount of air entrained is greater than what is expected for smooth surfaces. Theoretically, we show that the hairy surface can be considered as a porous medium and we describe the air entrainment via a competition between the hydrostatic forcing and the viscous resistance in the pores. A phase diagram that includes data from our experiments and biological data from diving semiaquatic mammals is included to place the model system in a biological context and predict the regime for which the animal is protected by a plastron of air.

  8. Study of Air Entrainment by a Horizontal Plunging Liquid Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trujillo, Mario; Deshpande, Suraj; Wu, Xiongjun; Chahine, Georges

    2009-11-01

    The process of air entrainment following the impact of an initially horizontal circular water jet on a pool of water has been studied computationally and experimentally. It has been found that the entrainment of air cavities in the near field region is periodic, not continuous as reported in earlier studies. The simulations are based on a Volume-of-Fluid methodology with interfacial compression using a modified version of the open source utilities, OpenFoam. Close agreement with experiments is reported on the creation of cavities in the near field, where air entrainment occurs. The period of entrainment is found to be proportional to g, and a simplified closed-form solution for this periodic event is presented. An overall physical picture of the mechanisms leading to bubble formation is given. The far field, which is characterized by the presence of small bubbles is only partially resolved computationally. Comparisons against velocity data are performed in this region leading to adequate qualitative agreement.

  9. Air entrainment by breaking waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deike, Luc; Lenain, Luc; Melville, W. Kendall

    2017-04-01

    We present an estimate of the total volume of entrained air by breaking waves in the open ocean, based on a model for a single breaking wave and the statistics of breaking waves measured in the field and described by the average length of breaking crests moving with speeds in the range (c,c + dc) per unit area of ocean surface, Λ(c)dc, introduced by Phillips (1985). By extending the single breaking wave model to the open ocean, we show that the volume flux of air entrained by breaking waves, VA (volume per unit ocean area per unit time, a velocity), is given by the third moment of Λ(c), modulated by a function of the wave slope. Using field measurements of the distribution Λ(c) and the wave spectrum, we obtain an estimate of the total volume flux of air entrained by breaking for a wide range of wind and wave conditions. These results pave the way for accurate remote sensing of the air entrained by breaking waves and subsequent estimates of the associated gas transfer.

  10. Simulation study on factors influencing the entrainment behavior of liquid steel as bubbles pass through the steel/slag interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiang; Bao, Yan-ping; Wang, Min; Lin, Lu

    2016-05-01

    In this study, a water/silicone oil interface was used to simulate the steel/slag interface in a converter. A high-speed camera was used to record the entrainment process of droplets when air bubbles were passed through the water/silicone oil interface. Motion parameters of the bubbles and droplets were obtained using particle kinematic analysis software, and the entrainment rate of the droplets was calculated. It was found that the entrainment rate decreased from 29.5% to 0 when the viscosity of the silicone oil was increased from 60 mPa·s to 820 mPa·s in the case of bubbles with a 5 mm equivalent diameter passing through the water/silicone oil interface. The results indicate that increasing the viscosity of the silicone oil is conducive to reducing the entrainment rate. The entrainment rate increased from 0 to 136.3% in the case of silicone oil with a viscosity of 60 mPa·s when the equivalent diameter of the bubbles was increased from 3 mm to 7 mm. We therefore conclude that small bubbles are also conductive to reducing the entrainment rate. The force analysis results for the water column indicate that the entrainment rate of droplets is affected by the velocity of the bubble passing through the water/silicone oil interface and that the entrainment rate decreases with the bubble velocity.

  11. Depth of penetration of bubbles entrained by a plunging water jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clanet, Christophe; Lasheras, Juan C.

    1997-07-01

    A model is proposed to predict the depth of penetration of the air bubbles entrained by a round water jet impacting into a flat, liquid pool. This depth is shown to be determined only by the initial jet momentum and by the non-monotonic nature of the bubble terminal velocities as a function of their size. The model is shown to be in excellent agreement with measurements of the depth and width of penetration of the bubbles performed over a wide range of jet diameters, velocities, and plunging angles.

  12. An experimental study of air entrainment and oxygen transfer at a water jet from a nozzle with air holes.

    PubMed

    Baylar, Ahmet; Emiroglu, M Emin

    2004-01-01

    An adequate supply of dissolved oxygen is important in natural rivers and in some water treatment processes. The dissolved oxygen concentration can be enhanced by entraining air bubbles in a receiving pool. When a water jet impinges a receiving pool at rest, air bubbles may be entrained and carried away below the pool free surface. This process is called plunging water jet entrainment and aeration. This paper describes an experimental study of the air entrainment rate and oxygen transfer efficiency of circular nozzles with and without air holes. In particular, the effect of varying the number, positions, and open/close status of the air holes is investigated. A negative pressure occurred depending on the air holes opened on the circular nozzles. This phenomenon affected the water jet expansion, water jet shape, air entrainment, and bubble penetration depth and, hence, the oxygen transfer efficiency. It was demonstrated that the air entrainment rate and the oxygen transfer efficiency of the circular nozzles with air holes were better than those of the circular nozzles without air holes. Therefore, adding air holes to a simple, circular nozzle could lead to a significantly increased air entrainment rate and oxygen transfer efficiency.

  13. Vortex-ring-induced large bubble entrainment during drop impact.

    PubMed

    Thoraval, Marie-Jean; Li, Yangfan; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T

    2016-03-01

    For a limited set of impact conditions, a drop impacting onto a pool can entrap an air bubble as large as its own size. The subsequent rise and rupture of this large bubble plays an important role in aerosol formation and gas transport at the air-sea interface. The large bubble is formed when the impact crater closes up near the pool surface and is known to occur only for drops that are prolate at impact. Herein we use experiments and numerical simulations to show that a concentrated vortex ring, produced in the neck between the drop and the pool, controls the crater deformations and pinchoff. However, it is not the strongest vortex rings that are responsible for the large bubbles, as they interact too strongly with the pool surface and self-destruct. Rather, it is somewhat weaker vortices that can deform the deeper craters, which manage to pinch off the large bubbles. These observations also explain why the strongest and most penetrating vortex rings emerging from drop impacts are not produced by oblate drops but by more prolate drop shapes, as had been observed in previous experiments.

  14. Acoustic measurements of air entrainment by breaking waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrill, Eric James

    1998-11-01

    Wave breaking at the surface of the ocean plays an important role in air-sea interaction processes. Bubbles entrained by breaking waves not only enhance the transfer of atmospheric gases to the ocean, but also modify the phase speed and attenuation of acoustic waves propagating through the bubbly medium. The development of acoustic instruments to measure bubbles and the results obtained from a number of field and laboratory experiments are presented. The first part of this dissertation addresses sound speed measurements made in the North Atlantic as part of the Acoustic Surface Reverberation Experiment (ASREX). An autonomous buoy system that directly measures the sound speed in the surface wave layer was developed. Data obtained with the instrument spanned several storm cycles with wind speeds and significant wave heights reaching 20 m/s and 8 m, respectively. The use of Wood's relation (1946) allows the calculation of the void fraction of air based on the low-frequency sound speed measurements. The highly variable near-surface sound speed/void fraction field is analyzed with respect to wind and surface wave- breaking parameters. The second part of this dissertation presents the development of a broadband acoustic technique which simultaneously measures the phase speed and attenuation at acoustic frequencies ranging from 4-100 kHz. The acoustic data is inverted for the size distribution of bubbles using algorithms that are based upon the physics of sound propagation through a bubbly mixture. This acoustic technique was evaluated in the large wave channel at the Hydraulics Laboratory, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, using mechanically generated breaking waves in seawater. Field measurements of bubble concentrations that result from wave breaking were made in both shallow water off Scripps Pier, California and in deep water near Point Conception, California using the broadband technique. Significant variability is observed in the bubble field, characterized by

  15. Air Entrainment in a Liquid Cell due to Fiber Drawing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpkins, P. G.; Kuck, V. J.

    1997-11-01

    Preliminary observations of air entrainment into a liquid bath of viscous Newtonian fluid are described. The motion generated by an optical fiber moving vertically through the bath gives rise to a free surface that is cusp-like. Photomicrographs of the contact region, however, illustrate that the free surface profile becomes conical with a small included angle that is draw speed dependent. There is some evidence to suggest that tip-streaming ( Taylor, G. I. 1934 The Formation of Emulsions in Definable Fields of Flow. Proc. Roy. Soc. Lond. A146, 501-523.) footnote Sherwood, J. D. 1984 Tip Streaming from Slender Drops in a Nonlinear Extensional Flow. J. Fluid Mech. 144, 281-295. filaments of air emanate from the contact zone to give rise to minute ( 10mm) bubbles via Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Continuous operation after the onset of tip-streaming results in the creation of larger bubbles from the small ones via coalescence during recirculation in the bath. Eventually the occurrence of very large bubbles can lead to break out and the absence of any coating on the fiber.

  16. Entrainment Rate in Shallow Cumuli: Dependence on Entrained Dry Air Sources and Probability Density Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, C.; Liu, Y.; Niu, S.; Vogelmann, A. M.

    2012-12-01

    In situ aircraft cumulus observations from the RACORO field campaign are used to estimate entrainment rate for individual clouds using a recently developed mixing fraction approach. The entrainment rate is computed based on the observed state of the cloud core and the state of the air that is laterally mixed into the cloud at its edge. The computed entrainment rate decreases when the air is entrained from increasing distance from the cloud core edge; this is because the air farther away from cloud edge is drier than the neighboring air that is within the humid shells around cumulus clouds. Probability density functions of entrainment rate are well fitted by lognormal distributions at different heights above cloud base for different dry air sources (i.e., different source distances from the cloud core edge). Such lognormal distribution functions are appropriate for inclusion into future entrainment rate parameterization in large scale models. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first time that probability density functions of entrainment rate have been obtained in shallow cumulus clouds based on in situ observations. The reason for the wide spread of entrainment rate is that the observed clouds are affected by entrainment mixing processes to different extents, which is verified by the relationships between the entrainment rate and cloud microphysics/dynamics. The entrainment rate is negatively correlated with liquid water content and cloud droplet number concentration due to the dilution and evaporation in entrainment mixing processes. The entrainment rate is positively correlated with relative dispersion (i.e., ratio of standard deviation to mean value) of liquid water content and droplet size distributions, consistent with the theoretical expectation that entrainment mixing processes are responsible for microphysics fluctuations and spectral broadening. The entrainment rate is negatively correlated with vertical velocity and dissipation rate because entrainment

  17. Dry Air Entrainment into Hurricane Earl

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guillory, Anthony R.; Jedlovec, Gary J.; Atkinson, Robert J.; Hood, Robbie E.; LaFontaine, Frank J.

    2000-01-01

    Hurricane Earl formed in the Gulf of Mexico in September 1998. It quickly was upgraded from a tropical disturbance to tropical storm status and then to a hurricane. Earl possessed hybrid (tropical and extratropical) characteristics throughout its lifetime. The system maintained and erratic track, which led to wide variability in the operational track forecasts. It eventually made landfall on the Florida panhandle on 2 September and raced northeastward. During August and September 1998, NASA conducted the third Convection and Moisture Experiment (CAMEX-3). The experiment was focused on studying hurricanes with an emphasis toward developing a better understanding of their intensification and motion. Earl provides a unique opportunity to utilize high spatial and temporal resolution data collected from the DC-8 and high altitude ER-2 NASA platforms, which flew over Earl as it made landfall. These data can also be put into broader view provided by other instruments from the Geosychronous Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) and the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellites. Hurricane Earl was affected by entrainment of dry air from the northwest. Hurricane Isis was intensifying and approaching the Mexican Pacific coast with its associated outflow potentially affecting the inflow into Earl as the storm neared Florida. In addition, a longwave synoptic trough circulation was present over the eastern U.S. Either or both of these could be responsible for the dry air into the system. This paper will focus on identifying the source of the dry by using upper-level wind and moisture fields derived from the GOES 6.7 um water vapor imagery. We will attempt to relate the large-scale observations to those from the NASA aircraft. An infrared instrument onboard the ER-2 also has a similar wavelength and may be able to confirm some of the GOES findings. In addition, a microwave radiometer with 4 channels focused on measuring precipitation and its associated ice

  18. Dry Air Entrainment into Hurricane Earl

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guillory, Anthony R.; Jedlovec, Gary J.; Atkinson, Robert J.; Hood, Robbie E.; LaFontaine, Frank J.

    2000-01-01

    Hurricane Earl formed in the Gulf of Mexico in September 1998. It quickly was upgraded from a tropical disturbance to tropical storm status and then to a hurricane. Earl possessed hybrid (tropical and extratropical) characteristics throughout its lifetime. The system maintained and erratic track, which led to wide variability in the operational track forecasts. It eventually made landfall on the Florida panhandle on 2 September and raced northeastward. During August and September 1998, NASA conducted the third Convection and Moisture Experiment (CAMEX-3). The experiment was focused on studying hurricanes with an emphasis toward developing a better understanding of their intensification and motion. Earl provides a unique opportunity to utilize high spatial and temporal resolution data collected from the DC-8 and high altitude ER-2 NASA platforms, which flew over Earl as it made landfall. These data can also be put into broader view provided by other instruments from the Geosychronous Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) and the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellites. Hurricane Earl was affected by entrainment of dry air from the northwest. Hurricane Isis was intensifying and approaching the Mexican Pacific coast with its associated outflow potentially affecting the inflow into Earl as the storm neared Florida. In addition, a longwave synoptic trough circulation was present over the eastern U.S. Either or both of these could be responsible for the dry air into the system. This paper will focus on identifying the source of the dry by using upper-level wind and moisture fields derived from the GOES 6.7 um water vapor imagery. We will attempt to relate the large-scale observations to those from the NASA aircraft. An infrared instrument onboard the ER-2 also has a similar wavelength and may be able to confirm some of the GOES findings. In addition, a microwave radiometer with 4 channels focused on measuring precipitation and its associated ice

  19. Bending and growth of entrained air filament under converging and asymmetric rotational fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Parmod; Das, Arup K.; Mitra, Sushanta K.

    2017-02-01

    Here we have proposed the increase of the entrainment rate by extruding an air filament under the action of convergent but asymmetric rotational field. By varying the source speed and the diameter of rotational fields, we showed the bending of an air filament towards the higher strength direction of the asymmetric inertia. Interfacial profiles like bubble ejection from the air filament and non-collapsible entrainment with air accumulation in a stagnant zone are obtained in finite volume based numerical simulations, on gradual increase of average rotational fields. Physical understanding of bent interface profile reveals the presence of multiple stages in filament growth depending upon the inertia of surrounding medium. Accumulation of air in the stagnant zone is found to be more prominent in case of rotational speed based asymmetry in contrast to its counterpart having diametric asymmetry of imposing sources. Relative comparison between these two methods of producing asymmetric field showed faster growth of filament upon varying the source diameter, while keeping the speed same. In case of extreme retardation and enhancement of rotational asymmetry, film pinch off and formation of bubble train have been reported. The shape of ejected bubbles is governed by the inertia of the surrounding medium, and bubbles have taken elliptical shapes with their major axis aligned parallel to the adjacent velocity field.

  20. Foam Generation and Air Entrainment Near a Free Surface

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-09-30

    plunging jets and by the action of turbulent eddies in water flowing over spillways has been discussed by several authors. Data for the entrained air flow...r = mean jet radius. 1 They determined the size of the region in the liquid which was affected by air entrainment and mea- sured the...Spilling Breaker," J. Fluid Mech., Vol. 63, 1. E.J. McKeogh and D.A. Ervine, 1981, " Air Entrainment Rate and Diffusion Pattern of Plunging Liquid

  1. Air bubble bursting effect of lotus leaf.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingming; Zheng, Yongmei; Nie, Fu-Qiang; Zhai, Jin; Jiang, Lei

    2009-12-15

    In this paper, a phenomenon of air bubbles quickly bursting within several milliseconds on a "self-cleaning" lotus leaf was described. This observation prompted the synthesis of artificial surfaces similar to that of the lotus leaf. The artificial leaf surfaces, prepared by photolithography and wet etching, showed a similar air bubble bursting effect. Smooth and rough silicon surfaces with an ordered nanostructure or patterned microstructure were utilized to study the contribution of the micro/nano hierarchical structures to this phenomenon of air bubble bursting. Air bubbles were found to burst on some superhydrophobic surfaces with microstructure (within 220 ms). However, air bubbles burst much more rapidly (within 13 ms) on similar surfaces with micro/nanostructure. The height, width, and spacing of hierarchical structures could also affect air bubble bursting, and the effect of the height was more obvious. When the height of hierarchical structures was around the height found in natural lotus papillae, the width and spacing were significant for air bubble bursting. An original model was proposed to further evaluate the reason why the micro/nano hierarchical rough structures had an excellent air bubble bursting effect, and the validity of the model was theoretically demonstrated.

  2. Using Ultrasound to Characterize Pulp Slurries with Entrained Air

    SciTech Connect

    Bamberger, Judith A.

    2006-08-06

    The development of fast and practical methods for inspecting fiber suspensions is of great interest in the paper making industry. For process control and paper quality prediction, several elements of the refining process during paper making must be accurately monitored, including specific fiber properties, weight percent fiber (composition), degree of refining, amount of solids, and entrained air content. The results of previous ultrasonic studies applied to wood pulp provide guidance that ultrasound attenuation is information rich, and it does potentially provide a tool for consistency measurement. Ultrasound has the ability to penetrate dense suspensions such as wood pulp slurries. It is has been shown, in some studies, that ultrasound is sensitive to degree of refining. The effects of entrained air, additives, the origin and treatment of the fibers do however all influence the measured data. A series of measurements were made with hardwood and softwood slurries to evaluate the ability of measuring pulp consistency, solids, and entrained air. The attenuation through the slurry was measured as the ultrasound travels from one transducer through the slurry to the other. The measurements identified the presence of entrained air in the pulp samples. To better understand the effects of air, measurements were made at increasing pressures to show how increased pressure reduced the amount of air observed in the spectrum.

  3. Dynamical properties of breaking waves: dissipation, air entrainment and spray generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deike, Luc; Melville, W. Kendall; Popinet, Stephane

    2016-11-01

    Wave breaking in the ocean is of fundamental importance in order to quantify wave dissipation and air-sea interaction, including gas and momentum exchange, and to improve parametrization for ocean-atmosphere exchange in weather and climate models. Here, we present 2D and 3D direct numerical simulations of breaking waves, compared with laboratory measurements. The dissipation due to breaking in the 2D and 3D simulations is found to be in good agreement with experimental observations and inertial-scaling arguments. We discuss the transition from a 2D to a 3D flow during breaking. We present a model for air entrainment and bubble statistics that describes well the experimental and numerical data, and is based on turbulent fragmentation of the bubbles and a balance between buoyancy forces and viscous dissipation. Finally we discuss the generation of large drops during the impact and splashing process.

  4. Numerical simulations of air entrainment in a plunging jet of liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brouilliot, Denis; Lubin, Pierre

    2013-11-01

    Air entrainment upon impact of a jet of liquid is a phenomenon present in wide variety of applications. We performed a series of two-dimensional simulations consisting in three different conditions of jet impingement and compared the results to experimental data. This study was first dedicated to the establishment of the numerical configuration and the setting of the injection parameters of the jet. We studied the dynamics of air entrainment by the jets impacting on the surface of the water in a tank, from the creation of the aerated cavities to the motion of the bubble plumes resulting from their deterioration of the cavities. The results concerned time-dependent and transient phenomena. To validate the simulations, we made several comparisons with experimental data, considering three angles of jet impact. Finally, we compared two numerical models for the free-surface description, using the most prevalent method in the literature and an original free-surface tracking method recently developed in our numerical tool. We showed that the formation of air cavities was similar for each condition and each numerical model, in agreement with the experimental results. Moreover, it was observed that the air entrainment had a different behavior depending on the conditions of jet impact.

  5. Entrainment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carrier, Romance F.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review including: (1) theoretical studies concerned with the development of methdology to determine the significance of entrainment effects to whale populations and ecosystems; and (2) site and laboratory studies. A list of 107 references drawn from the 1976 and 1977 literature is also presented. (HM)

  6. Bubble generation and venous air filtration by hard-shell venous reservoirs: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, S J; Willcox, T; Gorman, D F

    1997-09-01

    We have previously shown significant bubble formation in Medtronic Maxima hard-shell venous reservoirs (HSVRs). In the present study, we not only investigated the mechanism of this bubble formation, but also the extent of bubble clearance by membrane oxygenators and arterial line filters. In addition, we also compared the performance of five HSVRs with respect to bubble formation and venous air filtration. Salvaged clinical CPB circuits containing different HSVRs were studied by downstream Doppler monitoring under fixed flow-decreasing volume, fixed volume-increasing flow, and entrained venous air conditions. Bubbles formed in the Medtronic Maxima top entry HSVR at volumes below 800 ml and flows above 3.5 l min-1, and were incompletely removed by a membrane oxygenator and arterial line filter. Decreased bubbling was seen when the reservoir atmosphere was flushed with CO2, suggesting that these bubbles formed in a fountain at the venous inflow. The Medtronic Maxima Forte HSVR formed significantly fewer bubbles at low volumes, and filtered venous air effectively. Negligible bubble formation occurred in the Sorin, Terumo, or Baxter reservoirs. The minimum recommended operating volume for the Medtronic Maxima top entry reservoir should be reset at 600 ml and this device should always be used with an arterial filter. Bubble formation is substantially reduced in the new Medtronic Maxima Forte HSVR and this device is a good filter for venous air.

  7. Understanding air-gun bubble behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.T. )

    1994-11-01

    An air-gun bubble behaves approximately as a spherical bubble of an ideal gas in an infinite volume of practically incompressible water. With this simplification, the equation of bubble motion and its far-field signature is more understandable than with the more exact theory commonly cited in the literature. The terms of the equation of bubble motion are explained using elementary physics and mathematics, computation of numerical results is outlined, and an example signature is shown. An air-gun bubble is analogous to a simple harmonic oscillator consisting of a mass on a spring, with an equivalent mass equal three times that of the water displaced by the bubble, and air pressure following an ideal gas law corresponding to a spring. With this understanding, one is prepared to deal with the effects of interactions among air guns and with the high-order terms and other features that must be included to model the air-gun signature of actual seismic source arrays.

  8. Onset of air entrainment in laminar plunging jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartellier, A.; Lasheras, J. C.

    1999-11-01

    A cylindrical jet impacting perpendicularly on a free surface is known to entrain air above a critical velocity. The question of the determination of the onset of air entainment has received a large attention, and various correlations are proposed in the litterature (see the review by Bin, Chem. Eng. Sc.- 1993). For jets free of any surface roughness, extensive data have been correlated by Lin and Donnelly (A.I.Ch.E. J. - 1965) leading to a widely accepted onset criteria of the form We = 10 Re^0.74 where the Weber and Reynolds numbers are defined on the jet characteristics at impact. However, this correlation fails for viscosities below 25cSt or Re above 1200. In addition, it cannot be extended to planar liquid sheets. Here, we revisit the question of the onset of air entrainment, and in particular the effect of the liquid properties such as viscosity and surface tension. Experiments have been conducted for viscous liquids and over a wide range of jet diameters. We propose a model which accounts both for the depression induced by the entrained flow field and for the viscous stresses at the interface generated by the acceleration of the liquid along the free surface. The onset of air entrainment expresses as a critical capillary number Ca versus the Morton number Mo =ρ^3 g ν^4 / σ^3 (one has Mo = (Ca/Rec)^2, where Rec is the Reynolds number based on the capillary length) and the ratio a/R of the capillary length to the jet radius. In the limit of large (respectivelly small) Morton numbers, Ca behaves as Mo^1/6 (respectivelly Mo^1/4) in agreement with the experiments. The dependency of Ca versus a/R will also be discussed.

  9. Freeze-Thaw Durability of Air-Entrained Concrete

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Huai-Shuai; Yi, Ting-Hua

    2013-01-01

    One of the most damaging actions affecting concrete is the abrupt temperature change (freeze-thaw cycles). The types of deterioration of concrete structures by cyclic freeze-thaw can be largely classified into surface scaling (characterized by the weight loss) and internal crack growth (characterized by the loss of dynamic modulus of elasticity). The present study explored the durability of concrete made with air-entraining agent subjected to 0, 100, 200, 300, and 400 cycles of freeze-thaw. The experimental study of C20, C25, C30, C40, and C50 air-entrained concrete specimens was completed according to “the test method of long-term and durability on ordinary concrete” GB/T 50082-2009. The dynamic modulus of elasticity and weight loss of specimens were measured after different cycles of freeze-thaw. The influence of freeze-thaw cycles on the relative dynamic modulus of elasticity and weight loss was analyzed. The findings showed that the dynamic modulus of elasticity and weight decreased as the freeze-thaw cycles were repeated. They revealed that the C30, C40, and C50 air-entrained concrete was still durable after 300 cycles of freeze-thaw according to the experimental results. PMID:23576906

  10. Air entrainment and the dynamics of volcanic jets and plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mastin, L. G.; Solovitz, S.

    2008-12-01

    During a typical pyroclastic eruption, gas and pyroclasts exit a volcanic vent at speeds of tens to hundreds of meters per second. At the vent the mixture is negatively buoyant, and rises as a plinian column only if it ingests and heats sufficient air to attain positive buoyancy. As erosion increases vent radius r during an eruption, eruptive mass flux increases with r2, but the mass of air entrained increases only with r1. Hence the column ingests progressively less air relative to its mass and eventually, at some threshold mass flux m, collapses. The threshold mass flux m depends strongly on the air entrainment coefficient ɛ, i.e. the velocity of inrushing air normalized to the upward jet velocity. The value of ɛ is not well characterized in the near-vent region, and likely varies with vent geometry, overpressure, and jet density among other factors. Theoretical scaling relations suggest that a two-fold variation in ɛ (e.g. 0.05-0.10) results in a four-fold variation in m. Numerical models of overpressured jets show that near- vent entrainment may be inhibited by shock waves, promoting partial or oscillatory column collapse within an otherwise steady plinian column. Here we present the first results of laboratory experiments using particle image velocimetry to quantify near-vent air entrainment. In these experiments, we use a jet of compressed air seeded with 3 μm TiO2 tracer particles, exiting a vertically-directed pipe 1.27 cm in inside diameter and 18 cm long, with upstream pressures of 0 to 21 kPa, producing a pressure-balanced jet at the exit with velocities up to about 180 m s-1. The ambient air was seeded with tracer oil droplets a few micrometers in diameter from a fog machine. The seeded jet was illuminated by a 0.5 mm-thick Nd:YAG laser sheet that extended 5 cm above and horizontally from the vent. Particles illuminated by this sheet were photographed by pairs of images separated in time by 10 to 200 μs, from which we were able to extract flow

  11. Laboratory air-entraining breaking waves: Imaging visible foam signatures to estimate energy dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callaghan, A. H.; Deane, G. B.; Stokes, M. D.

    2016-11-01

    Oceanic air-entraining breaking waves fundamentally influence weather and climate through bubble-mediated ocean-atmosphere exchanges, and influence marine engineering design by impacting statistics of wave heights, crest heights, and wave loading. However, estimating individual breaking wave energy dissipation in the field remains a fundamental problem. Using laboratory experiments, we introduce a new method to estimate energy dissipation by individual breaking waves using above-water images of evolving foam. The data show the volume of the breaking wave two-phase flow integrated in time during active breaking scales linearly with wave energy dissipated. To determine the volume time-integral, above-water images of surface foam provide the breaking wave timescale and horizontal extent of the submerged bubble plume, and the foam decay time provides an estimate of the bubble plume penetration depth. We anticipate that this novel remote sensing method will improve predictions of air-sea exchanges, validate models of wave energy dissipation, and inform ocean engineering design.

  12. Aerator Combined With Bubble Remover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreschel, Thomas W.

    1993-01-01

    System produces bubble-free oxygen-saturated water. Bubble remover consists of outer solid-walled tube and inner hydrophobic, porous tube. Air bubbles pass from water in outer tube into inner tube, where sucked away. Developed for long-term aquaculture projects in space. Also applicable to terrestrial equipment in which entrained bubbles dry membranes or give rise to cavitation in pumps.

  13. The effect of bubbles on air-water oxygen transfer in the breaker zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakuno, Shohachi; Moog, Douglas B.; Tatekawa, Tetsuya; Takemura, Kenji; Yamagishi, Tatsuya

    The effect of bubbles entrained in the breaker zone on air-water oxygen transfer is examined. First, the area of bubbles entrained by breakers generated on a sloping bottom in a wave tank is analyzed using a color image sensor which can count the pixel number of a specific color in a frame. It was found that the time-averaged pixel number over a wave period has a strong relationship to the energy dissipation rate per unit mass of the breaker. The time-averaged pixel number is then incorporated with some modification into an equation proposed by Eckenfelder for the calculation of the mass transfer coefficient from bubble surfaces in an aeration tank. The coefficient resulting from the modified equation shows a strong relationship between the mass transfer coefficient and the dissipation rate.

  14. Hydrodynamics of air entrainment by moving contact lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, T. S.; Srivastava, S.; Marchand, A.; Andreotti, B.; Biferale, L.; Toschi, F.; Snoeijer, J. H.

    2013-07-01

    We study the dynamics of the interface between two immiscible fluids in contact with a chemically homogeneous moving solid plate. We consider the generic case of two fluids with any viscosity ratio and of a plate moving in either directions (pulled or pushed in the bath). The problem is studied by a combination of two models, namely, an extension to finite viscosity ratio of the lubrication theory and a Lattice Boltzmann method. Both methods allow to resolve, in different ways, the viscous singularity at the triple contact between the two fluids and the wall. We find a good agreement between the two models particularly for small capillary numbers. When the solid plate moves fast enough, the entrainment of one fluid into the other one can occur. The extension of the lubrication model to the case of a non-zero air viscosity, as developed here, allows us to study the dependence of the critical capillary number for air entrainment on the other parameters in the problem (contact angle and viscosity ratio).

  15. Downward flow of water with entrained air in a nonuniformaly heated subdivided annulus

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, B.S.; May, C.P.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental study in which water was fed to a vertical annulus, entraining air in downward flow. The annulus was subdivided by longitudinal fins into four subchannels and was heated with an azimuthally varying heat flux. A bypass was provided to simulate flow in parallel channels. For steady liquid flow, inlet temperature, and pressure boundary conditions, the power was increased until critical heat flux was reached. Overheating characteristics were grouped according to the prevailing flow pattern. In annular flows (j{sub L} < 0.3 m/s) overheating of the whole test section occurs when steam production causes countercurrent flooding. In intermittent flows (0.3 < j{sub L} < 0.9 m/s) the overheating is confined to a portion of the hot subchannel. The mechanism is postulated to be stagnation of a large bubble. In bubble flows (0.9 m/s < j{sub L}) overheating occurs by diverting inlet flow to the bypass and again involves the whole test section. Except at the very lowest flow rates, critical heat flux occurs when the effluent liquid temperature is below saturation.

  16. Downward flow of water with entrained air in a nonuniformaly heated subdivided annulus

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, B.S.; May, C.P.

    1992-10-01

    This paper describes an experimental study in which water was fed to a vertical annulus, entraining air in downward flow. The annulus was subdivided by longitudinal fins into four subchannels and was heated with an azimuthally varying heat flux. A bypass was provided to simulate flow in parallel channels. For steady liquid flow, inlet temperature, and pressure boundary conditions, the power was increased until critical heat flux was reached. Overheating characteristics were grouped according to the prevailing flow pattern. In annular flows (j{sub L} < 0.3 m/s) overheating of the whole test section occurs when steam production causes countercurrent flooding. In intermittent flows (0.3 < j{sub L} < 0.9 m/s) the overheating is confined to a portion of the hot subchannel. The mechanism is postulated to be stagnation of a large bubble. In bubble flows (0.9 m/s < j{sub L}) overheating occurs by diverting inlet flow to the bypass and again involves the whole test section. Except at the very lowest flow rates, critical heat flux occurs when the effluent liquid temperature is below saturation.

  17. Air bubble migration is a random event post embryo transfer.

    PubMed

    Confino, E; Zhang, J; Risquez, F

    2007-06-01

    Air bubble location following embryo transfer (ET) is the presumable placement spot of embryos. The purpose of this study was to document endometrial air bubble position and migration following embryo transfer. Multicenter prospective case study. Eighty-eight embryo transfers were performed under abdominal ultrasound guidance in two countries by two authors. A single or double air bubble was loaded with the embryos using a soft, coaxial, end opened catheters. The embryos were slowly injected 10-20 mm from the fundus. Air bubble position was recorded immediately, 30 minutes later and when the patient stood up. Bubble marker location analysis revealed a random distribution without visible gravity effect when the patients stood up. The bubble markers demonstrated splitting, moving in all directions and dispersion. Air bubbles move and split frequently post ET with the patient in the horizontal position, suggestive of active uterine contractions. Bubble migration analysis supports a rather random movement of the bubbles and possibly the embryos. Standing up changed somewhat bubble configuration and distribution in the uterine cavity. Gravity related bubble motion was uncommon, suggesting that horizontal rest post ET may not be necessary. This report challenges the common belief that a very accurate ultrasound guided embryo placement is mandatory. The very random bubble movement observed in this two-center study suggests that a large "window" of embryo placement maybe present.

  18. Entrainment of Upper Level Dry Air into Hurricane Earl

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guillory, Anthony R.; Jedlovee, Gary J.; Hood, Robbie E.; Atkinson, Robert J.; LaFontaine, Frank J.

    2000-01-01

    Hurricane Earl developed from a tropical wave that moved into the Gulf of Mexico, which triggered abundant convection. On 1 Sept. 1998, the wave was upgraded directly to a tropical storm. Earl reached hurricane status the next morning. The system moved erratically as it interacted with an upper level short wave trough rotating around a long wave trough to the northeast. The storm made landfall near 0600 UTC on 3 September near Panama City, FL. During August and September 1998, NASA conducted the Third Convection and Moisture Experiment (CAMEX-3). It focused on studying the intensity, track, and impacts at landfall of hurricanes. On the afternoon of 2 September 1998, the NASA ER2 high-altitude aircraft flying at 65,000 feet in tandem with the NASA DC-8 flying at 35,000 feet flew over and through, respectively, the eastern rainbands of Earl near the Florida Panhandle as the storm neared landfall in the region. Two approaches to studying Earl are undertaken here: first, an examination of the source and height of the dry air region using GOES-8 water vapor data and, second, a look into the impact of the dry air entrainment on the system using aircraft remote sensing data.

  19. Air bubble migration rates as a proxy for bubble pressure distribution in ice cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dadic, Ruzica; Schneebeli, Martin; Bertler, Nancy

    2015-04-01

    Air bubble migration can be used as a proxy to measure the pressure of individual bubbles and can help constrain the gradual close-off of gas bubbles and the resulting age distribution of gases in ice cores. The close-off depth of single bubbles can vary by tens of meters, which leads to a distribution of pressures for bubbles at a given depth. The age distribution of gases (along with gas-age-ice-age differences) decreases the resolution of the gas level reconstructions from ice cores and limits our ability to determine the phase relationship between gas and ice, and thus, the impact of rapid changes of greenhouse gases on surface temperatures. For times of rapid climate change, including the last 150 years, and abrupt climate changes further back in the past, knowledge of the age distribution of the gases trapped in air bubbles will enable us to refine estimates of atmospheric changes. When a temperature gradient is applied to gas bubbles in an ice sample, the bubbles migrate toward warmer ice. This motion is caused by sublimation from the warm wall and subsequent frost deposition on the cold wall. The migration rate depends on ice temperature and bubble pressure and is proportional to the temperature gradient. The spread in migration rates for bubbles in the same samples at given temperatures should therefore reflect the variations in bubble pressures within a sample. Air bubbles with higher pressures would have been closed off higher in the firn column and thus have had time to equilibrate with the surrounding ice pressure, while air bubbles that have been closed off recently would have pressures that are similar to todays atmospheric pressure above the firn column. For ice under pressures up to ~13-16 bar, the pressure distribution of bubbles from a single depth provides a record of the trapping function of air bubbles in the firn column for a certain time in the past. We will present laboratory experiments on air bubble migration, using Antarctic ice core

  20. Entrainment of Upper Level Dry Air Into Hurricane Earl

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guillory, Anthony R.; Jedlovec, Gary J.; Hood, Robbie E.; Atkinson, Robert J.; LaFontaine, Frank J.

    1999-01-01

    Hurricane Earl formed in the Gulf of Mexico in September 1998. It quickly was upgraded from a tropical disturbance to tropical storm status and then to a hurricane. Earl possessed hybrid (tropical and extratropical) characteristics throughout its lifetime. The system maintained and erratic track, which led to wide variability in the operational track forecasts. It eventually made landfall on the Florida panhandle on 2 September and raced northeastward. During August and September 1998, NASA conducted the third Convection and Moisture Experiment (CAMEX-3). The experiment was focused on studying hurricanes with an emphasis toward developing a better understanding of their intensification and motion. Earl provides a unique opportunity to utilize high spatial and temporal resolution data collected from the DC-8 and high altitude ER-2 NASA platforms, which flew over Earl as it made landfall. These data can also be put into broader view provided by other instruments from the Geosynchronous Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) and the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellites. Hurricane Earl was affected by entrainment of dry air from the northwest. Hurricane Isis was intensifying and approaching the Mexican Pacific coast with its associated outflow potentially affecting the inflow into Earl as the storm neared Florida. In addition, a longwave synoptic trough circulation was present over the eastern U.S. Either or both of these could be responsible for the dry air into the system. This paper will focus on identifying the source of the dry by using upper-level wind and moisture fields derived from the GOES 6.7 um water vapor imagery. We will attempt to relate the large-scale observations to those from the NASA aircraft. An infrared instrument onboard the ER-2 also has a similar wavelength and may be able to confirm some of the GOES findings. In addition, a microwave radiometer with 4 channels focused on measuring precipitation and its associated ice

  1. Entrainment of Upper Level Dry Air Into Hurricane Earl

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guillory, Anthony R.; Jedlovec, Gary J.; Hood, Robbie E.; Atkinson, Robert J.; LaFontaine, Frank J.

    1999-01-01

    Hurricane Earl formed in the Gulf of Mexico in September 1998. It quickly was upgraded from a tropical disturbance to tropical storm status and then to a hurricane. Earl possessed hybrid (tropical and extratropical) characteristics throughout its lifetime. The system maintained and erratic track, which led to wide variability in the operational track forecasts. It eventually made landfall on the Florida panhandle on 2 September and raced northeastward. During August and September 1998, NASA conducted the third Convection and Moisture Experiment (CAMEX-3). The experiment was focused on studying hurricanes with an emphasis toward developing a better understanding of their intensification and motion. Earl provides a unique opportunity to utilize high spatial and temporal resolution data collected from the DC-8 and high altitude ER-2 NASA platforms, which flew over Earl as it made landfall. These data can also be put into broader view provided by other instruments from the Geosynchronous Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) and the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellites. Hurricane Earl was affected by entrainment of dry air from the northwest. Hurricane Isis was intensifying and approaching the Mexican Pacific coast with its associated outflow potentially affecting the inflow into Earl as the storm neared Florida. In addition, a longwave synoptic trough circulation was present over the eastern U.S. Either or both of these could be responsible for the dry air into the system. This paper will focus on identifying the source of the dry by using upper-level wind and moisture fields derived from the GOES 6.7 um water vapor imagery. We will attempt to relate the large-scale observations to those from the NASA aircraft. An infrared instrument onboard the ER-2 also has a similar wavelength and may be able to confirm some of the GOES findings. In addition, a microwave radiometer with 4 channels focused on measuring precipitation and its associated ice

  2. Prevention of air bubble formation in a microfluidic perfusion cell culture system using a microscale bubble trap.

    PubMed

    Sung, Jong Hwan; Shuler, Michael L

    2009-08-01

    Formation of air bubbles is a serious obstacle to a successful operation of a long-term microfluidic systems using cell culture. We developed a microscale bubble trap that can be integrated with a microfluidic device to prevent air bubbles from entering the device. It consists of two PDMS (polydimethyldisiloxane) layers, a top layer providing barriers for blocking bubbles and a bottom layer providing alternative fluidic paths. Rather than relying solely on the buoyancy of air bubbles, bubbles are physically trapped and prevented from entering a microfluidic device. Two different modes of a bubble trap were fabricated, an independent module that is connected to the main microfluidic system by tubes, and a bubble trap integrated with a main system. The bubble trap was tested for the efficiency of bubble capture, and for potential effects a bubble trap may have on fluid flow pattern. The bubble trap was able to efficiently trap air bubbles of up to 10 mul volume, and the presence of captured air bubbles did not cause alterations in the flow pattern. The performance of the bubble trap in a long-term cell culture with medium recirculation was examined by culturing a hepatoma cell line in a microfluidic cell culture device. This bubble trap can be useful for enhancing the consistency of microfluidic perfusion cell culture operation.

  3. What's All the Talc About? Air Entrainment in Dilute Pyroclastic Density Currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, B. J.; Andrews, B. J.; Fauria, K.

    2015-12-01

    A quantitative understanding of air entrainment is critical to predicting the behaviors of dilute Pyroclastic Density Currents (PDCs), including runout distance, liftoff, and mass fractionation into co-PDC plumes. We performed experiments in an 8.5x6x2.6 meter tank using 20 micron talc powder over a range of conditions to describe air entrainment as a function of temperature, duration and mass flux. The experiments are reproducible and are scaled with respect to the densimetric and thermal Richardson numbers (Ri and RiT), Froude number, thermal to kinetic energy density ratio (TEb/KE), Stokes number, and Settling number, such that they are dynamically similar to natural dilute PDCs. Experiments are illuminated with a swept laser sheet and imaged at 1000 Hz to create 3D reconstructions of the currents, with ~1-2 cm resolution, at up to 1.5 Hz. An array of 30 high-frequency thermocouples record the precise temperature in the currents at 3 Hz. Bulk entrainment rates are calculated based on measured current volumes, surface areas, temperatures and velocities. Entrainment rates vary from ~0-0.9 and do not show simple variation with TEb/KE, Ri, or RiT. Entrainment does, however, increase with decreasing eruption duration and increasing mass flux. Our results suggest that current heads entrain air more efficiently than current bodies (>0.5 compared to ~0.1). Because shorter duration currents have proportionally larger heads, their bulk entrainment rates are controlled by those heads, whereas longer duration currents are dominated by their bodies. Our experiments demonstrate that air entrainment, which exerts a fundamental control on PDC runout and liftoff, varies spatially and temporally within PDCs.

  4. PTV analysis of the entrained air into the diesel spray at high-pressure injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toda, Naoki; Yamashita, Hayato; Mashida, Makoto

    2014-08-01

    In order to clarify the effect of high-pressure injection on soot reduction in terms of the air entrainment into spray, the air flow surrounding the spray and set-off length indicating the distance from the nozzle tip to the flame region in diffusion diesel combustion were investigated using 300MPa injection of a multi-hole injector. The measurement of the air entrainment flow was carried out at non-evaporating condition using consecutive PTV (particle tracking velocimetry) method with a high-speed camera and a high-frequency pulse YAG laser. The set-off length was measured at highpressure and high-temperature using the combustion bomb of constant volume and optical system of shadow graph method. And the amount of air entrainment into spray until reaching set-off length in diffusion combustion was studied as a factor of soot formation.

  5. Rise of Air Bubbles in Aircraft Lubricating Oils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, J. V.

    1950-01-01

    Lubricating and antifoaming additives in aircraft lubricating oils may impede the escape of small bubbles from the oil by forming shells of liquid with a quasi-solid or gel structure around the bubbles. The rates of rise of small air bubbles, up to 2 millimeters in diameter, were measured at room temperature in an undoped oil, in the same oil containing foam inhibitors, and in an oil containing lubricating additives. The apparent diameter of the air bubbles was measured visually through an ocular micrometer on a traveling telescope. The bubbles in the undoped oil obeyed Stokes' Law, the rate of rise being proportional to the square of the apparent diameter and inversely proportional to the viscosity of the oil. The bubbles in the oils containing lubricating additives or foam inhibitors rose more slowly than the rate predicted by Stokes 1 Law from the apparent diameter, and the rate of rise decreased as the length of path the bubbles traveled increased. A method is derived to calculate the thickness of the liquid shell which would have to move with the bubbles in the doped oils to account for the abnoi'I!l8.lly slow velocity. The maximum thickness of this shell, calculated from the velocities observed, was equal to the bubble radius.

  6. Effect of fast freeze-thaw cycles on mechanical properties of ordinary-air-entrained concrete.

    PubMed

    Shang, Huai-shuai; Cao, Wei-qun; Wang, Bin

    2014-01-01

    Freezing-thawing resistance is a very significant characteristic for concrete in severe environment (such as cold region with the lowest temperature below 0°C). In this study, ordinary-air-entrained (O-A-E) concrete was produced in a laboratory environment; the compressive strength, cubic compressive strength of C50, C40, C30, C25, and C20 ordinary-air-entrained concrete, tensile strength, and cleavage strength of C30 ordinary-air-entrained concrete were measured after fast freeze-thaw cycles. The effects of fast freeze-thaw cycles on the mechanical properties (compressive strength and cleavage strength) of ordinary-air-entrained concrete materials are investigated on the basis of the experimental results. And the concise mathematical formula between mechanical behavior and number of fast freeze-thaw cycles was established. The experiment results can be used as a reference in design, maintenance, and life prediction of ordinary-air-entrained concrete structure (such as dam, offshore platform, etc.) in cold regions.

  7. Effect of Fast Freeze-Thaw Cycles on Mechanical Properties of Ordinary-Air-Entrained Concrete

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Huai-shuai; Cao, Wei-qun; Wang, Bin

    2014-01-01

    Freezing-thawing resistance is a very significant characteristic for concrete in severe environment (such as cold region with the lowest temperature below 0°C). In this study, ordinary-air-entrained (O-A-E) concrete was produced in a laboratory environment; the compressive strength, cubic compressive strength of C50, C40, C30, C25, and C20 ordinary-air-entrained concrete, tensile strength, and cleavage strength of C30 ordinary-air-entrained concrete were measured after fast freeze-thaw cycles. The effects of fast freeze-thaw cycles on the mechanical properties (compressive strength and cleavage strength) of ordinary-air-entrained concrete materials are investigated on the basis of the experimental results. And the concise mathematical formula between mechanical behavior and number of fast freeze-thaw cycles was established. The experiment results can be used as a reference in design, maintenance, and life prediction of ordinary-air-entrained concrete structure (such as dam, offshore platform, etc.) in cold regions. PMID:24895671

  8. Quantification of hood effectiveness and entrained subsurface air in a Seattle Hospital

    SciTech Connect

    Dietz, R.N.; Goodrich, R.W.

    1994-05-01

    An underground 3-story wing of a hospital having problems with sewer air odors was tested with perfluorocarbon tracer (PFI) technology to quantify the performance of the mechanical ventilation system and determine the extent of sewer air entrainment and chemical hood effectiveness.

  9. Method and apparatus for preventing air pollution by the entrainment of particulate material

    SciTech Connect

    Walters, W.Z.

    1986-05-06

    A particulate material handling system is described which is capable of reducing the pollution of air by the entrainment of particulate solids. The system consists of: a covered elevated conveyor means from which the particulate material can be deposited to form a pile of that material in a designated area or to add to such a pile and air diversion means which is adapted to so cooperate with the conveyor as to prevent wind from entraining fines in the particulate material as it is dumped onto the pile or into the area and to prevent wind from stripping and entraining material from the pile by diverting the wind upwardly over the top of the elevated conveyor means and creating an eddy in the air on the leeward side of the pile of particulate material. Particulate material entrained in the air diverted over the elevated conveyor means will drop out of the air currents in the region where the eddy currents are formed and be deposited on the leeward side of the pile, the air diversion means being vertically oriented and adapted to extend lengthwise along at least the initial segment of the pile and essentially along the longitudinal centerline. The air diversion means have a lower edge which is adapted to be proximate to, in contact with, or buried in the pile depending on the height of the pile, and the conveyor being so constructed that it is capable of depositing particulate material on both sides of the air diversion means.

  10. The acoustic excitation of air bubbles fragmenting in sheared flow.

    PubMed

    Deane, Grant B; Stokes, M Dale

    2008-12-01

    An analysis of the acoustic emissions of air bubbles fragmenting in sheared fluid flow is presented. The fragmentation of bubbles into two products only is considered. While the measured pressure amplitude is highly variable, the partition of energy between fragmentation products is highly correlated. The partition of energy between products is, on average, approximately equal irrespective of the relative sizes of the bubble products. This observation suggests that the acoustic excitation mechanism is common to both bubbles immediately prior to fragmentation. A model for the excitation mechanism based on symmetric collapse of the neck of air joining fragmentation products is proposed and found to be sufficient to explain the range of observed bubble pulse amplitudes and the equal partition of energy.

  11. Numerical simulations of transient air entrainment by rough and smooth plunging jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiger, Ken; Kharoua, Nabil; Khezzar, Lyes

    2012-11-01

    Plunging jets are intimately linked to the process of air or gas entrainment into liquid pools, and can play either a beneficial or detrimental role in many environmental and industrial flows. The purpose of the present work is to assess the capability of combined LES/VOF algorithms to simulate water/air plunging jet flows, starting with the transient impact of the free jet, initial cavity formation, pinch off, and evolution towards a continuous entrainment phase. We focus on what happens in the transient impact phase for weakly and highly disturbed jets, operating with impact conditions of Re = UD / ν = 10 , 500 , We = ρU2 D / σ = 300 and Fr =U2 / gD = 83 . In particular, the study investigates the ability of the simulations to capture liquid surface instabilities and the influence of the exiting jet turbulence content on the entrainment behavior. The results indicate that the qualitative behavior of the entrainment process follows very closely what is observed in experiments, with the rough jet exhibiting surface instabilities at impact that are not present in the smooth jet. These have an effect on the development of the initial air cavity and interfacial area, leading to a doubling of the interfacial area for a nominally similar entrained volume of air.

  12. Period adding cascades: experiment and modeling in air bubbling.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Felipe Augusto Cardoso; Colli, Eduardo; Sartorelli, José Carlos

    2012-03-01

    Period adding cascades have been observed experimentally/numerically in the dynamics of neurons and pancreatic cells, lasers, electric circuits, chemical reactions, oceanic internal waves, and also in air bubbling. We show that the period adding cascades appearing in bubbling from a nozzle submerged in a viscous liquid can be reproduced by a simple model, based on some hydrodynamical principles, dealing with the time evolution of two variables, bubble position and pressure of the air chamber, through a system of differential equations with a rule of detachment based on force balance. The model further reduces to an iterating one-dimensional map giving the pressures at the detachments, where time between bubbles come out as an observable of the dynamics. The model has not only good agreement with experimental data, but is also able to predict the influence of the main parameters involved, like the length of the hose connecting the air supplier with the needle, the needle radius and the needle length.

  13. Period adding cascades: Experiment and modeling in air bubbling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augusto Cardoso Pereira, Felipe; Colli, Eduardo; Carlos Sartorelli, José

    2012-03-01

    Period adding cascades have been observed experimentally/numerically in the dynamics of neurons and pancreatic cells, lasers, electric circuits, chemical reactions, oceanic internal waves, and also in air bubbling. We show that the period adding cascades appearing in bubbling from a nozzle submerged in a viscous liquid can be reproduced by a simple model, based on some hydrodynamical principles, dealing with the time evolution of two variables, bubble position and pressure of the air chamber, through a system of differential equations with a rule of detachment based on force balance. The model further reduces to an iterating one-dimensional map giving the pressures at the detachments, where time between bubbles come out as an observable of the dynamics. The model has not only good agreement with experimental data, but is also able to predict the influence of the main parameters involved, like the length of the hose connecting the air supplier with the needle, the needle radius and the needle length.

  14. Air Entrainment and Thermal Evolution of Pyroclastic Density Currents at Tungurahua, Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benage, M. C.; Dufek, J.; Mothes, P. A.

    2015-12-01

    The entrainment of air into pyroclastic density currents (PDCs) impacts the thermal profile and evolution of the current. However, the associated hazards and opaqueness of PDCs make it difficult to discern internal dynamics and entrainment through direct observations. In this work, we use a three-dimensional multiphase Eulerian-Eulerian-Lagrangian (EEL) model, deposit descriptions, and pyroclast field data, such as paleomagnetic and rind thickness, to study the entrainment efficiency and thus the thermal history of PDCs down the Juive Grande quebrada during the August 16-17th 2006 eruption of Tungurahua volcano. We conclude that 1) the efficient entrainment of ambient air cools the nose and upper portion of the PDCs by 30-60% of the original temperature, 2) PDCs with an initial temperature of 727 °C are on average more efficient at entraining ambient air than PDCs with an initial temperature of 327 °C, 3) the channelized PDCs develop a particle concentration gradient with a concentrated bed load region and suspended load region that leads to a large vertical temperature gradient, and 4) observations and pyroclast temperatures and textures suggest that the PDCs had temperatures greater than 327 °C in the bed load region while the upper, exterior portion of the currents cooled down to temperatures less than 100 °C. By combining field data and numerical models, the structure and dynamics of a PDC can be deduced for these relatively common small volume PDCs.

  15. Single-bubble sonoluminescence in air-saturated water.

    PubMed

    Krefting, Dagmar; Mettin, Robert; Lauterborn, Werner

    2003-10-24

    Single bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) is realized in air-saturated water at ambient pressure and room temperature. The behavior is similar to SBSL in degassed water, but with a higher spatial variability of the bubble position. A detailed view on the dynamics of the bubbles shows agreement between calculated shape stability borders but differs slightly in the equilibrium radii predicted by a mass diffusion model. A comparison with results in degassed water is done as well as a time resolved characterization of bubble oscillation, translation, and light emission for synchronous and recycling SBSL. The formation of streamer structures is observed in the same parameter range, when bubble nuclei are present. This may lead to a unified interpretation of SBSL and multibubble sonoluminescence.

  16. Single-Bubble Sonoluminescence in Air-Saturated Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krefting, Dagmar; Mettin, Robert; Lauterborn, Werner

    2003-10-01

    Single bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) is realized in air-saturated water at ambient pressure and room temperature. The behavior is similar to SBSL in degassed water, but with a higher spatial variability of the bubble position. A detailed view on the dynamics of the bubbles shows agreement between calculated shape stability borders but differs slightly in the equilibrium radii predicted by a mass diffusion model. A comparison with results in degassed water is done as well as a time resolved characterization of bubble oscillation, translation, and light emission for synchronous and recycling SBSL. The formation of streamer structures is observed in the same parameter range, when bubble nuclei are present. This may lead to a unified interpretation of SBSL and multibubble sonoluminescence.

  17. Light Scattering by Ice Crystals Containing Air Bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Panetta, R. L.; Yang, P.; Bi, L.

    2014-12-01

    The radiative effects of ice clouds are often difficult to estimate accurately, but are very important for interpretation of observations and for climate modeling. Our understanding of these effects is primarily based on scattering calculations, but due to the variability in ice habit it is computationally difficult to determine the required scattering and absorption properties, and the difficulties are only compounded by the need to include consideration of air and carbon inclusions of the sort frequently observed in collected samples. Much of the previous work on effects of inclusions in ice particles on scattering properties has been conducted with variants of geometric optics methods. We report on simulations of scattering by ice crystals with enclosed air bubbles using the pseudo-spectral time domain method (PSTD) and improved geometric optics method (IGOM). A Bouncing Ball Model (BBM) is proposed as a parametrization of air bubbles, and the results are compared with Monte Carlo radiative transfer calculations. Consistent with earlier studies, we find that air inclusions lead to a smoothing of variations in the phase function, weakening of halos, and a reduction of backscattering. We extend these studies by examining the effects of the particular arrangement of a fixed number of bubbles, as well as the effects of splitting a given number of bubbles into a greater number of smaller bubbles with the same total volume fraction. The result shows that the phase function will not change much for stochastic distributed air bubbles. It also shows that local maxima of phase functions are smoothed out for backward directions, when we break bubbles into small ones, single big bubble scatter favors more forward scattering than multi small internal scatters.

  18. Air-gun bubble damping by a screen

    SciTech Connect

    Langhammer, J.; Landroe, M.; Martin, J.; Berg, E.

    1995-11-01

    A method for damping unwanted bubble oscillations from a seismic air gun is presented. The method exploits the fact that the primary pressure peak generated by an air gun is produced during the first 5--10 ms after firing. The air bubble is destroyed by mounting a perforated screen with an optimal radius about the gun. Once the primary pressure peak has been generated by the bubble, the bubble is destroyed by the screen, leading to a corresponding decrease in the measured pressure amplitude of the secondary bubble oscillations. Controlled near-field measurements of 40-cubic inch and 120-cubic inch air guns with and without damping screens are used. The primary to bubble ratio improves from 1.4 without a screen to 4.4 with a screen in the near-field. The corresponding values for estimated far-field signatures are 1.8 to 9.0 when the signatures are filtered with an out-128 Hz (72 dB/Oct) DFS V filter.

  19. Computational Study of Air Entrainment by Plunging Jets-Influence of Jet Inclination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshpande, Suraj; Trujillo, Mario

    2012-11-01

    The process of air entrainment by a continuous liquid jet plunging into a quiescent liquid pool is studied computationally. Our earlier study [APS2011] focused on shallow impacts and the discernible periodicity of air cavity formation. Here, we consider the effect of jet angle. For steep impacts, we see a chaotic formation of small cavities, in agreement with the literature. To explain the difference, we track evolution of the flow from initial impact to quasi-stationary state, for different jet inclinations. The initial impact always yields a large air cavity, regardless of jet angle. Difference emerges in the quasi-stationary state where shallow jets demonstrate the periodicity but the steep jets do not. We show that this is a manifestation of the air entrainment being a function of flow disturbance. For shallow jets, the disturbance originates from strong wavelike motion of the cavity which results in a total disruption of the jet. Thus, the resulting cavities are large and occur periodically. For the steep jets, entrainment happens by collapse of a thin gas film uniformly enshrouding the submerged jet. Such a thin film is very sensitive to the local flow disturbances. Thus, its collapse occurs stochastically all around the jet causing chaotic entrainment of small air pocket.

  20. Lipid bilayer deposition and patterning via air bubble collapse.

    PubMed

    Mager, Morgan D; Melosh, Nicholas A

    2007-08-28

    We report a new method for forming patterned lipid bilayers on solid substrates. In bubble collapse deposition (BCD), an air bubble is first "inked" with a monolayer of phospholipid molecules and then touched to the surface of a thermally oxidized silicon wafer and the air is slowly withdrawn. As the bubble shrinks, the lipid monolayer pressure increases. Once the monolayer exceeds the collapse pressure, it folds back on itself, depositing a stable lipid bilayer on the surface. These bilayer disks have lateral diffusion coefficients consistent with high quality supported bilayers. By sequentially depositing bilayers in overlapping areas, fluid connections between bilayers of different compositions are formed. Performing vesicle rupture on the open substrate surrounding this bilayer patch results in a fluid but spatially isolated bilayer. Very little intermixing was observed between the vesicle rupture and bubble-deposited bilayers.

  1. Response of entrained air-void systems in cement paste to pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frazier, Robert

    2011-12-01

    Scope and Method of Study: Determine the response of entrained air-void systems in fresh cement paste to applied pressures by utilizing micro-computed tomography. Compare results to those suggested by the ASTM C231 Type B pressure meter calibration equations. Findings and Conclusions: The results of this research suggest that although the Type B pressure meter assumptions are valid for the compression of individual voids, the volume of air-voids which dissolve under pressure is significant enough to register noticeable errors when using a synthetic air-entraining admixture with the Type B pressure meter test. Results currently suggest that air-void systems with a significant percentage of small voids present will have higher deviation from the Boyle's Law model used by the Type B pressure meter due to the dissolution of these air-voids.

  2. Laboratory air bubble generation of various size distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Puleo, Jack A.; Johnson, Rex V.; Kooney, Tim N.

    2004-11-01

    Air bubble size in aqueous environments is an important factor governing natural processes ranging from fluid/atmosphere gas transfer to noise production. Bubbles are also known to affect various scientific instruments. In this study we investigate the production capability of eight inexpensive bubble generators using optical imaging techniques. Specific emphasis is directed towards determining bubble size and distribution for a given device, flow conditions, and type of water used (fresh vs salt). In almost all cases tested here, bubbles produced in salt water were more numerous, and smaller than for the same bubbler and conditions in fresh water. For porous media, the finer the pore size, the smaller the bubble produced with some variation depending on thickness of material containing the pore and water type. While no single generator tested was capable of spanning all the bubble sizes observed (100 to 6000 microns), the data contained herein will enable proper choice of bubbler or combinations thereof for future studies depending on the size and distribution of bubbles required.

  3. Amateur scientists - producing light from a bubble of air

    SciTech Connect

    Hiller, R.A.; Barber, B.P.

    1995-02-01

    A glowing bubble of air cannot be bought anywhere at any price. But with an oscilloscope, a moderately precise sound generator, a home stereo amplifier and about $100, readers can turn sound into light through a process called sonoluminescence. The apparatus is relatively simple. A glass spherical flask filled with water serves as the resonator - the cavity in which sound is created to trap and drive the bubble. Small speakers, called piezoelectric transducers, are cemented to the flask and powered by an audo generator and amplifier. Bubbles introduced into the water coalesce at the center of the flask and produce a dim light visible to the unaided eye in a darkened room.

  4. Interaction between Air Bubbles and Superhydrophobic Surfaces in Aqueous Solutions.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chen; Cui, Xin; Zhang, Xurui; Tchoukov, Plamen; Liu, Qingxia; Encinas, Noemi; Paven, Maxime; Geyer, Florian; Vollmer, Doris; Xu, Zhenghe; Butt, Hans-Jürgen; Zeng, Hongbo

    2015-07-07

    Superhydrophobic surfaces are usually characterized by a high apparent contact angle of water drops in air. Here we analyze the inverse situation: Rather than focusing on water repellency in air, we measure the attractive interaction of air bubbles and superhydrophobic surfaces in water. Forces were measured between microbubbles with radii R of 40-90 μm attached to an atomic force microscope cantilever and submerged superhydrophobic surfaces. In addition, forces between macroscopic bubbles (R = 1.2 mm) at the end of capillaries and superhydrophobic surfaces were measured. As superhydrophobic surfaces we applied soot-templated surfaces, nanofilament surfaces, micropillar arrays with flat top faces, and decorated micropillars. Depending on the specific structure of the superhydrophobic surfaces and the presence and amount of entrapped air, different interactions were observed. Soot-templated surfaces in the Cassie state showed superaerophilic behavior: Once the electrostatic double-layer force and a hydrodynamic repulsion were overcome, bubbles jumped onto the surface and fully merged with the entrapped air. On nanofilaments and micropillar arrays we observed in addition the formation of sessile bubbles with finite contact angles below 90° or the attachment of bubbles, which retained their spherical shape.

  5. The role of bubbles during air-sea gas exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emerson, Steven; Bushinsky, Seth

    2016-06-01

    The potential for using the air-sea exchange rate of oxygen as a tracer for net community biological production in the ocean is greatly enhanced by recent accuracy improvements for in situ measurements of oxygen on unmanned platforms. A limiting factor for determining the exchange process is evaluating the air-sea flux contributed by bubble processes produced by breaking waves, particularly during winter months under high winds. Highly accurate measurements of noble gases (Ne, Ar & Kr) and nitrogen, N2, in seawater are tracers of the importance of bubble process in the surface mixed layer. We use measured distributions of these gases in the ventilated thermocline of the North Pacific and an annual time series of N2 in the surface ocean of the NE Subarctic Pacific to evaluate four different air-water exchange models chosen to represent the range of model interpretation of bubble processes. We find that models must have an explicit bubble mechanism to reproduce concentrations of insoluble atmospheric gases, but there are periods when they all depart from observations. The recent model of Liang et al. (2013) stems from a highly resolved model of bubble plumes and categorizes bubble mechanisms into those that are small enough to collapse and larger ones that exchange gases before they resurface, both of which are necessary to explain the data.

  6. Noninvasive CPAP with face mask: comparison among new air-entrainment masks and the Boussignac valve.

    PubMed

    Mistraletti, Giovanni; Giacomini, Matteo; Sabbatini, Giovanni; Pinciroli, Riccardo; Mantovani, Elena S; Umbrello, Michele; Palmisano, Debora; Formenti, Paolo; Destrebecq, Anne L L; Iapichino, Gaetano

    2013-02-01

    The performances of 2 noninvasive CPAP systems (high flow and low flow air-entrainment masks) were compared to the Boussignac valve in 3 different scenarios. Scenario 1: pneumatic lung simulator with a tachypnea pattern (tidal volume 800 mL at 40 breaths/min). Scenario 2: Ten healthy subjects studied during tidal breaths and tachypnea. Scenario 3: Twenty ICU subjects enrolled for a noninvasive CPAP session. Differences between set and effective CPAP level and F(IO(2)), as well as the lowest airway pressure and the pressure swing around the imposed CPAP level, were analyzed. The lowest airway pressure and swing were correlated to the pressure-time product (area of the airway pressure curve below the CPAP level) measured with the simulator. P(aO(2)) was a subject's further performance index. Lung simulator: Boussignac F(IO(2)) was 0.54, even if supplied with pure oxygen. The air-entrainment masks had higher swing than the Boussignac (P = .007). Pressure-time product correlated better with pressure swing (Spearman correlation coefficient [ρ] = 0.97) than with lowest airway pressure (ρ = 0.92). In healthy subjects, the high-flow air-entrainment mask showed lower difference between set and effective F(IO(2)) (P < .001), and lowest airway pressure (P < .001), compared to the Boussignac valve. In all measurements the Boussignac valve showed higher than imposed CPAP level (P < .001). In ICU subjects the high-flow mask had lower swing than the Boussignac valve (P = .03) with similar P(aO(2)) increase. High-flow air-entrainment mask showed the best performance in human subjects. During high flow demand, the Boussignac valve delivered lower than expected F(IO(2)) and showed higher dynamic hyper-pressurization than the air-entrainment masks. © 2013 Daedalus Enterprises.

  7. Experimental study of near-field air entrainment by subsonic volcanic jets

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Solovitz, S.A.; Mastin, L.G.

    2009-01-01

    The flow structure in the developing region of a turbulent jet has been examined using particle image velocimetry methods, considering the flow at steady state conditions. The velocity fields were integrated to determine the ratio of the entrained air speed to the jet speed, which was approximately 0.03 for a range of Mach numbers up to 0.89 and. Reynolds numbers up to 217,000. This range of experimental Mach and Reynolds numbers is higher than previously considered for high-accuracy entrainment measures, particularly in the near-vent region. The entrainment values are below those commonly used for geophysical analyses of volcanic plumes, suggesting that existing 1-D models are likely to understate the tendency for column collapse. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  8. Noise Generation by Air Bubbles in Water: An Experimental Study of Creation and Splitting

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-01

    associated with the creation of air bubbles at a nozzle, and the noise radiated by air bubbles splitting in the shear layer of a submerged turbulent water ... jet . Experiments were conducted to measure the sound pressure levels associated with bubble creation and bubble splitting, under a variety of

  9. Vorticity generation by shock propagation through bubbles in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picone, J. M.; Boris, J. P.

    1986-11-01

    We use numerical solutions of the fluid equations for conservation of mass, momentum, and energy to study the interaction of a planar shock with a local, discrete inhomogeneity in the ambient medium. We study the effects of both geometry and distortion of the local sound speed by considering the nonuniformity to be a cylindrical of spherical bubble which has either a higher or lower density than the ambient gas. The Mach number of the shock is 1.2, the ambient gas is air, and the pressure is 1 atmosphere. The passage of the shock through a bubble generates vorticity at the boundary of the bubble. This vorticity produces a jet of ambient gas through the bubble, and as a consequence, the vorticity rolls up into a vortex filament pair (cylindrical bubble) or a vortex ring (spherical bubble). We discuss the theoretical treatment of this nonlinear interaction of the vorticity with itself and the relationship of our work to other theories. We relate our results to recent experiments of Haas and Sturtevant, in which helium and freon bubbles were used to simulate the local departures from ambient density.

  10. Descemet membrane air-bubble separation in donor corneas.

    PubMed

    Venzano, Davide; Pagani, Paola; Randazzo, Nadia; Cabiddu, Francesco; Traverso, Carlo Enrico

    2010-12-01

    We describe a technique to obtain Descemet-endothelium disks from donors. To detach Descemet membrane, an air bubble was introduced in the deep stroma of human donor corneas mounted on an artificial chamber. In Group A (n = 5), the bubble was left inflated. In Group B (n = 4), the bubble was deflated immediately after the membrane was detached. In Group C (n = 7), the Descemet-endothelium disk was trephined and separated from the stroma after the bubble was deflated. All tissues were stored at 4°C. Descemet detachment was achieved in 89% of the tissues. After 48 hours, the mean endothelial loss was 83% ± 10% (SD), 15% ± 11%, and 3% ± 3% in the 3 groups, respectively. With this technique, Descemet-endothelium disks were obtained without significant alterations in the endothelial layer. Copyright © 2010 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Pressure sensing with optical fiber-tip air bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Wenbing; Fu, Cailing; Wang, D. N.; Wang, Ying

    2013-09-01

    Optical fiber-tip air bubbles are demonstrated for pressure sensing with ultrahigh sensitivity. The air bubble locates in the end facet of a single mode fiber (SMF) that spliced with a silica tube, which is naturally formed and acts as a compressible Fabry-Pérot interferometer (FPI) cavity when immersing the silica tube into liquid. The proposed device exhibits pressure sensitivity of <1000 nm/kPa. This kind of compressible FPI cavity may find potential applications in highly sensitive pressure and/or acoustic sensing.

  12. Motion of Air Bubbles in Water Subjected to Microgravity Accelerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLombard, Richard; Kelly, Eric M.; Hrovat, Kenneth; Nelson, Emily S.; Pettit, Donald R.

    2006-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) serves as a platform for microgravity research for the foreseeable future. A microgravity environment is one in which the effects of gravity are drastically reduced which then allows physical experiments to be conducted without the over powering effects of gravity. During his 6-month stay on the ISS, astronaut Donald R. Pettit performed many informal/impromptu science experiments with available equipment. One such experiment focused on the motion of air bubbles in a rectangular container nearly filled with de-ionized water. Bubbles were introduced by shaking and then the container was secured in place for several hours while motion of the bubbles was recorded using time-lapse photography. This paper shows correlation between bubble motion and quasi-steady acceleration levels during one such experiment operation. The quasi-steady acceleration vectors were measured by the Microgravity Acceleration Measurement System (MAMS). Essentially linear motion was observed in the condition considered here. Dr. Pettit also created other conditions which produced linear and circulating motion, which are the subjects of further study. Initial observations of this bubble motion agree with calculations from many microgravity physical science experiments conducted on shuttle microgravity science missions. Many crystal-growth furnaces involve heavy metals and high temperatures in which undesired acceleration-driven convection during solidification can adversely affect the crystal. Presented in this paper will be results showing correlation between bubble motion and the quasi-steady acceleration vector.

  13. Motion of Air Bubbles in Water Subjected to Microgravity Accelerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLombard, Richard; Kelly, Eric M.; Hrovar, Kenneth; Nelson, Emily S.; Pettit, Donald R.

    2004-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) serves as a platform for microgravity research for the foreseeable future. A microgravity environment is one in which the effects of gravity are drastically reduced which then allows physical experiments to be conducted without the overpowering effects of gravity. During his six month stay on the ISS, astronaut Donald R Pettit performed many informal/impromptu science experiments with available equipment. One such experiment focused on the motion of air bubbles in a rectangular container nearly filled with de-ionized water. Bubbles were introduced by shaking and the container was secured in place for several hours while motion of the bubbles were recorded using time-lapse photography. This paper shows correlation between bubble motion and quasi-steady acceleration levels during one such experiment operation. The quasi-steady acceleration vectors were measured by the Microgravity Acceleration Measurement System. Essentially linear motion was observed in the condition considered here. Dr. Pettit also created other conditions which produced linear and circulating motion, which are the subjects of further study. Initial observations of this bubble motion agree with calculations from many microgravity physical science experiments conducted on Shuttle microgravity science missions. Many crystal-growth furnaces involve heavy metals and high temperatures in which undesired acceleration-driven convection during solidification can adversely affect the crystal. Presented in this paper will be results showing correlation between bubble motion and the quasi-steady acceleration vector.

  14. Air entrainment by a plunging liquid jet on a liquid pool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liñan, Amable; Lasheras, Juan C.

    1999-11-01

    When a liquid jet impinges on liquid pool, with a velocity higher than a critical velocity, a thin air film is entrained by the jet. The thickness ha of the air film, and thus the air mass entrained by the jet, is a function of its radius a and velocity U. This function, for the realistic small values of the capillary number ɛ = μa U/σ << 1 (based on the air viscosity μa and surface tension σ) turns out to be of the form h_a/a = F(a/a_c, ɛ), where a_c=√ σ/ρl g is the capillary length (based on the acceleration of gravity and liquid density ρ_l). An analysis similar to the analysis of Levish and Landau, for the entrainment of liquid by a plate moving out of a liquid pool, shows that the dependence of h_a/a on ɛ is of the form h_a/a = ɛ^2/3f(a/a_c), where f is of order unity for a/ac << 1 and f ≈ a_c/a for large values of a_c/a

  15. Large Field of View PIV Measurements of Air Entrainment by SLS SMAT Water Sound Suppression System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stegmeir, Matthew; Pothos, Stamatios; Bissell, Dan

    2015-11-01

    Water-based sound suppressions systems have been used to reduce the acoustic impact of space vehicle launches. Water flows at a high rate during launch in order to suppress Engine Generated Acoustics and other potentially damaging sources of noise. For the Space Shuttle, peak flow rates exceeded 900,000 gallons per minute. Such large water flow rates have the potential to induce substantial entrainment of the surrounding air, affecting the launch conditions and generating airflow around the launch vehicle. Validation testing is necessary to quantify this impact for future space launch systems. In this study, PIV measurements were performed to map the flow field above the SMAT sub-scale launch vehicle scaled launch stand. Air entrainment effects generated by a water-based sound suppression system were studied. Mean and fluctuating fluid velocities were mapped up to 1m above the test stand deck and compared to simulation results. Measurements performed with NASA MSFC.

  16. Intradescemetic air bubble trapping during deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty.

    PubMed

    Touboul, David; Binder, Perry S; Colin, Joseph

    2012-02-01

    We describe a case of a 52-year-old man in whom the appearance of an air bubble developed, trapped within the Descemet membrane (DM), that occurred during a planned deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty using the "big bubble" technique. This situation can occur because Descemet membrane's anatomic structure can be opened by the gas dissection; this complication may result in unanticipated results during and after this type of surgery. Surgeons should be aware of this specific risk, so they will recognize it when it occurs. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging and surgical management are presented.

  17. Material Properties Governing Co-Current Flame Spread: The Effect of Air Entrainment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coutin, Mickael; Rangwala, Ali S.; Torero, Jose L.; Buckley, Steven G.

    2003-01-01

    A study on the effects of lateral air entrainment on an upward spreading flame has been conducted. The fuel is a flat PMMA plate of constant length and thickness but variable width. Video images and surface temperatures have allowed establishing the progression of the pyrolyis front and on the flame stand-off distance. These measurements have been incorporated into a theoretical formulation to establish characteristic mass transfer numbers ("B" numbers). The mass transfer number is deemed as a material related parameter that could be used to assess the potential of a material to sustain co-current flame spread. The experimental results show that the theoretical formulation fails to describe heat exchange between the flame and the surface. The discrepancies seem to be associated to lateral air entrainment that lifts the flame off the surface and leads to an over estimation of the local mass transfer number. Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) measurements are in the process of being acquired. These measurements are intended to provide insight on the effect of air entrainment on the flame stand-off distance. A brief description of the methodology to be followed is presented here.

  18. Air bubble-shock wave interaction adjacent to gelantine surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lush, P. A.; Tomita, Y.; Onodera, O.; Takayama, K.; Sanada, N.; Kuwahara, M.; Ioritani, N.; Kitayama, O.

    1990-07-01

    The interaction between a shock wave and an air bubble-adjacent to a gelatine surface is investigated in order to simulate human tissue damage resulting from extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy. Using high speed cine photography it is found that a shock wave of strength 11 MPa causes 1-3 mm diameter bubbles to produce high velocity microjets with penetration rates of approximately 110 m/s and penetration depths approximately equal to twice the initial bubble diameter. Theoretical considerations for liquid impact on soft solid of similar density indicate that microjet velocities will be twice the penetration rate, i.e. 220 m/s in the present case. Such events are the probable cause of observed renal tissue damage.

  19. Single bubble air-gun array for deep exploration

    SciTech Connect

    Avedik, F.; Renard, V.; Allenou, J.P.; Morvan, B. . Centre de Brest)

    1993-03-01

    Large tuned air-gun arrays operated in off-shore petroleum exploration are also used for deep penetration marine seismic reflection surveys conducted to define structures in the earth's crust. Because of the attenuation of higher frequencies, the useful upper frequency limit of these records is usually about 50--60 Hz. The aim of this paper is to report on a method of seismic pulse generation that preferentially concentrates the air gun's energy in the low range of the seismic frequency band by centering the output on the first bubble pulse'' instead of the initial (primary) pulse. Experimental results show that, due to the increased low-frequency energy content of this single bubble'' pulse, air-gun arrays considerably reduced both in size and volume can generate the necessary acoustic energy for deep seismic exploration.

  20. Air bubbles clean produced water for reinjection

    SciTech Connect

    Michnick, M.J.

    1995-12-31

    The reuse of produced water in a waterflood may be hazardous to the health and wealth of the reservoir. Disposal of produced water and finding a new source of water for a waterflood can double your costs. Air flotation is being tested to rehabilitate produced water on a lease in eastern Kansas. The use of air flotation in the oil field is at least forty years old. However, many operators are reluctant to spend the capital for surface equipment to assure a supply of good quality water for their waterflood operation. Before the installation of the air flotation unit only the produced water was filtered through a 75-micron bag and the filter water was then added to the make-up water. Seventy-five micron cartridge filters were used at the wellhead. Both the plant and wellhead filters required frequent replacement. Injection wells averaged more than one cleaning and acidization per year. Since installation of the air flotation unit, the combined produced and makeup water is passed through either a 25-or 10-micron bag filter in the plant and a 10-micron cartridge at the wellhead. The results of the test being conducted by an independent oil operator show a reduction in the cost for the water injection system. This study is part of the Department of Energy Class I PONS with independent oil operators.

  1. A polydisperse two-fluid model for surf zone bubble simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Gangfeng; Shi, Fengyan; Kirby, James T.

    2011-05-01

    Wave breaking in the surf zone entrains large volumes of air bubbles into the water column, forming a two-phase bubbly flow field. Numerical study of bubbly flow is largely restricted by the lack of robust and comprehensive bubble entrainment models. In this paper, we propose a new model that connects bubble entrainment with turbulent dissipation rate at the air-water interface. The entrainment model as well as a polydisperse two-fluid model are incorporated into a 3-D volume of fluid code TRUCHAS. The bubbly flow model is first tested against laboratory experimental data for an oscillatory bubble plume. The calculated time-averaged liquid velocities and their fluctuations agree well with measurements, indicating that the model correctly reproduces dynamic interactions between the liquid phase and the continuum representation of the gas phase. Then, it is employed to study the bubbly flow under a laboratory surf zone breaking wave. Through the comparisons with experimental data, it is demonstrated that the model describes bubble entrainment and void fraction evolution reasonably well. The exponential decay of void fraction observed in the laboratory experiments is captured by the model. The kinematics of bubble plume as well as the vertical evolution of bubble size spectrum at any depth are investigated. Studies of bubble effects on liquid phase turbulence show that the presence of bubbles could suppress a large amount of turbulence under breaking waves.

  2. Plasma quenching by air during single-bubble sonoluminescence.

    PubMed

    Flannigan, David J; Suslick, Kenneth S

    2006-08-03

    We report the observation of sudden and dramatic changes in single-bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) intensity (i.e., radiant power, phi(SL)) and spectral profiles at a critical acoustic pressure (P(c)) for solutions of sulfuric acid (H2SO4) containing mixtures of air and noble gas. Nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen (N2), and atomic oxygen emission lines are visible just below P(c). At P(c), very bright (factor of 7000 increase in phi(SL)) and featureless SBSL is observed when Ar is present. In addition, Ar lines are observed from a dimmed bubble that has been driven above P(c). These observations suggest that bright SBSL from H2SO4 is due to a plasma, and that molecular components of air suppress the onset of bright light emission through quenching mechanisms and endothermic processes. Determination of temperatures from simulations of the emission lines shows that air limits the heating during single-bubble cavitation. When He is present, phi(SL) increases by only a factor of 4 at P(c), and the SBSL spectrum is not featureless as for Ar, but instead arises from sulfur oxide (SO) and sulfur dioxide (SO2) bands. These differences are attributed to the high thermal conductivity and ionization potential of He compared to Ar.

  3. Numerical investigation of a turbulent hydraulic jump: Interface statistics and air entrainment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortazavi, Milad; Kim, Dokyun; Mani, Ali; Moin, Parviz

    2011-11-01

    The objective of this study is to develop an understanding of formation of bubbles due to turbulence/interface interactions and nonlinear surface wave phenomena. As a model problem a statistically stationary turbulent hydraulic jump has been considered. Turbulent hydraulic jump with an inflow Froude number of 2 and Reynolds number of 88000-based on inflow height-has been numerically simulated. Based on typical air- water systems, a density ratio of 831 has been selected for our calculations. A refined level-set method is employed to track the detailed dynamics of the interface evolution. Comparison of flow statistics with experimental results of Murzyn et al. (Int. J. Multiphase Flow, 2005) will be presented. The probability density function of principal curvatures of the air- water interface and curvature distribution patterns in the chaotic regions are investigated. The importance of liquid impact events in bubble generation will be discussed. Supported by the Office of Naval Research, with Dr. Pat Purtell, program manager.

  4. Pseudo painting/air bubble technique for planar lipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Braun, Christian J; Baer, Tom; Moroni, Anna; Thiel, Gerhard

    2014-08-15

    A functional reconstitution of channel proteins in planar lipid bilayers is still very versatile to study structure/function correlates under well-defined conditions at the single protein level. In this study we present an improved planar lipid bilayer technique in which an air bubble is used for stabilizing unstable/leaky bilayers or for removing excess lipids. The bubble can also be used as a tool for reducing the number of channels in the bilayer with the goal of having only one active channel in the membrane. Stable planar lipid bilayers are formed within seconds to minutes. In the case of multiple channel insertion the air bubble can be used to reduce the number of channels within minutes. The simple improvement of the classical folding technique guarantees a very fast creation of stable bilayers even with difficult phospholipids in a conventional vertical bilayer set-up; it requires no modifications of the existing set-up. This technique is very easy to handle and guarantees successful single channel recordings for any kind of planar lipid bilayer experiment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Failure Mechanisms of Air Entrainment in Drop Impact on Lubricated Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pack, Min; Hu, Han; Kim, Dong-Ook; Zheng, Zhong; Stone, Howard; Sun, Ying; Drexel University Team; Princeton University Team

    2016-11-01

    Lubricated surfaces have recently been introduced and studied due to their potential benefit in various applications. Combining the techniques of total internal reflection microscopy and reflection interference microscopy, we examine the dynamics of an underlying air film upon drop impact on a lubricated substrate. In contrast to drop impact on solid surfaces where asperities cause random breakup of the entraining air film, we report two air film failure mechanisms on lubricated surfaces. In particular, using thin liquid films of high viscosity, we show that air film rupture shifts from a randomly driven to a controlled event. At low Weber numbers (We) the droplet bounces. At intermediate We, the air film fails at the center as the drop top surface crashes downward owing to impact-induced capillary waves; the resulting liquid-liquid contact time is found to be independent of We. In contrast, at high We, the air film failure occurs much earlier in time at the first inflection point of the air film shape away from the drop center, where the liquid-liquid van der Waals interactions become important. The predictable failure modes of the air film upon drop impact sheds light on droplet deposition in applications such as lubricant-infused self-cleaning surfaces. Support for this work was provided by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. CMMI-1401438 to Y.S.

  6. Dynamic Wetting in a Non-Equilibrium Gas: The Effect of Gas Pressure on Air Entrainment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprittles, James

    2014-11-01

    Experimentally, it is now well established that lowering the pressure of an ambient gas can suppress wetting failures, or ``air entrainment,'' at a liquid-solid-gas moving contact-line in both coating processes and drop impact dynamics. In this work, we consider the possibility that non-equilibrium effects in the gas are responsible for such phenomena. These can be included into a continuum framework by allowing for slip at both the solid-gas and liquid-gas interfaces, caused by Knudsen layers attached to these boundaries, which is related to the mean free path in the gas, and hence the ambient pressure. This model has been incorporated into a computational framework developed for dynamic wetting phenomena, which resolves all scales in the problem, so that these new effects can be investigated. It is shown that reductions in gas pressure, and hence increases in slip, can dramatically modify the flow field in the gas-film in front of a moving contact-line so that air entrainment is prevented. Specifically, in a dip-coating setup it is shown that the new model (a) describes experimental results for the critical wetting speed at a given gas pressure and (b) allows us to identify new parameters associated with the non-equilibrium gas dynamics which govern the contact-line's motion.

  7. Acoustical Emission from Bubbles and Dynamics of Bubbles and Bubble Clouds.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-01-01

    distribution of bubble sizes from a breaking wave , that is immediately following on the entrainment and disintegration of a given volume of air? In the...experimental confirmation was found by later workers. A simple statistical model has been proposed for the initial bubble sizes from breaking waves ...which also has received experimental support. A direct method of calculating wave -generated ripples has been proposed, which accounts quantitatively

  8. In vitro study of air bubble dynamics following pneumodissection of donor corneas and relationship of air bubble pattern with a peripheral paracentesis incision.

    PubMed

    Chaurasia, Sunita; Ramappa, Muralidhar

    2016-12-01

    To study various types of morphological patterns of the air bubble and their relation to a peripheral paracentesis after air injection in corneal stroma in vitro experiment. Air was injected into the donor corneas from the endothelial side and pattern was noted. Four different scenarios were created, namely (a) air injection into the deep stroma (n=11), (b) air injection into the superficial stroma (n=3), (c) air injection into the deep stroma after making a peripheral incision internal to the trabecular meshwork region that simulated an anteriorly placed paracentesis incision, with the site of air injection within a clock hour of the peripheral incision (n=7) and (d) air injection into the deep stroma after making a peripheral incision, the site of air injection being 180° away from the peripheral incision site (n=3). Air injection at deep posterior stroma resulted in the formation of type-1 and type-2 bubbles, type 2 began from the periphery and followed the type-1 bubble pattern in majority of the donor corneas. The type-1 pattern was noted as a bubble in the central part of the donor disc that did not reach the peripheral extent of the cornea. The type-2 pattern was a bubble that started at the peripheral cornea and expanded but was limited by the limbus circumferentially. With a full-thickness peripheral incision and air injection in the same clock hour of the incision, only a type-1 bubble pattern was noted with air leakage from the site of the incision. The results of the study corroborate with the clinical observations made during deep lamellar keratoplasty (DLK). The placement of the paracentesis has a bearing on the pattern of the air bubble and can be used to an advantage during DLK surgery. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  9. Management of intra-Descemet membrane air bubble in big-bubble deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Namrata; Swarup, Rishi; Bali, Shveta Jindal; Maharana, Prafulla; Titiyal, Jeewan S; Vajpayee, Rasik B

    2013-09-01

    To report the recognition and management of intra-Descemet membrane air bubble (IDMA) as a complication of big-bubble deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty (DALK). IDMA was present intraoperatively in 8 eyes after DALK. Indications for surgery were healed keratitis (n = 4), macular dystrophy (n = 2), and keratoconus (n = 2). The IDMA was present between the anterior banded layer and posterior nonbanded layer of Descemet membrane (DM). They were slid and displaced toward the peripheral cornea using 27-gauge cannula and punctured taking care that underlying DM was not ruptured. DM was bared in all eyes, and DALK was completed in 7 cases. One patient required conversion to penetrating keratoplasty because of macroperforation. No case had double anterior chamber. Mean follow-up was 13.9 ± 4.1 months. A DM fold was noted in 1 eye. Seven cases had postoperative best-corrected visual acuity of 20/60 or better. Prompt recognition of the IDMA intraoperatively is required, which can be managed successfully.

  10. Failure mechanisms of air entrainment in drop impact on lubricated surfaces.

    PubMed

    Pack, M; Hu, H; Kim, D; Zheng, Z; Stone, H A; Sun, Y

    2017-03-22

    Lubricated surfaces have recently been introduced and studied due to their potential benefit in various configurations and applications. Combining the techniques of total internal reflection microscopy and reflection interference microscopy, we examine the dynamics of an underlying air film upon drop impact on a lubricated substrate where the thin liquid film is immiscible to the drop. In contrast to drop impact on solid surfaces where even the smallest asperities cause random breakup of the entraining air film, we report two air film failure mechanisms on lubricated surfaces. In particular, using ≈5 μm thick liquid films of high viscosity, which should make the substrate nearly atomically smooth, we show that air film rupture shifts from asperity-driven to a controlled event. At low Weber numbers (We < 2, We = ρlU0(2)R/σ, U0 the impact velocity, R the drop radius, and ρl the density and σ the surface tension of the droplet) the droplet bounces. At intermediate We (2 < We < 10), the air film fails at the center as the top surface of the drop crashes downward owing to impact-induced capillary waves; the resulting liquid-liquid contact time is found to be independent of We. In contrast, at high We (We > 10), the air film failure occurs much earlier in time at the first inflection point of the air film shape away from the drop center, where the liquid-liquid van der Waals interactions become important. The predictable failure modes of the air film upon drop impact sheds light on droplet deposition in applications such as lubricant-infused self-cleaning surfaces.

  11. Bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prosperetti, Andrea

    2004-06-01

    Vanitas vanitatum et omnia vanitas: bubbles are emptiness, non-liquid, a tiny cloud shielding a mathematical singularity. Born from chance, a violent and brief life ending in the union with the (nearly) infinite. But a wealth of phenomena spring forth from this nothingness: underwater noise, sonoluminescence, boiling, and many others. Some recent results on a "blinking bubble" micropump and vapor bubbles in sound fields are outlined. The last section describes Leonardo da Vinci's observation of the non-rectlinear ascent of buoyant bubbles and justifies the name Leonardo's paradox recently attributed to this phenomenon.

  12. Effects of air chemistry and stiffened EOS of air in numerical simulations of bubble collapse in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Jackson, T. L.; Jost, A. M. D.

    2017-05-01

    In this paper we study the effects of a stiffened gas equation of state for air at high pressure and air chemistry with dissociation in numerical simulations of bubble collapse in water. Two types of bubble collapse are studied, with one corresponding to spherically symmetric collapse simulating single-bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL), and the other a GPa-shock-induced axisymmetric bubble collapse. The numerical method is a finite-volume based solver with diffuse material interface model. Verification and validation of the solver are demonstrated by comparing to analytical solutions and experimental observations. We find that for sonoluminescence, air chemistry and equation of state for air at high pressures can have significant effects on the peak temperature and pressure attained during the evolution, and that the peak temperature is on the order of 1 eV, which is close to that observed in experiments. For shock-induced bubble collapse, the pressure inside the bubble will not be as high as that in sonoluminescence due to the absence of spherical symmetry. However, the air chemistry still has a significant effect on the temperature of the bubble. We also examine the effect of multiple bubble interaction in shock-induced bubble collapse and find several mechanisms that can significantly increase the pressure in the water. These mechanisms include frontal-distal-side-collision, shock focusing, upstream-traveling shocks, and compression of the water near the centerline by the vortex generated by bubble collapse. These have important implications for cavitation erosion.

  13. Ceramic membrane defouling (cleaning) by air Nano Bubbles.

    PubMed

    Ghadimkhani, Aliasghar; Zhang, Wen; Marhaba, Taha

    2016-03-01

    Ceramic membranes are among the most promising technologies for membrane applications, owing to their excellent resistance to mechanical, chemical, and thermal stresses. However, membrane fouling is still an issue that hampers the applications at large scales. Air Nano Bubbles (NBs), due to high mass transfer efficiency, could potentially prevent fouling of ceramic membrane filtration processes. In this study, bench and pilot scale ceramic membrane filtration was performed with air NBs to resist fouling. To simulate fouling, humic acid, as an organic foulant, was applied to the membrane flat sheet surface. Complete membrane clogging was achieved in less than 6 h. Membrane defouling (cleaning) was performed by directly feeding of air NBs to the membrane cells. The surface of the ceramic membrane was superbly cleaned by air NBs, as revealed by atomic force microscope (AFM) images before and after the treatment. The permeate flux recovered to its initial level (e.g., 26.7 × 10(-9) m(3)/m(2)/s at applied pressure of 275.8 kPa), which indicated that NBs successfully unclogged the pores of the membrane. The integrated ceramic membrane and air NBs system holds potential as an innovative sustainable technology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Effects of air bubbles and tube transportation on blood oxygen tension in arterial blood gas analysis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jin Ying; Kao, Jau Tsuen; Chien, Tzu I; Lee, Tai Fen; Tsai, Keh Sung

    2003-04-01

    Pneumatic tube transport has been reported to aggravate the error in partial pressure of oxygen (PO(2)) measurements caused by air bubbles. The aim of this study was to clarify the effect of manual and pneumatic tube methods of sample transportation and different amounts of air bubbles on arterial blood gas analysis. Blood gas samples from 15 patients and a pooled wasted blood mixture with 3 different levels of PO(2) were analyzed to determine the effects of air bubbles and manual versus pneumatic tube transportation on PO(2) levels. PO(2) increased significantly in samples containing 10% air bubbles and was exaggerated by pneumatic tube transport (from 115.63 +/- 9.31 mm Hg to 180.51 +/- 11.29 mm Hg, p < 0.001). In samples with low PO(2) ( approximately 30 mm Hg), the measurement was not aberrant regardless of the method of transportation or the amount of air bubbles contained in the specimen. However, in samples with medium and high PO(2) (> 70 mm Hg), aberrances in measurements were noted even with only 0.5% air bubbles and regardless of whether the sample was transported by manual methods or pressurized tube. The increments of PO(2) correlated positively with the amount of air introduced into the specimens. Thus, the measured PO(2) increased 8.13 and 31.77 mm Hg when 0.5% and 10% air bubbles were introduced, respectively, to samples with medium PO(2) (p < 0.05). The interaction between the amount of air bubbles and the method of transportation was significant (p < 0.001). Trapped air in the syringe should be expelled as thoroughly as possible, since the presence of only 1% air bubbles can result in aberrance in PO(2) measurement. Samples for blood gas analysis should be carried in ambient pressure to the laboratory because pneumatic tube delivery systems significantly aggravate the air bubble-related aberrance in PO(2) measurement.

  15. Morphological bubble evolution induced by air diffusion on submerged hydrophobic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Pengyu; Xiang, Yaolei; Xue, Yahui; Lin, Hao; Duan, Huiling

    2017-03-01

    Bubbles trapped in the cavities always play important roles in the underwater applications of structured hydrophobic surfaces. Air exchange between bubbles and surrounding water has a significant influence on the morphological bubble evolution, which in turn frequently affects the functionalities of the surfaces, such as superhydrophobicity and drag reduction. In this paper, air diffusion induced bubble evolution on submerged hydrophobic micropores under reduced pressures is investigated experimentally and theoretically. The morphological behaviors of collective and single bubbles are observed using confocal microscopy. Four representative evolution phases of bubbles are captured in situ. After depressurization, bubbles will not only grow and coalesce but also shrink and split although the applied pressure remains negative. A diffusion-based model is used to analyze the evolution behavior and the results are consistent with the experimental data. A criterion for bubble growth and shrinkage is also derived along with a phase diagram, revealing that the competition of effective gas partial pressures across the two sides of the diffusion layer dominates the bubble evolution process. Strategies for controlling the bubble evolution behavior are also proposed based on the phase diagram. The current work provides a further understanding of the general behavior of bubble evolution induced by air diffusion and can be employed to better designs of functional microstructured hydrophobic surfaces.

  16. One-group interfacial area transport in vertical air-water bubbly flow

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Q.; Kim, S.; Ishii, M.; Beus, S.G.

    1997-07-01

    In the two-fluid model for two-phase flows, interfacial area concentration is one of the most important closure relations that should be obtained from careful mechanistic modeling. The objective of this study is to develop a one-group interfacial area transport equation together with the modeling of the source and sink terms due to bubble breakage and coalescence. For bubble coalescence, two mechanisms are considered to be dominant in vertical two-phase bubbly flow. These are the random collisions between bubbles due to turbulence in the flow field, and the wake entrainment process due to the relative motion of the bubbles in the wake region of a seeding bubble. For bubble breakup, the impact of turbulent eddies is considered. These phenomena are modeled individually, resulting in a one-group interfacial area concentration transport equation with certain parameters to be determined from experimental data. Compared to the measured axial distribution of the interfacial area concentration under various flow conditions, these parameters are obtained for the reduced one-group, one-dimensional transport equation. The results indicate that the proposed models for bubble breakup and coalescence are appropriate.

  17. Sarnicola air-visco bubble technique in deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty.

    PubMed

    Muftuoglu, Orkun; Toro, Patricia; Hogan, R Nick; Bowman, R Wayne; Cavanagh, H Dwight; McCulley, James P; Mootha, V Vinod; Sarnicola, Vicenzo

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe a new modification for big-bubble deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty (DALK) using pneumatic pressure to detach Descemet membrane (DM) via air injection followed by ophthalmic viscoelastic device (OVD) injection. After failure of big-bubble formation after air injection, OVD was injected from a different site other than the previous air injection using a 27-gauge cannula to detach DM, called air-visco bubble (AVB) DALK technique. The technique was used in 7 human corneoscleral rims that were investigated with anterior segment optical coherence tomography and histopathology and in 69 eyes that underwent DALK surgeries. Big-bubble formation was noted in 4 of 7 of the donor corneoscleral rims. The anterior segment optical coherence tomography showed big-bubble formations together with intrastromal OVD accumulation. The histology of the donor corneas showed microdetachments at the DM in the periphery, deep intrastromal separation, and big-bubble formation filled with OVD. One hundred forty-one of 210 eyes (67%) underwent successful DALK with only air injection, and 69 of 210 eyes (33%) underwent AVB technique when a big bubble was not achieved with only air injection. All the corneas showed a clear interface with good wound healing when DM was bared with the AVB DALK technique. Additional OVD injection to detach DM may be useful in cases where air injection fails. Also, creating small DM detachments with air injection may facilitate the formation of a big bubble with further OVD injection.

  18. Air bubble-associated endothelial trauma in descemet stripping automated endothelial keratoplasty.

    PubMed

    Hong, Anna; Caldwell, Matthew C; Kuo, Anthony N; Afshari, Natalie A

    2009-08-01

    To evaluate endothelial cell trauma by anterior chamber (AC) air bubbles in Descemet stripping automated endothelial keratoplasty (DSAEK). Laboratory investigation. Twelve human donor corneas (6 pairs) were sectioned using an automated microkeratome system (Moria ALTK System, Antony, France). One cornea of each pair was mounted on a Moria artificial AC, and an air bubble was injected to fill 40% of the AC. The apparatus was rotated 180 degrees for a total of 50 times to simulate air bubble trauma. The fellow corneas were used as controls. Each endothelial graft was stained with 0.25% Trypan blue for 90 seconds followed by 0.2% alizarin red for 2 minutes, and digital photomicrographs were obtained. Abnormally staining areas indicative of graft injury were removed digitally from the total graft area. The proportion of uninjured corneal endothelium was calculated, and differences were analyzed. In this ex vivo model of air bubble trauma, the proportion of viable graft endothelium after air bubble injury was 79.8 +/- 0.04% (n = 6). The proportion of viable endothelium in the control group was 89.9 +/- 0.02% (n = 6). The statistically significant mean difference of 10.1% (P = .03) is indicative of greater endothelial injury after air bubble trauma. Using this model, a moderate but significant amount of endothelial cell damage was associated with air bubble trauma compared with the control group. Air bubble trauma may account partially for the loss of endothelial cell density after DSAEK surgery and may impact graft survival.

  19. Effect of air bubble localization after transfer on embryo transfer outcomes.

    PubMed

    Tiras, Bulent; Korucuoglu, Umit; Polat, Mehtap; Saltik, Ayse; Zeyneloglu, Hulusi Bulent; Yarali, Hakan

    2012-09-01

    Our study aimed to provide information about the effects of air bubble localization after transfer on embryo transfer outcomes. Retrospective analysis of 7489 ultrasound-guided embryo transfers. Group 1 included 6631 embryo transfers in which no movement of the air bubbles was observed after transfer. Group 2 consisted of 407 embryo transfers in which the air bubbles moved towards the uterine fundus spontaneously, a little time after transfer. Group 3 included 370 embryo transfers in which the air bubbles moved towards the uterine fundus with ejection, immediately after transfer. Group 4 consisted of 81 embryo transfers in which the air bubbles moved towards the cervical canal. The four patient groups were different from one another with respect to positive pregnancy tests. Post hoc test revealed that this difference was between group 4 and other groups. An initial finding of our study was significantly decreased positive pregnancy test rates and clinical pregnancy rates with air bubbles moving towards the cervical canal after transfer. Although air bubbles moving towards the uterine fundus with ejection were associated with higher pregnancy rates, higher miscarriage rates and similar live birth rates were observed compared to air bubbles remaining stable after transfer. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Keeping warm with fur in cold water: entrainment of air in hairy surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasto, Alice; Regli, Marianne; Brun, Pierre-Thomas; Clanet, Christophe; Hosoi, Anette

    2015-11-01

    Instead of relying on a thick layer of body fat for insulation as many aquatic mammals do, fur seals and otters trap air in their dense fur for insulation in cold water. Using a combination of model experiments and theory, we rationalize this mechanism of air trapping underwater for thermoregulation. For the model experiments, hairy surfaces are fabricated using laser cut molds and casting samples with PDMS. Modeling the hairy texture as a network of capillary tubes, the imbibition speed of water into the hairs is obtained through a balance of hydrostatic pressure and viscous stress. In this scenario, the bending of the hairs and capillary forces are negligible. The maximum diving depth that can be achieved before the hairs are wetted to the roots is predicted from a comparison of the diving speed and imbibition speed. The amount of air that is entrained in hairy surfaces is greater than what is expected for classic Landau-Levich-Derjaguin plate plunging. A phase diagram with the parameters from experiments and biological data allows a comparison of the model system and animals.

  1. Simple method for high-performance stretchable composite conductors with entrapped air bubbles.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Hyejin; Kim, Dae-Gon; Jang, Nam-Su; Kong, Jeong-Ho; Kim, Jong-Man

    2016-12-01

    We integrate air bubbles into conductive elastic composite-based stretchable conductors to make them mechanically less stiff and electrically more robust against physical deformations. A surfactant facilitates both the formation and maintenance of air bubbles inside the elastic composites, leading to a simple fabrication of bubble-entrapped stretchable conductors. Based on the unique bubble-entrapped architecture, the elastic properties are greatly enhanced and the resistance change in response to tensile strains can clearly be controlled. The bubble-entrapped conductor achieves ~80 % elongation at ~3.4 times lower stress and ~44.8 % smaller change in the electrical resistance at 80 % tensile strain, compared to bare conductor without air bubbles.

  2. Air bubbles and hemolysis of blood samples during transport by pneumatic tube systems.

    PubMed

    Mullins, Garrett R; Bruns, David E

    2017-08-10

    Transport of blood samples through pneumatic tube systems (PTSs) generates air bubbles in transported blood samples and, with increasing duration of transport, the appearance of hemolysis. We investigated the role of air-bubble formation in PTS-induced hemolysis. Air was introduced into blood samples for 0, 1, 3 or 5min to form air bubbles. Hemolysis in the blood was assessed by (H)-index, lactate dehydrogenase (LD) and potassium in plasma. In an effort to prevent PTS-induced hemolysis, blood sample tubes were completely filled, to prevent air bubble formation, and compared with partially filled samples after PTS transport. We also compared hemolysis in anticoagulated vs clotted blood subjected to PTS transport. As with transport through PTSs, the duration of air bubble formation in blood by a gentle stream of air predicted the extent of hemolysis as measured by H-index (p<0.01), LD (p<0.01), and potassium (p<0.02) in plasma. Removing air space in a blood sample prevented bubble formation and fully protected the blood from PTS-induced hemolysis (p<0.02 vs conventionally filled collection tube). Clotted blood developed less foaming during PTS transport and was partially protected from hemolysis vs anticoagulated blood as indicated by lower LD (p<0.03) in serum than in plasma after PTS sample transport. Prevention of air bubble formation in blood samples during PTS transport protects samples from hemolysis. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Studies on the tempo of bubble formation in recently cavitated vessels: a model to predict the pressure of air bubbles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yujie; Pan, Ruihua; Tyree, Melvin T

    2015-06-01

    A cavitation event in a vessel replaces water with a mixture of water vapor and air. A quantitative theory is presented to argue that the tempo of filling of vessels with air has two phases: a fast process that extracts air from stem tissue adjacent to the cavitated vessels (less than 10 s) and a slow phase that extracts air from the atmosphere outside the stem (more than 10 h). A model was designed to estimate how water tension (T) near recently cavitated vessels causes bubbles in embolized vessels to expand or contract as T increases or decreases, respectively. The model also predicts that the hydraulic conductivity of a stem will increase as bubbles collapse. The pressure of air bubbles trapped in vessels of a stem can be predicted from the model based on fitting curves of hydraulic conductivity versus T. The model was validated using data from six stem segments each of Acer mono and the clonal hybrid Populus 84 K (Populus alba × Populus glandulosa). The model was fitted to results with root mean square error less than 3%. The model provided new insight into the study of embolism formation in stem tissue and helped quantify the bubble pressure immediately after the fast process referred to above. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  4. Probing the interaction between air bubble and sphalerite mineral surface using atomic force microscope.

    PubMed

    Xie, Lei; Shi, Chen; Wang, Jingyi; Huang, Jun; Lu, Qiuyi; Liu, Qingxia; Zeng, Hongbo

    2015-03-03

    The interaction between air bubbles and solid surfaces plays important roles in many engineering processes, such as mineral froth flotation. In this work, an atomic force microscope (AFM) bubble probe technique was employed, for the first time, to directly measure the interaction forces between an air bubble and sphalerite mineral surfaces of different hydrophobicity (i.e., sphalerite before/after conditioning treatment) under various hydrodynamic conditions. The direct force measurements demonstrate the critical role of the hydrodynamic force and surface forces in bubble-mineral interaction and attachment, which agree well with the theoretical calculations based on Reynolds lubrication theory and augmented Young-Laplace equation by including the effect of disjoining pressure. The hydrophobic disjoining pressure was found to be stronger for the bubble-water-conditioned sphalerite interaction with a larger hydrophobic decay length, which enables the bubble attachment on conditioned sphalerite at relatively higher bubble approaching velocities than that of unconditioned sphalerite. Increasing the salt concentration (i.e., NaCl, CaCl2) leads to weakened electrical double layer force and thereby facilitates the bubble-mineral attachment, which follows the classical Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory by including the effects of hydrophobic interaction. The results provide insights into the basic understanding of the interaction mechanism between bubbles and minerals at nanoscale in froth flotation processes, and the methodology on probing the interaction forces of air bubble and sphalerite surfaces in this work can be extended to many other mineral and particle systems.

  5. Oceanic Whitecaps and Associated, Bubble-Mediated, Air-Sea Exchange Processes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-10-01

    parameters of wind waves and whitecap coverage from the available data sets. Three following projects were pursued: 1. Nonlinear Geometry of Wind Waves ...Entrainment by Plunging Liquid Jets, by X. Wang 92 CHAPTER 12 Wind Waves and Oceanic Whitecap Coverage, by I.A. Leykin 111 APPENDIX A Modelling the...Evolution of the Bubble Population Resulting from a Spilling Wave , With Due Consideration to the Influence Of Salinity, Water Temperature, and Dissolved

  6. A study of the accuracy of neutrally buoyant bubbles used as flow tracers in air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerho, Michael F.

    1993-01-01

    Research has been performed to determine the accuracy of neutrally buoyant and near neutrally buoyant bubbles used as flow tracers in air. Theoretical, computational, and experimental results are presented to evaluate the dynamics of bubble trajectories and factors affecting their ability to trace flow-field streamlines. The equation of motion for a single bubble was obtained and evaluated using a computational scheme to determine the factors which affect a bubble's trajectory. A two-dimensional experiment was also conducted to experimentally determine bubble trajectories in the stagnation region of NACA 0012 airfoil at 0 deg angle of attack using a commercially available helium bubble generation system. Physical properties of the experimental bubble trajectories were estimated using the computational scheme. These properties included the density ratio and diameter of the individual bubbles. the helium bubble system was then used to visualize and document the flow field about a 30 deg swept semispan wing with simulated glaze ice. Results were compared to Navier-Stokes calculations and surface oil flow visualization. The theoretical and computational analysis have shown that neutrally buoyant bubbles will trace even the most complex flow patterns. Experimental analysis revealed that the use of bubbles to trace flow patterns should be limited to qualitative measurements unless care is taken to ensure neutral buoyancy. This is due to the difficulty in the production of neutrally buoyant bubbles.

  7. How Does an Air Film Evolve into a Bubble During Drop Impact?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ji San; Weon, Byung Mook; Je, Jung Ho; Fezzaa, Kamel

    2012-11-01

    When a liquid drop impacts a solid surface, air is generally entrapped underneath. Using ultrafast x-ray phase-contrast imaging, we directly visualized the profile of an entrapped air film and its evolution into a bubble during drop impact. We identified a complicated evolution process that consists of three stages: inertial retraction of the air film, contraction of the top air surface into a bubble, and pinch-off of a daughter droplet inside the bubble. Energy transfer during retraction drives the contraction and pinch-off of a daughter droplet. The wettability of the solid surface affects the detachment of the bubble, suggesting a method for bubble elimination in many drop-impact applications.

  8. How does an air film evolve into a bubble during drop impact?

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji San; Weon, Byung Mook; Je, Jung Ho; Fezzaa, Kamel

    2012-11-16

    When a liquid drop impacts a solid surface, air is generally entrapped underneath. Using ultrafast x-ray phase-contrast imaging, we directly visualized the profile of an entrapped air film and its evolution into a bubble during drop impact. We identified a complicated evolution process that consists of three stages: inertial retraction of the air film, contraction of the top air surface into a bubble, and pinch-off of a daughter droplet inside the bubble. Energy transfer during retraction drives the contraction and pinch-off of a daughter droplet. The wettability of the solid surface affects the detachment of the bubble, suggesting a method for bubble elimination in many drop-impact applications.

  9. Experimental and computational study and development of the bituminous coal entrained-flow air-blown gasifier for IGCC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abaimov, N. A.; Osipov, P. V.; Ryzhkov, A. F.

    2016-10-01

    In the paper the development of the advanced bituminous coal entrained-flow air- blown gasifier for the high power integrated gasification combined cycle is considered. The computational fluid dynamics technique is used as the basic development tool. The experiment on the pressurized entrained-flow gasifier was performed by “NPO CKTI” JSC for the thermochemical processes submodel verification. The kinetic constants for Kuznetsk bituminous coal (flame coal), obtained by thermal gravimetric analysis method, are used in the model. The calculation results obtained by the CFD model are in satisfactory agreements with experimental data. On the basis of the verified model the advanced gasifier structure was suggested which permits to increase the hydrogen content in the synthesis gas and consequently to improve the gas turbine efficiency. In order to meet the specified requirements vapor is added on the second stage of MHI type gasifier and heat necessary for air gasification is compensated by supplemental heating of the blasting air.

  10. Magma mixing enhanced by bubble segregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiesmaier, S.; Daniele, M.; Renggli, C.; Perugini, D.; De Campos, C.; Hess, K. U.; Ertel-Ingrisch, W.; Lavallée, Y.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2014-12-01

    Rising bubbles may significantly affect magma mixing paths as has been demonstrated by analogue experiments in the past. Here, bubble-advection experiments are performed for the first time employing natural materials at magmatic temperatures. Cylinders of basaltic glass were placed below cylinders of rhyolite glass. Upon melting, interstitial air formed bubbles that rose into the rhyolite melt, thereby entraining tails of basaltic liquid. The formation of plume-like filaments of advected basalt within the rhyolite was characterized by microCT and subsequent high-resolution EMP analyses. Melt entrainment by bubble ascent appears as efficient mechanism to mingle contrasting melt compositions. MicroCT imaging shows bubbles trailing each other and trails of multiple bubbles having converged. Rheological modelling of the filaments yields viscosities of up to 2 orders of magnitude lower than for the surrounding rhyolitic liquid. Such a viscosity contrast implies that subsequent bubbles rising are likely to follow the same pathways that previously ascending bubbles have generated. Filaments formed by multiple bubbles would thus experience episodic replenishment with mafic material. Fundamental implications for the concept of bubble advection in magma mixing are thus a) an acceleration of mixing because of decreased viscous resistance for bubbles inside filaments and b) non-conventional diffusion systematics because of intermittent supply of mafic material (instead of a single pulse) inside a filament. Inside these filaments, the mafic material was variably hybridised to andesitic through rhyolitic composition. Compositional profiles alone are ambiguous, however, to determine whether single or multiple bubbles were involved during formation of a filament. Statistical analysis, employing concentration variance as measure of homogenisation, demonstrates that also filaments appearing as single-bubble filaments are likely to have experienced multiple bubbles passing through

  11. Modified big-bubble deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty using peripheral air injection.

    PubMed

    Feizi, Sepehr; Faramarzi, Amir; Javadi, Mohammad Ali; Jafarinasab, Mohammad Reza

    2014-11-01

    To introduce a modification to big-bubble deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty (DALK) which can decrease the risk of Descemet membrane (DM) perforation during air injection. In Anwar's big-bubble technique, a 27-guage needle is inserted from the trephination site and advanced into the corneal stroma up to the centre. The technique we introduce modifies the original technique in the following fashion. After trephination to approximately 80% of corneal thickness, a 27-guage needle is inserted into the stroma peripherally from the trephination site towards the limbus. Air is injected gently into the deep stroma until a big bubble is formed. This technique was performed in 16 consecutive keratoconic eyes undergoing DALK. Additionally, peripheral air injection was carried out in 27 eye-bank corneas using a peripheral approach. In all (100%) eye-bank and 13 (81.3%) live corneas, a successful big bubble was easily achieved following peripheral air injection. In these 13 live corneas, all bubbles were formed at the central (n=10) or paracentral (n=3) cornea and extended centrifugally (type 1 bubble). In one of these corneas, an additional three bubbles were noted in the periphery between the DM and the pre-Descemet posterior stromal layer (Dua's layer, type 2) after a type 1 bubble was formed. In two live corneas in which peripheral air injection failed, a big bubble was successfully formed after air was injected inside the trephination site. Air injection peripheral to the trephination site is a reproducible modification to the standard technique which can decrease the risk of DM perforation during air injection. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  12. Modeling variable density turbulence in the wake of an air-entraining transom stern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendrickson, Kelli; Yue, Dick

    2015-11-01

    This work presents a priori testing of closure models for the incompressible highly-variable density turbulent (IHVDT) flows in the near wake region of a transom stern. This three-dimensional flow is comprised of convergent corner waves that originate from the body and collide on the ship center plane forming the ``rooster tail'' that then widens to form the divergent wave train. These violent free-surface flows and breaking waves are characterized by significant turbulent mass flux (TMF) at Atwood number At = (ρ2 -ρ1) / (ρ2 +ρ1) ~ 1 for which there is little guidance in turbulence closure modeling for the momentum and scalar transport along the wake. To whit, this work utilizes high-resolution simulations of the near wake of a canonical three-dimensional transom stern using conservative Volume-of-Fluid (cVOF), implicit Large Eddy Simulation (iLES), and Boundary Data Immersion Method (BDIM) to capture the turbulence and large scale air entrainment. Analysis of the simulation results across and along the wake for the TMF budget and turbulent anisotropy provide the physical basis of the development of multiphase turbulence closure models. Performance of isotropic and anisotropic turbulent mass flux closure models will be presented. Sponsored by the Office of Naval Research.

  13. Three-dimensional flow observation on the air entrainment into a vertical-wet-pit pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, K.; Maeda, T.; Nagura, T.; Inoue, T.

    2016-11-01

    The authors consider the air entrainment into a suction pipe which is vertically inserted down into a suction sump across a mean free-water surface. This configuration is often referred to as the “vertical wet-pit pump,” and has many practical advantages in construction, maintenance and operation. Most of the flows appearing in various industrial and environmental problems like the present suction- sump flow become often complicated owing to both of their unsteadiness with poor periodicity and their fully-three-dimensionality. In order to understand the complicated flow inside a suction sump in the vertical-wet-pit-pump configuration, the authors experimentally observe the flow using the three-dimensional particle tracking velocimetry (3D-PTV) technique, which includes more unknown factors in accuracy and reliability than other established measuring techniques. So, the authors examine the simultaneous measurement by the 3D-PTV with another velocimetry the ultrasonic velocity profiler. As a result, under the suitable condition with high accuracy, the authors have revealed the complicated flow.

  14. Investigation of Proprietary Air-Entraining Admixtures to Produce Frost- Resistant Concrete with Low Air Content

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-03-01

    given air content, a higher specific surface should result in a smaller spacing factor ( Mindess and Young 1981). Therefore, if a particular AEA produced...MS. Mindess , S., and Young, J. F. 1981. Concrete, Prentice-Hall, Englewood Cliffs, NJ. Powers, T. C. 1954 (May). "Void Spacing as a Basis for

  15. Liquid jet pumped by rising gas bubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hussain, N. A.; Siegel, R.

    1975-01-01

    A two-phase mathematical model is proposed for calculating the induced turbulent vertical liquid flow. Bubbles provide a large buoyancy force and the associated drag on the liquid moves the liquid upward. The liquid pumped upward consists of the bubble wakes and the liquid brought into the jet region by turbulent entrainment. The expansion of the gas bubbles as they rise through the liquid is taken into account. The continuity and momentum equations are solved numerically for an axisymmetric air jet submerged in water. Water pumping rates are obtained as a function of air flow rate and depth of submergence. Comparisons are made with limited experimental information in the literature.

  16. An approach to mineral particle-air bubble interaction in turbulent flow of flotation cell

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, S.; Song, S.; Gou, J.; Pan, Y.

    1995-12-31

    The calculated potential energies of interaction between hydrophobic particle of three minerals (rhodochrosite, quartz and talc) and air bubble show that the energy of hydrophobic interaction is the dominant factor for their attachment. An attachment rate equation, integrating particle-bubble collision and adhesion by introducing a capture efficiency, has been put forward. It was found that the hydrophobic particle-bubble aggregates can not be disconnected in the bulk zone of flotation cell, whereas in the impeller zone the breakup may occur, particularly for the coarser particles captured by bubble. Finally, the flotation rate constant was estimated theoretically and verified by experiments.

  17. Scale dependence of bubble creation mechanisms in breaking waves.

    PubMed

    Deane, Grant B; Stokes, M Dale

    2002-08-22

    Breaking ocean waves entrain air bubbles that enhance air-sea gas flux, produce aerosols, generate ambient noise and scavenge biological surfactants. The size distribution of the entrained bubbles is the most important factor in controlling these processes, but little is known about bubble properties and formation mechanisms inside whitecaps. We have measured bubble size distributions inside breaking waves in the laboratory and in the open ocean, and provide a quantitative description of bubble formation mechanisms in the laboratory. We find two distinct mechanisms controlling the size distribution, depending on bubble size. For bubbles larger than about 1 mm, turbulent fragmentation determines bubble size distribution, resulting in a bubble density proportional to the bubble radius to the power of -10/3. Smaller bubbles are created by jet and drop impact on the wave face, with a -3/2 power-law scaling. The length scale separating these processes is the scale where turbulent fragmentation ceases, also known as the Hinze scale. Our results will have important implications for the study of air-sea gas transfer.

  18. ENTRAINMENT MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation presented information on entrainment models. Entrainment models use entrainment hypotheses to express the continuity equation. The advantage is that plume boundaries are known. A major disadvantage is that the problems that can be solved are rather simple. The ...

  19. ENTRAINMENT MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation presented information on entrainment models. Entrainment models use entrainment hypotheses to express the continuity equation. The advantage is that plume boundaries are known. A major disadvantage is that the problems that can be solved are rather simple. The ...

  20. Diffusion-driven growth of a spherical gas bubble in gelatin gels supersaturated with air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirota, Eriko; Ando, Keita

    2016-11-01

    We experimentally and theoretically study diffusion-driven growth of laser-induced gas bubbles in gelatin gels supersaturated with air. The supersaturation in the gels is realized by using a large separation between heat and mass diffusion rates. An optical system is developed to induce bubble nucleation by laser focusing and visualize the subsequent bubble growth. To evaluate the effect of the gel elasticity on the bubble growth rate, we propose the extended Epstein-Plesset theory that considers bubble pressure modifications due to linear/nonlinear elasticity (in addition to Laplace pressure). From comparisons between the experiments and the proposed theory, the bubble growth rate is found to be hindered by the elasticity. This study is supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 25709008.

  1. Role of air bubbles overlooked in the adsorption of perfluorooctanesulfonate on hydrophobic carbonaceous adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Meng, Pingping; Deng, Shubo; Lu, Xinyu; Du, Ziwen; Wang, Bin; Huang, Jun; Wang, Yujue; Yu, Gang; Xing, Baoshan

    2014-12-02

    Hydrophobic interaction has been considered to be responsible for adsorption of perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) on the surface of hydrophobic adsorbents, but the long C-F chain in PFOS is not only hydrophobic but also oleophobic. In this study, for the first time we propose that air bubbles on the surface of hydrophobic carbonaceous adsorbents play an important role in the adsorption of PFOS. The level of adsorption of PFOS on carbon nanotubes (CNTs), graphite (GI), graphene (GE), and powdered activated carbon (PAC) decreases after vacuum degassing. Vacuum degassing time and pressure significantly affect the removal of PFOS by these adsorbents. After vacuum degassing at 0.01 atm for 36 h, the extent of removal of PFOS by the pristine CNTs and GI decreases 79% and 74%, respectively, indicating the main contribution of air bubbles to PFOS adsorption. When the degassed solution is recontacted with air during the adsorption process, the removal of PFOS recovers to the value obtained without vacuum degassing, further verifying the key role of air bubbles in PFOS adsorption. By theoretical calculation, the distribution of PFOS in air bubbles on the adsorbent surfaces is discussed, and a new schematic sorption model of PFOS on carbonaceous adsorbents in the presence of air bubbles is proposed. The accumulation of PFOS at the interface of air bubbles on the adsorbents is primarily responsible for its adsorption, providing a new mechanistic insight into the transport, fate, and removal of PFOS.

  2. Anterior Chamber Air Bubble to Achieve Graft Attachment After DMEK: Is Bigger Always Better?

    PubMed

    Ćirković, Aleksandar; Beck, Christina; Weller, Julia M; Kruse, Friedrich E; Tourtas, Theofilos

    2016-04-01

    To analyze the influence of the size of the air bubble subsequent to Descemet membrane endothelial keratoplasty (DMEK) surgery on the rate of graft detachment and need for rebubbling, the incidence of pupillary block, and the observed endothelial cell loss. This is a single-center, retrospective, consecutive case series of 74 cases undergoing DMEK and fulfilling the inclusion criteria concerning the size of the air bubble at the end of surgery. Based on the medical records, patients were divided into 2 groups (n = 37, respectively). The first group had an air bubble with a volume of approximately 50% and the second group of approximately 80% of the anterior chamber (AC) volume, respectively. Patients who did not comply with instructions to remain in the supine position until complete resorption of AC air or cases in which difficulties in graft preparation (eg, radial breaks) occurred were excluded from data analysis. The central corneal thickness and endothelial cell density were measured 6 months after surgery. Ten of 37 patients (27.0%) in the 50% air bubble group and 3 of 37 patients (8.1%) in the 80% air bubble group needed 1 rebubbling procedure (P = 0.032). There was no difference between the groups after 6 months regarding endothelial cell density and central corneal thickness. No pupillary block was observed. Larger air bubbles of 80% anterior chamber volume decrease the risk of graft detachment after DMEK with no detrimental effect on the outcome and risk for pupillary block.

  3. Bubbling behavior of a fluidized bed of fine particles caused by vibration-induced air inflow

    PubMed Central

    Matsusaka, Shuji; Kobayakawa, Murino; Mizutani, Megumi; Imran, Mohd; Yasuda, Masatoshi

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate that a vibration-induced air inflow can cause vigorous bubbling in a bed of fine particles and report the mechanism by which this phenomenon occurs. When convective flow occurs in a powder bed as a result of vibrations, the upper powder layer with a high void ratio moves downward and is compressed. This process forces the air in the powder layer out, which leads to the formation of bubbles that rise and eventually burst at the top surface of the powder bed. A negative pressure is created below the rising bubbles. A narrow opening at the bottom allows the outside air to flow into the powder bed, which produces a vigorously bubbling fluidized bed that does not require the use of an external air supply system. PMID:23378921

  4. Bubbling behavior of a fluidized bed of fine particles caused by vibration-induced air inflow.

    PubMed

    Matsusaka, Shuji; Kobayakawa, Murino; Mizutani, Megumi; Imran, Mohd; Yasuda, Masatoshi

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate that a vibration-induced air inflow can cause vigorous bubbling in a bed of fine particles and report the mechanism by which this phenomenon occurs. When convective flow occurs in a powder bed as a result of vibrations, the upper powder layer with a high void ratio moves downward and is compressed. This process forces the air in the powder layer out, which leads to the formation of bubbles that rise and eventually burst at the top surface of the powder bed. A negative pressure is created below the rising bubbles. A narrow opening at the bottom allows the outside air to flow into the powder bed, which produces a vigorously bubbling fluidized bed that does not require the use of an external air supply system.

  5. Air bubble location inside the uterus after transfer: is the embryo really there?

    PubMed

    Soares, Sérgio Reis; Godinho, Catarina; Nunes, Sofia; Pellicer, António

    2008-08-01

    To demonstrate that the location of the air bubble after embryo transfer (ET) does not necessarily indicate the final embryo location. Case report. Private clinic. A couple with primary infertility for whom a diagnosis of bicornuate uterus with a very open angle between horns was confirmed. Laparoscopy and hysteroscopy were performed before an IVF cycle in which a single embryo was replaced. Air bubble image immediately after ET and gestational sac location 3 weeks later. Immediately after a single ET, the air bubble was seen in the left uterine horn. Three weeks later, a gestational sac was seen in the right uterine horn. The location of the air bubble immediately after ET does not necessarily indicate the final embryo location.

  6. Gas and liquid measurements in air-water bubbly flows

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, X.; Doup, B.; Sun, X.

    2012-07-01

    Local measurements of gas- and liquid-phase flow parameters are conducted in an air-water two-phase flow loop. The test section is a vertical pipe with an inner diameter of 50 mm and a height of 3.2 m. The measurements are performed at z/D = 10. The gas-phase measurements are performed using a four-sensor conductivity probe. The data taken from this probe are processed using a signal processing program to yield radial profiles of the void fraction, bubble velocity, and interfacial area concentration. The velocity measurements of the liquid-phase are performed using a state-of-the-art Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) system. The raw PIV images are acquired using fluorescent particles and an optical filtration device. Image processing is used to remove noise in the raw PIV images. The statistical cross correlation is introduced to determine the axial velocity field and turbulence intensity of the liquid-phase. Measurements are currently being performed at z/D = 32 to provide a more complete data set. These data can be used for computational fluid dynamic model development and validation. (authors)

  7. "Bubble-in-the-Roll" Technique Using the Endoject DMEK Injector: Influence of the Air Bubble on Endothelial Cell Loss.

    PubMed

    Akbaba, Yasemin; Weller, Julia M; Rössler, Kathrin; Armitage, W John; Schlötzer-Schrehardt, Ursula; Kruse, Friedrich E; Tourtas, Theofilos

    2017-09-08

    To evaluate the impact of the air bubble on endothelial cell loss using the "bubble-in-the-roll" technique during Descemet membrane endothelial keratoplasty (DMEK). Twenty DMEK grafts not suitable for transplantation were manually prepared from organ-cultured corneoscleral discs and injected into culture media using the Endoject DMEK injector (Medicel AG, Wolfhalden, Switzerland). Based on the injection method, the grafts were divided into 2 groups: In group A (n = 10), a small air bubble was placed inside the graft roll while it was in the injector. In group B (n = 10), the grafts were injected without an air bubble inside the graft roll. Main outcome measures included endothelial cell density (ECD) after graft stripping and graft injection. There were no statistically significant differences between groups A and B in donor age, storage duration, and donor ECD. ECD decreased from 1929 ± 145 cells/mm to 1796 ± 303 cells/mm after graft stripping in group A and from 1801 ± 226 cells/mm to 1709 ± 290 cells/mm in group B. ECD after graft injection further decreased to 1683 ± 291 cells/mm in group A and to 1651 ± 292 cells/mm in group B. Endothelial cell loss after graft stripping and graft injection was not statistically significant between groups A and B (P = 0.29 and P = 1, respectively). The bubble-in-the-roll technique for injection and unfolding of the graft is a safe method for graft delivery into the anterior chamber guaranteeing orientation of the graft without harming the endothelium.

  8. Effect of surfactants on bubble collisions with an air-water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shiyan; Guo, Tianqi; Dabiri, Sadegh; Vlachos, Pavlos P.; Ardekani, Arezoo M.

    2016-11-01

    Collisions of bubbles on an air-water interface are frequently observed in natural environments and industrial applications. We study the coefficient of restitution of a bubble colliding on an air-water interface in the presence of surfactants through a combination of experimental and numerical approaches. In a high concentration surfactant solution, bubbles experience perfectly inelastic collisions, and bubbles are arrested by the interface after the collision. As the surfactant concentration decreases, collisions are altered to partially inelastic, and eventually, elastic collisions occur in the pure water. In a high concentration surfactant solution, the reduced bouncing is attributed to the Marangoni stress. We identify the Langmuir number, the ratio between absorption and desorption rates, as the fundamental parameter to quantify the Marangoni effect on collision processes in surfactant solutions. The effect of Marangoni stress on the bubble's coefficient of restitution is non-monotonic, where the coefficient of restitution first decreases with Langmuir number, and then increases.

  9. Bubble technique for Descemet membrane endothelial keratoplasty tissue preparation in an eye bank: air or liquid?

    PubMed

    Ruzza, Alessandro; Parekh, Mohit; Salvalaio, Gianni; Ferrari, Stefano; Camposampiero, Davide; Amoureux, Marie-Claude; Busin, Massimo; Ponzin, Diego

    2015-03-01

    To compare the big-bubble method using air and liquid as medium of separation for Descemet membrane endothelial keratoplasty (DMEK) lenticule preparation in an eye bank. Donor corneas (n=20) were immersed in liquid [tissue culture medium (TCM)]. Air and liquid was injected using a 25-gauge needle in the posterior stroma or as near to the stroma-Descemet membrane (DM) phase as possible to create a complete bubble of larger diameter. The endothelial cell density and mortality were checked pre- and postbubble after deflating the tissue. Four pairs of tissues were used to analyse the intracellular tight junctions and three pairs for histological examination and DNA integrity studies, respectively. The yield obtained using air was 80%, whereas that with liquid was 100%. Single injection was required in six cases; twice in two cases; three and four times in one case each with air bubble, whereas seven cases required single injection; twice in two cases; and thrice in just one case with liquid bubble. The average diameter of the final lenticule was 9.12 (±1.71) mm for air bubble and 9.78 (±1.75) mm for liquid bubble with p=0.4362 (no statistical significance). Endothelial cell mortality postbubble preparation was 8.9 (±12.38)% for air and 6.25 (±9.57)% for liquid (p=0.6268). DM and endothelium could be separated exclusively using air or liquid bubble. However, liquid bubble seems to have certain advantages over air such as the generation of yield, larger diameter and higher maintenance of endothelial cell density and integrity. © 2014 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. A study on air bubble wetting: Role of surface wettability, surface tension, and ionic surfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Jijo Easo; Chidangil, Santhosh; George, Sajan D.

    2017-07-01

    Fabrication of hydrophobic/hydrophilic surfaces by biomimicking nature has attracted significant attention recently due to their potential usage in technologies, ranging from self-cleaning to DNA condensation. Despite the potential applications, compared to surfaces of tailored wettability, less attention has been paid towards development and understanding of air bubble adhesion and its dynamics on surfaces with varying wettability. In this manuscript, following the commonly used approach of oxygen plasma treatment, polydimethylsiloxane surfaces with tunable wettability are prepared. The role of plasma treatment conditions on the surface hydrophilicity and the consequent effect on adhesion dynamics of an underwater air bubble is explored for the first time. The ATR-FTIR spectroscopic analysis reveals that the change in hydrophilicity arises from the chemical modification of the surface, manifested as Si-OH vibrations in the spectra. The thickness of the formed thin liquid film at the surface responsible for the experimentally observed air bubble repellency is estimated from the augmented Young-Laplace equation. The concentration dependent studies using cationic as well as anionic surfactant elucidate that the reduced surface tension of the aqueous solution results in a stable thicker film and causes non-adherence of air bubble to the aerophilic surface. Furthermore, the study carried out to understand the combined effect of plasma treatment and surfactants reveals that even below critical micelle concentration, a negatively charged surface results in air bubble repellency for the anionic surfactant, whereas only enhanced air bubble contact angle is observed for the cationic surfactant.

  11. Disproportionation of clustered protein-stabilized bubbles at planar air-water interfaces.

    PubMed

    Ettelaie, Rammile; Dickinson, Eric; Du, Zhiping; Murray, Brent S

    2003-07-01

    The rate of shrinkage of air bubbles, of initial radius from 50 to 200 microm, injected beneath a planar air-water interface has been measured. Bubbles were stabilized in solutions of 0.05 wt% gelatin or pure beta-lactoglobulin. It has been observed that small size differences between two closely spaced or touching bubbles result in markedly divergent rates of shrinkage for the two. By studying a number of different initial bubble configurations, it is demonstrated that the overall change in bubble size distribution is strongly dependent on local, interbubble gas diffusion. In this respect, the strong tendency for the gelatin-stabilized bubbles to aggregate and shrink, while remaining in contact, produced patterns of disproportionation significantly different from those observed with beta-lactoglobulin. In beta-lactoglobulin solutions, it was usually found that bubbles initially in contact shrank away from each other with time, becoming increasingly isolated as a result. A theoretical approach that can exactly incorporate the perturbation of local diffusion fluxes due to the proximity of two bubbles is presented. This enables one to map a "stability diagram" that delineates regions where the larger bubble of a pair will either shrink or grow, according to the relative size of the bubbles and their separation. Theoretical calculations show that it is possible for a bubble to exhibit more complex shrinkage behavior than is predicted by a mean field approach or the Lifshitz, Slyozov, and Wagner (LSW) theory of Ostwald ripening for dilute systems. The inclusion of dilatational elasticity in the theoretical model introduces additional complications, which are also briefly discussed.

  12. Impact of bubble size in a rat model of cerebral air microembolization.

    PubMed

    Juenemann, Martin; Yeniguen, Mesut; Schleicher, Nadine; Blumenstein, Johannes; Nedelmann, Max; Tschernatsch, Marlene; Bachmann, Georg; Kaps, Manfred; Urbanek, Petr; Schoenburg, Markus; Gerriets, Tibo

    2013-10-18

    Cerebral air microembolization (CAM) is a frequent side effect of diagnostic or therapeutic interventions. Besides reduction of the amount of bubbles, filter systems in the clinical setting may also lead to a dispersion of large gas bubbles and therefore to an increase of the gas-liquid-endothelium interface. We evaluated the production and application of different strictly defined bubble diameters in a rat model of CAM and assessed functional outcome and infarct volumes in relation to the bubble diameter. Gas emboli of defined number and diameter were injected into the carotid artery of rats. Group I (n = 7) received 1800 air bubbles with a diameter of 45 μm, group II (n = 7) 40 bubbles of 160 μm, controls (n = 6) saline without gas bubbles; group I and II yielded the same total injection volume of air with 86 nl. Functional outcome was assessed at baseline, after 4 h and 24 h following cerebral MR imaging and infarct size calculation. Computer-aided evaluation of bubble diameters showed high constancy (group I: 45.83 μm ± 2.79; group II: 159 μm ± 1.26). Animals in group I and II suffered cerebral ischemia and clinical deterioration without significant difference. Infarct sizes did not differ significantly between the two groups (p = 0.931 u-test). We present further development of a new method, which allows reliable and controlled CAM with different bubble diameters, producing neurological deficits due to unilateral cerebral damage. Our findings could not display a strong dependency of stroke frequency and severity on bubble diameter.

  13. Impact of bubble size in a rat model of cerebral air microembolization

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cerebral air microembolization (CAM) is a frequent side effect of diagnostic or therapeutic interventions. Besides reduction of the amount of bubbles, filter systems in the clinical setting may also lead to a dispersion of large gas bubbles and therefore to an increase of the gas–liquid-endothelium interface. We evaluated the production and application of different strictly defined bubble diameters in a rat model of CAM and assessed functional outcome and infarct volumes in relation to the bubble diameter. Methods Gas emboli of defined number and diameter were injected into the carotid artery of rats. Group I (n = 7) received 1800 air bubbles with a diameter of 45 μm, group II (n = 7) 40 bubbles of 160 μm, controls (n = 6) saline without gas bubbles; group I and II yielded the same total injection volume of air with 86 nl. Functional outcome was assessed at baseline, after 4 h and 24 h following cerebral MR imaging and infarct size calculation. Results Computer-aided evaluation of bubble diameters showed high constancy (group I: 45.83 μm ± 2.79; group II: 159 μm ± 1.26). Animals in group I and II suffered cerebral ischemia and clinical deterioration without significant difference. Infarct sizes did not differ significantly between the two groups (p = 0.931 u-test). Conclusions We present further development of a new method, which allows reliable and controlled CAM with different bubble diameters, producing neurological deficits due to unilateral cerebral damage. Our findings could not display a strong dependency of stroke frequency and severity on bubble diameter. PMID:24139539

  14. Entrainment Heat Flux Computed with Lidar and Wavelet Technique in Buenos Aires During Last Chaitén Volcano Eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawelko, Ezequiel Eduardo; Salvador, Jacobo Omar; Ristori, Pablo Roberto; Pallotta, Juan Vicente; Otero, Lidia Ana; Quel, Eduardo Jaime

    2016-06-01

    At Lidar Division of CEILAP (CITEDEF-CONICET) a multiwavelength Raman-Rayleigh lidar optimized to measure the atmospheric boundary layer is being operated. This instrument is used for monitoring important aerosol intrusion events in Buenos Aires, such as the arrival of volcanic ashes from the Chaitén volcano eruption on May 2008. That was the first monitoring of volcanic ash with lidar in Argentina. In this event several volcanic ash plumes with high aerosol optical thickness were detected in the free atmosphere, affecting the visibility, surface radiation and therefore, the ABL evolution. In this work, the impact of ashes in entrainment flux ratio is studied. This parameter is obtained from the atmospheric boundary layer height and entrainment zone thickness using algorithms based on covariance wavelet transform.

  15. Two-phase numerical study of the flow field formed in water pump sump: influence of air entrainment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayeul-Lainé, A. C.; Simonet, S.; Bois, G.; Issa, A.

    2012-11-01

    In a pump sump it is imperative that the amount of non-homogenous flow and entrained air be kept to a minimum. Free air-core vortex occurring at a water-intake pipe is an important problem encountered in hydraulic engineering. These vortices reduce pump performances, may have large effects on the operating conditions and lead to increase plant operating costs.This work is an extended study starting from 2006 in LML and published by ISSA and al. in 2008, 2009 and 2010. Several cases of sump configuration have been numerically investigated using two specific commercial codes and based on the initial geometry proposed by Constantinescu and Patel. Fluent and Star CCM+ codes are used in the previous studies. The results, obtained with a structured mesh, were strongly dependant on main geometrical sump configuration such as the suction pipe position, the submergence of the suction pipe on one hand and the turbulence model on the other hand. Part of the results showed a good agreement with experimental investigations already published. Experiments, conducted in order to select best positions of the suction pipe of a water-intake sump, gave qualitative results concerning flow disturbances in the pump-intake related to sump geometries and position of the pump intake. The purpose of this paper is to reproduce the flow pattern of experiments and to confirm the geometrical parameter that influences the flow structure in such a pump. The numerical model solves the Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations and VOF multiphase model. STAR CCM+ with an adapted mesh configuration using hexahedral mesh with prism layer near walls was used. Attempts have been made to calculate two phase unsteady flow for stronger mass flow rates and stronger submergence with low water level in order to be able to capture air entrainment. The results allow the knowledge of some limits of numerical models, of mass flow rates and of submergences for air entrainment. In the validation of this

  16. Damping of secondary bubble oscillations for towed air guns with a screen

    SciTech Connect

    Landroe, M.; Langhammer, J.; Martin, J.

    1997-03-01

    A method for damping unwanted bubble oscillations from a horizontally towed seismic air gun is presented. The air bubble is destroyed by a perforated screen mounted at an optimal radius about the gun. Once the primary pressure peak has been generated by the emerging bubble, the bubble continues to expand and is destroyed by the screen, leading to a corresponding decrease in the measured pressure amplitude of the secondary bubble oscillations. For a stationary gun fired first without, and then with, the screen fitted, the primary-to-bubble ratio improves in the near field from 1.7 to 5.2, respectively, at a firing depth of 3 m and from 1.5 to 5.5, respectively, at 5 m depth. The primary-to-bubble ratio for a towed air gun in the quasi-far-field improves from 2.0 to 11.0 at 4 m depth and from 1.5 to 8.7 at 7 m depth when the screen is fitted. The boat speed was 1.6 knots and the signatures were filtered with an out-128 Hz (72 dB/Oct) DFS V filter.

  17. Water-to-Air Transfer and Enrichment of Bacteria in Drops from Bursting Bubbles

    PubMed Central

    Blanchard, Duncan C.; Syzdek, Lawrence D.

    1982-01-01

    An electrostatic induction technique was used to determine both drop size distribution and concentration of bacteria in the film drops produced by bubbles bursting at the surface of a suspension of Serratia marcescens. Film drops are produced from the collapse of the thin film of water that just before bursting separates the air in the bubble from the atmosphere. Bubbles of 1.7-mm diameter produced from 10 to 20 film drops which ranged from <2 μm to over 30 μm in diameter. Half the drops were <10 μm. For bubbles rising a distance of less than 2 cm through the bacterial suspension, bacterial enrichment factors in the drops were between 10 and 20. Electrostatic methods can be used to determine the enrichment of bacteria in film drops as a function of bubble size and distance of rise through the bacterial suspension. PMID:16346001

  18. Electric Field Effects on an Injected Air Bubble at Detachment in a Low Gravity Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iacona, Estelle; Herman, Cila; Chang, Shinan

    2002-01-01

    The objective of the study is to investigate the behavior of individual air bubbles injected through an orifice into an electrically insulating liquid under the influence of a static and uniform electric field. Bubble formation and detachment were visualized and recorded in microgravity using a high-speed video camera. Bubble volume, dimensions and contact angle at detachment were measured. In addition to the experimental studies, a simple model, predicting bubble characteristics at detachment was developed. The model, based on thermodynamic considerations, accounts for the level of gravity as well as the magnitude of the uniform electric field. Measured data and model predictions show good agreement, and indicate that the level of gravity and the electric field magnitude significantly affect bubble shape, volume and dimensions.

  19. Noise reduction by the application of an air-bubble curtain in offshore pile driving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsouvalas, A.; Metrikine, A. V.

    2016-06-01

    Underwater noise pollution is a by-product of marine industrial operations. In particular, the noise generated when a foundation pile is driven into the soil with an impact hammer is considered to be harmful for the aquatic species. In an attempt to reduce the ecological footprint, several noise mitigation techniques have been investigated. Among the various solutions proposed, the air-bubble curtain is often applied due to its efficacy in noise reduction. In this paper, a model is proposed for the investigation of the sound reduction during marine piling when an air-bubble curtain is placed around the pile. The model consists of the pile, the surrounding water and soil media, and the air-bubble curtain which is positioned at a certain distance from the pile surface. The solution approach is semi-analytical and is based on the dynamic sub-structuring technique and the modal decomposition method. Two main results of the paper can be distinguished. First, a new model is proposed that can be used for predictions of the noise levels in a computationally efficient manner. Second, an analysis is presented of the principal mechanisms that are responsible for the noise reduction due to the application of the air-bubble curtain in marine piling. The understanding of these mechanisms turns to be crucial for the exploitation of the maximum efficiency of the system. It is shown that the principal mechanism of noise reduction depends strongly on the frequency content of the radiated sound and the characteristics of the bubbly medium. For piles of large diameter which radiate most of the acoustic energy at relatively low frequencies, the noise reduction is mainly attributed to the mismatch of the acoustic impedances between the seawater and the bubbly layer. On the contrary, for smaller piles and when the radiated acoustic energy is concentrated at frequencies close to, or higher than, the resonance frequency of the air bubbles, the sound absorption within the bubbly layer

  20. Growth of oxygen bubbles during recharge process in zinc-air battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Keliang; Pei, Pucheng; Ma, Ze; Chen, Huicui; Xu, Huachi; Chen, Dongfang; Xing, Haoqiang

    2015-11-01

    Rechargeable zinc-air battery used for energy storage has a serious problem of charging capacity limited by oxygen bubble coalescence. Fast removal of oxygen bubbles adhered to the charging electrode surface is of great importance for improving the charging performance of the battery. Here we show that the law of oxygen bubble growth can be achieved by means of phase-field simulation, revealing two phenomena of bubble detachment and bubble coalescence located in the charging electrode on both sides. Hydrodynamic electrolyte and partial insulation structure of the charging electrode are investigated to solve the problem of oxygen bubble coalescence during charging. Two types of rechargeable zinc-air battery are developed on the basis of different tri-electrode configurations, demonstrating that the charging performance of the battery with electrolyte flow (Ⅰ) is better than that of the battery with the partially insulated electrode (Ⅱ), while the battery Ⅱ is superior to the battery Ⅰ in the discharging performance, cost and portability. The proposed solutions and results would be available for promoting commercial application of rechargeable zinc-air batteries or other metal-air batteries.

  1. Occurrence of intraocular air bubbles during intravitreal injections for retinopathy of prematurity.

    PubMed

    Sukgen, Emine Alyamac; Gunay, Murat; Kocluk, Yusuf

    2017-02-01

    This study aims to present five cases with retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) who were found to have intraocular air bubbles after intravitreal injection (IVI) treatment. The medical records of 148 infants who underwent IVI for ROP were retrospectively reviewed and the ones who demonstrated post-injection intraocular air bubble formation were recruited. Of the 148 patients (31 babies received ranibizumab, 20 babies received aflibercept, 97 babies received bevacizumab), five were found to have intraocular air bubbles right after the IVI. Two infants received intravitreal ranibizumab and three received intravitreal bevacizumab injections. Although intraocular pressure increased temporarily, no intraocular sterile or infective reactions were observed in the postoperative period. The air bubble was found to resorb spontaneously within 72 h. The occurrence rate of the intravitreal air bubbles in our series was 3.37 % despite previously not been reported in the literature. Due to the intravitreal air injection risk, it is important to be more careful while preparing the intravitreal medication before treatment in premature babies.

  2. Movement of fine particles on an air bubble surface studied using high-speed video microscopy.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Anh V; Evans, Geoffrey M

    2004-05-01

    A CCD high-speed video microscopy system operating at 1000 frames per second was used to obtain direct quantitative measurements of the trajectories of fine glass spheres on the surface of air bubbles. The glass spheres were rendered hydrophobic by a methylation process. Rupture of the intervening water film between a hydrophobic particle and an air bubble with the consequent formation of a three-phase contact was observed. The bubble-particle sliding attachment interaction is not satisfactorily described by the available theories. Surface forces had little effect on the particle sliding with a water film, which ruptured probably due to the submicrometer-sized gas bubbles existing at the hydrophobic particle-water interface.

  3. Interaction between bubble and air-backed plate with circular hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y. L.; Wang, S. P.; Zhang, A. M.

    2016-06-01

    This paper investigates the nonlinear interaction between a violent bubble and an air-backed plate with a circular hole. A numerical model is established using the incompressible potential theory coupled with the boundary integral method. A double-node technique is used to solve the overdetermined problem caused by the intersection between the solid wall and the free surface. A spark-generated bubble near the air-backed plate with a circular hole is observed experimentally using a high-speed camera. Our numerical results agree well with the experimental results. Both experimental and numerical results show that a multilevel spike emerges during the bubble's expansion and contraction. Careful numerical simulation reveals that this special type of spike is caused by the discontinuity in the boundary condition. The influences of the hole size and depth on the bubble and spike dynamics are also analyzed.

  4. Hydrophilic strips for preventing air bubble formation in a microfluidic chamber.

    PubMed

    Choi, Munseok; Na, Yang; Kim, Sung-Jin

    2015-12-01

    In a microfluidic chamber, unwanted formation of air bubbles is a critical problem. Here, we present a hydrophilic strip array that prevents air bubble formation in a microfluidic chamber. The array is located on the top surface of the chamber, which has a large variation in width, and consists of a repeated arrangement of super- and moderately hydrophilic strips. This repeated arrangement allows a flat meniscus (i.e. liquid front) to form when various solutions consisting of a single stream or two parallel streams with different hydrophilicities move through the chamber. The flat meniscus produced by the array completely prevents the formation of bubbles. Without the array in the chamber, the meniscus shape is highly convex, and bubbles frequently form in the chamber. This hydrophilic strip array will facilitate the use of a microfluidic chamber with a large variation in width for various microfluidic applications. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Free-Lagrange simulations of the expansion and jetting collapse of air bubbles in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turangan, C. K.; Jamaluddin, A. R.; Ball, G. J.; Leighton, T. G.

    A free-Lagrange numerical method is implemented to simulate the axisymmetric jetting collapse of air bubbles in water. This is performed for both lithotripter shock-induced collapses of initially stable bubbles, and for free-running cases where the bubble initially contains an overpressure. The code is validated using two test problems (shock-induced bubble collapse using a step shock, and shock10 MPa tensile waves, interacts with a bubble of initial radius 0.04 mm located in a free field (case 1) and near a rigid boundary (case 2). The interaction of the shock with the bubble causes it to involute and a liquid jet is formed that achieves a velocity exceeding 1.2 km s1 for case 2. The impact of the jet on the downstream wall of the bubble generates a blast wave with peak overpressure exceeding 1 GPa and 1.75 GPa for cases 1 and 2, respectively. The results show that the simulation technique retains sharply resolved gas/liquid interfaces regardless of the degree of geometric deformation, and reveal details of the dynamics of bubble collapse. The effects of compressibility are included for both liquid and gas phases, whereas stress distributions can be predicted within elastic-plastic solid surfaces (both planar and notched) in proximity to cavitation events. There is a movie with the online version of the paper.

  6. Form of gastric air bubble is associated with gastroesophageal reflux symptoms.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Toshiyasu; Urita, Yoshihisa; Maeda, Tadashi; Sasaki, Yosuke; Hike, Kazuo; Sanaka, Masaki; Nakajima, Hitoshi; Sugimoto, Motonobu

    2009-01-01

    Gastric bubble is present in approximately 70% of normal chest and abdominal radiograph. Most swallowed air is regurgitated and belching is a physiological phenomenon to expel ingested gas from the stomach and is a common symptom in normal adults. In the present study it was investigated whether gastric bubble detected on abdominal radiograph is associated with GERD symptoms. All of the patients who first attend our hospital were asked to respond the F-scale questionnaire regardless of their chief complaints to diagnose GERD. Plain abdominal films in the erect position were used to measure the size of gastric bubble and to classify the form of gastric bubble into four groups: dome-type; irregular-type; stomach-type; and undetected-type. The quantity of gastric bubble (gastric bubble score) was determined as the pixel value on image collected from hospital's digital database. The gastric bubble score of irregular-type was significant lower than that of dome-type and stomach-type. GERD was most frequently detected in stomach-type group, followed by undetected-type, irregular-type, and dome-type. The mean score of F-scale was significantly higher in stomach-type than in dome-type. It is concluded that gastric bubble detected on plain abdominal films is an informative marker for evaluating the functional disorder of upper digestive tracts. Physicians have to recognize the importance of plain films of the abdomen in the diagnostic process of GERD.

  7. Bubble absorption by an air-filled helically-supported capillary channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beheshtipour, Negar; Thiessen, David

    2016-11-01

    Gas-liquid phase separation under microgravity conditions where buoyancy is not active represents a challenge for two-phase liquid-continuous space systems. Similar challenges are present in micro-scale electrochemical systems on Earth that generate gas bubbles in geometries where surface tension prevails over gravity. A possible ground-based application would be the removal of carbon dioxide bubbles from large aspect ratio channels in a direct-methanol fuel cell that could otherwise occlude the channel. In this study we use a 3-mm diameter stretched stainless-steel spring coated with a superhydrophobic layer to create a helically-supported capillary channel. Such a channel that is submerged in water and filled with air while vented to the atmosphere was found to absorb a stream of 2.5-mm diameter air bubbles at a rate of at least 36 bubbles/s. An optical detector and high-speed imaging system have been used to study bubble absorption dynamics. A significant finding is that the initial attachment of the bubble to the channel that involves the rupture of a thin film of water happens in less than 1 ms. The rapid rupture of the water film separating the bubble from the channel might be attributed to the roughness of the hydrophobic coating.

  8. Turbulent flow field and air entrainment in laboratory plunging breaking waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Na, Byoungjoon; Chang, Kuang-An; Huang, Zhi-Cheng; Lim, Ho-Joon

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents laboratory measurements of turbulent flow fields and void fraction in deep-water plunging breaking waves using imaging and optical fiber techniques. Bubble-size distributions are also determined based on combined measurements of velocity and bubble residence time. The most excited mode of the local intermittency measure of the turbulent flow and its corresponding length scale are obtained using a wavelet-based method and found to correlate with the swirling strength and vorticity. Concentrated vortical structures with high intermittency are observed near the lower boundaries of the aerated rollers where the velocity shear is high; the length scale of the deduced eddies ranges from 0.05 to 0.15 times the wave height. The number of bubbles with a chord length less than 2 mm demonstrates good correlation with the swirling strength. The power-law scaling and the Hinze scale of the bubbles determined from the bubble chord length distribution compare favorably with existing measurements. The turbulent dissipation rate, accounting for void fraction, is estimated using mixture theory. When void fraction is not considered, the turbulent dissipation rate is underestimated by more than 70% in the initial impinging and the first splash-up roller. A significant discrepancy of approximately 67% between the total energy dissipation rate and the turbulence dissipation rate is found. Of this uncounted dissipation, 23% is caused by bubble-induced dissipation.

  9. The production of drops by the bursting of a bubble at an air liquid interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darrozes, J. S.; Ligneul, P.

    1982-01-01

    The fundamental mechanism arising during the bursting of a bubble at an air-liquid interface is described. A single bubble was followed from an arbitrary depth in the liquid, up to the creation and motion of the film and jet drops. Several phenomena were involved and their relative order of magnitude was compared in order to point out the dimensionless parameters which govern each step of the motion. High-speed cinematography is employed. The characteristic bubble radius which separates the creation of jet drops from cap bursting without jet drops is expressed mathematically. The corresponding numerical value for water is 3 mm and agrees with experimental observations.

  10. [Air Bubble in the Left Ventricle due to Computed Tomography Guided Lung Needle Biopsy].

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Eisuke; Yoshida, Kumiko; Yoshiyama, Koichi; Hayashi, Tatsuro; Tanaka, Toshiki; Tao, Hiroyuki; Okabe, Kazunori

    2015-11-01

    Computed tomography (CT) guided lung biopsy is a useful examination in diagnosing pulmonary diseases, but the complications such as pneumothorax or pulmonary hemorrhage can not be ignored. Among them, air embolization is a severe complication, although it is infrequently encountered. Forty two-year-old man admitted to our department for the examination of left lung tumor. CT guided lung biopsy was performed. After examination, the patient showed disturbance in cardiac function, which recovered in several minutes. Chest CT revealed air bubble in the left ventricle. After 2-hours head down position followed by bed rest, air bubble is confirmed to be dissappeared by CT.

  11. Effect of air bubble on inflammation after cataract surgery in rabbit eyes

    PubMed Central

    Demirci, Goktug; Karabaş, Levent; Maral, Hale; Ozdek, Şengül; Gülkılık, Gökhan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Intense inflammation after cataract surgery can cause cystoid macular edema, posterior synechia and posterior capsule opacification. This experimental study was performed to investigate the effect of air bubble on inflammation when given to anterior chamber of rabbit eyes after cataract surgery. Materials and Methods: 30 eyes of 15 rabbits were enrolled in the study. One of the two eyes was in the study group and the other eye was in the control group. After surgery air bubble was given to the anterior chamber of the study group eye and balanced salt solution (BSS; Alcon) was left in the anterior chamber of control eye. Results: On the first, second, fourth and fifth days, anterior chamber inflammations of the eyes were examined by biomicroscopy. On the sixth day anterior chamber fluid samples were taken for evaluation of nitric oxide levels as an inflammation marker. When the two groups were compared, in the air bubble group there was statistically less inflammation was seen. (1, 2, 4. days P = 0,001, and 5. day P = 0,009). Conclusions: These results have shown that when air bubble is left in anterior chamber of rabbits’ eyes after cataract surgery, it reduced inflammation. We believe that, air bubble in the anterior chamber may be more beneficial in the cataract surgery of especially pediatric age group, uveitis patients and diabetics where we see higher inflammation. However, greater and long termed experimental and clinical studies are necessary for more accurate findings. PMID:23571264

  12. Effect of air bubble on inflammation after cataract surgery in rabbit eyes.

    PubMed

    Demirci, Goktug; Karabas, Levent; Maral, Hale; Ozdek, Sengul; Gülkilik, Gokhan

    2013-07-01

    Intense inflammation after cataract surgery can cause cystoid macular edema, posterior synechia and posterior capsule opacification. This experimental study was performed to investigate the effect of air bubble on inflammation when given to anterior chamber of rabbit eyes after cataract surgery. 30 eyes of 15 rabbits were enrolled in the study. One of the two eyes was in the study group and the other eye was in the control group. After surgery air bubble was given to the anterior chamber of the study group eye and balanced salt solution (BSS; Alcon) was left in the anterior chamber of control eye. On the first, second, fourth and fifth days, anterior chamber inflammations of the eyes were examined by biomicroscopy. On the sixth day anterior chamber fluid samples were taken for evaluation of nitric oxide levels as an inflammation marker. When the two groups were compared, in the air bubble group there was statistically less inflammation was seen. (1, 2, 4. days P = 0,001, and 5. day P = 0,009). These results have shown that when air bubble is left in anterior chamber of rabbits' eyes after cataract surgery, it reduced inflammation. We believe that, air bubble in the anterior chamber may be more beneficial in the cataract surgery of especially pediatric age group, uveitis patients and diabetics where we see higher inflammation. However, greater and long termed experimental and clinical studies are necessary for more accurate findings.

  13. An experimental study on the effect of air bubble injection on the flow induced rotational hub

    SciTech Connect

    Nouri, N.M.; Sarreshtehdari, A.

    2009-01-15

    Modification of shear stress due to air bubbles injection in a rotary device was investigated experimentally. Air bubbles inject to the water flow crosses the neighbor of the hub which can rotate just by water flow shear stresses, in this device. Increasing air void fraction leads to decrease of shear stresses exerted on the hub surface until in high void fractions, the hub motion stopped as observed. Amount of skin friction decrease has been estimated by counting central hub rotations. Wall shear stress was decreased by bubble injection in all range of tested Reynolds number, changing from 50,378 to 71,238, and also by increasing air void fraction from zero to 3.06%. Skin friction reduction more than 85% was achieved in this study as maximum measured volume of air fraction injected to fluid flow while bubbles are distinct and they do not make a gas layer. Significant skin friction reduction obtained in this special case indicate that using small amount of bubble injection causes large amount of skin friction reduction in some rotary parts in the liquid phases like as water. (author)

  14. Mesler entrainment in alcohols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saylor, J. R.; Sundberg, R. K.

    2012-11-01

    When a drop impacts a flat surface of the same liquid at an intermediate velocity, the impact can result in the formation of a very large number of very small bubbles. At lower velocities, drops bounce or float, and at larger velocities a single bubble forms, or there is a splash. The formation of large numbers of small bubbles during intermediate velocity impacts is termed Mesler entrainment and its controlling mechanism is poorly understood. Existing research has shown that Mesler entrainment is highly irreproducible when water is the working fluid, and very reproducible when silicone oil is the working fluid. Whether this is because water is problematic, or silicone oil is uniquely well-suited, is unclear. To answer this question, experiments were conducted using three different alcohols. The results of these experiments were very reproducible for all alcohols tested, suggesting that there is something unique about water which accounts for its lack of reproducibility. The data from these experiments were also used to develop a dimensionless group that quantifies the conditions under which Mesler entrainment occurs. This dimensionless group is used to provide insight into the mechanism of this unique method of bubble formation.

  15. Effects of floc and bubble size on the efficiency of the dissolved air flotation (DAF) process.

    PubMed

    Han, Mooyoung; Kim, Tschung-il; Kim, Jinho

    2007-01-01

    Dissolved air flotation (DAF) is a method for removing particles from water using micro bubbles instead of settlement. The process has proved to be successful and, since the 1960s, accepted as an alternative to the conventional sedimentation process for water and wastewater treatment. However, limited research into the process, especially the fundamental characteristics of bubbles and particles, has been carried out. The single collector collision model is not capable of determining the effects of particular characteristics, such as the size and surface charge of bubbles and particles. Han has published a set of modeling results after calculating the collision efficiency between bubbles and particles by trajectory analysis. His major conclusion was that collision efficiency is maximum when the bubbles and particles are nearly the same size but have opposite charge. However, experimental verification of this conclusion has not been carried out yet. This paper describes a new method for measuring the size of particles and bubbles developed using computational image analysis. DAF efficiency is influenced by the effect of the recycle ratio on various average floc sizes. The larger the recycle ratio, the higher the DAF efficiency at the same pressure and particle size. The treatment efficiency is also affected by the saturation pressure, because the bubble size and bubble volume concentration are controlled by the pressure. The highest efficiency is obtained when the floc size is larger than the bubble size. These results, namely that the highest collision efficiency occurs when the particles and bubbles are about the same size, are more in accordance with the trajectory model than with the white water collector model, which implies that the larger the particles, the higher is the collision efficiency.

  16. Measurements of the Growth of Air Bubbles by Rectified Diffusion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-08-01

    enough each cycle to cause a significant increase in the amount of gas containea within the bubble. The observations 32 by Liebermann that diffusion rates...32. L. Liebermann , J. Appl. Phys. 28, 205-211 (1957). 33. Lord Rayleiyh, Proc. Roy. Soc. 47, 231-287 (1890). -25- Ii. DISTRIBUTION LIST Director 3

  17. Three-dimensionally ordered array of air bubbles in a polymer film

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasarao, M.; Collings, D.; Philips, A.; Patel, S.; Brown, C. S. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    We report the formation of a three-dimensionally ordered array of air bubbles of monodisperse pore size in a polymer film through a templating mechanism based on thermocapillary convection. Dilute solutions of a simple, coil-like polymer in a volatile solvent are cast on a glass slide in the presence of moist air flowing across the surface. Evaporative cooling and the generation of an ordered array of breath figures leads to the formation of multilayers of hexagonally packed water droplets that are preserved in the final, solid polymer film as spherical air bubbles. The dimensions of these bubbles can be controlled simply by changing the velocity of the airflow across the surface. When these three-dimensionally ordered macroporous materials have pore dimensions comparable to the wavelength of visible light, they are of interest as photonic band gaps and optical stop-bands.

  18. Beneficial effect of enriched air nitrox on bubble formation during scuba diving. An open-water study.

    PubMed

    Brebeck, Anne-Kathrin; Deussen, Andreas; Range, Ursula; Balestra, Costantino; Cleveland, Sinclair; Schipke, Jochen D

    2017-05-21

    Bubble formation during scuba diving might induce decompression sickness. This prospective randomised and double-blind study included 108 advanced recreational divers (38 females). Fifty-four pairs of divers, 1 breathing air and the other breathing nitrox28 undertook a standardised dive (24 ± 1 msw; 62 ± 5min) in the Red Sea. Venous gas bubbles were counted (Doppler) 30-<45 min (early) and 45-60 min (late) post-dive at jugular, subclavian and femoral sites. Only 7% (air) vs. 11% (air28®) (n.s.) were bubble-free after a dive. Independent of sampling time and breathing gas, there were more bubbles in the jugular than in the femoral vein. More bubbles were counted in the air-group than in the air28-group (pooled vein: early: 1845 vs. 948; P = 0.047, late: 1817 vs. 953; P = 0.088). The number of bubbles was sex-dependent. Lastly, 29% of female air divers but only 14% of male divers were bubble-free (P = 0.058). Air28® helps to reduce venous gas emboli in recreational divers. The bubble number depended on the breathing gas, sampling site and sex. Thus, both exact reporting the dive and in particular standardising sampling characteristics seem mandatory to compare results from different studies to further investigate the hitherto incoherent relation between inert gas bubbles and DCS.

  19. Entrainment of stratospheric air and Asian pollution by the convective boundary layer in the southwestern U.S.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langford, A. O.; Alvarez, R. J.; Brioude, J.; Fine, R.; Gustin, M. S.; Lin, M. Y.; Marchbanks, R. D.; Pierce, R. B.; Sandberg, S. P.; Senff, C. J.; Weickmann, A. M.; Williams, E. J.

    2017-01-01

    A series of deep stratospheric intrusions in late May 2013 increased the daily maximum 8 h surface ozone (O3) concentrations to more than 70 parts per billion by volume (ppbv) at rural and urban surface monitors in California and Nevada. This influx of ozone-rich lower stratospheric air and entrained Asian pollution persisted for more than 5 days and contributed to exceedances of the 2008 8 h national ambient air quality standard of 75 ppbv on 21 and 25 May in Clark County, NV. Exceedances would also have occurred on 22 and 23 May had the new standard of 70 ppbv been in effect. In this paper, we examine this episode using lidar measurements from a high-elevation site on Angel Peak, NV, and surface measurements from NOAA, the Clark County, Nevada Department of Air Quality, the Environmental Protection Agency Air Quality System, and the Nevada Rural Ozone Initiative. These measurements, together with analyses from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction/North American Regional Reanalysis; NOAA Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory AM3 model; NOAA National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service Real-time Air Quality Modeling System; and FLEXPART models, show that the exceedances followed entrainment of 20 to 40 ppbv of lower stratospheric ozone mingled with another 0 to 10 ppbv of ozone transported from Asia by the unusually deep convective boundary layers above the Mojave desert. Our analysis suggests that this vigorous mixing can affect both high and low elevations and help explain the springtime ozone maximum in the southwestern U.S.

  20. A model for sound velocity in a two-phase air-water bubbly flow

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, N.M.; Lin, W.K.; Pei, B.S.; Hsu, Y.Y. )

    1992-07-01

    In this paper, wave propagation in a homogeneous, low void fraction, two-phase air-water bubbly flow is analyzed through the compressibility of a single bubble to derive a P({rho}) relation; the dispersion relation is then derived by a homogeneous model. The phase velocity and attenuation calculated from the model are compared with existing data and are in good agreement. The momentum transfer effect is considered through the virtual mass term and is significant at a higher void fraction. The interfacial heat transfer between phases is significant at low frequency, while bubble scattering effects are important at high frequency (near resonance). Bubble behavior at both low and high frequency is derived based on the isothermal and the adiabatic cases, respectively. The phase velocity occurs at the limiting condition in both cases. Furthermore, resonance is present in the model, and the resonant frequency is determined.

  1. The effect of air bubble position after blastocyst transfer on pregnancy rates in IVF cycles.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Brooke E; Lathi, Ruth B; Henne, Melinda B; Fisher, Stephanie L; Milki, Amin A

    2011-03-01

    To investigate the relationship between air bubble position after blastocyst transfer (BT) and pregnancy rates (PRs). Retrospective cohort study. University-based infertility center. Three hundred fifteen consecutive nondonor BTs by a single provider. Catheters were loaded with 25 μL of culture media, 20 μL of air, 25 μL of media containing the blastocysts, 20 μL of air, and a small amount of additional media. The distance from the air bubble to the fundus, as seen on abdominal ultrasound examination, was measured at the time of transfer. Air bubble location was categorized as <10 mm, 10-20 mm, and >20 mm from the fundus. Clinical pregnancy rate. After controlling for age, parity, FSH and frozen transfers, and accounting for repeated cycles per patient, the PRs for both the >20-mm (38.3%) and the 10-20-mm (42.0%) from the fundus group were significantly reduced compared with the group in which the bubble was <10 mm from the fundus (62.5%). This study is the first to suggest that BT closer to the fundus is associated with higher PR. Although no ectopic pregnancies occurred in the <10-mm group, this outcome should be monitored closely in larger studies. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Interaction Mechanisms between Air Bubble and Molybdenite Surface: Impact of Solution Salinity and Polymer Adsorption.

    PubMed

    Xie, Lei; Wang, Jingyi; Yuan, Duowei; Shi, Chen; Cui, Xin; Zhang, Hao; Liu, Qi; Liu, Qingxia; Zeng, Hongbo

    2017-03-07

    The surface characteristics of molybdenite (MoS2) such as wettability and surface interactions have attracted much research interest in a wide range of engineering applications, such as froth flotation. In this work, a bubble probe atomic force microscope (AFM) technique was employed to directly measure the interaction forces between an air bubble and molybdenite mineral surface before/after polymer (i.e., guar gum) adsorption treatment. The AFM imaging showed that the polymer coverage on the surface of molybdenite could achieve ∼5.6, ∼44.5, and ∼100% after conditioning in 1, 5, and 10 ppm polymer solution, respectively, which coincided with the polymer coverage results based on contact angle measurements. The electrolyte concentration and surface treatment by polymer adsorption were found to significantly affect bubble-mineral interaction and attachment. The experimental force results on bubble-molybdenite (without polymer treatment) agreed well with the calculations using a theoretical model based on the Reynolds lubrication theory and augmented Young-Laplace equation including the effect of disjoining pressure. The overall surface repulsion was enhanced when the NaCl concentration decreased from 100 to 1 mM, which inhibited the bubble-molybdenite attachment. After conditioning the molybdenite surface in 1 ppm polymer solution, it was more difficult for air bubbles to attach to the molybdenite surface due to the weakened hydrophobic interaction with a shorter decay length. Increasing the polymer concentration to 5 ppm effectively inhibited bubble attachment on mineral surface, which was mainly due to the much reduced hydrophobic interaction as well as the additional steric repulsion between the extended polymer chains and bubble surface. The results provide quantitative information on the interaction mechanism between air bubbles and molybdenite mineral surfaces on the nanoscale, with useful implications for the development of effective polymer depressants

  3. A simple technique for evacuating air bubbles with scum from the bladder dome during transurethral resection of bladder tumor

    PubMed Central

    Moriyama, Shingo; Chiba, Koji; Noro, Akira

    2014-01-01

    Air bubbles floating in the bladder dome during transurethral resection of a bladder tumor can interfere with the resection, causing intravesical explosion and increasing the potential risk of tumor cell reimplantation. We describe a simple and effective technique for evacuating air bubbles from the bladder dome using routine resectoscopes. First, the beak of the resectoscope is positioned near the air bubble in the bladder dome. Second, the drainage channel of the resectoscope is closed. Third, the irrigation tube is detached from the irrigation channel, and then the channel is opened. Subsequently, the air bubble with entangled scum will be retrogradely aspirated from the beak of the resectoscope to the irrigation channel. Reversing the direction of the water stream enables evacuation of the air bubble with the scum under direct vision. This simple and effective technique may assist surgeons and ensure the safety of patients during a transurethral procedure. PMID:25562002

  4. Pachymetry-guided intrastromal air injection ("pachy-bubble") for deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty: results of the first 110 cases.

    PubMed

    Ghanem, Ramon C; Bogoni, Ayla; Ghanem, Vinícius C

    2015-06-01

    To report intraoperative and 1-year postoperative results of the pachy-bubble technique for deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty (DALK). This prospective interventional case series included 110 eyes of 107 patients with anterior corneal pathology who underwent DALK, including 78 with keratoconus. Outcome measures included the rate of bubble formation, rate of completing DALK, bubble types, complications, and visual and keratometric parameters. Intrastromal air injection was attempted in 109 eyes, and the air bubble was achieved in 93 eyes (85.3%). Intrastromal 2% methylcellulose injection was attempted in 9 eyes, after unsuccessful air bubble formation, and the viscobubble was achieved in 7 eyes (77.8%). Manual layer-by-layer dissection was performed in 8 eyes. Bubble formation was reached in 100 eyes (90.9%). Overall, 105 eyes (95.5%) achieved DALK. Air bubble occurred as type 1 (white margin) in 96.6% of the cases and as type 2 (clear margin) in 3.4%. There was a statistically significant improvement in all visual and keratometric parameters analyzed. Macroperforations converted to penetrating keratoplasty occurred in 5 eyes (4.5%) and microperforations in 12 (10.9%). There were significantly higher rates of perforation when a bubble was not achieved (P = 0.018) and when it was achieved as type 2 (P = 0.033). Interface haze occurred in 5 eyes (4.5%) and stromal rejection in 11 (10.0%). A short learning curve was observed for air bubble formation. Bubble formation, especially type 1, is the key to decrease the risk of perforation in DALK. The pachy-bubble was safe, effective, and reproducible in promoting DALK with air bubble and viscobubble formation with a short learning curve.

  5. Primary Particles from different bubble generation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butcher, A. C.; King, S. M.; Rosenoern, T.; Nilsson, E. D.; Bilde, M.

    2011-12-01

    Sea spray aerosols (SSA) are of major interest to global climate models due to large uncertainty in their emissions and ability to form Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN). In general, SSA are produced from wind breaking waves that entrain air and cause bubble bursting on the ocean surface. Preliminary results are presented for bubble generation, bubble size distribution, and CCN activity for laboratory generated SSA. In this study, the major processes of bubble formation are examined with respect to particle emissions. It has been suggested that a plunging jet closely resembles breaking wave bubble entrainment processes and subsequent bubble size distributions (Fuentes, Coe et al. 2010). Figure 1 shows the different particle size distributions obtained from the various bubble generation techniques. In general, frits produce a higher concentration of particles with a stronger bimodal particle size distribution than the various jet configurations used. The experiments consist of a stainless steel cylinder closed at both ends with fittings for aerosol sampling, flow connections for the recirculating jet, and air supply. Bubble generation included a recirculating jet with 16 mm or 4 mm nozzles, a stainless steel frit, or a ceramic frit. The chemical composition of the particles produced via bubble bursting processes has been probed using particle CCN activity. The CCN activity of sodium chloride, artificial sea salt purchased from Tropic Marin, and laboratory grade artificial sea salt (Kester, Duedall et al. 1967) has been compared. Considering the the limits of the shape factor as rough error bars for sodium chloride and bubbled sea salt, the CCN activity of artificial sea salt, Tropic Marin sea salt, and sodium chloride are not significantly different. This work has been supported by the Carlsberg Foundation.

  6. Complicated hydatid cyst and "air bubble" sign: a stepping-stone to correct diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Urvinderpal; Kumar, Sunil; Gour, Hitesh; Singh, Navdeep; Ramaraj, Murlidharan; Mittal, Vidhu; Jhim, Daksh

    2015-01-18

    Hydatid cyst, or Echinococcosis, is an important helminthic zoonotic disease in humans that commonly affects the liver and lungs. Uncomplicated hydatid cysts, seen as round opaque lesions on chest radiography, are easily diagnosed, whereas complicated cysts (infected and or perforated) may change the radiographic appearance of the hydatid cyst, causing an incorrect diagnosis and delayed treatment. Although in radiology many signs have been described, the "air bubble" sign, seen in the mediastinal window of CECT as a single or multiple small rounded radiolucent areas with sharp margins within the periphery of a solid mass lesion, is being recognized as a sign with high sensitivity and specificity in the diagnosis of complicated hydatid cysts. A 32-year-old female on anti-tubercular treatment for the past 3 months without any improvement was admitted to our hospital. CECT of the chest revealed a mass-like lesion with the "air bubble" sign. After 15 days the patient had a vigorous bout of coughing, leading to expectoration of pieces of whitish yellowish gelatinous membrane for the next 3 days. The ELISA result for Echinococcus was highly positive. On the basis of the "air bubble" sign, positive serology, and expectorated pieces of the membrane, the patient was diagnosed as having a complicated hydatid cyst. Due to the varied presentations of complicated hydatid cyst, the knowledge and awareness of various signs in radiology associated with the hydatid cyst, in particular the "air bubble" sign, is imperative in making a prompt and accurate diagnosis of a complicated hydatid cyst.

  7. Modeling of bubble nucleation of an air-water mixture near hydrophobic walls.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Di; Haque Ansari, Ziaul; Mi, Jianguo

    2013-05-08

    In this work, a density functional approach is applied to calculate the interfacial thermodynamic properties of an air-water mixture in the presence of a hydrophobic wall. Without any mixing parameter, the theoretical model can correctly reproduce the measured interfacial tensions of a nitrogen-water binary mixture. The density profiles of the dissolved air and water near the hydrophobic walls are predicted using the validated model. It is shown clearly that a hydrophobic wall leads to air enrichment and water depletion. According to the extent of air enrichment, the free energy barriers and critical radii of bubble nucleation at different hydrophobic interfaces are calculated to evaluate the possibility of spontaneous bubble nucleation.

  8. Computational Studies on Interaction between Air Bubbles and Hydrophobic Mineral Particles Covered by Nonpolar Oil.

    PubMed

    Song; Lopez-Valdivieso

    1999-04-01

    Computations based on the extended DLVO theory are carried out on the potential energies of interactions between air bubbles and talc particles covered by nonpolar oil. It is shown that the major role of nonpolar oil in this system is to greatly increase the depth of the primary energy valley, giving rise to a much stronger bubble-particle aggregate that can support greater aggregate-rupture force fields from turbulent flows. Also, due to nonpolar oil involvement, the energy barrier between bubbles and mineral particles sharply collapses down and further separates, indicative of a greater probability of attachment of mineral particles to air bubbles. A linear relationship is found between the primary energy valley and the contact angles of oil or bubbles, and thus a simple and approximate formula is presented to evaluate the depth of the primary energy valley. In addition, it is found that the primary energy valley and the energy barrier are directly proportional to the effective particle radius, but the barrier location is independent of the effective particle radius. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  9. Liquid jet pumped by rising gas bubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hussain, N. A.; Siegel, R.

    1975-01-01

    From observations of a stream of gas bubbles rising through a liquid, a two-phase mathematical model is proposed for calculating the induced turbulent vertical liquid flow. The bubbles provide a large buoyancy force and the associated drag on the liquid moves the liquid upward. The liquid pumped upward consists of the bubble wakes and the liquid brought into the jet region by turbulent entrainment. The expansion of the gas bubbles as they arise through the liquid is taken into account. The continuity and momentum equations are solved numerically for an axisymmetric air jet submerged in water. Water pumping rates are obtained as a function of air flow rate and depth of submergence. Comparisons are made with limited experimental information in the literature.

  10. Liquid jet pumped by rising gas bubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hussain, N. A.; Siegel, R.

    1975-01-01

    From observations of a stream of gas bubbles rising through a liquid, a two-phase mathematical model is proposed for calculating the induced turbulent vertical liquid flow. The bubbles provide a large buoyancy force and the associated drag on the liquid moves the liquid upward. The liquid pumped upward consists of the bubble wakes and the liquid brought into the jet region by turbulent entrainment. The expansion of the gas bubbles as they arise through the liquid is taken into account. The continuity and momentum equations are solved numerically for an axisymmetric air jet submerged in water. Water pumping rates are obtained as a function of air flow rate and depth of submergence. Comparisons are made with limited experimental information in the literature.

  11. Observation of Brewster Angle Light Scattering from Air Bubbles Rising in Water

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-08-25

    At the bottom of this pipe a hollow needle is placed which is connected to an air supply. By regulating the air through the needle bubbles were...back scattering direction a beamsplitter was inserted in the light path. Then a retroreflector was placed behind the beamsplitter. The beam coming...out of the retroreflector is reflected at 45’ off the beamsplitter and then focused to a point. This point now defines the backwards direction. 03 0 t W

  12. The Influence of Shock-Induced Air Bubble Collapse Resulting from Underwater Explosive Events

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-01

    this process occurs, the sphere migrates towards the water surface due to Archimedes ’ principle . 7 Figure 2 provides a good visualization of the...surface. This vertical movement is known as bubble migration and occurs due to the principles of buoyancy. For each period of expansion and...human eye [15]. The less dense water vapor (your breath) displaces the heavier air molecules and rises due to the principles of buoyancy. While air

  13. Numerical and experimental study of dissociation in an air-water single-bubble sonoluminescence system.

    PubMed

    Puente, Gabriela F; Urteaga, Raúl; Bonetto, Fabián J

    2005-10-01

    We performed a comprehensive numerical and experimental analysis of dissociation effects in an air bubble in water acoustically levitated in a spherical resonator. Our numerical approach is based on suitable models for the different effects considered. We compared model predictions with experimental results obtained in our laboratory in the whole phase parameter space, for acoustic pressures from the bubble dissolution limit up to bubble extinction. The effects were taken into account simultaneously to consider the transition from nonsonoluminescence to sonoluminescence bubbles. The model includes (1) inside the bubble, transient and spatially nonuniform heat transfer using a collocation points method, dissociation of O2 and N2, and mass diffusion of vapor in the noncondensable gases; (2) at the bubble interface, nonequilibrium evaporation and condensation of water and a temperature jump due to the accommodation coefficient; (3) in the liquid, transient and spatially nonuniform heat transfer using a collocation points method, and mass diffusion of the gas in the liquid. The model is completed with a Rayleigh-Plesset equation with liquid compressible terms and vapor mass transfer. We computed the boundary for the shape instability based on the temporal evolution of the computed radius. The model is valid for an arbitrary number of dissociable gases dissolved in the liquid. We also obtained absolute measurements for R(t) using two photodetectors and Mie scattering calculations. The robust technique used allows the estimation of experimental results of absolute R0 and P(a). The technique is based on identifying the bubble dissolution limit coincident with the parametric instability in (P(a),R0) parameter space. We take advantage of the fact that this point can be determined experimentally with high precision and replicability. We computed the equilibrium concentration of the different gaseous species and water vapor during collapse as a function of P(a) and R0. The

  14. Numerical and experimental study of dissociation in an air-water single-bubble sonoluminescence system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puente, Gabriela F.; Urteaga, Raúl; Bonetto, Fabián J.

    2005-10-01

    We performed a comprehensive numerical and experimental analysis of dissociation effects in an air bubble in water acoustically levitated in a spherical resonator. Our numerical approach is based on suitable models for the different effects considered. We compared model predictions with experimental results obtained in our laboratory in the whole phase parameter space, for acoustic pressures from the bubble dissolution limit up to bubble extinction. The effects were taken into account simultaneously to consider the transition from nonsonoluminescence to sonoluminescence bubbles. The model includes (1) inside the bubble, transient and spatially nonuniform heat transfer using a collocation points method, dissociation of O2 and N2 , and mass diffusion of vapor in the noncondensable gases; (2) at the bubble interface, nonequilibrium evaporation and condensation of water and a temperature jump due to the accommodation coefficient; (3) in the liquid, transient and spatially nonuniform heat transfer using a collocation points method, and mass diffusion of the gas in the liquid. The model is completed with a Rayleigh-Plesset equation with liquid compressible terms and vapor mass transfer. We computed the boundary for the shape instability based on the temporal evolution of the computed radius. The model is valid for an arbitrary number of dissociable gases dissolved in the liquid. We also obtained absolute measurements for R(t) using two photodetectors and Mie scattering calculations. The robust technique used allows the estimation of experimental results of absolute R0 and Pa . The technique is based on identifying the bubble dissolution limit coincident with the parametric instability in (Pa,R0) parameter space. We take advantage of the fact that this point can be determined experimentally with high precision and replicability. We computed the equilibrium concentration of the different gaseous species and water vapor during collapse as a function of Pa and R0 . The model

  15. Measurement of interfacial structures in horizontal air-water bubbly flows

    SciTech Connect

    Talley, J. D.; Worosz, T.; Dodds, M. R.; Kim, S.

    2012-07-01

    In order to predict multi-dimensional phenomena in nuclear reactor systems, methods relying on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes are essential. However, to be applicable in assessing thermal-hydraulic safety, these codes must be able to accurately predict the development of two-phase flows. Therefore, before practical application these codes must be assessed using experimental databases that capture multi-dimensional phenomena. While a large database exists that can be employed to assess predictions in vertical flows, the available database for horizontal flows is significantly lacking. Therefore, the current work seeks to develop an additional database in air-water horizontal bubbly flow through a 38.1 mm ID test section with a total development length of approximately 250 diameters. The experimental conditions are chosen to cover a wide range of the bubbly flow regime based upon flow visualization using a high-speed video camera. A database of local time-averaged void fraction, bubble velocity, interfacial area concentration, and bubble Sauter mean diameter are acquired throughout the pipe cross-section using a four-sensor conductivity probe. To investigate the evolution of the flow, measurements are made at axial locations of 44, 116, and 244 diameters downstream of the inlet. In the current work, only measurements obtained at L/D = 244 are presented. It is found that increasing the liquid superficial velocity tends to reduce both the bubble size and the degree of bubble packing near the upper wall. However, it is observed that the position of the maximum void fraction value remains nearly constant and is located approximately one bubble diameter away from the upper wall. It is also found that the bubble velocity exhibits a power law behavior resembling a single phase liquid turbulent velocity profile. Moreover, the local bubble velocity tends to decrease as the local void fraction increases. Conversely, increasing the gas superficial velocity is found to

  16. Simulation study on the effect of air distribution on the bed height and bubble formation in bubbling fluidization reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    bin Ibrahim, Muhamad Hilmee; Mohd Najib, Nur Khadijah; Karuppanan, Saravanan; Sinnathambi, Chandra Mohan

    2012-09-01

    This paper describes the numerical study on the effect of inlet air distribution in the Bubbling Fluidized Bed (BFB) riser of diameter 0.18 m and 1.44 m of length using a 3-hole orifice plate. A 2D model has been developed and meshed using Gambit software version 2.4.6 and was simulated using CFD code, fluent version 6.3. Laminar model has been used for the modeling and Eulerian-Eulerian multiphase model coupled with kinetic theory of granular flow was employed. For the drag, Gidaspow Drag Model was used to calculate the phase interaction between the gas and solid particles. The simulation results obtained for the validation purpose showed good agreement with the results available in the literature. The model with orifice plate gives a better and clear bubble shape with improved turbulent and better mixing compared to the model without the orifice plate. The model with orifice plate is also more realistic and ideal as compared to the model without the orifice plate.

  17. Probing Interactions between Air Bubble and Hydrophobic Polymer Surface: Impact of Solution Salinity and Interfacial Nanobubbles.

    PubMed

    Cui, Xin; Shi, Chen; Xie, Lei; Liu, Jing; Zeng, Hongbo

    2016-11-01

    The interactions between air bubbles and hydrophobic polymer surfaces in aqueous media play important roles in many industrial and engineering processes. In this work, the interaction forces between air bubble and a model hydrophobic polymer-polystyrene (PS) in NaCl solutions (1 mM to 1000 mM) were directly measured using a bubble probe atomic force microscope (AFM) technique, and the measured forces were analyzed by a theoretical model based on Reynolds lubrication theory and augmented Young-Laplace equation including the influence of disjoining pressure. It was found that the theoretical analysis, by assuming that the PS surface was a pristine and bare polymer surface in aqueous solutions, could not fully agree with the experimental force measurements at intermedium salinity condition (i.e., 100 mM NaCl), and the discrepancy could not be described by the classical Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory even including the effects of non-DLVO interactions such as hydrophobic interaction. Atomic force microscope (AFM) imaging demonstrated that the above discrepancy was caused by the presence of interfacial nanobubbles (INBs) on the hydrophobic PS surface. The solution salinity was found to significantly affect the size and surface coverage of INBs on the PS surface, thereby influencing the surface forces. At high NaCl concentration (e.g., 500 and 1000 mM), the INB formation (and its impact on the surface interactions) and electric double layer repulsion were highly suppressed, and the bubble-PS attachment was observed attributing to their hydrophobic attraction with a decay length of ∼0.75 ± 0.05 nm. The results agree with our previous surface force measurements between two PS surfaces using a surface forces apparatus. This work provides useful insights into the interaction mechanism between air bubbles and hydrophobic polymer surfaces, as well as the influence of solution salinity and interfacial nanobubbles on the bubble-polymer interaction.

  18. Reliability of air bubble test in assessment of anatomical and functional success after external dacryocystorhinostomy.

    PubMed

    Kashkouli, Mohsen Bahmani; Jamshidian-Tehrani, Mansooreh; Shahrzad, Sahab

    2014-01-01

    To assess the sensitivity and specificity of air bubble test (ABT) for anatomical and functional success after external dacryocystorhinostomy (Ext-DCR). In a retrospective interventional case series, patients with nasolacrimal duct obstruction who had undergone Ext-DCR procedure were included. Functional success was defined as no symptom or mild excess tear in the cold weather and anatomical success as free irrigation at last follow-up time (at least 6 months). Air bubble test was performed by putting antibiotic drops into the eye and asking the patient to exhale while keeping the nose and mouth closed. Formation of bubbles inside the eye (hissing noise) was considered as positive test. Specificity, sensitivity, and positive and negative predictive values were then calculated for both anatomical and functional success. There were 85 procedures in 77 patients. Anatomical and overall functional success was 98.8% (84/85) and 95.3% (81/85), respectively. Air bubble test showed a sensitivity of 82.1% and specificity of 100% for the anatomical success after Ext-DCR. Sensitivity and specificity were 83.9% and 75% for the functional success. Positive ABT indicated no anatomical failure after Ext-DCR in this series.

  19. Magma mixing enhanced by bubble segregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiesmaier, S.; Morgavi, D.; Renggli, C. J.; Perugini, D.; De Campos, C. P.; Hess, K.-U.; Ertel-Ingrisch, W.; Lavallée, Y.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2015-08-01

    In order to explore the materials' complexity induced by bubbles rising through mixing magmas, bubble-advection experiments have been performed, employing natural silicate melts at magmatic temperatures. A cylinder of basaltic glass was placed below a cylinder of rhyolitic glass. Upon melting, bubbles formed from interstitial air. During the course of the experimental runs, those bubbles rose via buoyancy forces into the rhyolitic melt, thereby entraining tails of basaltic liquid. In the experimental run products, these plume-like filaments of advected basalt within rhyolite were clearly visible and were characterised by microCT and high-resolution EMP analyses. The entrained filaments of mafic material have been hybridised. Their post-experimental compositions range from the originally basaltic composition through andesitic to rhyolitic composition. Rheological modelling of the compositions of these hybridised filaments yield viscosities up to 2 orders of magnitude lower than that of the host rhyolitic liquid. Importantly, such lowered viscosities inside the filaments implies that rising bubbles can ascend more efficiently through pre-existing filaments that have been generated by earlier ascending bubbles. MicroCT imaging of the run products provides textural confirmation of the phenomenon of bubbles trailing one another through filaments. This phenomenon enhances the relevance of bubble advection in magma mixing scenarios, implying as it does so, an acceleration of bubble ascent due to the decreased viscous resistance facing bubbles inside filaments and yielding enhanced mass flux of mafic melt into felsic melt via entrainment. In magma mixing events involving melts of high volatile content, bubbles may be an essential catalyst for magma mixing. Moreover, the reduced viscosity contrast within filaments implies repeated replenishment of filaments with fresh end-member melt. As a result, complex compositional gradients and therefore diffusion systematics can be

  20. Study of interfacial area transport and sensitivity analysis for air-water bubbly flow

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.; Sun, X.; Ishii, M.; Beus, S.G.

    2000-09-01

    The interfacial area transport equation applicable to the bubbly flow is presented. The model is evaluated against the data acquired by the state-of-the-art miniaturized double-sensor conductivity probe in an adiabatic air-water co-current vertical test loop under atmospheric pressure condition. In general, a good agreement, within the measurement error of plus/minus 10%, is observed for a wide range in the bubbly flow regime. The sensitivity analysis on the individual particle interaction mechanisms demonstrates the active interactions between the bubbles and highlights the mechanisms playing the dominant role in interfacial area transport. The analysis employing the drift flux model is also performed for the data acquired. Under the given flow conditions, the distribution parameter of 1.076 yields the best fit to the data.

  1. High-sensitivity strain sensor based on in-fiber rectangular air bubble

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shen; Yang, Kaiming; Wang, Yiping; Qu, Junle; Liao, Changrui; He, Jun; Li, Zhengyong; Yin, Guolu; Sun, Bing; Zhou, Jiangtao; Wang, Guanjun; Tang, Jian; Zhao, Jing

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrated a unique rectangular air bubble by means of splicing two sections of standard single mode fibers together and tapering the splicing joint. Such an air bubble can be used to develop a promising high-sensitivity strain sensor based on Fabry-Perot interference. The sensitivity of the strain sensor with a cavity length of about 61 μm and a wall thickness of about 1 μm was measured to be up to 43.0 pm/με and is the highest strain sensitivity among the in-fiber FPI-based strain sensors with air cavities reported so far. Moreover, our strain sensor has a very low temperature sensitivity of about 2.0 pm/°C. Thus, the temperature-induced strain measurement error is less than 0.046 με/°C. PMID:25557614

  2. High-sensitivity strain sensor based on in-fiber rectangular air bubble.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shen; Yang, Kaiming; Wang, Yiping; Qu, Junle; Liao, Changrui; He, Jun; Li, Zhengyong; Yin, Guolu; Sun, Bing; Zhou, Jiangtao; Wang, Guanjun; Tang, Jian; Zhao, Jing

    2015-01-05

    We demonstrated a unique rectangular air bubble by means of splicing two sections of standard single mode fibers together and tapering the splicing joint. Such an air bubble can be used to develop a promising high-sensitivity strain sensor based on Fabry-Perot interference. The sensitivity of the strain sensor with a cavity length of about 61 μm and a wall thickness of about 1 μm was measured to be up to 43.0 pm/με and is the highest strain sensitivity among the in-fiber FPI-based strain sensors with air cavities reported so far. Moreover, our strain sensor has a very low temperature sensitivity of about 2.0 pm/°C. Thus, the temperature-induced strain measurement error is less than 0.046 με/°C.

  3. Blood platelet-derived microparticles release and bubble formation after an open-sea air dive.

    PubMed

    Pontier, Jean-Michel; Gempp, Emmanuel; Ignatescu, Mihaela

    2012-10-01

    Bubble-induced platelet aggregation offers an index for evaluating decompression severity in humans and in a rat model of decompression sickness. Endothelial cells, blood platelets, or leukocytes shed microparticles (MP) upon activation and during cell apoptosis. The aim was to study blood platelet MP (PMP) release and bubble formation after a scuba-air dive in field conditions. Healthy, experienced divers were assigned to 1 experimental group (n = 10) with an open-sea air dive to 30 msw for 30 min and 1 control group (n = 5) during head-out water immersion for the same period. Bubble grades were monitored with a pulsed doppler according to Kissman Integrated Severity Score (KISS). Blood samples for platelet count (PC) and PMP (annexin V and CD41) were taken 1 h before and after exposure in both groups. The result showed a decrease in post-dive PC compared with pre-dive values in experimental group with no significant change in the control group. We observed a significant increase in PMP values after the dive while no change was revealed in the control group. There was a significant positive correlation between the PMP values after the dive and the KISS bubble score. The present study highlighted a relationship between the post-dive decrease in PC, platelet MP release, and bubble formation. Release of platelet MPs could reflect bubble-induced platelet aggregation and could play a key role in alteration of the coagulation. Further studies must investigate endothelial and leukocyte MP release in the same field conditions.

  4. Air Bubble-Induced High Intraocular Pressure After Descemet Membrane Endothelial Keratoplasty.

    PubMed

    Röck, Daniel; Bartz-Schmidt, Karl Ulrich; Röck, Tobias; Yoeruek, Efdal

    2016-08-01

    To investigate the incidence and risk factors of pupillary block caused by an air bubble in the anterior chamber in the early postoperative period after Descemet membrane endothelial keratoplasty (DMEK). A retrospective review was conducted in 306 eyes that underwent DMEK from September 2009 through October 2014 at the Tübingen Eye Hospital. Intraocular pressure (IOP) elevation was defined as a spike above 30 mm Hg. In the first 190 eyes, an intraoperative peripheral iridectomy was performed at the 12-o'clock position and in the other 116 eyes at the 6-o'clock position. If possible, reasons for IOP elevation were identified. For all eyes, preoperative and postoperative slit-lamp examinations and IOP measurements were performed. Overall, 30 eyes (9.8%) showed a postoperative IOP elevation within the first postoperative day. The incidence of IOP elevation was 13.9% (5/36) in the triple DMEK group, and 2 of 5 phakic eyes (40%) developed an air bubble-induced IOP elevation. All eyes presented with a de novo IOP elevation, associated in 25 patients with pupillary block from air anterior to iris and in 5 patients with angle closure from air migration posterior to the iris. All of them had an iridectomy at the 12-o'clock position. A postoperative pupillary block with IOP elevation caused by the residual intraoperative air bubble may be an important complication that could be avoided by close and frequent observations, especially in the first postoperative hours and by an inferior peripheral iridectomy and an air bubble with a volume of ≤80% of the anterior chamber.

  5. Tunneling effects in resonant acoustic scattering of an air bubble in unbounded water.

    PubMed

    Simão, André G; Guimarães, Luiz G

    2016-01-01

    The problem of acoustic scattering of a gaseous spherical bubble immersed within unbounded liquid surrounding is considered in this work. The theory of partial wave expansion related to this problem is revisited. A physical model based on the analogy between acoustic scattering and potential scattering in quantum mechanics is proposed to describe and interpret the acoustical natural oscillation modes of the bubble, namely, the resonances. In this context, a physical model is devised in order to describe the air water interface and the implications of the high density contrast on the various regimes of the scattering resonances. The main results are presented in terms of resonance lifetime periods and quality factors. The explicit numerical calculations are undertaken through an asymptotic analysis considering typical bubble dimensions and underwater sound wavelengths. It is shown that the resonance periods are scaled according to the Minnaert's period, which is the short lived resonance mode, called breathing mode of the bubble. As expected, resonances with longer lifetimes lead to impressive cavity quality Q-factor ranging from 1010 to 105. The present theoretical findings lead to a better understanding of the energy storage mechanism in a bubbly medium.

  6. Air bubbles are released by thoracic endograft deployment: An in vitro experimental study

    PubMed Central

    Inci, Kamuran; Koutouzi, Giasemi; Chernoray, Valery; Jeppsson, Anders; Nilsson, Håkan; Falkenberg, Mårten

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Embolic stroke is a dreaded complication of thoracic endovascular aortic repair. The prevailing theory about its cause is that particulate debris from atherosclerotic lesions in the aortic wall are dislodged by endovascular instruments and embolize to the brain. An alternative source of embolism might be air trapped in the endograft delivery system. The aim of this experimental study was to determine whether air is released during deployment of a thoracic endograft. Methods: In an experimental benchtop study, eight thoracic endografts (five Medtronic Valiant Thoracic and three Gore TAG) were deployed in a water-filled transparent container drained from air. Endografts were prepared and deployed according to their instructions for use. Deployment was filmed and the volume of air released was collected and measured in a calibrated syringe. Results: Air was released from all the endografts examined. Air volumes ranged from 0.1 to 0.3 mL for Medtronic Valiant Thoracic and from <0.025 to 0.04 mL for Gore TAG. The largest bubbles had a diameter of approximately 3 mm and came from the proximal end of the Medtronic Valiant device. Conclusion: Air bubbles are released from thoracic endografts during deployment. Air embolism may be an alternative cause of stroke during thoracic endovascular aortic repair. PMID:27994872

  7. Theoretical Investigation on Particle Brownian Motion on Micro-air-bubble Characteristic in H2O Solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eka Putri, Irana; Gita Redhyka, Grace

    2017-07-01

    Micro-air-bubble has a high potential contribution in waste water, farming, and fishery treatment. In this research, submicron scale of micro-air-bubble was observed to determine its stability in H2O solvent. By increasing its stability, it can be used for several applications, such as bio-preservative for medical and food transport. The micro-air-bubble was assumed in spherical shape that in incompressible gas boundary condition. So, the random motion of particle (Brownian motion) can be solved by using Stokes-Einstein approximation. But, Hadamard and Rybczynski equation is promoted to solve for larger bubble (micro scale). While, the effect of physical properties (e.g. diffusion coefficient, density, and flow rate) have taken important role in its characteristics in water. According to the theoretical investigation that have been done, decreasing of bubble velocity indicates that the bubble dissolves away or shrinking to the surface. To obtain longevity bubble in pure water medium, it is recomended to apply some surfactant molecules (e.g. NaCl) in micro-air-bubble medium.

  8. Simple test to confirm cleavage with air between Descemet's membrane and stroma during big-bubble deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty.

    PubMed

    Fontana, Luigi; Parente, Gabriella; Tassinari, Giorgio

    2007-04-01

    We describe a simple test to confirm big-bubble formation in deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty by observing the position and movements of small air bubbles injected into the anterior chamber through a limbal paracentesis. The test also allows evaluation of the extension of Descemet's membrane cleavage from the posterior stroma relative to the margins of the corneal trephination.

  9. Big-bubble deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty using central vs peripheral air injection: a clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Feizi, Sepehr; Daryabari, Seyed-Hashem; Najdi, Danial; Javadi, Mohammad Ali; Karimian, Farid

    2016-06-10

    To compare 2 sites of air injection to achieve Descemet membrane (DM) detachment in big-bubble deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty (DALK). In this prospective, randomized study, 48 eyes of 48 keratoconus-affected patients who underwent DALK by cornea fellows were enrolled. Each patient was randomly assigned into one of 2 groups. After trephination to approximately 80% of the corneal thickness, a 27-G needle was inserted into the stroma from the trephination site. The needle was moved radially inside the trephination site and advanced to the central or paracentral cornea in group 1. In group 2, the needle was inserted into the deep stroma from the trephination site and advanced into the peripheral cornea to approximately 1.5 mm anterior to the limbus. Air was gently injected into the deep stroma until a big bubble was formed. The rates of DM separation and complications were compared between the 2 groups. Big-bubble formation was successful in 79.2% of the eyes in the study group. A bare DM was achieved by central injection in 68.0% of group 1 and by peripheral injection in 69.6% of group 2 (p = 0.68). This rate was increased to 80.0% and 78.3% in groups 1 and 2, respectively, after the injection site was shifted when injections failed. The study groups were comparable in terms of complications including DM perforation and bubble bursting. Both injection sites were equivalent in their rates of big-bubble formation and complications. Less experienced surgeons are advised to initially inject air outside the trephination.

  10. Effect of isobaric breathing gas shifts from air to heliox mixtures on resolution of air bubbles in lipid and aqueous tissues of recompressed rats.

    PubMed

    Hyldegaard, O; Kerem, D; Melamed, Y

    2011-09-01

    Deep tissue isobaric counterdiffusion that may cause unwanted bubble formation or transient bubble growth has been referred to in theoretical models and demonstrated by intravascular gas formation in animals, when changing inert breathing gas from nitrogen to helium after hyperbaric air breathing. We visually followed the in vivo resolution of extravascular air bubbles injected at 101 kPa into nitrogen supersaturated rat tissues: adipose, spinal white matter, skeletal muscle or tail tendon. Bubbles were observed during isobaric breathing-gas shifts from air to normoxic (80:20) heliox mixture while at 285 kPa or following immediate recompression to either 285 or 405 kPa, breathing 80:20 and 50:50 heliox mixtures. During the isobaric shifts, some bubbles in adipose tissue grew marginally for 10-30 min, subsequently they shrank and disappeared at a rate similar to or faster than during air breathing. No such bubble growth was observed in spinal white matter, skeletal muscle or tendon. In spinal white matter, an immediate breathing gas shift after the hyperbaric air exposure from air to both (80:20) and (50:50) heliox, coincident with recompression to either 285 or 405 kPa, caused consistent shrinkage of all air bubbles, until they disappeared from view. Deep tissue isobaric counterdiffusion may cause some air bubbles to grow transiently in adipose tissue. The effect is marginal and of no clinical consequence. Bubble disappearance rate is faster with heliox breathing mixtures as compared to air. We see no reason for reservations in the use of heliox breathing during treatment of air-diving-induced decompression sickness.

  11. Air Bubble Contact with Endothelial Cells Causes a Calcium-Independent Loss in Mitochondrial Membrane Potential

    PubMed Central

    Sobolewski, Peter; Kandel, Judith; Eckmann, David M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Gas microembolism remains a serious risk associated with surgical procedures and decompression. Despite this, the signaling consequences of air bubbles in the vasculature are poorly understood and there is a lack of pharmacological therapies available. Here, we investigate the mitochondrial consequences of air bubble contact with endothelial cells. Methods and Results Human umbilical vein endothelial cells were loaded with an intracellular calcium indicator (Fluo-4) and either a mitochondrial calcium indicator (X-Rhod-1) or mitochondrial membrane potential indicator (TMRM). Contact with 50–150 µm air bubbles induced concurrent rises in intracellular and mitochondrial calcium, followed by a loss of mitochondrial membrane potential. Pre-treating cells with 1 µmol/L ruthenium red, a TRPV family calcium channel blocker, did not protect cells from the mitochondrial depolarization, despite blocking the intracellular calcium response. Mitigating the interactions between the air-liquid interface and the endothelial surface layer with 5% BSA or 0.1% Pluronic F-127 prevented the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential. Finally, inhibiting protein kinase C-α (PKCα), with 5 µmol/L Gö6976, protected cells from mitochondrial depolarization, but did not affect the intracellular calcium response. Conclusions Our results indicate that air bubble contact with endothelial cells activates a novel, calcium-independent, PKCα-dependent signaling pathway, which results in mitochondrial depolarization. As a result, mitochondrial dysfunction is likely to be a key contributor to the pathophysiology of gas embolism injury. Further, this connection between the endothelial surface layer and endothelial mitochondria may also play an important role in vascular homeostasis and disease. PMID:23091614

  12. Air bubble contact with endothelial cells causes a calcium-independent loss in mitochondrial membrane potential.

    PubMed

    Sobolewski, Peter; Kandel, Judith; Eckmann, David M

    2012-01-01

    Gas microembolism remains a serious risk associated with surgical procedures and decompression. Despite this, the signaling consequences of air bubbles in the vasculature are poorly understood and there is a lack of pharmacological therapies available. Here, we investigate the mitochondrial consequences of air bubble contact with endothelial cells. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells were loaded with an intracellular calcium indicator (Fluo-4) and either a mitochondrial calcium indicator (X-Rhod-1) or mitochondrial membrane potential indicator (TMRM). Contact with 50-150 µm air bubbles induced concurrent rises in intracellular and mitochondrial calcium, followed by a loss of mitochondrial membrane potential. Pre-treating cells with 1 µmol/L ruthenium red, a TRPV family calcium channel blocker, did not protect cells from the mitochondrial depolarization, despite blocking the intracellular calcium response. Mitigating the interactions between the air-liquid interface and the endothelial surface layer with 5% BSA or 0.1% Pluronic F-127 prevented the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential. Finally, inhibiting protein kinase C-α (PKCα), with 5 µmol/L Gö6976, protected cells from mitochondrial depolarization, but did not affect the intracellular calcium response. Our results indicate that air bubble contact with endothelial cells activates a novel, calcium-independent, PKCα-dependent signaling pathway, which results in mitochondrial depolarization. As a result, mitochondrial dysfunction is likely to be a key contributor to the pathophysiology of gas embolism injury. Further, this connection between the endothelial surface layer and endothelial mitochondria may also play an important role in vascular homeostasis and disease.

  13. Studies on the Tempo of Bubble Formation in Recently Cavitated Vessels: A Model to Predict the Pressure of Air Bubbles1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yujie; Pan, Ruihua; Tyree, Melvin T.

    2015-01-01

    A cavitation event in a vessel replaces water with a mixture of water vapor and air. A quantitative theory is presented to argue that the tempo of filling of vessels with air has two phases: a fast process that extracts air from stem tissue adjacent to the cavitated vessels (less than 10 s) and a slow phase that extracts air from the atmosphere outside the stem (more than 10 h). A model was designed to estimate how water tension (T) near recently cavitated vessels causes bubbles in embolized vessels to expand or contract as T increases or decreases, respectively. The model also predicts that the hydraulic conductivity of a stem will increase as bubbles collapse. The pressure of air bubbles trapped in vessels of a stem can be predicted from the model based on fitting curves of hydraulic conductivity versus T. The model was validated using data from six stem segments each of Acer mono and the clonal hybrid Populus 84K (Populus alba × Populus glandulosa). The model was fitted to results with root mean square error less than 3%. The model provided new insight into the study of embolism formation in stem tissue and helped quantify the bubble pressure immediately after the fast process referred to above. PMID:25907963

  14. The influence of bubble plumes on air-seawater gas transfer velocities

    SciTech Connect

    Asher, W.E.; Karle, L.M.; Higgins, B.J.

    1995-07-01

    Air-sea gas exchange is an important process in the geochemical cycling of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). The air-sea flux of CO{sub 2} is determined in part by the physical forcing functions, which are parameterized in terms of the air-sea transfer velocity, k{sub L}. Past studies have attempted to correlate k{sub L} with wind speed, U. Because strong winds occur in ocean regions thought to be important sources or sinks of CO{sub 2}, accurate knowledge of k{sub L} at high U is important in estimating the global air-sea flux of CO{sub 2}. Better understanding of the physical processes affecting gas transfer at large U will increase the accuracy in estimating k{sub L} in ocean regions with high CO{sub 2}, fluxes. Increased accuracy in estimating k{sub L} will increase the accuracy in calculating the net global air-sea CO{sub 2} flux and provide more accurate boundary and initial conditions for global ocean carbon cycle models. High wind speeds are associated with the presence of whitecaps, which can increase the gas flux by generating turbulence, disrupting surface films, and creating bubble plumes. Bubble plumes will create additional turbulence, prolong the surface disruption, and transfer gas to or from individual bubbles while they are beneath the surface. These turbulence and bubble processes very effectively promote gas transfer. Because of this, it is postulated that breaking waves, if present, will dominate non-whitecap related gas exchange. Under this assumption, k{sub L} Will increase linearly with increasing fractional area whitecap coverage, W{sub c}. In support of this, researchers found k{sub L} measured in a whitecap simulation tank (WSI) was linearly correlated with bubble plume coverage, B{sub c} (the laboratory analog of W{sub c}). However, it is not definitively known how the presence of breaking waves and bubble plumes affect the dependence of k{sub L} on Schmidt number, Sc, and aqueous-phase solubility, {alpha}.

  15. Step-Wise Velocity of an Air Bubble Rising in a Vertical Tube Filled with a Liquid Dispersion of Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Cho, Heon Ki; Nikolov, Alex D; Wasan, Darsh T

    2017-03-21

    The motion of air bubbles in tubes filled with aqueous suspensions of nanoparticles (nanofluids) is of practical interest for bubble jets, lab-on-a-chip, and transporting media. Therefore, the focus of this study is the dynamics of air bubbles rising in a tube in a nanofluid. Many authors experimentally and analytically proposed that the velocity of rising air bubbles is constant for long air bubbles suspended in a vertical tube in common liquids (e.g. an aqueous glycerol solution) when the capillary number is larger than 10(-4). For the first time, we report here a systematic study of an air bubble rising in a vertical tube in a nanofluid (e.g. an aqueous silica dioxide nanoparticle suspension, nominal particle size, 19 nm). We varied the bubble length scaled by the diameter of the tubes (L/D), the concentration of the nanofluid (10 and 12.5 v %), and the tube diameter (0.45, 0.47, and 0.50 cm). The presence of the nanoparticles creates a significant change in the bubble velocity compared with the bubble rising in the common liquid with the same bulk viscosity. We observed a novel phenomenon of a step-wise increase in the air bubble rising velocity versus bubble length for small capillary numbers less than 10(-7). This step-wise velocity increase versus the bubble length was not observed in a common fluid. The step-wise velocity increase is attributed to the nanoparticle self-layering phenomenon in the film adjacent to the tube wall. To elucidate the role of the nanoparticle film self-layering on the bubble rising velocity, the effect of the capillary number, the tube diameter (e.g. the capillary pressure), and nanofilm viscosity are investigated. We propose a model that takes into consideration the nanoparticle layering in the film confinement to explain the step-wise velocity phenomenon versus the length of the bubble. The oscillatory film interaction energy isotherm is calculated and the Frenkel approach is used to estimate the film viscosity.

  16. Vacuum-assisted venous drainage: to air or not to air, that is the question. Has the bubble burst?

    PubMed

    Willcox, Timothy W

    2002-03-01

    Assisted venous drainage is a recent development in cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) and was introduced to overcome limitations in achieving adequate blood flow through small diameter cannulas used in minimally invasive surgery. The more common application, vacuum assisted venous drainage (VAVD) is now widely used in both adult and pediatric CPB. During a clinical investigation into pharmacological cerebral protection at Green Lane Hospital, we repeatedly observed evidence of emboli in the right common carotid artery following both entrainment of air into the venous line, and also, reductions in the blood level of the hard-shell venous reservior. We subsequently embarked upon a series of in vitro experiments designed to identify sources of emboli from the CPB circuit, and to evaluate the ability of CPB circuit components to remove air entrained into the venous line under conditions of both gravity and vacuum assisted venous drainage. Initial experiments revealed design features of certain hard-shell venous reservoirs that generated gaseous emboli. In further studies using adult circuits, entrainment of air into the venous line under conditions of conventional gravity venous drainage resulted in emboli distal to the arterial filter. When these studies were repeated using VAVD, arterial line emboli increased eight to tenfold. Initial experiments with a pediatric circuit showed similar findings. Cerebral emboli during CPB have been positively correlated with increasing neurocognitive deficits. The application of VAVD has been employed clinically without any significant redesign of the components of the CPB circuit. While VAVD may be efficacious in certain scenarios, a thorough understanding of its influence on CPB is essential. Advantages must be balanced against potential hazards. The safe use of VAVD necessitates refinement of perfusion techniques, judicious choice of application, and further development of the CPB circuit.

  17. Bubble baths: just splashing around?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Wesley; Speirs, Nathan; Sharker, Saberul Islam; Hurd, Randy; Williams, Bj; Truscott, Tadd

    2016-11-01

    Soap Bubbles on the water surface would seem to be an intuitive means for splash suppression, but their presence appears to be a double edged sword. We present on the water entry of hydrophilic spheres where the liquid surface is augmented by the presence of a bubble layer, similar to a bubble bath. While the presence of a bubble layer can diminish splashing upon impact at low Weber numbers, it also induces cavity formation at speeds below the critical velocity. The formation of a cavity generally results in larger Worthington jets and thus, larger amounts of ejected liquid. Bubble layers induce cavity formation by wetting the sphere prior to liquid impact, causing them to form cavities similar to those created by hydrophobic spheres. Droplets present on a pre-wetted sphere disrupt the flow of the advancing liquid during entry, pushing it away from the impacting body to form an entrained air cavity. This phenomena was noted by Worthington with pre-wetted stone marbles, and suggests that the application of a bubble layer is generally ineffective as a means of splash suppression.

  18. Importance of flow stratification and bubble aggregation in the separation zone of a dissolved air flotation tank.

    PubMed

    Lakghomi, B; Lawryshyn, Y; Hofmann, R

    2012-09-15

    The importance of horizontal flow patterns and bubble aggregation on the ability of dissolved air flotation (DAF) systems to improve bubble removal during drinking water treatment were explored using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling. Both analytical and CFD analyses demonstrated benefits to horizontal flow. Two dimensional CFD modeling of a DAF system showed that increasing the amount of air in the system improved the bubble removal and generated a beneficial stratified horizontal flow pattern. Loading rates beyond a critical level disrupted the horizontal flow pattern, leading to significantly lower bubble removal. The results also demonstrated that including the effects of bubble aggregation in CFD modeling of DAF systems is an essential component toward achieving realistic modeling results. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect of anterior chamber air bubble on prevention of experimental Staphylococcus epidermidis endophthalmitis.

    PubMed

    Mehdizadeh, Morteza; Rahat, Feisal; Khalili, Mohammad Reza; Ahmadi, Farzin

    2010-02-01

    Bacterial endophthalmitis is a serious complication of penetrating ocular trauma and cataract surgery. The purpose of this study is to assess the ability of an anterior chamber air bubble to prevent experimental Staphylococcus epidermidis endophthalmitis. The anterior chamber was opened with a clear corneal incision to drain the aqueous humor in one eye of 24 rabbits. S. epidermidis was injected into the anterior chamber. The infected rabbits were randomly divided into two groups. Animals in group 1 (n = 12) received an air bubble to reconstruct the anterior chamber, and animals in Group 2 (n = 12) received Balanced Salt Solution (BSS) for reconstruction. Clinical examination in each group was performed 2, 3 and 7 days after inoculation of the bacteria. Clinical examination scores were recorded. All eyes were enucleated for histophatological examination. Clinical endophthalmitis was seen in 7/12 (58.3%) in group 2, but in only 1/12 (8.3%) in group 1 (p = 0.027). Mean clinical scores of groups 1and 2 on the 3rd day were 2.6 +/- 1.4 and 7.2 +/- 1.7 respectively. (p < 0.001). The mean clinical scores of groups 1and 2 on the 7th day were 2.3 +/- 1.2 and 6.8 +/- 1.5 respectively (p < 0.001). Histopathological examination confirmed clinical findings. An air bubble in the anterior chamber may have protective effects against the development of experimental S. epidermidis endophthalmitis.

  20. Air-sea exchange from bubble-induced jetting: How viscous forces suppress droplet production from small bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, Elena; Walls, Peter; Bird, James

    2016-11-01

    When a bubble ruptures in the ocean, it frequently produces a jet that releases aerosols into the atmosphere. The number of jet drops ejected is important because droplets may contain sea salt and other cloud condensation nuclei. It is generally accepted that the smallest bubbles produce the largest number of jet drops. However, if the bubble is sufficiently small, viscosity prevents droplet production altogether. Here we investigate the number of jet drops produced by small bubbles. Using a combination of high-speed microscopy, similitude, and numerical simulations, we quantify the extent that viscous forces inhibit this droplet production. We acknowledge support from NSF under Grant No. 1351466.

  1. Visualization and quantification of the entrapped air bubbles by neutron imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snehota, Michal; Jelinkova, Vladimira; Sobotkova, Martina; Sacha, Jan; Cislerova, Milena; Vontobel, Peter

    2013-04-01

    Preferential flow in structured soils may be accompanied by a significant temporal variation of quasi saturated hydraulic conductivity. These effects, observed in number of experiments mainly on heterogeneous soil of Cambisol series, are sometimes attributed to a changing distribution of the entrapped air within the sample. We have reproduced the variation of the quasi steady state flow during the constant head ponded infiltration experiment on the packed sample composed of three different grades of quartz sand, and visualized the water distribution during i) the initial stages of infiltration by neutron radiography and ii) during the steady state flow by neutron tomography. Provided that the hydraulic gradient is known, in the case of the experiment with ponding at the top and the seepage face at the bottom of the sample, the effective quasi-saturated (or satiated) hydraulic conductivity (KQS) is known. Gradual decrease of the KQS has been observed during first four hours of the infiltration event. Series of neutron tomography images taken during the quasi-steady state stage have detected trapping of the air bubbles in coarser sand. Furthermore, the volume of a number of entrapped air bubbles increased during the infiltration event. The fraction of the entrapped air was calculated for a series of tomography images taken during each experiment. Similarly to previous experiments performed on natural Cambisols, experimental results support the hypothesis that the effect of the gradual KQS decrease is caused by the entrapped air redistribution and the build-up of bubbles in preferential pathways. The trapped air thus restricts the preferential flow pathways and causes a lower hydraulic conductivity.

  2. Relative acoustic frequency response of induced methane, carbon dioxide and air gas bubble plumes, observed laterally.

    PubMed

    Kubilius, Rokas; Pedersen, Geir

    2016-10-01

    There is an increased need to detect, identify, and monitor natural and manmade seabed gas leaks. Fisheries echosounders are well suited to monitor large volumes of water and acoustic frequency response [normalized acoustic backscatter, when a measure at one selected frequency is used as a denominator, r(f)] is commonly used to identify echoes from fish and zooplankton species. Information on gas plume r(f) would be valuable for automatic detection of subsea leaks and for separating bubble plumes from natural targets such as swimbladder-bearing fish. Controlled leaks were produced with a specially designed instrument frame suspended in mid-water in a sheltered fjord. The frame was equipped with echosounders, stereo-camera, and gas-release nozzles. The r(f) of laterally observed methane, carbon dioxide, and air plumes (0.040-29 l/min) were measured at 70, 120, 200, and 333 kHz, with bubble sizes determined optically. The observed bubble size range (1-25 mm) was comparable to that reported in the literature for natural cold seeps of methane. A negative r(f) with increasing frequency was observed, namely, r(f) of about 0.7, 0.6, and 0.5 at 120, 200, and 333 kHz when normalized to 70 kHz. Measured plume r(f) is also compared to resolved, single bubble target strength-based, and modeled r(f).

  3. Magma mixing enhanced by bubble segregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiesmaier, S.; Morgavi, D.; Renggli, C.; Perugini, D.; De Campos, C. P.; Hess, K.-U.; Ertel-Ingrisch, W.; Lavallée, Y.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2015-04-01

    That rising bubbles may significantly affect magma mixing paths has already been demon strated by analogue experiments. Here, for the first time, bubble-advection experiments are performed employing volcanic melts at magmatic temperatures. Cylinders of basaltic glass were placed below cylinders of rhyolite glass. Upon melting, interstitial air formed bubbles that rose into the rhyolite melt, thereby entraining tails of basaltic liquid. The formation of plume-like filaments of advected basalt within the rhyolite was characterized by microCT and subsequent high-resolution EMP analyses. Melt entrainment by bubble ascent appears to be an efficient mechanism for mingling volcanic melts of highly contrasting compositions and properties. MicroCT imaging reveals bubbles trailing each other and multiple filaments coalescing into bigger ones. Rheological modelling of the filaments yields viscosities of up to 2 orders of magnitude lower than for the surrounding rhyolitic liquid. Such a viscosity contrast implies that bubbles rising successively are likely to follow this pathway of low resistance that previously ascending bubbles have generated. Filaments formed by multiple bubbles would thus experience episodic replenishment with mafic material. Inevitable implications for the concept of bubble advection in magma mixing include thereby both an acceleration of mixing because of decreased viscous resistance for bubbles inside filaments and non-conventional diffusion systematics because of intermittent supply of mafic material (instead of a single pulse) inside a material. Inside the filaments, the mafic material was variably hybridised to andesitic through rhyolitic composition. Compositional profiles alone are ambiguous, however, to determine whether single or multiple bubbles were involved during formation of a filament. Statistical analysis, employing concentration variance as measure of homogenisation, demonstrates that also filaments appearing as single-bubble filaments

  4. On the role of sea-state in bubble-mediated air-sea gas flux during a winter storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Jun-Hong; Emerson, Steven R.; D'Asaro, Eric A.; McNeil, Craig L.; Harcourt, Ramsey R.; Sullivan, Peter P.; Yang, Bo; Cronin, Meghan F.

    2017-04-01

    Oceanic bubbles play an important role in the air-sea exchange of weakly soluble gases at moderate to high wind speeds. A Lagrangian bubble model embedded in a large eddy simulation model is developed to study bubbles and their influence on dissolved gases in the upper ocean. The transient evolution of mixed-layer dissolved oxygen and nitrogen gases at Ocean Station Papa (50°N, 145°W) during a winter storm is reproduced with the model. Among different physical processes, gas bubbles are the most important in elevating dissolved gas concentrations during the storm, while atmospheric pressure governs the variability of gas saturation anomaly (the relative departure of dissolved gas concentration from the saturation concentration). For the same wind speed, bubble-mediated gas fluxes are larger during rising wind with smaller wave age than during falling wind with larger wave age. Wave conditions are the primary cause for the bubble gas flux difference: when wind strengthens, waves are less-developed with respect to wind, resulting in more frequent large breaking waves. Bubble generation in large breaking waves is favorable for a large bubble-mediated gas flux. The wave-age dependence is not included in any existing bubble-mediated gas flux parameterizations.

  5. Hydrodynamic effects of air sparging on hollow fiber membranes in a bubble column reactor.

    PubMed

    Xia, Lijun; Law, Adrian Wing-Keung; Fane, Anthony G

    2013-07-01

    Air sparging is now a standard approach to reduce concentration polarization and fouling of membrane modules in membrane bioreactors (MBRs). The hydrodynamic shear stresses, bubble-induced turbulence and cross flows scour the membrane surfaces and help reduce the deposit of foulants onto the membrane surface. However, the detailed quantitative knowledge on the effect of air sparging remains lacking in the literature due to the complex hydrodynamics generated by the gas-liquid flows. To date, there is no valid model that describes the relationship between the membrane fouling performance and the flow hydrodynamics. The present study aims to examine the impact of hydrodynamics induced by air sparging on the membrane fouling mitigation in a quantitative manner. A modelled hollow fiber module was placed in a cylindrical bubble column reactor at different axial heights with the trans-membrane pressure (TMP) monitored under constant flux conditions. The configuration of bubble column without the membrane module immersed was identical to that studied by Gan et al. (2011) using Phase Doppler Anemometry (PDA), to ensure a good quantitative understanding of turbulent flow conditions along the column height. The experimental results showed that the meandering flow regime which exhibits high flow instability at the 0.3 m is more beneficial to fouling alleviation compared with the steady flow circulation regime at the 0.6 m. The filtration tests also confirmed the existence of an optimal superficial air velocity beyond which a further increase is of no significant benefit on the membrane fouling reduction. In addition, the alternate aeration provided by two air stones mounted at the opposite end of the diameter of the bubble column was also studied to investigate the associated flow dynamics and its influence on the membrane filtration performance. It was found that with a proper switching interval and membrane module orientation, the membrane fouling can be effectively

  6. Fluorescence light microscopy of pulmonary surfactant at the air-water interface of an air bubble of adjustable size.

    PubMed

    Knebel, D; Sieber, M; Reichelt, R; Galla, H-J; Amrein, M

    2002-07-01

    The structural dynamics of pulmonary surfactant was studied by epifluorescence light microscopy at the air-water interface of a bubble as a model close to nature for an alveolus. Small unilamellar vesicles of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine, dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol, a small amount of a fluorescent dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine-analog, and surfactant-associated protein C were injected into the buffer solution. They aggregated to large clusters in the presence of Ca(2+) and adsorbed from these units to the interface. This gave rise to an interfacial film that eventually became fully condensed with dark, polygonal domains in a fluorescent matrix. When now the bubble size was increased or decreased, respectively, the film expanded or contracted. Upon expansion of the bubble, the dark areas became larger to the debit of the bright matrix and reversed upon contraction. We were able to observe single domains during the whole process. The film remained condensed, even when the interface was increased to twice its original size. From comparison with scanning force microscopy directly at the air-water interface, the fluorescent areas proved to be lipid bilayers associated with the (dark) monolayer. In the lung, such multilayer phase acts as a reservoir that guarantees a full molecular coverage of the alveolar interface during the breathing cycle and provides mechanical stability to the film.

  7. Detachment force of particles from air-liquid interfaces of films and bubbles.

    PubMed

    Ally, Javed; Kappl, Michael; Butt, Hans-Jürgen; Amirfazli, A

    2010-12-07

    The detachment force required to pull a microparticle from an air-liquid interface is measured using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and the colloidal probe technique. Water, solutions of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), and silicone oils are tested in order to study the effects of surface tension and viscosity. Two different liquid geometries are considered: the air-liquid interface of a bubble and a liquid film on a solid substrate. It was shown that detaching particles from liquid films is fundamentally different than from bubbles or drops due to the restricted flow of the liquid phase. Additional force is required to detach a particle from a film, and the maximum force during detachment is not necessarily at the position where the particle breaks away from the interface (as seen in bubble or drop systems). This is due to the dynamics of meniscus formation and viscous effects, which must be considered if the liquid is constrained in a film. The magnitude of these effects is related to the liquid viscosity, film thickness, and detachment speed.

  8. The dynamic air bubble trap reduces cerebral microembolism during cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Schoenburg, M; Kraus, B; Muehling, A; Taborski, U; Hofmann, H; Erhardt, G; Hein, S; Roth, M; Vogt, P R; Karliczek, G F; Kloevekorn, W-P

    2003-11-01

    Neuropsychologic disorders are common after coronary artery bypass operations. Air microbubbles are identified as a contributing factor. A dynamic bubble trap might reduce the number of gaseous microemboli. A total of 50 patients undergoing coronary artery bypass operation were recruited for this study. In 26 patients a dynamic bubble trap was placed between the arterial filter and the aortic cannula (group 1), and in 24 patients a placebo dynamic bubble trap was used (group 2). The number of high-intensity transient signals within the proximal middle cerebral artery was continuously measured on both sides during bypass, which was separated into 4 periods: phase 1, start of bypass until aortic clamping; phase 2, aortic clamping until rewarming; phase 3, rewarming until clamp removal; and phase 4, clamp removal until end of bypass. S100 beta values were measured before, immediately after, and 6 and 48 hours after the operation and before hospital discharge. The bubble elimination rate during bypass was 77% in group 1 and 28% in group 2 (P <.0001). The number of high-intensity signals was lower in group 1 during phase 1 (5.8 +/- 7.3 vs 16 +/- 15.4, P <.05 vs group 2) and phase 2 (6.9 +/- 7.3 vs 24.2 +/- 27.3, P <.05 vs group 2) but not during phases 3 and 4. Serum S100 beta values were equally increased in both groups immediately after the operation. Group 2 patients had higher S100 beta values 6 hours after the operation and significantly higher S100 beta values 48 hours after the operation (0.06 +/- 0.14 vs 0.18 +/- 0.24, P =.0133 vs group 2). Age and S100 beta values were correlated in group 2 but not in group 1. Gaseous microemboli can be removed with a dynamic bubble trap. Subclinical cerebral injury detectable by increases of S100 beta disappears earlier after surgical intervention.

  9. An air-bubble-actuated micropump for on-chip blood transportation.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Sheng-Hung; Liu, Cheng-Hsien

    2009-06-07

    A novel electrolysis-based micropump using air bubbles to achieve indirect actuation is proposed and demonstrated. Compared with other electrochemical micropumps, our micropump can drive microfluids without inducing the pH value variation in the main channel and the choking/sticking phenomena of electrolytic bubbles. It is promising for biomedical applications, especially for blood transportation. Our proposed on-chip electrolysis-bubble actuator with the features of room temperature operation, low driving voltage, low power consumption and large actuation force not only can minimize the possibility of cell-damage but also may enable portable and implantable lab-on-a-chip microsystems. Utilizing our proposed hydrophobic trapeziform pattern located at the junction of the T-shaped microchannel, the micropump makes the pumped fluid in the main channel be isolated from the electrolytic bubbles. It can be used for a variety of applications without the constraints on the pumped liquid. Experimental results show that the liquid displacement and the pumping rate could be easily and accurately controlled via the signal of a two-phase peristaltic sequence and the periodic generation of electrolytic bubbles. With an applied voltage of 2.5 V, the maximum pumping rate for DI water and whole blood were 121 nl min(-1) and 88 nl min(-1), respectively, with a channel cross section of 100 x 50 microm. Maximum back-pressure of 16 kPa and 11 kPa for DI water and whole blood, respectively, were achieved in our present prototype chips.

  10. Jet drops from bursting bubbles: the importance of bubble shape in producing droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bird, James; Walls, Peter; Henaux, Louis

    2015-11-01

    When wave-entrained bubbles rupture at the air-sea interface, the collapsing cavity produces a central jet that can eject droplets into the atmosphere. Previous experiments and theory predict that the production of these jet drops will be limited by either viscous or gravitational effects. Yet, little is understood about the limits of production when both gravitational and viscous effects are significant. Here, we conduct systematic experiments to explore the conditions necessary for jet drops to form. We propose that the role of gravity is most important before rupture, and carry out simulations that demonstrate the importance of the equilibrium bubble shape in the production of jet drops.

  11. Interfacial structures of confined air-water two-phase bubbly flow

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.; Ishii, M.; Wu, Q.; McCreary, D.; Beus, S.G.

    2000-08-01

    The interfacial structure of the two-phase flows is of great importance in view of theoretical modeling and practical applications. In the present study, the focus is made on obtaining detailed local two-phase parameters in the air-water bubbly flow in a rectangular vertical duct using the double-sensor conductivity probe. The characteristic wall-peak is observed in the profiles of the interracial area concentration and the void fraction. The development of the interfacial area concentration along the axial direction of the flow is studied in view of the interfacial area transport and bubble interactions. The experimental data is compared with the drift flux model with C{sub 0} = 1.35.

  12. Gas Bubbles and Slugs Crossover in Air-Water Two-phase Flow by Multifractals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorski, Grzegorz; Litak, Grzegorz; Mosdorf, Romuald; Rysak, Andrzej

    2017-05-01

    Slugs and bubbles two-phase flow patterns dynamics in a minichannel are analysed. During the experiment, the volume flow rates of air and water were changed. We study transition of bubbles to slugs two-phase flow patterns using Fourier and multifractal approaches to optical transitivity signal. The sequences of light transmission time series are recorded by a laser-phototransistor sensor. Multifractal analysis helps to identify the two-phase structure and estimate the signal complexity. Especially, we discuss occurrence and identification of a self-aggregation phenomenon. These results are compared to corresponding Fourier spectra. The results indicate that the fractality is a an important factor influencing the distribution of the gas phase in water.

  13. Air-bubbling, hollow-fiber reactor with cell bleeding and cross-flow filtration.

    PubMed

    Nishii, K; Sode, K; Karube, I

    1990-05-01

    Continuous asymmetric reduction of dyhydrooxoisophorone (DOIP) to 4-hydroxy-2,2,6-trimethylcyclo-hexanone (4-HTMCH) was achieved by a thermophilic bacterium Bacillus stearothermophilus NK86-0151. Three reactors were used: an air-bubbling hollow-fiber reactor with cell bleeding and cross-flow filtration, an air-lift reactor, and a CSTR with PAA immobilized cells. The maximum cell concentration of 11.1 g dry wt L(-1) was obtained in an air-bubbling hollow-fiber reactor, while in the other reactors the cell densities were between 3.5 and 4.1 g dry wt L(-1) The optimum bleed ratio was 0.1 at the dilution rate 0.3 h(-1) in the hollow-fiber reactor. The highest viable cell concentration was maintained in the dilution range of 0.4-0.7 h(-1) by a combination of proper cell bleeding and cross-flow filtration. The maximum volumetric productivity of 4-HTMCH reached 826 mg L(-1) h(-1) at the dilution rate 0.54 h(-1). This value was 4 and 2 times higher than those in the air-lift reactor and CSTR, respectively. The increasing viable cell concentration increased the volumetric productivity of 4-HTMCH. A cell free product solution was continuously obtained by cross-flow filtration.

  14. Bubble and bubble cloud dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Yoichiro

    2000-07-01

    Cavitation bubbles are formed from small air bubbles, so-called nuclei, with the surrounding pressure reduction caused by the flow, and then, the bubbles shrink and collapse with the surrounding pressure rise. Such volumetric changes of bubbles are calculated in detail and it is found that they are significantly influenced by the internal phenomena, such as thermal diffusion, mist formation due to a homogeneous condensation, mass diffusion between vapor and noncondensable gas, heat and mass transfer through the bubble wall. The structure in cavitating flow interacts with the cavitation bubbles, and those bubbles form a cloud cavitation. It is well known that cloud cavitation is one of the most destructive forms. The behavior of bubble clouds is simulated numerically. An inward propagating shock wave is formed during the collapse of the bubble cloud, and the shock wave and its precursor are focused at the cloud center area. These phenomena associate high frequency pressure oscillations and violent bubble collapses. Those bubble collapses emit high pressure peaks, which are several hundreds times larger than that of a single bubble collapse.

  15. Breaking waves and near-surface sea spray aerosol dependence on changing winds: Wave breaking efficiency and bubble-related air-sea interaction processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, P. A.; Savelyev, I. B.; Anguelova, M. D.

    2016-05-01

    Simultaneous measurements of sea spray aerosol (SSA), wind, wave, and microwave brightness temperature are obtained in the open ocean on-board Floating Instrument Platform (FLIP). These data are analysed to clarify the ocean surface processes important to SSA production. Parameters are formulated to represent surface processes with characteristic length scales spanning a broad range. The investigation reveals distinct differences of the SSA properties in rising winds and falling winds, with higher SSA volume in falling winds. Also, in closely related measurements of whitecap coverage, higher whitecap fraction as a function of wind speed is found in falling winds than in rising winds or in older seas than in younger seas. Similar trend is found in the short scale roughness reflected in the microwave brightness temperature data. In the research of length and velocity scales of breaking waves, it has been observed that the length scale of wave breaking is shorter in mixed seas than in wind seas. For example, source function analysis of short surface waves shows that the characteristic length scale of the dissipation function shifts toward higher wavenumber (shorter wavelength) in mixed seas than in wind seas. Similarly, results from feature tracking or Doppler analysis of microwave radar sea spikes, which are closely associated with breaking waves, show that the magnitude of the average breaking wave velocity is smaller in mixed seas than in wind seas. Furthermore, breaking waves are observed to possess geometric similarity. Applying the results of breaking wave analyses to the SSA and whitecap observations described above, it is suggestive that larger air cavities resulting from the longer breakers are entrained in rising high winds. The larger air cavities escape rapidly due to buoyancy before they can be fully broken down into small bubbles for the subsequent SSA production or whitecap manifestation. In contrast, in falling winds (with mixed seas more likely), the

  16. Ring Bubbles of Dolphins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shariff, Karim; Marten, Ken; Psarakos, Suchi; White, Don J.; Merriam, Marshal (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    The article discusses how dolphins create and play with three types of air-filled vortices. The underlying physics is discussed. Photographs and sketches illustrating the dolphin's actions and physics are presented. The dolphins engage in this behavior on their own initiative without food reward. These behaviors are done repeatedly and with singleminded effort. The first type is the ejection of bubbles which, after some practice on the part of the dolphin, turn into toroidal vortex ring bubbles by the mechanism of baroclinic torque. These bubbles grow in radius and become thinner as they rise vertically to the surface. One dolphin would blow two in succession and guide them to fuse into one. Physicists call this a vortex reconnection. In the second type, the dolphins first create an invisible vortex ring in the water by swimming on their side and waving their tail fin (also called flukes) vigorously. This vortex ring travels horizontally in the water. The dolphin then turns around, finds the vortex and injects a stream of air into it from its blowhole. The air "fills-out" the core of the vortex ring. Often, the dolphin would knock-off a smaller ring bubble from the larger ring (this also involves vortex reconnection) and steer the smaller ring around the tank. One other dolphin employed a few other techniques for planting air into the fluke vortex. One technique included standing vertically in the water with tail-up, head-down and tail piercing the free surface. As the fluke is waved to create the vortex ring, air is entrained from above the surface. Another technique was gulping air in the mouth, diving down, releasing air bubbles from the mouth and curling them into a ring when they rose to the level of the fluke. In the third type, demonstrated by only one dolphin, the longitudinal vortex created by the dorsal fin on the back is used to produce 10-15 foot long helical bubbles. In one technique she swims in a curved path. This creates a dorsal fin vortex since

  17. Ring Bubbles of Dolphins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shariff, Karim; Marten, Ken; Psarakos, Suchi; White, Don J.; Merriam, Marshal (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    The article discusses how dolphins create and play with three types of air-filled vortices. The underlying physics is discussed. Photographs and sketches illustrating the dolphin's actions and physics are presented. The dolphins engage in this behavior on their own initiative without food reward. These behaviors are done repeatedly and with singleminded effort. The first type is the ejection of bubbles which, after some practice on the part of the dolphin, turn into toroidal vortex ring bubbles by the mechanism of baroclinic torque. These bubbles grow in radius and become thinner as they rise vertically to the surface. One dolphin would blow two in succession and guide them to fuse into one. Physicists call this a vortex reconnection. In the second type, the dolphins first create an invisible vortex ring in the water by swimming on their side and waving their tail fin (also called flukes) vigorously. This vortex ring travels horizontally in the water. The dolphin then turns around, finds the vortex and injects a stream of air into it from its blowhole. The air "fills-out" the core of the vortex ring. Often, the dolphin would knock-off a smaller ring bubble from the larger ring (this also involves vortex reconnection) and steer the smaller ring around the tank. One other dolphin employed a few other techniques for planting air into the fluke vortex. One technique included standing vertically in the water with tail-up, head-down and tail piercing the free surface. As the fluke is waved to create the vortex ring, air is entrained from above the surface. Another technique was gulping air in the mouth, diving down, releasing air bubbles from the mouth and curling them into a ring when they rose to the level of the fluke. In the third type, demonstrated by only one dolphin, the longitudinal vortex created by the dorsal fin on the back is used to produce 10-15 foot long helical bubbles. In one technique she swims in a curved path. This creates a dorsal fin vortex since

  18. Laminar Plunging Jets - Interfacial Rupture and Inception of Entrainment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishore, Aravind

    Interfacial rupture and entrainment are commonly observed, e.g., air bubbles within a container being filled with water from a faucet. The example involves a liquid jet (density, rho, and viscosity, η) plunging into a receiving pool of liquid. Below a critical liquid-jet velocity, the interface develops a cusp-like shape within the receiving pool. The cusp becomes sharper with increasing liquid-jet velocity, and at a critical velocity ( Vc), the interface between the liquid and the surrounding fluid (density, rho0, and viscosity, η0) ruptures. Interfacial tension (sigma) can no longer preserve the integrity of the interface between the two immiscible fluids, and the plunging jet drags/entrains surrounding fluid into the receiving pool. Subsequently, the entrained fluid breaks up into bubbles within the receiving pool. The focus of this dissertation is the numerical prediction of the critical entrainment inception velocities for laminar plunging jets using the Volume-Of-Fluid (VOF) method, a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) method to simulate multi-fluid flows. Canonical to bottle-filling operations in the industry is the plunging-jet configuration -- the liquid jet issues from a nozzle and plunges into a container filled with liquid. Simulations of this configuration require capturing flow phenomena over a large range of length scales (4 orders of magnitude). Results show severe under-prediction of critical entrainment velocities when the maximum resolution is insufficient to capture the sharpening, and eventual rupture, of the interfacial cusp. Higher resolutions resulted in computational meshes with prohibitively large number of cells, and a drastic reduction in time-step values. Experimental results in the literature suggest at least a 100-fold increase in the smallest length scale when the entrained fluid is a liquid instead of air. This narrows the range of length scales in the problem. We exploit the experimental correlation between critical capillary

  19. Observations of internal flow inside an evaporating nanofluid sessile droplet in the presence of an entrapped air bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Dong Hwan; Allen, Jeffrey S.; Lee, Seong Hyuk; Choi, Chang Kyoung

    2016-09-01

    Using a unique, near-field microscopy technique, fringe patterns and nanoparticle motions are visualized immediately following a nanofluid droplet deposition on a glass substrate in which an air bubble is entrapped. The nanofluid consists of DI-water, 0.10% Aluminum Oxide nanoparticles with an average diameter of 50 nm, and 0.0005% yellow-green polystyrene fluorescent particles of 1 μm diameter. High-speed, fluorescent-mode confocal imaging enables investigation of depth-wise sectioned particle movements in the nanofluid droplet inside which a bubble is entrapped. The static contact angle is increased when a bubble is applied. In the presence of the bubble in the droplet, the observed flow toward the center of the droplet is opposite to the flow observed in a droplet without the bubble. When the bubble is present, the evaporation process is retarded. Also, random motion is observed in the contact line region instead of the typical evaporation-driven flow toward the droplet edge. Once the bubble bursts, however, the total evaporation time decreases due to the change in the contact line characteristics. Moreover, the area of fringe patterns beneath the bubble increases with time. Discussed herein is a unique internal flow that has not been observed in nanofluid droplet evaporation.

  20. On the breakup of an air bubble injected into a fully developed turbulent flow. Part 1. Breakup frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Bazán, C.; Montañés, J. L.; Lasheras, J. C.

    1999-12-01

    The transient evolution of the bubble-size probability density functions resulting from the breakup of an air bubble injected into a fully developed turbulent water ow has been measured experimentally using phase Doppler particle sizing (PDPA) and image processing techniques. These measurements were used to determine the breakup frequency of the bubbles as a function of their size and of the critical diameter Dc defined as Dc = 1.26 ([sigma]/[rho])3/5[epsilon][minus sign]2/5, where [epsilon] is the rate of dissipation per unit mass and per unit time of the underlying turbulence. A phenomenological model is proposed showing the existence of two distinct bubble size regimes. For bubbles of sizes comparable to Dc, the breakup frequency is shown to increase as ([sigma]/[rho])[minus sign]2/5[epsilon][minus sign]3/5 [surd radical]D/Dc[minus sign]1, while for large bubbles whose sizes are greater than 1.63Dc, it decreases with the bubble size as [epsilon]1/3D[minus sign]2/3. The model is shown to be in good agreement with measurements performed over a wide range of bubble sizes and turbulence intensities.

  1. Observations of internal flow inside an evaporating nanofluid sessile droplet in the presence of an entrapped air bubble

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Dong Hwan; Allen, Jeffrey S.; Lee, Seong Hyuk; Choi, Chang Kyoung

    2016-01-01

    Using a unique, near-field microscopy technique, fringe patterns and nanoparticle motions are visualized immediately following a nanofluid droplet deposition on a glass substrate in which an air bubble is entrapped. The nanofluid consists of DI-water, 0.10% Aluminum Oxide nanoparticles with an average diameter of 50 nm, and 0.0005% yellow-green polystyrene fluorescent particles of 1 μm diameter. High-speed, fluorescent-mode confocal imaging enables investigation of depth-wise sectioned particle movements in the nanofluid droplet inside which a bubble is entrapped. The static contact angle is increased when a bubble is applied. In the presence of the bubble in the droplet, the observed flow toward the center of the droplet is opposite to the flow observed in a droplet without the bubble. When the bubble is present, the evaporation process is retarded. Also, random motion is observed in the contact line region instead of the typical evaporation-driven flow toward the droplet edge. Once the bubble bursts, however, the total evaporation time decreases due to the change in the contact line characteristics. Moreover, the area of fringe patterns beneath the bubble increases with time. Discussed herein is a unique internal flow that has not been observed in nanofluid droplet evaporation. PMID:27615999

  2. Observations of internal flow inside an evaporating nanofluid sessile droplet in the presence of an entrapped air bubble.

    PubMed

    Shin, Dong Hwan; Allen, Jeffrey S; Lee, Seong Hyuk; Choi, Chang Kyoung

    2016-09-12

    Using a unique, near-field microscopy technique, fringe patterns and nanoparticle motions are visualized immediately following a nanofluid droplet deposition on a glass substrate in which an air bubble is entrapped. The nanofluid consists of DI-water, 0.10% Aluminum Oxide nanoparticles with an average diameter of 50 nm, and 0.0005% yellow-green polystyrene fluorescent particles of 1 μm diameter. High-speed, fluorescent-mode confocal imaging enables investigation of depth-wise sectioned particle movements in the nanofluid droplet inside which a bubble is entrapped. The static contact angle is increased when a bubble is applied. In the presence of the bubble in the droplet, the observed flow toward the center of the droplet is opposite to the flow observed in a droplet without the bubble. When the bubble is present, the evaporation process is retarded. Also, random motion is observed in the contact line region instead of the typical evaporation-driven flow toward the droplet edge. Once the bubble bursts, however, the total evaporation time decreases due to the change in the contact line characteristics. Moreover, the area of fringe patterns beneath the bubble increases with time. Discussed herein is a unique internal flow that has not been observed in nanofluid droplet evaporation.

  3. Influence of water depth on the sound generated by air-bubble vibration in the water musical instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohuchi, Yoshito; Nakazono, Yoichi

    2014-06-01

    We have developed a water musical instrument that generates sound by the falling of water drops within resonance tubes. The instrument can give people who hear it the healing effect inherent in the sound of water. The sound produced by falling water drops arises from air- bubble vibrations. To investigate the impact of water depth on the air-bubble vibrations, we conducted experiments at varying values of water pressure and nozzle shape. We found that air-bubble vibration frequency does not change at a water depth of 50 mm or greater. Between 35 and 40 mm, however, the frequency decreases. At water depths of 30 mm or below, the air-bubble vibration frequency increases. In our tests, we varied the nozzle diameter from 2 to 4 mm. In addition, we discovered that the time taken for air-bubble vibration to start after the water drops start falling is constant at water depths of 40 mm or greater, but slower at depths below 40 mm.

  4. Measuring forces and spatiotemporal evolution of thin water films between an air bubble and solid surfaces of different hydrophobicity.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chen; Cui, Xin; Xie, Lei; Liu, Qingxia; Chan, Derek Y C; Israelachvili, Jacob N; Zeng, Hongbo

    2015-01-27

    A combination of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and reflection interference contrast microscopy (RICM) was used to measure simultaneously the interaction force and the spatiotemporal evolution of the thin water film between a bubble in water and mica surfaces with varying degrees of hydrophobicity. Stable films, supported by the repulsive van der Waals-Casimir-Lifshitz force were always observed between air bubble and hydrophilic mica surfaces (water contact angle, θ(w) < 5°) whereas bubble attachment occurred on hydrophobized mica surfaces. A theoretical model, based on the Reynolds lubrication theory and the augmented Young-Laplace equation including the effects of disjoining pressure, provided excellent agreement with experiment results, indicating the essential physics involved in the interaction between air bubble and solid surfaces can be elucidated. A hydrophobic interaction free energy per unit area of the form: WH(h) = -γ(1 - cos θ(w))exp(-h/D(H)) can be used to quantify the attraction between bubble and hydrophobized solid substrate at separation, h, with γ being the surface tension of water. For surfaces with water contact angle in the range 45° < θ(w) < 90°, the decay length DH varied between 0.8 and 1.0 nm. This study quantified the hydrophobic interaction in asymmetric system between air bubble and hydrophobic surfaces, and provided a feasible method for synchronous measurements of the interaction forces with sub-nN resolution and the drainage dynamics of thin films down to nm thickness.

  5. Pachymetry-guided intrastromal air injection ("pachy-bubble") for deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty.

    PubMed

    Ghanem, Ramon C; Ghanem, Marcielle A

    2012-09-01

    To evaluate an innovative technique for intrastromal air injection to achieve deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty (DALK) with bare Descemet membrane (DM). Thirty-four eyes with anterior corneal pathology, including 27 with keratoconus, underwent DALK. After 400 μm trephination with a suction trephine, ultrasound pachymetry was performed 0.8 mm internally from the trephination groove in the 11 to 1 o'clock position. In this area, a 2-mm incision was created, parallel to the groove, with a micrometer diamond knife calibrated to 90% depth of the thinnest measurement. A cannula was inserted through the incision and 0.5 mL of air was injected to dissect the DM from the stroma. After peripheral paracentesis, anterior keratectomy was carried out to bare the DM. A 0.25-mm oversized graft was sutured in place. Overall, 94.1% of eyes achieved DALK. Bare DM was achieved in 30 eyes, and a pre-DM dissection was performed in 2 eyes. Air injection was successful in detaching the DM (achieving the big bubble) in 88.2% of the eyes. In keratoconus eyes, the rate was 88.9%. All cases but one required a single air injection to achieve DM detachment. Microperforations occurred in 5 cases: 3 during manual layer-by-layer dissection after air injection failed to detach the DM, 1 during removal of the residual stroma after big-bubble formation, and 1 during the diamond knife incision. Two cases (5.9%) were converted to penetrating keratoplasty because of macroperforations. The technique was reproducible, safe, and highly effective in promoting DALK with bare DM.

  6. Enriched Air Nitrox Breathing Reduces Venous Gas Bubbles after Simulated SCUBA Diving: A Double-Blind Cross-Over Randomized Trial.

    PubMed

    Souday, Vincent; Koning, Nick J; Perez, Bruno; Grelon, Fabien; Mercat, Alain; Boer, Christa; Seegers, Valérie; Radermacher, Peter; Asfar, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    To test the hypothesis whether enriched air nitrox (EAN) breathing during simulated diving reduces decompression stress when compared to compressed air breathing as assessed by intravascular bubble formation after decompression. Human volunteers underwent a first simulated dive breathing compressed air to include subjects prone to post-decompression venous gas bubbling. Twelve subjects prone to bubbling underwent a double-blind, randomized, cross-over trial including one simulated dive breathing compressed air, and one dive breathing EAN (36% O2) in a hyperbaric chamber, with identical diving profiles (28 msw for 55 minutes). Intravascular bubble formation was assessed after decompression using pulmonary artery pulsed Doppler. Twelve subjects showing high bubble production were included for the cross-over trial, and all completed the experimental protocol. In the randomized protocol, EAN significantly reduced the bubble score at all time points (cumulative bubble scores: 1 [0-3.5] vs. 8 [4.5-10]; P < 0.001). Three decompression incidents, all presenting as cutaneous itching, occurred in the air versus zero in the EAN group (P = 0.217). Weak correlations were observed between bubble scores and age or body mass index, respectively. EAN breathing markedly reduces venous gas bubble emboli after decompression in volunteers selected for susceptibility for intravascular bubble formation. When using similar diving profiles and avoiding oxygen toxicity limits, EAN increases safety of diving as compared to compressed air breathing. ISRCTN 31681480.

  7. Enriched Air Nitrox Breathing Reduces Venous Gas Bubbles after Simulated SCUBA Diving: A Double-Blind Cross-Over Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Souday, Vincent; Koning, Nick J.; Perez, Bruno; Grelon, Fabien; Mercat, Alain; Boer, Christa; Seegers, Valérie; Radermacher, Peter; Asfar, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Objective To test the hypothesis whether enriched air nitrox (EAN) breathing during simulated diving reduces decompression stress when compared to compressed air breathing as assessed by intravascular bubble formation after decompression. Methods Human volunteers underwent a first simulated dive breathing compressed air to include subjects prone to post-decompression venous gas bubbling. Twelve subjects prone to bubbling underwent a double-blind, randomized, cross-over trial including one simulated dive breathing compressed air, and one dive breathing EAN (36% O2) in a hyperbaric chamber, with identical diving profiles (28 msw for 55 minutes). Intravascular bubble formation was assessed after decompression using pulmonary artery pulsed Doppler. Results Twelve subjects showing high bubble production were included for the cross-over trial, and all completed the experimental protocol. In the randomized protocol, EAN significantly reduced the bubble score at all time points (cumulative bubble scores: 1 [0–3.5] vs. 8 [4.5–10]; P < 0.001). Three decompression incidents, all presenting as cutaneous itching, occurred in the air versus zero in the EAN group (P = 0.217). Weak correlations were observed between bubble scores and age or body mass index, respectively. Conclusion EAN breathing markedly reduces venous gas bubble emboli after decompression in volunteers selected for susceptibility for intravascular bubble formation. When using similar diving profiles and avoiding oxygen toxicity limits, EAN increases safety of diving as compared to compressed air breathing. Trial Registration ISRCTN 31681480 PMID:27163253

  8. Significant reduction of air microbubbles with the dynamic bubble trap during cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Schönburg, M; Urbanek, P; Erhardt, G; Kraus, B; Taborski, U; Mühling, A; Hein, S; Roth, M; Tiedtke, H J; Klövekorn, W P

    2001-01-01

    Air microbubbles mostly occur unnoticed during cardiopulmonary bypass and are predominantly responsible for serious postoperative psychoneurological dysfunction. A dynamic bubble trap (DBT), which removes air microbubbles from the arterial blood, was tested in a clinical study. The aim was to evaluate the efficiency of microbubble removal under clinical conditions. As blood passes through the DBT, which is placed in the arterial line between the arterial filter and arterial cannula, it is converted into a rotating stream. The bubbles are directed to the centre of the blood flow and are collected in the distal end of the DBT, from where they are returned to the cardiotomy reservoir. Doppler ultrasonography was used to detect the microbubbles before and after the DBT, and also the number of high-intensity transient signals (HITS) in the right and left middle cerebral artery during extracorporeal circulation. A significant reduction of microbubbles in the arterial line (3,990 before DBT, 537 after, p < 0.001) and HITS in the brain (51 in the DBT group, 77 in the placebo group, p = 0.04) was measured.

  9. Snowflake Impact on the Air-Sea Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, David

    2016-11-01

    The air-sea interface is the site of globally important exchanges of mass, momentum, and heat between the sea and atmosphere. These climate-driving exchanges occur through small-scale processes such as bubble entrainment and bursting, raindrop impact, and wind-wave creation. The physics of snowflakes falling on the sea surface has not been previously considered. High speed imaging of natural snowflakes of characteristic size up to 6.5 mm falling at a mean speed of 1 m/s into an aquarium of chilled seawater reveals a complex multiphase flow. Snowflakes impacting and crossing the air-seawater interface appear to entrain a thin air film which forms micro-bubbles as the snowflake melts. Large, morphologically complex snowflakes may entrain hundreds of micro-bubbles which are up to 0.15 mm in diameter. Large snowflakes melt milliseconds after entry and subsequently form a downward-moving vortex ring of freshwater, evident from the motion of the bubbles it contains, which may penetrate up to 16 mm below the surface. Buoyant freshwater and bubbles then rise, with larger bubbles escaping from the downward flow more quickly than the smaller bubbles. The dissolution and popping of these bubbles represent previously unrecognized sources of air-sea gas transfer and marine aerosol droplet creation, respectively.

  10. Variation of Local Surface Properties of an Air Bubble in Water Caused by Its Interaction with Another Surface.

    PubMed

    Del Castillo, Lorena A; Ohnishi, Satomi; Carnie, Steven L; Horn, Roger G

    2016-08-02

    Surface and hydrodynamic forces acting between an air bubble and a flat mica surface in surfactant-free water and in 1 mM KCl solution have been investigated by observing film drainage using a modified surface force apparatus (SFA). The bubble shapes observed with the SFA are compared to theoretical profiles computed from a model that considers hydrodynamic interactions, surface curvature, and disjoining pressure arising from electrical double layer and van der Waals interactions. It is shown that the bubble experiences double-layer forces, and a final equilibrium wetting film between the bubble and mica surfaces is formed by van der Waals repulsion. However, comparison with the theoretical model reveals that the double-layer forces are not simply a function of surface separation. Rather, they appear to be changed by one of more of the following: the bubble's dynamic deformation, its proximity to another surface, and/or hydrodynamic flow in the aqueous film that separate them. The same comments apply to the hydrodynamic mobility or immobility of the air-water interface. Together the results show that the bubble's surface is "soft" in two senses: in addition to its well-known deformability, its local properties are affected by weak external forces, in this case the electrical double-layer interactions with a nearby surface and hydrodynamic flow in the neighboring aqueous phase.

  11. Numerical and experimental investigations of an air bubble rising in a Carreau-Yasuda shear-thinning liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Premlata, A. R.; Tripathi, Manoj Kumar; Karri, Badarinath; Sahu, Kirti Chandra

    2017-03-01

    The dynamics of an air bubble rising in a quiescent shear-thinning fluid modelled using a simplified Carreau-Yasuda rheological model is investigated numerically and experimentally. For the parameter values considered in the present study, a rising bubble in a shear-thinning fluid exhibits a three-dimensional behaviour. Both path instabilities (zigzagging/spiralling motion) and topological changes are observed for an air bubble rising in a shear-thinning fluid. However, for a Newtonian surrounding fluid, a bubble maintains azimuthal symmetry and rises in a straight path for the same set of parameters. The mechanism of this three-dimensional behaviour is investigated by inspecting the variation of the vertical vorticity component and viscosity. Experiments have also been conducted using a high speed camera to visualise the bubble rise behaviour in both Newtonian and shear-thinning fluids as surrounding media. The shapes and trajectories of the bubble obtained from experiments show a qualitative agreement with those obtained from numerical simulations.

  12. Coalescence of protein-stabilized bubbles undergoing expansion at a simultaneously expanding planar air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Murray, Brent S; Dickinson, Eric; Lau, Cathy Ka; Nelson, Phillip V; Schmidt, Estelle

    2005-05-10

    A novel design of apparatus is described that allows observation of the coalescence stability of bubbles at a planar interface when the planar interface and the bubble surface both expand. Bubbles are introduced beneath the planar air-water interface contained within a square barrier made of perfluorocarbon rubber. The bubbles are then expanded by reducing the air pressure above the interface, while at the same time the rubber barrier is mechanically expanded, maintaining its square shape, to give the same rate and extent of expansion of the planar interface. The area can typically be increased by a factor of three over time scales as short as 0.2 s. This arrangement has been designed to mimic the behavior of aerated products when they exit from a pressurized aeration unit or product dispenser. Compared to results obtained via a previous technique, where it was only possible to expand the bubbles but not the planar interface, the bubbles are less stable. The apparatus has been used to compare the stabilizing effects of ovalbumin, beta-lactoglobulin, whey protein isolate, and sodium caseinate, in a model aqueous food system thickened with 40% invert sugar. Stability improved with increasing concentration of all the proteins and with a decrease in expansion rate, but considerable instability remained even at protein concentrations as high as 4 to 6 wt % and also at very low expansion rates, though the systems were stable in the absence of expansion. However, the stability was greatly improved by the replacement of the above proteins by the hydrocolloids gelatine or polypropylene glycol alginate. Detailed analysis revealed that the coalescence of individual bubbles in clusters of bubbles were not strongly correlated in distance or time, but larger bubbles and bubbles toward the outside of a cluster were found to be, on average, less stable than smaller bubbles and bubbles located more toward the interior of a cluster. The different degrees of stability are discussed

  13. A model of particle removal in a dissolved air flotation tank: importance of stratified flow and bubble size.

    PubMed

    Lakghomi, B; Lawryshyn, Y; Hofmann, R

    2015-01-01

    An analytical model and a computational fluid dynamic model of particle removal in dissolved air flotation were developed that included the effects of stratified flow and bubble-particle clustering. The models were applied to study the effect of operating conditions and formation of stratified flow on particle removal. Both modeling approaches demonstrated that the presence of stratified flow enhanced particle removal in the tank. A higher air fraction was shown to be needed at higher loading rates to achieve the same removal efficiency. The model predictions showed that an optimum bubble size was present that increased with an increase in particle size.

  14. Bubble Drag Reduction Requires Large Bubbles.

    PubMed

    Verschoof, Ruben A; van der Veen, Roeland C A; Sun, Chao; Lohse, Detlef

    2016-09-02

    In the maritime industry, the injection of air bubbles into the turbulent boundary layer under the ship hull is seen as one of the most promising techniques to reduce the overall fuel consumption. However, the exact mechanism behind bubble drag reduction is unknown. Here we show that bubble drag reduction in turbulent flow dramatically depends on the bubble size. By adding minute concentrations (6 ppm) of the surfactant Triton X-100 into otherwise completely unchanged strongly turbulent Taylor-Couette flow containing bubbles, we dramatically reduce the drag reduction from more than 40% to about 4%, corresponding to the trivial effect of the bubbles on the density and viscosity of the liquid. The reason for this striking behavior is that the addition of surfactants prevents bubble coalescence, leading to much smaller bubbles. Our result demonstrates that bubble deformability is crucial for bubble drag reduction in turbulent flow and opens the door for an optimization of the process.

  15. Bubble Drag Reduction Requires Large Bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verschoof, Ruben A.; van der Veen, Roeland C. A.; Sun, Chao; Lohse, Detlef

    2016-09-01

    In the maritime industry, the injection of air bubbles into the turbulent boundary layer under the ship hull is seen as one of the most promising techniques to reduce the overall fuel consumption. However, the exact mechanism behind bubble drag reduction is unknown. Here we show that bubble drag reduction in turbulent flow dramatically depends on the bubble size. By adding minute concentrations (6 ppm) of the surfactant Triton X-100 into otherwise completely unchanged strongly turbulent Taylor-Couette flow containing bubbles, we dramatically reduce the drag reduction from more than 40% to about 4%, corresponding to the trivial effect of the bubbles on the density and viscosity of the liquid. The reason for this striking behavior is that the addition of surfactants prevents bubble coalescence, leading to much smaller bubbles. Our result demonstrates that bubble deformability is crucial for bubble drag reduction in turbulent flow and opens the door for an optimization of the process.

  16. Bubble-Free Containers For Liquids In Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kornfeld, Dale M.; Antar, Basil L.

    1995-01-01

    Reports discuss entrainment of gas bubbles during handling of liquids in microgravity, and one report proposes containers filled with liquids in microgravity without entraining bubbles. Bubbles are troublesome in low-gravity experiments - particularly in biological experiments. Wire-mesh cage retains liquid contents without solid wall, because in microgravity, surface tension of liquid exerts sufficient confining force.

  17. Interaction of the Helium, Hydrogen, Air, Argon, and Nitrogen Bubbles with Graphite Surface in Water.

    PubMed

    Bartali, Ruben; Otyepka, Michal; Pykal, Martin; Lazar, Petr; Micheli, Victor; Gottardi, Gloria; Laidani, Nadhira

    2017-05-24

    The interaction of the confined gas with solid surface immersed in water is a common theme of many important fields such as self-cleaning surface, gas storage, and sensing. For that reason, we investigated the gas-graphite interaction in the water medium. The graphite surface was prepared by mechanical exfoliation of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). The surface chemistry and morphology were studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, profilometry, and atomic force microscopy. The surface energy of HOPG was estimated by contact angle measurements using the Owens-Wendt method. The interaction of gases (Ar, He, H2, N2, and air) with graphite was studied by a captive bubble method, in which the gas bubble was in contact with the exfoliated graphite surface in water media. The experimental data were corroborated by molecular dynamics simulations and density functional theory calculations. The surface energy of HOPG equaled to 52.8 mJ/m(2) and more of 95% of the surface energy was attributed to dispersion interactions. The results on gas-surface interaction indicated that HOPG surface had gasphilic behavior for helium and hydrogen, while gasphobic behavior for argon and nitrogen. The results showed that the variation of the gas contact angle was related to the balance between the gas-surface and gas-gas interaction potentials. For helium and hydrogen the gas-surface interaction was particularly high compared to gas-gas interaction and this promoted the favorable interaction with graphite surface.

  18. Pacing and sensing interference by air bubble surrounding the non-extended helix of intact active fixation lead.

    PubMed

    Oginosawa, Yasushi; Abe, Haruhiko; Ohe, Hisaharu; Hayashi, Katsuhide; Kohno, Ritsuko; Watabe, Taichi; Takahashi, Masao; Fujino, Yoshihisa; Tamura, Masahito; Takeuchi, Masaaki; Otsuji, Yutaka

    2014-01-01

    Active fixation pacing leads with silicon cylinder tips have been used for their safety and flexibility. Measurement of baseline sensing/pacing characteristics before fixation of helix helps to identify the optimal pacing site, but we encountered difficulties in making these measurements despite multiple attempts with the model LPA 1200M lead. To identify the cause and overcome this complication, we compared 4 different retractable active fixation lead models, which enabled baseline sensing/pacing measurements before extension of helix. METHODS AND RESULTS: We immersed 4 different lead tips and rings in a 0.18% saline solution, and measured the lead impedance before and after flushing of air bubble visible inside the lead tip. Before evacuation of the air bubble, the impedance of the model LPA 1200M lead was >4,000 Ω in 8 out of 10 measurements, although that of the other leads was within the measurable range. After evacuation of the air bubble, the lead impedance returned to within the measurable range. There was no prominent change in the impedance of the metal cylinder tip lead. Air bubbles may interfere with the measurement of baseline sensing/pacing characteristics before active fixation of pacing leads with cylindrical silicon tips. In the case of high impedance beyond the measurable range before extension of helix, the measurement should be repeated after fixation into the myocardium before suspecting lead dysfunction.

  19. Hydrophobically-associating cationic polymers as micro-bubble surface modifiers in dissolved air flotation for cyanobacteria cell separation.

    PubMed

    Yap, R K L; Whittaker, M; Diao, M; Stuetz, R M; Jefferson, B; Bulmus, V; Peirson, W L; Nguyen, A V; Henderson, R K

    2014-09-15

    Dissolved air flotation (DAF), an effective treatment method for clarifying algae/cyanobacteria-laden water, is highly dependent on coagulation-flocculation. Treatment of algae can be problematic due to unpredictable coagulant demand during blooms. To eliminate the need for coagulation-flocculation, the use of commercial polymers or surfactants to alter bubble charge in DAF has shown potential, termed the PosiDAF process. When using surfactants, poor removal was obtained but good bubble adherence was observed. Conversely, when using polymers, effective cell removal was obtained, attributed to polymer bridging, but polymers did not adhere well to the bubble surface, resulting in a cationic clarified effluent that was indicative of high polymer concentrations. In order to combine the attributes of both polymers (bridging ability) and surfactants (hydrophobicity), in this study, a commercially-available cationic polymer, poly(dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate) (polyDMAEMA), was functionalised with hydrophobic pendant groups of various carbon chain lengths to improve adherence of polymer to a bubble surface. Its performance in PosiDAF was contrasted against commercially-available poly(diallyl dimethyl ammonium chloride) (polyDADMAC). All synthesised polymers used for bubble surface modification were found to produce positively charged bubbles. When applying these cationic micro-bubbles in PosiDAF, in the absence of coagulation-flocculation, cell removals in excess of 90% were obtained, reaching a maximum of 99% cell removal and thus demonstrating process viability. Of the synthesised polymers, the polymer containing the largest hydrophobic functionality resulted in highly anionic treated effluent, suggesting stronger adherence of polymers to bubble surfaces and reduced residual polymer concentrations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Electrically driven motion of an air bubble on hemispherical oil/water interface by three-phase boundary reactions.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Masanori; Aoki, Koichi; Chen, Jingyuan

    2008-04-15

    Our electrochemical cell consisted of a ferrocene-included hemispherical nitrobenzene (NB) droplet on the glassy carbon (GC) electrode which was immersed in the aqueous solution including sodium sulfate and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). When an air bubble was injected near the boundary between the oil and the aqueous phase, it stayed at the top of the hemisphere on the boundary so that the lower half of the bubble was put in oil and the other half was in water. From the force balance of surface tension and buoyancy of the bubble, the bubble took an energetic minimum at the interface. It sank into the oil phase when ferrocene in the oil was electrochemically oxidized through the GC electrode by the three-phase boundary reaction. The electrochemical reduction caused the bubble to move back toward the aqueous phase. The motion of the bubble was synchronized with the redox reaction of ferrocene. The potential step oxidation showed such a rapid response that the motion could not be attributed to diffusion of ferricenium ion from the three-phase boundary to the bubble. Our idea of explaining the rapidity was the translational motion of the SDS layer along the boundary, which was driven by the difference in the surface concentration of SDS caused by the electrochemical generation of the ferricenium ion. The motion of the SDS layer was demonstrated by the shrinkage of the oil layer spread on the water surface when SDS solution was dropped on the oil layer. The spreading velocity was close to the velocity of propagating the oxidation of ferrocene to the bubble.

  1. Sinking Bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Jeremy; Ewoldt, Randy

    2016-11-01

    Intuition tells us that bubbles will rise and steel objects will sink in liquids, though here we describe the opposite. With experimental demonstration and theoretical rationale, we describe how the motion of containers of liquid with immersed solid objects and air bubbles can cause curious behaviors: sinking bubbles and rising high-density particles. Bubbles and solid spheres of diameter on the order of a few millimeters are introduced into fluids with different rheological constitutive behaviors. Imposed motion of the rigid container allows for control of the trajectories of the immersed particles - without the container imparting direct shearing motion on the fluid. Results demonstrate the necessary conditions to prevent or produce net motion of the bubbles and heavy particles, both with and against gravitational expectations.

  2. Surfactant effects on cumulative drop size distributions produced by air bubbles bursting on a non-quiescent free surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parmar, K.; Liu, X.; Duncan, J. H.

    2013-11-01

    The generation of droplets when air bubbles travel upwards from within a liquid and burst at a free surface is studied experimentally. The bubbles are generated in a glass water tank that is 0.91 m long and 0.46 m wide with a water depth of 0.5 m. The tank is equipped with an acrylic box at its bottom that creates the bubble field using filtered air injected through an array of 180 hypodermic needles (0.33 mm ID). Two different surface conditions are created by using clean water and a 0.4% aqueous solution of Triton X-100 surfactant. Measurements of the bubble diameters as they approach the free surface are obtained with diffuse light shadowgraph images. The range of bubble diameters studied is 2.885 mm to 3.301 mm for clean water and 2.369 mm to 3.014 mm for the surfactant solution. A laser-light high-speed cinematic shadowgraph system is employed to record and measure the diameters and motions of the droplets at the free surface. This system can measure droplets with diameters <= 50 μm. The results show a clear distinction between the droplet distributions obtained in clean water and the surfactant solution. A bimodal droplet distribution is observed for clean water with at least two dominating peaks. For the surfactant solution, a single distribution peak is seen. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation, Division of Ocean Sciences.

  3. Should Air Bubble Detectors Be Used to Quantify Microbubble Activity during Cardiopulmonary Bypass?

    PubMed

    Newland, Richard F; Baker, Robert A; Mazzone, Annette L; Valiyapurayil, Vijaykumar N

    2015-09-01

    Air bubble detectors (ABDs) are utilized during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) to protect against massive air embolism. Stockert (Munich, Germany) ABD quantify microbubbles >300 μm; however, their reliability has not been reported. The aim of this study was to assess the reliability of the microbubble data from the ABD with the SIII and S5 heart-lung machines. Microbubble counts from the ABD with the SIII (SIII ABD) and S5 (S5 ABD) were measured simultaneously with the emboli detection and classification (EDAC) quantifier in 12 CPB procedures using two EDAC detectors and two ABDs in series in the arterial line. Reliability was assessed by the Spearman correlation co-efficient (r) between measurements for each detector type, and between each ABD and EDAC detector for counts >300 μm. No correlation was found between the SIII ABD (r = .008, p = .793). A weak negative correlation was found with the S5 ABD (r = -.16, p < .001). A strong correlation was found between the EDAC detectors (SIII; r = .958, p < .001), (S5; r = .908, p < .001). With counts >300 μm, the SIII ABDs showed a correlation of small-medium effect size between EDAC detectors and ABD1 (r = .286, p < .001 [EDAC1], r = .347, p < .001 [EDAC2]). There was no correlation found between ABD2 and either EDAC detector (r = .003, p = .925 (EDAC1), r = .003, p = .929 [EDAC2]). A correlation between EDAC and the S5 ABD, was not able to be determined due to the low bubble count detected by the EDAC >300 μm. Both SIII ABD and S5 ABD were found to be unreliable for quantification of microbubble activity during CPB in comparison with the EDAC. These results highlight the importance of ensuring that data included in the CPB report is accurate and clinically relevant, and suggests that microbubble counts from devices such as the SIII ABD and S5 ABD should not be reported.

  4. Turbulent Diffusivity under High Winds from Acoustic Measurements of Bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, D. W.; Wijesekera, H. W.; Jarosz, E.; Teague, W. J.; Pegau, W. S.

    2015-12-01

    Breaking surface waves generate layers of bubble clouds as air parcels entrain into the upper-ocean by the action of turbulent motions. The turbulent diffusivity in the bubble cloud layer was investigated by combining measurements of surface winds, waves, bubble acoustic backscatter, currents, and hydrography. These measurements were made at water depths of 60-90 m on the shelf of the Gulf of Alaska near Kayak Island during late December 2012, a period where the ocean was experiencing winds and significant wave heights up to 22 m s-1 and 9 m, respectively. Vertical profiles of acoustic backscatter decayed exponentially from the wave surface with e-folding lengths of about 0.6 to 6 m, while the bubble penetration depths were about 3 to 30 m. Both e-folding lengths and bubble depths were highly correlated with surface wind and wave conditions. The turbulent diffusion coefficients, inferred from e-folding length and bubble depth, varied from about 0.01 m2 s-1 to 0.4 m2 s-1. Our analysis suggests that the turbulent diffusivity in the bubble layer can be parameterized as a function of the cube of the wind friction velocity with a proportionality coefficient that depends weakly on wave age. Furthermore, in the bubble layer, on average, the shear production of the turbulent kinetic energy estimated by the diffusion coefficients was a similar order magnitude as the dissipation rate predicted by the wall boundary-layer theory.

  5. Field-scale tests for determining mixing patterns associated with coarse-bubble air diffuser configurations, Egan Quarry, Illinois

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hornewer, N.J.; Johnson, G.P.; Robertson, Dale M.; Hondzo, Miki

    1997-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Chicago District did field-scale tests in August-September 1996 to determine mixing patterns associated with different configurations of coarse-bubble air diffusers. The tests were done in an approximately 13-meter deep quarry near Chicago, Ill. Three-dimensional velocity, water-temperature, dissolved oxygen concentration, and specific-conductivity profiles were collected from locations between approximately 2 to 30 meters from the diffusers for two sets of five test configurations; one set for stratified and one set for destratified conditions in the quarry. The data-collection methods and instrumentation used to characterize mixing patterns and interactions of coarse-bubble diffusers were successful. An extensive data set was collected and is available to calibrate and verify aeration and stratification models, and to characterize basic features of bubble-plume interaction.

  6. Using Sound To Study the Effect of Frothers on the Breakaway of Air Bubbles at an Underwater Capillary.

    PubMed

    Chu, Pengbo; Pax, Randolph; Li, Ronghao; Langlois, Ray; Finch, James A

    2017-04-04

    Frothers, a class of surfactants, are widely employed in froth flotation to aid the generation of small bubbles. Their action is commonly explained by their ability to hinder coalescence. There are occasional references suggesting that the frother may also play a role in the initial breakup of the injected air mass. This work investigates the possible effect of the frother on breakup by monitoring air bubbles produced quasi-statically at an underwater capillary. Under this condition, breakup is isolated from coalescence and an impact of frothers on the detached bubble can be ascribed to an impact on breakup. The breakaway process was monitored by an acoustic technique along with high-speed cinematography. The results showed that the presence of frothers did influence the breakaway process and that the acoustic technique was able to detect the impact. It was demonstrated that the acoustic frequency and acoustic damping ratio depend upon the frother type and concentration and that they are associated with a liquid jet, which initially excites the bubble and then decays to form a surface wave. The addition of the frother did not influence the formation of the jet but did increase its decay rate, hence, dampening the surface wave. It is postulated that the action of the frother is related to an effect on the magnitude of surface tension gradients.

  7. Acoustic levitation of soap bubbles in air: Beyond the half-wavelength limit of sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zang, Duyang; Lin, Kejun; Li, Lin; Chen, Zhen; Li, Xiaoguang; Geng, Xingguo

    2017-03-01

    We report on the behavior of levitated soap bubbles in a single-axis acoustic field. For a single bubble, its surface in the polar regions is under compression, but in the equatorial region, it is under suction. Levitation becomes unstable when the height of the bubble approaches half the wavelength of the sound wave because horizontal fluctuations lead to a negative recovery force and a negative levitation force. Vertically stacked double bubbles notably can be stable under levitation if their total vertical length is ˜5λ/6, significantly beyond λ/2 in consequence of the formation of a toroidal high-pressure region around the waist of the two bubbles. Our results provide a deeper insight into the stability of acoustic levitation and the coupling between bubbles and sound field.

  8. Cold Heat Release Characteristics of Solidified Oil Droplet-Water Solution Latent Heat Emulsion by Air Bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inaba, Hideo; Morita, Shin-Ichi

    The present work investigates the cold heat-release characteristics of the solidified oil droplets (tetradecane, C14H30, freezing point 278.9 K)/water solution emulsion as a latent heat-storage material having a low melting point. An air bubbles-emulsion direct-contact heat exchange method is selected for the cold heat-results from the solidified oil droplet-emulsion layer. This type of direct-contact method results in the high thermal efficiency. The diameter of air bubbles in the emulsion increases as compared with that in the pure water. The air bubbles blown from a nozzle show a strong mixing behavior during rising in the emulsion. The temperature effectiveness, the sensible heat release time and the latent heat release time have been measured as experimental parameters. The useful nondimensional emulsion level equations for these parameters have been derived in terms of the nondimensional emalsion level expressed the emulsion layer dimensions, Reynolds number for air flow, Stefan number and heat capacity ratio.

  9. Probing Effect of Salinity and pH on Surface Interactions between Air Bubbles and Hydrophobic Solids: Implications on Colloidal Assembly at Air/Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Cui, Xin; Shi, Chen; Zhang, Shuo; Xie, Lei; Liu, Jing; Jiang, Dazhi; Zeng, Hongbo

    2017-04-05

    In this work, bubble probe atomic force microscope (AFM) was employed to quantify the interactions between two air bubbles and between an air bubble and an octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS)-hydrophobized mica under various aqueous conditions. The key parameters (e.g. surface potentials, decay length of hydrophobic attraction) were obtained by analyzing the measured forces through a theoretical model based on Reynolds lubrication theory and augmented Young-Laplace equation by including effect of disjoining pressure. The bubble-OTS hydrophobic attraction with a decay length of 1.0 nm was found to be independent of solution pH and salinity. These parameters were further used to predict the attachment of OTS-hydrophobized particles onto air/water interface, demonstrating that particle attachment driven by hydrophobic attraction could be facilitated by suppressing electrical double-layer repulsion at low pH or high salinity condition. This facile methodology can be readily extended to quantify interactions of many other colloidal particles with gas/water and oil/water interfaces, with implications on colloidal assembly at different interfaces in many engineering applications.

  10. Exploiting zone trapping to avoid liberation of air bubbles in flow-based analytical procedures requiring heating.

    PubMed

    Vida, Ana C F; Zagatto, Elias A G

    2014-01-01

    In flow-based analytical procedures requiring heating, liberation of air bubbles is avoided by trapping a sample selected portion into a heated hermetic environment. The flow-through cuvette is maintained into a temperature-controlled aluminium block, thus acting as the trapping element and allowing real-time monitoring. The feasibility of the innovation was demonstrated in the spectrophotometric catalytic determination of vanadium in mineral waters. Air bubbles were not released even for temperatures as high as 95°C. The proposed system handles about 25 samples per hour, requires only 3 mg p-anisidine per determination and yields precise results (r.s.d. = 2.1%), in agreement with ICP-MS. Detection limit was evaluated (3.3 σ criterion) as 0.1 μg L(-1) V.

  11. Gas bubbles in fossil amber as possible indicators of the major gas composition of ancient air

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berner, R.A.; Landis, G.P.

    1988-01-01

    Gases trapped in Miocene to Upper Cretaceous amber were released by gently crushing the amber under vacuum and were analyzed by quadrupole mass spectrometry. After discounting the possibility that the major gases N2, O2, and CO2 underwent appreciable diffusion and diagenetic exchange with their surroundings or reaction with the amber, it has been concluded that in primary bubbles (gas released during initial breakage) these gases represent mainly original ancient air modified by the aerobic respiration of microorganisms. Values of N2/(CO2+O2) for each time period give consistent results despite varying O2/CO2 ratios that presumably were due to varying degrees of respiration. This allows calculation of original oxygen concentrations, which, on the basis of these preliminary results, appear to have changed from greater than 30 percent O2 during one part ofthe Late Cretaceous (between 75 and 95 million years ago) to 21 percent during the Eocene-Oligocene and for present-day samples, with possibly lower values during the Oligocene-Early Miocene. Variable O2 levels over time in general confirm theoretical isotope-mass balance calculations and suggest that the atmosphere has evolved over Phanerozoic time.

  12. Bioremediation of crystal violet using air bubble bioreactor packed with Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    El-Naggar, Manal A; El-Aasar, Samy A; Barakat, Khlood I

    2004-12-01

    Seven water and sediment samples were collected and tested for decolorizing crystal violet. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was the most effective isolate for dye decolorization. The LC(50) of the crystal violet (115 mg/l) was measured using Artemia salina as a biomarker. The effect of different heavy metals on crystal violet decolorization was investigated. Cd(2+) and Fe(3+) ions showed marginal enhancement of the decolorization process, the rate was 1.35 mg/l/h compared to 1.25 mg/l/h for the control. Phenol and m-cresol showed no effect on crystal violet decolorization, meanwhile p-cresol and p-nitrophenol reduced the decolorization rate to 1.07 and 0.01 mg/l/h, respectively. P. aeruginosa cells were immobilized by entrapment in agar-alginate beads. The beads were cultivated and reused in Erlenmeyer flask and in an air bubble column bioreactor and they enhanced the crystal violet decolorization rate to 3.33 and 7.5 mg/l/h, respectively.

  13. Gasification of torrefied Miscanthus × giganteus in an air-blown bubbling fluidized bed gasifier.

    PubMed

    Xue, G; Kwapinska, M; Horvat, A; Kwapinski, W; Rabou, L P L M; Dooley, S; Czajka, K M; Leahy, J J

    2014-05-01

    Torrefaction is suggested to be an effective method to improve the fuel properties of biomass and gasification of torrefied biomass should provide a higher quality product gas than that from unprocessed biomass. In this study, both raw and torrefied Miscanthus × giganteus (M×G) were gasified in an air-blown bubbling fluidized bed (BFB) gasifier using olivine as the bed material. The effects of equivalence ratio (ER) (0.18-0.32) and bed temperature (660-850°C) on the gasification performance were investigated. The results obtained suggest the optimum gasification conditions for the torrefied M × G are ER 0.21 and 800°C. The product gas from these process conditions had a higher heating value (HHV) of 6.70 MJ/m(3), gas yield 2m(3)/kg biomass (H2 8.6%, CO 16.4% and CH4 4.4%) and cold gas efficiency 62.7%. The comparison between raw and torrefied M × G indicates that the torrefied M × G is more suitable BFB gasification. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Effects of ice crystal surface roughness and air bubble inclusions on cirrus cloud radiative properties from remote sensing perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Guanglin; Panetta, R. Lee; Yang, Ping; Kattawar, George W.; Zhai, Peng-Wang

    2017-07-01

    We study the combined effects of surface roughness and inhomogeneity on the optical scattering properties of ice crystals and explore the consequent implications to remote sensing of cirrus cloud properties. Specifically, surface roughness and inhomogeneity are added to the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) collection 6 (MC6) cirrus cloud particle habit model. Light scattering properties of the new habit model are simulated using a modified version of the Improved Geometric Optics Method (IGOM). Both inhomogeneity and surface roughness affect the single scattering properties significantly. In visible bands, inhomogeneity and surface roughness both tend to smooth the phase function and eliminate halos and the backscattering peak. The asymmetry parameter varies with the degree of surface roughness following a U shape - decreases and then increases - with a minimum at around 0.15, whereas it decreases monotonically with the air bubble volume fraction. Air bubble inclusions significantly increase phase matrix element -P12 for scattering angles between 20°-120°, whereas surface roughness has a much weaker effect, increasing -P12 slightly from 60°-120°. Radiative transfer simulations and cirrus cloud property retrievals are conducted by including both the factors. In terms of surface roughness and air bubble volume fraction, retrievals of cirrus cloud optical thickness or the asymmetry parameter using solar bands show similar patterns of variation. Polarimetric simulations using the MC6 cirrus cloud particle habit model are shown to be more consistent with observations when both surface roughness and inhomogeneity are simultaneously considered.

  15. The use of an air bubble curtain to reduce the received sound levels for harbor porpoises (Phocoena phocoena).

    PubMed

    Lucke, Klaus; Lepper, Paul A; Blanchet, Marie-Anne; Siebert, Ursula

    2011-11-01

    In December 2005 construction work was started to replace a harbor wall in Kerteminde harbor, Denmark. A total of 175 wooden piles were piled into the ground at the waters edge over a period of 3 months. During the same period three harbor porpoises were housed in a marine mammal facility on the opposite side of the harbor. All animals showed strong avoidance reactions after the start of the piling activities. As a measure to reduce the sound exposure for the animals an air bubble curtain was constructed and operated in a direct path between the piling site and the opening of the animals' semi-natural pool. The sound attenuation effect achieved with this system was determined by quantitative comparison of pile driving impulses simultaneously measured in front of and behind the active air bubble curtain. Mean levels of sound attenuation over a sequence of 95 consecutive pile strikes were 14 dB (standard deviation (s.d.) 3.4 dB) for peak to peak values and 13 dB (s.d. 2.5 dB) for SEL values. As soon as the air bubble curtain was installed and operated, no further avoidance reactions of the animals to the piling activities were apparent.

  16. Investigation of Bubble-Slag Layer Behaviors with Hybrid Eulerian-Lagrangian Modeling and Large Eddy Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Linmin; Li, Baokuan

    2016-08-01

    In ladle metallurgy, bubble-liquid interaction leads to complex phase structures. Gas bubble behavior, as well as the induced slag layer behavior, plays a significant role in the refining process and the steel quality. In the present work, a mathematical model using the large eddy simulation (LES) is developed to investigate the bubble transport and slag layer behavior in a water model of an argon-stirred ladle. The Eulerian volume of fluid model is adopted to track the liquid steel-slag-air free surfaces while the Lagrangian discrete phase model is used for tracking and handling the dynamics of discrete bubbles. The bubble coalescence is considered using O'Rourke's algorithm to solve the bubble diameter redistribution and bubbles are removed after leaving the air-liquid interface. The turbulent liquid flow that is induced by bubble-liquid interaction is solved by LES. The slag layer fluactuation, slag droplet entrainment and spout eye open-close phenomenon are well revealed. The bubble diameter distribution and the spout eye size are compared with the experiment. The results show that the hybrid Eulerian-Lagrangian-LES model provides a valid modeling framework to predict the unsteady gas bubble-slag layer coupled behaviors.

  17. Air emission into a water shear layer through porous media. Part 1: Scaling of bubble creation noise

    SciTech Connect

    Myer, E.C.; Marboe, R.C.

    1994-12-31

    In many industrial processes, including aeration systems and reduction of cavitation induced vibration and erosion in hydroturbine casings, it is advantageous to be able to create gas bubbles with specific size distributions, higher uniform or widely distributed in diameter, depending on the situation. The induced noise and vibration associated with such systems is of increasing concern due to hearing protection standards and structural fatigue of the casing and piping. A convenient way to generate a two-phase distribution within a water pipe is to span the pipe with a streamlined surface such as a two dimensional hydrofoil and emit air through a porous medium into the shear flow over the hydrofoil. Such a hydrofoil was built and mounted in the ARL Penn state 30.5 cm diameter water tunnel. Air was introduced into a plenum within the hydrofoil which provided air evenly to the entire surface of the centered stainless steel cover plates (20 and 100 micron porosities). Air bubbles formed at the surfaces of the cover plates through the breakdown of small jets of air issuing from the pores. The effects of the air jet size and momentum on the formation noise for a given set of conditions were evaluated by using the two different porosities of sintered metal and through the use of an array of 20, 1.2 mm diameter orifices. A variation in the shear layer was achieved by discharge through plates mounted on either the pressure or suction side of the foil. The noise due to bubble creation and transport through the highly turbulent foil wake was measured by a 2.5 cm diameter hydrophone mounted on the water tunnel window.

  18. Thermocapillary Flow and Aggregation of Bubbles on a Solid Wall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasumi, Hiroki; Solomentsev, Yuri E.; Guelcher, Scott A.; Anderson, John L.; Sides, Paul J.

    2000-01-01

    were equated by using a wall hindrance parameter q: U = qu [1] which shows the velocity of bubble is proportional to the entraining velocity. The hindrance parameter q can experimentally be measured independently. q can also be calculated by solving the equations of motion for a bubble translating parallel to a solid wall. The experimental cell is cylindrical with an ID of 10 cm and consists of a 1 cm deep main cell filled with silicone oil and flanked by two thermal reservoirs. The upper thermal reservoir was heated and the lower thermal reservoir was cooled so that the bubbles aggregate. Two types of silicone oil (eta = 0.02 and 0.50 Pa s) were used. Two equal sized air bubbles were injected into the cell with a syringe. The center-to-center distance of bubbles was observed through a microscope. Bubble radius ranged from 0.40 mm to 0.65 mm and the temperature gradients along with the cell ranged from 1400 to 5000 K/m. The bubbles aggregated when heat flows from the wall to the fluid. The velocities of bubbles were in the range of 1 - 10 microns/s. The separation r decreased more quickly when the temperature gradient was higher, bubble size was larger, and the oil viscosity was lower. r decreased more rapidly as the bubbles approached each other. Dimensionless time was arbitrarily set to be zero when the dimensionless center-to-center distance between the bubbles was 4. All the bubble trajectories fall onto one line, especially in the range of dimensionless distance from 4 to 3. This means the relative movement of the bubble pair is proportional to the temperature gradient and bubble size and it is inversely proportional to the viscosity of the oil. This result strongly suggests that the thermocapillary flow-based aggregation mechanism is correct. A value of q can be estimated by fitting the scaled data to Eq. [1]. A best fit value of q was obtained as q = 0.26 with a standard deviation of 0.03. Independent experimental results for q for a 0.5 mm radius bubble, give

  19. ENTRAINMENT BY LIGAMENT-CONTROLLED EFFERVESCENT ATOMIZER-PRODUCED SPRAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Entrainment of ambient air into sprays produced by a new type of effervescent atomizer is reported. Entrainment data were obtained using a device similar to that described by Ricou & Spalding (1961). Entrainment data were analyzed using the model of Bush & Sojka (1994), in concer...

  20. ENTRAINMENT BY LIGAMENT-CONTROLLED EFFERVESCENT ATOMIZER-PRODUCED SPRAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Entrainment of ambient air into sprays produced by a new type of effervescent atomizer is reported. Entrainment data were obtained using a device similar to that described by Ricou & Spalding (1961). Entrainment data were analyzed using the model of Bush & Sojka (1994), in concer...

  1. Development of an air bubble curtain to reduce underwater noise of percussive piling.

    PubMed

    Würsig, B; Greene, C R; Jefferson, T A

    2000-02-01

    Underwater bubbles can inhibit sound transmission through water due to density mismatch and concomitant reflection and absorption of sound waves. For the present study, a perforated rubber hose was used to produce a bubble curtain, or screen, around pile-driving activity in 6-8-m depth waters of western Hong Kong. The percussive hammer blow sounds of the pile driver were measured on 2 days at distances of 250, 500, and 1000 m; broadband pulse levels were reduced by 3-5 dB by the bubble curtain. Sound intensities were measured from 100 Hz to 25.6 kHz, and greatest sound reduction by the bubble curtain was evident from 400 to 6400 Hz. Indo-Pacific hump-backed dolphins (Sousa chinensis) occurred in the immediate area of the industrial activity before and during pile driving, but with a lower abundance immediately after it. While hump-backed dolphins generally showed no overt behavioral changes with and without pile driving, their speeds of travel increased during pile driving, indicating that bubble screening did not eliminate all behavioral responses to the loud noise. Because the bubble curtain effectively lowered sound levels within 1 km of the activity, the experiment and its application during construction represented a success, and this measure should be considered for other appropriate areas with high industrial noises and resident or migrating sound-sensitive animals.

  2. Bubbling cell death: A hot air balloon released from the nucleus in the cold

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Cell death emanating from the nucleus is largely unknown. In our recent study, we determined that when temperature is lowered in the surrounding environment, apoptosis stops and bubbling cell death (BCD) occurs. The study concerns the severity of frostbite. When exposed to severe cold and strong ultraviolet (UV) irradiation, people may suffer serious damages to the skin and internal organs. This ultimately leads to limb amputations, organ failure, and death. BCD is defined as “formation of a single bubble from the nucleus per cell and release of this swelling bubble from the cell surface to extracellular space that causes cell death.” When cells are subjected to UV irradiation and/or brief cold shock (4℃ for 5 min) and then incubated at room temperature or 4℃ for time-lapse microscopy, each cell releases an enlarging nuclear gas bubble containing nitric oxide. Certain cells may simultaneously eject hundreds or thousands of exosome-like particles. Unlike apoptosis, no phosphatidylserine flip-over, mitochondrial apoptosis, damage to Golgi complex, and chromosomal DNA fragmentation are shown in BCD. When the temperature is increased back at 37℃, bubble formation stops and apoptosis restarts. Mechanistically, proapoptotic WW domain-containing oxidoreductase and p53 block the protective TNF receptor adaptor factor 2 that allows nitric oxide synthase 2 to synthesize nitric oxide and bubble formation. In this mini-review, updated knowledge in cell death and the proposed molecular mechanism for BCD are provided. PMID:27075929

  3. Bubbling cell death: A hot air balloon released from the nucleus in the cold.

    PubMed

    Chang, Nan-Shan

    2016-06-01

    Cell death emanating from the nucleus is largely unknown. In our recent study, we determined that when temperature is lowered in the surrounding environment, apoptosis stops and bubbling cell death (BCD) occurs. The study concerns the severity of frostbite. When exposed to severe cold and strong ultraviolet (UV) irradiation, people may suffer serious damages to the skin and internal organs. This ultimately leads to limb amputations, organ failure, and death. BCD is defined as "formation of a single bubble from the nucleus per cell and release of this swelling bubble from the cell surface to extracellular space that causes cell death." When cells are subjected to UV irradiation and/or brief cold shock (4℃ for 5 min) and then incubated at room temperature or 4℃ for time-lapse microscopy, each cell releases an enlarging nuclear gas bubble containing nitric oxide. Certain cells may simultaneously eject hundreds or thousands of exosome-like particles. Unlike apoptosis, no phosphatidylserine flip-over, mitochondrial apoptosis, damage to Golgi complex, and chromosomal DNA fragmentation are shown in BCD. When the temperature is increased back at 37℃, bubble formation stops and apoptosis restarts. Mechanistically, proapoptotic WW domain-containing oxidoreductase and p53 block the protective TNF receptor adaptor factor 2 that allows nitric oxide synthase 2 to synthesize nitric oxide and bubble formation. In this mini-review, updated knowledge in cell death and the proposed molecular mechanism for BCD are provided. © 2016 by the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine.

  4. Near Surface Vapor Bubble Layers in Buoyant Low Stretch Burning of Polymethylmethacrylate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, Sandra L.; Tien, J. S.

    1999-01-01

    Large-scale buoyant low stretch stagnation point diffusion flames over solid fuel (polymethylmethacrylate) were studied for a range of aerodynamic stretch rates of 2-12/ sec which are of the same order as spacecraft ventilation-induced stretch in a microgravity environment. An extensive layer of polymer material above the glass transition temperature is observed. Unique phenomena associated with this extensive glass layer included substantial swelling of the burning surface, in-depth bubble formation, and migration and/or elongation of the bubbles normal to the hot surface. The bubble layer acted to insulate the polymer surface by reducing the effective conductivity of the solid. The reduced in-depth conduction stabilized the flame for longer than expected from theory neglecting the bubble layer. While buoyancy acts to move the bubbles deeper into the molten polymer, thermocapillary forces and surface regression both act to bring the bubbles to the burning surface. Bubble layers may thus be very important in low gravity (low stretch) burning of materials. As bubbles reached the burning surface, monomer fuel vapors jetted from the surface, enhancing burning by entraining ambient air flow. Popping of these bubbles at the surface can expel burning droplets of the molten material, which may increase the fire propagation hazards at low stretch rates.

  5. Turbulent water flow in a channel at Reτ = 400 laden with 0.25 mm diameter air-bubbles clustered near the wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakehal, D.; Métrailler, D.; Reboux, S.

    2017-06-01

    This paper presents Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) results of a turbulent water flow in a channel at Reτ = 400 laden with 0.25 mm diameter air bubbles clustered near the wall (maximum void fraction of α = 8% at y+ ˜ 20). The bubbles were fully resolved using the level set approach built within the CFD/CMFD code TransAT. The fluid properties (air and water) were kept real, including density, viscosity, and surface tension coefficient. The aim of this work is to understand the effects of the bubbles on near-wall turbulence, paving the way towards convective wall-boiling flow studies. The interactions between the gas bubbles and the water stream were studied through an in-depth analysis of the turbulence statistics. The near-wall flow is overall affected by the bubbles, which act like roughness elements during the early phase, prior to their departure from the wall. The average profiles are clearly altered by the bubbles dynamics near the wall, which somewhat contrasts with the findings from similar studies [J. Lu and G. Tryggvason, "Dynamics of nearly spherical bubbles in a turbulent channel upflow," J. Fluid Mech. 732, 166 (2013)], most probably because the bubbles were introduced uniformly in the flow and not concentrated at the wall. The shape of the bubbles measured as the apparent to initial diameter ratio is found to change by a factor of at least two, in particular at the later stages when the bubbles burst out from the boundary layer. The clustering of the bubbles seems to be primarily localized in the zone populated by high-speed streaks and independent of their size. More importantly, the bubbly flow seems to differ from the single-phase flow in terms of turbulent stress distribution and energy exchange, in which all the stress components seem to be increased in the region very close to the wall, by up to 40%. The decay in the energy spectra near the wall was found to be significantly slower for the bubbly flow than for a single-phase flow, which

  6. Air bubble contact with endothelial cells in vitro induces calcium influx and IP3-dependent release of calcium stores

    PubMed Central

    Sobolewski, Peter; Kandel, Judith; Klinger, Alexandra L.

    2011-01-01

    Gas embolism is a serious complication of decompression events and clinical procedures, but the mechanism of resulting injury remains unclear. Previous work has demonstrated that contact between air microbubbles and endothelial cells causes a rapid intracellular calcium transient and can lead to cell death. Here we examined the mechanism responsible for the calcium rise. Single air microbubbles (50–150 μm), trapped at the tip of a micropipette, were micromanipulated into contact with individual human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) loaded with Fluo-4 (a fluorescent calcium indicator). Changes in intracellular calcium were then recorded via epifluorescence microscopy. First, we confirmed that HUVECs rapidly respond to air bubble contact with a calcium transient. Next, we examined the involvement of extracellular calcium influx by conducting experiments in low calcium buffer, which markedly attenuated the response, or by pretreating cells with stretch-activated channel blockers (gadolinium chloride or ruthenium red), which abolished the response. Finally, we tested the role of intracellular calcium release by pretreating cells with an inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) receptor blocker (xestospongin C) or phospholipase C inhibitor (neomycin sulfate), which eliminated the response in 64% and 67% of cases, respectively. Collectively, our results lead us to conclude that air bubble contact with endothelial cells causes an influx of calcium through a stretch-activated channel, such as a transient receptor potential vanilloid family member, triggering the release of calcium from intracellular stores via the IP3 pathway. PMID:21633077

  7. Air bubble contact with endothelial cells in vitro induces calcium influx and IP3-dependent release of calcium stores.

    PubMed

    Sobolewski, Peter; Kandel, Judith; Klinger, Alexandra L; Eckmann, David M

    2011-09-01

    Gas embolism is a serious complication of decompression events and clinical procedures, but the mechanism of resulting injury remains unclear. Previous work has demonstrated that contact between air microbubbles and endothelial cells causes a rapid intracellular calcium transient and can lead to cell death. Here we examined the mechanism responsible for the calcium rise. Single air microbubbles (50-150 μm), trapped at the tip of a micropipette, were micromanipulated into contact with individual human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) loaded with Fluo-4 (a fluorescent calcium indicator). Changes in intracellular calcium were then recorded via epifluorescence microscopy. First, we confirmed that HUVECs rapidly respond to air bubble contact with a calcium transient. Next, we examined the involvement of extracellular calcium influx by conducting experiments in low calcium buffer, which markedly attenuated the response, or by pretreating cells with stretch-activated channel blockers (gadolinium chloride or ruthenium red), which abolished the response. Finally, we tested the role of intracellular calcium release by pretreating cells with an inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) receptor blocker (xestospongin C) or phospholipase C inhibitor (neomycin sulfate), which eliminated the response in 64% and 67% of cases, respectively. Collectively, our results lead us to conclude that air bubble contact with endothelial cells causes an influx of calcium through a stretch-activated channel, such as a transient receptor potential vanilloid family member, triggering the release of calcium from intracellular stores via the IP3 pathway.

  8. Upper ocean bubble measurements from the NE Pacific and estimates of their role in air-sea gas transfer of the weakly soluble gases nitrogen and oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vagle, Svein; McNeil, Craig; Steiner, Nadja

    2010-12-01

    Simultaneous observations of upper-ocean bubble clouds, and dissolved gaseous nitrogen (N2) and oxygen (O2) from three winter storms are presented and analyzed. The data were collected on the Canadian Surface Ocean Lower Atmosphere Study (C-SOLAS) mooring located near Ocean Station Papa (OSP) at 50°N, 145°W in the NE Pacific during winter of 2003/2004. The bubble field was measured using an upward looking 200 kHz echosounder. Direct estimates of bubble mediated gas fluxes were made using assumed bubble size spectra and the upward looking echosounder data. A one-dimensional biogeochemical model was used to help compare data and various existing models of bubble mediated air-sea gas exchange. The direct bubble flux calculations show an approximate quadratic/cubic dependence on mean bubble penetration depth. After scaling from N2/O2 to carbon dioxide, near surface, nonsupersaturating, air-sea transfer rates, KT, for U10 > 12 m s-1 fall between quadratic and cubic relationships. Estimates of the subsurface bubble induced air injection flux, VT, show an approximate quadratic/cubic dependence on mean bubble penetration depth. Both KT and VT are much higher than those measured during Hurricane Frances over the wind speed range 12 < U10 < 23 m s-1. This result implies that over the open ocean and this wind speed range, older and more developed seas which occur during winter storms are more effective in exchanging gases between the atmosphere and ocean than younger less developed seas which occur during the rapid passage of a hurricane.

  9. Bubbles Within Bubbles

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-06-05

    This infrared image from NASA Spitzer Space Telescope shows a striking example of what is called a hierarchical bubble structure, in which one giant bubble, carved into the dust of space by massive stars, has triggered the formation of smaller bubbles.

  10. What is the Shape of an Air Bubble on a Liquid Surface?

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Miguel A C; Arscott, Steve; Cox, Simon J; Teixeira, Paulo I C

    2015-12-29

    We have calculated the equilibrium shape of the axially symmetric meniscus along which a spherical bubble contacts a flat liquid surface by analytically integrating the Young-Laplace equation in the presence of gravity, in the limit of large Bond numbers. This method has the advantage that it provides semianalytical expressions for key geometrical properties of the bubble in terms of the Bond number. Results are in good overall agreement with experimental data and are consistent with fully numerical (Surface Evolver) calculations. In particular, we are able to describe how the bubble shape changes from hemispherical, with a flat, shallow bottom, to lenticular, with a deeper, curved bottom, as the Bond number is decreased.

  11. Air bubble in anterior chamber as indicator of full-thickness incisions in femtosecond-assisted astigmatic keratotomy.

    PubMed

    Vaddavalli, Pravin K; Hurmeric, Volkan; Yoo, Sonia H

    2011-09-01

    Femtosecond-assisted astigmatic keratotomy is predictable and precise but may occasionally lead to a full-thickness incision on the cornea and the attendant complications. The presence of an air bubble in the anterior chamber soon after creation of the keratotomy by the femtosecond laser may indicate a full-thickness incision. We present a case in which recognition of this clinical finding early in the procedure might have prevented undesirable complications, such as leakage of aqueous and the potential for intraocular infection. Copyright © 2011 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Non-dispersive atomic-fluorescence spectrometry of trace amounts of bismuth by introduction of its gaseous hydride into a premixed argon (entrained air)-hydrogen flame.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, S; Nakahara, T; Musha, S

    1979-10-01

    A method has been developed for the determination of bismuth by generation of its gaseous hydride and introduction of the hydride into a premixed argon (entrained air)-hydrogen flame, the atomic-fluorescence lines from which are all detected by use of a non-dispersive system. The detection limit is 5 pg/ml, or 0.1 ng of bismuth, but the reagent blank found in a 20-ml sample volume was approximately 2 ng of bismuth. Analytical working curves obtained by measuring peak-heights and integrated peak-areas of the signals are linear over a range of about four orders of magnitude from the detection limit. Perchloric, phosphoric and sulphuric acids up to 2.0M concentration give no interference, but nitric acid gives slight depression of the signal. The presence of silver, gold, nickel, palladium, platinum, selenium and tellurium in 1000-fold ratio to bismuth causes pronounced depression of the signal, whereas mercury and tin slightly enhance the atomic-fluorescence signal. The method has been applied to the determination of bismuth in aluminium-base alloys and sulphide ores with use of the standard additions method. The results are in good agreement with those obtained by flame atomic-absorption spectrometry and optical emission spectrometry with an inductively coupled plasma.

  13. The Making of an Air-Supported Campus. Antioch's Bubble. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brann, James

    The inflation of the vinyl bubble by Antioch students and faculty climaxed more than a year of study, planning, dealing with contractors, county officials, manufacturers of equipment and materials--and maturing the technology of pneumatic buildings. These activities were combined into what Antioch calls a "process-oriented curriculum."…

  14. REFERENCE DESIGN STUDY OF MIST-JET PROPULSION SYSTEMS IN CAPTURED-AIR-BUBBLE SHIPS,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    bubble surface effect ships with a Mist-Jet, a water - jet , and a propeller propulsion system were examined. Based on cost per ton mile, payload, and...low development cost as compared to the water - jet or the supercavitating controllable-pitch propeller systems. (Author)

  15. Large Eddy Simulation of Bubbly Flow and Slag Layer Behavior in Ladle with Discrete Phase Model (DPM)-Volume of Fluid (VOF) Coupled Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Linmin; Liu, Zhongqiu; Cao, Maoxue; Li, Baokuan

    2015-07-01

    In the ladle metallurgy process, the bubble movement and slag layer behavior is very important to the refining process and steel quality. For the bubble-liquid flow, bubble movement plays a significant role in the phase structure and causes the unsteady complex turbulent flow pattern. This is one of the most crucial shortcomings of the current two-fluid models. In the current work, a one-third scale water model is established to investigate the bubble movement and the slag open-eye formation. A new mathematical model using the large eddy simulation (LES) is developed for the bubble-liquid-slag-air four-phase flow in the ladle. The Eulerian volume of fluid (VOF) model is used for tracking the liquid-slag-air free surfaces and the Lagrangian discrete phase model (DPM) is used for describing the bubble movement. The turbulent liquid flow is induced by bubble-liquid interactions and is solved by LES. The procedure of bubble coming out of the liquid and getting into the air is modeled using a user-defined function. The results show that the present LES-DPM-VOF coupled model is good at predicting the unsteady bubble movement, slag eye formation, interface fluctuation, and slag entrainment.

  16. Bubble drag reduction requires large bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verschoof, Ruben; van der Veen, Roeland; Sun, Chao; Lohse, Detlef

    2016-11-01

    In the maritime industry, the injection of air bubbles into the turbulent boundary layer under the ship hull is seen as one of the most promising techniques to reduce the overall fuel consumption. A few volume percent (<= 4 %) of bubbles can reduce the overall drag up to 40% and beyond. However, the exact mechanism is unknown, thus hindering further progress and optimization. Here we show that bubble drag reduction in turbulent flow dramatically depends on the bubble size. By adding minute concentrations (6 ppm) of the surfactant Triton X-100 into otherwise completely unchanged strongly turbulent Taylor-Couette flow containing bubbles, we dramatically reduce the drag reduction from more than 40% to about 4%, corresponding to the trivial effect of the bubbles on the density and viscosity of the liquid . The reason for this striking behavior is that the addition of surfactants prevents bubble coalescence, leading to much smaller bubbles. Our result demonstrates that bubble deformability is crucial for bubble drag reduction in turbulent flow. We acknowledge support from STW and FOM.

  17. In Search of the Big Bubble

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simoson, Andrew; Wentzky, Bethany

    2011-01-01

    Freely rising air bubbles in water sometimes assume the shape of a spherical cap, a shape also known as the "big bubble". Is it possible to find some objective function involving a combination of a bubble's attributes for which the big bubble is the optimal shape? Following the basic idea of the definite integral, we define a bubble's surface as…

  18. In Search of the Big Bubble

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simoson, Andrew; Wentzky, Bethany

    2011-01-01

    Freely rising air bubbles in water sometimes assume the shape of a spherical cap, a shape also known as the "big bubble". Is it possible to find some objective function involving a combination of a bubble's attributes for which the big bubble is the optimal shape? Following the basic idea of the definite integral, we define a bubble's surface as…

  19. Vapor-Gas Bubble Evolution and Growth in Extremely Viscous Fluids Under Vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kizito, John; Balasubramaniam, R.; Nahra, Henry; Agui, Juan; Truong, Duc

    2008-01-01

    Formation of vapor and gas bubbles and voids is normal and expected in flow processes involving extremely viscous fluids in normal gravity. Practical examples of extremely viscous fluids are epoxy-like filler materials before the epoxy fluids cure to their permanent form to create a mechanical bond between two substrates. When these fluids flow with a free liquid interface exposed to vacuum, rapid bubble expansion process may ensue. Bubble expansion might compromise the mechanical bond strength. The potential sources for the origin of the gases might be incomplete out-gassing process prior to filler application; regasification due to seal leakage in the filler applicator; and/or volatiles evolved from cure reaction products formed in the hardening process. We embarked on a study that involved conducting laboratory experiments with imaging diagnostics in order to deduce the seriousness of bubbling caused by entrained air and volatile fluids under space vacuum and low gravity environment. We used clear fluids with the similar physical properties as the epoxy-like filler material to mimic the dynamics of bubbles. Another aspect of the present study was to determine the likelihood of bubbling resulting from dissolved gases nucleating from solution. These experimental studies of the bubble expansion are compared with predictions using a modified Rayleigh- Plesset equation, which models the bubble expansion.

  20. The injection of air/oxygen bubble into the anterior chamber of rabbits as a treatment for hyphema in patients with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Ayintap, Emre; Keskin, Uğurcan; Sadigov, Fariz; Coskun, Mesut; Ilhan, Nilufer; Motor, Sedat; Semiz, Hilal; Parlakfikirer, Nihan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the changes of partial oxygen pressure (PaO2) in aqueous humour after injecting air or oxygen bubble into the anterior chamber in sickle cell hyphema. Methods. Blood samples were taken from the same patient with sickle cell disease. Thirty-two rabbits were divided into 4 groups. In group 1 (n = 8), there was no injection. Only blood injection constituted group 2 (n = 8), both blood and air bubble injection constituted group 3 (n = 8), and both blood and oxygen bubble injection constituted group 4 (n = 8). Results. The PaO2 in the aqueous humour after 10 hours from the injections was 78.45 ± 9.9 mmHg (Mean ± SD) for group 1, 73.97 ± 8.86 mmHg for group 2, 123.35 ± 13.6 mmHg for group 3, and 306.47 ± 16.5 mmHg for group 4. There was statistically significant difference between group 1 and group 2, when compared with group 3 and group 4. Conclusions. PaO2 in aqueous humour was increased after injecting air or oxygen bubble into the anterior chamber. We offer to leave an air bubble in the anterior chamber of patients with sickle cell hemoglobinopathies and hyphema undergoing an anterior chamber washout.

  1. Experimental study of bubble cavities attached to a rotating shaft in a reservoir

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Braun, M. J.; Mullen, R. L.

    1984-01-01

    Bubble cavities formed by air entrainment and attached to a rotating shaft in an oil reservoir were studied. The cavities appear to the unaided eye as toroidal. High speed photography, however, reveals the individuality of the bubble cavities and their near solid body rotational characteristics. The cavities are distorted by the rotation effects but remain attached and tend to merge because of edge effects in the axial direction. The flow field within the reservoir is influenced by the unusual character of the two phase fluid found there; the vorticity is readily visualized. Other examples of vapor entrapment at the inlet of an eccentric rotor are also discussed. A simplified analytical method is provided, and a numerical analysis is being investigated. Vapor (void) entrainment and generation can significantly alter leakage rates and stability of seals, bearings, and dampers. Recognition of these effects in the component design systems will result only after detailed studies of the above phenomena.

  2. Regioselective air oxidation of sulfides to O,S-acetals in a bubble column.

    PubMed

    Brockmeyer, Fabian; Martens, Jürgen

    2014-09-01

    In this paper the use of a bubble column for a metal-free, selective oxidation of α-alkylthio-imines to O,S-acetals is presented. During the synthesis, which is straightforward to perform, the sulfides are oxidized to α-alkoxy- or, respectively, α-hydroxysulfide by adding activated carbon in the presence of atmospheric oxygen only. We show that the use of the bubble column, which is unusual on laboratory scale, improves the efficiency of the reaction in comparison to common laboratory techniques. As atmospheric oxygen alone is used for oxidation, this method is cost saving, environmentally friendly, and safe. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Application of an Ultrasonic array sensor to air-water bubbly flow measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, D.; Kikura, H.; Aritomi, M.; Mori, M.

    2009-02-01

    The ultrasonic array sensor, which has been successfully applied in the field of medical diagnostics and non-destructive testing, was applied to single-phase and two-phase flow measurement. The applied array sensor has 128 elements on the surface and each of them has a basic frequency of 8 MHz. Flow measurement using the array sensor is very effective, because it can obtain the cross-sectional flow visualization images from outside the pipe without disturbing flows. In this study, the ultrasonic sound pressure distributions were measured by the sound field measuring system, and the ultrasonic beam characteristics and the grouping effects of elements were investigated from the sound pressure field. The velocity profiles of single-phase flows in a rectangular channel were measured with Ultrasonic Velocity Profiler (UVP) by scanning the parallel ultrasonic beam emitted from the array sensor. Furthermore, an ultrasonic array measuring system, which consists of a pulser/receiver, a multiplexer, an A/D converter and a signal processing device, was developed for the improvement of temporal resolution in bubbly flow measurement using the ultrasonic array sensor. Then the bubble distributions in the channel cross-section were confirmed by using the echo signals reflected from bubbles.

  4. Effect of oxygen-breathing during a decompression-stop on bubble-induced platelet activation after an open-sea air dive: oxygen-stop decompression.

    PubMed

    Pontier, J-M; Lambrechts, K

    2014-06-01

    We highlighted a relationship between decompression-induced bubble formation and platelet micro-particle (PMP) release after a scuba air-dive. It is known that decompression protocol using oxygen-stop accelerates the washout of nitrogen loaded in tissues. The aim was to study the effect of oxygen deco-stop on bubble formation and cell-derived MP release. Healthy experienced divers performed two scuba-air dives to 30 msw for 30 min, one with an air deco-stop and a second with 100% oxygen deco-stop at 3 msw for 9 min. Bubble grades were monitored with ultrasound and converted to the Kisman integrated severity score (KISS). Blood samples for cell-derived micro-particle analysis (AnnexinV for PMP and CD31 for endothelial MP) were taken 1 h before and after each dive. Mean KISS bubble score was significantly lower after the dive with oxygen-decompression stop, compared to the dive with air-decompression stop (4.3 ± 7.3 vs. 32.7 ± 19.9, p < 0.001). After the dive with an air-breathing decompression stop, we observed an increase of the post-dive mean values of PMP (753 ± 245 vs. 381 ± 191 ng/μl, p = 0.003) but no significant change in the oxygen-stop decompression dive (329 ± 215 vs. 381 +/191 ng/μl, p = 0.2). For the post-dive mean values of endothelial MP, there was no significant difference between both the dives. The Oxygen breathing during decompression has a beneficial effect on bubble formation accelerating the washout of nitrogen loaded in tissues. Secondary oxygen-decompression stop could reduce bubble-induced platelet activation and the pro-coagulant activity of PMP release preventing the thrombotic event in the pathogenesis of decompression sickness.

  5. Body fat does not affect venous bubble formation after air dives of moderate severity: theory and experiment.

    PubMed

    Schellart, Nico A M; van Rees Vellinga, Tjeerd P; van Hulst, Rob A

    2013-03-01

    For over a century, studies on body fat (BF) in decompression sickness and venous gas embolism of divers have been inconsistent. A major problem is that age, BF, and maximal oxygen consumption (Vo2max) show high multicollinearity. Using the Bühlmann model with eight parallel compartments, preceded by a blood compartment in series, nitrogen tensions and loads were calculated with a 40 min/3.1 bar (absolute) profile. Compared with Haldanian models, the new model showed a substantial delay in N2 uptake and (especially) release. One hour after surfacing, an increase of 14-28% in BF resulted in a whole body increase of the N2 load of 51%, but in only 15% in the blood compartment. This would result in an increase in the bubble grade of only 0.01 Kisman-Masurel (KM) units at the scale near KM = I-. This outcome was tested indirectly by a dry dive simulation (air breathing) with 53 male divers with a small range in age and Vo2max to suppress multicollinearity. BF was determined with the four-skinfold method. Precordial Doppler bubble grades determined at 40, 80, 120, and 160 min after surfacing were used to calculate the Kisman Integrated Severity Score and were also transformed to the logarithm of the number of bubbles/cm(2) (logB). The highest of the four scores yielded logB = -1.78, equivalent to KM = I-. All statistical outcomes of partial correlations with BF were nonsignificant. These results support the model outcomes. Although this and our previous study suggest that BF does not influence venous gas embolism (Schellart NAM, van Rees Vellinga TP, van Dijk FH, Sterk W. Aviat Space Environ Med 83: 951-957, 2012), more studies with different profiles under various conditions are needed to establish whether BF remains (together with age and Vo2max) a basic physical characteristic or will become less important for the medical examination and for risk assessment.

  6. Mechanotransductional Basis of Endothelial Cell Response to Intravascular Bubbles

    PubMed Central

    Klinger, Alexandra L.; Pichette, Benjamin; Sobolewski, Peter; Eckmann, David M.

    2011-01-01

    Vascular air embolism resulting from too rapid decompression is a well-known risk in deep-sea diving, aviation and space travel. It is also a common complication during surgery or other medical procedures when air or other endogenously administered gas is entrained in the circulation. Preventive and post-event treatment options are extremely limited for this dangerous condition, and none of them address the poorly understood pathophysiology of endothelial response to intravascular bubble presence. Using a novel apparatus allowing precise manipulation of microbubbles in real time fluorescence microscopy studies, we directly measure human umbilical vein endothelial cell responses to bubble contact. Strong intracellular calcium transients requiring extracellular calcium are observed upon cell-bubble interaction. The transient is eliminated both by the presence of the stretch activated channel inhibitor, gadolinium, and the transient receptor potential vanilliod family inhibitor, ruthenium red. No bubble induced calcium upsurge occurs if the cells are pretreated with an inhibitor of actin polymerization, cytochalasin-D. This study explores the biomechanical mechanisms at play in bubble interfacial interactions with endothelial surface layer (ESL) macromolecules, reassessing cell response after selective digestion of glycocalyx glycosoaminoglycans, hyaluran (HA) and heparin sulfate (HS). HA digestion causes reduction of cell-bubble adherence and a more rapid induction of calcium influx after contact. HS depletion significantly decreases calcium transient amplitudes, as does pharmacologically induced sydencan ectodomain shedding. The surfactant perfluorocarbon oxycyte abolishes any bubble induced calcium transient, presumably through direct competition with ESL macromolecules for interfacial occupancy, thus attenuating the interactions that trigger potentially deleterious biochemical pathways. PMID:21931900

  7. Mesler entrainment in alcohols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundberg-Anderson, R. K.; Saylor, J. R.

    2014-01-01

    Mesler entrainment has been studied extensively in water and, more recently, in silicone oils. Studies of Mesler entrainment in liquids other than these are rare. The extant experimental results in water show significant irreproducibility both in the qualitative characteristics of Mesler entrainment and in the existence or nonexistence of Mesler entrainment when, for example, drops of the same diameter are released from the same height. In contrast, in silicone oils, Mesler entrainment is highly reproducible, essentially occurring either all of the time, or none of the time for a given set of conditions. A goal of the present work was to determine which of these two behaviors is the "standard" behavior—that is, to determine whether Mesler entrainment is typically repeatable or not. The experimental studies presented herein were conducted in three liquids that have not been the subject of detailed investigation to date: ethyl alcohol, isopropyl alcohol, and methyl alcohol. All of these alcohol results showed behavior very similar to that observed in silicone oils, suggesting that Mesler entrainment is typically repeatable and that water is an atypical fluid, causing irreproducible results. Additionally, we present data obtained in silicone oils and combine that with the alcohol data in an attempt to develop a combination of dimensionless groups that predicts the boundaries within which Mesler entrainment occurs for liquids other than water.

  8. Cloud-Top Entrainment in Stratocumulus Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mellado, Juan Pedro

    2017-01-01

    Cloud entrainment, the mixing between cloudy and clear air at the boundary of clouds, constitutes one paradigm for the relevance of small scales in the Earth system: By regulating cloud lifetimes, meter- and submeter-scale processes at cloud boundaries can influence planetary-scale properties. Understanding cloud entrainment is difficult given the complexity and diversity of the associated phenomena, which include turbulence entrainment within a stratified medium, convective instabilities driven by radiative and evaporative cooling, shear instabilities, and cloud microphysics. Obtaining accurate data at the required small scales is also challenging, for both simulations and measurements. During the past few decades, however, high-resolution simulations and measurements have greatly advanced our understanding of the main mechanisms controlling cloud entrainment. This article reviews some of these advances, focusing on stratocumulus clouds, and indicates remaining challenges.

  9. Entraining gravity currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Chris; Hogg, Andrew

    2012-11-01

    Large-scale gravity currents, such as those formed when industrial effluent is discharged at sea, are greatly affected by the entrainment and mixing of ambient fluid into the current, which both dilutes the flow and causes an effective drag between the current and ambient. We study these currents theoretically by combining a shallow-water model for gravity currents flowing under a deep ambient with an empirical model for entrainment, and seek long-time similarity solutions of this model. We find that the dependence of entrainment on the bulk Richardson number plays a crucial role in the current dynamics, and results in entrainment occurring mainly in a region close to the flow front, reminiscent of the entraining current `head' observed in natural flows. The long-time solution of an entraining lock-release current is a similarity solution of the second kind, in which the current grows as a power of time that is dependent on the form of the entrainment model, approximately as t 0 . 44. The structure of a current driven by a constant buoyancy flux is quite different, with the current length growing as t 4 / 5. Scaling arguments suggest that these solutions are reached only at very long times, and so may be attained in large natural flows, but not in small-scale experiments.

  10. The art of entrainment.

    PubMed

    Roenneberg, Till; Daan, Serge; Merrow, Martha

    2003-06-01

    The circadian system actively synchronizes the temporal sequence of biological functions with the environment. The oscillatory behavior of the system ensures that entrainment is not passive or driven and therefore allows for great plasticity and adaptive potential. With the tools at hand, we now can concentrate on the most important circadian question: How is the complex task of entrainment achieved by anatomical, cellular, and molecular components? Understanding entrainment is equal to understanding the circadian system. The results of this basic research will help us to understand temporal ecology and will allow us to improve conditions for humans in industrialized societies.

  11. Structure of Air-Water Bubbly Flow in a Vertical Annulus

    SciTech Connect

    Rong Situ; Takashi Hibiki; Ye Mi; Mamoru Ishii; Michitsugu Mori

    2002-07-01

    Local measurements of flow parameters were performed for vertical upward bubbly flows in an annulus. The annulus channel consisted of an inner rod with a diameter of 19.1 mm and an outer round tube with an inner diameter of 38.1 mm, and the hydraulic equivalent diameter was 19.1 mm. Double-sensor conductivity probe was used for measuring void fraction, interfacial area concentration, and interfacial velocity, and Laser Doppler anemometer was utilized for measuring liquid velocity and turbulence intensity. The mechanisms to form the radial profiles of local flow parameters were discussed in detail. The constitutive equations for distribution parameter and drift velocity in the drift-flux model, and the semi-theoretical correlation for Sauter mean diameter namely interfacial area concentration, which were proposed previously, were validated by local flow parameters obtained in the experiment using the annulus. (authors)

  12. Bubble stimulation efficiency of dinoflagellate bioluminescence.

    PubMed

    Deane, Grant B; Stokes, M Dale; Latz, Michael I

    2016-02-01

    Dinoflagellate bioluminescence, a common source of bioluminescence in coastal waters, is stimulated by flow agitation. Although bubbles are anecdotally known to be stimulatory, the process has never been experimentally investigated. This study quantified the flash response of the bioluminescent dinoflagellate Lingulodinium polyedrum to stimulation by bubbles rising through still seawater. Cells were stimulated by isolated bubbles of 0.3-3 mm radii rising at their terminal velocity, and also by bubble clouds containing bubbles of 0.06-10 mm radii for different air flow rates. Stimulation efficiency, the proportion of cells producing a flash within the volume of water swept out by a rising bubble, decreased with decreasing bubble radius for radii less than approximately 1 mm. Bubbles smaller than a critical radius in the range 0.275-0.325 mm did not stimulate a flash response. The fraction of cells stimulated by bubble clouds was proportional to the volume of air in the bubble cloud, with lower stimulation levels observed for clouds with smaller bubbles. An empirical model for bubble cloud stimulation based on the isolated bubble observations successfully reproduced the observed stimulation by bubble clouds for low air flow rates. High air flow rates stimulated more light emission than expected, presumably because of additional fluid shear stress associated with collective buoyancy effects generated by the high air fraction bubble cloud. These results are relevant to bioluminescence stimulation by bubbles in two-phase flows, such as in ship wakes, breaking waves, and sparged bioreactors. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Increasing jet entrainment, mixing and spreading

    DOEpatents

    Farrington, Robert B.

    1994-01-01

    A free jet of air is disturbed at a frequency that substantially matches natural turbulences in the free jet to increase the entrainment, mixing, and spreading of air by the free jet, for example in a room or other enclosure. The disturbances are created by pulsing the flow of air that creates the free jet at the desired frequency. Such pulsing of the flow of air can be accomplished by sequentially occluding and opening a duct that confines and directs the flow of air, such as by rotating a disk on an axis transverse to the flow of air in the duct.

  14. Increasing jet entrainment, mixing and spreading

    DOEpatents

    Farrington, R.B.

    1994-08-16

    A free jet of air is disturbed at a frequency that substantially matches natural turbulences in the free jet to increase the entrainment, mixing, and spreading of air by the free jet, for example in a room or other enclosure. The disturbances are created by pulsing the flow of air that creates the free jet at the desired frequency. Such pulsing of the flow of air can be accomplished by sequentially occluding and opening a duct that confines and directs the flow of air, such as by rotating a disk on an axis transverse to the flow of air in the duct. 11 figs.

  15. Catalytic wet air oxidation of coke-plant wastewater on ruthenium-based eggshell catalysts in a bubbling bed reactor.

    PubMed

    Yang, M; Sun, Y; Xu, A H; Lu, X Y; Du, H Z; Sun, C L; Li, C

    2007-07-01

    Catalytic wet air of coke-plant wastewater was studied in a bubbling bed reactor. Two types of supported Ru-based catalysts, eggshell and uniform catalysts, were employed. Compared with the results in the wet air oxidation of coke-plant wastewater, supported Ru uniform catalysts showed high activity for chemical oxygen demand (COD) and ammonia/ammonium compounds (NH3-N) removal at temperature of 250 degrees C and pressure of 4.8 MPa, and it has been demonstrated that the catalytic activity of uniform catalyst depended strongly on the distribution of active sites of Ru on catalyst. Compared to the corresponding uniform catalysts with the same Ru loading (0.25 wt.% and 0.1 wt.%, respectively), the eggshell catalysts showed higher activities for CODcr removal and much higher activities for NH3-N degradation. The high activity of eggshell catalyst for treatment of coke-plant wastewater can be attributed to the higher density of active Ru sites in the shell layer than that of the corresponding uniform catalyst with the same Ru loading. It has been also evidenced that the active Ru sites in the internal core of uniform catalyst have very little or no contribution to CODcr and NH3-N removal in the total oxidation of coke-plant wastewater.

  16. Estimation of bubble-mediated air-sea gas exchange from concurrent DMS and CO2 transfer velocities at intermediate-high wind speeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Thomas G.; Landwehr, Sebastian; Miller, Scott D.; de Bruyn, Warren J.; Callaghan, Adrian H.; Scanlon, Brian; Ward, Brian; Yang, Mingxi; Saltzman, Eric S.

    2017-07-01

    Simultaneous air-sea fluxes and concentration differences of dimethylsulfide (DMS) and carbon dioxide (CO2) were measured during a summertime North Atlantic cruise in 2011. This data set reveals significant differences between the gas transfer velocities of these two gases (Δkw) over a range of wind speeds up to 21 m s-1. These differences occur at and above the approximate wind speed threshold when waves begin breaking. Whitecap fraction (a proxy for bubbles) was also measured and has a positive relationship with Δkw, consistent with enhanced bubble-mediated transfer of the less soluble CO2 relative to that of the more soluble DMS. However, the correlation of Δkw with whitecap fraction is no stronger than with wind speed. Models used to estimate bubble-mediated transfer from in situ whitecap fraction underpredict the observations, particularly at intermediate wind speeds. Examining the differences between gas transfer velocities of gases with different solubilities is a useful way to detect the impact of bubble-mediated exchange. More simultaneous gas transfer measurements of different solubility gases across a wide range of oceanic conditions are needed to understand the factors controlling the magnitude and scaling of bubble-mediated gas exchange.

  17. Visualization of airflow growing soap bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Rahbi, Hamood; Bock, Matthew; Ryu, Sangjin

    2016-11-01

    Visualizing airflow inside growing soap bubbles can answer questions regarding the fluid dynamics of soap bubble blowing, which is a model system for flows with a gas-liquid-gas interface. Also, understanding the soap bubble blowing process is practical because it can contribute to controlling industrial processes similar to soap bubble blowing. In this study, we visualized airflow which grows soap bubbles using the smoke wire technique to understand how airflow blows soap bubbles. The soap bubble blower setup was built to mimic the human blowing process of soap bubbles, which consists of a blower, a nozzle and a bubble ring. The smoke wire was placed between the nozzle and the bubble ring, and smoke-visualized airflow was captured using a high speed camera. Our visualization shows how air jet flows into the growing soap bubble on the ring and how the airflow interacts with the soap film of growing bubble.

  18. On-line ultrasonic gas entrainment monitor

    DOEpatents

    Day, Clifford K.; Pedersen, Herbert N.

    1978-01-01

    Apparatus employing ultrasonic energy for detecting and measuring the quantity of gas bubbles present in liquids being transported through pipes. An ultrasonic transducer is positioned along the longitudinal axis of a fluid duct, oriented to transmit acoustic energy radially of the duct around the circumference of the enclosure walls. The back-reflected energy is received centrally of the duct and interpreted as a measure of gas entrainment. One specific embodiment employs a conical reflector to direct the transmitted acoustic energy radially of the duct and redirect the reflected energy back to the transducer for reception. A modified embodiment employs a cylindrical ultrasonic transducer for this purpose.

  19. An observational study of entrainment rate in deep convection

    DOE PAGES

    Guo, Xiaohao; Lu, Chunsong; Zhao, Tianliang; ...

    2015-09-22

    This study estimates entrainment rate and investigates its relationships with cloud properties in 156 deep convective clouds based on in-situ aircraft observations during the TOGA-COARE (Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere Coupled Ocean Atmosphere Response Experiment) field campaign over the western Pacific. To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study on the probability density function of entrainment rate, the relationships between entrainment rate and cloud microphysics, and the effects of dry air sources on the calculated entrainment rate in deep convection from an observational perspective. Results show that the probability density function of entrainment rate can be well fitted by lognormal,more » gamma or Weibull distribution, with coefficients of determination being 0.82, 0.85 and 0.80, respectively. Entrainment tends to reduce temperature, water vapor content and moist static energy in cloud due to evaporative cooling and dilution. Inspection of the relationships between entrainment rate and microphysical properties reveals a negative correlation between volume-mean radius and entrainment rate, suggesting the potential dominance of homogeneous mechanism in the clouds examined. The entrainment rate and environmental water vapor content show similar tendencies of variation with the distance of the assumed environmental air to the cloud edges. Their variation tendencies are non-monotonic due to the relatively short distance between adjacent clouds.« less

  20. An observational study of entrainment rate in deep convection

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Xiaohao; Lu, Chunsong; Zhao, Tianliang; Zhang, Guang Jun; Liu, Yangang

    2015-09-22

    This study estimates entrainment rate and investigates its relationships with cloud properties in 156 deep convective clouds based on in-situ aircraft observations during the TOGA-COARE (Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere Coupled Ocean Atmosphere Response Experiment) field campaign over the western Pacific. To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study on the probability density function of entrainment rate, the relationships between entrainment rate and cloud microphysics, and the effects of dry air sources on the calculated entrainment rate in deep convection from an observational perspective. Results show that the probability density function of entrainment rate can be well fitted by lognormal, gamma or Weibull distribution, with coefficients of determination being 0.82, 0.85 and 0.80, respectively. Entrainment tends to reduce temperature, water vapor content and moist static energy in cloud due to evaporative cooling and dilution. Inspection of the relationships between entrainment rate and microphysical properties reveals a negative correlation between volume-mean radius and entrainment rate, suggesting the potential dominance of homogeneous mechanism in the clouds examined. The entrainment rate and environmental water vapor content show similar tendencies of variation with the distance of the assumed environmental air to the cloud edges. Their variation tendencies are non-monotonic due to the relatively short distance between adjacent clouds.

  1. Technique for air bubble management during endothelial keratoplasty in eyes after penetrating glaucoma surgery.

    PubMed

    Banitt, Michael; Arrieta-Quintero, Esdras; Parel, Jean-Marie; Fantes, Francisco

    2011-02-01

    Our purpose was to develop a technique for maintaining air within the anterior chamber during endothelial keratoplasty in eyes that have previously undergone trabeculectomy or a glaucoma drainage implant. Whole human globes and rabbits underwent penetrating glaucoma surgery to develop the technique. Without the aid of any additional device or manipulation, continuing to inject air into the anterior chamber as it escapes through the sclerostomy or tube eventually fills the subconjunctival space and allows for back pressure. This allows for a full anterior chamber air fill and brief elevation of intraocular pressure. We employed this overfilling technique on 3 patients with previous incisional glaucoma surgery to perform successful Descemet stripping endothelial keratoplasty without complication. We recommend using the overfilling technique when performing Descemet stripping endothelial keratoplasty surgery in eyes with previous penetrating glaucoma surgery because it is a simple technique without the need for pre- or postoperative manipulation.

  2. A review of induction and attachment times of wetting thin films between air bubbles and particles and its relevance in the separation of particles by flotation.

    PubMed

    Albijanic, Boris; Ozdemir, Orhan; Nguyen, Anh V; Bradshaw, Dee

    2010-08-11

    Bubble-particle attachment in water is critical to the separation of particles by flotation which is widely used in the recovery of valuable minerals, the deinking of wastepaper, the water treatment and the oil recovery from tar sands. It involves the thinning and rupture of wetting thin films, and the expansion and relaxation of the gas-liquid-solid contact lines. The time scale of the first two processes is referred to as the induction time, whereas the time scale of the attachment involving all the processes is called the attachment time. This paper reviews the experimental studies into the induction and attachment times between minerals and air bubbles, and between oil droplets and air bubbles. It also focuses on the experimental investigations and mathematical modelling of elementary processes of the wetting film thinning and rupture, and the three-phase contact line expansion relevant to flotation. It was confirmed that the time parameters, obtained by various authors, are sensitive enough to show changes in both flotation surface chemistry and physical properties of solid surfaces of pure minerals. These findings should be extended to other systems. It is proposed that measurements of the bubble-particle attachment can be used to interpret changes in flotation behaviour or, in conjunction with other factors, such as particle size and gas dispersion, to predict flotation performance. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Entrainment by Lazy Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaye, Nigel; Hunt, Gary

    2004-11-01

    We consider plumes with source conditions that have a net momentum flux deficit compared to a pure plume - so called lazy plumes. We examine both the case of constant buoyancy flux and buoyancy flux linearly increasing with height. By re-casting the plume conservation equations (Morton, Taylor & Turner 1956) for a constant entrainment coefficient ((α)) in terms of the plume radius (β) and the dimensionless parameter (Γ=frac5Q^2 B4α M^5/2) we show that the far-field flow in a plume with a linear internal buoyancy flux gain is a constant velocity lazy plume with reduced entrainment and radial growth rate. For highly lazy source conditions we derive first-order approximate solutions which indicate a region of zero entrainment near the source. These phenomena have previously been observed, however, it has often been assumed that reduced entrainment implies a reduced (α). We demonstrate that a constant (α) formulation is able to capture the behaviour of these reduced entrainment flows. Morton, B. R., Taylor, G. I. & Turner, J. S. (1956), Turbulent gravitational convection from maintained and instantaneous sources.', Proc. Roy. Soc. 234, 1-23.

  4. Air removal efficiency of a venous bubble trap in a minimal extracorporeal circuit during coronary artery bypass grafting.

    PubMed

    Roosenhoff, Tamara P A; Stehouwer, Marco C; De Vroege, Roel; Butter, René P; Van Boven, Wim-Jan; Bruins, Peter

    2010-12-01

    The use of minimized extracorporeal circuits (MECC) in cardiac surgery is expanding. These circuits eliminate volume storage and bubble trap reservoirs to minimize the circuit. However, this may increase the risk of gaseous micro emboli (GME). To reduce this risk, a venous bubble trap was designed. This study was performed to evaluate if incorporation of a venous bubble trap in a MECC system as compared to our standard minimized extracorporeal circuit without venous bubble trap reduces gaseous micro emboli during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Forty patients were randomly assigned to be perfused either with or without an integrated venous bubble trap. After preliminary evaluation of the data of 23 patients, the study was terminated prior to study completion. The quantity and volume of GME were significantly lower in patients perfused with a venous bubble trap compared to patients perfused without a venous bubble trap. The present study demonstrates that a MECC system with a venous bubble trap significantly reduces the volume of GME and strongly reduces the quantity of large GME (>500 µm). Therefore, the use of a venous bubble trap in a MECC system is warranted. © 2010, Copyright the Authors. Artificial Organs © 2010, International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Influence of bubble size, diffuser width, and flow rate on the integral behavior of bubble plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraga, Bruño.; Stoesser, Thorsten

    2016-06-01

    A large-eddy simulation based Eulerian-Lagrangian model is employed to quantify the impact of bubble size, diffuser diameter, and gas flow rate on integral properties of bubble plumes, such as the plume's width, centerline velocity, and mass flux. Calculated quantities are compared with experimental data and integral model predictions. Furthermore, the LES data were used to assess the behavior of the entrainment coefficient, the momentum amplification factor, and the bubble-to-momentum spread ratio. It is found that bubble plumes with constant bubble size and smaller diameter behave in accordance with integral plume models. Plumes comprising larger and non-uniform bubble sizes appear to deviate from past observations and model predictions. In multi-diameter bubble plumes, a bubble self-organisation takes place, i.e., small bubbles cluster in the center of the plume whilst large bubbles are found at the periphery of the plume. Multi-diameter bubble plumes also feature a greater entrainment rate than single-size bubble plumes, as well as a higher spread ratio and lower turbulent momentum rate. Once the plume is fully established, the size of the diffuser does not appear to affect integral properties of bubble plumes. However, plume development is affected by the diffuser width, as larger release areas lead to a delayed asymptotic behavior of the plume and consequently to a lower entrainment and higher spread ratio. Finally, the effect of the gas flow rate on the integral plume is studied and is deemed very relevant with regards to most integral plume properties and coefficients. This effect is already fairly well described by integral plume models.

  6. Acoustic radiation force on an air bubble and soft fluid spheres in ideal liquids: Example of a high-order Bessel beam of quasi-standing waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitri, F. G.

    2009-04-01

    The partial wave series for the scattering of a high-order Bessel beam (HOBB) of acoustic quasi-standing waves by an air bubble and fluid spheres immersed in water and centered on the axis of the beam is applied to the calculation of the acoustic radiation force. A HOBB refers to a type of beam having an axial amplitude null and an azimuthal phase gradient. Radiation force examples obtained through numerical evaluation of the radiation force function are computed for an air bubble, a hexane, a red blood and mercury fluid spheres in water. The examples were selected to illustrate conditions having progressive, standing and quasi-standing waves with appropriate selection of the waves’ amplitude ratio. An especially noteworthy result is the lack of a specific vibrational mode contribution to the radiation force determined by appropriate selection of the HOBB parameters.

  7. Acoustic radiation force on an air bubble and soft fluid spheres in ideal liquids: example of a high-order Bessel beam of quasi-standing waves.

    PubMed

    Mitri, F G

    2009-04-01

    The partial wave series for the scattering of a high-order Bessel beam (HOBB) of acoustic quasi-standing waves by an air bubble and fluid spheres immersed in water and centered on the axis of the beam is applied to the calculation of the acoustic radiation force. A HOBB refers to a type of beam having an axial amplitude null and an azimuthal phase gradient. Radiation force examples obtained through numerical evaluation of the radiation force function are computed for an air bubble, a hexane, a red blood and mercury fluid spheres in water. The examples were selected to illustrate conditions having progressive, standing and quasi-standing waves with appropriate selection of the waves' amplitude ratio. An especially noteworthy result is the lack of a specific vibrational mode contribution to the radiation force determined by appropriate selection of the HOBB parameters.

  8. Interfacial Bubble Deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seymour, Brian; Shabane, Parvis; Cypull, Olivia; Cheng, Shengfeng; Feitosa, Klebert

    Soap bubbles floating at an air-water experience deformations as a result of surface tension and hydrostatic forces. In this experiment, we investigate the nature of such deformations by taking cross-sectional images of bubbles of different volumes. The results show that as their volume increases, bubbles transition from spherical to hemispherical shape. The deformation of the interface also changes with bubble volume with the capillary rise converging to the capillary length as volume increases. The profile of the top and bottom of the bubble and the capillary rise are completely determined by the volume and pressure differences. James Madison University Department of Physics and Astronomy, 4VA Consortium, Research Corporation for Advancement of Science.

  9. Sensitivity of Hollow Fiber Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator Systems to Potable Water Constituents, Contaminants and Air Bubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bue, Grant C.; Trevino, Luis A.; Fritts, Sharon; Tsioulos, Gus

    2008-01-01

    The Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator (SWME) is the baseline heat rejection technology selected for development for the Constellation lunar suit. The first SWME prototype, designed, built, and tested at Johnson Space Center in 1999 used a Teflon hydrophobic porous membrane sheet shaped into an annulus to provide cooling to the coolant loop through water evaporation to the vacuum of space. This present study describes the test methodology and planning and compares the test performance of three commercially available hollow fiber materials as alternatives to the sheet membrane prototype for SWME, in particular, a porous hydrophobic polypropylene, and two variants that employ ion exchange through non-porous hydrophilic modified Nafion. Contamination tests will be performed to probe for sensitivities of the candidate SWME elements to ordinary constituents that are expected to be found in the potable water provided by the vehicle, the target feedwater source. Some of the impurities in potable water are volatile, such as the organics, while others, such as the metals and inorganic ions are nonvolatile. The non-volatile constituents will concentrate in the SWME as evaporated water from the loop is replaced by the feedwater. At some point in the SWME mission lifecycle as the concentrations of the non-volatiles increase, the solubility limits of one or more of the constituents may be reached. The resulting presence of precipitate in the coolant water may begin to plug pores and tube channels and affect the SWME performance. Sensitivity to macroparticles, lunar dust simulant, and air bubbles will also be investigated.

  10. Vapor Bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prosperetti, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    This article reviews the fundamental physics of vapor bubbles in liquids. Work on bubble growth and condensation for stationary and translating bubbles is summarized and the differences with bubbles containing a permanent gas stressed. In particular, it is shown that the natural frequency of a vapor bubble is proportional not to the inverse radius, as for a gas bubble, but to the inverse radius raised to the power 2/3. Permanent gas dissolved in the liquid diffuses into the bubble with strong effects on its dynamics. The effects of the diffusion of heat and mass on the propagation of pressure waves in a vaporous bubbly liquid are discussed. Other topics briefly touched on include thermocapillary flow, plasmonic nanobubbles, and vapor bubbles in an immiscible liquid.

  11. CFD Simulations of an Air-Water Bubble Column: Effect of Luo Coalescence Parameter and Breakup Kernels

    PubMed Central

    Syed, Alizeb Hussain; Boulet, Micael; Melchiori, Tommaso; Lavoie, Jean-Michel

    2017-01-01

    In this work, CFD simulations of an air-water bubbling column were performed and validated with experimental data. The superficial gas velocities used for the experiments were 0.019 and 0.038 m/s and were considered as an homogeneous regime. The former involves simpler physics when compared to a heterogeneous regime where the superficial velocities are higher. In order to simulate the system, a population balance model (PBM) was solved numerically using a discrete method and a closure kernels involving the Luo coalescence model as well as two different breakup models: Luo's and Lehr's. For the multi-phase calculations, an eulerian framework was selected and the interphase momentum transfer included drag, lift, wall lubrication, and turbulent dispersion terms. A sensitivity analysis was performed on a Luo coalescence kernel by changing the coalescence parameter (c0) from 1.1 to 0.1 and results showed that the radial profiles of gas holdup and axial liquid velocity were significantly affected by such parameter. From the simulation results, the main conclusions were: (a) A combination of the Luo coalescence and Luo breakup kernels (Luo-Luo) combined with a decreasing value of c0 improves the gas holdup profiles as compared to empirical values. However, at the lowest value of c0 investigated in this work, the axial liquid velocity deteriorates with regards to experimental data when using a superficial gas velocity of 0.019 m/s. (b) A combination of the Luo coalescence and Lehr breakup models (Luo-Lehr) was shown to improve the gas holdup values with experimental data when compared to the Luo-Luo kernels. However, as c0 decreases, the Luo-Lehr models underestimate the axial liquid velocity profiles with regards to empirical values. (c) A first and second order numerical schemes allowed predicting similar radial profiles of gas holdup and axial liquid velocity. (d) The mesh sensitivity results show that a 3 mm mesh size can be considered as reasonable for simulating

  12. Air gasification of rice husk in bubbling fluidized bed reactor with bed heating by conventional charcoal.

    PubMed

    Makwana, J P; Joshi, Asim Kumar; Athawale, Gaurav; Singh, Dharminder; Mohanty, Pravakar

    2015-02-01

    An experimental study of air gasification of rice husk was conducted in a bench-scale fluidized bed gasifier (FBG) having 210 mm diameter and 1600 mm height. Heating of sand bed material was performed using conventional charcoal fuel. Different operating conditions like bed temperature, feeding rate and equivalence ratio (ER) varied in the range of 750-850 °C, 25-31.3 kg/h, and 0.3-0.38, respectively. Flow rate of air was kept constant (37 m(3)/h) during FBG experiments. The carbon conversion efficiencies (CCE), cold gas efficiency, and thermal efficiency were evaluated, where maximum CCE was found as 91%. By increasing ER, the carbon conversion efficiency was decreased. Drastic reduction in electric consumption for initial heating of gasifier bed with charcoal compared to ceramic heater was ∼45%. Hence rice husk is found as a potential candidate to use directly (without any processing) in FBG as an alternative renewable energy source from agricultural field.

  13. A survey on air bubble detector placement in the CPB circuit: a 2011 cross-sectional analysis of the practice of Certified Clinical Perfusionists.

    PubMed

    Kelting, T; Searles, B; Darling, E

    2012-07-01

    The ideal location of air bubble detector (ABD) placement on the cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) circuit is debatable. There is, however, very little data characterizing the prevalence of specific ABD placement preferences by perfusionists. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to survey the perfusion community to collect data describing the primary locations of air bubble detector placement on the CPB circuit. In June 2011, an 18-question on-line survey was conducted. Completed surveys were received from 627 participants. Of these, analysis of the responses from the 559 certified clinical perfusionists (CCP) was performed. The routine use of ABD during CPB was reported by 96.8% of CCPs. Of this group, specific placement of the bubble detector is as follows: distal to the venous reservoir outlet (35.6%), between the arterial pump and oxygenator (3.8%), between the oxygenator and arterial line filter (35.1%), distal to the arterial line filter (ALF) (23.6%), and other (1.8%). Those placing the ABD distal to the venous reservoir predominately argued that an emptied venous reservoir was the most likely place to introduce air into the circuit. Those who placed the ABD between the oxygenator and the arterial line filter commonly reasoned that this placement protects against air exiting the membrane. Those placing the ABD distal to the ALF (23.6%) cited that this location protects from all possible entry points of air. A recent false alarm event from an ABD during a case was reported by 36.1% of CCPs. This study demonstrates that the majority of CCPs use an ABD during the conduct of CPB. The placement of the ABD on the circuit, however, is highly variable across the perfusion community. A strong rationale for the various ABD placements suggests that the adoption of multiple ABD may offer the greatest comprehensive protection against air emboli.

  14. Cardiovascular bubble dynamics.

    PubMed

    Bull, Joseph L

    2005-01-01

    Gas bubbles can form in the cardiovascular system as a result of patho-physiological conditions or can be intentionally introduced for diagnostic or therapeutic reasons. The dynamic behavior of these bubbles is caused by a variety of mechanisms, such as inertia, pressure, interfacial tension, viscosity, and gravity. We review recent advances in the fundamental mechanics and applications of cardiovascular bubbles, including air embolism, ultrasound contrast agents, targeted microbubbles for drug delivery and molecular imaging, cavitation-induced tissue erosion for ultrasonic surgery, microbubble-induced angiogenesis and arteriogenesis, and gas embolotherapy.

  15. An Experimental Study of Sound Transmission from Air Into Bubbly Water

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-07-01

    and G.C. Neuimim, Sov. Phys.- Acoustics 7, 341 (1962) 3B.S. McCartney and B. McK. Bary, Deep Sea Res. 12, 285 (1965) 4 C.S. Clay and H. Medwin ...J.A.S.A 36, 2132 (1964) 5 H. Medwin , J. Geophys. Res. 75, 599 (1970) S6 C. Devin, Jr., J.A.S.A. 31, 1654 (1959) 2 NSWCIWOLI"R 75-69 X =466r f 326 r 2 2 ’o...in air is sensitive to 0. Ray calculations show that when the receiver is directly under the sourcel4, 15 13H Medwin and J.D. Hagy, Jr., J.A.S.A. 51

  16. Excessive negative venous line pressures and increased arterial air bubble counts during miniaturized cardiopulmonary bypass: an experimental study comparing miniaturized with conventional perfusion systems.

    PubMed

    Aboud, Anas; Liebing, Kai; Börgermann, Jochen; Ensminger, Stephan; Zittermann, Armin; Renner, Andre; Hakim-Meibodi, Kavous; Gummert, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Miniaturized cardiopulmonary bypass (MCPB) is increasingly used in cardiac surgery, because it can lower clinically significant complications such as systemic inflammatory response, haemolysis and high transfusion requirements. A limitation of MCPB is the risk of excessive negative pressure in the venous line during volume depletion, probably leading to gaseous microembolism. In an experimental study with 24 pigs, we compared conventional open cardiopulmonary bypass (CCPB group, n = 11) with MCPB (n = 13). The same pump and identical tubing materials were used in both groups. Primary endpoints were pressure values in the venous line and the right atrium as well as the amount of air bubbles >500 µm. Secondary endpoints were biochemical parameters of systemic inflammatory response, ischaemia, haemodilution and haemolysis. Nearly 20% of venous pressure values were below -150 mmHg and approximately 10% of the right atrial pressure values were below -100 mmHg in the MCPB group, during the experiment. No such low values were observed in the CCPB group. In addition, the number of large arterial air bubbles was higher in the MCPB group compared with the CCPB group (mean ± standard deviation [SD]: 13 444 ± 5709 vs 0.9 ± 0.6, respectively; P < 0.001). Bubble volume was also significantly larger during MCPB compared with CCPB (mean ± SD: 1522 ± 654 vs 4.1 ± 2.5 µl, respectively; P < 0.001). Blood levels of interleukin-6, free haemoglobin and creatine kinase were significantly higher in the CCPB group compared with the MCPB group. Despite the benefits of MCPB regarding systemic inflammatory response and haemolysis, this technique is associated with excessive negative venous line pressures and a significant increase in the number and volume of arterial air bubbles compared with CCPB. Mini-perfusion systems and the management of MCPB require further refinements to avoid such adverse effects.

  17. Measurement and modeling on hydrodynamic forces and deformation of an air bubble approaching a solid sphere in liquids.

    PubMed

    Shahalami, Mansoureh; Wang, Louxiang; Wu, Chu; Masliyah, Jacob H; Xu, Zhenghe; Chan, Derek Y C

    2015-03-01

    The interaction between bubbles and solid surfaces is central to a broad range of industrial and biological processes. Various experimental techniques have been developed to measure the interactions of bubbles approaching solids in a liquid. A main challenge is to accurately and reliably control the relative motion over a wide range of hydrodynamic conditions and at the same time to determine the interaction forces, bubble-solid separation and bubble deformation. Existing experimental methods are able to focus only on one of the aspects of this problem, mostly for bubbles and particles with characteristic dimensions either below 100 μm or above 1 cm. As a result, either the interfacial deformations are measured directly with the forces being inferred from a model, or the forces are measured directly with the deformations to be deduced from the theory. The recently developed integrated thin film drainage apparatus (ITFDA) filled the gap of intermediate bubble/particle size ranges that are commonly encountered in mineral and oil recovery applications. Equipped with side-view digital cameras along with a bimorph cantilever as force sensor and speaker diaphragm as the driver for bubble to approach a solid sphere, the ITFDA has the capacity to measure simultaneously and independently the forces and interfacial deformations as a bubble approaches a solid sphere in a liquid. Coupled with the thin liquid film drainage modeling, the ITFDA measurement allows the critical role of surface tension, fluid viscosity and bubble approach speed in determining bubble deformation (profile) and hydrodynamic forces to be elucidated. Here we compare the available methods of studying bubble-solid interactions and demonstrate unique features and advantages of the ITFDA for measuring both forces and bubble deformations in systems of Reynolds numbers as high as 10. The consistency and accuracy of such measurement are tested against the well established Stokes-Reynolds-Young-Laplace model

  18. Modeling algal growth in bubble columns under sparging with CO2-enriched air.

    PubMed

    Pegallapati, Ambica Koushik; Nirmalakhandan, Nagamany

    2012-11-01

    A theoretical model for predicting biomass growth in semi-continuous mode under sparging with CO(2)-enriched air was developed. The model includes gas-to-liquid mass transfer, algal uptake of carbon dioxide, algal growth kinetics, and light and temperature effects. The model was validated using experimental data on growth of two microalgal species in an internally illuminated photobioreactor: Nannochloropsis salina under gas flow rates of 800 and 1200 mL min(-1) and CO(2) enrichments of 0.5, 1, and 2%; and Scenedesmus sp. at a gas flow rate of 800 mL min(-1) and CO(2) enrichments of 3 and 4%. Temporal algal concentration profiles predicted by the model under semi-continuous mode with harvesting under the different test conditions agreed well with the measured data, with r(2) values ranging from 0.817 to 0.944, p<0.001. As demonstrated, this model can be beneficial in predicting temporal variations in algal concentration and in scheduling harvesting operations under semi-continuous cultivation mode. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Multiple Size Group Modeling of Polydispersed Bubbly Flow in the Mold: An Analysis of Turbulence and Interfacial Force Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhongqiu; Qi, Fengsheng; Li, Baokuan; Jiang, Maofa

    2015-04-01

    An inhomogeneous Multiple Size Group (MUSIG) model based on the Eulerian-Eulerian approach has been developed to describe the polydispersed bubbly flow inside the continuous-casting mold. A laboratory scale mold has been simulated using four different turbulence closure models (modified k - ɛ, RNG k - ɛ, k - ω, and SST) with the purpose of critically comparing their predictions of bubble Sauter mean diameter distribution with previous experimental data. Furthermore, the influences of all the interfacial momentum transfer terms including drag force, lift force, virtual mass force, wall lubrication force, and turbulent dispersion force are investigated. The breakup and coalescence effects of the bubbles are modeled according to the bubble breakup by the impact of turbulent eddies while for bubble coalescence by the random collisions driven by turbulence and wake entrainment. It has been found that the modified k - ɛ model shows better agreement than other models in predicting the bubble Sauter mean diameter profiles. Further, simulations have also been performed to understand the sensitivity of different interfacial forces. The appropriate drag force coefficient, lift force coefficient, virtual mass force coefficient, and turbulent dispersion force coefficient are chosen in accordance with measurements of water model experiments. However, the wall lubrication force does not have much effect on the current polydispersed bubbly flow system. Finally, the MUSIG model is then used to estimate the argon bubble diameter in the molten steel of the mold. The argon bubble Sauter mean diameter generated in molten steel is predicted to be larger than air bubbles in water for the similar conditions.

  20. Tropical deep convection, entrainment, and dilution during the dynamo field campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannah, Walter

    a more robust MJO representation than CAM5, as expected. SP-CAM has an interesting systematic drift away from the initial conditions that projects well on the Real-time Multivariate MJO index (RMM), which negatively impacts the RMM skill scores. Analysis of the column MSE budget shows that SP-CAM has more realistic cloud-radiative feedbacks when compared to CAM5. SP-CAM also has a bias towards stronger import by vertical MSE advection that is similar CAM5 and inconsistent with re-analysis data. VGMS in SP-CAM is also found to be negative, which is similar to CAM5 and inconsistent with re-analysis data. The results from the first part of this study highlight a paradox surrounding entrainment. Although, previous studies have shown that entrainment rates should be larger than typical values used in parameterizations, increasing the entrainment rate does not make global model simulations more realistic. This prompted a detailed investigation into entrainment processes in high-resolution CRM simulations. A series of simulations are conducted where deep convection is initiated with a warm humid bubble. The bubble simulations are compared to a more realistic field of deep convection driven by forcing derived from the DYNAMO northern sounding array data. Entrainment and detrainment are found to be associated with toroidal circulations, consistent with recent studies. Analysis of the directly measured fractional entrainment rates does support an inverse relationship between entrainment and cloud radius, as is often assumed in simple models of deep convection. A method for quantifying the dilution by entrainment is developed and tested. Dilution and entrainment are generally not synonymous, but dilution is found to have a weak inverse relationship to cloud core radius. Sensitivity experiments show that entrainment and total water dilution are enhanced with environmental humidity is increased, contrary to the assumptions of some parameterizations. More vigorous convection in a

  1. Using MRI to detect and differentiate calcium oxalate and calcium hydroxyapatite crystals in air-bubble-free phantom.

    PubMed

    Mustafi, Devkumar; Fan, Xiaobing; Peng, Bo; Foxley, Sean; Palgen, Jeremy; Newstead, Gillian M

    2015-12-01

    Calcium oxalate (CaOX) crystals and calcium hydroxyapatite (CaHA) crystals were commonly associated with breast benign and malignant lesions, respectively. In this research, CaOX (n = 6) and CaHA (n = 6) crystals in air-bubble-free agarose phantom were studied and characterized by using MRI at 9.4 T scanner. Calcium micro-crystals, with sizes that ranged from 200 to 500 µm, were made with either 99% pure CaOX or CaHA powder and embedded in agar to mimic the dimensions and calcium content of breast microcalcifications in vivo. MRI data were acquired with high spatial resolution T2-weighted (T2W) images and gradient echo images with five different echo times (TEs). The crystal areas were determined by setting the threshold relative to agarose signal. The ratio of crystal areas was calculated by the measurements from gradient echo images divided by T2W images. Then the ratios as a function of TE were fitted with the radical function. The results showed that the blooming artifacts due to magnetic susceptibility between agar and CaHA crystals were more than twice as large as the susceptibility in CaOX crystals (p < 0.05). In addition, larger bright rings were observed on gradient echo images around CaHA crystals compared to CaOX crystals. Our results suggest that MRI may provide useful information regarding breast microcalcifications by evaluating the apparent area of crystal ratios obtained between gradient echo and T2W images. Copyright © 2015 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Counteracting negative venous line pressures to avoid arterial air bubbles: an experimental study comparing two different types of miniaturized extracorporeal perfusion systems.

    PubMed

    Aboud, Anas; Mederos-Dahms, Hendrikje; Liebing, Kai; Zittermann, Armin; Schubert, Harald; Murray, Edward; Renner, Andre; Gummert, Jan; Börgermann, Jochen

    2015-05-29

    Because of its low rate of clinical complications, miniaturized extracorporeal perfusion systems (MEPS) are frequently used in heart centers worldwide. However, many recent studies refer to the higher probability of gaseous microemboli formation by MEPS, caused by subzero pressure values. This is the main reason why various de-airing devices were developed for today's perfusion systems. In the present study, we investigated the potential benefits of a simple one-way-valve connected to a volume replacement reservoir (OVR) for volume and pressure compensation. In an experimental study on 26 pigs, we compared MEPS (n = 13) with MEPS plus OVR (n = 13). Except OVR, perfusion equipment was identical in both groups. Primary endpoints were pressure values in the venous line and the right atrium as well as the number and volume of air bubbles. Secondary endpoints were biochemical parameters of systemic inflammatory response, ischemia, hemodilution and hemolysis. One animal was lost in the MEPS + OVR group. In the MEPS + OVR group no pressure values below -150 mmHg in the venous line and no values under -100 mmHg in right atrium were noticed. On the contrary, nearly 20% of venous pressure values in the MEPS group were below -150 and approximately 10% of right atrial pressure values were below -100 mmHg. Compared with the MEPS group, the bubble counter device showed lower numbers of arterial air bubbles in the MEPS + OVR group (mean ± SD: 13444 ± 5709 vs. 1 ± 2, respectively; p < 0.001). In addition, bubble volume was significantly lower in the MEPS + OVR group than in the MEPS group (mean ± SD: 1522 ± 654 μl vs. 4 ± 6 μl, respectively; p < 0.001). The proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 and biochemical indices of cardiac ischemia (creatine kinase, and troponin I) were comparable between both groups. The use of a miniaturized perfusion system with a volume replacement reservoir is able to counteract excessive

  3. Colloquium: Soap bubble clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Frank

    2007-07-01

    Soap bubble clusters and froths model biological cells, metallurgical structures, magnetic domains, liquid crystals, fire-extinguishing foams, bread, cushions, and many other materials and structures. Despite the simplicity of the governing principle of energy or area minimization, the underlying mathematical theory is deep and still not understood, even for rather simple, finite clusters. Only with the advent of geometric measure theory could mathematics treat surfaces which might have unprescribed singularities and topological complexities. In 1884, Schwarz gave a rigorous mathematical proof that a single round soap bubble provides the least-area way to enclose a given volume of air. Similarly, the familiar double bubble provides the absolute least-area way to enclose and separate the two given volumes of air, although the proof did not come until 2000 and has an interesting story, as this Colloquium explains in some detail. Whether a triple soap bubble provides the least-area way to enclose and separate three given volumes of air remains an open conjecture today. Even planar bubble clusters remain mysterious. In about 200 B.C. Zenodorus essentially proved that a circle provides the least-perimeter way to enclose a single given area. The planar double and triple bubbles were proved minimizing recently. The status of the planar four-bubble remains open today. In most spaces other than Euclidean space, even the best single bubble remains unproven. One exception is Gauss space, which is of much interest to probabilists and should be more familiar to physicists. General “isoperimetric” problems of minimizing area for given volume occur throughout mathematics and play an important role in differential geometry and analysis, including Perelman’s proof of the Poincaré conjecture.

  4. Hydrocarbon-oil encapsulated air bubble flotation of fine coal. Technical progress report for the second quarter, January 1, 1991--March 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, F.F.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of the present work is to have a good understanding on the fundamentals of modes of reagent/collector dispersion and adsorbing collector on the bubbles to improve the selectivity and recovery of fine coal flotation. A portion of this reporting period has been consumed in building experimental apparatus and equipment. These include an automated flotation machine, a computer-based induction time apparatus, a bubble charge measuring apparatus, continuous flotation column, etc. An automated flotation machine was constructed for Denver model D-12 with 2- and 4-liter cells. The standard test procedure was established for using the machine with improved pulp level control and constant frother removal to minimize the human error. The flotation results of Upper Freeport coal sample showed a good reproducibility for using the improved automatic flotation machine/cell. The reagentless flotation was conducted in a Hallimond tube to determine the hydrophobicity of coal particles. Upper Freeport coal samples were used for all of the tests including -30 mesh, -200 mesh and -400 mesh U.S. sieves coal samples. High floatability was obtained for Upper Freeport coal samples. The significant entrainment of fine particles were observed for coal samples with -200 mesh and -400 mesh U.S. Sieve samples. The electrokinetic properties of coal particles from Upper Freeport seam was determined as the function of pH, frother or collector concentrations. The IEP of -200 mesh coal particle was at pHaw.53. The zeta potential of the coal particles with or without addition of MIBC or kerosene were exhibited negative values for pH greater than 3 and decreased with increasing pH values. The coal particles with kerosene has the higher zeta-potential value than that of particles with MIBC or free of frother/collector. The negative zeta-potential of coal sample was also observed regardless of MIBC concentration employed.

  5. Air pressure changes in the creation and bursting of the type-1 big bubble in deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty: an ex vivo study.

    PubMed

    AlTaan, S L; Mohammed, I; Said, D G; Dua, H S

    2017-06-30

    PurposeTo measure the pressure and volume of air required to create a big bubble (BB) in simulated deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty (DALK) in donor eyes and ascertain the bursting pressure of the BB.Patients and methodsTwenty-two human sclera-corneal discs were used. Air was injected into the corneal stroma to create a BB and the pressure measured by means of a pressure converter attached to the system via a side port. A special clamp was designed to prevent air leak from the periphery of the discs. The pressure at which air emerged in the corneal tissue; the bursting pressure measured after advancing the needle into the bubble cavity and injecting more air; the volume of air required to create a BB and the volume of the BB were ascertained.ResultsType-1 BB were achieved in 19 and type-2 BB in 3 eyes. The maximum pressure reached to create a BB was 96.25+/- 21.61 kpa; the mean type-1 intrabubble pressure was 10.16 +/- 3.65 kpa. The mean bursting pressure of a type-1 BB was 66.65 +/- 18.65 kpa, while that of a type-2 BB was 14.77 +/- 2.44 kpa. The volume of air required to create a type-1 BB was 0.54 ml and the volume of a type-1 BB was consistently 0.1 ml.ConclusionsDua's layer baring DALK can withstand high intraoperative pressures compared to Descemet's membrane baring DALK. The study suggests that it could be safe to undertake procedures such as DALK-triple with a type-1 BB but not with a type-2 BB.Eye advance online publication, 30 June 2017; doi:10.1038/eye.2017.121.

  6. Estimating bulk entrainment with aggregated and unaggregated convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Tobias; Stevens, Bjorn; Hohenegger, Cathy; Bretherton, Chris

    2017-04-01

    Entrainment alters both the updraft mass flux and the updraft composition, especially its buoyancy. This study investigates how entrainment depends on the degree of convective aggregation in convection-permitting simulations. This is investigated with the ICON-LEM model with 1 km resolution, using a radiative-convective equilibrium framework that mimics conditions over the tropical ocean in a 600x600 km2 cubic domain with doubly-periodic boundary conditions. Bulk entrainment is quantified with a radioactive tracer, which is injected at the surface and decays in the atmosphere, with an e-folding time scale of 4 days. Vertically-integrated bulk entrainment estimates show that the entrainment rate is independent of the degree of aggregation, though entrainment rate varies more with height in aggregated conditions. Additionally, the entrainment rate is mostly independent of the updraft location within the aggregated cluster of convection, but entrainment does depend on the number of surrounding updraft grid points. However, the efficiency of entrainment strongly depends on the degree of aggregation. In aggregated conditions, the mean moist static energy in the nearby environment of updraft grid points is closer to the updraft moist static energy than in unaggregated conditions. Thus, when aggregating, the entrainment efficiency decreases by one third, considering all model levels between 850 hPa and 600 hPa. So aggregation does not affect how much mass is exchanged through entrainment, but it affects the constitution of the entrained air, thereby changing how efficient entrainment is in decreasing the updraft buoyancy. Although the impact of entrainment on updraft mass flux is the same in aggregated and unaggregated conditions, updraft mass flux is twice as large in unaggregated conditions as in aggregated conditions because cloud base mass flux is higher. The reason is that higher subsidence velocities are necessary for balancing the radiative cooling because the

  7. The macroscopic entrainment processes of simulated cumulus ensemble. Part I: Entrainment sources

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Chichung; Arakawa, A.

    1997-04-15

    Parameterization of cumulus convection requires a model that describes the statistical properties of a cumulus ensemble under given large-scale conditions. Such a model is called a cloud model for cumulus parameterization (CMCP). It would be best if the development of a CMCP were guided by synchronous observations covering a population of clouds. Unfortunately, observations for cumulus clouds are usually confined to individual clouds, leaving many uncertainties in designing a CMCP. In an attempt to improve the formulation of entrainment effects in a CMCP, the data simulated by a two-dimensional cloud-resolving model are used to investigate sources of entrainment into cumulus clouds. The authors first plot the Paluch diagram using the data from a nonprecipitating experiment. It is found that typical patterns on the Paluch diagram obtained by observational studies can be reproduced using the simulated data and can be interpreted in ways other than two-point mixing. The authors further examine entrainment sources through extensive trajectory analysis using the data from a precipitating experiment. They find that cloud air parcels at one level usually originate from locations of various heights, indicating a continuous series of entrainment events occurring throughout the cloud depth. However, the authors do not find a cloud air parcel decending more than several hundred meters. Penetrative downdrafts produced by mixing between cloud air and entrained air are not observed in the cases simulated. It seems that, as far as tropical deep convection is concerned, ignoring the contribution from descendent cloud air in a CMCP is an acceptable simplification. 52 refs., 14 figs.

  8. The macroscopic entrainment processes of simulated cumulus ensemble. Part II: Testing the entraining-plume model

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Chichung; Arakawa, Akio

    1997-04-15

    According to Part I of this paper, is seems that ignoring the contribution from descendent cloud air in a cloud model for cumulus parameterization (CMCP), such as the spectral cumulus ensemble model in the Arakawa-Schubert parameterization, is an acceptable simplification for tropical deep convection. Since each subensemble in the spectral cumulus ensemble model is formally analogous to an entraining plume, the latter is examined using the simulated data from a cloud-resolving model (CRM). The authors first follow the analysis procedure of Warner. With the data from a nonprecipitating experiment, the authors show that the entraining-plume model cannot simultaneously predict the mean liquid water profile and cloud top height of the clouds simulated by the CRM. However, the mean properties of active elements of clouds, which are characterized by strong updrafts, can be described by an entraining plume of similar top height. With data from a precipitating experiment, the authors examine the spectral cumulus ensemble model using the Paluch diagram. It is found that the spectral cumulus ensemble model appears adequate if different types of clouds in the spectrum are interpreted as subcloud elements with different entrainment characteristics. The resolved internal structure of clouds can thus be viewed as a manifestation of a cloud spectrum. To further investigate whether the fractional rate of entrainment is an appropriate parameter for characterizing cloud types in the spectral cumulus ensemble model, the authors stratify the simulated saturated updrafts (subcloud elements) into different types according to their eventual heights and calculate the cloud mass flux and mean moist static energy for each type. Entrainment characteristics are then inferred through the cloud mass flux and in-cloud moist static energy. It is found that different types of subcloud elements have distinguishable thermodynamic properties and entrainment characteristics. 16 refs., 8 figs.

  9. Formation, stability, and mechanical properties of bovine serum albumin stabilized air bubbles produced using coaxial electrohydrodynamic atomization.

    PubMed

    Mahalingam, S; Meinders, M B J; Edirisinghe, M

    2014-06-17

    Bovine serum albumin (BSA) microbubbles were generated using coaxial electrohydrodynamic atomization (CEDHA) using various concentrations of BSA solutions. The bubble characteristics and the long-term stability of the microbubbles were studied through adjustment of processing parameters and the collection media. Bubbles in the range of 40-800 μm were obtained in a controlled fashion, and increasing the flow rate of the BSA solution reduced the polydispersity of the microbubbles. Use of distilled water-glutaraldehyde, glycerol, and glycerol-Tween 80 collection media allowed a remarkable improvement in bubble stability compared to BSA solution collection medium. Possible physical mechanisms were developed to explain the stability of the microbubbles. The collection distance showed a marked influence on stability of the microbubbles. Near-monodisperse particle-reinforced microbubbles were formed with various concentrations of 2,2'-azobis(isobutyramidine) dihydrochloride (AIBA)-polystyrene particle in BSA solution. The bubble size and the size distribution showed negligible change over a period of time irrespective of the concentration of particles at the bubble surface. The compression stiffness of the microbubbles was determined using nanoindentation at ambient temperature and showed that the stiffness of the microbubbles increased from 8 N/m to 20 N/m upon changing the concentration of BSA solution from 5 wt % to 15 wt %.

  10. A Survey of Scattering, Attenuation, and Size Spectra Studies of Bubble Layers and Plumes Beneath the Air-Sea Interface.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-08-30

    of Laboratory-Generated Bubble Plumes" A. Kolaini, M. Yi, R. Roy, and L. Crum , 1990. p.21 "Bubbles as Sources of Ambient Noise," H. Pumphrey and J...optionally) a video camera and sidescan sonar. The instrument was deployed in the open ocean as a drifter suspended from a surface float by a rubber cord...R. Roy, and L. Crum , J. Acoust. Soc. Am. Suppl. 1., Vol. 88, Fall 1990 (120th meeting, November 1990, San Diego, California). Two laboratory

  11. Hydrocarbon-oil encapsulated air bubble flotation of fine coal. Technical progress report for the fifth quarter, October 1, 1991--December 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, F.F.

    1995-01-01

    A main portion of this reporting period has been consumed in the following tasks: (i) Contact angle measurement using gasified collector encapsulated bubble; (ii) wettability measurement using film flotation method; (iii) induction time measurement; (iv) conducting atomized collector flotation tests in a stirred tank cell; (v) developing the experimental design and conducting a column flotation test. The coal samples used in this period of work are five ranks of coal samples from Mammoth, Lower Kittanning, Upper Freeport, Pittsburgh No. 8 and Wyodak seam coals. To better understand the fundamental steps involved in the modes of collector addition techniques in the froth flotation, contact angle, wettability and induction time were measurement. It was found increasing in the contact angles and decreasing in the induction time for a hydrocarbon-oil encapsulated air bubble compared to those for an oil-free bubble for all the coal samples measured. These observations may account for the improved flotation kinetics and, hence, the recovery with the hydrocarbon-oil encapsulated bubbles. Two level fractional factorial experimental design were developed for conducting the column flotation tests to obtain the optimal operating conditions. In the first series of the tests, seven operating parameters were considered with 16 runs. Based on those results, subsequently, the second experimental design was developed for six operating parameters with 16 runs. The third experiment design was formulated with three most significant operating parameters with 8 runs. A high combustible recovery was obtained for -200 mesh Upper Freeport coal sample. However, the results indicated that for further reduction of the ash content of the froth product, the height of column flotation cell needed to be increased.

  12. Enlarging the big-bubble during deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty.

    PubMed

    McKee, Hamish D; Jhanji, Vishal; Brahma, Arun K

    2013-04-01

    During big-bubble deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty, a bubble that is not large enough can be formed. Further air injection can result in the rupture of the posterior lamella, necessitating conversion to penetrating keratoplasty. We describe some techniques to safely enlarge the big-bubble in such a circumstance. In cases in which a white-margin bubble forms that has extended to the trephination margin, the bubble is collapsed and the margins are extended by blunt dissection. For cases of an undersized clear-margin bubble, the bubble is enlarged by gentle injection of a cohesive ophthalmic viscosurgical device into the bubble cavity. Using these techniques, big-bubbles were safely extended beyond the trephination margin for both white- and clear-margin bubbles. An undersized big-bubble can safely be extended using blunt dissection for white-margin bubbles and ophthalmic viscosurgical device injection for clear-margin bubbles.

  13. High-Resolution Entrainment in Stratocumulus During the POST Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerber, H. E.

    2012-12-01

    In July and August of 2008 an NSF-supported field campaign called POST (Physics of Stratocumulus Top) was conducted off the California coast using the fully-instrumented Twin Otter aircraft from the Naval Post Graduate School. POST provided the first opportunity to closely co-locate on an aircraft high-rate and time synchronized microphysics (PVM; LWC and effective radius) and thermodynamics (UFT; Ultra-Fast Temperature) probes and a gust probe to produce measurements of entrainment fluxes and features over entrainment scales thought to be important in warm stratocumulus (Sc). This combination of probes permitted investigating the properties of individual entrained parcels Seventeen flights were conducted during POST in a quasi-Lagrangian fashion in largely unbroken stratocumulus. The horizontal fight path was adjusted to follow the mean air velocity in the Sc. The vertical flight path concentrated on flying between 100-m above and below the cloud-top interface; and some additional profiles were flown to various higher and lower levels where flux runs were made. This presentation describes the analysis of this unique and excellent data set including the following: The data permitted testing Lilly's classical theory for the entrainment velocity where its application requires strong jumps of temperature and moisture across the inversion located above cloud top, a linear flux of the entrained scalar below cloud top, and entrained parcels that descend. All flights showed Sc with wind shear and mixing at cloud top with some strong enough to dissipate the Sc. The relationship between shear and entrainment velocity is described. The pdf of the horizontal size of entrainment parcels vs entrainment flux is established for all flights to help in choosing grid-sizes for modeling. High -resolution in-cloud temperature and LWC measurements in entrained parcels reveal the relative importance of radiative cooling vs cooling by liquid water evaporation in causing buoyancy reversal

  14. Final Report - "Foaming and Antifoaming and Gas Entrainment in Radioactive Waste Pretreatment and Immobilization Processes"

    SciTech Connect

    Wasan, Darsh T.

    2007-10-09

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) and Hanford site are in the process of stabilizing millions of gallons of radioactive waste slurries remaining from production of nuclear materials for the Department of Energy (DOE). The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at SRS is currently vitrifying the waste in borosilicate glass, while the facilities at the Hanford site are in the construction phase. Both processes utilize slurry-fed joule-heated melters to vitrify the waste slurries. The DWPF has experienced difficulty during operations. The cause of the operational problems has been attributed to foaming, gas entrainment and the rheological properties of the process slurries. The rheological properties of the waste slurries limit the total solids content that can be processed by the remote equipment during the pretreatment and meter feed processes. Highly viscous material can lead to air entrainment during agitation and difficulties with pump operations. Excessive foaming in waste evaporators can cause carryover of radionuclides and non-radioactive waste to the condensate system. Experimental and theoretical investigations of the surface phenomena, suspension rheology and bubble generation of interactions that lead to foaming and air entrainment problems in the DOE High Level and Low Activity Radioactive Waste separation and immobilization processes were pursued under this project. The first major task accomplished in the grant proposal involved development of a theoretical model of the phenomenon of foaming in a three-phase gas-liquid-solid slurry system. This work was presented in a recently completed Ph.D. thesis (9). The second major task involved the investigation of the inter-particle interaction and microstructure formation in a model slurry by the batch sedimentation method. Both experiments and modeling studies were carried out. The results were presented in a recently completed Ph.D. thesis. The third task involved the use of laser confocal microscopy to study

  15. Single-Bubble and Multibubble Sonoluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasui, Kyuichi

    1999-11-01

    Computer simulations of radiation processes in an air bubble and an argon bubble are performed under a condition of single-bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) based on a quasiadiabatic compression model of a bubble collapse. It is clarified that emissions from excited molecules are strongly quenched by high pressure and temperature inside a SBSL bubble and SBSL originates in the emissions from plasma. It is pointed out that sonoluminescence from cavitation fields (MBSL) originates in emissions from excited molecules, which is not quenched due to the much lower pressure and temperature inside the MBSL bubbles.

  16. Entrainment Characteristics for variable-angle plunging liquid jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshpande, Suraj; Trujillo, Mario

    2013-11-01

    Simulations based on an algebraic VoF method are used to study the entrainment characteristics of a water jet plunging into a quiescent pool at angles ranging from 10 to 90 deg. with pool. Our previous study of shallow plunging jets (Deshpande et al. 2012) revealed a discernible frequency in the formation of large air cavities. This contrasts the well-documented chaotic entrainment at steeper inclinations, suggesting a different entrainment mechanism exists for shallow angles. Quantitatively, it is found that larger cavities and greater volume of entrained air occur at shallower angles (10, 12 deg.). A precursor to the formation of these large cavities is the presence of a stagnation region in the zone of impingement. Using a local mass and momentum balance, we show that this stagnation region deflects the incoming jet at wide angles producing large air cavities. Entrainment in shallow jets is similar to the initial impact of the jet with a pool, but it occurs periodically. The recurrence is a consequence of jet disruption by traveling waves on the pool. Qualitative analysis, supported with simulations, demonstrates linear scaling of entrainment period with Froude number.

  17. Closed circuit cardiopulmonary bypass with centrifugal pump for open-heart surgery: new trial for air removal.

    PubMed

    Morita, M; Yozu, R; Matayoshi, T; Mitsumaru, A; Shin, H; Kawada, S

    2000-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the efficiency of venous air removal with a new cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) circuit design for conventional open-heart surgeries. A main concern with a closed circuit for open-heart surgeries is air entrainment into the venous line. A venous filter was placed proximal to the centrifugal pump. The circuit proximal to the centrifugal pump was divided into two lines; one line was attached to the venous reservoir outlet. By clamping the line to the reservoir, this circuit becomes closed. Negative pressure was applied to the purge line connected to the venous reservoir for venous air removal. Micro bubbles were measured at two locations, both distal to the venous and arterial filters. When the injection rate reached 100 ml/min, with the air-injection over 30 s, micro bubbles greater than 40 micro were observed at the outlet of venous filter. However, there was no micro bubble greater than 40 micro detected at the outlet of arterial filter. Although micro bubbles greater than 40 micro were not detected at the outlet of the arterial filter up to the injection rate of 300 ml/min, when the injection rate reached 400 ml/min, micro bubbles greater than 50 microm were detected distal to the arterial filter. From this examination, we determined that air entrained in the venous line up to approximately 300 ml/min is automatically removed by this method with the pressure-balanced condition. This pressure balance means that resistance of venous return, gravity siphon, negative pressure by centrifugal pump, and negative pressure applied to the air-purge line of the filter are balanced; that is, the venous return is sufficient, and the venous reservoir volume is kept stable. From this study we determined that this circuit design efficiently removes the entrained air in the venous line.

  18. Bubble Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corrigan, Jackie

    2004-01-01

    A method of energy production that is capable of low pollutant emissions is fundamental to one of the four pillars of NASA s Aeronautics Blueprint: Revolutionary Vehicles. Bubble combustion, a new engine technology currently being developed at Glenn Research Center promises to provide low emissions combustion in support of NASA s vision under the Emissions Element because it generates power, while minimizing the production of carbon dioxide (CO2) and nitrous oxides (NOx), both known to be Greenhouse gases. and allows the use of alternative fuels such as corn oil, low-grade fuels, and even used motor oil. Bubble combustion is analogous to the inverse of spray combustion: the difference between bubble and spray combustion is that spray combustion is spraying a liquid in to a gas to form droplets, whereas bubble combustion involves injecting a gas into a liquid to form gaseous bubbles. In bubble combustion, the process for the ignition of the bubbles takes place on a time scale of less than a nanosecond and begins with acoustic waves perturbing each bubble. This perturbation causes the local pressure to drop below the vapor pressure of the liquid thus producing cavitation in which the bubble diameter grows, and upon reversal of the oscillating pressure field, the bubble then collapses rapidly with the aid of the high surface tension forces acting on the wall of the bubble. The rapid and violent collapse causes the temperatures inside the bubbles to soar as a result of adiabatic heating. As the temperatures rise, the gaseous contents of the bubble ignite with the bubble itself serving as its own combustion chamber. After ignition, this is the time in the bubble s life cycle where power is generated, and CO2, and NOx among other species, are produced. However, the pollutants CO2 and NOx are absorbed into the surrounding liquid. The importance of bubble combustion is that it generates power using a simple and compact device. We conducted a parametric study using CAVCHEM

  19. Bubble Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corrigan, Jackie

    2004-01-01

    A method of energy production that is capable of low pollutant emissions is fundamental to one of the four pillars of NASA s Aeronautics Blueprint: Revolutionary Vehicles. Bubble combustion, a new engine technology currently being developed at Glenn Research Center promises to provide low emissions combustion in support of NASA s vision under the Emissions Element because it generates power, while minimizing the production of carbon dioxide (CO2) and nitrous oxides (NOx), both known to be Greenhouse gases. and allows the use of alternative fuels such as corn oil, low-grade fuels, and even used motor oil. Bubble combustion is analogous to the inverse of spray combustion: the difference between bubble and spray combustion is that spray combustion is spraying a liquid in to a gas to form droplets, whereas bubble combustion involves injecting a gas into a liquid to form gaseous bubbles. In bubble combustion, the process for the ignition of the bubbles takes place on a time scale of less than a nanosecond and begins with acoustic waves perturbing each bubble. This perturbation causes the local pressure to drop below the vapor pressure of the liquid thus producing cavitation in which the bubble diameter grows, and upon reversal of the oscillating pressure field, the bubble then collapses rapidly with the aid of the high surface tension forces acting on the wall of the bubble. The rapid and violent collapse causes the temperatures inside the bubbles to soar as a result of adiabatic heating. As the temperatures rise, the gaseous contents of the bubble ignite with the bubble itself serving as its own combustion chamber. After ignition, this is the time in the bubble s life cycle where power is generated, and CO2, and NOx among other species, are produced. However, the pollutants CO2 and NOx are absorbed into the surrounding liquid. The importance of bubble combustion is that it generates power using a simple and compact device. We conducted a parametric study using CAVCHEM

  20. A Quantitative Investigation of Entrainment and Detrainment in Numerically Simulated Convective Clouds. Pt. 2; Simulations of Cumulonimbus Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Charles

    1998-01-01

    Deep cumulonimbus clouds are simulated using a model that makes accurate diagnoses of entrainment and detrainment rates and of the properties of entrained and detrained air. Clouds generated by a variety of initial thermodynamic soundings are compared. In the simulations, updraft entrainment rates are large near and above cloud base, through the entire depth of the conditionally unstable layer. Stronger updrafts in a more unstable environment are better able to entrain relatively undisturbed environmental air, while weaker updrafts can entrain only air that has been modified by the clouds. When the maximum buoyancy is large, the updraft includes parcels with a wide range of buoyancies, while weaker clouds are more horizontally uniform. Strong downdrafts originate from levels at which updrafts detrain, and their mass flux depends on the mass flux of the updraft. The magnitude of mixing between cloud and environment, not the entrainment rate, varies inversely with the cloud radius. How much of the mixed air is entrained depends on the buoyancy.

  1. Hydrocarbon-oil encapsulated air bubble flotation of fine coal. Technical progress report for the third quarter, April 1, 1991--June 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, F.F.

    1995-01-01

    This report is concerned with the progress made during the third period of the two year project. A significant portion of this reporting period has been consumed in measurement of induction time of oil-free and oil-coated bubbles, modification of collector gasifier, hydrocarbon oil encapsulated flotation tests and float and sink analyses of various rank of coal samples, building a 1-inch column cell, as well as building the ultrasound collector emulsification apparatus. Induction time has been measured using an Electronic Induction Timer. The results indicate that alteration of chemical properties of air bubble by applying hydrocarbon oil or reagent can drastically improve the rate of flotation process. Various techniques have been employed in hydrocarbon oil encapsulated flotation processes to further enhance the selectivity of the process, which include: (1) gasified collector flotation with addition of gasified collector into the air stream in the initial stage; (2) two-stage (rougher-cleaner) gasified collector flotation; and (3) starvation gasified collector flotation by addition of gasified collector at various flotation times. Among these, three techniques used in hydrocarbon oil encapsulated flotation process, the starvation flotation technique provides the best selectivity.

  2. Entraining synthetic genetic oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagemakers, Alexandre; Buldú, Javier M.; Sanjuán, Miguel A. F.; de Luis, Oscar; Izquierdo, Adriana; Coloma, Antonio

    2009-09-01

    We propose a new approach for synchronizing a population of synthetic genetic oscillators, which consists in the entrainment of a colony of repressilators by external modulation. We present a model where the repressilator dynamics is affected by periodic changes in temperature. We introduce an additional plasmid in the bacteria in order to correlate the temperature variations with the enhancement of the transcription rate of a certain gene. This can be done by introducing a promoter that is related to the heat shock response. This way, the expression of that gene results in a protein that enhances the overall oscillations. Numerical results show coherent oscillations of the population for a certain range of the external frequency, which is in turn related to the natural oscillation frequency of the modified repressilator. Finally we study the transient times related with the loss of synchronization and we discuss possible applications in biotechnology of large-scale production coupled to synchronization events induced by heat shock.

  3. Power plant intake entrainment analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Edinger, J.E.; Kolluru, V.S.

    2000-04-01

    Power plant condenser cooling water intake entrainment of fish eggs and larvae is becoming an issue in evaluating environmental impacts around the plants. Methods are required to evaluate intake entrainment on different types of water bodies. Presented in this paper is a derivation of the basic relationships for evaluating entrainment from the standing crop of fish eggs and larvae for different regions of a water body, and evaluating the rate of entrainment from the standing crop. These relationships are coupled with a 3D hydrodynamic and transport model that provides the currents and flows required to complete the entrainment evaluation. Case examples are presented for a simple river system, and for the more complex Delaware River Estuary with multiple intakes. Example evaluations are made for individual intakes, and for the cumulative impacts of multiple intakes.

  4. Lidar measurements of the atmospheric entrainment zone and the potential temperature jump across the top of the mixed layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boers, R.; Eloranta, E. W.

    1986-01-01

    Lidar data of the atmospheric entrainment zone from six days of clear air convection obtained in central Illinois during July 1979 are presented. A new method to measure the potential temperature jump across the entrainment zone based on only one temperature sounding and continuous lidar measurements of the mixed layer height is developed. An almost linear dependence is found between the normalized entrainment rate and the normalized thickness of the entrainment zone.

  5. Bubble, Bubble, Toil and Trouble.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Chemical Education, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Bubbles are a fun way to introduce the concepts of surface tension, intermolecular forces, and the use of surfactants. Presents two activities in which students add chemicals to liquid dishwashing detergent with water in order to create longer lasting bubbles. (ASK)

  6. Bubble, Bubble, Toil and Trouble.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Chemical Education, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Bubbles are a fun way to introduce the concepts of surface tension, intermolecular forces, and the use of surfactants. Presents two activities in which students add chemicals to liquid dishwashing detergent with water in order to create longer lasting bubbles. (ASK)

  7. Bubble bouncing at a clean water surface.

    PubMed

    Zawala, Jan; Dorbolo, Stéphane; Vandewalle, Nicolas; Malysa, Kazimierz

    2013-10-28

    Experiments on the coalescence time of submillimeter bubbles colliding with a distilled water/air interface either being at rest (undisturbed) or vibrating vertically (with controlled amplitude and frequency) were carried out. It was found that the outcome of the bubble collision (coalescence or bounce) depends on impact velocity and size of the bubble, i.e. the parameters determining the bubble deformation degree. With the surface at rest, when the deformation of the bubble was sufficiently high, bubble bouncing was observed. It was caused by the fact that the radius of the intervening liquid film formed between the colliding bubble and water/air interface was large enough to prevent the liquid layer from reaching its thickness of rupture within the time of bubble-interface contact. Coalescence occurred in a consecutive collision if the bubble deformation was below a threshold value, as a result of dissipation of the kinetic energy associated with the bubble motion. The hypothesis about the crucial role of the bubble deformation and size of the liquid film formed in the bouncing mechanism was confirmed in a series of experiments where the bubble collided with a vibrating water/air interface. It was shown that when the kinetic energy was properly re-supplied from an external source (interface vibrations), the spectacular phenomenon of "immortal" bubbles, dancing indefinitely at the water/air interface, was achieved. It was shown that "immortal" bubble formation is a consequence of a similarly high degree of the bubble shape deformation and consequently a large enough radius of the liquid film formed.

  8. The budget of turbulent kinetic energy in bubble plumes by acoustic Doppler velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Chris; Socolofsky, Scott

    2016-11-01

    We present an experimental investigation on the TKE budget of a two-phase air-water bubble plume in an otherwise quiescent ambient. The required three-dimensional turbulent velocity field was measured by a profiling acoustic Doppler velocimeter. Experiments were carried out in a square water tank of 1m3 and covered both adjustment phase (z/D < 5) and asymptotic regime (z/D >= 5) of the plume in which the latter is characterized by a constant local Frp . The dynamic length scale D has previously been derived from a two-fluid approach and delineates the two regimes. Data on the mean flow establish the existence of an asymptotic regime when z / D > 8 with an entrainment coefficient of 0.095 and a Frp of 1.63. The data also corroborate well with previous measurements of large-scale bubble plumes. A budget of TKE was performed using curve-fits derived from the radial profiles of second- and third-order moments of turbulent velocities. From the budget, TKE production by bubbles was found to be larger than that by fluid shear. Approximately 55-60% of the total work done by bubbles is used to create fluid turbulence. This research was made possible by a Grant from The Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative to the Gulf Integrated Spill Research (GISR) Consortium.

  9. Mathematical and computer simulation modelling of intracameral forces causing pupil block due to air bubble use in Descemet's Stripping Endothelial Keratoplasty: the mechanics of iris buckling.

    PubMed

    Lockington, David; Luo, Xiaoyu; Wang, Huiming; Hill, Nick A; Ramaesh, Kanna

    2012-03-01

    Descemet's Stripping Endothelial Keratoplasty has been associated with a steep learning curve. Angle closure post Descemet's Stripping Endothelial Keratoplasty has been reported, either because of air posterior to the iris causing iridocorneal adhesions, or by air anterior to the iris causing pupillary block. The mechanics of floppy iris syndrome and pupil block have not been discussed. We evaluated the various forces competing within the anterior chamber via mathematical modelling and computational simulation, and considered the influence of floppy iris on pupil block glaucoma. Energy formulae suggest a critical pressure value will maintain normal anterior chamber relationships, above which abnormal iris buckling may occur. This mechanical instability can be influenced intraoperatively by abnormal iris properties and intracameral forces (such as air). This critical value is lowered if the patient has a floppy iris (because of a lower elastic modulus, a mechanical measure of iris rigidity). To demonstrate this mathematical concept, a 3-D computational model was built. Simulations show that, as intracameral pressure increases, the iris ring can buckle into predictable modes of shapes. This model shows how iris buckling could occur with an intracameral air bubble leading to posterior iris displacement and mechanical pupil block. It also shows that abnormal iris behaviour in IFIS is consistent with the expected predicted buckling of an elastic disc. © 2011 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental Ophthalmology © 2011 Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists.

  10. The Dueling Bubble Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Anshuman; Borrell, Marcos; Felts, John; Leal, Gary; Hirsa, Amir

    2007-11-01

    When two drops or bubbles are brought into close proximity to each other, the thin film of the fluid between them drains as they are squeezed together. If the film becomes thin enough that intermolecular forces of attraction overwhelm capillary forces, the drops/bubbles coalesce and the time it takes for this to happen, starting from the point of apparent contact is referred to as the drainage time. One practical version of this scenario occurs during the formation of foams, when the thin film forms between gas bubbles that are growing in volume with time. We performed an experimental study that is intended to mimic this process in which the two drops (or bubbles) in the size range of 50-100 microns diameter are created by oozing a liquid/gas out of two capillaries of diameter less than 100 microns directly facing each other and immersed in a second fluid. We present measurements of drainage times for the cases of very low viscosity ratios PDMS drops in Castor oil (less than 0.05) and bubbles of air in PDMS, and highlight the differences that arise in part due to the different boundary conditions for thin film drainage for liquid-liquid versus gas-liquid systems, and in part due to the different Hamaker constants for the two systems.

  11. Experimental study of the structure of isotropic turbulence with intermediate range of Reynolds number. [sea-air interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ling, S. C.; Saad, A.

    1977-01-01

    The energetic isotropic turbulence generated by a waterfall of low head was found to be developed in part through the unstable two-phase flow of entrained air bubbles. The resulting turbulent field had a turbulent Reynolds number in excess of 20,000 and maintained a self-similar structure throughout the decay period studied. The present study may provide some insight into the structure of turbulence produced by breaking waves over the ocean.

  12. Experimental study of the structure of isotropic turbulence with intermediate range of Reynolds number. [sea-air interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ling, S. C.; Saad, A.

    1977-01-01

    The energetic isotropic turbulence generated by a waterfall of low head was found to be developed in part through the unstable two-phase flow of entrained air bubbles. The resulting turbulent field had a turbulent Reynolds number in excess of 20,000 and maintained a self-similar structure throughout the decay period studied. The present study may provide some insight into the structure of turbulence produced by breaking waves over the ocean.

  13. Influence of bubble size on effervescent atomization. Part 1: bubble characterization and mean spray features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Taylor; Shepard, Thomas; Forliti, David

    2016-11-01

    In the effervescent atomization process a gas-liquid bubbly mixture is ejected from a nozzle with the goal of enhancing liquid break-up. In this work, high speed images are taken of the bubbly flow inside of an effervescent atomizer as well as downstream of the atomizer exit. The use of varying porous plate media grades and channel inserts at the air injection site of the atomizer permitted independent control of mean bubble size. Digital image analyses were used for bubble characterization and measuring mean spray features. The roles of air injection geometry on bubble population parameters inside of the effervescent atomizer are detailed. The effect of bubble size is examined at multiple gas to liquid flow rate ratios for which the bubbly flow regime was maintained. Results are presented demonstrating the influence of bubble size on the average jet width, jet dark core length, and liquid break-up.

  14. Bubble diagnostics

    DOEpatents

    Visuri, Steven R.; Mammini, Beth M.; Da Silva, Luiz B.; Celliers, Peter M.

    2003-01-01

    The present invention is intended as a means of diagnosing the presence of a gas bubble and incorporating the information into a feedback system for opto-acoustic thrombolysis. In opto-acoustic thrombolysis, pulsed laser radiation at ultrasonic frequencies is delivered intraluminally down an optical fiber and directed toward a thrombus or otherwise occluded vessel. Dissolution of the occlusion is therefore mediated through ultrasonic action of propagating pressure or shock waves. A vapor bubble in the fluid surrounding the occlusion may form as a result of laser irradiation. This vapor bubble may be used to directly disrupt the occlusion or as a means of producing a pressure wave. It is desirable to detect the formation and follow the lifetime of the vapor bubble. Knowledge of the bubble formation and lifetime yields critical information as to the maximum size of the bubble, density of the absorbed radiation, and properties of the absorbing material. This information can then be used in a feedback system to alter the irradiation conditions.

  15. Oscillations of soap bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornek, U.; Müller, F.; Harth, K.; Hahn, A.; Ganesan, S.; Tobiska, L.; Stannarius, R.

    2010-07-01

    Oscillations of droplets or bubbles of a confined fluid in a fluid environment are found in various situations in everyday life, in technological processing and in natural phenomena on different length scales. Air bubbles in liquids or liquid droplets in air are well-known examples. Soap bubbles represent a particularly simple, beautiful and attractive system to study the dynamics of a closed gas volume embedded in the same or a different gas. Their dynamics is governed by the densities and viscosities of the gases and by the film tension. Dynamic equations describing their oscillations under simplifying assumptions have been well known since the beginning of the 20th century. Both analytical description and numerical modeling have made considerable progress since then, but quantitative experiments have been lacking so far. On the other hand, a soap bubble represents an easily manageable paradigm for the study of oscillations of fluid spheres. We use a technique to create axisymmetric initial non-equilibrium states, and we observe damped oscillations into equilibrium by means of a fast video camera. Symmetries of the oscillations, frequencies and damping rates of the eigenmodes as well as the coupling of modes are analyzed. They are compared to analytical models from the literature and to numerical calculations from the literature and this work.

  16. Bubble Size Distribution in a Vibrating Bubble Column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohagheghian, Shahrouz; Wilson, Trevor; Valenzuela, Bret; Hinds, Tyler; Moseni, Kevin; Elbing, Brian

    2016-11-01

    While vibrating bubble columns have increased the mass transfer between phases, a universal scaling law remains elusive. Attempts to predict mass transfer rates in large industrial scale applications by extrapolating laboratory scale models have failed. In a stationary bubble column, mass transfer is a function of phase interfacial area (PIA), while PIA is determined based on the bubble size distribution (BSD). On the other hand, BSD is influenced by the injection characteristics and liquid phase dynamics and properties. Vibration modifies the BSD by impacting the gas and gas-liquid dynamics. This work uses a vibrating cylindrical bubble column to investigate the effect of gas injection and vibration characteristics on the BSD. The bubble column has a 10 cm diameter and was filled with water to a depth of 90 cm above the tip of the orifice tube injector. BSD was measured using high-speed imaging to determine the projected area of individual bubbles, which the nominal bubble diameter was then calculated assuming spherical bubbles. The BSD dependence on the distance from the injector, injector design (1.6 and 0.8 mm ID), air flow rates (0.5 to 5 lit/min), and vibration conditions (stationary and vibration conditions varying amplitude and frequency) will be presented. In addition to mean data, higher order statistics will also be provided.

  17. Robust acoustic wave manipulation of bubbly liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Gumerov, N. A.; Akhatov, I. S.; Ohl, C.-D.; Sametov, S. P.; Khazimullin, M. V.; Gonzalez-Avila, S. R.

    2016-03-28

    Experiments with water–air bubbly liquids when exposed to acoustic fields of frequency ∼100 kHz and intensity below the cavitation threshold demonstrate that bubbles ∼30 μm in diameter can be “pushed” away from acoustic sources by acoustic radiation independently from the direction of gravity. This manifests formation and propagation of acoustically induced transparency waves (waves of the bubble volume fraction). In fact, this is a collective effect of bubbles, which can be described by a mathematical model of bubble self-organization in acoustic fields that matches well with our experiments.

  18. Mechanism of bubble detachment from vibrating walls

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Dongjun; Park, Jun Kwon Kang, Kwan Hyoung; Kang, In Seok

    2013-11-15

    We discovered a previously unobserved mechanism by which air bubbles detach from vibrating walls in glasses containing water. Chaotic oscillation and subsequent water jets appeared when a wall vibrated at greater than a critical level. Wave forms were developed at water-air interface of the bubble by the wall vibration, and water jets were formed when sufficiently grown wave-curvatures were collapsing. Droplets were pinched off from the tip of jets and fell to the surface of the glass. When the solid-air interface at the bubble-wall attachment point was completely covered with water, the bubble detached from the wall. The water jets were mainly generated by subharmonic waves and were generated most vigorously when the wall vibrated at the volume resonant frequency of the bubble. Bubbles of specific size can be removed by adjusting the frequency of the wall's vibration.

  19. Interactions between two bubbles on a hot or cold wall.

    PubMed

    Kasumi, Hiroki; Sides, Paul J; Anderson, John L

    2004-08-01

    A temperature gradient normal to a planar wall produces two-dimensional motion and aggregation or separation of bubbles on the hot or cold wall, respectively. The origin of the motion is fluid convection driven by the thermal Marangoni stress on the surface of the bubbles. Previous theories for the dynamics of two or more bubbles have been based on an analysis of flow about a single bubble and the resulting convection that entrains its neighbors. Here we extend the theory by solving the quasi-steady equations for the temperature and velocity fields for two bubbles. The result is a quantitative model for the relative velocity between two bubbles as a function of both the distance between them and the gap between each bubble and the surface. Interactions between the bubbles strongly increase the approach velocity, which is counter-intuitive because the hydrodynamic resistance increases as the bubbles approach each other. An asymptotic analysis indicates the thermocapillary force bringing them together or pushing them apart is singular in the separation when the bubbles are close to each other. The two-bubble theory agrees reasonably well with the experimentally measured velocities of pairs of bubbles on hot or cold surfaces, though it slightly overestimates the velocities.

  20. Liquid-bubble Interaction under Surf Zone Breaking Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derakhti, M.; Kirby, J. T., Jr.

    2014-12-01

    Liquid-bubble interaction, especially in complex two-phase bubbly flow under breaking waves, is still poorly understood. Derakhti and Kirby (2014a,b) have recently studied bubble entrainment and turbulence modulation by dispersed bubbles under isolated unsteady breaking waves along with extensive model verifications and convergence tests. In this presentation, we continue this examination with attention turned to the simulation of periodic surf zone breaking waves. In addition, the relative importance of preferential accumulation of dispersed bubbles in coherent vortex cores is investigated. Heavier-than-liquid particles, i.e. sediment, tend to accumulate in regions of high strain rate and avoid regions of intense vorticity. In contrast, lighter-than-liquid particles such as bubbles tend to congregate in vortical regions. We perform a three dimensional (3D) large-eddy simulation (LES) using a Navier-Stokes solver extended to incorporate entrained bubble populations, using an Eulerian-Eulerian formulation for the polydisperse bubble phase. The volume of fluid (VOF) method is used for free surface tracking. The model accounts for momentum exchange between dispersed bubbles and liquid phase as well as bubble-induced dissipation. We investigate the formation and evolution of breaking-induced turbulent coherent structures (BTCS) under both plunging and spilling periodic breaking waves as well as BTCS's role on the intermittent 3D distributions of bubble void fraction in the surf zone. We particularly examine the correlation between bubble void fractions and Q-criterion values to quantify this interaction. Also, the vertical transport of dispersed bubbles by downburst type coherent structures in the transition region is compared to that by obliquely descending eddies. All the results are summarized at different zones from outer to inner surf zone.

  1. Adsorption of egg phosphatidylcholine to an air/water and triolein/water bubble interface: use of the 2-dimensional phase rule to estimate the surface composition of a phospholipid/triolein/water surface as a function of surface pressure.

    PubMed

    Mitsche, Matthew A; Wang, Libo; Small, Donald M

    2010-03-11

    Phospholipid monolayers play a critical role in the structure and stabilization of biological interfaces, including all membranes, the alveoli of the lungs, fat droplets in adipose tissue, and lipoproteins. The behavior of phospholipids in bilayers and at an air-water interface is well understood. However, the study of phospholipids at oil-water interfaces is limited due to technical challenges. In this study, egg phosphatidylcholine (EPC) was deposited from small unilamellar vesicles onto a bubble of either air or triolein (TO) formed in a low-salt buffer. The surface tension (gamma) was measured using a drop tensiometer. We observed that EPC binds irreversibly to both interfaces and at equilibrium exerts approximately 12 and 15 mN/m of pressure (Pi) at an air and TO interface, respectively. After EPC was bound to the interface, the unbound EPC was washed out of the cuvette, and the surface was compressed to study the Pi/area relationship. To determine the surface concentration (Gamma), which cannot be measured directly, compression isotherms from a Langmuir trough and drop tensiometer were compared. The air-water interfaces had identical characteristics using both techniques; thus, Gamma on the bubble can be determined by overlaying the two isotherms. Both TO and EPC are surface-active, so in a mixed TO/EPC monolayer, both molecules will be exposed to water. Since TO is less surface-active than EPC, as Pi increases, the TO is progressively ejected. To understand the Pi/area isotherm of EPC on a TO bubble, a variety of TO-EPC mixtures were spread at the air-water interface. The isotherms show an abrupt break in the curve caused by the ejection of TO from the monolayer into a new bulk phase. By overlaying the compression isotherm above the ejection point with a TO bubble compression isotherm, Gamma can be estimated. This allows determination of Gamma of EPC on a TO bubble as a function of Pi.

  2. High-Frequency Fiber-Optic Ultrasonic Sensor Using Air Micro-Bubble for Imaging of Seismic Physical Models.

    PubMed

    Gang, Tingting; Hu, Manli; Rong, Qiangzhou; Qiao, Xueguang; Liang, Lei; Liu, Nan; Tong, Rongxin; Liu, Xiaobo; Bian, Ce

    2016-12-14

    A micro-fiber-optic Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) is proposed and demonstrated experimentally for ultrasonic imaging of seismic physical models. The device consists of a micro-bubble followed by the end of a single-mode fiber (SMF). The micro-structure is formed by the discharging operation on a short segment of hollow-core fiber (HCF) that is spliced to the SMF. This micro FPI is sensitive to ultrasonic waves (UWs), especially to the high-frequency (up to 10 MHz) UW, thanks to its ultra-thin cavity wall and micro-diameter. A side-band filter technology is employed for the UW interrogation, and then the high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) UW signal is achieved. Eventually the sensor is used for lateral imaging of the physical model by scanning UW detection and two-dimensional signal reconstruction.

  3. High-Frequency Fiber-Optic Ultrasonic Sensor Using Air Micro-Bubble for Imaging of Seismic Physical Models

    PubMed Central

    Gang, Tingting; Hu, Manli; Rong, Qiangzhou; Qiao, Xueguang; Liang, Lei; Liu, Nan; Tong, Rongxin; Liu, Xiaobo; Bian, Ce

    2016-01-01

    A micro-fiber-optic Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) is proposed and demonstrated experimentally for ultrasonic imaging of seismic physical models. The device consists of a micro-bubble followed by the end of a single-mode fiber (SMF). The micro-structure is formed by the discharging operation on a short segment of hollow-core fiber (HCF) that is spliced to the SMF. This micro FPI is sensitive to ultrasonic waves (UWs), especially to the high-frequency (up to 10 MHz) UW, thanks to its ultra-thin cavity wall and micro-diameter. A side-band filter technology is employed for the UW interrogation, and then the high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) UW signal is achieved. Eventually the sensor is used for lateral imaging of the physical model by scanning UW detection and two-dimensional signal reconstruction. PMID:27983639

  4. Primordial Bubbles within Primordial Bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Occhionero, Franco; Amendola, Luca; Corasaniti, Pier Stefano

    The nucleation of primordial bubbles during an inflationary phase transition has been suggested to promote the formation of structure either above or below the horizon, depending on whether the nucleation occurs more or less than 60 e-folds before the end of inflation. Here we propose a mechanism which has both features and produces subhorizon cavities up to hundreds of h-1 Mpc -- where excess power is observed -- inside superhorizon bubbles, i.e. in open universes. For this purpose we build a new inflationary two-field model with two vacuum channels in the potential surface: by modulating the energy difference between these channels, episodes of back and forth transition occur in sequence during inflation. Thus, one physical process may i) reconcile inflation with openness and ii) seed a distribution of observable voids. Bubble spectra are given in terms of phenomenological parameters which in turn are functions of microscopic physical parameters. In principle large scale structure constrains fundamental physics: for example, to account for power at scales of hundreds of h-1 Mpc the singularity in the Euclidean action -- which separates the first from the second phase transition -- must be mild enough. The smoking gun of the process might be the imprint of non-Gaussian, ring-like signals on the microwave background at l > 1000 by the subhorizon bubbles. On the other end of the spectrum, the contribution to l =1,2 from the off-centerness of the observer in the open bubble, is being evaluated.

  5. Estimation of convective entrainment properties from a cloud-resolving model simulation during TWP-ICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guang J.; Wu, Xiaoqing; Zeng, Xiping; Mitovski, Toni

    2016-10-01

    The fractional entrainment rate in convective clouds is an important parameter in current convective parameterization schemes of climate models. In this paper, it is estimated using a 1-km-resolution cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulation of convective clouds from TWP-ICE (the Tropical Warm Pool-International Cloud Experiment). The clouds are divided into different types, characterized by cloud-top heights. The entrainment rates and moist static energy that is entrained or detrained are determined by analyzing the budget of moist static energy for each cloud type. Results show that the entrained air is a mixture of approximately equal amount of cloud air and environmental air, and the detrained air is a mixture of ~80 % of cloud air and 20 % of the air with saturation moist static energy at the environmental temperature. After taking into account the difference in moist static energy between the entrained air and the mean environment, the estimated fractional entrainment rate is much larger than those used in current convective parameterization schemes. High-resolution (100 m) large-eddy simulation of TWP-ICE convection was also analyzed to support the CRM results. It is shown that the characteristics of entrainment rates estimated using both the high-resolution data and CRM-resolution coarse-grained data are similar. For each cloud category, the entrainment rate is high near cloud base and top, but low in the middle of clouds. The entrainment rates are best fitted to the inverse of in-cloud vertical velocity by a second order polynomial.

  6. Wind profiler mixing depth and entrainment measurements with chemical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Angevine, W.M.; Trainer, M.; Parrish, D.D.; Buhr, M.P.; Fehsenfeld, F.C.; Kok, G.L.

    1994-12-31

    Wind profiling radars operating at 915 MHz have been present at a number of regional air quality studies. The profilers can provide a continuous, accurate record of the depth of the convective mixed layer with good time resolution. Profilers also provide information about entrainment at the boundary layer top. Mixing depth data from several days of the Rural Oxidants in the Southern Environment II (ROSE II) study in Alabama in June, 1992 are presented. For several cases, chemical measurements from aircraft and ground-based instruments are shown to correspond to mixing depth and entrainment zone behavior observed by the profiler.

  7. Tiny Bubbles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Hy

    1985-01-01

    A simple oxygen-collecting device (easily constructed from glass jars and a lid) can show bubbles released by water plants during photosynthesis. Suggestions are given for: (1) testing the collected gas; (2) using various carbon dioxide sources; and (3) measuring respiration. (DH)

  8. Leverage bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Wanfeng; Woodard, Ryan; Sornette, Didier

    2012-01-01

    Leverage is strongly related to liquidity in a market and lack of liquidity is considered a cause and/or consequence of the recent financial crisis. A repurchase agreement is a financial instrument where a security is sold simultaneously with an agreement to buy it back at a later date. Repurchase agreement (repo) market size is a very important element in calculating the overall leverage in a financial market. Therefore, studying the behavior of repo market size can help to understand a process that can contribute to the birth of a financial crisis. We hypothesize that herding behavior among large investors led to massive over-leveraging through the use of repos, resulting in a bubble (built up over the previous years) and subsequent crash in this market in early 2008. We use the Johansen-Ledoit-Sornette (JLS) model of rational expectation bubbles and behavioral finance to study the dynamics of the repo market that led to the crash. The JLS model qualifies a bubble by the presence of characteristic patterns in the price dynamics, called log-periodic power law (LPPL) behavior. We show that there was significant LPPL behavior in the market before that crash and that the predicted range of times predicted by the model for the end of the bubble is consistent with the observations.

  9. Tiny Bubbles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Hy

    1985-01-01

    A simple oxygen-collecting device (easily constructed from glass jars and a lid) can show bubbles released by water plants during photosynthesis. Suggestions are given for: (1) testing the collected gas; (2) using various carbon dioxide sources; and (3) measuring respiration. (DH)

  10. Generation of Bubbly Suspensions in Low Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nahra, Henry K.; Hoffmann, Monica I.; Hussey, Sam; Bell, Kimberly R.

    2000-01-01

    Generation of a uniform monodisperse bubbly suspension in low gravity is a rather difficult task because bubbles do not detach as easily as on Earth. Under microgravity, the buoyancy force is not present to detach the bubbles as they are formed from the nozzles. One way to detach the bubbles is to establish a detaching force that helps their detachment from the orifice. The drag force, established by flowing a liquid in a cross or co-flow configuration with respect to the nozzle direction, provides this additional force and helps detach the bubbles as they are being formed. This paper is concerned with studying the generation of a bubbly suspension in low gravity in support of a flight definition experiment titled "Behavior of Rapidly Sheared Bubbly Suspension." Generation of a bubbly suspension, composed of 2 and 3 mm diameter bubbles with a standard deviation <10% of the bubble diameter, was identified as one of the most important engineering/science issues associated with the flight definition experiment. This paper summarizes the low gravity experiments that were conducted to explore various ways of making the suspension. Two approaches were investigated. The first was to generate the suspension via a chemical reaction between the continuous and dispersed phases using effervescent material, whereas the second considered the direct injection of air into the continuous phase. The results showed that the reaction method did not produce the desired bubble size distribution compared to the direct injection of bubbles. However, direct injection of air into the continuous phase (aqueous salt solution) resulted in uniform bubble-diameter distribution with acceptable bubble-diameter standard deviation.

  11. Test ventilation with smoke, bubbles, and balloons

    SciTech Connect

    Pickering, P.L.; Cucchiara, A.L.; Gonzales, M.; McAtee, J.L.

    1987-06-01

    The behavior of smoke, bubbles, and helium-filled balloons was videotaped to demonstrate the mixing of air in the plutonium chemistry laboratories a plutonium facility. The air-distribution patterns, as indicated by each method, were compared. Helium-filled balloons proved more useful than bubbles or smoke in the visualization of airflow patterns. The replay of various segments of the videotape proved useful in evaluating the different techniques and in identifying airflow trends responsible for air mixing.

  12. Test ventilation with smoke, bubbles, and balloons

    SciTech Connect

    Pickering, P.L.; Cucchiara, A.L.; McAtee, J.L.; Gonzales, M.

    1987-01-01

    The behavior of smoke, bubbles, and helium-filled balloons was videotaped to demonstrate the mixing of air in the plutonium chemistry laboratories, a plutonium facility. The air-distribution patterns, as indicated by each method, were compared. Helium-filled balloons proved more useful than bubbles or smoke in the visualization of airflow patterns. The replay of various segments of the videotape proved useful in evaluating the different techniques and in identifying airflow trends responsible for air mixing. 6 refs.

  13. Doughnut-shaped soap bubbles.

    PubMed

    Préve, Deison; Saa, Alberto

    2015-10-01

    Soap bubbles are thin liquid films enclosing a fixed volume of air. Since the surface tension is typically assumed to be the only factor responsible for conforming the soap bubble shape, the realized bubble surfaces are always minimal area ones. Here, we consider the problem of finding the axisymmetric minimal area surface enclosing a fixed volume V and with a fixed equatorial perimeter L. It is well known that the sphere is the solution for V=L(3)/6π(2), and this is indeed the case of a free soap bubble, for instance. Surprisingly, we show that for V<αL(3)/6π(2), with α≈0.21, such a surface cannot be the usual lens-shaped surface formed by the juxtaposition of two spherical caps, but is rather a toroidal surface. Practically, a doughnut-shaped bubble is known to be ultimately unstable and, hence, it will eventually lose its axisymmetry by breaking apart in smaller bubbles. Indisputably, however, the topological transition from spherical to toroidal surfaces is mandatory here for obtaining the global solution for this axisymmetric isoperimetric problem. Our result suggests that deformed bubbles with V<αL(3)/6π(2) cannot be stable and should not exist in foams, for instance.

  14. Doughnut-shaped soap bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Préve, Deison; Saa, Alberto

    2015-10-01

    Soap bubbles are thin liquid films enclosing a fixed volume of air. Since the surface tension is typically assumed to be the only factor responsible for conforming the soap bubble shape, the realized bubble surfaces are always minimal area ones. Here, we consider the problem of finding the axisymmetric minimal area surface enclosing a fixed volume V and with a fixed equatorial perimeter L . It is well known that the sphere is the solution for V =L3/6 π2 , and this is indeed the case of a free soap bubble, for instance. Surprisingly, we show that for V <α L3/6 π2 , with α ≈0.21 , such a surface cannot be the usual lens-shaped surface formed by the juxtaposition of two spherical caps, but is rather a toroidal surface. Practically, a doughnut-shaped bubble is known to be ultimately unstable and, hence, it will eventually lose its axisymmetry by breaking apart in smaller bubbles. Indisputably, however, the topological transition from spherical to toroidal surfaces is mandatory here for obtaining the global solution for this axisymmetric isoperimetric problem. Our result suggests that deformed bubbles with V <α L3/6 π2 cannot be stable and should not exist in foams, for instance.

  15. Length and bursting of separation bubbles: A physical interpretation. [of pressure distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, J. M.

    1979-01-01

    A physical interpretation of the observed form of the pressure distribution beneath a two-dimensional separation bubble which modified the external inviscid pressure distribution only locally is given in terms of boundary layer concepts. A simple method for estimating along a mean streamline entrained into the underside of a growing shear layer through the transition region is discussed, and predictions of bubble bursting conditions and a lower bound on the bubble length are compared with experiment.

  16. Shock-wave propagation in a sonoluminescing gas bubble

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, C. C.; Roberts, Paul H.

    1993-01-01

    The motion of the bubble radius and of the air trapped inside the bubble during sonoluminescence are determined self-consistently by coupling the solution of the Rayleigh-Plesset equation governing the bubble radius to the solution of Euler's equations for the motion of air in the bubble. Results are presented for three slightly different conditions of excitation, in two of which shocks are formed during the collapse of the bubble, and in which such high temperatures are attained that the air is ionized. Estimates are made of the duration and intensity of the light then radiated by the plasma.

  17. Alternative model of single-bubble sonoluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasui, Kyuichi

    1997-12-01

    A model of single-bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) is constructed. In the model, the temperature is assumed to be spatially uniform inside the bubble except at the thermal boundary layer near the bubble wall even at the strong collapse based on the theoretical results of Kwak and Na [Phys. Rev. Lett. 77, 4454 (1996)]. In the model, the effect of the kinetic energy of gases inside the bubble is taken into account, which heats up the whole bubble when gases stop their motions at the end of the strong collapse. In the model, a bubble in water containing air is assumed to consist mainly of argon based on the hypothesis of Lohse et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 78, 1359 (1997)]. Numerical calculations under a SBSL condition reveal that the kinetic energy of gases heats up the whole bubble considerably. It is also clarified that vapor molecules (H2O) undergo chemical reactions in the heated interior of the bubble at the collapse and that chemical reactions decrease the temperature inside the bubble considerably. It is suggested that SBSL originates in thermal radiation from the whole bubble rather than a local point (the bubble center) heated by a converging spherical shock wave widely suggested in the previous theories of SBSL.

  18. Effect of particle entrainment on the runout of pyroclastic density currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fauria, Kristen E.; Manga, Michael; Chamberlain, Michael

    2016-09-01

    Pyroclastic density currents (PDCs) can erode soil and bedrock, yet we currently lack a mechanistic understanding of particle entrainment that can be incorporated into models and used to understand how PDC bulking affects runout. Here we quantify how particle splash, the ejection of particles due to impact by a projectile, entrains particles into dilute PDCs. We use scaled laboratory experiments to measure the mass of sand ejected by impacts of pumice, wood, and nylon spheres. We then derive an expression for particle splash that we validate with our experimental results as well as results from seven other studies. We find that the number of ejected particles scales with the kinetic energy of the impactor and the depth of the crater generated by the impactor. Last, we use a one-dimensional model of a dilute, compressible density current—where runout distance is controlled by air entrainment and particle exchange with the substrate—to examine how particle entrainment by splash affects PDC density and runout. Splash-driven particle entrainment can increase the runout distance of dilute PDCs by an order of magnitude. Furthermore, the temperature of entrained particles greatly affects runout and PDCs that entrain ambient temperature particles runout farther than those that entrain hot particles. Particle entrainment by splash therefore not only increases the runout of dilute PDCs but demonstrates that the temperature and composition of the lower boundary have consequences for PDC density, temperature, runout, hazards and depositional record.

  19. The Minnaert Bubble: An Acoustic Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devaud, Martin; Hocquet, Thierry; Bacri, Jean-Claude; Leroy, Valentin

    2008-01-01

    We propose an "ab initio" introduction to the well-known Minnaert pulsating bubble at graduate level. After a brief recall of the standard stuff, we begin with a detailed discussion of the radial movements of an air bubble in water. This discussion is managed from an acoustic point of view, and using the Lagrangian rather than the Eulerian…

  20. The Minnaert Bubble: An Acoustic Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devaud, Martin; Hocquet, Thierry; Bacri, Jean-Claude; Leroy, Valentin

    2008-01-01

    We propose an "ab initio" introduction to the well-known Minnaert pulsating bubble at graduate level. After a brief recall of the standard stuff, we begin with a detailed discussion of the radial movements of an air bubble in water. This discussion is managed from an acoustic point of view, and using the Lagrangian rather than the Eulerian…

  1. Steam-air blown bubbling fluidized bed biomass gasification (BFBBG): Multi-scale models and experimental validation

    DOE PAGES

    Bates, Richard B.; Ghoniem, Ahmed F.; Jablonski, Whitney S.; ...

    2017-02-02

    During fluidized bed biomass gasification, complex gas-solid mixing patterns and numerous chemical and physical phenomena make identification of optimal operating conditions challenging. In this work, a parametric experimental campaign was carried out alongside the development of a coupled reactor network model which successfully integrates the individually validated sub-models to predict steady-state reactor performance metrics and outputs. The experiments utilized an integrated gasification system consisting of an externally-heated, bench-scale, 4-in., 5 kWth, fluidized bed steam/air blown gasifier fed with woody biomass equipped with a molecular beam mass spectrometer to directly measure tar species. The operating temperature (750-850°C) and air/fuel equivalence ratiomore » (ER = 0-0.157) were independently varied to isolate their effects. Elevating temperature is shown to improve the char gasification rate and reduce tar concentrations. In conclusion, air strongly impacts the composition of tar, accelerating the conversion of lighter polycyclic-aromatic hydrocarbons into soot precursors, while also improving the overall carbon conversion.« less

  2. Tilted membrane panel: A new module concept to maximize the impact of air bubbles for membrane fouling control in microalgae harvesting.

    PubMed

    Eliseus, A; Bilad, M R; Nordin, N A H M; Putra, Z A; Wirzal, M D H

    2017-10-01

    Microalgae harvesting using membrane technology is challenging because of its high fouling propensity. As an established fouling mitigation technique, efficacy of air bubbles can be improved by maximizing the impact of shear-rates in scouring foulant. In this study, it is achieved by tilting the membrane panel. We investigate the effect of tilting angle, switching period as well as aeration rate during microalgal broth filtration. Results show that higher tilting angles (up to 20°) improve permeability of up to 2.7 times of the vertical panel. In addition, operating a one-sided panel is better than a two-sided panel, in which the later involved switching mode. One-sided membrane panel only require a half of area, yet its performance is comparable with of a large-scale module. This tilted panel can lead to significant membrane cost reductions and eventually improves the competitiveness of membrane technology for microalgae harvesting application. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Application of the ultrasonic technique and high-speed filming for the study of the structure of air-water bubbly flows

    SciTech Connect

    Carvalho, R.D.M.; Venturini, O.J.; Tanahashi, E.I.; Neves, F. Jr.; Franca, F.A.

    2009-10-15

    Multiphase flows are very common in industry, oftentimes involving very harsh environments and fluids. Accordingly, there is a need to determine the dispersed phase holdup using noninvasive fast responding techniques; besides, knowledge of the flow structure is essential for the assessment of the transport processes involved. The ultrasonic technique fulfills these requirements and could have the capability to provide the information required. In this paper, the potential of the ultrasonic technique for application to two-phase flows was investigated by checking acoustic attenuation data against experimental data on the void fraction and flow topology of vertical, upward, air-water bubbly flows in the zero to 15% void fraction range. The ultrasonic apparatus consisted of one emitter/receiver transducer and three other receivers at different positions along the pipe circumference; simultaneous high-speed motion pictures of the flow patterns were made at 250 and 1000 fps. The attenuation data for all sensors exhibited a systematic interrelated behavior with void fraction, thereby testifying to the capability of the ultrasonic technique to measure the dispersed phase holdup. From the motion pictures, basic gas phase structures and different flows patterns were identified that corroborated several features of the acoustic attenuation data. Finally, the acoustic wave transit time was also investigated as a function of void fraction. (author)

  4. Band gaps in bubble phononic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leroy, V.; Bretagne, A.; Lanoy, M.; Tourin, A.

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the interaction between Bragg and hybridization effects on the band gap properties of bubble phononic crystals. These latter consist of air cavities periodically arranged in an elastomer matrix and are fabricated using soft-lithography techniques. Their transmission properties are affected by Bragg effects due to the periodicity of the structure as well as hybridization between the propagating mode of the embedding medium and bubble resonance. The hybridization gap survives disorder while the Bragg gap requires a periodic distribution of bubbles. The distance between two bubble layers can be tuned to make the two gaps overlap or to create a transmission peak in the hybridization gap.

  5. Analysis of a deflating soap bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, David P.; Sleyman, Sarah

    2010-10-01

    A soap bubble on the end of a cylindrical tube is seen to deflate as the higher pressure air inside the bubble escapes through a tube. We perform an experiment to measure the radius of the slowly deflating bubble and observe that the radius decreases to a minimum before quickly increasing. This behavior reflects the fact that the bubble ends up as a flat surface over the end of the tube. A theoretical analysis reproduces this behavior and compares favorably with the experimental data.

  6. Investigation of the Entrainment Phenomenon Using a Scaling Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishore, Aravind; Ghia, Urmila

    2014-11-01

    Air entrainment is a commonly observed phenomenon; we see it when filling a glass with water from a faucet, in the frothing of the ocean surface, in white water rapids, etc. The focus of our work is the numerical simulation of the entrainment phenomenon associated with laminar plunging jets. With increasing jet velocity, the interfacial cusp formed between the jet and the liquid pool becomes sharper. At a critical jet velocity, entrainment inception occurs, i.e., the interfacial cusp breaks, the interface ruptures, and air is pulled into the liquid pool. We conduct two-fluid simulations using the Volume-Of-Fluid (VOF) methodology. The large range of length scales in the flow presents a major computational challenge. We postulate an approach based on scaling of the underlying physics and this helps alleviate the constraints that the physics poses on the numerical method. The approach is validated using a simple flow configuration - a cylinder rotating at an interface between two fluids. Our simulations capture the sharpening of the interfacial cusp, and the sudden rupture of the interface. The predicted critical entrainment velocities are within 1% of experimental data, thereby providing confidence in the approach. This work was supported by the UC Simulation Center at the University of Cincinnati.

  7. Effect of amino acids on aggregation behaviors of sodium deoxycholate at air/water surface: surface tension and oscillating bubble studies.

    PubMed

    He, Fang; Xu, Guiying; Pang, Jinyu; Ao, Mingqi; Han, Tingting; Gong, Houjian

    2011-01-18

    The aggregation behaviors of sodium deoxycholate (NaDC) at the air/water surface were investigated via surface tension and oscillating bubble measurements in the absence and presence of three alkaline amino acids, namely, L-Lysine (L-Lys), L-Arginine (L-Arg), and L-Histidine (L-His). The results of surface tension measurements show that NaDC has a lower ability to reduce the surface tension of water, because NaDC molecules orient at the surface in an oblique direction and tend to aggregate together, which is approved by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. L-Lys is the most efficient of the three amino acids in reducing the critical aggregation concentration (cac) of NaDC in aqueous solution. The influence of amino acids on the dilational rheological properties of NaDC was studied using the drop shape analysis method in the frequency range from 0.02 to 0.5 Hz. The results reveal that the absolute modulus passes through a maximum value with increasing NaDC concentration. The addition of amino acids increases the absolute modulus of NaDC, and the maximum value is observed at much lower concentration. From the perspective of structures of amino acids, the performance of L-Arg is similar to that of L-His, and both of them bring out a smaller effect on the absolute modulus than that of L-Lys. From the above results, it may be presumed that electrostatic and hydrophobic effects are important impetus during the interaction between amino acids and NaDC at the air/water surface. Hydrogen bonding is so ubiquitous in the system that the difference of hydrogen bonding between NaDC and amino acid is ignored.

  8. Dynamic removal of oral biofilms by bubbles.

    PubMed

    Parini, Michael R; Pitt, William G

    2006-09-01

    A novel approach to the removal of biofilms from solid surfaces is to pass large numbers of air bubbles over the surfaces. Such a phenomenon occurs when teeth are brushed with some types of powered toothbrushes that accelerate bubbly fluid against or across teeth surfaces. Video recordings of air bubbles propelled against a mature biofilm of Streptococcus mutans showed that the bubbles removed the biofilm at the point of collision. A mathematical model of the removal process was proposed and was able to simulate the kinetics of the biofilm removal process. Removal rate was modeled to be proportional to the bubble footprint area and the number of collisions per time. The fraction of biofilm removed per bubble collision is on the order of 0.4, a value much larger than would have been expected based on previous research employing bubbles that moved slowly along a surface that was partially covered with adherent bacteria. The higher removal efficiency is attributed to fluid dynamic shear forces that occur in conjunction with the thermodynamic forces that pull bacteria from a surface as a bubble contacts the biofilm. Fast bubbly flow is expected to remove bacterial biofilm from hard surfaces such as teeth.

  9. Bernoulli Suction Effect on Soap Bubble Blowing?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, John; Ryu, Sangjin

    2015-11-01

    As a model system for thin-film bubble with two gas-liquid interfaces, we experimentally investigated the pinch-off of soap bubble blowing. Using the lab-built bubble blower and high-speed videography, we have found that the scaling law exponent of soap bubble pinch-off is 2/3, which is similar to that of soap film bridge. Because air flowed through the decreasing neck of soap film tube, we studied possible Bernoulli suction effect on soap bubble pinch-off by evaluating the Reynolds number of airflow. Image processing was utilized to calculate approximate volume of growing soap film tube and the volume flow rate of the airflow, and the Reynolds number was estimated to be 800-3200. This result suggests that soap bubbling may involve the Bernoulli suction effect.

  10. Arrested Bubble Rise in a Narrow Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamstaes, Catherine; Eggers, Jens

    2017-05-01

    If a long air bubble is placed inside a vertical tube closed at the top it can rise by displacing the fluid above it. However, Bretherton found that if the tube radius, R, is smaller than a critical value Rc=0.918 ℓ _c, where ℓ _c=√{γ /ρ g} is the capillary length, there is no solution corresponding to steady rise. Experimentally, the bubble rise appears to have stopped altogether. Here we explain this observation by studying the unsteady bubble motion for Rbubble and the tube goes to zero in limit of large t like t^{-4/5}, leading to a rapid slow-down of the bubble's mean speed U ∝ t^{-2}. As a result, the total bubble rise in infinite time remains very small, giving the appearance of arrested motion.

  11. Bubbles Rising Through a Soft Granular Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Mestre, Robin; MacMinn, Chris; Lee, Sungyon

    2016-11-01

    Bubble migration through a soft granular material involves a strong coupling between the bubble dynamics and the deformation of the material. This is relevant to a variety of natural processes such as gas venting from sediments and gas exsolution from magma. Here, we study this process experimentally by injecting air bubbles into a quasi-2D packing of soft hydrogel beads and measuring the size, speed, and morphology of the bubbles as they rise due to buoyancy. Whereas previous work has focused on deformation resisted by intergranular friction, we focus on the previously inaccessible regime of deformation resisted by elasticity. At low confining stress, the bubbles are irregular and rounded, migrating via local rearrangement. At high confining stress, the bubbles become unstable and branched, migrating via pathway opening. The authors thank The Royal Society for support (International Exchanges Ref IE150885).

  12. The impacts of replacing air bubbles with microspheres for the clarification of algae from low cell-density culture.

    PubMed

    Ometto, Francesco; Pozza, Carlo; Whitton, Rachel; Smyth, Beatrice; Gonzalez Torres, Andrea; Henderson, Rita K; Jarvis, Peter; Jefferson, Bruce; Villa, Raffaella

    2014-04-15

    Dissolved Air Flotation (DAF) is a well-known coagulation-flotation system applied at large scale for microalgae harvesting. Compared to conventional harvesting technologies DAF allows high cell recovery at lower energy demand. By replacing microbubbles with microspheres, the innovative Ballasted Dissolved Air Flotation (BDAF) technique has been reported to achieve the same algae cell removal efficiency, while saving up to 80% of the energy required for the conventional DAF unit. Using three different algae cultures (Scenedesmus obliquus, Chlorella vulgaris and Arthrospira maxima), the present work investigated the practical, economic and environmental advantages of the BDAF system compared to the DAF system. 99% cells separation was achieved with both systems, nevertheless, the BDAF technology allowed up to 95% coagulant reduction depending on the algae species and the pH conditions adopted. In terms of floc structure and strength, the inclusion of microspheres in the algae floc generated a looser aggregate, showing a more compact structure within single cell alga, than large and filamentous cells. Overall, BDAF appeared to be a more reliable and sustainable harvesting system than DAF, as it allowed equal cells recovery reducing energy inputs, coagulant demand and carbon emissions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Armoring confined bubbles in concentrated colloidal suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yingxian; Khodaparast, Sepideh; Stone, Howard

    2016-11-01

    Encapsulation of a bubble with microparticles is known to significantly improve the stability of the bubble. This phenomenon has recently gained increasing attention due to its application in a variety of technologies such as foam stabilization, drug encapsulation and colloidosomes. Nevertheless, the production of such colloidal armored bubble with controlled size and particle coverage ratio is still a great challenge industrially. We study the coating process of a long air bubble by microparticles in a circular tube filled with a concentrated microparticles colloidal suspension. As the bubble proceeds in the suspension of particles, a monolayer of micro-particles forms on the interface of the bubble, which eventually results in a fully armored bubble. We investigate the phenomenon that triggers and controls the evolution of the particle accumulation on the bubble interface. Moreover, we examine the effects of the mean flow velocity, the size of the colloids and concentration of the suspension on the dynamics of the armored bubble. The results of this study can potentially be applied to production of particle-encapsulated bubbles, surface-cleaning techniques, and gas-assisted injection molding.

  14. Splitting and dispersion of bubbles by turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Carlos

    The transient evolution of the bubble-size probability density function resulting from the break-up of an air bubble injected into a fully developed turbulent water flow has been measured experimentally using digital image processing techniques. These measurements were used to determine the break up frequency of the bubbles as a function of their size and the dissipation rate of turbulent kinetic energy of the underlying turbulence, e , as well as to determine the bubble size probability density function of the daughter bubbles formed from the break-up of a mother bubble of size, D0. A phenomenological model for the break-up frequency is proposed showing that for large bubbles whose sizes are much greater than Dc=1.26(sr )3/5e-2/5 , it decreases with the bubble size as e1/3D-2/3 . The model is shown to be in good agreement with the measurements performed over a wide range of bubble sizes and values of e . Based on energy principles, a statistical model to describe the bubble size probability density function of the daughter bubbles resulting from the shattering of a mother bubble of size D0 immersed into a fully developed turbulent flow is proposed. The model shows that the bubble-size pdf depends not only on D0, but also on the value of the dissipation rate of turbulent kinetic energy of the underlying turbulence, e . This simple model predicts detailed experimental measurements of the transient bubble size pdfs performed over a range of bubble sizes and dissipation rates e , in a consistent manner. The agreement between the model and the experiments is particularly good for low and moderate values of turbulent Weber number of the bubbles, Wet=rDu2 D0D0 s , where the assumption of the binary break-up is shown to be consistent with the experimental observations. At larger values of Wet, it was found that the most probable number of daughter bubbles increases, and the assumption of tertiary break-up is shown to lead to a better fit of the experimental measurements

  15. Temperature measurements in cavitation bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coutier-Delgosha, Olivier

    2016-11-01

    Cavitation is usually a nearly isothermal process in the liquid phase, but in some specific flow conditions like hot water or cryogenic fluids, significant temperature variations are detected. In addition, a large temperature increase happens inside the cavitation bubbles at the very end of their collapse, due to the fast compression of the gas at the bubble core, which is almost adiabatic. This process is of primary interest in various biomedical and pharmaceutical applications, where the mechanisms of bubble collapse plays a major role. To investigate the amplitude and the spatial distribution of these temperature variations inside and outside the cavitation bubbles, a system based on cold wires has been developed. They have been tested in a configuration of a single bubble obtained by submitting a small air bubble to a large amplitude pressure wave. Some promising results have been obtained after the initial validation tests. This work is funded by the Office of Naval Research Global under Grant N62909-16-1-2116, Dr. Salahuddin Ahmed & Ki-Han Kim program managers.

  16. The Stochastic Parcel Model: A deterministic parameterization of stochastically entraining convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romps, David M.

    2016-03-01

    Convective entrainment is a process that is poorly represented in existing convective parameterizations. By many estimates, convective entrainment is the leading source of error in global climate models. As a potential remedy, an Eulerian implementation of the Stochastic Parcel Model (SPM) is presented here as a convective parameterization that treats entrainment in a physically realistic and computationally efficient way. Drawing on evidence that convecting clouds comprise air parcels subject to Poisson-process entrainment events, the SPM calculates the deterministic limit of an infinite number of such parcels. For computational efficiency, the SPM groups parcels at each height by their purity, which is a measure of their total entrainment up to that height. This reduces the calculation of convective fluxes to a sequence of matrix multiplications. The SPM is implemented in a single-column model and compared with a large-eddy simulation of deep convection.

  17. Entrainment by the jet in HH 47

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raymond, John C.; Morse, Jon A.; Hartigan, P.; Curiel, S.; Heathcote, Steve

    1994-01-01

    Fabry-Perot images of the HH 47 optical jet show that the velocity decreases from the center toward the edges which is interpreted as evidence for entrainment. Those images can be used to investigate the rate of entrainment required to account for the observed luminosity. Entrainment along the jet can account for only small fractions of the jet mass and the molecular outflow seen in CO. We compare the density, excitation, and velocity structure of the jet with the predictions of viscous entrainment models and models of entrainment by expulsion of jet material by internal shocks, and find that either type of model can explain the general features.

  18. Bubbling orientifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhi, Sunil; Smedbäck, Mikael

    2005-08-01

    We investigate a class of 1/2-BPS bubbling geometries associated to orientifolds of type-IIB string theory and thereby to excited states of the SO(N)/Sp(N) Script N = 4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory. The geometries are in correspondence with free fermions moving in a harmonic oscillator potential on the half-line. Branes wrapped on torsion cycles of these geometries are identified in the fermi fluid description. Besides being of intrinsic interest, these solutions may also occur as local geometries in flux compactifications where orientifold planes are present to ensure global charge cancellation. We comment on the extension of this procedure to M-theory orientifolds.

  19. Visualization of gas bubbles during cavitation in the nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jana, Jablonská; Milada, Kozubková

    2017-09-01

    The creation and extinction of bubbles is a very fast process that can be observed by a high-speed camera. The article deals with the visualization of gas bubbles and investigates the formation and collapse of cavitation bubbles in a convergent-divergent nozzle of a rectangular cross section. Measurement values are then used as boundary conditions for mathematical modeling. Comparison of the bubble velocities with the 3D mathematical model of the mixture flow (water - vapor - air) is performed.

  20. Phase diagrams for sonoluminescing bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilgenfeldt, Sascha; Lohse, Detlef; Brenner, Michael P.

    1996-11-01

    Sound driven gas bubbles in water can emit light pulses. This phenomenon is called sonoluminescence (SL). Two different phases of single bubble SL have been proposed: diffusively stable and diffusively unstable SL. We present phase diagrams in the gas concentration versus forcing pressure state space and also in the ambient radius versus gas concentration and versus forcing pressure state spaces. These phase diagrams are based on the thresholds for energy focusing in the bubble and two kinds of instabilities, namely (i) shape instabilities and (ii) diffusive instabilities. Stable SL only occurs in a tiny parameter window of large forcing pressure amplitude Pa˜1.2-1.5 atm and low gas concentration of less than 0.4% of the saturation. The upper concentration threshold becomes smaller with increased forcing. Our results quantitatively agree with experimental results of Putterman's UCLA group on argon, but not on air. However, air bubbles and other gas mixtures can also successfully be treated in this approach if in addition (iii) chemical instabilities are considered. All statements are based on the Rayleigh-Plesset ODE approximation of the bubble dynamics, extended in an adiabatic approximation to include mass diffusion effects. This approximation is the only way to explore considerable portions of parameter space, as solving the full PDEs is numerically too expensive. Therefore, we checked the adiabatic approximation by comparison with the full numerical solution of the advection diffusion PDE and find good agreement.

  1. Entrainment in electrohydrodynamic heat pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, T. B.; Perry, M. P.

    1972-01-01

    A theoretical analysis for predicting the onset of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability is reported. The model for the analysis is described, and the derived stability criterion are given. It is concluded that surface tension plays a role in the entrainment limit of electro hydrodynamic heat pipes. The surface of the liquid in an EHD flow structure is open, with no restriction placed on the wavenumbers of perturbations.

  2. Timescales of Massive Human Entrainment

    PubMed Central

    Fusaroli, Riccardo; Perlman, Marcus; Mislove, Alan; Paxton, Alexandra; Matlock, Teenie; Dale, Rick

    2015-01-01

    The past two decades have seen an upsurge of interest in the collective behaviors of complex systems composed of many agents entrained to each other and to external events. In this paper, we extend the concept of entrainment to the dynamics of human collective attention. We conducted a detailed investigation of the unfolding of human entrainment—as expressed by the content and patterns of hundreds of thousands of messages on Twitter—during the 2012 US presidential debates. By time-locking these data sources, we quantify the impact of the unfolding debate on human attention at three time scales. We show that collective social behavior covaries second-by-second to the interactional dynamics of the debates: A candidate speaking induces rapid increases in mentions of his name on social media and decreases in mentions of the other candidate. Moreover, interruptions by an interlocutor increase the attention received. We also highlight a distinct time scale for the impact of salient content during the debates: Across well-known remarks in each debate, mentions in social media start within 5–10 seconds after it occurs; peak at approximately one minute; and slowly decay in a consistent fashion across well-known events during the debates. Finally, we show that public attention after an initial burst slowly decays through the course of the debates. Thus we demonstrate that large-scale human entrainment may hold across a number of distinct scales, in an exquisitely time-locked fashion. The methods and results pave the way for careful study of the dynamics and mechanisms of large-scale human entrainment. PMID:25880357

  3. Localizing ventricular tachycardia through entrainment.

    PubMed

    Kuo, C T; Luqman, N; Lin, K H; Chiang, C W

    2000-12-01

    Area(s) of slow conduction are thought to be present within the reentry circuit of most clinically important ventricular tachycardia (VT). To prevent recurrence after ablation of VT late after myocardial infarction, it is desirable to localize and destroy area(s) of slow conduction "critical link" within the reentry circuit. Conventionally, they may be identified by endocardial catheter mapping, continuous electrical activity, mid-diastolic potentials, earliest endocardial activation, pace-mapping etc. However, none of these methods are very specific. Entrainment method may be used to localize the slow conduction zone of reentrant VT. Concealed entrainment is consistent with pacing at a site in the reentry circuit but may also occur at some "bystander" sites that are close to the reentry circuit but are not participating in the circuit itself. During pacing at the slow conduction area of the reentry circuit, the stimulus to QRS (S-QRS) interval should equal the electrogram to QRS (EG-QRS) interval during VT. Similarly the post-pacing interval (PPI) approximates the tachycardia cycle length. During pacing at bystander sites, the S-QRS interval may be greater, less than or equal to the EG-QRS interval, depending on the conduction time from the bystander site to the circuit. The PPI, however, always exceed the tachycardia cycle length. In conjunction with concealed entrainment, the use of diastolic potential, double potentials and continuous electrical activity enhances the prediction of radiofrequency termination of post-infarction VT.

  4. Pulsar rotation with superfluid entrainment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonelli, Marco; Pizzochero, Pierre M.

    2017-06-01

    Large pulsar glitches (like the ones detected in the Vela) are though to be a consequence of the superfluid component present in the interior of mature neutron stars: this component can rotate differentially with respect to the normal part of the star, storing the angular momentum needed to produce the observed sudden decrease of the pulsar rotational period. However strong entrainment (a non-dissipative effect that couples the superfluid component with the non-superfluid component inside the star) challenges this picture. Here we study the impact of entrainment on the angular momentum that can be exchanged between the normal component and the superfluid during a glitch by means of a consistent global model. This allows to estimate the maximum angular momentum reservoir stored into the superfluid component of the star: the essential ingredient are newly calculated mesoscopic pinning forces that block the superfluid vorticity in the crust of the neutron star. This method can also provide a quantitative test for global models of rotating neutron stars, as well as for microphysical inputs present in literature (like entrainment parameters and pinning forces).

  5. Nonlinear ultrasonic waves in bubbly liquids with nonhomogeneous bubble distribution: Numerical experiments.

    PubMed

    Vanhille, Christian; Campos-Pozuelo, Cleofé

    2009-06-01

    This paper deals with the nonlinear propagation of ultrasonic waves in mixtures of air bubbles in water, but for which the bubble distribution is nonhomogeneous. The problem is modelled by means of a set of differential equations which describes the coupling of the acoustic field and bubbles vibration, and solved in the time domain via the use and adaptation of the SNOW-BL code. The attenuation and nonlinear effects are assumed to be due to the bubbles exclusively. The nonhomogeneity of the bubble distribution is introduced by the presence of bubble layers (or clouds) which can act as acoustic screens, and alters the behaviour of the ultrasonic waves. The effect of the spatial distribution of bubbles on the nonlinearity of the acoustic field is analyzed. Depending on the bubble density, dimension, shape, and position of the layers, its effects on the acoustic field change. Effects such as shielding and resonance of the bubbly layers are especially studied. The numerical experiments are carried out in two configurations: linear and nonlinear, i.e. for low and high excitation pressure amplitude, respectively, and the features of the phenomenon are compared. The parameters of the medium are chosen such as to reproduce air bubbly water involved in the stable cavitation process.

  6. Visualization studies of a freon-113 bubble condensing in water

    SciTech Connect

    Kalman, H.; Ullmann, A.; Letan, R. )

    1987-05-01

    Several visualization methods have been applied in studies of organic bubbles condensing in water. The results, although qualitative in nature, have furnished an insight into the physical phenomena governing the process. Shadow graphing of the collapsing bubbles has outlined the thermal surroundings of the bubble. Shadowgraphs of a freon-113 bubble recorded in sequence have illustrated the formation of a thermal layer around the injected bubble. The shadowgraphing has reflected the density gradients, i.e., the temperature field, but it has also led to an understanding of the flow phenomena around the bubble. It was almost obvious that the thermal boundary layer and the wake, related also to a viscous boundary layer and a viscous wake, respectively. The thermal shedding of the wake, and further the envelopment of the bubble by the thermal cloud, were understood to correspond to the flow of the water surrounding the bubble. However, all that still remained to be experimentally proved by methods directly related to flow visualization. That goal was achieved by photographing the entrainment of colored water in the wake of a rising freon-113 bubble. These photographs complemented the shadowgraphs previously recorded and qualitatively proved that the thermal phenomena corresponded to the viscous flow.

  7. Single Bubble Sonoluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farley, Jennifer; Hough, Shane

    2003-05-01

    Single Bubble Sonoluminescence is the emission of light from a single bubble suspended in a liquid caused by a continuum of repeated implosions due to pressure waves generated from a maintained ultrasonic sinusoidal wave source. H. Frenzel and H. Schultz first studied it in 1934 at the University of Cologne. It was not until 1988 with D.F. Gaitan that actual research began with single bubble sonoluminescence. Currently many theories exist attempting to explain the observed bubble phenomenon. Many of these theories require spherical behavior of the bubble. Observation of the bubble has shown that the bubble does not behave spherically in most cases. One explanation for this is known as jet theory. A spectrum of the bubble will give us the mean physical properties of the bubble such as temperature and pressure inside the bubble. Eventually, with the aide of fluorocene dye a full spectrum of the bubble will be obtained.

  8. Investigating Liquid Leak from Pre-Filled Syringes upon Needle Shield Removal: Effect of Air Bubble Pressure.

    PubMed

    Chan, Edwin; Maa, Yuh-Fun; Overcashier, David; Hsu, Chung C

    2011-01-01

    This study is to investigate the effect of headspace air pressure in pre-filled syringes on liquid leak (dripping) from the syringe needle upon needle shield removal. Drip tests to measure drip quantity were performed on syringes manually filled with 0.5 or 1.0 mL of various aqueous solutions. Parameters assessed included temperature (filling and test), bulk storage conditions (tank pressure and the type of the pressurized gas), solution composition (pure water, 0.9% sodium chloride, and a monoclonal antibody formulation), and testing procedures. A headspace pressure analyzer was used to verify the drip test method. Results suggested that leakage is indeed caused by headspace pressure increase, and the temperature effect (ideal gas expansion) is a major, but not the only, factor. The dissolved gases in the liquid bulk prior to or during filling may contribute to leakage, as these gases could be released into the headspace due to solubility changes (in response to test temperature and pressure conditions) and cause pressure increase. Needle shield removal procedures were found to cause dripping, but liquid composition played little role. Overall, paying attention to the processing history (pressure and temperature) of the liquid bulk is the key to minimize leakage. The headspace pressure could be reduced by decreasing liquid bulk storage pressure, filling at a higher temperature, or employing lower solubility gas (e.g., helium) for bulk transfer and storage. Leakage could also be mitigated by simply holding the syringe needle pointing upward during needle shield removal. Substantial advances in pre-filled syringe technology development, particularly in syringe filling accuracy, have been made. However, there are factors, as subtle as how the needle shield (or tip cap) is removed, that may affect dosing accuracy. We recently found that upon removal of the tip cap from a syringe held vertically with needle pointed downwards, a small amount of solution, up to 3-4% of

  9. Scale dependence of entrainment-mixing mechanisms in cumulus clouds

    DOE PAGES

    Lu, Chunsong; Liu, Yangang; Niu, Shengjie; ...

    2014-12-17

    This work empirically examines the dependence of entrainment-mixing mechanisms on the averaging scale in cumulus clouds using in situ aircraft observations during the Routine Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Aerial Facility Clouds with Low Optical Water Depths Optical Radiative Observations (RACORO) field campaign. A new measure of homogeneous mixing degree is defined that can encompass all types of mixing mechanisms. Analysis of the dependence of the homogenous mixing degree on the averaging scale shows that, on average, the homogenous mixing degree decreases with increasing averaging scales, suggesting that apparent mixing mechanisms gradually approach from homogeneous mixing to extreme inhomogeneous mixing with increasingmore » scales. The scale dependence can be well quantified by an exponential function, providing first attempt at developing a scale-dependent parameterization for the entrainment-mixing mechanism. The influences of three factors on the scale dependence are further examined: droplet-free filament properties (size and fraction), microphysical properties (mean volume radius and liquid water content of cloud droplet size distributions adjacent to droplet-free filaments), and relative humidity of entrained dry air. It is found that the decreasing rate of homogeneous mixing degree with increasing averaging scales becomes larger with larger droplet-free filament size and fraction, larger mean volume radius and liquid water content, or higher relative humidity. The results underscore the necessity and possibility of considering averaging scale in representation of entrainment-mixing processes in atmospheric models.« less

  10. Scale dependence of entrainment-mixing mechanisms in cumulus clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Chunsong; Liu, Yangang; Niu, Shengjie; Endo, Satoshi

    2014-12-17

    This work empirically examines the dependence of entrainment-mixing mechanisms on the averaging scale in cumulus clouds using in situ aircraft observations during the Routine Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Aerial Facility Clouds with Low Optical Water Depths Optical Radiative Observations (RACORO) field campaign. A new measure of homogeneous mixing degree is defined that can encompass all types of mixing mechanisms. Analysis of the dependence of the homogenous mixing degree on the averaging scale shows that, on average, the homogenous mixing degree decreases with increasing averaging scales, suggesting that apparent mixing mechanisms gradually approach from homogeneous mixing to extreme inhomogeneous mixing with increasing scales. The scale dependence can be well quantified by an exponential function, providing first attempt at developing a scale-dependent parameterization for the entrainment-mixing mechanism. The influences of three factors on the scale dependence are further examined: droplet-free filament properties (size and fraction), microphysical properties (mean volume radius and liquid water content of cloud droplet size distributions adjacent to droplet-free filaments), and relative humidity of entrained dry air. It is found that the decreasing rate of homogeneous mixing degree with increasing averaging scales becomes larger with larger droplet-free filament size and fraction, larger mean volume radius and liquid water content, or higher relative humidity. The results underscore the necessity and possibility of considering averaging scale in representation of entrainment-mixing processes in atmospheric models.

  11. Influence of characteristics of micro-bubble clouds on backscatter lidar signal.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Yang, Kecheng; Xia, Min; Rao, Jionghui; Zhang, Wei

    2009-09-28

    Marine micro-bubbles are one of those important constituents that influence scattering characteristics of water column. Monte Carlo Based simulations show that a water entrained bubble cloud generate a characteristic backscatter of incident laser light [M. Xia, J. Opt. A: Pure Appl. Opt. 8, 350 (2006)]. This characteristic can be used to detect and localize bubble clouds, leading to wide ranging applications, especially in optical remote sensing. This paper describes tests of an underwater lidar system applied to detecting cloud of micro-bubbles. Laboratory experiments demonstrate that the system is capable of detecting bubbles ranging from diameter 10 microm approximately 200 microm, over a distance of 7-12 m from the detector. The dependence of the lidar return signal on size distribution of bubbles, concentration, thickness and location of bubble clouds is studied and compared with simulation results.

  12. Bubble formation in additive manufacturing of glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Junjie; Gilbert, Luke J.; Peters, Daniel C.; Bristow, Douglas A.; Landers, Robert G.; Goldstein, Jonathan T.; Urbas, Augustine M.; Kinzel, Edward C.

    2016-05-01

    Bubble formation is a common problem in glass manufacturing. The spatial density of bubbles in a piece of glass is a key limiting factor to the optical quality of the glass. Bubble formation is also a common problem in additive manufacturing, leading to anisotropic material properties. In glass Additive Manufacturing (AM) two separate types of bubbles have been observed: a foam layer caused by the reboil of the glass melt and a periodic pattern of bubbles which appears to be unique to glass additive manufacturing. This paper presents a series of studies to relate the periodicity of bubble formation to part scan speed, laser power, and filament feed rate. These experiments suggest that bubbles are formed by the reboil phenomena why periodic bubbles result from air being trapped between the glass filament and the substrate. Reboil can be detected using spectroscopy and avoided by minimizing the laser power while periodic bubbles can be avoided by a two-step laser melting process to first establish good contact between the filament and substrate before reflowing the track with higher laser power.

  13. Dynamics of impacting a bubble by another pulsed-laser-induced bubble: jetting, fragmentation, and entanglement.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yen-Hung; I, Lin

    2008-02-01

    We investigate experimentally the detailed dynamics of how an existing microbubble B1 is impacted and shattered by another nearby pulsed-laser-induced microbubble B2, and the backward interaction on B2 in a thin liquid layer. Mediated by the flow field, potential energy can be accumulated or lost through the alternate compression and expansion of the two bubbles. The symmetry breaking induced by the presence of the nearby counterbubble generates push-pull-type alternate forward and backward axial jetting on the compressed bubble associated with the elongated shape or even entrainment of the counterexpanding bubble into the jet-indented boundary. The strong penetrating axial jet through B1, and its interplay with the transverse jets by the flow field surrounding B1 in the first compression stage and the second expanding stage of B1 lead to a complicated fragmentation pattern of B1. Increasing the interbubble interaction by decreasing the interbubble distance causes B2 to become entangled with B1 through its entrainments into the backward axial jet-indented region of B2, in the expansion phase of B2. At the extreme of large laser energy for B2, the leftward reexpansion of B1 is suppressed. The strong shear flow field generates many tiny bubbles around the liquid-gas boundaries of the two axial jet-induced major daughter bubbles from B1. The detailed interaction behaviors over a broad range of the energy of B2, 0.14-0.55 microJ (corresponding to the maximum bubble expansion energy), and of the interbubble distance (170-500 microm) are presented and discussed.

  14. Entrainment by turbulent jets issuing from sharp-edged inlet round nozzles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trabold, T. A.; Essen, E. B.; Obot, N. T.

    Experiments were carried out to determine entrainment rates by turbulent air jets generated with square-edged inlet round nozzles. A parametric study was made which included the effects of Reynolds number, nozzle length, partial confinement and geometry of the jet plenum chamber. Measurements were made for the region extending from the nozzle exit to 24 jet hole diameters downstream. There is a large difference in entrainment rate between jets generated with relatively short nozzles and those discharged through long tubes.

  15. Using circadian entrainment to find cryptic clocks.

    PubMed

    Eelderink-Chen, Zheng; Olmedo, Maria; Bosman, Jasper; Merrow, Martha

    2015-01-01

    Three properties are most often attributed to the circadian clock: a ca. 24-h free-running rhythm, temperature compensation of the circadian rhythm, and its entrainment to zeitgeber cycles. Relatively few experiments, however, are performed under entrainment conditions. Rather, most chronobiology protocols concern constant conditions. We have turned this paradigm around and used entrainment to study the circadian clock in organisms where a free-running rhythm is weak or lacking. We describe two examples therein: Caenorhabditis elegans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. By probing the system with zeitgeber cycles that have various structures and amplitudes, we can demonstrate the establishment of systematic entrained phase angles in these organisms. We conclude that entrainment can be utilized to discover hitherto unknown circadian clocks and we discuss the implications of using entrainment more broadly, even in model systems that show robust free-running rhythms.

  16. Crustal entrainment and pulsar glitches.

    PubMed

    Chamel, N

    2013-01-04

    Large pulsar frequency glitches are generally interpreted as sudden transfers of angular momentum between the neutron superfluid permeating the inner crust and the rest of the star. Despite the absence of viscous drag, the neutron superfluid is strongly coupled to the crust due to nondissipative entrainment effects. These effects are shown to severely limit the maximum amount of angular momentum that can possibly be transferred during glitches. In particular, it is found that the glitches observed in the Vela pulsar require an additional reservoir of angular momentum.

  17. Bubble Growth and Detachment from a Needle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shusser, Michael; Rambod, Edmond; Gharib, Morteza

    1999-11-01

    The release of bubbles from an underwater nozzle or orifice occurs in large number of applications, such as perforated plate columns, blood oxygenators and various methods of water treatment. It is also a widely used method in laboratory research on multiphase flow and acoustics for generating small bubbles in a controlled fashion. We studied experimentally the growth and pinch-off of air bubbles released from a submerged needle into a quiescent liquid or a liquid flowing parallel to the needle. Micron-sized bubbles were generated by an air-liquid dispenser. High-speed imaging was performed to study the formation and detachment of bubbles from the tip of the needle. The impact of the needle diameter was investigated and the size and number of produced bubbles were assessed for different flow rates of air and for different velocities of the imposed upward liquid flow. The results were compared with available theoretical models and numerical computations. The existence of a critical gas flow rate and two regimes of bubble growth were verified.

  18. Acoustic bubble removal method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, E. H.; Elleman, D. D.; Wang, T. G. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A method is described for removing bubbles from a liquid bath such as a bath of molten glass to be used for optical elements. Larger bubbles are first removed by applying acoustic energy resonant to a bath dimension to drive the larger bubbles toward a pressure well where the bubbles can coalesce and then be more easily removed. Thereafter, submillimeter bubbles are removed by applying acoustic energy of frequencies resonant to the small bubbles to oscillate them and thereby stir liquid immediately about the bubbles to facilitate their breakup and absorption into the liquid.

  19. Micro Bubble and Sonoluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitome, Hideto

    2001-05-01

    The author reviews the interaction of micro bubbles with ultrasound. First, the action of acoustic radiation pressure on bubbles is discussed in contrast with that on small particles noting the concept of Bjerknes force, resonant bubbles and nonlinear oscillation of bubbles. In the past decade, sonoluminescence, light emission from a single oscillating bubble, attracted attention of researchers because of its strange characteristics. A short history of sonoluminescence and its characteristics are summarized based on bubble motion in a sound field. Lastly, industrial and medical applications of extreme environment generated by collapsing micro bubbles are discussed as promising technology in the new century.

  20. Period-adding bifurcations and chaos in a bubble column.

    PubMed

    Piassi, Viviane S M; Tufaile, Alberto; Sartorelli, Jose Carlos

    2004-06-01

    We obtained period-adding bifurcations in a bubble formation experiment. Using the air flow rate as the control parameter in this experiment, the bubble emission from the nozzle in a viscous fluid undergoes from single bubbling to a sequence of periodic bifurcations of k to k+1 periods, occasionally interspersed with some chaotic regions. Our main assumption is that this period-adding bifurcation in bubble formation depends on flow rate variations in the chamber under the nozzle. This assumption was experimentally tested by placing a tube between the air reservoir and the chamber under the nozzle in the bubble column experiment. By increasing the tube length, more period-adding bifurcations were observed. We associated two main types of bubble growth to the flow rate fluctuations inside the chamber for different bubbling regimes. We also studied the properties of piecewise nonlinear maps obtained from the experimental reconstructed attractors, and we concluded that this experiment is a spatially extended system.

  1. Optimal entrainment of heterogeneous noisy neurons.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Dan; Holt, Abbey B; Netoff, Theoden I; Moehlis, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    We develop a methodology to design a stimulus optimized to entrain nonlinear, noisy limit cycle oscillators with uncertain properties. Conditions are derived which guarantee that the stimulus will entrain the oscillators despite these uncertainties. Using these conditions, we develop an energy optimal control strategy to design an efficient entraining stimulus and apply it to numerical models of noisy phase oscillators and to in vitro hippocampal neurons. In both instances, the optimal stimuli outperform other similar but suboptimal entraining stimuli. Because this control strategy explicitly accounts for both noise and inherent uncertainty of model parameters, it could have experimental relevance to neural circuits where robust spike timing plays an important role.

  2. Partial entrainment of gravel bars during floods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Konrad, C.P.; Booth, D.B.; Burges, S.J.; Montgomery, D.R.

    2002-01-01

    Spatial patterns of bed material entrainment by floods were documented at seven gravel bars using arrays of metal washers (bed tags) placed in the streambed. The observed patterns were used to test a general stochastic model that bed material entrainment is a spatially independent, random process where the probability of entrainment is uniform over a gravel bar and a function of the peak dimensionless shear stress ??*0 of the flood. The fraction of tags missing from a gravel bar during a flood, or partial entrainment, had an approximately normal distribution with respect to ??*0 with a mean value (50% of the tags entrained) of 0.085 and standard deviation of 0.022 (root-mean-square error of 0.09). Variation in partial entrainment for a given ??*0 demonstrated the effects of flow conditioning on bed strength, with lower values of partial entrainment after intermediate magnitude floods (0.065 < ??*0 < 0.08) than after higher magnitude floods. Although the probability of bed material entrainment was approximately uniform over a gravel bar during individual floods and independent from flood to flood, regions of preferential stability and instability emerged at some bars over the course of a wet season. Deviations from spatially uniform and independent bed material entrainment were most pronounced for reaches with varied flow and in consecutive floods with small to intermediate magnitudes.

  3. Volume Displacement Effects in Bubble-laden Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cihonski, Andrew; Finn, Justin; Apte, Sourabh

    2012-11-01

    When a few bubbles are entrained in a traveling vortex ring, it has been shown that even at extremely low volume loadings, their presence can significantly affect the structure of the vortex core (Sridhar & Katz 1999). A typical Euler-Lagrange point-particle model with two-way coupling for this dilute system, wherein the bubbles are assumed subgrid and momentum point-sources are used to model their effect on the flow, is shown to be unable to accurately capture the experimental trends of bubble settling location and vortex distortion for a range of bubble parameters and vortex strengths. The bubbles experience a significant amount of drag, lift, added mass, pressure, and gravity forces. However, these forces are in balance of each other, as the bubbles reach a mean settling location away from the vortex core. Accounting for fluid volume displacement due to bubble motion, using a model termed as volumetric coupling, experimental trends on vortex distortion and bubble settling location are well captured. The fluid displacement effects are studied by introducing a notion of a volumetric coupling force, the net force on the fluid due to volumetric coupling, which is found to be dominant even at the low volume loadings investigated here.

  4. Size limits the formation of liquid jets during bubble bursting

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji San; Weon, Byung Mook; Park, Su Ji; Je, Jung Ho; Fezzaa, Kamel; Lee, Wah-Keat

    2011-01-01

    A bubble reaching an air–liquid interface usually bursts and forms a liquid jet. Jetting is relevant to climate and health as it is a source of aerosol droplets from breaking waves. Jetting has been observed for large bubbles with radii of R≫100 μm. However, few studies have been devoted to small bubbles (R<100 μm) despite the entrainment of a large number of such bubbles in sea water. Here we show that jet formation is inhibited by bubble size; a jet is not formed during bursting for bubbles smaller than a critical size. Using ultrafast X-ray and optical imaging methods, we build a phase diagram for jetting and the absence of jetting. Our results demonstrate that jetting in bubble bursting is analogous to pinching-off in liquid coalescence. The coalescence mechanism for bubble bursting may be useful in preventing jet formation in industry and improving climate models concerning aerosol production. PMID:21694715

  5. Optimizing the gas distributor based on CO2 bubble dynamic behaviors to improve microalgal biomass production in an air-lift photo-bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yun; Zhao, Sha; Ding, Yu-Dong; Liao, Qiang; Huang, Yong; Zhu, Xun

    2017-06-01

    Dynamic behavior of bubbles would significantly affect CO2 mass transfer and may cause microalgae cells uneven distribution due to the bubble carrying effect. To improve microalgae growth, the gas distributor and aeration conditions was optimized according to the bubble rising behavior. The CO2 bubble rising trajectory is similar to a Zigzag. The amplitude and wavelength of the Zigzag, which reflected the influenced zone of microalgae suspension in horizontal direction and disturbance intensity on culture, respectively, was controlled by the structure of gas distributor and aeration conditions. An optimized round gas distributor that full of holes with an inner diameter of 0.5mm and spacing of 1.5mm was designed. When cultivated with the optimized gas distributor aerating 5% CO2 gas at 0.250vvm, the maximum biomass concentration of Chlorella pyrenoidosa achieved 2.88gL(-1), increased by 83.44% compared to that of 1.57gL(-1)cultivated with the commercial micro-bubbles aerator. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. 'Expanding bubble' modification of 'big-bubble' technique for performing maximum-depth anterior lamellar keratoplasty.

    PubMed

    Daneshgar, F; Fallahtafti, M

    2011-06-01

    To describe a new technique for performing maximum-depth anterior lamellar keratoplasty. This was a case series study using a novel method. We introduce and describe a new sign (sunny-side up sign) that reveals the presence and extent of the air bubble at the Descemet membrane (DM)-stroma interface. We also report a novel technique to expand the bubble by injecting viscoelastic material into the bubble cavity and to excise the stromal tissues within the trephination area almost completely. The follow-up period ranged from 12 to 16 months. In all patients we recorded the best spectacle-corrected visual acuity, keratometry, and endothelial cell count preoperatively and postoperatively and the air bubble diameter using the sunny-side up sign. In eight of nine patients, a big bubble formed. The size of the air bubble ranged from 2 to 7 mm. All the bubbles were expanded to 8 mm and the bare DM throughout the trephination area was obtained in all cases. The postoperative mean keratometric readings were reduced compared with the preoperative mean keratometric readings. The BSCVA was increased postoperatively compared with the preoperative acuity. The difference between the preoperative and postoperative endothelial cell counts was not statistically significant. The early outcomes in our series using the expanding bubble technique suggest that it is safe and easy in performing maximum-depth anterior lamellar keratoplasty.

  7. Bubble migration inside a liquid drop in a space laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Annamalai, P.; Shankar, N.; Cole, R.; Subramanian, R. S.

    1982-01-01

    The design of experiments in materials processing for trials on board the Shuttle are described. Thermocapillary flows will be examined as an aid to mixing in the formation of glasses. Acoustically levitated molten glass spheres will be spot heated to induce surface flow away from the hot spot to induce mixing. The surface flows are also expected to cause internal convective motion which will drive entrained gas bubbles toward the hot spot, a process also enhanced by the presence of thermal gradients. The method is called fining, and will be augmented by rotation of the sphere to cause bubble migration toward the axes of rotation to form one large bubble which is more easily removed. Centering techniques to fix the maximum centering accuracy will also be tried. Ground-based studies of bubble migration in a rotating liquid and in a temperature gradient in a liquid drop are reviewed.

  8. Quantifying entrainment in pyroclastic density currents from the Tungurahua eruption, Ecuador: Integrating field proxies with numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benage, M. C.; Dufek, J.; Mothes, P. A.

    2016-07-01

    The entrainment of air into pyroclastic density currents (PDCs) impacts the dynamics and thermal history of these highly mobile currents. However, direct measurement of entrainment in PDCs is hampered due to hazardous conditions and opaqueness of these flows. We combine three-dimensional multiphase Eulerian-Eulerian-Lagrangian calculations with proxies of thermal conditions preserved in deposits to quantify air entrainment in PDCs at Tungurahua volcano, Ecuador. We conclude that small-volume PDCs develop a particle concentration gradient that results in disparate thermal characteristics for the concentrated bed load (>600 to ~800 K) and the overlying dilute suspended load (~300-600 K). The dilute suspended load has effective entrainment coefficients 2-3 times larger than the bed load. This investigation reveals a dichotomy in entrainment and thermal history between two regions in the current and provides a mechanism to interpret the depositional thermal characteristics of small-volume but frequently occurring PDCs.

  9. Entrainment instability and vertical motion as causes of stratocumulus breakup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, C. J.; Pearson, R., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Entrainment instability is thought to be a cause of stratocumulus breakup. At the interface between the cloud and the overlying air, mixtures may form which are negatively buoyant because of cloud droplet evaporation. Quantities devised to predict breakup are obtained from aircraft observations and are tested against cloud observations from satellite. Often, the parameters indicate that breakup should occur but the clouds remain, sometimes for several days. One possible explanation for breakup is vertical motion from passing synoptic cyclones. Several cases suggest that breakup is associated with the downward vertical motion from the cold air advected behind an eastward moving cyclone.

  10. The Minnaert bubble: an acoustic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devaud, Martin; Hocquet, Thierry; Bacri, Jean-Claude; Leroy, Valentin

    2008-11-01

    We propose an ab initio introduction to the well-known Minnaert pulsating bubble at graduate level. After a brief recall of the standard stuff, we begin with a detailed discussion of the radial movements of an air bubble in water. This discussion is managed from an acoustic point of view, and using the Lagrangian rather than the Eulerian variables. In unbounded water, the air-water system has a continuum of eigenmodes, some of them correspond to regular Fabry-Pérot resonances. A singular resonance, the lowest one, is shown to coincide with that of Minnaert. In bounded water, the eigenmodes spectrum is discrete, with a finite fundamental frequency. A spectacular quasi-locking of the latter occurs if it happens to exceed the Minnaert frequency, which provides an unforeseen one-bubble alternative version of the famous 'hot chocolate effect'. In the (low) frequency domain in which sound propagation inside the bubble reduces to a simple 'breathing' (i.e. inflation/deflation), the light air bubble can be 'dressed' by the outer water pressure forces, and is turned into the heavy Minnaert bubble. Thanks to this unexpected renormalization process, we demonstrate that the Minnaert bubble definitely behaves like a true harmonic oscillator of the spring-bob type, but with a damping term and a forcing term in apparent disagreement with those commonly admitted in the literature. Finally, we underline the double role played by the water. In order to tell the water motion associated with water compressibility (i.e. the sound) from the simple incompressible accompaniment of the bubble breathing, we introduce a new picture analogous to the electromagnetic radiative picture in Coulomb gauge, which naturally leads us to split the water displacement in an instantaneous and a retarded part. The Minnaert renormalized mass of the dressed bubble is then automatically recovered.

  11. Steady State Vapor Bubble in Pool Boiling

    PubMed Central

    Zou, An; Chanana, Ashish; Agrawal, Amit; Wayner, Peter C.; Maroo, Shalabh C.

    2016-01-01

    Boiling, a dynamic and multiscale process, has been studied for several decades; however, a comprehensive understanding of the process is still lacking. The bubble ebullition cycle, which occurs over millisecond time-span, makes it extremely challenging to study near-surface interfacial characteristics of a single bubble. Here, we create a steady-state vapor bubble that can remain stable for hours in a pool of sub-cooled water using a femtosecond laser source. The stability of the bubble allows us to measure the contact-angle and perform in-situ imaging of the contact-line region and the microlayer, on hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces and in both degassed and regular (with dissolved air) water. The early growth stage of vapor bubble in degassed water shows a completely wetted bubble base with the microlayer, and the bubble does not depart from the surface due to reduced liquid pressure in the microlayer. Using experimental data and numerical simulations, we obtain permissible range of maximum heat transfer coefficient possible in nucleate boiling and the width of the evaporating layer in the contact-line region. This technique of creating and measuring fundamental characteristics of a stable vapor bubble will facilitate rational design of nanostructures for boiling enhancement and advance thermal management in electronics. PMID:26837464

  12. Steady State Vapor Bubble in Pool Boiling.

    PubMed

    Zou, An; Chanana, Ashish; Agrawal, Amit; Wayner, Peter C; Maroo, Shalabh C

    2016-02-03

    Boiling, a dynamic and multiscale process, has been studied for several decades; however, a comprehensive understanding of the process is still lacking. The bubble ebullition cycle, which occurs over millisecond time-span, makes it extremely challenging to study near-surface interfacial characteristics of a single bubble. Here, we create a steady-state vapor bubble that can remain stable for hours in a pool of sub-cooled water using a femtosecond laser source. The stability of the bubble allows us to measure the contact-angle and perform in-situ imaging of the contact-line region and the microlayer, on hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces and in both degassed and regular (with dissolved air) water. The early growth stage of vapor bubble in degassed water shows a completely wetted bubble base with the microlayer, and the bubble does not depart from the surface due to reduced liquid pressure in the microlayer. Using experimental data and numerical simulations, we obtain permissible range of maximum heat transfer coefficient possible in nucleate boiling and the width of the evaporating layer in the contact-line region. This technique of creating and measuring fundamental characteristics of a stable vapor bubble will facilitate rational design of nanostructures for boiling enhancement and advance thermal management in electronics.

  13. Coalescence of Bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anthony, Christopher; Thete, Sumeet; Sambath, Krishnaraj; Basaran, Osman

    2014-11-01

    Drop and bubble coalescence plays a central role in industry and nature. During drop coalescence, two drops touch and merge as a liquid neck connecting them grows from microscopic to macroscopic scales. The hydrodynamic singularity that arises as two drops begin coalescing in a dynamically passive outer fluid (air) has been studied thoroughly in recent years. As a preliminary to developing a similar level of understanding when two drops coalesce in an outer fluid of non-negligible density and viscosity, we use simulation to analyze the coalescence of two identical gas bubbles (idealized as two passive spherical voids) in a liquid. This problem has recently been studied experimentally by Nagel and coworkers (2014). The simulations allow probing of the dynamics for neck radii much smaller than what is possible in experiments. At times earlier than those accessible in experiments, simulations reveal a new type of scaling response than those reported by Nagel et al. However, at larger times, the dynamics is shown to transition to regimes that have been proposed by Nagel and coworkers. Unlike in the experiments, it is shown that the observed scaling regimes can be readily rationalized by judicious interrogation of computed flow fields.

  14. [Bubble mirror technique for express shunt surgery].

    PubMed

    Marín-Montiel, J; López-Sánchez, E; Chaqués-Alepuz, V

    2015-07-01

    The bubble mirror technique consists of the stabilization of the anterior chamber by means of a plug made with a combination of conveniently placed air and viscoelastic material. A line arises at interface between the air and viscoelastic where the anterior chamber angle reflected can be seen as in a mirror (bubble mirror). The viscoelastic-air plug offers three advantages in glaucoma surgery with the Ex-PRESS implant: 1) plug effect of viscoelastic, giving stability to the anterior chamber and preventing it from collapsing; 2) toning effect of the air bubble; and 3) specular effect at the interface, which allows the surgeon to visually control the chamber angle during the Ex-PRESS implantation. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Rising Bubbles.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-12-01

    2. National Science Foundation; 3. Army Research Office; 4. Air Force Office of Scientific Research ; 5. Stanford University. The personnel...Mathematics Department, Stanford University. This group began functioning officially on September 1, 1979, and is supported by: 1. Office of Naval Research ...Stanford University; 13. Stephanos Venakides, Assistant Professor, Stanford University; 14. Margaret Cheney, Research Associate, Stanford University; 15

  16. Forces on ellipsoidal bubbles in a turbulent shear layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Barry; Loth, Eric

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this research was to gain fundamental knowledge of the drag and lift forces on ellipsoidal air bubbles in water in a turbulent flow. This was accomplished by employing a cinematic two-phase particle image velocimetry (PIV) system to evaluate bubbly flow in a two-stream, turbulent, planar free shear layer of filtered tap water. Ellipsoidal air bubbles with nominal diameters from 1.5 to 4.5 mm were injected directly into the shear layer through a single slender tube. The cinematic PIV allowed for high resolution of the unsteady liquid velocity vector field. Triple-pulsed bubble images were obtained in a temporal sequence, such that the bubble size and bubble trajectory could be accurately determined. The bubble's oscillation characteristics, velocity, acceleration, and buoyancy force were obtained from the trajectory data. A bubble dynamic equation was then applied to allow determination of the time-evolving lift and drag forces acting upon bubbles within the shear layer. The results indicate that for a fixed bubble diameter (and fixed Bond and Morton numbers), the drag coefficient decreases for an increasing Reynolds number. This is fundamentally different than the increasing drag coefficient trend seen for ellipsoidal bubbles rising in quiescent baths for increasing diameter (and increasing Bond number), but is qualitatively consistent with the trend for spherical bubbles. A new empirical expression for the dependence of the drag coefficient on Reynolds number for air bubbles in tap water for both quiescent and turbulent flows is constructed herein. Finally, the instantaneous side forces measured in this study were dominated by the inherent deformation-induced vortex shedding of the bubble wake rather than the inviscid lift force based on the background fluid vorticity.

  17. The entrainment rate for a row of turbulent jets. M.S. Thesis Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Eliott B.; Greber, Isaac

    1990-01-01

    Entrainment rates for a row of isothermal circular air jets issuing into a quiescent environment are found by integrating velocity distributions measured by a linearized hot-wire anemometer. Jet spacing to jet diameter ratios of 2.5, 5, 10, and 20 are studied at jet Reynold's numbers ranging from 5110 to 12070. Velocity distributions are determined at regular downstream intervals at axial distances equal to 16.4 to 164 jet diameters from the jet source. The entrainment rates for the four spacing configurations vary monotonically with increasing spacing/diameter between the limiting case of the slot jet entrainment rate (where the jet spacing to diameter ratio is zero) and the circular jet entrainment rate (in which the spacing to diameter ratio is infinity).

  18. Leaping shampoo glides on a lubricating air layer.

    PubMed

    Lee, S; Li, E Q; Marston, J O; Bonito, A; Thoroddsen, S T

    2013-06-01

    When a stream of shampoo is fed onto a pool in one's hand, a jet can leap sideways or rebound from the liquid surface in an intriguing phenomenon known as the Kaye effect. Earlier studies have debated whether non-Newtonian effects are the underlying cause of this phenomenon, making the jet glide on top of a shear-thinning liquid layer, or whether an entrained air layer is responsible. Herein we show unambiguously that the jet slides on a lubricating air layer. We identify this layer by looking through the pool liquid and observing its rupture into fine bubbles. The resulting microbubble sizes suggest this air layer is of submicron thickness. This thickness estimate is also supported by the tangential deceleration of the jet during the rebounding.

  19. Leaping shampoo glides on a lubricating air layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S.; Li, E. Q.; Marston, J. O.; Bonito, A.; Thoroddsen, S. T.

    2013-06-01

    When a stream of shampoo is fed onto a pool in one's hand, a jet can leap sideways or rebound from the liquid surface in an intriguing phenomenon known as the Kaye effect. Earlier studies have debated whether non-Newtonian effects are the underlying cause of this phenomenon, making the jet glide on top of a shear-thinning liquid layer, or whether an entrained air layer is responsible. Herein we show unambiguously that the jet slides on a lubricating air layer. We identify this layer by looking through the pool liquid and observing its rupture into fine bubbles. The resulting microbubble sizes suggest this air layer is of submicron thickness. This thickness estimate is also supported by the tangential deceleration of the jet during the rebounding.

  20. Interfacial area transport equation for bubbly to cap-bubbly transition flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worosz, Theodore S.

    To fully realize the benefit of the two-group interfacial area transport equation (IATE) as a constitutive model for the interfacial area concentration in the two-fluid model, it is imperative that models be developed to dynamically transition from one-group to two-group flows. With this in mind, the two-group IATE is derived in detail to establish new expansion source terms that correctly account for the effects of intergroup bubble transport. In addition to this theoretical effort, the state-of-the-art four-sensor conductivity probe is used to establish a reliable experimental database of local two-phase flow parameters to characterize one-group to two-group transition flows and to support model development. The experiments are performed in verticalupward air-water two-phase flow in a 5.08cm pipe. Additionally, the local conductivity probe is improved through systematic studies into: 1) signal "ghosting" electrical interference among probe sensors, 2) sampling frequency sensitivity, 3) measurement duration sensitivity, and 4) probe sensor orientation. Wake-dominated bubble transport characterizes the transition from onegroup to two-group flows. Therefore, the necessary intergroup and intragroup wake entrainment source terms that are required for two-group interfacial area transport in transition flows are developed. Furthermore, an approach is developed to initiate the shearing-off source and reduce the one-group interaction mechanisms as an established two-group flow develops. The new interfacial area transport model for one-group to two-group transition flows is evaluated against the experimental database. The model accurately captures the exchange of void fraction and interfacial area concentration between group-I and group-II in transition flows. Overall, the group-I void fraction and interfacial area concentration are predicted within +/-6% and +/-4%, respectively, of the experimental data. The group-II void fraction and interfacial area concentration are

  1. Experimental Visualization of Bubble Formation from an Orifice In Microgravity in the Presence of Electric Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, C.; Iacona, E.; Foldes, I. B.; Suner, G.; Milburn, C.

    2002-01-01

    The formation of air bubbles injected into a stagnant, isothermal liquid in microgravity through an orifice was studied. The bubbles grew very large in microgravity. They attained a nearly spherical shape and showed pronounced affinity towards coalescence in the absence of electric fields and other perturbations. Under the influence of electric fields, periodic detachment was observed, with bubble sizes larger than in terrestrial conditions. The bubble shape was elongated. After detachment, the bubbles moved away from the electrode at which they formed without coalescing with other bubbles. Experimental data on bubble shape and size at detachment showed good agreement with models.

  2. Experimental Visualization of Bubble Formation from an Orifice In Microgravity in the Presence of Electric Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, C.; Iacona, E.; Foldes, I. B.; Suner, G.; Milburn, C.

    2002-01-01

    The formation of air bubbles injected into a stagnant, isothermal liquid in microgravity through an orifice was studied. The bubbles grew very large in microgravity. They attained a nearly spherical shape and showed pronounced affinity towards coalescence in the absence of electric fields and other perturbations. Under the influence of electric fields, periodic detachment was observed, with bubble sizes larger than in terrestrial conditions. The bubble shape was elongated. After detachment, the bubbles moved away from the electrode at which they formed without coalescing with other bubbles. Experimental data on bubble shape and size at detachment showed good agreement with models.

  3. How are soap bubbles blown? Fluid dynamics of soap bubble blowing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, John; Lambert, Lori; Sherman, Erica; Wei, Timothy; Ryu, Sangjin

    2013-11-01

    Soap bubbles are a common interfacial fluid dynamics phenomenon having a long history of delighting not only children and artists but also scientists. In contrast to the dynamics of liquid droplets in gas and gas bubbles in liquid, the dynamics of soap bubbles has not been well documented. This is possibly because studying soap bubbles is more challenging due to there existing two gas-liquid interfaces. Having the thin-film interface seems to alter the characteristics of the bubble/drop creation process since the interface has limiting factors such as thickness. Thus, the main objective of this study is to determine how the thin-film interface differentiates soap bubbles from gas bubbles and liquid drops. To investigate the creation process of soap bubbles, we constructed an experimental model consisting of air jet flow and a soap film, which consistently replicates the conditions that a human produces when blowing soap bubbles, and examined the interaction between the jet and the soap film using the high-speed videography and the particle image velocimetry.

  4. Fluid entrainment by isolated vortex rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabiri, John O.; Gharib, Morteza

    2004-07-01

    Of particular importance to the development of models for isolated vortex ring dynamics in a real fluid is knowledge of ambient fluid entrainment by the ring. This time-dependent process dictates changes in the volume of fluid that must share impulse delivered by the vortex ring generator. Therefore fluid entrainment is also of immediate significance to the unsteady forces that arise due to the presence of vortex rings in starting flows. Applications ranging from industrial and transportation, to animal locomotion and cardiac flows, are currently being investigated to understand the dynamical role of the observed vortex ring structures. Despite this growing interest, fully empirical measurements of fluid entrainment by isolated vortex rings have remained elusive. The primary difficulties arise in defining the unsteady boundary of the ring, as well as an inability to maintain the vortex ring in the test section sufficiently long to facilitate measurements. We present a new technique for entrainment measurement that utilizes a coaxial counter-flow to retard translation of vortex rings generated from a piston cylinder apparatus, so that their growth due to fluid entrainment can be observed. Instantaneous streamlines of the flow are used to determine the unsteady vortex ring boundary and compute ambient fluid entrainment. Measurements indicate that the entrainment process does not promote self-similar vortex ring growth, but instead consists of a rapid convection-based entrainment phase during ring formation, followed by a slower diffusive mechanism that entrains ambient fluid into the isolated vortex ring. Entrained fluid typically constitutes 30% to 40% of the total volume of fluid carried with the vortex ring. Various counter-flow protocols were used to substantially manipulate the diffusive entrainment process, producing rings with entrained fluid fractions up to 65%. Measurements of vortex ring growth rate and vorticity distribution during diffusive entrainment

  5. Spherical bubble motion in a turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felton, Keith; Loth, Eric

    2001-09-01

    Monodisperse dilute suspensions of spherical air bubbles in a tap-water turbulent vertical boundary layer were experimentally studied to note their motion and distribution. Bubbles with diameters of 0.37-1.2 mm were injected at various transverse wall-positions for free-stream velocities between 0.4 and 0.9 m/s. The bubbles were released from a single injector at very low frequencies such that two-way coupling and bubble-bubble interaction were negligible. The experimental diagnostics included ensemble-averaged planar laser intensity profiles for bubble concentration distribution, as well as Cinematic Particle Image Velocimetry with bubble tracking for bubble hydrodynamic forces. A variety of void distributions within the boundary layer were found. For example, there was a tendency for bubbles to collect along the wall for higher Stokes number conditions, while the lower Stokes number conditions produced Gaussian-type profiles throughout the boundary layer. In addition, three types of bubble trajectories were observed—sliding bubbles, bouncing bubbles, and free-dispersion bubbles. Instantaneous liquid forces acting on individual bubbles in the turbulent flow were also obtained to provide the drag and lift coefficients (with notable experimental uncertainty). These results indicate that drag coefficient decreases with increasing Reynolds number as is conventionally expected but variations were observed. In general, the instantaneous drag coefficient (for constant bubble Reynolds number) tended to be reduced as the turbulence intensity increased. The averaged lift coefficient is higher than that given by inviscid theory (and sometimes even that of creeping flow theory) and tends to decrease with increasing bubble Reynolds number.

  6. Influence of mass transfer on bubble plume hydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Lima Neto, Iran E; Parente, Priscila A B

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents an integral model to evaluate the impact of gas transfer on the hydrodynamics of bubble plumes. The model is based on the Gaussian type self-similarity and functional relationships for the entrainment coefficient and factor of momentum amplification due to turbulence. The impact of mass transfer on bubble plume hydrodynamics is investigated considering different bubble sizes, gas flow rates and water depths. The results revealed a relevant impact when fine bubbles are considered, even for moderate water depths. Additionally, model simulations indicate that for weak bubble plumes (i.e., with relatively low flow rates and large depths and slip velocities), both dissolution and turbulence can affect plume hydrodynamics, which demonstrates the importance of taking the momentum amplification factor relationship into account. For deeper water conditions, simulations of bubble dissolution/decompression using the present model and classical models available in the literature resulted in a very good agreement for both aeration and oxygenation processes. Sensitivity analysis showed that the water depth, followed by the bubble size and the flow rate are the most important parameters that affect plume hydrodynamics. Lastly, dimensionless correlations are proposed to assess the impact of mass transfer on plume hydrodynamics, including both the aeration and oxygenation modes.

  7. Investigation and modeling of bubble-bubble interaction effect in homogeneous bubbly flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Jung Hee; Lele, Sanjiva K.; Tryggvason, Gretar

    2010-06-01

    The effect of bubble-bubble interaction in homogeneous bubbly flow is investigated by direct numerical simulation and a bubbly mixture model for bubbly shock flows at void fraction 0.4%-13%. It is found that the bubble-bubble interaction effect is significant at void fraction higher than O(1)% and decreases the amplitude and wavelength of the macroscale oscillations in the dispersive shock structure. For the modeling of bubble-bubble interaction effect, the locally volume averaged Rayleigh-Plesset (LVARP) equation, which is an extended version of the original Rayleigh-Plesset equation, is proposed in the present study. The results of bubbly mixture model using LVARP agree well with the direct simulation results for bubbly shock flows at void fraction up to 13%. The bubble-bubble interaction in nonuniform bubbly flows is also investigated in bubbly flows with randomized initial bubble positions. It is found that the LVARP model predicts the ensemble averaged behavior with reasonable accuracy.

  8. Morphology of Two-Phase Layers with Large Bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vékony, Klára; Kiss, László I.

    2010-10-01

    The understanding of formation and movement of bubbles nucleated during aluminum reduction is essential for a good control of the electrolysis process. In our experiments, we filmed and studied the formation of a bubble layer under the anode in a real-size air-water electrolysis cell model. The maximum height of the bubbles was found to be up to 2 cm because of the presence of the so-called Fortin bubbles. Also, the mean height of the bubble layer was found to be much higher than published previously. The Fortin bubbles were investigated more closely, and their shape was found to be induced by a gravity wave formed at the gas-liquid interface. In addition, large bubbles were always observed to break up into smaller parts right before escaping from under the anode. This breakup and escape led to a large momentum transfer in the bath.

  9. Entrainment rates and microphysics in POST stratocumulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerber, H.; Frick, G.; Malinowski, Szymon P.; Jonsson, H.; Khelif, D.; Krueger, Steven K.

    2013-11-01

    An aircraft field study (POST; Physics of Stratocumulus Top) was conducted off the central California coast in July and August 2008 to deal with the known difficulty of measuring entrainment rates in the radiatively important stratocumulus (Sc) prevalent in that area. The Center for Interdisciplinary Remotely-Piloted Aircraft Studies Twin Otter research aircraft flew 15 quasi-Lagrangian flights in unbroken Sc and carried a full complement of probes including three high-data-rate probes: ultrafast temperature probe, particulate volume monitor probe, and gust probe. The probes' colocation near the nose of the Twin Otter permitted estimation of entrainment fluxes and rates with an in-cloud resolution of 1 m. Results include the following: Application of the conditional sampling variation of classical mixed layer theory for calculating the entrainment rate into cloud top for POST flights is shown to be inadequate for most of the Sc. Estimated rates resemble previous results after theory is modified to take into account both entrainment and evaporation at cloud top given the strong wind shear and mixing at cloud top. Entrainment rates show a tendency to decrease for large shear values, and the largest rates are for the smallest temperature jumps across the inversion. Measurements indirectly suggest that entrained parcels are primarily cooled by infrared flux divergence rather than cooling from droplet evaporation, while detrainment at cloud top causes droplet evaporation and cooling in the entrainment interface layer above cloud top.

  10. Temperature compensation and entrainment in circadian rhythms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodenstein, C.; Heiland, I.; Schuster, S.

    2012-06-01

    To anticipate daily variations in the environment and coordinate biological activities into a daily cycle many organisms possess a circadian clock. In the absence of external time cues the circadian rhythm persists with a period of approximately 24 h. The clock phase can be shifted by single pulses of light, darkness, chemicals, or temperature and this allows entrainment of the clock to exactly 24 h by cycles of these zeitgebers. On the other hand, the period of the circadian rhythm is kept relatively constant within a physiological range of constant temperatures, which means that the oscillator is temperature compensated. The mechanisms behind temperature compensation and temperature entrainment are not fully understood, neither biochemically nor mathematically. Here, we theoretically investigate the interplay of temperature compensation and entrainment in general oscillatory systems. We first give an analytical treatment for small temperature shifts and derive that every temperature-compensated oscillator is entrainable to external small-amplitude temperature cycles. Temperature compensation ensures that this entrainment region is always centered at the endogenous period regardless of possible seasonal temperature differences. Moreover, for small temperature cycles the entrainment region of the oscillator is potentially larger for rectangular pulses. For large temperature shifts we numerically analyze different circadian clock models proposed in the literature with respect to these properties. We observe that for such large temperature shifts sinusoidal or gradual temperature cycles allow a larger entrainment region than rectangular cycles.

  11. Brut: Automatic bubble classifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaumont, Christopher; Goodman, Alyssa; Williams, Jonathan; Kendrew, Sarah; Simpson, Robert

    2014-07-01

    Brut, written in Python, identifies bubbles in infrared images of the Galactic midplane; it uses a database of known bubbles from the Milky Way Project and Spitzer images to build an automatic bubble classifier. The classifier is based on the Random Forest algorithm, and uses the WiseRF implementation of this algorithm.

  12. Bubbly Cavitation Flows.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-03-31

    and 12. Comparison is also made with analytical predictions based on the Rayleigh - Plesset equations . In addition to the single bubble studies, the...bubble maximum size distributions and those predicted using the measured nuclei number distribution and the Rayleigh - Plesset model for the bubble dyna

  13. Bursting the Taylor cone bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Zhao; Truscott, Tadd

    2014-11-01

    A soap bubble fixed on a surface and placed in an electric field will take on the shape of a cone rather than constant curvature (dome) when the electrical field is not present. The phenomenon was introduced by J. Zeleny (1917) and studied extensively by C.T. Wilson & G.I. Taylor (1925). We revisit the Taylor cone problem by studying the deformation and bursting of soap bubbles in a point charge electric field. A single bubble takes on the shape of a cone in the electric field and a high-speed camera equipped with a micro-lens is used to observe the unsteady dynamics at the tip. Rupture occurs as a very small piece of the tip is torn away from the bubble toward the point charge. Based on experiments, a theoretical model is developed that predicts when rupture should occur. This study may help in the design of foam-removal techniques in engineering and provide a better understanding of an electrified air-liquid interface.

  14. A Quantitative Investigation of Entrainment and Detrainment in Numerically Simulated Convective Clouds. Pt. 1; Model Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Charles

    1998-01-01

    A method is developed which uses numerical tracers to make accurate diagnoses of entraimnent and detrainment rates and of the properties of the entrained and detrained air in numerically simulated clouds. The numerical advection scheme is modified to make it nondispersive, as required by the use of the tracers. Tests of the new method are made, and an appropriate definition of clouds is selected. Distributions of mixing fractions in the model consistently show maximums at the end points, for nearly undilute environmental air or nearly undilute cloud air, with a uniform distribution between. The cumulonimbus clouds simulated here entrain air that had been substantially changed by the clouds, and detrained air that is not necessarily representative of the cloud air at the same level.

  15. Heat transfer and bubble dynamics in slurry bubble columns for Fischer-Tropsch clean alternative energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chengtian

    With the increasing demand for alternative energy resources, the Fischer-Tropsch (FT) process that converts synthesis gas into clean liquid fuels has attracted more interest from the industry. Slurry bubble columns are the most promising reactors for FT synthesis due to their advantages over other reactors. Successful operation, design, and scale-up of such reactors require detailed knowledge of hydrodynamics, bubble dynamics, and transport characteristics. However, most previous studies have been conducted at ambient pressure or covered only low superficial gas velocities. The objectives of this study were to experimentally investigate the heat transfer coefficient and bubble dynamics in slurry bubble columns at conditions that can mimic FT conditions. The air-C9C 11-FT catalysts/glass beads systems were selected to mimic the physical properties of the gas, liquid, and solid phases at commercial FT operating conditions. A heat transfer coefficient measurement technique was developed, and for the first time, this technique was applied in a pilot scale (6-inch diameter) high pressure slurry bubble column. The effects of superficial gas velocity, pressure, solids loading, and liquid properties on the heat transfer coefficients were investigated. Since the heat transfer coefficient can be affected by the bubble properties (Kumar et al., 1992), in this work bubble dynamics (local gas holdup, bubble chord length, apparent bubble frequency, specific interfacial area, and bubble velocity) were studied using the improved four-point optical probe technique (Xue et al., 2003; Xue, 2004). Because the four-point optical technique had only been successfully applied in a churn turbulent flow bubble column (Xue, 2004), this technique was first assessed in a small scale slurry bubble column in this study. Then the bubble dynamics were studied at the same conditions as the heat transfer coefficient investigation in the same pilot scale column. The results from four-point probe

  16. Interacting bubble clouds and their sonochemical production.

    PubMed

    Stricker, Laura; Dollet, Benjamin; Fernández Rivas, David; Lohse, Detlef

    2013-09-01

    An acoustically driven air pocket trapped in a pit etched on a surface can emit a bubble cluster. When several pits are present, the resulting bubble clusters interact in a nontrivial way. Fernández Rivas et al. [Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 49, 9699-9701 (2010)] observed three different behaviors at increasing driving power: clusters close to their "mother" pits, clusters attracting each other but still well separated, and merging clusters. The last is highly undesirable for technological purposes as it is associated with a reduction of the radical production and an enhancement of the erosion of the reactor walls. In this paper, the conditions for merging to occur are quantified in the case of two clusters, as a function of the following control parameters: driving pressure, distance between the two pits, cluster radius, and number of bubbles within each cluster. The underlying mechanism, governed by the secondary Bjerknes forces, is strongly influenced by the nonlinearity of the bubble oscillations and not directly by the number of nucleated bubbles. The Bjerknes forces are found to dampen the bubble oscillations, thus reducing the radical production. Therefore, the increased number of bubbles at high power could be the key to understanding the experimental observation that, above a certain power threshold, any further increase of the driving does not improve the sonochemical efficiency.

  17. Heat transfer between immiscible liquids enhanced by gas bubbling. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, G.A.; Schwarz, C.E.; Klages, J.; Klein, J.

    1982-08-01

    The phenomena of core-concrete interactions impact upon containment integrity of light water reactors (LWR) following postulated complete meltdown of the core by containment pressurization, production of combustible gases, and basemat penetration. Experiments have been performed with non-reactor materials to investigate one aspect of this problem, heat transfer between overlying immiscible liquids whose interface is disturbed by a transverse non-condensable gas flux emanating from below. Hydrodynamic studies have been performed to test a criterion for onset of entrainment due to bubbling through the interface and subsequent heat transfer studies were performed to assess the effect of bubbling on interfacial heat transfer rates, both with and without bubble induced entrainment. Non-entraining interfacial heat transfer data with mercury-water/oil fluid pairs were observed to be bounded from below within a factor of two to three by the Szekeley surface renewal heat transfer model. However heat transfer data for fluid pairs which are found to entrain (water-oil), believed to be characteristic of molten reactor core-concrete conditions, were measured to be up to two orders of magnitude greater than surface renewal predictions and are calculated by a simple entrainment heat transfer model.

  18. The influence of bubbles on the perception carbonation bite.

    PubMed

    Wise, Paul M; Wolf, Madeline; Thom, Stephen R; Bryant, Bruce

    2013-01-01

    Although many people naively assume that the bite of carbonation is due to tactile stimulation of the oral cavity by bubbles, it has become increasingly clear that carbonation bite comes mainly from formation of carbonic acid in the oral mucosa. In Experiment 1, we asked whether bubbles were in fact required to perceive carbonation bite. Subjects rated oral pungency from several concentrations of carbonated water both at normal atmospheric pressure (at which bubbles could form) and at 2.0 atmospheres pressure (at which bubbles did not form). Ratings of carbonation bite under the two pressure conditions were essentially identical, indicating that bubbles are not required for pungency. In Experiment 2, we created controlled streams of air bubbles around the tongue in mildly pungent CO2 solutions to determine how tactile stimulation from bubbles affects carbonation bite. Since innocuous sensations like light touch and cooling often suppress pain, we predicted that bubbles might reduce rated bite. Contrary to prediction, air bubbles flowing around the tongue significantly enhanced rated bite, without inducing perceived bite in blank (un-carbonated) solutions. Accordingly, though bubbles are clearly not required for carbonation bite, they may well modulate perceived bite. More generally, the results show that innocuous tactile stimulation can enhance chemogenic pain. Possible physiological mechanisms are discussed.

  19. The Influence of Bubbles on the Perception Carbonation Bite

    PubMed Central

    Wise, Paul M.; Wolf, Madeline; Thom, Stephen R.; Bryant, Bruce

    2013-01-01

    Although many people naively assume that the bite of carbonation is due to tactile stimulation of the oral cavity by bubbles, it has become increasingly clear that carbonation bite comes mainly from formation of carbonic acid in the oral mucosa. In Experiment 1, we asked whether bubbles were in fact required to perceive carbonation bite. Subjects rated oral pungency from several concentrations of carbonated water both at normal atmospheric pressure (at which bubbles could form) and at 2.0 atmospheres pressure (at which bubbles did not form). Ratings of carbonation bite under the two pressure conditions were essentially identical, indicating that bubbles are not required for pungency. In Experiment 2, we created controlled streams of air bubbles around the tongue in mildly pungent CO2 solutions to determine how tactile stimulation from bubbles affects carbonation bite. Since innocuous sensations like light touch and cooling often suppress pain, we predicted that bubbles might reduce rated bite. Contrary to prediction, air bubbles flowing around the tongue significantly enhanced rated bite, without inducing perceived bite in blank (un-carbonated) solutions. Accordingly, though bubbles are clearly not required for carbonation bite, they may well modulate perceived bite. More generally, the results show that innocuous tactile stimulation can enhance chemogenic pain. Possible physiological mechanisms are discussed. PMID:23990956

  20. Devolatilization of oil sludge in a lab-scale bubbling fluidized bed.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianguo; Jiang, Xiumin; Han, Xiangxin

    2011-01-30

    Devolatilization of oil sludge pellets was investigated in nitrogen and air atmosphere in a lab-scale bubbling fluidized bed (BFB). Devolatilization times were measured by the degree of completion of the evolution of the volatiles for individual oil sludge pellets in the 5-15 mm diameter range. The influences of pellet size, bed temperature and superficial fluidization velocity on devolatilization time were evaluated. The variation of devolatilization time with particle diameter was expressed by the correlation, τ(d) = Ad(p)(N). The devolatilization time to pellet diameter curve shows nearly a linear increase in nitrogen, whereas an exponential increase in air. No noticeable effect of superficial fluidization velocity on devolatilization time in air atmosphere was observed. The behavior of the sludge pellets in the BFB was also focused during combustion experiments, primary fragmentation (a micro-explosive combustion phenomenon) was observed for bigger pellets (>10mm) at high bed temperatures (>700 °C), which occurred towards the end of combustion and remarkably reduce the devolatilization time of the oil sludge pellet. The size analysis of bed materials and fly ash showed that entire ash particle was entrained or elutriated out of the BFB furnace due to the fragile structure of oil sludge ash particles. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Acoustic bubble traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geisler, Reinhard; Kurz, Thomas; Lauterborn, Werner

    2000-07-01

    A small, oscillating bubble in a liquid can be trapped in the antinode of an acoustic standing wave field. Bubble stability is required for the study of single bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL). The properties of the acoustic resonator are essential for the stable trapping of sonoluminescing bubbles. Resonators can be chosen according to the intended application: size and geometry can be varied in a wide range. In this work, the acoustic responses of different resonators were measured by means of holographic interferometry, hydrophones and a laser vibrometer. Also, high-speed photography was used to observe the bubble dynamics. Several single, stable sonoluminescent bubbles were trapped simultaneously within an acoustic resonator in the pressure antinodes of a higher harmonic mode (few bubble sonoluminescence, FBSL).

  2. Eyeblink entrainment at breakpoints of speech.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Tamami; Kitazawa, Shigeru

    2010-09-01

    The eyes play an essential role in social communication. Eyeblinks, however, have thus far received minor attention. We previously showed that subjects blink in synchrony while viewing the same video stories (Nakano et al. in Proc R Soc B 276:3635-3644, 2009). We therefore hypothesized that eyeblinks are synchronized between listener and speaker in face-to-face conversation. Here, we show that listeners blinked with a delay of 0.25-0.5 s after the speaker blinked when the listeners viewed close-up video clips (with sound) of the speaker's face. Furthermore, this entrainment was selectively triggered by speaker's eyeblinks occurring at the end and during pauses in speech. Eyeblink entrainment was not observed when viewing identical video clips without sound, indicating that blink entrainment was not an automatic imitation. We therefore suggest that eyeblink entrainment reflects smooth communication between interactants.

  3. Chemical Reactions in a Sonoluminescing Bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasui, Kyuichi

    1997-09-01

    Rates of chemical reactions in an air bubble are calculatednumerically under a condition of the single-bubble sonoluminescence(SBSL) and that of non-light-emission. In the calculations, effect of non-equilibrium evaporation and condensationof water vapor at the bubble wall andthat of thermal conduction both inside and outside the bubbleare taken into account.Numerical calculations reveal that appreciable amounts of OH, H2O2, HO2, O3, H2, H, and O moleculesare created in a bubble under the condition of SBSL.The amounts of chemical products containing nitrogen such as NOx, NHx, and HNOx are much less than those of the above products at least in the first few acoustic cycles.Numerical calculations also reveal that no chemical reactionstake place under a condition of non-light-emission.Connection with sonoluminescence is also discussed.

  4. Washing of the AN-107 entrained solids

    SciTech Connect

    GJ Lumetta; FV Hoopes

    2000-03-31

    This report describes the results of a test conducted by Battelle to assess the effects of inhibited water washing on the composition of the entrained solids in the diluted AN-107 low-activity waste (LAW) sample. The objective of this work was to gather data on the solubility of the AN-107 entrained solids in 0.01 M NaOH, so that BNFL can evaluate whether these solids require caustic leaching.

  5. Visual cortex entrains to sign language.

    PubMed

    Brookshire, Geoffrey; Lu, Jenny; Nusbaum, Howard C; Goldin-Meadow, Susan; Casasanto, Daniel

    2017-06-13

    Despite immense variability across languages, people can learn to understand any human language, spoken or signed. What neural mechanisms allow people to comprehend language across sensory modalities? When people listen to speech, electrophysiological oscillations in auditory cortex entrain to slow ([Formula: see text]8 Hz) fluctuations in the acoustic envelope. Entrainment to the speech envelope may reflect mechanisms specialized for auditory perception. Alternatively, flexible entrainment may be a general-purpose cortical mechanism that optimizes sensitivity to rhythmic information regardless of modality. Here, we test these proposals by examining cortical coherence to visual information in sign language. First, we develop a metric to quantify visual change over time. We find quasiperiodic fluctuations in sign language, characterized by lower frequencies than fluctuations in speech. Next, we test for entrainment of neural oscillations to visual change in sign language, using electroencephalography (EEG) in fluent speakers of American Sign Language (ASL) as they watch videos in ASL. We find significant cortical entrainment to visual oscillations in sign language <5 Hz, peaking at [Formula: see text]1 Hz. Coherence to sign is strongest over occipital and parietal cortex, in contrast to speech, where coherence is strongest over the auditory cortex. Nonsigners also show coherence to sign language, but entrainment at frontal sites is reduced relative to fluent signers. These results demonstrate that flexible cortical entrainment to language does not depend on neural processes that are specific to auditory speech perception. Low-frequency oscillatory entrainment may reflect a general cortical mechanism that maximizes sensitivity to informational peaks in time-varying signals.

  6. Neurophysiological Analysis of Circadian Rhythm Entrainment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-05-24

    the newly discovered 5 - HT7 receptor have yet to be performed. These results demonstrate that serotonin acting through a 5 -HTIA-like receptor can...ANNUAL 1 Jan 93 TO 31 Dec 93 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5 . FUNDING NUMBERS NEUROPHYSIOLOGICAL ANALYSIS OF CIRCADIAN RHYTHM F49620-93-1-0089 ENTRAINMENT j...sensitivity of SCN cells to serotonin ( 5 -HT) and the effects of serotonin on rhythm entrainment. The evidence to date has suggested, however, that

  7. Turbulent bubble plumes and CO 2-driven lake eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, Andrew W.; Phillips, Jeremy C.

    1999-10-01

    We examine the motion of turbulent bubble plumes within lakes containing large quantities of dissolved CO 2 such as Lake Nyos, Cameroon. First we describe some new laboratory experiments in which we examine the dynamics of turbulent bubbles plumes produced by electrolysis in an aqueous solution. These experiments were analysed to determine the entrainment rate into the plume. Using the experimental results, we then develop a model of the motion of a bubble plume through a CO 2-rich lake. The model identifies that for a sufficient amount of dissolved CO 2 in the lake or a sufficient flux of CO 2 at the base of the lake, a turbulent bubble plume can rise through the lake and erupt at the surface. The model predicts that owing to the rapid entrainment of ambient fluid, the surface flux of CO 2 may be 10 4-10 5 times greater than that at the base of the lake. We also show that the return flow in the lake acts to decrease the CO 2 content at all depths as the CO 2 is erupted at the surface, and that this eventually leads to termination of the activity. The model provides the first quantitative analysis that CO 2 saturated lakes can overturn convectively and lead to rapid degassing events such as occurred at Lake Nyos in Cameroon in 1986.

  8. Air

    MedlinePlus

    ... do to protect yourself from dirty air . Indoor air pollution and outdoor air pollution Air can be polluted indoors and it can ... this chart to see what things cause indoor air pollution and what things cause outdoor air pollution! Indoor ...

  9. Nanoemulsions obtained via bubble-bursting at a compound interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Jie; Roché, Matthieu; Vigolo, Daniele; Arnaudov, Luben N.; Stoyanov, Simeon D.; Gurkov, Theodor D.; Tsutsumanova, Gichka G.; Stone, Howard A.

    2014-08-01

    Bursting of bubbles at an air/liquid interface is a familiar occurrence relevant to foam stability, cell cultures in bioreactors and ocean-atmosphere mass transfer. In the latter case, bubble-bursting leads to the dispersal of sea-water aerosols in the surrounding air. Here we show that bubbles bursting at a compound air/oil/water-with-surfactant interface can disperse submicrometre oil droplets in water. Dispersal results from the detachment of an oil spray from the bottom of the bubble towards water during bubble collapse. We provide evidence that droplet size is selected by physicochemical interactions between oil molecules and the surfactants rather than by hydrodynamics. We demonstrate the unrecognized role that this dispersal mechanism may play in the fate of the sea surface microlayer and of pollutant spills by dispersing petroleum in the water column. Finally, our system provides an energy-efficient route, with potential upscalability, for applications in drug delivery, food production and materials science.

  10. Entrainment of peripheral clock genes by cortisol

    PubMed Central

    Mavroudis, Panteleimon D.; Scheff, Jeremy D.; Calvano, Steve E.; Lowry, Stephen F.

    2012-01-01

    Circadian rhythmicity in mammals is primarily driven by the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), often called the central pacemaker, which converts the photic information of light and dark cycles into neuronal and hormonal signals in the periphery of the body. Cells of peripheral tissues respond to these centrally mediated cues by adjusting their molecular function to optimize organism performance. Numerous systemic cues orchestrate peripheral rhythmicity, such as feeding, body temperature, the autonomic nervous system, and hormones. We propose a semimechanistic model for the entrainment of peripheral clock genes by cortisol as a representative entrainer of peripheral cells. This model demonstrates the importance of entrainer's characteristics in terms of the synchronization and entrainment of peripheral clock genes, and predicts the loss of intercellular synchrony when cortisol moves out of its homeostatic amplitude and frequency range, as has been observed clinically in chronic stress and cancer. The model also predicts a dynamic regime of entrainment, when cortisol has a slightly decreased amplitude rhythm, where individual clock genes remain relatively synchronized among themselves but are phase shifted in relation to the entrainer. The model illustrates how the loss of communication between the SCN and peripheral tissues could result in desynchronization of peripheral clocks. PMID:22510707

  11. Tuning the phase of circadian entrainment.

    PubMed

    Bordyugov, Grigory; Abraham, Ute; Granada, Adrian; Rose, Pia; Imkeller, Katharina; Kramer, Achim; Herzel, Hanspeter

    2015-07-06

    The circadian clock coordinates daily physiological, metabolic and behavioural rhythms. These endogenous oscillations are synchronized with external cues ('zeitgebers'), such as daily light and temperature cycles. When the circadian clock is entrained by a zeitgeber, the phase difference ψ between the phase of a clock-controlled rhythm and the phase of the zeitgeber is of fundamental importance for the fitness of the organism. The phase of entrainment ψ depends on the mismatch between the intrinsic period τ and the zeitgeber period T and on the ratio of the zeitgeber strength to oscillator amplitude. Motivated by the intriguing complexity of empirical data and by our own experiments on temperature entrainment of mouse suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) slices, we present a theory on how clock and zeitgeber properties determine the phase of entrainment. The wide applicability of the theory is demonstrated using mathematical models of different complexity as well as by experimental data. Predictions of the theory are confirmed by published data on Neurospora crassa strains for different period mismatches τ - T and varying photoperiods. We apply a novel regression technique to analyse entrainment of SCN slices by temperature cycles. We find that mathematical models can explain not only the stable asymptotic phase of entrainment, but also transient phase dynamics. Our theory provides the potential to explore seasonal variations of circadian rhythms, jet lag and shift work in forthcoming studies.

  12. Ambient Fluid Entrainment by Vortex Ring Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olcay, Ali B.; Krueger, Paul S.

    2004-11-01

    During the formation of a vortex ring from a piston-cylinder mechanism, the roll-up of the ejected shear layer entrains ambient fluid. The resulting vortex ring convects both ejected and ambient fluid downstream. Ambient fluid entrained during the formation phase must be accelerated with the forming ring and can contribute to elevated propulsive effectiveness for pulsed-jet propulsion. In this regard it is of interest to know how much ambient fluid is entrained during vortex ring formation and if the entrainment occurs primarily during jet ejection or afterward. The present investigation evaluates ambient fluid entrainment experimentally using laser induced fluorescence of vortex ring formation from a piston-cylinder vortex ring generator. The fraction of ambient fluid in fully-developed vortex rings is evaluated directly for piston stroke-to-diameter (L/D) ratios in the range 0.25 to 4 for jet Reynolds number in the range 500 to 2000. The results indicate that the ambient fluid fraction is greater than 50% for L/D < 2.0, and the fraction tends to decrease as L/D increases. Time evolution of the entrainment during ring formation will also be presented.

  13. Coupling governs entrainment range of circadian clocks.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Ute; Granada, Adrián E; Westermark, Pål O; Heine, Markus; Kramer, Achim; Herzel, Hanspeter

    2010-11-30

    Circadian clocks are endogenous oscillators driving daily rhythms in physiology and behavior. Synchronization of these timers to environmental light-dark cycles ('entrainment') is crucial for an organism's fitness. Little is known about which oscillator qualities determine entrainment, i.e., entrainment range, phase and amplitude. In a systematic theoretical and experimental study, we uncovered these qualities for circadian oscillators in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN-the master clock in mammals) and the lung (a peripheral clock): (i) the ratio between stimulus (zeitgeber) strength and oscillator amplitude and (ii) the rigidity of the oscillatory system (relaxation rate upon perturbation) determine entrainment properties. Coupling among oscillators affects both qualities resulting in increased amplitude and rigidity. These principles explain our experimental findings that lung clocks entrain to extreme zeitgeber cycles, whereas SCN clocks do not. We confirmed our theoretical predictions by showing that pharmacological inhibition of coupling in the SCN leads to larger ranges of entrainment. These differences between master and the peripheral clocks suggest that coupling-induced rigidity in the SCN filters environmental noise to create a robust circadian system.

  14. Tuning the phase of circadian entrainment

    PubMed Central

    Bordyugov, Grigory; Abraham, Ute; Granada, Adrian; Rose, Pia; Imkeller, Katharina; Kramer, Achim; Herzel, Hanspeter

    2015-01-01

    The circadian clock coordinates daily physiological, metabolic and behavioural rhythms. These endogenous oscillations are synchronized with external cues (‘zeitgebers’), such as daily light and temperature cycles. When the circadian clock is entrained by a zeitgeber, the phase difference ψ between the phase of a clock-controlled rhythm and the phase of the zeitgeber is of fundamental importance for the fitness of the organism. The phase of entrainment ψ depends on the mismatch between the intrinsic period τ and the zeitgeber period T and on the ratio of the zeitgeber strength to oscillator amplitude. Motivated by the intriguing complexity of empirical data and by our own experiments on temperature entrainment of mouse suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) slices, we present a theory on how clock and zeitgeber properties determine the phase of entrainment. The wide applicability of the theory is demonstrated using mathematical models of different complexity as well as by experimental data. Predictions of the theory are confirmed by published data on Neurospora crassa strains for different period mismatches τ − T and varying photoperiods. We apply a novel regression technique to analyse entrainment of SCN slices by temperature cycles. We find that mathematical models can explain not only the stable asymptotic phase of entrainment, but also transient phase dynamics. Our theory provides the potential to explore seasonal variations of circadian rhythms, jet lag and shift work in forthcoming studies. PMID:26136227

  15. Coupling governs entrainment range of circadian clocks

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Ute; Granada, Adrián E; Westermark, Pål O; Heine, Markus; Kramer, Achim; Herzel, Hanspeter

    2010-01-01

    Circadian clocks are endogenous oscillators driving daily rhythms in physiology and behavior. Synchronization of these timers to environmental light–dark cycles (‘entrainment') is crucial for an organism's fitness. Little is known about which oscillator qualities determine entrainment, i.e., entrainment range, phase and amplitude. In a systematic theoretical and experimental study, we uncovered these qualities for circadian oscillators in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN—the master clock in mammals) and the lung (a peripheral clock): (i) the ratio between stimulus (zeitgeber) strength and oscillator amplitude and (ii) the rigidity of the oscillatory system (relaxation rate upon perturbation) determine entrainment properties. Coupling among oscillators affects both qualities resulting in increased amplitude and rigidity. These principles explain our experimental findings that lung clocks entrain to extreme zeitgeber cycles, whereas SCN clocks do not. We confirmed our theoretical predictions by showing that pharmacological inhibition of coupling in the SCN leads to larger ranges of entrainment. These differences between master and the peripheral clocks suggest that coupling-induced rigidity in the SCN filters environmental noise to create a robust circadian system. PMID:21119632

  16. Nonlinear Bubble Interactions in Acoustic Pressure Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbat, Tiberiu; Ashgriz, Nasser; Liu, Ching-Shi

    1996-01-01

    The systems consisting of a two-phase mixture, as clouds of bubbles or drops, have shown many common features in their responses to different external force fields. One of particular interest is the effect of an unsteady pressure field applied to these systems, case in which the coupling of the vibrations induced in two neighboring components (two drops or two bubbles) may result in an interaction force between them. This behavior was explained by Bjerknes by postulating that every body that is moving in an accelerating fluid is subjected to a 'kinetic buoyancy' equal with the product of the acceleration of the fluid multiplied by the mass of the fluid displaced by the body. The external sound wave applied to a system of drops/bubbles triggers secondary sound waves from each component of the system. These secondary pressure fields integrated over the surface of the neighboring drop/bubble may result in a force additional to the effect of the primary sound wave on each component of the system. In certain conditions, the magnitude of these secondary forces may result in significant changes in the dynamics of each component, thus in the behavior of the entire system. In a system containing bubbles, the sound wave radiated by one bubble at the location of a neighboring one is dominated by the volume oscillation mode and its effects can be important for a large range of frequencies. The interaction forces in a system consisting of drops are much smaller than those consisting of bubbles. Therefore, as a first step towards the understanding of the drop-drop interaction subject to external pressure fluctuations, it is more convenient to study the bubble interactions. This paper presents experimental results and theoretical predictions concerning the interaction and the motion of two levitated air bubbles in water in the presence of an acoustic field at high frequencies (22-23 KHz).

  17. Dynamics of two-dimensional bubbles.

    PubMed

    Piedra, Saúl; Ramos, Eduardo; Herrera, J Ramón

    2015-06-01

    The dynamics of two-dimensional bubbles ascending under the influence of buoyant forces is numerically studied with a one-fluid model coupled with the front-tracking technique. The bubble dynamics are described by recording the position, shape, and orientation of the bubbles as functions of time. The qualitative properties of the bubbles and their terminal velocities are described in terms of the Eötvos (ratio of buoyancy to surface tension) and Archimedes numbers (ratio of buoyancy to viscous forces). The terminal Reynolds number result from the balance of buoyancy and drag forces and, consequently, is not an externally fixed parameter. In the cases that yield small Reynolds numbers, the bubbles follow straight paths and the wake is steady. A more interesting behavior is found at high Reynolds numbers where the bubbles follow an approximately periodic zigzag trajectory and an unstable wake with properties similar to the Von Karman vortex street is formed. The dynamical features of the motion of single bubbles are compared to experimental observations of air bubbles ascending in a water-filled Hele-Shaw cell. Although the comparison is not strictly valid in the sense that the effect of the lateral walls is not incorporated in the model, most of the dynamical properties observed are in good qualitative agreement with the numerical calculations. Hele-Shaw cells with different gaps have been used to determine the degree of approximation of the numerical calculation. It is found that for the relation between the terminal Reynolds number and the Archimedes number, the numerical calculations are closer to the observations of bubble dynamics in Hele-Shaw cells of larger gaps.

  18. Dynamics of two-dimensional bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piedra, Saúl; Ramos, Eduardo; Herrera, J. Ramón

    2015-06-01

    The dynamics of two-dimensional bubbles ascending under the influence of buoyant forces is numerically studied with a one-fluid model coupled with the front-tracking technique. The bubble dynamics are described by recording the position, shape, and orientation of the bubbles as functions of time. The qualitative properties of the bubbles and their terminal velocities are described in terms of the Eötvos (ratio of buoyancy to surface tension) and Archimedes numbers (ratio of buoyancy to viscous forces). The terminal Reynolds number result from the balance of buoyancy and drag forces and, consequently, is not an externally fixed parameter. In the cases that yield small Reynolds numbers, the bubbles follow straight paths and the wake is steady. A more interesting behavior is found at high Reynolds numbers where the bubbles follow an approximately periodic zigzag trajectory and an unstable wake with properties similar to the Von Karman vortex street is formed. The dynamical features of the motion of single bubbles are compared to experimental observations of air bubbles ascending in a water-filled Hele-Shaw cell. Although the comparison is not strictly valid in the sense that the effect of the lateral walls is not incorporated in the model, most of the dynamical properties observed are in good qualitative agreement with the numerical calculations. Hele-Shaw cells with different gaps have been used to determine the degree of approximation of the numerical calculation. It is found that for the relation between the terminal Reynolds number and the Archimedes number, the numerical calculations are closer to the observations of bubble dynamics in Hele-Shaw cells of larger gaps.

  19. Bubble-solid interactions in water and electrolyte solutions.

    PubMed

    Pushkarova, Rada A; Horn, Roger G

    2008-08-19

    Surface forces between an air bubble and a flat mica surface immersed in aqueous electrolyte solutions have been investigated using a modified surface force apparatus. An analysis of the deformation of the air bubble with respect to the mutual position of the bubble and the mica surface, the capillary pressure, and the disjoining pressure allows the air-liquid surface electrical potential to be determined. The experiments show that a long-range, double-layer repulsion acts between the mica (which is negatively charged) and an air bubble in water and in various electrolyte solutions at low concentration, thereby indicating that the air bubble surface is negatively charged. However, there is clear evidence that charge regulation occurs at the air-water interface to maintain a constant surface potential, and as a result of this, the charge at this interface changes from negative to positive as the bubble approaches the mica surface. Because of the attraction that arises as a result of the charge reversal, a finite force is required to separate the bubble from the mica, though the mica remains wetted by the aqueous phase. At the low concentrations investigated, the potential on the gas-liquid interface is independent of the electrolyte type within experimental uncertainty.

  20. Cryoconite and Ice-bubble Microbial Ecosystems in Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Richard B.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    During the Antarctica 2000 Expedition samples of rocks and ice bubbles entrained in ice were collected from the blue ice fields near the Moulton Escarpment of the Thiel Mountains (85S, 94W) and the Morris Moraine of the Patriot Hills (80S, 8 1 W) Ellsworth Mountains of Antarctica. Investigation of the microbiota of these cryoconite and ice bubble ecosystems are now being conducted to help refine chemical and morphological biomarkers of potential significance to Astrobiology. The Antarctica 2000 Expedition will be discussed and the preliminary results of the studies of the ice bubble and cryoconite microbial ecosystems discussed. Recent ESEM images of the Antarctic microbiota will be presented a the relevance of ice ecosystems to Astrobiology will be discussed.

  1. Cryoconite and Ice-bubble Microbial Ecosystems in Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Richard B.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    During the Antarctica 2000 Expedition samples of rocks and ice bubbles entrained in ice were collected from the blue ice fields near the Moulton Escarpment of the Thiel Mountains (85S, 94W) and the Morris Moraine of the Patriot Hills (80S, 8 1 W) Ellsworth Mountains of Antarctica. Investigation of the microbiota of these cryoconite and ice bubble ecosystems are now being conducted to help refine chemical and morphological biomarkers of potential significance to Astrobiology. The Antarctica 2000 Expedition will be discussed and the preliminary results of the studies of the ice bubble and cryoconite microbial ecosystems discussed. Recent ESEM images of the Antarctic microbiota will be presented a the relevance of ice ecosystems to Astrobiology will be discussed.

  2. Measurements of Gas Bubble Size Distributions in Flowing Liquid Mercury

    SciTech Connect

    Wendel, Mark W; Riemer, Bernie; Abdou, Ashraf A

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pressure waves created in liquid mercury pulsed spallation targets have been shown to induce cavitation damage on the target container. One way to mitigate such damage would be to absorb the pressure pulse energy into a dispersed population of small bubbles, however, measuring such a population in mercury is difficult since it is opaque and the mercury is involved in a turbulent flow. Ultrasonic measurements have been attempted on these types of flows, but the flow noise can interfere with the measurement, and the results are unverifiable and often unrealistic. Recently, a flow loop was built and operated at Oak Ridge National Labarotory to assess the capability of various bubbler designs to deliver an adequate population of bubbles to mitigate cavitation damage. The invented diagnostic technique involves flowing the mercury with entrained gas bubbles in a steady state through a horizontal piping section with a glass-window observation port located on the top. The mercury flow is then suddenly stopped and the bubbles are allowed to settle on the glass due to buoyancy. Using a bright-field illumination and a high-speed camera, the arriving bubbles are detected and counted, and then the images can be processed to determine the bubble populations. After using this technique to collect data on each bubbler, bubble size distributions were built for the purpose of quantifying bubbler performance, allowing the selection of the best bubbler options. This paper presents the novel procedure, photographic technique, sample visual results and some example bubble size distributions. The