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Sample records for air carbon arc

  1. Shielded Metal Arc Welding and Carbon Arc Cutting--Air. Teacher Edition [and] Student Edition [and] Student Workbook. Third Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harper, Eddie; Knapp, John

    This document contains the teacher and student texts and student workbook for a secondary-level course in shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) and carbon arc cutting that consists of units on the following topics: SMAW safety; SMAW equipment, applications, and techniques; hardfacing; and carbon arc cutting--air. The teacher edition includes the…

  2. HOLLOW CARBON ARC DISCHARGE

    DOEpatents

    Luce, J.S.

    1960-10-11

    A device is described for producing an energetic, direct current, hollow, carbon-arc discharge in an evacuated container and within a strong magnetic field. Such discharges are particularly useful not only in dissociation and ionization of high energy molecular ion beams, but also in acting as a shield or barrier against the instreaming of lowenergy neutral particles into a plasma formed within the hollow discharge when it is used as a dissociating mechanism for forming the plasma. There is maintained a predetermined ratio of gas particles to carbon particles released from the arc electrodes during operation of the discharge. The carbon particles absorb some of the gas particles and are pumped along and by the discharge out of the device, with the result that smaller diffusion pumps are required than would otherwise be necessary to dispose of the excess gas.

  3. Helium and Carbon Systematics of the Sangihe Arc, Indonesia: Tracing Volatile Sources in an Arc-Arc Collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaffe, L. A.; Hilton, D. R.; Fischer, T. P.; Hartono, U.

    2002-12-01

    The Sangihe and Halmahera arcs in northeastern Indonesia are presently colliding, forming the world's only extant example of an arc-arc collision. We report the first helium and carbon isotopic and relative abundance data from the Sangihe Arc volcanoes as a means to trace magma origins in this complicated tectonic region. Gas chemistry and N-isotopes from the same localities are reported in a companion paper (Clor et al, this volume). There is a distinct regional pattern in He and CO2 variations along the north-south strike of the Sangihe Arc. The two northernmost volcanoes (Awu and Karangetang) have 3He/4He <= 6.4RA (where RA = air 3He/4He), CO2/3He >= 30x109, and δ13C >= -2.0‰ . In contrast, the southern volcanoes along the arc (Ruang, Lokon, Mahawu) have 3He/4He >= 7.0RA, CO2/3He < 7x109 and δ13C < -3.0‰ . The southern volcanoes, therefore, sample volatiles more typical of island arc volcanoes. Resolving the CO2 into component structures (mantle-derived, plus slab-derived organic and limestone CO2 - following the approach of Sano and Marty, Chem. Geol., 1995), the northern volcanoes contain higher than average slab-derived limestone contributions. For example, limestone-derived CO2 makes up > 90% of the total CO2 at Karangetang and ~98% at Awu. These values compare with an average limestone contribution of ~65% in the southern Sangihe arc and ~73% in other arcs worldwide. We are investigating possible reasons for the enhanced limestone contributions in the northern Sangihe arc. The sedimentary mélange wedge is thickest in the north (up to 15km) - where the arcs initially collided. The greater availability of sediment may result in a greater input of subducted sediment, thereby providing enhanced dilution of mantle wedge C inputs. Alternatively, subducted sediments may be more carbonate-rich in the northern segment of the arc. This may reflect obduction of shallow, organic-bearing sediments onto the over-riding plate, leaving only pelagic carbonates to

  4. Fluid simulation of carbon arc plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hara, Kentaro; Raitses, Yevgeny; Kaganovich, Igor

    2016-09-01

    An arc discharge using graphite electrodes is known to produce carbon nanomaterials, e.g. nanotubes and fullerenes. In order to understand where and how such nanomaterials are synthesized, the plasma properties inside the arc discharge must be characterized. The mechanism of the carbon arc plasma is as follows. Carbon particles evaporate from the graphite anode, which is mainly heated by the electrons. Carbon atoms and ions condensate and form a deposit on the cathode, from which the electrons are thermionically emitted. A one-dimensional fluid model is developed to study the characteristics of the carbon arc plasma in atmospheric pressures. Sheath models for the anode and cathode are coupled to the fluid simulation to obtain the material temperature and sheath potential. In the model, thermal nonequilibrium is assumed and atomic carbon, dimer, and trimer are considered. A typical operating condition of a carbon arc plasma is discharge voltage of 20 V, discharge current of 60 A, the electron radius of 6 to 12 mm, and background pressure of 500 Torr. Transition from low to high ablation mode is obtained from the simulations with a smaller electrode radius and with a larger discharge current, which agrees with experimental observations. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences, Materials Sciences and Engineering Division.

  5. More About Arc-Welding Process for Making Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benavides, Jeanette M.; Leidecker, Henning

    2005-01-01

    High-quality batches of carbon nanotubes are produced at relatively low cost in a modified atmospheric-pressure electric-arc welding process that does not include the use of metal catalysts. What would normally be a welding rod and a weldment are replaced by an amorphous carbon anode rod and a wider, hollow graphite cathode rod. Both electrodes are water-cooled. The cathode is immersed in ice water to about 0.5 cm from the surface. The system is shielded from air by flowing helium during arcing. As the anode is consumed during arcing at 20 to 25 A, it is lowered to maintain it at an approximately constant distance above the cathode. The process causes carbon nanotubes to form on the lowest 5 cm of the anode. The arcing process is continued until the anode has been lowered to a specified height. The nanotube-containing material is then harvested. The additional information contained in the instant report consists mostly of illustrations of carbon nanotubes and a schematic diagram of the arc-welding setup, as modified for the production of carbon nanotubes.

  6. Carbon arc ignition improved by simple auxiliary circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    High voltage, low current pulse in series with arc power supply efficiently ignites a carbon arc. The easily and economically produced circuit is useful with arc burners and searchlights and with plasma jets.

  7. RESEARCH ON ELECTRIC ARC REDUCTION OF CARBON DIOXIDE,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    CARBON DIOXIDE , REDUCTION(CHEMISTRY), ELECTRIC ARCS, CHEMICAL REACTIONS, HEAT OF REACTION, GAS FLOW, OXYGEN, CARBON COMPOUNDS, MONOXIDES, ELECTRODES, LABORATORY EQUIPMENT, HIGH TEMPERATURE, PLASMAS(PHYSICS), ENERGY.

  8. Numerical simulation of carbon arc discharge for nanoparticle synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundrapu, M.; Keidar, M.

    2012-07-01

    Arc discharge with catalyst-filled carbon anode in helium background was used for the synthesis of carbon nanoparticles. In this paper, we present the results of numerical simulation of carbon arc discharges with arc current varying from 10 A to 100 A in a background gas pressure of 68 kPa. Anode sublimation rate and current voltage characteristics are compared with experiments. Distribution of temperature and species density, which is important for the estimation of the growth of nanoparticles, is obtained. The probable location of nanoparticle growth region is identified based on the temperature range for the formation of catalyst clusters.

  9. Miniature Arcs for Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alford, J. M.; Mason, G. R.; Feikema, D. A.

    2006-01-01

    Although many methods are available for producing single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), the conventional carbon arc process remains the most popular due to its simplicity and large production rate. In the carbon arc, SWNTs are catalytically synthesized by rapidly evaporating a graphite anode impregnated with NiN metal catalyst from which the nanotubes grow in an inert atmosphere. However, high temperatures inside the carbon arc generate strong buoyancy driven convection, and it is hypothesized that the non-uniform environment created by this flow has a large effect on the growth and morphology of the SWNTs. To study the effect of buoyancy on the arc process, a miniature carbon arc apparatus was developed to synthesize SWNTs in a microgravity environment substantially free from these strong convective flows. The reactor was operated for either 2.2 or 5 seconds during free-fall in the drop towers at the NASA Glenn Research Center. Two apparatus designs differing mainly in their production rate and power capacity were investigated. The first consisted of a miniaturized carbon arc employing a 1 mm diameter graphite anode and powered by a 0.54 F capacitor bank charged to 65 V. The second, larger apparatus employed a 4 mm diameter anode and was powered by a portable battery pack capable of providing in excess of 300 amps at 30 volts to the arc for the duration of a 5 second drop. Initial results indicated that transient heating is a very large effect in the short-duration drop tower carbon arcs, and thermal equilibrium of the arc plasma, buffer gas, and apparatus was not attained during the short microgravity periods. In addition, removal of the buoyant convection by the microgravity now allowed clear observation of large jets of evaporated carbon vapor streaming from the anode and mixing with the inert buffer gas. The initial mixing of these jets with the cold buffer gas combined with the thermal transient made it difficult to establish a uniform high temperature

  10. Sustained arc temperature: better marker for phase transformation of carbon black to multiwalled carbon nanotubes in arc discharge method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arora, Neha; Sharma, N. N.

    2016-10-01

    The present study investigates the role of temperature in the formation of multiwalled carbon nanotubes from carbon black using arc discharge technique. Carbon black has been used as precursor to synthesize carbon nanotubes in argon atmosphere. The arc current has been varied from 25 to 40 A in order to study the morphological changes in carbon black as it gets converted to multi walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). We observed formation of MWCNTs at an arc current of 25 A; however the recorded temperature data suggested correlation of sustained arc temperature with the nanotube formation rather than the magnitude of current in its absoluteness. Interesting to note is that reported current magnitude in published literature are very high (>40 A) for conversion of carbon black but the present investigation shows that it is possible to convert the carbon black to MWCNTs even at lower current values in case the arc temperature is stabilized and sustained for longer period. Detailed investigations suggested that a sustained stable critical temperature of 1400 °C-1600 °C is essential for the growth of nanotubes and an unstable arc causing temperature fluctuation from critical temperature value yields very low or no MWCNTs.

  11. Tracing crustal and slab contributions to arc magmatism in the lesser antilles island arc using helium and carbon relationships in geothermal fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Soest, M. C.; Hilton, D. R.; Kreulen, R.

    1998-10-01

    We report helium and carbon isotope and CO 2/ 3He ratios from a regional survey of geothermal fluids from the Lesser Antilles island arc, an arc system where there is compelling geochemical evidence for the superimposition of a crustal component onto mantle-derived magmas. A predominant mantle helium isotope signature is observed throughout the arc. The highest ratios coincide with MORB helium (˜8R A where R A = air 3He/ 4He) and occur towards the centre of the arc (the islands of Martinique, Dominica, Guadeloupe, and Montserrat). In the south and north of the arc (Grenada, St. Vincent, St. Lucia in the south and Nevis and Saba in the north) 3He/ 4He ratios are lower and lie between 4.9 and 6.8R A. This regional variation is also apparent in the carbon isotope systematics: the central portion of the arc (Martinique to Montserrat) have δ 13C(CO 2) values between -2‰ and -4‰ (vs. PDB), heavier than the range observed in MORB (-4 to -9‰). The south of the arc (Grenada to St.Lucia) is characterized by MORB-like carbon isotope ratios (centred on -6‰). CO 2/ 3He ratios are significantly higher than the MORB value (˜2 × 10 9) for the entire arc. The values in the central islands fall close to 10 10 whereas the southern volcanoes have higher ratios between 10 10-10 13. Assuming the Lesser Antilles mantle wedge has a MORB-like helium and carbon composition our data can be explained by mixing of mantle wedge carbon with at least two other carbon components: an isotopically-heavy marine limestone endmember of slab-derivation and an isotopically-lighter component representing either slab-derived organic carbon and/or an upper crustal component with a large fraction of organic carbon. The helium-carbon systematics of the central portion of the arc are consistent with a large slab-derived marine limestone input to the carbon inventory, and we calculate a non-mantle:mantle carbon flux of 5.7:1. MORB-like helium isotope ratios, which are sensitive to perturbation by

  12. Anode Sheath Switching in a Carbon Nanotube Arc Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Abe Fetterman, Yevgeny Raitses, and Michael Keidar

    2008-04-08

    The anode ablation rate is investigated as a function of anode diameter for a carbon nanotube arc plasma. It is found that anomalously high ablation occurs for small anode diameters. This result is explained by the formation of a positive anode sheath. The increased ablation rate due to this positive anode sheath could imply greater production rate for carbon nanotubes.

  13. A Carbon Arc Apparatus For Production Of Nanotubes In Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alford, J. M.; Mason, G. R.; Feikema, D. A.

    2003-01-01

    Although many methods are available for production of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), the conventional carbon arc process remains the most popular due to its simplicity and large production rate. However, high temperatures inside the carbon arc generate strong buoyancy driven convection, and it is hypothesized that the non-uniform environment created by this flow will have large effects on the growth and morphology of SWNTs produced by the arc process. Indeed, using normal gravity experiments, Marin et al. have demonstrated that changes in the buoyant convection plume produced by altering the arc electrode orientation can be used to change the diameter distribution of the SWNTs produced; an effect they attribute to changes in the temperature of the local nanotube growth environment. While these experiments present convincing evidence that buoyant convection has a strong effect on nanotube growth, normal gravity experiments are severely limited in scope. The ideal way to study the effect of buoyancy on SWNT production is to remove it completely. Toward this goal, a microgravity carbon arc reactor has been designed for use in the NASA Glenn 2.2 and 5 second drop towers. Although simple in principle, conventional carbon arc machines, which generally employ large reaction chambers and require heavy duty welding power supplies capable of supplying kilowatts of power, are not suitable for microgravity experiments. Here we describe a miniature carbon arc machine for SWNT production that fits into a conventional drop rig for use on the NASA Glenn 2.2 and 5 second drop towers, but that has a performance (production rate) that is better than most large ground-based machines.

  14. Setup for Visual Observation of Carbon-Nanotube Arc Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Carl D.; Arepalli, Sivaram

    2004-01-01

    A simple optical setup has been devised to enable safe viewing of the arc and measurement of the interelectrode gap in a process in which carbon nanotubes are produced in an arc between a catalyst-filled carbon anode and a graphite cathode. This setup can be used for visually guided manual positioning of the anode to maintain the interelectrode gap at a desired constant value, possibly as a low-technology alternative to the automatic position/voltage control described in Automatic Control of Arc Process for Making Carbon Nanotubes (MSC-23134), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 28, No. 3 (March 2004), page 51. The optical setup consists mainly of lenses for projecting an image of the arc onto a wall, plus a calibrated grid that is mounted on the wall so that one can measure the superimposed image of the arc. To facilitate determination of the end point of the process, the anode is notched, by use of a file, at the end of the filled portion that is meant to be consumed in the process. As the anode is consumed and the notch comes into view in the scene projected onto the wall, the process operator switches off the arc current.

  15. The investigation of carbon nitride films prepared at various arc currents by vacuum cathode arc method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhimin; Xia, Lifang

    2002-08-01

    The carbon nitride films have been prepared in the arc currents range of 20-60 A at the Ar/N2 atmosphere of 50/400 sccm by the vacuum cathode arc deposition method. The properties of the films were characterized by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and nanoindentation. The N concentration showed a maximum of 35 at% at 20 A and decreased gradually with the arc currents. The films below 40 A consisted of linear polymeric-like component and sp2 graphitic cluster. With the increasing of the arc current from 20 to 40 A, the ID/IG rose and the photoluminescence (PL) fell gradually, which resulted from the development of the sp2 graphitic phase and the decrease of the polymeric-like phase. As a result, the CC bonds increased and sp3CN and sp2CN decreased. Above 40 A, with the increasing of arc currents, ID/IG fell and the PL increased gradually, which reflected the decreasing of sp2 graphitic phase and the modification of C and N atoms in sp2 cluster. The CC bonds and sp3CN fell and the sp2CN rose. The nanohardness of films showed increasing tendency with the arc currents. The variation of the relative ratio and the average energy of N-containing species and C-containing species at the atmosphere would be responsible for the change in the properties of films.

  16. Shunting arc plasma source for pure carbon ion beama)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koguchi, H.; Sakakita, H.; Kiyama, S.; Shimada, T.; Sato, Y.; Hirano, Y.

    2012-02-01

    A plasma source is developed using a coaxial shunting arc plasma gun to extract a pure carbon ion beam. The pure carbon ion beam is a new type of deposition system for diamond and other carbon materials. Our plasma device generates pure carbon plasma from solid-state carbon material without using a hydrocarbon gas such as methane gas, and the plasma does not contain any hydrogen. The ion saturation current of the discharge measured by a double probe is about 0.2 mA/mm2 at the peak of the pulse.

  17. Shunting arc plasma source for pure carbon ion beam.

    PubMed

    Koguchi, H; Sakakita, H; Kiyama, S; Shimada, T; Sato, Y; Hirano, Y

    2012-02-01

    A plasma source is developed using a coaxial shunting arc plasma gun to extract a pure carbon ion beam. The pure carbon ion beam is a new type of deposition system for diamond and other carbon materials. Our plasma device generates pure carbon plasma from solid-state carbon material without using a hydrocarbon gas such as methane gas, and the plasma does not contain any hydrogen. The ion saturation current of the discharge measured by a double probe is about 0.2 mA∕mm(2) at the peak of the pulse.

  18. Deposition of superhard amorphous carbon films by pulsed arc sources

    SciTech Connect

    Scheibe, H.J.; Schultrich, B.; Ziegele, H.; Siemroth, P.

    1996-12-31

    Hydrogen-free amorphous carbon films with hardness comparable to crystalline superhard materials have been deposited by special Pulsed arc techniques. By the combination of very high hardness, low adhesion and high smoothness, these films show superior behaviour in wear and glide applications. The influence of plasma and deposition conditions on these film properties and the choice of optimum conditions are discussed.

  19. Self-organisation Processes In The Carbon ARC For Nanosynthis

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, Jonathan; Raitses, Yevgeny

    2014-02-26

    The atmospheric pressure carbon arc in inert gases such as helium is an important method for the production of nanomaterials. It has recently been shown that the formation of the carbon deposit on the cathode from gaseous carbon plays a crucial role in the operation of the arc, reaching the high temperatures necessary for thermionic emission to take place even with low melting point cathodes. Based on observed ablation and deposition rates, we explore the implications of deposit formation on the energy balance at the cathode surface, and show how the operation of the arc is self-organised process. Our results suggest that the can arc operate in two di erent regimes, one of which has an important contribution from latent heat to the cathode energy balance. This regime is characterised by the enhanced ablation rate, which may be favourable for high yield synthesis of nanomaterials. The second regime has a small and approximately constant ablation rate with a negligible contribution from latent heat.

  20. Tracing crustal and slab contributions to arc magmatism in the Lesser Antilles island arc using helium and carbon relationships in geothermal fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Soest, M.C. van; Hilton, D.R. |; Kreulen, R.

    1998-10-01

    The authors report helium and carbon isotope and CO{sub 2}/{sup 3}He ratios from a regional survey of geothermal fluids from the Lesser Antilles island arc, an arc system where there is compelling geochemical evidence for the superimposition of a crustal component onto mantle-derived magmas. A predominant mantle helium isotope signature is observed throughout the arc. The highest ratios coincide with MORB helium ({approximately}8R{sub A} where R{sub A} = air {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He) and occur towards the center of the arc (the islands of Martinique, Dominica, Guadeloupe, and Montserrat). In the south and north of the arc (Grenada, St. Vincent, St. Lucia in the south and Nevis and Saba in the north) {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He ratios are lower and lie between 4.9 and 6.8R{sub A}. This regional variation is also apparent in the carbon isotope systematics: the central portion of the arc (Martinique to Montserrat) have {delta}{sup 13}C(CO{sub 2}) values between {minus}2{per_thousand} and {minus}4{per_thousand} (vs PDB), heavier than the range observed in MORB ({minus}4 to {minus}9{per_thousand}). The south of the arc (Grenada to St. Lucia) is characterized by MORB-like carbon isotope ratios (centered on {minus}6{per_thousand}). CO{sub 2}/{sup 3}He ratios are significantly higher than the MORB value ({approximately}2 {times} 10{sup 9}) for the entire arc. The values in the central islands fall close to 10{sup 10} whereas the southern volcanoes have higher ratios between 10{sup 10}--10{sup 13}.

  1. Emission spectra analysis of arc plasma for synthesis of carbon nanostructures in various magnetic conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Li Jian; Kundrapu, Madhusudhan; Shashurin, Alexey; Keidar, Michael

    2012-07-15

    Arc discharge supported by the erosion of anode materials is one of the most practical and efficient methods to synthesize various high-quality carbon nanostructures. By introducing a non-uniform magnetic field in arc plasmas, high-purity single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) and large-scale graphene flakes can be obtained in a single step. In this paper, ultraviolet-visible emission spectra of arc in different spots under various magnetic conditions are analyzed to provide an in situ investigation for transformation processes of evaporated species and growth of carbon nanostructures in arc. Based on the arc spectra of carbon diatomic Swan bands, vibrational temperature in arc is determined. The vibrational temperature in arc center was measured around 6950 K, which is in good agreement with our simulation results. Experimental and simulation results suggest that SWCNT are formed in the arc periphery region. Transmission electronic microscope and Raman spectroscope are also employed to characterize the properties of carbon nanostructures.

  2. Carbon arc production of heptagon-containing fullerene[68

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Yuan-Zhi; Chen, Rui-Ting; Liao, Zhao-Jiang; Li, Jia; Zhu, Feng; Lu, Xin; Xie, Su-Yuan; Li, Jun; Huang, Rong-Bin; Zheng, Lan-Sun

    2011-01-01

    A carbon heptagon ring is a key unit responsible for structural defects in sp2-hybrized carbon allotropes including fullerenes, carbon nanotubes and graphenes, with consequential influences on their mechanical, electronic and magnetic properties. Previous evidence concerning the existence of heptagons in fullerenes has been obtained only in off-line halogenation experiments through top-down detachment of a C2 unit from a stable fullerene. Here we report a heptagon-incorporating fullerene C68, tentatively named as heptafullerene[68], which is captured as C68Cl6 from a carbon arc plasma in situ. The occurrence of heptagons in fullerenes is rationalized by heptagon-related strain relief and temperature-dependent stability. 13C-labelled experiments and mass/energy conservation equation simulations show that heptafullerene[68] grows together with other fullerenes in a bottom-up fashion in the arc zone. This work extends fullerene research into numerous topologically possible, heptagon-incorporating isomers and provides clues to an understanding of the heptagon-involved growth mechanism and heptagon-dependent properties of fullerenes. PMID:21829182

  3. Tracing magma sources in an arc-arc collision zone: Helium and carbon isotope and relative abundance systematics of the Sangihe Arc, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaffe, Lillie A.; Hilton, David R.; Fischer, Tobias P.; Hartono, Udi

    2004-04-01

    The Sangihe Arc is presently colliding with the Halmahera Arc in northeastern Indonesia, forming the world's only extant example of an arc-arc collision zone. We report the first helium and carbon isotopic and relative abundance data from the Sangihe Arc volcanoes as a means to trace magma origins in this complicated tectonic region. Results of this study define a north-south trend in 3He/4He, CO2/3He, and δ13C, suggesting that there are variations in primary magma source characteristics along the strike of the arc. The northernmost volcanoes (Awu and Karangetang) have higher CO2/3He and δ13C (up to 179 × 109 and -0.4‰, respectively) and lower 3He/4He (˜5.4 RA) than the southernmost volcanoes (Ruang, Lokon, and Mahawu). Resolving the arc CO2 into component structures (mantle-derived, plus slab-derived organic and carbonate CO2), the northern volcanoes contain an unusually high (>90%) contribution of CO2 derived from isotopically heavy carbonate associated with the subducting slab (sediment and altered oceanic basement). Furthermore, the overall slab contribution (CO2 of carbonate and organic origin) relative to carbon of mantle wedge origin is significantly enhanced in the northern segment of the arc. These observations may be caused by greater volumes of sediment subduction in the northern arc, along-strike variability in subducted sediment composition, or enhanced slab-derived fluid/melt production resulting from the superheating of the slab as collision progresses southward.

  4. Magnetically Diffused Radial Electric-Arc Air Heater Employing Water-Cooled Copper Electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayo, R. F.; Davis, D. D., Jr.

    1962-01-01

    A magnetically rotated electric-arc air heater has been developed that is novel in that an intense magnetic field of the order of 10,000 to 25,000 gauss is employed. This field is supplied by a coil that is connected in series with the arc. Experimentation with this heater has shown that the presence of an intense magnetic field transverse to the arc results in diffusion of the arc and that the arc has a positive effective resistance. With the field coil in series with the arc, highly stable arc operation is obtained from a battery power supply. External ballast is not required to stabilize the arc when it is operating at maximum power level. The electrode erosion rate is so low that the airstream contamination is no more than 0.07 percent and may be substantially less.

  5. Theory of the arc discharge in air blast breakers

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, H.F.

    1980-08-01

    The complete set of equations obtaining in the arc's length element are given. The arc length is determined when the external circuit equations are closed by an expression for the arc inductance as a function of the radius and length, in addition to our relationships for the radius and voltage gradients.

  6. Understanding High Recession Rates of Carbon Ablators Seen in Shear Tests in an Arc Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Driver, David M.; Olson, Michael W.; Barnhardt, Michael D.; MacLean, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    High rates of recession in arc jet shear tests of Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA) inspired a series of tests and analysis on FiberForm (a carbon preform used in the fabrication of PICA). Arc jet tests were performed on FiberForm in both air and pure nitrogen for stagnation and shear configurations. The nitrogen tests showed little or no recession, while the air tests of FiberForm showed recession rates similar to that of PICA (when adjusted for the difference in density). While mechanical erosion can not be ruled out, this is the first step in doing so. Analysis using a carbon oxidation boundary condition within DPLR was used to predict the recession rate of FiberForm. The analysis indicates that much of the anomalous recession behavior seen in shear tests may simply be an artifact of the non-flight like test configuration (copper upstream of the test article) a result of dissimilar enthalpy and oxygen concentration profiles on the copper. Shape change effects were also investigated and shown to be relatively small.

  7. Synthesis of multiwalled carbon nanotube from different grades of carbon black using arc discharge method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arora, Neha; Sharma, N. N.

    2016-04-01

    This paper describes the synthesis of nanotube from different grades (Tread * A(non-ASTM), N134,N121,N660 and N330)of carbon black using DC arc discharge method at 40A current for 60sec. Carbon black samples of different grades were procured from industry (Aditya Birla Science and Technology Limited, India). Scanning Electron Micrographs (SEM) of the deposited carbon nanostructures suggests that MWCNTs are formed at 40A and for a minimal exposure time of 60sec.The result formed indicates the N330 grade of carbon black gets converted to MWCNTs (Multiwall Carbon nanotube) as compared to other grades.

  8. Investigation on Plasma Jet Flow Phenomena During DC Air Arc Motion in Bridge-Type Contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Guofu; Bo, Kai; Chen, Mo; Zhou, Xue; Qiao, Xinlei

    2016-05-01

    Arc plasma jet flow in the air was investigated under a bridge-type contacts in a DC 270 V resistive circuit. We characterized the arc plasma jet flow appearance at different currents by using high-speed photography, and two polished contacts were used to search for the relationship between roughness and plasma jet flow. Then, to make the nature of arc plasma jet flow phenomena clear, a simplified model based on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theory was established and calculated. The simulated DC arc plasma was presented with the temperature distribution and the current density distribution. Furthermore, the calculated arc flow velocity field showed that the circular vortex was an embodiment of the arc plasma jet flow progress. The combined action of volume force and contact surface was the main reason of the arc jet flow. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 51307030, 51277038)

  9. Simulation and Experimental Analysis of Arc Motion Characteristics in Air Circuit Breaker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Chunping; Ding, Juwen; Wu, Yi; Yang, Fei; Dong, Delong; Fan, Xingyu; Rong, Mingzhe

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, to simulate the arc motion in an air circuit breaker (ACB), a three-dimensional magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) model is developed, considering the influence of thermal radiation, the change of physical parameters of arc plasma and the nonlinear characteristic of ferromagnetic material. The distributions of pressure, temperature, gas flow and current density of arc plasma in the arc region are calculated. The simulation results show some phenomena which discourage arc interruption, such as back commutation and arc burning at the back of the splitter plate. To verify the simulation model, the arc motion is studied experimentally. The influences of the material and position of the innermost barrier plate are analyzed mainly. It proved that the model developed in this paper can efficiently simulate the arc motion. The results indicate that the insulation barrier plate close to the top of the splitter plate is conducive to the arc splitting, which leads to the significant increase of the arc voltage, so it is better for arc interruption. The research can provide methods and references to the optimization of ACB design. supported by National Key Basic Research Program of China (973 Program) (Nos. 2015CB251002, 6132620303), National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 51221005, 51377128, 51577144), and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, China

  10. Influence of Plasma Jet Temperature Profiles in Arc Discharge Methods of Carbon Nanotubes Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Raniszewski, Grzegorz; Wiak, Slawomir; Pietrzak, Lukasz; Szymanski, Lukasz; Kolacinski, Zbigniew

    2017-01-01

    One of the most common methods of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) synthesis is application of an electric-arc plasma. However, the final product in the form of cathode deposit is composed of carbon nanotubes and a variety of carbon impurities. An assay of carbon nanotubes produced in arc discharge systems available on the market shows that commercial cathode deposits contain about 10% CNTs. Given that the quality of the final product depends on carbon–plasma jet parameters, it is possible to increase the yield of the synthesis by plasma jet control. Most of the carbon nanotubes are multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). It was observed that the addition of catalysts significantly changes the plasma composition, effective ionization potential, the arc channel conductance, and in effect temperature of the arc and carbon elements flux. This paper focuses on the influence of metal components on plasma-jet forming containing carbon nanotubes cathode deposit. The plasma jet temperature control system is presented. PMID:28336884

  11. Interaction of graphite and ablative materials with CO2-laser, carbon-arc, and xenon-arc radiation. M.S. Thesis - George Washington Univ., Washington, D. C.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewer, W. D.

    1975-01-01

    The behavior of graphite and several charring ablators in a variety of high radiative heat flux environments was studied in various radiative environments produced by a CO2 laser and a carbon arc facility. Graphite was also tested in xenon arc radiation. Tests were conducted in air nitrogen, helium, and a mixture of CO2 and nitrogen, simulating the Venus atmosphere. The experimental results are compared with theoretical results obtained with a one dimensional charring ablator analysis and a two dimensional subliming ablator analysis. Photomicroscopy showed no significant differences in appearance or microstructure of the charring ablators or graphite after testing in the three different facilities, indicating that the materials respond fundamentally the same to the radiation of different frequencies. The performance of phenolic nylon and graphite was satisfactorily predicted with existing analyses and published material property data.

  12. Hydrogen uptake in single-walled carbon nanotubes synthesized by the hydrogen arc plasma jet method.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno-Ruiz, L. A.; Ortiz-Lopez, J.; de Ita de La Torre, A.; Arellano-Peraza, J. S.; Flores-Díaz, G.

    2006-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes were synthesized by a modified electric arc discharge method under hydrogen atmosphere using a catalytic mixture of powders with composition C/Ni/Co/Fe/FeS. The samples were characterized with transmission and scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and thermo-gravimetric analysis. Unpurified samples contain 20 wt% of carbon nanotubes, 2 wt% of other forms of carbon and 78 wt% of catalytic metals. Adsorption/desorption of hydrogen in unpurified samples at atmospheric pressure measured with gravimetric methods was of the order of 2 wt%. Samples for these measurements were prepared with a three-step treatment: (i) oxidation in air for 30 min at 500 ^oC, (ii) ball- milling for 1 hr, and (iii) second oxidation in air for 30 min at 500 ^oC. This treatment was applied to eliminate other forms of carbon as well as to shorten the tubes and open their caps. Hydrogen desorption was also measured in degassed samples (400 ^oC for 20 min in vacuum) which adsorbed H2 while cooling to room temperature. Desorption in degassed/hydrogenated samples is a two-step process which we attribute to distinct desorption characteristics of nanotubes and of residual oxidized metal catalysts.

  13. Sensing and identification of carbon monoxide using carbon films fabricated by methane arc discharge decomposition technique

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Carbonaceous materials have recently received attention in electronic applications and measurement systems. In this work, we demonstrate the electrical behavior of carbon films fabricated by methane arc discharge decomposition technique. The current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of carbon films are investigated in the presence and absence of gas. The experiment reveals that the current passing through the carbon films increases when the concentration of CO2 gas is increased from 200 to 800 ppm. This phenomenon which is a result of conductance changes can be employed in sensing applications such as gas sensors. PMID:25177219

  14. The Influence of Contact Space on Arc Commutation Process in Air Circuit Breaker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Chunping; Ding, Juwen; Yang, Fei; Dong, Delong; Rong, Mingzhe; Xu, Dan

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, a 3D magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) arc simulation model is applied to analyze the arc motion during current interruption in a certain air circuit breaker (ACB). The distributions of pressure, temperature, gas flow and current density of the arc plasma in the arc region are calculated, and the factors influencing the commutation process are analyzed according to the calculated results. Based on the airflow in the arc chamber, the causes of arc commutation asynchrony and the back commutation are investigated. It indicates that a reasonable contact space design is crucial to a successful arc commutation process. To verify the simulation results, the influence of contact space on arc voltage and arc commutation is tested. This research can provide methods and references to the optimization of ACB design. supported by National Key Basic Research Program of China (973 Program) (Nos. 2015CB251002, 6132620303) and National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 51221005, 51377128, 51577144), and Science and Technology Project Through Grid State Corporation (No. SGSNKYOOKJJS1501564)

  15. Free Fall Plasma-Arc Reactor for Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alford, J. M.; Mason, G. R.; Feinkema, D. A.

    2006-01-01

    High temperatures inside the plasma of a carbon arc generate strong buoyancy driven convection which has an effect on the growth and morphology of the single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). To study the effect of buoyancy on the arc process, a miniature carbon arc apparatus was designed and developed to synthesize SWNTs in a microgravity environment substantially free from buoyant convective flows. An arc reactor was operated in the 2.2- and 5.18-second drop towers at the NASA Glenn Research Center. The apparatus employed a 4 mm diameter anode and was powered by a portable battery pack capable of providing in excess of 300 amps at 30 volts to the arc for the duration of a 5-second drop. However, the principal result is that no dramatic difference in sample yield or composition was noted between normal gravity, 2.2-and 5-second long microgravity runs.

  16. Cyclicity in Silurian island-arc carbonates, Alexander terrane, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Kittredge, L.E.; Soja, C.M. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-03-01

    Silurian carbonates from Alaska (Alexander terrane) record the evolution of a submarine platform during waning volcanism in an island arc. A detailed stratigraphic analysis of a 47 meter-thick sequence revealed the existence of cyclically repeated limestones: coral-stromatoporoid wackestones alternate with oncoid packstones and bioturbated, silty lime mudstones. The coral-stromatoporoid deposits are characterized by a low-diversity assemblage of dendroid corals, massive stromatoporoids, Atrypoidea brachiopods, and rare occurrences of biostromes associated with Solenopora, high-spired gastropods, and crinoids. Oncoids typically are 2-6 mm in diameter and form massive, meter-thick units. Coated grains are symmetrically developed, have a shell or algal nucleus, and are also a minor component of coral-stromatoporoid beds. These lithologic units form seven, shallowing-upwards cycles (parasequences) that range in thickness from 3-9 meters. Coral-stomatoporoid wackestones form the base of each cycle and grade upwards into oncoid packstones with silty, lime mudstones at the top. This succession of lithofacies within each cycle reflects an increase in energy levels from relatively deeper water environments to relatively shallower ones. The lack of abrasion in the corals and stromatoporoids suggests predominantly quiet-water conditions in shallow subtidal areas affected by periodic turbulence. Comparison with correlative sections in Alaska and lack of correspondence with global sea level curves suggest that the primary cause of cyclicity was tectonic perturbations with secondary eustatic effects. Cyclic deposition in peri/subtidal sites was terminated by rapid drowning of the carbonate platform during late Silurian orogenesis.

  17. 1. INTERIOR VIEW LOOKING NORTHWEST; ELECTRIC/INFRARED/CARBON ARC CUBICLES ON LEFT, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. INTERIOR VIEW LOOKING NORTHWEST; ELECTRIC/INFRARED/CARBON ARC CUBICLES ON LEFT, DOORS TO MUSCLE TRAINING GYMNASIUM ON RIGHT - Fort McCoy, Building No. T-1054, South side of South Tenth Avenue, Block 10, Sparta, Monroe County, WI

  18. Preparation of Arc Black and Carbon Nano Balloon by Arc Discharge and Their Application to a Fuel Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Takashi; Kaida, Shota; Satou, Tosiyuki; Suda, Yoshiyuki; Takikawa, Hirofumi; Tanoue, Hideto; Oke, Shinichiro; Ue, Hitoshi; Okawa, Takashi; Aoyagi, Nobuhiro; Shimizu, Kazuki

    2011-01-01

    Arc black (AcB) was prepared in N2 gas using the twin-torch arc discharge apparatus, and a hollow capsule with graphite layers named a carbon nano balloon (CNB) was obtained by heat treatment of the AcB in Ar gas at 2400 °C. Transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, and compressive resistivity measurement confirmed that the CNB was well graphitized. In the direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) application of these carbon nanomaterials, catalyst metal nanoparticles were supported on the AcB, and a membrane-electrode assembly (MEA) was formed from the catalyst-supported AcB and the CNB by hotpressing them on an electrolyte film. The MEA containing the CNB resulted in a higher DMFC performance than that without the CNB, indicating that the CNB with lower compressive resistivity than the AcB works as a material for the improvement of electric conductivity in an MEA.

  19. Filtered pulsed cathodic arc deposition of fullerene-like carbon and carbon nitride films

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, Mark D. Broitman, Esteban; Näslund, Lars-Åke; Hultman, Lars; Rosen, Johanna; Czigány, Zsolt

    2014-04-14

    Carbon and carbon nitride films (CN{sub x}, 0 ≤ x ≤ 0.26) were deposited by filtered pulsed cathodic arc and were investigated using transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. A “fullerene-like” (FL) structure of ordered graphitic planes, similar to that of magnetron sputtered FL-CN{sub x} films, was observed in films deposited at 175 °C and above, with N{sub 2} pressures of 0 and 0.5 mTorr. Higher substrate temperatures and significant nitrogen incorporation are required to produce similar FL structure by sputtering, which may, at least in part, be explained by the high ion charge states and ion energies characteristic of arc deposition. A gradual transition from majority sp{sup 3}-hybridized films to sp{sup 2} films was observed with increasing substrate temperature. High elastic recovery, an attractive characteristic mechanical property of FL-CN{sub x} films, is evident in arc-deposited films both with and without nitrogen content, and both with and without FL structure.

  20. Filtered pulsed cathodic arc deposition of fullerene-like carbon and carbon nitride films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, Mark D.; Czigány, Zsolt; Broitman, Esteban; Näslund, Lars-Åke; Hultman, Lars; Rosen, Johanna

    2014-04-01

    Carbon and carbon nitride films (CNx, 0 ≤ x ≤ 0.26) were deposited by filtered pulsed cathodic arc and were investigated using transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. A "fullerene-like" (FL) structure of ordered graphitic planes, similar to that of magnetron sputtered FL-CNx films, was observed in films deposited at 175 °C and above, with N2 pressures of 0 and 0.5 mTorr. Higher substrate temperatures and significant nitrogen incorporation are required to produce similar FL structure by sputtering, which may, at least in part, be explained by the high ion charge states and ion energies characteristic of arc deposition. A gradual transition from majority sp3-hybridized films to sp2 films was observed with increasing substrate temperature. High elastic recovery, an attractive characteristic mechanical property of FL-CNx films, is evident in arc-deposited films both with and without nitrogen content, and both with and without FL structure.

  1. Optical characterization of 193nm amorphous carbon ARC films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leng, Jingmin; Opsal, Jon; Pois, Heath

    2005-05-01

    In this study, the optical properties of amorphous carbon (aC) ARC films are investigated using an Opti-probe OP7341, and a metrology solution that robustly measures a broad range of process conditions is presented. We find that the aC material is consistent with uni-axial anisotropy, and that this effect may have important implications for photolithography. These results are obtained through the combination of multiple technologies in one tool: spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE); spectroscopic reflectometry or broadband (BB), with a wavelength range of 190-840 nm; single wavelength (673 nm) but multiple incident angle beam profile reflectometry (BPR) and beam profile ellipsometry (BPE), and single wavelength (633nm) absolute ellipsometry (AE). The combination of technologies at multiple angles and wavelengths provides additional optical information and sensitivity not possible with single-technology approaches. A complex wavelength dependent anisotropy model was developed for this analysis, and is compared with a real anisotropy model. The complex anisotropy model and the effective medium approximation (EMA) with two and three components were applied to a set of 12 wafer set with thickness swing aC films in the range of 500-750 Å as well as a second set of 23 pre- and post- etch wafers. The complex anisotropy model clearly has the advantage of best fit the BPR profiles along with the SE Fourier coefficients. The etch rate obtained by the complex anisotropy also showed a much narrower variation as compared with the EMA2 and EMA32 models with the real anisotropy.

  2. Island-arc carbonates: characterization and recognition in the ancient geologic record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soja, C. M.

    1996-10-01

    Carbonates of island-arc origin that are preserved in Paleozoic-Mesozoic terranes of the North American Cordillera exhibit a distinctive suite of paleontologic and lithologic features and share a fundamental similarity with limestones forming in modern volcanic arcs. This study provides the first detailed synthesis of carbonate depositional systems in island arcs and documents primary sedimentary constituents based on facies relationships and faunal communities. Models are developed that show patterns in the long-term evolution of shallow marine organisms and the construction, evolution, and demise of carbonate platforms in island arcs. A suite of criteria is identified that may be used to differentiate island-arc carbonates from limestones that accumulated in other platform settings. Biogeographic isolation, prolonged subsidence, steep submarine slopes and tectonic instability of volcanic edifices contribute to the development of relatively high levels of species endemism, impoverished normal marine faunas, complex provincial affinities, and relict biotas in limestones that are characterized by exceptionally thick platform and periplatform sequences, fringing and barrier reefs at the shelf margin, extensive lagoonal deposits and rapid lateral and vertical facies changes. Although destructive tectonic and geologic processes in island arcs may hinder determining the original size and extent of the carbonate platform, and particular facies types may not be represented (e.g., fringing and barrier reefs may be replaced by sand shoals at the platform, margin), many characteristics have potential value for identifying carbonates of island-arc origin in the ancient rock record. Apart from being associated with calc-alkaline volcanic and volcaniclastic assemblages, the most valuable suite of features for recognizing island-arc carbonates is marine biotas that exhibit elevated levels of endemism and mixed paleobiogeographic affinities, extraordinary thicknesses of platform

  3. Electrical characteristics and cathode deposit growth in an anodic arc producing carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keidar, Michael; Shashurin, Alexey; Raitses, Yevgeny

    2008-11-01

    Voltage-current (V-I) characteristics of the carbon nanotube producing anodic arc are measured for different gap sizes, anode compositions and background He pressures. It is shown that voltage-current characteristics has V-type shape and with increasing of the gap V-I characteristic shifts to the higher arc voltages, while minimum shifts to higher arc currents. The increasing the metallic catalyst fraction in the anode composition leads to slight decrease in the arc voltage and shifts the minimum position to higher arc currents. Such shape of the voltage current characteristics is explained by superposition of two effects: decreasing of the potential drop in the quasineutral plasma column and increasing of the anode potential drop with arc current. In addition two effects regarding cathode deposit growth in the anodic arc producing carbon nanotubes are reported. First, decreasing of the cathode deposit growth rate with interelectrode gap increase and second, increasing of the cathode deposit diameter with arc current increase. Both effects are explained by invoking the argument that the interelectrode plasma is necessary to trigger the growth of the cathode deposit.

  4. Production of Carbon Clusters by Means of Arc Discharge and Their Application 3.Carbon Nanotubes and Nanocapsules Produced by Arc Discharge and their Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Yahachi

    This paper characterizes and describes the growth of carbon nanotubes (multiwall and single-wall) and nanocapsules produced by electric arc discharge. For the preparation of multiwall nanotubes, an electrode of pure carbon is evaporated in helium gas, while single-wall nanotubes are produced with the aid of metal catalysts. When carbon is evaporated together with metals, carbon nanocages filled with fine metal particles (called “nanocapsules”) are produced in addition to single-wall nanotubes. The growth of nanotubes and nanocapsules is discussed. Finally, the application of nanotubes in a field emission electron source (cold cathode) is demonstrated.

  5. The layered structure of the carbon arc discharge plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vekselman, Vladislav; Stratton, Brentley; Raitses, Yevgeny; LaboratoryPlasma Nanosynthesis Team

    2016-10-01

    The arc discharge with a consumed anode is commonly used for synthesis of nanomaterials such as fullerenes, nanotubes and, more recently, graphene. The role of the arc plasma in nanosynthesis processes, including ablation of the graphite anode, nucleation and growth of nanostructures remains unclear. Our recent fast frame camera measurements revealed arc oscillations associated with the ablation processes at the anode. More sophisticated measurements using optical emission spectroscopy and spectrally resolved fast framing imaging revealed the complex, layered structure of plasma species distribution, which is dynamically changing. The results of this research include time- and space- resolved distributions of plasma species, plasma electron density and temperature. The obtained experimental data suggest a strong correlation between arc plasma parameters and nanosynthesis processes. This work was supported by US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences, Materials Sciences and Engineering Division.

  6. Ultrathin diamond-like carbon films deposited by filtered carbon vacuum arcs

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre; Fong, Walton; Kulkarni, Ashok; Ryan, Francis W.; Bhatia, C. Singh

    2001-07-13

    Ultrathin (< 5 nm) hard carbon films are of great interest to the magnetic storage industry as the areal density approaches 100 Gbit/in{sup 2}. These films are used as overcoats to protect the magnetic layers on disk media and the active elements of the read-write slider. Tetrahedral amorphous carbon films can be produced by filtered cathodic arc deposition, but the films will only be accepted by the storage industry only if the ''macroparticle'' issue has been solved. Better plasma filters have been developed over recent years. Emphasis is put on the promising twist filter system - a compact, open structure that operates with pulsed arcs and high magnetic field. Based on corrosion tests it is shown that the macroparticle reduction by the twist filter is satisfactory for this demanding application, while plasma throughput is very high. Ultrathin hard carbon films have been synthesized using S-filter and twist filter systems. Film properties such as hardness, elastic modulus, wear, and corrosion resistance have been tested.

  7. Synthesis of few-walled carbon nanotube-Rh nanoparticles by arc discharge: Effect of selective oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Yanfeng

    2012-06-15

    Highly crystalline rhodium (Rh) nanoparticles supported on carbon nanotubes were prepared by selective oxidation method. Carbon nanotubes and FeRh nanoparticles were simultaneously generated in hydrogen arc plasma. The as-grown nanomaterials can be purified by heat treatment in open air and by soaking in HCl. X-ray diffraction and selected area electron diffraction results reveal that as-grown FeRh nanoparticles have a typical chemical CsCl-type structure which can be transformed into a face-centered cubic structure by thermal annealing in the purification process. The purification process is selective toward the removal of the amorphous carbon coating the nanoparticles, and transforms Fe to Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} can be easily dissolved in hydrochloric acid, leaving carbon nanotubes-Rh nanoparticles. Rh nanoparticles with diameters of 2-60 nm are deposited uniformly on the surface of the carbon nanotube bundles. This simple and selective chemistry offers a new process for synthesizing and controlling Fe content in carbon nanotube-FeRh nanoparticles. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High-crystallinity CNTs and FeRh nanoparticles were simultaneously generated in arc plasma. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The diameter distribution of CNTs depends on different gases. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Heat treatment in open air and soaking in HCl can convert CNTs-FeRh to CNTs-Rh. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The selective oxidation mechanisms of metal nanoparticles and carbon materials differ.

  8. Some features of horizontally oriented low-current electric arc in air

    SciTech Connect

    Tazmeev, Kh. K.; Tazmeev, B. Kh.

    2016-01-15

    The properties of an electric arc operating in open air at currents of lower than 1 A were studied experimentally. The rod cathode was oriented horizontally. Cylindrical rods and plane plates either installed strictly vertically in front of the cathode end or tilted at a certain angle served as the anode. It is shown that, with such an electrode configuration, it is possible to form a discharge channel much longer than the electrode gap length. Regimes of regular oscillations are revealed, and conditions for their appearance are established. The electric field strength in the arc column and the electron temperature near the anode are calculated.

  9. Spectroscopic Diagnostics and an Arc Jet Heated Air Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mack, Larry Howard, Jr.

    1996-01-01

    Spectral radiation measurements were made in the range of 200 to 900 nm across a section of the plenum of an arc jet wind tunnel using a series of optical fibers. The spectra contained line radiation from Oxygen and Nitrogen atoms and molecular radiation from N2(+), N2, and NO. Abel inversion technique is used to obtain radial distribution of the spectra. The analysis yielded radial profiles of the electronic excitation, vibrational and rotational temperatures of the flow field. Spectral fitting yielded branching ratios for different vibrational and rotational bands. Relatively mild flow conditions, i.e. enthalpy and mass flow rate, were used for prolonged measurements of up to and over two hours to establish the best experimental methods of temperature determinations. Signal to noise was improved by at least an order of magnitude enabling the molecular vibrational band heads of N2(+) (first negative system), N2 (second positive system), and NO (beta, gamma, delta, and epsilon systems) to be resolved in the lower ultraviolet wavelength regions. The increased signal to noise ratio also enabled partial resolution of the rotational lines of N2(+) and N2 in certain regions of minimal overlap. Comparison of the spectra with theoretical models such as the NEQAIR2 code are presented and show potential for fitting the spectra when reliable calibration is performed for the complete wavelength range.

  10. The effect of calcination on multi-walled carbon nanotubes produced by dc-arc discharge.

    PubMed

    Pillai, Sreejarani K; Augustyn, Willem G; Rossouw, Margaretha H; McCrindle, Robert I

    2008-07-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes were synthesized by dc-arc discharge in helium atmosphere and the effect of calcination at different temperatures ranging from 300-600 degrees C was studied in detail. The degree of degradation to the structural integrity of the multi-walled carbon nanotubes during the thermal process was studied by Raman spectroscopy, Scanning electron microscopy and High resolution transmission electron microscopy. The thermal behaviour of the as prepared and calcined samples was investigated by thermogravimetric analysis. Calcination in air at 400 degrees C for 2 hours was found to be an efficient and simple method to eliminate carbonaceous impurities from the nanotube bundles with minimal damage to the tube walls and length. The impurities were oxidized at a faster rate when compared to the nanotubes and gave good yield of about 50%. The nanotubes were observed to be damaged at temperature higher than 450 degrees C. The results show that this method is less destructive when compared liquid phase oxidation with 5 M HNO3.

  11. The morphology of carbon-metal composite synthesized in arc discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smovzh, D. V.; Sakhapov, S. Z.; Zaikovskii, A. V.

    2016-10-01

    The phase state of nanoparticles and function of distribution by size of particles, formed at joint electric arc spraying of metal (Ni/Cu/Ti/Pt/Zr) - carbon electrode, is studied. It is shown that the metal and carbide nanoparticles with the size of 2-9 nm are formed in the carbon matrix at spraying. When annealing the metal-carbon composites, the metal-containing nanoparticles oxidize and coagulate, forming the agglomerates of 100 nm or more.

  12. Experimental study of the heat transfer process of air around atmospheric arc plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salimi Meidanshahi, F.; Madanipour, Kh.; Shokri, Babak

    2011-05-01

    The experimental investigation of thermodynamic properties such heat and mass transfer of plasmas has many applications in different industries. Laboratory atmospheric arc plasma is studied in this work. The refractive index of the air around the plasma is changed because of convection phenomena. When the convection creates the air flowing around the plasma, the density and consequently, the refractive index of air are distributed symmetrically. Moiré deflectometry is a technique of wave front analysis which in both Talbot effect and moiré technique is applied for measuring phase objects. Deflection of light beam passing through the inhomogeneous medium is utilized to obtain the refractive index distribution. In experimental set-up, an expanded collimated He-Ne laser propagate through the arc plasma and the around air. The temperature distribution is obtained by use of thermo-optic coefficient of air. To calculate the thermo- optic coefficient and the refractive index of air for a given wavelength of light and given atmospheric conditions (air temperature, pressure, and humidity), the Edlén equation is used. The convective heat transfer coefficient is obtained by calculating the temperature gradient on the plasma border. This method is not expensive, complicated and sensitive to environmental vibrations.

  13. In situ analysis of formation of carbon nanostructures in arc discharge by optical spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jian; Hwangbo, George; Shashurin, Alexey; Keidar, Michael

    2011-10-01

    Arc discharge supported by the erosion of anode materials is one of the most practical and efficient methods to synthesize various high-quality carbon nanostructures due to its relatively high growth temperature. By introducing a non- uniform magnetic field with the component normal to arc current, graphene flakes and single-walled carbon nanotubes can be synthesized in one step. In contrast to the growth processes without magnetic field, the magnetically-enhanced arc is confined by the Lorentz force, which generates the plasma jet and makes effective delivery of carbon particles and heat flux. However, there are still unresolved questions concerning the location of the region of nanoparticle synthesis and growth steps of carbon nanostructures. In this work we carried out in situ analysis of the optical spectrum which can provide a unique investigation of the different transformation processes of the carbon and metal catalyst vapors generated from the vaporization of the anode in arc. The experiments were taken for various electrode gaps and different conditions of external magnetic field. Moreover, SEM, TEM, EDX and Raman spectroscopy were employed to characterize the properties of carbon nanotubes and graphene.

  14. In situ analysis of formation of carbon nanostructures in arc discharge by optical spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jian; Hwangbo, George; Shashurin, Alexey; Keidar, Michael

    2011-10-01

    Arc discharge supported by the erosion of anode materials is one of the most practical and efficient methods to synthesize various high-quality carbon nanostructures due to its relatively high growth temperature. By introducing a non-uniform magnetic field with the component normal to arc current, graphene flakes and single-walled carbon nanotubes can be synthesized in one step. In contrast to the growth processes without magnetic field, the magnetically-enhanced arc is confined by the Lorentz force, which generates the plasma jet and makes effective delivery of carbon particles and heat flux. However, there are still unresolved questions concerning the location of the region of nanoparticle synthesis and growth steps of carbon nanostructures. In this work we carried out in situ analysis of the optical spectrum which can provide a unique investigation of the different transformation processes of the carbon and metal catalyst vapors generated from the vaporization of the anode in arc. The experiments were taken for various electrode gaps and different conditions of external magnetic field. Moreover, SEM, TEM, EDX and Raman spectroscopy were employed to characterize the properties of carbon nanotubes and graphene.

  15. The Modification of Carbon with Iron Oxide Synthesized in Electrolysis Using the Arc Discharge Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endah Saraswati, Teguh; Dewi Indah Prasiwi, Oktaviana; Masykur, Abu; Handayani, Nestri; Anwar, Miftahul

    2017-02-01

    The modification of carbon-based nanomaterials with metals is widely studied due to its unique properties. Here, the modification of carbon nanomaterial with iron oxide has been successfully carried out. This modification was achieved using arc discharge in 50% ethanol liquid media. The anode used in the arc discharge was prepared from a mixture of carbon and iron oxide that was synthesized in electrolysis and was then calcined at 250°C with silicon binder with a mass ratio of 3:1:1, and the cathode used was graphite rod. Both electrodes were set in the nearest gap that could provide an arc during arc-discharging, leading to carbon-based nanoparticle formation. The diffractogram pattern of the X-ray diffraction of the fabricated nanoparticles confirmed the typical peak of carbon, iron oxide and iron. The magnetization value of the result analysis of the vibrating sample magnetometer was 9.9 emu/g. The bandgap energy measurement using diffuse reflectance ultra violet was estimated to be 2.18 eV. Using the transmission electron microscopy, the structure of the nanomaterial produced was observed as carbon-encapsulated iron compound nanoparticles.

  16. Non-Intrusive Magneto-Optic Detecting System for Investigations of Air Switching Arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Pengfei; Zhang, Guogang; Dong, Jinlong; Liu, Wanying; Geng, Yingsan

    2014-07-01

    In current investigations of electric arc plasmas, experiments based on modern testing technology play an important role. To enrich the testing methods and contribute to the understanding and grasping of the inherent mechanism of air switching arcs, in this paper, a non-intrusive detecting system is described that combines the magneto-optic imaging (MOI) technique with the solution to inverse electromagnetic problems. The detecting system works in a sequence of main steps as follows: MOI of the variation of the arc flux density over a plane, magnetic field information extracted from the magneto-optic (MO) images, arc current density distribution and spatial pattern reconstruction by inverting the resulting field data. Correspondingly, in the system, an MOI set-up is designed based on the Faraday effect and the polarization properties of light, and an intelligent inversion algorithm is proposed that involves simulated annealing (SA). Experiments were carried out for high current (2 kA RMS) discharge cases in a typical low-voltage switchgear. The results show that the MO detection system possesses the advantages of visualization, high resolution and response, and electrical insulation, which provides a novel diagnostics tool for further studies of the arc.

  17. The behaviour of arcs in carbon mixed-mode high-power impulse magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, M. D.; Putman, K. J.; Ganesan, R.; Lattemann, M.; Stueber, M.; Ulrich, S.; Bilek, M. M. M.; McKenzie, D. R.; Marks, N. A.

    2017-04-01

    Mixed-mode deposition of carbon is an extension of high-power impulse magnetron sputtering in which a short-lived arc is deliberately allowed to ignite on the target surface to increase the ionised fraction of carbon in the deposition flux. Here we investigate the ignition and evolution of these arcs and examine their behaviour for different conditions of argon pressure, power supply voltage, and current. We find that mixed-mode deposition is sensitive to the condition of the target surface, and changing the operating parameters causes changes in the target surface condition which themselves affect the discharge in a process of negative feedback. Initially the arcs are evenly distributed on the target racetrack, but after a long period of operation the mode of erosion changes and arcs become localised in a small region, resulting in a pronounced nodular structure. We also quantify macroparticle generation and observe a power-law size distribution typical of arc discharges. Fewer particles are generated for operation at lower Ar pressure when the arc spot velocity is higher.

  18. Highly stable carbon nanotube field emitters on small metal tips against electrical arcing

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) field emitters that exhibit extremely high stability against high-voltage arcing have been demonstrated. The CNT emitters were fabricated on a sharp copper tip substrate that produces a high electric field. A metal mixture composed of silver, copper, and indium micro- and nanoparticles was used as a binder to attach CNTs to the substrate. Due to the strong adhesion of the metal mixture, CNTs were not detached from the substrate even after many intense arcing events. Through electrical conditioning of the as-prepared CNT emitters, vertically standing CNTs with almost the same heights were formed on the substrate surface and most of loosely bound impurities were removed from the substrate. Consequently, no arcing was observed during the normal operation of the CNT emitters and the emission current remained constant even after intentionally inducing arcing at current densities up to 70 mA/cm2. PMID:23953847

  19. Free fall plasma-arc reactor for synthesis of carbon nanotubes in microgravity

    SciTech Connect

    Alford, J. M.; Mason, G. R.; Feikema, D. A.

    2006-07-15

    High temperatures inside the plasma of a carbon arc generate strong buoyancy driven convection which has an effect on the growth and morphology of the single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). To study the effect of buoyancy on the arc process, a miniature carbon arc apparatus was designed and developed to synthesize SWNTs in a microgravity environment substantially free from buoyant convective flows. An arc reactor was operated in the 2.2 and 5.18 s drop towers at the NASA Glenn Research Center. The apparatus employed a 4 mm diameter anode and was powered by a portable battery pack capable of providing in excess of 300 A at 30 V to the arc for the duration of a 5 s drop. However, the principal result is that no dramatic difference in sample yield or composition was noted between normal gravity and 2.2 and 5 s long microgravity runs. Much longer duration microgravity time is required for SWNT's growth such as the zero-G aircraft, but more likely will need to be performed on the international space station or an orbiting spacecraft.

  20. Free fall plasma-arc reactor for synthesis of carbon nanotubes in microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alford, J. M.; Mason, G. R.; Feikema, D. A.

    2006-07-01

    High temperatures inside the plasma of a carbon arc generate strong buoyancy driven convection which has an effect on the growth and morphology of the single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). To study the effect of buoyancy on the arc process, a miniature carbon arc apparatus was designed and developed to synthesize SWNTs in a microgravity environment substantially free from buoyant convective flows. An arc reactor was operated in the 2.2 and 5.18s drop towers at the NASA Glenn Research Center. The apparatus employed a 4mm diameter anode and was powered by a portable battery pack capable of providing in excess of 300A at 30V to the arc for the duration of a 5s drop. However, the principal result is that no dramatic difference in sample yield or composition was noted between normal gravity and 2.2 and 5s long microgravity runs. Much longer duration microgravity time is required for SWNT's growth such as the zero-G aircraft, but more likely will need to be performed on the international space station or an orbiting spacecraft.

  1. CARBON ADSORPTION FOR INDOOR AIR CLEANING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses the use of carbon adsorption for indoor air cleaning, focusing on the removal of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) using granular activated carbon (GAC). It addresses GAC performance in two directions. Initially, it presents performance measurements for GAC at...

  2. Analysis of the characteristics of DC nozzle arcs in air and guidance for the search of SF6 replacement gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J.; Zhang, Q.; Yan, J. D.; Zhong, J.; Fang, M. T. C.

    2016-11-01

    It is shown that the arc model based on laminar flow cannot predict satisfactorily the voltage of an air arc burning in a supersonic nozzle. The Prandtl mixing length model (PML) and a modified k-epsilon turbulence model (MKE) are used to introduce turbulence enhanced momentum and energy transport. Arc voltages predicted by these two turbulence models are in good agreement with experiments at the stagnation pressure (P 0) of 10 bar. The predicted arc voltages by MKE for P 0  =  13 bar and 7 bar are in better agreement with experiments than those predicted by PML. MKE is therefore a preferred turbulence model for an air nozzle arc. There are two peaks in ρC P of air at 4000 K and 7000 K due, respectively, to the dissociation of oxygen and that of nitrogen. These peaks produce corresponding peaks in turbulent thermal conductivity, which results in very broad radial temperature profile and a large arc radius. Thus, turbulence indirectly enhances axial enthalpy transport, which becomes the dominant energy transport process for the overall energy balance of the arc column at high currents. When the current reduces, turbulent thermal conduction gradually becomes dominant. The temperature dependence of ρC P has a decisive influence on the radial temperature profile of a turbulent arc, thus the thermal interruption capability of a gas. Comparison between ρC P for air and SF6 shows that ρC P for SF6 has peaks below 4000 K. This renders a distinctive arc core and a small arc radius for turbulent SF6, thus superior arc quenching capability. It is suggested, for the first time, that ρC P provides guidance for the search of a replacement switching gas for SF6.

  3. Optoelectronically automated system for carbon nanotubes synthesis via arc-discharge in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bera, Debasis; Brinley, Erik; Kuiry, Suresh C.; McCutchen, Matthew; Seal, Sudipta; Heinrich, Helge; Kabes, Bradley

    2005-03-01

    The method of arc discharge in the solution is unique and inexpensive route for synthesis of the carbon nanotubes (CNTs), carbon onions, and other carbon nanostructures. Such a method can be used for in situ synthesis of CNTs decorated with nanoparticles. Herein, we report a simple and inexpensive optoelectronically automated system for arc discharge in solution synthesis of CNTs. The optoelectronic system maintains a constant gap between the two electrodes allowing a continuous synthesis of the carbon nanostructures. The system operates in a feedback loop consisting of an electrode-gap detector and an analog electronic unit, as controller. This computerized feeding system of the anode was used for in situ nanoparticles incorporated CNTs. For example, we have successfully decorated CNTs with ceria, silica, and palladium nanoparticles. Characterizations of nanostructures are performed using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, scanning transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy.

  4. THE REMOVAL OF CARBON/BEUTERIUM FROM STAINLESS STEEL AND TUNGSTEN BY TRANSFERRED-ARC CLEANING

    SciTech Connect

    K. J. HOLLIS; R. G. CASTRO; ET AL

    2001-04-01

    Tungsten and stainless steel samples have been contaminated with deuterium and carbon to simulate deposited layers in magnetic-confinement fusion devices. Deuterium and carbon were co-deposited onto the sample surfaces using a deuterium plasma seeded with varying amounts of deuterated methane. Deuterium was also implanted into the samples in an accelerator to simulate hydrogen isotope ion implantation conditions in magnetic confinement fusion devices. Cathodic arc, or transferred-arc (TA) cleaning was employed to remove the deposits from the samples. The samples were characterized by ion beam analysis both before and after cleaning to determine deuterium and carbon concentrations present. The deuterium content was greatly reduced by the cleaning thus demonstrating the possibility of using the TA cleaning technique for removing deuterium and/or tritium from components exposed to D-T fuels. Removal of surface layers and significant reduction of subsurface carbon concentrations was also observed.

  5. Increasing the length of single-wall carbon nanotubes in a magnetically enhanced arc discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keidar, Michael; Levchenko, Igor; Arbel, Tamir; Alexander, Myriam; Waas, Anthony M.; Ostrikov, Kostya (Ken)

    2008-01-01

    It is demonstrated that a magnetic field has a profound effect on the length of a single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) synthesized in the arc discharge. The average length of SWCNT increases by a factor of 2 in discharge with magnetic field as compared with the discharge without magnetic field, and the yield of long nanotubes with lengths above 5μm also increases. A model of SWCNT growth on metal catalyst in arc plasma was developed. Monte-Carlo simulations confirm that the increase of the plasma density in the magnetic field leads to an increase in the nanotube growth rate and thus leads to longer nanotubes.

  6. Carbon adsorption for indoor air cleaning

    SciTech Connect

    VanOsdell, D.W.; Sparks, L.E.

    1995-02-01

    Gas-phase air filtration equipment (GPAFE) has been applied for many years to control industrial gaseous contaminants. Interest in cleaning recirculation air to provide ventilation without the need to condition excessive outdoor air has promoted increased interest in GPAFE as indoor air control devices. The removal of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) using granular activated carbon (GAC) is the focus of this article. First, the authors present performance measurements for GAC at low challenge VOC concentrations that might be encountered indoors. Unlike previously reported tests, these were continued long enough to directly determine the GAC`s expected lifetime. The results suggest that test results obtained at high challenge concentrations may be extrapolated to low, indoor concentrations. Further study is needed, but these data are encouraging. Second, they will discuss the implications of these performance measurements for the use of GAC to remove VOCs and improve indoor air quality (IAQ) using an indoor air building simulation model.

  7. Preparation and investigation of diamond-like carbon stripper foils by filtered cathodic vacuum arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Qiwen; Du, Yinghui; Zhang, Rong; Xu, Guoji

    2013-04-01

    Thin diamond-like carbon (DLC) stripper foils ˜5 μg/cm2 in thickness were produced and evaluated as heavy-ion strippers for the Beijing HI-13 Tandem Accelerator. The DLC layers ˜4 μg/cm2 in thickness were produced by the filtered cathodic vacuum arc technology onto glass slides coated with betaine-saccharose as releasing agent, which were previously covered with evaporated carbon layers ˜1 μg/cm2 in thickness by the controlled ac arc-discharge method. Irradiation lifetimes of the DLC stripper foils were tested using the heavy-ion beams at the terminal of the Beijing HI-13 Tandem Accelerator, and compared with those of the standard carbon stripper foils made by the combined dc and ac arc-discharge method. The measurements indicate that the DLC stripper foils outlast the standard combined dc and ac arc-discharge carbon stripper foils by a factor of at least 13 and 4for the 197Au- (˜9 MeV, ˜1 μA) and 63Cu- (˜9 MeV, ˜1 μA) ion beams, respectively. The structure and properties of the DLC foils deposited onto silicon substrates by the filtered cathodic vacuum arc technology were also evaluated and analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The scanning electron microscopy images show that the DLC foils contain hardly droplets through the double 90° filters. The X-ray photoelectron spectrum indicates that sp3 bonds of the DLC foils exceed 70%. The integral intensity ratio of the D peak to the G peak (ID/IG) measured by the Raman spectroscopy is0.78.

  8. Growth of small diameter multi-walled carbon nanotubes by arc discharge process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    T. Chaudhary, K.; J., Ali; P. Yupapin, P.

    2014-03-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are grown by arc discharge method in a controlled methane environment. The arc discharge is produced between two graphite electrodes at the ambient pressures of 100 torr, 300 torr, and 500 torr. Arc plasma parameters such as temperature and density are estimated to investigate the influences of the ambient pressure and the contributions of the ambient pressure to the growth and the structure of the nanotubes. The plasma temperature and density are observed to increase with the increase in the methane ambient pressure. The samples of MWCNT synthesized at different ambient pressures are analyzed using transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. An increase in the growth of MWCNT and a decrease in the inner tube diameter are observed with the increase in the methane ambient pressure.

  9. Plasma treatment of aqueous solutes: Some chemical properties of a gliding arc in humid air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benstaali, B.; Moussa, D.; Addou, A.; Brisset, J.-L.

    1998-11-01

    The chemical properties of the gaseous species generated in a humid air gliding arc discharge are investigated. Aqueous solutions are used as the targets exposed to the plasma, and this allows to evidence strong acid and oxidizing effects on various solutes by means of spectrometric or potentiometric methods. The influence of some working parameters such as the input gas flow, the distance from the electrodes to the target or the electrode gap is examined on the chemical transform and simple experimental laws are derived. A general feature is observed for oxidation and suggests the occurrence of an auto-catalytic step in the relevant kinetic mechanism.

  10. A Controlled Arc Welding and Separation Processes for Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benavides, Jeannette; Shaw, Harry; Day, John H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Stage 1 for the Carbon Nanotube Project has been completed. This videograph presents the proposal for Stage 2. The goals of this stage are to: (1) produce CNTs under different conditions such as cooling temperature, voltage, current, cathode and anode sizes; (2) use ferrocene to make longer CNTs; (3) characterize CNTs by spectroscopic methods; (4) develop applications of CNTs, i.e., batteries, composites, wires, etc.; and (5) complete the patent application.

  11. Measurement of anode surface temperature in carbon nanomaterial production by arc discharge method

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Feng; Tanaka, Manabu; Choi, Sooseok; Watanabe, Takayuki

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • We measured the temperature of anode surface by two-color pyrometry combined with a high speed camera successfully. • Growth temperature of pyrolytic graphite, MWNTs, and nano-graphite particles were in ranges of 2400–2600 K, 2600–2700 K, and 2700–3500 K, respectively. • High temperature contributes to form thermodynamically unstable material. - Abstract: Nano-graphite particles, multi-wall carbon nanotube (MWNT), and pyrolytic graphite were prepared at different positions of the anode surface in an arc discharge. Graphite electrodes were employed for the arc discharge under helium environment at atmospheric pressure. Nano-sized carbon products were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. During the arc discharge, two-color pyrometry combined with a high-speed camera was conducted to measure the temperature distribution of the anode surface. The growth temperature of pyrolytic graphite, MWNT, and nano-graphite particles were in the ranges of 2400–2600 K, 2600–2700 K, and 2700–3500 K, respectively. The local temperature of anode surface is a critical parameter to determine the products with different morphologies. The formation mechanism of these carbon nanomaterials is suggested based on the local temperature of anode surface and their thermodynamic stability.

  12. Erosion of carbon arc cathodes operating in the thermo-field electron emission mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meunier, Jean-Luc; Coulombe, Sylvain; Kandah, Munther

    2007-02-01

    Steady-state modelling and experimental results are given on the electric arc attachment on cold carbon cathodes working at low pressure. The modelling results are compared with the case of copper cathodes and with experimental data on vacuum arc erosion characteristics for graphite materials. A region of existence of a physically meaningful solution for self-sustained operation of the steady-state cathode spot is given in the electron temperature-cathode spot plasma pressure space. A solution domain comprised between Te ap 1.2-1.5 eV and pap 2-45 atm corresponding to carbon surface temperatures in the range 4200-4900 K is found. Values of the local heat flux to the cathode surface are evaluated in the range 1-20 × 1010 W m-2, and ratios of the various contributions to this flux and current density are given. Also given are the cathode spot radii and upper/lower limits for the erosion rate through vapourization, these being compared with experimental data. It is shown that the cathode spot pressure conditions can provide a mechanism for the control of macroparticle emission on carbon. This effect is used experimentally through cathode spot plasma confinement for the reduction of the microdroplet emission in arc sources used for diamondlike film deposition. Experimental data obtained on graphite materials are in agreement with the model-based design guidelines.

  13. Carbon dioxide, ground air and carbon cycling in Gibraltar karst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattey, D. P.; Atkinson, T. C.; Barker, J. A.; Fisher, R.; Latin, J.-P.; Durrell, R.; Ainsworth, M.

    2016-07-01

    We put forward a general conceptual model of CO2 behaviour in the vadose zone of karst aquifers, based on physical principles of air flow through porous media and caves, combined with a geochemical interpretation of cave monitoring data. This 'Gibraltar model' links fluxes of water, air and carbon through the soil with the porosity of the vadose zone, the circulation of ground air and the ventilation of caves. Gibraltar hosts many natural caves whose locations span the full length and vertical range of the Rock. We report results of an 8-year monitoring study of carbon in soil organic matter and bedrock carbonate, dissolved inorganic carbon in vadose waters, and gaseous CO2 in soil, cave and ground air. Results show that the regime of cave air CO2 results from the interaction of cave ventilation with a reservoir of CO2-enriched ground air held within the smaller voids of the bedrock. The pCO2 of ground air, and of vadose waters that have been in close contact with it, are determined by multiple factors that include recharge patterns, vegetation productivity and root respiration, and conversion of organic matter to CO2 within the soil, the epikarst and the whole vadose zone. Mathematical modelling and field observations show that ground air is subject to a density-driven circulation that reverses seasonally, as the difference between surface and underground temperatures reverses in sign. The Gibraltar model suggests that cave air pCO2 is not directly related to CO2 generated in the soil or the epikarstic zone, as is often assumed. Ground air CO2 formed by the decay of organic matter (OM) washed down into the deeper unsaturated zone is an important additional source of pCO2. In Gibraltar the addition of OM-derived CO2 is the dominant control on the pCO2 of ground air and the Ca-hardness of waters within the deep vadose zone. The seasonal regime of CO2 in cave air depends on the position of a cave in relation to the density-driven ground air circulation pattern which

  14. Electric arc surfacing on low carbon steel: Structure and properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Yurii; Gromov, Victor; Kormyshev, Vasilii; Konovalov, Sergey; Kapralov, Evgenii; Semin, Alexander

    2016-11-01

    By the methods of modern materials science, the structure-phase state and microhardness distribution along the cross-section of single and double coatings surfaced on martensite low carbon steel by alloy powder-cored wire were studied. It was established that the increased mechanical properties of surfaced layer are determined by the sub-micro and nanodispersed martensite structure formation, containing iron borides forming the eutectic of lamellar form. The plates of Fe2B are formed mainly in the eutectic of a single-surfaced layer, while FeB is formed in a double-surfaced layer. The existence of bend extinction contours indicating the internal stress fields formation at the boundaries of Fe borides-α-Fe phases were revealed.

  15. The Bacterial Response Regulator ArcA Uses a Diverse Binding Site Architecture to Regulate Carbon Oxidation Globally

    PubMed Central

    Park, Dan M.; Akhtar, Md. Sohail; Ansari, Aseem Z.; Landick, Robert; Kiley, Patricia J.

    2013-01-01

    Despite the importance of maintaining redox homeostasis for cellular viability, how cells control redox balance globally is poorly understood. Here we provide new mechanistic insight into how the balance between reduced and oxidized electron carriers is regulated at the level of gene expression by mapping the regulon of the response regulator ArcA from Escherichia coli, which responds to the quinone/quinol redox couple via its membrane-bound sensor kinase, ArcB. Our genome-wide analysis reveals that ArcA reprograms metabolism under anaerobic conditions such that carbon oxidation pathways that recycle redox carriers via respiration are transcriptionally repressed by ArcA. We propose that this strategy favors use of catabolic pathways that recycle redox carriers via fermentation akin to lactate production in mammalian cells. Unexpectedly, bioinformatic analysis of the sequences bound by ArcA in ChIP-seq revealed that most ArcA binding sites contain additional direct repeat elements beyond the two required for binding an ArcA dimer. DNase I footprinting assays suggest that non-canonical arrangements of cis-regulatory modules dictate both the length and concentration-sensitive occupancy of DNA sites. We propose that this plasticity in ArcA binding site architecture provides both an efficient means of encoding binding sites for ArcA, σ70-RNAP and perhaps other transcription factors within the same narrow sequence space and an effective mechanism for global control of carbon metabolism to maintain redox homeostasis. PMID:24146625

  16. Carbonate assimilation during magma evolution at Nisyros (Greece), South Aegean Arc: Evidence from clinopyroxenite xenoliths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spandler, Carl; Martin, Lukas H. J.; Pettke, Thomas

    2012-08-01

    To contribute to the understanding of magma evolution in arc settings we investigate the oldest volcanic unit (Kanafià Synthem) of Nisyros volcano, located in the eastern Aegean Sea (Greece). The unit consists of porphyritic pillow lavas of basaltic andesite composition with trace element signatures that are characteristic of island-arc magmas. Two lava types are distinguished on the basis of geochemistry and the presence or absence of xenoliths, with the xenolith-bearing lavas having distinctly elevated Sr, MREE/HREE and MgO/Fe2O3 compared to the xenolith-free lavas. Xenoliths include relatively rare quartzo-feldspathic fragments that represent continental-type material, and coarse clinopyroxenite xenoliths that consist largely of aluminous and calcic clinopyroxene, and accessory aluminous spinel. Anorthite-diopside reaction selvages preserved around the clinopyroxenite xenoliths demonstrate disequilibrium between the xenoliths and the host magma. The xenolith clinopyroxene is distinctly enriched in most lithophile trace elements compared to clinopyroxene phenocrysts in the host magmas. A notable exception is the Sr concentration, which is similar in both clinopyroxene types. The high Al and low Na contents of the clinopyroxenites preclude a cumulate, deep metamorphic, or mantle origin for these xenoliths. Instead, their composition and mineralogy are diagnostic of skarn rocks formed by magma-carbonate interaction in the mid/upper crust. The Kanafià lavas are interpreted to have undergone crystal fractionation, magma mixing/mingling and crustal assimilation while resident in the upper crust. We show that magma-carbonate reaction and associated skarn formation does not necessarily result in easily recognised modification of the melt composition, with the exception of increasing Sr contents. Carbonate assimilation also releases significant CO2, which will likely form a free vapour phase due to the low CO2 solubility of arc magmas. In the broader context, we stress

  17. Defect studies on as-synthesized and purified carbon nanostructures produced by arc-discharge in solution process.

    PubMed

    Bera, Debasis; Perrault, Jean-Philippe; Heinrich, Helge; Seal, Sudipta

    2006-04-01

    Carbon nanostructures are synthesized using a novel arc-discharge in solution process. A multitude of defects on nanotubes and nanostructures is found. Evidence of these defects in as-synthesized carbon nanostructures is explored using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). Tri-, tetra-, penta-, hexa-, heptagonal, toroidal, oval, and spherical nanoshells are found in HRTEM investigation along with carbon nanotubes, carbon nanohorns, carbon rods, nanoporous carbon, dislodged graphene sheets, and amorphous carbon. Purifications are carried out through two oxidation methods to eliminate the amorphous carbon. Several different defects caused by oxidations are also found in purified samples.

  18. Copper induced hollow carbon nanospheres by arc discharge method: controlled synthesis and formation mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Rui; Alexandru Ciolan, Mihai; Wang, Xiangke; Nagatsu, Masaaki

    2016-08-01

    Hollow carbon nanospheres with controlled morphologies were synthesized via the copper-carbon direct current arc discharge method by alternating the concentrations of methane in the reactant gas mixture. A self-healing process to keep the structural integrity of encapsulated graphitic shells was evolved gradually by adding methane gas from 0% to 20%. The outer part of the coated layers expanded and hollow nanospheres grew to be large fluffy ones with high methane concentrations from 30% to 50%. A self-repairing function by the reattachment of broken graphitic layers initiated from near-electrode space to distance was also distinctly exhibited. By comparing several comparable metals (e.g. copper, silver, gold, zinc, iron and nickel)-carbon arc discharge products, a catalytic carbon-encapsulation mechanism combined with a core-escaping process has been proposed. Specifically, on the basis of the experimental results, copper could be applied as a unique model for both the catalysis of graphitic encapsulation and as an adequate template for the formation of hollow nanostructures.

  19. Quantifying and understanding carbon storage and sequestration within the Eastern Arc Mountains of Tanzania, a tropical biodiversity hotspot

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Oliver L; Platts, Philip J; Balmford, Andrew; Burgess, Neil D; Lovett, Jon C; Ahrends, Antje; Bayliss, Julian; Doggart, Nike; Doody, Kathryn; Fanning, Eibleis; Green, Jonathan MH; Hall, Jaclyn; Howell, Kim L; Marchant, Rob; Marshall, Andrew R; Mbilinyi, Boniface; Munishi, Pantaleon KT; Owen, Nisha; Swetnam, Ruth D; Topp-Jorgensen, Elmer J; Lewis, Simon L

    2014-01-01

    Background The carbon stored in vegetation varies across tropical landscapes due to a complex mix of climatic and edaphic variables, as well as direct human interventions such as deforestation and forest degradation. Mapping and monitoring this variation is essential if policy developments such as REDD+ (Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation) are to be known to have succeeded or failed. Results We produce a map of carbon storage across the watershed of the Tanzanian Eastern Arc Mountains (33.9 million ha) using 1,611 forest inventory plots, and correlations with associated climate, soil and disturbance data. As expected, tropical forest stores more carbon per hectare (182 Mg C ha-1) than woody savanna (51 Mg C ha-1). However, woody savanna is the largest aggregate carbon store, with 0.49 Pg C over 9.6 million ha. We estimate the whole landscape stores 1.3 Pg C, significantly higher than most previous estimates for the region. The 95% Confidence Interval for this method (0.9 to 3.2 Pg C) is larger than simpler look-up table methods (1.5 to 1.6 Pg C), suggesting simpler methods may underestimate uncertainty. Using a small number of inventory plots with two censuses (n = 43) to assess changes in carbon storage, and applying the same mapping procedures, we found that carbon storage in the tree-dominated ecosystems has decreased, though not significantly, at a mean rate of 1.47 Mg C ha-1 yr-1 (c. 2% of the stocks of carbon per year). Conclusions The most influential variables on carbon storage in the region are anthropogenic, particularly historical logging, as noted by the largest coefficient of explanatory variable on the response variable. Of the non-anthropogenic factors, a negative correlation with air temperature and a positive correlation with water availability dominate, having smaller p-values than historical logging but also smaller influence. High carbon storage is typically found far from the commercial capital, in locations

  20. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes produced by direct current arc discharge in hydrogen gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jinno, M.; Bandow, S.; Ando, Y.

    2004-11-01

    Multiwalled carbon nanotubes were produced by direct current (DC) arc discharge in the mixture gas of H 2-N 2. Raman scattering spectroscopy was used to characterize the MWNTs. Radial breathing mode vibration signals were observed at 272 and 388 cm -1. Tangential mode vibration signal was observed at ≈1582 cm -1, and other intense signals were also observed at ≈1860 cm -1for the MWNTs produced in the gas with the H 2 contents exceeding 90%. DC arc discharge in pure D 2 was also carried out, by which it was confirmed that the peak position and intensity of the Raman signal at ≈1860 cm -1 were independent of whether the gas was H 2 or D 2. This suggests that the ≈1860 cm -1 band is not associated with hydrogen-based vibrations.

  1. Single-Wall Carbon Nanotube Production by the Arc Process: A Parametric Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Carl D.; Gorelik, Olga; Proft, William J.

    2000-01-01

    Single wall carbon nanotubes are produced using the arc discharge process. Graphite anodes are filled with a mixture of nickel and yttrium metallic powders, then vaporized by creating a high current arc. By varying the current, gap distance, and ambient pressure it is shown that the best yield of single wall carbon nanotubes is obtained within a narrow range of conditions. The relative yield and purity of the product are indicated semi-quantitatively from scanning electric microscopy (SEM) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Two types of anodes have been investigated. The first is hollow and filled with a powder mixture of graphite, nickel and yttrium. The second is filled with a paste made of a mixture of metal nitrates, graphite powder and carbon adhesive, then reduced in an argon atmosphere at high temperature. Product purity and yield will be compared for the two types of anodes. The graphite in the anodes may have hydrogen attached in the pores. To remove this impurity anodes have been baked up to 1400 - 1500 C. The effect of baking the anodes on impurities in the product will be given.

  2. Activated Carbon Composites for Air Separation

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Frederick S; Contescu, Cristian I; Tsouris, Costas; Burchell, Timothy D

    2011-09-01

    Coal-derived synthesis gas is a potential major source of hydrogen for fuel cells. Oxygen-blown coal gasification is an efficient approach to achieving the goal of producing hydrogen from coal, but a cost-effective means of enriching O2 concentration in air is required. A key objective of this project is to assess the utility of a system that exploits porous carbon materials and electrical swing adsorption to produce an O2-enriched air stream for coal gasification. As a complement to O2 and N2 adsorption measurements, CO2 was used as a more sensitive probe molecule for the characterization of molecular sieving effects. To further enhance the potential of activated carbon composite materials for air separation, work was implemented on incorporating a novel twist into the system; namely the addition of a magnetic field to influence O2 adsorption, which is accompanied by a transition between the paramagnetic and diamagnetic states. The preliminary findings in this respect are discussed.

  3. Helium and Carbon Relationships in Geothermal Fluids From the Central American arc in Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, A. M.; Hilton, D. R.; Fischer, T. P.; Zimmer, M. M.; Alvarado, G.

    2001-12-01

    A fundamental aim of arc-related studies is to quantify the flux of elements from the various subduction zone reservoirs: a) the mantle wedge, b) the overlying arc crust through which the magmas erupt and c) both the oceanic basement and sedimentary veneer of the subducting slab. In the case of estimating the CO2 mass balance at convergent margins, one approach has been to couple CO2 and He measurements (isotopes and relative abundances) which allows both identification and quantitative assessment of the various contributors to the magmatic output. The Central American arc presents a unique opportunity to consider the He-C approach given prior studies which show dramatic variations in the angle of subduction, the amount and type of sediments subducted and the crustal thickness. The Costa Rica subduction zone is particularly intriguing due to the pronounced steepening of the down-going slab to the north and the occurrence of carbonate rich sediments on the down-going plate. Here, we report 3He/4He ratios, He, Ne, and CO2 abundances as well as δ 13C values for volatiles from the volcanic output along the Costa Rican segment utilising fumaroles, geothermal wells, water springs and bubbling hot springs. The results from our study show the following: 1) 3He/4He ratios of the southern volcanoes (Turrialba, Irazu and Poas) are slightly higher (6.9-8.1 RA) than those of Miravalles and Rincon de la Vieja in the north (5.1-6.8 RA), 2) water spring samples show poor preservation of magmatic gases (low 3He/4He; very high CO2/3He) relative to other sampling media, 3) CO2/3He ratios range from 9.9-27 x 109 in the south to 13-78 x 109 in the north, and 4) δ 13C values trend from isotopically heavier values in the north ( ~ -1.0 ‰ at Rincon de la Vieja) to lighter more MORB-like values in the south ( ~ -6.1 ‰ at Poas volcano). The He-CO2 relationships are consistent with a large input of marine carbonate/limestone carbon to magma sources in Costa Rica. The average ratio of

  4. Purification and alignment of arc-synthesis single-walled carbon nanotube bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Houjin; Kajiura, Hisashi; Yamada, Atsuo; Ata, Masafumi

    2002-04-01

    We report here a scalable method for purification and alignment of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) in an aqueous solution. Arc-synthesis soot containing SWNTs is first treated with a concentrated nitric acid. After removal of most of the impurities and water, macroscopic and well-aligned SWNT bundles up to several centimeters long are formed in a rotary evaporator. Alignment of the SWNT bundles is ascribed to the liquid flow induced by rotary evaporation and van der Waals interactions among the bundles. The aligned SWNT bundles are further purified by ultrasonic Soxhlet extraction and annealing.

  5. Arc spraying of nano-structured wire on carbon steel: examination of coating microstructures

    SciTech Connect

    Al Askandarani, A.; Hashmi, M. S. J.; Yilbas, B. S.

    2011-01-17

    Arc spraying of nano-structured wire (TAFA 95MX) onto carbon steel is carried out. The workpieces coated were heat treated at temperature similar to the operating temperature of the hot-path components of power gas turbines. The morphological and microstructural changes in the coating are examined using optical and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). The surface roughness and microhardness of the resulting coatings are measured. It is found that the formation of dimples like structure at surface increased the surface roughness of the coating. The microhardness of the resulting coating is significantly higher than the base material hardness. Heat treatment does not alter the microstructure and microhardness of the coating.

  6. Mechanism of Synthesis of Ultra-Long Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes in Arc Discharge Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Keidar, Michael

    2013-06-23

    In this project fundamental issues related to synthesis of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), which is relationship between plasma parameters and SWNT characteristics were investigated. Given that among plasma-based techniques arc discharge stands out as very advantageous in several ways (fewer defects, high flexibility, longer lifetime) this techniques warrants attention from the plasma physics and plasma technology standpoint. Both experimental and theoretical investigations of the plasma and SWNTs synthesis were conducted. Experimental efforts focused on plasma diagnostics, measurements of nanostructures parameters, and nanoparticle characterization. Theoretical efforts focused to focus on multi-dimensional modeling of the arc discharge and single wall nanotube synthesis in arc plasmas. It was demonstrated in experiment and theoretically that controlling plasma parameters can affect nanostucture synthesis altering SWNT properties (length and diameter) and leading to synthesis of new structures such as a few-layer graphene. Among clearly identified parameters affecting synthesis are magnetic and electric fields. Knowledge of the plasma parameters and discharge characteristics is crucial for ability to control synthesis process by virtue of both magnetic and electric fields. New graduate course on plasma engineering was introduced into curriculum. 3 undergraduate students were attracted to the project and 3 graduate students (two are female) were involved in the project. Undergraduate student from Historically Black University was attracted and participated in the project during Summer 2010.

  7. Preparation and characterization of carbon nanofluid by a plasma arc nanoparticles synthesis system

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Heat dissipation from electrical appliances is a significant issue with contemporary electrical devices. One factor in the improvement of heat dissipation is the heat transfer performance of the working fluid. In this study, we used plasma arc technology to produce a nanofluid of carbon nanoparticles dispersed in distilled water. In a one-step synthesis, carbon was simultaneously heated and vaporized in the chamber, the carbon vapor and particles were then carried to a collector, where cooling furnished the desired carbon/water nanofluid. The particle size and shape were determined using the light-scattering size analyzer, SEM, and TEM. Crystal morphology was examined by XRD. Finally, the characterization include thermal conductivity, viscosity, density and electric conductivity were evaluated by suitable instruments under different temperatures. The thermal conductivity of carbon/water nanofluid increased by about 25% at 50°C compared to distilled water. The experimental results demonstrated excellent thermal conductivity and feasibility for manufacturing of carbon/water nanofluids. PMID:21711828

  8. Effect of cerium ions in an arc peripheral plasma on the growth of radial single-walled carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Y.; Motomiya, K.; Jeyadevan, B.; Tohji, K.; Sato, G.; Ishida, H.; Hirata, T.; Hatakeyama, R.

    2005-11-01

    Radial single-walled carbon nanotubes (radial SWCNTs) are formed by using a direct current (dc) arc discharge when carbon and metal atoms are mixed in a gas phase after the vaporization and cooled together in a liquid droplet. Since SWCNTs sprout through the precipitation of saturated carbon atoms from liquid droplets during cooling, a mass synthesis of radial SWCNTs can be achieved when a large number of liquid droplets are generated. In order to understand the effects of arc peripheral plasma parameters (electrons, ions, radical atoms, and molecules) on the growth of radial SWCNTs, the optimum production efficiency of radial SWCNTs is investigated by superimposing a radio-frequency (rf) plasma on the thermal arc plasma and controlling the arc peripheral plasma density. Two parameters--the rf power and the dc potential--of the rf electrode, which is equipped above 20 mm from the center of an arc-discharge point, are changed with the constant He pressure (200 Torr), dc arc current (75 A), and power (2000 W). The production yield of radial SWCNTs is found to be enhanced under the condition of the rf power of 100 W and the dc component of the rf electrode voltage of -22 V, revealing that the optimum ion flux and ion bombardment energy are important key parameters for the formation of radial SWCNTs.

  9. Effect of cerium ions in an arc peripheral plasma on the growth of radial single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Y.; Motomiya, K.; Jeyadevan, B.; Tohji, K.; Sato, G.; Ishida, H.; Hirata, T.; Hatakeyama, R.

    2005-11-01

    Radial single-walled carbon nanotubes (radial SWCNTs) are formed by using a direct current (dc) arc discharge when carbon and metal atoms are mixed in a gas phase after the vaporization and cooled together in a liquid droplet. Since SWCNTs sprout through the precipitation of saturated carbon atoms from liquid droplets during cooling, a mass synthesis of radial SWCNTs can be achieved when a large number of liquid droplets are generated. In order to understand the effects of arc peripheral plasma parameters (electrons, ions, radical atoms, and molecules) on the growth of radial SWCNTs, the optimum production efficiency of radial SWCNTs is investigated by superimposing a radio-frequency (rf) plasma on the thermal arc plasma and controlling the arc peripheral plasma density. Two parameters-the rf power and the dc potential-of the rf electrode, which is equipped above 20 mm from the center of an arc-discharge point, are changed with the constant He pressure (200 Torr), dc arc current (75 A), and power (2000 W). The production yield of radial SWCNTs is found to be enhanced under the condition of the rf power of 100 W and the dc component of the rf electrode voltage of -22 V, revealing that the optimum ion flux and ion bombardment energy are important key parameters for the formation of radial SWCNTs.

  10. Spatiotemporally resolved characteristics of a gliding arc discharge in a turbulent air flow at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jiajian; Gao, Jinlong; Ehn, Andreas; Aldén, Marcus; Larsson, Anders; Kusano, Yukihiro; Li, Zhongshan

    2017-01-01

    A gliding arc discharge was generated in a turbulent air flow at atmospheric pressure driven by a 35 kHz alternating current (AC) electric power. The spatiotemporally resolved characteristics of the gliding arc discharge, including glow-type discharges, spark-type discharges, short-cutting events and transitions among the different types of discharges, were investigated using simultaneously optical and electrical diagnostics. The glow-type discharge shows sinusoidal-like voltage and current waveforms with a peak current of hundreds of milliamperes. The frequency of the emission intensity variation of the glow-type discharge is the same as that of the electronic power dissipated in the plasma column. The glow-type discharge can transfer into a spark discharge characterized by a sharp peak current of several amperes and a sudden increase of the brightness in the plasma column. Transitions can also be found to take place from spark-type discharges to glow-type discharges. Short-cutting events were often observed as the intermediate states formed during the spark-glow transition. Three different types of short-cutting events have been observed to generate new current paths between two plasma channel segments, and between two electrodes, as well as between the channel segment and the electrodes, respectively. The short-cut upper part of the plasma column that was found to have no current passing through can be detected several hundreds of microseconds after the short-cutting event. The voltage recovery rate, the period of AC voltage-driving signal, the flow rates and the rated input powers were found to play an important role in affecting the transitions among the different types of discharges.

  11. Synthesis of Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes by Plasma Arc: Role of Plasma Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farhart, Samir; Scott, Carl D.

    2000-01-01

    Single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) are porous objects on the molecular scale and have a low density, which gives them potential applications as adsorbent for molecular hydrogen. Their H2 absorption capacity published in the literature varies from 4 to 10% by mass according to the purity of the materials and storage conditions. Optimization of production methods of SWNTs should permit improving these new materials for storage of hydrogen. In this article, we show the potential of using SWNTs in hydrogen storage. In particular, we pose problems associated with synthesis, purification, and opening up of the nanotubes. We present an electric arc process currently used at laboratory scale to produce single wall carbon nanotubes. We discuss, in particular, operating conditions that permit growth of nanotubes and some plasma parameters that assure control of the material. Analysis of the process is carried out with the aid of local measurements of temperature and scanning and transmission electron microscopy of the materials.

  12. Can We Optimize Arc Discharge and Laser Ablation for Well-Controlled Carbon Nanotube Synthesis?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Rasel; Shahnavaz, Zohreh; Ali, Md. Eaqub; Islam, Mohammed Moinul; Abd Hamid, Sharifah Bee

    2016-11-01

    Although many methods have been documented for carbon nanotube (CNT) synthesis, still, we notice many arguments, criticisms, and appeals for its optimization and process control. Industrial grade CNT production is urgent such that invention of novel methods and engineering principles for large-scale synthesis are needed. Here, we comprehensively review arc discharge (AD) and laser ablation (LA) methods with highlighted features for CNT production. We also display the growth mechanisms of CNT with reasonable grassroots knowledge to make the synthesis more efficient. We postulate the latest developments in engineering carbon feedstock, catalysts, and temperature cum other minor reaction parameters to optimize the CNT yield with desired diameter and chirality. The rate limiting steps of AD and LA are highlighted because of their direct role in tuning the growth process. Future roadmap towards the exploration of CNT synthesis methods is also outlined.

  13. Synthesis and characterization of carbon-encapsulated magnetic nanoparticles via arc-plasma assisted CVD.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhentao; Hu, Chao; Yu, Chang; Qiu, Jieshan

    2009-12-01

    Carbon-encapsulated magnetic nanoparticles (CEMNs) were fabricated on a large scale by arc-plasma assisted CVD in acetylene. The coal-derived metal-containing (Fe, Co and Ni) carbon rods were used as anodes, while a high-purity graphite rod was used as a cathode that remained unchanged during the arcing process. The CEMNs obtained were characterized by TEM, XRD, Raman spectroscopy, N2 adsorption isotherms and VSM. The diameter distribution of the obtained CEMNs varies from 10 to 70 nm, of which the metal cores are proximately 5-50 nm. The core phases in Fe(C) nanoparticles are body-centered cubic Fe and orthorhombic Fe3C while Co(C) nanoparticles and Ni(C) nanoparticles show the characteristic of a face-centered cubic structure. The Fe(C), Co(C) and Ni(C) nanoparticles with well-ordered graphitic shells have the surface area of 89 m2/g, 72 m2/g and 75 m2/g, respectively. The CEMNs show ferromagnetic of which was characterized by a ratio of remnant magnetization (MR) to saturation magnetization (MS).

  14. Preparation of Amine-Functionalized TiO2/Carbon Photocatalyst by Arc Discharge in Liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arikawati, Erlina; Pranoto; Endah Saraswati, Teguh

    2017-02-01

    Amine-functionalized titanium dioxide/carbon (TiO2/C) was prepared via the arc discharge method using graphite electrodes and a liquid medium consisting of 50% ethanol with the addition of urea. The arc discharge was conducted using a voltage of 20 to 40 V. X-ray diffraction (XRD) of prepared TiO2/C showed a pattern of definitive peaks at 25.32°, 26.61°, and 36.14°, which are the main characteristic peaks of TiO2, C graphite, and titanium carbide, respectively. The successful surface modification of TiO2/C synthesized in liquid ethanol/urea resulted in better dispersion of nanoparticles in water than TiO2/C synthesized in ethanol only. This surface characteristic was also confirmed via Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra of TiO2/C synthesized in liquid ethanol/urea, which revealed C=O, C–N, C–O, and N–H stretching vibrations at 1600–1700, 1400–1100, 1200–1300, and 3300–3400 cm‑1, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis showed that the nanocomposite had a spherical morphology. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis found that the structure of the nanocomposite was carbon coated with TiO2.

  15. Formation of Ultrananocrystalline Diamond/Amorphous Carbon Composite Films in Vacuum Using Coaxial Arc Plasma Gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanada, Kenji; Yoshida, Tomohiro; Nakagawa, You; Yoshitake, Tsuyoshi

    2010-12-01

    Ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD)/nonhydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C) composite films were grown in vacuum using a coaxial arc plasma gun. From the X-ray diffraction measurement, the UNCD crystallite size was estimated to be 1.6 nm. This size is dramatically reduced from that (2.3 nm) of UNCD/hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) composite films grown in a hydrogen atmosphere. The sp3/(sp3 + sp2) value, which was estimated from the X-ray photoemission spectrum, was also reduced to be 41%. A reason for it might be the reduction in the UNCD crystallite size. From the near-edge X-ray absorption fine-structure (NEXAFS) spectrum, it was found that the π*C=C and π*C≡C bonds are preferentially formed instead of the σ*C-H bonds in the UNCD/a-C:H films. Since the extremely small UNCD crystallites (1.6 nm) correspond to the nuclei of diamond, we consider that UNCD crystallite formation should be due predominantly to nucleation. The supersaturated condition required for nucleation is expected to be realized in the deposition using the coaxial arc plasma gun.

  16. Influence of chamber volume in single-walled carbon nanotube synthesis by an electric arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramarozatovo, V.; Mansour, A.; Razafinimanana, M.; Monthioux, M.; Valensi, F.; Noé, L.; Masquère, M.

    2012-08-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were produced by an electric arc process in a low-pressure chamber with vertical electrodes using heterogeneous graphite anodes containing nickel and yttrium catalysts. The influence of the chamber volume (18, 25 and 60 L) and graphite grain size (1 and 100 µm) of the anode on the resulting products was analysed. This was correlated with the physical properties of the plasma as studied by optical emission spectroscopy and with the temperature of the gaseous atmosphere surrounding the plasma as measured using thermocouples. Nanotube yield and purity were evaluated from high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Results showed a strong influence of the heterogeneous anode grain size. It was found that the optimal synthesis conditions correspond to an arc chamber volume of 25 L and a graphite grain size of 1 µm. In that case the plasma temperature and the carbon over nickel concentration ratio in the plasma differ notably from those observed under the other synthesis conditions. It was also found that a slower temperature rise of the gaseous atmosphere surrounding the plasma and a higher anode erosion rate are associated with a higher SWCNT yield. These results were interpreted considering the vapour-liquid-solid nanotube formation model.

  17. Activated Carbon Composites for Air Separation

    SciTech Connect

    Contescu, Cristian I; Baker, Frederick S; Tsouris, Costas; McFarlane, Joanna

    2008-03-01

    In continuation of the development of composite materials for air separation based on molecular sieving properties and magnetic fields effects, several molecular sieve materials were tested in a flow system, and the effects of temperature, flow conditions, and magnetic fields were investigated. New carbon materials adsorbents, with and without pre-loaded super-paramagnetic nanoparticles of Fe3O4 were synthesized; all materials were packed in chromatographic type columns which were placed between the poles of a high intensity, water-cooled, magnet (1.5 Tesla). In order to verify the existence of magnetodesorption effect, separation tests were conducted by injecting controlled volumes of air in a flow of inert gas, while the magnetic field was switched on and off. Gas composition downstream the column was analyzed by gas chromatography and by mass spectrometry. Under the conditions employed, the tests confirmed that N2 - O2 separation occurred at various degrees, depending on material's intrinsic properties, temperature and flow rate. The effect of magnetic fields, reported previously for static conditions, was not confirmed in the flow system. The best separation was obtained for zeolite 13X at sub-ambient temperatures. Future directions for the project include evaluation of a combined system, comprising carbon and zeolite molecular sieves, and testing the effect of stronger magnetic fields produced by cryogenic magnets.

  18. Electric field induced needle-pulsed arc discharge carbon nanotube production apparatus: Circuitry and mechanical design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kia, Kaveh Kazemi; Bonabi, Fahimeh

    2012-12-01

    A simple and low cost apparatus is reported to produce multiwall carbon nanotubes and carbon nano-onions by a low power short pulsed arc discharge reactor. The electric circuitry and the mechanical design details and a micro-filtering assembly are described. The pulsed-plasma is generated and applied between two graphite electrodes. The pulse width is 0.3 μs. A strong dc electric field is established along side the electrodes. The repetitive discharges occur in less than 1 mm distance between a sharp tip graphite rod as anode, and a tubular graphite as cathode. A hydrocarbon vapor, as carbon source, is introduced through the graphite nozzle in the cathode assembly. The pressure of the chamber is controlled by a vacuum pump. A magnetic field, perpendicular to the plasma path, is provided. The results show that the synergetic use of a pulsed-current and a dc power supply enables us to synthesize carbon nanoparticles with short pulsed plasma. The simplicity and inexpensiveness of this plan is noticeable. Pulsed nature of plasma provides some extra degrees of freedom that make the production more controllable. Effects of some design parameters such as electric field, pulse frequency, and cathode shape are discussed. The products are examined using scanning probe microscopy techniques.

  19. Energetic deposition of carbon in a cathodic vacuum arc with a biased mesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moafi, A.; Lau, D. W. M.; Sadek, A. Z.; Partridge, J. G.; McKenzie, D. R.; McCulloch, D. G.

    2011-04-01

    Carbon films were deposited in a filtered cathodic vacuum arc with a bias potential applied to a conducting mesh mounted in the plasma stream between the source and the substrate. We determined the stress and microstructural properties of the resulting carbon films and compared the results with those obtained using direct substrate bias with no mesh. Since the relationship between deposition energy and the stress, sp2 fraction and density of carbon are well known, measuring these film properties enabled us to investigate the effect of the mesh on the energy and composition of the depositing flux. When a mesh was used, the film stress showed a monotonic decrease for negative mesh bias voltages greater than 400V, even though the floating potential of the substrate did not vary. We explain this result by the neutralization of some ions when they are near to or passing through the negatively biased mesh. The microstructure of the films showed a change from amorphous to glassy carbonlike with increasing bias. Potential applications for this method include the deposition of carbon films with controlled stress on low conductivity substrates to form rectifying or ohmic contacts.

  20. Electric field induced needle-pulsed arc discharge carbon nanotube production apparatus: circuitry and mechanical design.

    PubMed

    Kia, Kaveh Kazemi; Bonabi, Fahimeh

    2012-12-01

    A simple and low cost apparatus is reported to produce multiwall carbon nanotubes and carbon nano-onions by a low power short pulsed arc discharge reactor. The electric circuitry and the mechanical design details and a micro-filtering assembly are described. The pulsed-plasma is generated and applied between two graphite electrodes. The pulse width is 0.3 μs. A strong dc electric field is established along side the electrodes. The repetitive discharges occur in less than 1 mm distance between a sharp tip graphite rod as anode, and a tubular graphite as cathode. A hydrocarbon vapor, as carbon source, is introduced through the graphite nozzle in the cathode assembly. The pressure of the chamber is controlled by a vacuum pump. A magnetic field, perpendicular to the plasma path, is provided. The results show that the synergetic use of a pulsed-current and a dc power supply enables us to synthesize carbon nanoparticles with short pulsed plasma. The simplicity and inexpensiveness of this plan is noticeable. Pulsed nature of plasma provides some extra degrees of freedom that make the production more controllable. Effects of some design parameters such as electric field, pulse frequency, and cathode shape are discussed. The products are examined using scanning probe microscopy techniques.

  1. Electric field induced needle-pulsed arc discharge carbon nanotube production apparatus: Circuitry and mechanical design

    SciTech Connect

    Kia, Kaveh Kazemi; Bonabi, Fahimeh

    2012-12-15

    A simple and low cost apparatus is reported to produce multiwall carbon nanotubes and carbon nano-onions by a low power short pulsed arc discharge reactor. The electric circuitry and the mechanical design details and a micro-filtering assembly are described. The pulsed-plasma is generated and applied between two graphite electrodes. The pulse width is 0.3 {mu}s. A strong dc electric field is established along side the electrodes. The repetitive discharges occur in less than 1 mm distance between a sharp tip graphite rod as anode, and a tubular graphite as cathode. A hydrocarbon vapor, as carbon source, is introduced through the graphite nozzle in the cathode assembly. The pressure of the chamber is controlled by a vacuum pump. A magnetic field, perpendicular to the plasma path, is provided. The results show that the synergetic use of a pulsed-current and a dc power supply enables us to synthesize carbon nanoparticles with short pulsed plasma. The simplicity and inexpensiveness of this plan is noticeable. Pulsed nature of plasma provides some extra degrees of freedom that make the production more controllable. Effects of some design parameters such as electric field, pulse frequency, and cathode shape are discussed. The products are examined using scanning probe microscopy techniques.

  2. LARGE AREA FILTERED ARC DEPOSITION OF CARBON AND BORON BASED HARD COATINGS

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharya, Rabi S.

    2003-12-05

    This document is a final report covering work performed under Contract No. DE-FG02-99ER82911 from the Department of Energy under a SBIR Phase II Program. Wear resistant, hard coatings can play a vital role in many engineering applications. The primary goal of this project was to develop coatings containing boron and carbon with hardness greater than 30 GPa and evaluate these coatings for machining applications. UES has developed a number of carbon and boron containing coatings with hardness in the range of 34 to 65 GPa using a combination of filtered cathodic arc and magnetron sputtering. The boron containing coatings were based on TiB2, TiBN, and TiBCN, while the carbon containing coatings ere TiC+C and hydrogen free diamond-like-carbon. Machining tests were performed with single and multilayer coated tools. The turning and milling tests were run at TechSolve Inc., under a subcontract at Ohio State University. Significant increases in tool lives were realized in end milling of H-13 die steel (8X) and titanium alloy (80%) using the TiBN coating. A multilayer TiBN/TiN performed the best in end-milling of highly abrasive Al-Si alloys. A 40% increase in life over the TiAlN benchmark coating was found. Further evaluations of these coatings with commercialization partners are currently in progress.

  3. Corrosion Behavior of Pulsed Gas Tungsten Arc Weldments in Power Plant Carbon Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumaresh Babu, S. P.; Natarajan, S.

    2007-10-01

    Welding plays an essential role in fabrication of components such as boiler drum, pipe work, heat exchangers, etc., used in power plants. Gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) is mainly used for welding of boiler components. Pulsed GTAW is another process widely used where high quality and precision welds are required. In all arc-welding processes, the intense heat produced by the arc and the associated local heating and cooling lead to varied corrosion behavior and several metallurgical phase changes. Since the occurrence of corrosion is due to electrochemical potential gradient developed in the adjacent site of a weld metal, it is proposed to study the effects of welding on the corrosion behavior of these steels. This paper describes the experimental work carried out to evaluate and compare corrosion and its inhibition in SA 516 Gr.70 carbon steel by pulsed GTAW process in HCl medium at 0.1, 0.5, and 1.0 M concentrations. The parent metal, weld metal and heat affected zone are chosen as regions of exposure for the study made at room temperature (R.T.) and at 100 °C. Electrochemical polarization techniques such as Tafel line extrapolation (Tafel), linear polarization resistance (LPR), and ac impedance method have been used to measure the corrosion current. The role of hexamine and mixed inhibitor (thiourea + hexamine in 0.5 M HCl), each at 100 ppm concentration is studied in these experiments. Microstructural observation, surface characterization, and morphology using SEM and XRD studies have been made on samples exposed at 100 °C in order to highlight the nature and extent of film formation.

  4. In situ synthesis of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes by modified arc discharging method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Tingkai; Ji, Xianglin; Jin, Wenbo; Yang, Wenbo; Zhao, Xing; Dang, Alei; Li, Hao; Li, Tiehu

    2017-02-01

    Semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (s-SWCNTs) were in situ synthesized by a temperature-controlled arc discharging furnace with DC electric field using Co-Ni alloy powder as catalyst in helium gas. The microstructures of s-SWCNTs were characterized using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, electron diffraction, and Raman spectrometry apparatus. The experimental results indicated that the best voltage value in DC electric field is 54 V, and the environmental temperature of the reaction chamber is 600 °C. The mean diameter of s-SWCNTs was estimated about 1.3 nm. The chiral vector ( n, m) of s-SWCNTs was calculated to be (10, 10) type according to the electron diffraction patterns.

  5. Carbon Dioxide Detection and Indoor Air Quality Control.

    PubMed

    Bonino, Steve

    2016-04-01

    When building ventilation is reduced, energy is saved because it is not necessary to heat or cool as much outside air. Reduced ventilation can result in higher levels of carbon dioxide, which may cause building occupants to experience symptoms. Heating or cooling for ventilation air can be enhanced by a DCV system, which can save energy while providing a comfortable environment. Carbon dioxide concentrations within a building are often used to indicate whether adequate fresh air is being supplied to the building. These DCV systems use carbon dioxide sensors in each space or in the return air and adjust the ventilation based on carbon dioxide concentration; the higher the concentration, the more people occupy the space relative to the ventilation rate. With a carbon dioxide sensor DCV system, the fresh air ventilation rate varies based on the number ofpeople in the space, saving energy while maintaining a safe and comfortable environment.

  6. SiC multi-layer protective coating on carbon obtained by thermionic vacuum arc method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciupina, V.; Lungu, C. P.; Vladoiu, R.; Epure, T.-D.; Prodan, G.; Roşca, C.; Porosnicu, C.; Jepu, I.; Belc, M.; Prodan, M.; Stanescu, I. M.; Stefanov, C.; Contulov, M.; Mandes, A.; Dinca, V.; Vasile, E.; Zarovschi, V.; Nicolescu, V.

    2013-09-01

    SiC single-layer or multi-layer on C used to improve the oxidation resistance and tribological properties of C have been obtained by Thermionic Vacuum Arc (TVA) method. The 200nm thickness carbon thin films was deposed on glass or Si substrate and then 100÷500 nm thickness SiC successively layers on carbon thin film was deposed. The microstructure and mechanical characteristics of as-prepared SiC coating were investigated by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM, STEM), Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDS), Electron Scattering Chemical Analysis (ESCA) and tribological techniques. Samples containing SiC single-layer or multi-layer coating on carbon were investigated up to 1000°C. The results of thermal treatments reveals the increase of oxidation resistance with increase of the number of SiC layers. The mechanism of oxidation protection is based on the reaction between SiC and elemental oxygen resulting SiO2 and CO. The tribological behavior of SiC coatings was evaluated with a tribometer with ball-on-disk configuration from CSM device with 6mm diameter sapphire ball, sliding speed in dry conditions being 0.2m/s, with normal contact loads of 0.5N, 1N, 1.5N and 2N, under unlubricated conditions. The friction coefficient on SiC was compared with the friction coefficient on uncoated carbon layer. Electrical surface resistance of SiC coating on carbon at different temperatures was measured comparing the potential drop on the sample with the potential drop on a series standard resistance in constant mode.

  7. Stabilized luminous arcs (rotating arcs) in nitrogen and carbon dioxide at pressures of one to forty atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foitzik, R.

    1984-01-01

    The arcs were run in the axis of a rapidly rotating glass tube, at 1 to 20 atm. For pressures over 20 atm., a decrease of stability appeared and above 40 atm., the results were very unsatisfactory owing to turbulence. The voltage and longitudinal-field-strength curves for both gases had a descending character. The field strength was 1.5 to 2.0 times as high in CO2 as in N. Under 10 atm. of pressure approx. linear values obtained. In N the column diam. increased with pressure. C. d. increased with pressure in CO2. Good agreement with the Steenbeck minimum principle was in general obtained.

  8. Dispersion and characterization of arc discharge single-walled carbon nanotubes - towards conducting transparent films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rösner, B.; Guldi, D. M.; Chen, J.; Minett, A. I.; Fink, R. H.

    2014-03-01

    This study addresses a combination of a well-developed and mild dispersion method and high-quality arc discharge single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) as starting materials. Thus, we advance in fabrication of transparent, conducting films with extraordinary low material loss during SWCNT processing. The starting material was characterized by means of thermogravimetric analysis, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. The quality of the starting material and produced dispersions was evaluated by ultraviolet and visible light absorption spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. A transparent conductive film was fabricated by drop-casting, whereas films were obtained with electrical to optical conductivity ratios (σDC/σOp) as high as 2.2, combined with a loss of nanotube material during processing well below 20 wt%. High pressure carbon monoxide conversion (HiPCO) SWCNTs, which are very well described in the literature, were used for comparison.This study addresses a combination of a well-developed and mild dispersion method and high-quality arc discharge single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) as starting materials. Thus, we advance in fabrication of transparent, conducting films with extraordinary low material loss during SWCNT processing. The starting material was characterized by means of thermogravimetric analysis, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. The quality of the starting material and produced dispersions was evaluated by ultraviolet and visible light absorption spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. A transparent conductive film was fabricated by drop-casting, whereas films were obtained with electrical to optical conductivity ratios (σDC/σOp) as high as 2.2, combined with a loss of nanotube material during processing well below 20 wt%. High pressure carbon monoxide conversion (HiPCO) SWCNTs, which are very well described in the literature, were used for comparison. Electronic

  9. Silurian trace fossils in carbonate turbidites from the Alexander Arc of southeastern Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Soja, C.M. )

    1990-05-01

    Early to Late Silurian (Wenlock-Ludlow) body and trace fossils from the Heceta Formation are preserved in the oldest widespread carbonates in the Alexander terrane of southeastern Alaska. They represent the earliest shelly benthos to inhabit a diversity of marine environments and are important indicators of the early stages in benthic community development within this ancient island arc. The trace fossils are significant because they add to a small but growing body of knowledge about ichnofaunas in deep-water Paleozoic carbonates. Proximal to medial carbonate turbidites yield a low-diversity suite of trace fossils that comprises five distinct types of biogenic structures. Bedding planes reveal simple epichnial burrows (Planolites), cross-cutting burrows (Fucusopsis), and tiny cylindrical burrows. These and other casts, including chondrites( )-like burrow clusters, represent the feeding activities (fodinichnia) of preturbidite animals. Hypichnial burrows and rare endichnial traces reflect the activities of postturbidite animals. Broken and offset traces indicate that infaunal biota commenced burrowing before slumping and subsequent soft-sediment deformation. The abundance and density of trace fossils increases offshore in the medial turbidites associated with a decrease in the size and amount of coarse particles and with an increase in mud and preserved organic material. Although diversity levels are similar in the proximal and medial turbidite facies, they are much lower than in Paleozoic siliciclastic turbidites. This may reflect unfavorable environmental conditions for infaunal biota or paleobiogeographic isolation of the Alexander terrane during the Silurian. A greater use of trace fossils in terrane analysis will help to resolve this issue and should provide new data for reconstructing the paleogeography of circum-Pacific terranes.

  10. Compilation of reinforced carbon-carbon transatlantic abort landing arc jet test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milhoan, James D.; Pham, Vuong T.; Yuen, Eric H.

    1993-01-01

    This document consists of the entire test database generated to support the Reinforced Carbon-Carbon Transatlantic Abort Landing Study. RCC components used for orbiter nose cap and wing leading edge thermal protection were originally designed to have a multi-mission entry capability of 2800 F. Increased orbiter range capability required a predicted increase in excess of 3300 F. Three test series were conducted. Test series #1 used ENKA-based RCC specimens coated with silicon carbide, treated with tetraethyl orthosilicate, sealed with Type A surface enhancement, and tested at 3000-3400 F with surface pressure of 60-101 psf. Series #2 used ENKA- or AVTEX-based RCC, with and without silicon carbide, Type A or double Type AA surface enhancement, all impregnated with TEOS, and at temperatures from 1440-3350 F with pressures from 100-350 psf. Series #3 tested ENKA-based RCC, with and without silicon carbide coating. No specimens were treated with TEOS or sealed with Type A. Surface temperatures ranged from 2690-3440 F and pressures ranged from 313-400 psf. These combined test results provided the database for establishing RCC material single-mission-limit temperature and developing surface recession correlations used to predict mass loss for abort conditions.

  11. The Effects of Varying Crustal Carbonate Composition on Assimilation and CO2 Degassing at Arc Volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, L. B.; Holmes, A. K.; Dasgupta, R.; Tumiati, S.

    2015-12-01

    Magma-crustal carbonate interaction and subsequent decarbonation can provide an additional source of CO2 release to the exogenic system superimposed on mantle-derived CO2. Carbonate assimilation at present day volcanoes is often modeled by limestone consumption experiments [1-4]. Eruptive products, however, do not clearly display the characteristic ultracalcic melt compositions produced during limestone-magma interaction [4]. Yet estimated CO2outflux [5] and composition of volcanics in many volcanic systems may allow ~3-17% limestone- or dolostone-assimilated melt contribution. Crystallization may retain ultracalcic melts in pyroxenite cumulates. To extend our completed study on limestone assimilation, here we explore the effect of varying composition from calcite to dolomite on chemical and thermal decarbonation efficiency of crustal carbonates. Piston cylinder experiments at 0.5 GPa and 900-1200 °C demonstrate that residual mineralogy during interaction with magma shifts from CaTs cpx and anorthite/scapolite in the presence of calcite to Di cpx and Fo-rich olivine with dolomite. Silica-undersaturated melts double in magnesium content, while maintaining high (>30 wt.%) CaO values. At high-T, partial thermal breakdown of dolomite into periclase and CO2 is minimal (<5%) suggesting that in the presence of magma, CO2 is primarily released due to assimilation. Assimilated melts at identical P-T conditions depict similarly high volatile contents (10-20 wt.% by EMPA deficit at 0.5 GPa, 1150 °C with hydrous basalt) with calcite or dolomite. Analysis of the coexisting fluid phase indicates the majority of water is dissolved in the melt, while CO2 released from the carbonate is preferentially partitioned into the vapor. This suggests that although assimilated melts have a higher CO2 solubility, most of the CO2can easily degas from the vapor phase at arc volcanoes, possibly more so at volcanic plumbing systems traversing dolomite [8]. [1]Conte et al 2009 EuJMin (21) 763

  12. AIR QUALITY CRITERIA CARBON MONOXIDE, EXTERNAL REVIEW DRAFT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) promulgates the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) on the basis of scientific information contained in criteria documents. The last air quality criteria document for carbon monoxide (CO) was completed by EPA in 1991. This...

  13. Characteristics of optical emissions of arc plasma processing for high-rate synthesis of highly crystalline single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Atsushi; Takeda, Keigo; Ohta, Takayuki; Ito, Masafumi; Hiramatsu, Mineo; Ishikawa, Kenji; Kondo, Hiroki; Sekine, Makoto; Suzuki, Tomoko; Inoue, Sakae; Ando, Yoshinori; Hori, Masaru

    2017-03-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were synthesized with a high growth rate using an arc plasma employing carbon electrodes with a Ni–Y mixture catalyst. However, the mechanism of growth of highly crystalline SWNTs has not been clarified. Reactions between carbon and catalyst are considered to be one of the crucial factors in SWNT growth. Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) provides the information about the species in the plasma. C2, Ni, and Y emissions in the arc plasma at different currents were measured to investigate the relationship between active species in the arc plasma and the SWNT synthesis. On the basis of OES results, it was found that the balance between catalytic metal atoms and C2 radical emissions indicated the crystallinity ratio of SWNTs in thin graphitic or amorphous carbon layers. These results are useful for controlling the growth of SWNTs employing arc plasmas.

  14. Continuous air agglomeration method for high carbon fly ash beneficiation

    DOEpatents

    Gray, McMahon L.; Champagne, Kenneth J.; Finseth, Dennis H.

    2000-01-01

    The carbon and mineral components of fly ash are effectively separated by a continuous air agglomeration method, resulting in a substantially carboree mineral stream and a highly concentrated carbon product. The method involves mixing the fly ash comprised of carbon and inorganic mineral matter with a liquid hydrocarbon to form a slurry, contacting the slurry with an aqueous solution, dispersing the hydrocarbon slurry into small droplets within the aqueous solution by mechanical mixing and/or aeration, concentrating the inorganic mineral matter in the aqueous solution, agglomerating the carbon and hydrocarbon in the form of droplets, collecting the droplets, separating the hydrocarbon from the concentrated carbon product, and recycling the hydrocarbon.

  15. Carbon fiber composite molecular sieve electrically regenerable air filter media

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, K.A.; Burchell, T.D.; Judkins, R.R.

    1998-10-27

    An electrically regenerable gas filter system includes a carbon fiber composite molecular sieve (CFCMS) filter medium. After a separate medium-efficiency pre-filter removes particulate from the supply air stream, the CFCMS filter sorbs gaseous air pollutants before the air is recirculated to the space. When saturated, the CFCMS media is regenerated utilizing a low-voltage current that is caused to pass through the filter medium. 3 figs.

  16. Mo-containing tetrahedral amorphous carbon deposited by dualfiltered cathodic vacuum arc with selective pulsed bias voltage

    SciTech Connect

    Pasaja, Nitisak; Sansongsiri, Sakon; Anders, Andre; Vilaithong,Thiraphat; Intasiri, Sawate

    2006-09-10

    Metal-containing tetrahedral amorphous carbon films were produced by dual filtered cathodic vacuum arc (FCVA) plasma sources operated in sequential pulsed mode. A negatively pulsed bias was applied to the substrate only when carbon plasma was generated. Films thickness was measured after deposition by profilometry. Glass slides with silver pads were used as substrate for the of the measurement sheet resistance. The microstructure and composition of the films were characterized by Raman spectroscopy and Rutherford backscattering, respectively. It found that the electrical resistivity decreases with an increase of the Mo content, which can be ascribed to an increase of sp2 content and an increase of the sp2 cluster size.

  17. Mo-containing tetrahedral amorphous carbon deposited by dualfiltered cathodic vacuum arc with selective pulsed bias voltage

    SciTech Connect

    Pasaja, Nitisak; Sansongsiri, Sakon; Intasiri, Sawate; Vilaithong, Thiraphat; Anders, Andre

    2007-01-24

    Metal-containing tetrahedral amorphous carbon films wereproduced by dual filtered cathodic vacuum arc plasma sources operatedinsequentially pulsed mode. Negatively pulsed bias was applied to thesubstrate when carbon plasma was generated, whereas it was absentwhen themolybdenum plasma was presented. Film thickness was measured afterdeposition by profilometry. Glass slides with silver padswere used assubstrates for the measurement of the sheet resistance. Themicrostructure and composition of the films were characterizedbyRamanspectroscopy and Rutherford backscattering, respectively. It was foundthat the electrical resistivity decreases with an increaseof the Mocontent, which can be ascribed to an increase of the sp2 content and anincrease of the sp2 cluster size.

  18. Note: Limitations of the optoelectronic control for carbon nanoparticles synthesis via arc-discharge in solution.

    PubMed

    Darias-González, J G; Hernández-Tabares, L; Carrillo-Barroso, E; Ledo-Pereda, L M; Arteche-Díaz, J; Desdín-García, L F

    2014-03-01

    Submerged electric arc discharge in liquids has shown to be a promising method for synthesizing a wide variety of nanomaterials. However, it requires an accurate current stability control to ensure the desired purity and structure of the products. The discharge stability control through light emission has been previously studied, but still requires further investigation to clarify the influence of some parameters. The present work has studied the solution's transmittance variation over time, the correlation between the arc light emission and the arc current, and the feasibility of controlling the arc current by using a specific wavelength of the arc light spectrum. Several limitations of the optoelectronic control were found at low currents (I < 50 A).

  19. A Comparative Study of the Dispersion of Multi-Wall Carbon Nanotubes Made by Arc-Discharge and Chemical Vapour Deposition.

    PubMed

    Frømyr, Tomas-Roll; Bourgeaux-Goget, Marie; Hansen, Finn Knut

    2015-05-01

    A method has been developed to characterize the dispersion of multi-wall carbon nanotubes in water using a disc centrifuge for the detection of individual carbon nanotubes, residual aggregates, and contaminants. Carbon nanotubes produced by arc-discharge have been measured and compared with carbon nanotubes produced by chemical vapour deposition. Studies performed on both pristine (see text) arc-discharge nanotubes is rather strong and that high ultra-sound intensity is required to achieve complete dispersion of carbon nanotube bundles. The logarithm of the mode of the particle size distribution of the arc-discharge carbon nanotubes was found to be a linear function of the logarithm of the total ultrasonic energy input in the dispersion process.

  20. Carbon dioxide emissions from international air freight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howitt, Oliver J. A.; Carruthers, Michael A.; Smith, Inga J.; Rodger, Craig J.

    2011-12-01

    Greenhouse gas emissions from international air transport were excluded from reduction targets under the Kyoto Protocol, partly because of difficulties with quantifying and apportioning such emissions. Although there has been a great deal of recent research into calculating emissions from aeroplane operations globally, publicly available emissions factors for air freight emissions are scarce. This paper presents a methodology to calculate the amount of fuel burnt and the resulting CO 2 emissions from New Zealand's internationally air freighted imports and exports in 2007. This methodology could be applied to other nations and/or regions. Using data on fuel uplift, air freight and air craft movements, and assumptions on mean passenger loadings and the mass of passengers and air freight, CO 2 emissions factors of 0.82 kg CO 2 per t-km and 0.69 kg CO 2 per t-km for short-haul and long-haul journeys, respectively, were calculated. The total amount of fuel consumed for the international air transport of New Zealand's imports and exports was calculated to be 0.21 Mt and 0.17 Mt respectively, with corresponding CO 2 emissions of 0.67 Mt and 0.53 Mt.

  1. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes mass-produced by dc arc discharge in He-H2 gas mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, T.; Guo, Y.; Inoue, S.; Zhao, X.; Ohkohchi, M.; Ando, Y.

    2006-04-01

    Uniform cathode deposits (longer than 15 mm), containing multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) inside, were produced by dc arc discharge evaporation with a computer-controlled feeder of a pure-carbon electrode without a metal catalyst in a He-H2 gas mixture. The purification of MWNTs was carried out to remove amorphous carbon and carbon nanoparticles. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy observations and Raman scattering studies show that the MWNTs possess a high crystallinity and a mean outermost diameter of ˜ ˜10 nm. It has been confirmed that the current density in the electron field emission from a purified MWNT mat can reach 77.92 mA/cm2, indicating that the purified MWNTs are a promising candidate electron source in a super high-luminance light-source tube or a miniature X-ray source.

  2. Moisture swing sorbent for carbon dioxide capture from ambient air.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Lackner, Klaus S; Wright, Allen

    2011-08-01

    An amine-based anion exchange resin dispersed in a flat sheet of polypropylene was prepared in alkaline forms so that it would capture carbon dioxide from air. The resin, with quaternary ammonium cations attached to the polymer structure and hydroxide or carbonate groups as mobile counterions, absorbs carbon dioxide when dry and releases it when wet. In ambient air, the moist resin dries spontaneously and subsequently absorbs carbon dioxide. This constitutes a moisture induced cycle, which stands in contrast to thermal pressure swing based cycles. This paper aims to determine the isothermal performance of the sorbent during such a moisture swing. Equilibrium experiments show that the absorption and desorption process can be described well by a Langmuir isothermal model. The equilibrium partial pressure of carbon dioxide over the resin at a given loading state can be increased by 2 orders of magnitude by wetting the resin.

  3. Equipment for Measuring Air Flow, Air Temperature, Relative Humidity, and Carbon Dioxide in Schools. Technical Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Bruce W.

    Information on equipment and techniques that school facility personnel may use to evaluate IAQ conditions are discussed. Focus is placed on the IAQ parameters of air flow, air temperature, relative humidity, as well as carbon dioxide and the equipment used to measure these factors. Reasons for measurement and for when the measurement of these…

  4. Distribution of air and serum PCDD/F levels of electric arc furnaces and secondary aluminum and copper smelters.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ching-Chang; Shih, Tung-Seng; Chen, Hsiu-Ling

    2009-12-30

    Metallurgical processes, such as smelting, can generate organic impurities such as organic chloride chemicals, polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs). The objective of this study was to elucidate the serum PCDD/F levels of 134 workers and ambient air levels around electric arc furnaces (EAF), secondary copper smelters and secondary aluminum smelters (ALSs) in Taiwan. The highest serum PCDD/F levels were found in the ALSs workers (21.9 pg WHO-TEQ/g lipid), with lower levels in copper smelter workers (21.5 pg WHO-TEQ/g lipid), and the lowest in the EAF plant workers (18.8 pg WHO-TEQ/g lipid). This was still higher than the levels for residents living within 5 km of municipal waste incinerators (14.0 pg WHO-TEQ/g lipid). For ambient samples, the highest ambient air PCDD/F level was in the copper smelters (12.4 pg WHO-TEQ/Nm(3)), with lower levels in ALSs (7.2 pg WHO-TEQ/Nm(3)), and the lowest in the EAF industry (1.8 pg WHO-TEQ/Nm(3)). The congener profiles were consistent in serum and in air samples collected in the copper smelters, but not for ALSs and EAF. In secondary copper smelters, the air PCDD/Fs levels might be directly linked to the PCDD/Fs accumulated in the workers due to the exceedingly stable congener pattern of the PCDD/F emission.

  5. Investigations into the damage for various types of unprotected carbon fibre composites with a variety of lightning arc attachments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, G. W.

    1991-01-01

    Very little quantitative information exists on the extent and nature of damage caused to unprotected carbon fiber composites (CFC's) due to lightning arc attachment. An initial investigation into the arc damage to three different types and various thickness of CFC's from A and C component type lightning discharges is described. The difference in damage which the two types of waveform produced and the way the area of damage varies with different levels of action integral and charge transfer is compared. In some cases, the temperature rise at the rear of the panels was recorded for various levels of action integral and charge transfer. A comparison was made of the area of damage from visual inspection and soft x ray photography, using a suitable penetrant in the damage area. It is concluded there is a need for a more detailed analysis of the damage.

  6. A new test method for the assessment of the arc tracking properties of wire insulation in air, oxygen enriched atmospheres and vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, Dieter

    1994-01-01

    Development of a new test method suitable for the assessment of the resistance of aerospace cables to arc tracking for different specific environmental and network conditions of spacecraft is given in view-graph format. The equipment can be easily adapted for tests at different realistic electrical network conditions incorporating circuit protection and the test system works equally well whatever the test atmosphere. Test results confirm that pure Kapton insulated wire has bad arcing characteristics and ETFE insulated wire is considerably better in air. For certain wires, arc tracking effects are increased at higher oxygen concentrations and significantly increased under vacuum. All tests on different cable insulation materials and in different environments, including enriched oxygen atmospheres, resulted in a more or less rapid extinguishing of all high temperature effects at the beginning of the post-test phase. In no case was a self-maintained fire initiated by the arc.

  7. Carbonate bank sedimentation in a volcaniclastic arc setting: Lower Carboniferous limestones of the eastern Klamath terrane, California

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, R. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-09-01

    Carboniferous volcaniclastic-arc deposits of the eastern Klamath terrane, California, include Late Visean/Namurian limestone lenses that formed as small carbonate banks. The limestone lenses, within the Bragdon and Baird formations, reach 17 m in thickness and 1.2 km in length. Slope deposits consist of argillaceous spiculitic wackestone, and bank-edge deposits include ooid grainstone, Striatifera packstone, argillaceous phylloid algal packstone, and argillaceous skeletal packstone, Bank-interior deposits include skeletal wackestone/packstone and argillaceous sandy mudstone. The limestone lenses overlie proximal deltaic deposits of thick-bedded volcaniclastic sandstone and conglomerate. Carbonate banks developed on delta lobes during intervals of minimal clastic sedimentation, possibly related to sea-level rise and volcanic quiescence. The carbonate banks were short-lived depositional systems, and they were covered by prograding deposits of younger volcaniclastic sands.

  8. Effect of metal oxide and oxygen on the growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes by electric arc discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Delong; Liu, Yongning; Zhao, Tingkai; Zhu, Jiewu; Yu, Guang

    2008-03-01

    The effect of oxygen on the growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes was studied with Ni-Co alloy powder as catalyst under helium atmosphere of 500 Torr by electric arc discharge. The oxygen included in nickel or (and) cobalt oxides was added in catalyst. The content of oxygen in atmosphere was controlled by changing vacuum degree inside furnace before inputting buffer gas. The examinations of TEM and Raman scattering showed that oxygen in metal oxide as catalyst promotes the nucleation of SWCNT by taking effect on the metal catalyst particles. However, O2 in atmosphere has the role of oxidizing amorphous particles along with nanotubes. When its molar proportion is higher than 0.22 ppm (Parts per million), the carbon nanotubes produced are oxidized and their purity decreases. The diameter of single-walled carbon nanotube obtained under different condition has a narrow distribution around 1.28 nm.

  9. Carbon fiber composite molecular sieve electrically regenerable air filter media

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Kirk A.; Burchell, Timothy D.; Judkins, Roddie R.

    1998-01-01

    An electrically regenerable gas filter system includes a carbon fiber composite molecular sieve (CFCMS) filter medium. After a separate medium-efficiency pre-filter removes particulate from the supply airstream, the CFCMS filter sorbs gaseous air pollutants before the air is recirculated to the space. When saturated, the CFCMS media is regenerated utilizing a low-voltage current that is caused to pass through the filter medium.

  10. Synthesis of branched, nano channeled, ultrafine and nano carbon tubes from PET wastes using the arc discharge method

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph Berkmans, A.; Jagannatham, M.; Priyanka, S.; Haridoss, Prathap

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • Polymer wastes are converted into ultrafine and nano carbon tubes and spheres. • Simple process with a minimal processing time. • It is a catalyst free and solvent free approach. • This process forms branched ultrafine carbon tubules with nano channels. - Abstract: Upcycling polymer wastes into useful, and valuable carbon based materials, is a challenging process. We report a novel catalyst-free and solvent-free technique for the formation of nano channeled ultrafine carbon tubes (NCUFCTs) and multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) from polyethylene terephthalate (PET) wastes, using rotating cathode arc discharge technique. The soot obtain from the anode contains ultrafine and nano-sized solid carbon spheres (SCS) with a mean diameter of 221 nm and 100 nm, respectively, formed at the lower temperature region of the anode where the temperature is approximately 1700 °C. The carbon spheres are converted into long “Y” type branched and non-branched NCUFCTs and MWCNTs at higher temperature regions where the temperature is approximately 2600 °C, with mean diameters of 364 nm and 95 nm, respectively. Soot deposited on the cathode is composed of MWCNTs with a mean diameter of 20 nm and other nanoparticles. The tubular structures present in the anode are longer, bent and often coiled with lesser graphitization compared to the nanotubes in the soot on the cathode.

  11. Carbon Monoxide | Air Quality Planning Unit | Ground-level ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    2017-04-10

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is a colorless, odorless gas that can increase the severity of lung ailments, cause dizziness, fatigue, nausea, and even death. EPA has defined the national ambient air quality standard (NAAQS) for carbon monoxide as nine parts per million averaged over an eight-hour period, and this threshold cannot be exceeded more than once a year or an area would be violating the standard.

  12. Coagulation of carbon nanoparticles in the acoustic field in the vicinity of the arc discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shneider, Mikhail

    2016-09-01

    An arc discharge produced in a background inert gase between graphite electrodes is one of the popular methods of nanoparticle synthesis. Nanoparticles and microscopic soot particles are produced in the peripheral region of arc. Intensive soot generation significantly reduces the efficiency of the arc as the technological process for production of fullerenes and other nanoparticles. Experimental studies have shown that exposure of peripheral region of the arc to intense ultrasound leads to a noticeable increase in the efficiency of the nanoparticle synthesis and reduces the soot yield (see, e.g.), because ultrasound causes coagulation of soot particles and decrease of their concentration without affecting the nanoparticles. The paper presents theoretical study of the threshold for the ultrasound intensity required for the coagulation as a function of particle sizes and charge, and background gas parameters. The charge acquired in a thermionic emission, as a result of particles heating by radiation from the arc, is calculated self-consistently. I would like to thank Dr. Yevgeny Raitses, Dr. Igor Kaganovich, and Mr. James Mitrani for their interest in this work and fruitful discussions. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences, Materials Sciences and Engineering Division.

  13. Coating of porous carbon for use in lithium air batteries

    DOEpatents

    Amine, Khalil; Lu, Jun; Du, Peng; Lei, Yu; Elam, Jeffrey W

    2015-04-14

    A cathode includes a carbon material having a surface, the surface having a first thin layer of an inert material and a first catalyst overlaying the first thin layer, the first catalyst including metal or metal oxide nanoparticles, wherein the cathode is configured for use as the cathode of a lithium-air battery.

  14. Electronic Excitation in Air and Carbon Dioxide Gas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-01

    processes in nonequilibrium low-temperature plasma of chemical compositions (air and carbon dioxide mixtures) frequently occurring in different aerospace...presents the problem of data processing automation. This problem is considered on the example of prediction of oscillator strengths of atomic species...elementary processes including into RC models .................................... 8 3.1 Ionization at collision of atoms and molecules with electrons

  15. Carbon dioxide extraction from air: Is it an option?

    SciTech Connect

    Lackner, K.S.; Grimes, P.; Ziock, H.J.

    1999-07-01

    Controlling the level of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere without limiting access to fossil energy resources is only possible if carbon dioxide is collected and disposed of away from the atmosphere. While it may be cost-advantageous to collect the carbon dioxide at concentrated sources without ever letting it enter the atmosphere, this approach is not available for the many diffuse sources of carbon dioxide. Similarly, for many older plants, a retrofit to collect the carbon dioxide is either impossible or prohibitively expensive. For these cases the authors investigate the possibility of collecting the carbon dioxide directly from the atmosphere. The authors conclude that there are no fundamental obstacles to this approach and that it deserves further investigation. Carbon dioxide extraction directly from the atmosphere would allow carbon management without the need for a completely changed infrastructure. In addition it eliminates the need for a completely changed infrastructure. In addition it eliminates the need for a complex carbon dioxide transportation infrastructure, thus at least in part offsetting the higher cost of extraction from air.

  16. Vacuum-Induction, Vacuum-Arc, and Air-Induction Melting of a Complex Heat-Resistant Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, R. F.; Rowe, John P.; Freeman, J. W.

    1959-01-01

    The relative hot-workability and creep-rupture properties at 1600 F of a complex 55Ni-20Cr-15Co-4Mo-3Ti-3Al alloy were evaluated for vacuum-induction, vacuum-arc, and air-induction melting. A limited study of the role of oxygen and nitrogen and the structural effects in the alloy associated with the melting process was carried out. The results showed that the level of boron and/or zirconium was far more influential on properties than the melting method. Vacuum melting did reduce corner cracking and improve surface during hot-rolling. It also resulted in more uniform properties within heats. The creep-rupture properties were slightly superior in vacuum heats at low boron plus zirconium or in heats with zirconium. There was little advantage at high boron levels and air heats were superior at high levels of boron plus zirconium. Vacuum heats also had fewer oxide and carbonitride inclusions although this was a function of the opportunity for separation of the inclusions from high oxygen plus nitrogen heats. The removal of phosphorous by vacuum melting was not found to be related to properties. Oxygen plus nitrogen appeared to increase ductility in creep-rupture tests suggesting that vacuum melting removes unidentified elements detrimental to ductility. Oxides and carbonitrides in themselves did not initiate microcracks. Carbonitrides in the grain boundaries of air heats did initiate microcracks. The role of microcracking from this source and as a function of oxygen and nitrogen content was not clear. Oxygen and nitrogen did intensify corner cracking during hot-rolling but were not responsible for poor surface which resulted from rolling heats melted in air.

  17. Study of Nanodispersed Iron Oxides Produced in Steel Drilling by Contracted Electric-Arc Air Plasma Torch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanov, P.; Galanov, D.; Vissokov, G.; Paneva, D.; Kunev, B.; Mitov, I.

    2008-06-01

    The optimal conditions on the plasma-forming gas flowrate, discharge current and voltage, distance between the plasma-torch nozzle and the metal plate surface for the process of penetration in and vaporization of steel plates by the contracted electric-arc air plasma torch accompanied by water quenching, were determined. The X-ray structural and phase studies as well as Mössbauer and electron microscope studies on the samples treated were performed. It was demonstrated that the vaporized elemental iron was oxidized by the oxygen present in the air plasma jet to form iron oxides (wüstite, magnetite, hematite), which, depending on their mass ratios, determined the color of the iron oxide pigments, namely, beginning from light yellow, through deep yellow, light brown, deep brown, violet, red-violet, to black. A high degree of dispersity of the iron oxides is thus produced, with an averaged diameter of the particles below 500 nm, and their defective crystal structure form the basis of their potential application as components of iron-containing catalysts and pigments.

  18. Temporary stabilization of air pollution control residues using carbonation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hua; He, Pin-Jing; Shao, Li-Ming; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2008-01-01

    Carbonation presents a good prospect for stabilizing alkaline waste materials. The risk of metal leaching from carbonated waste was investigated in the present study; in particular, the effect of the carbonation process and leachate pH on the leaching toxicity of the alkaline air pollution control (APC) residues from municipal solid waste incinerator was evaluated. The pH varying test was conducted to characterize the leaching characteristics of the raw and carbonated residue over a broad range of pH. Partial least square modeling and thermodynamic modeling using Visual MINTEQ were applied to highlight the significant process parameters that controlled metal leaching from the carbonated residue. By lowering the pH to 8-11, the carbonation process reduced markedly the leaching toxicity of the alkaline APC residue; however, the treated APC residue showed similar potential risk of heavy metal release as the raw ash when subjected to an acid shock. The carbonated waste could, thereby, not be disposed of safely. Nonetheless, carbonation could be applied as a temporary stabilization process for heavy metals in APC residues in order to reduce the leaching risk during its transportation and storage before final disposal.

  19. Role of autonomic reflex arcs in cardiovascular responses to air pollution exposure.

    PubMed

    Perez, Christina M; Hazari, Mehdi S; Farraj, Aimen K

    2015-01-01

    The body responds to environmental stressors by triggering autonomic reflexes in the pulmonary receptors, baroreceptors, and chemoreceptors to maintain homeostasis. Numerous studies have shown that exposure to various gases and airborne particles can alter the functional outcome of these reflexes, particularly with respect to the cardiovascular system. Modulation of autonomic neural input to the heart and vasculature following direct activation of sensory nerves in the respiratory system, elicitation of oxidative stress and inflammation, or through other mechanisms is one of the primary ways that exposure to air pollution affects normal cardiovascular function. Any homeostatic process that utilizes the autonomic nervous system to regulate organ function might be affected. Thus, air pollution and other inhaled environmental irritants have the potential to alter both local airway function and baro- and chemoreflex responses, which modulate autonomic control of blood pressure and detect concentrations of key gases in the body. While each of these reflex pathways causes distinct responses, the systems are heavily integrated and communicate through overlapping regions of the brainstem to cause global effects. This short review summarizes the function of major pulmonary sensory receptors, baroreceptors, and carotid body chemoreceptors and discusses the impacts of air pollution exposure on these systems.

  20. Carbon nanoparticles in the radiation field of the stationary arc discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Shneider, M. N.

    2015-07-15

    The paper considers a simple theoretical model of heating the nanoparticles, depending on their size and the parameters of the radiating arc and the surrounding gas. This problem is of interest to diagnostics and modeling of the dynamics of the nanoparticles formation and their local size distribution. Heating of nanoparticles by the radiation can affect the process of synthesis. The degree of heating of the particle is determined by its geometry, which opens, apparently, additional possibilities for nonintrusive optical diagnostics.

  1. Reception carbon nanomodifiers in arc discharge plasma and their application for modifying of building materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, A. P.; Smirnyagina, N. N.; Urkhanova, L. A.; Kanakin, S. V.; Lkhasaranov, S. A.; Semenova, I. A.; Tsyrenov, B. O.; Dasheev, D. E.; Khaltarov, Z. M.

    2017-01-01

    Carbon nanomaterials are perspective additives for modifying cement composites. In this work the influence of carbon nanomodifier (CNM) formed in plasma chemical reactor on phase composition, structure and properties of cement stone was investigated. Method of dispersion of nanoparticles has been used, which consists in sonication mixing water with carbon nanomodifier and super plasticizers (SP). Change in phase composition, structure and properties of modifying cement stone were investigated.

  2. Composition of silicate partial melts of carbonated pelite at 3-5 GPa and genesis of arc magma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuno, K.; Dasgupta, R.; Danielson, L. R.; Righter, K.

    2012-12-01

    The composition of arc magmas reflects a complex process of slab-modified mantle wedge melting and magma differentiation in the crust. The composition of arc magma is distinct among various subduction zones owing to the different thermal structures [1] and perhaps different subduction input. Partial melts of downgoing sediment generated at slab-top or in sedimentary diapir [2] may be key in metasomatizing the mantle wedge. However, the effect of carbonates on the silicate partial melt composition of pelitic sediments is less constrained under the deep sub-arc conditions (~5 GPa). Here we provide silicate partial melt composition of Al-poor carbonated pelite to 5 GPa and discuss whether such melts may be a potential metasomatizing agent for arc source, particularly in Central America, Sunda, and Vanuatu where low-alumina carbonated pelite subduct [3]. We performed piston cylinder (3 GPa) and multianvil (4 and 5 GPa) experiments at 800-1150 °C, using a synthetic pelite with 0.5 and 1.0 wt.% H2O and 5.0 wt.% CO2. The experimental procedures and the resulting melting phase relations of this study are described in ref. [4]. The rhyolitic partial melt at 3 GPa evolves to trachydacite at 4 GPa and tephriphonolite at 5 GPa. At 3 GPa silicate partial melt compositions of our study are similar to those derived from hydrous, CO2-free pelite [e.g., 5-7], and are lower in SiO2 (63-65 wt.%) and higher in TiO2 (1-2 wt.%), MnO (~0.6 wt.%) and CaO (2-9 wt.%) at 4 GPa. At 5 GPa and 1050-1100 °C immiscible silicate melts, in the presence of carbonatitic melt, are even more distinct in terms of SiO2 (51-55 wt.%), TiO2 (~2-3 wt.%), Al2O3 (~10-12 wt.%), FeO* (~5-9 wt.%), MnO (0.1-0.3 wt.%), and CaO (~11-14 wt.%) compared to pelite partial melts in the absence of CO2 (~69-74 wt.% SiO2, 0.5-1.0 wt.% TiO2, ~12-15 wt.% Al2O3, ~1 wt.% FeO*, ~0.1 wt.% MnO, and 0.3-0.9 wt.% CaO). The compositions of Central America, Sunda, and Vanuatu arc basalts, at 5-15 wt.% MgO, are richer in FeO*, Mn

  3. Experimental study on copper cathode erosion rate and rotational velocity of magnetically driven arcs in a well-type cathode non-transferred plasma torch operating in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chau, S. W.; Hsu, K. L.; Lin, D. L.; Tzeng, C. C.

    2007-04-01

    The cathode erosion rate, arc root velocity and output power of a well-type cathode (WTC), non-transferred plasma torch operating in air are studied experimentally in this paper. An external solenoid to generate a magnetically driven arc and a circular swirler to produce a vortex flow structure are equipped in the studied torch system, which is designed to reduce the erosion rate at the cathode. A least square technique is applied to correlate the system parameters, i.e. current, axial magnetic field and mass flow rate, with the cathode erosion rate, arc root velocity and system power output. In the studied WTC torch system, the cathode erosion has a major thermal erosion component and a minor component due to the ion-bombardment effect. The cathode erosion increases with the increase of current due to the enhancement in both Joule heating and ion bombardment. The axial magnetic field can significantly reduce the cathode erosion by reducing the thermal loading of cathode materials at the arc root and improving the heat transfer to gas near the cathode. But, the rise in the mass flow rate leads to the deterioration of erosion, since the ion-bombardment effect prevails over the convective cooling at the cathode. The most dominant system parameter to influence the arc root velocity is the axial magnetic field, which is mainly contributed to the magnetic force driving the arc. The growth in current has a negative impact on increasing the arc root velocity, because the friction force acting at the spot due to a severe molten condition becomes the dominant component counteracting the magnetic force. The mass flow rate also suppresses the arc root velocity, as a result of which the arc root moves in the direction against that of the swirled working gas. All system parameters such as current, magnetic field and gas flow rate increase with the increase in the torch output power. The experimental evidences suggest that the axial magnetic field is the most important parameter

  4. Investigation of non-hydrogenated DLC:Si prepared by cathodic arc[Diamond-Like Carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Monteiro, Othon R.; Delplancke-Ogletree, Marie-Paule

    2002-03-18

    Non-hydrogenated DLC films (also referred as ta-C) have been extensively studied and are used for a variety of wear related applications. Alloying DLC with refractory metals and other elements have been shown to be promising techniques to overcome some of the problems associated with pure DLC, such as excessive level of intrinsic stresses and high-temperature stability. The microstructure of DLC:Me in general consists of crystalline metal carbides dispersed in a DLC matrix. In contrary, DLC:Si has an amorphous structure. We have used filtered cathodic arc to prepare DLC:Si up to 6 percent Si, and have characterized their structure and bonding using microscopy (TEM) and spectroscopy (XPS, NEXAFS). The effect of Si in changing the bonding configuration of the C network is discussed. The microstructure is then correlated to hardness and friction measured by nano-indentation and micro-wear.

  5. The efficiency of quartz addition on electric arc furnace (EAF) carbon steel slag stability.

    PubMed

    Mombelli, D; Mapelli, C; Barella, S; Gruttadauria, A; Le Saout, G; Garcia-Diaz, E

    2014-08-30

    Electric arc furnace slag (EAF) has the potential to be re-utilized as an alternative to stone material, however, only if it remains chemically stable on contact with water. The presence of hydraulic phases such as larnite (2CaO SiO2) could cause dangerous elements to be released into the environment, i.e. Ba, V, Cr. Chemical treatment appears to be the only way to guarantee a completely stable structure, especially for long-term applications. This study presents the efficiency of silica addition during the deslagging period. Microstructural characterization of modified slag was performed by SEM and XRD analysis. Elution tests were performed according to the EN 12457-2 standard, with the addition of silica and without, and the obtained results were compared. These results demonstrate the efficiency of the inertization process: the added silica induces the formation of gehlenite, which, even in caustic environments, does not exhibit hydraulic behaviour.

  6. Use of Carbon Fiber Composite Molecular Sieves for Air Separation

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Frederick S; Contescu, Cristian I; Gallego, Nidia C; Burchell, Timothy D

    2005-09-01

    A novel adsorbent material, 'carbon fiber composite molecular sieve' (CFCMS), has been developed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Its features include high surface area, large pore volume, and a rigid, permeable carbon structure that exhibits significant electrical conductivity. The unique combination of high adsorptive capacity, permeability, good mechanical properties, and electrical conductivity represents an enabling technology for the development of novel gas separation and purification systems. In this context, it is proposed that a fast-cycle air separation process that exploits a kinetic separation of oxygen and nitrogen should be possible using a CFCMS material coupled with electrical swing adsorption (ESA). The adsorption of O{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, and CO{sub 2} on activated carbon fibers was investigated using static and dynamic techniques. Molecular sieving effects in the activated carbon fiber were highlighted by the adsorption of CO{sub 2}, a more sensitive probe molecule for the presence of microporosity in adsorbents. The kinetic studies revealed that O2 was more rapidly adsorbed on the carbon fiber than N{sub 2}, and with higher uptake under equilibrium conditions, providing the fiber contained a high proportion of very narrow micropores. The work indicated that CFCMS is capable of separating O{sub 2} and N{sub 2} from air on the basis of the different diffusion rates of the two molecules in the micropore network of the activated carbon fibers comprising the composite material. In response to recent enquires from several potential users of CFCMS materials, attention has been given to the development of a viable continuous process for the commercial production of CFCMS material. As part of this effort, work was implemented on characterizing the performance of lignin-based activated carbon fiber, a potentially lower cost fiber than the pitch-based fibers used for CFCMS production to date. Similarly, to address engineering issues, measurements were

  7. A model of reaction field in gas-injected arc-in-water method to synthesize single-walled carbon nanohorns: Influence of water temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Poonjarernsilp, Chantamanee; Sano, Noriaki; Tamon, Hajime; Charinpanitkul, Tawatchai

    2009-11-15

    The method to synthesize single-walled carbon nanohorns (SWCNHs) using gas-injected arc in water (GI-AIW) has been experimentally studied. GI-AIW is known as one of the cost-effective methods to obtain SWCNHs. It was revealed that the yield of SWCNHs significantly decreases with the increase in water temperature although the purity of SWCNHs is not dependent on the temperature change. Then the model of relevant reactions in the GI-AIW system was proposed by accounting the emission of carbon vapor, formation of SWCNHs, and diffusion of water vapor in three zones inside the cathode hole (arc plasma zone, quenching zone, and downstream zone). The side reaction between H{sub 2}O and C produces H{sub 2} gas and consumes a certain amount of carbon vapor, resulting in the hindered SWCNH formation. Moreover the observation of the optical spectra emitting from the arc plasma zone strongly supported that the H{sub 2} generating reaction does not occur at arc plasma zone since N{sub 2} flow can purge H{sub 2}O out. The model proposed in this study can precisely explain the correlation between H{sub 2} gas production and water temperature.

  8. Exergy parametric study of carbon monoxide oxidation in moist air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souidi, Ferhat; Benmalek, Toufik; Yesaad, Billel; Baik, Mouloud

    2015-12-01

    This study aims to analyze the oxidation of carbon monoxide in moist air from the second thermodynamic law aspect. A mathematical model of laminar premixed flame in a stagnation point flow has been achieved by numerical solution of the boundary layer equation using a self-made code. The chemical kinetic mechanism for flameless combustion of fuel, which is a mixture of carbon monoxide, oxygen, and water vapor, is modeled by 34 elementary reactions that incorporate (09) nine chemical species: CO, O, CO2, O2, H2O, H, H2, HO2, and OH. The salient point is that for all the parameters we considered, the exergy of the process is completely destroyed by irreversibilities. From the chemical viewpoint, the OH radical plays an essential role in CO oxidation. This latter point has already been mentioned by previous investigators.

  9. Carbon fibre composite for ventilation air methane (VAM) capture.

    PubMed

    Thiruvenkatachari, Ramesh; Su, Shi; Yu, Xin Xiang

    2009-12-30

    Coal mine methane (CMM) is not only a hazardous greenhouse gas but is also a wasted energy resource, if not utilised. This paper evaluates a novel adsorbent material developed for capturing methane from ventilation air methane (VAM) gas in underground coal mines. The adsorbent material is a honeycomb monolithic carbon fibre composite (HMCFC) consisting of multiple parallel flow-through channels and the material exhibits unique features including low pressure drop, good mechanical properties, ability to handle dust-containing gas streams, good thermal and electrical conductivity and selective adsorption of gases. During this study, a series of HMCFC adsorbents (using different types of carbon fibres) were successfully fabricated. Experimental data demonstrated the proof-of-concept of using the HMCFC adsorbent to capture methane from VAM gas. The adsorption capacity of the HMCFC adsorbent was twice that of commercial activated carbon. Methane concentration of 0.56% in the inlet VAM gas stream is reduced to about 0.011% after it passes through the novel carbon fibre composite adsorbent material at ambient temperature and atmospheric pressure. This amounts to a maximum capture efficiency of 98%. These encouraging laboratory scale studies have prompted further large scale trials and economic assessment.

  10. A carbon-air battery for high power generation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Binbin; Ran, Ran; Zhong, Yijun; Su, Chao; Tadé, Moses O; Shao, Zongping

    2015-03-16

    We report a carbon-air battery for power generation based on a solid-oxide fuel cell (SOFC) integrated with a ceramic CO2-permeable membrane. An anode-supported tubular SOFC functioned as a carbon fuel container as well as an electrochemical device for power generation, while a high-temperature CO2-permeable membrane composed of a CO3(2-) mixture and an O(2-) conducting phase (Sm(0.2)Ce(0.8)O(1.9)) was integrated for in situ separation of CO2 (electrochemical product) from the anode chamber, delivering high fuel-utilization efficiency. After modifying the carbon fuel with a reverse Boudouard reaction catalyst to promote the in situ gasification of carbon to CO, an attractive peak power density of 279.3 mW cm(-2) was achieved for the battery at 850 °C, and a small stack composed of two batteries can be operated continuously for 200 min. This work provides a novel type of electrochemical energy device that has a wide range of application potentials.

  11. Sedimentary Record of the Back-Arc Basins of South-Central Mexico: an Evolution from Extensional Basin to Carbonate Platform.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sierra-Rojas, M. I.; Molina-Garza, R. S.; Lawton, T. F.

    2015-12-01

    The Lower Cretaceous depositional systems of southwestern Oaxaquia, in south-central Mexico, were controlled by tectonic processes related to the instauration of a continental arc and the accretion of the Guerrero arc to mainland Mexico. The Atzompa Formation refers to a succession of conglomerate, sandstone, siltstone, and limestone that crop out in southwestern Mexico with Early Cretaceous fauna and detrital zircon maximum depositional ages. The sedimentary record shows a transition from early fluvial/alluvial to shallow marine depositional environments. The first stage corresponds to juvenile fluvial/alluvial setting followed by a deep lacustrine depositional environment, suggesting the early stages of an extensional basin. The second stage is characterized by anabranched deposits of axial fluvial systems flowing to the NE-SE, showing deposition during a period of rapid subsidence. The third and final stage is made of tidal deposits followed, in turn, by abrupt marine flooding of the basin and development of a Barremian-Aptian carbonate ramp. We interpret the Tentzo basin as a response to crustal extension in a back-arc setting, with high rates of sedimentation in the early stages of the basin (3-4 mm/m.y), slower rates during the development of starved fluvial to tidal systems and carbonate ramps, and at the top of the Atzompa Formation an abrupt deepening of the basin due to flexural subsidence related to terrane docking and attendant thrusting to the west. These events were recorded in the back-arc region of a continental convergent margin (Zicapa arc) where syn-sedimentary magmatism is indicated by Early Cretaceous detrital and volcanic clasts from alluvial fan facies west of the basin. Finally, and as a response to the accretion of the Guerrero superterrane to Oaxaquia during the Aptian, a carbonate platform facing toward the Gulf of Mexico was established in central to eastern Oaxaquia.

  12. Porosity control in nanoporous carbide-derived carbon by oxidation in air and carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Osswald, S.; Portet, C.; Gogotsi, Y.; Laudisio, G.; Singer, J.P.; Fischer, J.E.; Sokolov, V.V.; Kukushkina, J.A.; Kravchik, A.E.

    2009-07-15

    Carbide-derived carbons (CDC) allow a precise control over the pore size through the selection of the carbide precursor and varying of the synthesis conditions. However, their pore volume is limited by the carbide stoichiometry. While activation of carbons derived from various organic precursors has been widely studied, this process may similarly be able to increase the pore volume and specific surface area of CDC. Oxidation of carbide-derived carbon in air and CO{sub 2} at different temperatures and times allows for significant increase in pore volume and specific surface area as well as control over average pore size with subnanometer accuracy. The effect of activation and associated changes in the pore volume and surface area on the hydrogen uptake are also discussed. - Graphical abstract: Carbide-derived carbons (CDC) provide great potential for sorption of toxicants and gas storage applications. Activation of CDC in air and CO{sub 2} at different temperatures and times is applied in order to maximize pore volume and specific surface area, and control the average pore size with subnanometer accuracy.

  13. Carbon-based air electrodes carrying MnO 2 in zinc-air batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Zidong; Huang, Wenzhang; Zhang, Shengtao; Tan, Jun

    Catalysts prepared from the carbon black impregnated with manganous nitrate solution and then heated at temperature from 270°C to 450°C were investigated. It was found that the impregnated catalysts heated at temperature of 340°C exhibited the best catalytic activity for oxygen reduction in alkaline electrolyte. It was also found that the XRD spectra of pyrolytic MnO 2 from manganous nitrate over 340°C were different from those below 340°C. The enhanced catalysis of air electrodes was ascribed to the formation of MnO 2 crystal with d-value of 2.72 Å as the impregnated-catalysts was heated at temperature of 340°C. The other factors in preparation of air electrodes were also discussed.

  14. Synthesis and characterization of carbon black/manganese oxide air cathodes for zinc-air batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Po-Chieh; Hu, Chi-Chang; Lee, Tai-Chou; Chang, Wen-Sheng; Wang, Tsin Hai

    2014-12-01

    Due to the poor electric conductivity but the excellent catalytic ability for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), manganese dioxide in the α phase (denoted as α-MnO2) anchored onto carbon black powders (XC72) has been synthesized by the reflux method. The specific surface area and electric conductivity of the composites are generally enhanced by increasing the XC72 content while the high XC72 content will induce the formation of MnOOH which shows a worse ORR catalytic ability than α-MnO2. The ORR activity of such air cathodes have been optimized at the XC72/α-MnO2 ratio equal to 1 determined by the thermogravimetric analysis. By using this optimized cathode under the air atmosphere, the quasi-steady-state full-cell discharge voltages are equal to 1.353 and 1.178 V at 2 and 20 mA cm-2, respectively. Due to the usage of ambient air rather than pure oxygen, this Zn-air battery shows a modestly high discharge peak power density (67.51 mW cm-2) meanwhile the power density is equal to 47.22 mW cm-2 and the specific capacity is more than 750 mAh g-1 when this cell is operated at 1 V.

  15. Novel air electrode for metal-air battery with new carbon material and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Ross, P.N. Jr.

    1988-06-21

    This invention relates to a rechargeable battery or fuel cell. More particularly, this invention relates to a novel air electrode comprising a new carbon electrode support material and a method of making same. 3 figs.

  16. Removal of hexavalent chromium in carbonic acid solution by oxidizing slag discharged from steelmaking process in electric arc furnace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, Seiji; Okazaki, Kohei; Sasano, Junji; Izaki, Masanobu

    2014-02-01

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) is well-known to be a strong oxidizer, and is recognized as a carcinogen. Therefore, it is regulated for drinking water, soil, groundwater and sea by the environmental quality standards all over the world. In this study, it was attempted to remove Cr(VI) ion in a carbonic acid solution by the oxidizing slag that was discharged from the normal steelmaking process in an electric arc furnace. After the addition of the slag into the aqueous solution contained Cr(VI) ion, concentrations of Cr(VI) ion and total chromium (Cr(VI) + trivalent chromium (Cr(III)) ions decreased to lower detection limit of them. Therefore, the used slag could reduce Cr(VI) and fix Cr(III) ion on the slag. While Cr(VI) ion existed in the solution, iron did not dissolve from the slag. From the relation between predicted dissolution amount of iron(II) ion and amount of decrease in Cr(VI) ion, the Cr(VI) ion did not react with iron(II) ion dissolved from the slag. Therefore, Cr(VI) ion was removed by the reductive reaction between Cr(VI) ion and the iron(II) oxide (FeO) in the slag. This reaction progressed on the newly appeared surface of iron(II) oxide due to the dissolution of phase composed of calcium etc., which existed around iron(II) oxide grain in the slag.

  17. Hard coating of ultrananocrystalline diamond/nonhydrogenated amorphous carbon composite films on cemented tungsten carbide by coaxial arc plasma deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naragino, Hiroshi; Egiza, Mohamed; Tominaga, Aki; Murasawa, Koki; Gonda, Hidenobu; Sakurai, Masatoshi; Yoshitake, Tsuyoshi

    2016-08-01

    Ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD)/nonhydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C) composite (UNCD/a-C) films were deposited on cemented carbide containing Co by coaxial arc plasma deposition. With decreasing substrate temperature, the hardness was enhanced accompanied by an enhancement in the sp3/(sp2 + sp3). Energy-dispersive X-ray and secondary ion mass spectrometry spectroscopic measurements exhibited that the diffusion of Co atoms from the substrates into the films hardly occurs. The film deposited at room temperature exhibited the maximum hardness of 51.3 GPa and Young's modulus of 520.2 GPa, which evidently indicates that graphitization induced by Co in the WC substrates, and thermal deformation from sp3 to sp2 bonding are suppressed. The hard UNCD/a-C films can be deposited at a thickness of approximately 3 μm, which is an order larger than that of comparably hard a-C films. The internal compressive stress of the 51.3-GPa film is 4.5 GPa, which is evidently smaller than that of comparably hard a-C films. This is a reason for the thick deposition. The presence of a large number of grain boundaries in the film, which is a structural specific to UNCD/a-C films, might play a role in releasing the internal stress of the films.

  18. Diameter control of single-walled carbon nanotube forests from 1.3–3.0 nm by arc plasma deposition

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guohai; Seki, Yasuaki; Kimura, Hiroe; Sakurai, Shunsuke; Yumura, Motoo; Hata, Kenji; Futaba, Don N.

    2014-01-01

    We present a method to both precisely and continuously control the average diameter of single-walled carbon nanotubes in a forest ranging from 1.3 to 3.0 nm with ~1 Å resolution. The diameter control of the forest was achieved through tuning of the catalyst state (size, density, and composition) using arc plasma deposition of nanoparticles. This 1.7 nm control range and 1 Å precision exceed the highest reports to date. PMID:24448201

  19. Performance and operating characteristics of the arc-driven Langley 6-inch shock tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nealy, J. E.

    1972-01-01

    Performance characteristics for the arc-driven Langley 6-inch shock tube were determined for driver energies from 0.62 to 5 MJ. Voltage, current and pressure histories of the arc driver were recorded, and driver efficiencies were determined from measured shock velocities. Time-resolved spectra for test gases of air, carbon monoxide, xenon, and a mixture of 80 percent helium and 20 percent hydrogen are presented.

  20. Indoor Air Quality in Schools (IAQ): The Importance of Monitoring Carbon Dioxide Levels.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sundersingh, David; Bearg, David W.

    This article highlights indoor air quality and exposure to pollutants at school. Typical air pollutants within schools include environmental tobacco smoke, formaldehyde, volatile organic compounds, nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, allergens, pathogens, radon, pesticides, lead, and dust. Inadequate ventilation, inefficient…

  1. Carbon dioxide capture from atmospheric air using sodium hydroxide spray.

    PubMed

    Stolaroff, Joshuah K; Keith, David W; Lowry, Gregory V

    2008-04-15

    In contrast to conventional carbon capture systems for power plants and other large point sources, the system described in this paper captures CO2 directly from ambient air. This has the advantages that emissions from diffuse sources and past emissions may be captured. The objective of this research is to determine the feasibility of a NaOH spray-based contactor for use in an air capture system by estimating the cost and energy requirements per unit CO2 captured. A prototype system is constructed and tested to measure CO2 absorption, energy use, and evaporative water loss and compared with theoretical predictions. A numerical model of drop collision and coalescence is used to estimate operating parameters for a full-scale system, and the cost of operating the system per unit CO2 captured is estimated. The analysis indicates that CO2 capture from air for climate change mitigation is technically feasible using off-the-shelf technology. Drop coalescence significantly decreases the CO2 absorption efficiency; however, fan and pump energy requirements are manageable. Water loss is significant (20 mol H2O/mol CO2 at 15 degrees C and 65% RH) but can be lowered by appropriately designing and operating the system. The cost of CO2 capture using NaOH spray (excluding solution recovery and CO2 sequestration, which may be comparable) in the full-scale system is 96 $/ton-CO2 in the base case, and ranges from 53 to 127 $/ton-CO2 under alternate operating parameters and assumptions regarding capital costs and mass transfer rate. The low end of the cost range is reached by a spray with 50 microm mean drop diameter, which is achievable with commercially available spray nozzles.

  2. Arc-textured high emittance radiator surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    High emittance radiator surfaces are produced by arc-texturing. This process produces such a surface on a metal by scanning it with a low voltage electric arc from a carbon electrode in an inert environment.

  3. Mechanical properties and platelet adhesion behavior of diamond-like carbon films synthesized by pulsed vacuum arc plasma deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leng, Y. X.; Chen, J. Y.; Yang, P.; Sun, H.; Wan, G. J.; Huang, N.

    2003-05-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) is an attractive biomedical material due to its high inertness and excellent mechanical properties. In this study, DLC films were fabricated on Ti6Al4V and Si(1 0 0) substrates at room temperature by pulsed vacuum arc plasma deposition. By changing the argon flow from 0 to 13 sccm during deposition, the effects of argon flow on the characteristics of the DLC films were systematically examined to correlate to the blood compatibility. The microstructure and mechanical properties of the films were investigated using Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) surface analysis, a nano-indenter and pin-on-disk tribometer. The blood compatibility of the films was evaluated using in vitro platelet adhesion investigation, and the quantity and morphology of the adherent platelets was investigated employing optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The Raman spectroscopy results showed a decreasing sp 3 fraction (an increasing trend in ID/ IG ratio) with increasing argon flow from 0 to 13 sccm. The sp 3:sp 2 ratio of the films was evaluated from the deconvoluted XPS spectra. We found that the sp 3 fraction decreased as the argon flow was increased from 0 to 13 sccm, which is consistent with the results of the Raman spectra. The mechanical properties results confirmed the decreasing sp 3 content with increasing argon flow. The Raman D-band to G-band intensity ratio increased and the platelet adhesion behavior became better with higher flow. This implies that the blood compatibility of the DLC films is influenced by the sp 3:sp 2 ratio. DLC films deposited on titanium alloys have high wear resistance, low friction and good adhesion.

  4. Arc-discharge in solution: A novel synthesis method for carbon nanotubes and in situ decoration of carbon nanotubes with nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bera, Debasis

    2005-11-01

    During the last decade, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been envisioned for a host of different new applications. One of the objectives of the present research is to develop a simplified synthesis method for the production of large-scale, low-cost carbon nanotubes with functionality. Herein, a unique, simple, inexpensive and one-step synthesis route of CNTs and CNTs decorated with nanoparticles is reported. The method is simple arc-discharge in solution (ADS). For this new method, a full-fledged optoelectronically controlled instrument is reported here to achieve high efficiency and continuous bulk production of CNTs. In this system, a constant gap between the two electrodes is maintained using a photosensor which allows a continuous synthesis of the carbon nanostructures. The system operates in a feedback loop consisting of an electrode-gap detector and an analogue electronic unit, as controller. This computerized feed system was also used in single process step to produce in situ-decorated CNTs with a variety of industrially important nanoparticles. To name a few, we have successfully synthesized CNTs decorated with 3--4 nm ceria, silica and palladium nanoparticles for many industrially relevant applications. This process can be extended to synthesize decorated CNTs with other oxide and metallic nanoparticles. Sixty experimental runs were carried out for parametric analysis varying process parameters including voltage, current and precursors. The amount of yield with time, rate of erosion of the anode, and rate of deposition of carbonaceous materials on the cathode electrode were investigated. Normalized kinetic parameters were evaluated for different amperes from the sets of runs. The production rate of pristine CNT at 75 A is as high as 5.89 +/- 0.28 g.min-1. In this study, major emphasis was given on the characterizations of CNTs with and without nanoparticles using various techniques for surface and bulk analysis of the nanostructures. The nanostructures were

  5. Analysis of processes in DC arc plasma torches for spraying that use air as plasma forming gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frolov, V.; Ivanov, D.; Toropchin, A.

    2014-11-01

    Developed in Saint Petersburg State Polytechnical University technological processes of air-plasma spraying of wear-resistant, regenerating, hardening and decorative coatings used in number of industrial areas are described. The article contains examples of applications of air plasma spraying of coatings as well as results of mathematical modelling of processes in air plasma torches for spraying.

  6. Carbon Nanotube Emissions from Arc Discharge Production: Classification of Particle Types with Electron Microscopy and Comparison with Direct Reading Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Ludvigsson, Linus; Isaxon, Christina; Nilsson, Patrik T.; Tinnerberg, Hakan; Messing, Maria E.; Rissler, Jenny; Skaug, Vidar; Gudmundsson, Anders; Bohgard, Mats; Hedmer, Maria; Pagels, Joakim

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: An increased production and use of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is occurring worldwide. In parallel, a growing concern is emerging on the adverse effects the unintentional inhalation of CNTs can have on humans. There is currently a debate regarding which exposure metrics and measurement strategies are the most relevant to investigate workplace exposures to CNTs. This study investigated workplace CNT emissions using a combination of time-integrated filter sampling for scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and direct reading aerosol instruments (DRIs). Material and Methods: Field measurements were performed during small-scale manufacturing of multiwalled carbon nanotubes using the arc discharge technique. Measurements with highly time- and size-resolved DRI techniques were carried out both in the emission and background (far-field) zones. Novel classifications and counting criteria were set up for the SEM method. Three classes of CNT-containing particles were defined: type 1: particles with aspect ratio length:width >3:1 (fibrous particles); type 2: particles without fibre characteristics but with high CNT content; and type 3: particles with visible embedded CNTs. Results: Offline sampling using SEM showed emissions of CNT-containing particles in 5 out of 11 work tasks. The particles were classified into the three classes, of which type 1, fibrous CNT particles contributed 37%. The concentration of all CNT-containing particles and the occurrence of the particle classes varied strongly between work tasks. Based on the emission measurements, it was assessed that more than 85% of the exposure originated from open handling of CNT powder during the Sieving, mechanical work-up, and packaging work task. The DRI measurements provided complementary information, which combined with SEM provided information on: (i) the background adjusted emission concentration from each work task in different particle size ranges, (ii) identification of the key procedures in each work

  7. The research and implementation of coalfield spontaneous combustion of carbon emission WebGIS based on Silverlight and ArcGIS server

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Z.; Bi, J.; Wang, X.; Zhu, W.

    2014-02-01

    As an important sub-topic of the natural process of carbon emission data public information platform construction, coalfield spontaneous combustion of carbon emission WebGIS system has become an important study object. In connection with data features of coalfield spontaneous combustion carbon emissions (i.e. a wide range of data, which is rich and complex) and the geospatial characteristics, data is divided into attribute data and spatial data. Based on full analysis of the data, completed the detailed design of the Oracle database and stored on the Oracle database. Through Silverlight rich client technology and the expansion of WCF services, achieved the attribute data of web dynamic query, retrieval, statistical, analysis and other functions. For spatial data, we take advantage of ArcGIS Server and Silverlight-based API to invoke GIS server background published map services, GP services, Image services and other services, implemented coalfield spontaneous combustion of remote sensing image data and web map data display, data analysis, thematic map production. The study found that the Silverlight technology, based on rich client and object-oriented framework for WCF service, can efficiently constructed a WebGIS system. And then, combined with ArcGIS Silverlight API to achieve interactive query attribute data and spatial data of coalfield spontaneous emmission, can greatly improve the performance of WebGIS system. At the same time, it provided a strong guarantee for the construction of public information on China's carbon emission data.

  8. Nanostructured carbon materials based electrothermal air pump actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qing; Liu, Luqi; Kuang, Jun; Dai, Zhaohe; Han, Jinhua; Zhang, Zhong

    2014-05-01

    Actuator materials can directly convert different types of energy into mechanical energy. In this work, we designed and fabricated electrothermal air pump-type actuators by utilization of various nanostructured carbon materials, including single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), reduced graphene oxide (r-GO), and graphene oxide (GO)/SWCNT hybrid films as heating elements to transfer electrical stimulus into thermal energy, and finally convert it into mechanical energy. Both the actuation displacement and working temperature of the actuator films show the monotonically increasing trend with increasing driving voltage within the actuation process. Compared with common polymer nanocomposites based electrothermal actuators, our actuators exhibited better actuation performances with a low driving voltage (<10 V), large generated stress (tens of MPa), high gravimetric density (tens of J kg-1), and short response time (few hundreds of milliseconds). Besides that, the pump actuators exhibited excellent stability under cyclic actuation tests. Among these actuators, a relatively larger actuation strain was obtained for the r-GO film actuator due to the intrinsic gas-impermeability nature of graphene platelets. In addition, the high modulus of the r-GO and GO/SWCNT films also guaranteed the large generated stress and high work density. Specifically, the generated stress and gravimetric work density of the GO/SWCNT hybrid film actuator could reach up to more than 50 MPa and 30 J kg-1, respectively, under a driving voltage of 10 V. The resulting stress value is at least two orders of magnitude higher than that of natural muscles (~0.4 MPa).Actuator materials can directly convert different types of energy into mechanical energy. In this work, we designed and fabricated electrothermal air pump-type actuators by utilization of various nanostructured carbon materials, including single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), reduced graphene oxide (r-GO), and graphene oxide (GO)/SWCNT hybrid

  9. Nanostructured carbon materials based electrothermal air pump actuators.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qing; Liu, Luqi; Kuang, Jun; Dai, Zhaohe; Han, Jinhua; Zhang, Zhong

    2014-06-21

    Actuator materials can directly convert different types of energy into mechanical energy. In this work, we designed and fabricated electrothermal air pump-type actuators by utilization of various nanostructured carbon materials, including single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), reduced graphene oxide (r-GO), and graphene oxide (GO)/SWCNT hybrid films as heating elements to transfer electrical stimulus into thermal energy, and finally convert it into mechanical energy. Both the actuation displacement and working temperature of the actuator films show the monotonically increasing trend with increasing driving voltage within the actuation process. Compared with common polymer nanocomposites based electrothermal actuators, our actuators exhibited better actuation performances with a low driving voltage (<10 V), large generated stress (tens of MPa), high gravimetric density (tens of J kg(-1)), and short response time (few hundreds of milliseconds). Besides that, the pump actuators exhibited excellent stability under cyclic actuation tests. Among these actuators, a relatively larger actuation strain was obtained for the r-GO film actuator due to the intrinsic gas-impermeability nature of graphene platelets. In addition, the high modulus of the r-GO and GO/SWCNT films also guaranteed the large generated stress and high work density. Specifically, the generated stress and gravimetric work density of the GO/SWCNT hybrid film actuator could reach up to more than 50 MPa and 30 J kg(-1), respectively, under a driving voltage of 10 V. The resulting stress value is at least two orders of magnitude higher than that of natural muscles (∼ 0.4 MPa).

  10. Preparation of Fiber Based Binder Materials to Enhance the Gas Adsorption Efficiency of Carbon Air Filter.

    PubMed

    Lim, Tae Hwan; Choi, Jeong Rak; Lim, Dae Young; Lee, So Hee; Yeo, Sang Young

    2015-10-01

    Fiber binder adapted carbon air filter is prepared to increase gas adsorption efficiency and environmental stability. The filter prevents harmful gases, as well as particle dusts in the air from entering the body when a human inhales. The basic structure of carbon air filter is composed of spunbond/meltblown/activated carbon/bottom substrate. Activated carbons and meltblown layer are adapted to increase gas adsorption and dust filtration efficiency, respectively. Liquid type adhesive is used in the conventional carbon air filter as a binder material between activated carbons and other layers. However, it is thought that the liquid binder is not an ideal material with respect to its bonding strength and liquid flow behavior that reduce gas adsorption efficiency. To overcome these disadvantages, fiber type binder is introduced in our study. It is confirmed that fiber type binder adapted air filter media show higher strip strength, and their gas adsorption efficiencies are measured over 42% during 60 sec. These values are higher than those of conventional filter. Although the differential pressure of fiber binder adapted air filter is relatively high compared to the conventional one, short fibers have a good potential as a binder materials of activated carbon based air filter.

  11. Avoidance of 20% carbon dioxide-enriched air with humans.

    PubMed Central

    Lejuez, C W; O'Donnell, J; Wirth, O; Zvolensky, M J; Eifert, G H

    1998-01-01

    Four college students were exposed to a Sidman avoidance procedure to determine if an avoidance contingency involving 20% carbon dioxide-enriched air (CO2) would produce and maintain responding. In Phase 1, two conditions (contingent and noncontingent) were conducted each day. These conditions were distinguished by the presence or absence of a blue or green box on a computer screen. In the contingent condition, CO2 presentation were delivered every 3 s unless a subject pulled a plunger. Each plunger pull postponed CO2 presentations for 10 s. In the noncontingent condition, CO2 presentations occurred on the average of every 5 min independent of responding. Following stable responding in Phase 1, condition-correlated stimuli were reversed. In both conditions, plunger response rate was high during the contingent condition and low or zero during the noncontingent condition. Furthermore, subjects avoided most CO2 presentations. However, CO2 presentations did not increase verbal reports of fear. Overall, the results from the present study suggest that CO2 can be used effectively in basic studies of aversive control and in laboratory analogues of response patterns commonly referred to as anxiety. PMID:9684345

  12. Cathodic arcs

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre

    2003-10-29

    Cathodic arc plasma deposition has become the technology of choice for hard, wear and corrosion resistant coatings for a variety of applications. The history, basic physics of cathodic arc operation, the infamous macroparticle problem and common filter solutions, and emerging high-tech applications are briefly reviewed. Cathodic arc plasmas standout due to their high degree of ionization, with important consequences for film nucleation, growth, and efficient utilization of substrate bias. Industrial processes often use cathodic arc plasma in reactive mode. In contrast, the science of arcs has focused on the case of vacuum arcs. Future research directions include closing the knowledge gap for reactive mode, large area coating, linear sources and filters, metal plasma immersion process, with application in high-tech and biomedical fields.

  13. Arc Synthesis of Fullerenes from the Carbide of Waste Cloths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Koichiro; Mieno, Tetsu

    2000-09-01

    A great many scraps of cotton cloth are disposed of as industrial waste through making clothes. The purpose of this study is to transform the waste into very valuable carbon compounds, that is, fullerenes. The scraps were piled and carbonized in air at 1050°C. By carbonization, the weight of the scraps decreased to 16-18%. Carbide from the scraps was used as the raw material for synthesizing fullerenes with the \\mbi{J}×\\mbi{B} arc discharge method. The soot that was deposited on the inside of the vacuum chamber contained C60 (>0.05 wt%), C70 and higher fullerenes.

  14. Exploring the structural controls on helium, nitrogen and carbon isotope signatures in hydrothermal fluids along an intra-arc fault system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tardani, Daniele; Reich, Martin; Roulleau, Emilie; Takahata, Naoto; Sano, Yuji; Pérez-Flores, Pamela; Sánchez-Alfaro, Pablo; Cembrano, José; Arancibia, Gloria

    2016-07-01

    There is a general agreement that fault-fracture meshes exert a primary control on fluid flow in both volcanic/magmatic and geothermal/hydrothermal systems. For example, in geothermal systems and epithermal gold deposits, optimally oriented faults and fractures play a key role in promoting fluid flow through high vertical permeability pathways. In the Southern Volcanic Zone (SVZ) of the Chilean Andes, both volcanism and hydrothermal activity are strongly controlled by the Liquiñe-Ofqui Fault System (LOFS), an intra-arc, strike-slip fault, and by the Arc-oblique Long-lived Basement Fault System (ALFS), a set of transpressive NW-striking faults. However, the role that principal and subsidiary fault systems exert on magma degassing, hydrothermal fluid flow and fluid compositions remains poorly constrained. In this study we report new helium, carbon and nitrogen isotope data (3He/4He, δ13C-CO2 and δ15N) of a suite of fumarole and hot spring gas samples from 23 volcanic/geothermal localities that are spatially associated with either the LOFS or the ALFS in the central part of the SVZ. The dataset is characterized by a wide range of 3He/4He ratios (3.39 Ra to 7.53 Ra, where Ra = (3He/4He)air), δ13C-CO2 values (-7.44‰ to -49.41‰) and δ15N values (0.02‰ to 4.93‰). The regional variations in 3He/4He, δ13C-CO2 and δ15N values are remarkably consistent with those reported for 87Sr/86Sr in lavas along the studied segment, which are strongly controlled by the regional spatial distribution of faults. Two fumaroles gas samples associated with the northern "horsetail" transtensional termination of the LOFS are the only datapoints showing uncontaminated MORB-like 3He/4He signatures. In contrast, the dominant mechanism controlling helium isotope ratios of hydrothermal systems towards the south appears to be the mixing between mantle-derived helium and a radiogenic component derived from, e.g., magmatic assimilation of 4He-rich country rocks or contamination during the

  15. Characteristics and mechanical properties of titanium-containing diamond like carbon films deposited by cathodic arc evaporation.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Pi-Chuen; Chiang, Jueh-Yu; Hwang, Yen-Fei

    2008-05-01

    Depositions of titanium-containing diamond-like carbon (Ti-DLC) films were conducted by mixing C+ and Ti+ plasma streams originated from cathodic arc plasma sources in argon (Ar). The deposition was processed at Ti target current ranging from 20 Amp to 70 Amp. Film characteristics were investigated using Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Film microstructures were evaluated using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FEGSEM), an atomic force microscope (AFM), X-ray diffractometry (XRD) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). Mechanical properties were investigated by using a nanoindentation tester and ball on disc wear test. Results shows that surface roughness (Ra) of the films ranged between 2.4 and 7.2 nm and roughness increased relative to the increase in Ti target current. The FESEM studies showed that the surface micrographs of Ti-DLC films revealed a cauliflower-like microstructure and the cross-sectional micrograph revealed a snake-skin like structure. HRTEM studies showed that the Ti-DLC films consisted of nano scale TiC particles which were comparable with low angle XRD and XPS results. XPS analysis established that the Ti2p spectrum is present when the Ti target current reaches 30 Amp or higher. Ti concentration increased as the Ti target current was increased. An extremely thin TiO2 layer exists on the top of the Ti-DLC films which was comparable with the AES results. The film thickness which could be deposited for Ti-DLC is much higher than that of conventional DLC films. Nanoindentation tests show that the nanohardness of the films ranging 15-22 GPa, with Er values ranging from 145 to 175 GPa. The wear test demonstrates the friction coefficient of the 420SS substrate, DLC and Ti-DLC films were about 0.8, 0.3 and 0.2, respectively. Obviously, the friction coefficients of the Ti-DLC films were lower than that of the DLC films.

  16. More New Carbon in the Soil of a Poplar Plantation Under Free Air Carbon Enrichment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoosbeek, M. R.

    2002-12-01

    Early 1999 three FACE (Free Air Carbon Enrichment) and three control rings were installed on former agricultural fields near Viterbo, Italy. A 9 ha poplar plantation was established using hardwood cuttings. Within the rings two Populus species and one hybrid were planted (P. nigra, P. alba, P.x euramericana) at a density of 10000 per ha. The 314 m2 circular plots were divided in six sectors, with two sectors per species. Carbon enrichment was achieved by injection of pure CO2 through laser drilled holes in tubing mounted on telescopic poles. The average CO2 concentration was 544 +/- 48 micromol mol-1. During the first year the total C content of the soils decreased on average from 1.05% to 0.95%. During the second and third year the total soil carbon content remained more or less stable, while no treatment effects could be detected due to the large C pool as compared to the annual C influx. The d13C signature of the CO2 enrichment gas was close to that of ambient CO2, and could therefore not be used as an isotopic signal to follow the incorporation of new carbon into the soil carbon pool. Instead we used root ingrowth cores (40 cm deep, 4 cm in diameter) filled with sieved and well mixed C4 soil. This C4 soil with a d13C value of -18.33 was obtained from a similar soil that had been under corn for many years. For each incubation period, species and rings, two ingrowth cores were placed in the C3 soil. Fractions of new carbon were calculated with a simple mixing model. Multiplying these fractions with the total C content yielded the new C contents (by weight percentage). During the first year no treatment effect was detected. During the second year, new soil C% under P. alba was respectively 0.12 under ambient and 0.15 under increased CO2 treatment (P= 0.07). The third year showed the same effect on new soil C%, i.e. with P. alba respectively 0.07 under ambient and 0.13 under increased CO2 treatment (P= 0.02), and with P. nigra respectively 0.08 under ambient and 0

  17. Unstable behavior of anodic arc discharge for synthesis of nanomaterials

    DOE PAGES

    Gershman, Sophia; Raitses, Yevgeny

    2016-07-27

    A short carbon arc operating with a high ablation rate of the graphite anode exhibits a combined motion of the arc and the arc attachment to the anode. A characteristic time scale of this motion is in a 10-3 sec range. The arc exhibits a negative differential resistance before the arc motion occurs. Thermal processes in the arc plasma region interacting with the ablating anode are considered as possible causes of this unstable arc behavior. It is also hypothesized that the arc motion could potentially cause mixing of the various nanoparticles synthesized in the arc in the high ablation regime.

  18. Unstable behavior of anodic arc discharge for synthesis of nanomaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Gershman, Sophia; Raitses, Yevgeny

    2016-07-27

    A short carbon arc operating with a high ablation rate of the graphite anode exhibits a combined motion of the arc and the arc attachment to the anode. A characteristic time scale of this motion is in a 10-3 sec range. The arc exhibits a negative differential resistance before the arc motion occurs. Thermal processes in the arc plasma region interacting with the ablating anode are considered as possible causes of this unstable arc behavior. It is also hypothesized that the arc motion could potentially cause mixing of the various nanoparticles synthesized in the arc in the high ablation regime.

  19. Predicting the dilution of plasma transferred arc hardfacing of stellite on carbon steel using response surface methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakshminarayanan, A. K.; Balasubramanian, V.; Varahamoorthy, R.; Babu, S.

    2008-12-01

    Control of dilution is important in hardfacing, where low dilution is typically desirable. At present, most fabrication industries use shielded metal are welding, gas metal arc welding, gas tungsten arc welding and submerged are welding processes for hardfacing purposes. In these processes, the percentage of the dilution level is higher, ranging between 10% and 30%. In Plasma Transferred Arc (PTA) hardfacing, a solidified metallurgical bond between the deposit and the substrate is obtained with minimum dilution (less than 10%). This paper highlights the application of response surface methodology to predict and optimize the percentage of the dilution of a cobalt-based hardfaced surface produced by the PTA process. Experiments were conducted based on a fully replicable five-factor, five-level central composite rotatable design and a mathematical model was developed using response surface methodology. Furthermore, the response surface methodology was used to optimize the process parameters that yield the lowest percentage of dilution.

  20. Settlement with Continental Carbon Company to Reduce Air Pollution at Manufacturing Facilities in Three States

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    WASHINGTON - In a settlement with the United States and the states of Alabama and Oklahoma, Continental Carbon Company has agreed to install pollution control technology that will significantly cut emissions of harmful air pollutants at manufacturin

  1. Settlement with Continental Carbon Company to Reduce Air Pollution at Manufacturing Facility in Okla. and Texas

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    WASHINGTON - In a settlement with the United States and the states of Alabama and Oklahoma, Continental Carbon Company has agreed to install pollution control technology that will significantly cut emissions of harmful air pollutants at manufacturing facil

  2. PERFORMANCE OF ACTIVATED SLUDGE-POWDERED ACTIVATED CARBON-WET AIR REGENERATION SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The investigation summarized in the report was undertaken to evaluate the performance of powdered activated carbon (PAC) technology used in conjunction with wet air regeneration (WAR) at municipal wastewater treatment plants. Excessive ash concentrations accumulated in the mixed ...

  3. Making Conductive Polymers By Arc Tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daech, Alfred F.

    1992-01-01

    Experimental technique for fabrication of electrically conductive polymeric filaments based on arc tracking, in which electrical arc creates conductive carbon track in material that initially was insulator. Electrically conductive polymeric structures made by arc tracking aligned along wire on which formed. Alignment particularly suited to high conductivity and desirable in materials intended for testing as candidate superconductors.

  4. Experimental investigation of supersonic low pressure air plasma flows obtained with different arc-jet operating conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Lago, Viviana; Ndiaye, Abdoul-Aziz

    2012-11-27

    A stationary arc-jet plasma flow at low pressure is used to simulate some properties of the gas flow surrounding a vehicle during its entry into celestial body's atmospheres. This paper presents an experimental study concerning plasmas simulating a re-entry into our planet. Optical measurements have been carried out for several operating plasma conditions in the free stream, and in the shock layer formed in front of a flat cylindrical plate, placed in the plasma jet. The analysis of the spectral radiation enabled the identification of the emitting species, the determination of the rotational and vibrational temperatures in the free-stream and in the shock layer and the determination of the distance of the shock to the flat plate face. Some plasma fluid parameters like, stagnation pressure, specific enthalpy and heat flux have been determined experimentally along the plasma-jet axis.

  5. Livestock Air Treatment Using PVA-Coated Powdered Activated Carbon Biofilter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ideal biofilter media provide surface for attachment of microorganisms responsible for removing air-born contaminants while facilitating passage of air. This study evaluated the efficacy of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)-coated powdered activated carbon particles as a biofiltration medium. This material e...

  6. The transfer of carbon fibers through a commercial aircraft water separator and air cleaner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyers, J. A.

    1979-01-01

    The fraction of carbon fibers passing through a water separator and an air filter was determined in order to estimate the proportion of fibers outside a closed aircraft that are transmitted to the electronics through the air conditioning system. When both devices were used together and only fibers 3 mm or larger were considered, a transfer function of .001 was obtained.

  7. No slab-derived CO2 in Mariana Trough back-arc basalts: Implications for carbon subduction and for temporary storage of CO2 beneath slow spreading ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacPherson, Colin G.; Hilton, David R.; Hammerschmidt, Konrad

    2010-11-01

    The Southern Mariana Trough is particularly well suited to study mass balance in subduction zones because the flux of material recycled from the subducted slab has been shown to diminish to negligible levels in the southernmost part of the area. We present new He and Ar concentration and isotopic data for 16 back-arc basaltic glasses and combine these with previously published CO2 and H2O concentration and δ13C data to explore the recycling of carbon and light noble gases in the Mariana back arc. Degassing has affected all samples and is particularly extensive in more water-rich samples, i.e., those containing the largest recycled component. The degassing history features three stages: (1) deep degassing which commenced when the melt reached saturation of CO2 and noble gases in the mantle, (2) preeruptive degassing during storage in the crust-mantle transition zone which involved addition of extraneous CO2 to the vapor phase, and (3) eruption. CO2 released during stage 1 was, at least partially, incorporated into wall rock and subsequently remobilized during stage 2 degassing of later magma batches. Reconstructed parental values for 3He/4He, δ13C, CO2/3He, and CO2/40Ar* are indistinguishable from those of mid-ocean ridge basalt. This implies that there is negligible recycling of subducted carbon, helium, or argon into the source of Mariana Trough basalt.

  8. Air annealing effects on the optical properties of ZnO SnO2 thin films deposited by a filtered vacuum arc deposition system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çetinörgü, E.; Goldsmith, S.; Boxman, R. L.

    2006-03-01

    ZnO-SnO2 transparent and conducting thin films were deposited on microscope glass substrates by a filtered vacuum arc deposition (FVAD) system. The cathode was prepared with 50%:50% atomic concentration of Zn:Sn. The films were annealed in air at 500 °C for 1 h. Structural and compositional analyses were obtained using XRD and XPS diagnostics. X-ray diffraction analysis indicated that as-deposited and air-annealed thin ZnO-SnO2 films were amorphous. The atomic ratio of Zn to Sn in the film obtained using the 50%:50% cathode as determined by XPS analysis was ~2.7:1 in the bulk film. The optical properties were determined from normal incidence transmission measurements. Film transmission in the visible was 70% to 90%, affected by interference effects. Annealed films did not show higher transmission in the VIS compared to as-deposited films. Assuming that the interband electron transition is direct, the optical band gap was found to be in the range 3.34-3.61 eV for both as-deposited and annealed films. However, the average Eg for annealed films was 3.6 eV, larger by 0.2 eV than that of as-deposited. The refractive index n increased while the extinction index k decreased significantly with annealing.

  9. Fabrication and characterization of carbon nanofiber@mesoporous carbon core-shell composite for the Li-air battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Myeong Jun; Shin, Moo Whan

    2014-11-01

    In this study, we successfully design and synthesize the mesoporous carbon coated carbon nanofibers (CNF@mesoCs) for the Li-air battery. The composites are fabricated via electrospinning technique and nanocasting strategy. After mesoporous carbon coating process, the composites have retained their original one-dimensional structure as pristine carbon nanofibers. Every nanofiber entangles with each other to form a three-dimensional cross-linked web structure. Because of the mesoporous carbon coating on carbon nanofibers, the surface area increases from 708 m2 g-1 to 2194 m2 g-1. We confirm that the mesoporous carbon coated on carbon nanofibers is well-graphitized by analysis of Raman spectra. The graphitized surface of CNF@mesoCs (4.638 S cm-1) is believed to result in their higher electrical conductivity than that of pristine carbon nanofibers (3.0759 S cm-1). Without employment of any binders and metal foams, the cathode of CNF@mesoCs exhibits high discharge capacity of 4000 mA h g-1, which is much higher than that from pristine carbon nanofibers (2750 mA h g-1). This work demonstrates that the fabricated CNF@mesoCs structures have a great potential to be employed as light-weight and efficient electrode for energy storage and conversion devices.

  10. Performance and cycle life of carbon- and conductive-based air electrodes for rechargeable Zn-air battery applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chellapandi Velraj, Samgopiraj

    The development of high-performance, cyclically stable bifunctional air electrodes are critical to the commercial deployment of rechargeable Zn-air batteries. The carbon material predominantly used as support material in the air electrodes due to its higher surface area and good electrical conductivity suffers from corrosion at high oxygen evolution overpotentials. This study addresses the carbon corrosion issues and suggests alternate materials to replace the carbon as support in the air electrode. In this study, Sm0.5Sr0.5CoO3-delta with good electrochemical performance and cyclic lifetime was identified as an alternative catalyst material to the commonly used La0.4Ca 0.6CoO3 catalyst for the carbon-based bifunctional electrodes. Also, a comprehensive study on the effects of catalyst morphology, testing conditions on the cycle life as well as the relevant degradation mechanism for the carbon-based electrode was conducted in this dissertation. The cyclic life of the carbon-based electrodes was strongly dependent on the carbon support material, while the degradation mechanisms were entirely controlled by the catalyst particle size/morphology. Some testing conditions like resting time and electrolyte concentration did not change the cyclic life or degradation mechanism of the carbon-based electrode. The current density used for cyclic testing was found to dictate the degradation mechanism leading to the electrode failure. An alternate way to circumvent the carbon corrosion is to replace the carbon support with a suitable electrically-conductive ceramic material. In this dissertation, LaNi0.9Mn0.1O3, LaNi 0.8Co0.2O3, and NiCo2O4 were synthesized and evaluated as prospective support materials due to their good electrical conductivity and their ability to act as the catalyst needed for the bifunctional electrode. The carbon-free electrodes had remarkably higher catalytic activity for oxygen evolution reaction (OER) when compared to the carbon-based electrode. However

  11. Modelling the relative stability of carbon nanotubes exposed to environmental adsorbates and air.

    PubMed

    Barnard, Amanda S

    2009-04-08

    In parallel with the development of technological applications for carbon nanotubes, issues related to toxicology and environmental impact are also under increased scrutiny. It is clear from the available literature that the integrity of future carbon nanotube-based devices, our ability to anticipate failure of these devices, and our ability to manage the toxicological and environmental impacts require a detailed understanding of the stability of pure and functionalized carbon nanotubes under a full range of environmental conditions. Motivated by this endeavour, the present study uses a general thermodynamic model to predict the relative stability of carbon nanotubes exposed to a variety of atmospheric adsorbates, and uses them to examine the stability of nanotubes in air, as a function of the relative humidity. In general the results indicate that the adsorption of a sparse coverage of air is thermodynamically favoured, depending on the humidity, and the stability of small diameter nanotubes may be improved by exposure to humid air.

  12. Development of carbon-based cathodes for Li-air batteries: Present and future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Hyungsub; Kang, Joonhyeon; Kim, Jaewook; Kim, Chunjoong; Nam, Seunghoon; Park, Byungwoo

    2016-09-01

    Rechargeable lithium-air (Li-air) batteries are regarded as one of the most fascinating energy storage devices for use in the future electric vehicles, since Li-air batteries provide ten-times-higher theoretical capacities than those from current Li-ion batteries. Nonetheless, Li-air batteries have not yet been implemented to the market because of several major drawbacks such as low capacity, poor cycle life, and low round-trip efficiency. These battery performances are highly dependent on the design of air cathodes, thus much effort has been devoted to the development of high performance cathode. Among various materials, carbonaceous materials have been widely studied as the basis of air cathodes especially for non-aqueous Li-O2 cells due to their high electric conductivity, low cost, and ease of fabrication. This review summarizes the history, scientific background, and perspectives of Liair batteries, particularly from the viewpoint of carbon-based air cathodes.

  13. Gas Tungsten Arc Welding and Plasma Arc Cutting. Teacher Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortney, Clarence; And Others

    This welding curriculum guide treats two topics in detail: the care of tungsten electrodes and the entire concept of contamination control and the hafnium electrode and its importance in dual-air cutting systems that use compressed shop air for plasma arc cutting activities. The guide contains three units of instruction that cover the following…

  14. Consolidating NASA's Arc Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balboni, John A.; Gokcen, Tahir; Hui, Frank C. L.; Graube, Peter; Morrissey, Patricia; Lewis, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    The paper describes the consolidation of NASA's high powered arc-jet testing at a single location. The existing plasma arc-jet wind tunnels located at the Johnson Space Center were relocated to Ames Research Center while maintaining NASA's technical capability to ground-test thermal protection system materials under simulated atmospheric entry convective heating. The testing conditions at JSC were reproduced and successfully demonstrated at ARC through close collaboration between the two centers. New equipment was installed at Ames to provide test gases of pure nitrogen mixed with pure oxygen, and for future nitrogen-carbon dioxide mixtures. A new control system was custom designed, installed and tested. Tests demonstrated the capability of the 10 MW constricted-segmented arc heater at Ames meets the requirements of the major customer, NASA's Orion program. Solutions from an advanced computational fluid dynamics code were used to aid in characterizing the properties of the plasma stream and the surface environment on the calorimeters in the supersonic flow stream produced by the arc heater.

  15. Research Update: Direct conversion of amorphous carbon into diamond at ambient pressures and temperatures in air

    SciTech Connect

    Narayan, Jagdish Bhaumik, Anagh

    2015-10-01

    We report on fundamental discovery of conversion of amorphous carbon into diamond by irradiating amorphous carbon films with nanosecond lasers at room-temperature in air at atmospheric pressure. We can create diamond in the form of nanodiamond (size range <100 nm) and microdiamond (>100 nm). Nanosecond laser pulses are used to melt amorphous diamondlike carbon and create a highly undercooled state, from which various forms of diamond can be formed upon cooling. The quenching from the super undercooled state results in nucleation of nanodiamond. It is found that microdiamonds grow out of highly undercooled state of carbon, with nanodiamond acting as seed crystals.

  16. Elements of arc welding

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    This paper looks at the following arc welding techniques: (1) shielded metal-arc welding; (2) submerged-arc welding; (3) gas metal-arc welding; (4) flux-cored arc welding; (5) electrogas welding; (6) gas tungsten-arc welding; and (7) plasma-arc welding.

  17. Mantle and Crustal Sources of Carbon, Nitrogen, and Noble gases in Cascade-Range and Aleutian-Arc Volcanic gases

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Symonds, Robert B.; Poreda, Robert J.; Evans, William C.; Janik, Cathy J.; Ritchie, Beatrice E.

    2003-01-01

    Here we report anhydrous chemical (CO2, H2S, N2, H2, CH4, O2, Ar, He, Ne) and isotopic (3He/4He, 40Ar/36Ar, δ13C of CO2, δ13C of CH4, δ15N) compositions of virtually airfree gas samples collected between 1994 and 1998 from 12 quiescent but potentially restless volcanoes in the Cascade Range and Aleutian Arc (CRAA). Sample sites include ≤173°C fumaroles and springs at Mount Shasta, Mount Hood, Mount St. Helens, Mount Rainier, Mount Baker, Augustine Volcano, Mount Griggs, Trident, Mount Mageik, Aniakchak Crater, Akutan, and Makushin. The chemical and isotopic data generally point to magmatic (CO2, Ar, He), shallow crustal sedimentary (hereafter, SCS) (CO2, N2, CH4), crustal (He), and meteoric (N2, Ar) sources of volatiles. CH4 clearly comes from SCS rocks in the subvolcanic systems because CH4 cannot survive the higher temperatures of deeper potential sources. Further evidence for a SCS source for CH4 as well as for non-mantle CO2 and non-meteoric N2 comes from isotopic data that show wide variations between volcanoes that are spatially very close and similar isotopic signatures from volcanoes from very disparate areas. Our results are in direct opposition to many recent studies on other volcanic arcs (Kita and others, 1993; Sano and Marty, 1995; Fischer and others, 1998), in that they point to a dearth of subducted components of CO2 and N2 in the CRAA discharges. Either the CRAA volcanoes are fundamentally different from volcanoes in other arcs or we need to reevaluate the significance of subducted C and N recycling in convergent-plate volcanoes.

  18. Destruction of hazardous military wastes using plasma arc technology

    SciTech Connect

    Kanaras, L.; Qazi, M.

    1996-12-31

    A Plasma Arc Technology (PAT) system treats hazardous wastes in a furnace, at temperatures of 2,000 C, or higher, using a plasma torch. The organic components vaporize, decompose or oxidize. The off-gases consist of hydrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide and nitric oxides. A wet air scrubber is used to remove most of these gases. The scrubber water is treated and recycled. Metal-bearing solids are melted or vaporized. The solids are usually recovered as molten metal, or as non-leachable vitrified slag, suitable for disposal in a landfill. A Plasma Arc Centrifugal Treatment system was used to evaluate this technology for destruction of four military hazardous wastes: sludge from Longhorn Army Ammunition Plant, TX; blast media from Letterkenny Army Depot, PA; medical incineration ash from Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD; and contaminated soil from open burning/open detonation ground at Picatinny Arsenal, NJ.

  19. Functionalization of Hydrogen-free Diamond-like Carbon Films using Open-air Dielectric Barrier Discharge Atmospheric Plasma Treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA; Instituto de Materiales de Madrid, C.S.I.C., Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid, Spain; Instituto de Quimica-Fisica"Rocasolano"C.S.I.C., 28006 Madrid, Spain; Mahasarakham University, Mahasarakham 44150, Thailand; CASTI, CNR-INFM Regional Laboratory, L'Aquila 67100, Italy; SUNY Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, NY 13210, USA; Endrino, Jose; Endrino, J. L.; Marco, J. F.; Poolcharuansin, P.; Phani, A.R.; Allen, M.; Albella, J. M.; Anders, A.

    2007-12-28

    A dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) technique has been employed to produce uniform atmospheric plasmas of He and N2 gas mixtures in open air in order to functionalize the surface of filtered-arc deposited hydrogen-free diamond-like carbon (DLC) films. XPS measurements were carried out on both untreated and He/N2 DBD plasma treated DLC surfaces. Chemical states of the C 1s and N 1s peaks were collected and used to characterize the surface bonds. Contact angle measurements were also used to record the short- and long-term variations in wettability of treated and untreated DLC. In addition, cell viability tests were performed to determine the influence of various He/N2 atmospheric plasma treatments on the attachment of osteoblast MC3T3 cells. Current evidence shows the feasibility of atmospheric plasmas in producing long-lasting variations in the surface bonding and surface energy of hydrogen-free DLC and consequently the potential for this technique in the functionalization of DLC coated devices.

  20. Chemical bonding structural analysis of nitrogen-doped ultrananocrystalline diamond/hydrogenated amorphous carbon composite films prepared by coaxial arc plasma deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gima, Hiroki; Zkria, Abdelrahman; Katamune, Yūki; Ohtani, Ryota; Koizumi, Satoshi; Yoshitake, Tsuyoshi

    2017-01-01

    Nitrogen-doped ultra-nanocrystalline diamond/hydrogenated amorphous carbon composite films prepared in hydrogen and nitrogen mixed-gas atmospheres by coaxial arc plasma deposition with graphite targets were studied electrically and chemical-bonding-structurally. The electrical conductivity was increased by nitrogen doping, accompanied by the production of n-type conduction. From X-ray photoemission, near-edge X-ray absorption fine-structure, hydrogen forward-scattering, and Fourier transform infrared spectral results, it is expected that hydrogen atoms that terminate diamond grain boundaries will be partially replaced by nitrogen atoms and, consequently, π C-N and C=N bonds that easily generate free electrons will be formed at grain boundaries.

  1. Room-temperature hard coating of ultrananocrystalline diamond/nonhydrogenated amorphous carbon composite films on tungsten carbide by coaxial arc plasma deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naragino, Hiroshi; Egiza, Mohamed; Tominaga, Aki; Murasawa, Koki; Gonda, Hidenobu; Sakurai, Masatoshi; Yoshitake, Tsuyoshi

    2016-03-01

    Ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD)/nonhydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C) composite films were deposited on unheated WC containing Co by coaxial arc plasma deposition. The hardness of the film is 51.3 GPa, which is comparable with the highest values of hard a-C films deposited on nonbiased substrates. The deposited film is approximately 3 µm thick, which is one order larger than that of hard a-C films. The internal compressive stress is 4.5 GPa, which is evidently smaller than that of comparably hard a-C films. The existence of a large number of grain boundaries in the UNCD/a-C film might play a role in the release of the internal stress.

  2. High-Performance Sorbents for Carbon Dioxide Capture from Air

    SciTech Connect

    Sholl, David; Jones, Christopher

    2013-03-13

    This project has focused on capture of CO{sub 2} from ambient air (“air capture”). If this process is technically and economically feasible, it could potentially contribute to net reduction of CO{sub 2} emissions in ways that are complementary to better developed techniques for CO{sub 2} from concentrated point sources. We focused on cyclic adsorption processes for CO{sub 2} capture from air in which the entire cycle is performed at moderate temperatures. The project involved both experimental studies of sorbent materials and process level modeling of cyclic air capture processes. In our experimental work, a series of amine-functionalized silica adsorbents were prepared and characterized to determine the impact of molecular architecture on CO{sub 2} capture. Some key findings were: • Amine functionalized silicas can be prepared with high enough CO{sub 2} capacities under ambient conditions to merit consideration for use in air capture processes. • Primary amines are better candidates for CO{sub 2} capture than secondary or tertiary amines, both in terms of amine efficiency for CO{sub 2} adsorption and enhanced water affinity. • Mechanistic understanding of degradation of these materials can enable control of molecular architecture to significantly improve material stability. Our process modeling work provided the first publically available cost and energy estimates for cyclic adsorption processes for air capture of CO{sub 2}. Some key findings were: • Cycles based on diurnal ambient heating and cooling cannot yield useful purities or amounts of captured CO{sub 2}. • Cycles based on steam desorption at 110 oC can yield CO{sub 2} purities of ~88%. • The energy requirements for cycles using steam desorption are dominated by needs for thermal input, which results in lower costs than energy input in the form of electricity. Cyclic processes with operational costs of less than $100 tCO{sub 2}-net were described, and these results point to process and

  3. Novel air electrode for metal-air battery with new carbon material and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Ross, Jr., Philip N.

    1990-01-01

    A novel carbonaceous electrode support material is disclosed characterized by a corrosion rate of 0.03 wt. %/hour or less when measured a5 550 millivolts vs. a Hg/HgO electrode in a 30 wt. % KOH electrolyte a5 30.degree. C. The electrode support material comprises a preselected carbon black material which has been heat-treated by heating the material to a temperature of from about 2500.degree. to about 3000.degree. C. over a period of from about 1 to about 5 hours in an inert atmosphere and then maintaining the preselected carbon black material at this temperature for a period of at least about 1 hour, and preferably about 2 hours, in the inert atmosphere. A carbonaceous electrode suitable for use as an air electrode in a metal-air cell may be made from the electrode support material by shaping and forming it into a catalyst support and then impregnating it with a catalytically active material capable of catalyzing the reaction with oxygen at the air electrode of metal-air cell.

  4. Phase transitions of doped carbon in CrCN coatings with modified mechanical and tribological properties via filtered cathodic vacuum arc deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, J. J.; Wang, H. Q.; Qin, L. Z.; Liao, B.; Liang, H.; Li, B.

    2017-04-01

    The CrCN coatings were fabricated onto Si (1 1 1) wafers and SUS304 stainless steel plates using filtered cathodic vacuum arc deposition (FCVAD) technique under different flow ratios of N2/C2H2 gas mixture. The morphology, crystalline structure and chemical composition of the coatings were characterized. It was found that the grain size reduce with increasing carbon content, which makes the CrCN coatings refined and smooth. The quasi-one-dimensional carbolite phase was also found in CrN host lattice with C2H2 content ranging from 5% to 20%, and it will be evolved into amorphous carbon and amorphous CNx phases as C2H2 content exceeds 20%. Moreover, we examined the mechanical and tribological properties of the CrCN coatings, and the experimental results confirmed that the friction coefficient of the coatings descend to the lowest value as 0.39 with 30% C2H2 content, due to the graphite (sp2 Csbnd C) phase embed in CrN host lattice; while the chromium carbon (Cr3C2) and diamond (sp3 Csbnd C) phases may give rise to the increase of the coating hardness with the highest value at 23.97 GPa under 20% C2H2 content.

  5. Hybrid Li-air battery cathodes with sparse carbon nanotube arrays directly grown on carbon fiber papers

    SciTech Connect

    Li, YF; Huang, ZP; Huang, K; Carnahan, D; Xing, YC

    2013-11-01

    Sparsely populated, vertically aligned nitrogen doped carbon nanotube arrays (CNTAs) with dislocated-graphene stacking were grown directly on carbon fiber papers and investigated as hierarchical air cathodes in hybrid Li-air batteries with aqueous catholytes. The CNTAs were made with electrodeposited Ni nanocatalysts, followed by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The thus obtained CNTAs can reach a population number density as low as similar to 10(7) per cm(2) on the carbon fibers, achieving an extremely high porosity of over 99% for the active layer in the cathode. The sparse CNTAs not only provide effective pathways for the reacting species, but also show a significantly high catalytic activity, which is found to be comparable to that of a supported Pt electrocatalyst. The high activity of the CNTAs is attributed to the rich graphene edges exposed on the CNT surface and nitrogen doping. Hybrid Li-air batteries with such cathodes have shown a consistent discharging capacity of 710 mA h g(-1) and a specific energy of 2057 W h kg(-1) at 0.5 mA cm(-2). Stable charge-discharge cycling at 0.5 mA cm(-2) showed an average potential difference of 1.35 V, indicative of a relatively small overpotential and high round trip efficiency (71%). Furthermore, the hybrid Li-air battery based on the hierarchical cathode can reach a power density as high as 10.4 mW cm(-2).

  6. Modelling of Carbon Monoxide Air Pollution in Larg Cities by Evaluetion of Spectral LANDSAT8 Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamzelo, M.; Gharagozlou, A.; Sadeghian, S.; Baikpour, S. H.; Rajabi, A.

    2015-12-01

    Air pollution in large cities is one of the major problems that resolve and reduce it need multiple applications and environmental management. Of The main sources of this pollution is industrial activities, urban and transport that enter large amounts of contaminants into the air and reduces its quality. With Variety of pollutants and high volume manufacturing, local distribution of manufacturing centers, Testing and measuring emissions is difficult. Substances such as carbon monoxide, sulfur dioxide, and unburned hydrocarbons and lead compounds are substances that cause air pollution and carbon monoxide is most important. Today, data exchange systems, processing, analysis and modeling is of important pillars of management system and air quality control. In this study, using the spectral signature of carbon monoxide gas as the most efficient gas pollution LANDSAT8 images in order that have better spatial resolution than appropriate spectral bands and weather meters،SAM classification algorithm and Geographic Information System (GIS ), spatial distribution of carbon monoxide gas in Tehran over a period of one year from the beginning of 2014 until the beginning of 2015 at 11 map have modeled and then to the model valuation ،created maps were compared with the map provided by the Tehran quality comparison air company. Compare involved plans did with the error matrix and results in 4 types of care; overall, producer, user and kappa coefficient was investigated. Results of average accuracy were about than 80%, which indicates the fit method and data used for modeling.

  7. Bioinspired carbon nanotube fuzzy fiber hair sensor for air-flow detection.

    PubMed

    Maschmann, Matthew R; Ehlert, Gregory J; Dickinson, Benjamin T; Phillips, David M; Ray, Cody W; Reich, Greg W; Baur, Jeffery W

    2014-05-28

    Artificial hair sensors consisting of a piezoresistive carbon-nanotube-coated glass fiber embedded in a microcapillary are assembled and characterized. Individual sensors resemble a hair plug that may be integrated in a wide range of host materials. The sensors demonstrate an air-flow detection threshold of less than 1 m/s with a piezoresistive sensitivity of 1.3% per m/s air-flow change.

  8. Design and Development of an air-cooled Temperature-Swing Adsorption Compressor for Carbon Dioxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulloth, Lila M.

    2003-01-01

    The air revitalization system of the International Space Station (ISS) operates in an open loop mode and relies on the resupply of oxygen and other consumables from earth for the life support of astronauts. A compressor is required for delivering the carbon dioxide from a removal assembly to a reduction unit to recover oxygen and thereby closing the air-loop. We have a developed a temperature-swing adsorption compressor (TSAC) for performing these tasks that is energy efficient, quiet, and has no wearing parts. This paper discusses the design features of a TSAC hardware that uses air as the cooling medium and has Space Station application.

  9. DEVICE AND METHOD FOR PRODUCING A HIGH INTENSITY ARC DISCHARGE

    DOEpatents

    Luce, J.S.

    1960-01-01

    A device is described for producing an energetic d-c carbon arc discharge between widely spaced electrodes with arc currents in excess of 100 amperes in a magnetic field of about 3000 gauss and witnin an evacuated enclo sure at a pressure of about 10/sup -5/ mm Hg. No defining electrodes are used in the device, thus essentially eliminating the problems of shorting which heretofore limited the amount of current that could be produced in an arc discharge. The energetic carbon arc discharge is sustained by the potential across the electrodes and by carbon ions and electrons released from the electrodes during arc operation. A large part of the potential drop of the arc occurs along the arc and many energetic electrons reach the anode because the arc pressure is relatively low, and few collisions occur. The carbon discharge is also an efficient ion pump.

  10. [Experimental research on combined water and air backwashing reactor technology for biological activated carbon].

    PubMed

    Xie, Zhi-Gang; Qiu, Xue-Min; Zhao, Yan-Ling

    2012-01-01

    To proper control the backwashing process of biological activated carbon (BAC) reactor and improve the overall operation performance, the evaluative indexes such as backwashing wastewater turbidity, organic pollutants removal rate of pre and post-backwashing, and the variation of biomass and biological activity in carbon column are used to compare and analyze the effect of three different combined water and air backwashing methods on the operation of BAC reactor. The result shows that intermittent combined water and air backwashing method is most suitable to BAC reactor. The biological activaty obviously increases by 62.5% after intermittent combined water and air backwashing process. While, the biological activaty using the backwashing method of air plus water and the backwashing method of water and air compounded plus water washing increases by 55.6%, 38.5%, respectively. After backwashing 308h, the reactor recovered to its normal function after intermittent combined water and air backwashing process with the removal rate of UV254 reaching to 60.0%. The fulvic-like fluorescence peak of backwashing water are very weak, and are characterized by low-excitation wavelength tryptophan like (peak S) and high excitation wavelength of tryptophan (peak T), which are caused by the microbial debris washed down. The three-dimensional fluorescence spectra also show that microbial fragments are easy to be washed clean with intermittent combined water and air backwashing.

  11. Use of intra-articular carbon dioxide and air for MR arthrography: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Maes, Robbert M; Morrison, William B; Lewin, Jonathan S; Duerk, Jeffrey L; Kiewiet, Cunera J M; Wacker, Frank K

    2006-01-01

    During animal experiments, carbon dioxide (CO(2)) and air were used as a novel contrast agent for direct magnetic resonance arthrography (MRAr). MRAr was performed after injection of CO(2) and air in the knee joints of two pigs. MR images of phantoms containing air, CO(2) and nitrogen were compared. After intra-articular injection, both present as a signal void on various sequences and permit sharp delineation of cartilage and other adjacent structures. Despite the potential for artefact generation, only a slight susceptibility artefact was seen after injection of CO(2) and air. In phantom experiments, air, CO(2) and nitrogen demonstrated identical slight regular susceptibility artefacts at the phantom margins. CO(2) MRAr can yield high contrast between cartilage, ligaments and synovium relative to the joint compartment. Therefore, this technique might be useful as an investigational method for the evaluation of cartilage surface lesions and possibly as an alternative contrast agent for clinical use.

  12. Dry Air Cooler Modeling for Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Brayton Cycle Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Moisseytsev, A.; Sienicki, J. J.; Lv, Q.

    2016-07-28

    Modeling for commercially available and cost effective dry air coolers such as those manufactured by Harsco Industries has been implemented in the Argonne National Laboratory Plant Dynamics Code for system level dynamic analysis of supercritical carbon dioxide (sCO2) Brayton cycles. The modeling can now be utilized to optimize and simulate sCO2 Brayton cycles with dry air cooling whereby heat is rejected directly to the atmospheric heat sink without the need for cooling towers that require makeup water for evaporative losses. It has sometimes been stated that a benefit of the sCO2 Brayton cycle is that it enables dry air cooling implying that the Rankine steam cycle does not. A preliminary and simple examination of a Rankine superheated steam cycle and an air-cooled condenser indicates that dry air cooling can be utilized with both cycles provided that the cycle conditions are selected appropriately

  13. Cladding of the carbon fiber on the steel base using electron beam in the air atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Losinskaya, A.; Lozhkina, E.; Bardin, A.; Stepanova, N.

    2016-11-01

    The formation of the high-carbon layers on the low-carbon steel (0.18 % C) using the method of electron-beam partial melting of the carbon fibers is considered. A 1.4 MeV electron beam extracted into air was used. The features of the cladded layers formation using different binders for a reliable fixation of the cladding material are studied. It is revealed that the best results are obtained using the phenol-formaldehyde glue as the binder. A 3 mm thickness layers with 2.2 % C are shown to be formed.

  14. Evaluation of various activated carbons for air cleaning - Towards design of immune and sustainable buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haghighat, Fariborz; Lee, Chang-Seo; Pant, Bhuvan; Bolourani, Golnoush; Lakdawala, Ness; Bastani, Arash

    There are increased demands for security, sustainability and indoor air quality in today's building design, construction, operation and maintenance. Installation of air cleaning systems can improve the indoor air quality by reducing the air pollution levels, and enhance the building security against sudden release of chemical and/or biological agents. At the same time, air cleaning techniques may reduce the building energy consumption by reducing the outdoor air supply rate, hence lowering the needs for conditioning of outdoor air. While the air filtration of particulate matter is well standardized, the standards against which the performance of air cleaning for gaseous contaminants is measured or classified are still under development. This study examined the performance of various granular activated carbons (GACs) for the removal of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from mechanically ventilated buildings. Eight different GACs (three virgin and five impregnated) were tested against toluene using a dynamic test system. The virgin GACs showed better performance than impregnated ones, the percentage and the type of impregnation affected the removal efficiencies. Tests were also conducted with selected GACs against toluene, cyclohexane and ethyl acetate at relative humidity (RH) values of 30%, 50% and 70%. The effect of humidity was dependant on the VOC used. Both for toluene and cyclohexane, the removal efficiency decreased as RH increased. However, higher humidity showed a positive impact on the removal of ethyl acetate.

  15. Preparation of activated carbons from macadamia nut shell and coconut shell by air activation

    SciTech Connect

    Tam, M.S.; Antal, M.J. Jr.

    1999-11-01

    A novel, three-step process for the production of high-quality activated carbons from macadamia nut shell and coconut shell charcoals is described. In this process the charcoal is (1) heated to a high temperature (carbonized), (2) oxidized in air following a stepwise heating program from low (ca. 450 K) to high (ca. 660 K) temperatures (oxygenated), and (3) heated again in an inert environment to a high temperature (activated). By use of this procedure, activated carbons with surface areas greater than 1,000 m{sub 2}/g are manufactured with an overall yield of 15% (based on the dry shell feed). Removal of carbon mass by the development of mesopores and macropores is largely responsible for increases in the surface area of the carbons above 600 m{sub 2}/g. Thus, the surface area per gram of activated carbon can be represented by an inverse function of the yield for burnoffs between 15 and 60%. These findings are supported by mass-transfer calculations and pore-size distribution measurements. A kinetic model for gasification of carbon by oxygen, which provides for an Eley-Rideal type reaction of a surface oxide with oxygen in air, fits the measured gasification rates reasonably well over the temperature range of 550--660 K.

  16. Air

    MedlinePlus

    ... do to protect yourself from dirty air . Indoor air pollution and outdoor air pollution Air can be polluted indoors and it can ... this chart to see what things cause indoor air pollution and what things cause outdoor air pollution! Indoor ...

  17. LASERS: Ultrashort-pulse erbium-doped fibre laser using a saturable absorber based on single-wall carbon nanotubes synthesised by the arc-discharge method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tausenev, A. V.; Obraztsova, E. D.; Lobach, A. S.; Konov, V. I.; Konyashchenko, A. V.; Kryukov, P. G.; Dianov, E. M.

    2007-09-01

    An erbium-doped fibre laser operating in self-mode-locked regime achieved with the help of a saturable absorber based on single-wall carbon nanotubes synthesised by the arc-discharge method is fabricated and studied. Due to the development of an original method for preparing samples, films of the optical quality containing individual single-wall carbon nanotubes were synthesised. The study of the dependence of resonance absorption at a wavelength of 1.5 μm on the laser radiation intensity transmitted through a film showed that these films have nonlinear transmission and can be used in fibre lasers as saturable absorbers to provide self-mode locking. Stable transform-limited pulses having the shape of optical solitons were generated at a wavelength of 1557.5 nm in the laser with a ring resonator. The pulse duration was 1.13 ps at a pulse repetition rate of 20.5 MHz. The continuous output power achieved 1.1 mW upon pumping by a 25-mW laser diode at 980 nm.

  18. COST ANALYSIS OF ACTIVATED CARBON VERSUS PHOTOCATALYTIC OXIDATION FOR REMOVING ORGANIC COMPOUNDS FROM INDOOR AIR

    EPA Science Inventory

    A cost comparison has been conducted of 1 m3/s indoor air cleaners using granular activated carbon (GAC) vs. photocatalytic oxidation (PCO) for treating a steady-state inlet volatile organic compound (VOC) concentration of 0.3 mg/m3. The commercial GAC unit was costed assuming t...

  19. PULMONARY TOXICOLOGY OF SYNTHETIC AIR POLLUTION PARTICLES CONTAINING METAL SULFATES COMPARED TO CARBON BLACK AND DIESEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    PULMONARY TOXICITY OF SYNTHETIC AIR POLLUTION PARTICLES CONTAINING METAL SULFATES COMPARED TO CARBON BLACK AND DIESEL.

    M Daniels, A Ranade* & MJ Selgrade & MI Gilmour.
    Experimental Toxicology Division, ORD/NHEERL, U.S. EPA, RTP, NC. * Particle Technology, College Par...

  20. Livestock air treatment using PVA-coated powdered activated carbon biofilter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The efficacy of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) biofilters was studied using bench-scale biofilters and air from aerobically-treated swine manure. The PVA-coated powdered activated carbon particles showed excellent properties as a biofiltration medium: water holding capacity of 1.39 g H2O/g-dry PVA; wet por...

  1. EVALUATION OF PROPYLENE CARBONATE IN AIR LOGISTICS CENTER (ALC) DEPAINTING OPERATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report summarizes a two-phase, laboratory-scale screening study that evaluated solvent blends containing propylene carbonate (PC) as a potential replacement for methyl ethyl ketone (MEK) in aircraft radome depainting operations. The study was conducted at Oklahoma City Air L...

  2. Response of sugarcane to carbon dioxide enrichment and elevated air temperature

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Four sugarcane cultivars (CP 72-2086, CP 73-1547, CP 88-1508, and CP 80-1827) were grown in elongated temperature-gradient greenhouses (TGG) at ambient or elevated carbon dioxide (CO2) of 360 or 720 µmol CO2 mol-1 air (ppm, mole fraction basis), respectively. Elevated CO2 was maintained by injection...

  3. Evaluation of Length-of-Stain Gas Indicator Tubes for Measuring Carbon Monoxide in Air.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klaubert, Earl C.; And Others

    Techniques for detection and measurement of carbon monoxide (CO) in air are of interest and utility in many aspects of automotive safety. CO concentrations may range from less than 100 parts per million (ppm), or 0.01 percent, to about 10 percent by volume. Gas indicator tubes have been used for many years primarily as detectors of hazardous gases…

  4. Photoluminescence microscopy on air-suspended carbon nanotubes coupled to photonic crystal nanobeam cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, R.; Imamura, S.; Shimada, T.; Ohta, R.; Iwamoto, S.; Arakawa, Y.; Kato, Y. K.

    2014-03-01

    Because carbon nanotubes are room-temperature telecom-band emitters and can be grown on silicon substrates, they are ideal for coupling to silicon photonic cavities.[2,3 In particular, as-grown air-suspended carbon nanotubes show excellent optical properties, but cavity modes with large fields in the air are needed in order to achieve efficient coupling. Here we investigate individual air-suspended nanotubes coupled to photonic crystal nanobeam cavities. We utilize cavities that confine air-band modes which have large fields in the air. Dielectric mode cavities are also prepared for comparison. We fabricate the devices from silicon-on-insulator substrates by using electron beam lithography and dry etching to form the nanobeam structure. The buried oxide layer is removed by wet etching, and carbon nanotubes are grown onto the cavities by chemical vapor deposition. We perform photoluminescence imaging and excitation spectroscopy to find the positions of the nanotubes and identify their chiralities. For both types of devices, cavity modes with quality factors of ~3000 are observed within the nanotube emission peak. Work supported by SCOPE, KAKENHI, The Telecommunications Advancement Foundation, The Toyota Physical and Chemical Research Institute, Project for Developing Innovation Systems of MEXT, Japan and the Photon Frontier Network Program of MEXT, Japan.

  5. Carbon and energy saving markets in compressed air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cipollone, R.

    2015-08-01

    CO2 reduction and fossil fuel saving represent two of the cornerstones of the environmental commitments of all the countries of the world. The first engagement is of a medium to long term type, and unequivocally calls for a new energetic era. The second delays in time the fossil fuel technologies to favour an energetic transition. In order to sustain the two efforts, new immaterial markets have been established in almost all the countries of the world, whose exchanges (purchases and sales) concern CO2 emissions and equivalent fossil fuels that have not been emitted or burned. This paper goes deep inside two aspects not yet exploited: specific CO2 emissions and equivalent fossil fuel burned, as a function of compressed air produced. Reference is made to the current compressor technology, carefully analysing CAGI's (Compressed Air Gas Institute) data and integrating it with the PNUEROP (European Association of manufacturers of compressors, vacuum pumps, pneumatic tools and allied equipment) contribution on the compressor European market. On the base of energy saving estimates that could be put in place, this article also estimates the financial value of the CO2 emissions and fossil fuels avoided.

  6. Microstructural, compositional, and microhardness variations across a gas-metal arc weldment made with an ultralow-carbon consumable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spanos, G.; Moon, D. W.; Fonda, R. W.; Menon, E. S. K.; Fox, A. G.

    2001-12-01

    An experimental gas-metal arc (GMA) weldment of HSLA-100 steel fabricated with an ultralowcarbon (ULC) consumable of interest for United States Navy applications, designated “ARC100,” was studied to determine the relationships among the microstructure, the solute redistributions at various positions across the weldment, and the local properties (microhardness). These relationships were investigated by a variety of techniques, including microhardness mapping, optical microscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) (including compositional X-ray mapping), and parallel electron energy-loss spectroscopy (PEELS). The microconstituents observed in this weld include lath ferrite, degenerate ferrite, lath martensite, retained austenite, and oxide inclusions; no carbides or other solid-state precipitates are present within the weld metal. Microhardness mapping indicates an undermatched weld metal (lower hardness as compared to the base plate) in which the hardest regions are in the first and last top beads, the root passes, and between highly ferritic soft bands associated with the outer portion of each weld bead’s heat-affected zone (HAZ) (within the fusion zone). The majority of the gradient in the substitutional alloying elements (Ni, Cu, Mn, and Cr) occurs within a region of less than about 0.5 mm of the fusion boundary, but the composition still changes even well into the fusion zone. Appreciable segregation of Ni and Cu to solidification cell boundaries occurs, and there is appreciable enrichment of C, Ni, Cu, and Mn in thin films of interlath retained austenite. This ULC weld metal is softer than the base plate due to the preponderance of lath ferrite rather than lath martensite, even at the high cooling rates experienced in this low-heat-input weld. Alternatively, the strength of the weld metal is due to the presence of at least some untempered lath martensite and the fact that the

  7. US power plant carbon standards and clean air and health co-benefits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driscoll, Charles T.; Buonocore, Jonathan J.; Levy, Jonathan I.; Lambert, Kathleen F.; Burtraw, Dallas; Reid, Stephen B.; Fakhraei, Habibollah; Schwartz, Joel

    2015-06-01

    Carbon dioxide emissions standards for US power plants will influence the fuels and technologies used to generate electricity, alter emissions of pollutants such as sulphur dioxide and nitrogen oxide, and influence ambient air quality and public health. We present an analysis of how three alternative scenarios for US power plant carbon standards could change fine particulate matter and ozone concentrations in ambient air, and the resulting public health co-benefits. The results underscore that carbon standards to curb global climate change can also provide immediate local and regional health co-benefits, but the magnitude depends on the design of the standards. A stringent but flexible policy that counts demand-side energy efficiency towards compliance yields the greatest health benefits of the three scenarios analysed.

  8. Global carbon monoxide products from combined AIRS, TES and MLS measurements on A-train satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, J. X.; Yang, R.; Wei, Z.; Carminati, F.; Tangborn, A.; Sun, Z.; Lahoz, W.; Attié, J.-L.; El Amraoui, L.; Duncan, B.

    2013-06-01

    This study tests a novel methodology to add value to satellite datasets. This methodology, data fusion, is similar to data assimilation, except that the background model-based field is replaced by a satellite dataset, in this case AIRS (Atmospheric Infrared Sounder) carbon monoxide (CO) measurements. The observational information comes from CO measurements with lower spatial coverage than AIRS, namely, from TES (Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer) and MLS (Microwave Limb Sounder). We show that combining these datasets with data fusion uses the higher spectral resolution of TES to extend AIRS CO observational sensitivity to the lower troposphere, a region especially important for air quality studies. We also show that combined CO measurements from AIRS and MLS provide enhanced information in the UTLS (upper troposphere/lower stratosphere) region compared to each product individually. The combined AIRS/TES and AIRS/MLS CO products are validated against DACOM (differential absorption mid-IR diode laser spectrometer) in situ CO measurements from the INTEX-B (Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment: MILAGRO and Pacific phases) field campaign and in situ data from HIPPO (HIAPER Pole-to-Pole Observations) flights. The data fusion results show improved sensitivities in the lower and upper troposphere (20-30% and above 20%, respectively) as compared with AIRS-only retrievals, and improved coverage compared with TES and MLS CO data.

  9. Global carbon monoxide products from combined AIRS, TES and MLS measurements on A-train satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, J. X.; Yang, R.; Wei, Z.; Carminati, F.; Tangborn, A.; Sun, Z.; Lahoz, W.; Attié, J.-L.; El Amraoui, L.; Duncan, B.

    2014-01-01

    This study tests a novel methodology to add value to satellite data sets. This methodology, data fusion, is similar to data assimilation, except that the background model-based field is replaced by a satellite data set, in this case AIRS (Atmospheric Infrared Sounder) carbon monoxide (CO) measurements. The observational information comes from CO measurements with lower spatial coverage than AIRS, namely, from TES (Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer) and MLS (Microwave Limb Sounder). We show that combining these data sets with data fusion uses the higher spectral resolution of TES to extend AIRS CO observational sensitivity to the lower troposphere, a region especially important for air quality studies. We also show that combined CO measurements from AIRS and MLS provide enhanced information in the UTLS (upper troposphere/lower stratosphere) region compared to each product individually. The combined AIRS-TES and AIRS-MLS CO products are validated against DACOM (differential absorption mid-IR diode laser spectrometer) in situ CO measurements from the INTEX-B (Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment: MILAGRO and Pacific phases) field campaign and in situ data from HIPPO (HIAPER Pole-to-Pole Observations) flights. The data fusion results show improved sensitivities in the lower and upper troposphere (20-30% and above 20%, respectively) as compared with AIRS-only version 5 CO retrievals, and improved daily coverage compared with TES and MLS CO data.

  10. Global Carbon Monoxide Products from Combined AIRS, TES and MLS Measurements on A-Train Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warner, Juying X.; Yang, R.; Wei, Z.; Carminati, F.; Tangborn, A.; Sun, Z.; Lahoz, W.; Attie, J. L.; El Amraoui, L.; Duncan, B.

    2014-01-01

    This study tests a novel methodology to add value to satellite data sets. This methodology, data fusion, is similar to data assimilation, except that the background modelbased field is replaced by a satellite data set, in this case AIRS (Atmospheric Infrared Sounder) carbon monoxide (CO) measurements. The observational information comes from CO measurements with lower spatial coverage than AIRS, namely, from TES (Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer) and MLS (Microwave Limb Sounder). We show that combining these data sets with data fusion uses the higher spectral resolution of TES to extend AIRS CO observational sensitivity to the lower troposphere, a region especially important for air quality studies. We also show that combined CO measurements from AIRS and MLS provide enhanced information in the UTLS (upper troposphere/lower stratosphere) region compared to each product individually. The combined AIRS-TES and AIRS-MLS CO products are validated against DACOM (differential absorption mid-IR diode laser spectrometer) in situ CO measurements from the INTEX-B (Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment: MILAGRO and Pacific phases) field campaign and in situ data from HIPPO (HIAPER Pole-to-Pole Observations) flights. The data fusion results show improved sensitivities in the lower and upper troposphere (20-30% and above 20%, respectively) as compared with AIRS-only version 5 CO retrievals, and improved daily coverage compared with TES and MLS CO data.

  11. A Southern Hemisphere atmospheric history of carbon monoxide from South Pole firn air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verhulst, K. R.; Aydin, M.; Novelli, P. C.; Holmes, C. D.; Prather, M. J.; Saltzman, E. S.

    2013-12-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is a reactive trace gas and is important to tropospheric photochemistry as a major sink of hydroxyl radicals (OH). Major sources of CO are fossil fuel combustion, linked mostly to automotive emissions, biomass burning, and oxidation of atmospheric methane. Understanding changes in carbon monoxide over the past century will improve our understanding of man's influence on the reactivity of the atmosphere. Little observational information is available about CO levels and emissions prior to the 1990s, particularly for the Southern Hemisphere. The NOAA global flask network provides the most complete instrumental record of CO, extending back to 1988. Annually averaged surface flask measurements suggest atmospheric CO levels at South Pole were relatively stable from 2004-2009 at about 51 nmol mol-1 [Novelli and Masarie, 2013]. In this study, a 20th century atmospheric history of CO is reconstructed from South Pole firn air measurements, using a 1-D firn air diffusion model. Firn air samples were collected in glass flasks from two adjacent holes drilled from the surface to 118 m at South Pole, Antarctica during the 2008/2009 field season and CO analysis was carried out by NOAA/CCG. Carbon monoxide levels increase from about 45 nmol mol-1 in the deepest firn sample at 116 m to 52 nmol mol-1 at 107 m, and remain constant at about 51-52 nmol mol-1 at shallower depths. Atmospheric histories based on the firn air reconstructions suggest that CO levels over Antarctica increased by roughly 40% (from about 36 to 50 nmol mol-1) between 1930-1990, at a rate of about 0.18 nmol mol-1 yr-1. Firn air and surface air results suggest the rate of CO increase at South Pole slowed considerably after 1990. The firn air-based atmospheric history is used to infer changes in Southern Hemisphere CO emissions over the 20th century.

  12. Distribution and air-sea fluxes of carbon dioxide on the Chukchi Sea shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pipko, I. I.; Pugach, S. P.; Repina, I. A.; Dudarev, O. V.; Charkin, A. N.; Semiletov, I. P.

    2015-12-01

    This article presents the results of long-term studies of the dynamics of carbonate parameters and air-sea carbon dioxide fluxes on the Chukchi Sea shelf during the summer. As a result of the interaction of physical and biological factors, the surface waters on the west of Chukchi Sea were undersaturated with carbon dioxide when compared with atmospheric air; the partial pressure of CO2 varied in the range from 134 to 359 μatm. The average value of CO2 flux in the Chukchi Sea per unit area varied in the range from-2.4 to-22.0 mmol /(m2 day), which is significantly higher than the average value of CO2 flux in the World Ocean. It has been estimated that the minimal mass of C absorbed by the surface of Chukchi Sea from the atmosphere during ice-free season is 13 × 1012 g; a great part of this carbon is transported to the deeper layers of sea and isolated from the atmosphere for a long period of time. The studies of the carbonate system of the Chukchi Sea, especially of its western part, will provide some new data on the fluxes of carbon dioxide in the Arctic Ocean and their changes. Our analysis can be used for an interpretation of the satellite assessment of CO2 fluxes and dissolved CO2 distribution in the upper layers of the ocean.

  13. Catalytic wet air oxidation of phenol with functionalized carbon materials as catalysts: reaction mechanism and pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianbing; Fu, Wantao; He, Xuwen; Yang, Shaoxia; Zhu, Wanpeng

    2014-08-01

    The development of highly active carbon material catalysts in catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) has attracted a great deal of attention. In this study different carbon material catalysts (multi-walled carbon nanotubes, carbon fibers and graphite) were developed to enhance the CWAO of phenol in aqueous solution. The functionalized carbon materials exhibited excellent catalytic activity in the CWAO of phenol. After 60 min reaction, the removal of phenol was nearly 100% over the functionalized multi-walled carbon, while it was only 14% over the purified multi-walled carbon under the same reaction conditions. Carboxylic acid groups introduced on the surface of the functionalized carbon materials play an important role in the catalytic activity in CWAO. They can promote the production of free radicals, which act as strong oxidants in CWAO. Based on the analysis of the intermediates produced in the CWAO reactions, a new reaction pathway for the CWAO of phenol was proposed in this study. There are some differences between the proposed reaction pathway and that reported in the literature. First, maleic acid is transformed directly into malonic acid. Second, acetic acid is oxidized into an unknown intermediate, which is then oxidized into CO2 and H2O. Finally, formic acid and oxalic acid can mutually interconvert when conditions are favorable.

  14. Mapping Air Quality Index of Carbon Monoxide (CO) in Medan City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suryati, I.; Khair, H.

    2017-03-01

    This study aims to map and analyze air quality index of carbon monoxide (CO) in Medan City. This research used 12 (twelve) sampling points around in Medan with an hour duration each point. CO concentration was analyzed using the NDIR CO Analyzer sampling tool. The concentration CO was obtained between 1 ppm - 23 ppm, with an average concentration was 9.5 ppm. This condition is still below the national ambient air quality standard set by Government Regulation of Indonesian Republic Number 41-1999 amounted to 29 ppm. The result of CO concentration measurements was converted into air pollutant standard index, obtained the index value of 58 - 204. Surfer 10 was used to create map of air pollutant standard index for CO. The map illustrates very unhealthy area where located in the Medan Belawan district. The main factors affecting the concentration of CO are from transportation and meteorological factors.

  15. Solid Lubrication by Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes in Air and in Vacuum for Space and Aeronautics Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa; Street, Kenneth W., Jr.; Andraws, Rodney; Jacques, David; VanderWal, Randy L.; Sayir, Ali

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate recently developed aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) and dispersed MWNTs for solid lubrication applications, unidirectional sliding friction experiments were conducted with 440 C stainless steel balls and hemispherical alumina-yttria stabilized zirconia pins in sliding contact with the MWNTs deposited on quartz disks in air and in vacuum. The results indicate that MWNTs have superior solid lubrication friction properties and endurance lives in air and vacuum under dry conditions. The coefficient of friction of the dispersed MWNTs is close to 0.05 and 0.009 in air and in vacuum, respectively, showing good dry lubricating ability. The wear life of MWNTs exceeds 1 million passes in both air and vacuum showing good durability. In general, the low coefficient of friction can be attributed to the combination of the transferred, agglomerated patches of MWNTs on the counterpart ball or pin surfaces and the presence of tubular MWNTs at interfaces.

  16. Biological removal of carbon disulfide from waste air streams

    SciTech Connect

    Hugler, W.; Acosta, C.; Revah, S.

    1999-09-30

    A pilot-scale biological control system for the treatment of 3,400 m{sup 3} h{sup {minus}1} of a gaseous stream containing up to 7.8 g CS{sub 2} m{sup {minus}3} and trace amounts of hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) was installed in a cellulose sponge manufacturing facility. The objective was to demonstrate the capability of the process to attain sustained removal efficiencies of 90% for CS{sub 2} and 99% for H{sub 2}S. The system consisted of two sequential biotrickling reactors, which had been previously inoculated with an adapted microbial consortium. During the pilot test, stable removal efficiency and elimination capacity of +90% and 220g CS{sub 2} m{sup {minus}3} h{sup {minus}1}, respectively, were attained with an empty bed residence time (EBTR) of 33 seconds for a period of several weeks. Efficiencies greater than 99% were always obtained for H{sub 2}S. Based on the results, the system was determined to be an effective process to remediate waste air streams containing reduced sulfur compounds generated at cellulose sponge facilities.

  17. Two modes of transformation of amorphous calcium carbonate films in air.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xurong; Han, Joong Tark; Kim, Do Hwan; Cho, Kilwon

    2006-02-16

    Large-area amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) films in air are shown to be transformed into crystalline calcium carbonate (CaCO(3)) films via two modes-dissolution-recrystallization and solid-solid phase transition-depending on the relative humidity of the air and the temperature. Moisture in the air promotes the transformation of ACC into crystalline forms via a dissolution-recrystallization process. Increasing the humidity increases the rate of ACC crystallization and gives rise to films with numerous large pores. As the temperature is increased, the effect of moisture in the air is reduced and solid-solid transition by thermal activation becomes the dominant transformation mechanism. At 100 and 120 degrees C, ACC films are transformed into predominantly (110) oriented crystalline films. Collectively, the results show that calcium carbonate films with different morphologies, crystal phases, and structures can be obtained by controlling the humidity and temperature. This ability to control the transformation of ACC should assist in clarifying the role of ACC in the biomineralization of CaCO(3) and should open new avenues for preparing CaCO(3) films with oriented and fine structure.

  18. Carbon treated commercial aluminium alloys as anodes for aluminium-air batteries in sodium chloride electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pino, M.; Herranz, D.; Chacón, J.; Fatás, E.; Ocón, P.

    2016-09-01

    An easy treatment based in carbon layer deposition into aluminium alloys is presented to enhance the performance of Al-air primary batteries with neutral pH electrolyte. The jellification of aluminate in the anode surface is described and avoided by the carbon covering. Treated commercial Al alloys namely Al1085 and Al7475 are tested as anodes achieving specific capacities above 1.2 Ah g-1vs 0.5 Ah g-1 without carbon covering. The influence of the binder proportion in the treatment as well as different carbonaceous materials, Carbon Black, Graphene and Pyrolytic Graphite are evaluated as candidates for the covering. Current densities of 1-10 mA cm-2 are measured and the influence of the alloy explored. A final battery design of 4 cells in series is presented for discharges with a voltage plateau of 2 V and 1 Wh g-1 energy density.

  19. Southern Ocean Carbon Sink Constraints from Radiocarbon in Drake Passage Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsay, C. M.; Lehman, S.; Miller, J. B.

    2014-12-01

    The Southern Ocean is one of the earth's largest regional net carbon sinks due to strong westerly winds, which drive surface gas exchange, deep mixing and upwelling. The strength of the sink is set by complex interactions between the physical circulation, gas exchange and biological activity in surface waters. Recent work by others has predicted that global warming may weaken the sink by strengthening the regional winds, increasing upwelling and the flux of deep, naturally carbon-rich and radiocarbon-depleted water into the surface mixed layer. The resulting decrease in the air-sea pCO2 gradient is thought to overwhelm other compensating changes, causing a weakened net sink. Here we demonstrate the use of precise measurements of radiocarbon in Drake Passage air (14CO2) to detect short-term fluctuations in the Southern Ocean gross sea-to-air C flux, and by extension, possible changes in the net carbon sink and their underlying causes. Drake Passage boundary layer air has been sampled since 2006 at roughly fortnightly intervals as part of NOAA's Cooperative Air Sampling Network, resulting in a 5-year high-resolution 14CO2 time-series with accompanying same-flask CO2 concentration measurements. Atmospheric measurements at Drake Passage are representative of zonal average exchange fluxes due to strong mixing by the westerly winds. In preliminary results, anomalously low ∆14C values are correlated with positive states of the Southern Annular Mode, a hemispheric-scale indicator of stronger westerly winds in the high latitude Southern Ocean. Simulations from the TM5 atmospheric transport model with a detailed global radiocarbon budget are used to interpret the results. These results appear to support the hypothesized link between stronger westerly winds and a weaker Southern Ocean carbon sink.

  20. In-situ measurement of aerosol organic and elemental carbon, Southern California Air Quality Study. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Turpin, B.J.; Huntzicker, J.J.

    1989-09-09

    An in situ carbon analyzer measured particulate organic and elemental carbon with two hour time resolution during the Southern California Air Quality Study. Organic and elemental carbon concentrations showed strong diurnal variations. Peak concentrations occurred during the daylight hours in the summer and at night in the fall. The maximum concentrations observed in the fall (maximum total carbon = 88 micrograms carbon per cubic meter) were two to three times higher than the summer maxima (maximum total carbon = 36 micrograms carbon per cubic meter). On several summer days the profiles of organic and elemental carbon were quite similar, and good correlations, comparable to those observed during the fall, were observed between organic and elemental carbon, suggesting that the organic aerosol on those days was principally primary. Comparison of the diurnal profile of organic carbon with those of elemental carbon and ozone provided evidence for considerable secondary formation of organic aerosol during three sampling periods.

  1. Purification of tantalum by plasma arc melting

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, Paul S.; Korzekwa, Deniece R.

    1999-01-01

    Purification of tantalum by plasma arc melting. The level of oxygen and carbon impurities in tantalum was reduced by plasma arc melting the tantalum using a flowing plasma gas generated from a gas mixture of helium and hydrogen. The flowing plasma gases of the present invention were found to be superior to other known flowing plasma gases used for this purpose.

  2. Made-to-order metal-organic frameworks for trace carbon dioxide removal and air capture.

    PubMed

    Shekhah, Osama; Belmabkhout, Youssef; Chen, Zhijie; Guillerm, Vincent; Cairns, Amy; Adil, Karim; Eddaoudi, Mohamed

    2014-06-25

    Direct air capture is regarded as a plausible alternate approach that, if economically practical, can mitigate the increasing carbon dioxide emissions associated with two of the main carbon polluting sources, namely stationary power plants and transportation. Here we show that metal-organic framework crystal chemistry permits the construction of an isostructural metal-organic framework (SIFSIX-3-Cu) based on pyrazine/copper(II) two-dimensional periodic 4(4) square grids pillared by silicon hexafluoride anions and thus allows further contraction of the pore system to 3.5 versus 3.84 Å for the parent zinc(II) derivative. This enhances the adsorption energetics and subsequently displays carbon dioxide uptake and selectivity at very low partial pressures relevant to air capture and trace carbon dioxide removal. The resultant SIFSIX-3-Cu exhibits uniformly distributed adsorption energetics and offers enhanced carbon dioxide physical adsorption properties, uptake and selectivity in highly diluted gas streams, a performance, to the best of our knowledge, unachievable with other classes of porous materials.

  3. Made-to-order metal-organic frameworks for trace carbon dioxide removal and air capture

    PubMed Central

    Shekhah, Osama; Belmabkhout, Youssef; Chen, Zhijie; Guillerm, Vincent; Cairns, Amy; Adil, Karim; Eddaoudi, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    Direct air capture is regarded as a plausible alternate approach that, if economically practical, can mitigate the increasing carbon dioxide emissions associated with two of the main carbon polluting sources, namely stationary power plants and transportation. Here we show that metal-organic framework crystal chemistry permits the construction of an isostructural metal-organic framework (SIFSIX-3-Cu) based on pyrazine/copper(II) two-dimensional periodic 44 square grids pillared by silicon hexafluoride anions and thus allows further contraction of the pore system to 3.5 versus 3.84 Å for the parent zinc(II) derivative. This enhances the adsorption energetics and subsequently displays carbon dioxide uptake and selectivity at very low partial pressures relevant to air capture and trace carbon dioxide removal. The resultant SIFSIX-3-Cu exhibits uniformly distributed adsorption energetics and offers enhanced carbon dioxide physical adsorption properties, uptake and selectivity in highly diluted gas streams, a performance, to the best of our knowledge, unachievable with other classes of porous materials. PMID:24964404

  4. Aerosol Absorption by Black Carbon and Dust: Implications of Climate Change and Air Quality in Asia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Mian

    2010-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosol distributions from 2000 to 2007 are simulated with the global model GOCART to attribute light absorption by aerosol to its composition and sources. We show the seasonal and interannual variations of absorbing aerosols in the atmosphere over Asia, mainly black carbon and dust. and their linkage to the changes of anthropogenic and dust emissions in the region. We compare our results with observations from satellite and ground-based networks, and estimate the importance of black carbon and dust on regional climate forcing and air quality.

  5. Degradation of paracetamol by catalytic wet air oxidation and sequential adsorption - Catalytic wet air oxidation on activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Quesada-Peñate, I; Julcour-Lebigue, C; Jáuregui-Haza, U J; Wilhelm, A M; Delmas, H

    2012-06-30

    The concern about the fate of pharmaceutical products has raised owing to the increasing contamination of rivers, lakes and groundwater. The aim of this paper is to evaluate two different processes for paracetamol removal. The catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) of paracetamol on activated carbon was investigated both as a water treatment technique using an autoclave reactor and as a regenerative treatment of the carbon after adsorption in a sequential fixed bed process. Three activated carbons (ACs) from different source materials were used as catalysts: two microporous basic ACs (S23 and C1) and a meso- and micro-porous acidic one (L27). During the first CWAO experiment the adsorption capacity and catalytic performance of fresh S23 and C1 were higher than those of fresh L27 despite its higher surface area. This situation changed after AC reuse, as finally L27 gave the best results after five CWAO cycles. Respirometry tests with activated sludge revealed that in the studied conditions the use of CWAO enhanced the aerobic biodegradability of the effluent. In the ADOX process L27 also showed better oxidation performances and regeneration efficiency. This different ageing was examined through AC physico-chemical properties.

  6. Effects of nitrogen doping on the electrical conductivity and optical absorption of ultrananocrystalline diamond/hydrogenated amorphous carbon films prepared by coaxial arc plasma deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zkria, Abdelrahman; Katamune, Yūki; Yoshitake, Tsuyoshi

    2016-07-01

    3 at. % nitrogen-doped ultrananocrystalline diamond/hydrogenated amorphous carbon composite (UNCD/a-C:H) films were synthesized by coaxial arc plasma deposition. Optically, the films possess large absorption coefficients of more than 105 cm-1 at photon energies from 3 to 5 eV. The optical band gap was estimated to be 1.28 eV. This value is smaller than that of undoped films, which might be attributable to increased sp2 fractions. The temperature dependence of the electrical conductivity implies that carrier transport follows a hopping conduction model. Heterojunctions with p-type Si substrates exhibited a typical rectifying action. From the capacitance-voltage characteristics that evidently indicated the expansion of a depletion region into the film side, the built-in potential and carrier concentration were estimated to be 0.51 eV and 7.5 × 1016 cm-3, respectively. It was experimentally demonstrated that nitrogen-doped UNCD/a-C:H films are applicable as an n-type semiconductor.

  7. Optimization of the electric arc discharge synthesis of single-walled carbon nanotubes on the basis of near-IR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itkis, M. E.; Perea, D. E.; Niyogi, S.; Love, J.; Tang, J.; Yu, A.; Kang, C.; Haddon, R. C.

    2004-03-01

    The metal catalyst plays an important role in the synthesis of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT). It was originally reported that nickel and yttrium provide the optimum yield for bulk production of SWNTs by the electric arc discharge technique, at a catalyst composition of 4.0/ at. percent of Ni and 1.0 atomic percent of Y.[1] More recent work suggested a much lower concentration of Ni and Y for optimum SWNT generation: 0.6 atomic percent of Ni and 0.1 atomic percent of Y.[2] Both results were based on TGA, SEM and Raman analysis of milligrams quantities of SWNT soot. Recently we developed a quantitative technique to reliably assess the carbonaceous purity of bulk (10g scale) quantities of SWNTs, based on near-IR spectroscopy.[3] In this presentation we report the utilization of this technique for the determination of the purity of SWNT soot as a function of the catalyst composition. We present the range of optimum concentrations of Ni and Y for the bulk synthesis of the SWNTs. [1] C.Journet et al., Nature 388 (1997) 756; [2] M.Takizawa et al., Chem. Phys. Lett. 326 (2000) 351; [3] M.E. Itkis et al., Nano Lett. 3 (2003) 309.

  8. Hydrogenation effects on carrier transport in boron-doped ultrananocrystalline diamond/amorphous carbon films prepared by coaxial arc plasma deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Katamune, Yūki Takeichi, Satoshi; Ohmagari, Shinya; Yoshitake, Tsuyoshi

    2015-11-15

    Boron-doped ultrananocrystalline diamond/hydrogenated amorphous carbon composite (UNCD/a-C:H) films were deposited by coaxial arc plasma deposition with a boron-blended graphite target at a base pressure of <10{sup −3} Pa and at hydrogen pressures of ≤53.3 Pa. The hydrogenation effects on the electrical properties of the films were investigated in terms of chemical bonding. Hydrogen-scattering spectrometry showed that the maximum hydrogen content was 35 at. % for the film produced at 53.3-Pa hydrogen pressure. The Fourier-transform infrared spectra showed strong absorptions by sp{sup 3} C–H bonds, which were specific to the UNCD/a-C:H, and can be attributed to hydrogen atoms terminating the dangling bonds at ultrananocrystalline diamond grain boundaries. Temperature-dependence of the electrical conductivity showed that the films changed from semimetallic to semiconducting with increasing hydrogen pressure, i.e., with enhanced hydrogenation, probably due to hydrogenation suppressing the formation of graphitic bonds, which are a source of carriers. Carrier transport in semiconducting hydrogenated films can be explained by a variable-range hopping model. The rectifying action of heterojunctions comprising the hydrogenated films and n-type Si substrates implies carrier transport in tunneling.

  9. Self-mode-locking in erbium-doped fibre lasers with saturable polymer film absorbers containing single-wall carbon nanotubes synthesised by the arc discharge method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tausenev, Anton V.; Obraztsova, Elena D.; Lobach, A. S.; Chernov, A. I.; Konov, Vitalii I.; Konyashchenko, Aleksandr V.; Kryukov, P. G.; Dianov, Evgenii M.

    2007-03-01

    We studied the ring and linear schemes of erbium-doped fibre lasers in which passive mode locking was achieved with the help of saturable absorbers made of high-optical quality films based on cellulose derivatives with dispersed single-wall carbon nanotubes. The films were prepared by the original method with the use of nanotubes synthesised by the arc discharge method. The films exhibit nonlinear absorption at a wavelength of 1.5 μm. Pulses in the form of optical solitons of duration 1.17 ps at a avelength of 1.56 μm were generated in the ring scheme of the erbium laser. The average output power was 1.1 mW at a pulse repetition rate of 20.5 MHz upon pumping by the 980-nm, 25-mW radiation from a laser diode. The pulse duration in the linear scheme was reduced to 466 fs for the output power up to 4 mW and a pulse repetition rate of 28.5 MHz. The specific feature of these lasers is a low pump threshold in the regime of generation of ultrashort pulses.

  10. Quantification of carbon dioxide poisoning in air breathing alkaline fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tewari, A.; Sambhy, V.; Urquidi Macdonald, M.; Sen, A.

    Carbon dioxide intolerance has impeded the development of alkaline fuel cells as an alternate source of power supply. The CO 2, in a fuel cell system, could come from the anode side (if "dirty" H 2 is used as fuel), from the cathode side (if air instead of pure O 2 is used as an oxidant) or from inside the electrolyte (if methanol is used as a fuel). In this work, an novel analytical approach is proposed to study and quantify the carbon dioxide poisoning problem. Accelerated tests were carried out in an alkaline fuel cell using methanol as a fuel with different electrical loads and varying the concentration of carbon dioxide in a mixture CO 2/O 2 used as oxidant. Two characteristic quantities, t max and R max, were specified which were shown to comprehensively define the nature and extent of carbon dioxide poisoning in alkaline fuel cells. The poisoning phenomenon was successfully quantified by determining the dependence of these characteristic quantities on the operating parameters, viz. atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration and applied electrical load. Such quantification enabled the prediction of the output of a fuel cell operating in a carbon dioxide enriched atmosphere. In addition, static and dynamic analyses of electrolytes were carried out to determine the dependence of cell current on the electrolyte composition in a fuel cell undergoing poisoning. It was observed that there is a critical concentration of KOH in the electrolyte only below which the effect of carbon dioxide poisoning is reflected on the cell performance. Potentiostatic polarization tests confirmed that the underlying reason for the decreased cell performance because of carbon dioxide poisoning is the sluggish kinetics of methanol oxidation in the presence of potassium carbonate in the electrolyte. Moreover, the decreased conductivity of the electrolyte resulting from hydroxide to carbonate conversion was also shown to increase the ohmic loses in an alkaline fuel cell leading to lower

  11. Third harmonic generation in air ambient and laser ablated carbon plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Ravi Pratap Gupta, Shyam L.; Thareja, Raj K.

    2015-12-15

    We report the third harmonic generation of a nanosecond laser pulse (1.06 μm) in air ambient and in the presence of nanoparticles from laser ablated carbon plasma. Significant decrease in the threshold of third harmonic generation and multi-fold increment in the intensity of generated third harmonic is observed in presence of carbon plasma. The third harmonic in air is due to the quasi-resonant four photon process involving vibrationally excited states of molecular ion of nitrogen due to electron impact ionization and laser pulse. Following optical emission spectroscopic observations we conclude that the presence of C{sub 2} and CN in the ablated plume play a vital role in the observed third harmonic signals.

  12. Oxidation resistance of selected mechanical carbons at 650 deg C in dry flowing air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, G. P.; Wisander, D. W.

    1973-01-01

    Oxidation experiments were conducted with several experimental mechanical carbons at 650 C in air flowing at 28 cu cm/sec (STP). Experiments indicate that boron carbide addition and zinc phosphate treatment definitely improved oxidation resistance. Impregnation with coal tar pitch before final graphitization had some beneficial effect on oxidation resistance and it markedly improved flexure strength and hardness. Graphitization temperature alone did not affect oxidation resistance, but with enough added boron carbide the oxidation resistance was increased although the hardness greatly decreased.

  13. Evaluation of pyrolysis and arc tracking on candidate wire insulation designs for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stueber, Thomas J.; Hrovat, Kenneth

    1994-01-01

    The ability of wire insulation materials and constructions to resist arc tracking was determined and the damage caused by initial arcing and restrike events was assessed. Results of arc tracking tests on various insulation constructions are presented in view-graph format. Arc tracking tests conducted on Champlain, Filotex, and Teledyne Thermatics indicate the Filotex is least likely to arc track. Arc tracking occurs more readily in air than it does in vacuum.

  14. Biofiltration of benzene contaminated air streams using compost-activated carbon filter media

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, L.; Kocher, W.M.; Abumaizar, R.J.

    1998-12-31

    Three laboratory-scale biofilter columns were operated for 81 days to investigate the removal of benzene from a waste gas stream. The columns contain a mixture of yard waste and sludge compost as biomedia. Different amounts of granular activated carbon (GAC) are mixed with the compost in two of the three columns to evaluate the extent to which biofilter performance can be enhanced. The effects of different operating conditions on the performance of the removal of benzene from air were evaluated. More than 90% removal efficiency was observed for an influent benzene concentration of about 75 ppm and an air flow rate of 0.3 L/min. in all 3 columns under steady-state conditions. Under most cases of shock loading conditions, such as a sudden increase in the air flow rate, or the benzene concentration in the influent, the biofilters containing GAC provided higher removal efficiencies and more stable operation than the biofilter containing compost only.

  15. Advances in chemical and physical properties of electric arc furnace carbon steel slag by hot stage processing and mineral mixing.

    PubMed

    Liapis, Ioannis; Papayianni, Ioanna

    2015-01-01

    Slags are recognised as a highly efficient, cost effective tool in the metal processing industry, by minimising heat losses, reducing metal oxidation through contact with air, removing metal impurities and protecting refractories and graphite electrodes. When compared to natural aggregates for use in the construction industry, slags have higher specific weight that acts as an economic deterrent. A method of altering the specific weight of EAFC slag by hot stage processing and mineral mixing, during steel production is presented in this article. The method has minimal interference with the production process of steel, even by limited additions of appropriate minerals at high temperatures. Five minerals are examined, namely perlite, ladle furnace slag, bauxite, diatomite and olivine. Measurements of specific weight are accompanied by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and fluorescence (XRF) analysis and scanning electron microscopy spectral images. It is also shown how altering the chemical composition is expected to affect the furnace refractory lining. Additionally, the process has been repeated for the most suitable mix in gas furnace and physical properties (FI, SI, LA, PSV, AAV, volume stability) examined. Alteration of the specific weight can result in tailoring slag properties for specific applications in the construction sector.

  16. Diamond-like carbon coatings for orthopedic applications: Tribological behaviors of vacuum arc diamond-like carbon-coated titanium alloy against medical-grade ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Tianzong

    An extensive and detailed investigation of tribological behaviors of vacuum arc carbon coated Ti6Al4V against medical grade ultra high molecular weight polyethylene were conducted in this work in order to investigate the potential use of diamond-like carbon coatings for orthopedic applications. Further, the gas plasma sterilization and surface modification technique were evaluated as an alternative to the currently used gamma-radiation technique which has previously shown degradation effects on the mechanical properties of the UHMWPE. In addition, an emerging polymer surface modification technique using high-energy ion-implantation is explored to modify the surface of the UHMWPE for improved wear performance. The experiments were performed using a standard pin-on-disk wear tester under both dry and distilled water lubricated condition. The evolution of friction and wear processes are interpreted in the context of in situ recorded coefficient of friction and microscopic images of worn surfaces. Sliding wear tests demonstrated the existence of two distinct friction and wear regimes which comprise physically different dominant mechanisms: an adhesive and abrasive mechanism activated early in the run-in stage, followed by fatigue processes which developed later microscopically in the (quasi) steady-state sliding stage. The effects of surface roughness, distilled water lubricant, coating structure, polymer sterilization and surface modification on the tribological behaviors are presented and discussed in light of these results. Explanations based on theories of sliding contact stress fields, temperature profiles, as well as lubrication and coating fracture mechanics are presented to discuss and support the experimental results. It is revealed that, largely depending on material structures and surface roughness of both articulating components, significantly improved friction and wear performance can be achieved by optimal design of their process

  17. Response of electrochemical oxygen sensors to inert gas-air and carbon dioxide-air mixtures: measurements and mathematical modelling.

    PubMed

    Walsh, P T; Gant, S E; Dowker, K P; Batt, R

    2011-02-15

    Electrochemical oxygen gas sensors are widely used for monitoring the state of inertisation of flammable atmospheres and to warn of asphyxiation risks. It is well established but not widely known by users of such oxygen sensors that the response of the sensor is affected by the nature of the diluent gas responsible for the decrease in ambient oxygen concentration. The present work investigates the response of electrochemical sensors, with either acid or alkaline electrolytes, to gas mixtures comprising air with enhanced levels of nitrogen, carbon dioxide, argon or helium. The measurements indicate that both types of sensors over-read the oxygen concentrations when atmospheres contain high levels of helium. Sensors with alkaline electrolytes are also shown to underestimate the severity of the hazard in atmospheres containing high levels of carbon dioxide. This deviation is greater for alkaline electrolyte sensors compared to acid electrolyte sensors. A Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model is developed to predict the response of an alkaline electrolyte, electrochemical gas sensor. Differences between predicted and measured sensor responses are less than 10% in relative terms for nearly all of the gas mixtures tested, and in many cases less than 5%. Extending the model to simulate responses of sensors with acid electrolytes would be straightforward.

  18. Easily regenerable solid adsorbents based on polyamines for carbon dioxide capture from the air.

    PubMed

    Goeppert, Alain; Zhang, Hang; Czaun, Miklos; May, Robert B; Prakash, G K Surya; Olah, George A; Narayanan, S R

    2014-05-01

    Adsorbents prepared easily by impregnation of fumed silica with polyethylenimine (PEI) are promising candidates for the capture of CO2 directly from the air. These inexpensive adsorbents have high CO2 adsorption capacity at ambient temperature and can be regenerated in repeated cycles under mild conditions. Despite the very low CO2 concentration, they are able to scrub efficiently all CO2 out of the air in the initial hours of the experiments. The influence of parameters such as PEI loading, adsorption and desorption temperature, particle size, and PEI molecular weight on the adsorption behavior were investigated. The mild regeneration temperatures required could allow the use of waste heat available in many industrial processes as well as solar heat. CO2 adsorption from the air has a number of applications. Removal of CO2 from a closed environment, such as a submarine or space vehicles, is essential for life support. The supply of CO2-free air is also critical for alkaline fuel cells and batteries. Direct air capture of CO2 could also help mitigate the rising concerns about atmospheric CO2 concentration and associated climatic changes, while, at the same time, provide the first step for an anthropogenic carbon cycle.

  19. Easily Regenerable Solid Adsorbents Based on Polyamines for Carbon Dioxide Capture from the Air

    SciTech Connect

    Goeppert, A; Zhang, H; Czaun, M; May, RB; Prakash, GKS; Olah, GA; Narayanan, SR

    2014-03-18

    Adsorbents prepared easily by impregnation of fumed silica with polyethylenimine (PEI) are promising candidates for the capture of CO2 directly from the air. These inexpensive adsorbents have high CO2 adsorption capacity at ambient temperature and can be regenerated in repeated cycles under mild conditions. Despite the very low CO2 concentration, they are able to scrub efficiently all CO2 out of the air in the initial hours of the experiments. The influence of parameters such as PEI loading, adsorption and desorption temperature, particle size, and PEI molecular weight on the adsorption behavior were investigated. The mild regeneration temperatures required could allow the use of waste heat available in many industrial processes as well as solar heat. CO2 adsorption from the air has a number of applications. Removal of CO2 from a closed environment, such as a submarine or space vehicles, is essential for life support. The supply of CO2-free air is also critical for alkaline fuel cells and batteries. Direct air capture of CO2 could also help mitigate the rising concerns about atmospheric CO2 concentration and associated climatic changes, while, at the same time, provide the first step for an anthropogenic carbon cycle.

  20. Moisture-swing sorption for carbon dioxide capture from ambient air: a thermodynamic analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Lackner, Klaus S; Wright, Allen B

    2013-01-14

    An ideal chemical sorbent for carbon dioxide capture from ambient air (air capture) must have a number of favourable properties, such as environmentally benign behaviour, a high affinity for CO(2) at very low concentration (400 ppm), and a low energy cost for regeneration. The last two properties seem contradictory, especially for sorbents employing thermal swing adsorption. On the other hand, thermodynamic analysis shows that the energy cost of an air capture device need only be slightly larger than that of a flue gas scrubber. The moisture swing separation process studied in this paper provides a novel approach to low cost CO(2) capture from air. The anionic exchange resin sorbent binds CO(2) when dry and releases it when wet. A thermodynamic model with coupled phase and chemical equilibria is developed to study the complex H(2)O-CO(2)-resin system. The moisture swing behaviour is compatible with hydration energies changing with the activity of water on the resin surfaces. This activity is in turn set by the humidity. The rearrangement of hydration water on the resin upon the sorption of a CO(2) molecule is predicted as a function of the humidity and temperature. Using water as fuel to drive the moisture swing enables an economical, large-scale implementation of air capture. By generating CO(2) with low partial pressures, the present technology has implications for in situ CO(2) utilizations which require low pressure CO(2) gas rather than liquid CO(2).

  1. Stability of carbon electrodes for aqueous lithium-air secondary batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohkuma, Hirokazu; Uechi, Ichiro; Matsui, Masaki; Takeda, Yasuo; Yamamoto, Osamu; Imanishi, Nobuyuki

    2014-01-01

    The air electrode performance of various carbon materials, such as Ketjen black (KB), acetylene black (AB and AB-S), Vulcan XC-72R (VX), and vapor grown carbon fiber (VGCF) with and without La0.6Sr0.4Co0.2Fe0.8O3 (LSCF) catalyst were examined in an aqueous solution of saturated LiOH with 10 M LiCl in the current density range 0.2-2.0 mA cm-2. The best performance for oxygen reduction and evolution reactions was observed for the KB electrode, which has the highest surface area among the carbon materials examined. A steady over-potential of 0.2 V was obtained for the oxygen reduction reaction using the KB electrode without the catalyst, while the over-potential was 0.15 V for KB with the LSCF catalyst at 2.0 mA cm-2. The over-potentials for the oxygen evolution reaction were slightly higher than those for the oxygen reduction reaction, and gradually increased with the polarization period. Analysis of the gas in the cell after polarization above 0.4 V revealed the evolution of a small amount of CO during the oxygen evolution reaction by the decomposition of carbon in the electrode. The amount of CO evolved was significantly decreased by the addition of LSCF to the carbon electrode.

  2. Air Quality Co-Benefits of a Carbon Policy: Regional Implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, T. M.; Rausch, S.; Saari, R.; Selin, N. E.

    2013-12-01

    We use an integrated modeling framework to assess the air quality influence of climate change policies in the Northeast U.S. states for air pollution, and their relative health and economic benefits. We analyze three carbon policy scenarios, each reducing the same total amount of GHG emissions in the Northeast United States: an economy-wide Cap and Trade (CAT) program reducing emissions from all sectors of the economy, a Clean Energy Scenario (CES) reducing emissions from the electricity sector only, and a Transportation Scenario (TRN) reducing emissions from the transportation sector only. Regional CES policy and a regional TRN policy will cost about 10 times and 50 times more than a CAT policy, respectively. Regional CAT policy will lead to a 6% greater reduction in carbon emissions nationally in the year 2030 compared to an electric or transportation sector cap with the same regional targets. This is because, unlike a total economy cap, targeted policy options will likely cause increases in carbon emissions outside of the region covered (called carbon leakage). The human health benefits of the CAT, CES and TRN policies are 530%, 118%, and 10% of the costs of each policy respectively, meaning that the CAT and CES policies will likely fully pay for themselves in the NE U.S. We estimate that the value of human health co-benefits associated with reductions of ground level ozone and particulate matter of the CES scenario is twice that of the CAT and TRN scenarios. Economic welfare costs for each of three regionally applied carbon emissions reduction scenario are shown in blue. The calculated dollar amount of the human health benefits point estimate is shown in red with the 95% confidence interval, associated with human health response only, shown using the green line. Values are in billions of year 2006 US dollars.

  3. Final Technical Report: Science and technology reviews of FACE[Free Air Carbon Enrichment

    SciTech Connect

    Strain, Boyd R.

    1998-03-23

    The purpose of this grant was to bring together the principals of all known facilities that had been developed, principals who had submitted proposals to develop FACE facilities, and principals who want to develop proposals for facilities. In addition, critical program personnel from potential funding agencies and a few high level science administrators were invited to observe the proceedings and to visit a working FACE facility. The objectives of this study are to conduct a three-day international meeting on scientific aspects of research with the new and developing free air carbon enrichment (FACE) technology. Immediately following the science meeting, conduct a two-day international meeting on experimental protocols to be applied in FACE research. To conduct a four day international meeting on the assessment of the responses of forest ecosystems to elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide. The three meetings supported by this grant were all highly successful meetings and resulted in the formation of an organized and identified working group with the acronym InterFACE (International Free-Air Carbon Dioxide Enrichment) working group.

  4. Air-sea exchange of carbon dioxide in the Southern Ocean and Antarctic marginal ice zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butterworth, Brian J.; Miller, Scott D.

    2016-07-01

    Direct carbon dioxide flux measurements using eddy covariance from an icebreaker in the high-latitude Southern Ocean and Antarctic marginal ice zone are reported. Fluxes were combined with the measured water-air carbon dioxide partial pressure difference (ΔpCO2) to compute the air-sea gas transfer velocity (k, normalized to Schmidt number 660). The open water data showed a quadratic relationship between k (cm h-1) and the neutral 10 m wind speed (U10n, m s-1), kopen = 0.245 U10n2 + 1.3, in close agreement with decades old tracer-based results and much lower than cubic relationships inferred from previous open ocean eddy covariance studies. In the marginal ice zone, the effective gas transfer velocity decreased in proportion to sea ice cover, in contrast with predictions of enhanced gas exchange in the presence of sea ice. The combined open water and marginal ice zone results affect the calculated magnitude and spatial distribution of Southern Ocean carbon flux.

  5. Fast Conversion of Ionic Liquids and Poly(Ionic Liquid)s into Porous Nitrogen-Doped Carbons in Air.

    PubMed

    Men, Yongjun; Ambrogi, Martina; Han, Baohang; Yuan, Jiayin

    2016-04-08

    Ionic liquids and poly(ionic liquid)s have been successfully converted into nitrogen-doped porous carbons with tunable surface area up to 1200 m²/g at high temperatures in air. Compared to conventional carbonization process conducted under inert gas to produce nitrogen-doped carbons, the new production method was completed in a rather shorter time without noble gas protection.

  6. Fast Conversion of Ionic Liquids and Poly(Ionic Liquid)s into Porous Nitrogen-Doped Carbons in Air

    PubMed Central

    Men, Yongjun; Ambrogi, Martina; Han, Baohang; Yuan, Jiayin

    2016-01-01

    Ionic liquids and poly(ionic liquid)s have been successfully converted into nitrogen-doped porous carbons with tunable surface area up to 1200 m2/g at high temperatures in air. Compared to conventional carbonization process conducted under inert gas to produce nitrogen-doped carbons, the new production method was completed in a rather shorter time without noble gas protection. PMID:27070588

  7. Weld arc simulator

    DOEpatents

    Burr, Melvin J.

    1990-01-30

    An arc voltage simulator for an arc welder permits the welder response to a variation in arc voltage to be standardized. The simulator uses a linear potentiometer connected to the electrode to provide a simulated arc voltage at the electrode that changes as a function of electrode position.

  8. Wear and friction of oxidation-resistant mechanical carbon graphites at 650 C in air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, G. P.; Wisnader, D. W.

    1975-01-01

    Studies were conducted to determine the friction and wear properties of experimental carbon-graphites. Hemispherically tipped carbon-graphite rider specimens were tested in sliding contact with rotating Inconel X-750 disks in air. A surface speed of 1.33 m/sec, a load of 500 g, and a specimen temperature of 650 C were used. Results indicate: (1) hardness is not a major factor in determining friction and wear under the conditions of these studies. (2) Friction and wear as low as or lower than those observed for a good commercial seal material were attained with some of the experimental materials studied. (3) The inclusion of boron carbide (as an oxidation inhibitor) has a strong influence on wear rate. (4) Phosphate treatment reduces the friction coefficient when boron carbide is not present in the base material.

  9. Air plasma gasification of RDF as a prospective method for reduction of carbon dioxide emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bratsev, A. N.; Kumkova, I. I.; Kuznetsov, V. A.; Popov, V. E.; Shtengel', S. V.; Ufimtsev, A. A.

    2011-03-01

    Waste disposal dumps are one of sources of carbonic gas penetration in the atmosphere. The waste is treated into RDF (refuse-derived fuel) and used in boilers for electric power or heat generation for decrease in carbonic gas emissions in the atmosphere. In industry power stations on the basis of the combined cycle have the highest efficiency of burning. The paper deals with the application of an air-plasma gasifier using the down draft scheme of RDF transformation into synthesis gas, which afterwards can be used in the combined cycle. Results of calculations of the process characteristics for various RDF compositions are presented. The advantage of the plasma method in comparison with autothermal one is shown. Experimental data are shown.

  10. Exciton diffusion, end quenching, and exciton-exciton annihilation in individual air-suspended carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, A.; Yoshida, M.; Kato, Y. K.

    2015-03-01

    Luminescence properties of carbon nanotubes are strongly affected by exciton diffusion, which plays an important role in various nonradiative decay processes. Here we perform photoluminescence microscopy on hundreds of individual air-suspended carbon nanotubes to elucidate the interplay between exciton diffusion, end quenching, and exciton-exciton annihilation processes. A model derived from random-walk theory as well as Monte Carlo simulations are utilized to analyze nanotube length dependence and excitation power dependence of emission intensity. We have obtained the values of exciton diffusion length and absorption cross section for different chiralities, and diameter-dependent photoluminescence quantum yields have been observed. The simulations have also revealed the nature of a one-dimensional coalescence process, and an analytical expression for the power dependence of emission intensity is given.

  11. Comparison of Arc Tracking Tests in Various Aerospace Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stueber, Thomas J.; Hammoud, Ahmad; McCall, David

    1996-01-01

    Momentary short-circuit arcs between a polyimide insulated wire with defective insulation and another conductor may cause pyrolization of the insulation resulting in a conductive path capable of sustaining the arc. These sustained arcs may propagate along the wires or to neighboring wires leading to complete failure of the wire bundle. Wire insulation susceptibility to arc tracking may be dependent on its environment. Because all wire insulation types tested to date arc track, a test procedure has been developed to compare different insulation types with respect to their arc tracking susceptibility. This test procedure is presented along with a comparison of arc tracking in the following three environments: (1) Air at atmospheric pressure and 1 gravitational(g) force; (2) Vacuum (2.67 x 10(exp -3) Pa) and 1g, and (3) Air at atmospheric pressure and microgravity (less than 0.04g).

  12. Time-resolved laser-induced incandescence from multiwalled carbon nanotubes in air

    SciTech Connect

    Mitrani, J. M.; Shneider, M. N.

    2015-01-26

    We observed temporal laser-induced incandescence (LII) signals from multiwalled carbon nanotubes(MWCNTs) suspended in ambient air. Unlike previous LII experiments with soot particles, which showed that primary particles with larger diameters cool at slower timescales relative to smaller particles, we observed that thicker MWCNTs with larger outer diameters (ODs) cool at faster timescales relative to thinner MWCNTs with smaller ODs. We suggested a simple explanation of this effect, based on the solution of one-dimensional nonstationary heat conduction equation for the initial non-uniform heating of MWCNTs with ODs greater than the skin depth.

  13. Direct Air Capture of CO2 - an Overview of Carbon Engineering's Technology and Pilot Plant Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, G.; Corless, A.

    2014-12-01

    At Carbon Engineering, we are developing and commercializing technology to scrub CO2 directly from atmospheric air at industrial scale. By providing atmospheric CO2 for use in fuel production, we can enable production of transportation fuels with ultra-low carbon intensities, which command price premiums in the growing set of constrained fuels markets such as California's LCFS. We are a Calgary based startup founded in 2009 with 10 employees, and we are considered a global leader in the direct air capture (DAC) field. We will review CE's DAC technology, based on a wet-scrubbing "air contactor" which absorbs CO2 into aqueous solution, and a chemical looping "regeneration" component, which liberates pure CO2 from this aqueous solution while re-making the original absorption chemical. CE's DAC tecnology exports purified atmospheric CO2, combined with the combustion CO2 from plant energy usage, as the end product. We will also discuss CE's 2014-2015 end-to-end Pilot Demonstration Unit. This is a $7M technology demonstration plant that CE is building with the help of key industrial partners and equipment vendors. Vendor design and engineering requirements have been used to specify the pilot air contactor, pellet reactor, calciner, and slaker modules, as well as auxiliary systems. These modules will be run for several months to obtain the engineering and performance data needed for subsequent commercial plant design, as well as to test the residual integration risks associated with CE's process. By the time of the AGU conference, the pilot is expected to be in late stages of fabrication or early stages of site installation.

  14. Carbon Monoxide Distribution over Peninsular Malaysia from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajab, Jaso M.; MatJafri, M. Z.; Lim, H. S.; Abdullah, K.

    2009-07-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) onboard NASA's Aqua satellite. It daily coverage of ˜70% of the planet represents a significant evolutionary advance in satellite traces gas remote sensing. AIRS, the part of a large international investment to upgrade the operational meteorological satellite systems, is first of the new generation of meteorological advanced sounders for operational and research use, Providing New Insights into Weather and Climate for the 21st Century. Carbon monoxide (CO) is a ubiquitous, an indoor and outdoor air pollutant, is not a significant greenhouse gas as it absorbs little infrared radiation from the Earth. However, it does have an influence on oxidization in the atmosphere through interaction with hydroxyl radicals (OH), which also react with methane, halocarbons and tropospheric ozone. It produced by the incomplete combustion of fossil fuels and biomass burning, and that it has a role as a smog. The aim of this investigation is to study the (CO) carbon monoxide distribution over Peninsular Malaysia. The land use map of the Peninsular Malaysia was conducted by using CO total column amount, obtained from AIRS data, the map & data was processed and analyzed by using Photoshop & SigmaPlot 11.0 programs and compared for timing of various (day time) (28 August 2005 & 29 August 2007) for both direct comparison and the comparison using the same a priori profile, the CO concentrations in 28/8/2005 higher. The CO maps were generated using Kriging Interpolation technique. This interpolation technique produced high correlation coefficient, R2 and low root mean square error, RMS for CO. This study provided useful information for influence change of CO concentration on varies temperature.

  15. Co3O4 nanoparticles decorated carbon nanofiber mat as binder-free air-cathode for high performance rechargeable zinc-air batteries.

    PubMed

    Li, Bing; Ge, Xiaoming; Goh, F W Thomas; Hor, T S Andy; Geng, Dongsheng; Du, Guojun; Liu, Zhaolin; Zhang, Jie; Liu, Xiaogang; Zong, Yun

    2015-02-07

    An efficient, durable and low cost air-cathode is essential for a high performance metal-air battery for practical applications. Herein, we report a composite bifunctional catalyst, Co3O4 nanoparticles-decorated carbon nanofibers (CNFs), working as an efficient air-cathode in high performance rechargeable Zn-air batteries (ZnABs). The particles-on-fibers nanohybrid materials were derived from electrospun metal-ion containing polymer fibers followed by thermal carbonization and a post annealing process in air at a moderate temperature. Electrochemical studies suggest that the nanohybrid material effectively catalyzes oxygen reduction reaction via an ideal 4-electron transfer process and outperforms Pt/C in catalyzing oxygen evolution reactions. Accordingly, the prototype ZnABs exhibit a low discharge-charge voltage gap (e.g. 0.7 V, discharge-charge at 2 mA cm(-2)) with higher stability and longer cycle life compared to their counterparts constructed using Pt/C in air-cathode. Importantly, the hybrid nanofiber mat readily serves as an integrated air-cathode without the need of any further modification. Benefitting from its efficient catalytic activities and structural advantages, particularly the 3D architecture of highly conductive CNFs and the high loading density of strongly attached Co3O4 NPs on their surfaces, the resultant ZnABs show significantly improved performance with respect to the rate capability, cycling stability and current density, promising good potential in practical applications.

  16. Global carbon management using air capture and geosequestration at remote locations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lackner, K. S.; Goldberg, D.

    2014-12-01

    CO2 emissions need not only stop; according the IPCC, emissions need to turn negative. This requires means to remove CO2 from air and store it safely and permanently. We outline a combination of secure geosequestration and direct capture of CO2 from ambient air to create negative emissions at remote locations. Operation at remote sites avoids many difficulties associated with capture at the source, where space for added equipment is limited, good storage sites are in short supply, and proximity to private property engenders resistance. Large Igneous Provinces have been tested as secure CO2 reservoirs. CO2 and water react with reservoir rock to form stable carbonates, permanently sequestering the carbon. Outfitting reservoirs in large igneous provinces far from human habitation with ambient air capture systems creates large CO2 sequestration sites. Their remoteness offers advantages in environmental security and public acceptance and, thus, can smooth the path toward CO2 stabilization. Direct capture of CO2 from ambient air appears energetically and economically viable and could be scaled up quickly. Thermodynamic energy requirements are very small and a number of approaches have shown to be energy efficient in practice. Sorbent technologies include supported organoamines, alkaline brines, and quaternary ammonium based ion-exchange resins. To demonstrate that the stated goals of low cost and low energy consumption can be reached at scale, public research and demonstration projects are essential. We suggest co-locating air capture and geosequestration at sites where renewable energy resources can power both activities. Ready renewable energy would also allow for the co-production of synthetic fuels. Possible locations with large wind and basalt resources include Iceland and Greenland, the north-western United States, the Kerguelen plateau, Siberia and Morocco. Capture and sequestration in these reservoirs could recover all of the emissions of the 20th century and

  17. Canopy carbon budget of Siebold's beech (Fagus crenata) sapling under free air ozone exposure.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Makoto; Hoshika, Yasutomo; Inada, Naoki; Koike, Takayoshi

    2014-01-01

    To determine the effects of ozone (O3) on the canopy carbon budget, we investigated photosynthesis and respiration of leaves of Siebold's beech saplings under free air O3 exposure (60 nmol mol(-1), during daytime) in relation to the within-canopy light gradient; we then calculated the canopy-level photosynthetic carbon gain (PCG) and respiratory carbon loss (RCL) using a canopy photosynthesis model. Susceptibilities of photosynthesis and respiration to O3 were greater in leaves of upper canopy than in the lower canopy. The canopy net carbon gain (NCG) was reduced by O3 by 12.4% during one growing season. The increased RCL was the main factor for the O3-induced reduction in NCG in late summer, while contributions of the reduced PCG and the increased RCL to the NCG were almost the same in autumn. These results indicate contributions of changes in PCG and RCL under O3 to NCG were different between seasons.

  18. Air filtration in the free molecular flow regime: a review of high-efficiency particulate air filters based on carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Li, Peng; Wang, Chunya; Zhang, Yingying; Wei, Fei

    2014-11-01

    Air filtration in the free molecular flow (FMF) regime is important and challenging because a higher filtration efficiency and lower pressure drop are obtained when the fiber diameter is smaller than the gas mean free path in the FMF regime. In previous studies, FMF conditions have been obtained by increasing the gas mean free path through reducing the pressure and increasing the temperature. In the case of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with nanoscale diameters, it is possible to filtrate in the FMF regime under normal conditions. This paper reviews recent progress in theoretical and experimental studies of air filtration in the FMF regime. Typical structure models of high-efficiency particulate (HEPA) air filters based on CNTs are introduced. The pressure drop in air filters operated in the FMF regime is less than that predicted by the conventional air filtration theory. The thinnest HEPA filters fabricated from single-walled CNT films have an extremely low pressure drop. CNT air filters with a gradient nanostructure are shown to give a much better filtration performance in dynamic filtration. CNT air filters with a hierarchical structure and an agglomerated CNT fluidized bed air filter are also introduced. Finally, the challenges and opportunities for the application of CNTs in air filtration are discussed.

  19. Electric-arc synthesis of soot with high content of higher fullerenes in parallel arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutlov, A. E.; Nekrasov, V. M.; Sergeev, A. G.; Bubnov, V. P.; Kareev, I. E.

    2016-12-01

    Soot with a relatively high content of higher fullerenes (C76, C78, C80, C82, C84, C86, etc.) is synthesized in a parallel arc upon evaporation of pure carbon electrodes. The content of higher fullerenes in soot extract amounts to 13.8 wt % when two electrodes are simultaneously burnt in electric-arc reactor. Such a content is comparable with the content obtained upon evaporation of composite graphite electrodes with potassium carbonate impurity.

  20. Carbon and Air Quality Emissions from Crop Residue Burning in the Contiguous United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarty, J. L.; Korontzi, S.; Justice, C. O.

    2009-12-01

    Crop residue burning is a global agricultural activity that is a source of carbon and air quality emissions. Carbon and air quality emissions from crop residue burning in the contiguous U.S. (CONUS) were estimated for a five-year period, 2003 through 2007, using multispectral remote sensing-derived products. The atmospheric species that comprise the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) were selected as air quality emissions. CO2 emissions were also calculated due to its importance to global climate change. This analysis utilized multiple remote sensing data sets and products to quantify crop residue burning in CONUS, including multi-year crop type maps, an 8-day difference Normalized Burn Ratio product, and calibrated area estimates of cropland burning from 1 km MODIS Active Fire Points. Remote sensing products were combined in a GIS to quantify the location of cropland burning, burned area size, and associated crop type. A crop-specific emission factor database was compiled from the scientific literature. Fuel loads and combustion efficiency estimates were derived from the literature as well as from in-field collaborators. These data were combined to estimate crop residue burning emissions using the bottom-up methodology developed by Seiler and Crutzen (1980). This analysis found that an average of 1,239,000 ha of croplands burn each year in the CONUS. Florida, Arizona, Idaho, Utah, Washington, Arkansas, Louisiana, Oregon, California, and Colorado accounted for approximately 61% of the total crop residue burning. Crop residue burning is a significant fire activity in the CONUS, averaging 43% of the burned area reported for wildland fires in the U.S. (including Alaska and Hawaii). Crop residue burning was also found to be a significant source of emissions that negatively impacted air quality. Crop residue burning emissions occurred most often in summer and fall, with the exception of winter and early spring

  1. Gas arc constriction for plasma arc welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGee, William F. (Inventor); Rybicki, Daniel J. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A welding torch for plasma arc welding apparatus has an inert gas applied circumferentially about the arc column externally of the constricting nozzle so as to apply a constricting force on the arc after it has exited the nozzle orifice and downstream of the auxiliary shielding gas. The constricting inert gas is supplied to a plenum chamber about the body of the torch and exits through a series of circumferentially disposed orifices in an annular wall forming a closure at the forward end of the constricting gas plenum chamber. The constricting force of the circumferential gas flow about the arc concentrates and focuses the arc column into a more narrow and dense column of energy after exiting the nozzle orifice so that the arc better retains its energy density prior to contacting the workpiece.

  2. Soil carbon isotopic composition and soil carbon content in an agroecosystem during six years of Free Air Carbon dioxide Enrichment (FACE).

    PubMed

    Giesemann, Anette; Weigel, Hans-Joachim

    2008-12-01

    The Free Air Carbon dioxide Enrichment (FACE) experiment conducted at the Federal Agricultural Research Centre (FAL) in Braunschweig in an arable crop rotation (total duration six years) allowed us to trace carbon (C) input in the soil C pool, as the CO(2), used in the experiment to increase the atmospheric CO(2) concentration, was depleted in (13)C. Accurate assessment of the C input by means of stable C isotope analysis requires detailed knowledge on the spatial distribution of both the C isotopic composition and the C content in the soil C. Assumed changes in these parameters were examined. CO(2) enrichment treatment over a six year period resulted in a clear trend towards an increase of soil C content in the uppermost 10 cm of soil. About 4.9% of the soil C present under ambient air conditions, and 10.7% present under elevated CO(2) conditions were determined as new input. However, the results are not statistically significant yet.

  3. Diagnostic air quality model evaluation of source-specific primary and secondary fine particulate carbon.

    PubMed

    Napelenok, Sergey L; Simon, Heather; Bhave, Prakash V; Pye, Havala O T; Pouliot, George A; Sheesley, Rebecca J; Schauer, James J

    2014-01-01

    Ambient measurements of 78 source-specific tracers of primary and secondary carbonaceous fine particulate matter collected at four midwestern United States locations over a full year (March 2004-February 2005) provided an unprecedented opportunity to diagnostically evaluate the results of a numerical air quality model. Previous analyses of these measurements demonstrated excellent mass closure for the variety of contributing sources. In this study, a carbon-apportionment version of the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model was used to track primary organic and elemental carbon emissions from 15 independent sources such as mobile sources and biomass burning in addition to four precursor-specific classes of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) originating from isoprene, terpenes, aromatics, and sesquiterpenes. Conversion of the source-resolved model output into organic tracer concentrations yielded a total of 2416 data pairs for comparison with observations. While emission source contributions to the total model bias varied by season and measurement location, the largest absolute bias of -0.55 μgC/m(3) was attributed to insufficient isoprene SOA in the summertime CMAQ simulation. Biomass combustion was responsible for the second largest summertime model bias (-0.46 μgC/m(3) on average). Several instances of compensating errors were also evident; model underpredictions in some sectors were masked by overpredictions in others.

  4. Enhanced photoluminescence in air-suspended carbon nanotubes by oxygen doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jihan; Dhall, Rohan; Hou, Bingya; Yang, Sisi; Wang, Bo; Kang, Daejing; Cronin, Stephen B.

    2016-10-01

    We report photoluminescence (PL) imaging and spectroscopy of air-suspended carbon nanotubes (CNTs) before and after exposure to a brief (20 s) UV/ozone treatment. These spectra show enhanced PL intensities in 10 out of 11 nanotubes that were measured, by as much as 5-fold. This enhancement in the luminescence efficiency is caused by oxygen defects which trap excitons. We also observe an average 3-fold increase in the D-band Raman intensity further indicating the creation of defects. Previous demonstrations of oxygen doping have been carried out on surfactant-coated carbon nanotubes dissolved in solution, thus requiring substantial longer ozone/UV exposure times (˜15 h). Here, the ozone treatment is more efficient because of the surface exposure of the air-suspended CNTs. In addition to enhanced PL intensities, we observe narrowing of the emission linewidth by 3-10 nm. This ability to control and engineer defects in CNTs is important for realizing several optoelectronic applications such as light-emitting diodes and single photon sources.

  5. Driven Motion and Instability of an Atmospheric Pressure Arc

    SciTech Connect

    Max Karasik

    1999-12-01

    Atmospheric pressure arcs are used extensively in applications such as welding and metallurgy. However, comparatively little is known of the physics of such arcs in external magnetic fields and the mechanisms of the instabilities present. In order to address questions of equilibrium and stability of such arcs, an experimental arc furnace is constructed and operated in air with graphite cathode and steel anode at currents 100-250 A. The arc is diagnosed with a gated intensified camera and a collimated photodiode array, as well as fast voltage and current probes.

  6. Arc Deflection Length Affected by Transverse Rotating Magnetic Field with Lateral Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiino, Toru; Ishii, Yoko; Yamamoto, Shinji; Iwao, Toru; High Current Energy Laboratory (HiCEL) Team

    2016-10-01

    Gas metal arc welding using shielding gas is often used in the welding industry. However, the arc deflection affected by lateral gas is problem because of inappropriate heat transfer. Shielding gas is used in order to prevent the instability affected by the arc deflection. However, the shielding gas causes turbulence, then blowhole of weld defect occurs because the arc affected by the instability is contaminated by the air. Thus, the magnetic field is applied to the arc in order to stabilize the arc using low amount of shielding gas. The method of applying the transverse rotating magnetic field (RMF) to the arc is one of the methods to prevent the arc instability. The RMF drives the arc because of electromagnetic force. The driven arc is considered to be prevented to arc deflection of lateral gas because the arc is restrained by the magnetic field because of the driven arc. In addition, it is assume the RMF prevented to the arc deflection of lateral gas from the multiple directions. In this paper, the arc deflection length affected by the RMF with lateral gas was elucidated in order to know the effect of the RMF for arc stabilization. Specifically, the arc deflection length affected by the magnetic frequency and the magnetic flux density is measured by high speed video camera. As a result, the arc deflection length decreases with increasing magnetic frequency, and the arc deflection length increases with increasing the magnetic flux density.

  7. Arc spot welding technique for underwater use

    SciTech Connect

    Koga, H.; Ide, Y.; Ogawa, Y.

    1995-12-31

    An arc spot welding equipment with special local cavity shroud was developed for underwater salvaging activity. Arc spot welding for lapped plates is an effective method to recover defects. This method in surface is so simple to use widely in the field of railways and chemical plants manufacturing. But there is some problems on the reliability of joint strength and bead shapes. A special arc spot nozzle to improve welding quality was developed. A small outlet of air jet at the bottom of the nozzle was created to maintain the swirl flow of shielding gas and certain rejection of excessive molten metal. This nozzle covers the welding part completely, then it also works as a local cavity shroud under water. This paper describes the design and function of the nozzle for CO{sub 2} arc spot welding system. A programmable controller manages the welding sequence of shielding gas flow, air jet flow, and arcing time. This welding gun is operated manually, but the operation is only to press the gun on the weld point. After that welding will proceed automatically, and arcing time is about three seconds. Whole time for welding which includes pre and post gas flow time is less than ten seconds for surface use, it is required some more additional pre drying process of welding point for underwater use to guarantee the high quality welding results. Fundamental analysis of welding conditions and the effects of air jet were considered.

  8. The deployment of carbon monoxide wireless sensor network (CO-WSN) for ambient air monitoring.

    PubMed

    Chaiwatpongsakorn, Chaichana; Lu, Mingming; Keener, Tim C; Khang, Soon-Jai

    2014-06-16

    Wireless sensor networks are becoming increasingly important as an alternative solution for environment monitoring because they can reduce cost and complexity. Also, they can improve reliability and data availability in places where traditional monitoring methods are difficult to site. In this study, a carbon monoxide wireless sensor network (CO-WSN) was developed to measure carbon monoxide concentrations at a major traffic intersection near the University of Cincinnati main campus. The system has been deployed over two weeks during Fall 2010, and Summer 2011-2012, traffic data was also recorded by using a manual traffic counter and a video camcorder to characterize vehicles at the intersection 24 h, particularly, during the morning and evening peak hour periods. According to the field test results, the 1 hr-average CO concentrations were found to range from 0.1-1.0 ppm which is lower than the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) 35 ppm on a one-hour averaging period. During rush hour periods, the traffic volume at the intersection varied from 2,067 to 3,076 vehicles per hour with 97% being passenger vehicles. Furthermore, the traffic volume based on a 1-h average showed good correlation (R2 = 0.87) with the 1-h average CO-WSN concentrations for morning and evening peak time periods whereas CO-WSN results provided a moderate correlation (R2 = 0.42) with 24 hours traffic volume due to fluctuated changes of meteorological conditions. It is concluded that the performance and the reliability of wireless ambient air monitoring networks can be used as an alternative method for real time air monitoring.

  9. The Deployment of Carbon Monoxide Wireless Sensor Network (CO-WSN) for Ambient Air Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Chaiwatpongsakorn, Chaichana; Lu, Mingming; Keener, Tim C.; Khang, Soon-Jai

    2014-01-01

    Wireless sensor networks are becoming increasingly important as an alternative solution for environment monitoring because they can reduce cost and complexity. Also, they can improve reliability and data availability in places where traditional monitoring methods are difficult to site. In this study, a carbon monoxide wireless sensor network (CO-WSN) was developed to measure carbon monoxide concentrations at a major traffic intersection near the University of Cincinnati main campus. The system has been deployed over two weeks during Fall 2010, and Summer 2011–2012, traffic data was also recorded by using a manual traffic counter and a video camcorder to characterize vehicles at the intersection 24 h, particularly, during the morning and evening peak hour periods. According to the field test results, the 1 hr-average CO concentrations were found to range from 0.1–1.0 ppm which is lower than the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) 35 ppm on a one-hour averaging period. During rush hour periods, the traffic volume at the intersection varied from 2,067 to 3,076 vehicles per hour with 97% being passenger vehicles. Furthermore, the traffic volume based on a 1-h average showed good correlation (R2 = 0.87) with the 1-h average CO-WSN concentrations for morning and evening peak time periods whereas CO-WSN results provided a moderate correlation (R2 = 0.42) with 24 hours traffic volume due to fluctuated changes of meteorological conditions. It is concluded that the performance and the reliability of wireless ambient air monitoring networks can be used as an alternative method for real time air monitoring. PMID:24937527

  10. Perovskite-nitrogen-doped carbon nanotube composite as bifunctional catalysts for rechargeable lithium-air batteries.

    PubMed

    Park, Hey Woong; Lee, Dong Un; Park, Moon Gyu; Ahmed, Raihan; Seo, Min Ho; Nazar, Linda F; Chen, Zhongwei

    2015-03-01

    Developing an effective bifunctional catalyst is a significant issue, as rechargeable metal-air batteries are very attractive for future energy systems. In this study, a facile one-pot process is introduced to prepare an advanced bifunctional catalyst (op-LN) incorporating nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes (NCNTs) into perovskite La0.5 Sr0.5 Co0.8 Fe0.2 O3 nanoparticles (LSCF-NPs). Confirmed by half-cell testing, op-LN exhibits synergistic effects of LSCF-NP and NCNT with excellent bifunctionality for both the oxygen reduction reaction and the oxygen evolution reaction. Furthermore, op-LN exhibits comparable performances in these reactions to Pt/C and Ir/C, respectively, which highlights its potential for use as a commercially viable bifunctional catalyst. Moreover, the results obtained by testing op-LN in a practical Li-air battery demonstrate improved and complementary charge/discharge performance compared to those of LSCF-NP and NCNT, and this confirms that simply prepared op-LN is a promising candidate as a highly effective bifunctional catalyst for rechargeable metal-air batteries.

  11. Air - water temperature relationships in the trout streams of southeastern Minnesota’s carbonate - sandstone landscape

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krider, Lori A.; Magner, Joseph A.; Perry, Jim; Vondracek, Bruce C.; Ferrington, Leonard C.

    2013-01-01

    Carbonate-sandstone geology in southeastern Minnesota creates a heterogeneous landscape of springs, seeps, and sinkholes that supply groundwater into streams. Air temperatures are effective predictors of water temperature in surface-water dominated streams. However, no published work investigates the relationship between air and water temperatures in groundwater-fed streams (GWFS) across watersheds. We used simple linear regressions to examine weekly air-water temperature relationships for 40 GWFS in southeastern Minnesota. A 40-stream, composite linear regression model has a slope of 0.38, an intercept of 6.63, and R2 of 0.83. The regression models for GWFS have lower slopes and higher intercepts in comparison to surface-water dominated streams. Regression models for streams with high R2 values offer promise for use as predictive tools for future climate conditions. Climate change is expected to alter the thermal regime of groundwater-fed systems, but will do so at a slower rate than surface-water dominated systems. A regression model of intercept vs. slope can be used to identify streams for which water temperatures are more meteorologically than groundwater controlled, and thus more vulnerable to climate change. Such relationships can be used to guide restoration vs. management strategies to protect trout streams.

  12. Roles of nitrogen, oxygen, and carbon dioxide in compressed-air narcosis.

    PubMed

    Hesser, C M; Fagraeus, L; Adolfson, J

    1978-12-01

    In an attempt to determine the roles of nitrogen, oxygen, and carbon dioxide in compressed-air narcosis, the effects on performance (mental function and manual dexterity) of adding CO2 in various concentrations to the inspired gas under three different conditions were studied in eight healthy male volunteers. The three conditions were: (1) air breathing at 1.3 ATA; (2) oxygen breathing at 1.7 ATA; and (3) air breathing at 8.0 ATA (same inspired O2 pressure as in (2)). By relating performance to the changes induced in end-tidal (alveolar) gas pressures, and comparing the data from the three conditions, we arrived at the following results and conclusions. A rise in O2 pressure to 1.65 ATA, or in N2 pressure to 6.3 ATA at a constant high PO2 level, caused a significant decrement of 10% in mental function but no consistent effect on psychomotor function. A rise in end-tidal PCO2 of 10 mmHg caused an impairment of approximately 10% in both mental and psychomotor functions. The results suggest that, at raised partial pressures, all three gases have narcotic properties, and that the mechanism of CO2 narcosis differs fundamentally from that of N2 and O2 narcosis.

  13. Precision cleaning verification of fluid components by air/water impingement and total carbon analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barile, Ronald G.; Fogarty, Chris; Cantrell, Chris; Melton, Gregory S.

    1994-01-01

    NASA personnel at Kennedy Space Center's Material Science Laboratory have developed new environmentally sound precision cleaning and verification techniques for systems and components found at the center. This technology is required to replace existing methods traditionally employing CFC-113. The new patent-pending technique of precision cleaning verification is for large components of cryogenic fluid systems. These are stainless steel, sand cast valve bodies with internal surface areas ranging from 0.2 to 0.9 sq m. Extrapolation of this technique to components of even larger sizes (by orders of magnitude) is planned. Currently, the verification process is completely manual. In the new technique, a high velocity, low volume water stream impacts the part to be verified. This process is referred to as Breathing Air/Water Impingement and forms the basis for the Impingement Verification System (IVS). The system is unique in that a gas stream is used to accelerate the water droplets to high speeds. Water is injected into the gas stream in a small, continuous amount. The air/water mixture is then passed through a converging/diverging nozzle where the gas is accelerated to supersonic velocities. These droplets impart sufficient energy to the precision cleaned surface to place non-volatile residue (NVR) contaminants into suspension in the water. The sample water is collected and its NVR level is determined by total organic carbon (TOC) analysis at 880 C. The TOC, in ppm carbon, is used to establish the NVR level. A correlation between the present gravimetric CFC113 NVR and the IVS NVR is found from experimental sensitivity factors measured for various contaminants. The sensitivity has the units of ppm of carbon per mg/sq ft of contaminant. In this paper, the equipment is described and data are presented showing the development of the sensitivity factors from a test set including four NVRs impinged from witness plates of 0.05 to 0.75 sq m.

  14. Precision Cleaning Verification of Fluid Components by Air/Water Impingement and Total Carbon Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barile, Ronald G.; Fogarty, Chris; Cantrell, Chris; Melton, Gregory S.

    1995-01-01

    NASA personnel at Kennedy Space Center's Material Science Laboratory have developed new environmentally sound precision cleaning and verification techniques for systems and components found at the center. This technology is required to replace existing methods traditionally employing CFC-113. The new patent-pending technique of precision cleaning verification is for large components of cryogenic fluid systems. These are stainless steel, sand cast valve bodies with internal surface areas ranging from 0.2 to 0.9 m(exp 2). Extrapolation of this technique to components of even larger sizes (by orders of magnitude) is planned. Currently, the verification process is completely manual. In the new technique, a high velocity, low volume water stream impacts the part to be verified. This process is referred to as Breathing Air/Water Impingement and forms the basis for the Impingement Verification System (IVS). The system is unique in that a gas stream is used to accelerate the water droplets to high speeds. Water is injected into the gas stream in a small, continuous amount. The air/water mixture is then passed through a converging-diverging nozzle where the gas is accelerated to supersonic velocities. These droplets impart sufficient energy to the precision cleaned surface to place non-volatile residue (NVR) contaminants into suspension in the water. The sample water is collected and its NVR level is determined by total organic carbon (TOC) analysis at 880 C. The TOC, in ppm carbon, is used to establish the NVR level. A correlation between the present gravimetric CFC-113 NVR and the IVS NVR is found from experimental sensitivity factors measured for various contaminants. The sensitivity has the units of ppm of carbon per mg-ft(exp 2) of contaminant. In this paper, the equipment is described and data are presented showing the development of the sensitivity factors from a test set including four NVR's impinged from witness plates of 0.05 to 0.75 m(exp 2).

  15. Air-sea carbon dioxide exchange in the Southern Ocean and Antarctic Sea ice zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butterworth, Brian J.

    The Southern Ocean is an important part of the global carbon cycle, responsible for roughly half of the carbon dioxide (CO2) absorbed by the global ocean. The air-sea CO2 flux (Fc) can be expressed as the product of the water-air CO2 partial pressure difference (DeltapCO2) and the gas transfer velocity ( k), an exchange coefficient which represents the efficiency of gas exchange. Generally, Fc is negative (a sink) throughout the Southern Ocean and Antarctic sea ice zone (SIZ), but uncertainty in k has made it difficult to develop an accurate regional carbon budget. Constraining the functional dependence of k on wind speed in open water environments, and quantifying the effect of sea ice on k, will reduce uncertainty in the estimated contribution of the Southern Ocean and Antarctic SIZ to the global carbon cycle. To investigate Fc in the Southern Ocean, a ruggedized, unattended, closed-path eddy covariance (EC) system was deployed on the Antarctic research vessel Nathaniel B. Palmer for nine cruises during 18 months from January 2013 to June 2014 in the Southern Ocean and coastal Antarctica. The methods are described and results are shown for two cruises chosen for their latitudinal range, inclusion of open water and sea ice cover, and large DeltapCO2. The results indicated that ship-based unattended EC measurements in high latitudes are feasible, and recommendations for deployments in such environments were provided. Measurements of Fc and DeltapCO2 were used to compute k. The open water data showed a quadratic relationship between k (cm hr-1) and the neutral 10-m wind speed (U10n, m s -1), k=0.245 U10n 2+1.3, in close agreement with tracer-based results and much lower than previous EC studies. In the SIZ, it was found that k decreased in proportion to sea ice cover. This contrasted findings of enhanced Fc in the SIZ by previous open-path EC campaigns. Using the NBP results a net annual Southern Ocean (ocean south of 30°S) carbon flux of -1.1 PgC yr-1 was

  16. Prolonged spontaneous emission and dephasing of localized excitons in air-bridged carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarpkaya, Ibrahim; Zhang, Zhengyi; Walden-Newman, William; Wang, Xuesi; Hone, James; Wong, Chee W.; Strauf, Stefan

    2013-07-01

    The bright exciton emission of carbon nanotubes is appealing for optoelectronic devices and fundamental studies of light-matter interaction in one-dimensional nanostructures. However, to date, the photophysics of excitons in carbon nanotubes is largely affected by extrinsic effects. Here we perform time-resolved photoluminescence measurements over 14 orders of magnitude for ultra-clean carbon nanotubes bridging an air gap over pillar posts. Our measurements demonstrate a new regime of intrinsic exciton photophysics with prolonged spontaneous emission times up to T1=18 ns, about two orders of magnitude better than prior measurements and in agreement with values hypothesized by theorists about a decade ago. Furthermore, we establish for the first time exciton decoherence times of individual nanotubes in the time domain and find fourfold prolonged values up to T2=2.1 ps compared with ensemble measurements. These first observations motivate new discussions about the magnitude of the intrinsic dephasing mechanism while the prolonged exciton dynamics is promising for applications.

  17. When smoke gets in our eyes: the multiple impacts of atmospheric black carbon on climate, air quality and health.

    PubMed

    Highwood, Eleanor J; Kinnersley, Robert P

    2006-05-01

    With both climate change and air quality on political and social agendas from local to global scale, the links between these hitherto separate fields are becoming more apparent. Black carbon, largely from combustion processes, scatters and absorbs incoming solar radiation, contributes to poor air quality and induces respiratory and cardiovascular problems. Uncertainties in the amount, location, size and shape of atmospheric black carbon cause large uncertainty in both climate change estimates and toxicology studies alike. Increased research has led to new effects and areas of uncertainty being uncovered. Here we draw together recent results and explore the increasing opportunities for synergistic research that will lead to improved confidence in the impact of black carbon on climate change, air quality and human health. Topics of mutual interest include better information on spatial distribution, size, mixing state and measuring and monitoring.

  18. Co3O4 nanoparticles decorated carbon nanofiber mat as binder-free air-cathode for high performance rechargeable zinc-air batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bing; Ge, Xiaoming; Goh, F. W. Thomas; Hor, T. S. Andy; Geng, Dongsheng; Du, Guojun; Liu, Zhaolin; Zhang, Jie; Liu, Xiaogang; Zong, Yun

    2015-01-01

    An efficient, durable and low cost air-cathode is essential for a high performance metal-air battery for practical applications. Herein, we report a composite bifunctional catalyst, Co3O4 nanoparticles-decorated carbon nanofibers (CNFs), working as an efficient air-cathode in high performance rechargeable Zn-air batteries (ZnABs). The particles-on-fibers nanohybrid materials were derived from electrospun metal-ion containing polymer fibers followed by thermal carbonization and a post annealing process in air at a moderate temperature. Electrochemical studies suggest that the nanohybrid material effectively catalyzes oxygen reduction reaction via an ideal 4-electron transfer process and outperforms Pt/C in catalyzing oxygen evolution reactions. Accordingly, the prototype ZnABs exhibit a low discharge-charge voltage gap (e.g. 0.7 V, discharge-charge at 2 mA cm-2) with higher stability and longer cycle life compared to their counterparts constructed using Pt/C in air-cathode. Importantly, the hybrid nanofiber mat readily serves as an integrated air-cathode without the need of any further modification. Benefitting from its efficient catalytic activities and structural advantages, particularly the 3D architecture of highly conductive CNFs and the high loading density of strongly attached Co3O4 NPs on their surfaces, the resultant ZnABs show significantly improved performance with respect to the rate capability, cycling stability and current density, promising good potential in practical applications.An efficient, durable and low cost air-cathode is essential for a high performance metal-air battery for practical applications. Herein, we report a composite bifunctional catalyst, Co3O4 nanoparticles-decorated carbon nanofibers (CNFs), working as an efficient air-cathode in high performance rechargeable Zn-air batteries (ZnABs). The particles-on-fibers nanohybrid materials were derived from electrospun metal-ion containing polymer fibers followed by thermal carbonization

  19. Studying the Effect of the Air-Cap Configuration in Twin-Wire Arc-Spraying Process on the Obtained Flow Characteristics Using Design of Experiment Oriented Fluid Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tillmann, W.; Abdulgader, M.; Anjami, N.; Hagen, L.

    2015-01-01

    The computational fluid dynamics approach is adopted in this work using the design of experiments to reveal the effect of the air-cap configurations on the obtained gas velocity, the shear stresses, the high velocity zone, and the convergence of the obtained spraying plume in the twin-wire arc-spraying process. The parameters, which are revealed to optimize the air-cap configuration, are the throat diameter, the convergence angle of the throat inlet, the throat length, and the distance between the throat outlet and the intersection point of the approaching wires. The throat length is dependent upon the other configuration parameters. Outlet gas velocity, the turbulence in the flow, and the exerted shear stresses at wire tips are directly affected by the dominating flow regimes near the intersection point of the approaching wires. The presence of wires and the contact tips in the gas flow has enormous impact on the obtained flow characteristics. Air-cap throat diameter and the distance between throat outlet and intersection point determine the shape and length of the obtained high velocity zone in the spraying plum.

  20. Investigation of Lithium-Air Battery Discharge Product Formed on Carbon Nanotube and Nanofiber Electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Robert Revell, III

    Carbon nanotubes have been actively investigated for integration in a wide variety of applications since their discovery over 20 years ago. Their myriad desirable material properties including exceptional mechanical strength, high thermal conductivities, large surface-to-volume ratios, and considerable electrical conductivities, which are attributable to a quantum mechanical ability to conduct electrons ballistically, have continued to motivate interest in this material system. While a variety of synthesis techniques exist, carbon nanotubes and nanofibers are most often conveniently synthesized using chemical vapor deposition (CVD), which involves their catalyzed growth from transition metal nanoparticles. Vertically-aligned nanotube and nanofiber carpets produced using CVD have been utilized in a variety of applications including those related to energy storage. Li-air (Li-O2) batteries have received much interest recently because of their very high theoretical energy densities (3200 Wh/kgLi2O2 ). which make them ideal candidates for energy storage devices for future fully-electric vehicles. During operation of a Li-air battery O2 is reduced on the surface a porous air cathode, reacting with Li-ions to form lithium peroxide (Li-O2). Unlike the intercalation reactions of Li-ion batteries, discharge in a Li-air cell is analogous to an electrodeposition process involving the nucleation and growth of the depositing species on a foreign substrate. Carbon nanofiber electrodes were synthesized on porous substrates using a chemical vapor deposition process and then assembled into Li-O2 cells. The large surface to volume ratio and low density of carbon nanofiber electrodes were found to yield a very high gravimetric energy density in Li-O 2 cells, approaching 75% of the theoretical energy density for Li 2O2. Further, the carbon nanofiber electrodes were found to be excellent platforms for conducting ex situ electron microscopy investigations of the deposition Li2O2 phase

  1. Effects of atmospheric air plasma treatment of graphite and carbon felt electrodes on the anodic current from Shewanella attached cells.

    PubMed

    Epifanio, Monica; Inguva, Saikumar; Kitching, Michael; Mosnier, Jean-Paul; Marsili, Enrico

    2015-12-01

    The attachment of electrochemically active microorganisms (EAM) on an electrode is determined by both the chemistry and topography of the electrode surface. Pre-treatment of the electrode surface by atmospheric air plasma introduces hydrophilic functional groups, thereby increasing cell attachment and electroactivity in short-term experiments. In this study, we use graphite and carbon felt electrodes to grow the model EAM Shewanella loihica PV-4 at oxidative potential (0.2 V vs. Ag/AgCl). Cell attachment and electroactivity are measured through electrodynamic methods. Atmospheric air plasma pre-treatment increases cell attachment and current output at graphite electrodes by 25%, while it improves the electroactivity of the carbon felt electrodes by 450%. Air plasma pre-treatment decreased the coulombic efficiency on both carbon felt and graphite electrodes by 60% and 80%, respectively. Microbially produced flavins adsorb preferentially at the graphite electrode, and air plasma pre-treatment results in lower flavin adsorption at both graphite and carbon felt electrodes. Results show that air plasma pre-treatment is a feasible option to increase current output in bioelectrochemical systems.

  2. Low-carbon energy policy and ambient air pollution in Shanghai, China: a health-based economic assessment.

    PubMed

    Chen, Changhong; Chen, Bingheng; Wang, Bingyan; Huang, Cheng; Zhao, Jing; Dai, Yi; Kan, Haidong

    2007-02-01

    Energy and related health issues are of growing concern worldwide today. To investigate the potential public health and economic impact of ambient air pollution under various low-carbon energy scenarios in Shanghai, we estimated the exposure level of Shanghai residents to air pollution under various planned scenarios, and assessed the public health impact using concentration-response functions derived from available epidemiologic studies. We then estimated the corresponding economic values of the health effects based on unit values for each health outcome. Our results show that ambient air pollution in relation to low-carbon energy scenarios could have a significant impact on the future health status of Shanghai residents, both in physical and monetary terms. Compared with the base case scenario, implementation of various low-carbon energy scenarios could prevent 2804-8249 and 9870-23,100 PM10-related avoidable deaths (mid-value) in 2010 and 2020, respectively. It could also decrease incidence of several relevant diseases. The corresponding economic benefits could reach 507.31-1492.33 and 2642.45-6192.11 million U.S. dollars (mid-value) in 2010 and 2020, respectively. These findings illustrate that a low-carbon energy policy will not only decrease the emission of greenhouse gases, but also play an active role in the reduction of air pollutant emissions, improvement of air quality, and promotion of public health. Our estimates can provide useful information to local decision-makers for further cost-benefit analysis.

  3. Rotating arc spark plug

    DOEpatents

    Whealton, John H.; Tsai, Chin-Chi

    2003-05-27

    A spark plug device includes a structure for modification of an arc, the modification including arc rotation. The spark plug can be used in a combustion engine to reduce emissions and/or improve fuel economy. A method for operating a spark plug and a combustion engine having the spark plug device includes the step of modifying an arc, the modifying including rotating the arc.

  4. Effects of welding fumes on nuclear air cleaning system carbon adsorber banks

    SciTech Connect

    Roberson, P.W.

    1997-08-01

    Standard Technical Specifications for nuclear air cleaning systems include requirements for surveillance tests following fire, painting, or chemical release in areas communicating with the affected system. To conservatively implement this requirement, many plants categorize welding as a chemical release process, and institute controls to ensure that welding fumes do not interact with carbon adsorbers in a filter system. After reviewing research data that indicated welding had a minimal impact on adsorber iodine removal efficiency, further testing was performed with the goal of establishing a welding threshold. It was anticipated that some quantity of weld electrodes could be determined that had a corresponding detrimental impact on iodine removal efficiency for the exposed adsorber. This value could be used to determine a conservative sampling schedule that would allow the station to perform laboratory testing to ensure system degradation did not occur without a full battery of surveillance tests. A series of tests was designed to demonstrate carbon efficiency versus cumulative welding fume exposure. Three series of tests were performed, one for each of three different types of commonly used weld electrodes. Carbon sampling was performed at baseline conditions, and every five pounds of electrode thereafter. Two different laboratory tests were performed for each sample; one in accordance with ASTM 3803/1989 at 95% relative humidity and 30 degrees C, and another using the less rigorous conditions of 70% relative humidity and 80 degrees C. Review of the test data for all three types of electrodes failed to show a significant correlation between carbon efficiency degradation and welding fume exposure. Accordingly, welding is no longer categorized as a `chemical release process` at McGuire Nuclear Station, and limits on welding fume interaction with ventilation systems have been eliminated. 4 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  5. On the effect of carbon monoxide addition on soot formation in a laminar ethylene/air coflow diffusion flame

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Hongsheng; Thomson, Kevin A.; Smallwood, Gregory J.

    2009-06-15

    The effect of carbon monoxide addition on soot formation in an ethylene/air diffusion flame is investigated by experiment and detailed numerical simulation. The paper focuses on the chemical effect of carbon monoxide addition by comparing the results of carbon monoxide and nitrogen diluted flames. Both experiment and simulation show that although overall the addition of carbon monoxide monotonically reduces the formation of soot, the chemical effect promotes the formation of soot in an ethylene/air diffusion flame. The further analysis of the details of the numerical result suggests that the chemical effect of carbon monoxide addition may be caused by the modifications to the flame temperature, soot surface growth and oxidation reactions. Flame temperature increases relative to a nitrogen diluted flame, which results in a higher surface growth rate, when carbon monoxide is added. Furthermore, the addition of carbon monoxide increases the concentration of H radical owing to the intensified forward rate of the reaction CO + OH = CO{sub 2} + H and therefore increases the surface growth reaction rates. The addition of carbon monoxide also slows the oxidation rate of soot because the same reaction CO + OH = CO{sub 2} + H results in a lower concentration of OH. (author)

  6. DC arc weld starter

    DOEpatents

    Campiotti, Richard H.; Hopwood, James E.

    1990-01-01

    A system for starting an arc for welding uses three DC power supplies, a high voltage supply for initiating the arc, an intermediate voltage supply for sustaining the arc, and a low voltage welding supply directly connected across the gap after the high voltage supply is disconnected.

  7. Time and species dependent ambient air's effects on carbon clusters generated during femtosecond laser ablation of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Wenxia; Zhang, Nan; Feng, Peipei; Wu, Han; Zhu, Xiaonong

    2015-12-01

    Near infrared femtosecond laser is employed to ablate highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) in ambient air and in vacuum respectively. The recorded transient emission spectra of the ablated plume with a time resolution of 2 ns indicate that the effects of air on the plume are dependent on both time and species. This finding provides important insights into the generation and decay mechanisms of different carbon radicals or clusters. At 1 or 2 ns after the laser pulse strikes the target, air weakens the Swan bands of C2 compared with the case in vacuum, an effect that may be caused by the quenching collisions between air molecules and C2 radicals. This result shows that C2 may be mainly generated by direct spallation from the target surface at the early stage of ablation. Emission spectra at large time delays present that the existence time of the Swan bands in air is longer than the lifetime of the upper electronic state of the Swan system, suggesting that the air-involved three-body recombination and collisional excitation that enhance the generation of emitting C2 overcome quenching collisions at large time delays. A spectral band at ~416 nm assigned to the transition from 1Σ u + to X 1Σ g + of C15 is more intense in air than in vacuum, indicating that C15 clusters are generated at least partially by the combination of smaller clusters in air. It is also found that air-assisted heat transfer makes the temperature of carbon clusters decrease more quickly in air than in vacuum, leading to a much shorter lifetime of the continuum in air.

  8. Unstable Behavior of Anodic Arc Discharge for Synthesis of Nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gershman, Sophia; Raitses, Yevgeny

    2016-09-01

    Fast imaging and electrical current measurements reveal unstable behavior of the carbon arc discharge for synthesis of nanomaterials. The arc column and the arc attachment region to the anode move in a somewhat sporadic way with a characteristic time in a 10-3 sec range. The arc exhibits a negative differential resistance before the arc motion occurs. A physical mechanism is proposed based on the thermal processes in the arc plasma region interacting with the ablating anode which leads to the shift of the arc to a new anode region. According to the transient heat transfer analysis, the time needed to heat a new anode region is also in a 10-3 sec range. For a 0.6 cm diameter anode used in our experiments, this time yields a frequency of about 200-300 Hz, comparable to the measured frequency of the arc motion. The voltage and current measurements show oscillations with a similar characteristic frequency. The thermal model is indirectly supported by the measured negative differential resistance of the arc discharge during arc oscillations. The observed unstable behavior of the arc may be responsible for the mixing of the flow of nanoparticles during the synthesis of nanoparticles leading to poor selectivity typical for the arc synthesis. The work was supported by US DOE under Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  9. Indoor air quality assessment of daycare facilities with carbon dioxide, temperature, and humidity as indicators.

    PubMed

    Ferng, Shiaw-Fen; Lee, Li-Wen

    2002-11-01

    Poor indoor air quality (IAQ) in daycare facilities affects both attending children and care providers. Incident rates of upper-respiratory-tract infections have been reported to be higher in children who attend daycare. Excessive carbon dioxide (CO2) exposure can cause several health effects and even sudden infant death. For this study, 26 facilities were randomly selected in a Midwestern county of the United States. CO2, room temperature, and relative humidity were used as indicators for IAQ and comfort levels. These IAQ parameters were continuously monitored for eight hours at each facility by a direct-reading instrument that was calibrated before each measurement. More than 50 percent of the facilities had an average CO2 level over the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) standard of 1,000 parts per million (ppm). For temperature and relative humidity, respectively, 42.3 percent and 15.4 percent of facilities were outside of the ASHRAE-recommended comfort zones. The nap-time average CO2 level was about 117 ppm higher than the non-nap-time level. The increment of the nap-time CO2 level in the sleeping-only room over the level in multipurpose rooms was statistically significant (p < .05). According to stepwise multiple regression analysis, nap-time CO2 level was predicted by CO2 level before occupancy, nap-time average temperature, carbon monoxide, and child density (R2 = .83). It is recommended that an appropriate IAQ standard for daycare facilities be established and that children should not be placed in a completely isolated room during nap time.

  10. Biological treatment of carbon disulfide laden air from sponge manufacturing facility

    SciTech Connect

    Hugler, W.; Acosta, C.M.; Benavente, J.L.; Revah, S.

    1998-12-31

    While several different biological techniques have been developed to eliminate hydrogen sulfide (H2S) from air, there are only few examples of successful results with high concentrations of carbon disulfide (CS2). A pilot-scale biological control system for the treatment of 2,000 ACFM of a gaseous stream containing up to 2,500 ppmv of carbon disulfide, was installed in a cellulose sponge manufacturing facility. The project`s objective was to evaluate the ability of the system to attain continuous removal efficiency levels of 90% for CS{sub 2} and 99% for H{sub 2}S. During the pilot test, the two-unit sequential biotrickling filter reached stable average removal efficiency and rate of 90% and 185 g S/m3-h (based on CS{sub 2} load); individual data analysis for each unit showed that first tower reached a maximum performance of 86% efficiency and 350 g S/m3-h removal rate. Removal efficiencies greater than 99% were obtained for H{sub 2}S during most test period. Furthermore, the system was evaluated for the treatment of a similar waste stream with high fluctuations on CS{sub 2} concentration (in order to assess the need for a dampening unit). New waste gas conditions had a negative impact on performance, which eventually improved reaching an efficiency of 77%; due to time constraints an steady-state was not attained during this test phase. Based on results, the BIOCYD technology demonstrated to be an effective process to remediate waste air streams generated at cellulose sponge facilities.

  11. Arc-heated gas flow experiments for hypersonic propulsion applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roseberry, Christopher Matthew

    Although hydrogen is an attractive fuel for a hypersonic air-breathing vehicle in terms of reaction rate, flame temperature, and energy content per unit mass, the substantial tank volume required to store hydrogen imposes a drag penalty to performance that tends to offset these advantages. An alternative approach is to carry a hydrocarbon fuel and convert it on-board into a hydrogen-rich gas mixture to be injected into the engine combustors. To investigate this approach, the UTA Arc-Heated Wind Tunnel facility was modified to run on methane rather than the normally used nitrogen. Previously, this facility was extensively developed for the purpose of eventually performing experiments simulating scramjet engine flow along a single expansion ramp nozzle (SERN) in addition to more generalized applications. This formidable development process, which involved modifications to every existing subsystem along with the incorporation of new subsystems, is described in detail. Fortunately, only a minor plumbing reconfiguration was required to prepare the facility for the fuel reformation research. After a failure of the arc heater power supply, a 5.6 kW plasma-cutting torch was modified in order to continue the arc pyrolysis experiments. The outlet gas flow from the plasma torch was sampled and subsequently analyzed using gas chromatography. The experimental apparatus converted the methane feedstock almost completely into carbon, hydrogen and acetylene. A high yield of hydrogen, consisting of a product mole fraction of roughly 0.7, was consistently obtained. Unfortunately, the energy consumption of the apparatus was too excessive to be feasible for a flight vehicle. However, other researchers have pyrolyzed hydrocarbons using electric arcs with much less power input per unit mass.

  12. Errors in measurements of 222Rn in methane and carbon dioxide using scintillation cells calibrated for 222Rn in air.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Phillip H; Burkhart, James F; Camley, Robert E

    2014-03-01

    Scintillation cells are used typically for measuring the concentration of (222)Rn in air and are calibrated for that purpose. However, scintillation cells are sometimes used for measuring (222)Rn in natural gas or carbon dioxide. The counting efficiencies of scintillation cells for measurements of (222)Rn in these gases should be different from those for measuring (222)Rn in air because the ranges of alpha particles emitted by (222)Rn and its progeny are greater in methane and smaller in carbon dioxide than in air. If these effects are not taken into consideration, measurements of (222)Rn in natural gas will be biased high and in carbon dioxide will be biased low. The authors previously investigated the effects of barometric pressure on measurements of (222)Rn in air using scintillation cells. A modeling technique was used in a previous study to calculate theoretical errors that would result if atmospheric pressure were not considered. In the current study, the same modeling technique was used to calculate theoretical errors that would be made for measurements of (222)Rn in methane and carbon dioxide if the calibration for (222)Rn in air were used. Results are presented for four types of scintillation cells of varying geometries and for barometric pressures representative of four elevations ranging from sea level to 1,963 m (6,440 feet). These results indicate that the errors introduced by the ranges of the alpha particles in gases different from air can be significant. Depending on the type of cell and the local pressure, a measurement of (222)Rn in methane may be biased high by 2-7%, while a measurement of (222)Rn in CO2 may be biased low by 15-20% if the calibration for (222)Rn in air is used.

  13. Tracking Sediment Subduction Along the Sangihe Volcanic Arc, Indonesia Using Volatile Chemistry and N-isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clor, L. E.; Fischer, T. P.; Hilton, D. R.; Sharp, Z.; Hartono, U.

    2002-12-01

    We report the first data on volatile emissions from the Sangihe Volcanic Arc to trace sediment subduction. The Sangihe Arc is part of an unusual tectonic setting where the Molucca Sea Plate subducts beneath both the Sangihe and Halmahera Arcs, resulting in oblique arc-arc collision. The northern parts of Sangihe and Halmahera are fused, while the south has not yet collided. Collision has resulted in sediment obduction onto the facing arcs, decoupling it from the oceanic plate below. To study the geochemical effects of collision, we collected gases at eight locations along Sangihe Arc at fumaroles and hot springs. Our results complement CO2-He systematics of the same samples (Jaffe et al., this volume). Gas samples were analyzed for major volatiles and N isotopes. Typical N2/He for subduction zones are 1000-25,000, while MORB and OIB are lower (10-100) due to the lack of sediment-derived N input. Most Sangihe samples have N2/He that deviate from the subduction signature (330-2825). The N isotopic (δ15N) value of air is 0‰ by definition, -3 to -5‰ in the upper mantle, and +7‰ in marine sediments. δ15N values for Sangihe samples range from -7 to +2‰ . Variations in N2/He ratios and δ15N data (tracers of hemipelagic sediment) correlate with latitude, with values decreasing to the north suggesting that subduction of hemipelagic sediment is less significant in the north than the south. The N2-He systematics suggest that arc-arc collision, more advanced in the north (where N2/He=537 and δ15N=-7‰ at Ruang Volcano), has caused the sediment package to become less coupled to the underlying ocean crust. The higher values in the south (N2/He=1977 and δ15N=+2‰ at Ambang Volcano) suggest that sediment is still subducting there, as the collision is less developed. Alternatively, sediment composition may vary along strike of the arc, with hemipelagic and carbonate-rich sediments subducted in the south and north, respectively.

  14. On the causal link between carbon dioxide and air pollution mortality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, Mark Z.

    2008-02-01

    Greenhouse gases and particle soot have been linked to enhanced sea-level, snowmelt, disease, heat stress, severe weather, and ocean acidification, but the effect of carbon dioxide (CO2) on air pollution mortality has not been examined or quantified. Here, it is shown that increased water vapor and temperatures from higher CO2 separately increase ozone more with higher ozone; thus, global warming may exacerbate ozone the most in already-polluted areas. A high-resolution global-regional model then found that CO2 may increase U.S. annual air pollution deaths by about 1000 (350-1800) and cancers by 20-30 per 1 K rise in CO2-induced temperature. About 40% of the additional deaths may be due to ozone and the rest, to particles, which increase due to CO2-enhanced stability, humidity, and biogenic particle mass. An extrapolation by population could render 21,600 (7400-39,000) excess CO2-caused annual pollution deaths worldwide, more than those from CO2-enhanced storminess.

  15. Electrical properties of carbon-nanotube-network transistors in air after gamma irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Satoshi; Yabe, Daisuke; Enomoto, Shotaro; Koshio, Shigeru; Konishi, Teruaki; Hamano, Tsuyoshi; Hirao, Toshio

    2017-02-01

    We experimentally evaluate the electrical properties of carbon nanotube (CNT)-network transistors before and after 60Co gamma-ray irradiation up to 50 kGy in an air environment. When the total dose is increased, the degree of the threshold voltage (Vth) shift towards positive gate voltages in the drain current-gate voltage (ID-VGS) characteristics decreases for total irradiation doses above 30 kGy, although it is constant below 30 kGy. From our analysis of the ID-VGS characteristics along with micro-Raman spectroscopy, the gamma-ray irradiation does not change the structure of the CNT network channel for total doses up to 50 kGy; it instead generates charge traps near the CNT/SiO2 gate insulator interfaces. These traps are located within the SiO2 layer and/or the adsorbate on the device surface. The positively charged traps near the CNT/SiO2 interface contribute less to the Vth shift than the interface dipoles at the CNT/metal electrode interfaces and the segment of the CNT network channel below doses of 30 kGy, while the contribution of the charge traps increases for total doses above 30 kGy. Our findings indicate the possibility of the application of CNT-network transistors as radiation detectors suitable for use in air for radiation doses above 30 kGy.

  16. Low-voltage ionization of air with carbon-based materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, M. S.; Zhang, W.; Fisher, T. S.; Garimella, S. V.

    2005-11-01

    Polycrystalline diamond and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) exhibit excellent vacuum field emission properties, characterized by low turn-on voltage and high current density. Their atmospheric field emission and ionization capabilities are reported in this paper. Highly graphitic polycrystalline diamond (HGPD) film was grown in a plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition process, and its ability to ionize atmospheric air was characterized and compared against CNTs. The HGPD sample was activated by applying a moderate voltage bias (340 V) for an extended period across a 10 µm electrode gap. After activation, a turn-on voltage of 20 V and a sustainable current of 10 µA were observed with the same gap. Results also indicate that field emission helps to create a moderate ionization effect without catastrophic air breakdown. A hydrogen plasma treatment is shown to restore emission current back to or even exceeding the original level, which suggests an important role of surface termination in the electron emission process. CNTs were grown and tested but did not perform as well under similar conditions.

  17. A hierarchical three-dimensional NiCo2O4 nanowire array/carbon cloth as an air electrode for nonaqueous Li-air batteries.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei-Ming; Gao, Ting-Ting; Yang, Yin; Sun, Qian; Fu, Zheng-Wen

    2013-10-14

    A 3D NiCo2O4 nanowire array/carbon cloth (NCONW/CC) was employed as the cathode for Li-air batteries with a non-aqueous electrolyte. After its discharge, novel porous ball-like Li2O2 was found to be deposited on the tip of NiCo2O4 nanowires. The special structure of Li2O2 and active sites of catalysts are also discussed.

  18. Catalytic wet air oxidation of 2-chlorophenol over sewage sludge-derived carbon-based catalysts.

    PubMed

    Tu, Yuting; Xiong, Ya; Tian, Shuanghong; Kong, Lingjun; Descorme, Claude

    2014-07-15

    A sewage sludge derived carbon-supported iron oxide catalyst (FeSC) was prepared and used in the Catalytic Wet Air Oxidation (CWAO) of 2-chlorophenol (2-CP). The catalysts were characterized in terms of elemental composition, surface area, pHPZC, XRD and SEM. The performances of the FeSC catalyst in the CWAO of 2-CP was assessed in a batch reactor operated at 120°C under 0.9MPa oxygen partial pressure. Complete decomposition of 2-CP was achieved within 5h and 90% Total Organic Carbon (TOC) was removed after 24h of reaction. Quite a straight correlation was observed between the 2-CP conversion, the amount of iron leached in solution and the pH of the reaction mixture at a given reaction time, indicating a strong predominance of the homogeneous catalysis contribution. The iron leaching could be efficiently prevented when the pH of the solution was maintained at values higher than 4.5, while the catalytic activity was only slightly reduced. Upon four successive batch CWAO experiments, using the same FeSC catalyst recovered by filtration after pH adjustment, only a very minor catalyst deactivation was observed. Finally, based on all the identified intermediates, a simplified reaction pathway was proposed for the CWAO of 2-CP over the FeSC catalyst.

  19. A free-air system for long-term stable carbon isotope labeling of adult forest trees

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stable carbon (C) isotopes, in particular employed in labeling experiments, are an ideal tool to broaden our understanding of C dynamics in trees and forest ecosystems. Here, we present a free-air exposure system, named isoFACE, designed for long-term stable C isotope labeling in...

  20. Water-Processable, Air-Stable Organic Nanoparticle-Carbon Nanotube Nanocomposites Exhibiting n-Type Thermoelectric Properties.

    PubMed

    Nonoguchi, Yoshiyuki; Tani, Atsushi; Ikeda, Tomohiro; Goto, Chigusa; Tanifuji, Naoki; Uda, Ryoko M; Kawai, Tsuyoshi

    2017-03-01

    Water-dispersed organic base nanoparticles are utilized for the highly stable n-type doping of single-walled carbon nanotubes in aqueous dispersion. Long-term stability is often a critical challenge in the application of n-type organic conductors. The present n-type organic materials exhibit almost no degradation in the thermoelectric properties over months, in air.

  1. Filters for cathodic arc plasmas

    DOEpatents

    Anders, Andre; MacGill, Robert A.; Bilek, Marcela M. M.; Brown, Ian G.

    2002-01-01

    Cathodic arc plasmas are contaminated with macroparticles. A variety of magnetic plasma filters has been used with various success in removing the macroparticles from the plasma. An open-architecture, bent solenoid filter, with additional field coils at the filter entrance and exit, improves macroparticle filtering. In particular, a double-bent filter that is twisted out of plane forms a very compact and efficient filter. The coil turns further have a flat cross-section to promote macroparticle reflection out of the filter volume. An output conditioning system formed of an expander coil, a straightener coil, and a homogenizer, may be used with the magnetic filter for expanding the filtered plasma beam to cover a larger area of the target. A cathodic arc plasma deposition system using this filter can be used for the deposition of ultrathin amorphous hard carbon (a-C) films for the magnetic storage industry.

  2. Characteristics of Atmospheric Pressure Rotating Gliding Arc Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao; Zhu, Fengsen; Tu, Xin; Bo, Zheng; Cen, Kefa; Li, Xiaodong

    2016-05-01

    In this work, a novel direct current (DC) atmospheric pressure rotating gliding arc (RGA) plasma reactor has been developed for plasma-assisted chemical reactions. The influence of the gas composition and the gas flow rate on the arc dynamic behaviour and the formation of reactive species in the N2 and air gliding arc plasmas has been investigated by means of electrical signals, high speed photography, and optical emission spectroscopic diagnostics. Compared to conventional gliding arc reactors with knife-shaped electrodes which generally require a high flow rate (e.g., 10-20 L/min) to maintain a long arc length and reasonable plasma discharge zone, in this RGA system, a lower gas flow rate (e.g., 2 L/min) can also generate a larger effective plasma reaction zone with a longer arc length for chemical reactions. Two different motion patterns can be clearly observed in the N2 and air RGA plasmas. The time-resolved arc voltage signals show that three different arc dynamic modes, the arc restrike mode, takeover mode, and combined modes, can be clearly identified in the RGA plasmas. The occurrence of different motion and arc dynamic modes is strongly dependent on the composition of the working gas and gas flow rate. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 51576174), the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (No. 20120101110099) and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities (No. 2015FZA4011)

  3. [Rationale for the permissible level of carbon dioxide in indoor air in residential and public buildings with the permanent human presence].

    PubMed

    Gubernskiĭ, Iu D

    2014-01-01

    On the base of the analysis of domestic and foreign data on the issue of rating of carbon dioxide in the indoor air of residential and public buildings and results of own research there is justified an permissible level of carbon dioxide in the indoor air of residential and public buildings with a permanent human presence. The concentration of carbon dioxide in the air space, not higher 1000 ppm (0.1%) was established to have no negative impact on the human health and performance, with this content of carbon dioxide there is no accumulation of toxic chemicals and registered by devices reducing of the oxygen content in the air of spaces, it meets the regulatory requirements for content dioxide carbon in the indoor air, applicable in most of foreign countries.

  4. AIRS Map of Carbon Monoxide Draped on Globe: Time Series from 8/1/2005 to 9/30/2005

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for movie of AIRS Map of Carbon Monoxide Draped on Globe

    Forest fires and agricultural burning create large amounts of carbon monoxide. AIRS provides daily global maps of carbon monoxide from space, allowing scientists to follow the global transport of this gas day-to-day. In this image sequence, carbon monoxide pollution from agricultural burning blooms repeatedly over the Amazonian basin. The gas is then transported across the Atlantic Ocean. Carbon monoxide pollution from fires in sub-Saharan Africa is also apparent.

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder Experiment, with its visible, infrared, and microwave detectors, provides a three-dimensional look at Earth's weather. Working in tandem, the three instruments can make simultaneous observations all the way down to the Earth's surface, even in the presence of heavy clouds. With more than 2,000 channels sensing different regions of the atmosphere, the system creates a global, 3-D map of atmospheric temperature and humidity and provides information on clouds, greenhouse gases, and many other atmospheric phenomena. The AIRS Infrared Sounder Experiment flies onboard NASA's Aqua spacecraft and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., under contract to NASA. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  5. Assessing the impact of the forthcoming decrease in diesel exhaust particulate matter emissions on air quality: implications for black carbon concentrations in ambient air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, Y.; Rodríguez, S.; Cuevas, E.; Ramos, R.; Abreu-Afonso, J.; Baldasano, J. M.

    2009-04-01

    Forthcoming regulations (e.g. EURO 5 and EURO 6) are planned to reduce particulate matter emissions (PM) in the exhaust of forthcoming vehicles. In this study we assess the impact of such reduction in the diesel PM exhaust emissions on the urban ambient air PM concentrations. This has been done by studying the relationship between black carbon (BC) and carbon monoxide (CO) in urban ambient air and in the exhaust of current and forthcoming vehicles. The slope of the BC-vs-CO linear relationship is mainly affected by the percentage (%) of diesel automobiles in the urban vehicles fleet. This slope is a better indicator of the diesel PM emissions than bulk BC concentrations in urban ambient air. BC-vs-CO slopes within the range 1-3 and 7-14 ngBC/µgCO are typically observed in urban areas with low (<25%) and high (≥50%) proportions of diesel-fuel consumption for on road transportation, respectively. The entry into force of forthcoming regulations will decrease the BC-vs-CO slope in urban ambient air from about 10 to 5 ngBC/µgCO in the next decade, according to calculations based on the current data on diesel vehicles in urban fleets in Spanish cities. However, this will not necessary prompt a significant decrease in the urban BC concentrations if road traffic volume follows the increasing trend of the last decade. The results of this study shows that the analysis of the BC-vs-CO slope trend in ambient air is an useful tool for understanding the involvement "of the changes in the vehicle exhaust emissions rates" and "of the changes in the road traffic volume" in the BC and PMx trends in urban ambient air.

  6. Rethinking Recycling in Arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelemen, P.; Behn, M. D.; Jagoutz, O.

    2012-12-01

    Hacker et al EPSL 2011 and Behn et al Nature Geosci 2011 investigated pathways for return of buoyant, subducted material to arc crust. These include (1) diapirs rising into the hot mantle wedge, with extensive melts adding a component to arc magmas, (2) flow of material back up a relatively cold "subduction channel", adding solids to the lower crust and small-degree partial melts to the upper crust, (3) flow from the forearc along the base of arc crust, and (4) imbrication of forearc material into arc crust. These processes add felsic, incompatible-element-rich components to arc crust. The flux of incompatible elements such as Th in arc lavas, thought to be mainly recycled from subducted sediments, is > sediment subduction flux. There are large uncertainties: arc crustal growth rates are imprecise; young, primitive arc lavas may not be representative of magmatic flux into arc crust; sediment subduction flux may have varied. Nevertheless, this result is found for all arcs examined, using recently published growth rates. Perhaps arc growth rates that include subduction erosion are systematically overestimated. Instead or in addition, maybe significant Th comes from material other than sediments. Here, we consider the implications of pathways 1-4 for arc growth rates and incompatible element enrichment, in the context of subduction erosion and arc-arc collision. Subducting arc lithologies can become separated, with only felsic components returned to arc crust. Buoyant lithologies are mobile in viscous instabilities at > 700-800°C. Whereas thin layers such as sediments may become mobile all at once, instabilities may periodically strip the hottest parts from the top of thick buoyant layers, replacing them with hot mantle. In arc-arc collision, the top of a subducting plate starts at about 0°C on the seafloor, so heating is slow. In subduction erosion, forearc material in the subducting package can be > 200°C before erosion so buoyant lithologies reach 700-800

  7. Arc initiation in cathodic arc plasma sources

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre

    2002-01-01

    A "triggerless" arc initiation method and apparatus is based on simply switching the arc supply voltage to the electrodes (anode and cathode). Neither a mechanical trigger electrode nor a high voltage flashover from a trigger electrode is required. A conducting path between the anode and cathode is provided, which allows a hot spot to form at a location where the path connects to the cathode. While the conductive path is eroded by the cathode spot action, plasma deposition ensures the ongoing repair of the conducting path. Arc initiation is achieved by simply applying the relatively low voltage of the arc power supply, e.g. 500 V-1 kV, with the insulator between the anode and cathode coated with a conducting layer and the current at the layer-cathode interface concentrated at one or a few contact points. The local power density at these contact points is sufficient for plasma production and thus arc initiation. A conductive surface layer, such as graphite or the material being deposited, is formed on the surface of the insulator which separates the cathode from the anode. The mechanism of plasma production (and arc initiation) is based on explosive destruction of the layer-cathode interface caused by joule heating. The current flow between the thin insulator coating and cathode occurs at only a few contact points so the current density is high.

  8. Investigating the major carbon input to cave-air CO2 and speleothem calcite by using the respiratory quotient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergel, S.; Breecker, D.; Carlson, P.; Larson, T.; Banner, J. L.

    2014-12-01

    Speleothems (cave mineral deposits) are used to reconstruct changes in rainfall, moisture sources, atmospheric temperatures, and vegetation. Soil respiration is generally considered to be one of the major sources of cave-air CO2, and by extension a major source of carbon in speleothem calcite. However, the δ13C values from speleothem calcite are difficult to interpret. The purpose of this study is to investigate the major source of carbon in cave-air CO2 using a novel tracer, and thereby increase the accuracy of δ13C from speleothem calcite as a paleoenvironmental proxy. Potential sources of CO2 in cave-air include (1) soil respiration (primarily from roots and microbes), (2) animal respiration, (3) in-cave decomposition of organic matter, (4) deep magmatic or metamorphic sources, and (5) atmospheric air. Of these potential sources, soil respiration and atmospheric air are currently considered to be most significant in most caves. We use the respiratory quotient (RQ, which is the number of moles of CO2 produced per mole of O2 consumed, defined here in relation to atmospheric air) to compare cave air and overlying soil gas at two localities in central Texas: Natural Bridge Caverns and Inner Space Cavern. Soil gas samples (RQ = 1.32) follow a trend expected for respiration followed by diffusion whereas cave air samples (RQ = 0.97) follow a trend expected for respiration without subsequent diffusion. We suggest that root and rhizomicrobial respiration below the soil in the epikarst fracture network, where gas transport is dominated by advection rather than diffusion, contributes significantly to cave-air CO2. This is important because 12CO2 preferentially diffuses out of soils, elevating the d13C values of residual soil CO2, whereas no carbon isotope fractionation occurs during advection. Our interpretation of RQ values suggests that the d13C value of cave-air CO2 is not influenced by diffusive loss of CO2. In order to further investigate soil and cave carbon

  9. Minimizing human health effects of urban air pollution through quantification and control of motor vehicular carbon monoxide (CO) in Lahore.

    PubMed

    Aziz, Amer; Bajwa, Ihsan Ullah

    2007-12-01

    Impact of urban air pollution has variety of focuses such as urban ecology, human health, economy, etc. But human health is always given priority. Air pollution is threat to the lives of people living in big cities of Pakistan. In Lahore only there die 1,250 people annually because of air pollution. A strong correlation exists between urban air pollution and human health in Lahore. Growth of COPD is highest among other air pollution borne diseases. Existing mass transit system (one of driving forces behind motor vehicular emission) in Lahore due to frequent stoppages, entering and exit in flow of traffic causes excess discharge of motor vehicular carbon monoxide (CO) which is a hazardous to human health. Quantification and enumeration of this discharge is essential for environmental management. The paper is an attempt to highlight human health effects of urban air pollution through correlation and regression analysis. Further it is focused upon quantifying excess motor vehicular carbon monoxide through application of simplified mobile emission model. In light of results emission control measures are recommended.

  10. Structural alteration of carbon nanoparticle and carbon nanoparticles carrying Pt clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shintaku, Masayuki; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Sato, Takeshi; Tamano, Masayuki; Matsuura, Toyoaki; Hori, Michio; Kaito, Chihiro

    2005-06-01

    Alterations of carbon particles carrying Pt clusters were studied by means of transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Carbon particles of size 20-30 nm produced in a He gas atmosphere by the conventional arc-discharge method changed into carbon tubes or ribbon-like spherules based on an onion-like structure by heating in air at 300 °C. In the case of carbon particles carrying Pt clusters, the alteration of carbon particles took place gradually at 300 °C, and the Pt clusters become partially exposed to the air as they were no longer covered by the carbon layer. The generation of electricity by using Pt clusters in fuel cell is proposed as an application for the Pt clusters.

  11. Long arc stabilities with various arc gas flow rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruyama, K.; Takeda, K.; Sugimoto, M.; Noguchi, Y.

    2014-11-01

    A new arc torch for use in magnetically driven arc device was developed with a commercially available TIG welding arc torch. The torch has a water-cooling system to the torch nozzle and has a nozzle nut to supply a swirling-free plasma gas flow. Its endurance against arc thermal load is examined. Features of its generated arc are investigated.

  12. The stable carbon isotope composition of PM 2.5 and PM 10 in Mexico City Metropolitan Area air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Veneroni, D.

    The sources and distribution of carbon in ambient suspended particles (PM 2.5 and PM 10) of Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) air were traced using stable carbon isotopes ( 13C/ 12C). Tested potential sources included rural and agricultural soils, gasoline and diesel, liquefied-petroleum gas, volcanic ash, and street dust. The complete combustion of LP gas, diesel and gasoline yielded the lightest δ13C values (-27 to -29‰ vs. PDB), while street dust (PM 10) represented the isotopically heaviest endmember (-17‰). The δ13C values of rural soils from four geographically separated sites were similar (-20.7 ± 1.5‰). δ13C values of particles and soot from diesel and gasoline vehicle emissions and agricultural soils varied between -23 and -26‰. Ambient PM samples collected in November of 2000, and March and December of 2001 at three representative receptor sites of industrial, commercial and residential activities had a δ13C value centered around -25.1‰ in both fractions, resulting from common carbon sources. The predominant carbon sources to MCMA atmospheric particles were hydrocarbon combustion (diesel and/or gasoline) and particles of geological origin. The significantly depleted δ13C values from the industrial site reflect the input of diesel combustion by mobile and point source emissions. Based on stable carbon isotope mass balance, the carbon contribution of geological sources at the commercial and residential sites was approximately 73% for the PM 10 fraction and 54% for PM 2.5. Although not measured in this study, biomass-burning emissions from nearby forests are an important carbon source characterized by isotopically lighter values (-29‰), and can become a significant contributor (67%) of particulate carbon to MCMA air under the prevalence of southwesterly winds. Alternative sources of these 13C-depleted particles, such as cooking fires and municipal waste incineration, need to be assessed. Results show that stable carbon isotope

  13. Ag-catalysed cutting of multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Torre, A.; Rance, G. A.; Miners, S. A.; Herreros Lucas, C.; Smith, E. F.; Fay, M. W.; Zoberbier, T.; Giménez-López, M. C.; Kaiser, U.; Brown, P. D.; Khlobystov, A. N.

    2016-04-01

    In this work, the cutting of carbon nanotubes is investigated using silver nanoparticles deposited on arc discharge multi-walled carbon nanotubes. The composite is subsequently heated in air to fabricate shortened multi-walled nanotubes. Complementary transmission electron microscopy and spectroscopy techniques shed light on the cutting mechanism. The nanotube cutting is catalysed by the fundamental mechanism based on the coordination of the silver atoms to the π-bonds of carbon nanotubes. As a result of the metal coordination, the strength of the carbon-carbon bond is reduced, promoting the oxidation of carbon at lower temperature when heated in air, or lowering the activation energy required for the removal of carbon atoms by electron beam irradiation, assuring in both cases the cutting of the nanotubes.

  14. Ag-catalysed cutting of multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    La Torre, A; Rance, G A; Miners, S A; Herreros Lucas, C; Smith, E F; Fay, M W; Zoberbier, T; Giménez-López, M C; Kaiser, U; Brown, P D; Khlobystov, A N

    2016-04-29

    In this work, the cutting of carbon nanotubes is investigated using silver nanoparticles deposited on arc discharge multi-walled carbon nanotubes. The composite is subsequently heated in air to fabricate shortened multi-walled nanotubes. Complementary transmission electron microscopy and spectroscopy techniques shed light on the cutting mechanism. The nanotube cutting is catalysed by the fundamental mechanism based on the coordination of the silver atoms to the π-bonds of carbon nanotubes. As a result of the metal coordination, the strength of the carbon-carbon bond is reduced, promoting the oxidation of carbon at lower temperature when heated in air, or lowering the activation energy required for the removal of carbon atoms by electron beam irradiation, assuring in both cases the cutting of the nanotubes.

  15. Welding arc plasma physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cain, Bruce L.

    1990-01-01

    The problems of weld quality control and weld process dependability continue to be relevant issues in modern metal welding technology. These become especially important for NASA missions which may require the assembly or repair of larger orbiting platforms using automatic welding techniques. To extend present welding technologies for such applications, NASA/MSFC's Materials and Processes Lab is developing physical models of the arc welding process with the goal of providing both a basis for improved design of weld control systems, and a better understanding of how arc welding variables influence final weld properties. The physics of the plasma arc discharge is reasonably well established in terms of transport processes occurring in the arc column itself, although recourse to sophisticated numerical treatments is normally required to obtain quantitative results. Unfortunately the rigor of these numerical computations often obscures the physics of the underlying model due to its inherent complexity. In contrast, this work has focused on a relatively simple physical model of the arc discharge to describe the gross features observed in welding arcs. Emphasis was placed of deriving analytic expressions for the voltage along the arc axis as a function of known or measurable arc parameters. The model retains the essential physics for a straight polarity, diffusion dominated free burning arc in argon, with major simplifications of collisionless sheaths and simple energy balances at the electrodes.

  16. Gas flaring and resultant air pollution: A review focusing on black carbon.

    PubMed

    Fawole, Olusegun G; Cai, X-M; MacKenzie, A R

    2016-09-01

    Gas flaring is a prominent source of VOCs, CO, CO2, SO2, PAH, NOX and soot (black carbon), all of which are important pollutants which interact, directly and indirectly, in the Earth's climatic processes. Globally, over 130 billion cubic metres of gas are flared annually. We review the contribution of gas flaring to air pollution on local, regional and global scales, with special emphasis on black carbon (BC, "soot"). The temporal and spatial characteristics of gas flaring distinguishes it from mobile combustion sources (transport), while the open-flame nature of gas flaring distinguishes it from industrial point-sources; the high temperature, flame control, and spatial compactness distinguishes gas flaring from both biomass burning and domestic fuel-use. All of these distinguishing factors influence the quantity and characteristics of BC production from gas flaring, so that it is important to consider this source separately in emissions inventories and environmental field studies. Estimate of the yield of pollutants from gas flaring have, to date, paid little or no attention to the emission of BC with the assumption often being made that flaring produces a smokeless flame. In gas flares, soot yield is known to depend on a number of factors, and there is a need to develop emission estimates and modelling frameworks that take these factors into consideration. Hence, emission inventories, especially of the soot yield from gas flaring should give adequate consideration to the variation of fuel gas composition, and to combustion characteristics, which are strong determinants of the nature and quantity of pollutants emitted. The buoyant nature of gas flaring plume, often at temperatures in the range of 2000 K, coupled with the height of the stack enables some of the pollutants to escape further into the free troposphere aiding their long-range transport, which is often not well-captured by model studies.

  17. Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (SWCNTs), as a Novel Sorbent for Determination of Mercury in Air

    PubMed Central

    Golbabaei, Farideh; Ebrahimi, Ali; Shirkhanloo, Hamid; Koohpaei, Alireza; Faghihi-Zarandi, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background: Based on the noticeable toxicity and numerous application of mercury in industries, removal of mercury vapor through sorbent is an important environmental challenge. Purpose of the Study: Due to their highly porous and hollow structure, large specific surface area, light mass density and strong interaction, Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (SWCNTs) sorbent were selected for this investigation. Methods: In this study, instrumental conditions, method procedure and different effective parameters such as adsorption efficiency, desorption capacity, time, temperature and repeatability as well as retention time of adsorbed mercury were studied and optimized. Also, mercury vapor was determined by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry (CV-AAS). Obtained data were analyzed by Independent T- test, Multivariate linear regression and one way–ANOVA finally. Results: For 80 mg nanotubes, working range of SWCNT were achieved 0.02-0.7 μg with linear range (R2=0.994). Our data revealed that maximum absorption capacity was 0.5 μg g-1 as well as limit of detection (LOD) for studied sorbent was 0.006 μg. Also, optimum time and temperature were reported, 10 min and 250 °C respectively. Retention time of mercury on CNTs for three weeks was over 90%. Results of repeated trials indicated that the CNTs had long life, so that after 30 cycles of experiments, efficiency was determined without performance loss. Conclusion: Results showed that carbon nanotubes have high potential for efficient extraction of mercury from air and can be used for occupational and environmental purposes. The study of adsorption properties of CNTs is recommended. PMID:26925918

  18. 75 FR 6337 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Maryland; Control of Carbon...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-09

    ... Carbon Monoxide Emissions from Basic Oxygen Furnaces AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA... carbon monoxide (CO) emissions from basic oxygen furnaces (BOFs) at steel mills with a new CO...

  19. Plasma arc melting of zirconium

    SciTech Connect

    Tubesing, P.K.; Korzekwa, D.R.; Dunn, P.S.

    1997-12-31

    Zirconium, like some other refractory metals, has an undesirable sensitivity to interstitials such as oxygen. Traditionally, zirconium is processed by electron beam melting to maintain minimum interstitial contamination. Electron beam melted zirconium, however, does not respond positively to mechanical processing due to its large grain size. The authors undertook a study to determine if plasma arc melting (PAM) technology could be utilized to maintain low interstitial concentrations and improve the response of zirconium to subsequent mechanical processing. The PAM process enabled them to control and maintain low interstitial levels of oxygen and carbon, produce a more favorable grain structure, and with supplementary off-gassing, improve the response to mechanical forming.

  20. Insufflation using carbon dioxide versus room air during colonoscopy: comparison of patient comfort, recovery time, and nursing resources.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Isabelle; Hayes, Ann; Buffum, Martha D; Conners, Erin E

    2015-01-01

    The standard of practice for colonoscopy is room air insufflation. Recent research demonstrates safety and significant decrease in postcolonoscopy discomfort from distention when carbon dioxide (CO2) is used during insufflation. Reducing abdominal pain after colonoscopy may lead to increased acceptance of colonoscopy screening for colorectal cancer. This study aims to compare patient comfort intra- and postprocedure, length of recovery, and nursing time in patients undergoing colonoscopy using room air vs. CO2 insufflation. This study uses an experimental design with patients randomly assigned to either room air or CO2 during colonoscopy. Physician endoscopists, postprocedure nurses, and patients were blinded to assignment. Prior bowel surgery, inflammatory bowel disease, or inability to consent excluded participants. Outcome measures included discomfort assessment, nursing tasks, and recovery time.Of 191 participants, 177 were men and 14 were women; 94 received room air; 97 received CO2. Patients insufflated with room air reported higher levels of some measures of discomfort: (a) during colonoscopy (p = .02), (b) on admission to recovery (p = .001), and (c) on discharge from recovery (p = .001). Patients receiving room air required more nursing tasks in recovery (p = .001) and more total nursing time (p = .001).Compared with room air, CO2 insufflation increases patient comfort and decreases nursing tasks and time.

  1. External influences on Europe's air quality: Baseline methane, carbon monoxide and ozone from 1990 to 2030 at Mace Head, Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derwent, R. G.; Simmonds, P. G.; O'Doherty, S.; Stevenson, D. S.; Collins, W. J.; Sanderson, M. G.; Johnson, C. E.; Dentener, F.; Cofala, J.; Mechler, R.; Amann, M.

    A global 3-D chemistry-transport model STOCHEM has been employed to study trends in the mole fractions of methane, carbon monoxide and ozone in baseline air masses entering Europe from the Atlantic Ocean over the period from 1990 to 2030. With a range of emission scenarios for man-made ozone precursor emission sources available, a wide range of model trends were predicted for the period up to 2030. In the scenario based on current planned air pollution controls, IIASA CLE, methane shows a strong upward trend, ozone shows a weaker upward trend, and carbon monoxide is approximately flat in baseline air masses. In one of the more pessimistic IPCC SRES scenarios, A2, all three gases show future increases. However, in the scenario based on maximum feasible emission reductions, IIASA MFR all three trace gases decline. By 2030, projected climate change reduces the growth in CH 4, but has insignificant effects on baseline CO and O 3 in these simulations. Global or hemispheric ozone precursor emissions and their controls exert a potentially large external influence on Europe's air quality. This influence is currently not taken into account in future European air quality policy formulation.

  2. Synthesis of free-standing carbon nanohybrid by directly growing carbon nanotubes on air-sprayed graphene oxide paper and its application in supercapacitor

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Li; Jiang, Wenchao; Yuan, Yang; Goh, Kunli; Yu, Dingshan; Wang, Liang; Chen, Yuan

    2015-04-15

    We report the synthesis of a free-standing two dimensional carbon nanotube (CNT)-reduced graphene oxide (rGO) hybrid by directly growing CNTs on air-sprayed GO paper. As a result of the good integration between CNTs and thermally reduced GO film during chemical vapor deposition, excellent electrical conductivity (2.6×10{sup 4} S/m), mechanical flexibility (electrical resistance only increases 1.1% after bent to 90° for 500 times) and a relatively large surface area (335.3 m{sup 2}/g) are achieved. Two-electrode supercapacitor assembled using the CNT–rGO hybrids in ionic liquid electrolyte (1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate) shows excellent stability upon 500 bending cycles with the gravimetric energy density measuring 23.7 Wh/kg and a power density of 2.0 kW/kg. Furthermore, it shows an impedance phase angle of −64.4° at a frequency of 120 Hz, suggesting good potentials for 120 Hz alternating current line filtering applications. - Graphical abstract: Flexible and highly conductive carbon nanotube-reduced graphene oxide nanohybrid. - Highlights: • Direct growth of carbon nanotubes by chemical vapor deposition on air-sprayed graphene oxide paper. • Two-dimensional carbon nanohybrid with excellent conductivity and mechanical flexibility. • Supercapacitor with excellent performance stability upon mechanical deformation for flexible electronics applications. • Supercapacitor with high impedance phase angle for 120 Hz alternating current line filtering applications.

  3. Protein linear indices of the 'macromolecular pseudograph alpha-carbon atom adjacency matrix' in bioinformatics. Part 1: prediction of protein stability effects of a complete set of alanine substitutions in Arc repressor.

    PubMed

    Marrero-Ponce, Yovani; Medina-Marrero, Ricardo; Castillo-Garit, Juan A; Romero-Zaldivar, Vicente; Torrens, Francisco; Castro, Eduardo A

    2005-04-15

    A novel approach to bio-macromolecular design from a linear algebra point of view is introduced. A protein's total (whole protein) and local (one or more amino acid) linear indices are a new set of bio-macromolecular descriptors of relevance to protein QSAR/QSPR studies. These amino-acid level biochemical descriptors are based on the calculation of linear maps on Rn[f k(xmi):Rn-->Rn] in canonical basis. These bio-macromolecular indices are calculated from the kth power of the macromolecular pseudograph alpha-carbon atom adjacency matrix. Total linear indices are linear functional on Rn. That is, the kth total linear indices are linear maps from Rn to the scalar R[f k(xm):Rn-->R]. Thus, the kth total linear indices are calculated by summing the amino-acid linear indices of all amino acids in the protein molecule. A study of the protein stability effects for a complete set of alanine substitutions in the Arc repressor illustrates this approach. A quantitative model that discriminates near wild-type stability alanine mutants from the reduced-stability ones in a training series was obtained. This model permitted the correct classification of 97.56% (40/41) and 91.67% (11/12) of proteins in the training and test set, respectively. It shows a high Matthews correlation coefficient (MCC=0.952) for the training set and an MCC=0.837 for the external prediction set. Additionally, canonical regression analysis corroborated the statistical quality of the classification model (Rcanc=0.824). This analysis was also used to compute biological stability canonical scores for each Arc alanine mutant. On the other hand, the linear piecewise regression model compared favorably with respect to the linear regression one on predicting the melting temperature (tm) of the Arc alanine mutants. The linear model explains almost 81% of the variance of the experimental tm (R=0.90 and s=4.29) and the LOO press statistics evidenced its predictive ability (q2=0.72 and scv=4.79). Moreover, the

  4. Relative acoustic frequency response of induced methane, carbon dioxide and air gas bubble plumes, observed laterally.

    PubMed

    Kubilius, Rokas; Pedersen, Geir

    2016-10-01

    There is an increased need to detect, identify, and monitor natural and manmade seabed gas leaks. Fisheries echosounders are well suited to monitor large volumes of water and acoustic frequency response [normalized acoustic backscatter, when a measure at one selected frequency is used as a denominator, r(f)] is commonly used to identify echoes from fish and zooplankton species. Information on gas plume r(f) would be valuable for automatic detection of subsea leaks and for separating bubble plumes from natural targets such as swimbladder-bearing fish. Controlled leaks were produced with a specially designed instrument frame suspended in mid-water in a sheltered fjord. The frame was equipped with echosounders, stereo-camera, and gas-release nozzles. The r(f) of laterally observed methane, carbon dioxide, and air plumes (0.040-29 l/min) were measured at 70, 120, 200, and 333 kHz, with bubble sizes determined optically. The observed bubble size range (1-25 mm) was comparable to that reported in the literature for natural cold seeps of methane. A negative r(f) with increasing frequency was observed, namely, r(f) of about 0.7, 0.6, and 0.5 at 120, 200, and 333 kHz when normalized to 70 kHz. Measured plume r(f) is also compared to resolved, single bubble target strength-based, and modeled r(f).

  5. Development of an activated carbon filter to remove NO2 and HONO in indoor air.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jun Young; Park, Chan Jung; Kim, Ki Yeong; Son, Youn-Suk; Kang, Choong-Min; Wolfson, Jack M; Jung, In-Ha; Lee, Sung-Joo; Koutrakis, Petros

    2015-05-30

    To obtain the optimum removal efficiency of NO2 and HONO by coated activated carbon (ACs), the influencing factors, including the loading rate, metal and non-metal precursors, and mixture ratios, were investigated. The NOx removal efficiency (RE) for K, with the same loading (1.0 wt.%), was generally higher than for those loaded with Cu or Mn. The RE of NO2 was also higher when KOH was used as the K precursor, compared to other K precursors (KI, KNO3, and KMnO4). In addition, the REs by the ACs loaded with K were approximately 38-55% higher than those by uncoated ACs. Overall, the REs (above 95%) of HONO and NOx with 3% KOH were the highest of the coated AC filters that were tested. Additionally, the REs of NOx and HONO using a mixing ratio of 6 (2.5% PABA (p-aminobenzoic acid)+6% H3PO4):4 (3% KOH) were the highest of all the coatings tested (both metal and non-metal). The results of this study show that AC loaded with various coatings has the potential to effectively reduce NO2 and HONO levels in indoor air.

  6. Mitigation of air pollution and carbon footprint by energy conservation through CFLs: a case study.

    PubMed

    Wath, Sushant B; Majumdar, Deepanjan

    2011-01-01

    Electricity consumption of compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) is low, making them a useful tool for minimizing the rapidly increasing demand of electrical energy in India. The present study aims to project the likely electricity conservation in a scenario of complete replacement of existing Fluorescent Tubes (FTs) by CFLs at CSIR-NEERI (National Environmental Engineering Research Institute) visa vis the financial repercussions and indirect reduction in emissions of greenhouse gases, e.g. CO2, N2O, CH4 and other air pollutants, e.g. SO2, NO, suspended particulate matter (SPM), black carbon (BC) and mercury (Hg) from coal fired thermal power plants. The calculations show that the Institute could save around 122850 kWh of electricity per annum, thereby saving approximately INR 859950/(USD 18453.86) towards electricity cost per annum and would be able to minimize 44579.08 kg of CO2-C equivalent (over 100 year time horizon), 909 kg SO2, 982.8 kg NO, 9.8 kg of BC, 368.5 kg SPM, 18.4 kg PM10 and 0.0024 kg Hg emissions per annum from a coal fired thermal power plant by conserving electricity at the institute level.

  7. Active carbon-ceramic sphere as support of ruthenium catalysts for catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) of resin effluent.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei-Min; Hu, Yi-Qiang; Tu, Shan-Tung

    2010-07-15

    Active carbon-ceramic sphere as support of ruthenium catalysts were evaluated through the catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) of resin effluent in a packed-bed reactor. Active carbon-ceramic sphere and ruthenium catalysts were characterized by N(2) adsorption and chemisorption measurements. BET surface area and total pore volume of active carbon (AC) in the active carbon-ceramic sphere increase with increasing KOH-to-carbon ratio, and AC in the sample KC-120 possesses values as high as 1100 m(2) g(-1) and 0.69 cm(3) g(-1) (carbon percentage: 4.73 wt.%), especially. Active carbon-ceramic sphere supported ruthenium catalysts were prepared using the RuCl(3) solution impregnation onto these supports, the ruthenium loading was fixed at 1-5 wt.% of AC in the support. The catalytic activity varies according to the following order: Ru/KC-120>Ru/KC-80>Ru/KC-60>KC-120>without catalysts. It is found that the 3 wt.% Ru/KC-120 catalyst displays highest stability in the CWAO of resin effluent during 30 days. Chemical oxygen demand (COD) and phenol removal were about 92% and 96%, respectively at the reaction temperature of 200 degrees C, oxygen pressure of 1.5 MPa, the water flow rate of 0.75 L h(-1) and the oxygen flow rate of 13.5 L h(-1).

  8. [Performance of microbial fuel cells with Fe/C catalyst carbon felt air-cathode for treating landfill leachate].

    PubMed

    Tang, Yu-Lan; Peng, Man; Yu, Yan; He, Ya-Ting; Fu, Jin-Xiang; Zhao, Yu-Hua

    2012-06-01

    Ferric nitrate/activated carbon powder catalyst was obtained through impregnation and Fe/C catalyst was adsorbed on carbon felt as air cathode electrodes. Effects of activated carbon powder dosage and ferric nitrate concentration on electricity generation of MFC with landfill leachate as fuel were measured. Performances of cathodes obtained at different ferric nitrate concentrations were evaluated by cyclic voltammetry tests. The results showed that with the increase of activated carbon powder dosage or the iron nitrate concentration, MFC produce electrical properties showed a decreasing trend after the first rise. When the activated carbon powder dosage was 1 g and the iron nitrate concentration was 0.25 mol x L(-1), it was proved to be an optimum cell performance for 4199.8 mW x m(-3) output power and 465 omega apparent resistance. Under the optimal ratio rang between ferric nitrate and activated carbon powder, MFC apparent resistance decreased and the power density increased respectively with the increase of catalyst total dosage. The best produce electrical properties of MFC with Fe/C catalyst for 0.25 mol x L(-1) iron nitrate and 1 g activated carbon powder dosage was observed by cyclic voltammetry tests. The output power of MFC and the removal quantity increased with the concentration of inlet and the maximum values were respectively 5478.92 mW x m(-3) and 1505.2 mg x L(-1). the maximum removal rates of COD achieved at 89.1%.

  9. Flexible, Stretchable, and Rechargeable Fiber-Shaped Zinc-Air Battery Based on Cross-Stacked Carbon Nanotube Sheets.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yifan; Zhang, Ye; Guo, Ziyang; Ren, Jing; Wang, Yonggang; Peng, Huisheng

    2015-12-14

    The fabrication of flexible, stretchable and rechargeable devices with a high energy density is critical for next-generation electronics. Herein, fiber-shaped Zn-air batteries, are realized for the first time by designing aligned, cross-stacked and porous carbon nanotube sheets simultaneously that behave as a gas diffusion layer, a catalyst layer, and a current collector. The combined remarkable electronic and mechanical properties of the aligned carbon nanotube sheets endow good electrochemical properties. They display excellent discharge and charge performances at a high current density of 2 A g(-1) . They are also flexible and stretchable, which is particularly promising to power portable and wearable electronic devices.

  10. WSTF electrical arc projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linley, Larry

    1994-09-01

    The objectives of these projects include the following: validate method used to screen wire insulation with arc tracking characteristics; determine damage resistance to arc as a function of source voltage and insulation thickness; investigate propagation characteristics of Kapton at low voltages; and investigate pyrolytic properties of polyimide insulated (Kapton) wire for low voltage (less than 35 VDC) applications. Supporting diagrams and tables are presented.

  11. WSTF electrical arc projects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linley, Larry

    1994-01-01

    The objectives of these projects include the following: validate method used to screen wire insulation with arc tracking characteristics; determine damage resistance to arc as a function of source voltage and insulation thickness; investigate propagation characteristics of Kapton at low voltages; and investigate pyrolytic properties of polyimide insulated (Kapton) wire for low voltage (less than 35 VDC) applications. Supporting diagrams and tables are presented.

  12. TIGER Arc Modification Application

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, Hillary

    1995-03-06

    The application enables the geometric correction of TIGER arcs to a more accurate spatial data set. This is done in a structured automated environment according to Census Bureau guidelines and New Mexico state GIS standards. Arcs may be deleted, added, combined, split, and moved relative to a coverage or image displayed in the background.

  13. A ballistic investigation of the aerodynamic characteristics of a blunt vehicle at hypersonic speeds in carbon dioxide and air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Packard, James D.; Griffith, Wayland C.; Yates, Leslie A.; Strawa, Anthony W.

    1992-01-01

    Missions to Mars require the successful development of aerobraking technology, and therefore a blunt cone representative of aerobrake shapes is investigated. Ballistic tests of the Pioneer Venus configuration are conducted in carbon dioxide and air at Mach numbers from 7 to 20 and Reynolds numbers from 0.1 x 10 exp 5 to 4 x 10 exp 6. Experimental results show that for defined conditions aerodynamic research can be conducted in air rather than carbon dioxide, providing savings in time and money. In addition, the results offer a prediction of flight aerodynamics during entry into the Martian atmosphere. Also discussed is a comparison of results from two data-reduction techniques showing that a five-degree-of-freedom routine employing weighted least-squares with differential corrections analyzes ballistic data more accurately.

  14. Lazy arc consistency

    SciTech Connect

    Schiex, T.; Gaspin, C.; Regin, J.C.; Verfaillie, G.

    1996-12-31

    Arc consistency filtering is widely used in the framework of binary constraint satisfaction problems: with a low complexity, inconsistency may be detected and domains are filtered. In this paper, we show that when detecting inconsistency is the objective, a systematic domain filtering is useless and a lazy approach is more adequate. Whereas usual arc consistency algorithms produce the maximum arc consistent sub-domain, when it exists, we propose a method, called LAC{tau}, which only looks for any arc consistent sub-domain. The algorithm is then extended to provide the additional service of locating one variable with a minimum domain cardinality in the maximum arc consistent sub-domain, without necessarily computing all domain sizes. Finally, we compare traditional AC enforcing and lazy AC enforcing using several benchmark problems, both randomly generated CSP and real life problems.

  15. Personal black carbon exposure influences ambulatory blood pressure: air pollution and cardiometabolic disease (AIRCMD-China) study.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiaoyi; Sun, Zhichao; Ruan, Yanping; Yan, Jianhua; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Yang, Fumo; Duan, Fengkui; Sun, Lixian; Liang, Ruijuan; Lian, Hui; Zhang, Shuyang; Fang, Quan; Gu, Dongfeng; Brook, Jeffrey R; Sun, Qinghua; Brook, Robert D; Rajagopalan, Sanjay; Fan, Zhongjie

    2014-04-01

    Few prospective studies have assessed the blood pressure effect of extremely high air pollution encountered in Asia's megacities. The objective of this study was to evaluate the association between combustion-related air pollution with ambulatory blood pressure and autonomic function. During February to July 2012, personal black carbon was determined for 5 consecutive days using microaethalometers in patients with metabolic syndrome in Beijing, China. Simultaneous ambient fine particulate matter concentration was obtained from the Beijing Municipal Environmental Monitoring Center and the US Embassy. Twenty-four-hour ambulatory blood pressure and heart rate variability were measured from day 4. Arterial stiffness and endothelial function were obtained at the end of day 5. For statistical analysis, we used generalized additive mixed models for repeated outcomes and generalized linear models for single/summary outcomes. Mean (SD) of personal black carbon and fine particulate matter during 24 hours was 4.66 (2.89) and 64.2 (36.9) μg/m(3). Exposure to high levels of black carbon in the preceding hours was associated significantly with adverse cardiovascular responses. A unit increase in personal black carbon during the previous 10 hours was associated with an increase in systolic blood pressure of 0.53 mm Hg and diastolic blood pressure of 0.37 mm Hg (95% confidence interval, 0.17-0.89 and 0.10-0.65 mm Hg, respectively), a percentage change in low frequency to high frequency ratio of 5.11 and mean interbeat interval of -0.06 (95% confidence interval, 0.62-9.60 and -0.11 to -0.01, respectively). These findings highlight the public health effect of air pollution and the importance of reducing air pollution.

  16. Direct electrolytic dissolution of silicate minerals for air CO2 mitigation and carbon-negative H2 production

    PubMed Central

    Rau, Greg H.; Carroll, Susan A.; Bourcier, William L.; Singleton, Michael J.; Smith, Megan M.; Aines, Roger D.

    2013-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate the direct coupling of silicate mineral dissolution with saline water electrolysis and H2 production to effect significant air CO2 absorption, chemical conversion, and storage in solution. In particular, we observed as much as a 105-fold increase in OH− concentration (pH increase of up to 5.3 units) relative to experimental controls following the electrolysis of 0.25 M Na2SO4 solutions when the anode was encased in powdered silicate mineral, either wollastonite or an ultramafic mineral. After electrolysis, full equilibration of the alkalized solution with air led to a significant pH reduction and as much as a 45-fold increase in dissolved inorganic carbon concentration. This demonstrated significant spontaneous air CO2 capture, chemical conversion, and storage as a bicarbonate, predominantly as NaHCO3. The excess OH− initially formed in these experiments apparently resulted via neutralization of the anolyte acid, H2SO4, by reaction with the base mineral silicate at the anode, producing mineral sulfate and silica. This allowed the NaOH, normally generated at the cathode, to go unneutralized and to accumulate in the bulk electrolyte, ultimately reacting with atmospheric CO2 to form dissolved bicarbonate. Using nongrid or nonpeak renewable electricity, optimized systems at large scale might allow relatively high-capacity, energy-efficient (<300 kJ/mol of CO2 captured), and inexpensive (<$100 per tonne of CO2 mitigated) removal of excess air CO2 with production of carbon-negative H2. Furthermore, when added to the ocean, the produced hydroxide and/or (bi)carbonate could be useful in reducing sea-to-air CO2 emissions and in neutralizing or offsetting the effects of ongoing ocean acidification. PMID:23729814

  17. Direct electrolytic dissolution of silicate minerals for air CO2 mitigation and carbon-negative H2 production.

    PubMed

    Rau, Greg H; Carroll, Susan A; Bourcier, William L; Singleton, Michael J; Smith, Megan M; Aines, Roger D

    2013-06-18

    We experimentally demonstrate the direct coupling of silicate mineral dissolution with saline water electrolysis and H2 production to effect significant air CO2 absorption, chemical conversion, and storage in solution. In particular, we observed as much as a 10(5)-fold increase in OH(-) concentration (pH increase of up to 5.3 units) relative to experimental controls following the electrolysis of 0.25 M Na2SO4 solutions when the anode was encased in powdered silicate mineral, either wollastonite or an ultramafic mineral. After electrolysis, full equilibration of the alkalized solution with air led to a significant pH reduction and as much as a 45-fold increase in dissolved inorganic carbon concentration. This demonstrated significant spontaneous air CO2 capture, chemical conversion, and storage as a bicarbonate, predominantly as NaHCO3. The excess OH(-) initially formed in these experiments apparently resulted via neutralization of the anolyte acid, H2SO4, by reaction with the base mineral silicate at the anode, producing mineral sulfate and silica. This allowed the NaOH, normally generated at the cathode, to go unneutralized and to accumulate in the bulk electrolyte, ultimately reacting with atmospheric CO2 to form dissolved bicarbonate. Using nongrid or nonpeak renewable electricity, optimized systems at large scale might allow relatively high-capacity, energy-efficient (<300 kJ/mol of CO2 captured), and inexpensive (<$100 per tonne of CO2 mitigated) removal of excess air CO2 with production of carbon-negative H2. Furthermore, when added to the ocean, the produced hydroxide and/or (bi)carbonate could be useful in reducing sea-to-air CO2 emissions and in neutralizing or offsetting the effects of ongoing ocean acidification.

  18. Arc Inception Mechanism on a Solar Array Immersed in a Low-Density Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vayner, B.; Galofaro, J.; Ferguson, D.

    2001-01-01

    In this report, results are presented of an experimental and theoretical study of arc phenomena and snapover for two samples of solar arrays immersed in argon plasma. The effects of arcing and snapover are investigated. I-V curves are measured, and arc and snapover inception voltages and arc rates are determined within the wide range of plasma parameters. A considerable increase in arc rate due to absorption of molecules from atmospheric air has been confirmed. It is shown that increasing gas pressure causes increasing ion current collection and, consequently, arc rate even though the effect of conditioning also takes place. Arc sites have been determined by employing a video-camera. It is confirmed that keeping sample under high vacuum for a long time results in shifting arc threshold voltage well below -300 V. The results obtained seem to be important for the understanding of arc inception mechanism.

  19. Quantitative Spectral Radiance Measurements in the HYMETS Arc Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danehy, Paul M.; Hires, Drew V.; Johansen, Craig T.; Bathel, Brett F.; Jones, Stephen B.; Gragg, Jeffrey G.; Splinter, Scott C.

    2012-01-01

    Calibrated spectral radiance measurements of gaseous emission spectra have been obtained from the HYMETS (Hypersonic Materials Environmental Test System) 400 kW arc-heated wind tunnel at NASA Langley Research Center. A fiber-optic coupled spectrometer collected natural luminosity from the flow. Spectral radiance measurements are reported between 340 and 1000 nm. Both Silicon Carbide (SiC) and Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA) samples were placed in the flow. Test gases studied included a mostly-N2 atmosphere (95% nitrogen, 5% argon), a simulated Earth Air atmosphere (75% nitrogen, 20% oxygen, 5% argon) and a simulated Martian atmosphere (71% carbon dioxide, 24% nitrogen, 5% argon). The bulk enthalpy of the flow was varied as was the location of the measurement. For the intermediate flow enthalpy tested (20 MJ/kg), emission from the Mars simulant gas was about 10 times higher than the Air flow and 15 times higher than the mostly-N2 atmosphere. Shock standoff distances were estimated from the spectral radiance measurements. Within-run, run-to-run and day-to-day repeatability of the emission were studied, with significant variations (15-100%) noted.

  20. Highly air- and moisture-stable hole-doped carbon nanotube films achieved using boron-based oxidant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funahashi, Kazuma; Tanaka, Naoki; Shoji, Yoshiaki; Imazu, Naoki; Nakayama, Ko; Kanahashi, Kaito; Shirae, Hiroyuki; Noda, Suguru; Ohta, Hiromichi; Fukushima, Takanori; Takenobu, Taishi

    2017-03-01

    Hole doping into carbon nanotubes can be achieved. However, the doped nanotubes usually suffer from the lack of air and moisture stability, thus, they eventually lose their improved electrical properties. Here, we report that a salt of the two-coordinate boron cation Mes2B+ (Mes: 2,4,6-trimethylphenyl group) can serve as an efficient hole-doping reagent to produce nanotubes with markedly high stability in the presence of air and moisture. Upon doping, the resistances of the nanotubes decreased, and these states were maintained for one month in air. The hole-doped nanotube films showed a minimal increase in resistance even upon humidification with a relative humidity of 90%.

  1. Setting and Reviewing Standards to Control Carbon Monoxide (CO) Pollution in Outdoor Air

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA sets National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for CO to protect public health and to protect public welfare. The Clean Air Act also requires EPA to periodically review and revise them if appropriate.

  2. Simulation of Carbon and Oxygen Isotopic Compositions of Air CO2 in a Black Spruce Stand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, S.; Chen, J. M.; Huang, L.; Chen, B.; Higuchi, K.; Chan, D.; Shashkov, A.

    2002-05-01

    For the purpose of understanding the vertical diffusion processes of CO2 and carbon isotopes and retrieving ecosystem information from isotope measurements, a scalar conservative equation was combined with a well-documented ecosystem model for C3 plants. The model is further developed into a multi-layer canopy model with sunlit and shaded leaf separation in each layer to simulate the processes of photosynthesis, autotrophic respiration, 13C and 18O isotopic fractionation, and the vertical distribution of CO2 and isotope concentrations. Measurements made by scientists at Meteorological Service of Canada in 1998 and 1999 in a forested area near Fraserdale, Ontario, Canada were used for model validation. The measurements include hourly CO2 concentration at 20 m and 40 m heights, and flask samples of d13C and d18O at 20 m height and hourly meteorological data (temperature, wind speed and vapor pressure) measured at 10 m, 20 m and 40 m heights. The model is able to simulate the mean values and temporal variation patterns of CO2 at the measurement heights. Calculated results of d13C and d18O in air CO2 seem reasonable not only with agreeable daily ranges but also with meaningful temporal characteristics. The strong vertical stratification for CO2 was accompanied by d13C and d18O which both were most depleted immediately above the forest floor and concentrated in upper-middle layers of large LAI. During the course of the day, fluctuations in d13C and d18O were most negative in the morning and most enriched during midday with small vertical gradients. The model has been used to investigate (1) the importance of both sunlit and shaded leaf stomatal conductance in simulating the ratio of Ci/Ca and isotope fractionation in different layers of the canopy, (2) the recycling of CO2 inside the canopy and its effect on carbon isotope exchange with the atmosphere, (3) the influence of soil water potential on both d13C and d18O, and (4) the possibility of inferring ecosystem

  3. Development and Testing of a Temperature-swing Adsorption Compressor for Carbon Dioxide in Closed-loop Air Revitalization Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulloth, Lila M.; Rosen, Micha; Affleck, David; LeVan, M. Douglas; Wang, Yuan

    2005-01-01

    The air revitalization system of the International Space Station (ISS) operates in an open loop mode and relies on the resupply of oxygen and other consumables from earth for the life support of astronauts. A compressor is required for delivering the carbon dioxide from a removal assembly to a reduction unit to recover oxygen and thereby dosing the air-loop. We have developed a temperature-swing adsorption compressor (TSAC) that is energy efficient, quiet, and has no rapidly moving parts for performing these tasks. The TSAC is a solid-state compressor that has the capability to remove CO2 from a low- pressure source, and subsequently store, compress, and deliver at a higher pressure as required by a processor. The TSAC is an ideal interface device for CO2 removal and reduction units in the air revitalization loop of a spacecraft for oxygen recovery. This paper discusses the design and testing of a TSAC for carbon dioxide that has application in the ISS and future spacecraft for closing the air revitalization loop.

  4. Silver nanoparticle-decorated carbon nanotubes as bifunctional gas-diffusion electrodes for zinc-air batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, T.; Kaempgen, M.; Nopphawan, P.; Wee, G.; Mhaisalkar, S.; Srinivasan, M.

    Thin, lightweight, and flexible gas-diffusion electrodes (GDEs) based on freestanding entangled networks of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) decorated with Ag nanoparticles (AgNPs) are tested as the air-breathing cathode in a zinc-air battery. The SWNT networks provide a highly porous surface for active oxygen absorption and diffusion. The high conductivity of SWNTs coupled with the catalytic activity of AgNPs for oxygen reduction leads to an improvement in the performance of the zinc-air cell. By modulating the pH value and the reaction time, different sizes of AgNPs are decorated uniformly on the SWNTs, as revealed by transmission electron microscopy and powder X-ray diffraction. AgNPs with sizes of 3-5 nm double the capacity and specific energy of a zinc-air battery as compared with bare SWNTs. The simplified, lightweight architecture shows significant advantages over conventional carbon-based GDEs in terms of weight, thickness and conductivity, and hence may be useful for mobile and portable applications.

  5. Cloud Arcs in the Western Pacific

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Small cumulus clouds in this natural-color view from the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer have formed a distinctive series of quasi-circular arcs. Clues regarding the formation of these arcs can be found by noting that larger clouds exist in the interior of each arc.

    The interior clouds are thicker and likely to be more convectively active than the other clouds, causing much of the air near the centers of the arcs to rise. This air spreads out horizontally in all directions as it rises and continues to spread out as it begins to sink back to the surface. This pushes any existing small cumulus clouds away from the central region of convection.

    As the air sinks, it also warms, preventing other small clouds from forming, so that the regions just inside the arcs are kept clear. At the arcs, the horizontal flow of sinking air is now quite weak and on meeting the undisturbed air it can rise again slightly -- possibly assisting in the formation of new small cumulus clouds. Although examples of the continuity of air, in which every rising air motion must be compensated by a sinking motion elsewhere, are very common, the degree of organization exhibited here is relatively rare, as the wind field at different altitudes usually disrupts such patterns. The degree of self organization of this cloud image, whereby three or four such circular events form a quasi-periodic pattern, probably also requires a relatively uncommon combination of wind, temperature and humidity conditions for it to occur.

    The image was acquired by MISR's nadir camera on March 11, 2002, and is centered west of the Marshall Islands. Enewetak Atoll is discernible through thin cloud as the turquoise band near the right-hand edge of the image.

    The Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer observes the daylit Earth continuously from pole to pole, and views almost the entire globe every 9 days. This image is a portion of the data acquired during Terra orbit 11863, and covers an area of about 380

  6. The influence of air-sea exchange on the isotropic composition of oceanic carbon: Observations and modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch-Stieglitz, J.; Broecker, W.S.; Fairbanks, R.G.

    1995-12-01

    Although the carbon isotropic composition of ocean waters after they leave the surface ocean is determined by biological cycling, air-sea exchange affects the carbon isotopic composition of surface waters in two ways. The equilibrium fractionation between oceanic and atmospheric carbon increases with decreasing temperature. In Southern Ocean Surface Waters this isotopic equilibrium enriches {delta}{sup 13}C relative to the {delta}{sup 13}C expected from uptake and release of carbon by biological processes alone. Similarly, surface waters in the subtropical gyres are depleted in {delta}{sup 13}C due to extensive air-sea exchange at warm temperatures. Countering the tendency toward isotopic equilibration with the atmosphere (a relatively slow process), are the effects of the equilibration of CO{sub 2} itself (a much faster process). In regions where there is a net transfer of isotopically light CO{sub 2} from the ocean to the atmosphere (e.g., the equator) surface waters become enriched in {sup 13}C, whereas in regions where isotopically light CO{sub 2} is entering the ocean (e.g., the North Atlantic) surface waters become depleted in {sup 13}C. A compilation of high quality oceanic {delta}{sup 13}C measurements along with experiments performed using a zonally averaged three-basin dynamic ocean model are used to explore these processes. 40 refs., 14 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Influential role of black carbon in the soil-air partitioning of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in the Indus River Basin, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Ali, Usman; Syed, Jabir Hussain; Mahmood, Adeel; Li, Jun; Zhang, Gan; Jones, Kevin C; Malik, Riffat Naseem

    2015-09-01

    Levels of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were assessed in surface soils and passive air samples from the Indus River Basin, and the influential role of black carbon (BC) in the soil-air partitioning process was examined. ∑26-PCBs ranged between 0.002-3.03 pg m(-3) and 0.26-1.89 ng g(-1) for passive air and soil samples, respectively. Lower chlorinated (tri- and tetra-) PCBs were abundant in both air (83.9%) and soil (92.1%) samples. Soil-air partitioning of PCBs was investigated through octanol-air partition coefficients (KOA) and black carbon-air partition coefficients (KBC-A). The results of the paired-t test revealed that both models showed statistically significant agreement between measured and predicted model values for the PCB congeners. Ratios of fBCKBC-AδOCT/fOMKOA>5 explicitly suggested the influential role of black carbon in the retention and soil-air partitioning of PCBs. Lower chlorinated PCBs were strongly adsorbed and retained by black carbon during soil-air partitioning because of their dominance at the sampling sites and planarity effect.

  8. Tokamak ARC damage

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, J.G.; Gorker, G.E.

    1985-01-01

    Tokamak fusion reactors will have large plasma currents of approximately 10 MA with hundreds of megajoules stored in the magnetic fields. When a major plasma instability occurs, the disruption of the plasma current induces voltage in the adjacent conducting structures, giving rise to large transient currents. The induced voltages may be sufficiently high to cause arcing across sector gaps or from one protruding component to another. This report reviews a tokamak arcing scenario and provides guidelines for designing tokamaks to minimize the possibility of arc damage.

  9. Electric arc saw apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Deichelbohrer, Paul R [Richland, WA

    1986-01-01

    A portable, hand held electric arc saw has a small frame for supporting an electrically conducting rotary blade which serves as an electrode for generating an electric arc to erode a workpiece. Electric current is supplied to the blade by biased brushes and a slip ring which are mounted in the frame. A pair of freely movable endless belts in the form of crawler treads stretched between two pulleys are used to facilitate movement of the electric arc saw. The pulleys are formed of dielectric material to electrically insulate the crawler treads from the frame.

  10. Welding arc initiator

    DOEpatents

    Correy, Thomas B.

    1989-01-01

    An improved inert gas shielded tungsten arc welder is disclosed of the type wherein a tungsten electrode is shielded within a flowing inert gas, and, an arc, following ignition, burns between the energized tungsten electrode and a workpiece. The improvement comprises in combination with the tungsten electrode, a starting laser focused upon the tungsten electrode which to ignite the electrode heats a spot on the energized electrode sufficient for formation of a thermionic arc. Interference problems associated with high frequency starters are thus overcome.

  11. Welding arc initiator

    DOEpatents

    Correy, T.B.

    1989-05-09

    An improved inert gas shielded tungsten arc welder is disclosed of the type wherein a tungsten electrode is shielded within a flowing inert gas, and, an arc, following ignition, burns between the energized tungsten electrode and a workpiece. The improvement comprises in combination with the tungsten electrode, a starting laser focused upon the tungsten electrode which to ignite the electrode heats a spot on the energized electrode sufficient for formation of a thermionic arc. Interference problems associated with high frequency starters are thus overcome. 3 figs.

  12. Measurements of Organic Carbon & Elemental Carbon in Fine PM From Urban to Rural to Background Air Over Canada: Tracking Human Impacts on Atmospheric Compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, L.; Zhang, W.; Sharma, S.; Brook, J.; Chan, T.; Worthy, D.; Yang, F.; Leaitch, R.; MacDonald, A.

    2008-12-01

    Quantifying human induced CO2 and other air pollutants in ambient air is important in air quality and climate change research. Elemental and organic carbon (EC and OC) components in fine carbonaceous particulate matter (PM) are key air pollutants, existing in urban, rural and remote environments. They are released from various emission sources (e.g., fossil fuel combustion, biomass burning, primary biological matter) and also produced in the atmosphere from photochemical oxidation of gas phase organics. Tracking their spatial (e.g., from urban to rural to background air or latitudinal) and temporal (e.g. seasonal and inter-annual) distributions will provide valuable information for constraining their emission strength and propagation mechanisms, assessing their impact of human induced fractions on current ambient concentrations, as well as evaluating the effectiveness of mitigation actions for these pollutants. Quartz filter samples were collected for one year (2006-2007) at the five sites in Canada, from Toronto (a typical urban site), Egbert (a rural site, about 80 km northwest of Toronto), to Fraserdale, and Berm-TT (both are continental boreal forest sites), to Alert (an Arctic baseline site, also a WMO/GAW station). OC and EC concentrations were determined using a thermal/optical method developed in our lab. A subset of the samples was selected for carbon isotope measurements in each carbon fraction (e.g., OC and EC). The sampling for OC and EC measurements have been co-located with those for aerosol optical properties and greenhouse gas measurements in Environment Canada's GHGs and Aerosol Observation Network. The spatial and temporal distributions, including annual means and the seasonal variations of EC, OC, POC (pyrolized OC) and their related ratios (e.g. OC/EC, POC/OC), were derived. Combined with the carbon isotope information, it was found that the spatial gradients of EC and OC from urban, rural to background air over Canada were mainly due to the

  13. Metal halide arc discharge lamp having short arc length

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muzeroll, Martin E. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A metal halide arc discharge lamp includes a sealed light-transmissive outer jacket, a light-transmissive shroud located within the outer jacket and an arc tube assembly located within the shroud. The arc tube assembly includes an arc tube, electrodes mounted within the arc tube and a fill material for supporting an arc discharge. The electrodes have a spacing such that an electric field in a range of about 60 to 95 volts per centimeter is established between the electrodes. The diameter of the arc tube and the spacing of the electrodes are selected to provide an arc having an arc diameter to arc length ratio in a range of about 1.6 to 1.8. The fill material includes mercury, sodium iodide, scandium tri-iodide and a rare gas, and may include lithium iodide. The lamp exhibits a high color rendering index, high lumen output and high color temperature.

  14. Indoor Air Quality in Urban and Rural Preschools in Upper Silesia, Poland: Particulate Matter and Carbon Dioxide.

    PubMed

    Mainka, Anna; Zajusz-Zubek, Elwira

    2015-07-08

    Indoor air quality (IAQ) in preschools is an important public health challenge. Particular attention should be paid to younger children, because they are more vulnerable to air pollution than higher grade children and because they spend more time indoors. Among air pollutants, particulate matter (PM) is of the greatest interest mainly due to its acute and chronic effects on children's health. In addition, carbon dioxide (CO2) levels indicate ventilation conditions. In this paper, we present the concentrations of PM (PM1, PM2.5, PM10 and total-TSP) and CO2 monitored in four naturally ventilated nursery schools located in the area of Gliwice, Poland. The nursery schools were selected to characterize areas with different degrees of urbanization and traffic densities during the winter season. The results indicate the problem of elevated concentrations of PM inside the examined classrooms, as well as that of high levels of CO2 exceeding 1000 ppm in relation to outdoor air. The characteristics of IAQ were significantly different, both in terms of classroom occupation (younger or older children) and of localization (urban or rural). To evaluate the children's exposure to poor IAQ, indicators based on air quality guidelines were proposed to rank classrooms according to their hazard on the health of children.

  15. Indoor Air Quality in Urban and Rural Preschools in Upper Silesia, Poland: Particulate Matter and Carbon Dioxide

    PubMed Central

    Mainka, Anna; Zajusz-Zubek, Elwira

    2015-01-01

    Indoor air quality (IAQ) in preschools is an important public health challenge. Particular attention should be paid to younger children, because they are more vulnerable to air pollution than higher grade children and because they spend more time indoors. Among air pollutants, particulate matter (PM) is of the greatest interest mainly due to its acute and chronic effects on children’s health. In addition, carbon dioxide (CO2) levels indicate ventilation conditions. In this paper, we present the concentrations of PM (PM1, PM2.5, PM10 and total—TSP) and CO2 monitored in four naturally ventilated nursery schools located in the area of Gliwice, Poland. The nursery schools were selected to characterize areas with different degrees of urbanization and traffic densities during the winter season. The results indicate the problem of elevated concentrations of PM inside the examined classrooms, as well as that of high levels of CO2 exceeding 1000 ppm in relation to outdoor air. The characteristics of IAQ were significantly different, both in terms of classroom occupation (younger or older children) and of localization (urban or rural). To evaluate the children’s exposure to poor IAQ, indicators based on air quality guidelines were proposed to rank classrooms according to their hazard on the health of children. PMID:26184249

  16. Arc Voltage Between Deion Grid Affected by Division of Arc in Magnetic Driven Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inuzuka, Yutaro; Yamato, Takashi; Yamamoto, Shinji; Iwao, Toru

    2016-10-01

    Magnetic driven arc has been applied to DC breaker and fault current limiters. However, it has not been researched, especially stagnation and re-strike of the arc. In this paper, the arc voltage between deion grid affected by division of arc in magnetic driven arc and arc behavior are measured by using the oscilloscope and HSVC (High Speed Video Camera). As a result, arc voltage increased because of division of the arc. The arc mean moving speed increases with increasing the external magnetic field. However, when the arc was not stalemate, the arc moving speed does not change so much. The arc re-strike time increases and stalemate time decreases with increasing the external magnetic field. Therefore, the anode spot moving speed increases 8 times because arc re-strike occurs easily with the external magnetic field. Thus, the erosion of electrodes decreases and the arc movement becomes the smooth. When the arc is divided, the arc voltage increased because of the electrode fall voltage. Therefore, the arc voltage increases with increasing the number of deion grid.

  17. Where does the carbon go? A model-data intercomparison of vegetation carbon allocation and turnover processes at two temperate forest free-air CO2 enrichment sites.

    PubMed

    De Kauwe, Martin G; Medlyn, Belinda E; Zaehle, Sönke; Walker, Anthony P; Dietze, Michael C; Wang, Ying-Ping; Luo, Yiqi; Jain, Atul K; El-Masri, Bassil; Hickler, Thomas; Wårlind, David; Weng, Ensheng; Parton, William J; Thornton, Peter E; Wang, Shusen; Prentice, I Colin; Asao, Shinichi; Smith, Benjamin; McCarthy, Heather R; Iversen, Colleen M; Hanson, Paul J; Warren, Jeffrey M; Oren, Ram; Norby, Richard J

    2014-08-01

    Elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration (eCO2) has the potential to increase vegetation carbon storage if increased net primary production causes increased long-lived biomass. Model predictions of eCO2 effects on vegetation carbon storage depend on how allocation and turnover processes are represented. We used data from two temperate forest free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) experiments to evaluate representations of allocation and turnover in 11 ecosystem models. Observed eCO2 effects on allocation were dynamic. Allocation schemes based on functional relationships among biomass fractions that vary with resource availability were best able to capture the general features of the observations. Allocation schemes based on constant fractions or resource limitations performed less well, with some models having unintended outcomes. Few models represent turnover processes mechanistically and there was wide variation in predictions of tissue lifespan. Consequently, models did not perform well at predicting eCO2 effects on vegetation carbon storage. Our recommendations to reduce uncertainty include: use of allocation schemes constrained by biomass fractions; careful testing of allocation schemes; and synthesis of allocation and turnover data in terms of model parameters. Data from intensively studied ecosystem manipulation experiments are invaluable for constraining models and we recommend that such experiments should attempt to fully quantify carbon, water and nutrient budgets.

  18. Filtered cathodic arc source

    DOEpatents

    Falabella, S.; Sanders, D.M.

    1994-01-18

    A continuous, cathodic arc ion source coupled to a macro-particle filter capable of separation or elimination of macro-particles from the ion flux produced by cathodic arc discharge is described. The ion source employs an axial magnetic field on a cathode (target) having tapered sides to confine the arc, thereby providing high target material utilization. A bent magnetic field is used to guide the metal ions from the target to the part to be coated. The macro-particle filter consists of two straight solenoids, end to end, but placed at 45[degree] to one another, which prevents line-of-sight from the arc spot on the target to the parts to be coated, yet provides a path for ions and electrons to flow, and includes a series of baffles for trapping the macro-particles. 3 figures.

  19. Filtered cathodic arc source

    DOEpatents

    Falabella, Steven; Sanders, David M.

    1994-01-01

    A continuous, cathodic arc ion source coupled to a macro-particle filter capable of separation or elimination of macro-particles from the ion flux produced by cathodic arc discharge. The ion source employs an axial magnetic field on a cathode (target) having tapered sides to confine the arc, thereby providing high target material utilization. A bent magnetic field is used to guide the metal ions from the target to the part to be coated. The macro-particle filter consists of two straight solenoids, end to end, but placed at 45.degree. to one another, which prevents line-of-sight from the arc spot on the target to the parts to be coated, yet provides a path for ions and electrons to flow, and includes a series of baffles for trapping the macro-particles.

  20. Preliminary evaluation of the air and fuel specific-impulse characteristics of several potential ram-jet fuels IV : hydrogen, a-methylnaphthalene, and carbon / Benson E. Gammon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gammon, Benson E

    1951-01-01

    A preliminary analytical evaluation of the air and fuel specific-impulse characteristics of hydrogen, a-methylnapthalene, and graphite carbon has been made. Adiabatic constant-pressure combustion flame temperatures for each fuel at several equivalence ratios were calculated for an initial air temperature of 560 degrees R and a pressure of 2 atmospheres.

  1. Emissions of chromium (VI) from arc welding.

    PubMed

    Heung, William; Yun, Myoung-Jin; Chang, Daniel P Y; Green, Peter G; Halm, Chris

    2007-02-01

    The presence of Cr in the +6 oxidation state (Cr[VI]) is still observed in ambient air samples in California despite steps taken to reduce emissions from plating operations. One known source of emission of Cr(VI) is welding, especially with high Cr-content materials, such as stainless steels. An experimental effort was undertaken to expand and update Cr(VI) emission factors by conducting tests on four types of arc-welding operations: gas-metal arc welding (GMAW), shielded metal arc welding (SMAW), fluxcore arc welding, and pulsed GMAW. Standard American Welding Society hood results were compared with a total enclosure method that permitted isokinetic sampling for particle size-cut measurement, as well as total collection of the aerosol. The fraction of Cr(VI) emitted per unit mass of Cr electrode consumed was determined. Consistent with AP-42 data, initial results indicate that a significant fraction of the total Cr in the aerosol is in the +6 oxidation state. The fraction of Cr(VI) and total aerosol mass produced by the different arc welding methods varies with the type of welding process used. Self-shielded electrodes that do not use a shield gas, for example, SMAW, produce greater amounts of Cr(VI) per unit mass of electrode consumed. The formation of Cr(VI) from standard electrode wires used for welding mild steel was below the method detection limit after eliminating an artifact in the analytical method used.

  2. Electric arc saw apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Deichelbohrer, P.R.

    1983-08-08

    A portable, hand-held electric arc saw apparatus comprising a small frame for supporting an electrically conducting rotary blade which serves as an electrode for generating an electric arc between the blade and a workpiece of opposite polarity. Electrically conducting means are provided on said frame for transmitting current to said blade. A pair of freely movable endless belts in the form of crawler treads are employed to facilitate movement of the apparatus relative to the workpiece.

  3. Stochastic estimates of exposure and cancer risk from carbon tetrachloride released to the air from the rocky flats plant.

    PubMed

    Rood, A S; McGavran, P D; Aanenson, J W; Till, J E

    2001-08-01

    Carbon tetrachloride is a degreasing agent that was used at the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) in Colorado to clean product components and equipment. The chemical is considered a volatile organic compound and a probable human carcinogen. During the time the plant operated (1953-1989), most of the carbon tetrachloride was released to the atmosphere through building exhaust ducts. A smaller amount was released to the air via evaporation from open-air burn pits and ground-surface discharge points. Airborne releases from the plant were conservatively estimated to be equivalent to the amount of carbon tetrachloride consumed annually by the plant, which was estimated to be between 3.6 and 180 Mg per year. This assumption was supported by calculations that showed that most of the carbon tetrachloride discharged to the ground surface would subsequently be released to the atmosphere. Atmospheric transport of carbon tetrachloride from the plant to the surrounding community was estimated using a Gaussian Puff dispersion model (RATCHET). Time-integrated concentrations were estimated for nine hypothetical but realistic exposure scenarios that considered variation in lifestyle, location, age, and gender. Uncertainty distributions were developed for cancer slope factors and atmospheric dispersion factors. These uncertainties were propagated through to the final risk estimate using Monte Carlo techniques. The geometric mean risk estimates varied from 5.2 x 10(-6) for a hypothetical rancher or laborer working near the RFP to 3.4 x 10(-9) for an infant scenario. The distribution of incremental lifetime cancer incidence risk for the hypothetical rancher was between 1.3 x 10(-6) (5% value) and 2.1 x 10(-5) (95% value). These estimates are similar to or exceed estimated cancer risks posed by releases of radionuclides from the site.

  4. Synthesis and characterization of carbon black/manganese oxide air cathodes for zinc-air batteries: Effects of the crystalline structure of manganese oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Po-Chieh; Hu, Chi-Chang; Noda, Hiroyuki; Habazaki, Hiroki

    2015-12-01

    Manganese oxides (MnOx) in α-, β-, γ-, δ-MnO2 phases, Mn3O4, Mn2O3, and MnOOH are synthesized for systematically comparing their electrocatalytic activity of the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in the Zn-air battery application. The optimal MnOx/XC-72 mass ratio for the ORR is equal to 1 and the oxide crystalline structure effect on the ORR is compared. The order of composites with respect to decreasing the ORR activity is: α-MnO2/XC-72 > γ-MnO2/XC-72 > β-MnO2/XC-72 > δ-MnO2/XC-72 > Mn2O3/XC-72 > Mn3O4/XC-72 > MnOOH/XC-72. The textural properties of MnOx are investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), N2 adsorption/desorption isotherms with Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) analysis, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Electrochemical studies include linear sweep voltammetry (LSV), rotating ring-disk electrode (RRDE) voltammetry, and the full-cell discharge test. The discharge peak power density of Zn-air batteries varies from 61.5 mW cm-2 (α-MnO2/XC-72) to 47.1 mW cm-2 (Mn3O4/XC-72). The maximum peak power density is 102 mW cm-2 for the Zn-air battery with an air cathode containing α-MnO2/XC-72 under an oxygen atmosphere when the carbon paper is 10AA. The specific capacity of all full-cell tests is higher than 750 mAh g-1 at all discharge current densities.

  5. Spherical nitrogen-doped hollow mesoporous carbon as an efficient bifunctional electrocatalyst for Zn-air batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadidi, Lida; Davari, Elaheh; Iqbal, Muhammad; Purkait, Tapas K.; Ivey, Douglas G.; Veinot, Jonathan G. C.

    2015-12-01

    Materials based upon porous carbon have gained considerable attention due to their high surface area, electric conductivity, thermal and chemical stability, low density, and availability. These superior properties make them ideal for diverse applications. Doping these carbon nanostructures holds promise of designing the properties of these structures and opening the door to practical applications. Herein, we report the preparation of hollow N-doped mesoporous carbon (HMC) spheres fabricated via polymerization and carbonization of dopamine on a sacrificial spherical SiO2 template that is removed upon hydrofluoric acid etching. The morphology and structural features of these HMCs were evaluated using scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy and the N-doping (7.1 at%) was confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The oxygen reduction/evolution reaction (ORR/OER) performance of N-doped HMC was evaluated using rotating disk electrode (RDE) voltammetry in an alkaline electrolyte. N-doped HMC demonstrated a high ORR onset potential of -0.055 V (vs. Hg/HgO) and excellent stability. The outstanding bifunctional activity was implemented in a practical Zn-air battery (ZAB), which exhibited a small charge-discharge voltage polarization of 0.89 V and high stability over repeated cycling.Materials based upon porous carbon have gained considerable attention due to their high surface area, electric conductivity, thermal and chemical stability, low density, and availability. These superior properties make them ideal for diverse applications. Doping these carbon nanostructures holds promise of designing the properties of these structures and opening the door to practical applications. Herein, we report the preparation of hollow N-doped mesoporous carbon (HMC) spheres fabricated via polymerization and carbonization of dopamine on a sacrificial spherical SiO2 template that is removed upon hydrofluoric acid etching. The morphology and structural

  6. A novel carbon black graphite hybrid air-cathode for efficient hydrogen peroxide production in bioelectrochemical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Nan; An, Jingkun; Zhou, Lean; Li, Tian; Li, Junhui; Feng, Cuijuan; Wang, Xin

    2016-02-01

    Carbon black and graphite hybrid air-cathode is proved to be effective for H2O2 production in bioelectrochemical systems. The optimal mass ratio of carbon black to graphite is 1:5 with the highest H2O2 yield of 11.9 mg L-1 h-1 cm-2 (12.3 mA cm-2). Continuous flow is found to improve the current efficiency due to the avoidance of H2O2 accumulation. In the biological system, the highest H2O2 yield reaches 3.29 mg L-1h-1 (0.079 kg m-3day-1) with a current efficiency of 72%, which is higher than the abiotic system at the same current density. H2O2 produced in this system is mainly from the oxygen diffused through this air-cathode (>66%), especially when a more negative cathode potential is applied (94% at -1.0 V). This hybrid air-cathode has advantages of high H2O2 yield, high current density and no need of aeration, which make the synthesis of H2O2 more efficient and economical.

  7. CO2 Fixation, Lipid Production, and Power Generation by a Novel Air-Lift-Type Microbial Carbon Capture Cell System.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xia; Liu, Baojun; Zhou, Jiti; Jin, Ruofei; Qiao, Sen; Liu, Guangfei

    2015-09-01

    An air-lift-type microbial carbon capture cell (ALMCC) was constructed for the first time by using an air-lift-type photobioreactor as the cathode chamber. The performance of ALMCC in fixing high concentration of CO2, producing energy (power and biodiesel), and removing COD together with nutrients was investigated and compared with the traditional microbial carbon capture cell (MCC) and air-lift-type photobioreactor (ALP). The ALMCC system produced a maximum power density of 972.5 mW·m(-3) and removed 86.69% of COD, 70.52% of ammonium nitrogen, and 69.24% of phosphorus, which indicate that ALMCC performed better than MCC in terms of power generation and wastewater treatment efficiency. Besides, ALMCC demonstrated 9.98- and 1.88-fold increases over ALP and MCC in the CO2 fixation rate, respectively. Similarly, the ALMCC significantly presented a higher lipid productivity compared to those control reactors. More importantly, the preliminary analysis of energy balance suggested that the net energy of the ALMCC system was significantly superior to other systems and could theoretically produce enough energy to cover its consumption. In this work, the established ALMCC system simultaneously achieved the high level of CO2 fixation, energy recycle, and municipal wastewater treatment effectively and efficiently.

  8. Miniaturized cathodic arc plasma source

    DOEpatents

    Anders, Andre; MacGill, Robert A.

    2003-04-15

    A cathodic arc plasma source has an anode formed of a plurality of spaced baffles which extend beyond the active cathode surface of the cathode. With the open baffle structure of the anode, most macroparticles pass through the gaps between the baffles and reflect off the baffles out of the plasma stream that enters a filter. Thus the anode not only has an electrical function but serves as a prefilter. The cathode has a small diameter, e.g. a rod of about 1/4 inch (6.25 mm) diameter. Thus the plasma source output is well localized, even with cathode spot movement which is limited in area, so that it effectively couples into a miniaturized filter. With a small area cathode, the material eroded from the cathode needs to be replaced to maintain plasma production. Therefore, the source includes a cathode advancement or feed mechanism coupled to cathode rod. The cathode also requires a cooling mechanism. The movable cathode rod is housed in a cooled metal shield or tube which serves as both a current conductor, thus reducing ohmic heat produced in the cathode, and as the heat sink for heat generated at or near the cathode. Cooling of the cathode housing tube is done by contact with coolant at a place remote from the active cathode surface. The source is operated in pulsed mode at relatively high currents, about 1 kA. The high arc current can also be used to operate the magnetic filter. A cathodic arc plasma deposition system using this source can be used for the deposition of ultrathin amorphous hard carbon (a-C) films for the magnetic storage industry.

  9. Measurements of concentrations of chlorofluoromethanes (CFMs) carbon dioxide and carbon isotope ratio in stratospheric and tropospheric air by grab-sampling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Itoh, T.; Kubo, H.; Honda, H.; Tominaga, T.; Makide, Y.; Yakohata, A.; Sakai, H.

    1985-01-01

    Measurements of concentrations of chlorofluoromethanes (CFMs), carbon dioxide and carbon isotope ratio in stratospheric and tropospheric air by grab-sampling systems are reported. The balloon-borne grab-sampling system has been launched from Sanriku Balloon Center three times since 1981. It consists of: (1) six sampling cylinders, (2) eight motor driven values, (3) control and monitor circuits, and (4) pressurized housing. Particular consideration is paid to the problem of contamination. Strict requirements are placed on the choice of materials and components, construction methods, cleaning techniques, vacuum integrity, and sampling procedures. An aluminum pressurized housing and a 4-m long inlet line are employed to prevent the sampling air from contamination by outgassing of sampling and control devices. The sampling is performed during the descent of the system. Vertical profiles of mixing ratios of CF2Cl2, CFCl3 and CH4 are given. Mixing ratios of CF2Cl2 and CFCl3 in the stratosphere do not show the discernible effect of the increase of those in the ground level background, and decrease with altitude. Decreasing rate of CFCl3 is larger than that of CF2Cl2. CH4 mixing ratio, on the other hand, shows diffusive equilibrium, as the photodissociation cross section of CH4 is small and concentrations of OH radical and 0(sup I D) are low.

  10. Porosity and sorption properties of activated carbons prepared from anthracite by steam-air activation

    SciTech Connect

    Sych, N.V.; Kartel, N.T.; Tsyba, N.N.; Strelko, V.V.; Nikolaichuk, A.D.; Mironyuk, T.I.

    2006-04-15

    Fundamental aspects of the steam-air activation of anthracite from Donets coal fields were studied. The effect of the flow rate of moistened air on the development of a porous structure and the sorption properties of the adsorbents obtained were examined.

  11. Scaling of Carbon Cycle Processes in a Mountain Ecosystem Using Isotopes of Respired Carbon Dioxide in Nocturnal Cold-air Drainage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bond, B. J.; Barnard, H.; Conklin, D.; Hauck, M.; Kayler, Z.; Mix, A. C.; Phillips, C.; Pypker, T.; Sulzman, E.; Unsworth, M.

    2006-12-01

    Nocturnal air drainage in mountain ecosystems offers a unique opportunity for scaling of carbon cycle processes in complex terrain using stable isotopes. We have found that more than half of ecosystem-respired CO2 can be transferred advectively from a small (100 ha) watershed at night, and the range of CO2 concentrations in the air collected from a 37 m tower situated at the base of the watershed is sufficient for Keeling plot analysis to determine the carbon isotope composition of ecosystem-respired CO2, or δ13CR-eco. We now seek to determine, 1) What is the spatial "footprint" of δ13CR- eco measurements, and how does this footprint vary over time? 2) What is the relationship between δ13CR-eco and measurements of isofluxes from soils and foliage across a range of specific sites in the watershed? 3) What is the relationship between δ13CR-eco and carbon cycle processes in the watershed? To answer these questions we conducted extensive measurements of atmospheric processes, augmented by experimental releases of an inert gas (SF6) in collaboration with Dr. Brian Lamb, Washington State University. We installed and instrumented eight plots along a ridge-to-ridge transect; we are continuously measuring above- and belowground microclimate in all plots and in a subset of plots we are continuously measuring sapflow and periodically measuring soil and leaf respiration and their isotopic composition. Atmospheric analyses indicated that air collected for Keeling plot analysis represented a well-mixed sample of all or nearly all of the watershed, and for several hours of most nights this footprint was stable. Respiratory fluxes and isofluxes from both soils and foliage varied both temporally and spatially; the variation among plots was often greater than the temporal variation of a particular plot over the growing season. Scaled to the ecosystem level, respiratory fluxes from foliage exceeded soil fluxes by as much as a factor of two, and fluxes from the south-facing slope

  12. [Life support of the Mars exploration crew. Control of a zeolite system for carbon dioxide removal from space cabin air within a closed air regeneration cycle].

    PubMed

    Chekov, Iu F

    2009-01-01

    The author describes a zeolite system for carbon dioxide removal integrated into a closed air regeneration cycle aboard spacecraft. The continuous operation of a double-adsorbent regeneration system with pCO2-dependable productivity is maintained through programmable setting of adsorption (desorption) semicycle time. The optimal system regulation curve is presented within the space of statistical performance family obtained in quasi-steady operating modes with controlled parameters of the recurrent adsorption-desorption cycle. The automatically changing system productivity ensures continuous intake of concentrated CO2. Control of the adsorption-desorption process is based on calculation of the differential adsorption (desorption) heat from gradient of adsorbent and test inert substance temperatures. The adaptive algorithm of digital control is implemented through the standard spacecraft interface with the board computer system and programmable microprocessor-based controllers.

  13. Carnation-like MnO2 modified activated carbon air cathode improve power generation in microbial fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Peng; Li, Kexun; Liu, Xianhua

    2014-10-01

    Highly active and low-cost electrocatalysts are of great importance for large-scale commercial applications of microbial fuel cells (MFCs). In this work, we prepared an activated carbon (AC) air cathode containing electrodeposited γ-MnO2 using a potentiostatic method. The results indicated that carnation-like MnO2 crystals were bound to the surface of the AC air cathode after a deposition time of 10 min, which greatly improved the performance of the cathode. BET analysis results demonstrated that the electrodeposition of MnO2 decreased the micropore surface area of the cathode but increased the mesopore surface area. When compared with a bare AC air cathode, the electrodeposited MnO2 cathode exhibited higher catalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction. The maximum power density of the MFC equipped with the electrodeposited MnO2 AC air cathode was 1554 mW m-2, which is 1.5 times higher than the control cathode.

  14. Operation of a breadboard liquid-sorbent/membrane-contactor system for removing carbon dioxide and water vapor from air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccray, Scott B.; Ray, Rod; Newbold, David D.; Millard, Douglas L.; Friesen, Dwayne T.; Foerg, Sandra

    1992-01-01

    Processes to remove and recover carbon dioxide (CO2) and water vapor from air are essential for successful long-duration space missions. This paper presents results of a developmental program focused on the use of a liquid-sorbent/membrane-contactor (LSMC) system for removal of CO2 and water vapor from air. In this system, air from the spacecraft cabin atmosphere is circulated through one side of a hollow-fiber membrane contactor. On the other side of the membrane contactor is flowed a liquid sorbent, which absorbs the CO2 and water vapor from the feed air. The liquid sorbent is then heated to desorb the CO2 and water vapor. The CO2 is subsequently removed from the system as a concentrated gas stream, whereas the water vapor is condensed, producing a water stream. A breadboard system based on this technology was designed and constructed. Tests showed that the LSMC breadboard system can produce a CO2 stream and a liquid-water stream. Details are presented on the operation of the system, as well as the effects on performance of variations in feed conditions.

  15. 76 FR 27908 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Massachusetts; Revised Carbon...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-13

    ...; Revised Carbon Monoxide Maintenance Plan for Lowell AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION... of Massachusetts. This SIP submittal contains revisions to the carbon monoxide (CO) maintenance plan... original maintenance plan. The intended effect of this action is to approve this revision to the Lowell...

  16. Pasture management – Converting carbon in the air into something useful on the ground

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil organic matter is a key indicator of agricultural productivity, water relations, nutrient cycling, biodiversity, and greenhouse gas mitigation potential. This presentation was made at the Iowa Grazing Conference to describe to what soil organic carbon is, how soil organic carbon affects other ...

  17. 76 FR 9281 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Massachusetts; Revised Carbon...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-17

    ...; Revised Carbon Monoxide Maintenance Plan for Lowell AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION... the State of Massachusetts. This SIP submittal contains revisions to the carbon monoxide (CO... Implementation Plan (SIP) for Massachusetts. The SIP revision consists of a minor modification to the...

  18. 75 FR 6307 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Maryland; Control of Carbon...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-09

    ... Carbon Monoxide Emissions From Basic Oxygen Furnaces AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA... current SIP requirements for the control of carbon monoxide (CO) emissions from basic oxygen furnaces... blast furnace and scrap metal which is heated with oxygen to produce molten metal. The molten metal...

  19. Synthesis of a high-yield activated carbon by air gasification of macadamia nut shell charcoal

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, X.; Antal, M.J. Jr.

    1999-09-01

    Macadamia nut shell charcoal was heated in an inert environment to temperatures above 1000 K (carbonized), reacted with oxygen (Po{sub 2} = 2.68--11.3 kPa) at temperatures between 525 and 586 K (oxygenated), and heated again in an inert environment to temperatures above 1000 K (activated) to produce an activated carbon. Carbons produced by this process possess surface areas and iodine numbers in the range of 400--550. Overall yields of these carbons (based on the dry, raw macadamia nut shell feed) ranged from 24 to 30 wt %. Under the conditions employed in this work, the rates of chemisorption and gasification were not mass transfer limited. Initially, the gasification reaction was first-order with respect to oxygen concentration but became independent of oxygen concentration as the surface sites of the carbon became saturated with oxygen.

  20. Applications for activated carbons from waste tires: Natural gas storage and air pollution control

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brady, T.A.; Rostam-Abadi, M.; Rood, M.J.

    1996-01-01

    Natural gas storage for natural gas vehicles and the separation and removal of gaseous contaminants from gas streams represent two emerging applications for carbon adsorbents. A possible precursor for such adsorbents is waste tires. In this study, activated carbon has been developed from waste tires and tested for its methane storage capacity and SO2 removal from a simulated flue-gas. Tire-derived carbons exhibit methane adsorption capacities (g/g) within 10% of a relatively expensive commercial activated carbon; however, their methane storage capacities (Vm/Vs) are almost 60% lower. The unactivated tire char exhibits SO2 adsorption kinetics similar to a commercial carbon used for flue-gas clean-up. Copyright ?? 1996 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  1. The tubular MFC with carbon tube air-cathode for power generation and N,N-dimethylacetamide treatment.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiadong; Liu, Lifen; Gao, Bo

    2016-01-01

    A continuous flow microbial fuel cell (MFC) was assembled with carbon tube air-cathode and carbon felt anode. The organic solvent N,N-dimethylacetamide (DMAC) was used as the only carbon source for power generation. After the adaptive phase, the cell potential was gradually increased from 0.15 to 0.45 V with 200 Ω of external resistor during 150 h of operation. The calculated power density of this MFC was 100 mW L(-1) when the cell potential was 0.45 V. The reversible redox peaks of carbon tube were obtained in cyclic voltammogram between -0.5 and -0.25 V under aerobic circumstance. The removal rate of DMAC was 15-50% after treatment with hydraulic retention time of 12 min. The results indicated that it is possible to realize the power extraction from DMAC wastewater in the form of electricity by the bioconversion process of MFC.

  2. Nondestructive natural gas hydrate recovery driven by air and carbon dioxide

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Hyery; Koh, Dong-Yeun; Lee, Huen

    2014-01-01

    Current technologies for production of natural gas hydrates (NGH), which include thermal stimulation, depressurization and inhibitor injection, have raised concerns over unintended consequences. The possibility of catastrophic slope failure and marine ecosystem damage remain serious challenges to safe NGH production. As a potential approach, this paper presents air-driven NGH recovery from permeable marine sediments induced by simultaneous mechanisms for methane liberation (NGH decomposition) and CH4-air or CH4-CO2/air replacement. Air is diffused into and penetrates NGH and, on its surface, forms a boundary between the gas and solid phases. Then spontaneous melting proceeds until the chemical potentials become equal in both phases as NGH depletion continues and self-regulated CH4-air replacement occurs over an arbitrary point. We observed the existence of critical methane concentration forming the boundary between decomposition and replacement mechanisms in the NGH reservoirs. Furthermore, when CO2 was added, we observed a very strong, stable, self-regulating process of exchange (CH4 replaced by CO2/air; hereafter CH4-CO2/air) occurring in the NGH. The proposed process will work well for most global gas hydrate reservoirs, regardless of the injection conditions or geothermal gradient. PMID:25311102

  3. High-end exposure relationships of volatile air toxics and carbon monoxide to community-scale air monitoring stations in Atlanta, Chicago, and Houston.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Eric M; Zielinska, Barbara; Campbell, David E; Sagebiel, John C; Ollison, Will

    Evaporative and exhaust mobile source air toxic (MSAT) emissions of total volatile organic compounds, carbon monoxide, BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes), formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, butadiene, methyl tertiary butyl ether, and ethanol were measured in vehicle-related high-end microenvironments (ME) under worst-case conditions plausibly simulating the >99th percentile of inhalation exposure concentrations in Atlanta (baseline gasoline), Chicago (ethanol-oxygenated gasoline), and Houston (methyl tertiary butyl either-oxygenated gasoline) during winter and summer seasons. High-end MSAT values as ratios of the corresponding measurements at nearby air monitoring stations exceeded the microenvironmental proximity factors used in regulatory exposure models, especially for refueling operations and MEs under reduced ventilation. MSAT concentrations were apportioned between exhaust and evaporative vehicle emissions in Houston where methyl tertiary butyl ether could be used as a vehicle emission tracer. With the exception of vehicle refueling operations, the results indicate that evaporative emissions are a minor component of high-end MSAT exposure concentrations.

  4. A technique of purification process of single-walled carbon nanotubes with air.

    PubMed

    Song, Xin; Fang, Yan

    2007-07-01

    A technique of purifying SWCNTs has been developed by means of oxidizing carbonaceous particles with air using fluidized-bed. Air was introduced into the fluidized-bed by pump with controllable flux. The powders were "boiling" at a temperature of 550 degrees C for 50 min. With this technique, the flux can be controlled simply. The fluidized-bed was applied as the heating apparatus instead of rotated quartz tubes. The air and the powders can be mixed with each other more sufficiently. Characteristics of the raw and purified powder were presented using Raman spectroscopy and transmission electronic microscopy (TEM), revealing that the purified powder is free from carbonaceous particles.

  5. Method for processing aluminum spent potliner in a graphite electrode ARC furnace

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connor, William K.; Turner, Paul C.; Addison, Gerald W.

    2002-12-24

    A method of processing spent aluminum pot liner containing carbon, cyanide compositions, fluorides and inorganic oxides. The spent aluminum pot liner is crushed iron oxide is added to form an agglomerated material. The agglomerated material is melted in an electric arc furnace having the electrodes submerged in the molten material to provide a reducing environment during the furnace operation. In the reducing environment, pot liner is oxidized while the iron oxides are reduced to produce iron and a slag substantially free of cyanide compositions and fluorides. An off-gas including carbon oxides and fluorine is treated in an air pollution control system with an afterburner and a scrubber to produce NaF, water and a gas vented to the atmosphere free of cyanide compositions, fluorine and CO.

  6. Method for processing aluminum spent potliner in a graphite electrode arc furnace

    DOEpatents

    O'Connor, William K.; Turner, Paul C.; Addison, G.W.

    2002-12-24

    A method of processing spent aluminum pot liner containing carbon, cyanide compositions, fluorides and inorganic oxides. The spend aluminum pot liner is crushed, iron oxide is added to form an agglomerated material. The agglomerated material is melted in an electric arc furnace having the electrodes submerged in the molten material to provide a reducing environment during the furnace operation. In the reducing environment, pot liner is oxidized while the iron oxides are reduced to produce iron and a slag substantially free of cyanide compositions and fluorides. An off-gas including carbon oxides and fluorine is treated in an air pollution control system with an afterburner and a scrubber to produce NaF, water and a gas vented to the atmosphere free of cyanide compositions, fluorine, and CO.

  7. Evidence that an internal carbonic anhydrase is present in 5% CO/sub 2/-grown and air-grown Chlamydomonas. [Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    SciTech Connect

    Moroney, J.V.; Togasaki, R.K.; Husic, H.D.; Tolbert, N.E.

    1987-07-01

    Inorganic carbon (C/sub i/) uptake was measured in wild-type cells of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, and in cia-3, a mutant strain of C. reinhardtii that cannot grow with air levels of CO/sub 2/. Both air-grown cells, that have a CO/sub 2/ concentrating system, and 5% CO/sub 2/-grown cells that do not have this system, were used. When the external pH was 5.1 or 7.3, air-grown, wild-type cells accumulated inorganic carbon (C/sub i/) and this accumulation was enhanced when the permeant carbonic anhydrase inhibitor, ethoxyzolamide, was added. When the external pH was 5.1, 5% CO/sub 2/-grown cells also accumulated some C/sub i/, although not as much as air-grown cells and this accumulation was stimulated by the addition of ethoxyzolamide. At the same time, ethoxyzolamide inhibited CO/sub 2/ fixation by high CO/sub 2/-grown, wild-type cells at both pH 5.1 and 7.3. These observations imply that 5% CO/sub 2/-grown, wild-type cells, have a physiologically important internal carbonic anhydrase, although the major carbonic anhydrase located in the periplasmic space is only present in air-grown cells. Inorganic carbon uptake by cia-3 cells supported this conclusion. This mutant strain, which is thought to lack an internal carbonic anhydrase, was unaffected by ethoxyzolamide at pH 5.1. Other physiological characteristics of cia-3 resemble those of wild-type cells that have been treated with ethoxyzolamide. It is concluded that an internal carbonic anhydrase is under different regulatory control than the periplasmic carbonic anhydrase.

  8. Control of arc length during gas metal arc welding

    SciTech Connect

    Madigan, R.B.; Quinn, T.P.

    1994-12-31

    An arc-length control system has been developed for gas metal arc welding (GMAW) under spray transfer welding conditions. The ability to monitor and control arc length during arc welding allows consistent weld characteristics to be maintained and therefore improves weld quality. Arc length control has only been implemented for gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW), where an automatic voltage control (AVC) unit adjusts torch-to-work distance. The system developed here compliments the voltage- and current-sensing techniques commonly used for control of GMAW. The system consists of an arc light intensity sensor (photodiode), a Hall-effect current sensor, a personal computer and software implementing a data interpretation and control algorithms. Arc length was measured using both arc light and arc current signals. Welding current was adjusted to maintain constant arc length. A proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller was used. Gains were automatically selected based on the desired welding conditions. In performance evaluation welds, arc length varied from 2.5 to 6.5 mm while welding up a sloped workpiece (ramp in CTWD) without the control. Arc length was maintained within 1 mm of the desired (5 mm ) with the control.

  9. Mixing gasdynamic laser with nonequilibrium arc excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonov, G. G.; Kovshechnikov, V. B.; Rutberg, F. G.

    2016-05-01

    A mixing gasdynamic laser with nonuniform arc excitation is investigated using a model setup. Tentative analysis of the results indicates the appropriateness of using plasmatrons to improve the efficiency of mixing gasdynamic lasers by making carbon dioxide molecules vibrationally more nonuniform. In addition, a plasmatron serves as a preionization source both for a fast-flow gas-discharge laser and for a gasdynamic laser with combined pumping.

  10. Radiation of long and high power arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cressault, Y.; Bauchire, J. M.; Hong, D.; Rabat, H.; Riquel, G.; Sanchez, F.; Gleizes, A.

    2015-10-01

    The operators working on electrical installations of low, medium and high voltages can be accidentally exposed to short-circuit arcs ranging from a few kA to several tens of kA. To protect them from radiation, according to the exposure limits, we need to characterize the radiation emitted by the powerful arc. Therefore, we have developed a general experimental and numerical study in order to estimate the spectral irradiance received at a given distance from the arc. The experimental part was based on a very long arc (up to 2 m) with high ac current (between 4 and 40 kA rms, duration 100 ms) using 3 kinds of metallic contacts (copper, steel and aluminium). We measured the irradiance received 10m from the axis of the arc, and integrated on 4 spectral intervals corresponding to the UV, visible, IRA  +  B and IRC. The theoretical part consisted of calculating the radiance of isothermal plasmas in mixtures of air and metal vapour, integrated over the same spectral intervals as defined in the experiments. The comparison between the theoretical and experimental results has allowed the defining of three isothermal radiation sources whose combination leads to a spectral irradiation equivalent to the experimental one. Then the calculation allowed the deduction of the spectral description of the irradiance over all the wavelength range, between 200 nm and 20 μm. The final results indicate that the influence of metal is important in the visible and UVA ranges whereas the IR radiation is due to the air plasma and surrounding hot gas and fumes.

  11. Arc electrode interaction study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, X.; Berns, D.; Heberlein, J.

    1994-01-01

    The project consisted of two parts: (1) the cathode interaction studies which were a continuation of previous work and had the objective of increasing our understanding of the microscopic phenomena controlling cathode erosion in arc jet thrusters, and (2) the studies of the anode attachment in arc jet thrusters. The cathode interaction studies consisted of (1) a continuation of some modeling work in which the previously derived model for the cathode heating was applied to some specific gases and electrode materials, and (2) experimental work in which various diagnostics was applied to the cathode. The specific diagnostics used were observation of the cathode tip during arcing using a Laser Strobe Video system in conjunction with a tele-microscope, a monochromator with an optical multichannel analyzer for the determination of the cathode temperature distribution, and various ex situ materials analysis methods. The emphasis of our effort was shifted to the cathode materials analysis because a parallel project was in place during the second half of 1993 with a visiting scientist pursuing arc electrode materials studies. As a consequence, the diagnostic investigations of the arc in front of the cathode had to be postponed to the first half of 1994, and we are presently preparing these measurements. The results of last year's study showed some unexpected effects influencing the cathode erosion behavior, such as increased erosion away from the cathode tip, and our understanding of these effects should improve our ability to control cathode erosion. The arc jet anode attachment studies concentrated on diagnostics of the instabilities in subsonic anode attachment arc jet thrusters, and were supplemental measurements to work which was performed by one of the authors who spent the summer as an intern at NASA Lewis Research Center. A summary of the results obtained during the internship are included because they formed an integral part of the study. Two tasks for 1994, the

  12. Pulsed Long Arc Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krampit, N. Yu

    2016-04-01

    The paper presents a method and an appliance for pulsed arc welding. The method supports dosage of energy required for melting each bead of electrode metal starting from the detachment of a bead. The appliance including a sensor to register bead detachment shows this moment due to the voltage burst in the arc space. Transferred beads of electrode metal are of similar size because of the dosage of energy used for melting each bead, as the consequence, the process is more stable and starting conditions to transfer electrode metal are similar, as the result, a produced weld is improved.

  13. Influence of invasive earthworm activity on carbon dynamics in soils from the Aspen Free Air CO2 Enrichment Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filley, T. R.; Top, S. M.; Hopkins, F. M.

    2010-12-01

    The influence of CO2-driven increase in net primary productivity on soil organic carbon accrual has received considerable emphasis in ecological literature with conclusions varying from positive, to neutral, to negative. What has been understudied is the coupled role of soil fauna, such as earthworms, in controlling the ultimate fate of new above and below ground plant carbon under elevated CO2. Such considerations are particularly relevant considering that in most northern North American forests earthworms are an exotic organism known to cause significant changes to forest floor chemistry and soil structure, possibly increasing nutrient loss from both soil and leaf litter and mixing litter and humus deep into the mineral soil. The impact of these exotic earthworms on overall soil carbon stabilization is largely unknown but likely a function of both species composition and edaphic soil properties. In this paper we present the initial results of a carbon isotope study (13C, 14C) conducted at the Aspen free air CO2 enrichment (FACE) site, Rhinelander, WI, USA to track allocation and redistribution within the soil of plant litter and root carbon (bulk and biopolymer). Along with litter and soil to 25 cm depth, earthworm populations were quantified, and their gut contents collected for isotopic and plant biopolymer chemistry analysis. Contributions of root vs. leaf input to soil and earthworm fecal matter were derived from differences in the chemical and isotope composition of alkaline CuO-derived lignin and substituted fatty acids (SFA) from cutin and suberin. Our investigation demonstrates the presence of invasive European earthworms, of both litter and surface soil dwelling (epigeic) and deep soil dwelling (endogeic) varieties, whose abundance increases under elevated CO2 conditions. Additionally, the different species show selective vertical movement of new and pre-FACE plant biopolymers indicating dynamics in root and leaf decomposition and burial (down to 30 cm

  14. Chemical Extraction of Carbon Dioxide From Air: A Strategy to Avoid Climate Change and Sustain Fossil Energy?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubey, M. K.; Ziock, H.; Rueff, G.; Colman, J.; Smith, W. S.

    2002-12-01

    Fossil energy use has benefited humankind but also threatens our environment. It has increased atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) levels from 280 ppm to 370 ppm, over the past century. This rise has been linked to with observed ocean acidification and global warming. Projections indicate that atmospheric CO2 could reach 540 to 970 ppm in 2100, with significant effects on our earth system. Given that fossil fuels are plentiful, cost-effective, and energy rich their use will be limited by our ability to mitigate their environmental impact. Carbon management provides potential solutions to this. Current approaches to manage carbon focus on capturing CO2 from large point sources such as power plants. They are limited because they fail to address emissions from transportation and the myriad of dispersed sources that amount to about half of all emissions. To solve this problem we have proposed and are developing direct CO2 extraction from air as a means to capture emissions from all sources [1-3]. It preserves our fuel distribution and transportation systems, and in principle could allow us to restore CO2 to pre-industrial levels. Our concept utilizes atmospheric circulation to capture CO2 directly from the dilute stream in air (370 ppm) by binding it to an adsorbent. Subsequent heating releases the bound CO2 as a pure stream suitable for permanent sequestration. For example, this cycle is favorable for Ca(OH)2 which reacts rapidly with CO2 to form CaCO3. The heat to recover CO2 from CaCO3 is 190 kJ/mole of C, less than half the heat of combustion of 500 kJ/ mole of C for coal. The scale of CO2 air-extraction plants to offset global emissions is large but could be manageable, and favorable relative to renewable sources. We report experiments on CO2 uptake by alkaline solutions as a function of pH, contact time, and mixing. Both active and passive mixing conditions are explored. Gram scale quantities of CO2 has been extracted from air by Ca(OH)2 and the product CaCO3

  15. Co3O4/Co-N-C modified ketjenblack carbon as an advanced electrocatalyst for Al-air batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jingsha; Zhou, Zhi; Liu, Kun; Li, Fuzhi; Peng, Zhiguang; Tang, Yougen; Wang, Haiyan

    2017-03-01

    Nitrogen-doped carbon materials containing non-precious metal (TM-N-C) and Co-based oxides have been extensively investigated as promising catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Herein, we report a novel Co3O4/Co-N-C modified ketjenblack carbon (KB) catalyst via a one-pot and scalable pyrolysis process using cheap melamine, cobalt acetate tetrahydrate and KB as raw materials. Owing to the high specific surface area and good electrical conductivity, this KB-based catalyst exhibits remarkable catalytic activity with a half-wave potential of 0.798 V (vs RHE) and a limiting current density of 5.10 mA cm-2 in alkaline solution, which are comparable with those of the commercial 20 wt% Pt/C. More importantly, it displays superior stability to Pt/C, which makes it one of the most promising non-noble-metal catalysts. Al-air batteries with this catalyst are also tested and generate a maximum power density of 161.1 mW cm-2, which is close to that with 20 wt% Pt/C catalyst (161.9 mW cm-2). After the discharge for 18 h at 50 mA cm-2, the voltage degradation of Al-air battery with Co3O4/Co-N-C modified KB is 7%, while that using Pt/C is increased to 12%. By virtues of its remarkable performance, low cost and simple fabrication method, Co3O4/Co-N-C modified KB here can be used as an efficient ORR cathode catalyst instead of the commercial Pt/C for practical Al-air batteries.

  16. ARc Welding (Industrial Processing Series).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    ARC WELDING , *BIBLIOGRAPHIES), (*ARC WELDS, BIBLIOGRAPHIES), ALUMINUM ALLOYS, TITANIUM ALLOYS, CHROMIUM ALLOYS, METAL PLATES, SPOT WELDING , STEEL...INERT GAS WELDING , MARAGING STEELS, MICROSTRUCTURE, HEAT RESISTANT ALLOYS, HEAT RESISTANT METALS, WELDABILITY, MECHANICAL PROPERTIES, MOLYBDENUM ALLOYS, NICKEL ALLOYS, RESISTANCE WELDING

  17. Ambient carbon monoxide and daily mortality in three Chinese cities: the China Air Pollution and Health Effects Study (CAPES).

    PubMed

    Chen, Renjie; Pan, Guowei; Zhang, Yanping; Xu, Qun; Zeng, Guang; Xu, Xiaohui; Chen, Bingheng; Kan, Haidong

    2011-11-01

    Ambient carbon monoxide (CO) is an air pollutant primarily generated by traffic. CO has been associated with increased mortality and morbidity in developed countries, but few studies have been conducted in Asian developing countries. In the China Air Pollution and Health Effects Study (CAPES), the short-term associations between ambient CO and daily mortality were examined in three Chinese cities: Shanghai, Anshan and Taiyuan. Poisson regression models incorporating natural spline smoothing functions were used to adjust for long-term and seasonal trend of mortality, as well as other time-varying covariates. Effect estimates were obtained for each city and then for the cities combined. In both individual-city and combined analysis, significant associations of CO with both total non-accidental and cardiovascular mortality were observed. In the combined analysis, a 1 mg/m(3) increase of 2-day moving average concentrations of CO corresponded to 2.89% (95%CI: 1.68, 4.11) and 4.17% (95%CI: 2.66, 5.68) increase of total and cardiovascular mortality, respectively. CO was not significantly associated with respiratory mortality. Sensitivity analyses showed that our findings were generally insensitive to alternative model specifications. In conclusion, ambient CO was associated with increased risk of daily mortality in these three cities. Our findings suggest that the role of exposure to CO and other traffic-related air pollutants should be further investigated in China.

  18. BIFoR FACE: A Free-Air Carbon Dioxide Enrichment (FACE) facility in old-growth temperate deciduous woodland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacKenzie, Rob; Thomas, Rick; Ellsworth, David; Hemming, Debbie; Crous, Kristine; Blaen, Phillip; Poynter, Alex; Blenkhorn, Daniel; Pope, Francis

    2016-04-01

    The Birmingham Institute of Forest research (BIFoR) focuses on fundamental physical, biological, ecological, social and cultural research of direct relevance to forested landscapes worldwide. A core platform for BIFoR is a Free-Air Carbon Dioxide Enrichment (FACE) facility, with which we study the ten-year response of a mature temperate deciduous forest ecosystem to a 150-ppmv step-change in atmospheric [CO2]. BIFoR FACE is being established in Mill Haft, a mature (~150 year-old) oak (Quercus robur) and hazel (Corylus avellana) coppice-with-standards woodland in central England, UK. The facility enables elevated CO2 (eCO2) treatments to be introduced in 30 m diameter rings (3 treatment plots, 3 fully-replicated control plots, and 3 unmodified ambient controls). Primary research questions focus on carbon uptake and storage, corresponding nutrient limitations, and biodiversity and ecosystem responses to elevated CO2. Here we describe the facility and experimental design, and present baseline data collected through the growing season of 2015. These data include: biophysical tree properties; atmospheric CO2/H2O fluxes; airborne and ground laser scatterometry; leaf area index; geophysical survey data; canopy phenology; soil and water chemical and physical properties; and invertebrate surveys. Data from an intensive campaign conducted during august 2015 are also shown, including in- and above- canopy characterisation of biogenic VOCs using a Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer, aerosol loading including bioaerosols, and air quality. Further campaign results are presented from leaf level photosynthetic carbon-dioxide response curve (A/Ci) performed at different canopy heights on oak trees, and on the dominant understory species - hazel and sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus) across the site. BIFoR FACE is intended to be an international facility for forest science - ideas for collaborations are encouraged. Please see http

  19. Review of the national ambient air quality standards for carbon monoxide assessment of scientific and technical information. OAQPS staff paper. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    McKee, D.J.; McCurdy, T.R.; Richmond, H.M.

    1992-08-01

    The paper evaluates and interprets the updated scientific and technical information that EPA staff believes is most relevant to the review of primary (health) national ambient air quality standards for carbon monoxide. The assessment is intended to bridge the gap between the scientific review in the EPA criteria document for carbon monoxide and the judgements required of the Administrator in setting ambient air quality standards for carbon monoxide. The major recommendations of the staff paper include the following: (1) There continues to be a need to control ambient levels of carbon monoxide to protect public health; (2) Both 1-hour and 8-hour averaging times should be retained for primary carbon monoxide standards; (3) Exposure analysis results indicate relatively few individuals with angina pectoris would experience carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) levels of 2.1% or greater when exposed to carbon monoxide levels in ambient air only if current standards are attained; (4) Public health risk for COHb levels of 2.0% or lower appears to be small, if any; (5) Current 1-hour (35 ppm) and 8-hour (9 ppm) standards for carbon monoxide should be reaffirmed.

  20. Thermal Arc Spray Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafiz Abd Malek, Muhamad; Hayati Saad, Nor; Kiyai Abas, Sunhaji; Mohd Shah, Noriyati

    2013-06-01

    Usage of protective coating for corrosion protection was on highly demand during the past decade; and thermal spray coating played a major part during that time. In recent years, the thermal arc spray coating becomes a popular coating. Many big players in oil and gas such as PETRONAS, EXXON MOBIL and SHELL in Malaysia tend to use the coating on steel structure as a corrosion protection. Further developments in coating processes, the devices, and raw materials have led to expansion of functional coatings and applications scope from conventional coating to specialized industries. It is widely used because of its ability to withstand high process temperature, offer advantages in efficiency, lower cost and acts as a corrosion protection. Previous research also indicated that the thermal arc spray offers better coating properties compared to other methods of spray. This paper reviews some critical area of thermal spray coating by discussing the process/parameter of thermal arc spray technology and quality control of coating. Coating performance against corrosion, wear and special characteristic of coating are also described. The field application of arc spray technology are demonstrated and reviewed.

  1. Variable polarity arc welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayless, E. O., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Technological advances generate within themselves dissatisfactions that lead to further advances in a process. A series of advances in welding technology which culminated in the Variable Polarity Plasma Arc (VPPA) Welding Process and an advance instituted to overcome the latest dissatisfactions with the process: automated VPPA welding are described briefly.

  2. Gas tungsten arc welder

    DOEpatents

    Christiansen, D.W.; Brown, W.F.

    A welder for automated closure of fuel pins by a gas tungsten arc process in which a rotating length of cladding is positioned adjacent a welding electrode in a sealed enclosure. An independently movable axial grinder is provided in the enclosure for refurbishing the used electrode between welds.

  3. Arc Length Gone Global

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boudreaux, Gregory M.; Wells, M. Scott

    2007-01-01

    Everyone with a thorough knowledge of single variable calculus knows that integration can be used to find the length of a curve on a given interval, called its arc length. Fortunately, if one endeavors to pose and solve more interesting problems than simply computing lengths of various curves, there are techniques available that do not require an…

  4. Carbon Dioxide and Ionic Liquid Refrigerants: Compact, Efficient Air Conditioning with Ionic Liquid-Based Refrigerants

    SciTech Connect

    2010-10-01

    BEETIT Project: Notre Dame is developing an air-conditioning system with a new ionic liquid and CO2 as the working fluid. Synthetic refrigerants used in air conditioning and refrigeration systems are potent GHGs and can trap 1,000 times more heat in the atmosphere than CO2 alone—making CO2 an attractive alternative for synthetic refrigerants in cooling systems. However, operating cooling systems with pure CO2 requires prohibitively high pressures and expensive hardware. Notre Dame is creating a new fluid made of CO2 and ionic liquid that enables the use of CO2 at low pressures and requires minimal changes to existing hardware and production lines. This new fluid also produces no harmful emissions and can improve the efficiency of air conditioning systems— enabling new use of CO2 as a refrigerant in cooling systems.

  5. A cross-sectional study of exhaled carbon monoxide as a biomarker of recent household air pollution exposure

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Alison; Sanchez, Tiffany R.; Shahriar, Muhammad Hasan; Eunus, Mahbubul; Perzanowski, Matthew; Graziano, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    RATIONALE Household air pollution causes 3.5 million deaths annually. Personal exposure assessments required for examining health associations are expensive and require technical expertise, limiting the quality of research in resource-poor settings. OBJECTIVES To assess the feasibility of exhaled carbon monoxide and its relationship to continuous personal carbon monoxide monitoring and markers of respiratory health in female cooks primarily cooking with biomass fuels in Araihazar, Bangladesh. METHODS & MEASURES For a 24-hour period, exhaled carboxyhemoglobin (eCOHb) % saturation was measured before and after each cooking episode while simultaneous 24-hour personal carbon monoxide monitoring was conducted. The Coburn-Forester-Kane (CFK) equation was used to convert continuous personal CO exposures to predicted COHb % saturation. Respiratory symptoms were assessed by St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire, airway inflammation measured by exhaled breath condensate pH, and lung function determined by spirometry. Spearman's correlation was used to examine the relationship between eCOHb and CKF-derived COHb, EBC pH, and lung function variables. eCOHb % saturation was dichotomized around the median and odds ratios calculated for each respiratory symptom. MAIN RESULTS Measurement of eCOHb % saturation is feasible in a resource-poor setting. eCOHb % saturation responds to cooking episodes and demonstrates consistency when measured at the same time point 24-hours later, suggesting that eCOHb may be a sensitive biomarker of recent HAP exposures. PMID:26457622

  6. Continuous multichannel monitoring of cave air carbon dioxide using a pumped non-dispersive infrared analyser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattey, D.

    2012-04-01

    The concentration of CO2 in cave air is one of the main controls on the rate of degassing of dripwater and on the kinetics of calcite precipitation forming speleothem deposits. Measurements of cave air CO2reveal great complexity in the spatial distribution among interconnected cave chambers and temporal changes on synoptic to seasonal time scales. The rock of Gibraltar hosts a large number of caves distributed over a 300 meter range in altitude and monthly sampling and analysis of air and water combined with continuous logging of temperature, humidity and drip discharge rates since 2004 reveals the importance of density-driven seasonal ventilation which drives large-scale advection of CO2-rich air though the cave systems. Since 2008 we have deployed automatic CO2 monitoring systems that regularly sample cave air from up to 8 locations distributed laterally and vertically in St Michaels Cave located near the top of the rock at 275m asl and Ragged Staff Cave located in the heart of the rock near sea level. The logging system is controlled by a Campbell Scientific CR1000 programmable datalogger which controls an 8 port manifold connected to sampling lines leading to different parts of the cave over a distance of up to 250 meters. The manifold is pumped at a rate of 5l per minute drawing air through 6mm or 8mm id polythene tubing via a 1m Nafion loop to reduce humidity to local ambient conditions. The outlet of the primary pump leads to an open split which is sampled by a second low flow pump which delivers air at 100ml/minute to a Licor 820 CO2 analyser. The software selects the port to be sampled, flushes the line for 2 minutes and CO2 analysed as a set of 5 measurements averaged over 10 second intervals. The system then switches to the next port and when complete shuts down to conserve power after using 20 watts over a 30 minute period of analysis. In the absence of local mains power (eg from the show cave lighting system) two 12v car batteries will power the system

  7. Determination of carbon monoxide, methane and carbon dioxide in refinery hydrogen gases and air by gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Kamiński, Marian; Kartanowicz, Rafal; Jastrzebski, Daniel; Kamiński, Marcin M

    2003-03-14

    This paper illustrates a method for determining trace amounts of CO, CH4 and CO2 with the detection limit of 0.15, 0.15 and 0.20 microg/l, respectively, in refinery hydrogen gases or in air. A simple modification of a gas chromatograph equipped with a flame-ionization detector is presented. A Porapak Q column, additionally connected with a short molecular sieve 5A packed column and a catalytic hydrogenation reactor on the Ni catalyst have been applied. The principle of the analytical method proposed is the separation of CO from O2 before the introduction of CO to the methanizer. The analytical procedure and examples of the results obtained have been presented. The modification applied makes it possible to use the GC instrument for other determinations, requiring utilization of the Porapak Q column and the flame-ionization detector. In such cases, the short molecular sieve 5A column and the methanizer can be by-passed.

  8. Polymer-carbon black composite sensors in an electronic nose for air-quality monitoring.

    PubMed

    Ryan, M A; Shevade, A V; Zhou, H; Homer, M L

    2004-10-01

    An electronic nose that uses an array of 32 polymer-carbon black composite sensors has been developed, trained, and tested. By selecting a variety of chemical functionalities in the polymers used to make sensors, it is possible to construct an array capable of identifying and quantifying a broad range of target compounds, such as alcohols and aromatics, and distinguishing isomers and enantiomers (mirror-image isomers). A model of the interaction between target molecules and the polymer-carbon black composite sensors is under development to aid in selecting the array members and to enable identification of compounds with responses not stored in the analysis library.

  9. Polymer-carbon black composite sensors in an electronic nose for air-quality monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, M. A.; Shevade, A. V.; Zhou, H.; Homer, M. L.

    2004-01-01

    An electronic nose that uses an array of 32 polymer-carbon black composite sensors has been developed, trained, and tested. By selecting a variety of chemical functionalities in the polymers used to make sensors, it is possible to construct an array capable of identifying and quantifying a broad range of target compounds, such as alcohols and aromatics, and distinguishing isomers and enantiomers (mirror-image isomers). A model of the interaction between target molecules and the polymer-carbon black composite sensors is under development to aid in selecting the array members and to enable identification of compounds with responses not stored in the analysis library.

  10. Synergistically enhanced activity of graphene quantum dots/graphene hydrogel composites: a novel all-carbon hybrid electrocatalyst for metal/air batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Mengran; Fang, Zhao; Zhang, Kai; Fang, Jing; Qin, Furong; Zhang, Zhian; Li, Jie; Liu, Yexiang; Lai, Yanqing

    2016-06-01

    Primary zinc/air batteries could be the next generation of energy storage devices because of their high power density and high safety. Graphene quantum dots nested in the graphene hydrogel have been proposed as excellent all-carbon hybrid oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalysts, indicative of their great potential in primary zinc/air batteries.Primary zinc/air batteries could be the next generation of energy storage devices because of their high power density and high safety. Graphene quantum dots nested in the graphene hydrogel have been proposed as excellent all-carbon hybrid oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalysts, indicative of their great potential in primary zinc/air batteries. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr02622b

  11. Marine Technician's Handbook, Instructions for Taking Air Samples on Board Ship: Carbon Dioxide Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeling, Charles D.

    This booklet is one of a series intended to provide explicit instructions for the collection of oceanographic data and samples at sea. The methods and procedures described have been used by the Scripps Institution of Oceanography and found reliable and up-to-date. Instructions are given for taking air samples on board ship to determine the…

  12. Synergistic bifunctional catalyst design based on perovskite oxide nanoparticles and intertwined carbon nanotubes for rechargeable zinc-air battery applications.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Un; Park, Hey Woong; Park, Moon Gyu; Ismayilov, Vugar; Chen, Zhongwei

    2015-01-14

    Advanced morphology of intertwined core-corona structured bifunctional catalyst (IT-CCBC) is introduced where perovskite lanthanum nickel oxide nanoparticles (LaNiO3 NP) are encapsulated by high surface area network of nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes (NCNT) to produce highly active and durable bifunctional catalyst for rechargeable metal-air battery applications. The unique composite morphology of IT-CCBC not only enhances the charge transport property by providing rapid electron-conduction pathway but also facilitates in diffusion of hydroxyl and oxygen reactants through the highly porous framework. Confirmed by electrochemical half-cell testing, IT-CCBC in fact exhibits very strong synergy between LaNiO3 NP and NCNT demonstrating bifunctionality with significantly improved catalytic activities of oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and oxygen evolution reaction (OER). Furthermore, when compared to the state-of-art catalysts, IT-CCBC outperforms Pt/C and Ir/C in terms of ORR and OER, respectively, and shows improved electrochemical stability compared to them after cycle degradation testing. The practicality of the catalyst is corroborated by testing in a realistic rechargeable zinc-air battery utilizing atmospheric air in ambient conditions, where IT-CCBC demonstrates superior charge and discharge voltages and long-term cycle stability with virtually no battery voltage fading. These improved electrochemical properties of the catalyst are attributed to the nanosized dimensions of LaNiO3 NP controlled by simple hydrothermal technique, which enables prolific growth of and encapsulation by highly porous NCNT network. The excellent electrochemical results presented in this study highlight IT-CCBC as highly efficient and commercially viable bifunctional catalyst for rechargeable metal-air battery applications.

  13. Comparison between air and carbon dioxide insufflation in the endoscopic submucosal excavation of gastrointestinal stromal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Wei-Bin; Wang, Zi-Hao; Qu, Chun-Ying; Zhang, Yi; Jiang, Han; Zhou, Min; Chen, Ying; Xu, Lei-Ming

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of CO2 insufflation compared with air insufflation in the endoscopic submucosal excavation (ESE) of gastrointestinal stromal tumors. METHODS: Sixty patients were randomized to undergo endoscopic submucosal excavation, with the CO2 group (n = 30) and the air group (n = 30) undergoing CO2 insufflation and air insufflation in the ESE, respectively. The end-tidal CO2 level (pETCO2) was observed at 4 time points: at the beginning of ESE, at total removal of the tumors, at completed wound management, and 10 min after ESE. Additionally, the patients’ experience of pain at 1, 3, 6 and 24 h after the examination was registered using a visual analog scale (VAS). RESULTS: Both the CO2 group and air group were similar in mean age, sex, body mass index (all P > 0.05). There were no significant differences in PetCO2 values before and after the procedure (P > 0.05). However, the pain scores after the ESE at different time points in the CO2 group decreased significantly compared with the air group (1 h: 21.2 ± 3.4 vs 61.5 ± 1.7; 3 h: 8.5 ± 0.7 vs 42.9 ± 1.3; 6 h: 4.4 ± 1.6 vs 27.6 ± 1.2; 24 h: 2.3 ± 0.4 vs 21.4 ± 0.7, P < 0.05). Meanwhile, the percentage of VAS scores of 0 in the CO2 group after 1, 3, 6 and 24 h was significantly higher than that in the air group (60.7 ± 1.4 vs 18.9 ± 1.5, 81.5 ± 2.3 vs 20.6 ± 1.2, 89.2 ± 0.7 vs 36.8 ± 0.9, 91.3 ± 0.8 vs 63.8 ± 1.3, respectively, P < 0.05). Moreover, the condition of the CO2 group was better than that of the air group with respect to anal exsufflation. CONCLUSION: Insufflation of CO2 in the ESE of gastrointestinal stromal tumors will not cause CO2 retention and it may significantly reduce the level of pain, thus it is safe and effective. PMID:23326136

  14. A new piece in the puzzle of lithium/air batteries: computational study on the chemical stability of propylene carbonate in the presence of lithium peroxide.

    PubMed

    Laino, Teodoro; Curioni, Alessandro

    2012-03-19

    The electrolyte role in non-aqueous lithium/air batteries is attracting a lot of attention in several research groups, because of its fundamental importance in producing the appropriate reversible electrochemical reduction. While recent published works identify the lithium superoxide as the main degrading agent for propylene carbonate (PC), there is no clear experimental evidence that the oxygen at the cathode interface layer does not reduce further to peroxide before reacting with PC. Here, we investigate the reactivity of lithium peroxide versus propylene carbonate and find that Li(2)O(2) irreversibly decomposes the carbonate solvent, leading to alkyl carbonates. We also show that, compared with a single Li(2)O(2) unit in PC, a crystalline surface of Li(2)O(2) exhibits an enhanced reactivity. Our findings support the possibility that in lithium/air cells, oxygen may still be reduced to peroxide, with the formation of solid Li(2)O(2), which degrades by decomposing PC.

  15. Dynamics of phase transformations and microstructure evolution in carbon-manganese steel arc welds using time-resolved synchrotron X-ray diffraction.

    PubMed

    Wong, Joe; Ressler, Thorsten; Elmer, John W

    2003-03-01

    Phase transformations that occur in both the heat-affected zone (HAZ) and the fusion zone (FZ) of a carbon-manganese steel spot weld have been investigated using time-resolved X-ray diffraction (TRXRD) with time resolutions down to 50 ms. It is found that in both zones the gamma(f.c.c.) --> alpha(b.c.c.) transformation on cooling is twice as fast as the forward transformation of alpha --> gamma on heating. Profile analysis of the major Bragg reflections recorded in the TRXRD patterns reveals similarities and differences in the microstructural evolution with time in the HAZ and in the FZ. The latter undergoes melting and solidification in addition to solid-state transformations. With increasing temperature, the (110) d-spacing of the alpha phase prior to and during the alpha --> gamma transformation and the (111) d-spacing of the gamma phase just after the same transformation exhibit a decrease. The observed (and unusual) lattice contraction with temperature rise may be attributed to chemical effects, such as carbide precipitation in the alpha matrix, and/or mechanical effects due to stress relief. In the FZ, the gamma-Fe that forms has a preferential (200) texture on solidification of the liquid, whereas, on cooling in the HAZ, the gamma-Fe retains largely a (111) texture that is induced in the alpha --> gamma transformation on heating. On cooling in the HAZ, the width of the gamma(111) reflection increases initially, which is indicative of microstrain developing in the f.c.c. lattice, but decreases as expected, with a reduction of thermal disorder, on further cooling until the completion of the gamma --> alpha transformation. In the FZ, however, the microstrain in the gamma phase increases steadily on solidification and more rapidly for the duration of the gamma --> alpha transformation on further cooling. The final microstructure of the FZ is likely to consist of a single alpha phase dispersed in two morphological entities, whereas in the HAZ the alpha phase

  16. Studying the impact of air/brine displacement on acoustic velocities in carbonates. El Amin Mokhtar and Sandra Vega

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokhtar, E.; Vega, D.

    2012-12-01

    The impact of air/brine displacement on acoustic velocities of carbonate rocks is not fully comprehended yet. In order to improve our understanding of this effect, we conducted laboratory measurements of porosity and acoustic velocities (Vp and Vs) under both dry and brine saturated conditions at ambient pressure and temperature. The core plug samples in this study were collected from a hydrocarbon reservoir in the Middle East. A petrographic analysis was also performed on thin sections taken from the core plugs using a microscope and a digital camera. The aim of this analysis was to study depositional facies and the extent of diagenetic overprint that caused the observed variations in rock fabrics. Cross-plots were generated to analyze the trends of behavior between acoustic velocities and porosities taking into account the influence of different rock fabrics, in both dry and brine saturated samples. Acoustic velocities of brine saturated samples were higher than velocities of dry samples, as expected. However, their differences also respond to both, total porosity and carbonate rock fabrics. This result can be attributed to the different carbonate pore structures and rock frames formed during deposition and diagenesis. Similarly, the Vp/Vs ratio cross-plots display an increase in Vp/Vs ratios for the brine saturated samples compared to the dry ones. In conclusion, differences in acoustic velocities between dry and brine saturated carbonate rocks seem to be highly effected by porosity, rock fabric, and fluid content. This information can help to better understand the differences in acoustic response between gas and brine saturated zones in well logs and seismic.

  17. Nitrogen-Doped Carbon as a Cathode Material for Lithium-air Batteries (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-01

    desorption isotherms has been conducted and all isotherms show adsorption hysteresis indicating the presence of mesopores . The Brunauer-Emmett...uptake above the relative pressure ratio of 0.80 has been observed in BET isotherm and is due to the condensation of nitrogen in a mesoporous carbon

  18. Understanding Moisture and Carbon Dioxide Involved Interfacial Reactions on Electrochemical Performance of Lithium-Air Batteries Catalyzed by Gold/Manganese-Dioxide.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guoqing; Huang, Liliang; Liu, Shuangyu; Xie, Jian; Zhang, Shichao; Zhu, Peiyi; Cao, Gaoshao; Zhao, Xinbing

    2015-11-04

    Lithium-air (Li-air) battery works essentially based on the interfacial reaction of 2Li + O2 ↔ Li2O2 on the catalyst/oxygen-gas/electrolyte triphase interface. Operation of Li-air batteries in ambient air still remains a great challenge despite the recent development, because some side reactions related to moisture (H2O) and carbon dioxide (CO2) will occur on the interface with the formation of some inert byproducts on the surface of the catalyst. In this work, we investigated the effect of H2O and CO2 on the electrochemical performance of Li-air batteries to evaluate the practical operation of the batteries in ambient air. The use of a highly efficient gold/δ-manganese-dioxide (Au/δ-MnO2) catalyst helps to understand the intrinsic mechanism of the effect. We found that H2O has a more detrimental influence than CO2 on the battery performance when operated in ambient air. The battery operated in simulated dry air can sustain a stable cycling up to 200 cycles at 400 mA g(-1) with a relatively low polarization, which is comparable with that operated in pure O2. This work provides a possible method to operate Li-air batteries in ambient air by using optimized catalytic electrodes with a protective layer, for example a hydrophobic membrane.

  19. Hall-effect arc protector

    DOEpatents

    Rankin, Richard A.; Kotter, Dale K.

    1997-01-01

    The Hall-Effect Arc Protector is used to protect sensitive electronics from high energy arcs. The apparatus detects arcs by monitoring an electrical conductor, of the instrument, for changes in the electromagnetic field surrounding the conductor which would be indicative of a possible arcing condition. When the magnitude of the monitored electromagnetic field exceeds a predetermined threshold, the potential for an instrument damaging are exists and the control system logic activates a high speed circuit breaker. The activation of the breaker shunts the energy imparted to the input signal through a dummy load to the ground. After the arc condition is terminated, the normal signal path is restored.

  20. Hall-effect arc protector

    DOEpatents

    Rankin, R.A.; Kotter, D.K.

    1997-05-13

    The Hall-Effect Arc Protector is used to protect sensitive electronics from high energy arcs. The apparatus detects arcs by monitoring an electrical conductor, of the instrument, for changes in the electromagnetic field surrounding the conductor which would be indicative of a possible arcing condition. When the magnitude of the monitored electromagnetic field exceeds a predetermined threshold, the potential for an instrument damaging are exists and the control system logic activates a high speed circuit breaker. The activation of the breaker shunts the energy imparted to the input signal through a dummy load to the ground. After the arc condition is terminated, the normal signal path is restored. 2 figs.

  1. Nickel cobalt oxide/carbon nanotubes hybrid as a high-performance electrocatalyst for metal/air battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hui; Qiao, Hang; Wang, Haiyan; Zhou, Nan; Chen, Jiajie; Tang, Yougen; Li, Jingsha; Huang, Chenghuan

    2014-08-01

    High-performance, low cost catalyst for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) remains a big challenge. Herein, nanostructured NiCo2O4/CNTs hybrid was proposed as a high-performance catalyst for metal/air battery for the first time. The well-formed NiCo2O4/CNTs hybrid was studied by steady-state linear polarization curves and galvanostatic discharge curves in comparison with CNTs-free NiCo2O4 and commercial carbon-supported Pt. Because of the synergistic effect, NiCo2O4/CNTs hybrid exhibited significant improvement of catalytic performance in comparison with NiCo2O4 or CNTs alone, even outperforming Pt/C hybrid in ORR process. In addition, the benefits of Ni incorporation were demonstrated by the improved catalytic performance of NiCo2O4/CNTs compared to Co3O4/CNTs, which should be attributed to improved electrical conductivity and new, highly efficient, active sites created by Ni cation incorporation into the spinel structure. NiCo2O4/CNTs hybrid could be used as a promising catalyst for high power metal/air battery.High-performance, low cost catalyst for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) remains a big challenge. Herein, nanostructured NiCo2O4/CNTs hybrid was proposed as a high-performance catalyst for metal/air battery for the first time. The well-formed NiCo2O4/CNTs hybrid was studied by steady-state linear polarization curves and galvanostatic discharge curves in comparison with CNTs-free NiCo2O4 and commercial carbon-supported Pt. Because of the synergistic effect, NiCo2O4/CNTs hybrid exhibited significant improvement of catalytic performance in comparison with NiCo2O4 or CNTs alone, even outperforming Pt/C hybrid in ORR process. In addition, the benefits of Ni incorporation were demonstrated by the improved catalytic performance of NiCo2O4/CNTs compared to Co3O4/CNTs, which should be attributed to improved electrical conductivity and new, highly efficient, active sites created by Ni cation incorporation into the spinel structure. NiCo2O4/CNTs hybrid could be used as a

  2. Semicircular Rashba arc spin polarizer

    SciTech Connect

    Bin Siu, Zhuo; Jalil, Mansoor B. A.; Ghee Tan, Seng

    2014-05-07

    In this work, we study the generation of spin polarized currents using curved arcs of finite widths, in which the Rashba spin orbit interaction (RSOI) is present. Compared to the 1-dimensional RSOI arcs with zero widths studied previously, the finite width presents charge carriers with another degree of freedom along the transverse width of the arc, in addition to the longitudinal degree of freedom along the circumference of the arc. The asymmetry in the transverse direction due to the difference in the inner and outer radii of the arc breaks the antisymmetry of the longitudinal spin z current in a straight RSOI segment. This property can be exploited to generate spin z polarized current output from the RSOI arc by a spin unpolarized current input. The sign of the spin current can be manipulated by varying the arc dimensions.

  3. Penetration Characteristics of Air, Carbon Dioxide and Helium Transverse Sonic Jets in Mach 5 Cross Flow

    PubMed Central

    Erdem, Erinc; Kontis, Konstantinos; Saravanan, Selvaraj

    2014-01-01

    An experimental investigation of sonic air, CO2 and Helium transverse jets in Mach 5 cross flow was carried out over a flat plate. The jet to freestream momentum flux ratio, J, was kept the same for all gases. The unsteady flow topology was examined using high speed schlieren visualisation and PIV. Schlieren visualisation provided information regarding oscillating jet shear layer structures and bow shock, Mach disc and barrel shocks. Two-component PIV measurements at the centreline, provided information regarding jet penetration trajectories. Barrel shocks and Mach disc forming the jet boundary were visualised/quantified also jet penetration boundaries were determined. Even though J is kept the same for all gases, the penetration patterns were found to be remarkably different both at the nearfield and the farfield. Air and CO2 jet resulted similar nearfield and farfield penetration pattern whereas Helium jet spread minimal in the nearfield. PMID:25494348

  4. High velocity pulsed wire-arc spray

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witherspoon, F. Douglas (Inventor); Massey, Dennis W. (Inventor); Kincaid, Russell W. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    Wire arc spraying using repetitively pulsed, high temperature gas jets, usually referred to as plasma jets, and generated by capillary discharges, substantially increases the velocity of atomized and entrained molten droplets. The quality of coatings produced is improved by increasing the velocity with which coating particles impact the coated surface. The effectiveness of wire-arc spraying is improved by replacing the usual atomizing air stream with a rapidly pulsed high velocity plasma jet. Pulsed power provides higher coating particle velocities leading to improved coatings. 50 micron aluminum droplets with velocities of 1500 m/s are produced. Pulsed plasma jet spraying provides the means to coat the insides of pipes, tubes, and engine block cylinders with very high velocity droplet impact.

  5. PEM fuel cell cathode carbon corrosion due to the formation of air/fuel boundary at the anode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Hao; Qi, Zhigang; Ramani, Manikandan; Elter, John F.

    The impacts of unprotected start up and shut down on fuel cell performance degradation was investigated using both single cell and dual cell configurations. It was found that the air/fuel boundary developed at the anode side after a fuel cell shut down or during its restart caused extremely quick degradation of the cathode. The thickness, the electrochemical active surface area, and the performance of the cathode catalyst layer were significantly reduced. By using a dual cell configuration, cathode potential as high as two times of open circuit voltage was measured, and the corrosion current flowing externally between the two cells was detected and quantified. Carbon catalyst-support corrosion/oxidation at such a high potential was largely responsible for the accelerated fuel cell performance degradation.

  6. The measurement of carbon monoxide and methane in the National Capital Air Quality Control Region. I - Measurement systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lebel, P. J.; Lamontagne, R. A.; Goldstein, H. W.

    1976-01-01

    The Carbon Monoxide Pollution Experiment (COPE) and the National Capital Air Quality Control Region (NCAQCR) undertook a series of measurements of atmospheric CO and CH4 to determine the accuracy of the airborne COPE Correlation Interfer4meter. The device, a modified Michelson interferometer, measures the atmospheric column density of CO and CH4 at 2.3 microns with tropospheric measurement sensitivities of 70 and 10 PPB, respectively. Data for evaluating the remote measurements included atmospheric column density measurements at a ground truth site using a van-mounted infrared Fourier spectrometer; continuous ground level gas chromatographic measurements; and chromatographic data from atmospheric grab samples collected by aircraft and at ground locations. The instruments and sampling techniques used in the experiment are described in detail.

  7. How well do stomatal conductance models perform on closing plant carbon budgets? A test using seedlings grown under current and elevated air temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Way, Danielle A.; Oren, Ram; Kim, Hyun-Seok; Katul, Gabriel G.

    2011-12-01

    Future carbon and water fluxes within terrestrial ecosystems will be determined by how stomatal conductance (gs) responds to rising atmospheric CO2and air temperatures. While both short- and long-term CO2 effects on gs have been repeatedly studied, there are few studies on how gs acclimates to higher air temperatures. Six gs models were parameterized using leaf gas exchange data from black spruce (Picea mariana) seedlings grown from seed at ambient (22/16°C day/night) or elevated (30/24°C) air temperatures. Model performance was independently assessed by how well carbon gain from each model reproduced estimated carbon costs to close the seedlings' seasonal carbon budgets, a `long-term' indicator of success. A model holding a constant intercellular to ambient CO2ratio and the Ball-Berry model (based on stomatal responses to relative humidity) could not close the carbon balance for either treatment, while the Jarvis-Oren model (based on stomatal responses to vapor pressure deficit,D) and a model assuming a constant gs each closed the carbon balance for one treatment. Two models, both based on gs responses to D, performed best overall, estimating carbon uptake within 10% of carbon costs for both treatments: the Leuning model and a linear optimization model that maximizes carbon gain per unit water loss. Since gsresponses in the optimization model are not a priori assumed, this approach can be used in modeling land-atmosphere exchange of CO2 and water in future climates.

  8. Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes as anode and air-cathode in single chamber microbial fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amade, R.; Moreno, H. A.; Hussain, S.; Vila-Costa, M.; Bertran, E.

    2016-10-01

    Electrode optimization in microbial fuel cells is a key issue to improve the power output and cell performance. Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) grown on low cost stainless-steel mesh present an attractive approach to increase the cell performance while avoiding the use of expensive Pt-based materials. In comparison with non-aligned carbon nanotubes (NACNTs), VACNTs increase the oxygen reduction reaction taking place at the cathode by a factor of two. In addition, vertical alignment also increases the power density up to 2.5 times with respect to NACNTs. VACNTs grown at the anode can further improve the cell performance by increasing the electrode surface area and thus the electron transfer between bacteria and the electrode. The maximum power density obtained using VACNTs was 14 mW/m2 and 160 mV output voltage.

  9. Extraction and detection of pesticide residues from air filter inserts using supercritical carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Zemanian, T.S.; Robins, W.H.; Lee, R.N.; Wright, B.W.

    1994-10-01

    Trace quantities of airborne herbicide residues were collected on adsorbent bed cartridges and were subsequently extracted from the adsorbent using supercritical carbon dioxide. An apparatus was constructed to facilitate the extraction and recovery of the desired analytes. The resulting extracts were analyzed using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) or high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) techniques. Results are presented for a series of analytes representative of common commercial pesticides or herbicides.

  10. Cycling of sulfur in subduction zones: The geochemistry of sulfur in the Mariana Island Arc and back-arc trough

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alt, J.C.; Shanks, Wayne C.; Jackson, M.C.

    1993-01-01

    The sulfur contents and sulfur isotopic compositions of 24 glassy submarine volcanics from the Mariana Island Arc and back-arc Mariana Trough were determined in order to investigate the hypothesis that subducted seawater sulfur (??34S = 21???) is recycled through arc volcanism. Our results for sulfur are similar to those for subaerial arc volcanics: Mariana Arc glasses are enriched in 34S (??34S = up to 10.3???, mean = 3.8???) and depleted in S (20-290 ppm, mean = 100 ppm) relative to MORB (850 ppm S, ??34S = 0.1 ?? 0.5???). The back-arc trough basalts contain 200-930 ppm S and have ??34S values of 1.1 ?? 0.5???, which overlap those for the arc and MORB. The low sulfur contents of the arc and some of the trough glasses are attributed to (1) early loss of small amounts of sulfur through separation of immiscible sulfide and (2) later vapor-melt equilibrium control of sulfur contents and loss of sulfur in a vapor phase from sulfide-undersaturated melts near the minimum in sulfur solubility at f{hook}O2 ??? NNO (nickel-nickel oxide). Although these processes removed sulfur from the melts their effects on the sulfur isotopic compositions of the melts were minimal. Positive trends of ??34S with 87Sr 86Sr, LILE and LREE contents of the arc volcanics are consistent with a metasomatic seawater sulfur component in the depleted sub-arc mantle source. The lack of a 34S-rich slab signature in the trough lavas may be attributed to equilibration of metasomatic fluid with mantle material along the longer pathway from the slab to the source of the trough volcanics. Sulfur is likely to have been transported into the mantle wedge by metasomatic fluid derived from subducted sediments and pore fluids. Gases extracted from vesicles in arc and back-arc samples are predominantly H2O, with minor CO2 and traces of H2S and SO2. CO2 in the arc and back-arc rocks has ??13C values of -2.1 to -13.1???, similar to MORB. These data suggest that degassing of CO2 could explain the slightly lower

  11. Back-arc with frontal-arc component origin of Triassic Karmutsen basalt, British Columbia, Canada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barker, F.; Sutherland, Brown A.; Budahn, J.R.; Plafker, G.

    1989-01-01

    The largely basaltic, ???4.5-6.2-km-thick, Middle to Upper Triassic Karmutsen Formation is a prominent part of the Wrangellian sequence. Twelve analyses of major and minor elements of representative samples of pillowed and massive basalt flows and sills from Queen Charlotte and Vancouver Islands are ferrotholeiites that show a range of 10.2-3.8% MgO (as normalized, H2O- and CO2-free) and related increases in TiO2 (1.0-2.5%), Zr (43-147 ppm) and Nb (5-16 ppm). Other elemental abundances are not related simply to MgO: distinct groupings are evident in Al2O3, Na2O and Cr, but considerable scatter is present in FeO* (FeO + 0.9Fe2O3) and CaO. Some of the variation is attributed to alteration during low-rank metamorphism or by seawater - including variation of Ba, Rb, Sr and Cu, but high-field-strength elements (Sc, Ti, Y, Zr and Nb) as well as Cr, Ni, Cu and rare-earth elements (REE's) were relatively immobile. REE's show chondrite-normalized patterns ranging from light-REE depleted to moderately light-REE enriched. On eleven discriminant plots these analyses fall largely into or across fields of within-plate basalt (WIP), normal or enriched mid-ocean-ridge tholeiite (MORB) and island-arc tholeiite (IAT). Karmutsen basalts are chemically identical to the stratigraphically equivalent Nikolai Greenstone of southern Alaska and Yukon Territory. These data and the fact that the Karmutsen rests on Sicker Group island-arc rocks of Paleozoic age suggest to us that: 1. (1) the basal arc, after minor carbonate-shale deposition, underwent near-axial back-arc rifting (as, e.g., the Mariana arc rifted at different times); 2. (2) the Karmutsen basalts were erupted along this rift or basin as "arc-rift" tholeiitite; and 3. (3) after subsequent deposition of carbonates and other rocks, and Jurassic magmatism, a large fragment of this basalt-sediment-covered island arc was accreted to North America as Wrangellia. The major- and minor-elemental abundances of Karmutsen basalt is modeled

  12. Amazon Rainforest Exchange of Carbon and Subcanopy Air Flow: Manaus LBA Site—A Complex Terrain Condition

    PubMed Central

    Tóta, Julio; Roy Fitzjarrald, David; da Silva Dias, Maria A. F.

    2012-01-01

    On the moderately complex terrain covered by dense tropical Amazon Rainforest (Reserva Biologica do Cuieiras—ZF2—02°36′17.1′′ S, 60°12′24.4′′ W), subcanopy horizontal and vertical gradients of the air temperature, CO2 concentration and wind field were measured for the dry and wet periods in 2006. We tested the hypothesis that horizontal drainage flow over this study area is significant and can affect the interpretation of the high carbon uptake rates reported by previous works at this site. A similar experimental design as the one by Tóta et al. (2008) was used with a network of wind, air temperature, and CO2 sensors above and below the forest canopy. A persistent and systematic subcanopy nighttime upslope (positive buoyancy) and daytime downslope (negative buoyancy) flow pattern on a moderately inclined slope (12%) was observed. The microcirculations observed above the canopy (38 m) over the sloping area during nighttime presents a downward motion indicating vertical convergence and correspondent horizontal divergence toward the valley area. During the daytime an inverse pattern was observed. The micro-circulations above the canopy were driven mainly by buoyancy balancing the pressure gradient forces. In the subcanopy space the microcirculations were also driven by the same physical mechanisms but probably with the stress forcing contribution. The results also indicated that the horizontal and vertical scalar gradients (e.g., CO2) were modulated by these micro-circulations above and below the canopy, suggesting that estimates of advection using previous experimental approaches are not appropriate due to the tridimensional nature of the vertical and horizontal transport locally. This work also indicates that carbon budget from tower-based measurement is not enough to close the system, and one needs to include horizontal and vertical advection transport of CO2 into those estimates. PMID:22619608

  13. Amazon rainforest exchange of carbon and subcanopy air flow: Manaus LBA site--a complex terrain condition.

    PubMed

    Tóta, Julio; Fitzjarrald, David Roy; da Silva Dias, Maria A F

    2012-01-01

    On the moderately complex terrain covered by dense tropical Amazon Rainforest (Reserva Biologica do Cuieiras--ZF2--02°36'17.1'' S, 60°12'24.4'' W), subcanopy horizontal and vertical gradients of the air temperature, CO(2) concentration and wind field were measured for the dry and wet periods in 2006. We tested the hypothesis that horizontal drainage flow over this study area is significant and can affect the interpretation of the high carbon uptake rates reported by previous works at this site. A similar experimental design as the one by Tóta et al. (2008) was used with a network of wind, air temperature, and CO(2) sensors above and below the forest canopy. A persistent and systematic subcanopy nighttime upslope (positive buoyancy) and daytime downslope (negative buoyancy) flow pattern on a moderately inclined slope (12%) was observed. The microcirculations observed above the canopy (38 m) over the sloping area during nighttime presents a downward motion indicating vertical convergence and correspondent horizontal divergence toward the valley area. During the daytime an inverse pattern was observed. The micro-circulations above the canopy were driven mainly by buoyancy balancing the pressure gradient forces. In the subcanopy space the microcirculations were also driven by the same physical mechanisms but probably with the stress forcing contribution. The results also indicated that the horizontal and vertical scalar gradients (e.g., CO(2)) were modulated by these micro-circulations above and below the canopy, suggesting that estimates of advection using previous experimental approaches are not appropriate due to the tridimensional nature of the vertical and horizontal transport locally. This work also indicates that carbon budget from tower-based measurement is not enough to close the system, and one needs to include horizontal and vertical advection transport of CO(2) into those estimates.

  14. Arc jet diagnostics tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willey, Ronald J.

    1989-01-01

    Two objectives were addressed during a 10 week 1988 NASA/ASEE summer faculty fellowship at the Johnson Space Center Atmospheric Reentry Materials Structures Evaluation Facility (ARMSEF). These objectives were the evaluation of mass spectrometry for the measurement of atomic and molecular species in an arc jet environment, and the determination of atomic recombination coefficients for reaction cured glass (RCG) coated high temperature surface insulation (HRSI) materials subjected to simulated reentry conditions. Evaluation of mass spectrometry for the measurement of atomic and molecular species provided some of the first measurements of point compositions in arc jet tunnel environments. A major objective of this project centered around the sampling residence time. A three staged vacuum sampling system pulled the molecules and atoms from the arc jet to a quadrupole ionization mass spectrometer in 400 milliseconds. Conditions investigated included a composition survey across the nozzle exit at 3 cm z-distance from the nozzle exit for 3 different currents. Also, a point composition survey was taken around a shock created by the presence of a blunt body.

  15. Integrated Testing of a Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly and a Temperature-Swing Adsorption Compressor for Closed-Loop Air Revitalization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knox, J. C.; Mulloth, Lila; Frederick, Kenneth; Affleck, Dave

    2003-01-01

    Accumulation and subsequent compression of carbon dioxide that is removed from space cabin are two important processes involved in a closed-loop air revitalization scheme of the International Space Station (ISS). The carbon dioxide removal assembly (CDRA) of ISS currently operates in an open loop mode without a compressor. This paper describes the integrated test results of a flight-like CDRA and a temperature-swing adsorption compressor (TSAC) for carbon dioxide removal and compression. The paper provides details of the TSAC operation at various CO2 loadings and corresponding performance of CDRA.

  16. Carbon dioxide versus room air insufflation during balloon-assisted enteroscopy: A systematic review with meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shiani, Ashok; Lipka, Seth; Lai, Andrew; Rodriguez, Andrea C.; Andrade, Christian M.; Kumar, Ambuj; Brady, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    Background and study aims Carbon dioxide (CO2) insufflation has been suggested to be an ideal alternative to room air insufflation to reduce trapped air within the bowel lumen after balloon assisted enteroscopy (BAE). We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to assess the safety and efficacy of utilizing CO2 insufflation as compared to room air during BAE. Patients and methods The primary outcome is mean change in visual analog scale (VAS; 10 cm) at 1, 3, and 6 hours to assess pain. Secondary outcomes include insertion depth (anterograde or retrograde), adverse events, total enteroscopy rate, diagnostic yield, mean anesthetic dosage, and PaCO2 at procedure completion. We searched MEDLINE and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) from inception until May 2015. Multiple independent extractions were performed, the process was executed as per the standards of the Cochrane collaboration. Results Four randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were included in the meta-analysis. VAS at 6 hours favored CO2 over room air (MD 0.13; 95 % CI 0.01, 0.25; p = 0.03). Anterograde insertion depth (cm) was improved in the CO2 group (MD, 58.2; 95 % CI 17.17, 99.23; p = 0.005), with an improvement in total enteroscopy rate in the CO2 group (RR 1.91; 95 % CI 1.20, 3.06; p = 0.007). Mean dose of propofol (mg) favored CO2 compared to air (MD, – 70.53; 95 % CI – 115.07, – 25.98; P = 0.002). There were no differences in adverse events in either group. Conclusions Despite the ability of CO2 to improve insertion depth and decrease amount of anesthesia required, further randomized control trials are needed to determine the agent of choice for insufflation in balloon assisted enteroscopy. PMID:28191497

  17. Acute Respiratory Inflammation in Children and Black Carbon in Ambient Air before and during the 2008 Beijing Olympics

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Weiwei; Huang, Wei; Hu, Min; Brunekreef, Bert; Zhang, Yuanhang; Liu, Xingang; Cheng, Hong; Gehring, Ulrike; Li, Chengcai; Tang, Xiaoyan

    2011-01-01

    Background: Epidemiologic evidence for a causative association between black carbon (BC) and health outcomes is limited. Objectives: We estimated associations and exposure–response relationships between acute respiratory inflammation in schoolchildren and concentrations of BC and particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter of ≤ 2.5 μm (PM2.5) in ambient air before and during the air pollution intervention for the 2008 Beijing Olympics. Methods: We measured exhaled nitric oxide (eNO) as an acute respiratory inflammation biomarker and hourly mean air pollutant concentrations to estimate BC and PM2.5 exposure. We used 1,581 valid observations of 36 subjects over five visits in 2 years to estimate associations of eNO with BC and PM2.5 according to generalized estimating equations with polynomial distributed-lag models, controlling for body mass index, asthma, temperature, and relative humidity. We also assessed the relative importance of BC and PM2.5 with two-pollutant models. Results: Air pollution concentrations and eNO were clearly lower during the 2008 Olympics. BC and PM2.5 concentrations averaged over 0–24 hr were strongly associated with eNO, which increased by 16.6% [95% confidence interval (CI), 14.1–19.2%] and 18.7% (95% CI, 15.0–22.5%) per interquartile range (IQR) increase in BC (4.0 μg/m3) and PM2.5 (149 μg/m3), respectively. In the two-pollutant model, estimated effects of BC were robust, but associations between PM2.5 and eNO decreased with adjustment for BC. We found that eNO was associated with IQR increases in hourly BC concentrations up to 10 hr after exposure, consistent with effects primarily in the first hours after exposure. Conclusions: Recent exposure to BC was associated with acute respiratory inflammation in schoolchildren in Beijing. Lower air pollution levels during the 2008 Olympics also were associated with reduced eNO. PMID:21642045

  18. Arc reattachment driven by a turbulent boundary layer: implications for the sweeping of lightning arcs along aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerra-Garcia, C.; Nguyen, N. C.; Peraire, J.; Martinez-Sanchez, M.

    2016-09-01

    A lightning channel attached to an aircraft in flight will be swept along the aircraft’s surface in response to the relative velocity between the arc’s root (attached to a moving electrode) and the bulk of the arc, which is stationary with respect to the air. During this process, the reattachment of the arc to new locations often occurs. The detailed description of this swept stroke is still at an early stage of research, and it entails the interaction between an electrical arc and the flow boundary layer. In this paper we examine the implications of the structure of the boundary layer for the arc sweeping and reattachment process by considering different velocity profiles, both for laminar and turbulent flow, as well as a high fidelity description, using large eddy simulation, of transitional flow over an airfoil. It is found that the local velocity fluctuations in a turbulent flow may be important contributors to the reattachment of the arc, through a combination of an increased potential drop along the arc and local approaches of the arc to the surface. Specific flow features, such as the presence of a laminar recirculation bubble, can also contribute to the possibility of reattachment.

  19. Extraction of semivolatile organic compounds from high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters by supercritical carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Schilling, J.B.

    1997-09-01

    Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) using unmodified carbon dioxide has been explored as an alternative method for the extraction of semivolatile organic compounds from high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters. HEPA filters provide the final stage of containment on many exhaust systems in US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities by preventing the escape of chemical and radioactive materials entrained in the exhausted air. The efficiency of the filters is tested by the manufacturer and DOE using dioctylphthalate (DOP), a substance regulated by the US Environmental Protection Agency under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. Therefore, the filters must be analyzed for semivolatile organics before disposal. Ninety-eight acid, base, and neutral semivolatile organics were spiked onto blank HEPA material and extracted using SFE, Soxhlet, automated Soxhlet, and sonication techniques. The SFE conditions were optimized using a Dionex SFE-703 instrument. Average recoveries for the 98 semivolatile compounds are 82.7% for Soxhlet, 74.0% for sonication, 70.2% for SFE, and 62.9% for Soxtec. Supercritical fluid extraction reduces the extraction solvent volume to 10--15 mL, a factor of 20--30 less than Soxhlet and more than 5 times less than Soxtec and sonication. Extraction times of 30--45 min are used compared to 16--18 h for Soxhlet extraction.

  20. Nickel cobalt oxide/carbon nanotubes hybrid as a high-performance electrocatalyst for metal/air battery.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Qiao, Hang; Wang, Haiyan; Zhou, Nan; Chen, Jiajie; Tang, Yougen; Li, Jingsha; Huang, Chenghuan

    2014-09-07

    High-performance, low cost catalyst for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) remains a big challenge. Herein, nanostructured NiCo2O4/CNTs hybrid was proposed as a high-performance catalyst for metal/air battery for the first time. The well-formed NiCo2O4/CNTs hybrid was studied by steady-state linear polarization curves and galvanostatic discharge curves in comparison with CNTs-free NiCo2O4 and commercial carbon-supported Pt. Because of the synergistic effect, NiCo2O4/CNTs hybrid exhibited significant improvement of catalytic performance in comparison with NiCo2O4 or CNTs alone, even outperforming Pt/C hybrid in ORR process. In addition, the benefits of Ni incorporation were demonstrated by the improved catalytic performance of NiCo2O4/CNTs compared to Co3O4/CNTs, which should be attributed to improved electrical conductivity and new, highly efficient, active sites created by Ni cation incorporation into the spinel structure. NiCo2O4/CNTs hybrid could be used as a promising catalyst for high power metal/air battery.

  1. Microwave-swing adsorption to capture and recover vapors from air streams with activated carbon fiber cloth.

    PubMed

    Hashisho, Zaher; Rood, Mark; Botich, Leon

    2005-09-01

    Adsorption with regeneration is a desirable means to control the emissions of organic vapors such as hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from air streams as it allows for capture, recovery, and reuse of those VOCs/HAPS. Integration of activated-carbon fiber-cloth (ACFC) adsorbent with microwave regeneration provides promise as a new adsorption/ regeneration technology. This research investigates the feasibility of using microwaves to regenerate ACFC as part of a process for capture and recovery of organic vapors from gas streams. A bench-scale fixed-bed microwave-swing adsorption (MSA) system was built and tested for adsorption of water vapor, methyl ethyl ketone (MEK), and tetrachloroethylene (PERC) from an airstream and then recovery of those vapors with microwave regeneration. The electromagnetic heating behavior of dry and vapor-saturated ACFC was also characterized. The MSA system successfully adsorbed organic vapors from the airstreams, allowed for rapid regeneration of the ACFC cartridge, and recovered the water and organic vapors as liquids.

  2. Removal of metal catalyst in multi-walled carbon nanotubes with combination of air and hydrogen annealing followed by acid treatment.

    PubMed

    Li, Quanlong; Yuan, Dongxing; Guan, Bin; Lin, Qingmei; Wang, Xuefeng

    2008-11-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) prepared by the decomposition of CH4 on a Ni-MgO catalyst were treated with air and hydrogen annealing, and the combination of air and hydrogen annealing, respectively, followed by acid reflux. The treated MWCNTs were characterized by the techniques of transmission electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis and flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The results showed that hydrogen annealed MWCNTs were more air stable than air annealed ones. Followed by acid treatment, the combination of air and hydrogen annealing was more efficient than either air annealing or hydrogen annealing for the removal of catalyst in MWCNTs. For the treatment with 2 h of hydrogen annealing followed by 2 h of air annealing, the catalyst Ni remained in the purified sample was 10.8 microg/g, and the yield rate was 82.3%. With 2 h of air annealing followed by 2 h of hydrogen annealing, the data were 5.8 microg/g and 61.9%, respectively. The different functions of air and hydrogen during annealing were discussed.

  3. Routine preparation of air-dried negatively stained and unstained specimens on holey carbon support films: a review of applications.

    PubMed

    Harris, J Robin; Scheffler, Dirk

    2002-01-01

    Several representative examples are given of the successful application of negative staining across the holes of holey carbon support films using 5% (w/v) ammonium molybdate solution containing trehalose. The inclusion of 0.1% (w/v) trehalose is considered to be most satisfactory, although good data have also been obtained in the presence of 0.01 and 1.0% (w/v) trehalose. The examples given fall into the following groups: protein molecules in the absence of polyethylene glycol (PEG), protein molecules in the presence of PEG (Mr 1000), lipoproteins, lipids and membranes, filaments and tubules, viruses in the absence of PEG, viruses in the presence of PEG, aqueous polymer solutions, and finally for comparison purposes, four unstained samples studied in the presence of trehalose alone. In all these cases, and many others not documented here, successful spreading of the sample across holes has been achieved, with the sample embedded within a thin film of air-dried ammonium molybdate+trehalose. These specimens can be rapidly produced and provide an alternative to negatively stained specimens on carbon support films. Specimen stability in the electron bean is good and such specimens can usually generate superior negatively stained TEM images without flattening and adsorption artefacts. The formation of 2-D arrays/crystals of protein molecules and viruses, suspended across holes in the presence of ammonium molbybdate+trehalose, and trehalose alone, is also demonstrated.

  4. Emission factors of air pollutants from CNG-gasoline bi-fuel vehicles: Part I. Black carbon.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Xing, Zhenyu; Xu, Hui; Du, Ke

    2016-12-01

    Compressed natural gas (CNG) is considered to be a "cleaner" fuel compared to other fossil fuels. Therefore, it is used as an alternative fuel in motor vehicles to reduce emissions of air pollutants in transportation. To quantify "how clean" burning CNG is compared to burning gasoline, quantification of pollutant emissions under the same driving conditions for motor vehicles with different fuels is needed. In this study, a fleet of bi-fuel vehicles was selected to measure the emissions of black carbon (BC), carbon monoxide (CO), hydrocarbon (HC) and nitrogen oxide (NOx) for driving in CNG mode and gasoline mode respectively under the same set of constant speeds and accelerations. Comparison of emission factors (EFs) for the vehicles burning CNG and gasoline are discussed. This part of the paper series reports BC EFs for bi-fuel vehicles driving on the real road, which were measured using an in situ method. Our results show that burning CNG will lead to 54%-83% reduction in BC emissions per kilometer, depending on actual driving conditions. These comparisons show that CNG is a cleaner fuel than gasoline for motor vehicles in terms of BC emissions and provide a viable option for reducing BC emissions cause by transportation.

  5. An inorganic carbon transport system responsible for acclimation specific to air levels of CO2 in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yingjun; Spalding, Martin H

    2006-06-27

    Many photosynthetic microorganisms acclimate to CO(2) limited environments by induction and operation of CO(2)-concentrating mechanisms (CCMs). Despite their central role in CCM function, inorganic carbon (Ci) transport systems never have been identified in eukaryotic photosynthetic organisms. In the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, a mutant, pmp1, was described in 1983 with deficiencies in Ci transport, and a Pmp1 protein-associated Ci uptake system has been proposed to be responsible for Ci uptake in low CO(2) (air level)-acclimated cells. However, even though pmp1 represents the only clear genetic link to Ci transport in microalgae and is one of only a very few mutants directly affecting the CCM itself, the identity of Pmp1 has remained unknown. Physiological analyses indicate that C. reinhardtii possesses multiple Ci transport systems responsible for acclimation to different levels of limiting CO(2) and that the Pmp1-associated transport system is required specifically for low (air level) CO(2) acclimation. In the current study, we identified and characterized a pmp1 allelic mutant, air dier 1 (ad1) that, like pmp1, cannot grow in low CO(2) (350 ppm) but can grow either in high CO(2) (5% CO(2)) or in very low CO(2) (<200 ppm). Molecular analyses revealed that the Ad1/Pmp1 protein is encoded by LciB, a gene previously identified as a CO(2)-responsive gene. LciB and three related genes in C. reinhardtii compose a unique gene family that encode four closely related, apparently soluble plastid proteins with no clearly identifiable conserved motifs.

  6. Simple and efficient purification of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dettlaff-Weglikowska, U.; Roth, S.

    2001-11-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) produced by arc-discharge and laser ablation were purified by selective oxidation in air at 350°C and subsequent HCl treatment at 120°C. Raw soot and purified samples were analyzed with X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), chemical analysis and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The optimized purification temperature of SWNTs in air, 350°C, has been determined from TGA curves. Repetition of the oxidation and acid treatment, larger than 95 wt.% purity of SWNTs has been obtained.

  7. NAAQS (National Ambient Air Quality Standards) exposure model (NEM) applied to carbon monoxide: addendum. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, R.A.; Johnson, T.

    1985-04-01

    The report describes the results obtained when the carbon monoxide (CO) version of NEM is used to estimate national exposures associated with attaining the current CO standard (9 ppm, one observed exceedance). This standard was not analyzed in the basic report of the same title (EPA-450/5-83-003). NEM is a simulation model that simulates the intersection of a population with pollutant concentrations over space and time to estimate exposures that would obtain if various alternative NAAQs were just met. Estimates are presented for adults with cardiovascular disease in four urban study areas and for a nationwide extrapolation.

  8. Inverse air pollution modelling of urban-scale carbon monoxide emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulholland, Michael; Seinfeld, John H.

    A new recursive least-squares technique is developed to give spatial and temporal definition to the adjustments necessary in an emission inventory, to fit ambient concentration observations optimally. The CIT Photochemical Airshed Model is used to compute CO concentration distributions arising from 29 separate source domains in the South Coast Air Basin of California. A Kalman filter integrated within the model matches predictions with CO observations at 27 locations by superposing the computed distributions with optimal weighting factors. The filter structure allows control of the extent to which adjusted emission inventories are allowed to deviate from a base-case, which already has high spatial and temporal definition. Applied to the Southern California Air Quality Study, 27-29 August 1987, strong temporal dependence was noted in the necessary adjustment to the available CO emission inventory, with a peak factor of 3.0 at midday on weekdays. The spatial resolution of the technique revealed new high-emission zones for CO in a corridor between Pasadena and San Bernardino, in the Riverside-Corona area, and along the Pacific coast on Saturday. In this first such application to an urban environment, some success was also achieved in correcting the phasing of emissions for errors arising from the neglect of source-receptor lags in the inverse modelling technique.

  9. Controlling Arc Length in Plasma Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iceland, W. F.

    1986-01-01

    Circuit maintains arc length on irregularly shaped workpieces. Length of plasma arc continuously adjusted by control circuit to maintain commanded value. After pilot arc is established, contactor closed and transfers arc to workpiece. Control circuit then half-wave rectifies ac arc voltage to produce dc control signal proportional to arc length. Circuit added to plasma arc welding machines with few wiring changes. Welds made with circuit cleaner and require less rework than welds made without it. Beads smooth and free of inclusions.

  10. Geochemistry: A piece of the deep carbon puzzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, Craig E.

    2014-05-01

    Carbon loss from subducting slabs is thought to be insufficient to balance carbon dioxide emissions at arc volcanoes. Analyses of ancient subducted rocks in Greece suggest that fluid dissolution of slab carbonate can help solve this carbon-cycle conundrum.

  11. The Development of Models for Carbon Dioxide Reduction Technologies for Spacecraft Air Revitalization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swickrath, Michael J.; Anderson, Molly

    2012-01-01

    Through the respiration process, humans consume oxygen (O2) while producing carbon dioxide (CO2) and water (H2O) as byproducts. For long term space exploration, CO2 concentration in the atmosphere must be managed to prevent hypercapnia. Moreover, CO2 can be used as a source of oxygen through chemical reduction serving to minimize the amount of oxygen required at launch. Reduction can be achieved through a number of techniques. NASA is currently exploring the Sabatier reaction, the Bosch reaction, and co- electrolysis of CO2 and H2O for this process. Proof-of-concept experiments and prototype units for all three processes have proven capable of returning useful commodities for space exploration. All three techniques have demonstrated the capacity to reduce CO2 in the laboratory, yet there is interest in understanding how all three techniques would perform at a system level within a spacecraft. Consequently, there is an impetus to develop predictive models for these processes that can be readily rescaled and integrated into larger system models. Such analysis tools provide the ability to evaluate each technique on a comparable basis with respect to processing rates. This manuscript describes the current models for the carbon dioxide reduction processes under parallel developmental efforts. Comparison to experimental data is provided were available for verification purposes.

  12. The Development of Models for Carbon Dioxide Reduction Technologies for Spacecraft Air Revitalization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swickrath, Michael J.; Anderson, Molly

    2011-01-01

    Through the respiration process, humans consume oxygen (O2) while producing carbon dioxide (CO2) and water (H2O) as byproducts. For long term space exploration, CO2 concentration in the atmosphere must be managed to prevent hypercapnia. Moreover, CO2 can be used as a source of oxygen through chemical reduction serving to minimize the amount of oxygen required at launch. Reduction can be achieved through a number of techniques. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is currently exploring the Sabatier reaction, the Bosch reaction, and co-electrolysis of CO2 and H2O for this process. Proof-of-concept experiments and prototype units for all three processes have proven capable of returning useful commodities for space exploration. While all three techniques have demonstrated the capacity to reduce CO2 in the laboratory, there is interest in understanding how all three techniques would perform at a system-level within a spacecraft. Consequently, there is an impetus to develop predictive models for these processes that can be readily re-scaled and integrated into larger system models. Such analysis tools provide the ability to evaluate each technique on a comparable basis with respect to processing rates. This manuscript describes the current models for the carbon dioxide reduction processes under parallel developmental e orts. Comparison to experimental data is provided were available for veri cation purposes.

  13. Models for Jupiter's decametric arcs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warwick, J. W.

    1981-01-01

    Arc-shaped structures that dominate Jupiter's decametric emission are discussed in terms of a magnetic fine structure. The sequence of arcs manifest the occurence of widespread fine structures similar to the white ovals on Jupiter's visible surface. An arc concave toward increasing time occurs at the east limb passage, and an arc convex occurs at the west limb passage, which is consistent with the early source producing vertex early arcs, and the late source producing vertex late arcs. Due to the geometry of the Io plasma torus (IPT) which is arranged so that Io skims the northern surface of the IPT, for any connection between Io and Jupiter's surface that involves Alfven waves, the propagation time, the refraction and the directional defocusing of these waves must be strongly influenced by the amount of Alfven wave path length between the instantaneous position of Io and the surface of the IPT.

  14. Synthesis of free-standing carbon nanohybrid by directly growing carbon nanotubes on air-sprayed graphene oxide paper and its application in supercapacitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Li; Jiang, Wenchao; Yuan, Yang; Goh, Kunli; Yu, Dingshan; Wang, Liang; Chen, Yuan

    2015-04-01

    We report the synthesis of a free-standing two dimensional carbon nanotube (CNT)-reduced graphene oxide (rGO) hybrid by directly growing CNTs on air-sprayed GO paper. As a result of the good integration between CNTs and thermally reduced GO film during chemical vapor deposition, excellent electrical conductivity (2.6×104 S/m), mechanical flexibility (electrical resistance only increases 1.1% after bent to 90° for 500 times) and a relatively large surface area (335.3 m2/g) are achieved. Two-electrode supercapacitor assembled using the CNT-rGO hybrids in ionic liquid electrolyte (1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate) shows excellent stability upon 500 bending cycles with the gravimetric energy density measuring 23.7 Wh/kg and a power density of 2.0 kW/kg. Furthermore, it shows an impedance phase angle of -64.4° at a frequency of 120 Hz, suggesting good potentials for 120 Hz alternating current line filtering applications.

  15. Sea-air carbon dioxide fluxes along 35°S in the South Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lencina-Avila, J. M.; Ito, R. G.; Garcia, C. A. E.; Tavano, V. M.

    2016-09-01

    The oceans play an important role in absorbing a significant fraction of the atmospheric CO2 surplus, but there are still uncertainties concerning several open ocean regions, such as the under-sampled South Atlantic Ocean. This study assessed the net sea-air CO2 fluxes and distribution of sea-surface CO2 fugacity (f C O2sw) along the 35°S latitude in the South Atlantic, during 2011 spring and early summer periods. Underway CO2 molar fraction, temperature, salinity and dissolved oxygen measurements were taken continuously from South American to South African continental shelves. Values of both satellite and discrete in situ chlorophyll-a concentration along the ship's track were used as ancillary data. Both f C O2sw and difference in sea-air fugacity (ΔfCO2) showed high variability along the cruise track, with higher values found on the continental shelf and slope regions. All ΔfCO2 values were negative, implying that a sinking process was occurring during the cruise period, with an average net CO2 flux of -3.1±2.2 mmol CO2 m-2 day-1 (using Wanninkhof, 1992). Physical variables were the main drivers of f C O2sw variability in South American continental shelf and open ocean regions, while the biological factor dominated the South African continental shelf. Algorithms for estimating fCO2 and temperature-normalized fCO2 were developed and applied separately to the three defined sub-regions: the South American shelf, the open ocean and the South African continental shelf, with the regional temperature-normalized fCO2 models showing better results.

  16. Electroluminescence from individual air-suspended carbon nanotubes within split-gate structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higashide, N.; Uda, T.; Yoshida, M.; Ishii, A.; Kato, Y. K.

    Electrically induced light emission from chirality-identified single-walled carbon nanotubes are investigated by utilizing split-gate field-effect devices fabricated on silicon-on-insulator substrates. We begin by etching trenches through the top silicon layer into the buried oxide, and the silicon layer is thermally oxidized for use as local gates. We partially remove the oxide and form gate electrodes, then contacts for nanotubes are deposited on both sides of the trench. Catalyst particles are placed on the contacts, and nanotubes are grown over the trench by chemical vapor deposition. We use photoluminescence microscopy to locate the nanotubes and perform excitation spectroscopy to identify their chirality. Gate-induced photoluminescence quenching is used to confirm carrier doping, and electroluminescence intensity is investigated as a function of the split-gate and bias voltages. Work supported by JSPS (KAKENHI 24340066, 26610080), MEXT (Photon Frontier Network Program, Nanotechnology Platform), Canon Foundation, and Asahi Glass Foundation.

  17. Joan of Arc.

    PubMed

    Foote-Smith, E; Bayne, L

    1991-01-01

    For centuries, romantics have praised and historians and scientists debated the mystery of Joan of Arc's exceptional achievements. How could an uneducated farmer's daughter, raised in harsh isolation in a remote village in medieval France, have found the strength and resolution to alter the course of history? Hypotheses have ranged from miraculous intervention to creative psychopathy. We suggest, based on her own words and the contemporary descriptions of observers, that the source of her visions and convictions was in part ecstatic epileptic auras and that she joins the host of creative religious thinkers suspected or known to have epilepsy, from St. Paul and Mohammed to Dostoevsky, who have changed western civilization.

  18. APPARATUS FOR ARC WELDING

    DOEpatents

    Lingafelter, J.W.

    1960-04-01

    An apparatus is described in which a welding arc created between an annular electrode and a workpiece moves under the influence of an electromagnetic field about the electrode in a closed or annular path. This mode of welding is specially suited to the enclosing of nuclear-fuel slugs in a protective casing. For example, a uranium slug is placed in an aluminum can, and an aluminum closure is welded to the open end of the can along a closed or annular path conforming to the periphery of the end closure.

  19. Impact of California's Air Pollution Laws on Black Carbon and their Implications for Direct Radiative Forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahadur, R.; Feng, Y.; Russell, L. M.; Ramanathan, V.

    2010-12-01

    We examine the temporal and the spatial trends in the concentrations of black carbon (BC) - recorded by the IMPROVE monitoring network for the past 20 years - in California. Annual average BC concentrations in California have decreased by about 50% from 0.46 μg m-3 in 1989 to 0.24 μgm-3 in 2008 compared to a corresponding reductions in diesel BC emissions (also about 50%) from a peak of 0.013 Tg Yr-1 in 1990 to 0.006 Tg Yr-1 by 2008. We attribute the observed negative trends to the deployment of diesel particulate filters. Our conclusion that the reduction in diesel emissions is the primary cause of the observed BC reduction is also substantiated by a significant decrease in the ratio of BC to non-BC aerosols. The absorption efficiency of aerosols at visible wavelengths - determined from the observed scattering coefficient and the observed BC - also decreased by about 50% leading to a model-inferred negative direct radiative forcing (a cooling effect) of -1.4 Wm-2 (±60%) over California. Figure 1 (a) Annual means of measured Black Carbon (left axis) and BC fossil fuel emissions (right axis) in California from 1985 to 2008. Error bars correspond to standard deviation between measurements at each station. Dashed lines indicate a linear fit. Aerosol measurements from the IMPROVE network, emission inventories from (1) CARB, (2) [Ito and Penner, 2005] (b) Annual means of BC measured in Southern (South of 35 N), Northern (North of 38 N), and Central California (c) Annual means of measured Sulfate, Nitrate, and OC from IMPROVE network.

  20. Arcing on dc power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moores, Greg; Heller, R. P.; Sutanto, Surja; Dugal-Whitehead, Norma R.

    1992-01-01

    Unexpected and undesirable arcing on dc power systems can produce hazardous situations aboard space flights. The potential for fire and shock might exist in a situation where there is a broken conductor, a loose power connection, or a break in the insulation of the power cable. Such arcing has been found to be reproducible in a laboratory environment. Arcing tests show that the phenomena can last for several seconds and yet be undetectable by present protection schemes used in classical power relaying and remote power controller applications. This paper characterizes the arcing phenomena and suggests future research that is needed.

  1. Contrasting sedimentary processes along a convergent margin: the Lesser Antilles arc system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picard, Michel; Schneider, Jean-Luc; Boudon, Georges

    2006-12-01

    Sedimentation processes occurring in an active convergent setting are well illustrated in the Lesser Antilles island arc. The margin is related to westward subduction of the North and/or the South America plates beneath the Caribbean plate. From east to west, the arc can be subdivided into several tectono-sedimentary depositional domains: the accretionary prism, the fore-arc basin, the arc platform and inter-arc basin, and the Grenada back-arc basin. The Grenada back-arc basin, the fore-arc basin (Tobago Trough) and the accretionary prism on the east side of the volcanic arc constitute traps for particles derived from the arc platform and the South American continent. The arc is volcanically active, and provides large volumes of volcaniclastic sediments which accumulate mainly in the Grenada basin by volcaniclastic gravity flows (volcanic debris avalanches, debris flows, turbiditic flows) and minor amounts by fallout. By contrast, the eastern side of the margin is fed by ash fallout and minor volcaniclastic turbidites. In this area, the dominant component of the sediments is pelagic in origin, or derived from South America (siliciclastic turbidites). Insular shelves are the locations of carbonate sedimentation, such as large platforms which develop in the Limestone Caribbees in the northern part of the margin. Reworking of carbonate material by turbidity currents also delivers lesser amounts to eastern basins of the margin. This contrasting sedimentation on both sides of the arc platform along the margin is controlled by several interacting factors including basin morphology, volcanic productivity, wind and deep-sea current patterns, and sea-level changes. Basin morphology appears to be the most dominant factor. The western slopes of the arc platform are steeper than the eastern ones, thus favouring gravity flow processes.

  2. How well do stomatal conductance models perform on closing plant carbon budgets? A test using seedlings grown under current and elevated air temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Way, D.; Oren, R.; Kim, H.; Katul, G. G.

    2011-12-01

    Future carbon and water fluxes within terrestrial ecosystems will be determined by how stomatal conductance (gs) responds to rising atmospheric CO2 and air temperatures. While both short- and long-term CO2 effects on gs have been repeatedly studied, there are few studies on how gs acclimates to higher air temperatures. Six gs models were parameterized using leaf gas exchange data from black spruce (Picea mariana) seedlings grown from seed at ambient (22/16 °C day/night) or elevated (30/24 °C) temperatures. Model performance was independently assessed by how well carbon gain from each model reproduced estimated carbon costs to close the seedlings' seasonal carbon budgets, an indicator of the model success at time scales commensurate with biomass changes. A model holding a constant intercellular to ambient CO2 concentration ratio and the Ball-Berry model (based on stomatal responses to relative humidity) could not close the carbon balance for either treatment, while a so-called Jarvis-Oren model (based on stomatal responses to vapor pressure deficit, D) and a model assuming a constant gs each closed the carbon balance for one temperature treatment. Two models, both based on gs responses to D, performed best overall, estimating carbon uptake within 10% of carbon costs for both treatments: the Leuning model (a semi-empirical model that links gs to photosynthetic rates) and a linear optimization model that maximizes carbon gain per unit water loss. Since gs responses in the linear optimization model are not a priori assumed, this approach may be advantageous in modeling gs responses to temperature, especially in future climates.

  3. Environmental Influence of Gravity and Pressure on Arc Tracking of Insulated Wires Investigated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Momentary short-circuit arcs between a defective polyimide-insulated wire and another conductor may thermally char (pyrolize) the insulating material. The charred polyimide, being conductive, can sustain the short-circuit arc, which may propagate along the wire through continuous pyrolization of the polyimide insulation (arc tracking). If the arcing wire is part of a multiple-wire bundle, the polyimide insulation of other wires within the bundle may become thermally charred and start arc tracking also (flash over). Such arc tracking can lead to complete failure of an entire wire bundle, causing other critical spacecraft or aircraft failures. Unfortunately, all tested candidate wire insulations for aerospace vehicles were susceptible to arc tracking. Therefore, a test procedure was designed at the NASA Lewis Research Center to select the insulation type least susceptible to arc tracking. This test procedure addresses the following three areas of concern: (1) probability of initiation, (2) probability of reinitiation (restrike), and (3) extent of arc tracking damage (propagation rate). Item 2 (restrike probability) is an issue if power can be terminated from and reapplied to the arcing wire (by a switch, fuse, or resettable circuit breaker). The degree of damage from an arcing event (item 3) refers to how easily the arc chars nearby insulation and propagates along the wire pair. Ease of nearby insulation charring can be determined by measuring the rate of arc propagation. Insulation that chars easily will propagate the arc faster than insulation that does not char very easily. A popular polyimide insulated wire for aerospace vehicles, MIL-W-81381, was tested to determine a degree of damage from an arcing event (item 3) in the following three environments: (1) microgravity with air at 1-atm pressure, (2) 1g with air at 1 atm, and (3) 1g within a 10^-6 Torr vacuum. The microgravity 1-atm air was the harshest environment, with respect to the rate of damage of arc

  4. Optical diagnostics of a gliding arc.

    PubMed

    Sun, Z W; Zhu, J J; Li, Z S; Aldén, M; Leipold, F; Salewski, M; Kusano, Y

    2013-03-11

    Dynamic processes in a gliding arc plasma generated between two diverging electrodes in ambient air driven by 31.25 kHz AC voltage were investigated using spatially and temporally resolved optical techniques. The life cycles of the gliding arc were tracked in fast movies using a high-speed camera with framing rates of tens to hundreds of kHz, showing details of ignition, motion, pulsation, short-cutting, and extinction of the plasma column. The ignition of a new discharge occurs before the extinction of the previous discharge. The developed, moving plasma column often short-cuts its current path triggered by Townsend breakdown between the two legs of the gliding arc. The emission from the plasma column is shown to pulsate at a frequency of 62.5 kHz, i.e., twice the frequency of the AC power supply. Optical emission spectra of the plasma radiation show the presence of excited N2, NO and OH radicals generated in the plasma and the dependence of their relative intensities on both the distance relative to the electrodes and the phase of the driving AC power. Planar laser-induced fluorescence of the ground-state OH radicals shows high intensity outside the plasma column rather than in the center suggesting that ground-state OH is not formed in the plasma column but in its vicinity.

  5. Modify surfaces with ions and arcs

    SciTech Connect

    Banks, B.A. . Lewis Research Center)

    1993-12-01

    Ions, arcs, and atomic-oxygen techniques have been developed at NASA to texture metals, polymers, and biomaterials for a range of medical and industrial applications. NASA originally conducted research in the field of electron bombardment because the technology involves generation of high-velocity ions, which have the potential to produce much higher propellant exhaust velocities for spacecraft than chemical propulsion. As a consequence, considerable data were collected about the effects of ion beams on a wide range of materials. Based on this information, researchers designed specialized surface modification techniques such as ion beam sputter texturing, etching, and simultaneous deposition and etching. Arc-texturing technology was developed as a result of research on high-thermal-emittance radiators. In this process, an electric arc is formed between a carbon or silicon-carbide electrode and a moving metal surface, resulting in durable, microscopically rough surfaces that emit heat more efficiently than coated materials. Atomic-oxygen texturing is a by-product of studies about the effects of atomic oxygen on the surfaces of spacecraft. The purpose of the original research was to find coatings that could withstand atomic-oxygen attack, but it evolved into deliberate bombardment of polymeric materials to increase thermal emittance or reduce co-efficient of friction.

  6. Integrated primary flight display: the sky arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voulgaris, Theodore J.; Metalis, Sam A.; Mobley, R. S.

    1995-05-01

    Flight instrument interpretability has been a key piloting issue because it is directly related to operator performance and inversely related to operator error. To improve interpretability we have developed the Sky Arc, a new symbology initially developed for attitude control, particularly for a helmet-mounted display. It consists of an integrated set of graphic symbols which vary in a continuous, analog fashion with changing flight parameters. The Sky Arc currently integrates, pitch, roll, heading, air speed, and terrain avoidance. The display can be integrated into a head down display, a head up display, or a helmet mounted display. In this preliminary study the usability of the Sky Arc as an attitude indicator was compared to a conventional head-up display pitch ladder symbology. The test involved six test subject pilots and a medium-fidelity simulator. The pilots were asked to fully recover from a series of unusual attitude conditions that were presented on the simulator. The time taken to recover and the correctness of the recovery procedure served as the objective evaluation measures. A Likert-type rating scale and open-ended subject matter expert opinions served as the subjective measures of evaluation. To examine whether there was a relationship between usability of the attitude indicator and difficulty of the unusual attitude, the workload levels involved in performing the unusual attitude recoveries were grouped into three levels, low, medium, and high. At each workload level there were four conditions, for a total of 12 different conditions. Each pilot was asked to recovery twice from each condition, for a total of 24 unusual attitude recovery trials. The test trials were counterbalanced and displayed in a prearranged order. No differences due to difficulty of the unusual attitude were detected. Overall, the study revealed that the Sky Arc led to generally faster recoveries than did the standard display, as well as higher subjective preference ratings

  7. Electric arc welding gun

    DOEpatents

    Luttrell, Edward; Turner, Paul W.

    1978-01-01

    This invention relates to improved apparatus for arc welding an interior joint formed by intersecting tubular members. As an example, the invention is well suited for applications where many similar small-diameter vertical lines are to be welded to a long horizontal header. The improved apparatus includes an arc welding gun having a specially designed welding head which is not only very compact but also produces welds that are essentially free from rolled-over solidified metal. The welding head consists of the upper end of the barrel and a reversely extending electrode holder, or tip, which defines an acute angle with the barrel. As used in the above-mentioned example, the gun is positioned to extend upwardly through the vertical member and the joint to be welded, with its welding head disposed within the horizontal header. Depending on the design of the welding head, the barrel then is either rotated or revolved about the axis of the vertical member to cause the electrode to track the joint.

  8. Sustainable design of high-performance microsized microbial fuel cell with carbon nanotube anode and air cathode.

    PubMed

    Mink, Justine E; Hussain, Muhammad Mustafa

    2013-08-27

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are a promising alternative energy source that both generates electricity and cleans water. Fueled by liquid wastes such as wastewater or industrial wastes, the microbial fuel cell converts waste into energy. Microsized MFCs are essentially miniature energy harvesters that can be used to power on-chip electronics, lab-on-a-chip devices, and/or sensors. As MFCs are a relatively new technology, microsized MFCs are also an important rapid testing platform for the comparison and introduction of new conditions or materials into macroscale MFCs, especially nanoscale materials that have high potential for enhanced power production. Here we report a 75 μL microsized MFC on silicon using CMOS-compatible processes and employ a novel nanomaterial with exceptional electrochemical properties, multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), as the on-chip anode. We used this device to compare the usage of the more commonly used but highly expensive anode material gold, as well as a more inexpensive substitute, nickel. This is the first anode material study done using the most sustainably designed microsized MFC to date, which utilizes ambient oxygen as the electron acceptor with an air cathode instead of the chemical ferricyanide and without a membrane. Ferricyanide is unsustainable, as the chemical must be continuously refilled, while using oxygen, naturally found in air, makes the device mobile and is a key step in commercializing this for portable technology such as lab-on-a-chip for point-of-care diagnostics. At 880 mA/m(2) and 19 mW/m(2) the MWCNT anode outperformed the others in both current and power densities with between 6 and 20 times better performance. All devices were run for over 15 days, indicating a stable and high-endurance energy harvester already capable of producing enough power for ultra-low-power electronics and able to consistently power them over time.

  9. On-bicycle exposure to particulate air pollution: Particle number, black carbon, PM2.5, and particle size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hankey, Steve; Marshall, Julian D.

    2015-12-01

    Inhalation of air pollution during transport is an important exposure pathway, especially for certain modes of travel and types of particles. We measured concentrations of particulate air pollution (particle number [PN], black carbon [BC], fine particles [PM2.5], particle size) using a mobile, bicycle-based monitoring platform during morning and afternoon rush-hour to explore patterns of exposure while cycling (34 days between August 14 and October 16, 2012 in Minneapolis, MN). Measurements were geo-located at 1 ​s intervals along 3 prescribed monitoring routes totaling 85 h (1426 km) of monitoring. Mean morning [afternoon] on-road concentrations were 32,500 [16,600] pt cm-3, 2.5 [0.7] μg m-3 BC, 8.7 [8.3] μg m-3 PM2.5, and 42 [39] nm particle diameter. Concentrations were correlated with street functional class and declined within small distances from a major road (e.g., for PN and BC, mean concentration decreased ∼20% by moving 1 block away from major roads to adjacent local roads). We estimate the share of on-bicycle exposure attributable to near-traffic emissions (vs. regional pollution) is ∼50% for PN and BC; ∼25% for PM2.5. Regression models of instantaneous traffic volumes, derived from on-bicycle video recordings of nearby traffic, quantify the increase in particle-concentrations associated with each passing vehicle; for example, trucks were associated with acute, high concentration exposure events (average concentration-increase per truck: 31,000 pt cm-3, 1.0 μg m-3 PM2.5, 1.6 μg m-3 BC). Our findings could be used to inform design of low-exposure bicycle networks in urban areas.

  10. [Catalytic wet air oxidation of phenol and aniline over multi-walled carbon nanotubes].

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang; Yang, Shao-xi; Zhu, Wan-peng; Wang, Jian-bing; Wang, Li

    2008-09-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) without any metal ions were used as the catalyst, and investigated in the CWAO of phenol and aniline in a batch reactor. The structures of the MWNTs were characterized by means of SEM and TEM. It showed that the MWNTs, treated with the mixed acid (HNO3-H2SO4), displayed excellent activity and stability in the CWAO. Under the reaction temperature of 160 degrees C, the total pressure of 2.5 MPa, the initial concentration of 1000 mg/L and loading the catalyst of 1.6 g/L, 100% phenol and 86% COD were removed after 120 min reaction in CWAO of phenol. At the same operating conditions, 83% aniline and 68% COD removals were obtained in the CWAO of aniline solution when the initial concentration of aniline was 2 000 mg/L. The surface functional groups played the important role for the high activity of the MWNTs in CWAO of organic compounds.

  11. Interprovincial Reliance for Improving Air Quality in China: A Case Study on Black Carbon Aerosol.

    PubMed

    Li, Yun; Meng, Jing; Liu, Junfeng; Xu, Yuan; Guan, Dabo; Tao, Wei; Huang, Ye; Tao, Shu

    2016-04-05

    Black carbon (BC) is of global concern because of its adverse effects on climate and human health. It can travel long distances via atmospheric movement and can be geographically relocated through trade. Here, we explored the integrated patterns of BC transport within 30 provinces in China from the perspective of meteorology and interprovincial trade using the Weather Research and Forecasting with Chemistry (WRF/Chem) model and multiregional input-output analysis. In general, cross-border BC transport, which accounts for more than 30% of the surface concentration, occurs mainly between neighboring provinces. Specifically, Hebei contributes 1.2 μg·m(-3) BC concentration in Tianjin. By contrast, trade typically drives virtual BC flows from developed provinces to heavily industrial provinces, with the largest net flow from Beijing to Hebei (4.2 Gg). Shanghai is most vulnerable to domestic consumption with an average interprovincial consumption influence efficiency of 1.5 × 10(-4) (μg·m(-3))/(billion Yuan·yr(-1)). High efficiencies (∼8 × 10(-5) (μg·m(-3))/(billion Yuan·yr(-1))) are also found from regions including Beijing, Jiangsu, and Shanghai to regions including Hebei, Shandong, and Henan. The above source-receptor relationship indicates two control zones: Huabei and Huadong. Both mitigating end-of-pipe emissions and rationalizing the demand for pollution-intense products are important within the two control zones to reduce BC and other pollutants.

  12. Impacts of global, regional, and sectoral black carbon emission reductions on surface air quality and human mortality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anenberg, S. C.; Talgo, K.; Arunachalam, S.; Dolwick, P.; Jang, C.; West, J. J.

    2011-04-01

    As a component of fine particulate matter (PM2.5), black carbon (BC) is associated with premature human mortality. BC also affects climate by absorbing solar radiation and reducing planetary albedo. Several studies have examined the climate impacts of BC emissions, but the associated health impacts have been studied less extensively. Here, we examine the surface PM2.5 and premature mortality impacts of halving anthropogenic BC emissions globally, from eight world regions, and from three major economic sectors. We use a global chemical transport model, MOZART-4, to simulate PM2.5 concentrations and a health impact function to calculate premature cardiopulmonary and lung cancer deaths. We estimate that halving global anthropogenic BC emissions reduces outdoor population-weighted average PM2.5 by 542 ng m-3 (1.8%) and avoids 157 000 (95% confidence interval, 120 000-194 000) annual premature deaths globally, with the vast majority occurring within the source region. While most of these avoided deaths can be achieved by halving East Asian emissions (54%), followed by South Asian emissions (31%), South Asian emissions have 50% greater mortality impacts per unit BC emitted than East Asian emissions. Globally, the contribution of residential, industrial, and transportation BC emissions to PM2.5-related mortality is 1.3, 1.2, and 0.6 times each sector's contribution to anthropogenic BC emissions, owing to the degree of co-location with population. Impacts of residential BC emissions are underestimated since indoor PM2.5 exposure is excluded. We estimate ~8 times more avoided deaths when BC and organic carbon (OC) emissions are halved together, suggesting that these results greatly underestimate the full air pollution-related mortality benefits of BC mitigation strategies which generally decrease both BC and OC. Confidence in our results would be strengthened by reducing uncertainties in emissions, model parameterization of aerosol processes, grid resolution, and PM2

  13. Sensitivity of Surface Air Quality and Global Mortality to Global, Regional, and Sectoral Black Carbon Emission Reductions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anenberg, S.; Talgo, K.; Dolwick, P.; Jang, C.; Arunachalam, S.; West, J.

    2010-12-01

    Black carbon (BC), a component of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) released during incomplete combustion, is associated with atmospheric warming and deleterious health impacts, including premature cardiopulmonary and lung cancer mortality. A growing body of literature suggests that controlling emissions may therefore have dual benefits for climate and health. Several studies have focused on quantifying the potential impacts of reducing BC emissions from various world regions and economic sectors on radiative forcing. However, the impacts of these reductions on human health have been less well studied. Here, we use a global chemical transport model (MOZART-4) and a health impact function to quantify the surface air quality and human health benefits of controlling BC emissions. We simulate a base case and several emission control scenarios, where anthropogenic BC emissions are reduced by half globally, individually in each of eight world regions, and individually from the residential, industrial, and transportation sectors. We also simulate a global 50% reduction of both BC and organic carbon (OC) together, since they are co-emitted and both are likely to be impacted by actual control measures. Meteorology and biomass burning emissions are for the year 2002 with anthropogenic BC and OC emissions for 2000 from the IPCC AR5 inventory. Model performance is evaluated by comparing to global surface measurements of PM2.5 components. Avoided premature mortalities are calculated using the change in PM2.5 concentration between the base case and emission control scenarios and a concentration-response factor for chronic mortality from the epidemiology literature.

  14. Comparison of Global Model Results from the Carbon-Land Model Intercomparison Project (C-LAMP) with Free-Air Carbon Dioxide Enrichment (FACE) Manipulation Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, Forrest M; Randerson, Jim; Fung, Inez; Thornton, Peter E; Covey, Curtis; Bonan, Gordon; Running, Steven; Norby, Richard J

    2008-01-01

    Free-Air CO{sub 2} Enrichment (FACE) manipulation experiments have been carried out at a handful of sites to gauge the response of the biosphere to significant increases in atmospheric [CO{sub 2}]. Early synthesis results from four temperate forest sites suggest that the response of net primary productivity (NPP) is conserved across a broad range of productivity with a stimulation at the median of 23 {+-} 2% when the surrounding air [CO{sub 2}] was raised to 550{approx}ppm. As a part of the Carbon-Land Model Intercomparison Project (C-LAMP), a community-based model-data comparison activity, the authors have performed a global FACE modeling experiment using two terrestrial biogeochemistry modules, CLM3-CASA and CLM3-CN, coupled to the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Climate System Model (CCSM). The two models were forced with an improved NCEP/NCAR reanalysis data set and reconstructed atmospheric [CO{sub 2}] and N deposition data through 1997. At the beginning of 1997 in the transient simulations, global atmospheric [CO{sub 2}] was abruptly raised to 550{approx}ppm, the target value used at the FACE sites. In the control runs, [CO{sub 2}] continued to rise following observations until 2004, after which it was held constant out to year 2100. In both simulations, the last 25 years of reanalysis forcing and a constant N deposition were applied after year 2004. Across all forest biomes, the NPP responses from both models are weaker than those reported for the four FACE sites. Moreover, model responses vary widely geographically with a decreasing trend of NPP increases from 40{sup o}N to 70{sup o}N. For CLM3-CASA, the largest responses occur in arid regions of western North America and central Asia, suggesting that responses are most strongly influenced by increased water use efficiency for this model. CLM3-CN exhibits consistently weaker responses than CLM3-CASA' with the strongest responses in central Asia, but significantly constrained by N

  15. Alternating-Polarity Arc Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwinghamer, R. J.

    1987-01-01

    Brief reversing polarity of welding current greatly improves quality of welds. NASA technical memorandum recounts progress in art of variable-polarity plasma-arc (VPPA) welding, with emphasis on welding of aluminum-alloy tanks. VPPA welders offer important advantages over conventional single-polarity gas/tungsten arc welders.

  16. TAMA. TIGER Arc Modification Application

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, H

    1994-06-03

    The application enables the geometric correction of TIGER arcs to a more accurate spatial data set. This is done in a structured automated environment according to Census Bureau guidelines and New Mexico state GIS standards. Arcs may be deleted, added, combined, split, and moved relative to a coverage or image displayed in the background.

  17. Arc-textured metal surfaces for high thermal emittance space radiators

    SciTech Connect

    Banks, B.A.; Rutledge, S.K.; Mirtich, M.J.; Behrend, T.; Hotes, D.; Kussmaul, M.; Barry, J.; Stidham, C.; Stueber, T.; DiFilippo, F.

    1994-09-01

    Carbon arc electrical discharges struck across the surfaces of metals such as Nb-1% Zr, alter the morphology to produce a high thermal emittance surface. Metal from the surface and carbon from the arc electrode vaporize during arcing, and then condense on the metal surface to produce a microscopically rough surface having a high thermal emittance. Quantitative spectral reflectance measurements from 0.33 to 15 {mu}m were made on metal surfaces which were carbon arc treated in an inert gas environment. The resulting spectral reflectance data were then used to calculate thermal emittance as a function of temperature for various methods of arc treatment. The results of arc treatment on various metals are presented for both ac and dc arcs. Surface characterization data, including thermal emittance as a function of temperature, scanning electron microscopy, and atomic oxygen durability, are also presented. Ac arc texturing was found to increase the thermal emittance at 800 K from 0.05. to 0.70.

  18. Multiple-element semiquantitative analysis of one-milligram geochemical samples by D.C. arc emission spectrography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rait, N.

    1981-01-01

    A modified method is described for a 1-mg sample multi-element semiquantitative spectrographic analysis. This method uses a direct-current arc source, carbon instead of graphite electrodes, and an 80% argon-20% oxygen atmosphere instead of air. Although this is a destructive method, an analysis can be made for 68 elements in all mineral and geochemical samples. Carbon electrodes have been an aid in improving the detection limits of many elements. The carbon has a greater resistance to heat conductance and develops a better tip, facilitating sample volatilization and counter balancing the cooling effect of a flow of the argon-oxygen mixture around the anode. Where such an argon-oxygen atmosphere is used instead of air, the cyanogen band lines are greatly diminished in intensity, and thus more spectral lines of analysis elements are available for use; the spectral background is also lower. The main advantage of using the carbon electrode and the 80% argon-20% oxygen atmosphere is the improved detection limits of 36 out of 68 elements. The detection limits remain the same for 23 elements, and are not as good for only nine elements. ?? 1981.

  19. Of Eggs and Arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, Joseph A.; Thomas, P. C.; Helfenstein, P.; Tiscareno, M. S.; Hedman, M. M.; Agarwal, M.

    2012-10-01

    New scenarios for the origins of Saturn’s rings/interior moons have directed scientific attention to the region just exterior to Saturn’s main rings. Four satellites (Aegaeon = Ae; Anthe = An; Methone = Me; Pallene = Pa) discovered by the Cassini mission on either side of Mimas’s orbit perhaps comprise a distinct class of ring-moon. They are tiny (R = 0.3-2.5 km); three (AeAnMe) are trapped in co-rotation resonances with Mimas and reside within ring-arcs; and at least two (MePa) have remarkably regular shapes. Images with pixel scales as fine as 27 m taken in May 2012 reveal Methone to be ovoid within 10 m (from sub-pixel limb detection) and devoid of any craters (>130 m) across its 9 km2 of surface; Pallene and even tiny Aegaeon have similar appearances in lesser-quality images. Numerical simulations demonstrate that particles comprising the surrounding ring-arcs populate the same resonances as their embedded moons; escape speeds from the moons are < 0.5 m/s, smaller than the 2 m/s that dynamically characterize the resonant well. We investigate the gentle transfer of particles back and forth between the ring-arcs and any embedded bodies. In this environment, the moons’ shapes are smooth equipotentials; electrostatic effects may also determine how grains settle to surfaces. Considering these shapes to represent equipotential surfaces for rotating, tidally distorted, homogeneous bodies, we infer mean satellite densities of 250+/-60 (Pa), 310+/-30 (Me), and 540+/-120 (Ae) kg m-3. About half of Methone’s leading hemisphere is covered by a sharply bounded, lemon-shaped, relatively dark region, having a form reminiscent of Mimas’s thermal anomaly (Howett et al. 2011). Its (601 nm) albedo is 13% lower than the bounding brighter material. An irregularly shaped, even-darker (by 4%) blotch straddles the apex of the moon’s motion. Impacts with circum-planetary meteoroids and plasma are likely responsible for these features.

  20. Ignition and temperature behavior of a single-wall carbon nanotube sample.

    PubMed

    Volotskova, O; Shashurin, A; Keidar, M; Raitses, Y; Demidov, V; Adams, S

    2010-03-05

    The electrical resistance of mats of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) is measured as a function of mat temperature under various helium pressures, in vacuum and in atmospheric air. The objective of this paper is to study the thermal stability of SWNTs produced in a helium arc discharge in the experimental conditions close to natural conditions of SWNT growth in an arc, using a furnace instead of an arc discharge. For each tested condition, there is a temperature threshold at which the mat's resistance reaches its minimum. The threshold value depends on the helium pressure. An increase of the temperature above the temperature threshold leads to the destruction of SWNT bundles at a certain critical temperature. For instance, the critical temperature is about 1100 K in the case of helium background at a pressure of about 500 Torr. Based on experimental data on critical temperature it is suggested that SWNTs produced by an anodic arc discharge and collected in the web area outside the arc plasma most likely originate from the arc discharge peripheral region.