Science.gov

Sample records for air cargo facility

  1. Air Cargo Marketing Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kersey, J. W.

    1972-01-01

    The factors involved in developing a market for air cargo services are discussed. A comparison is made between the passenger traffic problems and those of cargo traffic. Emphasis is placed on distribution analyses which isolates total distribution cost, including logistical costs such as transportation, inventory, materials handling, packaging, and processing. Specific examples of methods for reducing air cargo costs are presented.

  2. Radiation Detection Field Test at the Federal Express (FedEx) Air Cargo Facility at Denver International Airport (DIA)

    SciTech Connect

    Weirup, D; Waters, A; Hall, H; Dougan, A; Trombino, D; Mattesich, G; Hull, E; Bahowick, S; Loshak, A; Gruidl, J

    2004-02-11

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) recently conducted a field-test of radiation detection and identification equipment at the air cargo facility of Federal Express (FedEx) located at Denver International Airport (DIA) over a period of two weeks. Comprehensive background measurements were performed and were analyzed, and a trial strategy for detection and identification of parcels displaying radioactivity was implemented to aid in future development of a comprehensive protection plan. The purpose of this project was threefold: {sm_bullet} Quantify background radiation environments at an air cargo facility. {sm_bullet} Quantify and identify ''nuisance'' alarms. {sm_bullet} Evaluate the performance of various isotope identifiers deployed in an operational environment (in this case, the operational environment included the biggest blizzard in over 90 years!).

  3. The Economics of Air Cargo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kersey, J. W.

    1972-01-01

    The economic factors involved in air cargo operations and air cargo marketing development are discussed. Specific steps which are followed by various airports to reduce operating costs are described. The economics of cargo handling within an airline are analyzed with respect to: (1) paperwork costs, (2) terminal costs, (3) line haul costs, and (4) claims costs.

  4. 76 FR 51847 - Air Cargo Screening

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-18

    ... the air cargo supply chain. TSA Response: The 9/11 Act required the Secretary of Homeland Security to... conduct screening at stages earlier within the cargo supply chain and off-airport. Thus, the CCSP gives... air cargo throughout the supply chain. TSA has established multiple layers of security for cargo as...

  5. Survey of air cargo forecasting techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhlthan, A. R.; Vermuri, R. S.

    1978-01-01

    Forecasting techniques currently in use in estimating or predicting the demand for air cargo in various markets are discussed with emphasis on the fundamentals of the different forecasting approaches. References to specific studies are cited when appropriate. The effectiveness of current methods is evaluated and several prospects for future activities or approaches are suggested. Appendices contain summary type analyses of about 50 specific publications on forecasting, and selected bibliographies on air cargo forecasting, air passenger demand forecasting, and general demand and modalsplit modeling.

  6. 76 FR 53080 - Air Cargo Screening; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-25

    ... Cargo Screening final rule in a separate Part III of the Federal Register (76 FR 51848). The rule amended two provisions of the Air Cargo Screening IFR issued on September 16, 2009 (74 FR 47672), proposed...(c)''. This document corrects the incorrect citation in the preamble. Correction In the FR Doc....

  7. 49 CFR 1549.111 - Security threat assessments for personnel of certified cargo screening facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... cargo screening facility, an indirect air carrier under 49 CFR part 1548 for transport on a passenger...) Each certified screening facility must complete the requirements in 49 CFR part 1540, subpart C. ... certified cargo screening facilities. 1549.111 Section 1549.111 Transportation Other Regulations Relating...

  8. The promise of air cargo: System aspects and vehicle design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitehead, A. H., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    The current operation of the air cargo system is reviewed. An assessment of the future of air cargo is provided by: (1) analyzing statistics and trends, (2) by noting system problems and inefficiencies, (3) by analyzing characteristics of 'air eligible' commodities, and (4) by showing the promise of new technology for future cargo aircraft with significant improvements in costs and efficiency. The following topics are discussed: (1) air cargo demand forecasts; (2) economics of air cargo transport; (3) the integrated air cargo system; (4) evolution of airfreighter design; and (5) the span distributed load concept.

  9. 14 CFR 296.3 - Indirect cargo air carrier.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Indirect cargo air carrier. 296.3 Section... PROCEEDINGS) ECONOMIC REGULATIONS INDIRECT AIR TRANSPORTATION OF PROPERTY General § 296.3 Indirect cargo air carrier. An indirect cargo air carrier is any U.S. citizen who undertakes to engage indirectly in...

  10. 14 CFR 296.3 - Indirect cargo air carrier.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Indirect cargo air carrier. 296.3 Section... PROCEEDINGS) ECONOMIC REGULATIONS INDIRECT AIR TRANSPORTATION OF PROPERTY General § 296.3 Indirect cargo air carrier. An indirect cargo air carrier is any U.S. citizen who undertakes to engage indirectly in...

  11. 14 CFR 296.3 - Indirect cargo air carrier.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Indirect cargo air carrier. 296.3 Section... PROCEEDINGS) ECONOMIC REGULATIONS INDIRECT AIR TRANSPORTATION OF PROPERTY General § 296.3 Indirect cargo air carrier. An indirect cargo air carrier is any U.S. citizen who undertakes to engage indirectly in...

  12. 14 CFR 296.3 - Indirect cargo air carrier.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Indirect cargo air carrier. 296.3 Section... PROCEEDINGS) ECONOMIC REGULATIONS INDIRECT AIR TRANSPORTATION OF PROPERTY General § 296.3 Indirect cargo air carrier. An indirect cargo air carrier is any U.S. citizen who undertakes to engage indirectly in...

  13. 19 CFR 122.48 - Air cargo manifest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Air cargo manifest. 122.48 Section 122.48 Customs... AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Aircraft Entry and Entry Documents; Electronic Manifest Requirements for..., and Overflying the United States § 122.48 Air cargo manifest. (a) When required. Except as provided...

  14. 19 CFR 122.48 - Air cargo manifest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Air cargo manifest. 122.48 Section 122.48 Customs... AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Aircraft Entry and Entry Documents; Electronic Manifest Requirements for..., and Overflying the United States § 122.48 Air cargo manifest. (a) When required. Except as provided...

  15. 19 CFR 122.48 - Air cargo manifest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Air cargo manifest. 122.48 Section 122.48 Customs... AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Aircraft Entry and Entry Documents; Electronic Manifest Requirements for..., and Overflying the United States § 122.48 Air cargo manifest. (a) When required. Except as provided...

  16. Aviation System Analysis Capability Air Carrier Investment Model-Cargo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Jesse; Santmire, Tara

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of the Aviation System Analysis Capability (ASAC) Air Cargo Investment Model-Cargo (ACIMC), is to examine the economic effects of technology investment on the air cargo market, particularly the market for new cargo aircraft. To do so, we have built an econometrically based model designed to operate like the ACIM. Two main drivers account for virtually all of the demand: the growth rate of the Gross Domestic Product (GDP) and changes in the fare yield (which is a proxy of the price charged or fare). These differences arise from a combination of the nature of air cargo demand and the peculiarities of the air cargo market. The net effect of these two factors are that sales of new cargo aircraft are much less sensitive to either increases in GDP or changes in the costs of labor, capital, fuel, materials, and energy associated with the production of new cargo aircraft than the sales of new passenger aircraft. This in conjunction with the relatively small size of the cargo aircraft market means technology improvements to the cargo aircraft will do relatively very little to spur increased sales of new cargo aircraft.

  17. An outlook for cargo aircraft of the future. [assessment of the future of air cargo by analyzing statistics and trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicks, O. W.; Whitehead, A. H., Jr.; Alford, W. J., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    An assessment is provided of the future of air cargo by analyzing air cargo statistics and trends, by noting air cargo system problems and inefficiencies, by analyzing characteristics of air-eligible commodities, and by showing the promise of new technology for future cargo aircraft with significant improvements in costs and efficiency. NASA's proposed program is reviewed which would sponsor the research needed to provide for development of advanced designs by 1985.

  18. Technical and economic evaluation of advanced air cargo system concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitehead, A. H., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    The paper reviews NASA air cargo market studies, reports on NASA and NASA-sponsored studies of advanced freighter concepts, and identifies the opportunities for the application of advanced technology. The air cargo market is studied to evaluate the timing for, and the potential market response to, advanced technology aircraft. The degree of elasticity in future air freight markets is also being investigated, since the demand for a new aircraft is most favorable in a price-sensitive environment. Aircraft design studies are considered with attention to mission and design requirements, incorporation of advanced technologies in transport aircraft, new cargo aircraft concepts, advanced freighter evaluation, and civil-military design commonality.

  19. 77 FR 30542 - Air Cargo Screening Fees

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-23

    ... Office's web page at http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR to view the... the civil aviation security regulation. 49 CFR 1540.209. \\1\\ 71 FR 30478. On September 16, 2009, TSA... screened cargo or carry out certain other cargo security duties. \\2\\ 74 FR 47672. The 2009 IFR amended...

  20. Air Cargo Transportation Route Choice Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obashi, Hiroshi; Kim, Tae-Seung; Oum, Tae Hoon

    2003-01-01

    Using a unique feature of air cargo transshipment data in the Northeast Asian region, this paper identifies the critical factors that determine the transshipment route choice. Taking advantage of the variations in the transport characteristics in each origin-destination airports pair, the paper uses a discrete choice model to describe the transshipping route choice decision made by an agent (i.e., freight forwarder, consolidator, and large shipper). The analysis incorporates two major factors, monetary cost (such as line-haul cost and landing fee) and time cost (i.e., aircraft turnaround time, including loading and unloading time, custom clearance time, and expected scheduled delay), along with other controls. The estimation method considers the presence of unobserved attributes, and corrects for resulting endogeneity by use of appropriate instrumental variables. Estimation results find that transshipment volumes are more sensitive to time cost, and that the reduction in aircraft turnaround time by 1 hour would be worth the increase in airport charges by more than $1000. Simulation exercises measures the impacts of alternative policy scenarios for a Korean airport, which has recently declared their intention to be a future regional hub in the Northeast Asian region. The results suggest that reducing aircraft turnaround time at the airport be an effective strategy, rather than subsidizing to reduce airport charges.

  1. Technology options for an enhanced air cargo system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winston, M. M.

    1979-01-01

    A view of potential enhancements to the air cargo system through technology application is provided. NASA's role in addressing deficiencies of the current civil and military air cargo systems is outlined. The evolution of conventional airfreighter design is traced and projected through the 1990's. Also, several advanced airfreighter concepts incorporating unconventional design features are described to show their potentials benefits. A number of ongoing NASA technology programs are discussed to indicate the wide range of advanced technologies offering potential benefits to the air cargo system. The promise of advanced airfreighters is then viewed in light of the future air cargo infrastructure predicted by extensive systems studies. The derived outlook concludes that the aircraft technology benefits may be offset somewhat by adverse economic, environmental, and institutional constraints.

  2. Air cargo: An Integrated Systems View. 1978 Summer Faculty Fellowship Program in Engineering Systems Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keaton, A. (Editor); Eastman, R. (Editor); Hargrove, A. (Editor); Rabiega, W. (Editor); Olsen, R. (Editor); Soberick, M. (Editor)

    1978-01-01

    The national air cargo system is analyzed and how it should be in 1990 is prescribed in order to operate successfully through 2015; that is through one equipment cycle. Elements of the system which are largely under control of the airlines and the aircraft manufacturers are discussed. The discussion deals with aircraft, networks, facilities, and procedures. The regulations which govern the movement of air freight are considered. The larger public policy interests which must be served by the kind of system proposed, the air cargo integrated system (ACIS), are addressed. The possible social, economical, political, and environment impacts of the system are considered. Recommendations are also given.

  3. Cargo Logistics Airlift Systems Study (CLASS). Volume 1: Analysis of current air cargo system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burby, R. J.; Kuhlman, W. H.

    1978-01-01

    The material presented in this volume is classified into the following sections; (1) analysis of current routes; (2) air eligibility criteria; (3) current direct support infrastructure; (4) comparative mode analysis; (5) political and economic factors; and (6) future potential market areas. An effort was made to keep the observations and findings relating to the current systems as objective as possible in order not to bias the analysis of future air cargo operations reported in Volume 3 of the CLASS final report.

  4. 19 CFR 122.113 - Form for transit air cargo manifest procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Form for transit air cargo manifest procedures... SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Transit Air Cargo Manifest (TACM) Procedures § 122.113 Form for transit air cargo manifest procedures. A manifest on Customs Form 7509 is...

  5. 19 CFR 122.163 - Transit air cargo traveling to U.S. ports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Transit air cargo traveling to U.S. ports. 122.163...; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Penalties § 122.163 Transit air cargo traveling to U.S. ports. (a) Application. If transit air cargo is traveling from the port of arrival to another U.S....

  6. 19 CFR 122.113 - Form for transit air cargo manifest procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Form for transit air cargo manifest procedures... SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Transit Air Cargo Manifest (TACM) Procedures § 122.113 Form for transit air cargo manifest procedures. A manifest on Customs Form 7509 is...

  7. 19 CFR 122.113 - Form for transit air cargo manifest procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Form for transit air cargo manifest procedures... SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Transit Air Cargo Manifest (TACM) Procedures § 122.113 Form for transit air cargo manifest procedures. A manifest on Customs Form 7509 is...

  8. 19 CFR 122.113 - Form for transit air cargo manifest procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Form for transit air cargo manifest procedures... SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Transit Air Cargo Manifest (TACM) Procedures § 122.113 Form for transit air cargo manifest procedures. A manifest on Customs Form 7509 is...

  9. 19 CFR 122.113 - Form for transit air cargo manifest procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Form for transit air cargo manifest procedures... SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Transit Air Cargo Manifest (TACM) Procedures § 122.113 Form for transit air cargo manifest procedures. A manifest on Customs Form 7509 is...

  10. 19 CFR 122.163 - Transit air cargo traveling to U.S. ports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Transit air cargo traveling to U.S. ports. 122.163...; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Penalties § 122.163 Transit air cargo traveling to U.S. ports. (a) Application. If transit air cargo is traveling from the port of arrival to another U.S....

  11. 19 CFR 122.163 - Transit air cargo traveling to U.S. ports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Transit air cargo traveling to U.S. ports. 122.163...; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Penalties § 122.163 Transit air cargo traveling to U.S. ports. (a) Application. If transit air cargo is traveling from the port of arrival to another U.S....

  12. 19 CFR 122.163 - Transit air cargo traveling to U.S. ports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Transit air cargo traveling to U.S. ports. 122.163...; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Penalties § 122.163 Transit air cargo traveling to U.S. ports. (a) Application. If transit air cargo is traveling from the port of arrival to another U.S....

  13. Technical and Economic Evaluation of Advanced Air Cargo Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitehead, A. H., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    The current air cargo environment and the relevance of advanced technology aircraft in enhancing the efficiency of the 1990 air cargo system are discussed. NASA preliminary design studies are shown to indicate significant potential gains in aircraft efficiency and operational economics for future freighter concepts. Required research and technology elements are outlined to develop a better base for evaluating advanced design concepts. Current studies of the market operation are reviewed which will develop design criteria for a future dedicated cargo transport. Design features desirable in an all-freighter design are reviewed. NASA-sponsored studies of large, distributed-load freighters are reviewed and these designs are compared to current wide-body aircraft. These concepts vary in gross takeoff weight from 0.5 Gg (one million lbs.) to 1.5 Gg (three million lbs.) and are found to exhibit economic advantages over conventional design concepts.

  14. 77 FR 65395 - Air Cargo Advance Screening (ACAS) Pilot Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Air Cargo Advance Screening (ACAS) Pilot Program Correction In notice document 2012-26031 appearing on pages 65006-65009 in the issue of October 24, 2012 make...

  15. 76 FR 60755 - Air Cargo Screening; Reopening of Comment Period

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-30

    ... ``Air Cargo Screening Security Threat Assessment Fee Development Report.'' 76 FR 51858. The final rule... fee. DATES: The comment period for the final rule at 76 FR 51848, Part III, August 18, 2011, is... Privacy Act Statement published in the Federal Register on April 11, 2000 (65 FR ] 19477) and modified...

  16. 49 CFR 175.26 - Notification at cargo facilities of hazardous materials requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... following information: (1) Cargo containing hazardous materials (dangerous goods) for transportation by... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Notification at cargo facilities of hazardous... REGULATIONS CARRIAGE BY AIRCRAFT General Information and Regulations § 175.26 Notification at cargo...

  17. 49 CFR 175.26 - Notification at cargo facilities of hazardous materials requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... following information: (1) Cargo containing hazardous materials (dangerous goods) for transportation by... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Notification at cargo facilities of hazardous... REGULATIONS CARRIAGE BY AIRCRAFT General Information and Regulations § 175.26 Notification at cargo...

  18. 49 CFR 175.26 - Notification at cargo facilities of hazardous materials requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... following information: (1) Cargo containing hazardous materials (dangerous goods) for transportation by... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Notification at cargo facilities of hazardous... REGULATIONS CARRIAGE BY AIRCRAFT General Information and Regulations § 175.26 Notification at cargo...

  19. 49 CFR 175.26 - Notification at cargo facilities of hazardous materials requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... following information: (1) Cargo containing hazardous materials (dangerous goods) for transportation by... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Notification at cargo facilities of hazardous... REGULATIONS CARRIAGE BY AIRCRAFT General Information and Regulations § 175.26 Notification at cargo...

  20. 49 CFR 175.26 - Notification at cargo facilities of hazardous materials requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... following information: (1) Cargo containing hazardous materials (dangerous goods) for transportation by... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Notification at cargo facilities of hazardous... REGULATIONS CARRIAGE BY AIRCRAFT General Information and Regulations § 175.26 Notification at cargo...

  1. 33 CFR 105.295 - Additional requirements-Certain Dangerous Cargo (CDC) facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Dangerous Cargo (CDC) facilities. 105.295 Section 105.295 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... Requirements § 105.295 Additional requirements-Certain Dangerous Cargo (CDC) facilities. (a) At all MARSEC Levels, owners or operators of CDC facilities must ensure the implementation of the following...

  2. 33 CFR 105.295 - Additional requirements-Certain Dangerous Cargo (CDC) facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Dangerous Cargo (CDC) facilities. 105.295 Section 105.295 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... Requirements § 105.295 Additional requirements-Certain Dangerous Cargo (CDC) facilities. (a) At all MARSEC Levels, owners or operators of CDC facilities must ensure the implementation of the following...

  3. National Security Science and Technology Initiative: Air Cargo Screening

    SciTech Connect

    Bingham, Philip R; White, Tim; Cespedes, Ernesto; Bowerman, Biays; Bush, John

    2010-11-01

    The non-intrusive inspection (NII) of consolidated air cargo carried on commercial passenger aircraft continues to be a technically challenging, high-priority requirement of the Department of Homeland Security's Science and Technology Directorate (DHS S&T), the Transportation Security Agency and the Federal Aviation Administration. The goal of deploying a screening system that can reliably and cost-effectively detect explosive threats in consolidated cargo without adversely affecting the flow of commerce will require significant technical advances that will take years to develop. To address this critical National Security need, the Battelle Memorial Institute (Battelle), under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with four of its associated US Department of Energy (DOE) National Laboratories (Oak Ridge, Pacific Northwest, Idaho, and Brookhaven), conducted a research and development initiative focused on identifying, evaluating, and integrating technologies for screening consolidated air cargo for the presence of explosive threats. Battelle invested $8.5M of internal research and development funds during fiscal years 2007 through 2009. The primary results of this effort are described in this document and can be summarized as follows: (1) Completed a gap analysis that identified threat signatures and observables, candidate technologies for detection, their current state of development, and provided recommendations for improvements to meet air cargo screening requirements. (2) Defined a Commodity/Threat/Detection matrix that focuses modeling and experimental efforts, identifies technology gaps and game-changing opportunities, and provides a means of summarizing current and emerging capabilities. (3) Defined key properties (e.g., elemental composition, average density, effective atomic weight) for basic commodity and explosive benchmarks, developed virtual models of the physical distributions (pallets) of three commodity types and three explosive

  4. 46 CFR 154.1710 - Exclusion of air from cargo tank vapor spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Exclusion of air from cargo tank vapor spaces. 154.1710 Section 154.1710 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS... Operating Requirements § 154.1710 Exclusion of air from cargo tank vapor spaces. When a vessel is...

  5. Cargo/Logistics Airlift System Study (CLASS), Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, J. M.; Henderson, R. D.; Macey, F. C.; Tuttle, R. P.

    1978-01-01

    Current and advanced air cargo systems are evaluated using industrial and consumer statistics. Market and commodity characteristics that influence the use of the air mode are discussed along with a comparison of air and surface mode on typical routes. Results of on-site surveys of cargo processing facilities at airports are presented, and institutional controls and influences on air cargo operations are considered.

  6. 46 CFR 154.1710 - Exclusion of air from cargo tank vapor spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Exclusion of air from cargo tank vapor spaces. 154.1710 Section 154.1710 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS FOR SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Special Design...

  7. 19 CFR 122.117 - Requirements for transit air cargo transport.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... receipt may be given only to an airline which: (i) Is a common carrier for the transportation of bonded... cargo, a receipt shall be given. The receipt shall be made by the airline responsible for transport or... airline exporting transit air cargo for direct exportation begins when a receipt, as provided in...

  8. 19 CFR 122.117 - Requirements for transit air cargo transport.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... receipt may be given only to an airline which: (i) Is a common carrier for the transportation of bonded... cargo, a receipt shall be given. The receipt shall be made by the airline responsible for transport or... airline exporting transit air cargo for direct exportation begins when a receipt, as provided in...

  9. 19 CFR 122.117 - Requirements for transit air cargo transport.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... receipt may be given only to an airline which: (i) Is a common carrier for the transportation of bonded... cargo, a receipt shall be given. The receipt shall be made by the airline responsible for transport or... airline exporting transit air cargo for direct exportation begins when a receipt, as provided in...

  10. 19 CFR 122.117 - Requirements for transit air cargo transport.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... receipt may be given only to an airline which: (i) Is a common carrier for the transportation of bonded... cargo, a receipt shall be given. The receipt shall be made by the airline responsible for transport or... airline exporting transit air cargo for direct exportation begins when a receipt, as provided in...

  11. 19 CFR 122.117 - Requirements for transit air cargo transport.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... receipt may be given only to an airline which: (i) Is a common carrier for the transportation of bonded... cargo, a receipt shall be given. The receipt shall be made by the airline responsible for transport or... airline exporting transit air cargo for direct exportation begins when a receipt, as provided in...

  12. 19 CFR 122.163 - Transit air cargo traveling to U.S. ports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... following factors: (1) Any data or documents available to the airline which presented a receipt for the transit air cargo, and available to the importing airline relating to the description and value of...

  13. Photon and neutron interrogation techniques for chemical explosives detection in air cargo: A critical review

    SciTech Connect

    Runkle, Robert C.; White, Timothy A.; Miller, Erin A.; Caggiano, Joseph A.; Collins, Brian A.

    2009-05-21

    Scanning cargo transported via aircraft ("air cargo") for explosive threats is a problem that, at present, lacks a comprehensive technical solution. While explosives detection in the baggage-scanning domain has a rich history that sheds light on potential solutions for air cargo, baggage scanning differs in several ways and thus one cannot look to the present array of technologies. Some contemporary solutions, like trace analysis, are not readily applied to cargo due to sampling challenges while the larger geometry of air cargo makes others less effective. This review article examines an array of interrogation techniques using photons and neutrons as incident particles. We first present a summary of the signatures and observables explosives provide and review how they have been exploited in baggage scanning. Following this is a description of the challenges posed by the air cargo application space. After considering interrogation sources, methods focused on transmission imaging, sub-surface examination and elemental characterization are described. It is our goal to shed light on the technical promise of each method while largely deferring questions that revolve around footprint, safety and conduct of operations. Our overarching intent is that a comprehensive understanding of potential techniques will foster development of a comprehensive solution.

  14. Characteristics of future air cargo demand and impact on aircraft development: A report on the Cargo/Logistic Airlift Systems Study (CLASS) project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitehead, A. H., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Current domestic and international air cargo operations are studied and the characteristics of 1990 air cargo demand are postulated from surveys conducted at airports and with shippers, consignees, and freight forwarders as well as air, land, and ocean carriers. Simulation and route optimization programs are exercised to evaluate advanced aircraft concepts. The results show that proposed changes in the infrastructure and improved cargo loading efficiencies are as important enhancing the prospects of air cargo growth as is the advent of advanced freighter aircraft. Potential reductions in aircraft direct operating costs are estimated and related to future total revenue. Service and cost elasticities are established and utilized to estimate future potential tariff reductions that may be realized through direct and indirect operating cost reductions and economies of scale.

  15. The Arteries of Global Trade: Industrial Restructuring and Technological Change in the Transatlantic Air Cargo Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwarz, Guido

    2010-01-01

    Air cargo enjoys a special importance: together with maritime transport it is the backbone of global trade and is indispensable for contemporary globalization. Air transport is the only mode that combines worldwide reach with high speed. Nonetheless there is a dearth of geographic research that analyzes the current restructuring affecting the air…

  16. Air cargo market outlook and impact via the NASA CLASS project. [Cargo/Logistics Airlift Systems Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winston, M. M.; Conner, D. W.

    1980-01-01

    An overview is given of the Cargo/Logistics Airlift Systems Study (CLASS) project which was a 10 man-year effort carried out by two contractor teams, aimed at defining factors impacting future system growth and obtaining market requirements and design guidelines for future air freighters. Growth projection was estimated by two approaches: one, an optimal systems approach with a more efficient and cost effective system considered as being available in 1990; and the other, an evolutionary approach with an econometric behavior model used to predict long term evolution from the present system. Both approaches predict significant growth in demand for international air freighter services and less growth for U.S. domestic services. Economic analysis of air freighter fleet options indicate very strong market appeal of derivative widebody transports in 1990 with little incentive to develop all new dedicated air freighters utilizing the 1990's technology until sometime beyond the year 2000. Advanced air freighters would be economically attractive for a wide range of payload sizes (to 500 metric tons), however, if a government would share in the RD and T costs by virtue of its needs for a slightly modified version of a civil air freighter design (a.g. military airlifter).

  17. 46 CFR 154.1710 - Exclusion of air from cargo tank vapor spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Exclusion of air from cargo tank vapor spaces. 154.1710 Section 154.1710 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS... is loaded by maintaining a positive pressure of at least 13.8 kPa gauge (2 psig) by: (1)...

  18. Fast-neutron/gamma-ray radiography scanner for the detection of contraband in air cargo containers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberhardt, J.; Liu, Y.; Rainey, S.; Roach, G.; Sowerby, B.; Stevens, R.; Tickner, J.

    2006-05-01

    There is a worldwide need for efficient inspection of cargo containers at airports, seaports and road border crossings. The main objectives are the detection of contraband such as illicit drugs, explosives and weapons. Due to the large volume of cargo passing through Australia's airports every day, it is critical that any scanning system should be capable of working on unpacked or consolidated cargo, taking at most 1-2 minutes per container. CSIRO has developed a fast-neutron/gamma-ray radiography (FNGR) method for the rapid screening of air freight. By combining radiographs obtained using 14 MeV neutrons and 60Co gamma-rays, high resolution images showing both density and material composition are obtained. A near full-scale prototype scanner has been successfully tested in the laboratory. With the support of the Australian Customs Service, a full-scale scanner has recently been installed and commissioned at Brisbane International Airport.

  19. Desktop Application Program to Simulate Cargo-Air-Drop Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuthbert, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The DSS Application is a computer program comprising a Windows version of the UNIX-based Decelerator System Simulation (DSS) coupled with an Excel front end. The DSS is an executable code that simulates the dynamics of airdropped cargo from first motion in an aircraft through landing. The bare DSS is difficult to use; the front end makes it easy to use. All inputs to the DSS, control of execution of the DSS, and postprocessing and plotting of outputs are handled in the front end. The front end is graphics-intensive. The Excel software provides the graphical elements without need for additional programming. Categories of input parameters are divided into separate tabbed windows. Pop-up comments describe each parameter. An error-checking software component evaluates combinations of parameters and alerts the user if an error results. Case files can be created from inputs, making it possible to build cases from previous ones. Simulation output is plotted in 16 charts displayed on a separate worksheet, enabling plotting of multiple DSS cases with flight-test data. Variables assigned to each plot can be changed. Selected input parameters can be edited from the plot sheet for quick sensitivity studies.

  20. 75 FR 69733 - Applications of National Air Cargo Group, Inc. D/B/A National Airlines for Certificate Authority

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-15

    ... to Show Cause (Order 2010-11-05). SUMMARY: The Department of Transportation is directing all interested persons to show cause why it should not issue an order finding National Air Cargo Group, Inc....

  1. Air support facilities. [interface between air and surface transportation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Airports are discussed in terms of the interface between the ground and air for transportation systems. The classification systems, design, facilities, administration, and operations of airports are described.

  2. A clean air continuous flow propulsion facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krauss, R. H.; Mcdaniel, J. C., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Consideration is given to a contaminant-free, high enthalpy, continuous flow facility designed to obtain detailed code validation measurements of high speed combustion. The facility encompasses uncontaminated air temperature control to within 5 K, fuel temperature control to 2 K, a ceramic flow straightener, drying of inlet air, and steady state continuous operation. The air heating method provides potential for independent control of contaminant level by injection, mixing, and heating upstream. Particular attention is given to extension of current capability of 1250 K total air temperature, which simulates Scramjet enthalpy at Mach 5.

  3. 19 CFR 122.48a - Electronic information for air cargo required in advance of arrival.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Freight Station/deconsolidator as identified by its FIRMS (Facilities Information and Resources Management... air carrier as identified by its carrier IATA (International Air Transport Association) code, that...) of this chapter), the party must possess a Customs international carrier bond containing all...

  4. 33 CFR 105.265 - Security measures for handling cargo.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... to do so, routinely check cargo, cargo transport units, and cargo storage areas within the facility..., containers, or other cargo transport units entering the facility match the delivery note or equivalent cargo..., containers or other cargo transport units, and cargo storage areas within the facility for evidence...

  5. 33 CFR 105.265 - Security measures for handling cargo.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... to do so, routinely check cargo, cargo transport units, and cargo storage areas within the facility..., containers, or other cargo transport units entering the facility match the delivery note or equivalent cargo..., containers or other cargo transport units, and cargo storage areas within the facility for evidence...

  6. 33 CFR 105.265 - Security measures for handling cargo.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... to do so, routinely check cargo, cargo transport units, and cargo storage areas within the facility..., containers, or other cargo transport units entering the facility match the delivery note or equivalent cargo..., containers or other cargo transport units, and cargo storage areas within the facility for evidence...

  7. 33 CFR 105.265 - Security measures for handling cargo.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... to do so, routinely check cargo, cargo transport units, and cargo storage areas within the facility..., containers, or other cargo transport units entering the facility match the delivery note or equivalent cargo..., containers or other cargo transport units, and cargo storage areas within the facility for evidence...

  8. 33 CFR 105.265 - Security measures for handling cargo.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... to do so, routinely check cargo, cargo transport units, and cargo storage areas within the facility..., containers, or other cargo transport units entering the facility match the delivery note or equivalent cargo..., containers or other cargo transport units, and cargo storage areas within the facility for evidence...

  9. 49 CFR 1548.21 - Screening of cargo.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Screening of cargo. 1548.21 Section 1548.21..., DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY CIVIL AVIATION SECURITY INDIRECT AIR CARRIER SECURITY § 1548.21 Screening of... if the IAC is a certified cargo screening facility as provided in part 1549....

  10. Primary Beam Air Kerma Dependence on Distance from Cargo and People Scanners.

    PubMed

    Strom, Daniel J; Cerra, Frank

    2016-06-01

    The distance dependence of air kerma or dose rate of the primary radiation beam is not obvious for security scanners of cargo and people in which there is relative motion between a collimated source and the person or object being imaged. To study this problem, one fixed line source and three moving-source scan-geometry cases are considered, each characterized by radiation emanating perpendicular to an axis. The cases are 1) a stationary line source of radioactive material, e.g., contaminated solution in a pipe; 2) a moving, uncollimated point source of radiation that is shuttered or off when it is stationary; 3) a moving, collimated point source of radiation that is shuttered or off when it is stationary; and 4) a translating, narrow "pencil" beam emanating in a flying-spot, raster pattern. Each case is considered for short and long distances compared to the line source length or path traversed by a moving source. The short distance model pertains mostly to dose to objects being scanned and personnel associated with the screening operation. The long distance model pertains mostly to potential dose to bystanders. For radionuclide sources, the number of nuclear transitions that occur a) per unit length of a line source or b) during the traversal of a point source is a unifying concept. The "universal source strength" of air kerma rate at 1 m from the source can be used to describe x-ray machine or radionuclide sources. For many cargo and people scanners with highly collimated fan or pencil beams, dose varies as the inverse of the distance from the source in the near field and with the inverse square of the distance beyond a critical radius. Ignoring the inverse square dependence and using inverse distance dependence is conservative in the sense of tending to overestimate dose. PMID:27115228

  11. 19 CFR 122.49 - Correction of air cargo manifest or air waybill.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Aircraft Entry and Entry Documents; Electronic Manifest Requirements for Passengers, Crew Members, and Non-Crew Members Onboard Commercial... satisfactory reply within 30 days of entry of the aircraft or receipt of the notice, whichever is later....

  12. 44. CAPE COD AIR STATION PAVE PAWS FACILITY BUILDING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    44. CAPE COD AIR STATION PAVE PAWS FACILITY - BUILDING ELEVATION WITH BUILDING METAL SIDING BEING APPLIED ON "B" FACE. - Cape Cod Air Station, Technical Facility-Scanner Building & Power Plant, Massachusetts Military Reservation, Sandwich, Barnstable County, MA

  13. Analysis of the photoneutron activation effects generated by 9 MeV X-ray in a container cargo inspection facility.

    PubMed

    Cho, Young Ho; Kang, Bo Sun

    2010-06-01

    The X-ray container cargo inspection facility is extensively implemented with the key objective to counter international terrorism and illicit smuggling of the contraband items via the ports. However, activation products are generated from photoneutron capture reactions in the high-energy X-ray container cargo inspection facility. The activation products release inherent delayed radiations which occupational workers are exposed to. In this study, the activation products are estimated using Monte Carlo method and radiation safety of the facility in terms of occupational dose is reviewed. PMID:20159916

  14. National Security Science and Technology Initiative: Air Cargo Screening, Final Report for CRADA Number NFE-07-01081

    SciTech Connect

    Bingham, Philip; Bush, John; Bowerman, Biays; Cespedes, Ernesto; White, Timothy

    2004-12-01

    The non-intrusive inspection (NII) of consolidated air cargo carried on commercial passenger aircraft continues to be a technically challenging, high-priority requirement of the Department of Homeland Security’s Science and Technology Directorate (DHS S&T), the Transportation Security Agency and the Federal Aviation Administration. The goal of deploying a screening system that can reliably and cost-effectively detect explosive threats in consolidated cargo without adversely affecting the flow of commerce will require significant technical advances that will take years to develop. To address this critical National Security need, the Battelle Memorial Institute (Battelle), under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with four of its associated US Department of Energy (DOE) National Laboratories (Oak Ridge, Pacific Northwest, Idaho, and Brookhaven), conducted a research and development initiative focused on identifying, evaluating, and integrating technologies for screening consolidated air cargo for the presence of explosive threats. Battelle invested $8.5M of internal research and development funds during fiscal years 2007 through 2009.

  15. 19 CFR 122.115 - Labeling of cargo.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Transit Air Cargo Manifest (TACM) Procedures § 122.115 Labeling of cargo. A warning label, as required by § 18.4(e) of this chapter, shall be attached to all transit air cargo...

  16. 75 FR 9919 - Extension of Agency Information Collection Activity Under OMB Review: Air Cargo Security...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-04

    ... below to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for ] renewal in compliance with the Paperwork... collection of information on November 16, 2009, 74 FR 58969. TSA has not received any comments. The...-cargo carriers. These five categories are: security programs, security threat assessments (STA),...

  17. 43 CFR 2651.6 - Airport and air navigation facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Airport and air navigation facilities... Village Selections § 2651.6 Airport and air navigation facilities. (a) Every airport and air navigation.... (b) The surface of all other lands of existing airport sites, airway beacons, or other...

  18. 43 CFR 2651.6 - Airport and air navigation facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Airport and air navigation facilities... Village Selections § 2651.6 Airport and air navigation facilities. (a) Every airport and air navigation.... (b) The surface of all other lands of existing airport sites, airway beacons, or other...

  19. 43 CFR 2651.6 - Airport and air navigation facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Airport and air navigation facilities... Village Selections § 2651.6 Airport and air navigation facilities. (a) Every airport and air navigation.... (b) The surface of all other lands of existing airport sites, airway beacons, or other...

  20. 43 CFR 2651.6 - Airport and air navigation facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Airport and air navigation facilities... Village Selections § 2651.6 Airport and air navigation facilities. (a) Every airport and air navigation.... (b) The surface of all other lands of existing airport sites, airway beacons, or other...

  1. Gamma-ray nuclear resonance absorption (γ-NRA) for explosives detection in air cargo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vartsky, D.; Goldberg, M. B.; Engler, G.; Goldschmidt, A.; Feldman, G.; Bar, D.; Sayag, E.; Katz, D.; Krauss, R. A.

    1999-06-01

    The γ-NRA method has been utilized to detect explosives concealed in aviation containers loaded with a variety of cargo. In γ-NRA, gamma-rays at an energy of 9.17 MeV undergo a resonant nuclear attenuation component proportional to the integrated density of 14N nuclei along the line of sight from source to detector. When inspecting objects in transmission mode, projected images of nitrogen density of their contents can be generated. In an experiment performed earlier this year at the Dynamitron accelerator lab. of Birmingham Univ., U.K., diverse items such as passenger bags, electronic equipment, paper goods and mixed cargo were scanned along with explosives simulants. The results from this run will be presented and anticipated performance ratings of an operational explosives detection system (EDS) discussed.

  2. 33 CFR 105.295 - Additional requirements-Certain Dangerous Cargo (CDC) facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... or independent power source for security and communications systems. (b) At MARSEC Level 2, in addition to the requirements for MARSEC Level 1, owners or operators of CDC facilities must ensure the... Levels, owners or operators of CDC facilities must ensure the implementation of the following...

  3. 33 CFR 105.295 - Additional requirements-Certain Dangerous Cargo (CDC) facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... or independent power source for security and communications systems. (b) At MARSEC Level 2, in addition to the requirements for MARSEC Level 1, owners or operators of CDC facilities must ensure the... Levels, owners or operators of CDC facilities must ensure the implementation of the following...

  4. 33 CFR 105.295 - Additional requirements-Certain Dangerous Cargo (CDC) facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... or independent power source for security and communications systems. (b) At MARSEC Level 2, in addition to the requirements for MARSEC Level 1, owners or operators of CDC facilities must ensure the... Levels, owners or operators of CDC facilities must ensure the implementation of the following...

  5. Cargo/Logistics Airlift System Study (CLASS), Executive Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, J. M.; Henderson, R. D.; Macey, F. C.; Tuttle, R. P.

    1978-01-01

    The current air cargo system is analyzed along with advanced air cargo systems studies. A forecast of advanced air cargo system demand is presented with cost estimates. It is concluded that there is a need for a dedicated advance air cargo system, and with application of advanced technology, reductions of 45% in air freight rates may be achieved.

  6. Design of a high capacity long range cargo aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisshaar, Terrence A.

    1994-01-01

    This report examines the design of a long range cargo transport to attempt to reduce ton-mile shipping costs and to stimulate the air cargo market. This design effort involves the usual issues but must also include consideration of: airport terminal facilities; cargo loading and unloading; and defeating the 'square-cube' law to design large structures. This report reviews the long range transport design problem and several solutions developed by senior student design teams at Purdue University. The results show that it will be difficult to build large transports unless the infrastructure is changed and unless the basic form of the airplane changes so that aerodynamic and structural efficiencies are employed.

  7. X-ray and neutron interrogation of air cargo for mobile applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Liew, Seth

    2015-06-01

    A system for scanning break-bulk cargo for mobile applications is presented. This combines a 140 kV multi-view, multi-energy X-ray system with 2.5 MeV neutrons. The system uses dual energy X-ray radiography with neutron radiography. The X-ray and neutron systems were designed to be collocated in a mobile environment. Various materials were interrogated with the intent of distinguishing threat materials such as explosives from similar benign materials. In particular, the identification of threats and bengins with nearly identical effective atomic numbers has been demonstrated.

  8. NASA's B377SGT Super Guppy Turbine cargo aircraft touches down at Edwards Air Force Base, Calif. on

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    NASA's B377SGT Super Guppy Turbine cargo aircraft touches down at Edwards Air Force Base, Calif. on June 11, 2000 to deliver the latest version of the X-38 flight test vehicle to NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center. The B-377SGT Super Guppy Turbine evolved from the 1960s-vintage Pregnant Guppy, Mini Guppy and Super Guppy, used for transporting sections of the Saturn rocket used for the Apollo program moon launches and other outsized cargo. The various Guppies were modified from 1940's and 50's-vintage Boeing Model 377 and C-97 Stratocruiser airframes by Aero Spacelines, Inc., which operated the aircraft for NASA. NASA's Flight Research Center assisted in certification testing of the first Pregnant Guppy in 1962. One of the turboprop-powered Super Guppies, built up from a YC-97J airframe, last appeared at Dryden in May, 1976 when it was used to transport the HL-10 and X-24B lifting bodies from Dryden to the Air Force Museum at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio. NASA's present Super Guppy Turbine, the fourth and last example of the final version, first flew in its outsized form in 1980. It and its three sister ships were built in the 1970s for Europe's Airbus Industrie to ferry outsized structures for Airbus jetliners to the final assembly plant in Toulouse, France. It later was acquired by the European Space Agency, and then acquired by NASA in late 1997 for transport of large structures for the International Space Station to the launch site. It replaced the earlier-model Super Guppy, which has been retired and is used for spare parts. NASA's Super Guppy Turbine carries NASA registration number N941NA, and is based at Ellington Field near the Johnson Space Center. For more information on NASA's Super Guppy Turbine, log onto the Johnson Space Center Super Guppy web page at http://spaceflight.nasa.gov/station/assembly/superguppy/

  9. 47. CAPE COD AIR STATION PAVE PAWS FACILITY AERIAL VIEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    47. CAPE COD AIR STATION PAVE PAWS FACILITY AERIAL VIEW OF "A" FACE (LEFT) WITH CLEANING SYSTEM INSTALLED (NOW REMOVED) AND "B" FACE (RIGHT) WITH CONSTRUCTION CRANE IN USE. - Cape Cod Air Station, Technical Facility-Scanner Building & Power Plant, Massachusetts Military Reservation, Sandwich, Barnstable County, MA

  10. 46. CAPE COD AIR STATION PAVE PAWS FACILITY BUILDING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    46. CAPE COD AIR STATION PAVE PAWS FACILITY - BUILDING ELEVATION VIEW WITH ALL METAL SIDING INSTALLED AND WITH EMITTER/ANTENNA ARRAY SYSTEM NEARING OCMPLETION ON "B" FACE (RIGHT). VIEW ALSO SHOWS TRAVELING "CLEANING" SYSTEM ON "B" FACE - NOW REMOVED. - Cape Cod Air Station, Technical Facility-Scanner Building & Power Plant, Massachusetts Military Reservation, Sandwich, Barnstable County, MA

  11. 45. CAPE COD AIR STATION PAVE PAWS FACILITY BUILDING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    45. CAPE COD AIR STATION PAVE PAWS FACILITY - BUILDING ELEVATION VIEW WITH BUILDING METAL SIDING BEING APPLIED ON "A" FACE (LEFT) AND "B" FACE (RIGHT). NOTE THAT NORTH IS GENERALLY TO RIGHT OF VIEW. - Cape Cod Air Station, Technical Facility-Scanner Building & Power Plant, Massachusetts Military Reservation, Sandwich, Barnstable County, MA

  12. 42. CAPE COD AIR STATION PAVE PAWS FACILITY SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    42. CAPE COD AIR STATION PAVE PAWS FACILITY - SHOWING BUILDING "RED IRON" STEEL STRUCTURE AT 46T DAY OF STEEL CONSTRUCTION. "BUILDING TOPPED OFF, 7 JULY, 1974. - Cape Cod Air Station, Technical Facility-Scanner Building & Power Plant, Massachusetts Military Reservation, Sandwich, Barnstable County, MA

  13. 43. CAPE COD AIR STATION PAVE PAWS FACILITY WITH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    43. CAPE COD AIR STATION PAVE PAWS FACILITY - WITH BUILDING METAL SIDING BEING APPLIED ON "C" FACE (RIGHT) AND "B" FACE BEING PREPARED FOR INSTALLATION. - Cape Cod Air Station, Technical Facility-Scanner Building & Power Plant, Massachusetts Military Reservation, Sandwich, Barnstable County, MA

  14. Workplace air monitoring and sampling practices at DOE facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Swinth, K.L.; Kenoyer, J.L.; Selby, J.M.; Vallario, E.J.; Burphy, B.L.

    1986-03-01

    Current air monitoring and sampling practices at DOE facilities were surveyed as a part of an air monitoring upgrade task. A comprehensive questionnaire was developed and distributed to DOE contractors through the DOE field offices. Twenty-six facilities returned a completed questionnaire. Questionnaire replies indicate diversity in air sampling and monitoring practices among DOE facilities. The difference among the facilities exist in monitoring and sampling instrumentation, procedures, calibration, analytical methods, detection levels, and action levels. Many of these differences could be attributed to different operational needs.

  15. Air Structures. Educational Facilities Review Series Number 23.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finne, Mary Lou

    Air structures can be erected quickly, cover large areas, cost substantially less than conventional buildings, and use less natural resources. Air structures are economically utilized for many facilities, such as athletic fields, swimming pools, high schools, day care centers, and college campuses. The literature on air structures covered in this…

  16. 19 CFR 122.48a - Electronic information for air cargo required in advance of arrival.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... based on the smallest external packing unit (M) (for example, 2 pallets containing 50 pieces each would... applicable (C)); and (xvii) Local transfer facility (C) (this facility is a Container Freight Station as... quantity based on the smallest external packing unit (M) (for example, 2 pallets containing 50 pieces...

  17. 19 CFR 122.73 - General declaration and air cargo manifest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Documents Required for Clearance and Permission To Depart; Electronic Manifest Requirements for Passengers, Crew Members, and Non-Crew Members Onboard...

  18. Cargo Logistics Airlift Systems Study (CLASS). Volume 3: Cross impact between the 1990 market and the air physical distribution systems, book 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burby, R. J.; Kuhlman, W. H.

    1978-01-01

    Book 2 of this volume is divided into the following sections: (1) commodities and system networks; (2) future mode choice decisions and commodity air eligibility; (3) comparative cargo transportation costs - air, truck, rail and water; (4) elasticities of demand; (5) operating cost; (6) operating profit, rate making, and returns; (7) importance of rate and service on future aircraft; (8) potential market demand for new aircraft; (9) scenario of events affecting system/market growth; and (10) future study and technology requirements.

  19. Accurate and portable weigh-in-motion system for manifesting air cargo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nodine, Robert N.; Scudiere, Matthew B.; Jordan, John K.

    1995-12-01

    An automated and portable weigh-in-motion system has been developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory for the purpose of manifesting cargo onto aircraft. The system has an accuracy range of plus or minus 3.0% to plus or minus 6.0% measuring gross vehicle weight and locating the center of balance of moving vehicles at speeds of 1 to 5 mph. This paper reviews the control/user interface system and weight determination algorithm developed to acquire, process, and interpret multiple sensor inputs. The development effort resulted in a self- zeroing, user-friendly system capable of weighing a wide range of vehicles in any random order. The control system is based on the STANDARD (STD) bus and incorporates custom- designed data acquisition and sensor fusion hardware controlled by a personal computer (PC) based single-board computer. The user interface is written in the 'C' language to display number of axles, axle weight, axle spacing, gross weight, and center of balance. The weighing algorithm developed functions with any linear weight sensor and a set of four axle switches per sensor.

  20. 49 CFR 1546.205 - Acceptance and screening of cargo.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... in its security program. Such methods may include TSA-approved x-ray systems, explosives detection... program, by a certified cargo screening facility in accordance with 49 CFR part 1549, or by TSA. (4) The... of any explosive or incendiary. Each foreign air carrier operating a program under § 1546.101(a),...

  1. 10. Building 105, Facilities Engineering Building, 1830, interior, air condition ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Building 105, Facilities Engineering Building, 1830, interior, air condition repair shop, S end of building, looking N. - Watervliet Arsenal, Building 105, South Broadway, on Hudson River, Watervliet, Albany County, NY

  2. 19 CFR 122.48a - Electronic information for air cargo required in advance of arrival.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... transportation from Hong Kong (HKG), and it transits through Narita, Japan (NRT), en route to the United States... its transportation from Hong Kong (HKG), and it transits through Narita, Japan (NRT), en route to the... air to the United States (for example, if a shipment began its transportation from Hong Kong...

  3. 19 CFR 122.48a - Electronic information for air cargo required in advance of arrival.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... transportation from Hong Kong (HKG), and it transits through Narita, Japan (NRT), en route to the United States... its transportation from Hong Kong (HKG), and it transits through Narita, Japan (NRT), en route to the... air to the United States (for example, if a shipment began its transportation from Hong Kong...

  4. 19 CFR 122.48a - Electronic information for air cargo required in advance of arrival.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... transportation from Hong Kong (HKG), and it transits through Narita, Japan (NRT), en route to the United States... its transportation from Hong Kong (HKG), and it transits through Narita, Japan (NRT), en route to the... air to the United States (for example, if a shipment began its transportation from Hong Kong...

  5. 164. GENERAL VIEW OF BUILDING 60 (AIR REWORK FACILITY) AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    164. GENERAL VIEW OF BUILDING 60 (AIR REWORK FACILITY) AND ENVIRONS. ROBERT AND CO., ARCHITECT-ENGINEERS FOR BUILDING 60. DISTANT VIEW NORTH TOWARD BUILDING 60 FROM THE INTERSECTION OF QUONSET RD. AND 1ST AVE., AIRFIELD VISIBLE ON RIGHT. - Quonset Point Naval Air Station, Roger Williams Way, North Kingstown, Washington County, RI

  6. 225. BUILDING 60. (AIR REWORK FACILITY) 194041; ALTERED 194849. GIBBS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    225. BUILDING 60. (AIR REWORK FACILITY) 1940-41; ALTERED 1948-49. GIBBS AND HALL, ARCHITECTS (WORKING FROM PLANS BY ROBERT AND CO. FOR NAS JACKSONVILLE). GENERAL VIEW FROM WEST. - Quonset Point Naval Air Station, Roger Williams Way, North Kingstown, Washington County, RI

  7. 224. BUILDING 60. (AIR REWORK FACILITY) 194041; ALTERED 194849 GIBBS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    224. BUILDING 60. (AIR REWORK FACILITY) 1940-41; ALTERED 1948-49 GIBBS AND HALL, ARCHITECTS, WORKING FROM PLANS BY ROBERT AND CO. FOR NAS JACKSONVILLE; SOUTH END OF THE HANGAR WING. VIEW FROM SOUTHEAST. - Quonset Point Naval Air Station, Roger Williams Way, North Kingstown, Washington County, RI

  8. 17. CAPE COD AIR STATION PAVE PAWS FACILITY AERIAL VIEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. CAPE COD AIR STATION PAVE PAWS FACILITY AERIAL VIEW WITH PROJECT NEARING COMPLETION. VIEW SHOWS "A" FACE (LEFT) AND "B" FACE OF RADAR ARRAY SYSTEM. NOTE THAT NORTH IS GENERALLY TO RIGHT OF VIEW. - Cape Cod Air Station, Massachusetts Military Reservation, Sandwich, Barnstable County, MA

  9. Mobile Quarantine Facility unloaded at Ellington Air Force Base, Texas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    A Mobile Quarantine Facility, with the three Apollo 11 crewmen inside, is unloaded from a U.S. Air Force C141 transport at Ellington Air Force Base early Sunday after a flight from Hawaii. A large crowd was present to welcome Astronauts Neil Armstrong, Michael Collins and Edwin Aldrin Jr. back to Houston following their historic lunar landing mission.

  10. CargoTIPS: an innovative approach to combating cargo theft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toth, Gail E.

    1998-12-01

    Cargo theft has been estimated by the Federal Bureau o Investigations to be 6 billion annually, while others believe it to be more than 10 billion annually. Opportunistic thieves, street gangs, traditional organized crime groups, and new organized crime groups have been targeting cargo. They steal from warehouses, terminals, equipment, truck stops, or any place where freight comes to a rest. With zero inventory levels, our trailers have become virtual warehouses on wheels and easy targets for thieves. Without information and communication cargo thieves can thrive. The industry and law enforcement are forced into being reactive instead of developing proactive policies and procedures. Cargo thieves cross town lines, county lines, state lines and country borders. This makes communication within the law enforcement community imperative. CargoTIPS (cargo theft information processing system) was developed in response to the need for cargo theft information. The system allows us to collect cargo theft statistics to analyze the problem, assess the threat and develop a response on a national level. CargoTIPS includes a bulletin board, which allows users to communicate with each other, pass on alerts or seek information. The system is also used as an investigative tool. CargoTIPS can identify the mode of transportation (truck, small parcel, air, rail or ocean). It was designed to take in international data. Currently the system has identified that food products are the number one targeted commodity, followed by electronic products and third, computers and computer parts.

  11. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act ( ARRA) FEMP Technical Assistance, U.S. General Services Administration - Project 194 U.S. Custom Cargo Inspection Facility, Detroit, MI

    SciTech Connect

    Arends, J.; Sandusky, William F.

    2010-05-31

    This report documents the findings of an on-site audit of the U.S. Customs Cargo Inspection Facility (CIF) in Detroit, Michigan. The federal landlord for this building is the General Services Administration (GSA). The focus of the audit was to identify various no-cost or low-cost energy-efficiency opportunities that, once implemented, would reduce electrical and gas consumption and increase the operational efficiency of the building. This audit also provided an opportunity to identify potential capital cost projects that should be considered in the future to acquire additional energy (electric and gas) and water savings to further increase the operational efficiency of the building.

  12. Physical Sciences Facility Air Emission Control Equivalency Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, David M.; Belew, Shan T.

    2008-10-17

    This document presents the adequacy evaluation for the application of technology standards during design, fabrication, installation and testing of radioactive air exhaust systems at the Physical Sciences Facility (PSF), located on the Horn Rapids Triangle north of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) complex. The analysis specifically covers the exhaust portion of the heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems associated with emission units EP-3410-01-S, EP-3420-01-S and EP 3430-01-S.

  13. 29 CFR 1917.114 - Cargo doors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Cargo doors. 1917.114 Section 1917.114 Labor Regulations...) MARINE TERMINALS Terminal Facilities § 1917.114 Cargo doors. (a) Mechanically operated. (1) Cargo door.... (1) The door shall be connected to its lifting tackle with shackles or equally secure means....

  14. Indoor air quality & airborne disease control in healthcare facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, S.

    1997-06-01

    This article is concerned with indoor air quality (IAQ) in the context of healthcare facilities. It defines what is meant by IAQ, lists health outcomes of poor IAQ, addresses specific healthcare IAQ issues, discusses solutions by means of HVAC systems, and covers relevant regulations and standards.

  15. Cleanliness Requirements For The Air In A BRDF Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asmail, Clara C.

    1990-01-01

    A method is presented for estimating the cleanliness level of the air contained in a BRDF measurement facility. The use of HEPA filters is assumed and a set of reasonable assumptions are set which provide a minimum criterion for the class of clean room required for a given minimum measurable BRDF desired. The basis of the method is the use of Rayleigh scattering theory.

  16. Air-bearing spin facility for measuring energy dissipation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, R. L.

    1976-01-01

    The air-bearing spin facility was developed to determine experimentally the effect of energy dissipation upon the motion of spinning spacecraft. The facility consists of an air-bearing spin table, a telemetry system, a command system, and a ground control station. The air-bearing spin table was designed to operate in a vacuum chamber. Tests were run on spacecraft components such as fuel tanks, nutation dampers, reaction wheels, and active nutation damper systems. Each of these items affected the attitude of a spinning spacecraft. An experimental approach to determine these effects was required because the dissipation of these components could not be adequately analyzed. The results of these experiments have been used, with excellent results, to predict spacecraft motion.

  17. Activation of Air and Utilities in the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Khater, H; Pohl, B; Brererton, S

    2010-04-08

    Detailed 3-D modeling of the NIF facility is developed to accurately simulate the radiation environment within the NIF. Neutrons streaming outside the NIF Target Chamber will activate the air present inside the Target Bay and the Ar gas inside the laser tubes. Smaller levels of activity are also generated in the Switchyard air and in the Ar portion of the SY laser beam path. The impact of neutron activation of utilities located inside the Target Bay is analyzed for variety of shot types. The impact of activating TB utilities on dose received by maintenance personnel post-shot is analyzed. The current NIF facility model includes all important features of the Target Chamber, shielding system, and building configuration. Flow of activated air from the Target Bay is controlled by the HVAC system. The amount of activated Target Bay air released through the stack is very small and does not pose significant hazard to personnel or the environment. Activation of Switchyard air is negligible. Activation of Target Bay utilities result in a manageable dose rate environment post high yield (20 MJ) shots. The levels of activation generated in air and utilities during D-D and THD shots are small and do not impact work planning post shots.

  18. Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (SNTP) Air Force facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, David F.

    1993-01-01

    The Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (SNTP) Program is an initiative within the US Air Force to acquire and validate advanced technologies that could be used to sustain superior capabilities in the area or space nuclear propulsion. The SNTP Program has a specific objective of demonstrating the feasibility of the particle bed reactor (PBR) concept. The term PIPET refers to a project within the SNTP Program responsible for the design, development, construction, and operation of a test reactor facility, including all support systems, that is intended to resolve program technology issues and test goals. A nuclear test facility has been designed that meets SNTP Facility requirements. The design approach taken to meet SNTP requirements has resulted in a nuclear test facility that should encompass a wide range of nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) test requirements that may be generated within other programs. The SNTP PIPET project is actively working with DOE and NASA to assess this possibility.

  19. Air compliance through pollution prevention at Air Force Materiel Command facilities.

    SciTech Connect

    Kolpa, R.; Ryckman, S.J. Jr.; Smith, A.E.

    1999-03-19

    Options for air compliance through pollution prevention (P2) have been identified at 14 facilities of the US Air Force Materiel Command, ranging from depots with significant light industrial activity to laboratories. Previous P2 efforts concentrated on reducing hazardous and solid wastes, with any reduction in air impacts generally being a collateral benefit. This work focused on reducing air emissions and air compliance vulnerabilities. P2 options were identified in three stages. First, potentially applicable P2 options were identified from Internet and published information. Attention was given to identifying the types of sources to which an option could be applied, the option's state of development, and constraints that could limit its application. Traditional P2 options involving technology or equipment changes and material substitution were considered. In addition, newer approaches based on administrative ''controls'' were considered. These included inserting P2 into operating permits in exchange for administrative relief, privatization, derating boilers, and reducing an installation's potential to emit and compliance vulnerability by separating sources not under the Air Force's ''common control.'' Next, criteria and toxic emissions inventories by source category were prepared from inventory data supplied by facilities. The major problems at this stage were differences in the levels of detail provided by facilities and in the categories used by different installations. Emitting categories were matched to P2 option categories to identify candidate options. Candidates were screened to account for local regulations and technical information about sources in the inventories. When possible, emission reductions were estimated to help facility personnel prioritize options. Some options identified are being actively pursued by facilities to determine their site-specific feasibility. Although much work has been done to implement material substitution programs, this

  20. 49 CFR 1549.101 - Acceptance, screening, and transfer of cargo.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... approved by TSA, an indirect air carrier under 49 CFR part 1548, an aircraft operator under part 1544, or a... onboard an aircraft of any unauthorized explosives, incendiaries, and other destructive substances or items in cargo onboard an aircraft, as provided in the facility's security program. (b) Screening...

  1. 49 CFR 1549.101 - Acceptance, screening, and transfer of cargo.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... approved by TSA, an indirect air carrier under 49 CFR part 1548, an aircraft operator under part 1544, or a... onboard an aircraft of any unauthorized explosives, incendiaries, and other destructive substances or items in cargo onboard an aircraft, as provided in the facility's security program. (b) Screening...

  2. 49 CFR 1549.101 - Acceptance, screening, and transfer of cargo.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... approved by TSA, an indirect air carrier under 49 CFR part 1548, an aircraft operator under part 1544, or a... onboard an aircraft of any unauthorized explosives, incendiaries, and other destructive substances or items in cargo onboard an aircraft, as provided in the facility's security program. (b) Screening...

  3. 49 CFR 1549.101 - Acceptance, screening, and transfer of cargo.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... approved by TSA, an indirect air carrier under 49 CFR part 1548, an aircraft operator under part 1544, or a... onboard an aircraft of any unauthorized explosives, incendiaries, and other destructive substances or items in cargo onboard an aircraft, as provided in the facility's security program. (b) Screening...

  4. 49 CFR 1549.101 - Acceptance, screening, and transfer of cargo.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... approved by TSA, an indirect air carrier under 49 CFR part 1548, an aircraft operator under part 1544, or a... onboard an aircraft of any unauthorized explosives, incendiaries, and other destructive substances or items in cargo onboard an aircraft, as provided in the facility's security program. (b) Screening...

  5. Open air demolition of facilities highly contaminated with plutonium

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, E.R.; Lackey, M.B.; Stevens, J.M.; Zinsli, L.C.

    2007-07-01

    The demolition of highly contaminated plutonium buildings usually is a long and expensive process that involves decontaminating the building to near free- release standards and then using conventional methods to remove the structure. It doesn't, however, have to be that way. Fluor has torn down buildings highly contaminated with plutonium without excessive decontamination. By removing the select source term and fixing the remaining contamination on the walls, ceilings, floors, and equipment surfaces; open-air demolition is not only feasible, but it can be done cheaper, better (safer), and faster. Open-air demolition techniques were used to demolish two highly contaminated buildings to slab-on-grade. These facilities on the Department of Energy's Hanford Site were located in, or very near, compounds of operating nuclear facilities that housed hundreds of people working on a daily basis. To keep the facilities operating and the personnel safe, the projects had to be creative in demolishing the structures. Several key techniques were used to control contamination and keep it within the confines of the demolition area: spraying fixatives before demolition; applying fixative and misting with a fine spray of water as the buildings were being taken down; and demolishing the buildings in a controlled and methodical manner. In addition, detailed air-dispersion modeling was done to establish necessary building and meteorological conditions and to confirm the adequacy of the proposed methods. Both demolition projects were accomplished without any spread of contamination outside the modest buffer areas established for contamination control. Furthermore, personnel exposure to radiological and physical hazards was significantly reduced by using heavy equipment rather than 'hands on' techniques. (authors)

  6. OPEN AIR DEMOLITION OF FACILITIES HIGHLY CONTAMINATED WITH PLUTONIUM

    SciTech Connect

    LLOYD, E.R.

    2007-05-31

    The demolition of highly contaminated plutonium buildings usually is a long and expensive process that involves decontaminating the building to near free- release standards and then using conventional methods to remove the structure. It doesn't, however, have to be that way. Fluor has torn down buildings highly contaminated with plutonium without excessive decontamination. By removing the select source term and fixing the remaining contamination on the walls, ceilings, floors, and equipment surfaces; open-air demolition is not only feasible, but it can be done cheaper, better (safer), and faster. Open-air demolition techniques were used to demolish two highly contaminated buildings to slab-on-grade. These facilities on the Department of Energy's Hanford Site were located in, or very near, compounds of operating nuclear facilities that housed hundreds of people working on a daily basis. To keep the facilities operating and the personnel safe, the projects had to be creative in demolishing the structures. Several key techniques were used to control contamination and keep it within the confines of the demolition area: spraying fixatives before demolition; applying fixative and misting with a fine spray of water as the buildings were being taken down; and demolishing the buildings in a controlled and methodical manner. In addition, detailed air-dispersion modeling was done to establish necessary building and meteorological conditions and to confirm the adequacy of the proposed methods. Both demolition projects were accomplished without any spread of contamination outside the modest buffer areas established for contamination control. Furthermore, personnel exposure to radiological and physical hazards was significantly reduced by using heavy equipment rather than ''hands on'' techniques.

  7. An inventory of aeronautical ground research facilities. Volume 2: Air breathing engine test facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pirrello, C. J.; Hardin, R. D.; Heckart, M. V.; Brown, K. R.

    1971-01-01

    The inventory covers free jet and direct connect altitude cells, sea level static thrust stands, sea level test cells with ram air, and propulsion wind tunnels. Free jet altitude cells and propulsion wind tunnels are used for evaluation of complete inlet-engine-exhaust nozzle propulsion systems under simulated flight conditions. These facilities are similar in principal of operation and differ primarily in test section concept. The propulsion wind tunnel provides a closed test section and restrains the flow around the test specimen while the free jet is allowed to expand freely. A chamber of large diameter about the free jet is provided in which desired operating pressure levels may be maintained. Sea level test cells with ram air provide controlled, conditioned air directly to the engine face for performance evaluation at low altitude flight conditions. Direct connect altitude cells provide a means of performance evaluation at simulated conditions of Mach number and altitude with air supplied to the flight altitude conditions. Sea level static thrust stands simply provide an instrumented engine mounting for measuring thrust at zero airspeed. While all of these facilities are used for integrated engine testing, a few provide engine component test capability.

  8. A turbulence-driven air fumigation facility for studying air pollution effects on vegetation

    SciTech Connect

    Lipfert, F.; Lewin, K.; Hendrey, G.; Nagy, J. ); Alexander, Y. . Applied Mathematics Dept.)

    1990-10-01

    Studying the effects of atmospheric perturbations on plant growth has usually involved compromises between realism and convenience. Isolating the effects of specific parameters, such as air pollution, elevated CO{sub 2} concentration, or water stress, requires a manipulated rather than a completely natural environment. Attempts to develop large free-air controlled exposure systems date back several years, primarily for experimental exposures to elevated levels of air pollutants such as SO{sub 2} or ozone. These early systems suffered from two types of problems: imprecise control of the exposure gas concentrations; substantial spatial variability within the exposed plots. The Free-Air CO{sub 2} Enrichment (FACE) open-air fumigation system, developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), has addressed both of these problem areas. This system differs from other free-air exposure systems in that the injection gas is pre-diluted in ambient air to an average 3--4% by volume, and the injection gas mass flow is adjusted each second by the micoprocessor-driven controller. This document discusses the design and performance of this facility. 3 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Development of a Test Facility for Air Revitalization Technology Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Sao-Dung; Lin, Amy; Campbell, Melissa; Smith, Frederick; Curley, Su

    2007-01-01

    Development of new air revitalization system (ARS) technology can initially be performed in a subscale laboratory environment, but in order to advance the maturity level, the technology must be tested in an end-to-end integrated environment. The Air Revitalization Technology Evaluation Facility (ARTEF) at the NASA Johnson Space Center serves as a ground test bed for evaluating emerging ARS technologies in an environment representative of spacecraft atmospheres. At the center of the ARTEF is a hypobaric chamber which serves as a sealed atmospheric chamber for closed loop testing. A Human Metabolic Simulator (HMS) was custom-built to simulate the consumption of oxygen, and production of carbon dioxide, moisture and heat of up to eight persons. A multitude of gas analyzers and dew point sensors are used to monitor the chamber atmosphere upstream and downstream of a test article. A robust vacuum system is needed to simulate the vacuum of space. A reliable data acquisition and control system is required to connect all the subsystems together. This paper presents the capabilities of the integrated test facility and some of the issues encountered during the integration.

  10. 33 CFR 126.17 - Permits required for handling designated dangerous cargo.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... designated dangerous cargo. 126.17 Section 126.17 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) WATERFRONT FACILITIES HANDLING OF DANGEROUS CARGO AT WATERFRONT FACILITIES § 126.17 Permits required for handling designated dangerous cargo. Designated dangerous cargo may...

  11. 33 CFR 126.17 - Permits required for handling designated dangerous cargo.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... designated dangerous cargo. 126.17 Section 126.17 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) WATERFRONT FACILITIES HANDLING OF DANGEROUS CARGO AT WATERFRONT FACILITIES § 126.17 Permits required for handling designated dangerous cargo. Designated dangerous cargo may...

  12. 33 CFR 126.17 - Permits required for handling designated dangerous cargo.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... designated dangerous cargo. 126.17 Section 126.17 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) WATERFRONT FACILITIES HANDLING OF DANGEROUS CARGO AT WATERFRONT FACILITIES § 126.17 Permits required for handling designated dangerous cargo. Designated dangerous cargo may...

  13. 33 CFR 126.17 - Permits required for handling designated dangerous cargo.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... designated dangerous cargo. 126.17 Section 126.17 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) WATERFRONT FACILITIES HANDLING OF DANGEROUS CARGO AT WATERFRONT FACILITIES § 126.17 Permits required for handling designated dangerous cargo. Designated dangerous cargo may...

  14. 33 CFR 126.17 - Permits required for handling designated dangerous cargo.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... designated dangerous cargo. 126.17 Section 126.17 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) WATERFRONT FACILITIES HANDLING OF DANGEROUS CARGO AT WATERFRONT FACILITIES § 126.17 Permits required for handling designated dangerous cargo. Designated dangerous cargo may...

  15. 49 CFR 1544.205 - Acceptance and screening of cargo.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... provided in its security program. Such methods may include TSA-approved x-ray systems, explosives detection... program, by a certified cargo screening facility in accordance with 49 CFR part 1549, or by TSA. (4... full program, a full all-cargo program, or a twelve-five program in an all-cargo operation, must...

  16. 33 CFR 126.13 - Designation of waterfront facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... for the handling, storing, stowing, loading, discharging, or transporting of dangerous cargo, subject..., storing, stowing, loading, discharging, or transporting dangerous cargo at any waterfront facility other... SECURITY (CONTINUED) WATERFRONT FACILITIES HANDLING OF DANGEROUS CARGO AT WATERFRONT FACILITIES §...

  17. 33 CFR 126.13 - Designation of waterfront facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... for the handling, storing, stowing, loading, discharging, or transporting of dangerous cargo, subject..., storing, stowing, loading, discharging, or transporting dangerous cargo at any waterfront facility other... SECURITY (CONTINUED) WATERFRONT FACILITIES HANDLING OF DANGEROUS CARGO AT WATERFRONT FACILITIES §...

  18. 33 CFR 126.13 - Designation of waterfront facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... for the handling, storing, stowing, loading, discharging, or transporting of dangerous cargo, subject..., storing, stowing, loading, discharging, or transporting dangerous cargo at any waterfront facility other... SECURITY (CONTINUED) WATERFRONT FACILITIES HANDLING OF DANGEROUS CARGO AT WATERFRONT FACILITIES §...

  19. 33 CFR 126.13 - Designation of waterfront facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... for the handling, storing, stowing, loading, discharging, or transporting of dangerous cargo, subject..., storing, stowing, loading, discharging, or transporting dangerous cargo at any waterfront facility other... SECURITY (CONTINUED) WATERFRONT FACILITIES HANDLING OF DANGEROUS CARGO AT WATERFRONT FACILITIES §...

  20. 33 CFR 126.13 - Designation of waterfront facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... for the handling, storing, stowing, loading, discharging, or transporting of dangerous cargo, subject..., storing, stowing, loading, discharging, or transporting dangerous cargo at any waterfront facility other... SECURITY (CONTINUED) WATERFRONT FACILITIES HANDLING OF DANGEROUS CARGO AT WATERFRONT FACILITIES §...

  1. 77 FR 11145 - Intent to Request Renewal From OMB of One Current Public Collection of Information: Air Cargo...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-24

    ... number 1652-0053. While aviation security requirements have greatly reduced the vulnerability of the air..., and compliance. The forms used in this collection of information include the Aviation Security Known... KSMS or IACMS, the regulated entity must conduct a physical visit of the shipper using the...

  2. 19 CFR 103.31a - Advance electronic information for air, truck, and rail cargo; Importer Security Filing...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Advance electronic information for air, truck, and... AVAILABILITY OF INFORMATION Other Information Subject to Restricted Access § 103.31a Advance electronic... following types of advance electronic information are per se exempt from disclosure under §...

  3. 49 CFR 175.25 - Notification at air passenger facilities of hazardous materials restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Notification at air passenger facilities of... MATERIALS REGULATIONS CARRIAGE BY AIRCRAFT General Information and Regulations § 175.25 Notification at air passenger facilities of hazardous materials restrictions. (a) Each person who engages in for-hire...

  4. 49 CFR 175.25 - Notification at air passenger facilities of hazardous materials restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Notification at air passenger facilities of... MATERIALS REGULATIONS CARRIAGE BY AIRCRAFT General Information and Regulations § 175.25 Notification at air passenger facilities of hazardous materials restrictions. (a) Each person who engages in for-hire...

  5. 46 CFR 154.534 - Cargo pumps and cargo compressors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cargo pumps and cargo compressors. 154.534 Section 154.534 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES... Equipment Cargo and Process Piping Systems § 154.534 Cargo pumps and cargo compressors. Cargo pumps...

  6. 46 CFR 154.534 - Cargo pumps and cargo compressors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Cargo pumps and cargo compressors. 154.534 Section 154.534 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES... Equipment Cargo and Process Piping Systems § 154.534 Cargo pumps and cargo compressors. Cargo pumps...

  7. 46 CFR 154.534 - Cargo pumps and cargo compressors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Cargo pumps and cargo compressors. 154.534 Section 154.534 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES... Equipment Cargo and Process Piping Systems § 154.534 Cargo pumps and cargo compressors. Cargo pumps...

  8. 46 CFR 154.534 - Cargo pumps and cargo compressors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Cargo pumps and cargo compressors. 154.534 Section 154.534 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES... Equipment Cargo and Process Piping Systems § 154.534 Cargo pumps and cargo compressors. Cargo pumps...

  9. 46 CFR 154.534 - Cargo pumps and cargo compressors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cargo pumps and cargo compressors. 154.534 Section 154.534 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES... Equipment Cargo and Process Piping Systems § 154.534 Cargo pumps and cargo compressors. Cargo pumps...

  10. Cargo/Logistics Airlift System Study (CLASS), Volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, J. M.; Henderson, R. D.; Macey, F. C.; Tuttle, R. P.

    1978-01-01

    Air containerization is discussed in terms of lower freight rates, size and pallet limitations, refrigeration, backhaul of empties, and ownership. It is concluded that there is a need for an advance air cargo system as indicated by the industry/transportation case studies, and a stimulation of the air cargo would result in freight rate reductions.

  11. Safety evaluation for packaging transport of LSA-II liquids in MC-312 cargo tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Carlstrom, R.F.

    1996-09-11

    This safety evaluation for packaging authorizes the onsite transfer of bulk LSA-II radioactive liquids in the 222-S Laboratory Cargo Tank and Liquid Effluent Treatment Facility Cargo Tanks (which are U.S. Department of Transportation MC-312 specification cargo tanks) from their operating facilities to tank farm facilities.

  12. Cargo-cult training

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magueijo, João

    2009-12-01

    Richard Feynman, in one of his famous rants, evoked as a metaphor what he called "cargo-cult science". During the Second World War, the indigenous people of the South Pacific became accustomed to US Air Force planes landing on their islands, invariably bringing a profusion of desirable goods and tasty foods. When the war ended, they were distressed by the discontinuation of this popular service. So, they decided to take action. They cleared elongated patches of land to make them look like runways. They lit wood fires where they had seen electric floodlights guiding in the planes. They built a wooden shack and made a man sit inside with two halves of a coconut on each ear and bamboo bars sticking out like antennas: he was the "air controller". And they waited for the planes to return.

  13. 49 CFR 175.25 - Notification at air passenger facilities of hazardous materials restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Notification at air passenger facilities of... MATERIALS REGULATIONS CARRIAGE BY AIRCRAFT General Information and Regulations § 175.25 Notification at air... engages in for-hire air transportation of passengers must display notices of the requirements...

  14. U.S. Marine Corps Air Facility, Santa Ana, California hangers no. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    U.S. Marine Corps Air Facility, Santa Ana, California hangers no. 1&2-building no. 28 &29. Drawing no. PW-66-044 - Marine Corps Air Station Tustin, Northern Lighter Than Air Ship Hangar, Meffett Avenue & Maxfield Street, Tustin, Orange County, CA

  15. Rapid on-site air sampling with a needle extraction device for evaluating the indoor air environment in school facilities.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Mitsuru; Mizuguchi, Ayako; Ueta, Ikuo; Takahashi, Kazuya; Saito, Yoshihiro

    2013-01-01

    A rapid on-site air sampling technique was developed with a miniaturized needle-type sample preparation device for a systematic evaluation of the indoor air environments in school facilities. With the in-needle extraction device packed with a polymer particle of divinylbenzene and activated carbon particles, various types of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were successfully extracted. For evaluating the indoor air qualities in school facilities, air samples in renovated rooms using organic solvent as a thinner of the paint were analyzed along with measurements of several VOCs in indoor air samples taken in newly built primary schools mainly using low-VOCs materials. After periodical renovation/maintenance, the time-variation profile of typical VOCs found in the school facilities has also been monitored. From the results, it could be observed that the VOCs in most of the rooms in these primary schools were at a quite low level; however, a relatively higher concentration of VOCs was found in some specially designed rooms, such as music rooms. In addition, some non-regulated compounds, including benzyl alcohol and branched alkanes, were detected in these primary schools. The results showed a good applicability of the needle device to indoor air analysis in schools, suggesting a wide range of future employment of the needle device, especially for indoor air analysis in other types of facilities and rooms including hospitals and hotels. PMID:23665624

  16. 46 CFR 154.1866 - Cargo hose connection: Transferring cargo.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Cargo hose connection: Transferring cargo. 154.1866 Section 154.1866 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS... Cargo hose connection: Transferring cargo. No person may transfer cargo through a cargo hose...

  17. 46 CFR 154.1866 - Cargo hose connection: Transferring cargo.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cargo hose connection: Transferring cargo. 154.1866 Section 154.1866 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS... Cargo hose connection: Transferring cargo. No person may transfer cargo through a cargo hose...

  18. 46 CFR 154.1866 - Cargo hose connection: Transferring cargo.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Cargo hose connection: Transferring cargo. 154.1866 Section 154.1866 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS... Cargo hose connection: Transferring cargo. No person may transfer cargo through a cargo hose...

  19. 46 CFR 154.1866 - Cargo hose connection: Transferring cargo.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cargo hose connection: Transferring cargo. 154.1866 Section 154.1866 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS... Cargo hose connection: Transferring cargo. No person may transfer cargo through a cargo hose...

  20. 46 CFR 154.1866 - Cargo hose connection: Transferring cargo.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Cargo hose connection: Transferring cargo. 154.1866 Section 154.1866 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS... Cargo hose connection: Transferring cargo. No person may transfer cargo through a cargo hose...

  1. 33 CFR 334.1290 - In Bering Sea, Shemya Island Area, Alaska; meteorological rocket launching facility, Alaskan Air...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., Alaska; meteorological rocket launching facility, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force. 334.1290 Section...; meteorological rocket launching facility, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force. (a) The danger zone. An arc of a...) Rockets will normally be launched one each day Monday through Friday between 9 a.m. and 3 p.m....

  2. 33 CFR 334.1290 - In Bering Sea, Shemya Island Area, Alaska; meteorological rocket launching facility, Alaskan Air...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., Alaska; meteorological rocket launching facility, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force. 334.1290 Section...; meteorological rocket launching facility, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force. (a) The danger zone. An arc of a...) Rockets will normally be launched one each day Monday through Friday between 9 a.m. and 3 p.m....

  3. 33 CFR 334.1290 - In Bering Sea, Shemya Island Area, Alaska; meteorological rocket launching facility, Alaskan Air...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., Alaska; meteorological rocket launching facility, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force. 334.1290 Section...; meteorological rocket launching facility, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force. (a) The danger zone. An arc of a...) Rockets will normally be launched one each day Monday through Friday between 9 a.m. and 3 p.m....

  4. 33 CFR 334.1290 - In Bering Sea, Shemya Island Area, Alaska; meteorological rocket launching facility, Alaskan Air...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., Alaska; meteorological rocket launching facility, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force. 334.1290 Section...; meteorological rocket launching facility, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force. (a) The danger zone. An arc of a...) Rockets will normally be launched one each day Monday through Friday between 9 a.m. and 3 p.m....

  5. 33 CFR 334.1290 - In Bering Sea, Shemya Island Area, Alaska; meteorological rocket launching facility, Alaskan Air...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., Alaska; meteorological rocket launching facility, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force. 334.1290 Section...; meteorological rocket launching facility, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force. (a) The danger zone. An arc of a...) Rockets will normally be launched one each day Monday through Friday between 9 a.m. and 3 p.m....

  6. Frequency response of a jet engine test facility air supply system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franke, M. E.; Ross, M. L.

    1985-01-01

    The frequency response of a laboratory scale model of a portion of the air supply system of an engine test facility is obtained both experimentally and using one-dimensional, small-signal, distributed parameter theory. The effects of line terminations and mean flow are considered. Good agreement between experiment and theory is obtained. Predictions are extended to a full scale test facility air supply system operating under several possible test conditions.

  7. 46 CFR 151.45-4 - Cargo-handling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... the persons in charge of cargo handling. (h) Auxiliary steam, air, fuel, or electric current. When discharging cargo from one or more barges, the towing vessel may furnish steam, air, fuel, or electric current... cleaning under Subpart C of 33 CFR part 155. (2) The person in charge of the transfer shall ensure...

  8. 46 CFR 151.45-4 - Cargo-handling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... the persons in charge of cargo handling. (h) Auxiliary steam, air, fuel, or electric current. When discharging cargo from one or more barges, the towing vessel may furnish steam, air, fuel, or electric current... cleaning under Subpart C of 33 CFR part 155. (2) The person in charge of the transfer shall ensure...

  9. 46 CFR 151.45-4 - Cargo-handling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... the persons in charge of cargo handling. (h) Auxiliary steam, air, fuel, or electric current. When discharging cargo from one or more barges, the towing vessel may furnish steam, air, fuel, or electric current... cleaning under Subpart C of 33 CFR part 155. (2) The person in charge of the transfer shall ensure...

  10. 46 CFR 151.45-4 - Cargo-handling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... the persons in charge of cargo handling. (h) Auxiliary steam, air, fuel, or electric current. When discharging cargo from one or more barges, the towing vessel may furnish steam, air, fuel, or electric current... cleaning under Subpart C of 33 CFR part 155. (2) The person in charge of the transfer shall ensure...

  11. 46 CFR 151.45-4 - Cargo-handling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... the persons in charge of cargo handling. (h) Auxiliary steam, air, fuel, or electric current. When discharging cargo from one or more barges, the towing vessel may furnish steam, air, fuel, or electric current... cleaning under Subpart C of 33 CFR part 155. (2) The person in charge of the transfer shall ensure...

  12. 33 CFR 126.29 - Supervision and control of dangerous cargo.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... dangerous cargo. 126.29 Section 126.29 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) WATERFRONT FACILITIES HANDLING OF DANGEROUS CARGO AT WATERFRONT FACILITIES § 126.29 Supervision and control of dangerous cargo. (a) Authority. The Captain of the Port is authorized to...

  13. 33 CFR 126.29 - Supervision and control of dangerous cargo.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... dangerous cargo. 126.29 Section 126.29 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) WATERFRONT FACILITIES HANDLING OF DANGEROUS CARGO AT WATERFRONT FACILITIES § 126.29 Supervision and control of dangerous cargo. (a) Authority. The Captain of the Port is authorized to...

  14. 33 CFR 126.33 - Penalties for handling dangerous cargo without permit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) WATERFRONT FACILITIES HANDLING OF DANGEROUS CARGO AT WATERFRONT FACILITIES § 126.33 Penalties for handling dangerous cargo without permit. Handling, storing, stowing, loading, discharging, or transporting any dangerous cargo covered by § 126.27 under circumstances not covered by...

  15. 33 CFR 126.33 - Penalties for handling dangerous cargo without permit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) WATERFRONT FACILITIES HANDLING OF DANGEROUS CARGO AT WATERFRONT FACILITIES § 126.33 Penalties for handling dangerous cargo without permit. Handling, storing, stowing, loading, discharging, or transporting any dangerous cargo covered by § 126.27 under circumstances not covered by...

  16. 33 CFR 126.29 - Supervision and control of dangerous cargo.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... dangerous cargo. 126.29 Section 126.29 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) WATERFRONT FACILITIES HANDLING OF DANGEROUS CARGO AT WATERFRONT FACILITIES § 126.29 Supervision and control of dangerous cargo. (a) Authority. The Captain of the Port is authorized to...

  17. 33 CFR 126.19 - Issuance of permits for handling designated dangerous cargo.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., or transporting designated dangerous cargo at such waterfront facility provided the following... designated dangerous cargo. 126.19 Section 126.19 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) WATERFRONT FACILITIES HANDLING OF DANGEROUS CARGO AT WATERFRONT...

  18. 33 CFR 126.19 - Issuance of permits for handling designated dangerous cargo.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., or transporting designated dangerous cargo at such waterfront facility provided the following... designated dangerous cargo. 126.19 Section 126.19 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) WATERFRONT FACILITIES HANDLING OF DANGEROUS CARGO AT WATERFRONT...

  19. 33 CFR 126.33 - Penalties for handling dangerous cargo without permit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) WATERFRONT FACILITIES HANDLING OF DANGEROUS CARGO AT WATERFRONT FACILITIES § 126.33 Penalties for handling dangerous cargo without permit. Handling, storing, stowing, loading, discharging, or transporting any dangerous cargo covered by § 126.27 under circumstances not covered by...

  20. 33 CFR 126.19 - Issuance of permits for handling designated dangerous cargo.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., or transporting designated dangerous cargo at such waterfront facility provided the following... designated dangerous cargo. 126.19 Section 126.19 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) WATERFRONT FACILITIES HANDLING OF DANGEROUS CARGO AT WATERFRONT...

  1. 33 CFR 126.19 - Issuance of permits for handling designated dangerous cargo.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., or transporting designated dangerous cargo at such waterfront facility provided the following... designated dangerous cargo. 126.19 Section 126.19 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) WATERFRONT FACILITIES HANDLING OF DANGEROUS CARGO AT WATERFRONT...

  2. 33 CFR 126.19 - Issuance of permits for handling designated dangerous cargo.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., or transporting designated dangerous cargo at such waterfront facility provided the following... designated dangerous cargo. 126.19 Section 126.19 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) WATERFRONT FACILITIES HANDLING OF DANGEROUS CARGO AT WATERFRONT...

  3. 33 CFR 126.29 - Supervision and control of dangerous cargo.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... dangerous cargo. 126.29 Section 126.29 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) WATERFRONT FACILITIES HANDLING OF DANGEROUS CARGO AT WATERFRONT FACILITIES § 126.29 Supervision and control of dangerous cargo. (a) Authority. The Captain of the Port is authorized to...

  4. 33 CFR 126.33 - Penalties for handling dangerous cargo without permit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) WATERFRONT FACILITIES HANDLING OF DANGEROUS CARGO AT WATERFRONT FACILITIES § 126.33 Penalties for handling dangerous cargo without permit. Handling, storing, stowing, loading, discharging, or transporting any dangerous cargo covered by § 126.27 under circumstances not covered by...

  5. 33 CFR 126.29 - Supervision and control of dangerous cargo.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... dangerous cargo. 126.29 Section 126.29 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) WATERFRONT FACILITIES HANDLING OF DANGEROUS CARGO AT WATERFRONT FACILITIES § 126.29 Supervision and control of dangerous cargo. (a) Authority. The Captain of the Port is authorized to...

  6. 33 CFR 126.33 - Penalties for handling dangerous cargo without permit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) WATERFRONT FACILITIES HANDLING OF DANGEROUS CARGO AT WATERFRONT FACILITIES § 126.33 Penalties for handling dangerous cargo without permit. Handling, storing, stowing, loading, discharging, or transporting any dangerous cargo covered by § 126.27 under circumstances not covered by...

  7. 75 FR 18255 - Passenger Facility Charge Database System for Air Carrier Reporting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-09

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Passenger Facility Charge Database System for Air Carrier Reporting AGENCY... interested parties of the availability of the Passenger Facility Charge (PFC) database system to report PFC... public agency. The FAA has developed a national PFC database system in order to more easily track the...

  8. Wind Tunnel Evaluation of Vegetative Buffer Effects on Air Flow near Swine Production Facilities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Increasing concerns about generation and transport of swine odor constituents have substantiated wind tunnel simulation studies on air flow dynamics near swine production facilities. A possible odor mitigation strategy is a forest vegetative buffer as a windbreak barrier near swine facilities becaus...

  9. SEMINAR PUBLICATION: ORGANIC AIR EMISSIONS FROM WASTE MANAGEMENT FACILITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The organic chemicals contained in wastes processed during waste management operations can volatilize into the atmosphere and cause toxic or carcinogenic effects or contribute to ozone formation. Because air emissions from waste management operations pose a threat to human health...

  10. Radioactivity in air around nuclear facilities in Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Salazar, S.; Alvarez, C.; Silva, H.A.; Dorantes, C. ); Gaso, M.I.; Segovia, N. ); Perez, I. )

    1994-01-01

    Radioactivity in air sampled around the Nucleoelectric Power Plant at Laguna Verde and the Nuclear Center of Mexico research laboratories was analyzed. The gross beta activity in air filters during the preoperational (1986-1989) and operational (1989-1992) periods of the plant showed stability except in May 1986 when a contribution from the Chernobyl accident was observed. The radionuclides in air were below the accepted operational limit in the whole period. The average gross beta concentration in air during the same period (1986-1992) at the Nuclear Center showed also the higher values in 1986 and the concentration values of [sup 132]Cs determined in composite samples of edible wild mushrooms collected at this site, exhibited an increase in the same year. An analysis of the synoptical meteorological large-scale pattern occurring in the Northern Hemisphere after the Chernobyl accident is presented in order to estimate how the radioactive plume arrived to Mexico. 25 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Building Air Quality: A Guide for Building Owners and Facility Managers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agle, Elizabeth; Galbraith, Susan

    The past two decades have witnessed increased concerns over the health and comfort of indoor air quality (IAQ), but little indoor air-related information has been targeted at building owners and facility managers of public and commercial buildings. This manual, specifically created for such a population, provides guidance on preventing,…

  12. Use of Air Modeling to Reduce Facility Demolition Costs

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Dennis; Sanford, Peter; Parsons, Duane A.

    2003-02-26

    DOE faces the problem of decommissioning facilities contaminated with plutonium, uranium, and beryllium. The standard process has been to remove the contaminated process equipment from a facility, and then decontaminate the residual radiological and hazardous contamination from the facility structure to an ''unconditional release'' level. The facility would then be taken down as a clean demolition. Several beryllium-contaminated facilities were identified that will be particularly difficult to decontaminate to these release levels. A number of alternative decommissioning approaches were investigated that would require less decontamination, and thus reduced cost and schedule. Initial alternative approaches proposed erection of barriers (i.e. building-size tent structures with ventilation controls) to minimize the release of contamination to the environment. More recently we have investigated methods to control contamination at the structure surfaces before and during demolition, and model the risk posed to the workers, public, and the environment by the small residual material actually dispersed. This approach promises to minimize decontamination by removing only the highest contamination levels, and eliminates the need for erecting large contamination control structures along with the attendant ventilation equipment and administrative controls. The modeling has demonstrated the regulatory acceptability of this approach, and the approach is ready to be discussed with the regulators and the public.

  13. [Indoor air quality in school facilities in Cassino (Italy)].

    PubMed

    Langiano, Elisa; Lanni, Liana; Atrei, Patrizia; Ferrara, Maria; La Torre, Giuseppe; Capelli, Giovanni; De Vito, Elisabetta

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated the indoor air quality of 26 classrooms of secondary schools in the city of Cassino (Italy). Two types of school buildings were assessed: buildings specifically designed as schools, and former dwellings converted to schools. Measurements were taken in both winter and spring months, before students entered the classrooms and while the classrooms were occupied. Lower thermal comfort levels were observed during the winter months; in fact, during the winter, ideal temperature, humidity and air speed parameters were found in only a small percentage of classrooms and students were found to experience thermal discomfort as a result. Air velocity was often found to be inadequate both in winter and spring months and in both types of school buildings evaluated. Illumination levels measured during the winter months with both natural daylight and mixed illumination, were found to be below 200 lux, the minimum recommended level recommended by the ministerial decree 18.12.1975. Noise levels above the maximum level recommended by the ministerial decree 01.03.1991 were also frequently observed. The symptoms most frequently reported by students were headache, difficulties in concentrating, cough, and unusual tiredness. The various discomfort situations observed in both types of school buildings point toward a need for greater attention toward indoor air quality of schools as this can have affect students' attention, concentration, productivity and comfort.

  14. Comparison of air emissions from waste management facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Licata, A.; Minott, D.H.

    1996-09-01

    Landfilling remains the predominate disposal method for managing municipal solid waste (MSW) in the US. According to the US EPA, in 1993 landfilling accounted for 62% of the management alternative for disposing of MSW while recycling and combustion account for 22% and 15% respectively. Recent actions such as limits on flow control and EPA`s proposed Most Achievable Control Technology (MACT) rules for Municipal Waste Combustors (MWCs) most likely will increase the amount of MSW that will be landfilled. The air emissions from landfill operations have in general been ignored and unregulated. This paper will make a comparison of air emissions from a landfill (Fresh Kills Landfill in NYC) and a modern MSW. The paper will present the emissions from landfill operations including uncontrolled emissions, residual and secondary emissions from gas control systems, and emissions from diesel equipment at the landfill. The MWC emissions will include boiler pollutants and a comparison to fossil-fuel fired power plants.

  15. The microbial population in the air of cultivation facility of oyster mushrooms.

    PubMed

    Chun, Se Chul; Ahn, Yu Na; Khan, Sajid Mohamad; Chung, Il Min; Won, Hyang Yoen; Jhune, Chang Sung; Park, Yool Jin

    2012-12-01

    The microbial population in the air of mushroom cultivation facility was studied to understand the population structure and size depending on the cultivation methods and regions. The air contents of ten farmers' oyster mushroom cultivation facilities in Kyunggi province were sampled. The results indicated that there was no difference in population size depending on the regions of mushroom cultivation. In addition, the population size of bacteria in the growth room was bigger than that of the cooling room and outside of the mushroom house, but the fungal population was similar in size between cultivation stages. With regard to population structure, Pseudomonas and Penicillium species were most frequently isolated from the air of oyster mushroom cultivation facility. PMID:23274995

  16. 46 CFR 154.1831 - Persons in charge of transferring liquid cargo in bulk or preparing cargo tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... CFR 155.710; (3) On each foreign tankship, the person in charge of either a transfer of liquid cargo... required by 33 CFR 155.710; (4) When cargo regulated under this part is being transferred, the person in... in bulk or a cool-down, warm-up, gas-free, or air-out of each cargo tank; (2) Each transfer of...

  17. Monitoring plan for routine organic air emissions at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex Waste Storage Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Galloway, K.J.; Jolley, J.G.

    1994-06-01

    This monitoring plan provides the information necessary to perform routine organic air emissions monitoring at the Waste Storage Facilities located at the Transuranic Storage Area of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The Waste Storage Facilities include both the Type I and II Waste Storage Modules. The plan implements a dual method approach where two dissimilar analytical methodologies, Open-Path Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (OP-FTIR) and ancillary SUMMA{reg_sign} canister sampling, following the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) analytical method TO-14, will be used to provide qualitative and quantitative volatile organic concentration data. The Open-Path Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy will provide in situ, real time monitoring of volatile organic compound concentrations in the ambient air of the Waste Storage Facilities. To supplement the OP-FTIR data, air samples will be collected using SUMMA{reg_sign}, passivated, stainless steel canisters, following the EPA Method TO-14. These samples will be analyzed for volatile organic compounds with gas chromatograph/mass spectrometry analysis. The sampling strategy, procedures, and schedules are included in this monitoring plan. The development of this monitoring plan is driven by regulatory compliance to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, State of Idaho Toxic Air Pollutant increments, Occupational Safety and Health Administration. The various state and federal regulations address the characterization of the volatile organic compounds and the resultant ambient air emissions that may originate from facilities involved in industrial production and/or waste management activities.

  18. Review of the Physical Science Facility Stack Air Sampling Probe Locations

    SciTech Connect

    Glissmeyer, John A.

    2007-09-30

    This letter report reviews compliance of the current design of the Physical Science Facility (PSF) stack air sampling locations with the ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999 standard. The review was based on performance criteria used for locating air sampling probes, the design documents provided and available information on systems previously tested for compliance with the criteria. Recommendations are presented for ways to bring the design into compliance with the requirements for the sampling probe placement.

  19. External Cargo Integration Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gueera, Alan

    2005-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the system integration efforts for external cargo for the International Space Station (ISS). The role and responsibility of the External Carriers Ofice is reviewed. The presentation also reviews the application of the office to the Commercial Cargo Services contract.

  20. 33 CFR 126.25 - Penalties for handling designated dangerous cargo without permit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., discharging, or transporting any designated dangerous cargo without a permit, as provided under § 126.17... dangerous cargo without permit. 126.25 Section 126.25 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) WATERFRONT FACILITIES HANDLING OF DANGEROUS CARGO AT...

  1. 33 CFR 126.25 - Penalties for handling designated dangerous cargo without permit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., discharging, or transporting any designated dangerous cargo without a permit, as provided under § 126.17... dangerous cargo without permit. 126.25 Section 126.25 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) WATERFRONT FACILITIES HANDLING OF DANGEROUS CARGO AT...

  2. 33 CFR 126.25 - Penalties for handling designated dangerous cargo without permit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., discharging, or transporting any designated dangerous cargo without a permit, as provided under § 126.17... dangerous cargo without permit. 126.25 Section 126.25 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) WATERFRONT FACILITIES HANDLING OF DANGEROUS CARGO AT...

  3. 33 CFR 126.25 - Penalties for handling designated dangerous cargo without permit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., discharging, or transporting any designated dangerous cargo without a permit, as provided under § 126.17... dangerous cargo without permit. 126.25 Section 126.25 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) WATERFRONT FACILITIES HANDLING OF DANGEROUS CARGO AT...

  4. 33 CFR 126.25 - Penalties for handling designated dangerous cargo without permit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., discharging, or transporting any designated dangerous cargo without a permit, as provided under § 126.17... dangerous cargo without permit. 126.25 Section 126.25 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) WATERFRONT FACILITIES HANDLING OF DANGEROUS CARGO AT...

  5. Design of a test facility for gas-fired desiccant-based air conditioning systems

    SciTech Connect

    Jalalzadeh-Azar, A.A.; Steele, W.G.; Hodge, B.K.

    1996-12-31

    The design of a facility for testing desiccant-based air conditioning systems is presented. The determination of the performance parameters of desiccant systems is discussed including moisture removal capacity, latent and total cooling capacities, and efficiency indexes. The appropriate procedures and key measurements for determining these parameters are identified using uncertainty analysis.

  6. 40 CFR 86.161-00 - Air conditioning environmental test facility ambient requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... to simulate the impact of an ambient heat load on the power requirements of the vehicle's air conditioning compressor while operating on a specific driving cycle. The environmental facility control... heat load are: (A) Metal halide; (B) Quartz halogen with dichroic mirrors; and (C) Sodium iodide....

  7. Effect of bedding material on air quality of bedded manure packs in livestock facilities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bedding materials may affect air quality in livestock facilities. The objective of this study was to compare headspace concentrations of odorous volatile organic compounds (VOC), total reduce sulfur (TRS), CO2, CH4, and N2O when corn stover, bean stover, wheat straw, switch grass, pine wood chips, p...

  8. 32 CFR 643.122 - Reserve facilities-Air Force and Navy use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Reserve facilities-Air Force and Navy use. 643... Force and Navy use. MACOM may approve local agreements with other Army, DOD, and Reserve elements... Force or Navy Reserve, or which involve a transfer of funds between services for other than...

  9. 32 CFR 643.122 - Reserve facilities-Air Force and Navy use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Reserve facilities-Air Force and Navy use. 643... Force and Navy use. MACOM may approve local agreements with other Army, DOD, and Reserve elements... Force or Navy Reserve, or which involve a transfer of funds between services for other than...

  10. Transpired Solar Collector at NREL's Waste Handling Facility Uses Solar Energy to Heat Ventilation Air

    SciTech Connect

    2010-09-08

    The transpired solar collector was installed on NREL's Waste handling Facility (WHF) in 1990 to preheat ventilation air. The electrically heated WHF was an ideal candidate for the this technology - requiring a ventilation rate of 3,000 cubic feet per meter to maintain safe indoor conditions.

  11. 32 CFR 643.122 - Reserve facilities-Air Force and Navy use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Reserve facilities-Air Force and Navy use. 643... Force and Navy use. MACOM may approve local agreements with other Army, DOD, and Reserve elements... Force or Navy Reserve, or which involve a transfer of funds between services for other than...

  12. 32 CFR 643.122 - Reserve facilities-Air Force and Navy use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Reserve facilities-Air Force and Navy use. 643... Force and Navy use. MACOM may approve local agreements with other Army, DOD, and Reserve elements... Force or Navy Reserve, or which involve a transfer of funds between services for other than...

  13. 32 CFR 643.122 - Reserve facilities-Air Force and Navy use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Reserve facilities-Air Force and Navy use. 643... Force and Navy use. MACOM may approve local agreements with other Army, DOD, and Reserve elements... Force or Navy Reserve, or which involve a transfer of funds between services for other than...

  14. Continuous measurements of ammonia, nitrous oxide and methane from air scrubbers at pig housing facilities.

    PubMed

    Van der Heyden, C; Brusselman, E; Volcke, E I P; Demeyer, P

    2016-10-01

    Ammonia, largely emitted by agriculture, involves a great risk for eutrophication and acidification leading to biodiversity loss. Air scrubbers are widely applied to reduce ammonia emission from pig and poultry housing facilities, but it is not always clear whether their performance meets the requirements. Besides, there is a growing international concern for the livestock related greenhouse gases methane and nitrous oxide but hardly any data concerning their fate in air scrubbers are available. This contribution presents the results from measurement campaigns conducted at a chemical, a biological and a two-stage biological air scrubber installed at pig housing facilities in Flanders. Ammonia, nitrous oxide and methane at the inlet and outlet of the air scrubbers were monitored on-line during one week using a photoacoustic gas monitor, which allowed to investigate diurnal fluctuations in the removal performance of air scrubbers. Additionally, the homogeneity of the air scrubbers, normally checked by gas detection tubes, was investigated in more detail using the continuous data. The biological air scrubber with extra nitrification tank performed well in terms of ammonia removal (86 ± 6%), while the two-stage air scrubber suffered from nitrifying bacteria inhibition. In the chemical air scrubber the pH was not kept constant, lowering the ammonia removal efficiency. A lower ammonia removal efficiency was found during the day, when the ventilation rate was the highest. Nitrous oxide was produced inside the biological and two-stage scrubber, resulting in an increased outlet concentration of more than 200%. Methane could not be removed in the different air scrubbers because of its low water solubility. PMID:27341376

  15. Continuous measurements of ammonia, nitrous oxide and methane from air scrubbers at pig housing facilities.

    PubMed

    Van der Heyden, C; Brusselman, E; Volcke, E I P; Demeyer, P

    2016-10-01

    Ammonia, largely emitted by agriculture, involves a great risk for eutrophication and acidification leading to biodiversity loss. Air scrubbers are widely applied to reduce ammonia emission from pig and poultry housing facilities, but it is not always clear whether their performance meets the requirements. Besides, there is a growing international concern for the livestock related greenhouse gases methane and nitrous oxide but hardly any data concerning their fate in air scrubbers are available. This contribution presents the results from measurement campaigns conducted at a chemical, a biological and a two-stage biological air scrubber installed at pig housing facilities in Flanders. Ammonia, nitrous oxide and methane at the inlet and outlet of the air scrubbers were monitored on-line during one week using a photoacoustic gas monitor, which allowed to investigate diurnal fluctuations in the removal performance of air scrubbers. Additionally, the homogeneity of the air scrubbers, normally checked by gas detection tubes, was investigated in more detail using the continuous data. The biological air scrubber with extra nitrification tank performed well in terms of ammonia removal (86 ± 6%), while the two-stage air scrubber suffered from nitrifying bacteria inhibition. In the chemical air scrubber the pH was not kept constant, lowering the ammonia removal efficiency. A lower ammonia removal efficiency was found during the day, when the ventilation rate was the highest. Nitrous oxide was produced inside the biological and two-stage scrubber, resulting in an increased outlet concentration of more than 200%. Methane could not be removed in the different air scrubbers because of its low water solubility.

  16. Development and use of hydrogen-air torches in an altitude facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lottig, Roy A.; Huber, Gary T.

    1993-01-01

    A hydrogen-air ignition torch concept that had been used successfully in two rocket engine test facilities to consume excess hydrogen in their exhausters at atmospheric conditions was experimentally evaluated and developed in an altitude test facility at NASA Lewis Research Center. The idea was to use several of these torches in conjunction with hydrogen detectors and dilution air to prevent excess accumulation of unburned hydrogen or mixtures of hydrogen and air exceeding the sea-level lower flammability limit in the altitude facility exhaust system during hydrogen-fueled propulsion system tests. The torches were evaluated for a range of fuel-to-air ratios from 0.09 to 0.39 and for a range of exit diameters from 19/64 to 49/64 in. From the results of these tests a torch geometry and a fuel-to-air ratio were selected that produced a reasonably sized torch exhaust flame for consumption of unburned hydrogen at altitude pressures from sea level to 4 psia.

  17. Survey of Aerothermodynamics Facilities Useful for the Design of Hypersonic Vehicles Using Air-Breathing Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, James O.; Deiwert, George S.

    1997-01-01

    This paper surveys the use of aerothermodynamic facilities which have been useful in the study of external flows and propulsion aspects of hypersonic, air-breathing vehicles. While the paper is not a survey of all facilities, it covers the utility of shock tunnels and conventional hypersonic blow-down facilities which have been used for hypersonic air-breather studies. The problems confronting researchers in the field of aerothermodynamics are outlined. Results from the T5 GALCIT tunnel for the shock-on lip problem are outlined. Experiments on combustors and short expansion nozzles using the semi-free jet method have been conducted in large shock tunnels. An example which employed the NASA Ames 16-Inch shock tunnel is outlined, and the philosophy of the test technique is described. Conventional blow-down hypersonic wind tunnels are quite useful in hypersonic air-breathing studies. Results from an expansion ramp experiment, simulating the nozzle on a hypersonic air-breather from the NASA Ames 3.5 Foot Hypersonic wind tunnel are summarized. Similar work on expansion nozzles conducted in the NASA Langley hypersonic wind tunnel complex is cited. Free-jet air-frame propulsion integration and configuration stability experiments conducted at Langley in the hypersonic wind tunnel complex on a small generic model are also summarized.

  18. Multipurpose Cargo Transfer Bag

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broyan, James; Baccus, Shelley

    2014-01-01

    The Logistics Reduction (LR) project within the Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) program is tasked with reducing logistical mass and repurposing logistical items. Multipurpose Cargo Transfer Bags (MCTB) have been designed such that they can serve the same purpose as a Cargo Transfer Bag, the suitcase-shaped common logistics carrying bag for Shuttle and the International Space Station. After use as a cargo carrier, a regular CTB becomes trash, whereas the MCTB can be unzipped, unsnapped, and unfolded to be reused. Reuse ideas that have been investigated include partitions, crew quarters, solar radiation storm shelters, acoustic blankets, and forward osmosis water processing.

  19. 46 CFR 154.1810 - Cargo manual.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... system that affect its operation and maintenance, including pressure and temperature ranges and relief valve settings. (6) Pressures, temperatures, and liquid levels for all operations. (7) General... with inert gas and air. (13) A description of hull and cargo tank temperature monitoring systems....

  20. 46 CFR 154.1810 - Cargo manual.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... system that affect its operation and maintenance, including pressure and temperature ranges and relief valve settings. (6) Pressures, temperatures, and liquid levels for all operations. (7) General... with inert gas and air. (13) A description of hull and cargo tank temperature monitoring systems....

  1. ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLING USING LOCATION SPECIFIC AIR MONITORING IN BULK HANDLING FACILITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Sexton, L.; Hanks, D.; Degange, J.; Brant, H.; Hall, G.; Cable-Dunlap, P.; Anderson, B.

    2011-06-07

    Since the introduction of safeguards strengthening measures approved by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Board of Governors (1992-1997), international nuclear safeguards inspectors have been able to utilize environmental sampling (ES) (e.g. deposited particulates, air, water, vegetation, sediments, soil and biota) in their safeguarding approaches at bulk uranium/plutonium handling facilities. Enhancements of environmental sampling techniques used by the IAEA in drawing conclusions concerning the absence of undeclared nuclear materials or activities will soon be able to take advantage of a recent step change improvement in the gathering and analysis of air samples at these facilities. Location specific air monitoring feasibility tests have been performed with excellent results in determining attribute and isotopic composition of chemical elements present in an actual test-bed sample. Isotopic analysis of collected particles from an Aerosol Contaminant Extractor (ACE) collection, was performed with the standard bulk sampling protocol used throughout the IAEA network of analytical laboratories (NWAL). The results yielded bulk isotopic values expected for the operations. Advanced designs of air monitoring instruments such as the ACE may be used in gas centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEP) to detect the production of highly enriched uranium (HEU) or enrichments not declared by a State. Researchers at Savannah River National Laboratory in collaboration with Oak Ridge National Laboratory are developing the next generation of ES equipment for air grab and constant samples that could become an important addition to the international nuclear safeguards inspector's toolkit. Location specific air monitoring to be used to establish a baseline environmental signature of a particular facility employed for comparison of consistencies in declared operations will be described in this paper. Implementation of air monitoring will be contrasted against the use of smear ES

  2. A Distributed Simulation Facility to Support Human Factors Research in Advanced Air Transportation Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amonlirdviman, Keith; Farley, Todd C.; Hansman, R. John, Jr.; Ladik, John F.; Sherer, Dana Z.

    1998-01-01

    A distributed real-time simulation of the civil air traffic environment developed to support human factors research in advanced air transportation technology is presented. The distributed environment is based on a custom simulation architecture designed for simplicity and flexibility in human experiments. Standard Internet protocols are used to create the distributed environment, linking all advanced cockpit simulator, all Air Traffic Control simulator, and a pseudo-aircraft control and simulation management station. The pseudo-aircraft control station also functions as a scenario design tool for coordinating human factors experiments. This station incorporates a pseudo-pilot interface designed to reduce workload for human operators piloting multiple aircraft simultaneously in real time. The application of this distributed simulation facility to support a study of the effect of shared information (via air-ground datalink) on pilot/controller shared situation awareness and re-route negotiation is also presented.

  3. Savings of 10--30% pollution reduction -- Air, and hazardous waste in painting facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph, R.

    1999-07-01

    Hands-on painter training was conducted at over 23 aerospace painting facilities with the goal of lowering coating and solvent usage, VOC/HAP emissions and hazardous waste. Direct improvements came from improved painting techniques resulting in less overspray and fewer reworks. However, many of the problems do not reside with the painters= techniques or their lack of understanding of the painting processes. Inadequate equipment, poor maintenance and lack of understanding by supervisors and engineering managers largely contribute to unnecessary air and waste pollution from painting facilities. This paper provides numerous findings and recommendations that have surfaced as a result of the training programs.

  4. Laboratory facility design and microbial indoor air quality in selected hospital laboratories.

    PubMed

    Luksamijarulkul, Pipat; Kiennukul, Nuchanard; Vatthanasomboon, Pisit

    2014-05-01

    Hospital laboratory is one of workplace areas contaminated with a variety of biohazards. A cross sectional study was conducted to assess the microbial air quality and facility design in the laboratories of four selected governmental hospitals (Hospitals A, B, C, and D) in Bangkok, Thailand. One hundred eighty-eight indoor air samples were collected from 40 laboratory rooms to investigate bacterial and fungal counts using the Millipore air tester. Forty air samples were collected from the waiting areas of those laboratories, and 16 outdoor air samples were collected to use for comparison. Additionally, those laboratory facilities were assessed following biosafety facility design (10 items). Results indicated that the facility design of laboratory in the Hospital A met most of items of the biosafety facility criteria. The rest met only seven items of the criteria. Means +/- standard deviation (SD) of bacterial counts of 253.1 +/- 247.7 cfu/m3, 236.8 +/- 200.1 cfu/m3, 304.4 +/- 264.2 cfu/m3, and 146.7 +/- 127.0 cfu/m3, and fungal counts of 500.8 +/- 64.2 cfu/ m3, 425.0 +/- 21.2 cfu/m3, 357.0 +/- 121.2 cfu/m3, and 355.7 +/- 86.8 cfu/m3 were found in hospital laboratories A, B, C and D, respectively. The isolated colonies of bacteria and fungi were identified as group or genus. It was found that the most common bacteria was Staphylococcus spp (84.1%, 76.0%, 72.1% and 80.5%, respectively), whereas, the most common fungi were Aspergillus spp and septate hyphae fungi (42.0%, 37.5%, 39.5%, and 45.7%; vs 38.6%, 56.2%, 52.1%, and 37.2%, respectively). These data may be valuable to develop interventions to improve the microbial indoor air quality among hospital laboratories and for preventing the laboratory-acquired infections. PMID:24974659

  5. Laboratory facility design and microbial indoor air quality in selected hospital laboratories.

    PubMed

    Luksamijarulkul, Pipat; Kiennukul, Nuchanard; Vatthanasomboon, Pisit

    2014-05-01

    Hospital laboratory is one of workplace areas contaminated with a variety of biohazards. A cross sectional study was conducted to assess the microbial air quality and facility design in the laboratories of four selected governmental hospitals (Hospitals A, B, C, and D) in Bangkok, Thailand. One hundred eighty-eight indoor air samples were collected from 40 laboratory rooms to investigate bacterial and fungal counts using the Millipore air tester. Forty air samples were collected from the waiting areas of those laboratories, and 16 outdoor air samples were collected to use for comparison. Additionally, those laboratory facilities were assessed following biosafety facility design (10 items). Results indicated that the facility design of laboratory in the Hospital A met most of items of the biosafety facility criteria. The rest met only seven items of the criteria. Means +/- standard deviation (SD) of bacterial counts of 253.1 +/- 247.7 cfu/m3, 236.8 +/- 200.1 cfu/m3, 304.4 +/- 264.2 cfu/m3, and 146.7 +/- 127.0 cfu/m3, and fungal counts of 500.8 +/- 64.2 cfu/ m3, 425.0 +/- 21.2 cfu/m3, 357.0 +/- 121.2 cfu/m3, and 355.7 +/- 86.8 cfu/m3 were found in hospital laboratories A, B, C and D, respectively. The isolated colonies of bacteria and fungi were identified as group or genus. It was found that the most common bacteria was Staphylococcus spp (84.1%, 76.0%, 72.1% and 80.5%, respectively), whereas, the most common fungi were Aspergillus spp and septate hyphae fungi (42.0%, 37.5%, 39.5%, and 45.7%; vs 38.6%, 56.2%, 52.1%, and 37.2%, respectively). These data may be valuable to develop interventions to improve the microbial indoor air quality among hospital laboratories and for preventing the laboratory-acquired infections.

  6. Monte-Carlo simulations of neutron-induced activation in a Fast-Neutron and Gamma-Based Cargo Inspection System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bromberger, B.; Bar, D.; Brandis, M.; Dangendorf, V.; Goldberg, M. B.; Kaufmann, F.; Mor, I.; Nolte, R.; Schmiedel, M.; Tittelmeier, K.; Vartsky, D.; Wershofen, H.

    2012-03-01

    An air cargo inspection system combining two nuclear reaction based techniques, namely Fast-Neutron Resonance Radiography and Dual-Discrete-Energy Gamma Radiography is currently being developed. This system is expected to allow detection of standard and improvised explosives as well as special nuclear materials. An important aspect for the applicability of nuclear techniques in an airport inspection facility is the inventory and lifetimes of radioactive isotopes produced by the neutron radiation inside the cargo, as well as the dose delivered by these isotopes to people in contact with the cargo during and following the interrogation procedure. Using MCNPX and CINDER90 we have calculated the activation levels for several typical inspection scenarios. One example is the activation of various metal samples embedded in a cotton-filled container. To validate the simulation results, a benchmark experiment was performed, in which metal samples were activated by fast-neutrons in a water-filled glass jar. The induced activity was determined by analyzing the gamma spectra. Based on the calculated radioactive inventory in the container, the dose levels due to the induced gamma radiation were calculated at several distances from the container and in relevant time windows after the irradiation, in order to evaluate the radiation exposure of the cargo handling staff, air crew and passengers during flight. The possibility of remanent long-lived radioactive inventory after cargo is delivered to the client is also of concern and was evaluated.

  7. Air quality investigations of the Sandia National Laboratories Sol se Mete Aerial Cable Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Gutman, W.M.; Silver, R.J.

    1994-12-01

    The air quality implications of the test and evaluation activities at the Sandia National Laboratories Sol se Mete Aerial Cable Facility are examined. All facets of the activity that affect air quality are considered. Air contaminants produced directly include exhaust products of rocket motors used to accelerate test articles, dust and gas from chemical explosives, and exhaust gases from electricity generators in the test arenas. Air contaminants produced indirectly include fugitive dust and exhaust contaminants from vehicles used to transport personnel and material to the test area, and effluents produced by equipment used to heat the project buildings. Both the ongoing program and the proposed changes in the program are considered. Using a reliable estimate of th maximum annual testing level, the quantities of contaminants released by project activities ar computed either from known characteristics of test items or from EPA-approved emission factors Atmospheric concentrations of air contaminants are predicted using EPA dispersion models. The predicted quantities and concentrations are evaluated in relation to Federal, New Mexico, an Bernalillo County air quality regulations and the human health and safety standards of the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists.

  8. 49 CFR 1544.228 - Access to cargo and cargo screening: Security threat assessments for cargo personnel in the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Access to cargo and cargo screening: Security... COMMERCIAL OPERATORS Operations § 1544.228 Access to cargo and cargo screening: Security threat assessments... authorizes to screen cargo or to supervise the screening of cargo under § 1544.205....

  9. 46 CFR 111.106-13 - Cargo handling devices or cargo pump rooms handling flammable or combustible cargoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Cargo handling devices or cargo pump rooms handling... OSVs § 111.106-13 Cargo handling devices or cargo pump rooms handling flammable or combustible cargoes... classification of such areas. (c) Cargo pump rooms must be isolated from all sources of vapor ignition...

  10. Characterization of microbial communities in exhaust air treatment systems of large-scale pig housing facilities.

    PubMed

    Haneke, J; Lee, N M; Gaul, T W; Van den Weghe, H F A

    2010-01-01

    Exhaust air treatment has gained importance as an essential factor in intensive livestock areas due to the rising emissions in the environment. Wet filter walls of multi-stage exhaust air treatment systems precipitate gaseous ammonia and dust particles from exhaust air in washing water. Microbial communities in the biomass developed in the washing water of five large-scale exhaust air treatment units of pig housing facilities, were investigated by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and 16S rDNA sequence analyses. No "standard" nitrifying bacteria were found in the washing water. Instead mainly α-Proteobacteria, aggregating β- and χ-Proteobacteria, a large number of Actinobacteria, as well as individual Planctomycetales and Crenarchaeota were detected after more than twelve months' operation. The main Proteobacteria species present were affiliated to the families Alcaligenaceae, Comamonadaceae and Xanthomonadaceae. Furthermore, we investigated the consumption of inorganic nitrogen compounds in the washing water of one exhaust air treatment unit during a fattening period with and without pH control. Maintaining the pH at 6.0 resulted in a ca. fivefold higher ammonium concentration and a ca. fourfold lower concentration of oxidized nitrogen compounds after the fattening period was finished.

  11. Space Shuttle cargo processing at the Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rock, W. H.

    1980-01-01

    This paper discusses the various activities involved in processing the two basic types of cargo being prepared for launch by the Space Transportation System. An overview will be presented describing the independent processing systems used to ready the Spacelabs and other horizontal cargo as well as upper stages and other vertical cargo. The interrelationship of these two types of preparations with the main line Space Shuttle test and checkout operations will be shown. In the explanation of each process, the ground support equipment and facilities of the Kennedy Space Center are described.

  12. Assessment of Air Emissions at the U S Liquids Exploration and Production Land Treatment Facility

    SciTech Connect

    John H. Pardue; K.T. Valsaraj

    2000-12-01

    This project was initiated to make the first set of measurements documenting the potential for emissions of pollutants from exploration and production (E&P) waste disposal facilities at Bourg, Louisiana and Bateman Island, Louisiana. The objective of the project was to quantify the emissions and to determine whether the measured emissions were potentially harmful to human health of workers and the adjacent community. The study, funded by the Department of Energy (DOE) is designed to complement additional studies funded by Louisiana Department of Natural Resources (LADNR) and the American Petroleum Institute. The distinguishing feature of this study is that actual, independent field measurements of emissions were used to assess the potential problems of this disposal technology. Initial measurements were made at the Bourg, LA facility, adjacent to the community of Grand Bois in late 1998-early 1999. Emission measurements were performed using aluminum chambers placed over the surface of the landfarm cells. Air was pulled through the chambers and the concentration of the contaminants in the air exiting the chambers was measured. The contaminants of interest were the ''BTEX'' compounds (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene), commonly found in E&P wastes and hydrogen sulfide, a noxious gas present naturally in many E&P wastes and crude oils. Measurements indicated that emissions were measurable using the techniques developed for the study. However, when the air concentrations of these contaminants that developed above the landfarm cells were compared with standards for workers from the Occupational and Safety and Health Association (''OSHA'') and for communities (Louisiana's ambient air standards), levels were not of concern. Since amounts of wastes being processed by the Bourg facility were considerably lower than normal, a decision was made to continue the study at the Bateman Island facility near Morgan City, LA. This facility was receiving more normal loadings

  13. Survey of Aerothermodynamics Facilities Useful for the Design of Hypersonic Vehicles Using Air-Breathing Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, James O.; Deiwert, G. S.

    1997-01-01

    The dream of producing an air-breathing, hydrogen fueled, hypervelocity aircraft has been before the aerospace community for decades. However, such a craft has not yet been realized, even in an experimental form. Despite the simplicity and beauty of the concept, many formidable problems must be overcome to make this dream a reality. This paper summarizes the aero/aerothermodynamic issues that must be addressed to make the dream a reality and discusses how aerothermodynamics facilities and their modem companion, real-gas computational fluid dynamics (CFD), can help solve the problems blocking the way to realizing the dream. The approach of the paper is first to outline the concept of an air-breathing hypersonic vehicle and then discuss the nose-to-tail aerothermodynamics issues and special aerodynamic problems that arise with such a craft. Then the utility of aerothermodynamic facilities and companion CFD analysis is illustrated by reviewing results from recent United States publications wherein these problems have been addressed. Papers selected for the discussion have k e n chosen such that the review will serve to survey important U.S. aero/aerothermodynamic real gas and conventional wind tunnel facilities that are useful in the study of hypersonic, hydrogen propelled hypervelocity vehicles.

  14. IMPACTS OF DIOXIN EMISSIONS FROM THE SHINKAMPO INCINERATOR TO THE U.S. NAVAL AIR FACILITY AT ATSUGI, JAPAN

    EPA Science Inventory

    The United States Naval Air Facility at Atsugi, Japan (NAF Atsugi) is located in the Kanto Plain area on the island of Honshu, Japan. Directly to the south of the facility, in the Tade River Valley, was the Shinkampo Incinerator Complex (SIC). The Incinerator is no longer in op...

  15. 10 CFR Appendix A to Part 835 - Derived Air Concentrations (DAC) for Controlling Radiation Exposure to Workers at DOE Facilities

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Derived Air Concentrations (DAC) for Controlling Radiation... RADIATION PROTECTION Pt. 835, App. A Appendix A to Part 835—Derived Air Concentrations (DAC) for Controlling Radiation Exposure to Workers at DOE Facilities The data presented in appendix A are to be used...

  16. 46 CFR 154.315 - Cargo pump and cargo compressor rooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Cargo pump and cargo compressor rooms. 154.315 Section... Equipment Ship Arrangements § 154.315 Cargo pump and cargo compressor rooms. (a) Cargo pump rooms and cargo compressor rooms must be above the weather deck and must be within the cargo area. (b) Where pumps...

  17. 46 CFR 154.315 - Cargo pump and cargo compressor rooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Cargo pump and cargo compressor rooms. 154.315 Section... Equipment Ship Arrangements § 154.315 Cargo pump and cargo compressor rooms. (a) Cargo pump rooms and cargo compressor rooms must be above the weather deck and must be within the cargo area. (b) Where pumps...

  18. 46 CFR 154.315 - Cargo pump and cargo compressor rooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cargo pump and cargo compressor rooms. 154.315 Section... Equipment Ship Arrangements § 154.315 Cargo pump and cargo compressor rooms. (a) Cargo pump rooms and cargo compressor rooms must be above the weather deck and must be within the cargo area. (b) Where pumps...

  19. 49 CFR 1548.9 - Acceptance of cargo.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Acceptance of cargo. 1548.9 Section 1548.9..., DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY CIVIL AVIATION SECURITY INDIRECT AIR CARRIER SECURITY § 1548.9 Acceptance of... program. (b) Refusal to transport. Each indirect air carrier must refuse to offer for transport on...

  20. Reliability and Maintainability Analysis of a High Air Pressure Compressor Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Safie, Fayssal M.; Ring, Robert W.; Cole, Stuart K.

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses a Reliability, Availability, and Maintainability (RAM) independent assessment conducted to support the refurbishment of the Compressor Station at the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC). The paper discusses the methodologies used by the assessment team to derive the repair by replacement (RR) strategies to improve the reliability and availability of the Compressor Station (Ref.1). This includes a RAPTOR simulation model that was used to generate the statistical data analysis needed to derive a 15-year investment plan to support the refurbishment of the facility. To summarize, study results clearly indicate that the air compressors are well past their design life. The major failures of Compressors indicate that significant latent failure causes are present. Given the occurrence of these high-cost failures following compressor overhauls, future major failures should be anticipated if compressors are not replaced. Given the results from the RR analysis, the study team recommended a compressor replacement strategy. Based on the data analysis, the RR strategy will lead to sustainable operations through significant improvements in reliability, availability, and the probability of meeting the air demand with acceptable investment cost that should translate, in the long run, into major cost savings. For example, the probability of meeting air demand improved from 79.7 percent for the Base Case to 97.3 percent. Expressed in terms of a reduction in the probability of failing to meet demand (1 in 5 days to 1 in 37 days), the improvement is about 700 percent. Similarly, compressor replacement improved the operational availability of the facility from 97.5 percent to 99.8 percent. Expressed in terms of a reduction in system unavailability (1 in 40 to 1 in 500), the improvement is better than 1000 percent (an order of magnitude improvement). It is worthy to note that the methodologies, tools, and techniques used in the LaRC study can be used to evaluate

  1. Simulation of air quality and cost to ventilate swine farrowing facilities in winter

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jae Hong; Peters, Thomas M.; Altmaier, Ralph; Sawvel, Russell A.; Anthony, T. Renée

    2016-01-01

    We developed a simulation model to study the effect of ventilation airflow rate with and without filtered recirculation on airborne contaminant concentrations (dust, NH3, CO, and CO2) for swine farrowing facilities. Energy and mass balance equations were used to simulate the indoor air quality and operational cost for a variety of ventilation conditions over a 3-month winter period, using time-varied outdoor temperature. The sensitivity of input and output parameters on indoor air quality and operational cost were evaluated. Significant factors affecting model output included mean winter temperature, generation rate of contaminants, pit-air-exchange ratio, and recirculation ratio. As mean outdoor temperature was decreased from −2.5 °C to −12.5 °C, total operational costs were increased from $872 to $1304. Dust generation rate affected dust concentrations linearly. When dust generation rates changed −50% and +100% from baseline, indoor dust concentrations were changed −50% and +100%, respectively. The selection of a pit-air-exchange ratio was found critical to NH3 concentration, but has little impact on other contaminants or cost. As the pit-air-exchange ratio was increased from 0.1 to 0.3, the NH3 concentration was increased by a factor of 1.5. The recirculation ratio affected both IAQ factors and total operational cost. As the recirculation ratio decreased to 0, inhalable and respirable dust concentrations, humidity, NH3 and CO2 concentrations decreased and total operational cost ($2216) was 104% more than with pit-fan-only ventilation ($1088). When the recirculation ratio was 1, the total operational cost was increased by $573 (53%) compared to pit-fan-only. Simulation provides a useful tool for examining the costs and benefits to installing common ventilation technology to CAFO and, ultimately, making sound management decisions. PMID:26937062

  2. Hazardous air pollutant (HAP) emission characterization of sewage treatment facilities in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kang, Kyoung-Hee; Dong, Jong-In

    2010-04-01

    Until recently, nearly all sewage treatment-related regulations and researches have focused on the removal of the conventional and toxic pollutants from liquid effluents. The discharge of toxic compounds to the atmosphere has been implicitly regarded as a way of removal or destruction. During sewage treatment, the fate mechanism of volatilization/stripping, sorption and biotransformation primarily determines the fate of volatile HAPs. The objectives of this study are to investigate the emission characteristics of HAPs, which are generated from the liquid surface of sewage treatment facilities, by using an emission isolation flux chamber. HAP emissions increased at the inlet of the aerobic chamber during summer due to the relatively high atmospheric temperature. The percent ratio of flux for toluene reached its peak in winter, accounting for 33.6-34.2% of the total, but decreased to 25.1-28.6% in summer. In autumn, trichloroethene (TCE) was the highest, recording 17.6-18.1%, with chloroform and toluene showing similar levels. It seems that the ratio of chlorinated hydrocarbons increases in both summer and autumn because the chamber temperature during that time is higher than winter. This study is the initial study to investigate the emission characteristics of volatile HAPs emitted from domestic sewage treatment facilities to the air in Korea. Therefore, the isolation flux chamber will be used as an emission estimations tool to measure HAPs from sewage treatment facilities and may be applied to develop the emission factor and national source inventory of HAPs. PMID:20383371

  3. Distribution of brominated flame retardants in different dust fractions in air from an electronics recycling facility.

    PubMed

    Julander, Anneli; Westberg, Håkan; Engwall, Magnus; van Bavel, Bert

    2005-11-01

    Twelve air samples were collected from an electronic recycling facility in Sweden representing three different dust fractions; respirable, total and inhalable dust. Four samples were collected from each fraction. The highest concentration of polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) #209 (ten bromine atoms) was found in the samples from the inhalable dust fraction (ID), which was 10 times higher than for the "total dust" fraction (TD). The concentration ranges were 157.6-208.6; 13.9-16.7; and 2.8-3.3 ng/m3 for inhalable, total and respirable fractions, respectively. The second most abundant PBDE congener was PBDE #183 (seven bromine atoms), followed by the second most abundant substance 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy)ethane (BTBPE) in all samples. In addition, decabromodiphenyl ethane (DeBDethane) was tentatively identified in five of the samples. Because of the large differences in air concentrations between the three fractions in ID, TD and RD, it is suggested that the inhalable instead of "total dust" fraction should be used to assess air concentrations, in particular for the larger and higher brominated flame retardants (BFRs).

  4. A geophysical shock and air blast simulator at the National Ignition Facility.

    PubMed

    Fournier, K B; Brown, C G; May, M J; Compton, S; Walton, O R; Shingleton, N; Kane, J O; Holtmeier, G; Loey, H; Mirkarimi, P B; Dunlop, W H; Guyton, R L; Huffman, E

    2014-09-01

    The energy partitioning energy coupling experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) have been designed to measure simultaneously the coupling of energy from a laser-driven target into both ground shock and air blast overpressure to nearby media. The source target for the experiment is positioned at a known height above the ground-surface simulant and is heated by four beams from the NIF. The resulting target energy density and specific energy are equal to those of a low-yield nuclear device. The ground-shock stress waves and atmospheric overpressure waveforms that result in our test system are hydrodynamically scaled analogs of full-scale seismic and air blast phenomena. This report summarizes the development of the platform, the simulations, and calculations that underpin the physics measurements that are being made, and finally the data that were measured. Agreement between the data and simulation of the order of a factor of two to three is seen for air blast quantities such as peak overpressure. Historical underground test data for seismic phenomena measured sensor displacements; we measure the stresses generated in our ground-surrogate medium. We find factors-of-a-few agreement between our measured peak stresses and predictions with modern geophysical computer codes. PMID:25273784

  5. A geophysical shock and air blast simulator at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Fournier, K. B.; Brown, C. G.; May, M. J.; Compton, S.; Walton, O. R.; Shingleton, N.; Kane, J. O.; Holtmeier, G.; Loey, H.; Mirkarimi, P. B.; Dunlop, W. H.; Guyton, R. L.; Huffman, E.

    2014-09-01

    The energy partitioning energy coupling experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) have been designed to measure simultaneously the coupling of energy from a laser-driven target into both ground shock and air blast overpressure to nearby media. The source target for the experiment is positioned at a known height above the ground-surface simulant and is heated by four beams from the NIF. The resulting target energy density and specific energy are equal to those of a low-yield nuclear device. The ground-shock stress waves and atmospheric overpressure waveforms that result in our test system are hydrodynamically scaled analogs of full-scale seismic and air blast phenomena. This report summarizes the development of the platform, the simulations, and calculations that underpin the physics measurements that are being made, and finally the data that were measured. Agreement between the data and simulation of the order of a factor of two to three is seen for air blast quantities such as peak overpressure. Historical underground test data for seismic phenomena measured sensor displacements; we measure the stresses generated in our ground-surrogate medium. We find factors-of-a-few agreement between our measured peak stresses and predictions with modern geophysical computer codes.

  6. A geophysical shock and air blast simulator at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Fournier, K. B.; Brown, C. G.; May, M. J.; Compton, S.; Walton, O. R.; Shingleton, N.; Kane, J. O.; Holtmeier, G.; Loey, H.; Mirkarimi, P. B.; Dunlop, W. H.; Guyton, R. L.; Huffman, E.

    2014-09-15

    The energy partitioning energy coupling experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) have been designed to measure simultaneously the coupling of energy from a laser-driven target into both ground shock and air blast overpressure to nearby media. The source target for the experiment is positioned at a known height above the ground-surface simulant and is heated by four beams from the NIF. The resulting target energy density and specific energy are equal to those of a low-yield nuclear device. The ground-shock stress waves and atmospheric overpressure waveforms that result in our test system are hydrodynamically scaled analogs of full-scale seismic and air blast phenomena. This report summarizes the development of the platform, the simulations, and calculations that underpin the physics measurements that are being made, and finally the data that were measured. Agreement between the data and simulation of the order of a factor of two to three is seen for air blast quantities such as peak overpressure. Historical underground test data for seismic phenomena measured sensor displacements; we measure the stresses generated in our ground-surrogate medium. We find factors-of-a-few agreement between our measured peak stresses and predictions with modern geophysical computer codes.

  7. Technical assessment of workplace air sampling requirements at tank farm facilities. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, P.A.

    1994-09-21

    WHC-CM-1-6 is the primary guidance for radiological control at Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). It was written to implement DOE N 5480.6 ``US Department of Energy Radiological Control Manual`` as it applies to programs at Hanford which are now overseen by WHC. As such, it complies with Title 10, Part 835 of the Code of Federal Regulations. In addition to WHC-CM-1-6, there is HSRCM-1, the ``Hanford Site Radiological Control Manual`` and several Department of Energy (DOE) Orders, national consensus standards, and reports that provide criteria, standards, and requirements for workplace air sampling programs. This document provides a summary of these, as they apply to WHC facility workplace air sampling programs. This document also provides an evaluation of the compliance of Tank Farms` workplace air sampling program to the criteria, standards, and requirements and documents compliance with the requirements where appropriate. Where necessary, it also indicates changes needed to bring specific locations into compliance.

  8. Innovative pollution prevention program at Air Force owned Raytheon operated facility incorporating Russian technology

    SciTech Connect

    Stallings, J.H.; Cepeda-Calderon, S.

    1999-07-01

    Air Force Plant 44 in Tucson, Arizona is owned by the Air Force and operated by Raytheon Missile Systems Company. A joint Air Force/Raytheon Pollution Prevention Team operates at AFP 44 with the ultimate goal to minimize or eliminate the use of hazardous substances. The team works together to uncover new technologies and methods that will replace chemicals used in the plant's missile manufacturing facilities. The program maximizes pollution prevention by first eliminating hazardous material use, then chemical recycling, next hazardous waste reduction and finally wastewater treatment and recycling. From fiscal years 1994 through 1997, nine pollution prevention projects have been implemented, totaling $2.6 million, with a payback averaging less than two years. A unique wastewater treatment method has been demonstrated as part of this program. This is electroflotation, a Russian technology which removes dispersed particles from liquid with gas bubbles obtained during water electrolysis. A unit was built in the US which successfully removed organic emulsions from wastewater. Operational units are planned for the removal of waste from waterfall paint booths. The pollution prevention joint team continues to be very active with two projects underway in FY 98 and two more funded for FY 99.

  9. GIS modeling of air toxics releases from TRI-reporting and non-TRI-reporting facilities: impacts for environmental justice.

    PubMed

    Dolinoy, Dana C; Miranda, Marie Lynn

    2004-12-01

    The Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) requires facilities with 10 or more full-time employees that process > 25,000 pounds in aggregate or use > 10,000 pounds of any one TRI chemical to report releases annually. However, little is known about releases from non-TRI-reporting facilities, nor has attention been given to the very localized equity impacts associated with air toxics releases. Using geographic information systems and industrial source complex dispersion modeling, we developed methods for characterizing air releases from TRI-reporting as well as non-TRI-reporting facilities at four levels of geographic resolution. We characterized the spatial distribution and concentration of air releases from one representative industry in Durham County, North Carolina (USA). Inclusive modeling of all facilities rather than modeling of TRI sites alone significantly alters the magnitude and spatial distribution of modeled air concentrations. Modeling exposure receptors at more refined levels of geographic resolution reveals localized, neighborhood-level exposure hot spots that are not apparent at coarser geographic scales. Multivariate analysis indicates that inclusive facility modeling at fine levels of geographic resolution reveals exposure disparities by income and race. These new methods significantly enhance the ability to model air toxics, perform equity analysis, and clarify conflicts in the literature regarding environmental justice findings. This work has substantial implications for how to structure TRI reporting requirements, as well as methods and types of analysis that will successfully elucidate the spatial distribution of exposure potentials across geographic, income, and racial lines. PMID:15579419

  10. Measurement of the Tracer Gradient and Sampling System Bias of the Hot Fuel Examination Facility Stack Air Monitoring System

    SciTech Connect

    Glissmeyer, John A.; Flaherty, Julia E.

    2011-07-20

    This report describes tracer gas uniformity and bias measurements made in the exhaust air discharge of the Hot Fuel Examination Facility at Idaho National Laboratory. The measurements were a follow-up on earlier measurements which indicated a lack of mixing of the two ventilation streams being discharged via a common stack. The lack of mixing is detrimental to the accuracy of air emission measurements. The lack of mixing was confirmed in these new measurements. The air sampling probe was found to be out of alignment and that was corrected. The suspected sampling bias in the air sample stream was disproved.

  11. 46 CFR 154.1858 - Cargo hose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cargo hose. 154.1858 Section 154.1858 Shipping COAST... SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Operations § 154.1858 Cargo hose. The person in charge of cargo transfer shall ensure that cargo hose used for cargo transfer service meets §§...

  12. 46 CFR 154.1858 - Cargo hose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cargo hose. 154.1858 Section 154.1858 Shipping COAST... SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Operations § 154.1858 Cargo hose. The person in charge of cargo transfer shall ensure that cargo hose used for cargo transfer service meets §§...

  13. 46 CFR 154.1858 - Cargo hose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Cargo hose. 154.1858 Section 154.1858 Shipping COAST... SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Operations § 154.1858 Cargo hose. The person in charge of cargo transfer shall ensure that cargo hose used for cargo transfer service meets §§...

  14. 46 CFR 154.1858 - Cargo hose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Cargo hose. 154.1858 Section 154.1858 Shipping COAST... SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Operations § 154.1858 Cargo hose. The person in charge of cargo transfer shall ensure that cargo hose used for cargo transfer service meets §§...

  15. 46 CFR 154.1858 - Cargo hose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Cargo hose. 154.1858 Section 154.1858 Shipping COAST... SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Operations § 154.1858 Cargo hose. The person in charge of cargo transfer shall ensure that cargo hose used for cargo transfer service meets §§...

  16. Evaluation of prototype air/fluid separator for Space Station Freedom Health Maintenance Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billica, Roger; Smith, Maureen; Murphy, Linda; Kizzee, Victor D.

    1991-01-01

    A prototype air/fluid separator suction apparatus proposed as a possible design for use with the Health Maintenance Facility aboard Space Station Freedom (SSF) was evaluated. A KC-135 parabolic flight test was performed for this purpose. The flights followed the standard 40 parabola profile with 20 to 25 seconds of near-zero gravity in each parabola. A protocol was prepared to evaluate the prototype device in several regulator modes (or suction force), using three fluids of varying viscosity, and using either continuous or intermittent suction. It was felt that a matrixed approach would best approximate the range of utilization anticipated for medical suction on SSF. The protocols were performed in one-gravity in a lab setting to familiarize the team with procedures and techniques. Identical steps were performed aboard the KC-135 during parabolic flight.

  17. Biological treatment of carbon disulfide laden air from sponge manufacturing facility

    SciTech Connect

    Hugler, W.; Acosta, C.M.; Benavente, J.L.; Revah, S.

    1998-12-31

    While several different biological techniques have been developed to eliminate hydrogen sulfide (H2S) from air, there are only few examples of successful results with high concentrations of carbon disulfide (CS2). A pilot-scale biological control system for the treatment of 2,000 ACFM of a gaseous stream containing up to 2,500 ppmv of carbon disulfide, was installed in a cellulose sponge manufacturing facility. The project`s objective was to evaluate the ability of the system to attain continuous removal efficiency levels of 90% for CS{sub 2} and 99% for H{sub 2}S. During the pilot test, the two-unit sequential biotrickling filter reached stable average removal efficiency and rate of 90% and 185 g S/m3-h (based on CS{sub 2} load); individual data analysis for each unit showed that first tower reached a maximum performance of 86% efficiency and 350 g S/m3-h removal rate. Removal efficiencies greater than 99% were obtained for H{sub 2}S during most test period. Furthermore, the system was evaluated for the treatment of a similar waste stream with high fluctuations on CS{sub 2} concentration (in order to assess the need for a dampening unit). New waste gas conditions had a negative impact on performance, which eventually improved reaching an efficiency of 77%; due to time constraints an steady-state was not attained during this test phase. Based on results, the BIOCYD technology demonstrated to be an effective process to remediate waste air streams generated at cellulose sponge facilities.

  18. Assessment of air quality at neighbor residences in the vicinity of swine production facilities.

    PubMed

    Donham, Kelley J; Lee, Joung Ae; Thu, Kendall; Reynolds, Stephen J

    2006-01-01

    Air sampling was completed on the front lawn of 35 homes neighboring swine farms in three different regions in the Upper Midwest of the United States. One region was dominated by large scale, swine confined animal feeding operations (CAFO's) noted as swine confinement area (SCA). The second area was dominated by smaller scale operations utilizing hoop structure facilities (HA). The third area was basically devoid of livestock, dominated by row-crop production, and served as the control area (CA). The time weighted average concentrations of hydrogen sulfide (8.42 ppb) was higher (p = 0.047) in SCA area than the control (3.48 ppb). However, carbon dioxide (449.6 ppm), ammonia (12.78 ppb) and PM10 (42.25 microg/m3) were higher in the hoop structure area than the other areas. Swine population density, distance between the homes and swine facilities, and wind direction had an interactive effect on the average levels of ammonia (p = 0.04). The contaminant levels at the homes were relatively low compared to typical concentrations inside animal buildings. However, exceedences of federal recommended limits for hydrogen sulfide in outdoor air were observed in the swine CAFO area. Concentration of hydrogen sulfide exceeded the recommended limits of the ATSDR (30 ppb) for chronic exposure at two of the 12 homes in the CAFO area (17%). Average hydrogen sulfide concentration exceeded the EPA recommended community standards (0.7 ppb) in all three areas assessed (SCA, HA, and CA). As chronic exposure to hydrogen sulfide may be present in areas of production agriculture, a potential health risk may be present. Further studies to provide additional information regarding exposures to hydrogen sulfide in rural environments are warranted. PMID:19274894

  19. Free Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) Data from the Duke Forest FACE Facility

    DOE Data Explorer

    DOE has conducted trace gas enrichment experiments since the mid 1990s. The FACE Data Management System is a central repository and archive for Free-Air Carbon Dioxide Enrichment (FACE) data, as well as for the related open-top chamber (OTC) experiments. FACE Data Management System is located at DOEÆs Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC). While the data from the various FACE sites, each one a unique user facility, are centralized at CDIAC, each of the FACE sites presents its own view of its activities and information. For that reason, DOE Data Explorer users are advised to see both the central repository at http://public.ornl.gov/face/index.shtml and the individual home pages of each site. The Duke University FACE website actually presents information on several FACE experiments. The Forest-Atmosphere Carbon Transfer and Storage (FACTS-I) facility is located in the Blackwood Division of the Duke Forest. It consists of four free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) plots that provide elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration and four plots that provide ambient CO2 control. The system has been in operation since June, 1994 in the prototype plot, and since August, 1996 in the three additional plots. The prototype plot and its reference were halved with a barrier inserted in the soil in 1998 to conduct, together with five additional plot pairs, CO2 X soil nutrient enrichment experiments. The rest of the plots were partitioned in early 2005 and incorporated into the CO2 X nutrient experiment. To increase statistical power, four additional ambient plots were established in January, 2005, halved, and one half of each fertilized. [copied from http://face.env.duke.edu/description.cfm] The Duke FACE home page makes information available from both completed and ongoing projects, provides a searchable database of publications and presentations, and data, images, and links to related websites.

  20. Radon gas distribution in natural gas processing facilities and workplace air environment.

    PubMed

    Al-Masri, M S; Shwiekani, R

    2008-04-01

    Evaluation was made of the distribution of radon gas and radiation exposure rates in the four main natural gas treatment facilities in Syria. The results showed that radiation exposure rates at contact of all equipment were within the natural levels (0.09-0.1 microSvh(-1)) except for the reflex pumps where a dose rate value of 3 microSvh(-1) was recorded. Radon concentrations in Syrian natural gas varied between 15.4 Bq m(-3) and 1141 Bq m(-3); natural gas associated with oil production was found to contain higher concentrations than the non-associated natural gas. In addition, radon concentrations were higher in the central processing facilities than the wellheads; these high levels are due to pressurizing and concentrating processes that enhance radon gas and its decay products. Moreover, the lowest 222Rn concentration was in the natural gas fraction used for producing sulfur; a value of 80 Bq m(-3) was observed. On the other hand, maximum radon gas and its decay product concentrations in workplace air environments were found to be relatively high in the gas analysis laboratories; a value of 458 Bq m(-3) was observed. However, all reported levels in the workplaces in the four main stations were below the action level set by IAEA for chronic exposure situations involving radon, which is 1000 Bq m(-3). PMID:17905489

  1. Radon gas distribution in natural gas processing facilities and workplace air environment.

    PubMed

    Al-Masri, M S; Shwiekani, R

    2008-04-01

    Evaluation was made of the distribution of radon gas and radiation exposure rates in the four main natural gas treatment facilities in Syria. The results showed that radiation exposure rates at contact of all equipment were within the natural levels (0.09-0.1 microSvh(-1)) except for the reflex pumps where a dose rate value of 3 microSvh(-1) was recorded. Radon concentrations in Syrian natural gas varied between 15.4 Bq m(-3) and 1141 Bq m(-3); natural gas associated with oil production was found to contain higher concentrations than the non-associated natural gas. In addition, radon concentrations were higher in the central processing facilities than the wellheads; these high levels are due to pressurizing and concentrating processes that enhance radon gas and its decay products. Moreover, the lowest 222Rn concentration was in the natural gas fraction used for producing sulfur; a value of 80 Bq m(-3) was observed. On the other hand, maximum radon gas and its decay product concentrations in workplace air environments were found to be relatively high in the gas analysis laboratories; a value of 458 Bq m(-3) was observed. However, all reported levels in the workplaces in the four main stations were below the action level set by IAEA for chronic exposure situations involving radon, which is 1000 Bq m(-3).

  2. Radioactive air emissions notice of construction for the Waste Receiving And Processing facility

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-02-01

    The mission of the Waste Receiving And Processing (WRAP) Module 1 facility (also referred to as WRAP 1) includes: examining, assaying, characterizing, treating, and repackaging solid radioactive and mixed waste to enable permanent disposal of the wastes in accordance with all applicable regulations. The solid wastes to be handled in the WRAP 1 facility include low-level waste (LLW), transuranic (TRU) waste, TRU mixed wastes, and low-level mixed wastes (LLMW). Airborne releases from the WRAP 1 facility will be primarily in particulate forms (99.999 percent of total unabated emissions). The release of two volatilized radionuclides, tritium and carbon-14 will contribute less than 0.001 percent of the total unabated emissions. Table 2-1 lists the radionuclides which are anticipated to be emitted from WRAP 1 exhaust stack. The Clean Air Assessment Package 1988 (CAP-88) computer code (WHC 1991) was used to calculate effective dose equivalent (EDE) from WRAP 1 to the maximally exposed offsite individual (MEI), and thus demonstrate compliance with WAC 246-247. Table 4-1 shows the dose factors derived from the CAP-88 modeling and the EDE for each radionuclide. The source term (i.e., emissions after abatement in curies per year) are multiplied by the dose factors to obtain the EDE. The total projected EDE from controlled airborne radiological emissions to the offsite MEI is 1.31E-03 mrem/year. The dose attributable to radiological emissions from WRAP 1 will, then, constitute 0.013 percent of the WAC 246-247 EDE regulatory limit of 10 mrem/year to the offsite MEI.

  3. Ecological risk assessment of landfill air emissions from a hazardous waste management facility in Ontario

    SciTech Connect

    Durda, J.L.; Suit-Kowalski, L.; Preziosi, D.; Chrostowski, P.C.

    1997-12-31

    An ecological risk assessment was conducted to evaluate the potential for adverse environmental impacts associated with chemicals released to air as a result of a proposed expansion of a hazardous waste landfill in Ontario. The purpose of the risk assessment was to characterize ecological risks associated with the proposed expansion relative to those associated with the existing landfill and those that would exist if the current landfill was completely closed and background conditions prevailed. The ecological risk assessment was one part of a comprehensive environmental impact assessment of the proposed landfill continuation that was being performed under the requirements of Ontario`s Environmental Assessment Act. Air monitoring data from the facility were used to identify a list of 141 chemicals potentially released during landfill continuation, as well as to characterize current emissions and background chemical levels. An ecological risk-based chemical screening process that considered background concentration, source strength, environmental partitioning, bioaccumulation potential, and toxicity was used to select a group of 23 chemicals for detailed evaluation in the ecological risk assessment. Dispersion, deposition, partitioning and bioaccumulation modeling were used to predict potential exposures in ecological receptors. Receptors were selected for evaluation based on regional habitat characteristics, exposure potential, toxicant sensitivity, ecological significance, population status, and societal value. Livestock and agricultural crop and pasture species were key receptors for the assessment, given the highly agricultural nature of the study area. In addition, native wildlife species, including the endangered Henslow`s sparrow and the regionally vulnerable pugnose minnow, also were considered.

  4. Proposed space shuttle cargo handling criteria at the operational site (preliminary)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, P. E.

    1972-01-01

    The criteria for cargo handling at the operational site of space shuttles are presented, based on assumed program requirements. The concepts for the following functions are described: maintenance and checkout facility, transfer to launch pad, and launch pad. The requirements for the ground equipment are given along with the general sequences for cargo loading.

  5. Design of a Regenerable Air Revitalization Control System for the ABRS Plant Growth Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monje, Oscar; Monje, Oscar; Shellack, James; Mortenson, Todd; Wells, Howard

    Design of a Regenerable Air Revitalization Control System for the ABRS Plant Growth Facility. O. Monje Space Life Sciences Laboratory, Dynamac Corp., DYN-3, Kennedy Space Center, FL 32899, USA J.L. Shellack, T.E. Mortenson, and H.W. Wells. Bionetics Corporation, BIO-1, Kennedy Space Center, FL 32899, USA The Advanced Biological Research System (ABRS) is a rear-breathing, single middeck locker equivalent plant growth system. ABRS is composed of two independently controlled growth chambers (each with 330 cm2 of growth area). The air revitalization system in each chamber is composed of two subsystems: CO2 Control and a Ethylene/VOC Control. The CO2 Control subsystem must control chamber [CO2] within a range of 300-2000 ppm, with a nominal setpoint of 1500 ppm. The Ethylene/VOC Control subsystem is required to maintain chamber ethylene concentration at ¡50 ppb. Previous spaceflight plant payloads have used non-regenerable cartridges for CO2 control and photocatalytic scrubbers for controlling concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Non-regenerable systems have used LiOH cartridges for [CO2] control with a combination of Purafil (KMnO4)/Activated charcoal for scrubbing VOCs. Regenerable air revitalization systems offer the potential for reducing the mass and volume of consumables used during spaceflight plant experiments. A system utilizing technologies employing regenerable adsorbents: zeolites 13X and 5A for CO2 control and Carbosieve SIII (C molecular sieve) for VOC control has been designed for ABRS. The filter cartridges were sized using expected chamber leak rates, measurements of adsorptive capacities, and measured CO2 consumption and VOC generation rates.

  6. Air

    MedlinePlus

    ... do to protect yourself from dirty air . Indoor air pollution and outdoor air pollution Air can be polluted indoors and it can ... this chart to see what things cause indoor air pollution and what things cause outdoor air pollution! Indoor ...

  7. Cargo transportation by airships: A systems study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, C. J.; Dalton, C.

    1976-01-01

    A systems engineering study of a lighter than air airship transportation system was conducted. The feasibility of the use of airships in hauling cargo was demonstrated. Social, legal, environmental and political factors were considered as well as the technical factors necessary to design an effective airship transportation system. In order to accomplish an effective airship transportation program two phases of implementation were recommended. Phase I would involve a fleet of rigid airships of 3.5 million cubic feet displacement capable of carrying 25 tons of cargo internal to the helium-filled gas bag. The Phase I fleet would demonstrate the economic and technical feasibility of modern-day airships while providing a training capability for the construction and operation of larger airships. The Phase II portion would be a fleet of rigid airships of 12 million cubic feet displacement capable of carrying a cargo of 100 tons a distance of 2,000 miles at a cruising speed of 60 mph. An economic analysis is given for a variety of missions for both Phase I and Phase II airships.

  8. Transpired Solar Collector at NREL's Waste Handling Facility Uses Solar Energy to Heat Ventilation Air (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-09-01

    The transpired solar collector was installed on NREL's Waste handling Facility (WHF) in 1990 to preheat ventilation air. The electrically heated WHF was an ideal candidate for the this technology - requiring a ventilation rate of 3,000 cubic feet per meter to maintain safe indoor conditions.

  9. Effects of lighting and air movement on temperatures in reproductive organs of plants in a closed plant growth facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitaya, Y.; Hirai, H.

    Temperature increases in plant reproductive organs such as anthers and stigmas could cause fertility impediments and thus produce sterile seeds under artificial lighting conditions without adequately controlled environments in closed plant growth facilities. There is a possibility such a situation could occur in Bioregenerative Life Support Systems under microgravity conditions in space because there will be little natural convective or thermal mixing. This study was conducted to determine the temperature of the plant reproductive organs as affected by illumination and air movement under normal gravitational forces on the earth and to make an estimation of the temperature increase in reproductive organs in closed plant growth facilities under microgravity in space. Thermal images of reproductive organs of rice and strawberry were captured using infrared thermography at air temperatures of 10 11 °C. Compared to the air temperature, temperatures of petals, stigmas and anthers of strawberry increased by 24, 22 and 14 °C, respectively, after 5 min of lighting at an irradiance of 160 W m-2 from incandescent lamps. Temperatures of reproductive organs and leaves of strawberry were significantly higher than those of rice. The temperatures of petals, stigmas, anthers and leaves of strawberry decreased by 13, 12, 13 and 14 °C, respectively, when the air velocity was increased from 0.1 to 1.0 ms-1. These results show that air movement is necessary to reduce the temperatures of plant reproductive organs in plant growth facilities.

  10. Storage of LWR spent fuel in air: Volume 1: Design and operation of a spent fuel oxidation test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Thornhill, C.K.; Campbell, T.K.; Thornhill, R.E.

    1988-12-01

    This report describes the design and operation and technical accomplishments of a spent-fuel oxidation test facility at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The objective of the experiments conducted in this facility was to develop a data base for determining spent-fuel dry storage temperature limits by characterizing the oxidation behavior of light-water reactor (LWR) spent fuels in air. These data are needed to support licensing of dry storage in air as an alternative to spent-fuel storage in water pools. They are to be used to develop and validate predictive models of spent-fuel behavior during dry air storage in an Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI). The present licensed alternative to pool storage of spent fuel is dry storage in an inert gas environment, which is called inerted dry storage (IDS). Licensed air storage, however, would not require monitoring for maintenance of an inert-gas environment (which IDS requires) but does require the development of allowable temperature limits below which UO/sub 2/ oxidation in breached fuel rods would not become a problem. Scoping tests at PNL with nonirradiated UO/sub 2/ pellets and spent-fuel fragment specimens identified the need for a statistically designed test matrix with test temperatures bounding anticipated maximum acceptable air-storage temperatures. This facility was designed and operated to satisfy that need. 7 refs.

  11. SPECIAL ANALYSIS AIR PATHWAY MODELING OF E-AREA LOW-LEVEL WASTE FACILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Hiergesell, R.; Taylor, G.

    2011-08-30

    This Special Analysis (SA) was initiated to address a concern expressed by the Department of Energy's Low Level Waste Disposal Facility Federal Review Group (LFRG) Review Team during their review of the 2008 E-Area Performance Assessment (PA) (WSRC, 2008). Their concern was the potential for overlapping of atmospheric plumes, emanating from the soil surface above SRS LLW disposal facilities within the E-Area, to contribute to the dose received by a member of the public during the Institutional Control (IC) period. The implication of this concern was that the dose to the maximally-exposed individual (MEI) located at the SRS boundary might be underestimated during this time interval. To address this concern a re-analysis of the atmospheric pathway releases from E-Area was required. In the process of developing a new atmospheric release model (ARM) capable of addressing the LFRG plume overlap concern, it became obvious that new and better atmospheric pathway disposal limits should be developed for each of the E-Area disposal facilities using the new ARM. The scope of the SA was therefore expanded to include the generation of these new limits. The initial work conducted in this SA was to develop a new ARM using the GoldSim{reg_sign} program (GTG, 2009). The model simulates the subsurface vapor diffusion of volatile radionuclides as they release from E-Area disposal facility waste zones and migrate to the land surface. In the process of this work, many new features, including several new physical and chemical transport mechanisms, were incorporated into the model. One of the most important improvements was to incorporate a mechanism to partition volatile contaminants across the water-air interface within the partially saturated pore space of the engineered and natural materials through which vapor phase transport occurs. A second mechanism that was equally important was to incorporate a maximum concentration of 1.9E-07 Ci/m{sup 3} of {sup 14}CO{sub 2} in the air

  12. 49 CFR 1544.205 - Acceptance and screening of cargo.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... provided in its security program. Such methods may include TSA-approved x-ray systems, explosives detection systems, explosives trace detection, explosives detection canine teams certified by TSA, or a physical... program, by a certified cargo screening facility in accordance with 49 CFR part 1549, or by TSA....

  13. 49 CFR 1546.205 - Acceptance and screening of cargo.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... in its security program. Such methods may include TSA-approved x-ray systems, explosives detection systems, explosives trace detection, explosives detection canine teams certified by TSA, a physical search... program, by a certified cargo screening facility in accordance with 49 CFR part 1549, or by TSA. (4)...

  14. 49 CFR 1544.205 - Acceptance and screening of cargo.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... provided in its security program. Such methods may include TSA-approved x-ray systems, explosives detection systems, explosives trace detection, explosives detection canine teams certified by TSA, or a physical... program, by a certified cargo screening facility in accordance with 49 CFR part 1549, or by TSA....

  15. 49 CFR 1544.205 - Acceptance and screening of cargo.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... provided in its security program. Such methods may include TSA-approved x-ray systems, explosives detection systems, explosives trace detection, explosives detection canine teams certified by TSA, or a physical... program, by a certified cargo screening facility in accordance with 49 CFR part 1549, or by TSA....

  16. 49 CFR 1546.205 - Acceptance and screening of cargo.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... in its security program. Such methods may include TSA-approved x-ray systems, explosives detection systems, explosives trace detection, explosives detection canine teams certified by TSA, a physical search... program, by a certified cargo screening facility in accordance with 49 CFR part 1549, or by TSA. (4)...

  17. 49 CFR 1546.205 - Acceptance and screening of cargo.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... in its security program. Such methods may include TSA-approved x-ray systems, explosives detection systems, explosives trace detection, explosives detection canine teams certified by TSA, a physical search... program, by a certified cargo screening facility in accordance with 49 CFR part 1549, or by TSA. (4)...

  18. Free Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) Research Data from the Nevada Desert FACE Facility (NDFF)

    DOE Data Explorer

    DOE has conducted trace gas enrichment experiments since the mid 1990s. The FACE Data Management System is a central repository and archive for Free-Air Carbon Dioxide Enrichment (FACE) data, as well as for the related open-top chamber (OTC) experiments. FACE Data Management System is located at the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC). While the data from the various FACE sites, each one a unique user facility, are centralized at CDIAC, each of the FACE sites presents its own view of its activities and information. For that reason, DOE Data Explorer users are advised to see both the central repository at http://public.ornl.gov/face/index.shtml and the individual home pages of each site. NDFF whole-ecosystem manipulation is a flagship experiment of the Terrestrial Carbon Process (TCP) research program of the US Dept. of Energy. It is also a core project of the International Geosphere-Biosphere Program (IGBP) and a contribution to the US Global Change Research Program. The NDFF was developed in conjunction with the National Science Foundation (NSF) and DOE-EPSCoR programs. FACE (Free-Air-Carbon dioxide-Enrichment) technology allows researchers to elevate the carbon dioxide level in large study plots while minimizing ecosystem disturbance. At the NDFF the concentration of CO2 was elevated by 50 percent above the present atmospheric levels in three plots in the Mojave Desert ecosystem, while six other plots remained at the current level. This experimental design provided a large area in which integrated teams of scientists could describe and quantify processes regulating carbon, nutrient, and water balances in desert ecosystems.

  19. 14 CFR 91.525 - Carriage of cargo.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Carriage of cargo. 91.525 Section 91.525 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES GENERAL OPERATING AND FLIGHT RULES Large and Turbine-Powered...

  20. 49 CFR 1546.205 - Acceptance and screening of cargo.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... system prescribed by this part. (c) Control. Each foreign air carrier operating a program under § 1546.101(a), (b), or (e) must use the procedures in its security program to control cargo that it accepts... in its security program. Such methods may include TSA-approved x-ray systems, explosives...

  1. 46 CFR 151.50-5 - Cargoes having toxic properties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... transporting liquids having a Reid vapor pressure exceeding 14 pounds per square inch absolute or vented at a gauge pressure exceeding 4 pounds per square inch, or where air or water pressure is used to discharge... cargo tanks shall be designed for a pressure not less than the vapor pressure, in pounds per square......

  2. Location and repair of air leaks in the ATF (Advanced Toroidal Facility) vacuum vessel

    SciTech Connect

    Schwenterly, S.W.; Gabbard, W.A.; Schaich, C.R.; Yarber, J.L. )

    1989-01-01

    On the basis of partial pressure rate-of-rise and base pressure measurements, it was determined that the Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF) vacuum vessel had an air leak in the low 10{sup -4} mbar-{ell}/s range. Pinpointing this leak by conventional helium leak-checking procedures was not possible, because large portions of the outside of the vessel are covered by the helcial field coils and a structural shell. Various alternative leak-detection schemes that were considered are summarized and their advantages and disadvantages noted. In the method ultimately employed, gun-rubber patches of various sizes ranging from 12.7 by 12.7 cm to 20.3 by 30.5 cm were positioned on the inside surfaces of the vessel and evacuated by the leak detector (LD). After roughly 5% of the surface was inspected in this way, a leak of > 10{sup -5} mbar-{ell}/s was discovered and localized to an area of 5 by 5 cm. Dye penetrant applied to this area disclosed three pinholes. Two small slag pockets were discovered while these points were being ground out. After these were rewelded, no furthered leakage could be found in the repaired area. Global leak rates measured after the machine was reevacuated indicated that this leak was about 30% of the overall leak rate. 1 ref., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Healy Clean Coal Project, Healy FCM testing at Niro Air Pollution Control Pilot Facility. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-10-01

    In September, 1991, pilot testing was performed at the Niro Air Pollution Control Pilot Plant in Copenhagen, Denmark in support of the Healy Clean Coal Project (HCCP), which is part of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Clean Coal Technology Ill Program. The HCCP is a proposed new coal fired power plant, located in Healy, Alaska. It consists of a TRW entrained combustion system, coupled with a limestone calciner, which operates in synergism with a Joy/Niro Spray Dryer Absorber (SDA) system equipped with a lime activation system that is designed to increase the utilization of the calcined product for sulfur capture in the SDA. The pilot tests, which were funded by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) and the Alaska Industrial Development and Export Authority (AIDEA), were conducted to investigate the characteristics of the TRW combustor/limestone calciner product, referred to as Flash Calcined Material (FCM) with respect to its ability to remove S0{sub 2 } in the Joy/Niro Activated Recycle SDA system. This report describes the pilot facility, the test objectives and methods, and the results of the tests.

  4. Healy Clean Coal Project, Healy FCM testing at Niro Air Pollution Control Pilot Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-10-01

    In September, 1991, pilot testing was performed at the Niro Air Pollution Control Pilot Plant in Copenhagen, Denmark in support of the Healy Clean Coal Project (HCCP), which is part of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Clean Coal Technology Ill Program. The HCCP is a proposed new coal fired power plant, located in Healy, Alaska. It consists of a TRW entrained combustion system, coupled with a limestone calciner, which operates in synergism with a Joy/Niro Spray Dryer Absorber (SDA) system equipped with a lime activation system that is designed to increase the utilization of the calcined product for sulfur capture in the SDA. The pilot tests, which were funded by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) and the Alaska Industrial Development and Export Authority (AIDEA), were conducted to investigate the characteristics of the TRW combustor/limestone calciner product, referred to as Flash Calcined Material (FCM) with respect to its ability to remove S0[sub 2 ] in the Joy/Niro Activated Recycle SDA system. This report describes the pilot facility, the test objectives and methods, and the results of the tests.

  5. The development of an experimental facility and investigation of rapidly maneuvering Micro-Air-Vehicle wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Lee Alexander

    Vertical Takeoff-and-Landing (VTOL) Micro Air Vehicles (MAVs) provide a versatile operational platform which combines the capabilities of fixed wing and rotary wing MAVs. In order to improve performance of these vehicles, a better understanding of the rapid transition between horizontal and vertical flight is required. This study examines the flow structures around the Mini-Vertigo VTOL MAV using flow visualization techniques. This will gives an understanding of the flow structures which dominate the flight dynamics of rapid pitching maneuvers. This study consists of three objectives: develop an experimental facility, use flow visualization to investigate the flow around the experimental subject during pitching, and analyze the results. The flow around the Mini-Vertigo VTOL MAV is dominated by the slipstream from its propellers. The slipstream delays LE separation and causes drastic deflection in the flow. While the frequency of the vortices shed from the LE and TE varies with flow speed, the non-dimensional frequency does not. It does, however, vary slightly with the pitching rate. These results are applicable across a wide range of flight conditions. The results correlate to previous research done to examine the aerodynamic forces on the MAV.

  6. Air Dispersion Modeling for the INL Application for a Synthetic Minor Sitewide Air Quality Permit to Construct with a Facility Emission Cap Component

    SciTech Connect

    Sondrup, Andrus Jeffrey

    2015-10-01

    The Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) is applying for a synthetic minor, Sitewide, air quality permit to construct (PTC) with a facility emission cap (FEC) component from the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) for Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to limit its potential to emit to less than major facility limits for criteria air pollutants (CAPs) and hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) regulated under the Clean Air Act. This document is supplied as an appendix to the application, Idaho National Laboratory Application for a Synthetic Minor Sitewide Air Quality Permit to Construct with a Facility Emissions Cap Component, hereafter referred to as “permit application” (DOE-ID 2015). Air dispersion modeling was performed as part of the permit application process to demonstrate pollutant emissions from the INL will not cause a violation of any ambient air quality standards. This report documents the modeling methodology and results for the air dispersion impact analysis. All CAPs regulated under Section 109 of the Clean Air Act were modeled with the exception of lead (Pb) and ozone, which are not required to be modeled by DEQ. Modeling was not performed for toxic air pollutants (TAPs) as uncontrolled emissions did not exceed screening emission levels for carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic TAPs. Modeling for CAPs was performed with the EPA approved AERMOD dispersion modeling system (Version 14134) (EPA 2004a) and five years (2000-2004) of meteorological data. The meteorological data set was produced with the companion AERMET model (Version 14134) (EPA 2004b) using surface data from the Idaho Falls airport, and upper-air data from Boise International Airport supplied by DEQ. Onsite meteorological data from the Grid 3 Mesonet tower located near the center of the INL (north of INTEC) and supplied by the local National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) office was used for surface wind directions and wind speeds. Surface data (i

  7. X-ray cargo inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ries, Hermann; Hemp, Fred; Koch, Cornelius

    1994-10-01

    Increasing world trade, besides others, means to take care for a continuous flow of cargo. This is important if politicians want to improve a country's economy. There are a lot of technical means assisting to speed up the handling of the huge amount of cargo. But, just taking care for a fast handling of merchandise means to support the fraudulent and often dangerous activities of criminal syndicates and organizations. Responsible governmental officials are now supported in fulfilling their difficult task.

  8. Nuclear cargo detector

    DOEpatents

    Christo, Steven Basil

    2006-12-19

    Apparatus for the inspection of cargo containers for nuclear materials comprising one or more arrays of modules comprising grounded, closed conductive tubes filled with an ionizing gas mixture such as, but not limited to, Argon:CO.sub.2. A wire is suspended along each tube axis and electrically connected at both ends of the tube. A positive, dc high voltage is supplied to one end of the wire and an amplifier is attached to the other end through a capacitance to decouple the amplifier from the high voltage. X-rays, gamma rays or neutrons produced by nuclear material and passing through the tube ionize the gas. The electrons from the gas ionization process are accelerated toward the wire surface due to the wire's electrical potential. The acceleration of the electrons near the wire's surface is sufficient to ionize more gas and produce an amplification of electrons/ions that create a surge of current large enough to be detectable by the amplifier. Means are also provided for a warning device coupled to the amplifier.

  9. Air pollution control technology for municipal solid waste-to-energy conversion facilities: capabilities and research needs

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, J F; Young, J C

    1980-09-01

    Three major categories of waste-to-energy conversion processes in full-scale operation or advanced demonstration stages in the US are co-combustion, mass incineration, and pyrolysis. These methods are described and some information on US conversion facilities is tabulated. Conclusions and recommendations dealing with the operation, performance, and research needs for these facilities are given. Section II identifies research needs concerning air pollution aspects of the waste-to-energy processes and reviews significant operating and research findings for the co-combustion, mass incinceration, and pyrolysis waste-to-energy systems.

  10. 33 CFR 126.15 - What conditions must a designated waterfront facility meet?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... facilities that handle dangerous cargo, not in transport units, must also meet the following: (1) Arrangement... reference, see § 126.5.) (c) All designated waterfront facilities that handle dangerous cargo in transport... HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) WATERFRONT FACILITIES HANDLING OF DANGEROUS CARGO AT WATERFRONT...

  11. 33 CFR 126.15 - What conditions must a designated waterfront facility meet?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... facilities that handle dangerous cargo, not in transport units, must also meet the following: (1) Arrangement... reference, see § 126.5.) (c) All designated waterfront facilities that handle dangerous cargo in transport... HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) WATERFRONT FACILITIES HANDLING OF DANGEROUS CARGO AT WATERFRONT...

  12. 33 CFR 126.15 - What conditions must a designated waterfront facility meet?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... facilities that handle dangerous cargo, not in transport units, must also meet the following: (1) Arrangement... reference, see § 126.5.) (c) All designated waterfront facilities that handle dangerous cargo in transport... HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) WATERFRONT FACILITIES HANDLING OF DANGEROUS CARGO AT WATERFRONT...

  13. 33 CFR 126.15 - What conditions must a designated waterfront facility meet?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... facilities that handle dangerous cargo, not in transport units, must also meet the following: (1) Arrangement... reference, see § 126.5.) (c) All designated waterfront facilities that handle dangerous cargo in transport... HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) WATERFRONT FACILITIES HANDLING OF DANGEROUS CARGO AT WATERFRONT...

  14. 33 CFR 126.15 - What conditions must a designated waterfront facility meet?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... facilities that handle dangerous cargo, not in transport units, must also meet the following: (1) Arrangement... reference, see § 126.5.) (c) All designated waterfront facilities that handle dangerous cargo in transport... HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) WATERFRONT FACILITIES HANDLING OF DANGEROUS CARGO AT WATERFRONT...

  15. Hydrogel Walkers with Electro-Driven Motility for Cargo Transport

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chao; Wang, Wei; Yao, Chen; Xie, Rui; Ju, Xiao-Jie; Liu, Zhuang; Chu, Liang-Yin

    2015-01-01

    In this study, soft hydrogel walkers with electro-driven motility for cargo transport have been developed via a facile mould-assisted strategy. The hydrogel walkers consisting of polyanionic poly(2-acrylamido-2-methylpropanesulfonic acid-co-acrylamide) exhibit an arc looper-like shape with two “legs” for walking. The hydrogel walkers can reversibly bend and stretch via repeated “on/off” electro-triggers in electrolyte solution. Based on such bending/stretching behaviors, the hydrogel walkers can move their two “legs” to achieve one-directional walking motion on a rough surface via repeated “on/off” electro-triggering cycles. Moreover, the hydrogel walkers loaded with very heavy cargo also exhibit excellent walking motion for cargo transport. Such hydrogel systems create new opportunities for developing electro-controlled soft systems with simple design/fabrication strategies in the soft robotic field for remote manipulation and transportation. PMID:26314786

  16. Hydrogel Walkers with Electro-Driven Motility for Cargo Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chao; Wang, Wei; Yao, Chen; Xie, Rui; Ju, Xiao-Jie; Liu, Zhuang; Chu, Liang-Yin

    2015-08-01

    In this study, soft hydrogel walkers with electro-driven motility for cargo transport have been developed via a facile mould-assisted strategy. The hydrogel walkers consisting of polyanionic poly(2-acrylamido-2-methylpropanesulfonic acid-co-acrylamide) exhibit an arc looper-like shape with two “legs” for walking. The hydrogel walkers can reversibly bend and stretch via repeated “on/off” electro-triggers in electrolyte solution. Based on such bending/stretching behaviors, the hydrogel walkers can move their two “legs” to achieve one-directional walking motion on a rough surface via repeated “on/off” electro-triggering cycles. Moreover, the hydrogel walkers loaded with very heavy cargo also exhibit excellent walking motion for cargo transport. Such hydrogel systems create new opportunities for developing electro-controlled soft systems with simple design/fabrication strategies in the soft robotic field for remote manipulation and transportation.

  17. Capacity Utilization Study for Aviation Security Cargo Inspection Queuing System

    SciTech Connect

    Allgood, Glenn O; Olama, Mohammed M; Lake, Joe E; Brumback, Daryl L

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we conduct performance evaluation study for an aviation security cargo inspection queuing system for material flow and accountability. The queuing model employed in our study is based on discrete-event simulation and processes various types of cargo simultaneously. Onsite measurements are collected in an airport facility to validate the queuing model. The overall performance of the aviation security cargo inspection system is computed, analyzed, and optimized for the different system dynamics. Various performance measures are considered such as system capacity, residual capacity, throughput, capacity utilization, subscribed capacity utilization, resources capacity utilization, subscribed resources capacity utilization, and number of cargo pieces (or pallets) in the different queues. These metrics are performance indicators of the system s ability to service current needs and response capacity to additional requests. We studied and analyzed different scenarios by changing various model parameters such as number of pieces per pallet, number of TSA inspectors and ATS personnel, number of forklifts, number of explosives trace detection (ETD) and explosives detection system (EDS) inspection machines, inspection modality distribution, alarm rate, and cargo closeout time. The increased physical understanding resulting from execution of the queuing model utilizing these vetted performance measures should reduce the overall cost and shipping delays associated with new inspection requirements.

  18. Building air quality: A guide for building owners and facility managers

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-01

    The guide was intended to help those individuals responsible for air quality control in buildings to prevent indoor air quality problems from developing and resolving such problems quickly should they develop. Background information and guidance on dealing with indoor air quality problems were provided. Specific topics included: factors which affect indoor air quality; sources of indoor air contaminants; heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems; the role of building occupants; effective communication between managers and others involved; developing an indoor air quality (IAQ) profile; managing a building for good IAQ; diagnosing IAQ problems; mitigating IAQ problems, hiring professional assistance to solve an IAQ problem; common IAQ measurements; HVAC systems and IAQ; moisture with resultant mold and mildew conditions; asbestos (1332214); radon (10043922); and resources through which additional information can be obtained. Indoor air quality forms were included which can be modified to meet individual needs.

  19. Detection of Shielded Nuclear Material in a Cargo Container

    SciTech Connect

    J. L. Jones; D. R. Norman; K. J. Haskell; J. W. Sterbentz; W. Y. Yoon; S. M. Watson; J. T. Johnson; J. M. Zabriskie; B. D. Bennett; R. W. Watson; J. F. Hamon

    2005-06-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory, along with Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Idaho State University’s Idaho Accelerator Center, are developing electron accelerator-based, photonuclear inspection technologies for the detection of shielded nuclear material within air-, rail-, and especially, maritime-cargo transportation containers. This paper describes a developing prototypical cargo container inspection system utilizing the Pulsed Photonuclear Assessment (PPA) technology, incorporates interchangeable, well-defined, contraband shielding structures (i.e., "calibration" pallets) providing realistic detection data for induced radiation signatures from smuggled nuclear material, and provides various shielded nuclear material detection results. Using a 4.8-kg quantity of depleted uranium, neutron and gamma-ray detection responses are presented for well-defined shielded and unshielded configurations evaluated in a selected cargo container inspection configuration. © 2001 Elsevier Science. All rights reserved

  20. 40 CFR 86.161-00 - Air conditioning environmental test facility ambient requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... impractical, air flow of 2 mph or less will be allowed at 0 mph vehicle speed. (3) The fan air flow velocity vector perpendicular to the axial flow velocity vector shall be less than 10 percent of the mean velocity measured at fan speeds corresponding to vehicle speeds of 20 and 40 mph. (4)(i) Fan axial air flow...

  1. Analysis of radionuclide concentration in air released through the stack of a radiopharmaceutical production facility based on a medical cyclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giardina, M.; Tomarchio, E.; Greco, D.

    2015-11-01

    Positron emitting radionuclides are increasingly used in medical diagnostics and the number of radiopharmaceutical production facilities have been estimated to be growing worldwide. During the process of production and/or patient administration of radiopharmaceuticals, an amount of these radionuclides might become airborne and escape into the environment. Therefore, the analysis of radionuclide concentration in the air released to the stack is a very important issue to evaluate the dose to the population living around the plant. To this end, sampling and measurement of radionuclide concentration in air released through the stack of a Nuclear Medicine Center (NMC), provided with a cyclotron for radiopharmaceuticals production, must be routinely carried out with an automatic measurement system. In this work is presented the air monitoring system realized at "San Gaetano" NMC at Bagheria (Italy) besides the analysis of the recorded stack relesead air concentration data. Sampling of air was carried out continuously and gamma-ray spectrometric measurement are made on-line and for a short time by using a shielded Marinelli beaker filled with sampled air and a gamma detector. The use of this system allows to have 1440 values of air concentration per day from 2002, year of the start of operation with the cyclotron. Therefore, the concentration values are very many and an analysis software is needed to determine the dose to the population. A comparison with the results of a simulation code based on a Gaussian Plume air dispersion modelling allow us to confirm the no-radiological significance of the stack effluent releases in terms of dose to population and to evaluate possible improvements in the plant devices to reduce the air concentration at stack.

  2. The Huygens probe arrives in a cargo plane at the Skid Strip, CCAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The Huygens probe, which will study the clouds, atmosphere and surface of Saturn's moon, Titan, as part of the Cassini mission to Saturn, arrives in a cargo plane at the Skid Strip, Cape Canaveral Air Station (CCAS). The probe was designed and developed for the European Space Agency (ESA) by a European industrial consortium led by Aerospatiale as prime contractor. Over the past year, it was integrated and tested at the facilities of Daimler Benz Aerospace Dornier Satellitensysteme in Germany. The probe will be mated to the Cassini orbiter, which was designed and assembled at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in California. The Cassini launch is targeted for October 6 from CCAS aboard a Titan IVB/Centaur expendable launch vehicle. After arrival at Saturn in 2004, the probe will be released from the Cassini orbiter to enter the Titan atmosphere.

  3. Incorporating biplane wing theory into a large, subsonic, all-cargo transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zyskowski, Michael K.

    1994-01-01

    If the air-cargo market increases at the pace predicted, a new conceptual aircraft will be demanded to meet the needs of the air-cargo industry. Furthermore, it has been found that not only should this aircraft be optimized to carry the intermodal containers used by the current shipping industry, but it should also be be able to operate at existing airports. The best solution to these problems is a configuration incorporating a bi-wing planform, which has resulted in significant improvements over the monoplane in lift/drag, weight reduction, and span reduction. The future of the air-cargo market, biplane theory, wind tunnel tests, and a comparison of the aerodynamic characteristics of the biplane and monoplane are discussed. The factors pertaining to a biplane cargo transport are then examined, resulting in biplane geometric parameters.

  4. Cargo Logistics Airlift Systems Study (CLASS). Volume 2: Case study approach and results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burby, R. J.; Kuhlman, W. H.

    1978-01-01

    Models of transportation mode decision making were developed. The user's view of the present and future air cargo systems is discussed. Issues summarized include: (1) organization of the distribution function; (2) mode choice decision making; (3) air freight system; and (4) the future of air freight.

  5. Source Term Estimates of Radioxenon Released from the BaTek Medical Isotope Production Facility Using External Measured Air Concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Eslinger, Paul W.; Cameron, Ian M.; Dumais, Johannes R.; Imardjoko, Yudi; Marsoem, Pujadi; McIntyre, Justin I.; Miley, Harry S.; Stoehlker, Ulrich; Widodo, Susilo; Woods, Vincent T.

    2015-10-01

    Abstract Batan Teknologi (BaTek) operates an isotope production facility in Serpong, Indonesia that supplies 99mTc for use in medical procedures. Atmospheric releases of Xe-133 in the production process at BaTek are known to influence the measurements taken at the closest stations of the International Monitoring System (IMS). The purpose of the IMS is to detect evidence of nuclear explosions, including atmospheric releases of radionuclides. The xenon isotopes released from BaTek are the same as those produced in a nuclear explosion, but the isotopic ratios are different. Knowledge of the magnitude of releases from the isotope production facility helps inform analysts trying to decide whether a specific measurement result came from a nuclear explosion. A stack monitor deployed at BaTek in 2013 measured releases to the atmosphere for several isotopes. The facility operates on a weekly cycle, and the stack data for June 15-21, 2013 show a release of 1.84E13 Bq of Xe-133. Concentrations of Xe-133 in the air are available at the same time from a xenon sampler located 14 km from BaTek. An optimization process using atmospheric transport modeling and the sampler air concentrations produced a release estimate of 1.88E13 Bq. The same optimization process yielded a release estimate of 1.70E13 Bq for a different week in 2012. The stack release value and the two optimized estimates are all within 10 percent of each other. Weekly release estimates of 1.8E13 Bq and a 40 percent facility operation rate yields a rough annual release estimate of 3.7E13 Bq of Xe-133. This value is consistent with previously published estimates of annual releases for this facility, which are based on measurements at three IMS stations. These multiple lines of evidence cross-validate the stack release estimates and the release estimates from atmospheric samplers.

  6. Nonradioactive air emissions notice of construction for the Waste Receiving And Processing facility

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-02-01

    The mission of the Waste Receiving And Processing (WRAP) Module 1 facility (also referred to as WRAP 1) is to examine assay, characterize, treat, and repackage solid radioactive and mixed waste to enable permanent disposal of the wastes in accordance with all applicable regulations. WRAP 1 will contain equipment and facilities necessary for non-destructive examination (NDE) of wastes and to perform a non-destructive examination assay (NDA) of the total radionuclide content of the wastes, without opening the outer container (e.g., 55-gal drum). WRAP 1 will also be equipped to open drums which do not meet waste acceptance and shipping criteria, and to perform limited physical treatment of the wastes to ensure that storage, shipping, and disposal criteria are met. The solid wastes to be handled in the WRAP 1 facility include low level waste (LLW), transuranic (TRU) waste, and transuranic and low level mixed wastes (LLMW). The WRAP 1 facility will only accept contact handler (CH) waste containers. A Best Available Control Technology for Toxics (TBACT) assessment has been completed for the WRAP 1 facility (WHC 1993). Because toxic emissions from the WRAP 1 facility are sufficiently low and do not pose any health or safety concerns to the public, no controls for volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and installation of HEPA filters for particulates satisfy TBACT for the facility.

  7. 46 CFR 150.120 - Definition of incompatible cargoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... COMPATIBILITY OF CARGOES § 150.120 Definition of incompatible cargoes. Except as described in § 150.150, a cargo of hazardous material is incompatible with another cargo listed in Table I if the chemical groups...

  8. 46 CFR 150.120 - Definition of incompatible cargoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... COMPATIBILITY OF CARGOES § 150.120 Definition of incompatible cargoes. Except as described in § 150.150, a cargo of hazardous material is incompatible with another cargo listed in Table I if the chemical groups...

  9. 46 CFR 150.120 - Definition of incompatible cargoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... COMPATIBILITY OF CARGOES § 150.120 Definition of incompatible cargoes. Except as described in § 150.150, a cargo of hazardous material is incompatible with another cargo listed in Table I if the chemical groups...

  10. 46 CFR 150.120 - Definition of incompatible cargoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... COMPATIBILITY OF CARGOES § 150.120 Definition of incompatible cargoes. Except as described in § 150.150, a cargo of hazardous material is incompatible with another cargo listed in Table I if the chemical groups...

  11. 46 CFR 150.120 - Definition of incompatible cargoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... COMPATIBILITY OF CARGOES § 150.120 Definition of incompatible cargoes. Except as described in § 150.150, a cargo of hazardous material is incompatible with another cargo listed in Table I if the chemical groups...

  12. Final work plan : indoor air and ambient air sampling near the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility in Everest, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.

    2010-05-24

    The Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) operated a grain storage facility at the western edge of Everest, Kansas, from the early 1950s to the early 1970s. Sampling by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) in 1997 resulted in the detection of carbon tetrachloride in one domestic well (the Nigh well) northwest of the former facility. On behalf of the CCC/USDA, Argonne National Laboratory subsequently conducted a series of investigations to characterize the contamination (Argonne 2003, 2006a,b,c). Automatic, continuous monitoring of groundwater levels began in 2002 and is ongoing at six locations. The results have consistently indicated groundwater flow toward the north-northwest from the former CCC/USDA property to the Nigh property, then west-southwest from the Nigh property to the intermittent creek. Sitewide periodic groundwater and surface water sampling with analysis for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) began in 2008. Argonne's combined data indicate no significant downgradient extension of contamination since 2000. At present, the sampling is annual, as approved by the KDHE (2009) in response to a plan developed for the CCC/USDA (Argonne 2009). This document presents a plan for collecting indoor air samples in homes located along and adjacent to the defined extent of the carbon tetrachloride contamination. The plan was requested by the KDHE. Ambient air samples to represent the conditions along this pathway will also be taken. The purpose of the proposed work is to satisfy KDHE requirements and to collect additional data for assessing the risk to human health due to the potential upward migration of carbon tetrachloride and its primary degradation product (chloroform) into homes located in close proximity to the former grain storage facility, as well as along and within 100 ft laterally from the currently defined plume emanating from the former Everest facility. Investigation of the indoor air

  13. Aircraft Cargo Compartment Fire Test Simulation Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blumke, R. E.

    1977-01-01

    The objective of the test was to assess fire containment and fire extinguishment in the cargo by reducing the ventilation through the cargo compartment. Parameters which were measured included ignition time, burnthrough time, and physical damage to the cargo liner, composition of selected combustible gases, temperature-time histories, heat flux, and detector response. The ignitor load was made of a typical cargo consisting of filled cardboard cartons occupying 50% of the compartment volume.

  14. 46 CFR 154.901 - Atmospheric control within cargo tanks and cargo piping systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Atmospheric control within cargo tanks and cargo piping... BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS FOR SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.901 Atmospheric...

  15. 46 CFR 153.908 - Cargo viscosity and melting point information; measuring cargo temperature during discharge...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... cargo temperature during discharge: Categories A, B, and C. 153.908 Section 153.908 Shipping COAST GUARD... Cargo viscosity and melting point information; measuring cargo temperature during discharge: Categories... in mPa.s and, if the cargo's viscosity exceeds 25 mPa.s at 20 °C, the temperature at which...

  16. 46 CFR 153.908 - Cargo viscosity and melting point information; measuring cargo temperature during discharge...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... cargo temperature during discharge: Categories A, B, and C. 153.908 Section 153.908 Shipping COAST GUARD... Cargo viscosity and melting point information; measuring cargo temperature during discharge: Categories... in mPa.s and, if the cargo's viscosity exceeds 25 mPa.s at 20 °C, the temperature at which...

  17. 46 CFR 153.908 - Cargo viscosity and melting point information; measuring cargo temperature during discharge...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... cargo temperature during discharge: Categories A, B, and C. 153.908 Section 153.908 Shipping COAST GUARD... Cargo viscosity and melting point information; measuring cargo temperature during discharge: Categories... in mPa.s and, if the cargo's viscosity exceeds 25 mPa.s at 20 °C, the temperature at which...

  18. 46 CFR 153.908 - Cargo viscosity and melting point information; measuring cargo temperature during discharge...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... cargo temperature during discharge: Categories A, B, and C. 153.908 Section 153.908 Shipping COAST GUARD..., LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Operations Documents and Cargo Information § 153.908 Cargo viscosity and melting point information; measuring cargo temperature during discharge:...

  19. Determination of high-risk cargo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Leo A.; Smith, Douglas E.; Khan, Siraj M.

    1994-10-01

    The approach and methodology used in the determination of the type of cargo containing concealments of commercial quantities of narcotics such as cocaine and heroin is described. This high-risk cargo enters the United States through border crossings at land, seaports and airports. The volume and variety of cargos make it a complex and challenging task for the U.S. Customs Service.

  20. 46 CFR 45.137 - Cargo ports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cargo ports. 45.137 Section 45.137 Shipping COAST GUARD....137 Cargo ports. (a) Unless otherwise authorized by the Commandant, the lower edge of any opening for... uppermost loadline. (b) The number of cargo ports in the sides of a ship must be— (1) No more than...

  1. 46 CFR 45.137 - Cargo ports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cargo ports. 45.137 Section 45.137 Shipping COAST GUARD....137 Cargo ports. (a) Unless otherwise authorized by the Commandant, the lower edge of any opening for... uppermost loadline. (b) The number of cargo ports in the sides of a ship must be— (1) No more than...

  2. 46 CFR 153.907 - Cargo information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Cargo information. 153.907 Section 153.907 Shipping... Information § 153.907 Cargo information. (a) The master shall ensure that the following information for each... process for the vessel. (b) The master shall make sure that the following information for cargoes...

  3. 46 CFR 153.907 - Cargo information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cargo information. 153.907 Section 153.907 Shipping... Information § 153.907 Cargo information. (a) The master shall ensure that the following information for each... process for the vessel. (b) The master shall make sure that the following information for cargoes...

  4. 49 CFR 172.328 - Cargo tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cargo tanks. 172.328 Section 172.328... SECURITY PLANS Marking § 172.328 Cargo tanks. (a) Providing and affixing identification numbers. Unless a cargo tank is already marked with the identification numbers required by this subpart,...

  5. 46 CFR 151.03-9 - Cargo.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES BARGES CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Definitions § 151.03-9 Cargo. This term means any liquid, gas or solid having one or more of the dangerous properties defined in this subchapter....

  6. 46 CFR 151.03-9 - Cargo.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES BARGES CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Definitions § 151.03-9 Cargo. This term means any liquid, gas or solid having one or more of the dangerous properties defined in this subchapter....

  7. 46 CFR 151.03-9 - Cargo.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES BARGES CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Definitions § 151.03-9 Cargo. This term means any liquid, gas or solid having one or more of the dangerous properties defined in this subchapter....

  8. 46 CFR 151.03-9 - Cargo.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES BARGES CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Definitions § 151.03-9 Cargo. This term means any liquid, gas or solid having one or more of the dangerous properties defined in this subchapter....

  9. 46 CFR 151.03-9 - Cargo.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES BARGES CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Definitions § 151.03-9 Cargo. This term means any liquid, gas or solid having one or more of the dangerous properties defined in this subchapter....

  10. Development and Validation of a Supersonic Helium-Air Coannular Jet Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carty, Atherton A.; Cutler, Andrew D.

    1999-01-01

    Data are acquired in a simple coannular He/air supersonic jet suitable for validation of CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) codes for high speed propulsion. Helium is employed as a non-reacting hydrogen fuel simulant, constituting the core of the coannular flow while the coflow is composed of air. The mixing layer interface between the two flows in the near field and the plume region which develops further downstream constitute the primary regions of interest, similar to those present in all hypersonic air breathing propulsion systems. A computational code has been implemented from the experiment's inception, serving as a tool for model design during the development phase.

  11. Russian Cargo Craft Final Undocking

    NASA Video Gallery

    The ISS Progress 47 resupply vehicle, loaded with trash, undocked from the International Space Station’s Pirs docking compartment for the final time July 30 at 5:19 p.m. EDT. The cargo ship undo...

  12. Cargo-shell and cargo-cargo couplings govern the mechanics of artificially loaded virus-derived cages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llauró, Aida; Luque, Daniel; Edwards, Ethan; Trus, Benes L.; Avera, John; Reguera, David; Douglas, Trevor; Pablo, Pedro J. De; Castón, José R.

    2016-04-01

    Nucleic acids are the natural cargo of viruses and key determinants that affect viral shell stability. In some cases the genome structurally reinforces the shell, whereas in others genome packaging causes internal pressure that can induce destabilization. Although it is possible to pack heterologous cargoes inside virus-derived shells, little is known about the physical determinants of these artificial nanocontainers' stability. Atomic force and three-dimensional cryo-electron microscopy provided mechanical and structural information about the physical mechanisms of viral cage stabilization beyond the mere presence/absence of cargos. We analyzed the effects of cargo-shell and cargo-cargo interactions on shell stability after encapsulating two types of proteinaceous payloads. While bound cargo to the inner capsid surface mechanically reinforced the capsid in a structural manner, unbound cargo diffusing freely within the shell cavity pressurized the cages up to ~30 atm due to steric effects. Strong cargo-cargo coupling reduces the resilience of these nanocompartments in ~20% when bound to the shell. Understanding the stability of artificially loaded nanocages will help to design more robust and durable molecular nanocontainers.Nucleic acids are the natural cargo of viruses and key determinants that affect viral shell stability. In some cases the genome structurally reinforces the shell, whereas in others genome packaging causes internal pressure that can induce destabilization. Although it is possible to pack heterologous cargoes inside virus-derived shells, little is known about the physical determinants of these artificial nanocontainers' stability. Atomic force and three-dimensional cryo-electron microscopy provided mechanical and structural information about the physical mechanisms of viral cage stabilization beyond the mere presence/absence of cargos. We analyzed the effects of cargo-shell and cargo-cargo interactions on shell stability after encapsulating two

  13. CAPSULE REPORT: SOURCES AND AIR EMISSION CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES AT WASTE MANAGEMENT FACILITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The chemicals processed during waste management operations can volatilize into the atmosphere and cause carcinogenic or other toxic effects or contribute to ozone formation. Regulations have been developed to control air emissions from these operations. The EPA has promulgated st...

  14. Impact of emissions from natural gas production facilities on ambient air quality in the Barnett Shale area: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Zielinska, Barbara; Campbell, Dave; Samburova, Vera

    2014-12-01

    Rapid and extensive development of shale gas resources in the Barnett Shale region of Texas in recent years has created concerns about potential environmental impacts on water and air quality. The purpose of this study was to provide a better understanding of the potential contributions of emissions from gas production operations to population exposure to air toxics in the Barnett Shale region. This goal was approached using a combination of chemical characterization of the volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from active wells, saturation monitoring for gaseous and particulate pollutants in a residential community located near active gas/oil extraction and processing facilities, source apportionment of VOCs measured in the community using the Chemical Mass Balance (CMB) receptor model, and direct measurements of the pollutant gradient downwind of a gas well with high VOC emissions. Overall, the study results indicate that air quality impacts due to individual gas wells and compressor stations are not likely to be discernible beyond a distance of approximately 100 m in the downwind direction. However, source apportionment results indicate a significant contribution to regional VOCs from gas production sources, particularly for lower-molecular-weight alkanes (< C6). Although measured ambient VOC concentrations were well below health-based safe exposure levels, the existence of urban-level mean concentrations of benzene and other mobile source air toxics combined with soot to total carbon ratios that were high for an area with little residential or commercial development may be indicative of the impact of increased heavy-duty vehicle traffic related to gas production. Implications: Rapid and extensive development of shale gas resources in recent years has created concerns about potential environmental impacts on water and air quality. This study focused on directly measuring the ambient air pollutant levels occurring at residential properties located near

  15. BIFoR FACE: A Free-Air Carbon Dioxide Enrichment (FACE) facility in old-growth temperate deciduous woodland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacKenzie, Rob; Thomas, Rick; Ellsworth, David; Hemming, Debbie; Crous, Kristine; Blaen, Phillip; Poynter, Alex; Blenkhorn, Daniel; Pope, Francis

    2016-04-01

    The Birmingham Institute of Forest research (BIFoR) focuses on fundamental physical, biological, ecological, social and cultural research of direct relevance to forested landscapes worldwide. A core platform for BIFoR is a Free-Air Carbon Dioxide Enrichment (FACE) facility, with which we study the ten-year response of a mature temperate deciduous forest ecosystem to a 150-ppmv step-change in atmospheric [CO2]. BIFoR FACE is being established in Mill Haft, a mature (~150 year-old) oak (Quercus robur) and hazel (Corylus avellana) coppice-with-standards woodland in central England, UK. The facility enables elevated CO2 (eCO2) treatments to be introduced in 30 m diameter rings (3 treatment plots, 3 fully-replicated control plots, and 3 unmodified ambient controls). Primary research questions focus on carbon uptake and storage, corresponding nutrient limitations, and biodiversity and ecosystem responses to elevated CO2. Here we describe the facility and experimental design, and present baseline data collected through the growing season of 2015. These data include: biophysical tree properties; atmospheric CO2/H2O fluxes; airborne and ground laser scatterometry; leaf area index; geophysical survey data; canopy phenology; soil and water chemical and physical properties; and invertebrate surveys. Data from an intensive campaign conducted during august 2015 are also shown, including in- and above- canopy characterisation of biogenic VOCs using a Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer, aerosol loading including bioaerosols, and air quality. Further campaign results are presented from leaf level photosynthetic carbon-dioxide response curve (A/Ci) performed at different canopy heights on oak trees, and on the dominant understory species - hazel and sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus) across the site. BIFoR FACE is intended to be an international facility for forest science - ideas for collaborations are encouraged. Please see http

  16. Flashback flame arrester devices for fuel cargo tank vapor vents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorklund, R. A.; Kushida, R. O.

    1981-01-01

    The flame quenching capability of four types of flame arresting devices suitable for installation on fuel cargo tank vents of marine transport vessels is evaluated. A single 30 mesh screen, a dual 20 mesh screen, a spiral wound crimped metal ribbon, and a packed bed of ballast rings were tested. Flame speed and flame penetration of the test arresters were determined. Eight fuels representative of bulk cargoes were tested. The test arresters quenched a minimum of three flashback flames from all eight fuels, with one exception: high speed ethylene flames penetrated the dual 20 mesh screen on three tests. The arresters withstood the sustained flame from a propane/air mixture for 30 minutes. None of the arresters withstood the sustained flame from an ethylene/air mixture for more than 7 minutes.

  17. Cargo Assured Access to International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, David A.

    2004-01-01

    Boeing's Cargo Assured Access logistics delivery system will provide a means to transport cargo to/from the International Space Station, Low Earth Orbit and the moon using Expendable Launch Vehicles. For Space Station, this capability will reduce cargo resupply backlog during nominal operations (e.g., supplement Shuttle, Progress, ATV and HTV) and augment cargo resupply capability during contingency operations (e.g., Shuttle delay and/or unavailability of International Partner launch or transfer vehicles). This capability can also provide an autonomous means to deliver cargo to lunar orbit, a lunar orbit refueling and work platform, and a contingency crew safe haven in support of NASA's new Exploration Initiative.

  18. Cargo-shell and cargo-cargo couplings govern the mechanics of artificially loaded virus-derived cages.

    PubMed

    Llauró, Aida; Luque, Daniel; Edwards, Ethan; Trus, Benes L; Avera, John; Reguera, David; Douglas, Trevor; Pablo, Pedro J de; Castón, José R

    2016-04-28

    Nucleic acids are the natural cargo of viruses and key determinants that affect viral shell stability. In some cases the genome structurally reinforces the shell, whereas in others genome packaging causes internal pressure that can induce destabilization. Although it is possible to pack heterologous cargoes inside virus-derived shells, little is known about the physical determinants of these artificial nanocontainers' stability. Atomic force and three-dimensional cryo-electron microscopy provided mechanical and structural information about the physical mechanisms of viral cage stabilization beyond the mere presence/absence of cargos. We analyzed the effects of cargo-shell and cargo-cargo interactions on shell stability after encapsulating two types of proteinaceous payloads. While bound cargo to the inner capsid surface mechanically reinforced the capsid in a structural manner, unbound cargo diffusing freely within the shell cavity pressurized the cages up to ∼30 atm due to steric effects. Strong cargo-cargo coupling reduces the resilience of these nanocompartments in ∼20% when bound to the shell. Understanding the stability of artificially loaded nanocages will help to design more robust and durable molecular nanocontainers. PMID:27091107

  19. Cargo-shell and cargo-cargo couplings govern the mechanics of artificially loaded virus-derived cages.

    PubMed

    Llauró, Aida; Luque, Daniel; Edwards, Ethan; Trus, Benes L; Avera, John; Reguera, David; Douglas, Trevor; Pablo, Pedro J de; Castón, José R

    2016-04-28

    Nucleic acids are the natural cargo of viruses and key determinants that affect viral shell stability. In some cases the genome structurally reinforces the shell, whereas in others genome packaging causes internal pressure that can induce destabilization. Although it is possible to pack heterologous cargoes inside virus-derived shells, little is known about the physical determinants of these artificial nanocontainers' stability. Atomic force and three-dimensional cryo-electron microscopy provided mechanical and structural information about the physical mechanisms of viral cage stabilization beyond the mere presence/absence of cargos. We analyzed the effects of cargo-shell and cargo-cargo interactions on shell stability after encapsulating two types of proteinaceous payloads. While bound cargo to the inner capsid surface mechanically reinforced the capsid in a structural manner, unbound cargo diffusing freely within the shell cavity pressurized the cages up to ∼30 atm due to steric effects. Strong cargo-cargo coupling reduces the resilience of these nanocompartments in ∼20% when bound to the shell. Understanding the stability of artificially loaded nanocages will help to design more robust and durable molecular nanocontainers.

  20. 40 CFR 86.161-00 - Air conditioning environmental test facility ambient requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... elements that are discussed are ambient air temperature and humidity, minimum test cell size, solar heating... be shown that all of the ambient test condition performance requirements are satisfied. (d) Solar heat loading. (1)(i) Acceptable types of radiant energy emitters that may be used for simulating...

  1. 40 CFR 86.161-00 - Air conditioning environmental test facility ambient requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... elements that are discussed are ambient air temperature and humidity, minimum test cell size, solar heating... be shown that all of the ambient test condition performance requirements are satisfied. (d) Solar heat loading. (1)(i) Acceptable types of radiant energy emitters that may be used for simulating...

  2. Preventing Indoor Air Quality Problems in Educational Facilities: Guidelines for Hot, Humid Climates. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Odom, J. David; DuBose, George

    This manual addresses the errors that occur during new construction that subsequently contribute to indoor air quality (IAQ) problems in newly constructed buildings in hot and humid climates, and offers guidelines for preventing them during the design and construction phases. It defines the roles and responsibilities of the design team, the…

  3. 76 FR 22095 - Clean Air Act: Opportunity To Comment, Activities Required by Federal Facilities Compliance...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-20

    ... companion Consent Agreement and Final Order (CAFO), Docket No. CAA-04-2010-1528(b), that TVA failed to... perform substantially the same relief as required by the Compliance Agreement. Neither the CAFO nor the... emissions of various air pollutants from units at the plants identified above. The CAFO assesses a...

  4. A Calibration Facility for Dew Point in Air up to 1 MPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, P. A.; Bell, S. A.; Stevens, M.

    2015-12-01

    The provision of primary dew-point standards for humidified air and nitrogen at atmospheric pressure is well established, and measurement traceability to these standards provides confidence in a vast number of air humidity measurements. However, hygrometers are used industrially at a wide range of pressures. Both the performance of hygrometers and the properties of humid gases are known to vary with gas pressure. The pressure-dependence of gas non-ideality for air-water mixtures (water-vapor enhancement factor) is well enough known at moderate pressures, but there remains a need to characterize hygrometers at the pressure of use. To address this, a humidity calibration capability of wider scope is under development at the UK National Physical Laboratory (NPL). As an initial stage in the development of this capability, a humidity standard generating air or nitrogen in the dew-point range from -60° C to +10° C, at pressures up to 1 MPa (10 bar) has been validated for the calibration of hygrometers. The expanded uncertainty of the dew-point generator in this range with a coverage factor k= 2 is ± 0.07° C.

  5. 40 CFR 86.161-00 - Air conditioning environmental test facility ambient requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... elements that are discussed are ambient air temperature and humidity, minimum test cell size, solar heating... be shown that all of the ambient test condition performance requirements are satisfied. (d) Solar heat loading. (1)(i) Acceptable types of radiant energy emitters that may be used for simulating...

  6. Waste water/storm water characterization survey, Willow Grove Air Reserve Facility, Pennsylvania. Final report, 15-26 Jul 91

    SciTech Connect

    McCoy, R.P.

    1992-03-01

    A wastewater characterization survey was conducted at Willow Grove Air Reserve Facility from 15-26 July 1991 by personnel from the Water Quality Function of Armstrong Laboratory. Quantitative data were also collected after a rain event to assess the quality of the water in the storm water holding pond. Sampling of the oil/water separators was also performed and recommendations were made concerning good management practices to implement to maintain the separators. Slight contamination of the wastewater discharged from the Facility was found, indicating the base is using good shop practices to minimize the disposal of industrial wastes through the sanitary sewer system. Results of the storm water sampling showed that the quality of the water in the holding pond was not greatly impacted by storm water runoff from the industrial areas on the Facility. A recommendation was made to install a pollution control device on the drain at the Bulk Fuels Storage Area. One oil/water separator was found to contain oil that had hazardous waste characteristics. All others had oil that was suitable for energy recovery.

  7. Radioactive Air Emmission Notice of Construction (NOC) for the Waste Receiving and Processing Facility (WRAP)

    SciTech Connect

    MENARD, N.M.

    2000-12-01

    This document serves as a notice of construction (NOC) pursuant to the requirements of Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-247-060, and as a request for approval to modify pursuant to 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 61.07 for the Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) Facility. The rewrite of this NOC incorporates all the approved revisions (Sections 5.0, 6.0, 8.0, and 9.0), a revised potential to emit (PTE) based on the revised maximally exposed individual (MEI) (Sections 8.0, 10.0, 11.0, 12.0, 13.0, 14.0, and 15.0), the results of a study on fugitive emissions (Sections 6.0, 10.0, and 15.0), and reflects the current operating conditions at the WRAP Facility (Section 5.0). This NOC replaces DOE/RL-93-15 and DOE/RL-93-16 in their entirety. The primary function of the WRAP Facility is to examine, assay, characterize, treat, verify, and repackage radioactive material and mixed waste. There are two sources of emissions from the WRAP Facility: stack emissions and fugitive emissions. The stack emissions have an unabated total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) estimate to the hypothetical offsite MEI of 1.13 E+02 millirem per year. The abated TEDE for the stack emissions is estimated at 5.63 E-02 millirem per year to the MEI. The fugitive emissions have an unabated TEDE estimate to the hypothetical offsite MEI of 5.87 E-04. There is no abatement for the fugitive emissions.

  8. Air-flow distortion and turbulence statistics near an animal facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prueger, J. H.; Eichinger, W. E.; Hipps, L. E.; Hatfield, J. L.; Cooper, D. I.

    The emission and dispersion of particulates and gases from concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFO) at local to regional scales is a current issue in science and society. The transport of particulates, odors and toxic chemical species from the source into the local and eventually regional atmosphere is largely determined by turbulence. Any models that attempt to simulate the dispersion of particles must either specify or assume various statistical properties of the turbulence field. Statistical properties of turbulence are well documented for idealized boundary layers above uniform surfaces. However, an animal production facility is a complex surface with structures that act as bluff bodies that distort the turbulence intensity near the buildings. As a result, the initial release and subsequent dispersion of effluents in the region near a facility will be affected by the complex nature of the surface. Previous Lidar studies of plume dispersion over the facility used in this study indicated that plumes move in complex yet organized patterns that would not be explained by the properties of turbulence generally assumed in models. The objective of this study was to characterize the near-surface turbulence statistics in the flow field around an array of animal confinement buildings. Eddy covariance towers were erected in the upwind, within the building array and downwind regions of the flow field. Substantial changes in turbulence intensity statistics and turbulence-kinetic energy (TKE) were observed as the mean wind flow encountered the building structures. Spectra analysis demonstrated unique distribution of the spectral energy in the vertical profile above the buildings.

  9. Maintain and operate California Air Resources Board field fumigation facility for experimental use. Final report, 17 December 1987-30 June 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Olszyk, D.M.

    1989-06-01

    The Statewide Air Pollution Research Center (SAPRC) has had a continuing mission to investigate the effects of air pollutants on both agricultural crops and native vegetation. To further this mission, SAPRC personnel have maintained the California Air Resources Board (ARB) field-exposure facilities at the Experiment Station at the University of California, Riverside for over seven years. The chamber facilities have been used for a wide variety of experiments. Over the past year, a total of five studies were completely or partially carried out in these facilities. ARB-funded studies included: a determination of the effects of ambient ozone on Valencia oranges, and an evaluation of hydrocarbon emissions from vegetation. Studies funded from other sources included an investigation on the effects of ozone and sulfur dioxide on quaking aspen and perennial ryegrass, investigation of the effects of ozone and sulfur dioxide on alfalfa, and a pilot investigation of the long-term injury effects of ozone on conifer seedlings.

  10. The Challenges of Field Testing the Traffic Management Advisor (TMA) in an Operational Air Traffic Control Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoang, Ty; Swenson, Harry N.

    1997-01-01

    The Traffic Management Advisor (TMA), the sequence and schedule tool of the Center/TRACON Automation System (CTAS), was evaluated at the Fort Worth Center (ZFW) in the summer of 1996. This paper describes the challenges encountered during the various phases of the TMA field evaluation, which included system (hardware and software) installation, personnel training, and data collection. Operational procedures were developed and applied to the evaluation process that would ensure air safety. The five weeks of field evaluation imposed minimal impact on the hosting facility and provided valuable engineering and human factors data. The collection of data was very much an opportunistic affair, due to dynamic traffic conditions. One measure of the success of the TMA evaluation is that, rather than remove TMA after the evaluation until it could be fully implemented, the prototype TMA is in continual use at ZFW as the fully operational version is readied for implementation.

  11. Measurement and control of the air contamination generated in a medical cyclotron facility for PET radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Calandrino, R; del Vecchio, A; Todde, S; Fazio, F

    2007-05-01

    The aim of this paper is to report the data concerning the contamination of the exhausted air from the hot cells dedicated to the large-scale synthesis of positron emission tomography (PET) radiopharmaceuticals. Two cyclotrons are currently operating in Ospedale San Raffaele for the routine production of C and F. They are linked with four radiochemistry laboratories by means of shielded radioisotope delivery lines. The above labs are dedicated both to the large scale preparation and to the research and development of PET radiopharmaceuticals. The department hosts four CT-PET scanners, which operate with a mean patient workload of 40 per day. Radiosyntheses are performed using automated modules located in 10 hot cells. The air outlets are monitored online by a 2-inch NaI(Tl) counter in a Marinelli geometry counting volume. Contamination values up to 10(5) Bq L(-1) have been measured at the hot cell exit point during the synthesis. The corresponding concentrations at the point of release in atmosphere are largely above the threshold of 1.29 Bq L(-1), defined by national regulations as the limit for free environmental release. A shielded gas storage system controlled by a dedicated, customized software program has thus been installed to prevent the potentially hazardous release of gaseous radioactive contaminants. The system has allowed us to maintain the effective dose to neighboring population groups below the limit of 10 muSv y(-1).

  12. Energy use test facility: CAC-DOE solar air heater test report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1981-11-01

    The solar air heater testing demonstrated an attractive application for residential space heating, especially appealing to the do-it-yourself market. Simple improvements in construction, such as caulking of the glazing, could increase collector performance at little cost. The operating cost of the fan was insignificant, being less than $0.05/week. Tested in its as-shipped configuration at 96.1 cfm (3 cfm/ft (2)), the useful energy delivered averaged 20,000 Btu/day for six days in December. The electrical consumption of the fan was approximately 1 kWh. Doubling the flowrate did not increase collector performance appreciably. A TRNSYS computer simulation model for this solar air heater design was validated by comparing the measured test data on Jaunary 4, 1981 with calculated values. TRNSYS predicted that measured collector outlet temperatures within +- 1.20F and the energy delivered within +- 3%. The excellent agreement was obtained by adjusting the collector loss coefficient to an unrealistically low value; therefore, a parametric study is recommended to determine the model sensitivity to varying different parameters. A first-order collector efficiency curve was derived from the TRNSYS simulations which compared well with the curve defined by the clear-day measured data.

  13. Occupational exposure and indoor air quality monitoring in a composting facility.

    PubMed

    Heida, H; Bartman, F; van der Zee, S C

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate indoor air quality in a completely covered enclosure used for the aerobic composting of organic wastes originating from vegetable, fruit, and garden refuse. Samples of gases and vapors were taken in the ventilation exhaust ducts. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were collected on Tenax absorbent; after thermal desorption they were analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Hydrogen sulfide was determined using Dräger test tubes. Microbial samplings were conducted on four sites inside the hall. Microbes were collected using a modified Anderson high-volume sampler, consisting of two impactor stages. Results indicate that the concentrations of VOCs were rather low; only the limonene level was elevated, but it was still well below the current Dutch provisional threshold limit value. Hydrogen sulfide levels found were also far less than the Dutch threshold limit value. Both total bacteria and gram-negative bacterial counts exceeded the provisional Dutch guideline of 10,000 cfu/m3 for indoor air in the work environment. Furthermore, the number of fungi, for the larger part consisting of the genera Aspergillus and Penicillium, which are known to cause respiratory tract disorders, approached the hazardous exposure level.

  14. 46 CFR 154.554 - Cargo hose: Bursting pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Cargo hose: Bursting pressure. 154.554 Section 154.554... Hose § 154.554 Cargo hose: Bursting pressure. Cargo hose that may be exposed to the pressure in the cargo tank, the cargo pump discharge, or the vapor compressor discharge must have a bursting pressure...

  15. 46 CFR 154.554 - Cargo hose: Bursting pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Cargo hose: Bursting pressure. 154.554 Section 154.554... Hose § 154.554 Cargo hose: Bursting pressure. Cargo hose that may be exposed to the pressure in the cargo tank, the cargo pump discharge, or the vapor compressor discharge must have a bursting pressure...

  16. 46 CFR 154.554 - Cargo hose: Bursting pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cargo hose: Bursting pressure. 154.554 Section 154.554... Hose § 154.554 Cargo hose: Bursting pressure. Cargo hose that may be exposed to the pressure in the cargo tank, the cargo pump discharge, or the vapor compressor discharge must have a bursting pressure...

  17. 46 CFR 154.554 - Cargo hose: Bursting pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cargo hose: Bursting pressure. 154.554 Section 154.554... Hose § 154.554 Cargo hose: Bursting pressure. Cargo hose that may be exposed to the pressure in the cargo tank, the cargo pump discharge, or the vapor compressor discharge must have a bursting pressure...

  18. 46 CFR 308.511 - Cancellation of Open Cargo Policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cancellation of Open Cargo Policy. 308.511 Section 308... INSURANCE War Risk Cargo Insurance Ii-Open Policy War Risk Cargo Insurance § 308.511 Cancellation of Open Cargo Policy. An assured may cancel an Open Cargo Policy by delivering to the underwriting agent,...

  19. 46 CFR 153.282 - Cargo filling lines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cargo filling lines. 153.282 Section 153.282 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING... and Cargo Handling Equipment § 153.282 Cargo filling lines. The discharge point of a cargo...

  20. 46 CFR 153.282 - Cargo filling lines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cargo filling lines. 153.282 Section 153.282 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING... and Cargo Handling Equipment § 153.282 Cargo filling lines. The discharge point of a cargo...

  1. 19 CFR 149.4 - Bulk and break bulk cargo.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Bulk and break bulk cargo. 149.4 Section 149.4... TREASURY (CONTINUED) IMPORTER SECURITY FILING § 149.4 Bulk and break bulk cargo. (a) Bulk cargo exempted.... (b) Break bulk cargo exempted from time requirement. For break bulk cargo that is exempt from...

  2. 19 CFR 149.4 - Bulk and break bulk cargo.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Bulk and break bulk cargo. 149.4 Section 149.4... TREASURY (CONTINUED) IMPORTER SECURITY FILING § 149.4 Bulk and break bulk cargo. (a) Bulk cargo exempted.... (b) Break bulk cargo exempted from time requirement. For break bulk cargo that is exempt from...

  3. 19 CFR 149.4 - Bulk and break bulk cargo.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Bulk and break bulk cargo. 149.4 Section 149.4... TREASURY (CONTINUED) IMPORTER SECURITY FILING § 149.4 Bulk and break bulk cargo. (a) Bulk cargo exempted.... (b) Break bulk cargo exempted from time requirement. For break bulk cargo that is exempt from...

  4. 19 CFR 149.4 - Bulk and break bulk cargo.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Bulk and break bulk cargo. 149.4 Section 149.4... TREASURY (CONTINUED) IMPORTER SECURITY FILING § 149.4 Bulk and break bulk cargo. (a) Bulk cargo exempted.... (b) Break bulk cargo exempted from time requirement. For break bulk cargo that is exempt from...

  5. 19 CFR 149.4 - Bulk and break bulk cargo.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Bulk and break bulk cargo. 149.4 Section 149.4... TREASURY (CONTINUED) IMPORTER SECURITY FILING § 149.4 Bulk and break bulk cargo. (a) Bulk cargo exempted.... (b) Break bulk cargo exempted from time requirement. For break bulk cargo that is exempt from...

  6. 46 CFR 153.972 - Connecting a cargo hose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Connecting a cargo hose. 153.972 Section 153.972... Procedures § 153.972 Connecting a cargo hose. The person in charge of cargo transfer may not authorize the connection of a hose to a cargo containment system unless: (a) He has ensured himself that the cargo will...

  7. 46 CFR 153.972 - Connecting a cargo hose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Connecting a cargo hose. 153.972 Section 153.972... Procedures § 153.972 Connecting a cargo hose. The person in charge of cargo transfer may not authorize the connection of a hose to a cargo containment system unless: (a) He has ensured himself that the cargo will...

  8. 46 CFR 153.972 - Connecting a cargo hose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Connecting a cargo hose. 153.972 Section 153.972... Procedures § 153.972 Connecting a cargo hose. The person in charge of cargo transfer may not authorize the connection of a hose to a cargo containment system unless: (a) He has ensured himself that the cargo will...

  9. 46 CFR 153.972 - Connecting a cargo hose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Connecting a cargo hose. 153.972 Section 153.972... Procedures § 153.972 Connecting a cargo hose. The person in charge of cargo transfer may not authorize the connection of a hose to a cargo containment system unless: (a) He has ensured himself that the cargo will...

  10. 46 CFR 153.972 - Connecting a cargo hose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Connecting a cargo hose. 153.972 Section 153.972... Procedures § 153.972 Connecting a cargo hose. The person in charge of cargo transfer may not authorize the connection of a hose to a cargo containment system unless: (a) He has ensured himself that the cargo will...

  11. 46 CFR 153.285 - Valving for cargo pump manifolds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Valving for cargo pump manifolds. 153.285 Section 153... Piping Systems and Cargo Handling Equipment § 153.285 Valving for cargo pump manifolds. (a) When cargo lines serving different tanks enter a pumproom and connect to the same pump: (1) Each cargo line...

  12. 46 CFR 153.285 - Valving for cargo pump manifolds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Valving for cargo pump manifolds. 153.285 Section 153... Piping Systems and Cargo Handling Equipment § 153.285 Valving for cargo pump manifolds. (a) When cargo lines serving different tanks enter a pumproom and connect to the same pump: (1) Each cargo line...

  13. 46 CFR 153.333 - Cargo pump discharge pressure gauge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Cargo pump discharge pressure gauge. 153.333 Section 153.333 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES... Cargo Pumprooms § 153.333 Cargo pump discharge pressure gauge. Each cargo pump within a pump-room...

  14. 46 CFR 153.285 - Valving for cargo pump manifolds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Valving for cargo pump manifolds. 153.285 Section 153... Piping Systems and Cargo Handling Equipment § 153.285 Valving for cargo pump manifolds. (a) When cargo lines serving different tanks enter a pumproom and connect to the same pump: (1) Each cargo line...

  15. 46 CFR 153.285 - Valving for cargo pump manifolds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Valving for cargo pump manifolds. 153.285 Section 153... Piping Systems and Cargo Handling Equipment § 153.285 Valving for cargo pump manifolds. (a) When cargo lines serving different tanks enter a pumproom and connect to the same pump: (1) Each cargo line...

  16. 46 CFR 153.333 - Cargo pump discharge pressure gauge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Cargo pump discharge pressure gauge. 153.333 Section 153.333 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES... Cargo Pumprooms § 153.333 Cargo pump discharge pressure gauge. Each cargo pump within a pump-room...

  17. 46 CFR 153.285 - Valving for cargo pump manifolds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Valving for cargo pump manifolds. 153.285 Section 153... Piping Systems and Cargo Handling Equipment § 153.285 Valving for cargo pump manifolds. (a) When cargo lines serving different tanks enter a pumproom and connect to the same pump: (1) Each cargo line...

  18. 9 CFR 3.114 - Primary conveyances (motor vehicle, rail, air and marine).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... conveyances (motor vehicle, rail, air and marine). (a) The animal cargo space of primary conveyances used in... animal cargo space must be constructed and maintained in a manner that will prevent the ingress of engine... mammals must only be placed in animal cargo spaces that have a supply of air sufficient for each...

  19. 9 CFR 3.88 - Primary conveyances (motor vehicle, rail, air, and marine).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... conveyances (motor vehicle, rail, air, and marine). (a) The animal cargo space of primary conveyances used to... cargo space must have a supply of air that is sufficient for the normal breathing of all the animals... the animal cargo space in a manner that provides protection from the elements and that allows...

  20. 9 CFR 3.88 - Primary conveyances (motor vehicle, rail, air, and marine).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... conveyances (motor vehicle, rail, air, and marine). (a) The animal cargo space of primary conveyances used to... cargo space must have a supply of air that is sufficient for the normal breathing of all the animals... the animal cargo space in a manner that provides protection from the elements and that allows...

  1. 9 CFR 3.37 - Primary conveyances (motor vehicle, rail, air, and marine).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... the safety and comfort of the live guinea pigs and hamsters at all times. (b) The animal cargo space... conveyances (motor vehicle, rail, air, and marine). (a) The animal cargo space of primary conveyances used in... be placed in an animal cargo space that does not have a supply of air sufficient for normal...

  2. 9 CFR 3.138 - Primary conveyances (motor vehicle, rail, air, and marine).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... comfort of the live animals contained therein at all times. (b) The animal cargo space shall be... (motor vehicle, rail, air, and marine). (a) The animal cargo space of primary conveyances used in... cargo space that does not have a supply of air sufficient for normal breathing for each live...

  3. 9 CFR 3.37 - Primary conveyances (motor vehicle, rail, air, and marine).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... the safety and comfort of the live guinea pigs and hamsters at all times. (b) The animal cargo space... conveyances (motor vehicle, rail, air, and marine). (a) The animal cargo space of primary conveyances used in... be placed in an animal cargo space that does not have a supply of air sufficient for normal...

  4. 9 CFR 3.88 - Primary conveyances (motor vehicle, rail, air, and marine).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... conveyances (motor vehicle, rail, air, and marine). (a) The animal cargo space of primary conveyances used to... cargo space must have a supply of air that is sufficient for the normal breathing of all the animals... the animal cargo space in a manner that provides protection from the elements and that allows...

  5. 9 CFR 3.114 - Primary conveyances (motor vehicle, rail, air and marine).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... conveyances (motor vehicle, rail, air and marine). (a) The animal cargo space of primary conveyances used in... animal cargo space must be constructed and maintained in a manner that will prevent the ingress of engine... mammals must only be placed in animal cargo spaces that have a supply of air sufficient for each...

  6. 9 CFR 3.88 - Primary conveyances (motor vehicle, rail, air, and marine).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... conveyances (motor vehicle, rail, air, and marine). (a) The animal cargo space of primary conveyances used to... cargo space must have a supply of air that is sufficient for the normal breathing of all the animals... the animal cargo space in a manner that provides protection from the elements and that allows...

  7. Maglev Launch: Ultra-low Cost, Ultra-high Volume Access to Space for Cargo and Humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, James; Maise, George; Rather, John

    2010-01-01

    Despite decades of efforts to reduce rocket launch costs, improvements are marginal. Launch cost to LEO for cargo is ~$10,000 per kg of payload, and to higher orbit and beyond much greater. Human access to the ISS costs $20 million for a single passenger. Unless launch costs are greatly reduced, large scale commercial use and human exploration of the solar system will not occur. A new approach for ultra low cost access to space-Maglev Launch-magnetically accelerates levitated spacecraft to orbital speeds, 8 km/sec or more, in evacuated tunnels on the surface, using Maglev technology like that operating in Japan for high speed passenger transport. The cost of electric energy to reach orbital speed is less than $1 per kilogram of payload. Two Maglev launch systems are described, the Gen-1System for unmanned cargo craft to orbit and Gen-2, for large-scale access of human to space. Magnetically levitated and propelled Gen-1 cargo craft accelerate in a 100 kilometer long evacuated tunnel, entering the atmosphere at the tunnel exit, which is located in high altitude terrain (~5000 meters) through an electrically powered ``MHD Window'' that prevents outside air from flowing into the tunnel. The Gen-1 cargo craft then coasts upwards to space where a small rocket burn, ~0.5 km/sec establishes, the final orbit. The Gen-1 reference design launches a 40 ton, 2 meter diameter spacecraft with 35 tons of payload. At 12 launches per day, a single Gen-1 facility could launch 150,000 tons annually. Using present costs for tunneling, superconductors, cryogenic equipment, materials, etc., the projected construction cost for the Gen-1 facility is 20 billion dollars. Amortization cost, plus Spacecraft and O&M costs, total $43 per kg of payload. For polar orbit launches, sites exist in Alaska, Russia, and China. For equatorial orbit launches, sites exist in the Andes and Africa. With funding, the Gen-1 system could operate by 2020 AD. The Gen-2 system requires more advanced technology

  8. Turboprop cargo aircraft systems study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muehlbauer, J. C.; Hewell, J. G., Jr.; Lindenbaum, S. P.; Randall, C. C.; Searle, N.; Stone, R. G., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of using advanced turboprop propulsion systems to reduce the fuel consumption and direct operating costs of cargo aircraft were studied, and the impact of these systems on aircraft noise and noise prints around a terminal area was determined. Parametric variations of aircraft and propeller characteristics were investigated to determine their effects on noiseprint areas, fuel consumption, and direct operating costs. From these results, three aircraft designs were selected and subjected to design refinements and sensitivity analyses. Three competitive turbofan aircraft were also defined from parametric studies to provide a basis for comparing the two types of propulsion.

  9. Experimental characterization of ultraviolet radiation of air in a high enthalpy plasma torch facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casses, C. J.; Bertrand, P. J.; Jacobs, C. M.; Mac Donald, M. E.; Laux, Ch. O.

    2015-06-01

    During atmospheric reentry, a plasma is formed ahead of the surface of the vehicle and the excited particle present in the plasma produces radiative heating fluxes to the surface of the vehicle. A high-temperature air plasma torch operating at atmospheric pressure was used to experimentally reproduce atmospheric reentry conditions. A high-resolution and absolute intensity emission spectrum (full width at half maximum (FWHM) = 0.064 nm) was obtained from 200 to 450 nm and then compared with computational results provided by the SPECAIR code [1]. This paper discusses the comparison of the two spectra over this wavelength range in order to confirm the validity of the calculation and provide direction to improve the calculated spectrum.

  10. Preliminary Assessment of Potential Avian Interactions at Four Proposed Wind Energy Facilities on Vandenberg Air Force Base, California

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2004-08-01

    The United States Air Force (USAF) is investigating whether to install wind turbines to provide a supplemental source of electricity at Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB) near Lompoc, California. As part of that investigation, VAFB sought assistance from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to provide a preliminary characterization of the potential risk to wildlife resources (mainly birds and bats) from wind turbine installations. With wind power development expanding throughout North America and Europe, concerns have surfaced over the number of bird fatalities associated with wind turbines. Guidelines developed for the wind industry by the National Wind Coordinating Committee (NWCC) recommend assessing potential impacts to birds, bats, and other potentially sensitive resources before construction. The primary purpose of an assessment is to identify potential conflicts with sensitive resources, to assist developers with identifying their permitting needs, and to develop strategies to avoid impacts or to mitigate their effects. This report provides a preliminary (Phase I) biological assessment of potential impacts to birds and bats that might result from construction and operation of the proposed wind energy facilities on VAFB.

  11. 46 CFR 150.130 - Loading a cargo on vessels carrying cargoes with which it is incompatible.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Loading a cargo on vessels carrying cargoes with which it is incompatible. 150.130 Section 150.130 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES COMPATIBILITY OF CARGOES § 150.130 Loading a cargo on...

  12. 46 CFR 150.130 - Loading a cargo on vessels carrying cargoes with which it is incompatible.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Loading a cargo on vessels carrying cargoes with which it is incompatible. 150.130 Section 150.130 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES COMPATIBILITY OF CARGOES § 150.130 Loading a cargo on...

  13. 46 CFR 150.130 - Loading a cargo on vessels carrying cargoes with which it is incompatible.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Loading a cargo on vessels carrying cargoes with which it is incompatible. 150.130 Section 150.130 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES COMPATIBILITY OF CARGOES § 150.130 Loading a cargo on...

  14. 46 CFR 150.130 - Loading a cargo on vessels carrying cargoes with which it is incompatible.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Loading a cargo on vessels carrying cargoes with which it is incompatible. 150.130 Section 150.130 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES COMPATIBILITY OF CARGOES § 150.130 Loading a cargo on...

  15. 46 CFR 154.1816 - Cargo location plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    .... The master shall ensure that: (a) A cargo location plan is prepared that gives: (1) The location and... kept with the sets of cargo information cards required under § 154.1814; and (c) The cargo names in...

  16. 46 CFR 153.316 - Special cargo pumproom ventilation rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Equipment Cargo Handling Space Ventilation § 153.316 Special cargo pumproom ventilation rate. When Table 1... 45 times per hour and discharge no less than 4 m (approx. 13.1 ft) above the deck. Cargo Pumprooms...

  17. 46 CFR 151.13-5 - Cargo segregation-tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...) Segregation of cargo from surrounding waters (Line 1 of Table 151.05). i=Skin of vessel (single skin) only required. Cargo tank wall can be vessel's hull. ii=Double skin required. Cargo tank wall cannot be...

  18. 46 CFR 151.13-5 - Cargo segregation-tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...) Segregation of cargo from surrounding waters (Line 1 of Table 151.05). i = Skin of vessel (single skin) only required. Cargo tank wall can be vessel's hull. ii = Double skin required. Cargo tank wall cannot be...

  19. 46 CFR 151.13-5 - Cargo segregation-tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...) Segregation of cargo from surrounding waters (Line 1 of Table 151.05). i=Skin of vessel (single skin) only required. Cargo tank wall can be vessel's hull. ii=Double skin required. Cargo tank wall cannot be...

  20. Design Report for the ½ Scale Air-Cooled RCCS Tests in the Natural convection Shutdown heat removal Test Facility (NSTF)

    SciTech Connect

    Lisowski, D. D.; Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Bremer, N.; Aeschlimann, R. W.

    2014-06-01

    The Natural convection Shutdown heat removal Test Facility (NSTF) is a large scale thermal hydraulics test facility that has been built at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The facility was constructed in order to carry out highly instrumented experiments that can be used to validate the performance of passive safety systems for advanced reactor designs. The facility has principally been designed for testing of Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS) concepts that rely on natural convection cooling for either air or water-based systems. Standing 25-m in height, the facility is able to supply up to 220 kW at 21 kW/m2 to accurately simulate the heat fluxes at the walls of a reactor pressure vessel. A suite of nearly 400 data acquisition channels, including a sophisticated fiber optic system for high density temperature measurements, guides test operations and provides data to support scaling analysis and modeling efforts. Measurements of system mass flow rate, air and surface temperatures, heat flux, humidity, and pressure differentials, among others; are part of this total generated data set. The following report provides an introduction to the top level-objectives of the program related to passively safe decay heat removal, a detailed description of the engineering specifications, design features, and dimensions of the test facility at Argonne. Specifications of the sensors and their placement on the test facility will be provided, along with a complete channel listing of the data acquisition system.

  1. Air Force Research Laboratory Spacecraft Cryocooler Endurance Evaluation Facility Closing Report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, J.; Martin, K. W.; Fraser, T.

    2015-12-01

    The Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) Spacecraft Component Thermal Research Group has been devoted to evaluating lifetime performance of space cryocooler technology for over twenty years. Long-life data is essential for confirming design lifetimes for space cryocoolers. Continuous operation in a simulated space environment is the only accepted method to test for degradation. AFRL has provided raw data and detailed evaluations to cryocooler developers for advancing the technology, correcting discovered deficiencies, and improving cryocooler designs. At AFRL, units of varying design and refrigeration cycles were instrumented in state-of-the-art experiment stands to provide spacelike conditions and were equipped with software data acquisition to track critical cryocooler operating parameters. This data allowed an assessment of the technology's ability to meet the desired lifetime and documented any long-term changes in performance. This paper will outline a final report of the various flight cryocoolers tested in our laboratory. The data summarized includes the seven cryocoolers tested during 2014-2015. These seven coolers have a combined total of 433,326 hours (49.5 years) of operation.

  2. 46 CFR 28.885 - Cargo gear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cargo gear. 28.885 Section 28.885 Shipping COAST GUARD... Aleutian Trade Act Vessels § 28.885 Cargo gear. (a) The safe working load (SWL) for the assembled gear... the load the gear is approved to lift, excluding the weight of the gear itself. (b) All wire...

  3. 46 CFR 28.885 - Cargo gear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Cargo gear. 28.885 Section 28.885 Shipping COAST GUARD... Aleutian Trade Act Vessels § 28.885 Cargo gear. (a) The safe working load (SWL) for the assembled gear... the load the gear is approved to lift, excluding the weight of the gear itself. (b) All wire...

  4. 46 CFR 28.885 - Cargo gear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Cargo gear. 28.885 Section 28.885 Shipping COAST GUARD... Aleutian Trade Act Vessels § 28.885 Cargo gear. (a) The safe working load (SWL) for the assembled gear... the load the gear is approved to lift, excluding the weight of the gear itself. (b) All wire...

  5. 46 CFR 28.885 - Cargo gear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Cargo gear. 28.885 Section 28.885 Shipping COAST GUARD... Aleutian Trade Act Vessels § 28.885 Cargo gear. (a) The safe working load (SWL) for the assembled gear... the load the gear is approved to lift, excluding the weight of the gear itself. (b) All wire...

  6. 46 CFR 154.1810 - Cargo manual.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Operations § 154.1810 Cargo manual. (a) No person may operate a foreign flag vessel, whose flag administration does not issue IMO Certificates, on the navigable waters of the United States, or a U.S. flag vessel, unless the vessel has on board a cargo...

  7. 46 CFR 154.1810 - Cargo manual.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Operations § 154.1810 Cargo manual. (a) No person may operate a foreign flag vessel, whose flag administration does not issue IMO Certificates, on the navigable waters of the United States, or a U.S. flag vessel, unless the vessel has on board a cargo...

  8. 46 CFR 154.1810 - Cargo manual.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Operations § 154.1810 Cargo manual. (a) No person may operate a foreign flag vessel, whose flag administration does not issue IMO Certificates, on the navigable waters of the United States, or a U.S. flag vessel, unless the vessel has on board a cargo...

  9. 48 CFR 470.203 - Cargo preference.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cargo preference. 470.203 Section 470.203 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FOOD ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS COMMODITY ACQUISITIONS 470.203 Cargo preference. An agency having responsibility under this subpart...

  10. 46 CFR 153.930 - Cargo antidotes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Cargo antidotes. 153.930 Section 153.930 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Operations General Vessel Safety §...

  11. 46 CFR 153.930 - Cargo antidotes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cargo antidotes. 153.930 Section 153.930 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Operations General Vessel Safety §...

  12. 46 CFR 153.930 - Cargo antidotes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Cargo antidotes. 153.930 Section 153.930 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Operations General Vessel Safety §...

  13. 46 CFR 153.930 - Cargo antidotes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cargo antidotes. 153.930 Section 153.930 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Operations General Vessel Safety §...

  14. 46 CFR 153.930 - Cargo antidotes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Cargo antidotes. 153.930 Section 153.930 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Operations General Vessel Safety §...

  15. 46 CFR 64.97 - Cargo hose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... that has an inside diameter— (a) Larger than three inches, must meet the requirements in 33 CFR 154.500... cargo pump or pump discharge relief valve setting, but not less than 100 pounds per square inch. 46 CFR... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Cargo hose. 64.97 Section 64.97 Shipping COAST...

  16. 46 CFR 64.97 - Cargo hose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... that has an inside diameter— (a) Larger than three inches, must meet the requirements in 33 CFR 154.500... cargo pump or pump discharge relief valve setting, but not less than 100 pounds per square inch. 46 CFR... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cargo hose. 64.97 Section 64.97 Shipping COAST...

  17. 46 CFR 64.97 - Cargo hose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... that has an inside diameter— (a) Larger than three inches, must meet the requirements in 33 CFR 154.500... cargo pump or pump discharge relief valve setting, but not less than 100 pounds per square inch. 46 CFR... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cargo hose. 64.97 Section 64.97 Shipping COAST...

  18. 46 CFR 64.97 - Cargo hose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... that has an inside diameter— (a) Larger than three inches, must meet the requirements in 33 CFR 154.500... cargo pump or pump discharge relief valve setting, but not less than 100 pounds per square inch. 46 CFR... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Cargo hose. 64.97 Section 64.97 Shipping COAST...

  19. 46 CFR 64.97 - Cargo hose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... that has an inside diameter— (a) Larger than three inches, must meet the requirements in 33 CFR 154.500... cargo pump or pump discharge relief valve setting, but not less than 100 pounds per square inch. 46 CFR... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Cargo hose. 64.97 Section 64.97 Shipping COAST...

  20. Cargo-towing synthetic nanomachines: towards active transport in microchip devices.

    PubMed

    Wang, Joseph

    2012-05-01

    This review article discusses the use of synthetic catalytic nano motors for cargo manipulations and for developing miniaturized lab-on-chip systems based on autonomous transport. The ability of using chemically-powered artificial nanomotors to capture, transport and release therapeutic payloads or nanostructured biomaterials represents one of the next major prospects for nanomotor development. The increased cargo-towing force of such self-propelled nanomotors, along with their precise motion control within microchannel networks, versatility and facile functionalization, pave the way to new integrated functional lab-on-a-chip powered by active transport and perform a series of tasks. Such use of cargo-towing artificial nanomotors has been inspired by on-chip kinesin molecular shuttles. Functionalized nano/microscale motors can thus be used to pick a selected nano/microscale chemical or biological payload target at the right place, transport and deliver them to a target location in a timely manner. Key challenges for using synthetic nanomachines for driving transport processes along microchannel networks are discussed, including loading and unloading of cargo and precise motion control, along with recent examples of related cargo manipulation processes and guided transport in lab-on-a-chip formats. The exciting research area of cargo-carrying catalytic man-made nanomachines is expected to grow rapidly, to lead to new lab-on-a-chip formats and to provide a wide range of future microchip opportunities.

  1. Irradiation Effects for the Pulsed Fast Neutron Analysis (PFNA) Cargo Interrogation System

    SciTech Connect

    Slater, C.O.

    2001-02-02

    At the request of Safety and Ecology Corporation of Tennessee, radiation effects of the proposed Pulsed Fast Neutron Analysis (PFNA) Cargo Interrogation System have been examined. First, fissile cargo were examined to determine if a significant neutron signal would be observable during interrogation. Results indicated that ample multiplication would be seen for near critical bare targets. The water-reflected sphere showed relatively little multiplication. By implication, a fissile target shielded by hydrogenous cargo might not be detectable by neutron interrogation, particularly if reliance is placed on the neutron signal. The cargo may be detectable if use can be made of the ample increase in the photon signal. Second, dose rates were calculated at various locations within and just outside the facility building. These results showed that some dose rates may be higher than the target dose rate of 0.05 mrem/h. However, with limited exposure time, the total dose may be well below the allowed total dose. Lastly, estimates were made of the activation of structures and typical cargo. Most cargo will not be exposed long enough to be activated to levels of concern. On the other hand, portions of the structure may experience buildup of some radionuclides to levels of concern.

  2. Cargo-Positioning System for Next-Generation Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holladay, Jon; Colton, Jonathan

    2006-01-01

    A report discusses a proposed system for mounting loaded pallets in the cargo bay of a next-generation space-shuttle-like spacecraft, such that the center of mass of the cargo would lie within a 1-in. (2.54-cm) cube that would also contain the center of mass of the spacecraft. The system would include (1) an algorithm for planning the locations of the pallets, given the geometric and weight properties of the pallets, and the geometric restrictions of the cargo bay; (2) quick-connect/quick-disconnect mounting mechanisms similar to those now used on air hoses; (3) other mounting mechanisms, comprising mostly spring-loaded pins, in a locking subsystem that would prevent shifting of the pallets under load; and (4) mechanisms for performing fine position adjustments to satisfy the center-of-mass requirement. The position- adjusting mechanisms would be motor-driven lead-screw mechanisms in groups of three - one for positioning each pin of the locking subsystem along each of three mutually perpendicular coordinate axes. The system also would include a triple-threaded screw that would provide compensation for thermal expansion or contraction of the spacecraft.

  3. Modification of NASA Langley 8 foot high temperature tunnel to provide a unique national research facility for hypersonic air-breathing propulsion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, H. N.; Wieting, A. R.

    1984-01-01

    A planned modification of the NASA Langley 8-Foot High Temperature Tunnel to make it a unique national research facility for hypersonic air-breathing propulsion systems is described, and some of the ongoing supporting research for that modification is discussed. The modification involves: (1) the addition of an oxygen-enrichment system which will allow the methane-air combustion-heated test stream to simulate air for propulsion testing; and (2) supplemental nozzles to expand the test simulation capability from the current nominal Mach number to 7.0 include Mach numbers 3.0, 4.5, and 5.0. Detailed design of the modifications is currently underway and the modified facility is scheduled to be available for tests of large scale propulsion systems by mid 1988.

  4. Comparison of Indoor Air Quality between 2 Ventilation Strategies in a Facility Housing Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta)

    PubMed Central

    Monts de Oca, Nicole A; Laughlin, Mitzi; Jenkins, John; Lockworth, Cynthia R; Bolton, Iris D; Brammer, David W

    2015-01-01

    Adequate indoor-air quality (IAQ)—defined by the temperature, relative humidity, and the levels of carbon dioxide, small particles, and total volatile organic compounds (TVOC)—is crucial in laboratory animal facilities. The ventilation standards for controlling these parameters are not well defined. This study assessed the effect of 2 ventilation strategies on IAQ in 2 rooms housing rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta). We hypothesized that using a demand-controlled ventilation (DCV) system with a baseline ventilation rate of less than 3 fresh-air changes per hour (ACH) would maintain IAQ comparable to or better than the traditional constant flow rate (CFR) system at 12 fresh ACH. During a 60-d study period, each of the 2 rooms operated 30 d on DCV and 30 d on CFR ventilation. In both rooms, temperatures remained more consistently within the established setpoint during the DCV phase than during the CFR phase. Relative humidity did not differ significantly between rooms or strategies. CO2 was lower during the CFR phase than DCV phase. Small-particle and TVOC levels were lower during CFR in the larger (3060 ft3) room but not the smaller (2340 ft3) room. During the DCV phase, the larger room was at the baseline airflow rate over 99% of the time and the smaller room over 96% of the time. The DCV strategy resulted in a baseline airflow rate of less than 3 ACH, which in turn provided acceptable IAQ over 96% of the time; higher ventilation rates were warranted only during sanitation periods. PMID:26424251

  5. Comparison of Indoor Air Quality between 2 Ventilation Strategies in a Facility Housing Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Monts de Oca, Nicole A; Laughlin, Mitzi; Jenkins, John; Lockworth, Cynthia R; Bolton, Iris D; Brammer, David W

    2015-09-01

    Adequate indoor-air quality (IAQ)--defined by the temperature, relative humidity, and the levels of carbon dioxide, small particles, and total volatile organic compounds (TVOC)--is crucial in laboratory animal facilities. The ventilation standards for controlling these parameters are not well defined. This study assessed the effect of 2 ventilation strategies on IAQ in 2 rooms housing rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta). We hypothesized that using a demand-controlled ventilation (DCV) system with a baseline ventilation rate of less than 3 fresh-air changes per hour (ACH) would maintain IAQ comparable to or better than the traditional constant flow rate (CFR) system at 12 fresh ACH. During a 60-d study period, each of the 2 rooms operated 30 d on DCV and 30 d on CFR ventilation. In both rooms, temperatures remained more consistently within the established setpoint during the DCV phase than during the CFR phase. Relative humidity did not differ significantly between rooms or strategies. CO₂ was lower during the CFR phase than DCV phase. Small-particle and TVOC levels were lower during CFR in the larger (3060 ft(3)) room but not the smaller (2340 ft(3)) room. During the DCV phase, the larger room was at the baseline airflow rate over 99% of the time and the smaller room over 96% of the time. The DCV strategy resulted in a baseline airflow rate of less than 3 ACH, which in turn provided acceptable IAQ over 96% of the time; higher ventilation rates were warranted only during sanitation periods.

  6. Real-air data reduction procedures based on flow parameters measured in the test section of supersonic and hypersonic facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. G., III; Wilder, S. E.

    1972-01-01

    Data-reduction procedures for determining free stream and post-normal shock kinetic and thermodynamic quantities are derived. These procedures are applicable to imperfect real air flows in thermochemical equilibrium for temperatures to 15 000 K and a range of pressures from 0.25 N/sq m to 1 GN/sq m. Although derived primarily to meet the immediate needs of the 6-inch expansion tube, these procedures are applicable to any supersonic or hypersonic test facility where combinations of three of the following flow parameters are measured in the test section: (1) Stagnation pressure behind normal shock; (2) freestream static pressure; (3) stagnation point heat transfer rate; (4) free stream velocity; (5) stagnation density behind normal shock; and (6) free stream density. Limitations of the nine procedures and uncertainties in calculated flow quantities corresponding to uncertainties in measured input data are discussed. A listing of the computer program is presented, along with a description of the inputs required and a sample of the data printout.

  7. Collective navigation of cargo-carrying swarms

    PubMed Central

    Shklarsh, Adi; Finkelshtein, Alin; Ariel, Gil; Kalisman, Oren; Ingham, Colin; Ben-Jacob, Eshel

    2012-01-01

    Much effort has been devoted to the study of swarming and collective navigation of micro-organisms, insects, fish, birds and other organisms, as well as multi-agent simulations and to the study of real robots. It is well known that insect swarms can carry cargo. The studies here are motivated by a less well-known phenomenon: cargo transport by bacteria swarms. We begin with a concise review of how bacteria swarms carry natural, micrometre-scale objects larger than the bacteria (e.g. fungal spores) as well as man-made beads and capsules (for drug delivery). A comparison of the trajectories of virtual beads in simulations (using different putative coupling between the virtual beads and the bacteria) with the observed trajectories of transported fungal spores implies the existence of adaptable coupling. Motivated by these observations, we devised new, multi-agent-based studies of cargo transport by agent swarms. As a first step, we extended previous modelling of collective navigation of simple bacteria-inspired agents in complex terrain, using three putative models of agent–cargo coupling. We found that cargo-carrying swarms can navigate efficiently in a complex landscape. We further investigated how the stability, elasticity and other features of agent–cargo bonds influence the collective motion and the transport of the cargo, and found sharp phase shifts and dual successful strategies for cargo delivery. Further understanding of such mechanisms may provide valuable clues to understand cargo-transport by smart swarms of other organisms as well as by man-made swarming robots. PMID:24312731

  8. Collective navigation of cargo-carrying swarms.

    PubMed

    Shklarsh, Adi; Finkelshtein, Alin; Ariel, Gil; Kalisman, Oren; Ingham, Colin; Ben-Jacob, Eshel

    2012-12-01

    Much effort has been devoted to the study of swarming and collective navigation of micro-organisms, insects, fish, birds and other organisms, as well as multi-agent simulations and to the study of real robots. It is well known that insect swarms can carry cargo. The studies here are motivated by a less well-known phenomenon: cargo transport by bacteria swarms. We begin with a concise review of how bacteria swarms carry natural, micrometre-scale objects larger than the bacteria (e.g. fungal spores) as well as man-made beads and capsules (for drug delivery). A comparison of the trajectories of virtual beads in simulations (using different putative coupling between the virtual beads and the bacteria) with the observed trajectories of transported fungal spores implies the existence of adaptable coupling. Motivated by these observations, we devised new, multi-agent-based studies of cargo transport by agent swarms. As a first step, we extended previous modelling of collective navigation of simple bacteria-inspired agents in complex terrain, using three putative models of agent-cargo coupling. We found that cargo-carrying swarms can navigate efficiently in a complex landscape. We further investigated how the stability, elasticity and other features of agent-cargo bonds influence the collective motion and the transport of the cargo, and found sharp phase shifts and dual successful strategies for cargo delivery. Further understanding of such mechanisms may provide valuable clues to understand cargo-transport by smart swarms of other organisms as well as by man-made swarming robots. PMID:24312731

  9. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Cccccc... - Applicability Criteria and Management Practices for Gasoline Cargo Tanks Unloading at Gasoline...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Practices for Gasoline Cargo Tanks Unloading at Gasoline Dispensing Facilities With Monthly Throughput of 100,000 Gallons of Gasoline or More 2 Table 2 to Subpart CCCCCC of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Pollutants for Source Category: Gasoline Dispensing Facilities Pt. 63, Subpt. CCCCCC, Table 2 Table 2...

  10. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Cccccc... - Applicability Criteria and Management Practices for Gasoline Cargo Tanks Unloading at Gasoline...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Practices for Gasoline Cargo Tanks Unloading at Gasoline Dispensing Facilities With Monthly Throughput of 100,000 Gallons of Gasoline or More 2 Table 2 to Subpart CCCCCC of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Pollutants for Source Category: Gasoline Dispensing Facilities Pt. 63, Subpt. CCCCCC, Table 2 Table 2...

  11. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Cccccc... - Applicability Criteria and Management Practices for Gasoline Cargo Tanks Unloading at Gasoline...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Practices for Gasoline Cargo Tanks Unloading at Gasoline Dispensing Facilities With Monthly Throughput of 100,000 Gallons of Gasoline or More 2 Table 2 to Subpart CCCCCC of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Pollutants for Source Category: Gasoline Dispensing Facilities Pt. 63, Subpt. CCCCCC, Table 2 Table 2...

  12. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Cccccc... - Applicability Criteria and Management Practices for Gasoline Cargo Tanks Unloading at Gasoline...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Practices for Gasoline Cargo Tanks Unloading at Gasoline Dispensing Facilities With Monthly Throughput of 100,000 Gallons of Gasoline or More 2 Table 2 to Subpart CCCCCC of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Pollutants for Source Category: Gasoline Dispensing Facilities Pt. 63, Subpt. CCCCCC, Table 2 Table 2...

  13. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Cccccc... - Applicability Criteria and Management Practices for Gasoline Cargo Tanks Unloading at Gasoline...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Practices for Gasoline Cargo Tanks Unloading at Gasoline Dispensing Facilities With Monthly Throughput of 100,000 Gallons of Gasoline or More 2 Table 2 to Subpart CCCCCC of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Pollutants for Source Category: Gasoline Dispensing Facilities Pt. 63, Subpt. CCCCCC, Table 2 Table 2...

  14. Unmanned barges carrying certain bulk dangerous cargoes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-07-03

    The US Coast Guard updates its regulations on the shipment of certain chemicals in bulk to include all dangerous cargoes that are now allowed to be shipped in bulk, and codifies the minimum carriage requirements that have been previously established for these cargoes, thus facilitating their shipment. Tables list the minimum requirements for certain regulated cargoes, including benzene-hydrocarbon mixtures (containing acetylenes), butyraldehydes, dichloromethane, ethylamine (72% or less), methyl tert.-butyl ether, nitric acid (70% or less), nitrobenzene, phthalic anhydride, sulfur dioxide, toluene diisocyanate, and trichloroethylene.

  15. 14 CFR 129.23 - Transport category cargo service airplanes: Increased zero fuel and landing weights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Transport category cargo service airplanes: Increased zero fuel and landing weights. 129.23 Section 129.23 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR CARRIERS AND OPERATORS FOR COMPENSATION OR HIRE: CERTIFICATION AND...

  16. 49 CFR 1544.202 - Persons and property onboard an all-cargo aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Persons and property onboard an all-cargo aircraft. 1544.202 Section 1544.202 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued... SECURITY: AIR CARRIERS AND COMMERCIAL OPERATORS Operations § 1544.202 Persons and property onboard an...

  17. 49 CFR 1544.202 - Persons and property onboard an all-cargo aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Persons and property onboard an all-cargo aircraft. 1544.202 Section 1544.202 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued... SECURITY: AIR CARRIERS AND COMMERCIAL OPERATORS Operations § 1544.202 Persons and property onboard an...

  18. 49 CFR 1544.202 - Persons and property onboard an all-cargo aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Persons and property onboard an all-cargo aircraft. 1544.202 Section 1544.202 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued... SECURITY: AIR CARRIERS AND COMMERCIAL OPERATORS Operations § 1544.202 Persons and property onboard an...

  19. 49 CFR 1544.202 - Persons and property onboard an all-cargo aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Persons and property onboard an all-cargo aircraft. 1544.202 Section 1544.202 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued... SECURITY: AIR CARRIERS AND COMMERCIAL OPERATORS Operations § 1544.202 Persons and property onboard an...

  20. 49 CFR 1544.202 - Persons and property onboard an all-cargo aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Persons and property onboard an all-cargo aircraft. 1544.202 Section 1544.202 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued... SECURITY: AIR CARRIERS AND COMMERCIAL OPERATORS Operations § 1544.202 Persons and property onboard an...

  1. 46 CFR 154.556 - Cargo hose: Maximum working pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Cargo hose: Maximum working pressure. 154.556 Section... Equipment Cargo Hose § 154.556 Cargo hose: Maximum working pressure. A cargo hose must have a maximum working pressure not less than the maximum pressure to which it may be subjected and at least 1034...

  2. 46 CFR 153.333 - Cargo pump discharge pressure gauge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cargo pump discharge pressure gauge. 153.333 Section 153... Cargo Pumprooms § 153.333 Cargo pump discharge pressure gauge. Each cargo pump within a pump-room must have a discharge pressure gauge outside the pumproom....

  3. 46 CFR 153.333 - Cargo pump discharge pressure gauge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Cargo pump discharge pressure gauge. 153.333 Section 153... Cargo Pumprooms § 153.333 Cargo pump discharge pressure gauge. Each cargo pump within a pump-room must have a discharge pressure gauge outside the pumproom....

  4. 46 CFR 154.556 - Cargo hose: Maximum working pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cargo hose: Maximum working pressure. 154.556 Section... Equipment Cargo Hose § 154.556 Cargo hose: Maximum working pressure. A cargo hose must have a maximum working pressure not less than the maximum pressure to which it may be subjected and at least 1034...

  5. 46 CFR 153.1020 - Unusually toxic cargoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... cargo. (c) No person may discharge overboard condensed steam from the heating system of a cargo... section in Table 1 unless the cargo's piping and venting systems are separated from piping and venting systems carrying cargoes not referred to this section. (b) The master shall ensure that no heat...

  6. 46 CFR 153.1020 - Unusually toxic cargoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... cargo. (c) No person may discharge overboard condensed steam from the heating system of a cargo... section in Table 1 unless the cargo's piping and venting systems are separated from piping and venting systems carrying cargoes not referred to this section. (b) The master shall ensure that no heat...

  7. 46 CFR 153.1020 - Unusually toxic cargoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... cargo. (c) No person may discharge overboard condensed steam from the heating system of a cargo... section in Table 1 unless the cargo's piping and venting systems are separated from piping and venting systems carrying cargoes not referred to this section. (b) The master shall ensure that no heat...

  8. 46 CFR 153.1020 - Unusually toxic cargoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... cargo. (c) No person may discharge overboard condensed steam from the heating system of a cargo... section in Table 1 unless the cargo's piping and venting systems are separated from piping and venting systems carrying cargoes not referred to this section. (b) The master shall ensure that no heat...

  9. 46 CFR 154.195 - Aluminum cargo tank: Steel enclosure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Aluminum cargo tank: Steel enclosure. 154.195 Section... Equipment Hull Structure § 154.195 Aluminum cargo tank: Steel enclosure. (a) An aluminum cargo tank and its... the aluminum cargo tank must meet the steel structural standards of the American Bureau of...

  10. 46 CFR 154.195 - Aluminum cargo tank: Steel enclosure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Aluminum cargo tank: Steel enclosure. 154.195 Section... Equipment Hull Structure § 154.195 Aluminum cargo tank: Steel enclosure. (a) An aluminum cargo tank and its... the aluminum cargo tank must meet the steel structural standards of the American Bureau of...

  11. 46 CFR 154.195 - Aluminum cargo tank: Steel enclosure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Aluminum cargo tank: Steel enclosure. 154.195 Section... Equipment Hull Structure § 154.195 Aluminum cargo tank: Steel enclosure. (a) An aluminum cargo tank and its... the aluminum cargo tank must meet the steel structural standards of the American Bureau of...

  12. 46 CFR 154.195 - Aluminum cargo tank: Steel enclosure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Aluminum cargo tank: Steel enclosure. 154.195 Section... Equipment Hull Structure § 154.195 Aluminum cargo tank: Steel enclosure. (a) An aluminum cargo tank and its... the aluminum cargo tank must meet the steel structural standards of the American Bureau of...

  13. 46 CFR 154.195 - Aluminum cargo tank: Steel enclosure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Aluminum cargo tank: Steel enclosure. 154.195 Section... Equipment Hull Structure § 154.195 Aluminum cargo tank: Steel enclosure. (a) An aluminum cargo tank and its... the aluminum cargo tank must meet the steel structural standards of the American Bureau of...

  14. 46 CFR 151.25-1 - Cargo tank.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Cargo tank. 151.25-1 Section 151.25-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES BARGES CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Environmental Control § 151.25-1 Cargo tank. When carrying certain commodities regulated by this subchapter, one...

  15. 46 CFR 151.13-5 - Cargo segregation-tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... hull. NA=Nonapplicable for this case. Independent tanks already have such segregation built in through... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cargo segregation-tanks. 151.13-5 Section 151.13-5... CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Cargo Segregation § 151.13-5 Cargo segregation—tanks....

  16. 46 CFR 151.13-5 - Cargo segregation-tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...'s hull. NA = Nonapplicable for this case. Independent tanks already have such segregation built in... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Cargo segregation-tanks. 151.13-5 Section 151.13-5... CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Cargo Segregation § 151.13-5 Cargo segregation—tanks....

  17. 46 CFR 151.20-5 - Cargo system valving requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... meet the requirements listed below. Cargo tanks, whether gravity or pressure vessel type, for cargoes... tank is insulated) shall be provided with a valving system designated as Gravity-1. Cargo tanks, whether gravity or pressure vessel type, for cargoes which are carried below ambient temperature and...

  18. 46 CFR 154.412 - Cargo tank corrosion allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Cargo tank corrosion allowance. 154.412 Section 154.412... Containment Systems § 154.412 Cargo tank corrosion allowance. A cargo tank must be designed with a corrosion...) carries a cargo that corrodes the tank material. Note: Corrosion allowance for independent tank type C...

  19. 46 CFR 154.412 - Cargo tank corrosion allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cargo tank corrosion allowance. 154.412 Section 154.412... Containment Systems § 154.412 Cargo tank corrosion allowance. A cargo tank must be designed with a corrosion...) carries a cargo that corrodes the tank material. Note: Corrosion allowance for independent tank type C...

  20. 46 CFR 154.412 - Cargo tank corrosion allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Cargo tank corrosion allowance. 154.412 Section 154.412... Containment Systems § 154.412 Cargo tank corrosion allowance. A cargo tank must be designed with a corrosion...) carries a cargo that corrodes the tank material. Note: Corrosion allowance for independent tank type C...

  1. 46 CFR 154.412 - Cargo tank corrosion allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Cargo tank corrosion allowance. 154.412 Section 154.412... Containment Systems § 154.412 Cargo tank corrosion allowance. A cargo tank must be designed with a corrosion...) carries a cargo that corrodes the tank material. Note: Corrosion allowance for independent tank type C...

  2. 46 CFR 151.20-10 - Cargo system instrumentation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... BARGES CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Cargo Transfer § 151.20-10 Cargo system instrumentation. (a) Each tank operated at other than ambient temperature shall be provided with at least one remote reading temperature sensor located in the liquid phase of the cargo. The temperature gauge...

  3. 46 CFR 151.20-10 - Cargo system instrumentation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... BARGES CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Cargo Transfer § 151.20-10 Cargo system instrumentation. (a) Each tank operated at other than ambient temperature shall be provided with at least one remote reading temperature sensor located in the liquid phase of the cargo. The temperature gauge...

  4. 46 CFR 154.1828 - Spaces containing cargo vapor: Entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Spaces containing cargo vapor: Entry. 154.1828 Section... Spaces containing cargo vapor: Entry. (a) No person may enter a cargo handling space without the... allowing anyone to enter a cargo handling space, the master shall ensure that: (1) The space is free...

  5. 41 CFR 102-117.140 - What is cargo preference?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What is cargo preference... cargo preference? Cargo preference is the statutory requirement that all, or a portion of all, ocean... the cargo preference laws must be approved by: Department of Transportation Maritime...

  6. 46 CFR 153.1020 - Unusually toxic cargoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... cargo. (c) No person may discharge overboard condensed steam from the heating system of a cargo... section in Table 1 unless the cargo's piping and venting systems are separated from piping and venting systems carrying cargoes not referred to this section. (b) The master shall ensure that no heat...

  7. 46 CFR 153.975 - Preparation for cargo transfer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... on deck or in compartments near the hose connections when Table 1 requires the cargo's containment.... (i) No repair work is underway in areas where cargo or cargo vapors may collect. (j) Cargo and sea... containment systems do not exceed the pressure ranges for which the transfer hose and containment systems...

  8. 46 CFR 154.551 - Cargo hose: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Cargo hose: General. 154.551 Section 154.551 Shipping... FOR SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment Cargo Hose § 154.551 Cargo hose: General. Each of the vessel's liquid and vapor cargo hose for loading...

  9. 46 CFR 154.560 - Cargo hose: Prototype test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Cargo hose: Prototype test. 154.560 Section 154.560... Hose § 154.560 Cargo hose: Prototype test. (a) Each cargo hose must be of a type that passes a... service temperature. (b) Each cargo hose must not be the hose used in the prototype test....

  10. 46 CFR 154.552 - Cargo hose: Compatibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Cargo hose: Compatibility. 154.552 Section 154.552 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY... Hose § 154.552 Cargo hose: Compatibility. Liquid and vapor cargo hoses must: (a) Not chemically...

  11. 46 CFR 154.551 - Cargo hose: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Cargo hose: General. 154.551 Section 154.551 Shipping... FOR SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment Cargo Hose § 154.551 Cargo hose: General. Each of the vessel's liquid and vapor cargo hose for loading...

  12. 46 CFR 154.560 - Cargo hose: Prototype test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Cargo hose: Prototype test. 154.560 Section 154.560... Hose § 154.560 Cargo hose: Prototype test. (a) Each cargo hose must be of a type that passes a... service temperature. (b) Each cargo hose must not be the hose used in the prototype test....

  13. 46 CFR 154.560 - Cargo hose: Prototype test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Cargo hose: Prototype test. 154.560 Section 154.560... Hose § 154.560 Cargo hose: Prototype test. (a) Each cargo hose must be of a type that passes a... service temperature. (b) Each cargo hose must not be the hose used in the prototype test....

  14. 46 CFR 154.556 - Cargo hose: Maximum working pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Cargo hose: Maximum working pressure. 154.556 Section 154.556 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS... Equipment Cargo Hose § 154.556 Cargo hose: Maximum working pressure. A cargo hose must have a...

  15. 46 CFR 154.558 - Cargo hose: Marking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cargo hose: Marking. 154.558 Section 154.558 Shipping... FOR SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment Cargo Hose § 154.558 Cargo hose: Marking. Each cargo hose must be marked with the: (a) Maximum working...

  16. 46 CFR 154.556 - Cargo hose: Maximum working pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Cargo hose: Maximum working pressure. 154.556 Section 154.556 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS... Equipment Cargo Hose § 154.556 Cargo hose: Maximum working pressure. A cargo hose must have a...

  17. 46 CFR 154.560 - Cargo hose: Prototype test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cargo hose: Prototype test. 154.560 Section 154.560... Hose § 154.560 Cargo hose: Prototype test. (a) Each cargo hose must be of a type that passes a... service temperature. (b) Each cargo hose must not be the hose used in the prototype test....

  18. 46 CFR 154.552 - Cargo hose: Compatibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cargo hose: Compatibility. 154.552 Section 154.552 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY... Hose § 154.552 Cargo hose: Compatibility. Liquid and vapor cargo hoses must: (a) Not chemically...

  19. 46 CFR 154.552 - Cargo hose: Compatibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Cargo hose: Compatibility. 154.552 Section 154.552 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY... Hose § 154.552 Cargo hose: Compatibility. Liquid and vapor cargo hoses must: (a) Not chemically...

  20. 46 CFR 154.558 - Cargo hose: Marking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Cargo hose: Marking. 154.558 Section 154.558 Shipping... FOR SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment Cargo Hose § 154.558 Cargo hose: Marking. Each cargo hose must be marked with the: (a) Maximum working...

  1. 46 CFR 154.554 - Cargo hose: Bursting pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Cargo hose: Bursting pressure. 154.554 Section 154.554... Hose § 154.554 Cargo hose: Bursting pressure. Cargo hose that may be exposed to the pressure in the... at least five times the maximum working pressure on the hose during cargo transfer....

  2. 46 CFR 154.558 - Cargo hose: Marking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cargo hose: Marking. 154.558 Section 154.558 Shipping... FOR SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment Cargo Hose § 154.558 Cargo hose: Marking. Each cargo hose must be marked with the: (a) Maximum working...

  3. 46 CFR 154.558 - Cargo hose: Marking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Cargo hose: Marking. 154.558 Section 154.558 Shipping... FOR SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment Cargo Hose § 154.558 Cargo hose: Marking. Each cargo hose must be marked with the: (a) Maximum working...

  4. 46 CFR 154.562 - Cargo hose: Hydrostatic test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Cargo hose: Hydrostatic test. 154.562 Section 154.562 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY... Hose § 154.562 Cargo hose: Hydrostatic test. Each cargo hose must pass a hydrostatic pressure test...

  5. 46 CFR 154.556 - Cargo hose: Maximum working pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cargo hose: Maximum working pressure. 154.556 Section 154.556 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS... Equipment Cargo Hose § 154.556 Cargo hose: Maximum working pressure. A cargo hose must have a...

  6. 46 CFR 154.552 - Cargo hose: Compatibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Cargo hose: Compatibility. 154.552 Section 154.552 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY... Hose § 154.552 Cargo hose: Compatibility. Liquid and vapor cargo hoses must: (a) Not chemically...

  7. 46 CFR 154.552 - Cargo hose: Compatibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cargo hose: Compatibility. 154.552 Section 154.552 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY... Hose § 154.552 Cargo hose: Compatibility. Liquid and vapor cargo hoses must: (a) Not chemically...

  8. 46 CFR 154.551 - Cargo hose: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Cargo hose: General. 154.551 Section 154.551 Shipping... FOR SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment Cargo Hose § 154.551 Cargo hose: General. Each of the vessel's liquid and vapor cargo hose for loading...

  9. 46 CFR 154.562 - Cargo hose: Hydrostatic test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cargo hose: Hydrostatic test. 154.562 Section 154.562 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY... Hose § 154.562 Cargo hose: Hydrostatic test. Each cargo hose must pass a hydrostatic pressure test...

  10. 46 CFR 154.562 - Cargo hose: Hydrostatic test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Cargo hose: Hydrostatic test. 154.562 Section 154.562 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY... Hose § 154.562 Cargo hose: Hydrostatic test. Each cargo hose must pass a hydrostatic pressure test...

  11. 46 CFR 154.551 - Cargo hose: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cargo hose: General. 154.551 Section 154.551 Shipping... FOR SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment Cargo Hose § 154.551 Cargo hose: General. Each of the vessel's liquid and vapor cargo hose for loading...

  12. 46 CFR 154.558 - Cargo hose: Marking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Cargo hose: Marking. 154.558 Section 154.558 Shipping... FOR SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment Cargo Hose § 154.558 Cargo hose: Marking. Each cargo hose must be marked with the: (a) Maximum working...

  13. 46 CFR 154.562 - Cargo hose: Hydrostatic test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cargo hose: Hydrostatic test. 154.562 Section 154.562 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY... Hose § 154.562 Cargo hose: Hydrostatic test. Each cargo hose must pass a hydrostatic pressure test...

  14. 46 CFR 154.551 - Cargo hose: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cargo hose: General. 154.551 Section 154.551 Shipping... FOR SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment Cargo Hose § 154.551 Cargo hose: General. Each of the vessel's liquid and vapor cargo hose for loading...

  15. 46 CFR 154.560 - Cargo hose: Prototype test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cargo hose: Prototype test. 154.560 Section 154.560... Hose § 154.560 Cargo hose: Prototype test. (a) Each cargo hose must be of a type that passes a... service temperature. (b) Each cargo hose must not be the hose used in the prototype test....

  16. 46 CFR 154.562 - Cargo hose: Hydrostatic test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Cargo hose: Hydrostatic test. 154.562 Section 154.562 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY... Hose § 154.562 Cargo hose: Hydrostatic test. Each cargo hose must pass a hydrostatic pressure test...

  17. 46 CFR 98.30-11 - Cargo pumps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Cargo pumps. 98.30-11 Section 98.30-11 Shipping COAST..., ARRANGEMENT, AND OTHER PROVISIONS FOR CERTAIN DANGEROUS CARGOES IN BULK Portable Tanks § 98.30-11 Cargo pumps. No person may operate a cargo pump to transfer a product to or from a portable tank unless the...

  18. 46 CFR 98.30-11 - Cargo pumps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cargo pumps. 98.30-11 Section 98.30-11 Shipping COAST..., ARRANGEMENT, AND OTHER PROVISIONS FOR CERTAIN DANGEROUS CARGOES IN BULK Portable Tanks § 98.30-11 Cargo pumps. No person may operate a cargo pump to transfer a product to or from a portable tank unless the...

  19. 46 CFR 98.30-11 - Cargo pumps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Cargo pumps. 98.30-11 Section 98.30-11 Shipping COAST..., ARRANGEMENT, AND OTHER PROVISIONS FOR CERTAIN DANGEROUS CARGOES IN BULK Portable Tanks § 98.30-11 Cargo pumps. No person may operate a cargo pump to transfer a product to or from a portable tank unless the...

  20. 46 CFR 98.30-11 - Cargo pumps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cargo pumps. 98.30-11 Section 98.30-11 Shipping COAST..., ARRANGEMENT, AND OTHER PROVISIONS FOR CERTAIN DANGEROUS CARGOES IN BULK Portable Tanks § 98.30-11 Cargo pumps. No person may operate a cargo pump to transfer a product to or from a portable tank unless the...