Science.gov

Sample records for air carrier pilots

  1. Airline Transport Pilot-Airplane (Air Carrier) Written Test Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Aviation Administration (DOT), Washington, DC. Flight Standards Service.

    Presented is information useful to applicants who are preparing for the Airline Transport Pilot-Airplane (Air Carrier) Written Test. The guide describes the basic aeronautical knowledge and associated requirements for certification, as well as information on source material, instructions for taking the official test, and questions that are…

  2. Geographic Region, Weather, Pilot Age and Air Carrier Crashes: a Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guohua; Pressley, Joyce C.; Qiang, Yandong; Grabowski, Jurek G.; Baker, Susan P.; Rebok, George W.

    2009-01-01

    Background Information about risk factors of aviation crashes is crucial for developing effective intervention programs. Previous studies assessing factors associated with crash risk were conducted primarily in general aviation, air taxis and commuter air carriers. Methods A matched case-control design was used to examine the associations of geographic region, basic weather condition, and pilot age with the risk of air carrier (14 CFR Part 121) crash involvement. Cases (n=373) were air carrier crashes involving aircraft made by Boeing, McDonnell Douglas, and Airbus, recorded in the National Transportation Safety Board’s aviation crash database during 1983 through 2002, and controls (n=746) were air carrier incidents involving aircraft of the same three makes selected at random from the Federal Aviation Administration’s aviation incident database. Each case was matched with two controls on the calendar year when the index crash occurred. Conditional logistic regression was used for statistical analysis. Results With adjustment for basic weather condition, pilot age, and total flight time, the risk of air carrier crashes in Alaska was more than three times the risk for other regions [adjusted odds ratio (OR) 3.18, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.35 – 7.49]. Instrument meteorological conditions were associated with an increased risk for air carrier crashes involving pilot error (adjusted OR 2.26, 95% CI 1.15 – 4.44) and a decreased risk for air carrier crashes without pilot error (adjusted OR 0.57, 95% CI 0.40 – 0.87). Neither pilot age nor total flight time was significantly associated with the risk of air carrier crashes. Conclusions The excess risk of air carrier crashes in Alaska and the effect of adverse weather on pilot-error crashes underscore the importance of environmental hazards in flight safety. PMID:19378910

  3. The use of total simulator training in transitioning air-carrier pilots: A field evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Randle, R. J., Jr.; Tanner, T. A.; Hamerman, J. A.; Showalter, T. H.

    1981-01-01

    A field study was conducted in which the performance of air carrier transitioning pilots who had landing training in a landing maneuver approved simulator was compared with the performance of pilots who had landing training in the aircraft. Forty-eight trainees transitioning to the B-727 aircraft and eighty-seven trainees transitioning to the DC-10 were included in the study. The study results in terms of both objectively measured performance indicants and observer and check-pilot ratings did not demonstrate a clear distinction between the two training groups. The results suggest that, for these highly skilled transitioning pilots, a separate training module in the aircraft may be of dubious value.

  4. Pilot Error in Air Carrier Mishaps: Longitudinal Trends Among 558 Reports, 1983–2002

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Susan P.; Qiang, Yandong; Rebok, George W.; Li, Guohua

    2009-01-01

    Background Many interventions have been implemented in recent decades to reduce pilot error in flight operations. This study aims to identify longitudinal trends in the prevalence and patterns of pilot error and other factors in U.S. air carrier mishaps. Method National Transportation Safety Board investigation reports were examined for 558 air carrier mishaps during 1983–2002. Pilot errors and circumstances of mishaps were described and categorized. Rates were calculated per 10 million flights. Results The overall mishap rate remained fairly stable, but the proportion of mishaps involving pilot error decreased from 42% in 1983–87 to 25% in 1998–2002, a 40% reduction. The rate of mishaps related to poor decisions declined from 6.2 to 1.8 per 10 million flights, a 71% reduction; much of this decrease was due to a 76% reduction in poor decisions related to weather. Mishandling wind or runway conditions declined by 78%. The rate of mishaps involving poor crew interaction declined by 68%. Mishaps during takeoff declined by 70%, from 5.3 to 1.6 per 10 million flights. The latter reduction was offset by an increase in mishaps while the aircraft was standing, from 2.5 to 6.0 per 10 million flights, and during pushback, which increased from 0 to 3.1 per 10 million flights. Conclusions Reductions in pilot errors involving decision making and crew coordination are important trends that may reflect improvements in training and technological advances that facilitate good decisions. Mishaps while aircraft are standing and during push-back have increased and deserve special attention. PMID:18225771

  5. 75 FR 6164 - New Pilot Certification Requirements for Air Carrier Operations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-08

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Parts 61 and 121 RIN 2120-AJ67 New Pilot Certification Requirements... comment on possible changes to regulations relating to the certification of pilots conducting domestic... current eligibility, training, and qualification requirements for commercial pilot certification...

  6. 78 FR 45055 - Pilot Certification and Qualification Requirements for Air Carrier Operations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-26

    ... requirements Requirements in final rule Hold: Hold: (1) At least a commercial pilot (1) An ATP certificate with certificate with an appropriate appropriate aircraft type category and class rating; rating OR--An ATP (2)...

  7. 14 CFR 135.76 - DOD Commercial Air Carrier Evaluator's Credentials: Admission to pilots compartment: Forward...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... DEMAND OPERATIONS AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Flight Operations § 135.76 DOD... aircraft operated by the certificate holder, the evaluator must be given free and uninterrupted access to the pilot's compartment of that aircraft. However, this paragraph does not limit the...

  8. 14 CFR 135.76 - DOD Commercial Air Carrier Evaluator's Credentials: Admission to pilots compartment: Forward...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... DEMAND OPERATIONS AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Flight Operations § 135.76 DOD... aircraft operated by the certificate holder, the evaluator must be given free and uninterrupted access to the pilot's compartment of that aircraft. However, this paragraph does not limit the...

  9. 14 CFR 135.76 - DOD Commercial Air Carrier Evaluator's Credentials: Admission to pilots compartment: Forward...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... DEMAND OPERATIONS AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Flight Operations § 135.76 DOD... aircraft operated by the certificate holder, the evaluator must be given free and uninterrupted access to the pilot's compartment of that aircraft. However, this paragraph does not limit the...

  10. 14 CFR 135.76 - DOD Commercial Air Carrier Evaluator's Credentials: Admission to pilots compartment: Forward...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... DEMAND OPERATIONS AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Flight Operations § 135.76 DOD... aircraft operated by the certificate holder, the evaluator must be given free and uninterrupted access to the pilot's compartment of that aircraft. However, this paragraph does not limit the...

  11. 14 CFR 135.76 - DOD Commercial Air Carrier Evaluator's Credentials: Admission to pilots compartment: Forward...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... DEMAND OPERATIONS AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Flight Operations § 135.76 DOD... aircraft operated by the certificate holder, the evaluator must be given free and uninterrupted access to the pilot's compartment of that aircraft. However, this paragraph does not limit the...

  12. 78 FR 44873 - Pilot Certification and Qualification Requirements for Air Carrier Operations; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-25

    .... FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: For technical questions concerning this correction contact Barbara... legal questions concerning this correction contact Anne Moore, Office of the Chief Counsel... revising former paragraph (a)(5) to permit pilots to credit time in a flight simulation training...

  13. 78 FR 42323 - Pilot Certification and Qualification Requirements for Air Carrier Operations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-15

    .... This rulemaking is consistent with the authority described in Subtitle VII, Part A, Subpart III... Aviation Major b. Transfer students c. Pilots with 1,500 hours who are not yet 23 years old d. Other Degree... may also be credited towards the 1,000 hours. The costs and benefits of this rule are best...

  14. Pilots' use of a traffic alert and collision-avoidance system (TCAS 2) in simulated air carrier operations. Volume 1: Methodology, summary and conclusions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chappell, Sheryl L.; Billings, Charles E.; Scott, Barry C.; Tuttell, Robert J.; Olsen, M. Christine; Kozon, Thomas E.

    1989-01-01

    Pilots' use of and responses to a traffic alert and collision-avoidance system (TCAS 2) in simulated air carrier line operations are described in Volume 1. TCAS 2 monitors the positions of nearby aircraft by means of transponder interrogation, and it commands a climb or descent when conflicting aircraft are projected to reach an unsafe closest point-of-approach within 20 to 25 seconds. A different level of information about the location of other air traffic was presented to each of three groups of flight crews during their execution of eight simulated air carrier flights. A fourth group of pilots flew the same segments without TCAS 2 equipment. Traffic conflicts were generated at intervals during the flights; many of the conflict aircraft were visible to the flight crews. The TCAS equipment successfully ameliorated the seriousness of all conflicts; three of four non-TCAS crews had hazardous encounters. Response times to TCAS maneuver commands did not differ as a function of the amount of information provided, nor did response accuracy. Differences in flight experience did not appear to contribute to the small performance differences observed. Pilots used the displays of conflicting traffic to maneuver to avoid unseen traffic before maneuver advisories were issued by the TCAS equipment. The results indicate: (1) that pilots utilize TCAS effectively within the response times allocated by the TCAS logic, and (2) that TCAS 2 is an effective collision avoidance device. Volume II contains the appendices referenced in Volume I, providing details of the experiment and the results, and the text of two reports written in support of the program.

  15. Pilots' use of a traffic alert and collision-avoidance system (TCAS 2) in simulated air carrier operations. Volume 2: Appendices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chappell, Sheryl L.; Billings, Charles E.; Scott, Barry C.; Tuttell, Robert J.; Olsen, M. Christine; Kozon, Thomas E.

    1989-01-01

    Pilots' use of and responses to a traffic alert and collision-avoidance system (TCAS 2) in simulated air carrier line operations are discribed in Volume 1. TCAS 2 monitors the positions of nearby aircraft by means of transponder interrogation, and it commands a climb or descent which conflicting aircraft are projected to reach an unsafe closest point-of-approach within 20 to 25 seconds. A different level of information about the location of other air traffic was presented to each of three groups of flight crews during their execution of eight simulated air carrier flights. A fourth group of pilots flew the same segments without TCAS 2 equipment. Traffic conflicts were generated at intervals during the flights; many of the conflict aircraft were visible to the flight crews. The TCAS equipment successfully ameliorated the seriousness of all conflicts; three of four non-TCAS crews had hazardous encounters. Response times to TCAS maneuver commands did not differ as a function of the amount of information provided, nor did response accuracy. Differences in flight experience did not appear to contribute to the small performance differences observed. Pilots used the displays of conflicting traffic to maneuver to avoid unseen traffic before maneuver advisories were issued by the TCAS equipment. The results indicate: (1) that pilots utilize TCAS effectively within the response times allocated by the TCAS logic, and (2) that TCAS 2 is an effective collision avoidance device. Volume 2 contains the appendices referenced in Volume 1, providing details of the experiment and the results, and the text of two reports written in support of the program.

  16. 14 CFR Section 04 - Air Carrier Groupings

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Air Carrier Groupings Section 04 Section 04... REGULATIONS UNIFORM SYSTEM OF ACCOUNTS AND REPORTS FOR LARGE CERTIFICATED AIR CARRIERS Section 04 Air Carrier Groupings (a) All large certificated air carriers are placed into three basic air carrier groupings...

  17. 14 CFR Section 04 - Air Carrier Groupings

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Air Carrier Groupings Section 04 Section 04... REGULATIONS UNIFORM SYSTEM OF ACCOUNTS AND REPORTS FOR LARGE CERTIFICATED AIR CARRIERS Section 04 Air Carrier Groupings (a) All large certificated air carriers are placed into three basic air carrier groupings...

  18. 29 CFR 1202.13 - Air carriers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... terms of title II of the Railway Labor Act, which was approved April 10, 1936, all of title I, except section 3, which relates to the National Railroad Adjustment Board, was extended to cover every common carrier by air engaged in interstate or foreign commerce, and every carrier by air transporting mail...

  19. 29 CFR 1202.13 - Air carriers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... terms of title II of the Railway Labor Act, which was approved April 10, 1936, all of title I, except section 3, which relates to the National Railroad Adjustment Board, was extended to cover every common carrier by air engaged in interstate or foreign commerce, and every carrier by air transporting mail...

  20. Commercial Air Carrier Vulnerabilities to Information Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    GMO /ENS/02E-11 DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE AIR UNIVERSITY AIR FORCE INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio...AFIT/ GMO /ENS/02E-11 COMMERCIAL AIR CARRIER VULNERABILITIES TO INFORMATION OPERATIONS...networks that without them, “there is no water coming out of your tap; there is no electricity lighting your room; there is no food being transported to

  1. 14 CFR 389.24 - Foreign air carriers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Foreign air carriers. 389.24 Section 389.24...) ORGANIZATION FEES AND CHARGES FOR SPECIAL SERVICES Filing and Processing License Fees § 389.24 Foreign air carriers. A foreign air carrier, or such carriers, if from the same country, acting jointly, may apply...

  2. Communicating Instantaneous Air Quality Data: Pilot Project

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Communicating Instantaneous Air Quality Data: Pilot ProjectEPA is launching a pilot project to test a new tool for making instantaneous outdoor air quality data useful for the public. The new “sensor scale” is designed to be used with sensors

  3. 14 CFR 296.3 - Indirect cargo air carrier.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Indirect cargo air carrier. 296.3 Section... PROCEEDINGS) ECONOMIC REGULATIONS INDIRECT AIR TRANSPORTATION OF PROPERTY General § 296.3 Indirect cargo air carrier. An indirect cargo air carrier is any U.S. citizen who undertakes to engage indirectly in...

  4. 14 CFR 296.3 - Indirect cargo air carrier.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Indirect cargo air carrier. 296.3 Section... PROCEEDINGS) ECONOMIC REGULATIONS INDIRECT AIR TRANSPORTATION OF PROPERTY General § 296.3 Indirect cargo air carrier. An indirect cargo air carrier is any U.S. citizen who undertakes to engage indirectly in...

  5. 14 CFR 298.52 - Air taxi operations by commuter air carriers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Air taxi operations by commuter air... (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS) ECONOMIC REGULATIONS EXEMPTIONS FOR AIR TAXI AND COMMUTER AIR CARRIER OPERATIONS Commuter Air Carrier Authorizations § 298.52 Air taxi operations by commuter air carriers. (a) A...

  6. 14 CFR 298.52 - Air taxi operations by commuter air carriers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Air taxi operations by commuter air... (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS) ECONOMIC REGULATIONS EXEMPTIONS FOR AIR TAXI AND COMMUTER AIR CARRIER OPERATIONS Commuter Air Carrier Authorizations § 298.52 Air taxi operations by commuter air carriers. (a) A...

  7. 14 CFR 252.3 - Smoking ban: air carriers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Smoking ban: air carriers. 252.3 Section... PROCEEDINGS) ECONOMIC REGULATIONS SMOKING ABOARD AIRCRAFT § 252.3 Smoking ban: air carriers. Air carriers shall prohibit smoking on all scheduled passenger flights....

  8. 14 CFR 252.3 - Smoking ban: air carriers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Smoking ban: air carriers. 252.3 Section... PROCEEDINGS) ECONOMIC REGULATIONS SMOKING ABOARD AIRCRAFT § 252.3 Smoking ban: air carriers. Air carriers shall prohibit smoking on all scheduled passenger flights....

  9. 14 CFR 252.5 - Smoking ban: foreign air carriers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Smoking ban: foreign air carriers. 252.5... PROCEEDINGS) ECONOMIC REGULATIONS SMOKING ABOARD AIRCRAFT § 252.5 Smoking ban: foreign air carriers. (a) Foreign air carriers shall prohibit smoking on all scheduled passenger flight segments: (1) Between...

  10. 14 CFR 252.5 - Smoking ban: foreign air carriers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Smoking ban: foreign air carriers. 252.5... PROCEEDINGS) ECONOMIC REGULATIONS SMOKING ABOARD AIRCRAFT § 252.5 Smoking ban: foreign air carriers. (a) Foreign air carriers shall prohibit smoking on all scheduled passenger flight segments: (1) Between...

  11. 14 CFR 252.5 - Smoking ban: foreign air carriers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Smoking ban: foreign air carriers. 252.5... PROCEEDINGS) ECONOMIC REGULATIONS SMOKING ABOARD AIRCRAFT § 252.5 Smoking ban: foreign air carriers. (a) Foreign air carriers shall prohibit smoking on all scheduled passenger flight segments: (1) Between...

  12. 14 CFR 252.5 - Smoking ban: foreign air carriers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Smoking ban: foreign air carriers. 252.5... PROCEEDINGS) ECONOMIC REGULATIONS SMOKING ABOARD AIRCRAFT § 252.5 Smoking ban: foreign air carriers. (a) Foreign air carriers shall prohibit smoking on all scheduled passenger flight segments: (1) Between...

  13. 14 CFR 252.5 - Smoking ban: foreign air carriers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Smoking ban: foreign air carriers. 252.5... PROCEEDINGS) ECONOMIC REGULATIONS SMOKING ABOARD AIRCRAFT § 252.5 Smoking ban: foreign air carriers. (a) Foreign air carriers shall prohibit smoking on all scheduled passenger flight segments: (1) Between...

  14. 14 CFR 252.3 - Smoking ban: air carriers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Smoking ban: air carriers. 252.3 Section... PROCEEDINGS) ECONOMIC REGULATIONS SMOKING ABOARD AIRCRAFT § 252.3 Smoking ban: air carriers. Air carriers shall prohibit smoking on all scheduled passenger flights....

  15. 14 CFR 399.83 - Unfair or deceptive practice of air carrier, foreign air carrier, or ticket agent in orally...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Unfair or deceptive practice of air carrier... Enforcement § 399.83 Unfair or deceptive practice of air carrier, foreign air carrier, or ticket agent in... confirmed reserved space, to be an unfair or deceptive practice and an unfair method of competition in...

  16. 14 CFR 399.83 - Unfair or deceptive practice of air carrier, foreign air carrier, or ticket agent in orally...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Unfair or deceptive practice of air carrier... Enforcement § 399.83 Unfair or deceptive practice of air carrier, foreign air carrier, or ticket agent in... confirmed reserved space, to be an unfair or deceptive practice and an unfair method of competition in...

  17. 14 CFR 399.83 - Unfair or deceptive practice of air carrier, foreign air carrier, or ticket agent in orally...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Unfair or deceptive practice of air carrier... Enforcement § 399.83 Unfair or deceptive practice of air carrier, foreign air carrier, or ticket agent in... confirmed reserved space, to be an unfair or deceptive practice and an unfair method of competition in...

  18. 14 CFR 399.83 - Unfair or deceptive practice of air carrier, foreign air carrier, or ticket agent in orally...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Unfair or deceptive practice of air carrier... Enforcement § 399.83 Unfair or deceptive practice of air carrier, foreign air carrier, or ticket agent in... confirmed reserved space, to be an unfair or deceptive practice and an unfair method of competition in...

  19. Reducing Air Force Fighter Pilot Shortages

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-31

    Albert A. Robbert, Anthony D. Rosello, Clarence R. Anderegg, John A. Ausink, James H. Bigelow, William W. Taylor, James Pita Reducing Air Force...Santa Monica, Calif. © Copyright 2015 RAND Corporation R® is a registered trademark. iii Preface The Air Force has faced a persistent challenge in...pilots in the reserve components. This research was sponsored by four elements of the U.S. Air Force: the Deputy Chief of Staff for Operations (AF/A3

  20. 14 CFR 252.3 - Smoking ban: air carriers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Smoking ban: air carriers. 252.3 Section 252.3 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS) ECONOMIC REGULATIONS SMOKING ABOARD AIRCRAFT § 252.3 Smoking ban: air carriers. Air...

  1. 14 CFR 252.3 - Smoking ban: air carriers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Smoking ban: air carriers. 252.3 Section 252.3 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS) ECONOMIC REGULATIONS SMOKING ABOARD AIRCRAFT § 252.3 Smoking ban: air carriers. Air...

  2. Commuter Air Carrier Loan Guarantee Study.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-01-01

    the heavy twin piston aircraft plus anti-ice, R- NAV , and full dual panels for both pilot and copilot. The equipped Blue Book prices were then compared...11,000 2 (3 ) o Glide Slope 700 800 1,300 2 (3 ) o Market Beacon 150 300 600 2 (3 ) o ADF 200 2,000 4,600 2 o Transponder 500 1,500 5,900 2 o DME 2,800...Flight Director 2,500 27,000 46,000 1 o Weather Radar 5,500 17,000 37,000 1 o R- Nav 1,900 16,000 80,000 1 o Anti-ice 1 o 02 70,000(2) o Air

  3. 77 FR 67584 - Air Carrier Contract Maintenance Requirements

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-13

    ... Stations, Report No. AV-2003-047 (July 8, 2003). In 2005, the IG issued a second report on air carriers...). \\4\\ Air Carrier's Outsourcing Use of Non-Certificated Repair Facilities, Report No. AV-2006-031 (Dec... Outsourcing of Aircraft Maintenance, Report No. AV-2008-090 (Sept. 30, 2008). \\7\\ The report noted...

  4. 14 CFR 399.83 - Unfair or deceptive practice of air carrier, foreign air carrier, or ticket agent in orally...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Unfair or deceptive practice of air carrier, foreign air carrier, or ticket agent in orally confirming to prospective passenger reserved space on... confirmed reserved space, to be an unfair or deceptive practice and an unfair method of competition in...

  5. Anthropometry of Brazilian Air Force pilots.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Gilvan V; Halpern, Manny; Gordon, Claire C

    2017-03-14

    Anthropometric data are essential for the design of military equipment including sizing of aircraft cockpits and personal gear. Currently, there are no anthropometric databases specific to Brazilian military personnel. The aim of this study was to create a Brazilian anthropometric database of Air Force pilots. The methods, protocols, descriptions, definitions, landmarks, tools and measurements procedures followed the instructions outlined in Measurer's Handbook: US Army and Marine Corps Anthropometric Surveys, 2010-2011 - NATICK/TR-11/017. The participants were measured countrywide, in all five Brazilian Geographical Regions. Thirty-nine anthropometric measurements related to cockpit design were selected. The results of 2133 males and 206 females aged 16-52 years constitute a set of basic data for cockpit design, space arrangement issues and adjustments, protective gear and equipment design, as well as for digital human modelling. Another important implication is that this study can be considered a starting point for reducing gender bias in women's career as pilots. Practitioner Summary: This paper describes the first large-scale anthropometric survey of the Brazilian Air Force pilots and the development of the related database. This study provides critical data for improving aircraft cockpit design for ergonomics and comprehensive pilot accommodation, protective gear and uniform design, as well as digital human modelling.

  6. Alternative Compensation Plans for Improving Retention of Air Force Pilots

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-08-01

    paid to most pilots. These plans do tend, however, to provide equal pay for pilots with equal YOS. o Plans that avoid indexing flight pay to annual... equal YOS receive different amounts of pay . Despite precedents for such differences in the military pay system, the Air Force argues that pilots with... equal YOS should receive equal pay in order to maintain pilot morale. o Plans that emphasize across-the-board pay increases for pilots of all types

  7. 2016 SmartWay Air Carrier Tool Demonstration

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This EPA presentation provides information on the SmartWay Air Carrier Tool: its background and development, participation in the program, application process, emission metrics, tool demonstration, data collection, and schedule for 2016.

  8. 77 FR 72432 - Application of Boutique Air, Inc. for Commuter Air Carrier Authority

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-05

    ... Department of Transportation is directing all interested persons to show cause why it should not issue an order finding Boutique Air, Inc., fit, willing, and able, and awarding it commuter air carrier...

  9. Analysis of flight equipment purchasing practices of representative air carriers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The process through which representative air carriers decide whether or not to purchase flight equipment was investigated as well as their practices and policies in retiring surplus aircraft. An analysis of the flight equipment investment decision process in ten airlines shows that for the airline industry as a whole, the flight equipment investment decision is in a state of transition from a wholly informal process in earliest years to a much more organized and structured process in the future. Individual air carriers are in different stages with respect to the formality and sophistication associated with the flight equipment investment decision.

  10. Pilot Age and Error in Air-Taxi Crashes

    PubMed Central

    Rebok, George W.; Qiang, Yandong; Baker, Susan P.; Li, Guohua

    2010-01-01

    Introduction The associations of pilot error with the type of flight operations and basic weather conditions are well documented. The correlation between pilot characteristics and error is less clear. This study aims to examine whether pilot age is associated with the prevalence and patterns of pilot error in air-taxi crashes. Methods Investigation reports from the National Transportation Safety Board for crashes involving non-scheduled Part 135 operations (i.e., air taxis) in the United States between 1983 and 2002 were reviewed to identify pilot error and other contributing factors. Crash circumstances and the presence and type of pilot error were analyzed in relation to pilot age using Chi-square tests. Results Of the 1751 air-taxi crashes studied, 28% resulted from mechanical failure, 25% from loss of control at landing or takeoff, 7% from visual flight rule conditions into instrument meteorological conditions, 7% from fuel starvation, 5% from taxiing, and 28% from other causes. Crashes among older pilots were more likely to occur during the daytime rather than at night and off airport than on airport. The patterns of pilot error in air-taxi crashes were similar across age groups. Of the errors identified, 27% were flawed decisions, 26% were inattentiveness, 23% mishandled aircraft kinetics, 15% mishandled wind and/or runway conditions, and 11% were others. Conclusions Pilot age is associated with crash circumstances but not with the prevalence and patterns of pilot error in air-taxi crashes. Lack of age-related differences in pilot error may be attributable to the “safe worker effect.” PMID:19601508

  11. 14 CFR 389.24 - Foreign air carriers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Foreign air carriers. 389.24 Section 389.24 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS... Director, Bureau of International Aviation. The request should include applicable official government...

  12. 14 CFR 389.24 - Foreign air carriers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Foreign air carriers. 389.24 Section 389.24 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS... Director, Bureau of International Aviation. The request should include applicable official government...

  13. 14 CFR 389.24 - Foreign air carriers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Foreign air carriers. 389.24 Section 389.24 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS... Director, Bureau of International Aviation. The request should include applicable official government...

  14. 14 CFR 389.24 - Foreign air carriers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Foreign air carriers. 389.24 Section 389.24 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS... Director, Bureau of International Aviation. The request should include applicable official government...

  15. 14 CFR 234.13 - Reports by air carriers on incidents involving animals during air transport.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... carrier that provides scheduled passenger air transportation shall, within 15 days of the end of the month... Consumer Protection Division a report on any incidents involving the loss, injury, or death of an...

  16. 14 CFR 234.13 - Reports by air carriers on incidents involving animals during air transport.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... carrier that provides scheduled passenger air transportation shall, within 15 days of the end of the month... Consumer Protection Division a report on any incidents involving the loss, injury, or death of an...

  17. 14 CFR 234.13 - Reports by air carriers on incidents involving animals during air transport.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... carrier that provides scheduled passenger air transportation shall, within 15 days of the end of the month... Consumer Protection Division a report on any incidents involving the loss, injury, or death of an...

  18. 14 CFR 234.13 - Reports by air carriers on incidents involving animals during air transport.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... carrier that provides scheduled passenger air transportation shall, within 15 days of the end of the month... Consumer Protection Division a report on any incidents involving the loss, injury, or death of an...

  19. 14 CFR 234.13 - Reports by air carriers on incidents involving animals during air transport.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... carrier that provides scheduled passenger air transportation shall, within 15 days of the end of the month... Consumer Protection Division a report on any incidents involving the loss, injury, or death of an...

  20. Retaining U.S. Air Force Pilots When the Civilian Demand for Pilots Is Growing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-01-01

    level of ARP needed to offset the impact. A Forecast Pilot Shortage Duggar, Smith, and Harrison (2009) reasoned that the excellent safety record of...line transport pilots (ATP). To quantify the possible shortfall, Duggar, Smith, and Harrison began with an FAA forecast (FAA, 2009) of the ATP...jet aircraft. Using the FAA forecast, Duggar, Smith, and Harrison assumed that the fraction 8 Retaining U.S. Air Force Pilots When the Civilian

  1. 78 FR 50138 - Applications for Certificates of Public Convenience and Necessity and Foreign Air Carrier Permits

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-16

    ... PanAir requesting a foreign air carrier permit to operate charter air transportation of property..., whether or not it constitutes part of a continuous operation that includes service to Panama. PanAir...

  2. The ASAC Air Carrier Investment Model (Second Generation)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingrove, Earl R., III; Johnson, Jesse P.; Sickles, Robin C.; Good, David H.

    1997-01-01

    To meet its objective of assisting the U.S. aviation industry with the technological challenges of the future, NASA must identify research areas that have the greatest potential for improving the operation of the air transportation system. To accomplish this, NASA is building an Aviation System Analysis Capability (ASAC). The ASAC differs from previous NASA modeling efforts in that the economic behavior of buyers and sellers in the air transportation and aviation industries is central to its conception. To link the economics of flight with the technology of flight, ASAC requires a parametrically based mode with extensions that link airline operations and investments in aircraft with aircraft characteristics. This model also must provide a mechanism for incorporating air travel demand and profitability factors into the airlines' investment decisions. Finally, the model must be flexible and capable of being incorporated into a wide-ranging suite of economic and technical models that are envisioned for ASAC. We describe a second-generation Air Carrier Investment Model that meets these requirements. The enhanced model incorporates econometric results from the supply and demand curves faced by U.S.-scheduled passenger air carriers. It uses detailed information about their fleets in 1995 to make predictions about future aircraft purchases. It enables analysts with the ability to project revenue passenger-miles flown, airline industry employment, airline operating profit margins, numbers and types of aircraft in the fleet, and changes in aircraft manufacturing employment under various user-defined scenarios.

  3. 77 FR 21834 - Airborne Radar Altimeter Equipment (For Air Carrier Aircraft)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-11

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Airborne Radar Altimeter Equipment (For Air Carrier Aircraft) AGENCY..., Airborne Radar Altimeter Equipment (For Air Carrier Aircraft). SUMMARY: This is a confirmation notice of the cancellation of TSO-C67, Airborne Radar Altimeter Equipment (For Air Carrier Aircraft). The...

  4. 14 CFR 399.12 - Negotiation by air carriers for landing rights in foreign countries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Negotiation by air carriers for landing... Relating to Operating Authority § 399.12 Negotiation by air carriers for landing rights in foreign..., landing rights abroad for United States flag air carriers will be acquired through negotiation by the...

  5. 14 CFR 399.12 - Negotiation by air carriers for landing rights in foreign countries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Negotiation by air carriers for landing... Relating to Operating Authority § 399.12 Negotiation by air carriers for landing rights in foreign..., landing rights abroad for United States flag air carriers will be acquired through negotiation by the...

  6. Communicating Instantaneous Air Quality Data: Pilot Project Feed Back

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA is launching a pilot project to test a new tool for making instantaneous outdoor air quality data useful for the public. The new “sensor scale” is designed to be used with air quality sensors that provide data in short time increments – often as little

  7. Efficient Conversation: The Talk between Pilots and Air Traffic Controllers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simmons, James L.

    Two-way radio communications between air traffic controllers using radar on the ground to give airplane pilots instructions are of interest within the developing framework of the sociology of language. The main purpose of air traffic control language is efficient communication to promote flight safety. This study describes the standardized format…

  8. Feedforward carrier recovery via pilot-aided transmission for single-carrier systems with arbitrary M-QAM constellations.

    PubMed

    Morsy-Osman, Mohamed; Zhuge, Qunbi; Chen, Lawrence R; Plant, David V

    2011-11-21

    We exploit pilot-aided (PA) transmission enabled by single-sideband (SSB) subcarrier modulation of both quadrature signals in the DSP domain to achieve fully feedforward carrier recovery (FFCR) in single-carrier (SC) coherent systems with arbitrary M-QAM constellations. A thorough mathematical description of the proposed PA-FFCR is presented, its linewidth tolerance is assessed by simulations and compared to other FFCR schemes in literature. Also, implementation and complexity issues of PA-FFCR are presented and briefly compared with other CR schemes. Simulation results show that PA-FFCR performs close to the best known CR technique in the literature with less computation complexity. Quantitatively, for 1 dB optical-signal-to-noise-ratio (OSNR) penalty at BER = 3.8 × 10(-3), PA-FFCR tolerates linewidth-symbol-duration products (Δf.Ts) of 1.5 × 10(-4) (4-QAM), 4 × 10(-5) (16-QAM) and 1 × 10(-5) (64-QAM). Finally, we propose the use of maximum likelihood (ML) phase estimation next to pilot phase compensation. This significantly improves tolerable Δf.Ts values to 7.5 × 10(-4) (4-QAM), 1.8 × 10(-4) (16-QAM) and 3.5 × 10(-5) (64-QAM). It turns out that PA-FFCR with ML always performs better or at least the same compared to other CR techniques known in literature with lower complexity in addition to the fact that pilot information can be as well exploited for tasks other than CR e.g., fiber nonlinearity compensation, with no extra complexity.

  9. Estimate of air carrier and air taxi crash frequencies from high altitude en route flight operations

    SciTech Connect

    Sanzo, D.; Kimura, C.Y.; Prassinos, P.G.

    1996-06-03

    In estimating the frequency of an aircraft crashing into a facility, it has been found convenient to break the problem down into two broad categories. One category estimates the aircraft crash frequency due to air traffic from nearby airports, the so-called near-airport environment. The other category estimates the aircraft crash frequency onto facilities due to air traffic from airways, jet routes, and other traffic flying outside the near-airport environment The total aircraft crash frequency is the summation of the crash frequencies from each airport near the facility under evaluation and from all airways, jet routes, and other traffic near the facility of interest. This paper will examine the problems associated with the determining the aircraft crash frequencies onto facilities outside the near-airport environment. This paper will further concentrate on the estimating the risk of aircraft crashes to ground facilities due to high altitude air carrier and air taxi traffic. High altitude air carrier and air taxi traffic will be defined as all air carrier and air taxi flights above 18,000 feet Mean Sea Level (MSL).

  10. A pilot study of energy efficient air cleaning for ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Gundel, Lara A.; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Katsapov, Gregory Y.; Fisk, William J.

    2002-11-01

    A laboratory pilot study has been undertaken with the material that showed the most promise (high capacity and low pressure drop) based on the literature review and associated calculations. The best-performing air cleaner was a commercially available pleated filter that contained a thin layer of small activated carbon particles between two sheets of non-woven fibrous webbing. We will refer to this unit as the ''ozone filter'' although it is marketed for removal of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from automobile passenger compartments. This pilot study strongly suggests that ozone air cleaning can be practical in commercial air handling systems; however, further tests are needed to assess air cleaner performance under a wider range of conditions.

  11. 77 FR 53779 - Reports by Air Carriers on Incidents Involving Animals During Air Transport

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-04

    .... DATES: Comments must be received by September 27, 2012. Comments received after this date will be... requirement for air carriers to report to the Department incidents involving the loss, injury, or death of an... be received 60 days after publication of the NPRM, or by August 28, 2012. Request for Comment...

  12. 14 CFR 206.4 - Exemption of air carriers for military transportation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Exemption of air carriers for military transportation. 206.4 Section 206.4 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... AUTHORIZATIONS AND EXEMPTIONS § 206.4 Exemption of air carriers for military transportation. Air...

  13. 14 CFR 206.4 - Exemption of air carriers for military transportation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Exemption of air carriers for military transportation. 206.4 Section 206.4 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... AUTHORIZATIONS AND EXEMPTIONS § 206.4 Exemption of air carriers for military transportation. Air...

  14. 14 CFR 206.4 - Exemption of air carriers for military transportation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Exemption of air carriers for military transportation. 206.4 Section 206.4 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... AUTHORIZATIONS AND EXEMPTIONS § 206.4 Exemption of air carriers for military transportation. Air...

  15. 77 FR 65395 - Air Cargo Advance Screening (ACAS) Pilot Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Air Cargo Advance Screening (ACAS) Pilot Program Correction In notice document 2012-26031 appearing on pages 65006-65009 in the issue of October 24, 2012 make...

  16. 32 CFR 861.6 - DOD review of foreign air carriers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... the foreign air carrier must meet ICAO standards as determined by ICAO, or the FAA under the FAA's... the CAA is not in compliance with ICAO standards. Unless otherwise authorized, use by DOD personnel on official business of foreign air carriers from countries in which the CAA is not in compliance with...

  17. 14 CFR Section 10 - Functional Classification-Operating Expenses of Group I Air Carriers

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Functional Classification-Operating... REPORTS FOR LARGE CERTIFICATED AIR CARRIERS Profit and Loss Classification Section 10 Functional Classification—Operating Expenses of Group I Air Carriers 5100Flying Operations. (a) This function shall...

  18. 14 CFR 119.21 - Commercial operators engaged in intrastate common carriage and direct air carriers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... common carriage and direct air carriers. 119.21 Section 119.21 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... operators engaged in intrastate common carriage and direct air carriers. (a) Each person who conducts airplane operations as a commercial operator engaged in intrastate common carriage of persons or...

  19. The Determinants of Career Decisions of Air Force Pilots.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-05-01

    entry into the Air Force, 2) age at the beginning of the sample period, 3) source of commission, 4) ethnic background, and 5) state from which accessed...Changing attitudes and characteristics of the officer a population would lead one to expect different responses to the same environment in different time...possible to analyse a larger segment of the pilot population . There are other year groups, both earlier and later than the ones used here, that were

  20. 16-QAM optical packet switching and real-time self-homodyne detection using polarization-multiplexed pilot-carrier.

    PubMed

    Shinada, Satoshi; Nakamura, Moriya; Kamio, Yukiyoshi; Wada, Naoya

    2012-12-10

    We demonstrated 20-Gbit/s 16 quadrature amplitude modulation (16-QAM) optical packet switching and real-time detection using self-homodyne. A prototype modulator consisting of an in-phase and quadrature (I-Q) modulator and monolithically integrated polarization beam splitters generated modulated signals and polarization-multiplexed pilot-carriers simultaneously. Self-homodyne detection using the pilot-carrier was resilient to phase noise and self-phase modulation, and the constellation was obtained in real time without digital signal processing. A low-polarization-dependent (Pb,La)(Zr,La)O(3) (PLZT) optical switch in the optical packet switch handled both 16-QAM optical packets and the polarization multiplexed pilot-carrier. Even after packet switching, a clear constellation diagram was obtained, and error-free operation was confirmed in real-time using a packet bit-error rate tester (BERT).

  1. 14 CFR 221.201 - Statement of filing with foreign governments to be shown in air carrier's tariff filings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... governments to be shown in air carrier's tariff filings. 221.201 Section 221.201 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE... Electronically Filed Tariffs § 221.201 Statement of filing with foreign governments to be shown in air carrier's tariff filings. (a) Every electronic tariff filed by or on behalf of an air carrier that contains...

  2. 78 FR 25352 - Agency Information Collection; Activity Under OMB Review; Preservation of Air carrier Records

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-30

    ... Research & Innovative Technology Administration Agency Information Collection; Activity Under OMB Review; Preservation of Air carrier Records AGENCY: Research & Innovative Technology Administration (RITA), Bureau of... techniques or other forms of information technology. Issued in Washington, DC, on April 23, 2013....

  3. Diltiazem Treatment for Preclinical Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Mutation Carriers: A Pilot Randomized Trial to Modify Disease Expression

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Carolyn Y.; Lakdawala, Neal K.; Cirino, Allison L.; Lipshultz, Steven E.; Sparks, Elizabeth; Abbasi, Siddique A.; Kwong, Raymond Y.; Antman, Elliott M.; Semsarian, Christopher; González, Arantxa; López, Begoña; Diez, Javier; Orav, E. John; Colan, Steven D.; Seidman, Christine E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is caused by sarcomere mutations and characterized by left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) with increased risk of heart failure and sudden death. HCM typically cannot be diagnosed early in life, although subtle phenotypes are present. Animal studies indicate alterations in intracellular calcium handling before LVH develops. Furthermore, early treatment with diltiazem appeared to attenuate disease emergence. Objectives To assess the safety, feasibility, and effect of diltiazem as disease-modifying therapy for at-risk HCM mutation carriers. Methods In a pilot, double-blind trial, we randomly assigned 38 sarcomere mutation carriers without LVH (mean age 15.8 years) to therapy with diltiazem 360 mg/day (or 5 mg/kg/day) or placebo. Treatment duration ranged from 12 to 42 months (median 25 months). Study procedures included electrocardiography, echocardiography, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, and serum biomarker measurement. Results Diltiazem was not associated with serious adverse events. Heart rate and blood pressure did not differ significantly between groups. However, mean left ventricular end diastolic diameter improved towards normal in the diltiazem group but decreased further in controls (change in z-scores, +0.6 vs. −0.5; P<0.001). Mean LV thickness-to-dimension ratio was stable in the diltiazem group, but increased in controls (−0.02 vs. +0.15; P=0.04). Among MYBPC3 mutation carriers, LV wall thickness and mass, diastolic filling, and cardiac troponin I levels improved in those taking diltiazem compared with controls. Four participants developed overt HCM, two in each treatment group. Conclusions Preclinical administration of diltiazem is safe and may improve early LV remodeling in HCM. This novel strategy merits further exploration. PMID:25543971

  4. Airport Activity Statistics of Certificated Route Air Carriers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-31

    INDIA ........................................ INTERNATIONAL S 392 388 38 120190 5134.50 1048 1.78 INDONESIA...TZ -A iCAI TRANS AIR ...................... DOMESTIC ... S 219 NS 946 AS 1165 UA . UNITED AIR LINES ............................ D ........... S

  5. 76 FR 2744 - Disclosure of Code-Share Service by Air Carriers and Sellers of Air Transportation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-14

    ... Office of the Secretary Disclosure of Code-Share Service by Air Carriers and Sellers of Air... Department is publishing the following notice on the enforcement of its rules relating to disclosure of code... Transportation, Office of the Secretary, Washington, DC Guidance on Disclosure of Code-Share Service Under...

  6. Commissioning Source and Personality Differences in U.S. Air Force Pilot Training

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-24

    personality traits associated with success in pilot training are well known. However, no research has looked at the “upstream” pipeline personality . The...within pilots, and the personality traits associated with success in pilot training are well known. However, no research has looked at the “upstream...AFRL-SA-WP-TR-2013-0001 Commissioning Source and Personality Differences in U.S. Air Force Pilot Training Erica Barto

  7. A pilot study to determine whether health care professionals perceive stigma in heterozygote carrier identification and disclosure decisions.

    PubMed

    Moffett, Alexander; Ross, Lainie Friedman

    2011-08-01

    We conducted an empirical pilot study to assess the attitudes of health care professionals (HCPs) to the personal identification of heterozygote carrier status for two autosomal recessive conditions (cystic fibrosis and a hemoglobinopathy) and for an X-linked disorder (Duchenne muscular dystrophy) using the Health Orientation Scale (HOS) and a modified HIV Stigma Scale. Attitudes towards carrier identification of children were also assessed. Three hundred and ten of 742 (42%) eligible HCPs fully or partly completed the survey. As measured with the HOS and the modified HIV scale, respondents had a more negative reaction to the hypothetical discovery of being a carrier for an autosomal recessive genetic condition that was less likely given their self-identified ancestry. Female respondents had a more negative reaction on both scales to being a carrier for an X-linked disorder than men thought their partners would feel. However, the differences found on the HOS and modified HIV scale are small and their clinical relevance unknown. Fifty-seven percent of respondents agreed that parents should tell their children to keep their carrier status private with many (44%) agreeing that children who learn that they are carriers may suffer from a decrease in self-esteem. The vast majority of respondents would inform immediate family members and HCPs of their carrier status, but would be unlikely to share this information with neighbors or employers. Further study is needed to develop a heterozygote genetic carrier stigma scale.

  8. Airport Activity Statistics of Certificated Route Air Carriers.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-12-31

    between those centers and principal centers. schedules, including extra sections. medium air trafic hub. A community enplaning from 0.25 to small air...O1618C-800U1820 149684 lima $3 41.35 4017.10 1144.2S 51186 4949.01 AIR ooft6o.- 6 A 39 437.811 74.35 253.41 2314.41 3Mo.ŝ 5 AL $ Lima & 3698 48s .114324

  9. 14 CFR 10 - Functional Classification-Operating Expenses of Group I Air Carriers

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Functional Classification-Operating Expenses of Group I Air Carriers Section 10 Section Section 10 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS) ECONOMIC REGULATIONS UNIFORM SYSTEM OF ACCOUNTS AND REPORTS FOR LARGE CERTIFICATED AIR...

  10. Performance Data Errors in Air Carrier Operations: Causes and Countermeasures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berman, Benjamin A.; Dismukes, R Key; Jobe, Kimberly K.

    2012-01-01

    Several airline accidents have occurred in recent years as the result of erroneous weight or performance data used to calculate V-speeds, flap/trim settings, required runway lengths, and/or required climb gradients. In this report we consider 4 recent studies of performance data error, report our own study of ASRS-reported incidents, and provide countermeasures that can reduce vulnerability to accidents caused by performance data errors. Performance data are generated through a lengthy process involving several employee groups and computer and/or paper-based systems. Although much of the airline indUStry 's concern has focused on errors pilots make in entering FMS data, we determined that errors occur at every stage of the process and that errors by ground personnel are probably at least as frequent and certainly as consequential as errors by pilots. Most of the errors we examined could in principle have been trapped by effective use of existing procedures or technology; however, the fact that they were not trapped anywhere indicates the need for better countermeasures. Existing procedures are often inadequately designed to mesh with the ways humans process information. Because procedures often do not take into account the ways in which information flows in actual flight ops and time pressures and interruptions experienced by pilots and ground personnel, vulnerability to error is greater. Some aspects of NextGen operations may exacerbate this vulnerability. We identify measures to reduce the number of errors and to help catch the errors that occur.

  11. The Effects on Pilot Retention as a Result of the United States Air Force’s Banked Pilot Program of 1991 to 1993

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-04-01

    AU/ACSC/143/1999-04 AIR COMMAND AND STAFF COLLEGE AIR UNIVERSITY THE EFFECTS ON PILOT RETENTION AS A RESULT OF THE UNITED STATES AIR FORCE’S BANKED ...SUBTITLE The Effects on Pilot Retention as a Result of the United States Air Force’s Banked Pilot Program of 1991 to 1993 Unclassified 5a. CONTRACT...RELEASE , 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The purpose of this study is to highlight the effects of the United States Air Force’s banked pilot program

  12. 14 CFR 298.63 - Reporting of aircraft operating expenses and related statistics by small certificated air carriers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Reporting of aircraft operating expenses and related statistics by small certificated air carriers. 298.63 Section 298.63 Aeronautics and Space... EXEMPTIONS FOR AIR TAXI AND COMMUTER AIR CARRIER OPERATIONS Reporting Requirements § 298.63 Reporting...

  13. 19 CFR 122.53 - Aircraft of foreign registry chartered or leased to U.S. air carriers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aircraft of foreign registry chartered or leased... Permit § 122.53 Aircraft of foreign registry chartered or leased to U.S. air carriers. Aircraft of foreign registry leased or chartered to a U.S. air carrier, while being operated by the U.S. air...

  14. 19 CFR 122.53 - Aircraft of foreign registry chartered or leased to U.S. air carriers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aircraft of foreign registry chartered or leased... Permit § 122.53 Aircraft of foreign registry chartered or leased to U.S. air carriers. Aircraft of foreign registry leased or chartered to a U.S. air carrier, while being operated by the U.S. air...

  15. 19 CFR 122.53 - Aircraft of foreign registry chartered or leased to U.S. air carriers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Aircraft of foreign registry chartered or leased... Permit § 122.53 Aircraft of foreign registry chartered or leased to U.S. air carriers. Aircraft of foreign registry leased or chartered to a U.S. air carrier, while being operated by the U.S. air...

  16. 19 CFR 122.53 - Aircraft of foreign registry chartered or leased to U.S. air carriers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aircraft of foreign registry chartered or leased... Permit § 122.53 Aircraft of foreign registry chartered or leased to U.S. air carriers. Aircraft of foreign registry leased or chartered to a U.S. air carrier, while being operated by the U.S. air...

  17. 19 CFR 122.53 - Aircraft of foreign registry chartered or leased to U.S. air carriers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Aircraft of foreign registry chartered or leased... Permit § 122.53 Aircraft of foreign registry chartered or leased to U.S. air carriers. Aircraft of foreign registry leased or chartered to a U.S. air carrier, while being operated by the U.S. air...

  18. 48 CFR 52.247-44 - F.o.b. Designated Air Carrier's Terminal, Point of Importation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false F.o.b. Designated Air... CLAUSES Text of Provisions and Clauses 52.247-44 F.o.b. Designated Air Carrier's Terminal, Point of... the delivery term is f.o.b. designated air carrier's terminal, point of importation: F.o.b....

  19. 48 CFR 47.303-15 - F.o.b. designated air carrier's terminal, point of exportation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false F.o.b. designated air... Contracts 47.303-15 F.o.b. designated air carrier's terminal, point of exportation. (a) Explanation of delivery term. F.o.b. designated air carrier's terminal, point of exportation means free of expense to...

  20. 48 CFR 47.303-16 - F.o.b. designated air carrier's terminal, point of importation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false F.o.b. designated air... Contracts 47.303-16 F.o.b. designated air carrier's terminal, point of importation. (a) Explanation of delivery term. F.o.b. designated air carrier's terminal, point of importation means free of expense to...

  1. 48 CFR 52.247-44 - F.o.b. Designated Air Carrier's Terminal, Point of Importation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false F.o.b. Designated Air... CLAUSES Text of Provisions and Clauses 52.247-44 F.o.b. Designated Air Carrier's Terminal, Point of... the delivery term is f.o.b. designated air carrier's terminal, point of importation: F.o.b....

  2. 48 CFR 52.247-43 - F.o.b. Designated Air Carrier's Terminal, Point of Exportation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false F.o.b. Designated Air... CLAUSES Text of Provisions and Clauses 52.247-43 F.o.b. Designated Air Carrier's Terminal, Point of... the delivery term is f.o.b. designated air carrier's terminal, point of exportation: F.o.b....

  3. 48 CFR 47.303-16 - F.o.b. designated air carrier's terminal, point of importation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false F.o.b. designated air... Contracts 47.303-16 F.o.b. designated air carrier's terminal, point of importation. (a) Explanation of delivery term. F.o.b. designated air carrier's terminal, point of importation means free of expense to...

  4. 48 CFR 47.303-15 - F.o.b. designated air carrier's terminal, point of exportation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false F.o.b. designated air... Contracts 47.303-15 F.o.b. designated air carrier's terminal, point of exportation. (a) Explanation of delivery term. F.o.b. designated air carrier's terminal, point of exportation means free of expense to...

  5. 48 CFR 52.247-43 - F.o.b. Designated Air Carrier's Terminal, Point of Exportation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false F.o.b. Designated Air... CLAUSES Text of Provisions and Clauses 52.247-43 F.o.b. Designated Air Carrier's Terminal, Point of... the delivery term is f.o.b. designated air carrier's terminal, point of exportation: F.o.b....

  6. Air Force: Actions Needed to Strengthen Management of Unmanned Aerial System Pilots

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-01

    combat operations in Iraq and Afghanistan. The Air Force flies three types of RPAs—the MQ-1 (Predator), the MQ-9 (Reaper) and the larger RQ-4...training, which is called Undergraduate Pilot Training. The Air Force currently flies the bulk of its RPAs using a concept known as remote-split...situation that many of these pilots will begin to reach the end of their service commitments in fiscal year 2017 . In a 2011 memorandum to the Air

  7. First Commuter Air Carrier Safety Symposium, January 16 - 17, 1980.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-01-01

    year. 96 a n ity; :..’ r " din tli •i 1 Ot’.-, it youi are e:,cirkini or’ an ambitio,:7 ~: ,:a t , >’’’.:, t: :x s . ume1s there can be good servicc...this technological breakthr ough . S )rnp , ; enthusiastic acceptance of these new aircraft by the r , travel ing public is test j’onv 1o the fact...carriers with relatively large markets wnici thi-v could integrate with hubs to form viable economic route system,) s . Tn’e r : -st these substitutions

  8. Mental health diagnoses and counseling among pilots of remotely piloted aircraft in the United States Air Force.

    PubMed

    Otto, Jean L; Webber, Bryant J

    2013-03-01

    Remotely piloted aircraft (RPA), also known as drones, have been used extensively in the recent conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. Although RPA pilots in the U.S. Air Force (USAF) have reported high levels of stress and fatigue, rates of mental health (MH) diagnoses and counseling in this population are unknown. We calculated incidence rates of 12 specific MH outcomes among all active component USAF RPA pilots between 1 October 2003 and 31 December 2011, and by various demographic and military variables. We compared these rates to those among all active component USAF manned aircraft (MA) pilots deployed to Iraq/Afghanistan during the same period. The unadjusted incidence rates of all MH outcomes among RPA pilots (n=709) and MA pilots (n=5,256) were 25.0 per 1,000 person-years and 15.9 per 1,000 person-years, respectively (adjusted incidence rate ratio=1.1, 95% confidence interval=0.9-1.5; adjusted for age, number of deployments, time in service, and history of any MH outcome). Th ere was no significant difference in the rates of MH diagnoses, including post-traumatic stress disorder, depressive disorders, and anxiety disorders between RPA and MA pilots. Military policymakers and clinicians should recognize that RPA and MA pilots have similar MH risk profiles.

  9. AIR DISPERSION MODELING AT THE WASTE ISOLATION PILOT PLANT

    SciTech Connect

    Rucker, D.F.

    2000-08-01

    One concern at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is the amount of alpha-emitting radionuclides or hazardous chemicals that can become airborne at the facility and reach the Exclusive Use Area boundary as the result of a release from the Waste Handling Building (WHB) or from the underground during waste emplacement operations. The WIPP Safety Analysis Report (SAR), WIPP RCRA Permit, and WIPP Emergency Preparedness Hazards Assessments include air dispersion calculations to address this issue. Meteorological conditions at the WIPP facility will dictate direction, speed, and dilution of a contaminant plume of respirable material due to chronic releases or during an accident. Due to the paucity of meteorological information at the WIPP site prior to September 1996, the Department of Energy (DOE) reports had to rely largely on unqualified climatic data from the site and neighboring Carlsbad, which is situated approximately 40 km (26 miles) to the west of the site. This report examines the validity of the DOE air dispersion calculations using new meteorological data measured and collected at the WIPP site since September 1996. The air dispersion calculations in this report include both chronic and acute releases. Chronic release calculations were conducted with the EPA-approved code, CAP88PC and the calculations showed that in order for a violation of 40 CFR61 (NESHAPS) to occur, approximately 15 mCi/yr of 239Pu would have to be released from the exhaust stack or from the WHB. This is an extremely high value. Hence, it is unlikely that NESHAPS would be violated. A site-specific air dispersion coefficient was evaluated for comparison with that used in acute dose calculations. The calculations presented in Section 3.2 and 3.3 show that one could expect a slightly less dispersive plume (larger air dispersion coefficient) given greater confidence in the meteorological data, i.e. 95% worst case meteorological conditions. Calculations show that dispersion will decrease

  10. The ASAC Air Carrier Investment Model (Third Generation)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingrove, Earl R., III; Gaier, Eric M.; Santmire, Tara E.

    1998-01-01

    To meet its objective of assisting the U.S. aviation industry with the technological challenges of the future, NASA must identify research areas that have the greatest potential for improving the operation of the air transportation system. To accomplish this, NASA is building an Aviation System Analysis Capability (ASAC). The ASAC differs from previous NASA modeling efforts in that the economic behavior of buyers and sellers in the air transportation and aviation industries is central to its conception. To link the economics of flight with the technology of flight, ASAC requires a parametrically based model with extensions that link airline operations and investments in aircraft with aircraft characteristics. This model also must provide a mechanism for incorporating air travel demand and profitability factors into the airlines' investment decisions. Finally, the model must be flexible and capable of being incorporated into a wide-ranging suite of economic and technical models flat are envisioned for ASAC.

  11. Aviation System Analysis Capability Air Carrier Investment Model-Cargo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Jesse; Santmire, Tara

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of the Aviation System Analysis Capability (ASAC) Air Cargo Investment Model-Cargo (ACIMC), is to examine the economic effects of technology investment on the air cargo market, particularly the market for new cargo aircraft. To do so, we have built an econometrically based model designed to operate like the ACIM. Two main drivers account for virtually all of the demand: the growth rate of the Gross Domestic Product (GDP) and changes in the fare yield (which is a proxy of the price charged or fare). These differences arise from a combination of the nature of air cargo demand and the peculiarities of the air cargo market. The net effect of these two factors are that sales of new cargo aircraft are much less sensitive to either increases in GDP or changes in the costs of labor, capital, fuel, materials, and energy associated with the production of new cargo aircraft than the sales of new passenger aircraft. This in conjunction with the relatively small size of the cargo aircraft market means technology improvements to the cargo aircraft will do relatively very little to spur increased sales of new cargo aircraft.

  12. Considerations Relative to the Use of Canes by Blind Travelers in Air Carrier Aircraft Cabins,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-07-01

    U) JUL 80 R F CHANDLER , J 0 GARNER, D L LOWREY UNCLASSIF lED FAAA-012EEEMEh EIEF’Tmom FAA-AM-80-12 CONSIDERATIONS RELATIVE TO THE USE OF CANES BY...BLIND TRAVELERS IN AIR CARRIER AIRCRAFT CABINS 0R. F. Chandler , J. D. Garner, D. L. Lowrey, qJ. G. Blethrow, and J. A. Anderson Civil Aeromedical...TRAVELERS IN AIR CARRIER AIRCRAFT CABINS 6 Perarming Organization Code .. PerformingOrgan ationReport No. 7.Au R. F. Chandler J. D./Garner D. L./Lowrey J

  13. Review of a long-term air sparging pilot test in a shallow aquifer

    SciTech Connect

    Weymann, D.F.; Hoffman, G.D.; Kuhn, E.M.

    1995-12-31

    A 5-month-long air sparging pilot study was conducted on a shallow surficial aquifer contaminated with gasoline. The pilot study was conducted on a shallow surficial aquifer contaminated with gasoline. The pilot study documented the physical and biological response of the aquifer and evaluated sampling techniques. Results indicated that sparging increased biological activity, but the zone of influence was limited. A transition from methanogenic to aerobic conditions was indicated. Monitoring results were significantly affected by sampling techniques.

  14. Private and Commercial Pilot: Ligher-Than-Air Airship. Flight Test Guide. (Part 61 Revised).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Aviation Administration (DOT), Washington, DC. Flight Standards Service.

    The flight test guide assists the applicant and his instructor in preparing for the flight test for the Private or Commercial Pilot Certificate with a Lighter-Than-Air Category and Airship Class Rating under Part 61 (revised) of Federal Aviation Regulations. It contains information and guidance concerning pilot operations, procedures, and…

  15. The Effect of Interruptions on Part 121 Air Carrier Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Damos, Diane L.

    1998-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to determine the relative priorities of various events and activities by examining the probability that a given activity was interrupted by a given event. The analysis will begin by providing frequency of interruption data by crew position (captain versus first officer) and event type. Any differences in the pattern of interruptions between the first officers and the captains will be explored and interpreted in terms of standard operating procedures. Subsequent data analyses will focus on comparing the frequency of interruptions for different types of activities and for the same activities under normal versus emergency conditions. Briefings and checklists will receive particular attention. The frequency with which specific activities are interrupted under multiple- versus single-task conditions also will be examined; because the majority of multiple-task data were obtained under laboratory conditions, LOFT-type tapes offer a unique opportunity to examine concurrent task performance under 'real-world' conditions. A second purpose of this study is to examine the effects of the interruptions on performance. More specifically, when possible, the time to resume specific activities will be compared to determine if pilots are slower to resume certain types of activities. Errors in resumption or failures to resume specific activities will be noted and any patterns in these errors will be identified. Again, particular attention will be given to the effects of interruptions on the completion of checklists and briefings. Other types of errors and missed events (i.e., the crew should have responded to the event but did not) will be examined. Any methodology using interruptions to examine task prioritization must be able to identify when an interruption has occurred and describe the ongoing activities that were interrupted. Both of these methodological problems are discussed In detail in the following section,

  16. Site 5 air sparging pilot test, Naval Air Station Cecil Field, Jacksonville, Florida.

    PubMed

    Murray, W A; Lunardini, R C; Ullo, F J; Davidson, M E

    2000-02-25

    A 72-h air sparging pilot test was conducted at Site 5 (Operable Unit 2), Naval Air Station Cecil Field, Jacksonville, FL, to determine performance parameters necessary for full-scale design. The sparge well was completed to a depth of 29 ft, several feet below the groundwater plume contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs), primarily benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX). Air flow rates supplied to the sparge well were 3 cubic feet/min (cfm) during the first day, 2 cfm during the second day, and 1 cfm during the third day. Water levels in monitoring wells initially rose approximately 2 ft during the first 4-5 h of the test, then receded back to pre-test equilibrium levels over the next 15 h, for a total duration of water mounding of about 20 h. A small (approximately 0.5 ft) water table drop, with subsequent recovery to equilibrium level, occurred each time the air sparging rate was decreased. Although there is considerable variation depending on direction from the sparge well, the average radius of influence varied from approximately 30 ft at 1 cfm to 50 ft at 3 cfm. The air sparge system was capable of increasing the dissolved oxygen from 0 to 6 or 7 mg/l within 12-15 h of air channels reaching a given location. A lag time of approximately 13 h was observed before air channels reached a radius of 30 ft and dissolved oxygen levels began to increase at that radius. CO(2) (stripped out of the groundwater by the sparging) decreased from a pre-test concentration of 150 to 20 mg/l at r=5 ft, and from 150 to 50 mg/l at r=30 ft, within a period of about 24 h. The rate of VOC mass removal during the pilot test was 0.06 lb/day at a sparge rate of 3 cfm, and it appears that air sparging will effect a rapid cleanup of the VOCs in the Site 5 groundwater plume.

  17. 77 FR 3323 - Airborne Radar Altimeter Equipment (For Air Carrier Aircraft)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-23

    ... Doc No: 2012-1243] DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration Airborne Radar...: Notice of intent to cancel Technical Standard Order (TSO)-C67, Airborne Radar Altimeter Equipment (For... Radar Altimeter Equipment (For Air Carrier Aircraft). The effect of the cancelled TSO will result in...

  18. 76 FR 38264 - Applications for Certificates of Public Convenience and Necessity and Foreign Air Carrier Permits...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Office of the Secretary Applications for Certificates of Public Convenience and Necessity and Foreign Air Carrier Permits Filed Under Subpart B (Formerly Subpart Q) During the Week Ending June 4, 2011 The following Applications for Certificates...

  19. 14 CFR 249.20 - Preservation of records by certificated air carriers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Preservation of records by certificated air carriers. 249.20 Section 249.20 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... internal reports on internal controls and other internal audits and procedural studies;...

  20. 76 FR 61245 - Provision of Aviation Insurance Coverage for Commercial Air Carrier Service in Domestic and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-03

    ... obtained on reasonable terms and conditions from any company authorized to conduct an insurance business in... October 3, 2011 Part VI The President Memorandum of September 28, 2011--Provision of Aviation Insurance... Aviation Insurance Coverage for Commercial Air Carrier Service in Domestic and International...

  1. 14 CFR 330.23 - To what address must air carriers send their applications?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false To what address must air carriers send their applications? 330.23 Section 330.23 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF...) to the following address: U.S. Department of Transportation, Aviation Relief Desk (X-50), 1200...

  2. 14 CFR 330.23 - To what address must air carriers send their applications?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false To what address must air carriers send their applications? 330.23 Section 330.23 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF...) to the following address: U.S. Department of Transportation, Aviation Relief Desk (X-50), 1200...

  3. 14 CFR 330.23 - To what address must air carriers send their applications?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false To what address must air carriers send their applications? 330.23 Section 330.23 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF...) to the following address: U.S. Department of Transportation, Aviation Relief Desk (X-50), 1200...

  4. 75 FR 61485 - Regulatory Training Session With Air Carriers, EPA Regional Partners and Other Interested Parties...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-05

    ... for Implementation of the Aircraft Drinking Water Rule AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA... on the regulatory requirements of the Aircraft Drinking Water Rule (ADWR). Under the ADWR, by April 19, 2011, air carriers who meet the definition of ``public water systems'' under the Safe...

  5. 3 CFR - Provision of Aviation Insurance Coverage for Commercial Air Carrier Service in Domestic and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 3 The President 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Provision of Aviation Insurance Coverage for Commercial Air Carrier Service in Domestic and International Operations Presidential Documents Other Presidential Documents Memorandum of September 29, 2010 Provision of Aviation Insurance Coverage for...

  6. 3 CFR - Provision of Aviation Insurance Coverage for Commercial Air Carrier Service in Domestic and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 3 The President 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Provision of Aviation Insurance Coverage for Commercial Air Carrier Service in Domestic and International Operations Presidential Documents Other Presidential Documents Memorandum of September 27, 2012 Provision of Aviation Insurance Coverage for...

  7. 3 CFR - Provision of Aviation Insurance Coverage for Commercial Air Carrier Service in Domestic and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 3 The President 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Provision of Aviation Insurance Coverage for Commercial Air Carrier Service in Domestic and International Operations Presidential Documents Other Presidential Documents Memorandum of December 27, 2013 Provision of Aviation Insurance Coverage for...

  8. 3 CFR - Provision of Aviation Insurance Coverage for Commercial Air Carrier Service in Domestic and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 3 The President 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Provision of Aviation Insurance Coverage for Commercial Air Carrier Service in Domestic and International Operations Presidential Documents Other Presidential Documents Memorandum of September 28, 2011 Provision of Aviation Insurance Coverage for...

  9. 3 CFR - Provision of Aviation Insurance Coverage for Commercial Air Carrier Service in Domestic and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 3 The President 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Provision of Aviation Insurance Coverage for Commercial Air Carrier Service in Domestic and International Operations Presidential Documents Other Presidential Documents Memorandum of August 21, 2009 Provision of Aviation Insurance Coverage for...

  10. 75 FR 18255 - Passenger Facility Charge Database System for Air Carrier Reporting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-09

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Passenger Facility Charge Database System for Air Carrier Reporting AGENCY... interested parties of the availability of the Passenger Facility Charge (PFC) database system to report PFC... public agency. The FAA has developed a national PFC database system in order to more easily track the...

  11. 14 CFR 204.3 - Applicants for new certificate or commuter air carrier authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... applicant for a type of certificate authority it does not currently hold or for commuter air carrier... interest in the applicant are related by blood or marriage, such relationship(s) shall be included in the... description of the applicant's fleet of aircraft, including: (1) The number of each type of aircraft...

  12. 14 CFR 204.3 - Applicants for new certificate or commuter air carrier authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... applicant for a type of certificate authority it does not currently hold or for commuter air carrier... interest in the applicant are related by blood or marriage, such relationship(s) shall be included in the... description of the applicant's fleet of aircraft, including: (1) The number of each type of aircraft...

  13. 14 CFR 204.3 - Applicants for new certificate or commuter air carrier authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... applicant for a type of certificate authority it does not currently hold or for commuter air carrier... interest in the applicant are related by blood or marriage, such relationship(s) shall be included in the... description of the applicant's fleet of aircraft, including: (1) The number of each type of aircraft...

  14. 14 CFR 204.3 - Applicants for new certificate or commuter air carrier authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... applicant for a type of certificate authority it does not currently hold or for commuter air carrier... interest in the applicant are related by blood or marriage, such relationship(s) shall be included in the... description of the applicant's fleet of aircraft, including: (1) The number of each type of aircraft...

  15. 78 FR 9865 - Air Carrier Contract Maintenance Requirements; Extension of Comment Period

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-12

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Parts 121 and 135 RIN 2120-AJ33 Air Carrier Contract Maintenance... maintenance regulations for domestic, flag, and supplemental operations, and commuter and on-demand operations... instructions for performing contract maintenance that are acceptable to the FAA and to include them in...

  16. An Analysis of Federal Airport and Air Carrier Employee Access Control, Screening. and Training Regulations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-03-01

    traveling public, air carriers, and persons employed by or conducting business at public airports. 14. SUBJECT TERMS Airport Security , Federal...26 4. Sterile Area 28 5. Exclusive Area 28 E. SECURITY ALERT LEVELS 29 F. AIRPORT SECURITY TOOLS 30 1. Electronic Detection System 31 a... Security Coordinator ASP Airport Security Program BIS Biometrie Identification System CCTV Closed Circuit Television CJIS Criminal Justice Information

  17. STANDARDS CONTROLLING AIR EMISSIONS FOR THE SOIL DESICCATION PILOT TEST

    SciTech Connect

    BENECKE MW

    2010-09-08

    This air emissions document supports implementation of the Treatability Test Plan for Soil Desiccation as outlined in the Deep Vadose Zone Treatability Test Plan for the Hanford Central Plateau (DOE/RL-2007-56). Treatability testing supports evaluation of remedial technologies for technetium-99 (Tc-99) contamination in the vadose zone at sites such as the BC Cribs and Trenches. Soil desiccation has been selected as the first technology for testing because it has been recommended as a promising technology in previous Hanford Site technology evaluations and because testing of soil desiccation will provide useful information to enhance evaluation of other technologies, in particular gas-phase remediation technologies. A soil desiccation pilot test (SDPT) will evaluate the desiccation process (e.g., how the targeted interval is dried) and the long-term performance for mitigation of contaminant transport. The SDPT will dry out a moist zone contaminated by Tc-99 and nitrate that has been detected at Well 299-E13-62 (Borehole C5923). This air emissions document applies to the activities to be completed to conduct the SDPT in the 200-BC-1 operable unit located in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site. Well 299-E13-62 is planned to be used as an injection well. This well is located between and approximately equidistant from cribs 216-B-16, 216-B-17, 216-B-18. and 216-B-19. Nitrogen gas will be pumped at approximately 300 ft{sup 3}/min into the 299-EI3-62 injection well, located approximately 12 m (39 ft) away from extraction well 299-EI3-65. The soil gas extraction rate will be approximately 150 ft{sup 3}/min. The SDPT will be conducted continuously over a period of approximately six months. The purpose of the test is to evaluate soil desiccation as a potential remedy for protecting groundwater. A conceptual depiction is provided in Figure 1. The soil desiccation process will physically dry, or evaporate, some of the water from the moist zone of interest. As such, it is

  18. 14 CFR 298.63 - Reporting of aircraft operating expenses and related statistics by small certificated air carriers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... and related statistics by small certificated air carriers. 298.63 Section 298.63 Aeronautics and Space... aircraft operating expenses and related statistics by small certificated air carriers. (a) Each small... Related Statistics.” This schedule shall be filed quarterly as prescribed in § 298.60. Data reported...

  19. 14 CFR 298.63 - Reporting of aircraft operating expenses and related statistics by small certificated air carriers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... and related statistics by small certificated air carriers. 298.63 Section 298.63 Aeronautics and Space... aircraft operating expenses and related statistics by small certificated air carriers. (a) Each small... Related Statistics.” This schedule shall be filed quarterly as prescribed in § 298.60. Data reported...

  20. 14 CFR 298.63 - Reporting of aircraft operating expenses and related statistics by small certificated air carriers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... and related statistics by small certificated air carriers. 298.63 Section 298.63 Aeronautics and Space... aircraft operating expenses and related statistics by small certificated air carriers. (a) Each small... Related Statistics.” This schedule shall be filed quarterly as prescribed in § 298.60. Data reported...

  1. 14 CFR 298.63 - Reporting of aircraft operating expenses and related statistics by small certificated air carriers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... and related statistics by small certificated air carriers. 298.63 Section 298.63 Aeronautics and Space... aircraft operating expenses and related statistics by small certificated air carriers. (a) Each small... Related Statistics.” This schedule shall be filed quarterly as prescribed in § 298.60. Data reported...

  2. 14 CFR 204.5 - Certificated and commuter air carriers undergoing or proposing to undergo substantial change in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... undergoing or proposing to undergo substantial change in operations, ownership, or management. 204.5 Section..., ownership, or management. (a) A certificated or commuter air carrier proposing a substantial change in... operations, management, or ownership, including changes that may affect the air carrier's citizenship,...

  3. 14 CFR 204.5 - Certificated and commuter air carriers undergoing or proposing to undergo substantial change in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... undergoing or proposing to undergo substantial change in operations, ownership, or management. 204.5 Section..., ownership, or management. (a) A certificated or commuter air carrier proposing a substantial change in... operations, management, or ownership, including changes that may affect the air carrier's citizenship,...

  4. 14 CFR Section 11 - Functional Classification-Operating Expenses of Group II and Group III Air Carriers

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Functional Classification-Operating... ACCOUNTS AND REPORTS FOR LARGE CERTIFICATED AIR CARRIERS Profit and Loss Classification Section 11 Functional Classification—Operating Expenses of Group II and Group III Air Carriers 5100Flying Operations....

  5. +GZ-induced neck injuries in Royal Australian Air Force fighter pilots.

    PubMed

    Newman, D G

    1997-06-01

    +GZ-induced neck injuries are a relatively common occurrence in pilots of high performance fighter aircraft. We surveyed 52 fighter pilots from the Royal Australian Air Force Base at Williamtown via an anonymous questionnaire in order to determine the prevalence and operational significance of these injuries. The pilots flew either the F/A-18 Hornet or the MB326H Macchi. Of the respondents, 44 reported having had a neck injury under +GZ. A higher rate was reported in pilots of the F/A-18. Most of these injuries were simple muscle sprains. There were 20 pilots who reported their neck injury as having interfered with mission completion. Only 12 pilots reported doing any regular neck strengthening exercises, while 33 pilots reported doing preflight neck stretches immediately prior to high +GZ exposure. There were 14 pilots who sought medical attention for their injury, with 9 being taken off flight status for an average of 2 weeks. Air combat maneuvering sorties and the "check six" head position were identified as causal factors by most pilots. This study demonstrates the operational significance of these injuries, and highlights the need for more research into this important aerospace medicine issue.

  6. Pilot-Assisted Channel Estimation for Orthogonal Multi-Carrier DS-CDMA with Frequency-Domain Equalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shima, Tomoyuki; Tomeba, Hiromichi; Adachi, Fumiyuki

    Orthogonal multi-carrier direct sequence code division multiple access (orthogonal MC DS-CDMA) is a combination of time-domain spreading and orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM). In orthogonal MC DS-CDMA, the frequency diversity gain can be obtained by applying frequency-domain equalization (FDE) based on minimum mean square error (MMSE) criterion to a block of OFDM symbols and can improve the bit error rate (BER) performance in a severe frequency-selective fading channel. FDE requires an accurate estimate of the channel gain. The channel gain can be estimated by removing the pilot modulation in the frequency domain. In this paper, we propose a pilot-assisted channel estimation suitable for orthogonal MC DS-CDMA with FDE and evaluate, by computer simulation, the BER performance in a frequency-selective Rayleigh fading channel.

  7. The Aviation System Analysis Capability Air Carrier Cost-Benefit Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, Eric M.; Edlich, Alexander; Santmire, Tara S.; Wingrove, Earl R.., III

    1999-01-01

    To meet its objective of assisting the U.S. aviation industry with the technological challenges of the future, NASA must identify research areas that have the greatest potential for improving the operation of the air transportation system. Therefore, NASA is developing the ability to evaluate the potential impact of various advanced technologies. By thoroughly understanding the economic impact of advanced aviation technologies and by evaluating how the new technologies will be used in the integrated aviation system, NASA aims to balance its aeronautical research program and help speed the introduction of high-leverage technologies. To meet these objectives, NASA is building the Aviation System Analysis Capability (ASAC). NASA envisions ASAC primarily as a process for understanding and evaluating the impact of advanced aviation technologies on the U.S. economy. ASAC consists of a diverse collection of models and databases used by analysts and other individuals from the public and private sectors brought together to work on issues of common interest to organizations in the aviation community. ASAC also will be a resource available to the aviation community to analyze; inform; and assist scientists, engineers, analysts, and program managers in their daily work. The ASAC differs from previous NASA modeling efforts in that the economic behavior of buyers and sellers in the air transportation and aviation industries is central to its conception. Commercial air carriers, in particular, are an important stakeholder in this community. Therefore, to fully evaluate the implications of advanced aviation technologies, ASAC requires a flexible financial analysis tool that credibly links the technology of flight with the financial performance of commercial air carriers. By linking technical and financial information, NASA ensures that its technology programs will continue to benefit the user community. In addition, the analysis tool must be capable of being incorporated into the

  8. F-22 Pilot Heart Rate Response to +Gz and Relationship to Pilot Fitness Using U.S. Air Force Fitness Test Scores

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-19

    AFRL-SA-WP-SR-2015-0024 F-22 Pilot Heart Rate Response to +Gz and Relationship to Pilot Fitness Using U.S. Air Force Fitness Test Scores...To) July 2013 – June 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE F-22 Pilot Heart Rate Response to +Gz and Relationship to Pilot Fitness Using U.S. Air Force... Fitness Test Scores 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Marie-France M. McIntee, Mark J

  9. Airport Activity Statistics of Certificated Route Air Carriers, 12 Months Ending December 31, 1984.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-12-31

    influence a Convenience and Necessity issued by the Department of community’s ability to generate air carrier or general aviation Transportation (DOT...the hub . c ft GENERAL NOTES CwrDATA MINNG t - ’rd This publication don not include complete yearly data for the Horzon A r Dec. 164 following list of...in a certificated point, and a point may be served as a single community. through more than one airport.) Interlcopoerl operatios. In general

  10. 77 FR 38747 - Reports by Air Carriers on Incidents Involving Animals During Air Transport

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-29

    ... all cats and dogs transported by the carrier, regardless of whether the cat or dog is transported as a... required to report all incidents involving the loss, injury, or death of cats and dogs that occur while they are traveling in an airline's care, custody, or control, regardless of whether the cat or dog...

  11. U.S. Air Force Considerations in Implementing a Specialized Pilot Program.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-06-06

    Experience and Supporting Data 11 Supporting Statistical Research........13 System Complexities..............16 Qualitative/Quantitative Effect of Hard...and 43.8% experienced pilots, respectively. While these figures have caused concern throughout the military, their full impact on combat effectiveness ...combat effective . Rather, the Air Force bases its definition of experience on the number of flying hours. For example, a pilot must have 500 hours in

  12. Predicting Active Duty Air Force Pilot Attrition Given an Anticipated Increase in Major Airline Pilot Hiring

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    the 2002???2012 annual average. The impact of attrition is not spread evenly among the aircraft communities , and, even though mobility and fighter...pilots account for the first- and second-highest proportions of future total attrition, respectively, it is the fighter community that is in the middle...and doing so would help in lowering pilot attrition in all communities , and especially in the fighter community . 15. SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY

  13. Frequency of SMN1 deletion carriers in a Mestizo population of central and northeastern Mexico: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    CONTRERAS-CAPETILLO, SILVINA NOEMI; BLANCO, HUGO LEONID GALLARDO; CERDA-FLORES, RICARDO MARTIN; LUGO-TRAMPE, JOSÉ; TORRES-MUÑOZ, IRIS; BRAVO-ORO, ANTONIO; ESMER, CARMEN; DE VILLARREAL, LAURA ELLA MARTÍNEZ

    2015-01-01

    Individuals who suffer from spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) exhibit progressive muscle weakness that frequently results in mortality in the most severe forms of the disease. In 98% of cases, there is a homozygous deletion of the survival of motor neuron 1 (SMN1) gene, and both parents carry the same heterozygous genetic abnormality in the majority of cases. Various population studies have been conducted to estimate the frequency of carriers and thereby identify the communities or countries in which children are at a high risk of being affected by SMA. However, the prevalence of SMA in Mexican populations has not yet been established. In the present pilot study, the frequency of the heterozygous deletion of the SMN1 gene was determined in two groups from northeastern (n=287) and central (n=133) Mexican Mestizo populations and compared with other ethnic populations. Amplification refractory mutation system polymerase chain reaction analysis yielded a disease carrier frequency of 11/420 (2.62%) healthy individuals, comprising 9/287 (3.14%) northeastern and 2/133 (1.5%) central Mexican individuals. In summary, no significant differences were identified between the northeastern and central populations of Mexico and other ethnic populations, with the exception of the general worldwide Hispanic population, which exhibited the lowest carrier frequency of 8/1,030. The results of the present study may be used to improve the evaluation procedure, and appear to justify further studies involving larger sample populations. PMID:26136935

  14. LITERATURE SEARCH FOR METHODS FOR HAZARD ANALYSES OF AIR CARRIER OPERATIONS.

    SciTech Connect

    MARTINEZ - GURIDI,G.; SAMANTA,P.

    2002-07-01

    Representatives of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and several air carriers under Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 121 developed a system-engineering model of the functions of air-carrier operations. Their analyses form the foundation or basic architecture upon which other task areas are based: hazard analyses, performance measures, and risk indicator design. To carry out these other tasks, models may need to be developed using the basic architecture of the Air Carrier Operations System Model (ACOSM). Since ACOSM encompasses various areas of air-carrier operations and can be used to address different task areas with differing but interrelated objectives, the modeling needs are broad. A literature search was conducted to identify and analyze the existing models that may be applicable for pursuing the task areas in ACOSM. The intent of the literature search was not necessarily to identify a specific model that can be directly used, but rather to identify relevant ones that have similarities with the processes and activities defined within ACOSM. Such models may provide useful inputs and insights in structuring ACOSM models. ACOSM simulates processes and activities in air-carrier operation, but, in a general framework, it has similarities with other industries where attention also has been paid to hazard analyses, emphasizing risk management, and in designing risk indicators. To assure that efforts in other industries are adequately considered, the literature search includes publications from other industries, e.g., chemical, nuclear, and process industries. This report discusses the literature search, the relevant methods identified and provides a preliminary assessment of their use in developing the models needed for the ACOSM task areas. A detailed assessment of the models has not been made. Defining those applicable for ACOSM will need further analyses of both the models and tools identified. The report is organized in four chapters

  15. Development of a Laboratory for Improving Communication between Air Traffic Controllers and Pilots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brammer, Anthony

    2003-01-01

    Runway incursions and other surface incidents are known to be significant threats to aviation safety and efficiency. Though the number of near mid-air collisions in U.S. air space has remained unchanged during the last five years, the number of runway incursions has increased and they are almost all due to human error. The three most common factors contributing to air traffic controller and pilot error in airport operations include two that involve failed auditory communication. This project addressed the problems of auditory communication in air traffic control from an acoustical standpoint, by establishing an acoustics laboratory designed for this purpose and initiating research into selected topics that show promise for improving voice communications between air traffic controllers and pilots.

  16. An Autosampler and Field Sample Carrier for Maximizing Throughput Using an Open-Air, Surface Sampling Ion Source for MS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A recently developed, commercially available, open-air, surface sampling ion source for mass spectrometers provides individual analyses in several seconds. To realize its full throughput potential, an autosampler and field sample carrier were designed and built. The autosampler ...

  17. A pilot study of BRCA mutation carriers' knowledge about the clinical impact of prophylactic-oophorectomy and views on fertility consultation: a single-center pilot study.

    PubMed

    Kim, J; Skrzynia, C; Mersereau, J E

    2015-02-01

    BRCA mutation carriers will experience early surgically induced menopause following prophylactic bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (PBSO). This pilot study aimed to investigate their (1) knowledge about the clinical impact of PBSO; (2) views on fertility consultation (FC)/fertility preservation (FP) treatment; and (3) difficulties in conceiving compared to non-carriers. A cross-sectional, single institution web-survey was performed at a university-based IVF center. Women aged 18-50 years who were screened for BRCA gene mutations from 2005 to 2013 were recruited via mail. Forty-one BRCA-positive and 110 BRCA-negative women completed the survey (response rate: 50 %). The knowledge about the reproductive impact of PBSO was limited, with the majority of women in this highly educated sample only identifying the correct response 64 % of the time. Among BRCA mutation carriers, 24 (59 %) had positive views about FC/FP treatments. A larger proportion of women with no children at the time of BRCA testing, and those who were non-white tended to have positive views toward FP. Women with, versus without, BRCA mutations were more likely to have difficulty in conceiving (p = 0.08). This well-educated group had limited knowledge about the reproductive clinical impact of PBSO, or the benefit of a FP before PBSO. Most women with BRCA mutations were interested in FC/FP treatment if they had not completed childbearing at the time of screening. Targeted referrals for FC at the time of BRCA screening may help women improve knowledge and allow improved decision-making about reproductive options.

  18. Effects of Flight Pay and Commitment on Air Force Pilot Applicants.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-09-01

    sampled group that would accept a com- mitment equal to or less than that shown on the left for each given amount of flight pay and bonus shown at the...EFFECTS OF FLIGHT PAY AND COMMITMENT ON AIR FORCE PILOT APPLICANTS Joel D. Haniford, First Lieutenant, USAF Bobby M. Stone, Major, USAF LSSR 16-82 I...FLIGHT PAY AND COMMITMENT Master’s Thesis ON AIR FORCE PILOT APPLICANTS S. PERFORmINo Oqi. REPORT HUmsERt 7. AUTOR(e.) . CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBERaI

  19. Intelligence and Neuropsychological Aptitude Testing of U.S. Air Force MQ-1 Predator Pilot Training Candidates

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-01

    pilot tasks completed by the United Kingdom Royal Air Force (UK RAF) (Bailey M, Predator Pilot and Sensor Operator Selection Test Batteries, Royal...standard deviation SME subject matter expert SUPT Specialized Undergraduate Pilot Training UK United Kingdom USAF U.S. Air Force VIQ verbal intelligence quotient ... UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) USAF School of Aerospace Medicine Aerospace Medicine Dept/FECN 2510 Fifth St

  20. Orthogonal Pilot Channel Using Combination of FDMA and CDMA in Single-Carrier FDMA-Based Evolved UTRA Uplink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, Teruo; Kishiyama, Yoshihisa; Higuchi, Kenichi; Sawahashi, Mamoru

    In the Evolved UTRA (UMTS Terrestrial Radio Access) uplink, single-carrier frequency division multiple access (SC-FDMA) radio access was adopted owing to its advantageous low peak-to-average power ratio (PAPR) feature, which leads to wide coverage area provisioning with limited peak transmission power of user equipments. This paper proposes orthogonal pilot channel generation using the combination of FDMA and CDMA in the SC-FDMA-based Evolved UTRA uplink. In the proposed method, we employ distributed FDMA transmission for simultaneous accessing users with different transmission bandwidths, and employ CDMA transmission for simultaneous accessing users with identical transmission bandwidth. Moreover, we apply a code sequence with a good auto-correlation property such as a Constant Amplitude Zero Auto-Correlation (CAZAC) sequence employing a cyclic shift to increase the number of sequences. Simulation results show that the average packet error rate performance using an orthogonal pilot channel with the combination of FDMA and CDMA in a six-user environment, i. e., four users each with a 1.25-MHz transmission bandwidth and two users each with a 5-MHz transmission bandwidth, employing turbo coding with the coding r of R=1/2 and QPSK and 16QAM data modulation coincides well with that in a single-user environment with the same transmission bandwidth. We show that the proposed orthogonal pilot channel structure using the combination of distributed FDMA and CDMA transmissions and the application of the CAZAC sequence is effective in the SC-FDMA-based Evolved UTRA uplink.

  1. THE NEW ENGLAND AIR QUALITY FORECASTING PILOT PROGRAM: DEVELOPMENT OF AN EVALUATION PROTOCOL AND PERFORMANCE BENCHMARK

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration recently sponsored the New England Forecasting Pilot Program to serve as a "test bed" for chemical forecasting by providing all of the elements of a National Air Quality Forecasting System, including the development and implemen...

  2. Effects of alcohol on pilot performance in simulated flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billings, C. E.; Demosthenes, T.; White, T. R.; O'Hara, D. B.

    1991-01-01

    Ethyl alcohol's known ability to produce reliable decrements in pilot performance was used in a study designed to evaluate objective methods for assessing pilot performance. Four air carrier pilot volunteers were studied during eight simulated flights in a B727 simulator. Total errors increased linearly and significantly with increasing blood alcohol. Planning and performance errors, procedural errors and failures of vigilance each increased significantly in one or more pilots and in the group as a whole.

  3. 14 CFR 272.9 - Selection of a carrier to provide essential air service and payment of compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... provide such essential air service shall be submitted to the President of the United States not less than... President of the Freely Associated State concerned and the Authorities designated by that Government(s) in... THE FREELY ASSOCIATED STATES § 272.9 Selection of a carrier to provide essential air service...

  4. 14 CFR Special Federal Aviation... - Prohibition Against Certain Flights by Syrian Air Carriers to the United States

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Syrian Air Carriers to the United States Federal Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 104 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES GENERAL OPERATING AND FLIGHT RULES Pt. 91, SFAR No. 104 Special Federal...

  5. 14 CFR Special Federal Aviation... - Prohibition Against Certain Flights by Syrian Air Carriers to the United States

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Syrian Air Carriers to the United States Federal Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 104 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES GENERAL OPERATING AND FLIGHT RULES Pt. 91, SFAR No. 104 Special Federal...

  6. 14 CFR Special Federal Aviation... - Prohibition Against Certain Flights by Syrian Air Carriers to the United States

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Syrian Air Carriers to the United States Federal Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 104 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES GENERAL OPERATING AND FLIGHT RULES Pt. 91, SFAR No. 104 Special Federal...

  7. 14 CFR Special Federal Aviation... - Prohibition Against Certain Flights by Syrian Air Carriers to the United States

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Syrian Air Carriers to the United States Federal Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 104 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES GENERAL OPERATING AND FLIGHT RULES Pt. 91, SFAR No. 104 Special Federal...

  8. 14 CFR Special Federal Aviation... - Prohibition Against Certain Flights by Syrian Air Carriers to the United States

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Syrian Air Carriers to the United States Federal Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 104 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES GENERAL OPERATING AND FLIGHT RULES Pt. 91, SFAR No. 104 Special Federal...

  9. Forecasting Demand for Civilian Pilots: A Cost Savings Approach to Managing Air Force Pilot Resources

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    algebraically as shown here: RPM2006 = ß0 + ß1Fleet2006 + ß2Pilots (5) Then...8) This model reported an R-squared of 0.985 and a Durbin -Watson statistic of 1.789, indicating that serial correlation...the errors are not correlated with each other, which could lead to incorrect results using OLS (Ashenfeltor and others, 2003). A Durbin -Watson test

  10. The Carrier's Liability for Damage Caused by Delay in International Air Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Kang Bin

    2003-01-01

    Delay in the air transport occurs when passengers, baggage or cargo do not arrive at their destination at the time indicated in the contract of carriage. The causes of delay in the carriage of passengers are booking errors or double booking, delayed departure of aircraft, incorrect information regarding the time of departure, failure to land at the scheduled destination and changes in flight schedule or addition of extra landing stops. Delay in the carriage of baggage or cargo may have different causes: no reservation, lack of space, failure to load the baggage or cargo at the right place, or to deliver the covering documents at the right place. The Montreal Convention of 1999 Article 19 provides that 'The carrier is liable for damage occasioned by delay in the carriage by air of passengers, baggage or cargo. Nevertheless, the carder shall not be liable for damage occasioned by delay if it proves that it and its servants and agents took all measures that could reasonably be required to avoid the damage or that it was impossible for it or them to take such measures'. The Montreal Convention Article 22 provides liability limits of the carrier in case of delay for passengers and their baggage and for cargo. In the carriage of persons, the liability of the carrier for each passenger is limited to 4,150 SDR. In the carriage of baggage, the liability of the carrier is limited to 1,000 SDR for each passenger unless a special declaration as to the value of the baggage has been made. In the carriage of cargo, the liability of the carrier is limited to 17 SDR per kilogram unless a special declaration as to the value of the cargo has been made. The Montreal Convention Article 19 has shortcomings: it is silent on the duration of the liability for carriage,andit does not make any distinction between persons and good. It does not give any indication concerning the circumstances to be taken into account in cases of delay, and about the length of delay. In conclusion, it is

  11. Can the Air Force and Airlines Collaborate for Mutual Benefit An Exploration of Pilot and Maintenance Workforce Options

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-01-01

    for unpredictable lengths of time. The Air Force active and reserve component leaders want to retain a quality workforce to maintain readiness...duty retirement. While this doesn’t account for quality of life or income security, the largest fiscal payoff for a pilot in the active duty Air Force...Summary Report Can the Air Force and Airlines Collaborate for Mutual Benefit? An Exploration of Pilot and Maintenance Workforce Options Anthony

  12. Impact of Conflict Avoidance Responsibility Allocation on Pilot Workload in a Distributed Air Traffic Management System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ligda, Sarah V.; Dao, Arik-Quang V.; Vu, Kim-Phuong; Strybel, Thomas Z.; Battiste, Vernol; Johnson, Walter W.

    2010-01-01

    Pilot workload was examined during simulated flights requiring flight deck-based merging and spacing while avoiding weather. Pilots used flight deck tools to avoid convective weather and space behind a lead aircraft during an arrival into Louisville International airport. Three conflict avoidance management concepts were studied: pilot, controller or automation primarily responsible. A modified Air Traffic Workload Input Technique (ATWIT) metric showed highest workload during the approach phase of flight and lowest during the en-route phase of flight (before deviating for weather). In general, the modified ATWIT was shown to be a valid and reliable workload measure, providing more detailed information than post-run subjective workload metrics. The trend across multiple workload metrics revealed lowest workload when pilots had both conflict alerting and responsibility of the three concepts, while all objective and subjective measures showed highest workload when pilots had no conflict alerting or responsibility. This suggests that pilot workload was not tied primarily to responsibility for resolving conflicts, but to gaining and/or maintaining situation awareness when conflict alerting is unavailable.

  13. Field of View Requirements for Carrier Landing Training

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-06-01

    Pilot Training ( ASPT ) at Williams Air Force Base. The visual image for the simulation was provided by a data base which crea&.ed the aircraft carrier...USS Forrestal (CVA-59) in the ASPT computer-image-generation systor.m. The pilots in these three groups’ were trained under different conditions. Two...Advanced Simalator for Pilot Training ( ASPT ) would be ideal for this effort, and later, Lt Col Samuel T. Hannan and Capt Ricky A. Perry were assigned

  14. Learning Styles of Pilots Currently Qualified in United States Air Force Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanske, Craig A.

    2001-01-01

    Kolb's Learning Style Inventory was used to identify the predominant learning styles of pilots currently qualified in United States Air Force aircraft. The results indicate that these pilots show a significant preference for facts and things over people and feelings. By understanding the preferred learning styles of the target population, course material can be developed that take advantage of the strengths of these learning styles. This information can be especially useful in the future design of cockpit resource management training. The training program can be developed to demonstrate both that there are different learning styles and that it is possible to take advantage of the relative strengths of each of these learning styles.

  15. 77 FR 65006 - Air Cargo Advance Screening (ACAS) Pilot Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-24

    ... data interchange (EDI) system before the cargo is brought into or departs the United States by any mode... submission of both the ACAS data and the advance electronic cargo information required by 19 CFR 122.48a... mandatory advance electronic information for air cargo. CBP regulations implementing the Trade Act of...

  16. PHASE I PILOT AIR CONVEYANCE SYSTEM DESIGN, CLEANING, AND CHARACTERIZATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a project to develop and refine surface and airborne contamination
    measurement techniques that can be used to evaluate air conveyance system (ACS) cleaning.
    (NOTE: ACS cleaning is advertized to homeowners as a service having a number of benefits...

  17. The Air Force Reserve Pilot -- A Critical Resource

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-03-01

    Robins AFB, GA: Headquarters, Air Force Reserve, 9 January 1987. 45 12. Geisler, Thomas M ., Major, USAFR. Operations Officer, 708th Military Airlift...Services Almanac, Inc. 1987. 19. Hegler, Freddy M ., Major, USAFR. Operations Officer, 357th Tactical Airlift Squadron, Maxwell AFB, AL. Interview with...the author. 7 March 1989. 20. Henthorn , David E., Major, USAFR. Operations Officer, 710th Military Airlift Squadron, Travis AFB, CA. Interview with

  18. Pilot-aided carrier phase recovery for M-QAM using superscalar parallelization based PLL.

    PubMed

    Zhuge, Qunbi; Morsy-Osman, Mohamed; Xu, Xian; Mousa-Pasandi, Mohammad E; Chagnon, Mathieu; El-Sahn, Ziad A; Plant, David V

    2012-08-13

    In this paper, we present a carrier phase recovery (CPR) algorithm using a modified superscalar parallelization based phase locked loop (M-SSP-PLL) combined with a maximum-likelihood (ML) phase estimation. Compared to the original SSP-PLL, M-SSP-PLL + ML reduces the required buffer size using a novel superscalar structure. In addition, by removing the differential coding/decoding and employing ML phase recovery it also improves the performance. In simulation, we show that the laser linewidth tolerance of M-SSP-PLL + ML is comparable to blind phase search (BPS) algorithm, which is known to be one of the best CPR algorithms in terms of performance for arbitrary QAM formats. In 28 Gbaud QPSK (112 Gb/s) and 16-QAM (224 Gb/s), and 7 Gbaud 64-QAM (84 Gb/s) experiments, it is also demonstrated that M-SSP-PLL + ML can increase the transmission distance by at least 12% compared to BPS for each of them. Finally, the computational complexity is discussed and a significant reduction is shown for our algorithm with respect to BPS.

  19. Evoked potential, cardiac, blink, and respiration measures of pilot workload in air-to-ground missions.

    PubMed

    Wilson, G F; Fullenkamp, P; Davis, I

    1994-02-01

    Brain evoked potentials were successfully recorded from F-4 pilots during air-to-ground training missions. They were recorded during two flight segments. During one the pilot was flying, and during the other, the weapon systems officer was flying the aircraft. The P2 component of the brain-evoked potential evidenced reduced amplitude during the pilot-flying segment, while the N1 component was reduced during both flight tasks compared to ground-based tasks. These data indicate that the P2 amplitude is sensitive to the level of pilot workload. These results were further substantiated using simultaneously recorded physiological data and subjective workload measures. For example, cardiac inter-beat intervals decreased during flight segments relative to those recorded when performing a tracking task, and further reduced for the pilot-flying vs. the weapon systems officer-flying segment. Eye blink measures were sensitive to the visual demands of the various tasks. These data show that evoked potentials can be recorded during flight, and that, together with cardiac and eye blink data, they provide a composite picture of operator state.

  20. Biofiltration of trichloroethylene-contaminated air: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Lackey, Laura W; Gamble, Johnny R; Boles, Jeffrey L

    2003-10-01

    This project demonstrated the biofiltration of a trichloroethylene (TCE)-contaminated airstream generated by air stripping groundwater obtained from several wells located at the Anniston Army Depot, Anniston, AL. The effects of several critical process variables were investigated to evaluate technical and economic feasibility, define operating limits and preferred operating conditions, and develop design information for a full-scale biofilter system. Long-term operation of the demonstration biofilter system was conducted to evaluate the performance and reliability of the system under variable weather conditions. Propane was used as the primary substrate necessary to induce the production of a nonspecific oxygenase. Results indicated that the process scheme used to introduce propane into the biofiltration system had a significant impact on the observed TCE removal efficiency. TCE degradation rates were dependent on the inlet contaminant concentration as well as on the loading rate. No microbial inhibition was observed at inlet TCE concentrations as high as 87 parts per million on a volume basis.

  1. Estimation of soil air permeability components at a laboratory-scale pilot.

    PubMed

    Boudouch, Otmane; Esrael, Daoud; Kacem, Mariem; Benadda, Belkacem

    2012-01-01

    Soil air permeability is a key parameter in the design of soil vapour extraction. The purpose of this study is to verify the applicability of different analytical solutions, developed to determine soil characteristics in field conditions, to estimate soil air permeability in a small-scale pilot, since field testing may be expensive. A laboratory tridirectional pilot and a unidirectional column were designed in order to achieve the objectives of this work. Use of a steady-state unconfined analytical solution was found to be an appropriate method to determine soil air permeability components for the pilot conditions. Using pressure data collected under open, steady-state conditions, the average values of radial and vertical permeability were found to be, respectively, 9.97 x 10(-7) and 8.74 x 10(-7) cm2. The use of semi-confined analytical solutions may not be suitable to estimate soil parameters since a significant difference was observed between simulated and observed vacuums. Air permeability was underestimated when transient solutions were used, in comparison with methods based on steady-state solutions. The air radial and vertical permeability was found to be, respectively, 7.06 x 10(-7) and 4.93 x 10(-7) cm2, in the open scenario, and 2.30 x 10(-7) and 1.51 x 10(-7) cm2 in the semi-confined scenario. However, a good estimate of soil porosity was achieved using the two transient methods. The average values were predicted to be 0.482, in the open scenario, and 0.451 in the semi-confined scenario, which was in good agreement with the real value.

  2. 41 CFR 301-10.135 - When must I travel using U.S. flag air carrier service?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... use of the U.S. flag air carrier would at least double your en route travel time; or (g) When the... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false When must I travel using... Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES ALLOWABLE TRAVEL...

  3. 75 FR 30776 - Exemption of Foreign Air Carriers From Excise Taxes; Review of Finding of Reciprocity (Ecuador...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration Exemption of Foreign Air Carriers From Excise Taxes; Review of Finding of Reciprocity (Ecuador), 26 U.S.C. 4221 AGENCY: International Trade Administration, U.S. Department of...

  4. Evaluating network analysis and agent based modeling for investigating the stability of commercial air carrier schedules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conway, Sheila Ruth

    For a number of years, the United States Federal Government has been formulating the Next Generation Air Transportation System plans for National Airspace System improvement. These improvements attempt to address air transportation holistically, but often address individual improvements in one arena such as ground or in-flight equipment. In fact, air transportation system designers have had only limited success using traditional Operations Research and parametric modeling approaches in their analyses of innovative operations. They need a systemic methodology for modeling of safety-critical infrastructure that is comprehensive, objective, and sufficiently concrete, yet simple enough to be deployed with reasonable investment. The methodology must also be amenable to quantitative analysis so issues of system safety and stability can be rigorously addressed. The literature suggests that both agent-based models and network analysis techniques may be useful for complex system development and analysis. The purpose of this research is to evaluate these two techniques as applied to analysis of commercial air carrier schedule (route) stability in daily operations, an important component of air transportation. Airline-like routing strategies are used to educe essential elements of applying the method. Two main models are developed, one investigating the network properties of the route structure, the other an Agent-based approach. The two methods are used to predict system properties at a macro-level. These findings are compared to observed route network performance measured by adherence to a schedule to provide validation of the results. Those interested in complex system modeling are provided some indication as to when either or both of the techniques would be applicable. For aviation policy makers, the results point to a toolset capable of providing insight into the system behavior during the formative phases of development and transformation with relatively low investment

  5. Piloted simulation of one-on-one helicopter air combat at NOE flight levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, M. S.; Aiken, E. W.

    1985-01-01

    A piloted simulation designed to examine the effects of terrain proximity and control system design on helicopter performance during one-on-one air combat maneuvering (ACM) is discussed. The NASA Ames vertical motion simulator (VMS) and the computer generated imagery (CGI) systems were modified to allow two aircraft to be independently piloted on a single CGI data base. Engagements were begun with the blue aircraft already in a tail-chase position behind the red, and also with the two aircraft originating from positions unknown to each other. Maneuvering was very aggressive and safety requirements for minimum altitude, separation, and maximum bank angles typical of flight test were not used. Results indicate that the presence of terrain features adds an order of complexiaty to the task performed over clear air ACM and that mix of attitude and rate command-type stability and control augmentation system (SCAS) design may be desirable. The simulation system design, the flight paths flown, and the tactics used were compared favorably by the evaluation pilots to actual flight test experiments.

  6. Preliminary performance estimates of an oblique, all-wing, remotely piloted vehicle for air-to-air combat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelms, W. P., Jr.; Bailey, R. O.

    1974-01-01

    A computerized aircraft synthesis program has been used to assess the effects of various vehicle and mission parameters on the performance of an oblique, all-wing, remotely piloted vehicle (RPV) for the highly maneuverable, air-to-air combat role. The study mission consists of an outbound cruise, an acceleration phase, a series of subsonic and supersonic turns, and a return cruise. The results are presented in terms of both the required vehicle weight to accomplish this mission and the combat effectiveness as measured by turning and acceleration capability. This report describes the synthesis program, the mission, the vehicle, and results from sensitivity studies. An optimization process has been used to establish the nominal RPV configuration of the oblique, all-wing concept for the specified mission. In comparison to a previously studied conventional wing-body canard design for the same mission, this oblique, all-wing nominal vehicle is lighter in weight and has higher performance.

  7. Direct Air Capture of CO2 - an Overview of Carbon Engineering's Technology and Pilot Plant Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, G.; Corless, A.

    2014-12-01

    At Carbon Engineering, we are developing and commercializing technology to scrub CO2 directly from atmospheric air at industrial scale. By providing atmospheric CO2 for use in fuel production, we can enable production of transportation fuels with ultra-low carbon intensities, which command price premiums in the growing set of constrained fuels markets such as California's LCFS. We are a Calgary based startup founded in 2009 with 10 employees, and we are considered a global leader in the direct air capture (DAC) field. We will review CE's DAC technology, based on a wet-scrubbing "air contactor" which absorbs CO2 into aqueous solution, and a chemical looping "regeneration" component, which liberates pure CO2 from this aqueous solution while re-making the original absorption chemical. CE's DAC tecnology exports purified atmospheric CO2, combined with the combustion CO2 from plant energy usage, as the end product. We will also discuss CE's 2014-2015 end-to-end Pilot Demonstration Unit. This is a $7M technology demonstration plant that CE is building with the help of key industrial partners and equipment vendors. Vendor design and engineering requirements have been used to specify the pilot air contactor, pellet reactor, calciner, and slaker modules, as well as auxiliary systems. These modules will be run for several months to obtain the engineering and performance data needed for subsequent commercial plant design, as well as to test the residual integration risks associated with CE's process. By the time of the AGU conference, the pilot is expected to be in late stages of fabrication or early stages of site installation.

  8. Prediction of pilot reserve attention capacity during air-to-air target tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Onstott, E. D.; Faulkner, W. H.

    1977-01-01

    Reserve attention capacity of a pilot was calculated using a pilot model that allocates exclusive model attention according to the ranking of task urgency functions whose variables are tracking error and error rate. The modeled task consisted of tracking a maneuvering target aircraft both vertically and horizontally, and when possible, performing a diverting side task which was simulated by the precise positioning of an electrical stylus and modeled as a task of constant urgency in the attention allocation algorithm. The urgency of the single loop vertical task is simply the magnitude of the vertical tracking error, while the multiloop horizontal task requires a nonlinear urgency measure of error and error rate terms. Comparison of model results with flight simulation data verified the computed model statistics of tracking error of both axes, lateral and longitudinal stick amplitude and rate, and side task episodes. Full data for the simulation tracking statistics as well as the explicit equations and structure of the urgency function multiaxis pilot model are presented.

  9. X-15 pilots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    X-15 Pilots, Left to Right: Air Force pilot William J. 'Pete' Knight, Air Force Major Robert A. Rushworth, Air Force Captain Joseph H. Engle, NASA pilot Milton O. Thompson, NASA pilot Bill Dana, and NASA pilot John B. 'Jack' McKay.

  10. A Piloted Simulation Investigating Handling Qualities and Performance Requirements of a Single-Pilot Helicopter in Air Combat Employing a Helmet-Driven Turreted Gun.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-09-01

    57 10. Environmental IFactors ................................. 57 B. EXPERIMENTAL VARIABLES ............................ 60 I. Yaw Axis...chrceitiso oftre hanbl quities roure elpe Maior dfcmbait. Thsirbe iost rcoentiot eAir Comba 11 l PilotC im)pconduceJnuay196 inetgte control...equivalent to the IHADSS gunsight pipper used for the turreted gun. 10. Environmental Factors Adjustable environmental factors included visibility, wind

  11. The influence of air traffic control message length and timing on pilot communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrow, Daniel; Rodvold, Michelle

    1993-01-01

    The present paper outlines an approach to air traffic control (ATC) communication that is based on theories of dialogue organization and describes several steps or phases in routine controller-pilot communication. The introduction also describes several kinds of communication problems that often disrupt these steps, as well as how these problems may be caused by factors related to ATC messages, the communication medium (radio vs. data link) and task workload. Next, a part-task simulation study is described. This study focused on how problems in radio communication are related to message factors. More specifically, we examined if pilots are more likely to misunderstanding longer ATC messages. A more general goal of the study is to show that communication analysis can help trace where problem occur and why.

  12. The NYC native air sampling pilot project: using HVAC filter data for urban biological incident characterization.

    PubMed

    Ackelsberg, Joel; Leykam, Frederic M; Hazi, Yair; Madsen, Larry C; West, Todd H; Faltesek, Anthony; Henderson, Gavin D; Henderson, Christopher L; Leighton, Terrance

    2011-09-01

    Native air sampling (NAS) is distinguished from dedicated air sampling (DAS) devices (eg, BioWatch) that are deployed to detect aerosol disseminations of biological threat agents. NAS uses filter samples from heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems in commercial properties for environmental sampling after DAS detection of biological threat agent incidents. It represents an untapped, scientifically sound, efficient, widely distributed, and comparably inexpensive resource for postevent environmental sampling. Calculations predict that postevent NAS would be more efficient than environmental surface sampling by orders of magnitude. HVAC filter samples could be collected from pre-identified surrounding NAS facilities to corroborate the DAS alarm and delineate the path taken by the bioaerosol plume. The New York City (NYC) Native Air Sampling Pilot Project explored whether native air sampling would be acceptable to private sector stakeholders and could be implemented successfully in NYC. Building trade associations facilitated outreach to and discussions with property owners and managers, who expedited contact with building managers of candidate NAS properties that they managed or owned. Nominal NAS building requirements were determined; procedures to identify and evaluate candidate NAS facilities were developed; data collection tools and other resources were designed and used to expedite candidate NAS building selection and evaluation in Manhattan; and exemplar environmental sampling playbooks for emergency responders were completed. In this sample, modern buildings with single or few corporate tenants were the best NAS candidate facilities. The Pilot Project successfully demonstrated that in one urban setting a native air sampling strategy could be implemented with effective public-private collaboration.

  13. Development of Motivation Assessment Techniques for Air Force Officer Training and Education Programs: Motivation for Pilot Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Calvin W.; And Others

    The study was an investigation into the relevance of motivational factors operating in various Air Force training programs, especially Air Training Command's Undergraduate Pilot Training Program. The research project, as a whole, was directed toward understanding motivational factors as they distinguish those who drop out of training from those…

  14. Air monitoring for volatile organic compounds at the Pilot Plant Complex, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, J.F.; O`Neill, H.J.; Raphaelian, L.A.; Tomczyk, N.A.; Sytsma, L.F.; Cohut, V.J.; Cobo, H.A.; O`Reilly, D.P.; Zimmerman, R.E.

    1995-03-01

    The US Army`s Aberdeen Proving Ground has been a test site for a variety of munitions, including chemical warfare agents (CWA). The Pilot Plant Complex (PPC) at Aberdeen was the site of development, manufacture, storage, and disposal of CWA. Deterioration of the buildings and violations of environmental laws led to closure of the complex in 1986. Since that time, all equipment, piping, and conduit in the buildings have been removed. The buildings have been declared free of surface CWA contamination as a result of air sampling using the military system. However, no air sampling has been done to determine if other hazardous volatile organic compounds are present in the PPC, although a wide range of toxic and/or hazardous materials other than CWA was used in the PPC. The assumption has been that the air in the PPC is not hazardous. The purpose of this air-monitoring study was to screen the indoor air in the PPC to confirm the assumption that the air does not contain volatile organic contaminants at levels that would endanger persons in the buildings. A secondary purpose was to identify any potential sources of volatile organic contaminants that need to be monitored in subsequent sampling efforts.

  15. Pilot and Controller Evaluations of Separation Function Allocation in Air Traffic Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wing, David; Prevot, Thomas; Morey, Susan; Lewis, Timothy; Martin, Lynne; Johnson, Sally; Cabrall, Christopher; Como, Sean; Homola, Jeffrey; Sheth-Chandra, Manasi; Mercer, Joey

    2013-01-01

    Two human-in-the-loop simulation experiments were conducted in coordinated fashion to investigate the allocation of separation assurance functions between ground and air and between humans and automation. The experiments modeled a mixed-operations concept in which aircraft receiving ground-based separation services shared the airspace with aircraft providing their own separation service (i.e., self-separation). Ground-based separation was provided by air traffic controllers without automation tools, with tools, or by ground-based automation with controllers in a managing role. Airborne self-separation was provided by airline pilots using self-separation automation enabled by airborne surveillance technology. The two experiments, one pilot-focused and the other controller-focused, addressed selected key issues of mixed operations, assuming the starting point of current-day operations and modeling an emergence of NextGen technologies and procedures. In the controller-focused experiment, the impact of mixed operations on controller performance was assessed at four stages of NextGen implementation. In the pilot-focused experiment, the limits to which pilots with automation tools could take full responsibility for separation from ground-controlled aircraft were tested. Results indicate that the presence of self-separating aircraft had little impact on the controllers' ability to provide separation services for ground-controlled aircraft. Overall performance was best in the most automated environment in which all aircraft were data communications equipped, ground-based separation was highly automated, and self-separating aircraft had access to trajectory intent information for all aircraft. In this environment, safe, efficient, and highly acceptable operations could be achieved for twice today's peak airspace throughput. In less automated environments, reduced trajectory intent exchange and manual air traffic control limited the safely achievable airspace throughput and

  16. 77 FR 12373 - Pilot Certification and Qualification Requirements for Air Carrier Operations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-29

    .... DATES: Send your comments on or before April 30, 2012. ADDRESSES: You may send comments identified by...://www.regulations.gov and follow the online instructions for sending your comments electronically. Mail... comment for an association, business, labor union, etc.). You may review DOT's complete Privacy...

  17. 78 FR 77572 - Pilot Certification and Qualification Requirements for Air Carrier Operations; Technical Amendment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-24

    ..., 2013. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: For technical questions concerning this correction contact....adams@faa.gov . For legal questions concerning this correction contact Anne Moore, Office of the Chief... privileges ATP certificate may credit 100 hours of time accomplished in flight simulation training...

  18. 78 FR 14619 - Applications for Certificates of Public Convenience and Necessity and Foreign Air Carrier Permits

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-06

    .... (``United''), Continental Airlines, Inc. (``Continental''), Continental Micronesia, Inc. (``Continental Micronesia'') and Air Micronesia, Inc. ] (``Air Micronesia'') (collectively, the ``Joint...

  19. A piloted simulation investigation of yaw dynamics requirements for turreted gun use in low-level helicopter air combat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, William A.; Morris, Patrick M.; Williams, Jeffrey N.

    1988-01-01

    A piloted, fixed-base simulation study was conducted to investigate the handling qualities requirements for helicopter air-to-air combat using turreted guns in the near-terrain environment. The study used a version of the helicopter air combat system developed at NASA Ames Research Center for one-on-one air combat. The study focused on the potential trade-off between gun angular movement capability and required yaw axis response. Experimental variables included yaw axis response frequency and damping and the size of the gun-movement envelope. A helmet position and sighting system was used for pilot control of gun aim. Approximately 340 simulated air combat engagements were evaluated by pilots from the Army and industry. Results from the experiment indicate that a highly-damped, high frequency yaw response was desired for Level I handling qualities. Pilot preference for those characteristics became more pronounced as gun turret movement was restricted; however, a stable, slow-reacting platform could be used with a large turret envelope. Most pilots preferred to engage with the opponent near the own-ship centerline. Turret elevation restriction affected the engagement more than azimuth restrictions.

  20. Preliminary Evaluation of the Control of Microbial Fouling by Laboratory and Pilot-Scale Air-Stripping Columns

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-03-01

    AD-A186 558 TECHNICAL REPORT AD NATICK/TR-87/039 PRELIMINARY EVALUATION OF THE CONTROL OF MICROBIAL FOULING BY LABORATORY AND PILOT-SCALE AIR ...Scale Air -Stripping Columns. 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Darrell Seekins, Morris Rogers 13a. TYPE OF REPORT 13b. TIME COVERED 114. DATE OF REPORT (Year...TERMS (Continue on reverse if necessary and identify by block number) FIELD GROUP TSUB-GROUP Air -Stripping Microbial Fouling Aeration Biogrowth Control

  1. Photocatalytic air purifiers for indoor air: European standard and pilot room experiments.

    PubMed

    Costarramone, N; Cantau, C; Desauziers, V; Pécheyran, C; Pigot, T; Lacombe, S

    2016-09-15

    At the European level (CEN/TC386), some efforts are currently devoted to new standards for comparing the efficiency of commercial photocatalytic material/devices in various application fields. Concerning prototype or commercial indoor photocatalytic air purifiers designed for volatile organic compounds (VOC) abatement, the methodology is based on a laboratory airtight chamber. The photocatalytic function is demonstrated by the mineralization of a mixture of five VOCs. Experimental data were obtained for four selected commercial devices and three commercial materials: drop of VOC concentration, but also identification of secondary species (with special attention to formaldehyde), mineralization rates, and Clean Air Delivery Rate (CADR). With two efficient air purifiers, these laboratory experiments were compared to the results in two experimental rooms (35-40 m(3)) where air pollution was introduced through wooden floor and furniture. The systems' ageing was also studied. The safety of the commercial products was also assessed by the determination of nanoparticle release. Standardized tests are useful to rank photocatalytic air purifiers and passive materials and to discard inefficient ones. A good correlation between the standard experiments and the experimental room experiments was found, even if in the latter case, the concentration of lower weight VOCs drops less quickly than that of heavier VOCs.

  2. Piloted simulation of an air-ground profile negotiation process in a time-based Air Traffic Control environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, David H.; Green, Steven M.

    1993-01-01

    Historically, development of airborne flight management systems (FMS) and ground-based air traffic control (ATC) systems has tended to focus on different objectives with little consideration for operational integration. A joint program, between NASA's Ames Research Center (Ames) and Langley Research Center (Langley), is underway to investigate the issues of, and develop systems for, the integration of ATC and airborne automation systems. A simulation study was conducted to evaluate a profile negotiation process (PNP) between the Center/TRACON Automation System (CTAS) and an aircraft equipped with a four-dimensional flight management system (4D FMS). Prototype procedures were developed to support the functional implementation of this process. The PNP was designed to provide an arrival trajectory solution which satisfies the separation requirements of ATC while remaining as close as possible to the aircraft's preferred trajectory. Results from the experiment indicate the potential for successful incorporation of aircraft-preferred arrival trajectories in the CTAS automation environment. Fuel savings on the order of 2 percent to 8 percent, compared to fuel required for the baseline CTAS arrival speed strategy, were achieved in the test scenarios. The data link procedures and clearances developed for this experiment, while providing the necessary functionality, were found to be operationally unacceptable to the pilots. In particular, additional pilot control and understanding of the proposed aircraft-preferred trajectory, and a simplified clearance procedure were cited as necessary for operational implementation of the concept.

  3. "Aqua-space", a new headspace method for isolation of natural floral aromas using humidified air as a carrier gas.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Masashi; Honda, Tsutomu; Fujita, Akira; Kurobayashi, Yoshiko; Kitahara, Takeshi

    2004-02-01

    A new method called "Aqua-space" was developed for the isolation of the natural fragrances of plants. Living flowers were enclosed in a space under simulated natural conditions, and humidified air was pumped into the space as a fragrance carrier. In a comparison among three isolation methods, i.e., Aqua-space, headspace, and solvent extraction, the Aqua-space method proved to be the most effective in retaining natural fragrances with abundant oxygenated components key to floral fragrances.

  4. Piloted Ignition of Polypropylene/Glass Composites in a Forced Air Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernandez-Pello, A. C.; Rich, D.; Lautenberger, C.; Stefanovich, A.; Metha, S.; Torero, J.; Yuan, Z.; Ross, H.

    2003-01-01

    The Forced Ignition and Spread Test (FIST) is being used to study the flammability characteristics of combustible materials in forced convective flows. The FIST methodology is based on the ASTM E-1321, Lateral Ignition and Flame Spread Test (LIFT) which is used to determine the ignition and flame spread characteristics of materials, and to produce 'Flammability Diagrams' of materials. The LIFT apparatus, however, relies on natural convection to bring air to the combustion zone and the fuel vapor to the pilot flame, and thus cannot describe conditions where the oxidizer flow velocity may change. The FIST on the other hand, by relying on a forced flow as the dominant transport mechanism, can be used to examine variable oxidizer flow characteristics, such as velocity, oxygen concentration, and turbulence intensity, and consequently has a wider applicability. Particularly important is its ability to determine the flammability characteristics of materials used in spacecraft since in the absence of gravity the only flow present is that forced by the HVAC of the space facility. In this paper, we report work on the use of the FIST approach on the piloted ignition of a blended polypropylene fiberglass (PP/GL) composite material exposed to an external radiant flux in a forced convective flow of air. The effect of glass concentration under varying external radiant fluxes is examined and compared qualitatively with theoretical predictions of the ignition process. The results are used to infer the effect of glass content on the fire safety characteristics of composites.

  5. Ambient Particulate Matter Air Pollution in Mpererwe District, Kampala, Uganda: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Schwander, Stephan; Okello, Clement D.; Freers, Juergen; Chow, Judith C.; Watson, John G.; Corry, Melody; Meng, Qingyu

    2014-01-01

    Air quality in Kampala, the capital of Uganda, has deteriorated significantly in the past two decades. We made spot measurements in Mpererwe district for airborne particulate matter PM2.5 (fine particles) and coarse particles. PM was collected on Teflon-membrane filters and analyzed for mass, 51 elements, 3 anions, and 5 cations. Both fine and coarse particle concentrations were above 100 µg/m3 in all the samples collected. Markers for crustal/soil (e.g., Si and Al) were the most abundant in the PM2.5 fraction, followed by primary combustion products from biomass burning and incinerator emissions (e.g., K and Cl). Over 90% of the measured PM2.5 mass can be explained by crustal species (41% and 59%) and carbonaceous aerosol (33%–55%). Crustal elements dominated the coarse particles collected from Kampala. The results of this pilot study are indicative of unhealthy air and suggest that exposure to ambient air in Kampala may increase the burden of environmentally induced cardiovascular, metabolic, and respiratory diseases including infections. Greater awareness and more extensive research are required to confirm our findings, to identify personal exposure and pollution sources, and to develop air quality management plans and policies to protect public health. PMID:24693293

  6. Geologic mapping of the air intake shaft at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Holt, R.M.; Powers, D.W. )

    1990-12-01

    The air intake shaft (AS) was geologically mapped from the surface to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) facility horizon. The entire shaft section including the Mescalero Caliche, Gatuna Formation, Santa Rosa Formation, Dewey Lake Redbeds, Rustler Formation, and Salado Formation was geologically described. The air intake shaft (AS) at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site was constructed to provide a pathway for fresh air into the underground repository and maintain the desired pressure balances for proper underground ventilation. It was up-reamed to minimize construction-related damage to the wall rock. The upper portion of the shaft was lined with slip-formed concrete, while the lower part of the shaft, from approximately 903 ft below top of concrete at the surface, was unlined. As part of WIPP site characterization activities, the AS was geologically mapped. The shaft construction method, up-reaming, created a nearly ideal surface for geologic description. Small-scale textures usually best seen on slabbed core were easily distinguished on the shaft wall, while larger scale textures not generally revealed in core were well displayed. During the mapping, newly recognized textures were interpreted in order to refine depositional and post-depositional models of the units mapped. The objectives of the geologic mapping were to: (1) provide confirmation and documentation of strata overlying the WIPP facility horizon; (2) provide detailed information of the geologic conditions in strata critical to repository sealing and operations; (3) provide technical basis for field adjustments and modification of key and aquifer seal design, based upon the observed geology; (4) provide geological data for the selection of instrument borehole locations; (5) and characterize the geology at geomechanical instrument locations to assist in data interpretation. 40 refs., 27 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Carving a Niche for the No-Frills Carrier, Air Arabia, in Oil-Rich Skies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKechnie, Donelda S.; Grant, Jim; Fahmi, Mona

    2007-01-01

    The concept of introducing a no-frills airline to the wealthy Arab region presented its risks. This independent study sought to position the new airline in the marketplace. After three focus groups and 400 self-administered surveys, safety (#1) and price (#2) are low-fare carrier considerations whereas safety (#1), punctuality (#2) and price (#3) apply for full-fare airlines. Recommended ways for the no-frills carrier to reach the market include newspaper ads, travel agent sales, online bookings, and call centers. Additionally, respondents appeared to evaluate this low-fare carrier as if it is a full-service airline.

  8. 78 FR 56983 - Agency Information Collection; Activity Under OMB Review: Foreign Air Carrier Application for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-16

    ... fourth-freedom flights conducted in the last twelve-month period, and certification of reciprocity from... that their homeland government will afford reciprocity to U.S. carriers seeking authority for...

  9. 14 CFR 204.4 - Carriers proposing to provide essential air service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... instead identify the data and provide a citation for the date and place of filing. All carriers may... costs and revenues are allocated. (4) A traffic forecast including a load factor analysis on...

  10. Feasibility of Measuring Tobacco Smoke Air Pollution in Homes: Report from a Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Laura; Zucker, David; Hovell, Melbourne; Brown, Nili; Ram, Amit; Myers, Vicki

    2015-11-30

    Tobacco smoke air pollution (TSAP) measurement may persuade parents to adopt smoke-free homes and thereby reduce harm to children from tobacco smoke in the home. In a pilot study involving 29 smoking families, a Sidepak was used to continuously monitor home PM(2.5) during an 8-h period, Sidepak and/or Dylos monitors provided real-time feedback, and passive nicotine monitors were used to measure home air nicotine for one week. Feedback was provided to participants in the context of motivational interviews. Home PM(2.5) levels recorded by continuous monitoring were not well-accepted by participants because of the noise level. Also, graphs from continuous monitoring showed unexplained peaks, often associated with sources unrelated to indoor smoking, such as cooking, construction, or outdoor sources. This hampered delivery of a persuasive message about the relationship between home smoking and TSAP. By contrast, immediate real-time PM(2.5) feedback (with Sidepak or Dylos monitor) was feasible and provided unambiguous information; the Dylos had the additional advantages of being more economical and quieter. Air nicotine sampling was complicated by the time-lag for feedback and questions regarding shelf-life. Improvement in the science of TSAP measurement in the home environment is needed to encourage and help maintain smoke-free homes and protect vulnerable children. Recent advances in the use of mobile devices for real-time feedback are promising and warrant further development, as do accurate methods for real-time air nicotine air monitoring.

  11. Feasibility of Measuring Tobacco Smoke Air Pollution in Homes: Report from a Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, Laura; Zucker, David; Hovell, Melbourne; Brown, Nili; Ram, Amit; Myers, Vicki

    2015-01-01

    Tobacco smoke air pollution (TSAP) measurement may persuade parents to adopt smoke-free homes and thereby reduce harm to children from tobacco smoke in the home. In a pilot study involving 29 smoking families, a Sidepak was used to continuously monitor home PM2.5 during an 8-h period, Sidepak and/or Dylos monitors provided real-time feedback, and passive nicotine monitors were used to measure home air nicotine for one week. Feedback was provided to participants in the context of motivational interviews. Home PM2.5 levels recorded by continuous monitoring were not well-accepted by participants because of the noise level. Also, graphs from continuous monitoring showed unexplained peaks, often associated with sources unrelated to indoor smoking, such as cooking, construction, or outdoor sources. This hampered delivery of a persuasive message about the relationship between home smoking and TSAP. By contrast, immediate real-time PM2.5 feedback (with Sidepak or Dylos monitor) was feasible and provided unambiguous information; the Dylos had the additional advantages of being more economical and quieter. Air nicotine sampling was complicated by the time-lag for feedback and questions regarding shelf-life. Improvement in the science of TSAP measurement in the home environment is needed to encourage and help maintain smoke-free homes and protect vulnerable children. Recent advances in the use of mobile devices for real-time feedback are promising and warrant further development, as do accurate methods for real-time air nicotine air monitoring. PMID:26633440

  12. Assessment of Interpersonal Risk (AIR) in Adults with Learning Disabilities and Challenging Behaviour--Piloting a New Risk Assessment Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Martin; McCue, Michael

    2013-01-01

    A new risk assessment tool, "Assessment of Interpersonal Risk" (AIR), was piloted and evaluated to measure risk factors and compatibility between individuals living in an assessment and treatment unit in one NHS area. The adults with learning disabilities in this unit had severe and enduring mental health problems and/or behaviour that is severely…

  13. 77 FR 76064 - Reopening of Application Period for Participation in the Air Cargo Advance Screening (ACAS) Pilot...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Reopening of Application Period for Participation in the Air Cargo Advance Screening (ACAS) Pilot Program AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, DHS....

  14. 78 FR 315 - Reopening of Application Period for Participation in the Air Cargo Advance Screening (ACAS) Pilot...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-03

    ... [Federal Register Volume 78, Number 2 (Thursday, January 3, 2013)] [Notices] [Page 315] [FR Doc No: C1-2012-30922] DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Reopening of Application Period for Participation in the Air Cargo Advance Screening (ACAS) Pilot Program Correction...

  15. Monitoring of atmospheric aerosol emissions using a remotely piloted air vehicle (RPV)-Borne Sensor Suite

    SciTech Connect

    1996-05-01

    We have developed a small sensor system, the micro-atmospheric measurement system ({mu}-AMS), to monitor and track aerosol emissions. The system was developed to fly aboard a remotely piloted air vehicle, or other mobile platform, to provide real-time particle measurements in effluent plumes and to collect particles for chemical analysis. The {mu}-AMS instrument measures atmospheric parameters including particle mass concentration and size distribution, temperature, humidity, and airspeed, altitude and position (by GPS receiver) each second. The sensor data are stored onboard and are also down linked to a ground station in real time. The {mu}-AMS is battery powered, small (8 in. dia x 36 in.), and lightweight (15 pounds). Aerosol concentrations and size distributions from above ground explosive tests, airbone urban pollution, and traffic-produced particulates are presented.

  16. Evaluation of flow hydrodynamics in a pilot-scale dissolved air flotation tank: a comparison between CFD and experimental measurements.

    PubMed

    Lakghomi, B; Lawryshyn, Y; Hofmann, R

    2015-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models of dissolved air flotation (DAF) have shown formation of stratified flow (back and forth horizontal flow layers at the top of the separation zone) and its impact on improved DAF efficiency. However, there has been a lack of experimental validation of CFD predictions, especially in the presence of solid particles. In this work, for the first time, both two-phase (air-water) and three-phase (air-water-solid particles) CFD models were evaluated at pilot scale using measurements of residence time distribution, bubble layer position and bubble-particle contact efficiency. The pilot-scale results confirmed the accuracy of the CFD model for both two-phase and three-phase flows, but showed that the accuracy of the three-phase CFD model would partly depend on the estimation of bubble-particle attachment efficiency.

  17. 78 FR 39435 - Applications for Certificates of Public Convenience and Necessity and Foreign Air Carrier Permits

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-01

    ... from any point or points behind any Member State of the European Union via any point or points in any... authorized by any additional route rights made available to European Union carriers in the future. Barbara J... United States and any point or points in any member of the European Common Aviation Area; (c)...

  18. 78 FR 20372 - Certificates of Public Convenience and Necessity and Foreign Air Carrier Permits; Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-04

    ... European Union carriers in the future. Docket Number: DOT-OST-2013-0057. Date Filed: March 20, 2013. Due... transportation of persons, property and mail from any point or points behind any Member State of the European Union, via any point or points in any Member State and via intermediate points to any point or points...

  19. Factors Influencing the Decisions and Actions of Pilots and Air Traffic Controllers in Three Plausible NextGen Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vu, Kim-Phuong L.; Strybel, Thomas Z.; Battiste, Vernol; Johnson, Walter

    2011-01-01

    In the current air traffic management (ATM) system, pilots and air traffic controllers have well-established roles and responsibilities: pilots fly aircraft and are concerned with energy management, fuel efficiency, and passenger comfort; controllers separate aircraft and are concerned with safety and management of traffic flows. Despite having different goals and obligations, both groups must be able to effectively communicate and interact with each other for the ATM system to work. This interaction will become even more challenging as traffic volume increases dramatically in the near future. To accommodate this increase, by 2025 the national air transportation system in the U.S. will go through a transformation that will modernize the ATM system and make it safer, more effective, and more efficient. This new system, NextGen, will change how pilots and controllers perform their tasks by incorporating advanced technologies and employing new procedures. It will also distribute responsibility between pilots, controllers and automation over such tasks as maintaining aircraft separation. The present chapter describes three plausible concepts of operations that allocate different ATM responsibilities to these groups. We describe how each concept changes the role of each operator and the types of decisions and actions performed by them.

  20. Air pollution and cardiovascular health in Mandi-Gobindgarh, Punjab, India - a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Nautiyal, Jyoti; Garg, M L; Kumar, Manoj Sharma; Khan, Asif Ali; Thakur, Jarnail S; Kumar, Rajesh

    2007-12-01

    Large number of epidemiological studies to know the effect of air pollution on the general mortality and morbidity, and the cardiopulmonary morbidity and mortality are concentrated in USA and Europe. Regional differences in air pollution necessitate regional level health effects studies. Present study is a cross sectional pilot study from India, an Asian country. A sample of population from an industrial town 'Mandi Gobindgarh' and a nonindustrial town 'Morinda' were selected. A cross-sectional household survey was done in both the towns. One hundred subjects were selected from each of the towns. Ambient air quality data was collected for both towns over a period of 10-months to assess seasonal variations. In the present study the average PM10 (particulate matter with < or = 10 microm aerodynamic diameter) levels in Morinda were 99.54 microg/m3 and in Mandi Gobindgarh 161.20 microg/m3. As per NAAQS the permitted levels of PM10 is 50 microg/m3 taken as annual average (arithmetic mean). Elemental analysis of the aerosol samples found the concentration levels to be higher in Mandi- Gobindgarh than Morinda. The population in Gobindgarh shows a higher prevalence of symptoms of angina and cardiovascular disease considered in the study as compared to Morinda. When the same data is viewed in terms of male and female population, the female population is found to show these symptoms marginally higher than their counterparts. Considering the results of present study it can be stated that the increased levels of different pollutants and the higher prevalence of cardiovascular symptoms in Mandi-Gobindgarh (Industrial town) than the Morinda (Non-Industrial town) is because of the association of PM pollution with cardiovascular diseases. Keeping in view the current status of literature, further studies in this direction are needed in a country like India. Such data will also be globally relevant.

  1. A piloted simulation of helicopter air combat to investigate effects of variations in selected performance and control response characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Michael S.; Mansur, M. Hossein; Chen, Robert T. N.

    1987-01-01

    A piloted simulation study investigating handling qualities and flight characteristics required for helicopter air to air combat is presented. The Helicopter Air Combat system was used to investigate this role for Army rotorcraft. Experimental variables were the maneuver envelope size (load factor and sideslip), directional axis handling qualities, and pitch and roll control-response type. Over 450 simulated, low altitude, one-on-one engagements were conducted. Results from the experiment indicate that a well damped directional response, low sideforce caused by sideslip, and some effective dihedral are all desirable for weapon system performance, good handling qualities, and low pilot workload. An angular rate command system was favored over the attitude type pitch and roll response for most applications, and an enhanced maneuver envelope size over that of current generation aircraft was found to be advantageous. Pilot technique, background, and experience are additional factors which had a significant effect on performance in the air combat tasks investigated. The implication of these results on design requirements for future helicopters is presented.

  2. 78 FR 76701 - Certificates of Public Convenience and Necessity and Foreign Air Carrier Permits

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-18

    ... permitted under the open skies U.S.-E.U.-Iceland-Norway Air Transport Agreement; Norwegian International... point or points in Norway, via intermediate points, and any point or points in the United States;...

  3. 78 FR 19354 - Certificates of Public Convenience and Necessity and Foreign Air Carrier Permits

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-29

    ... Modify Scope: March 26, 2013. Description: Application of AirBridgeCargo Airlines, LLC (``ABC..., Florida; Dallas/Fort Worth, Texas; and Los Angeles, California, on the other hand, and beyond. ABC...

  4. A piloted simulation investigation of the normal load factor and longitudinal thrust required for air-to-air acquisition and tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whalley, Matthew S.

    1993-01-01

    A piloted simulation study was performed by the U.S. Army Aeroflighydynamics Directorate to develop insight into the maneuverability requirements for aggressive helicopter maneuvering tasks such as air-to-air combat. Both a conventional helicopter and a helicopter with auxiliary thrust were examined. The aircraft parameters of interest were the normal and longitudinal load factor envelopes. Of particular interest were the mission performance and handling qualities tradeoffs with the parameters of interest. Two air-to-air acquisition and tracking tasks and a return-to-cover task were performed to assess mission performance. Results indicate that without auxiliary thrust, the ownship normal load factor capability needs to match that of the adversary in order to provide satisfactory handling qualities. Auxiliary thrust provides significant handling qualities advantages and can be substituted to some extent for normal load factor capability. Auxiliary thrust levels as low as 0.2 thrust/weight can provide significant handling qualities advantages.

  5. Global pilot study for persistent organic pollutants (POPs) using PUF disk passive air samplers.

    PubMed

    Harner, Tom; Pozo, Karla; Gouin, Todd; Macdonald, Anne-Marie; Hung, Hayley; Cainey, Jill; Peters, Andrew

    2006-11-01

    Polyurethane foam (PUF) disks were deployed at global background sites, to test logistical issues associated with a global monitoring network for persistent organic pollutants (POPs). alpha-HCH, exhibited relatively high and uniform concentrations (17-150 pg/m3) at temperate and arctic sites with elevated concentrations associated with trans-Pacific inflow. Concentrations were much lower (<5 pg/m3) in Bermuda, Chile and Cape Grim. Concentrations for gamma-HCH, the main component of lindane, were spatially similar to the alpha-HCH pattern but lower in magnitude (typically, <10 pg/m3). Chlordane concentrations (sum of cis-chlordane, trans-chlordane and trans-nonachlor) were also low (<10 pg/m3). Dieldrin concentrations were in the range 2-25 pg/m3 at most sites but elevated in Bermuda. Back trajectories suggest that advection from Africa and the US may contribute. Endosulfan, a popular current-use pesticide, exhibited highest concentrations ranging from tens to hundreds of pg/m3. There was good agreement between duplicate samplers at each site and PUF disk-derived air concentrations agreed with high volume data. Few logistical/analytical problems were encountered in this pilot study.

  6. Piloted methane/air jet flames : transport effects and aspects of scalar structure.

    SciTech Connect

    Karpetis, Adionos N.; Chen, J. Y.; Barlow, Robert S.; Frank, Jonathan H.

    2005-02-01

    Previously unpublished results from multiscalar point measurements in the series of piloted CH{sub 4}/air jet flames [R.S. Barlow, J.H. Frank, Proc. Combust. Inst. 27 (1998) 1087-1095] are presented and analyzed. The emphasis is on features of the data that reveal the relative importance of molecular diffusion and turbulent transport in these flames. The complete series A-F is considered. This includes laminar, transitional, and turbulent flames spanning a range in Reynolds number from 1100 to 44,800. Results on conditional means of species mass fractions, the differential diffusion parameter, and the state of the water-gas shift reaction all show that there is an evolution in these flames from a scalar structure dominated by molecular diffusion to one dominated by turbulent transport. Long records of 6000 single-point samples at each of several selected locations in flame D are used to quantify the cross-stream (radial) dependence of conditional statistics of measured scalars. The cross-stream dependence of the conditional scalar dissipation is determined from 6000-shot, line-imaging measurements at selected locations. The cross-stream dependence of reactive scalars, which is most significant in the near field of the jet flame, is attributed to radial differences in both convective and local time scales of the flow. Results illustrate some potential limitations of common modeling assumptions when applied to laboratory-scale flames and, thus, provide a more complete context for interpretation of comparisons between experiments and model calculations.

  7. Piloted methane/air jet flames: Transport effects and aspects of scalar structure

    SciTech Connect

    Barlow, R.S.; Frank, J.H.; Karpetis, A.N.; Chen, J.-Y.

    2005-12-01

    Previously unpublished results from multiscalar point measurements in the series of piloted CH{sub 4}/air jet flames [R.S. Barlow, J.H. Frank, Proc. Combust. Inst. 27 (1998) 1087-1095] are presented and analyzed. The emphasis is on features of the data that reveal the relative importance of molecular diffusion and turbulent transport in these flames. The complete series A-F is considered. This includes laminar, transitional, and turbulent flames spanning a range in Reynolds number from 1100 to 44,800. Results on conditional means of species mass fractions, the differential diffusion parameter, and the state of the water-gas shift reaction all show that there is an evolution in these flames from a scalar structure dominated by molecular diffusion to one dominated by turbulent transport. Long records of 6000 single-point samples at each of several selected locations in flame D are used to quantify the cross-stream (radial) dependence of conditional statistics of measured scalars. The cross-stream dependence of the conditional scalar dissipation is determined from 6000-shot, line-imaging measurements at selected locations. The cross-stream dependence of reactive scalars, which is most significant in the near field of the jet flame, is attributed to radial differences in both convective and local time scales of the flow. Results illustrate some potential limitations of common modeling assumptions when applied to laboratory-scale flames and, thus, provide a more complete context for interpretation of comparisons between experiments and model calculations.

  8. A method for the determination of potentially profitable service patterns for commuter air carriers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ransone, R. K.; Kuhlthau, A. R.; Deptula, D. A.

    1975-01-01

    A methodology for estimating market conception was developed as a part of the short-haul air transportation program. It is based upon an analysis of actual documents which provide a record of known travel history. Applying this methodology a forecast was made of the demand for an air feeder service between Charlottesville, Virginia and Dulles International Airport. Local business travel vouchers and local travel agent records were selected to provide the documentation. The market was determined to be profitable for an 8-passenger Cessna 402B aircraft flying a 2-hour daily service pattern designed to mesh to the best extent possible with the connecting schedules at Dulles. The Charlottesville - Dulles air feeder service market conception forecast and its methodology are documented.

  9. Mutagenicity of indoor air particles in a residential pilot field study: application and evaluation of new methodologies

    SciTech Connect

    Lewtas, J.; Goto, S.; Williams, K.; Chuang, J.C.; Petersen, B.A.

    1987-01-01

    The mutagenicity of indoor air-particulate matter was measured in a pilot field study of homes in Columbus, Ohio, during the 1984 winter. The study was conducted in eight all-natural-gas homes and two all-electric homes. Particulate matter and semi-volatile organic compounds were collected indoors using a medium-volume sampler. A micro-forward mutation bioassay employing Salmonella typhimurium strain TM 677 was used to quantify the mutagenicity in solvent extracts of microgram quantities of indoor air particles. The mutagenicity was quantified in terms of both mutation frequency per mg of organic matter extracted and per cubic meter of air sampled. The combustion-source variables explored in this study included woodburning in fireplaces and cigarette smoking. Homes in which cigarette smoking occurred had the highest concentrations of mutagenicity per cubic meter of air.

  10. An Integrated Framework for Modeling Air Carrier Behavior, Policy, and Impacts in the U.S. Air Transportation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horio, Brant M.; Kumar, Vivek; DeCicco, Anthony H.; Hasan, Shahab; Stouffer, Virginia L.; Smith, Jeremy C.; Guerreiro, Nelson M.

    2015-01-01

    The implementation of the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) in the United States is an ongoing challenge for policymakers due to the complexity of the air transportation system (ATS) with its broad array of stakeholders and dynamic interdependencies between them. The successful implementation of NextGen has a hard dependency on the active participation of U.S. commercial airlines. To assist policymakers in identifying potential policy designs that facilitate the implementation of NextGen, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and LMI developed a research framework called the Air Transportation System Evolutionary Simulation (ATS-EVOS). This framework integrates large empirical data sets with multiple specialized models to simulate the evolution of the airline response to potential future policies and explore consequential impacts on ATS performance and market dynamics. In the ATS-EVOS configuration presented here, we leverage the Transportation Systems Analysis Model (TSAM), the Airline Evolutionary Simulation (AIRLINE-EVOS), the Airspace Concept Evaluation System (ACES), and the Aviation Environmental Design Tool (AEDT), all of which enable this research to comprehensively represent the complex facets of the ATS and its participants. We validated this baseline configuration of ATS-EVOS against Airline Origin and Destination Survey (DB1B) data and subject matter expert opinion, and we verified the ATS-EVOS framework and agent behavior logic through scenario-based experiments that explored potential implementations of a carbon tax, congestion pricing policy, and the dynamics for equipage of new technology by airlines. These experiments demonstrated ATS-EVOS's capabilities in responding to a wide range of potential NextGen-related policies and utility for decision makers to gain insights for effective policy design.

  11. 78 FR 68134 - Certificates of Public Convenience and Necessity and Foreign Air Carrier Permits

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-13

    ... the European Union, via any point or points in any EU Member State and via intermediate points, to any...) charter transportation authorized by any additional route ] rights made available to European Union... of the European Common Aviation Area; (iii) foreign charter air transportation of cargo between...

  12. Equivalent ambipolar carrier injection of electrons and holes with Au electrodes in air-stable field effect transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Kanagasekaran, Thangavel E-mail: Shimotani@m.tohoku.ac.jp Ikeda, Susumu; Kumashiro, Ryotaro; Shimotani, Hidekazu E-mail: Shimotani@m.tohoku.ac.jp Shang, Hui; Tanigaki, Katsumi E-mail: Shimotani@m.tohoku.ac.jp

    2015-07-27

    Carrier injection from Au electrodes to organic thin-film active layers can be greatly improved for both electrons and holes by nano-structural surface control of organic semiconducting thin films using long-chain aliphatic molecules on a SiO{sub 2} gate insulator. In this paper, we demonstrate a stark contrast for a 2,5-bis(4-biphenylyl)bithiophene (BP2T) active semiconducting layer grown on a modified SiO{sub 2} dielectric gate insulator between two different modifications of tetratetracontane and poly(methyl methacrylate) thin films. Important evidence that the field effect transistor (FET) characteristics are independent of electrode metals with different work functions is given by the observation of a conversion of the metal-semiconductor contact from the Schottky limit to the Bardeen limit. An air-stable light emitting FET with an Au electrode is demonstrated.

  13. Air Transport Pilot Supply and Demand: Current State and Effects of Recent Legislation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    if a “perfect storm ” of current policy, demographics, and incentives will cause a pilot shortage. The policy section refers to the new first...larger than the 4000-4500 anticipated ATP 31 attrition rates. There is a strong correlation between ATP hiring rates and new ATP certifications...There also is a strong correlation between new commercial pilot certifications among young pilots and new ATP certifications. Thus, as more ATPs are

  14. Close Air Support Mission: Development of a Unitary Measure of Pilot Performance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-11-01

    training research and development (R&D) using the Advanced Simulator for Pilot Training ( ASPT ). A linear regression analysis was used to describe how...mission-ready, A-10 aircraft pilots rank-ordered hypothetical CAS mission outcomes *typical of those obtained in ASPT . CAS performance ratings predicted by...pilots exposed to ASPT , the data collected in a previous study were reanalyzed using the model. CAS performance as calculated hy the model was found to

  15. The influence of the elastic vibration of the carrier to the aerodynamics of the external store in air-launch-to-orbit process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lei; Ye, Zheng-Yin; Wu, Jie

    2016-11-01

    The separation between the carrier and store is one of the most important and difficult phases in Air-launch-to-orbit technology. Based on the previous researches, the interference aerodynamic forces of the store caused by the carrier are obvious in the earlier time during the separation. And the interference aerodynamics will be more complex when considering the elastic deformation of the carrier. Focusing on the conditions that in the earlier time during the separation, the steady and unsteady interference aerodynamic forces of the store are calculated at different angle of attacks and relative distances between the carrier and store. During the calculation, the elastic vibrations of the carrier are considered. According to the cause of formations of the interference aerodynamics, the interference aerodynamic forces of the store are divided into several components. The relative magnitude, change rule, sphere of influence and mechanism of interference aerodynamic forces components of the store are analyzed quantitatively. When the relative distance between the carrier and store is small, the interference aerodynamic forces caused by the elastic vibration of the carrier is about half of the total aerodynamic forces of the store. And as the relative distance increases, the value of interference aerodynamic forces decrease. When the relative distance is larger than twice the mean aerodynamic chord of the carrier, the values of interference aerodynamic forces of the store can be ignored. Besides, under the influence of the steady interference aerodynamic forces, the lift characteristics of the store are worse and the static stability margin is poorer.

  16. The United States Air Force and Profession: Why Sixty Percent of Air Force General Officers are Still Pilots When Pilots Comprise Just Twenty Percent of the Officer Corps

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-25

    missile’s flight. It is critical for Wild Weasel aircraft, designed to detect and destroy enemy Surface to Air Missile (SAM) sites, to not only detect and...some of the SAGE system with intercontinental ballistic missiles (ICBMs) or long-range air to surface missiles. Consequently, the system was designed ...Category 4: PGMs Operator Launch and Leave ................. 222 Chart 6-1: Number of Surface -to-Air-Missiles by Type and Year ....................... 256

  17. [Psychophysiological aspects of naval aviation pilots of the Navy in the operation of highly carrier-based aircraft].

    PubMed

    Mel'nik, S G; Chulaevskiĭ, A O

    2011-08-01

    The authors have shown that the most difficult elements of the flight deck of the ship are springboard takeoff and aerofinishing landing. An important task is to study the aerodynamic characteristics of the behavior of the aircraft during takeoff different characteristics, forming crews ready to act in particular situations. Adverse factors are the operating conditions of habitability of aircraft (noise, vibration, fumes in the air at work, and aircraft engines, etc.) that have a significant impact on the life of air crew and engineering staff. It is concluded that the development and use of effective means of protecting the organism from the effect of these factors is a priority for specialists in aviation medicine.

  18. Manning the Next Unmanned Air Force: Developing RPA Pilots of the Future

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    CHAPTER 2: BACKGROUND ........................................................................................3 Rated Accessions ...3 TABLE 1. FY 12 AF Pilot Accession ...............................................................................7 FIGURE 2. Causes...career field is failing to accurately prescreen and access the most appropriate pilots to fly RPA, which is resulting in an attrition rate during

  19. Agent Based Modeling of Air Carrier Behavior for Evaluation of Technology Equipage and Adoption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horio, Brant M.; DeCicco, Anthony H.; Stouffer, Virginia L.; Hasan, Shahab; Rosenbaum, Rebecca L.; Smith, Jeremy C.

    2014-01-01

    As part of ongoing research, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and LMI developed a research framework to assist policymakers in identifying impacts on the U.S. air transportation system (ATS) of potential policies and technology related to the implementation of the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen). This framework, called the Air Transportation System Evolutionary Simulation (ATS-EVOS), integrates multiple models into a single process flow to best simulate responses by U.S. commercial airlines and other ATS stakeholders to NextGen-related policies, and in turn, how those responses impact the ATS. Development of this framework required NASA and LMI to create an agent-based model of airline and passenger behavior. This Airline Evolutionary Simulation (AIRLINE-EVOS) models airline decisions about tactical airfare and schedule adjustments, and strategic decisions related to fleet assignments, market prices, and equipage. AIRLINE-EVOS models its own heterogeneous population of passenger agents that interact with airlines; this interaction allows the model to simulate the cycle of action-reaction as airlines compete with each other and engage passengers. We validated a baseline configuration of AIRLINE-EVOS against Airline Origin and Destination Survey (DB1B) data and subject matter expert opinion, and we verified the ATS-EVOS framework and agent behavior logic through scenario-based experiments. These experiments demonstrated AIRLINE-EVOS's capabilities in responding to an input price shock in fuel prices, and to equipage challenges in a series of analyses based on potential incentive policies for best equipped best served, optimal-wind routing, and traffic management initiative exemption concepts..

  20. 26 CFR 40.6071(a)-3 - Time for an eligible air carrier to file a return for the third calendar quarter of 2001.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... return for the third calendar quarter of 2001. 40.6071(a)-3 Section 40.6071(a)-3 Internal Revenue... calendar quarter of 2001. (a) In general. If, in the case of an eligible air carrier, the quarterly return required under § 40.6011(a)-1(a) for the third calendar quarter of 2001 includes tax imposed by...

  1. 26 CFR 40.6071(a)-3 - Time for an eligible air carrier to file a return for the third calendar quarter of 2001.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... return for the third calendar quarter of 2001. 40.6071(a)-3 Section 40.6071(a)-3 Internal Revenue... calendar quarter of 2001. (a) In general. If, in the case of an eligible air carrier, the quarterly return required under § 40.6011(a)-1(a) for the third calendar quarter of 2001 includes tax imposed by...

  2. 26 CFR 40.6071(a)-3 - Time for an eligible air carrier to file a return for the third calendar quarter of 2001.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... return for the third calendar quarter of 2001. 40.6071(a)-3 Section 40.6071(a)-3 Internal Revenue... calendar quarter of 2001. (a) In general. If, in the case of an eligible air carrier, the quarterly return required under § 40.6011(a)-1(a) for the third calendar quarter of 2001 includes tax imposed by...

  3. 26 CFR 40.6071(a)-3 - Time for an eligible air carrier to file a return for the third calendar quarter of 2001.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... return for the third calendar quarter of 2001. 40.6071(a)-3 Section 40.6071(a)-3 Internal Revenue... calendar quarter of 2001. (a) In general. If, in the case of an eligible air carrier, the quarterly return required under § 40.6011(a)-1(a) for the third calendar quarter of 2001 includes tax imposed by...

  4. Airport noise complaint patterns and interviews of frequent complainers at two major air carrier airports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaggers, Nicholas; Eiff, Gary

    2005-09-01

    The complex and highly sensitive topic of aircraft noise and population annoyance continues to be a major inhibitor to airport development plans. The projected growth of air travel necessitates expanded capacity at many existing airports and the development and construction of new airports in order to accommodate burgeoning traveler needs. Concerns by citizens near major airports about their economic, health, and social welfare continue to generate community and individual declarations of annoyance and concern which threaten timely solutions to airport expansion plans. A deeper understanding of the nature of these concerns is important to more effectively cope with airport expansion concerns among adjacent communities and surrounding neighbors. This study analyzed existing noise complaints registered at Denver International Airport (DEN) and Fort Lauderdale/Hollywood International Airport (FLL) in an attempt to gain greater understanding of noise complaint drivers and public annoyance. Interviews of frequent complainers were utilized in order to gain richer data concerning individual annoyance issues.

  5. The Division of Military Air Transportation between Civilian and Military Carriers,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1969-05-01

    AO-AOAO 379 RAND CORP SANTA MONICA CA F/ B 15/5 THE DIVISION OF MILITARY AIR TRANSPORTATION BETWEEN CIVILIAN AN-ETC(U) MAY 69 L J KLEIGER UNCLASSIFIED...26.1 19b6 89.5 30.2 1967 90.8 33.7 1968 b 91.0 25.6 SOURCES: USAF, Military Airlift Command, Airl ift Service t.anagement Renort, 1959-1967; ibid...93,257 64.8 144,021 1965 87,326 45.0 106,630 55.0 193,956 L966 156,253 47.7 171,630 52.3 327,883 1967 328,441 55.0 269,132 45.0 597,573 1968 b 310,838

  6. Determination of dispersion parameters for oxidizing air and the oxidation rate of calcium sulfites in a pilot desulfurization plant

    SciTech Connect

    Burenkov, D.K.; Derevich, I.V.; Rzaev, A.I.

    1995-10-01

    In the effort to remove sulfur oxides from waste gases, the widest use is gained by desulfurization plants based on wet collection of sulfur dioxide in empty absorbers in which a limestone-gypsum suspension is sprayed, with gypsum being produced as a commodity product. Dispersion of oxidizing air in a model liquid and the oxidation rate of calcium sulfites in a suspension contained in the sump of a pilot desulfurization plant absorber are studied experimentally. Flow velocities, bubble trajectories, and oxidation rates were determined and are presented.

  7. RESULTS OF A PILOT FIELD STUDY TO EVALUATE THE EFFECTIVENESS OF CLEANING RESIDENTIAL HEATING AND AIR-CONDITIONING SYSTEMS AND THE IMPACT ON INDOOR AIR QUALITY AND SYSTEM PERFORMANCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report discusses and gives results of a pilot field study to evaluate the effectiveness of air duct cleaning (ADC) as a source removal technique in residential heating and air-conditioning (HAC) systems and its impact on airborne particle, fiber, and bioaerosol concentrations...

  8. Violations of Temporary Flight Restrictions and Air Defense Identification Zones: An Analysis of Airspace Violations and Pilot Report Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuschlag, Michael

    2005-01-01

    This document provides the results from a study into the apparent factors and causes of violations of restricted airspace, particularly temporary flight restrictions (TFRs) and air defense identification zones (ADIZs). By illuminating the reasons for these violations, this study aims to take the first step towards reducing them. The study assesses the basic characteristics of restricted airspace violations as well as the probable causes and factors contributing to violations. Results from the study imply most violations occur where the restriction has been in place for a significant amount of time prior to the violation. Additionally, the study results imply most violations are not due to the pilot simply being unaware of the airspace at the time of violation. In most violations, pilots are aware of the presence of the restricted airspace but have incorrect information about it, namely, its exact boundaries or procedures for authorized penetration. These results imply that the best means to reduce violations of restricted airspace is to improve the effectiveness of providing pilots the details required to avoid the airspace.

  9. The mutagenicity of indoor air particles in a residential pilot field study: Application and evaluation of new methodologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewtas, Joellen; Goto, Sumio; Williams, Katherine; Chuang, Jane C.; Petersen, Bruce A.; Wilson, Nancy K.

    The mutagenicity of indoor air paniculate matter has been measured in a pilot field study of homes in Columbus, Ohio during the 1984 winter. The study was conducted in eight all natural-gas homes and two all electric homes. Paniculate matter and semi-volatile organic compounds were collected indoors using a medium volume sampler. A micro-forward mutation bioassay employing Salmonella typhimurium strain TM 677 was used to quantify the mutagenicity in solvent extracts of microgram quantities of indoor air particles. The mutagenicity was quantified in terms of both mutation frequency per mg of organic matter extracted and per cubic meter of air sampled. The combustion source variables explored in this study included woodburning in fireplaces and cigarette smoking. Homes in which cigarette smoking occurred had the highest concentrations of mutagenicity per cubic meter of air. The average indoor air mutagenicity per cubic meter was highly correlated with the number of cigarettes smoked. When the separate sampling periods in each room were compared, the mutagenicity in the kitchen samples was the most highly correlated with the number of cigarettes smoked.

  10. Pilot/Controller Coordinated Decision Making in the Next Generation Air Transportation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bearman, Chris; Miller, Ronald c.; Orasanu, Judith M.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: NextGen technologies promise to provide considerable benefits in terms of enhancing operations and improving safety. However, there needs to be a thorough human factors evaluation of the way these systems will change the way in which pilot and controllers share information. The likely impact of these new technologies on pilot/controller coordinated decision making is considered in this paper using the "operational, informational and evaluative disconnect" framework. Method: Five participant focus groups were held. Participants were four experts in human factors, between x and x research students and a technical expert. The participant focus group evaluated five key NextGen technologies to identify issues that made different disconnects more or less likely. Results: Issues that were identified were: Decision Making will not necessarily improve because pilots and controllers possess the same information; Having a common information source does not mean pilots and controllers are looking at the same information; High levels of automation may lead to disconnects between the technology and pilots/controllers; Common information sources may become the definitive source for information; Overconfidence in the automation may lead to situations where appropriate breakdowns are not initiated. Discussion: The issues that were identified lead to recommendations that need to be considered in the development of NextGen technologies. The current state of development of these technologies provides a good opportunity to utilize recommendations at an early stage so that NextGen technologies do not lead to difficulties in resolving breakdowns in coordinated decision making.

  11. Performance characteristics of a new prototype for a portable GC using ambient air as carrier gas for on-site analysis.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Juan M; Sacks, Richard D

    2007-05-01

    The performance characteristics of a portable GC instrument requiring no compressed gas supplies and using relatively lightweight transportable components for the analysis of volatile organic components in large-volume air samples are described. To avoid the need for compressed gas tanks, ambient air is used as the carrier gas, and a vacuum pump is used to pull the carrier gas and injected samples through the wall-coated capillary column and a photoionization detector (PID). At-column heating is used eliminating the need for a conventional oven. The fused silica column is wrapped with heater wire and sensor wire so that heating is provided directly at the column. A PID is used since it requires no external gas supplies and has high sensitivity for many compounds of interest in environmental air monitoring. In order to achieve detection limits in the ppb range, an online multibed preconcentrator containing beds of graphitized carbons and carbon molecular sieves is used. After sample collection, the flow direction through the preconcentrator is reversed, and the sample is thermally desorbed directly into the column. Decomposition of sensitive compounds during desorption is greater with air as the carrier gas than with hydrogen.

  12. Verbal workload in distributed air traffic management. [considering pilot controller interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kreifeldt, J. G.; Pardo, B.; Wempe, T. E.; Huff, E.

    1975-01-01

    The effects of alternative traffic management possibilities on task performance and pilot controller verbal workloads were studied. Two new rule structures - sequencing and advisory - in addition to vectoring were studied in conjunction with CRT pilot displays incorporating traffic situation displays with and without aircraft flight path predictors. The sequencing and advisory systems gave increasing control responsibility to the pilots. It was concluded that distributed management systems could in practice significantly reduce controller verbal workload without reducing system performance. Implications of this conclusion suggest that distributed management would allow controllers to handle a larger volume of traffic safely either as a normal operating procedure or as a failure mode alternative in a highly automated ground centered system.

  13. Aeronautical Decision Making for Air Ambulance Helicopter Pilots: Learning from Past Mistakes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-07-01

    facility that has jurisdiction over your area of operations. 4. And remember "If you don’t want to get eaten by sharks, stay out of the water". That is...subdural hematoma . The pilot called flight service for weather and received a VMC report. Ŗ,000 broken and higher decks with 7 miles visibility

  14. An Analysis of U.S. Air Force Pilot Separation Decisions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    these fields; however, this is not a big issue for pilots ( Ehrenberg & Smith, 2009). 31 Figure 8. Distribution of Separation by Education Level...selection, Economic Inquiry. Ehrenberg , Ronald G., Smith, Robert S. (2009). Modern labor economics theory and public policy, San Francisco, CA

  15. Personality: Its Use in Selecting Canditates for US Air Force Undergraduate Pilot Training

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-08-01

    significant positive correlation between success at UPT and the following personality trait scale scores: assertiveness, interpersonal orientation...superior performance in airline pilots correlates positively with assertiveness and interpersonal orientation. Negative correlation was found with...strument measures both positive and negative personality traits. Positive traits include assertiveness, interpersonal orientation, and aggressiveness

  16. Personality: Its Use in Selecting Candidates for US Air Force Undergraduate Pilot Training

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-02-01

    success at UPT and the following personality trait scale scores: assertiveness, interpersonal orientation, mastery motivation, competitiveness, work...in airline pilots correlates positively with assertiveness and interpersonal orientation. Negative correlation was found with competitiveness. 2 7...measures both positive and negative personality traits. Positive traits include assertiveness, interpersonal orientation, and aggressiveness; negative

  17. A PILOT STUDY FOR NEAR REAL-TIME AEROSOL MODELING AND AIR QUALITY CHARACTERIZATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The poster will present the objectives and initial results of a pilot study conducted as a partnership between the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and the New York State Department of Environmental Conservat...

  18. 14 CFR 204.6 - Certificated and commuter air carriers proposing a change in operations, ownership, or management...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... proposing a change in operations, ownership, or management which is not substantial. 204.6 Section 204.6... carriers proposing a change in operations, ownership, or management which is not substantial. Carriers proposing to make a change which would not substantially affect their operations, management, or...

  19. 14 CFR 204.6 - Certificated and commuter air carriers proposing a change in operations, ownership, or management...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... proposing a change in operations, ownership, or management which is not substantial. 204.6 Section 204.6... carriers proposing a change in operations, ownership, or management which is not substantial. Carriers proposing to make a change which would not substantially affect their operations, management, or...

  20. Control of air emissions from hazardous-waste combustion sources: field evaluations of pilot-scale air-pollution-control devices

    SciTech Connect

    Westbrook, C.W.; Tatsch, C.E.; Cottone, L.

    1986-01-01

    Pilot-scale air-pollution control devices supplied by Hydro-Sonic Systems, ETS, Inc., and Vulcan Engineering Company were installed at the ENSCO, Inc. Incinerator in El Dorado, Arkansas, in the spring of 1984. Each of these units treated an uncontrolled slipstream of the incinerator exhaust gas. Simultaneous measurement of the total particulate and HCl in the gas streams were made at the inlet to and exit from the units using an EPA Method 5 sampling train. Particle sizing at both locations using Andersen impactors was also done. The units supplied by Hydro-Sonics Systems and ETS, Inc. exhibited a high degree of HCl and particulate matter control. The Hydro-Sonic Tandem Nozzle SuperSub Model 100 gave the best overall performance for HCl and particulate control and ability to accommodate the variable composition of the exhaust gas.

  1. Air pollution prevention through urban heat island mitigation: An update on the urban heat island pilot project

    SciTech Connect

    Gorsevski, V.; Taha, H.; Quattrochi, D.; Luvall, J.

    1998-07-01

    Urban heat islands increase the demand for cooling energy and accelerate the formation of smog. They are created when natural vegetation is replaced by heat-absorbing surfaces such as building roofs and walls, parking lots, and streets. Through the implementation of measures designed to mitigate the urban heat island, communities can decrease their demand for energy and effectively cool the metropolitan landscape. In addition to the economic benefits, using less energy leads to reductions in emission of CO{sub 2}--a greenhouse gas--as well as ozone (smog) precursors such as NOx and VOCs. Because ozone is created when NOx and VOCs photochemically combine with heat and solar radiation, actions taken to lower ambient air temperature can significantly reduce ozone concentrations in certain areas. Measures to reverse the urban heat island include afforestation and the widespread use of highly reflective surfaces. To demonstrate the potential benefits of implementing these measures, EPA has teamed up with NASA and LBNL to initiate a pilot project with three US cities. As part of the pilot, NASA will use remotely-sensed data to quantify surface temperature, albedo, the thermal response number and NDVI vegetation of each city. This information will be used by scientists at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) along with other data as inputs to model various scenarios that will help quantify the potential benefits of urban heat island mitigation measures in terms of reduced energy use and pollution. This paper will briefly describe this pilot project and provide an update on the progress to date.

  2. An Examination of Some Behavioral Correlates of Air Force Undergraduate Pilot Training through the Use of the Porter and Lawler Performance/Satisfaction Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lohmann, David P.

    The study tested the applicability of portions of the Porter and Lawler model in a cognitive training environment and examined the relationships among some behavioral variables in Air Force Undergraduate Pilot Training. The variables analyzed were the Maslow need hierarchy, effort, abilities, role perceptions, performance, satisfaction and the…

  3. Airline Transport Pilot, Aircraft Dispatcher, and Flight Navigator. Question Book. Expires September 1, 1991.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Aviation Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    This question book was developed by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) for testing applicants who are preparing for certification as airline transport pilots, aircraft dispatchers, or flight navigators. The publication contains several innovative features that are a departure from previous FAA publications related to air carrier personnel…

  4. Carrier lifetime reduction in 1.5 μm AlGaAsSb saturable absorbers with air and AlAsSb barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostinelli, O.; Bächtold, W.; Haiml, H.; Grange, R.; Keller, U.; Gini, E.; Almuneau, G.

    2006-08-01

    The optical properties of different AlGaAsSb semiconductor saturable absorber mirrors and InP /AlGaAsSb heterostructures have been investigated by pump-probe and low temperature photoluminescence measurements. The results show that the type-II electron-hole recombination process at the InP-AlGaAsSb interface is responsible for the slow carrier decay time in the absorber. Nevertheless, this slow transition can be avoided by growing an AlAsSb barrier layer between InP and the absorber layer promoting the fast electron-hole recombination at the surface states on the absorber/air interface. This allows reducing the carrier decay time from several nanoseconds down to 20ps.

  5. Patterns of entrapped air dissolution in a two-dimensional pilot-scale synthetic aquifer.

    PubMed

    McLeod, Heather C; Roy, James W; Smith, James E

    2015-01-01

    Past studies of entrapped air dissolution have focused on one-dimensional laboratory columns. Here the multidimensional nature of entrapped air dissolution was investigated using an indoor tank (180 × 240 × 600 cm(3) ) simulating an unconfined sand aquifer with horizontal flow. Time domain reflectometry (TDR) probes directly measured entrapped air contents, while dissolved gas conditions were monitored with total dissolved gas pressure (PTDG ) probes. Dissolution occurred as a diffuse wedge-shaped front from the inlet downgradient, with preferential dissolution at depth. This pattern was mainly attributed to increased gas solubility, as shown by PTDG measurements. However, compression of entrapped air at greater depths, captured by TDR and leading to lower quasi-saturated hydraulic conductivities and thus greater velocities, also played a small role. Linear propagation of the dissolution front downgradient was observed at each depth, with both TDR and PTDG , with increasing rates with depth (e.g, 4.1 to 5.7× slower at 15 cm vs. 165 cm depth). PTDG values revealed equilibrium with the entrapped gas initially, being higher at greater depth and fluctuating with the barometric pressure, before declining concurrently with entrapped air contents to the lower PTDG of the source water. The observed dissolution pattern has long-term implications for a wide variety of groundwater management issues, from recharge to contaminant transport and remediation strategies, due to the persistence of entrapped air near the water table (potential timescale of years). This study also demonstrated the utility of PTDG probes for simple in situ measurements to detect entrapped air and monitor its dissolution.

  6. Effects of air velocity and clothing combination on heating efficiency of an electrically heated vest (EHV): a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Faming; Gao, Chuansi; Holmér, Ingvar

    2010-09-01

    Cold endangers the heat balance of the human body. Protective clothing is the natural and most common equipment against cold stress. However, clothing for cold protection may be bulky and heavy, affecting human performance and increasing the work load. In such cases, a heated garment with built-in heating elements may be helpful. This pilot study presents a method based on a thermal manikin to investigate the effects of air velocity and clothing combination on the heating efficiency of an electrically heated vest (EHV). An infrared thermal camera was used to detect surface temperature distributions of the EHV on the front and back. Results show that the heating efficiency of the EHV decreases with increasing air velocity. Changes in EHV sequence in the three-layer clothing combination also significantly affect the heating efficiency: it increases with the increasing number of layers on top of the EHV. The highest mean temperature on the inner surface of the EHV was 40.2 degrees C, which indicates that it is safe for the wearers. For the EHV to heat the human body effectively, we suggest that it be worn as a middle layer. Finally, the EHV is especially suitable for occupational groups whose metabolic rate is below 1.9 Mets.

  7. Air Pollution, Cognitive Deficits and Brain Abnormalities: A Pilot Study with Children and Dogs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calderon-Garciduenas, Lilian; Mora-Tiscareno, Antonieta; Ontiveros, Esperanza; Gomez-Garza, Gilberto; Barragan-Mejia, Gerardo; Broadway, James; Chapman, Susan; Valencia-Salazar, Gildardo; Jewells, Valerie; Maronpot, Robert R.; Henriquez-Roldan, Carlos; Perez-Guille, Beatriz; Torres-Jardon, Ricardo; Herrit, Lou; Brooks, Diane; Osnaya-Brizuela, Norma; Monroy, Maria E.; Gonzalez-Maciel, Angelica; Reynoso-Robles, Rafael; Villarreal-Calderon, Rafael; Solt, Anna C.; Engle, Randall W.

    2008-01-01

    Exposure to air pollution is associated with neuroinflammation in healthy children and dogs in Mexico City. Comparative studies were carried out in healthy children and young dogs similarly exposed to ambient pollution in Mexico City. Children from Mexico City (n:55) and a low polluted city (n:18) underwent psychometric testing and brain magnetic…

  8. Effect of Air-Polishing on Titanium Surfaces, Biofilm Removal, and Biocompatibility: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Bennani, Vincent; Hwang, Linda; Tawse-Smith, Andrew; Dias, George J.; Cannon, Richard D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. The aims of this in vitro study were to evaluate morphological changes induced by glycine powder air-polishing on titanium surfaces, biofilm removal, and biocompatibility. Material and Methods. Titanium grade IV discs were allocated into two groups: (1) discs without biofilm and (2) discs for Streptococcus mutans biofilm formation. Discs in each group were further subdivided into (a) no treatment and (b) air-polishing treatment with glycine powder. Discs were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and confocal microscopy. Bacterial biofilms were quantified using a crystal violet dye-binding assay. Biocompatibility was evaluated by measuring the coverage and viability of L929 fibroblast cells cultured on the discs. Results. Air-polishing increased the roughness of treated discs (P < 0.05). EDS analysis did not show significant differences in the chemical composition of treated and nontreated discs. The amount of residual biofilm on treated discs was 8.6-fold lower than untreated controls (P < 0.05). Coverage of treated discs by fibroblasts was half that of untreated discs (P < 0.05) although both groups had the same cell viability. Conclusions. Air-polishing removed a significant amount of biofilm from titanium surfaces. The “polishing” was accompanied by increased surface roughness, but there were no changes in chemical and elemental compositions, nor the biocompatibility. PMID:26881198

  9. A pilot study of indoor air quality in screen golf courses.

    PubMed

    Goung, Sun-Ju Nam; Yang, Jinho; Kim, Yoon Shin; Lee, Cheol Min

    2015-05-01

    The aims of this study were to provide basic data for determining policies on air quality for multi-user facilities, including the legal enrollment of the indoor air quality regulation as designated by the Ministry of Environment, and to establish control plans. To this end, concentrations of ten pollutants (PM10, carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO2), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), formaldehyde (HCHO), total volatile organic compounds (TVOCs), radon (Rn), oxone (O3), total bacteria counts (TBC), and asbestos) in addition to nicotine, a smoking index material used to determine the impact of smoking on the air quality, were investigated in indoor game rooms and lobbies of 64 screen golf courses. The average concentration of none of the ten pollutants in the game rooms and lobbies of screen golf courses was found to exceed the limit set by the law. There were, however, pollutant concentrations exceeding limits in some screen golf courses, in order to establish a control plan for the indoor air quality of screen golf courses, a study on the emission sources of each pollutant was conducted. The major emission sources were found to be facility users' activities such as smoking and the use of combustion appliances, building materials, and finishing materials.

  10. A PILOT STUDY OF THE INFLUENCE OF RESIDENTIAL HAC DUTY CYCLE ON INDOOR AIR QUALITY (AE)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A simple methodology was developed to collect measurements of duty cycle, the fraction of time the heating and air conditioning (HAC) system was operating, inside residences. The primary purpose of the measurements was to assess whether the HAC duty cycle was related to reductio...

  11. A PILOT STUDY OF THE INFLUENCE OF RESIDENTIAL HAC DUTY CYCLE ON INDOOR AIR QUALITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A simple methodology was developed to collect measurements of duty cycle, the fraction of time the heating and air conditioning (HAC) system was operating inside residences. The primary purpose of the measurements was to assess whether the HAC duty cycle was related to reducti...

  12. A PILOT STUDY FOR NEAR REAL-TIME AEROSOL MODELING AND AIR QUALITY CHARACTERIZATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The primary objectives of this study are to implement, operate, and evaluate an automated, numerical, model-based air quality forecast system to provide daily predictions of O3 and PM2.5 and to assess the integrated use of modeled and observed concentrations to better ...

  13. Investigation of the Influence of Air Defense Artillery on Combat Pilot Suppression and Attrition Management Practices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-05-01

    with regulatory requirements. It has been given no primary distribution other than to DTIC and will be available only through DTIC or the National...should not be construed as an official Department of the Army position , policy, or decision, unless so designated by other authorized documents. 1992...Army Field Artillery School , 1979.) The issue of interest in this report is whether performance is degraded in air-to-ground missions that are disrupted

  14. The challenge of regional accents for aviation English language proficiency standards: a study of difficulties in understanding in air traffic control-pilot communications.

    PubMed

    Tiewtrakul, T; Fletcher, S R

    2010-02-01

    Although English has been the international aviation language since 1951, formal language proficiency testing for key aviation personnel has only recently been implemented by the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO). It aims to ensure minimum acceptable levels of English pronunciation and comprehension universally, but does not attend to particular regional dialect difficulties. However, evidence suggests that voice transmissions between air traffic controllers and pilots are a particular problem in international airspace and that pilots may not understand messages due to the influence of different accents when using English. This study explores the potential impact of 'non-native English' in pilot-air traffic control transmissions using a 'conversation analysis' technique to examine approach phase recordings from Bangkok International Airport. Results support that communication errors, defined by incidents of pilots not understanding, occur significantly more often when speakers are both non-native English, messages are more complex and when numerical information is involved. These results and their possible implications are discussed with reference to the development of ICAO's new language proficiency standards. Statement of Relevance: This study builds on previous work and literature, providing further evidence to show that the risks caused by language and linguistics in aviation must be explored more deeply. Findings are particularly contemporary and relevant today, indicating that recently implemented international standards would benefit from further exploratory research and development.

  15. Understanding interdisciplinary health care teams: using simulation design processes from the Air Carrier Advanced Qualification Program to identify and train critical teamwork skills.

    PubMed

    Hamman, William R; Beaudin-Seiler, Beth M; Beaubien, Jeffrey M

    2010-09-01

    In the report "Five Years After 'To Err is Human' ", it was noted that "the combination of complexity, professional fragmentation, and a tradition of individualism, enhanced by a well-entrenched hierarchical authority structure and diffuse accountability, forms a daunting barrier to creating the habits and beliefs of common purpose, teamwork, and individual accountability for successful interdependence that a safe culture requires". Training physicians, nurses, and other professionals to work in teams is a concept that has been promoted by many patient safety experts. However the model of teamwork in healthcare is diffusely defined, no clear performance metrics have been established, and the use of simulation to train teams has been suboptimal. This paper reports on the first three years of work performed in the Michigan Economic Development Corporation (MEDC) Tri-Corridor life science grant to apply concepts and processes of simulation design that were developed in the air carrier industry to understand and train healthcare teams. This work has been monitored by the American Academy for the Advancement of Science (AAA) and is based on concepts designed in the Advanced Qualification Program (AQP) from the air carrier industry, which trains and assesses teamwork skills in the same manner as technical skills. This grant has formed the foundation for the Center of Excellence for Simulation Education and Research (CESR).

  16. The Wave of the Present - Remotely-Piloted Aircraft in Air Force Culture

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    feelings of apprehension bringing to mind the old phrase, ―You can‘t teach an old dog new tricks.‖ Barry Posen furthers, ―Because doctrinal innovation...the members of a given culture so that the proposed solution is not simply brushed aside. Rosen wrote, ―Change will come about through the actions...doing business, it‘s been like pulling teeth .‖ 3 Though senior Air Force leaders were already ramping up RPA operations in theater, this comment

  17. 77 FR 34784 - Removal of Six Month Line Check Requirement for Pilots Over Age 60; Technical Amendment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-12

    ... Over Age 60; Technical Amendment AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration, DOT. ] ACTION: Final rule... 60 years of age that applied to air carriers engaged in part 121 operations. This technical amendment... December 13, 2007. This legislation raised the upper age limit for pilots in part 121 from age 60 to age...

  18. Air pollution, cognitive deficits and brain abnormalities: a pilot study with children and dogs.

    PubMed

    Calderón-Garcidueñas, Lilian; Mora-Tiscareño, Antonieta; Ontiveros, Esperanza; Gómez-Garza, Gilberto; Barragán-Mejía, Gerardo; Broadway, James; Chapman, Susan; Valencia-Salazar, Gildardo; Jewells, Valerie; Maronpot, Robert R; Henríquez-Roldán, Carlos; Pérez-Guillé, Beatriz; Torres-Jardón, Ricardo; Herrit, Lou; Brooks, Diane; Osnaya-Brizuela, Norma; Monroy, Maria E; González-Maciel, Angelica; Reynoso-Robles, Rafael; Villarreal-Calderon, Rafael; Solt, Anna C; Engle, Randall W

    2008-11-01

    Exposure to air pollution is associated with neuroinflammation in healthy children and dogs in Mexico City. Comparative studies were carried out in healthy children and young dogs similarly exposed to ambient pollution in Mexico City. Children from Mexico City (n: 55) and a low polluted city (n:18) underwent psychometric testing and brain magnetic resonance imaging MRI. Seven healthy young dogs with similar exposure to Mexico City air pollution had brain MRI, measurement of mRNA abundance of two inflammatory genes cyclooxygenase-2, and interleukin 1 beta in target brain areas, and histopathological evaluation of brain tissue. Children with no known risk factors for neurological or cognitive disorders residing in a polluted urban environment exhibited significant deficits in a combination of fluid and crystallized cognition tasks. Fifty-six percent of Mexico City children tested showed prefrontal white matter hyperintense lesions and similar lesions were observed in dogs (57%). Exposed dogs had frontal lesions with vascular subcortical pathology associated with neuroinflammation, enlarged Virchow-Robin spaces, gliosis, and ultrafine particulate matter deposition. Based on the MRI findings, the prefrontal cortex was a target anatomical region in Mexico City children and its damage could have contributed to their cognitive dysfunction. The present work presents a groundbreaking, interdisciplinary methodology for addressing relationships between environmental pollution, structural brain alterations by MRI, and cognitive deficits/delays in healthy children.

  19. Air-lift bioreactors for algal growth on flue gas: Mathematical modeling and pilot-plant studies

    SciTech Connect

    Vunjak-Novakovic, G.; Kim, Y.; Wu, X.X.; Berzin, I.; Merchuk, J.C.

    2005-08-03

    Air-lift reactors (ALRs) have great potential for industrial bioprocesses, because of the low level and homogeneous distribution of hydrodynamic shear. One growing field of application is the flue-gas treatment using algae for the absorption of CO{sub 2}, In this paper, we discuss the requirements for photosynthetic biomass growth in an ALR. The effects of the operating variables are analyzed using a mathematical model that accounts for the effects of ALR geometry, fluid flow, and illumination on the biomass growth. On the basis of the ALR principles and the specific requirements of photosynthetic processes, we developed a 'triangular' ALR configuration that is particularly suitable for algal growth. We describe the design and operation of this novel bioreactor and present the first series of experimental data obtained for two different algal species in a pilot-scale unit supplied with flue gases from a small power plant. The measured removal efficiency of CO{sub 2} was significant (82.3 12.5% on sunny days and 50.1 6.5% on cloudy days) and consistent with the increase in the algal biomass.

  20. Air

    MedlinePlus

    ... do to protect yourself from dirty air . Indoor air pollution and outdoor air pollution Air can be polluted indoors and it can ... this chart to see what things cause indoor air pollution and what things cause outdoor air pollution! Indoor ...

  1. Traffic-related air pollution. A pilot exposure assessment in Beirut, Lebanon.

    PubMed

    Borgie, Mireille; Garat, Anne; Cazier, Fabrice; Delbende, Agnes; Allorge, Delphine; Ledoux, Frederic; Courcot, Dominique; Shirali, Pirouz; Dagher, Zeina

    2014-02-01

    Traffic-related volatile organic compounds (VOCs) pollution has frequently been demonstrated to be a serious problem in the developing countries. Benzene and 1,3-butadiene (BD) have been classified as a human carcinogen based on evidence for an increased genotoxic and epigenotoxic effects in both occupational exposure assessment and in vivo/in vitro studies. We have undertaken a biomonitoring of 25 traffic policemen and 23 office policemen in Beirut, through personal air monitoring, assessed by diffusive samplers, as well as through the use of biomarkers of exposure to benzene and BD. Personal benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX) exposure were quantified by GC-MS/MS, urinary trans, trans-muconic acid (t,t-MA) by HPLC/UV, S-phenyl mercapturic acid (S-PMA), monohydroxy-butenyl mercapturic acid (MHBMA) and dihydroxybutyl mercapturic acid (DHBMA) by ultra-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC/ESI(-)-MS/MS) in MRM (Multiple Reaction Monitoring) mode. We found that individual exposure to benzene in the traffic policemen was higher than that measured in traffic policemen in Prague, in Bologna, in Ioannina and in Bangkok. t,t-MA levels could distinguish between office and traffic policemen. However, median MHBMA levels in traffic policemen were slightly elevated, though not significantly higher than in office policemen. Alternatively, DHBMA concentrations could significantly distinguish between office and traffic policemen and showed a better correlation with personal total BTEX exposure. DHMBA, measured in the post-shift urine samples, correlated with both pre-shift MHMBA and pre-shift DHMBA. Moreover, there was not a marked effect of smoking habits on DHBMA. Taken together, these findings suggested that DHBMA is more suitable than MHBMA as biomarker of exposure to BD in humans. Traffic policemen, who are exposed to benzene and BD at the roadside in central Beirut, are potentially at a higher risk for development of

  2. 48 CFR 47.403-1 - Availability and unavailability of U.S.-flag air carrier service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... the time in a travel status, including delay at origin and accelerated arrival at destination, by at... gateway airport in the United States would extend time in a travel status by at least 6 hours more than... the time in a travel status by at least 6 hours more than travel by a foreign-flag air...

  3. 48 CFR 47.403-1 - Availability and unavailability of U.S.-flag air carrier service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... the time in a travel status, including delay at origin and accelerated arrival at destination, by at... gateway airport in the United States would extend time in a travel status by at least 6 hours more than... the time in a travel status by at least 6 hours more than travel by a foreign-flag air...

  4. 75 FR 8178 - Application of Rugby Aviation LLC D/B/A Northwest Sky Ferry for Commuter Air Carrier Authority

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Office of the Secretary Application of Rugby Aviation LLC D/B/A Northwest Sky Ferry for Commuter Air... persons to show cause why it should not issue an order finding Rugby ] Aviation, LLC d/b/a Northwest...

  5. Ground-based time-guidance algorithm for control of airplanes in a time-metered air traffic control environment: A piloted simulation study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knox, C. E.; Imbert, N.

    1986-01-01

    The rapidly increasing costs of flight operations and the requirement for increased fuel conservation have made it necessary to develop more efficient ways to operate airplanes and to control air traffic for arrivals and departures to the terminal area. One concept of controlling arrival traffic through time metering has been jointly studied and evaluated by NASA and ONERA/CERT in piloted simulation tests. From time errors attained at checkpoints, airspeed and heading commands issued by air traffic control were computed by a time-guidance algorithm for the pilot to follow that would cause the airplane to cross a metering fix at a preassigned time. These tests resulted in the simulated airplane crossing a metering fix with a mean time error of 1.0 sec and a standard deviation of 16.7 sec when the time-metering algorithm was used. With mismodeled winds representing the unknown in wind-aloft forecasts and modeling form, the mean time error attained when crossing the metering fix was increased and the standard deviation remained approximately the same. The subject pilots reported that the airspeed and heading commands computed in the guidance concept were easy to follow and did not increase their work load above normal levels.

  6. Characterization of the bacterial and fungal microbiome in indoor dust and outdoor air samples: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Blake; Zhou, Yanjiao; Bautista, Eddy J; Urch, Bruce; Speck, Mary; Silverman, Frances; Muilenberg, Michael; Phipatanakul, Wanda; Weinstock, George; Sodergren, Erica; Gold, Diane R; Sordillo, Joanne E

    2016-06-15

    Environmental microbes have been associated with both protective and adverse health effects in children and adults. Epidemiological studies often rely on broad biomarkers of microbial exposure (i.e. endotoxin, 1 → 3-beta-d-glucan), but fail to identify the taxonomic composition of the microbial community. Our aim was to characterize the bacterial and fungal microbiome in different types of environmental samples collected in studies of human health effects. We determined the composition of microbial communities present in home, school and outdoor air samples by amplifying and sequencing regions of rRNA genes from bacteria (16S) and fungi (18S and ITS). Samples for this pilot study included indoor settled dust (from both a Boston area birth cohort study on Home Allergens and Asthma (HAA) (n = 12) and a study of school exposures and asthma symptoms (SICAS) (n = 1)), as well as fine and coarse concentrated outdoor ambient particulate (CAP) samples (n = 9). Sequencing of amplified 16S, 18S, and ITS regions was performed on the Roche-454 Life Sciences Titanium pyrosequencing platform. Indoor dust samples were dominated by Gram-positive bacteria (Firmicutes and Actinobacteria); the most abundant bacterial genera were those related to human flora (Streptococcus, Staphylococcus, Corynebacterium and Lactobacillus). Outdoor CAPs were dominated by Gram-negative Proteobacteria from water and soil sources, in particular the genera Acidovorax, and Brevundimonas (which were present at very low levels or entirely absent in indoor dust). Phylum-level fungal distributions identified by 18S or ITS regions showed very similar findings: a predominance of Ascomycota in indoor dust and Basidiomycota in outdoor CAPs. ITS sequencing of fungal genera in indoor dust showed significant proportions of Aureobasidium and Leptosphaerulina along with some contribution from Cryptococcus, Epicoccum, Aspergillus and the human commensal Malassezia. ITS sequencing detected more than 70 fungal genera

  7. Carrier Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Women with Hemophilia Inheritance of Hemophilia Definitions & Terminology Bleeding Symptoms Carrier Diagnosis When to Test for ... and Women with Hemophilia Inheritance of Hemophilia Definitions & Terminology Bleeding Symptoms Carrier Diagnosis When to Test for ...

  8. INDOOR, OUTDOOR, AND PERSONAL EXPOSURE MONITORING OF PARTICULATE AIR POLLUTION: THE BALTIMORE ELDERLY EPIDEMIOLOGY-EXPOSURE PILOT STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A 17-day pilot study investigating potential PM exposures of an elderly population was conducted near Baltimore, Maryland. Collection of residential indoor, residential outdoor, and ambient monitoring data associated with the subjects living at a common retirement facility was...

  9. The influence of contact zone configuration on the flow structure in a dissolved air flotation pilot plant.

    PubMed

    Lundh, Måns; Jönsson, Lennart; Dahlquist, Jan

    2002-03-01

    The dissolved air flotation process is used in water and wastewater treatment. Among many parameters the fluid dynamics determine the capacity of the process. The contact zone is assumed to be important for the removal function, as it is believed to be the location for the aggregation of bubbles and flocs. This paper presents an experimental study on the flow structure in a contact zone of a DAF pilot tank and the influence of contact zone configuration. The flow structure in the contact zone was examined for different horizontal lengths of the zone and for different heights and inclinations of the shaft wall. The hydraulic surface loading was 11 m/h over the total tank surface area and the recycle rate was constant at 10% of the main flow. The examined hydraulic surface loading over the contact zone ranged from 40 to 98 m/h. Water velocities in the longitudinal, central section of the tank were measured with an acoustical Doppler velocimeter in a grid net for the different contact zone configurations, giving an insight into the flow structure. The result showed that the flow structure in the contact zone was characterised by a turbulent lower region and a plug-flow higher region. The hydraulic surface loading, a function of the length of the contact zone, seemingly determined the extension of the turbulent region. A higher hydraulic surface loading decreased the turbulent region while the lower loading increased it. A hydraulic surface loading of 65 m/h was suggested for design. It was not possible to determine the turbulent intensity quantitatively due to the measurement method. The height and inclination of the shaft wall did not seem to have a significant influence on the turbulent region. However, an increased height of the contact zone enhanced the higher, plug flow region and a recommended height of 0.81 m or higher for the recommended hydraulic surface loading was suggested when both mixing and plug-flow are desired. The separation zone was characterised by

  10. Disorienting effects of aircraft catapult launchings: III. Cockpit displays and piloting performance.

    PubMed

    Cohen, M M

    1977-09-01

    Accelerations closely approximating those encountered in catapult launchings of carrier-based aircraft were generated on the Naval Air Development Center's human centrifuge Dynamic Flight Simulator. Flight instruments, controls, and flight dynamics of an A-7 aircraft were provided to four experienced Naval Aviators, who exercised closed-loop control of a simulated climbout immediately after they were exposed to the accelerations. Four experimental conditions were employed for each aviator: 1) no operational flight instruments, 2) conventional flight instruments, 3) a single carrier takeoff director display operating concurrently. Measures of flight parameters, including indicated airspeed, angle of attack, rate of climb, altitude, pitch attitude, and pitch trim adjustment were monitored throughout the simulation. Subjective reactions and piloting performance were examined under each of the four conditions. Results indicate that the carrier takeoff director display significantly reduced pilot workload and enhanced performance during the climbout.

  11. Biodegradation of VOCs from printing press air by an on-site pilot plant bioscrubber and laboratory scale continuous yeast cultures.

    PubMed

    Granström, Tom; Lindberg, Pia; Nummela, Jyri; Jokela, Jouni; Leisola, Matti

    2002-01-01

    The volatile organic compound composition (VOCs) of printing press air was found to contain mostly ethanol, but also ethyl acetate, 1-propanol, 2-propanol, 1-methoxy-2-propanol and 3-ethoxy-1-propanol. A pilot plant bioscrubber inoculated with a mixed microbial population was constructed on-site. The bioscrubber was able to treat the polluted gas efficiently. It, however, suffered from strong wall growth and blockages in the column. The efficiencies of the pilot plant and a bioreactor is compared. The yeasts Candida guilliermondii and Saccharomyces cerevisiae known to tolerate ethanol were selected instead of mixed population to avoid the wall growth a nd blockages inthe bioreactor. The removal of the VOCs both individually and as a complex mixture was tested in a microcultivation system and in continuous chemostat cultures with and without cell recycling. The Candida yeast could use all the compounds as a carbon source while growth of S. cerevisiae was markedly slower on the methoxylated and ethoxylated propanols. Best total removal of the VOCs was 99% and achieved by C. guilliermondii. The only compound that was not totally removable in the chemostat experiment with C. guilliermondii was 1-methoxy-2-propanol. In laboratory scale the total and volumetric removal of VOCs by C. guilliermondii was more efficient compared to the pilot plant encouraging to scale up and applying the yeast bioreactor to real field conditions.

  12. Cost Benefit Analysis of Performing a Pilot Project for Hydrogen-Powered Ground Support Equipment at Lemoore Naval Air Station

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-01

    fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION from the NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL December 2006... Business and Public Policy iv THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK v COST BENEFIT ANALYSIS OF PERFORMING A PILOT...concern of the Hydrogen Fuel Initiative, as 55 percent of the oil consumed by the U.S. is imported, and

  13. Construction and economics of a pilot/full-scale biological trickling filter reactor for the removal of volatile organic compounds from polluted air.

    PubMed

    Deshusses, M A; Webster, T S

    2000-11-01

    The design and the construction of an actual 8.7-m3 pilot/full-scale biotrickling filter for waste air treatment is described and compared with a previous conceptual scale-up of a laboratory reactor. The reactor construction costs are detailed and show that about one-half of the total reactor costs ($97,000 out of $178,000) was for personnel and engineering time, whereas approximately 20% was for monitoring and control equipment. A detailed treatment cost analysis demonstrated that, for an empty bed contact time of 90 sec, the overall treatment costs (including capital charges) were as low as $8.7/1000 m3air in the case where a nonchlorinated volatile organic compound (VOC) was treated, and $14/1000 m3air for chlorinated compounds such as CH2Cl2. Comparison of these costs with conventional air pollution control techniques demonstrates excellent perspectives for more field applications of biotrickling filters. As the specific costs of building and operating biotrickling filter reactors decrease with increasing size of the reactor, the cost benefit of biotrickling filtration is expected to increase for full technical-scale bioreactors.

  14. F-18 chase craft with NASA test pilots Schneider and Fulton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Ed Schneider, (left), is the project pilot for the F-18 High Angle of Attack program at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. He has been a NASA research pilot at Dryden since 1983. In addition to his assignment with the F-18 High Angle of Attack program, Schneider is a project pilot for the F-15B aeronautical research aircraft, the NASA NB-52B launch aircraft, and the SR-71 'Blackbird' aircraft. He is a Fellow and was the 1994 President of the Society of Experimental Test Pilots. In 1996 he was awarded the NASA Exceptional Service Medal. Schneider is seen here with Fitzhugh L. Fulton Jr., (right), who was a civilian research pilot at Dryden. from August 1, 1966, until July 3, 1986, following 23 years of service as a pilot in the U.S. Air Force. Fulton was the project pilot on all early tests of the 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA) used to air launch the Space Shuttle prototype Enterprise in the Approach and Landing Tests (ALT) at Dryden in l977. For his work in the ALT program, Fulton received NASA's Exceptional Service Medal. He also received the Exceptional Service Medal again in 1983 for flying the 747 SCA during the European tour of the Space Shuttle Enterprise. During his career at Dryden, Fulton was project pilot on NASA's NB-52B launch aircraft used to air launch a variety of piloted and unpiloted research aircraft, including the X-15s and lifting bodies. He flew the XB-70 prototype supersonic bomber on both NASA-USAF tests and NASA research flights during the late 1960s, attaining speeds exceeding Mach 3. He was also a project pilot on the YF-12A and YF-12C research program from April 14, 1969, until September 25, 1978. The F/A-18 Hornet seen behind them is used primarily as a safety chase and support aircraft at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif. As support aircraft, the F-18's are used for safety chase, pilot proficiency and aerial photography. As a safety chase aircraft, F-18's, flown by research pilots

  15. Synthesized voice approach callouts for air transport operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, C. A.

    1980-01-01

    A flight simulation experiment was performed to determine the effectiveness of synthesized voice approach callouts for air transport operations. Flight deck data was first collected on scheduled air carrier operations to describe existing pilot-not-flying callout procedures in the flight context and to document the types and amounts of other auditory cockpit information during different types of air carrier operations. A flight simulation scenario for a wide-body jet transport airline training simulator was developed in collaboration with a major U.S. air carrier and flown by three-man crews of qualified line pilots as part of their normally scheduled recurrent training. Each crew flew half their approaches using the experimental synthesized voice approach callout system (SYNCALL) and the other half using the company pilot-not-flying approach callout procedures (PNF). Airspeed and sink rate performance was better with the SYNCALL system than with the PNF system for non-precision approaches. For the one-engine approach, for which SYNCALL made inappropriate deviation callouts, airspeed performance was worse with SYNCALL than with PNF. Reliability of normal altitude approach callouts was comparable for PNF on the line and in the simulator and for SYNCALL in the simulator.

  16. 78 FR 26106 - Pilot Program on NAFTA Trucking Provisions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration Pilot Program on NAFTA Trucking Provisions AGENCY: Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA). ACTION: Notice; correction. SUMMARY: The...

  17. Integrating causal reasoning at different levels of abstraction. [in problem-solving system functioning as pilot assistant in commercial air transport emergencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudlicka, Eva; Corker, Kevin

    1988-01-01

    In this paper, a problem-solving system which uses a multilevel causal model of its domain is described. The system functions in the role of a pilot's assistant in the domain of commercial air transport emergencies. The model represents causal relationships among the aircraft subsystems, the effectors (engines, control surfaces), the forces that act on an aircraft in flight (thrust, lift), and the aircraft's flight profile (speed, altitude, etc.). The causal relationships are represented at three levels of abstraction: Boolean, qualitative, and quantitative, and reasoning about causes and effects can take place at each of these levels. Since processing at each level has different characteristics with respect to speed, the type of data required, and the specificity of the results, the problem-solving system can adapt to a wide variety of situations. The system is currently being implemented in the KEE(TM) development environment on a Symbolics Lisp machine.

  18. Air intake shaft performance tests (Shaft 5): In situ data report (May 1988--July 1995). Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Thermal/Structural Interactions Program

    SciTech Connect

    Munson, D.E.; Hoag, D.L.; Ball, J.R.

    1995-07-01

    Data are presented from the Air Intake Shaft Test, an in situ test fielded at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The construction of this shaft, well after the initial three access shafts, presented an unusual opportunity to obtain valuable detailed data on the mechanical response of a shaft for application to seal design. These data include selected fielding information, test configuration, instrumentation activities, and comprehensive results from a large number of gages. Construction of the test began in December 1987; gage data in this report cover the period from May 1988 through July 1995, with the bulk of the data obtained after obtaining access in November, 1989 and from the heavily instrumented period after remote gage installation between May, 1990, and October, 1991.

  19. 14 CFR 271.5 - Carrier revenues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Carrier revenues. 271.5 Section 271.5 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS) ECONOMIC REGULATIONS GUIDELINES FOR SUBSIDIZING AIR CARRIERS PROVIDING ESSENTIAL AIR TRANSPORTATION § 271.5...

  20. 14 CFR 271.4 - Carrier costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Carrier costs. 271.4 Section 271.4 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS) ECONOMIC REGULATIONS GUIDELINES FOR SUBSIDIZING AIR CARRIERS PROVIDING ESSENTIAL AIR TRANSPORTATION § 271.4...

  1. Influence of diet and physical exercise on plasma lipid concentrations in an homogeneous sample of young Spanish Air Force pilots.

    PubMed

    Moreno Vazquez, J M; Garcia Alcon, J L; Campillo Alvarez, J E

    1994-01-01

    This study evaluates the influence of diet and physical exercise on plasma lipid concentrations--total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG), high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C), and the TC:HDL-C ratio, in a homogeneous (age, sex and anxiety levels) group of young pilots divided into the following groups: A. uncontrolled diet and exercise programme; B. controlled diet and uncontrolled exercise programme; C. controlled diet and exercise programme (n = 90). The dietary intake was a typical Mediterranean diet, which was supervised by the Flight Surgeon. The exercise was based on a physical training programme for pilots, directed by the Physical Training Officer. The State-Trait Anxiety Inventory test was performed to evaluate the anxiety levels. This test was supervised by a psychologist. The results showed a marked difference in all the lipid parameters studied between groups with an ad libitum diet versus groups with a controlled diet, this difference being demonstrated by TC and TG concentrations lower in the group with a controlled diet, than in the group with an ad libitum diet. A difference in HDL-C concentrations and TC:HDL-C ratio was found between groups with regular physical training (high HDL-C concentration and low TC:HDL-C ratio) versus groups with unlimited exercise (low HDL-C concentrations and high TC:HDL-C ratio). No differences in the state and trait of anxiety were found among any of the groups. Nevertheless, all the pilots showed a considerable increase in their anxiety state over their own anxiety trait.

  2. Ab Initio: And a New Era of Airline Pilot Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gesell, Laurence E.

    1995-01-01

    Expansion of air transportation and decreasing numbers seeking pilot training point to a shortage of qualified pilots. Ab initio training, in which candidates with no flight time are trained to air transport proficiency, could resolve the problem. (SK)

  3. Automated Pilot Advisory System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parks, J. L., Jr.; Haidt, J. G.

    1981-01-01

    An Automated Pilot Advisory System (APAS) was developed and operationally tested to demonstrate the concept that low cost automated systems can provide air traffic and aviation weather advisory information at high density uncontrolled airports. The system was designed to enhance the see and be seen rule of flight, and pilots who used the system preferred it over the self announcement system presently used at uncontrolled airports.

  4. A Pilot Study to Understand the Variation in Indoor Air Quality in Different Economic Zones of Delhi University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garg, Abhinav; Ghosh, Chirashree

    Today, one of the most grave environmental health problems being faced by the urban population is the poor air quality one breathes in. To testify the above statement, the recent survey report, World health statistics (WHO, 2012) reflects the fact that childhood mortality ratio from acute respiratory infection is one of the top leading causes of death in developing countries like India. Urban areas have a complex social stratification which ultimately results in forming different urban economic zones. This research attempts to understand the Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) by taking into consideration different lifestyle of occupants inhabiting these economic zones. The Study tries to evaluate the outdoor and indoor air quality by understanding the variation of selected pollutants (SPM, SOx, NOx) for the duration of four months - from October, 2012-January, 2013. For this, three economic zones (EZ) of Delhi University’s North Campus, were selected - Urban Slum (EZ I), Clerical (EZ II) and Faculty residence (EZ III). The statistical study indicates that Urban Slum (EZ I) was the most polluted site reporting maximum concentration of outdoor pollutants, whereas no significant difference in pollution load was observed in EZ II and EZ III. Further, the indoor air quality was evaluated by quantifying the indoor and outdoor pollution concentration ratios that shows EZ III have most inferior indoor air quality, followed by EZ I and EZ II. Moreover, it was also observed that ratio (phenomenon of infiltration) was dominant at the EZ II but was low for the EZ I and EZ III. With the evidence of high Indoor air pollution, the risk of pulmonary diseases and respiratory infections also increases, calling for an urgent requisite for making reforms to improve IAQ. Key words: Urban Area, Slum, IAQ, SOx, NOx, SPM

  5. Impact of emissions from natural gas production facilities on ambient air quality in the Barnett Shale area: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Zielinska, Barbara; Campbell, Dave; Samburova, Vera

    2014-12-01

    Rapid and extensive development of shale gas resources in the Barnett Shale region of Texas in recent years has created concerns about potential environmental impacts on water and air quality. The purpose of this study was to provide a better understanding of the potential contributions of emissions from gas production operations to population exposure to air toxics in the Barnett Shale region. This goal was approached using a combination of chemical characterization of the volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from active wells, saturation monitoring for gaseous and particulate pollutants in a residential community located near active gas/oil extraction and processing facilities, source apportionment of VOCs measured in the community using the Chemical Mass Balance (CMB) receptor model, and direct measurements of the pollutant gradient downwind of a gas well with high VOC emissions. Overall, the study results indicate that air quality impacts due to individual gas wells and compressor stations are not likely to be discernible beyond a distance of approximately 100 m in the downwind direction. However, source apportionment results indicate a significant contribution to regional VOCs from gas production sources, particularly for lower-molecular-weight alkanes (< C6). Although measured ambient VOC concentrations were well below health-based safe exposure levels, the existence of urban-level mean concentrations of benzene and other mobile source air toxics combined with soot to total carbon ratios that were high for an area with little residential or commercial development may be indicative of the impact of increased heavy-duty vehicle traffic related to gas production. Implications: Rapid and extensive development of shale gas resources in recent years has created concerns about potential environmental impacts on water and air quality. This study focused on directly measuring the ambient air pollutant levels occurring at residential properties located near

  6. The Measurement of Pilot Workload.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-01

    been labeled flights A, B, and C, respectively. Each flight was flown on the same geome- try from Millville to Atlantic City, New Jersey. Table 1 de...this point, the air traffic controller briefly described to the pilot the route he/she would be flying from Millville to Atlantic City. The pilot was...presented in appendix D-i. At the conclusion of these instructions, the experimenter informed the pilot that he/she could call Millville Flight Service

  7. A pilot study of measurement of the frequency of sounds emitted by high-speed dental air turbines.

    PubMed

    Altinöz, H C; Gökbudak, R; Bayraktar, A; Belli, S

    2001-09-01

    Since the development and use of the high-speed dental air turbine some 45 years ago, concern has been expressed in the literature about a possible cause and effect relationship between use of the drill and hearing loss in dentists. The hearing threshold in humans varies with the frequency of sound. It is well known that dentists experience gradual hearing loss during their working life. The aim of this study was to measure the frequency of sounds emitted by high-speed dental air turbines under different working conditions. Five high-speed dental air turbines were used (2 x Trend TC-80 BC W&H Dentalwerk, Austria, 2 x Black Pearl Eco Bien-air, Switzerland, 1 x Trend TC-80 BC W&H Dentalwerk, Austria. Each turbine was tested under 8 different working conditions: under free working conditions the turbines were tested without burs, with fissure burs, with flare burs, with round burs and with inverted cone burs; under operation they were tested with fissure burs by application to a 3 x 3 x 10 mm amalgam block surface, a 3 x 3 x 10 mm composite block surface, and the occlusal surface of an extracted molar tooth. Forty sound recordings were made in total using a computer with a microphone (Shure 16 LC) located 30 cm away from the samples, at 10-s intervals using a mixer. Frequency analysis was done by a Cool Edit Pro 1.2 computer program. Data were analyzed by multi-variate analysis with the S.P.S.S 9.05 software program. The average measurement was 6860 Hz. According to the statistical analysis there was no significant difference in the frequencies recorded under different working conditions. There was also no significant difference among the different high-speed dental air turbines at alpha = 0,05, P > alpha /2 levels. These results indicate that under any working conditions, high-speed dental air turbines emit frequencies which can cause hearing loss.

  8. Global pilot study of legacy and emerging persistent organic pollutants using sorbent-impregnated polyurethane foam disk passive air samplers.

    PubMed

    Genualdi, Susie; Lee, Sum Chi; Shoeib, Mahiba; Gawor, Anya; Ahrens, Lutz; Harner, Tom

    2010-07-15

    Sorbent-impregnated polyurethane foam (SIP) disk passive air samplers were deployed alongside polyurethane foam (PUF) disk samplers at 20 sites during the 2009 spring sampling period of the Global Atmospheric Passive Sampling (GAPS) Network. The SIP disk samplers consisted of PUF disks impregnated with finely ground XAD-4 resin. The addition of XAD-4 greatly improves the sorptive capacity of the PUF disk samplers for more volatile and polar chemicals, and allows for linear-phase sampling over several weeks for these compounds. The SIP and PUF disks were analyzed for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), neutral polyfluoroalkyl compounds (PFCs), and ionic PFCs. Correlations between sampler-derived air concentrations for PCBs in the PUF and SIP disks samplers were significant (p < 0.05). The SIP disks effectively captured 4-50% more of the low molecular weight PCBs than the PUF disks samplers, and the PUF disks also had limitations for time-weighted passive sampling of neutral PFCs in air. Theoretical uptake curves for PUF disks showed rapid equilibration occurring in just hours for 8:2 FTOH and in a few days for MeFOSE, while theoretical curves for SIP disks showed superior sampling profiles for the neutral PFCs. PFCs were measured on SIP disks at all sites with 8:2 FTOH being the dominant compound detected and urban centers (n = 3) having the highest total neutral PFC concentrations ranging from 51.7 to 248 pg/m(3). A positive correlation was found between the FTOHs and FOSAs/FOSEs (p < 0.001, Pearson correlation) indicating similar contamination sources. The SIP disk appears to be a promising passive air sampler for measuring both emerging and legacy POPs on a global scale. They can also be used as a complement to the PUF disk sampler for capturing broader classes of compounds, or as a replacement for PUF disks entirely, especially when longer than quarterly deployment periods are desired.

  9. The State of Ambient Air Quality in Two Ugandan Cities: A Pilot Cross-Sectional Spatial Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Kirenga, Bruce J.; Meng, Qingyu; van Gemert, Frederik; Aanyu-Tukamuhebwa, Hellen; Chavannes, Niels; Katamba, Achilles; Obai, Gerald; van der Molen, Thys; Schwander, Stephan; Mohsenin, Vahid

    2015-01-01

    Air pollution is one of the leading global public health risks but its magnitude in many developing countries’ cities is not known. We aimed to measure the concentration of particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter <2.5 µm (PM2.5), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and ozone (O3) pollutants in two Ugandan cities (Kampala and Jinja). PM2.5, O3, temperature and humidity were measured with real-time monitors, while NO2 and SO2 were measured with diffusion tubes. We found that the mean concentrations of the air pollutants PM2.5, NO2, SO2 and O3 were 132.1 μg/m3, 24.9 µg/m3, 3.7 µg/m3 and 11.4 μg/m3, respectively. The mean PM2.5 concentration is 5.3 times the World Health Organization (WHO) cut-off limits while the NO2, SO2 and O3 concentrations are below WHO cut-off limits. PM2.5 levels were higher in Kampala than in Jinja (138.6 μg/m3 vs. 99.3 μg/m3) and at industrial than residential sites (152.6 μg/m3 vs. 120.5 μg/m3) but residential sites with unpaved roads also had high PM2.5 concentrations (152.6 μg/m3). In conclusion, air pollutant concentrations in Kampala and Jinja in Uganda are dangerously high. Long-term studies are needed to characterize air pollution levels during all seasons, to assess related public health impacts, and explore mitigation approaches. PMID:26184273

  10. The State of Ambient Air Quality in Two Ugandan Cities: A Pilot Cross-Sectional Spatial Assessment.

    PubMed

    Kirenga, Bruce J; Meng, Qingyu; van Gemert, Frederik; Aanyu-Tukamuhebwa, Hellen; Chavannes, Niels; Katamba, Achilles; Obai, Gerald; van der Molen, Thys; Schwander, Stephan; Mohsenin, Vahid

    2015-07-15

    Air pollution is one of the leading global public health risks but its magnitude in many developing countries' cities is not known. We aimed to measure the concentration of particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter <2.5 µm (PM2.5), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and ozone (O3) pollutants in two Ugandan cities (Kampala and Jinja). PM2.5, O3, temperature and humidity were measured with real-time monitors, while NO2 and SO2 were measured with diffusion tubes. We found that the mean concentrations of the air pollutants PM2.5, NO2, SO2 and O3 were 132.1 μg/m3, 24.9 µg/m3, 3.7 µg/m3 and 11.4 μg/m3, respectively. The mean PM2.5 concentration is 5.3 times the World Health Organization (WHO) cut-off limits while the NO2, SO2 and O3 concentrations are below WHO cut-off limits. PM2.5 levels were higher in Kampala than in Jinja (138.6 μg/m3 vs. 99.3 μg/m3) and at industrial than residential sites (152.6 μg/m3 vs. 120.5 μg/m3) but residential sites with unpaved roads also had high PM2.5 concentrations (152.6 μg/m3). In conclusion, air pollutant concentrations in Kampala and Jinja in Uganda are dangerously high. Long-term studies are needed to characterize air pollution levels during all seasons, to assess related public health impacts, and explore mitigation approaches.

  11. Motivational Engineering for Pilot Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herzberg, Frederick I.; And Others

    The study was an investigation of student pilot motivation for, and toward, the Air Training Command's undergraduate pilot training (UPT) program. The motivation hygiene approach was used to identify the motivational factors operating in the UPT program systematically. This approach has been used extensively in industry and with success in a…

  12. Chemical Looping Autothermal Reforming at a 120 kW Pilot Rig

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bofhàr-Nordenkampf, Johannes; Pröll, Tobias; Kolbitsch, Philipp; Hofbauer, Hermann

    Chemical looping with selective oxygen transport allows two step combustion or autothermal reforming without mixing of fuel and air. The reactor system consists of two reactors, an air reactor and a fuel reactor with a suitable oxygen carrier that transports the necessary oxygen for operation. In the present study, a highly active nickel based oxygen carrier is tested in a novel dual circulating fluidized bed (DCFB) system at a scale of 120 kW fuel power. The mean particle size of the oxygen carrier is 120 μm and the pilot rig is fueled with natural gas. For the investigated oxygen carrier high CH4 conversion is achieved. Air/fuel ratio is varied at three different fuel reactor temperatures. For chemical looping reforming one can observe synthesis gas composition close to thermodynamic equilibrium. In spite of the fact that no additional steam has been added to the fuel besides the one present through steam fluidization of the loop seals, coke formation does not occur at global stoichiometric air/fuel ratios above 0.46.

  13. Assessing the use of the Air Quality Health Index by vulnerable populations in a ‘low-risk’ region: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Spurr, K; Pendergast, N; MacDonald, S

    2014-01-01

    Several studies have shown a relationship between exposure to outdoor air pollution and adverse health effects, and that people with specific chronic diseases appear to be particularly vulnerable. An important opportunity exists for respiratory therapists to inform at-risk clients, especially those with lung disease, about outdoor air pollution and its role in self-management. The Air Quality Health Index (AQHI), a national program led by Health Canada and Environment Canada, is intended to inform individuals about the level of health risk associated with air pollution in Canadian communities, and to provide a tool to manage those risks. The main purpose of the present study was to assess the use of the AQHI by vulnerable populations in a ‘low-risk’ (AQHI ≤3) region. The specific objectives were: to develop and evaluate an AQHI education strategy; to investigate whether awareness of the AQHI impacts self-management in vulnerable populations in low-risk regions; and to identify enabling factors and/or barriers concerning use of the AQHI by both health care professionals and their patients. A pilot study was conducted using a small convenience sample of clients/patients and educators at respiratory clinics across Nova Scotia. A short educational activity on the utility and application of the AQHI was incorporated into their regular disease management plans and surveys were administered pre- and posteducational intervention. Twenty-one clients from three respiratory clinics consented to participate in the study and received the AQHI education program. Using a Wilcoxon signed-rank test with paired data, five of six survey questions had statistically significant changes in response to pre- and posteducation. Some common themes that emerged from qualitative data collected included: limited access to the Internet; lack of its reporting in the media; confusion with other indexes; and relevancy of the AQHI in Nova Scotia, a ‘low-risk’ region. An AQHI educational

  14. Assessing the use of the Air Quality Health Index by vulnerable populations in a 'low-risk' region: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Spurr, K; Pendergast, N; MacDonald, S

    2014-01-01

    Several studies have shown a relationship between exposure to outdoor air pollution and adverse health effects, and that people with specific chronic diseases appear to be particularly vulnerable. An important opportunity exists for respiratory therapists to inform at-risk clients, especially those with lung disease, about outdoor air pollution and its role in self-management. The Air Quality Health Index (AQHI), a national program led by Health Canada and Environment Canada, is intended to inform individuals about the level of health risk associated with air pollution in Canadian communities, and to provide a tool to manage those risks. The main purpose of the present study was to assess the use of the AQHI by vulnerable populations in a 'low-risk' (AQHI ≤3) region. The specific objectives were: to develop and evaluate an AQHI education strategy; to investigate whether awareness of the AQHI impacts self-management in vulnerable populations in low-risk regions; and to identify enabling factors and/or barriers concerning use of the AQHI by both health care professionals and their patients. A pilot study was conducted using a small convenience sample of clients/patients and educators at respiratory clinics across Nova Scotia. A short educational activity on the utility and application of the AQHI was incorporated into their regular disease management plans and surveys were administered pre- and posteducational intervention. Twenty-one clients from three respiratory clinics consented to participate in the study and received the AQHI education program. Using a Wilcoxon signed-rank test with paired data, five of six survey questions had statistically significant changes in response to pre- and posteducation. Some common themes that emerged from qualitative data collected included: limited access to the Internet; lack of its reporting in the media; confusion with other indexes; and relevancy of the AQHI in Nova Scotia, a 'low-risk' region. An AQHI educational program

  15. Effects of a cyclooxygenase-2 preferential inhibitor in young healthy dogs exposed to air pollution: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Calderón-Garcidueñas, Lilian; Mora-Tiscareño, Antonieta; Gómez-Garza, Gilberto; Carrasco-Portugal, Miriam Del C; Pérez-Guillé, Beatriz; Flores-Murrieta, Francisco J; Pérez-Guillé, Gabriela; Osnaya, Norma; Juárez-Olguín, Hugo; Monroy, Maria E; Monroy, Silvia; González-Maciel, Angelica; Reynoso-Robles, Rafael; Villarreal-Calderon, Rafael; Patel, Sarjubhai A; Kumarathasan, Prem; Vincent, Renaud; Henríquez-Roldán, Carlos; Torres-Jardón, Ricardo; Maronpot, Robert R

    2009-08-01

    Residency in cities with high air pollution is associated with neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration in healthy children, young adults, and dogs. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs may offer neuroprotection. The authors measured the plasma concentrations of 3-nitrotyrosine and the cerebro-spinal-fluid concentrations of prostaglandin E2 metabolite and the oligomeric form of amyloid derived diffusible ligand; measured the mRNA expression of cyclooxygenase-2, interleukin 1beta, CD14, and Aquaporin-4 in target brain areas; and evaluated brain MRI, cognition, and neuropathology in 8 dogs treated with a preferential cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor (Nimesulide) versus 7 untreated litter-matched Mexico City dogs. Nimesulide significantly decreased nitrotyrosine in plasma (p < .0001), frontal gray IL1beta (p = .03), and heart IL1beta (p = .02). No effect was seen in mRNA COX2, amyloid, and PGE2 in CSF or the MRI white matter lesions. All exposed dogs exhibited olfactory bulb and frontal accumulation of Abeta(42) in neurons and blood vessels and frontal vascular subcortical pathology. White matter hyperintense MRI frontal lesions were seen in 4/6 non-treated and 6/8 treated dogs. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs may offer limited neuroprotection in the setting of severe air pollution exposures. The search for potentially beneficial drugs useful to ameliorate the brain effects of pollution represents an enormous clinical challenge.

  16. Thermal treatment of stabilized air pollution control residues in a waste incinerator pilot plant. Part 1: Fate of elements and dioxins.

    PubMed

    Bergfeldt, Brita; Jay, Klaus; Seifert, Helmuth; Vehlow, Jürgen; Christensen, Thomas H; Baun, Dorthe L; Mogensen, Erhardt P B

    2004-02-01

    Air pollution control (APC) residues from municipal solid waste incinerator plants that are treated by means of the Ferrox process can be more safely disposed of due to reduction of soluble salts and stabilization of heavy metals in an iron oxide matrix. Further stabilization can be obtained by thermal treatment inside a combustion chamber of a municipal solid waste incinerator. The influence of the Ferrox products on the combustion process, the quality of the residues, and the partitioning of heavy metals between the various solids and the gas have been investigated in the Karlsruhe TAM-ARA pilot plant for waste incineration. During the experiments only few parameters were influenced. An increase in the SO2 concentration in the raw gas and slightly lower temperatures in the fuel bed could be observed compared with reference tests. Higher contents of Fe and volatile heavy metals such as Zn, Cd, Pb and partly Hg in the Ferrox products lead to increased concentration of these elements in the solid residues of the co-feeding tests. Neither the burnout nor the PCDD/F formation was altered by the addition of the Ferrox products. Co-feeding of treated APC residues seems to be a feasible approach for obtaining a single solid residue from waste incineration.

  17. Pilot study of sampling and analysis for polynuclear aromatic compounds in indoor air. Report for 1 February-30 September 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, J.C.; Mack, G.A.; Koetz, J.R.; Petersen, B.A.

    1986-12-01

    The report presents the results of a nine-home indoor-air study that the authors performed in Columbus, Ohio in the winter of 1984. The main objective of the study was the field evaluation of sampling and analysis methodology. However, several additional results of the study are interesting and useful, including the finding of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) at levels from 0.000 to 143 ng/cu m in residences, strong correlations of these levels with smoking by occupants, little influence of fireplace use on the PAH levels, the identification of quinoline as a potential marker for cigarette smoking, and measurement of 2- and 3-nitrofluoranthene, which are potent mutagens, at significant levels from 0.000 to 0.185 ng/cu m, also correlated with smoking.

  18. INDOOR AIR QUALITY AND THERMAL COMFORT—RESULTS OF A PILOT STUDY IN ELDERLY CARE CENTERS IN PORTUGAL

    PubMed Central

    Mendes, Ana; Pereira, Cristiana; Mendes, Diana; Aguiar, Lívia; Neves, Paula; Silva, Susana; Batterman, Stuart; Teixeira, João Paulo

    2014-01-01

    The age of the European population is rising and percentage of adults aged 65 years and older is projected to increase from 16% in 2000 to 20% in 2020. It has been estimated that older subjects spend approximately 19 to 20 h/d indoors. Older individuals may be particularly at risk for detrimental effects from pollutants, even at low concentrations, due to reduced immunological defenses and multiple underlying chronic diseases. Six Porto, Portugal, urban area elderly care centers (ECC), housing a total of 425 older persons, were studied to assess indoor air quality (IAQ) and thermal comfort (TC) in two seasons. This study presents the IAQ and TC results in 36 rooms and constitutes part of a wider and ongoing study. The study areas were all naturally ventilated, and indoor concentrations in winter were within Portuguese reference values. However, 42% of the participants were dissatisfied with indoor thermal conditions, rating it “slightly cool.” In summer, the index rate of dissatisfied individuals was lower (8%). Significant differences were found between seasons in predicted percent of dissatisfied people (PPD) and predicted mean vote (PMV) indices. Fungal concentrations frequently exceeded reference levels (>500 colony-forming units [CFU]/m3). In addition, other pollutants occasionally exceeded reference levels. To our knowledge, this is the first study in Portugal to assess effects of indoor air contaminants on the health status and quality of life in older subjects living in ECC. Although IAQ and TC parameters were mostly within reference values, the results suggest a need to improve the balance between IAQ and TC in ECC, a critical environment housing a susceptible population. PMID:23514075

  19. 14 CFR 93.25 - Initial assignment of Arrival Authorizations to U.S. and Canadian air carriers for domestic and U...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Initial assignment of Arrival...) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES SPECIAL AIR TRAFFIC RULES Congestion and Delay Reduction at... this rule, Arrival Authorizations for each scheduled arrival that it published for either domestic or...

  20. Demonstration/Validation of Hazardous Air Pollutant-Free Adhesive Replacement for Federal Specification MMM-A-121 on the Stryker Infantry Carrier Vehicle

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    Inc. Patrice E. Dodson U.S. Army Tank-automotive Armaments Command, Anniston Army Depot John J. La Scala Weapons and Materials Research...Inc., 1003 Old Philadelphia Road, Aberdeen, MD 21001 † U.S. Army Tank-automotive Armaments Command, Anniston Army Depot, 7 Frankford Ave., Anniston ... Anniston Army Depot, AL, on a Stryker infantry carrier vehicle driver’s access hatch seal with successful results. In particular, technicians found

  1. The Pilot Staffing Conundrum: A Delphi Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-01

    Project, AFIT/ GMO /LAL/98J-2. School of Logistics and Acquisition Management, Air Force Institute of Technology (AU), Wright Patterson AFB, OH, June...Kafer, John H. Relationship of Airline Pilot Demand and Air Force Pilot Retention. Graduate Research Project, AFIT/ GMO /LAL/98J-11. School of Logistics

  2. Personnel emergency carrier vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owens, Lester J. (Inventor); Fedor, Otto H. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A personnel emergency carrier vehicle is disclosed which includes a vehicle frame supported on steerable front wheels and driven rear wheels. A supply of breathing air is connected to quick connect face mask coupling and umbilical cord couplings for supplying breathing air to an injured worker or attendant either with or without a self-contained atmospheric protection suit for protection against hazardous gases at an accident site. A non-sparking hydraulic motion is utilized to drive the vehicle and suitable direction and throttling controls are provided for controlling the delivery of a hydraulic driving fluid from a pressurized hydraulic fluid accumulator. A steering axis is steerable through a handle to steer the front wheels through a linkage assembly.

  3. Hydrogen carriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Teng; Pachfule, Pradip; Wu, Hui; Xu, Qiang; Chen, Ping

    2016-12-01

    Hydrogen has the potential to be a major energy vector in a renewable and sustainable future energy mix. The efficient production, storage and delivery of hydrogen are key technical issues that require improvement before its potential can be realized. In this Review, we focus on recent advances in materials development for on-board hydrogen storage. We highlight the strategic design and optimization of hydrides of light-weight elements (for example, boron, nitrogen and carbon) and physisorbents (for example, metal-organic and covalent organic frameworks). Furthermore, hydrogen carriers (for example, NH3, CH3OH-H2O and cycloalkanes) for large-scale distribution and for on-site hydrogen generation are discussed with an emphasis on dehydrogenation catalysts.

  4. Germicidal ultraviolet irradiation in air conditioning systems: effect on office worker health and wellbeing: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Menzies, D.; Pasztor, J.; Rand, T.; Bourbeau, J.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The indoor environment of modern office buildings represents a new ecosystem that has been created totally by humans. Bacteria and fungi may contaminate this indoor environment, including the ventilation systems themselves, which in turn may result in adverse health effects. The objectives of this study were to test whether installation and operation of germicidal ultraviolet (GUV) lights in central ventilation systems would be feasible, without adverse effects, undetected by building occupants, and effective in eliminating microbial contamination. METHODS: GUV lights were installed in the ventilation systems serving three floors of an office building, and were turned on and off during a total of four alternating 3 week blocks. Workers reported their environmental satisfaction, symptoms, as well as sickness absence, without knowledge of whether GUV lights were on or off. The indoor environment was measured in detail including airborne and surface bacteria and fungi. RESULTS: Airborne bacteria and fungi were not significantly different whether GUV lights were on or off, but were virtually eliminated from the surfaces of the ventilation system after 3 weeks of operation of GUV light. Of the other environmental variables measured, only total airborne particulates were significantly different under the two experimental conditions--higher with GUV lights on than off. Of 113 eligible workers, 104 (87%) participated; their environmental satisfaction ratings were not different whether GUV lights were on or off. Headache, difficulty concentrating, and eye irritation occurred less often with GUV lights on whereas skin rash or irritation was more common. Overall, the average number of work related symptoms reported was 1.1 with GUV lights off compared with 0.9 with GUV lights on. CONCLUSION: Installation and operation of GUV lights in central heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems of office buildings is feasible, cannot be detected by workers, and does

  5. Validation of a proposed pilot-trainee selection system.

    PubMed

    Koonce, J M

    1982-12-01

    The use of an Aircrew Psychomotor Test Device and the Air Force Officer Qualifying Test have been proposed for the selection of U.S. Air Force pilot training candidates. Random samples of the U.S. Air Force Academy's class of 1978 and the class of 1979 were given the proposed tests and followed through undergraduate pilot training. The results cast serious doubt as to the utility of these tests in selecting U.S. Air Force Academy cadets for pilot training.

  6. 14 CFR 91.5 - Pilot in command of aircraft requiring more than one required pilot.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pilot in command of aircraft requiring more than one required pilot. 91.5 Section 91.5 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES GENERAL OPERATING AND FLIGHT RULES General § 91.5 Pilot in command...

  7. Effect of Wind Over Deck Conditions on Aircraft Approach Speeds for Carrier Landings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-09-01

    the glideslope established by the carrier’s Fresnel lens , a pilot will perform a successful carrier landing. The NATOPS recommended approach speed...glideslope followed during the test, which is defined by the fresnel lens , establishes the aircraft’s sink rate. The minimum recovery head wind is...of a carrier landing, the pilot’s principle guidance shifts from the AOA indexer to the glideslope indicator i.e. the "ball" seen on the Fresnel Lens . The

  8. EPA's Response to the February 2014 Release of Radioactive Material from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP): EPA's WIPP Air Sampling Data from April 2014

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    In April 2014, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) environmental monitoring and assessment team members reviewed DOE's air sampling plan, visited DOE's air samplers and placed air samplers onsite near existing DOE samplers to corroborate results.

  9. X-15 Pilots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    The X-15 flight crew, left to right: Air Force Captain Joseph H. Engle, Air Force Major Robert A. Rushworth, NASA pilot John B. 'Jack' McKay, Air Force Major William J. 'Pete' Knight, NASA pilot Milton O. Thompson, and NASA pilot Bill Dana. First flown in 1959 from the NASA High Speed Flight Station (later renamed the Dryden Flight Research Center), the rocket-powered X-15 was developed to provide data on aerodynamics, structures, flight controls and the physiological aspects of high speed, high altitude flight. Three were built by North American Aviation for NASA and the U.S. Air Force. They made a total of 199 flights during a highly successful research program lasting almost ten years. The X-15's main rocket engine provided thrust for the first 80 to 120 seconds of a 10 to 11 minute flight; the aircraft then glided to a 200 mph landing. The X-15 reached altitudes of 354,200 feet (67.08 miles) and a speed of 4,520 mph (Mach 6.7).

  10. Flight test pilot evaluation of a delayed flap approach procedure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bull, J. S.; Edwards, F. G.; Foster, J. D.; Hegarty, D. M.; Drinkwater, F. J., III

    1977-01-01

    Using NASA's CV-990 aircraft, a delayed flap approach procedure was demonstrated to nine guest pilots from the air transport industry. Four demonstration flights and 37 approaches were conducted under VFR weather conditions. A limited pilot evaluation of the delayed flap procedure was obtained from pilot comments and from questionaires they completed. Pilot acceptability, pilot workload, and ATC compatibility were quantitatively rated. The delayed flap procedure was shown to be feasible, and suggestions for further development work were obtained.

  11. Alkaline sodium borohydride gel as a hydrogen source for PEMFC or an energy carrier for NaBH 4-air battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, B. H.; Li, Z. P.; Chen, L. L.

    In this preliminary study, we tried to use sodium polyacrylate as the super absorbent polymer to form alkaline NaBH 4 gel and explored its possibilities for borohydride hydrolysis and borohydride electro-oxidation. It was found that the absorption capacity of sodium polyacrylate decreased with increasing NaBH 4 concentration. The formed gel was rather stable in the sealed vessel but tended to slowly decompose in open air. Hydrogen generation from the gel was carried out using CoCl 2 catalyst precursor solutions. Hydrogen generation rate from the alkaline NaBH 4 gel was found to be higher and impurities in hydrogen were less than that from the alkaline NaBH 4 solution. The NaBH 4 gel also successfully powered a NaBH 4-air battery.

  12. 14 CFR 271.3 - Carrier subsidy need.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Carrier subsidy need. 271.3 Section 271.3 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS) ECONOMIC REGULATIONS GUIDELINES FOR SUBSIDIZING AIR CARRIERS PROVIDING ESSENTIAL AIR TRANSPORTATION § 271.3...

  13. Aircraft Disinsection: A Guide for Military and Civilian Air Carriers (Desinsectisation des aeronefs: Un guide a l’intention des responsables des transports aeriens civils et militaires)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-04-01

    D.K. Hayes, K. Stalker, and R. Pal, 1978. A comparison of Freon- and water -based insecticidal aerosols for air- craft disinsection. Bull. WHO 56(1):129...Chemical Pest Management Decision-making 32 12.2 Scheduling Insecticide Treatments 33 vi 12.3 Insecticide Selection 34 12.4 Equipment and Materials...walk to Aircraft Connections 42 12.7 Use of Insecticidal Baits 42 12.8 Fumigation 42 12.8.1 Fumigation with Methyl Bromide 42 12.8.2 Fumigation

  14. Use of Borehole-Radar Methods to Monitor a Steam-Enhanced Remediation Pilot Study at a Quarry at the Former Loring Air Force Base, Maine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gregoire, Colette; Joesten, Peter K.; Lane, Jr., John W.

    2007-01-01

    Single-hole radar reflection and crosshole radar tomography surveys were used in conjunction with conventional borehole-geophysical methods to evaluate the effectiveness of borehole-radar methods for monitoring the movement of steam and heat through fractured bedrock. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), conducted surveys in an abandoned limestone quarry at the former Loring Air Force Base during a field-scale, steam-enhanced remediation (SER) pilot project conducted by the USEPA, the U.S. Air Force, and the Maine Department of Environmental Protection to study the viability of SER to remediate non-aqueous phase liquid contamination in fractured bedrock. Numerical modeling and field experiments indicate that borehole-radar methods have the potential to monitor the presence of steam and to measure large temperature changes in the limestone matrix during SER operations. Based on modeling results, the replacement of water by steam in fractures should produce a decrease in radar reflectivity (amplitude of the reflected wave) by a factor of 10 and a change in reflection polarity. In addition, heating the limestone matrix should increase the bulk electrical conductivity and decrease the bulk dielectric permittivity. These changes result in an increase in radar attenuation and an increase in radar-wave propagation velocity, respectively. Single-hole radar reflection and crosshole radar tomography data were collected in two boreholes using 100-megahertz antennas before the start of steam injection, about 10 days after the steam injection began, and 2 months later, near the end of the injection. Fluid temperature logs show that the temperature of the fluid in the boreholes increased by 10?C (degrees Celsius) in one borehole and 40?C in the other; maximum temperatures were measured near the bottom of the boreholes. The results of the numerical modeling were used to interpret the borehole-radar data. Analyses of the

  15. Specialized common carriers: Long distance alternatives for military installations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klingler, S. L.

    1984-03-01

    Specialized Common Carriers, communications carriers which came into existence offering private line microwave service, are now significant competitors in the long distance telecommunications industry. This thesis provides military installation telecommunications managers with a basic knowledge of how Specialized Common Carriers entered the telecommunications market, what services Specialized Common Carriers offer, and how to obtain these services for a military installation. It includes a case study evaluation of the potential use of long distance services of two of these competing common carriers at Naval Air Station Moffett Field, California. A computer program used to calculate the costs of using these two alternative long distance carriers is included as part of the case study.

  16. Air Traffic Control Improvement Using Prioritized CSMA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Daryl C.

    2001-01-01

    Version 7 simulations of the industry-standard network simulation software "OPNET" are presented of two applications of the Aeronautical Telecommunications Network (ATN), Controller Pilot Data Link Communications (CPDLC) and Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast mode (ADS-B), over VHF Data Link mode 2 (VDL-2). Communication is modeled for air traffic between just three cities. All aircraft are assumed to have the same equipage. The simulation involves Air Traffic Control (ATC) ground stations and 105 aircraft taking off, flying realistic free-flight trajectories, and landing in a 24-hr period. All communication is modeled as unreliable. Collision-less, prioritized carrier sense multiple access (CSMA) is successfully tested. The statistics presented include latency, queue length, and packet loss. This research may show that a communications system simpler than the currently accepted standard envisioned may not only suffice, but also surpass performance of the standard at a lower cost of deployment.

  17. Progress in Carrier Phase Time Transfer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Progress in Carrier Phase Time Transfer Jim Ray U.S. Naval Observatory, Washington, DC 20392-5420 USA Felicitas Arias, Gérard Petit Bureau...Centre for Time Metrology, National Physical Laboratory, Teddington, UK Jan Johansson Swedish National Testing & Research Institute, Borås, Sweden...Published in GPS Solutions, Volume 4, number 4 (2001), pages 47-54. ABSTRACT The progress of the joint Pilot Project for time transfer, formed by the

  18. 14 CFR 61.94 - Student pilot seeking a sport pilot certificate or a recreational pilot certificate: Operations...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Student pilot seeking a sport pilot... flight rules of part 91 of this chapter for operations in Class B, C, and D airspace and air traffic... the solo flight is authorized, if applicable, within the 90-day period preceding the date of...

  19. An analysis of pilot error-related aircraft accidents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kowalsky, N. B.; Masters, R. L.; Stone, R. B.; Babcock, G. L.; Rypka, E. W.

    1974-01-01

    A multidisciplinary team approach to pilot error-related U.S. air carrier jet aircraft accident investigation records successfully reclaimed hidden human error information not shown in statistical studies. New analytic techniques were developed and applied to the data to discover and identify multiple elements of commonality and shared characteristics within this group of accidents. Three techniques of analysis were used: Critical element analysis, which demonstrated the importance of a subjective qualitative approach to raw accident data and surfaced information heretofore unavailable. Cluster analysis, which was an exploratory research tool that will lead to increased understanding and improved organization of facts, the discovery of new meaning in large data sets, and the generation of explanatory hypotheses. Pattern recognition, by which accidents can be categorized by pattern conformity after critical element identification by cluster analysis.

  20. Crewmen of the Gemini 7 spacecraft arrive aboard aircraft carrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Astronauts James A. Lovell Jr., (left), pilot, and Frank Borman, command pilot, are shown just after they arrived aboard the aircraft carrier U.S.S. Wasp. Greeting the astronauts are Donald Stullken (at Lovell's right), Recovery Operations Branch, Landing and Recovery Division; Dr. Howard Minners (standing beside Borman), Flight Medicine Branch, Cneter Medical Office, Manned Spacecraft Center, and Bennett James (standing behind Borman), a NASA Public Affairs Officer.

  1. Pilot performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicholls, Jennifer

    1988-01-01

    For many years, the emphasis has been placed on the performance of the aircraft, rather than on those who fly the aircraft. This is largely due to the relative safety of flying. Just in the last few years there have been several major accidents that have shown that flying is not quite as safe as it was thought to be. Sixty-five percent of these accidents are a result of pilot performance decrements, and so it is obvious that there is a need to reduce that figure. A study has been mandated to evaluate the performance of pilots. This includes workload, circadium rhythms, jet lag, and any other factors which might affect a pilot's performance in the cockpit. The purpose of this study is to find out when and why the decrement in a pilot's performance occur and how to remedy the situation.

  2. 14 CFR 121.503 - Flight time limitations: Pilots: airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... supplemental operations may schedule a pilot to fly in an airplane for eight hours or less during any 24 consecutive hours without a rest period during those eight hours. (b) Each pilot who has flown more than eight... consecutive days. (d) No pilot may fly as a crewmember in air transportation more than 100 hours during any...

  3. 14 CFR 61.133 - Commercial pilot privileges and limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... with a commercial pilot certificate with a lighter-than-air category rating may— (i) For an airship—(A) Give flight and ground training in an airship for the issuance of a certificate or rating; (B) Give an endorsement for a pilot certificate with an airship rating; (C) Endorse a student pilot certificate or...

  4. 14 CFR 61.133 - Commercial pilot privileges and limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... with a commercial pilot certificate with a lighter-than-air category rating may— (i) For an airship—(A) Give flight and ground training in an airship for the issuance of a certificate or rating; (B) Give an endorsement for a pilot certificate with an airship rating; (C) Endorse a student pilot certificate or...

  5. 14 CFR 61.133 - Commercial pilot privileges and limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... with a commercial pilot certificate with a lighter-than-air category rating may— (i) For an airship—(A) Give flight and ground training in an airship for the issuance of a certificate or rating; (B) Give an endorsement for a pilot certificate with an airship rating; (C) Endorse a student pilot certificate or...

  6. 14 CFR 61.133 - Commercial pilot privileges and limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... with a commercial pilot certificate with a lighter-than-air category rating may— (i) For an airship—(A) Give flight and ground training in an airship for the issuance of a certificate or rating; (B) Give an endorsement for a pilot certificate with an airship rating; (C) Endorse a student pilot certificate or...

  7. 14 CFR 61.133 - Commercial pilot privileges and limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... with a commercial pilot certificate with a lighter-than-air category rating may— (i) For an airship—(A) Give flight and ground training in an airship for the issuance of a certificate or rating; (B) Give an endorsement for a pilot certificate with an airship rating; (C) Endorse a student pilot certificate or...

  8. ICAAS piloted simulation results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landy, R. J.; Halski, P. J.; Meyer, R. P.

    1994-05-01

    This paper reports piloted simulation results from the Integrated Control and Avionics for Air Superiority (ICAAS) piloted simulation evaluations. The program was to develop, integrate, and demonstrate critical technologies which will enable United States Air Force tactical fighter 'blue' aircraft to achieve superiority and survive when outnumbered by as much as four to one by enemy aircraft during air combat engagements. Primary emphasis was placed on beyond visual range (BVR) combat with provisions for effective transition to close-in combat. The ICAAS system was developed and tested in two stages. The first stage, called low risk ICAAS, was defined as employing aircraft and avionics technology with an initial operational date no later than 1995. The second stage, called medium risk ICAAS, was defined as employing aircraft and avionics technology with an initial operational date no later than 1998. Descriptions of the low risk and medium risk simulation configurations are given. Normalized (unclassified) results from both the low risk and medium risk ICAAS simulations are discussed. The results show the ICAAS system provided a significant improvement in air combat performance when compared to a current weapon system. Data are presented for both current generation and advanced fighter aircraft. The ICAAS technologies which are ready for flight testing in order to transition to the fighter fleet are described along with technologies needing additional development.

  9. Insights into the roles of carrier microstructure in adhesive/carrier-based dry powder inhalation mixtures: Carrier porosity and fine particle content.

    PubMed

    Shalash, Ahmed O; Molokhia, Abdulla M; Elsayed, Mustafa M A

    2015-10-01

    To gain insights into complex interactions in carrier-based dry powder inhalation mixtures, we studied the relationships between the carrier microstructural characteristics and performance. We used mercury intrusion porosimetry to measure the microstructural characteristics and to also derive the air permeability of eight carriers. We evaluated the performances of inhalation mixtures of each of these carriers and fluticasone propionate after aerosolization from an Aerolizer®. We did not observe a simple relationship between the carrier total porosity and the performance. Classification of the porosity according to pore size, however, provided interesting insights. The carrier nanoporosity, which refers to pores smaller than micronized drug particles, has a positive influence on the performance. Nanopores reduce the carrier effective contact area and the magnitude of interparticulate adhesion forces in inhalation mixtures. The carrier microporosity, which refers to pores similar in size to drug particles, also has a positive influence on the performance. During mixing, micropores increase the effectiveness of frictional and press-on forces, which are responsible for breaking up of cohesive drug agglomerates and for distribution of drug particles over the carrier surface. On the other hand, the carrier macroporosity, which refers to pores larger than drug particles, apparently has a negative influence on the performance. This influence is likely mediated via the effects of macropores on the powder bed tensile strength and fluidization behavior. The air permeability better represents these effects. The inhalation mixture performance improved as the carrier air permeability decreased. Interestingly, as the carrier fine particle content increased, the carrier microporosity increased and the carrier air permeability decreased. This proposes a new mechanism for the positive effect of fine excipient materials on the performance of carrier-based inhalation mixtures. Fine

  10. 76 FR 73765 - Pilot Project on NAFTA Trucking Provisions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-29

    ... pilot program to test and demonstrate the ability of Mexico- domiciled motor carriers to operate safely in the United States beyond the municipalities in the United States on the United States-Mexico... to Mexico-domiciled motor carriers to operate beyond the municipalities in the United States on...

  11. 77 FR 56255 - Pilot Program on NAFTA Trucking Provisions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-12

    ... long-haul pilot program to test and demonstrate the ability of Mexico-domiciled motor carriers to... to Mexico-domiciled motor carriers to operate beyond the municipalities in the United States on the United States-Mexico international border or the commercial zones of such municipalities...

  12. 76 FR 56272 - Pilot Project on NAFTA Trucking Provisions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-12

    ... pilot program to test and demonstrate the ability of Mexico- domiciled motor carriers to operate safely in the United States beyond the municipalities in the United States on the United States-Mexico... to Mexico-domiciled motor carriers to operate beyond the municipalities in the United States on...

  13. F-18 HARV research pilot Dana Purifoy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Dana D. Purifoy is an aerospace research pilot at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. He joined NASA in August 1994. Purifoy is a former Air Force test pilot who served as a project pilot in the joint NASA/Air Force X-29 Forward Swept Wing research program conducted at Dryden from 1984 to 1991. His most recent assignment in the Air Force was flying U-2 aircraft as a test pilot at Air Force Plant 42, Palmdale, CA. In addition to flying the X-29 at Dryden as an Air Force pilot, Purifoy also served as project pilot and joint test force director with the AFTI F-16 (Advanced Fighter Technology Integration/F-16) program, also located at Dryden. Before his assignments as project pilot on the X-29 and AFTI/F-16 aircraft, Purifoy was chief of the Academics Systems Branch at the Air Force Test Pilot School at Edwards. Prior to becoming a test pilot, he flew F-111 and F-16 aircraft in Great Britain and Germany. He has accumulated 3800 hours of flying time in his career. The final flight for the F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV) took place at NASA Dryden on May 29, 1996. The highly modified F-18 airplane flew 383 flights over a nine year period and demonstrated concepts that greatly increase fighter maneuverability. Among concepts proven in the aircraft is the use of paddles to direct jet engine exhaust in cases of extreme altitudes where conventional control surfaces lose effectiveness. Another concept, developed by NASA Langley Research Center, is a deployable wing-like surface installed on the nose of the aircraft for increased right and left (yaw) control on nose-high flight angles.

  14. Non-Carriers of Reduced-Function CYP2C19 Alleles are Most Susceptible to Impairment of the Anti-Platelet Effect of Clopidogrel by Proton-Pump Inhibitors: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jen-Kuang; Wu, Cho-Kai; Juang, Jyh-Ming; Tsai, Chia-Ti; Hwang, Juey-Jen; Lin, Jiuun-Lee; Chiang, Fu-Tien

    2016-01-01

    Background The phenomenon of CYP2C19 polymorphism affects the metabolism of both clopidogrel and proton-pump inhibitors (PPI). However, concomitant use of both drugs may reduce the desired therapeutic effects. In this study, we evaluated whether individuals with different numbers of reduced-function CYP2C19 alleles were equally affected and whether PPIs with different dependencies on CYP2C19 metabolism were equally involved. Methods Thirty healthy volunteers were recruited to a six-week regimen of clopidogrel. Three PPIs with different metabolic dependencies on CYP2C19 were included and separately administered in this order. Each PPI was given for a week, followed by a one-week washout period before the intervention of the next PPI. The anti-platelet effect was examined by Thromboelastography Platelet MappingTM (TEG®) and vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) assays. Results Both TEG® and VASP tests showed the same general qualitative trend, but TEG® detected a statistically significant fluctuation of platelet aggregation in response to different drug interventions. The TEG® results also demonstrated that non-carriers experienced the most significant impairment of anti-platelet effect of clopidogrel after concomitant use of PPIs. This impairment was closely related to the metabolic dependence on CYP2C19 of PPI. Conclusions Our study indicated that non-carriers of reduced-function CYP2C19 alleles are most susceptible to impairment of the anti-platelet effect of clopidogrel after concomitant PPI use. Individual subjects are not equally affected, and PPIs are not equally involved. However, large-scale randomized clinical trials are needed to evaluate the clinical outcome. PMID:27122952

  15. Evaluation of a trajectory command concept for manual control of carrier approaches and landings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcneill, W. E.; Smith, G. A., Jr.; Gerdes, R. M.

    1982-01-01

    A novel trajectory control system concept was implemented to provide manual control of a conventional jet aircraft. This concept, called Total Aircraft Flight Control System (TAFCOS), utilizes an inverse model of the aerodynamic and propulsion characteristics and employs feedforward control to provide the required acceleration command. The concept requires on-board digital computations which can easily be handled by a modern airborne computer. The system was studied in a piloted simulation of the carrier approach and landing task with primarily visual flight and guidance cues. The principal modes of vertical flight-path control investigated were vertical velocity command and vertical acceleration command. The study included manual carrier approaches with and without moderate ship motion and associated air disturbances, and tests of the effects of discrete gusts. Manual control of flight path through this new concept was shown to be feasible as an addition to an automatic control system and to have potential as an improved mode of control over conventional control for the carrier approach task.

  16. 40 CFR 88.206-94 - State opt-in for the California Pilot Test Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true State opt-in for the California Pilot... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CLEAN-FUEL VEHICLES California Pilot Test Program § 88.206-94 State opt-in for the California Pilot Test Program. (a) A state may opt into the Pilot program if it...

  17. 40 CFR 88.206-94 - State opt-in for the California Pilot Test Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false State opt-in for the California Pilot... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CLEAN-FUEL VEHICLES California Pilot Test Program § 88.206-94 State opt-in for the California Pilot Test Program. (a) A state may opt into the Pilot program if it...

  18. 40 CFR 88.206-94 - State opt-in for the California Pilot Test Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false State opt-in for the California Pilot... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CLEAN-FUEL VEHICLES California Pilot Test Program § 88.206-94 State opt-in for the California Pilot Test Program. (a) A state may opt into the Pilot program if it...

  19. 40 CFR 88.206-94 - State opt-in for the California Pilot Test Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false State opt-in for the California Pilot... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CLEAN-FUEL VEHICLES California Pilot Test Program § 88.206-94 State opt-in for the California Pilot Test Program. (a) A state may opt into the Pilot program if it...

  20. Critical Components of Flight Instruction as Perceived by Instructor Pilots and Student Pilots.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brecke, Fritz; Reiser, Robert

    In order to ascertain Williams Air Force Base Instructor Pilots' (IPs) and Student Pilots' (SPs) perceptions concerning cruciality of components of flight instruction and their perceptions regarding areas of instruction in need of improvement, a questionnaire was developed and administered to 82 IPs and 50 SPs. Results revealed that a majority of…

  1. 14 CFR 91.1089 - Qualifications: Check pilots (aircraft) and check pilots (simulator).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Qualifications: Check pilots (aircraft) and check pilots (simulator). 91.1089 Section 91.1089 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES GENERAL OPERATING AND FLIGHT RULES Fractional...

  2. The Pilot Training Study: A Cost-Estimating Model for Advanced Pilot Training (APT).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knollmeyer, L. E.

    The Advanced Pilot Training Cost Model is a statement of relationships that may be used, given the necessary inputs, for estimating the resources required and the costs to train pilots in the Air Force formal flying training schools. Resources and costs are computed by weapon system on an annual basis for use in long-range planning or sensitivity…

  3. Dryden Test Pilots 1990 - Smolka, Fullerton, Schneider, Dana, Ishmael, Smith, and McMurtry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    It was a windy afternoon on Rogers Dry Lake as the research pilots of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility gathered for a photo shoot. It was a special day too, the 30th anniversary of the first F-104 flight by research pilot Bill Dana. To celebrate, a fly over of Building 4800, in formation, was made with Bill in a Lockheed F-104 (826), Gordon Fullerton in a Northrop T-38, and Jim Smolka in a McDonnell Douglas F/A-18 (841) on March 23, 1990. The F-18 (841), standing on the NASA ramp is a backdrop for the photo of (Left to Right) James W. (Smoke) Smolka, C. Gordon Fullerton, Edward T. (Ed) Schneider, William H. (Bill) Dana, Stephen D. (Steve) Ishmael, Rogers E. Smith, and Thomas C. (Tom) McMurtry. Smolka joined NASA Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility in September 1985. He has been the project pilot on the F-15 Advanced Control Technology for Integrated Vehicles (ACTIVE) research and F-15 Aeronautical Research Aircraft programs. He has also flown as a pilot on the NASA B-52 launch aircraft, as a co-project pilot on the F-16XL Supersonic Laminar Flow Control aircraft and the F-18 High Angle-of-Attack Research Vehicle (HARV) aircraft. Other aircraft he has flown in research programs are the F-16, F-111, F-104 and the T-38 as support. Fullerton, joined NASA's Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility in November 1986. He was project pilot on the NASA/Convair 990 aircraft to test space shuttle landing gear components, project pilot on the F-18 Systems Research Aircraft, and project pilot on the B-52 launch aircraft, where he was involved in six air launches of the commercially developed Pegasus space launch vehicle. Other assignments include a variety of flight research and support activities in multi-engine and high performance aircraft such as, F-15, F-111, F-14, X-29, MD-11 and DC-8. Schneider arrived at the NASA Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility on July 5, 1982, as a Navy Liaison Officer, becoming a NASA research

  4. Test pilot Michael R. Swann

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Michael R. Swann joined the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Dryden Flight Research Center on June 5, 1978, transferring from the NASA's Johnson Space Center, Houston, Texas, as a research pilot. Swann attended North Dakota State University, Fargo, North Dakota, from September 1968 to February 1977, where he earned his Masters in Physics. He was a member of three national honorary scholastic fraternities. Prior to joining NASA Swann served concurrently as an Aerospace Defense Command Interceptor pilot in the Air National Guard for five years and as a college physics instructor at North Dakota State University for two years. While at Johnson Space Center Mike was a pilot on high altitude earth resources and air sampling missions. He was also an instructor and check pilot for the Astronaut Space Flight Readiness Training program. As a Dryden research pilot Mike was involved with the F-111 #778 Transonic Aircraft Technology (TACT) program, F-15 # 281 Shuttle Tile tests, programs on the F-8C #802 and the PA-30 #808 Remotely Piloted Research Vehicle. He flew the Bell 47G #822 helicopter in support of research with the three-eighths-scale F-15 Spin Research Vehicle. On March 28, 1979, Mike made a pilot familiarization flight in the YF-12A #935. He also flew support flights in the F-104, C-47, T-37, T-38, and the Jetstar aircraft. Michael R. Swann was born June 5, 1949, in Fargo, North Dakota; he was fatally injured in a recreational glider accident on July 28, 1981, near California City, California.

  5. Mobile selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry (SIFT-MS) devices and their use for pollution exposure monitoring in breath and ambient air-pilot study.

    PubMed

    Storer, Malina; Salmond, Jennifer; Dirks, Kim N; Kingham, Simon; Epton, Michael

    2014-09-01

    Studies of health effects of air pollution exposure are limited by inability to accurately determine dose and exposure of air pollution in field trials. We explored the feasibility of using a mobile selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry (SIFT-MS) device, housed in a van, to determine ambient air and breath levels of benzene, xylene and toluene following exercise in areas of high motor vehicle traffic. The breath toluene, xylene and benzene concentration of healthy subjects were measured before and after exercising close to a busy road. The concentration of the volatile organic compounds (VOCs), in ambient air were also analysed in real time. Exercise close to traffic pollution is associated with a two-fold increase in breath VOCs (benzene, xylene and toluene) with levels returning to baseline within 20 min. This effect is not seen when exercising away from traffic pollution sources. Situating the testing device 50 m from the road reduced any confounding due to VOCs in the inspired air prior to the breath testing manoeuvre itself. Real-time field testing for air pollution exposure is possible using a mobile SIFT-MS device. This device is suitable for exploring exposure and dose relationships in a number of large scale field test scenarios.

  6. Radiation Exposure of Air Carrier Crewmembers 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-01

    occupationally exposed adult . The radiation exposure of a pregnant crewmember who worked 70 block hours a month for 5 months would exceed the recommended 2...the dose received. Table 5 provides estimates of the risk to the child of incurring one or more serious health defects from prenatal exposure to...the International Commission on Radiological Protection for a nonpregnant occupationally exposed adult . Thus, radiation exposure is not likely to be a

  7. 77 FR 45715 - Application of Key Lime Air Corporation for Commuter Authority

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-01

    ...] Application of Key Lime Air Corporation for Commuter Authority AGENCY: Department of Transportation. ACTION... Lime Air Corporation fit, willing, and able, and awarding it a Commuter Air Carrier...

  8. 14 CFR 223.6 - Carrier's rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS) ECONOMIC REGULATIONS FREE AND REDUCED-RATE TRANSPORTATION General Provisions § 223.6 Carrier's rules. (a) Each air... interchange of free and reduced-rate transportation passes or a statement describing those practices. (b)...

  9. The Pilot Training Study: Precommissioning Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, J. W.

    The cost of training, as conducted by the Air Force Academy, Reserve Officer Training Corps, and Officer Training School, and leading to the commissioning of new Air Force officers is presented. The student flows, personnel resources required to support the flows, and costs of pilot candidates graduating from each of the three commissioning…

  10. NASA's Shuttle Carrier Aircraft 911's Final Flight

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA 911, one of NASA's two modified Boeing 747 space shuttle carrier aircraft, flew its final flight Feb. 8, a short hop from NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center at Edwards Air Force Base to the ...

  11. 19 CFR 141.111 - Carrier's release order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...; (3) A combined carrier's certificate and release order issued in accordance with § 141.11(a)(4); or... given to release the articles covered by this certified duplicate bill of lading or air waybill to:...

  12. X-15 pilots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1960-01-01

    In keeping with the joint nature of the X-15 project, its pilots came from the four different organizations that were cooperating to design, build, and fly the airplane. X-15 Pilots in Order by Dates of First Flight A. Scott Crossfield, North American Aviation-14 flights Joseph A. Walker, NASA-25 flights Robert M. White, United States Air Force (USAF)-16 flights Forrest S. Petersen, United States Navy-5 flights John B. McKay, NASA-29 flights Robert A. Rushworth, USAF-34 flights Neil A. Armstrong, NASA-7 flights Joe H. Engle, USAF-16 flights Milton O. Thompson, NASA-14 flights William J. Knight, USAF-16 flights William H. Dana, NASA -16 flights Michael J. Adams, USAF-7 flights Total number of flights-199 The X-15 had its share of emergency landings and accidents, but only two produced serious injuries or death. On Nov. 9, 1962, Jack McKay experienced an engine failure and landed at Mud Lake, Nev. The landing gear collapsed, flipping him and the aircraft on its back. Although he recovered from his injuries sufficiently to fly again, he eventually had to retire because of them. On Nov. 15, 1967, on Michael Adams seventh flight, he entered a spin from which he was able to recover but could not bring it out of an inverted dive because of a technical problem with the adaptive flight control system. He died in the resultant crash of the X-15 number three. This short video clip provides two different views of X-15 pilots. In the first group are (left to right): Bob Rushworth and Joe Engle, Jack McKay, Pete Knight, Milt Thompson, and Bill Dana. The pilots shown in the close-up views are McKay, Thompson, and Dana.

  13. Method of immobilizing water-soluble bioorganic compounds on a capillary-porous carrier

    DOEpatents

    Ershov, Gennady Moiseevich; Timofeev, Eduard Nikolaevich; Ivanov, Igor Borisovich; Florentiev, Vladimir Leonidovich; Mirzabekov, Andrei Darievich

    1998-01-01

    The method for immobilizing water-soluble bioorganic compounds to capillary-porous carrier comprises application of solutions of water-soluble bioorganic compounds onto a capillary-porous carrier, setting the carrier temperature equal to or below the dew point of the ambient air, keeping the carrier till appearance of water condensate and complete swelling of the carrier, whereupon the carrier surface is coated with a layer of water-immiscible nonluminescent inert oil and is allowed to stand till completion of the chemical reaction of bonding the bioorganic compounds with the carrier.

  14. Common Carrier Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Communications Commission, Washington, DC.

    After outlining the Federal Communications Commission's (FCC) responsibility for regulating interstate common carrier communication (non-broadcast communication whose carriers are required by law to furnish service at reasonable charges upon request), this information bulletin reviews the history, technological development, and current…

  15. A flight test method for pilot/aircraft analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koehler, R.; Buchacker, E.

    1986-01-01

    In high precision flight maneuvres a pilot is a part of a closed loop pilot/aircraft system. The assessment of the flying qualities is highly dependent on the closed loop characteristics related to precision maneuvres like approach, landing, air-to-air tracking, air-to-ground tracking, close formation flying and air-to air refueling of the receiver. The object of a research program at DFVLR is the final flight phase of an air to ground mission. In this flight phase the pilot has to align the aircraft with the target, correct small deviations from the target direction and keep the target in his sights for a specific time period. To investigate the dynamic behavior of the pilot-aircraft system a special ground attack flight test technique with a prolonged tracking maneuvres was developed. By changing the targets during the attack the pilot is forced to react continously on aiming errors in his sights. Thus the closed loop pilot/aircraft system is excited over a wide frequency range of interest, the pilot gets more information about mission oriented aircraft dynamics and suitable flight test data for a pilot/aircraft analysis can be generated.

  16. COMPARISON OF 24H AVERAGE VOC MONITORING RESULTS FOR RESIDENTIAL INDOOR AND OUTDOOR AIR USING CARBOPACK X-FILLED DIFFUSIVE SAMPLERS AND ACTIVE SAMPLING - A PILOT STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Analytical results obtained by thermal desorption GC/MS for 24h diffusive sampling of 11 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are compared with results of time-averaged active sampling at a known constant flow rate. Air samples were collected with co-located duplicate diffusive samp...

  17. 49 CFR 381.420 - What will the FMCSA do after the agency receives my suggestion for a pilot program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... my suggestion for a pilot program? 381.420 Section 381.420 Transportation Other Regulations Relating... Pilot Programs § 381.420 What will the FMCSA do after the agency receives my suggestion for a pilot program? (a) The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration will review your suggestion for a...

  18. 49 CFR 381.420 - What will the FMCSA do after the agency receives my suggestion for a pilot program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... my suggestion for a pilot program? 381.420 Section 381.420 Transportation Other Regulations Relating... Pilot Programs § 381.420 What will the FMCSA do after the agency receives my suggestion for a pilot program? (a) The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration will review your suggestion for a...

  19. Indoor air quality risk factors for severe lower respiratory tract infections in Inuit infants in Baffin Region, Nunavut: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Kovesi, T; Creery, D; Gilbert, N L; Dales, R; Fugler, D; Thompson, B; Randhawa, N; Miller, J D

    2006-08-01

    Inuit infants have extremely high rates of lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI), but the causes for this are unclear. The aims of this study were to assess, in young Inuit children in Baffin Region, Nunavut, the feasibility of an epidemiologic study of the association between indoor air quality (IAQ) and respiratory health; to obtain data on IAQ in their housing; and to identify and classify risk factors for LRTI. Twenty houses in Cape Dorset, Nunavut with children below 2 years of age, were evaluated using a structured housing inspection and measurement of IAQ parameters, and a respiratory health questionnaire was administered. Twenty-five percent of the children had, at some time, been hospitalized for chest illness. Houses were very small, and had a median of six occupants per house. Forty-one percent of the houses had a calculated natural air change rate <0.35 air changes per hour. NO(2) concentrations were within the acceptable range. Smokers were present in at least 90% of the households, and nicotine concentrations exceeded 1.5 microg/m(3) in 25% of the dwellings. Particulates were found to be correlated closely with nicotine but not with NO(2) concentrations, suggesting that their main source was cigarette smoking rather than leakage from furnaces. Mattress fungal levels were markedly increased, although building fungal concentrations were low. Dust-mites were virtually non-existent. Potential risk factors related to IAQ for viral LRTI in Inuit infants were observed in this study, including reduced air exchange and environmental tobacco smoke exposure. Severe lower respiratory tract infection is common in Inuit infants. We found reduced air change rates and high occupancy levels in houses in Cape Dorset, which may increase the risk of respiratory infections. This suggests the measures to promote better ventilation or more housing may be beneficial. Further health benefits may be obtained by reducing bed sharing by infants and greater turnover of

  20. Operational problems experienced by single pilots in instrument meteorological conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weislogel, S.

    1981-01-01

    The development and implementation of a search strategy to extract pertinent reports from the Aviation Safety Reporting System-2 (ASRS-2) database are described. For any particular occurence to be pertinent to the study, it must have satisfied the following conditions: the aircraft must be of the type usually flown by a single pilot; operation on an IFR flight plan in instrument meteorological conditions; pilot experienced an operational problem. The occurances consist of reports by the pilot about his own performance, by the pilot about the system performance, or by an air traffic controller about a pilot's performance.

  1. Contactor Energy Requirements for Capturing CO2 From ambient air using NaOH determined in a pilot-scale prototype system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolaroff, J. K.; Keith, D.; Lowry, G.

    2005-12-01

    Systems for capturing CO2 from ambient air for sequestration have recently been proposed (e.g. Dubey et al., 2002; Zeman and Lackner, 2004; Keith et al., 2004). Capture from ambient air has a number of structural advantages over capture from point sources; in particular it makes possible future emissions scenarios with negative net CO2 emissions. The systems suggested use either a Ca(OH)2 or NaOH solution to capture CO2 and then regenerate the solution in a chemical loop. The energy requirements of such a system, however, have been hotly disputed (Herzog, 2003). The energy requirements and effectiveness of the chemical regeneration are well established as they are practiced on a large scale in the industrial kraft process used in pulp and paper production, but the energy and land use requirements of a contactor for this system are uncertain as this component of the system is not implemented industrially. In this research, we address the most controversial component of the system, the contactor, which extracts CO2 from air into solution. A prototype contactor with a spray tower design is constructed (1m by 6m), and CO2 absorption by a NaOH solution spray (5 l/min) is measured. The CO2 absorption efficiency and energy requirements per unit CO2 absorbed are calculated. The energy requirements of the contactor are found to be on the order of 10-40 kJ/mol-CO2, which is small compared to the energy of combustion of fossil fuels, and compared with the energy required for the regeneration steps. Thus, a NaOH-based spray tower design can serve as an energy-efficient contactor for capturing CO2 from ambient air. Dubey, M. K., Ziock, H., Rueff, G., Elliott, S., and Smith, W. S. (2002). ``Extraction of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere through engineered chemical sinkage''. ACS -- Division of Fuel Chemistry Reprints, 47(1):81--84. Herzog, H. (2003). Assessing the feasibility of capturing co2 from the air. Technical report, MIT Laboratory for Energy and the Environment. Keith

  2. Pilot Study of the Effects of Simulated Turbine Passage Pressure on Juvenile Chinook Salmon Acclimated with Access to Air at Absolute Pressures Greater than Atmospheric

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, Thomas J.; Abernethy, Cary S.

    2005-04-28

    The impacts of pressure on juvenile salmon who pass through the turbines of hydroelectric dams while migrating downstream on the Columbia and Snake rivers has not been well understood, especially as these impacts relate to injury to the fish's swim bladder. The laboratory studies described here were conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the US Army Corps of Engineers Portland District at PNNL's fisheries research laboratories in 2004 to investigate the impacts of simulated turbine passage pressure on fish permitted to achieve neutral buoyancy at pressures corresponding to depths at which they are typically observed during downstream migration. Two sizes of juvenile Chinook salmon were tested, 80-100mm and 125-145mm total length. Test fish were acclimated for 22 to 24 hours in hyperbaric chambers at pressures simulating depths of 15, 30, or 60 ft, with access to a large air bubble. High rates of deflated swim bladders and mortality were observed. Our results while in conclusive show that juvenile salmon are capable of drawing additional air into their swimbladder to compensate for the excess mass of implanted telemetry devices. However they may pay a price in terms of increased susceptibility to injury, predation, and death for this additional air.

  3. Preliminary evaluation of the control of microbial fouling by laboratory and pilot-scale air-stripping columns. Final report, March-December 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Seekins, D.; Rogers, M.R.

    1985-03-01

    The U.S. Army Natick Research, Development and Engineering Center (Natick) undertook a study to investigate the buildup of microbial slimes primarily pseudomonas, bacillus and azotobacter in Air Stripping Columns that are used by the military to remove volatile compounds from contaminated groundwater. The air-stripping and carbon-adsorption columns were previously used at the Anniston Army Depot (ANAD) to treat groundwater that had been contaminated with chemical solvents and metal-plating wastes. The major groundwater contaminants were: trichloroethylene (TCE), dichloroethylene (DCE), methylene chloride (MeCl), phenol, and chromium. The results of the study will provide the basis for recommendations on preventative or control measures to be taken in future applications of these water-treatment methods. Measures to prevent buildup of microbial slimes will allow for longer column life and reduction in costs. Treatment of the laboratory-scale column with 3% and 15% hydrogen peroxide reduced total microbial counts but was not successful at disinfecting the column. It was concluded that to prevent microbial fouling of air-stripping columns, the packing material should be disinfected prior to use and should be shock-chlorinated during use if microbial fouling should start to occur. The column should be run continuously if possible to keep the inside temperature as low as possible to retard the growth of microorganisms. If iron fouling should occur, the column should be treated with dilute HCl to clear the packing material of the hydroxide buildup.

  4. Survey of severe spatial disorientation episodes in Japan Air Self-Defense Force fighter pilots showing increased severity in night flight.

    PubMed

    Takada, Yuko; Hisada, Tetsuya; Kuwada, Naruo; Sakai, Masao; Akamatsu, Tomomitsu

    2009-06-01

    Spatial disorientation (SD) is one of the most severe causative factors in aviation accidents. We analyzed the reported SD episodes to evaluate the characteristics of severe SD in fighter pilots. Three hundred seventeen cases (95.5%) of 332 total valid cases experienced SD, and the ratio of night and day SD experiences (52.7% vs. 47.3%) (p < 0.05) shows a clear prevalence of night SD events. The severity of SD episodes at night (2.23 +/- 1.09) was higher than at day (1.89 +/- 1.04) (p < 0.01). In addition, the severity of visual illusions was significantly higher at night. A significant difference was found for meteorological conditions, such as visual meteorological conditions (VMC), instrument meteorological conditions (IMC) and VMC-IMC (VI) transition, among times of days. In conclusion, the severity of the SD episodes was higher at night. This may be due to an increase in visual severe SD episodes at night.

  5. Pilot Fatigue and Circadian Desynchronosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Pilot fatigue and circadian desynchronosis, its significance to air transport safety, and research approaches, were examined. There is a need for better data on sleep, activity, and other pertinent factors from pilots flying a variety of demanding schedules. Simulation studies of flight crew performance should be utilized to determine the degree of fatigue induced by demanding schedules and to delineate more precisely the factors responsible for performance decrements in flight and to test solutions proposed to resolve problems induced by fatigue and desynchronosis. It was concluded that there is a safety problem of uncertain magnitude due to transmeridian flying and a potential problem due to fatigue associated with various factors found in air transport operations.

  6. [Back ache in helicopter pilots].

    PubMed

    Colak, S; Jovelić, S; Manojlović, J

    1992-01-01

    Due to low back pain (LBP) and harmful effects of flying, questionnaires were sent to 71 helicopter pilots of the experimental group, 22 mechanics helicopter flyers and to the control group of 28 air-traffic controllers. The prevalence of LBP was the highest in helicopter pilots, then in helicomechanics and air-traffic controllers (53%, 50% and 36%). Effects of exposure to vibration, body posture and working load have not contributed significantly to the occurrence of LBP. LBP has not lead to an important difference in the strength of the back musculature, body mass index and spondylosis, that is, scoliosis. The necessity of further study of LBP and maintaining of specific preventive measures are indicated.

  7. A Pilot Study of the Effectiveness of Indoor Plants for Removal of Volatile Organic Compounds in Indoor Air in a Seven-Story Office Building

    SciTech Connect

    Apte, Michael G.; Apte, Joshua S.

    2010-04-27

    The Paharpur Business Centre and Software Technology Incubator Park (PBC) is a 7 story, 50,400 ft{sup 2} office building located near Nehru Place in New Delhi India. The occupancy of the building at full normal operations is about 500 people. The building management philosophy embodies innovation in energy efficiency while providing full service and a comfortable, safe, healthy environment to the occupants. Provision of excellent Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) is an expressed goal of the facility, and the management has gone to great lengths to achieve it. This is particularly challenging in New Delhi, where ambient urban pollution levels rank among the worst on the planet. The approach to provide good IAQ in the building includes a range of technical elements: air washing and filtration of ventilation intake air from rooftop air handler, the use of an enclosed rooftop greenhouse with a high density of potted plants as a bio-filtration system, dedicated secondary HVAC/air handling units on each floor with re-circulating high efficiency filtration and UVC treatment of the heat exchanger coils, additional potted plants for bio-filtration on each floor, and a final exhaust via the restrooms located at each floor. The conditioned building exhaust air is passed through an energy recovery wheel and chemisorbent cartridge, transferring some heat to the incoming air to increase the HVAC energy efficiency. The management uses 'green' cleaning products exclusively in the building. Flooring is a combination of stone, tile and 'zero VOC' carpeting. Wood trim and finish appears to be primarily of solid sawn materials, with very little evidence of composite wood products. Furniture is likewise in large proportion constructed from solid wood materials. The overall impression is that of a very clean and well-kept facility. Surfaces are polished to a high sheen, probably with wax products. There was an odor of urinal cake in the restrooms. Smoking is not allowed in the building. The

  8. Transition to Glass: Pilot Training for High-Technology Transport Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiener, Earl L.; Chute, Rebecca D.; Moses, John H.

    1999-01-01

    This report examines the activities of a major commercial air carrier between 1993 and late 1996 as it acquired an advanced fleet of high-technology aircraft (Boeing 757). Previously, the airline's fleet consisted of traditional (non-glass) aircraft, and this report examines the transition from a traditional fleet to a glass one. A total of 150 pilots who were entering the B-757 transition training volunteered for the study, which consisted of three query phases: (1) first day of transition training, (2) 3 to 4 months after transition training, and (3) 12 to 14 months after initial operating experience. Of these initial 150 pilots, 99 completed all three phases of the study, with each phase consisting of probes on attitudes and experiences associated with their training and eventual transition to flying the line. In addition to the three questionnaires, 20 in-depth interviews were conducted. Although the primary focus of this study was on the flight training program, additional factors such as technical support, documentation, and training aids were investigated as well. The findings generally indicate that the pilot volunteers were highly motivated and very enthusiastic about their training program. In addition, the group had low levels of apprehension toward automation and expressed a high degree of satisfaction toward their training. However, there were some concerns expressed regarding the deficiencies in some of the training aids and lack of a free-play flight management system training device.

  9. Test pilots 1952 - Walker, Butchart, and Jones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1952-01-01

    This photo shows test pilots, (Left-Right) Joseph A. Walker, Stanley P. Butchart and Walter P. Jones, standing in front of the Douglas D-558-II Skystreak, in 1952. These three test pilots at the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics' High-Speed Flight Research Station probably were discussing their flights in the aircraft. Joe flew research flights on the D-558-I #3 (14 flights, first on June 29, 1951) investigating buffeting, tail loads, and longitudinal stability. He flew the D-558-II #2 (3 flights, first on April 29, 1955) and recorded data on lateral stability and control. He also made pilot check-out flights in the D-558-II #3 (2 flights, first on May 7, 1954). For fifteen years Walker served as a pilot at the Edwards flight research facility (today known as the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Dryden Flight Research Center) on research flights as well as chase missions for other pilots on NASA and Air Force research programs. On June 8, 1966, he was flying chase in NASA's F-104N for the Air Force's experimental bomber, North American XB-70A, when he was fatally injured in a mid-air collision between the planes. Stan flew the D-558-I #3 (12 flights, first on October 19, 1951) to determine the dynamic longitudinal stability characteristics and investigations of the lateral stability and control. He made one flight in the D-558-II #3 on June 26, 1953, as a pilot check-out flight. Butchart retired from the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center at Edwards, California, on February 27, 1976, after a 25-year career in research aviation. Stan served as a research pilot, chief pilot, and director of flight operations. Walter P. Jones was a research pilot for NACA from the fall of 1950 to July 1952. He had been in the U.S. Air Force as a pilot before joining the Station. Jones flew the D-558-I #3 (5 flights, first on February 13, 1951) to study buffeting, tail loads and longitudinal stability. Jones made research flights on the D-558-II #3 ( 7 flights

  10. A simulator investigation of the use of digital data link for pilot/ATC communications in a single pilot operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinton, David A.; Lohr, Gary W.

    1988-01-01

    Studies have shown that radio communications between pilots and air traffic control contribute to high pilot workload and are subject to various errors. These errors result from congestion on the voice radio channel, and missed and misunderstood messages. The use of digital data link has been proposed as a means of reducing this workload and error rate. A critical factor, however, in determining the potential benefit of data link will be the interface between future data link systems and the operator of those systems, both in the air and on the ground. The purpose of this effort was to evaluate the pilot interface with various levels of data link capability, in simulated general aviation, single-pilot instrument flight rule operations. Results show that the data link reduced demands on pilots' short-term memory, reduced the number of communication transmissions, and permitted the pilots to more easily allocate time to critical cockpit tasks while receiving air traffic control messages. The pilots who participated unanimously indicated a preference for data link communications over voice-only communications. There were, however, situations in which the pilot preferred the use of voice communications, and the ability for pilots to delay processing the data link messages, during high workload events, caused delays in the acknowledgement of messages to air traffic control.

  11. Piloted Aircraft Environment Simulation Techniques

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-04-01

    Simulateurs et Syst mes Electroniques 3 avenue Albert Einstein 78192 Trappes Cedex France. SLUMMARY The special feature of the six degrees of freedom large...dunie part sous le nez de Ia cabine, d’autre part au-desss et en aire de Is tWe du -2 pilote. axe? 2 ?~ . ? axel L’image avioij projetde sar 1P6cran est

  12. Pilot Personality and Training Outcomes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-31

    AFRL-SA-WP-TR-2012-0013 PILOT PERSONALITY AND TRAINING OUTCOMES Raymond E. King U.S. Air Force School of Aerospace Medicine...license the holder or any other person or corporation or convey any rights or permission to manufacture, use, or sell any patented invention that may...Highway, Suite 1204, Arlington, VA 22202-4302. Respondents should be aware that notwithstanding any other provision of law, no person shall be subject to

  13. Performance of three pilot-scale immobilized-cell biotrickling filters for removal of hydrogen sulfide from a contaminated air steam.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yiqing; Fan, Zhidong; Ma, Lixia; Yin, Juan; Luo, Man; Cai, Wangfeng

    2014-11-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a major malodorous compound emitted from wastewater treatment plants. In this study, the performance of three pilot-scale immobilized-cell biotrickling filters (BTFs) spacked with combinations of bamboo charcoal and ceramsite in different ratios was investigated in terms of H2S removal. Extensive tests were performed to determine the removal characteristics, pressure drops, metabolic products, and removal kinetics of the BTFs. The BTFs were operated in continuous mode at low loading rates varying from 0.59 to 5.00 g H2S m(-3) h(-1) with an empty bed retention time (EBRT) of 25 s. The removal efficiency (RE) for each BTF was >99% in the steady-state period, and high standards were met for the exhaust gas. It was found that a multilayer BTF had a slight advantage over a perfectly mixed BTF for the removal of H2S. Furthermore, an impressive amount >97% of the H2S was eliminated by 10% of packing materials near the inlet of the BTF. The modified Michaelis-Menten equation was adopted to describe the characteristics of the BTF, and K s and V m values for the BTF with pure bamboo charcoal packing material were 3.68 ppmv and 4.26 g H2S m(-3) h(-1), respectively. Both bamboo charcoal and ceramsite demonstrated good performance as packing materials in BTFs for the removal of H2S, and the results of this study could serve as a guide for further design and operation of industrial-scale systems.

  14. Performance of three pilot-scale immobilized-cell biotrickling filters for removal of hydrogen sulfide from a contaminated air steam

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yiqing; Fan, Zhidong; Ma, Lixia; Yin, Juan; Luo, Man; Cai, Wangfeng

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a major malodorous compound emitted from wastewater treatment plants. In this study, the performance of three pilot-scale immobilized-cell biotrickling filters (BTFs) spacked with combinations of bamboo charcoal and ceramsite in different ratios was investigated in terms of H2S removal. Extensive tests were performed to determine the removal characteristics, pressure drops, metabolic products, and removal kinetics of the BTFs. The BTFs were operated in continuous mode at low loading rates varying from 0.59 to 5.00 g H2S m−3 h−1 with an empty bed retention time (EBRT) of 25 s. The removal efficiency (RE) for each BTF was >99% in the steady-state period, and high standards were met for the exhaust gas. It was found that a multilayer BTF had a slight advantage over a perfectly mixed BTF for the removal of H2S. Furthermore, an impressive amount >97% of the H2S was eliminated by 10% of packing materials near the inlet of the BTF. The modified Michaelis–Menten equation was adopted to describe the characteristics of the BTF, and Ks and Vm values for the BTF with pure bamboo charcoal packing material were 3.68 ppmv and 4.26 g H2S m−3 h−1, respectively. Both bamboo charcoal and ceramsite demonstrated good performance as packing materials in BTFs for the removal of H2S, and the results of this study could serve as a guide for further design and operation of industrial-scale systems. PMID:25313280

  15. Centrifuge Study of Pilot Tolerance to Acceleration and the Effects of Acceleration on Pilot Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Creer, Brent Y.; Smedal, Harald A.; Wingrove, Rodney C.

    1960-01-01

    A research program the general objective of which was to measure the effects of various sustained accelerations on the control performance of pilots, was carried out on the Aviation Medical Acceleration Laboratory centrifuge, U.S. Naval Air Development Center, Johnsville, PA. The experimental setup consisted of a flight simulator with the centrifuge in the control loop. The pilot performed his control tasks while being subjected to acceleration fields such as might be encountered by a forward-facing pilot flying an atmosphere entry vehicle. The study was divided into three phases. In one phase of the program, the pilots were subjected to a variety of sustained linear acceleration forces while controlling vehicles with several different sets of longitudinal dynamics. Here, a randomly moving target was displayed to the pilot on a cathode-ray tube. For each combination of acceleration field and vehicle dynamics, pilot tracking accuracy was measured and pilot opinion of the stability and control characteristics was recorded. Thus, information was obtained on the combined effects of complexity of control task and magnitude and direction of acceleration forces on pilot performance. These tests showed that the pilot's tracking performance deteriorated markedly at accelerations greater than about 4g when controlling a lightly damped vehicle. The tentative conclusion was also reached that regardless of the airframe dynamics involved, the pilot feels that in order to have the same level of control over the vehicle, an increase in the vehicle dynamic stability was required with increases in the magnitudes of the acceleration impressed upon the pilot. In another phase, boundaries of human tolerance of acceleration were established for acceleration fields such as might be encountered by a pilot flying an orbital vehicle. A special pilot restraint system was developed to increase human tolerance to longitudinal decelerations. The results of the tests showed that human tolerance

  16. 76 FR 68256 - Notice of Applications for Certificates of Public Convenience and Necessity and Foreign Air...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-03

    ... for Certificates of Public Convenience and Necessity and Foreign Air Carrier Permits Filed Under... Certificates of Public Convenience and Necessity and Foreign Air Carrier Permits were filed under Subpart B... foreign air carrier permit to the full extent authorized by the Air Transport Agreement between the...

  17. Conflict Resolution Automation and Pilot Situation Awareness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dao, Arik-Quang V.; Brandt, Summer L.; Bacon, Paige; Kraut, Josh; Nguyen, Jimmy; Minakata, Katsumi; Raza, Hamzah; Rozovski, David; Johnson, Walter W.

    2010-01-01

    This study compared pilot situation awareness across three traffic management concepts. The Concepts varied in terms of the allocation of traffic avoidance responsibility between the pilot on the flight deck, the air traffic controllers, and a conflict resolution automation system. In Concept 1, the flight deck was equipped with conflict resolution tools that enable them to fully handle the responsibility of weather avoidance and maintaining separation between ownship and surrounding traffic. In Concept 2, pilots were not responsible for traffic separation, but were provided tools for weather and traffic avoidance. In Concept 3, flight deck tools allowed pilots to deviate for weather, but conflict detection tools were disabled. In this concept pilots were dependent on ground based automation for conflict detection and resolution. Situation awareness of the pilots was measured using online probes. Results showed that individual situation awareness was highest in Concept 1, where the pilots were most engaged, and lowest in Concept 3, where automation was heavily used. These findings suggest that for conflict resolution tasks, situation awareness is improved when pilots remain in the decision-making loop.

  18. Association between Asian Dust-Borne Air Pollutants and Daily Symptoms on Healthy Subjects: A Web-Based Pilot Study in Yonago, Japan

    PubMed Central

    Onishi, Kazunari; Otani, Shinji; Kurosaki, Yasunori; Kurozawa, Youichi

    2016-01-01

    During the spring, Asian dust (AD) repeatedly makes its way to Japan, originating from drylands. We evaluated the association between AD-borne air pollutants and daily reported subjective symptoms in healthy subjects. We constructed an Internet questionnaire on daily ocular, nasal, respiratory, and skin symptoms. Forty-two healthy volunteers residents of Yonago (mean age, 33.57) were selected from the self-reporting web-based survey and recorded their symptoms between 1 and 31 of March 2013. We also collected information on levels of suspended particulate matter (SPM), particulate matter < 2.5 µm (PM2.5), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and nitrogen oxide (NOx) per hour on each of those days. SPM and PM2.5 were the dominant pollutants recorded throughout the month. A positive correlation was observed between SPM and ocular (r = 0.475, p < 0.01), nasal (r = 0.614, p < 0.001), and skin (r = 0.445, p < 0.05) symptoms. PM2.5 correlations were significant for ocular (r = 0.428, p < 0.05), nasal (r = 0.560, p < 0.01), and skin (r = 0.437, p < 0.05) symptoms. Our findings provide introductory evidence of AD-borne air pollutants and their association with several bodily symptoms in healthy subjects with the implementation of a self-administrated web-based survey application. PMID:28053609

  19. Association between unemployment, income, education level, population size and air pollution in Czech cities: evidence for environmental inequality? A pilot national scale analysis.

    PubMed

    Branis, Martin; Linhartova, Martina

    2012-09-01

    We analyzed differentials in exposure to SO(2), PM(10) and NO(2) among Czech urban populations categorized according to education level, unemployment rate, population size and average annual salary. Altogether 39 cities were included in the analysis. The principal component analysis revealed two factors explaining 72.8% of the data variability. The first factor explaining 44.7% of the data variability included SO(2), PM(10), low education level and high unemployment, documenting that inhabitants with unfavorable socioeconomic status mainly reside in smaller cities with higher concentration levels of combustion-related air pollutants. The second factor explaining 28.1% of the data variability included NO(2), high salary, high education level and large population, suggesting that large cities with residents with higher socioeconomic status are exposed to higher levels of traffic-related air pollution. We conclude that, after more than a decade of free-market economy, the Czech Republic, a former Soviet satellite with a centrally planned economy, displays signs of a certain kind of environmental inequality, since environmental hazards are unevenly distributed among the Czech urban populations.

  20. STS-42 Pilot Oswald dons CCA prior to egress exercises in JSC's WETF pool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    STS-42 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Pilot Stephen S. Oswald, wearing a launch and entry suit (LES), dons his communications carrier assembly (CCA) prior to launch emergency egress (bailout) exercises in JSC's Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) Bldg 29.

  1. Pilot Implementation of a Field Study Design to Evaluate the Impact of Source Control Measures on Indoor Air Quality in High Performance Homes

    SciTech Connect

    Widder, Sarah H.; Chamness, Michele A.; Petersen, Joseph M.; Singer, Brett C.; Maddalena, Randy L.; Destaillats, Hugo; Russell, M. L.

    2014-10-01

    To improve the indoor air quality in new, high performance homes, a variety of standards and rating programs have been introduced to identify building materials that are designed to have lower emission rates of key contaminants of concern and a number of building materials are being introduced that are certified to these standards. For example, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Zero Energy Ready Home program requires certification under the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Indoor airPLUS (IaP) label, which requires the use of PS1 or PS2 certified plywood and OSB; low-formaldehyde emitting wood products; low- or no-VOC paints and coatings as certified by Green Seal Standard GS-11, GreenGuard, SCS Indoor Advantage Gold Standard, MPI Green Performance Standard, or another third party rating program; and Green Label-certified carpet and carpet cushions. However, little is known regarding the efficacy of the IAP requirements in measurably reducing contaminant exposures in homes. The goal of this project is to develop a robust experimental approach and collect preliminary data to support the evaluation of indoor air quality (IAQ) measures linked to IAP-approved low-emitting materials and finishes in new residential homes. To this end, the research team of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) developed a detailed experimental plan to measure IAQ constituents and other parameters, over time, in new homes constructed with materials compliant with IAP’s low-emitting material and ventilation requirements (i.e., section 6.1, 6.2, 6.3, and 7.2) and similar homes constructed to the state building code with conventional materials. The IAQ in IAP and conventional homes of similar age, location, and construction style is quantified as the differences in the speciated VOC and aldehyde concentrations, normalized to dilution rates. The experimental plan consists of methods to evaluate the difference between low

  2. 76 FR 20807 - Pilot Program on NAFTA Long-Haul Trucking Provisions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-13

    ...The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) announces its proposal for the initiation of a United States-Mexico cross-border long-haul trucking pilot program to test and demonstrate the ability of Mexico-based motor carriers to operate safely in the United States beyond the municipalities and commercial zones along the United States-Mexico border. The pilot program is part of......

  3. 76 FR 27606 - Technical Corrections To Remove Obsolete References to Non-Automated Carriers From Electronic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-12

    ... commercial carrier (sea, air, rail, or truck) through a CBP-approved electronic data interchange system. The CBP-approved electronic data interchange (transmission) system is the Automated Manifest System (AMS... carrier (sea, air, rail, or truck) through the CBP-approved electronic data interchange system. The...

  4. 7. Interior of cockpit showing pilot and copilot seats with ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Interior of cockpit showing pilot and co-pilot seats with console and overhead instrument panels. View to northeast. - Offutt Air Force Base, Looking Glass Airborne Command Post, Looking Glass Aircraft, On Operational Apron covering northeast half of Project Looking Glass Historic District, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE

  5. C-130 Phase I Pilot Training Program (CCTS).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Jack B.; And Others

    This is a detailed study of the C-130 Phase I (CCTS) pilot training program conducted by the 4442nd Combat Crew Training Wing at Stewart Air Force Base, Tennessee. The purpose of the study was to determine the most effective training program that will continue to produce highly qualified pilots at the least cost. The program was evaluated and…

  6. 14 CFR 91.1051 - Pilot safety background check.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pilot safety background check. 91.1051... (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES GENERAL OPERATING AND FLIGHT RULES Fractional Ownership Operations Program Management § 91.1051 Pilot safety background check. Within 90 days of an...

  7. PILOT STUDY: THE TAMPA ASTHMATIC CHILDREN'S STUDY (TACS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Tampa Asthmatic Children's Study (TACS) was a pilot research study that focused on developing and evaluating air pollution exposure assessment methods and participant recruiting tools for children in the age range of 1-5 years old. The pilot study focused on (a) simple, cost-...

  8. 76 FR 55335 - Alternate Passenger Rail Service Pilot Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-07

    ...This NPRM is in response to a statutory mandate that FRA complete a rulemaking proceeding to develop a pilot program that permits a rail carrier or rail carriers that own infrastructure over which Amtrak operates certain passenger rail service routes to petition FRA to be considered as a passenger rail service provider over such a route in lieu of Amtrak for a period not to exceed five years......

  9. Interactive computerized air combat opponent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hankins, W. W., III

    1976-01-01

    A computer program developed to fly interactive one-on-one simulated air combat maneuvers against human pilots is described. The program which is called Adaptive Maneuvering Logic (AML), is being used in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Langley Research Center's Differential Maneuvering Simulator. The basic control logic evaluates the relative states of the two aircraft and reacts by choosing the best of several elemental maneuvers. Pilot comments and results obtained when the computer was flown against combat-qualified fighter pilots indicate that the program performs realistic maneuvers and offers a very competitive standard pilot.

  10. A pilot study on lignocelluloses to ethanol and fish feed using NMMO pretreatment and cultivation with zygomycetes in an air-lift reactor.

    PubMed

    Lennartsson, Patrik R; Niklasson, Claes; Taherzadeh, Mohammad J

    2011-03-01

    A complete process for the production of bioethanol and fungal biomass from spruce and birch was investigated. The process included milling, pretreatment with N-methylmorpholine-N-oxide (NMMO), washing of the pretreated wood, enzymatic hydrolysis, and cultivation of the zygomycetes fungi Mucor indicus. Investigated factors included wood chip size (0.5-16 mm), pretreatment time (1-5h), and scale of the process from bench-scale to 2m high air-lift reactor. Best hydrolysis yields were achieved from wood chips below 2mm after 5h of pretreatment. Ethanol yields (mg/g wood) of 195 and 128 for spruce, and 175 and 136 for birch were achieved from bench-scale and airlift, respectively. Fungal biomass yields (mg/g wood) of 103 and 70 for spruce, and 86 and 66 for birch from bench scale and airlift respectively were simultaneously achieved. NMMO pretreatment and cultivation with M. indicus appear to be a good alternative for ethanol production from birch and spruce.

  11. Automatic carrier acquisition system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bunce, R. C. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    An automatic carrier acquisition system for a phase locked loop (PLL) receiver is disclosed. It includes a local oscillator, which sweeps the receiver to tune across the carrier frequency uncertainty range until the carrier crosses the receiver IF reference. Such crossing is detected by an automatic acquisition detector. It receives the IF signal from the receiver as well as the IF reference. It includes a pair of multipliers which multiply the IF signal with the IF reference in phase and in quadrature. The outputs of the multipliers are filtered through bandpass filters and power detected. The output of the power detector has a signal dc component which is optimized with respect to the noise dc level by the selection of the time constants of the filters as a function of the sweep rate of the local oscillator.

  12. Private and Commercial Pilot: Free Balloon: Flight Test Guide (Part 61 Revised).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Aviation Administration (DOT), Washington, DC. Flight Standards Service.

    The flight test guide has been prepared to assist the applicant and his instructor in preparing for the private pilot or commercial pilot certificate with a lighter-than-air category and free balloon class rating. It contains information and guidance concerning the pilot operations, procedures, and maneuvers relevant to the flight test: layout and…

  13. Stress and Simulation in Pilot Training. Final Report, May 1977 Through December 1977.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krahenbuhl, Gary S.; And Others

    Research was conducted on pilot stress during simulated emergency flight conditions. Catecholamine (adrenaline and non-adrenaline) secretion for twenty United States Air Force student pilots and thirteen instructor pilots was determined during daily activities, during simulated flights performed in high realism simulators, and during actual…

  14. 40 CFR 88.205-94 - California Pilot Test Program Credits Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false California Pilot Test Program Credits...) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CLEAN-FUEL VEHICLES California Pilot Test Program § 88.205-94 California... program to enable vehicle manufacturers who are required to participate in the California Pilot...

  15. 40 CFR 88.205-94 - California Pilot Test Program Credits Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false California Pilot Test Program Credits...) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CLEAN-FUEL VEHICLES California Pilot Test Program § 88.205-94 California... program to enable vehicle manufacturers who are required to participate in the California Pilot...

  16. 40 CFR 88.205-94 - California Pilot Test Program Credits Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true California Pilot Test Program Credits...) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CLEAN-FUEL VEHICLES California Pilot Test Program § 88.205-94 California... program to enable vehicle manufacturers who are required to participate in the California Pilot...

  17. 40 CFR 88.205-94 - California Pilot Test Program Credits Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false California Pilot Test Program Credits...) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CLEAN-FUEL VEHICLES California Pilot Test Program § 88.205-94 California... program to enable vehicle manufacturers who are required to participate in the California Pilot...

  18. The Effect of Shared Information on Pilot/Controller and Controller/Controller Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansman, R. John; Davison, Hayley J.

    2000-01-01

    The increased ability to exchange information between Pilots, Controllers, Dispatchers, and other agents is a key component of advanced Air Traffic Management. The importance of shared information as well as current and evolving practices in information sharing are presented for a variety of interactions including: Controller/Pilot interactions, Pilot/Airline interactions, Controller/Controller interactions, and Airline/ATM interactions.

  19. Pilot mental workload: how well do pilots really perform?

    PubMed

    Morris, Charles H; Leung, Ying K

    2006-12-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of increasing mental demands on various aspects of aircrew performance. In particular, the robustness of the prioritization and allocation hierarchy of aviate-navigate-communicate was examined, a hierarchy commonly used within the aviation industry. A total of 42 trainee pilots were divided into three workload groups (low, medium, high) to complete a desktop, computer-based exercise that simulated combinations of generic flight deck activities: flight control manipulation, rule-based actions and higher level cognitive processing, in addition to Air Traffic Control instructions that varied in length from one chunk of auditory information to seven chunks. It was found that as mental workload and auditory input increased, participants experienced considerable difficulty in carrying out the primary manipulation task. A similar decline in prioritization was also observed. Moreover, when pilots were under a high mental workload their ability to comprehend more than two chunks of auditory data deteriorated rapidly.

  20. AD-1 with research pilot Richard E. Gray

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Standing in front of the AD-1 Oblique Wing research aircraft is research pilot Richard E. Gray. Richard E. Gray joined National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Johnson Space Center, Houston, Texas, in November 1978, as an aerospace research pilot. In November 1981, Dick joined the NASA's Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility, Edwards, California, as a research pilot. Dick was a former Co-op at the NASA Flight Research Center (a previous name of the Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility), serving as an Operations Engineer. At Ames-Dryden, Dick was a pilot for the F-14 Aileron Rudder Interconnect Program, AD-1 Oblique Wing Research Aircraft, F-8 Digital Fly-By-Wire and Pilot Induced Oscillations investigations. He also flew the F-104, T-37, and the F-15. On November 8, 1982, Gray was fatally injured in a T-37 jet aircraft while making a pilot proficiency flight. Dick graduated with a Bachelors degree in Aeronautical Engineering from San Jose State University in 1969. He joined the U.S. Navy in July 1969, becoming a Naval Aviator in January 1971, when he was assigned to F-4 Phantoms at Naval Air Station (NAS) Miramar, California. In 1972, he flew 48 combat missions in Vietnam in F-4s with VF-111 aboard the USS Coral Sea. After making a second cruise in 1973, Dick was assigned to Air Test and Evaluation Squadron Four (VX-4) at NAS Point Mugu, California, as a project pilot on various operational test and evaluation programs. In November 1978, Dick retired from the Navy and joined NASA's Johnson Space Center. At JSC Gray served as chief project pilot on the WB-57F high-altitude research projects and as the prime television chase pilot in a T-38 for the landing portion of the Space Shuttle orbital flight tests. Dick had over 3,000 hours in more than 30 types of aircraft, an airline transport rating, and 252 carrier arrested landings. He was a member of the Society of Experimental Test Pilots serving on the Board of Directors as Southwest Section Technical Adviser in

  1. NACA/NASA test pilot Stanley P. Butchart

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1954-01-01

    Stanley P. Butchart joined the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics' High-Speed Flight Research Station on May 10, 1951. Stan was the fourth research pilot hired at the Station affording him the opportunity to fly the early research aircraft. Stan began a flying career while attending Junior College. He received primary and secondary civilian pilot training, enlisting in the U.S. Navy in July 1942. Stan took his Navy air training at Corpus Christi, Texas. Upon completion of training he was assigned to a torpedo-bomber Air Group, VT-51, flying Grumman-General Motors TBM Avenger, a torpedo-bomber, from the carrier San Jacinto in the South Pacific. When World War II ended, Stan was released from active duty as a Navy Lieutenant, with a Distinguished Flying Cross and a Presidential Unit Citation among his service medals. Butchart elected to stay in the Naval Reserve group and flew for an additional 5 years while he attended the University of Washington. By 1950, Stan had earned bachelor degrees in aeronautical engineering and mechanical engineering. After graduation he went to work for Boeing Aircraft as a junior design engineer and was assigned to the B-47 body group. In May 1951, he arrived at the NACA facility to start a career as a research pilot. Stan flew the Douglas D-558-I #3 (12 flights, first on October 19, 1951), the Douglas D-558-II #3 (2 pilot check-out flights, first on June 26, 1953), Northrop X-4 (4 flights, first on May 27, 1952), Bell X-5 (13 flights, first in early December 1952). Other aircraft flown on research projects were the Boeing KC-135 Stratotanker, Convair CV-990, Boeing B-52-003, Boeing B-747, North American F-100A, Convair F-102, Piper PA-30 Twin Comanche, General Dynamics F-111, Boeing B-720, Convair CV-880, and the Boeing B-47 Stratojet, his favorite. he also flew many other aircraft. Stan did nearly all of the big airplane work at the Center. The biggest work load was flying the Boeing B-29 Stratofortress (Navy designation: P2B

  2. 14 CFR 61.11 - Expired pilot certificates and re-issuance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... with a lighter-than-air or free-balloon rating issued before July 1, 1945. (c) An airline transport... pilot certificate with a lighter-than-air or free-balloon rating that was issued after June 30,...

  3. 14 CFR 61.11 - Expired pilot certificates and re-issuance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... with a lighter-than-air or free-balloon rating issued before July 1, 1945. (c) An airline transport... pilot certificate with a lighter-than-air or free-balloon rating that was issued after June 30,...

  4. 14 CFR 61.11 - Expired pilot certificates and re-issuance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... with a lighter-than-air or free-balloon rating issued before July 1, 1945. (c) An airline transport... pilot certificate with a lighter-than-air or free-balloon rating that was issued after June 30,...

  5. 14 CFR 61.11 - Expired pilot certificates and re-issuance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... with a lighter-than-air or free-balloon rating issued before July 1, 1945. (c) An airline transport... pilot certificate with a lighter-than-air or free-balloon rating that was issued after June 30,...

  6. 14 CFR 61.11 - Expired pilot certificates and re-issuance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... with a lighter-than-air or free-balloon rating issued before July 1, 1945. (c) An airline transport... pilot certificate with a lighter-than-air or free-balloon rating that was issued after June 30,...

  7. 76 FR 16469 - Application of Air Charter, Inc. D/B/A Air Flamenco for Commuter Authority

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-23

    ... it should not issue an order finding Air Charter, Inc. d/b/a Air Flamenco fit, willing, and able, and awarding it Commuter Air Carrier Authorization. DATES: Persons wishing to file objections should do so...

  8. Preconception Carrier Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... What can the results of a carrier screening test tell me? A genetic counselor or your health care provider will use the results to calculate the ... the publisher. Related FAQs Genetic Disorders (FAQ094) Screening Tests for Birth Defects ... Education & Events Annual Meeting CME Overview CREOG ...

  9. Common Carrier Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Communications Commission, Washington, DC.

    This bulletin outlines the Federal Communications Commission's (FCC) responsibilities in regulating the interstate and foreign common carrier communication via electrical means. Also summarized are the history, technological development, and current capabilities and prospects of telegraph, wire telephone, radiotelephone, satellite communications,…

  10. Synthetic carriers of oxygen.

    PubMed

    Dellacherie, E; Labrude, P; Vigneron, C; Riess, J G

    1987-01-01

    During the last decade, construction of artificial carriers of oxygen for transfusion purposes has evolved in three main directions, which can be reviewed as follows. The first approach consists of modifying hemoglobin (Hb), the natural oxygen carrier, in order to lower its oxygen affinity and increase its intravascular persistence. To achieve this aim, two basic procedures have been used: molecular and environmental modification. In the first case, Hb is modified with chemical reagents; the second requires encapsulation of Hb to obtain artificial erythrocytes. The second approach is based on the use of synthetic oxygen-carrying chelates that mimic the oxygenation function of Hb. The main products in this class are metalloporphyrins, whose chemical environment is designed to render them efficient as reversible carriers of oxygen in vivo. Finally, the third approach deals with the perfluorochemicals used in emulsified form. Perfluorochemical liquids are excellent gas solvents, but some problems remain unsolved with regard to their development as oxygen carriers in vivo: low O2 dissolving capacity, toxicity, and excretion.

  11. Pilot’s Associate Definition Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-05-01

    Continue on ’Ye,5t if’,.ectsa,) and idenItify ti blonr numnbe, PIELO IGROUP sue. OR. Artificial Intelligence , System Architectures, Air 05 1 08...Air combat operational and technological problme in the 199S technology time frum are analyzed far application of artificial. intelligence technology as...situation and assist the pilot in revising plans as necessary. Artificial Intelligence technology, both hasduare and software, is reviewed and areas and

  12. Sealed substrate carrier for electroplating

    DOEpatents

    Ganti, Kalyana Bhargava [Fremont, CA

    2012-07-17

    One embodiment relates to a substrate carrier for use in electroplating a plurality of substrates. The substrate carrier includes a non-conductive carrier body on which the substrates are held, and conductive lines are embedded within the carrier body. A conductive bus bar is embedded into a top side of the carrier body and is conductively coupled to the conductive lines. A thermoplastic overmold covers a portion of the bus bar, and there is a plastic-to-plastic bond between the thermoplastic overmold and the non-conductive carrier body. Other embodiments, aspects and features are also disclosed.

  13. Data link air traffic control and flight deck environments: Experiment in flight crew performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lozito, Sandy; Mcgann, Alison; Corker, Kevin

    1993-01-01

    This report describes an experiment undertaken in a full mission simulation environment to investigate the performance impact of, and human/system response to, data-linked Air Traffic Control (ATC) and automated flight deck operations. Subjects were twenty pilots (ten crews) from a major United States air carrier. Crews flew the Advanced Concepts Flight Simulator (ACFS), a generic 'glass cockpit' simulator at NASA Ames. The method of data link used was similar to the data link implementation plans for a next-generation aircraft, and included the capability to review ATC messages and directly enter ATC clearance information into the aircraft systems. Each crew flew experimental scenarios, in which data reflecting communication timing, errors and clarifications, and procedures were collected. Results for errors and clarifications revealed an interaction between communication modality (voice v. data link) and communication type (air/ground v. intracrew). Results also revealed that voice crews initiated ATC contact significantly more than data link crews. It was also found that data link crews performed significantly more extraneous activities during the communication task than voice crews. Descriptive data from the use of the review menu indicate the pilot-not-flying accessing the review menu most often, and also suggest diffulty in accessing the target message within the review menu structure. The overall impact of communication modality upon air/ground communication and crew procedures is discussed.

  14. Objective Versus Subjective Military Pilot Selection Methods in the United States of America

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-14

    scores were near the superior range for ANG and AD pilots. Although chosen by diverse methods, both ANG and AD pilots shared similar cognitive and...personality characteristics. 15. SUBJECT TERMS U.S. Air Force, pilot selection, personality, cognitive characteristics 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION...by diverse methods, both ANG and AD pilots shared similar cognitive and personality characteristics. 2.0 INTRODUCTION There is a tradition in

  15. Piloted-simulation evaluation of escape guidance for microburst wind shear encounters. M.S. Thesis - George Washington Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinton, David A.

    1989-01-01

    Numerous air carrier accidents and incidents result from encounters with the atmospheric wind shear associated with microburst phenomena, in some cases resulting in heavy loss of life. An important issue in current wind shear research is how to best manage aircraft performance during an inadvertent wind shear encounter. The goals of this study were to: (1) develop techniques and guidance for maximizing an aircraft's ability to recover from microburst encounters following takeoff, (2) develop an understanding of how theoretical predictions of wind shear recovery performance might be achieved in actual use, and (3) gain insight into the piloting factors associated with recovery from microburst encounters. Three recovery strategies were implemented and tested in piloted simulation. Results show that a recovery strategy based on flying a flight path angle schedule produces improved performance over constant pitch attitude or acceleration-based recovery techniques. The best recovery technique was initially counterintuitive to the pilots who participated in the study. Evidence was found to indicate that the techniques required for flight through the turbulent vortex of a microburst may differ from the techniques being developed using classical, nonturbulent microburst models.

  16. 78 FR 20373 - Pilot Program on NAFTA Trucking Provisions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration Pilot Program on NAFTA Trucking Provisions AGENCY: Federal...) cross-border long-haul trucking provisions in compliance with section 6901(b)(2)(B) of the Act....

  17. 78 FR 24293 - Pilot Program on NAFTA Trucking Provisions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration Pilot Program on NAFTA Trucking Provisions AGENCY: Federal... implementation of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) cross-border long-haul trucking provisions...

  18. 78 FR 11728 - Pilot Project on NAFTA Trucking Provisions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-19

    ... Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration Pilot Project on NAFTA Trucking Provisions AGENCY: Federal...-border long-haul trucking provisions in compliance with section 6901(b)(2)(B) of the Act. FMCSA reviewed... provisions of the North American Free Trade Agreement, during any period in which a suspension,...

  19. 77 FR 47693 - Pilot Program on NAFTA Trucking Provisions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration Pilot Program on NAFTA Trucking Provisions AGENCY: Federal...-border long-haul trucking provisions in compliance with section 6901(b)(2)(B) of the Act. FMCSA...

  20. 77 FR 27837 - Pilot Program on NAFTA Trucking Provisions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration Pilot Program on NAFTA Trucking Provisions AGENCY: Federal...-haul trucking provisions in compliance with section 6901(b)(2)(B) of the Act. FMCSA reviewed,...

  1. 77 FR 12356 - Pilot Program on NAFTA Trucking Provisions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration Pilot Program on NAFTA Trucking Provisions AGENCY: Federal... Agreement (NAFTA) cross-border long-haul trucking provisions in compliance with section 6901(b)(2)(B) of...

  2. 76 FR 56868 - Pilot Project on NAFTA Trucking Provisions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration Pilot Project on NAFTA Trucking Provisions AGENCY: Federal...-border long-haul trucking provisions in compliance with section 6901(b)(2)(B) of the Act. FMCSA...

  3. 78 FR 67445 - Pilot Program on NAFTA Trucking Provisions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration Pilot Program on NAFTA Trucking Provisions AGENCY: Federal... Trade Agreement (NAFTA) cross-border long-haul trucking provisions in compliance with section...

  4. 14 CFR 135.297 - Pilot in command: Instrument proficiency check requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... autopilot system in place of a second in command, that pilot must show, during the required instrument... autopilot to— (1) Conduct instrument operations competently; and (2) Properly conduct air-ground communications and comply with complex air traffic control instructions. (3) Each pilot taking the...

  5. Simulator results of an F-14A airplane utilizing an aileron-rudder interconnect during carrier approaches and landings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, W. W.; Brown, P. W.

    1980-01-01

    A piloted simulator study was conducted to evaluate an aileron rudder interconnect (ARI) control system for the F-14A airplane in the landing configuration. Effects on pilot performance and handling characteristics were investigated. Two ARI configurations were tested and compared to the standard F-14 fleet control system. A nonlinear aerodynamic model of the F-14 was used in conjunction with a six degree of freedom motion base simulator. The evaluation task, which utilized three subject pilots, consistent of a night carrier approach and landing. Both ARI configurations produced improved pilot performance and pilot ratings when compared to the standard control system. Sideslip due to adverse yaw as considerably reduced by the ARI systems and heading control was more stable and precise. Lateral deviation from centerline was reduced during the approach and lateral touchdown dispersion on the carrier deck was reduced with the ARI control systems.

  6. 76 FR 35938 - Notice of Applications for Certificates of Public Convenience and Necessity and Foreign Air...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-20

    ...: Application of FLY DOM N.V. d/b/a JET BUDGET (``JET BUDGET'') requesting a foreign air carrier permit and... Certificates of Public Convenience and Necessity and Foreign Air Carrier Permits Filed Under Subpart B... Public Convenience and Necessity and Foreign Air Carrier Permits were filed under Subpart B...

  7. Yarn carrier with clutch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doyne, Richard A. (Inventor); Benson, Rio H. (Inventor); El-Shiekh, Aly (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A yarn carrier apparatus particularly suited for use in braiding machinery or the like due to its capability of continuous yarn feeding and retraction of long lengths of yarn. The yarn carrier apparatus comprises a yarn supply spool which is rotatably mounted within the housing, a spring motor also mounted within the housing and operatively connected to the yarn supply spool through a mechanical transmission assembly which is adapted to multiply rotational movement between the first element of the gear assembly operatively connected to the spring motor and the final element of the gear assembly operatively connected to the yarn supply spool. The spring motor is adapted to tension the yarn during both feeding and retraction thereof, and it is further adapted to periodically rotatably slip within the housing and partially unwind so as to allow for continuous withdrawal of a long length of yarn without the spring motor becoming fully wound and preventing further yarn retraction.

  8. Line Pilots' Attitudes about and Experience with Flight Deck Automation: Results of an International Survey and Proposed Guidelines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudisill, Marianne

    1995-01-01

    A survey of line pilots' attitudes about flight deck automation was conducted by the Royal Air Force Institute of Aviation Medicine (RAF IAM, Farnborough, UK) under the sponsorship of the United Kingdom s Civil Aviation Authority and in cooperation with IATA (the International Air Transport Association). Survey freehand comments given by pilots operating 13 types of commercial transports across five manufacturers (Airbus, Boeing, British Aerospace, Lockheed, and McDonnell-Douglas) and 57 air carriers/organizations were analyzed by NASA. These data provide a "lessons learned" knowledge base which may be used for the definition of guidelines for flight deck automation and its associated crew interface within the High Speed Research Program. The aircraft chosen for analysis represented a progression of levels of automation sophistication and complexity, from "Basic" types (e.g., B727, DC9), through "Transition" types (e.g., A300, Concorde), to two levels of glass cockpits (e.g., Glass 1: e.g., A310; Glass 2: e.g., B747-400). This paper reports the results of analyses of comments from pilots flying commercial transport types having the highest level of automation sophistication (B757/B767, B747-400, and A320). Comments were decomposed into five categories relating to: (1) general observations with regard to flight deck automation; comments concerning the (2) design and (3) crew understanding of automation and the crew interface; (4) crew operations with automation; and (5) personal factors affecting crew/automation interaction. The goal of these analyses is to contribute to the definition of guidelines which may be used during design of future aircraft flight decks.

  9. Pilots of the future - Human or computer?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chambers, A. B.; Nagel, D. C.

    1985-01-01

    In connection with the occurrence of aircraft accidents and the evolution of the air-travel system, questions arise regarding the computer's potential for making fundamental contributions to improving the safety and reliability of air travel. An important result of an analysis of the causes of aircraft accidents is the conclusion that humans - 'pilots and other personnel' - are implicated in well over half of the accidents which occur. Over 70 percent of the incident reports contain evidence of human error. In addition, almost 75 percent show evidence of an 'information-transfer' problem. Thus, the question arises whether improvements in air safety could be achieved by removing humans from control situations. In an attempt to answer this question, it is important to take into account also certain advantages which humans have in comparison to computers. Attention is given to human error and the effects of technology, the motivation to automate, aircraft automation at the crossroads, the evolution of cockpit automation, and pilot factors.

  10. Maintainable substrate carrier for electroplating

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Chen-An; Abas, Emmanuel Chua; Divino, Edmundo Anida; Ermita, Jake Randal G.; Capulong, Jose Francisco S.; Castillo, Arnold Villamor; Ma, Diana Xiaobing

    2016-08-02

    One embodiment relates to a substrate carrier for use in electroplating a plurality of substrates. The carrier includes a non-conductive carrier body on which the substrates are placed and conductive lines embedded within the carrier body. A plurality of conductive clip attachment parts are attached in a permanent manner to the conductive lines embedded within the carrier body. A plurality of contact clips are attached in a removable manner to the clip attachment parts. The contact clips hold the substrates in place and conductively connecting the substrates with the conductive lines. Other embodiments, aspects and features are also disclosed.

  11. Maintainable substrate carrier for electroplating

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Chen-An [Milpitas, CA; Abas, Emmanuel Chua [Laguna, PH; Divino, Edmundo Anida [Cavite, PH; Ermita, Jake Randal G [Laguna, PH; Capulong, Jose Francisco S [Laguna, PH; Castillo, Arnold Villamor [Batangas, PH; Ma,; Xiaobing, Diana [Saratoga, CA

    2012-07-17

    One embodiment relates to a substrate carrier for use in electroplating a plurality of substrates. The carrier includes a non-conductive carrier body on which the substrates are placed and conductive lines embedded within the carrier body. A plurality of conductive clip attachment parts are attached in a permanent manner to the conductive lines embedded within the carrier body. A plurality of contact clips are attached in a removable manner to the clip attachment parts. The contact clips hold the substrates in place and conductively connecting the substrates with the conductive lines. Other embodiments, aspects and features are also disclosed.

  12. Collaboration in Controller-Pilot Communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrow, Daniel; Lebacqz, J. Victor (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Like other forms of dialogue, air traffic control (ATC) communication is an act of collaboration between two or more people. Collaboration progresses more or less smoothly depending on speaker and listener strategies. For example, we have found that the way controllers organize and deliver messages influences how easily pilots understand these messages, which in turn determines how much time and effort is needed to successfully complete the transaction. In this talk, I will introduce a collaborative framework for investigating controller-pilot communication and then describe a set of studies that investigate ATC communication from two complementary directions. First, we focused on the impact of ATC message factors (e.g., length, speech rate) on the cognitive processes involved in ATC: communication. Second, we examined pilot factors that influence the amount of cognitive resources available for these communication processes. These studies also illustrate how the collaborate framework can help analyze the impact of proposed visual data link systems on ATC communication. Examining the joint effects of communication medium, message factors, and pilot/controller factors on performance should help improve air safety and communication efficiency. Increased efficiency is important for meeting the growing demands on the National Air System.

  13. Medical examinations for pilots.

    PubMed Central

    Nicholson, P. J.

    1995-01-01

    High altitude is an environment that is alien to man. Stressors associated with the mechanics of flight include motion and acceleration forces applied in three vectors and in degrees that are foreign to the human vestibular apparatus. Furthermore, the work patterns of a pilot can interfere with lifestyle and circadian rhythms. Therefore medical fitness is an important consideration in determining an individual's suitability to exercise a pilot's licence. The medical standards applied depend on the type of aircraft flown and the duties expected of a pilot. There are three broad categories of pilot. In ascending order of stringency of medical standards these are the private pilot, the professional pilot and the military pilot. PMID:7494767

  14. Selecting pilots with crew resource management skills.

    PubMed

    Hedge, J W; Bruskiewicz, K T; Borman, W C; Hanson, M A; Logan, K K; Siem, F M

    2000-10-01

    For years, pilot selection has focused primarily on the identification of individuals with superior flying skills and abilities. More recently, the aviation community has become increasingly aware that successful completion of a flight or mission requires not only flying skills but the ability to work well in a crew situation. This project involved development and validation of a crew resource management (CRM) skills test for Air Force transport pilots. A significant relation was found between the CRM skills test and behavior-based ratings of aircraft commander CRM performance, and the implications of these findings for CRM-based selection and training are discussed.

  15. Pilot Selection for the Air National Guard.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-03-01

    sixty thousand applicants request Pre-Candidate Questionaires from the Academy’s admissions office. After interviews, physical, medical and academic... effect . The ANG attrition rate compares favorably against the USAF total rate and suggests that the units are doing a good job of selecting applicants. The...Director of Leadership Laboratory, Headquarters Reserve Officer Training Corps, Maxwell AFB, Alabama: 2 October 1985. 15. ANGR 51-4. Application

  16. Air Force's First C-17 Flies into Retirement

    NASA Video Gallery

    The U.S. Air Force has retired its first C-17 transport after 21 years as a flight test aircraft and use in joint NASA-USAF propulsion research. NASA research pilot Frank Batteas, who was an Air Fo...

  17. New Jersey: Clean Air Communities (A Former EPA CARE Project)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Clean Air Communities (CAC) is the recipient of a Level II CARE cooperative agreement to implement recommendations by the state’s Environmental Justice Task Force and the Air Toxics Pilot Project to reduce environmental risks.

  18. AIR QUALITY CHARACTERIZATION OF ENVIRONMENTAL PUBLIC HEALTH TRACKING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The EPA and the CDC have conducted a collaborative effort entitled the Public Health Air Surveillance Evaluation (PHASE) to pilot the development of integrated air quality data sets, from routinely available sources, for specific use by public health officials.

  19. Air-Powered Projectile Launcher

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, T.; Bjorklund, R. A.; Elliott, D. G.; Jones, L. K.

    1987-01-01

    Air-powered launcher fires plastic projectiles without using explosive propellants. Does not generate high temperatures. Launcher developed for combat training for U.S. Army. With reservoir pressurized, air launcher ready to fire. When pilot valve opened, sleeve (main valve) moves to rear. Projectile rapidly propelled through barrel, pushed by air from reservoir. Potential applications in seismic measurements, avalanche control, and testing impact resistance of windshields on vehicles.

  20. 76 FR 42163 - Pilot Program on the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) Long-Haul Trucking Provisions...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration Pilot Program on the North American Free Trade... to an April 8, 2011 notice announcing a pilot program on the North American Free Trade...

  1. Neurological and Endocrine Phenotypes of Fragile X Carrier Women

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Deborah; Todorova-Koteva, Kristina; Pandya, Shrikant; Bernard, Bryan; Ouyang, Bichun; Walsh, Maura; Pounardjian, Tamar; Deburghraeve, Cory; Zhou, Lili; Losh, Molly; Leehey, Maureen; Berry-Kravis, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Women who carry fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1)gene premutation expansions frequently report neurological or endocrine symptoms and prior studies have predominantly focused on questionnaire report of medical issues. Methods Premutation carrier women (n=33) and non-carrier controls (n=13) were recruited and evaluated by a neurologist, neuropsychologist, and endocrinologist. Blood and skin biopsies were collected for molecular measures. Scales for movement disorders, neuropathy, cognitive function, psychiatric symptoms, sleep, and quality of life were completed. Results The average age of the women was 51 years (n=46) and average CGG repeat size was 91 ± 24.9 in the FMR1 premutation carrier women. Seventy-percent of the premutation carrier women had an abnormal neurological examination. Premutation carrier women had significantly higher scores on the FXTAS Rating Scale, more neuropathy, and difficulty with tandem gait compared to controls. Central sensitivity syndromes, a neuroticism profile on the NEO Personality Profile, and sleep disorders were also prevalent. Discrepancies between subject report and examination findings were also seen. Conclusions This pilot study suggests that women with the FMR1 premutation may have a phenotype that overlaps with that seen in FXTAS. Additional research with larger sample sizes is warranted to better delineate the clinical features. PMID:26212380

  2. AN ANALYSIS OF TERMINAL FLIGHT PATH CONTROL IN CARRIER LANDING

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Fresnel lens optical landing system/(FLOLS)/pilot/aircraft system, considering deck motions and air turbulence inputs. Performance of this model in terms of terminal conditions in the vertical plane (ramp clearance, impact velocity, dispersion of the touchdown point) and aircraft longitudinal motions in the groove prior to touchdown is consistent with and validated by actual performance. The terminal dispersions are statistically combined to yield probabilities of potential ramp strikes, landing gear failures, and bolters, which, when put through a simplified pilot/LSO

  3. Modelling piloted ignition of wood and plastics

    SciTech Connect

    Blijderveen, Maarten van; Bramer, Eddy A.; Brem, Gerrit

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We model piloted ignition times of wood and plastics. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The model is applied on a packed bed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer When the air flow is above a critical level, no ignition can take place. - Abstract: To gain insight in the startup of an incinerator, this article deals with piloted ignition. A newly developed model is described to predict the piloted ignition times of wood, PMMA and PVC. The model is based on the lower flammability limit and the adiabatic flame temperature at this limit. The incoming radiative heat flux, sample thickness and moisture content are some of the used variables. Not only the ignition time can be calculated with the model, but also the mass flux and surface temperature at ignition. The ignition times for softwoods and PMMA are mainly under-predicted. For hardwoods and PVC the predicted ignition times agree well with experimental results. Due to a significant scatter in the experimental data the mass flux and surface temperature calculated with the model are hard to validate. The model is applied on the startup of a municipal waste incineration plant. For this process a maximum allowable primary air flow is derived. When the primary air flow is above this maximum air flow, no ignition can be obtained.

  4. Telemetry carrier ring and support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wakeman, Thomas G. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A telemetry carrier ring for use in a gas turbine engine includes an annular support ring connected to the engine and an annular carrier ring coupled to the support ring, each ring exhibiting different growth characteristics in response to thermal and mechanical loading. The carrier ring is coupled to the support ring by a plurality of circumferentially spaced web members which are relatively thin in an engine radial direction to provide a predetermined degree of radial flexibility. the web members have a circumferential width and straight axial line of action selected to transfer torque and thrust between the support ring and the carrier ring without substantial deflection. The use of the web members with radial flexibility provides compensation between the support ring and the carrier ring since the carrier ring grows at a different rate than the supporting ring.

  5. The Effect of Shared Information on Pilot/Controller Situation Awareness and Re-Route Negotiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Todd C.; Hansman, R. John; Endsley, Mica R.; Amonlirdviman, Keith; Vigeant-Langlois, Laurence

    1998-01-01

    The effect of shared information is assessed in terms of pilot/controller negotiation and shared situation awareness. Pilot goals and situation awareness requirements are developed and compared against those of air traffic controllers to identify areas of common and competing interest. A part-task simulator experiment is described which probes pilot/controller interaction in areas where common information has the potential to lead to contention, as identified in the comparative analysis. Preliminary results are presented which suggest that shared information can effect more collaborative interaction between pilots and air traffic controllers.

  6. Airlines Performance and Eflciency Evaluation using a MCDA Methodology. The Case for Low Cost Carriers vs Legacy Carriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miranda, Miguel; Baltazar, Maria E.; Silva, Jorge

    2016-11-01

    The air transport has suffered a remarkable transformation over the past decade. Thewaywe travel today is quite different from how we did ten years ago. Due to the rise of low cost carriers, the market of air transportation has been constantly changing and presently witnessing the transformation of legacy carriers in order to manage to continue operating. The main purpose of thiswork is to show the differences in efficiency for different performance areas on a case study comprised of six different airline carriers, legacy and low cost, using a Multi Criteria Decision Making (MCDA) tool - Measuring Attractiveness by a Category Based Evaluation Technique (MACBETH). With the results obtained in this study, it is expected to show the work that is being carried out to obtain a model that would measure the efficiency of one or various airline companies in a defined period of time, using a set of performance indicators, to which specialists in the area previously have given weights.

  7. Flight management - Pilot procedures and system interfaces for the 1980-1990's

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wempe, T. E.

    1974-01-01

    In the air transportation system of the 1980-1990's, aircraft must perform with greater precision in time and position than is possible today. Rapid development in electronics technology makes renovation in airborne-system concepts feasible. The Ames Research Center is conducting research on pilot procedures and pilot-system interfaces for such systems. Research on various pilot-system interface devices and manned simulations was conducted to study rules of distributed decision making authority among pilots and controllers with various airborne display concepts, and a pilot-oriented command logic for the control of avionic systems was studied. Results are summarized, and ongoing work and future research plans described.

  8. The effects of display and autopilot functions on pilot workload for Single Pilot Instrument Flight Rule (SPIFR) operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoh, Roger H.; Smith, James C.; Hinton, David A.

    1987-01-01

    An analytical and experimental research program was conducted to develop criteria for pilot interaction with advanced controls and displays in single pilot instrument flight rules (SPIFR) operations. The analytic phase reviewed fundamental considerations for pilot workload taking into account existing data, and using that data to develop a divided attention SPIFR pilot workload model. The pilot model was utilized to interpret the two experimental phases. The first experimental phase was a flight test program that evaluated pilot workload in the presence of current and near-term displays and autopilot functions. The second experiment was conducted on a King Air simulator, investigating the effects of co-pilot functions in the presence of very high SPIFR workload. The results indicate that the simplest displays tested were marginal for SPIFR operations. A moving map display aided the most in mental orientation, but had inherent deficiencies as a stand alone replacement for an HSI. Autopilot functions were highly effective for reducing pilot workload. The simulator tests showed that extremely high workload situations can be adequately handled when co-pilot functions are provided.

  9. 48 CFR 47.404 - Air freight forwarders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Air freight forwarders. 47... MANAGEMENT TRANSPORTATION Air Transportation by U.S.-Flag Carriers 47.404 Air freight forwarders. (a) Agencies may use air freight forwarders that are engaged in international air transportation (49...

  10. 14 CFR 382.93 - Must carriers offer preboarding to passengers with a disability?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Must carriers offer preboarding to passengers with a disability? 382.93 Section 382.93 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT... DISABILITY IN AIR TRAVEL Boarding, Deplaning, and Connecting Assistance § 382.93 Must carriers...

  11. 14 CFR 382.93 - Must carriers offer preboarding to passengers with a disability?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Must carriers offer preboarding to passengers with a disability? 382.93 Section 382.93 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT... DISABILITY IN AIR TRAVEL Boarding, Deplaning, and Connecting Assistance § 382.93 Must carriers...

  12. 14 CFR 382.93 - Must carriers offer preboarding to passengers with a disability?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Must carriers offer preboarding to passengers with a disability? 382.93 Section 382.93 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT... DISABILITY IN AIR TRAVEL Boarding, Deplaning, and Connecting Assistance § 382.93 Must carriers...

  13. 14 CFR 382.141 - What training are carriers required to provide for their personnel?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false What training are carriers required to provide for their personnel? 382.141 Section 382.141 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY... DISABILITY IN AIR TRAVEL Training and Administrative Provisions § 382.141 What training are carriers...

  14. 14 CFR 382.93 - Must carriers offer preboarding to passengers with a disability?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Must carriers offer preboarding to passengers with a disability? 382.93 Section 382.93 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT... DISABILITY IN AIR TRAVEL Boarding, Deplaning, and Connecting Assistance § 382.93 Must carriers...

  15. 14 CFR 382.93 - Must carriers offer preboarding to passengers with a disability?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Must carriers offer preboarding to passengers with a disability? 382.93 Section 382.93 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT... DISABILITY IN AIR TRAVEL Boarding, Deplaning, and Connecting Assistance § 382.93 Must carriers...

  16. 14 CFR 382.141 - What training are carriers required to provide for their personnel?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false What training are carriers required to provide for their personnel? 382.141 Section 382.141 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY... DISABILITY IN AIR TRAVEL Training and Administrative Provisions § 382.141 What training are carriers...

  17. 48 CFR 47.403-2 - Air transport agreements between the United States and foreign governments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Air transport agreements....-Flag Carriers 47.403-2 Air transport agreements between the United States and foreign governments... attend, the use of a foreign-flag air carrier that provides transportation under an air...

  18. Unmanned Aircraft: A Pilot's Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pestana, Mark E.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews some of the challenges of "piloting" a unmanned aircraft. The topic include the pilot-vehicle interact design, the concept of pilot/operator, and role of NASA's Ikhana UAS in the western states fire mission.

  19. Air-To-Air Combat Skills: Contribution of Platform Motion to Initial Training

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-10-01

    AFHRL/FT) using the Advanced Simulator for Air-to-Air Combat (SAAC); (b) an A/A study Pilot Training ( ASPT ) indicated that platform using Northrop...Advanced interested in the implication of these findings in Simulator for Pilot Training ( ASPT ) at Williams view of their planned simulator procurements...i.e., air-to-surface weapons delivery TAC’s request, but the ASPT A/S study was (A/S) and air-to-air combat (A/A), was questioned. completed (Gray

  20. Incentive Pay for Remotely Piloted Aircraft Career Fields

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    attracting and retaining pilots and sensor operators.” This mono- graph addresses this subject using an econometric model of officer and enlisted...Incentive Pays Evaluating incentive pays requires estimates of their effect on retention and their cost. We used an econometric model of officer and...theoretical overview of how and why pilots and SOs should receive incentive pays. Additionally, the Air Force was tasked with using an econometric

  1. Single-Pilot Workload Management in Entry-Level Jets

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    under Instrument Flight Rules ( IFR ) in a Cessna Citation Mustang ELJ level 5 flight training device at CAMI. Eight of the pilots were Mustang owner...this study, we relied on the experience of two air traffic control subject matter experts ( SMEs ), Art Gilman and Greg Elwood. In addition, we sought...guidance during study design and data analysis from our Garmin G1000/Cessna 510 Citation Mustang aircraft pilot SME , Dave Fry. Their expertise

  2. CSMA Versus Prioritized CSMA for Air-Traffic-Control Improvement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Daryl C.

    2001-01-01

    OPNET version 7.0 simulations are presented involving an important application of the Aeronautical Telecommunications Network (ATN), Controller Pilot Data Link Communications (CPDLC) over the Very High Frequency Data Link, Mode 2 (VDL-2). Communication is modeled for essentially all incoming and outgoing nonstop air-traffic for just three United States cities: Cleveland, Cincinnati, and Detroit. There are 32 airports in the simulation, 29 of which are either sources or destinations for the air-traffic of the aforementioned three airports. The simulation involves 111 Air Traffic Control (ATC) ground stations, and 1,235 equally equipped aircraft-taking off, flying realistic free-flight trajectories, and landing in a 24-hr period. Collisionless, Prioritized Carrier Sense Multiple Access (CSMA) is successfully tested and compared with the traditional CSMA typically associated with VDL-2. The performance measures include latency, throughput, and packet loss. As expected, Prioritized CSMA is much quicker and more efficient than traditional CSMA. These simulation results show the potency of Prioritized CSMA for implementing low latency, high throughput, and efficient connectivity.

  3. Infrared hot carrier diode mixer.

    PubMed

    Aukerman, L W; Erler, J W

    1977-11-01

    Detection of a 54.3-GHz beatnote at 10.6 microm has been observed with a hot carrier diode mixer. The diode consists of a "cat whisker" antenna, which forms an ohmic point contact to n-InAs. The mechanism of this room-temperature detector is described as the "thermoelectric effect" of hot carriers.

  4. Carrier dynamics in III-nitride semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kai

    In the past decade, III-nitride semiconductors had a considerable impact in solid state lighting and high speed high power electronics. As technology develops, high Al content III-nitride semiconductors lead the edge of research. It opens the door to many applications especially portable ones: from homeland security, bio-analytical, medical diagnostic, air and water disinfection, sterilization, chemical sensing systems, non-line-of-sight (NLOS) communications, to high-density optical data storage. In this thesis, we first study GaN epilayers, as well as more complicate high Al content AlGaN/AlGaN MQW structures used as active media for deep UV LEDs. We theoretically study the photoluminescence (PL) dynamics in high quality GaN epilayers by establishing a new decay model. In our model, surface recombination, diffusion, and re-absorption are taken into account. Our model is in excellent agreement with experimental data obtained by time-resolved PL. Our results show that the carrier diffusion and surface recombination play key roles in the PL decay. For high Al content AlGaN/AlGaN MQW structures, we first present the investigation of built-in electric fields in AlxGa1-xN/Al yGa1-yN MQWs embedded into p-i-n structure by using photoluminescence experiments. By comparison of the Stark shifts induced by the p-i-n structure and by photo-excited free carrier screening, we evaluate the intrinsic electric field induced by piezoelectric and spontaneous polarizations. Furthermore we investigate carrier dynamics in sets of identically grown Al0.35Ga0.65N/Al 0.49Ga0.51N MQW structures with well widths varying from 1.65 to 5.0 nm by TR-PL and LITG techniques. We observed screening of the built-in electric field by free non-equilibrium carriers and localization governed PL kinetics at different decay stages. A decrease of carrier lifetime with increasing well width is observed and attributed to the carrier localization occurring due to well width fluctuations of the quantum well

  5. Benefits and limitations of composites in carrier-based aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcerlean, Donald P.

    1992-01-01

    There are many unique aspects of Navy air missions that lead to the differentiation between the design and performance of ship and shore-based aircraft. The major aspects are discussed from which essentially all Navy aircraft design requirements derive. (1) Navy aircraft operate from carriers at sea imposes a broad spectrum of physical conditions, constraints, and requirements ranging from the harsh sea environment, the space limitations of a carrier, takeoff and landing requirements as well as for endurance at long distances from the carrier. (2) Because the carrier and its airwing are intended to be capable of responding to a broad range of contingencies, mission flexibility is essential (maximum weapon carriage, rapid reconfiguration, multiple mission capability). (3) The embarked aircraft provides the long range defense of the battle group against air, surface and subsurface launched antiship missiles. (4) The carrier and its aircraft must operate independently and outside of normal supply lines. Taking into account these aspects, the use of composite materials in the design and performance of naval aircraft is outlined, also listing advantages and disadvantages.

  6. To Educate Pilots.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Dayton Y.

    1968-01-01

    As the highly trained ex-military pilots of World War II began to retire from commercial flying, there was concern over the pilot shortage, especially among the airlines with their growing needs. Miami-Dade Junior College, in January 1965, was the first to respond to this need. Although initial enrollment was expected to be small, 150 applications…

  7. SuperPILOT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weissmann, Stephen M.

    1983-01-01

    SuperPILOT is Apple Computer's new computer assisted instruction authoring language. Provided is a review of SuperPILOT, indicated to be ideally suited for the development of interactive tutorials for the classroom. Includes comments on the language's strengths/weaknesses as well as comments on system requirements and special program features. (JN)

  8. Preparing Pilots for Takeoff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ravage, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    Why would schools consider partnering with a vendor to operate a pilot? Why not just wait until the final product is released? For starters, pilots provide schools with a golden opportunity to get an early look at the software, take it for a test flight, and ask for changes tailored to their operating environment and business needs. In some cases,…

  9. Medical Handbook for Pilots.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Aviation Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    This handbook provides information on an airline pilot's physical and mental status and related medical factors which may affect his/her performance. Contents include information on the physical examination for pilots, the flyer's environment, hypoxia, hyperventilation, gas in the body, the ears, alcohol, drugs and flying, carbon monoxide, vision,…

  10. Pilot in Command: An Illustration of Autonomous Flight Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wing, David J.; Ponthieux, Joseph G.

    2004-01-01

    Several years of NASA research have produced the concept for air traffic management called "Distributed Air/Ground Traffic Management," a major operational advancement that should significantly increase the capacity of the National Airspace System. A key component, "Autonomous Flight Management," introduces a new class of aircraft operations in which pilots are authorized to freely maneuver and execute optimal trajectories independent from air traffic controllers. These aircraft operators would benefit from significant increases in flexibility to optimize all flight operations and from avoiding most of the delays associated with ground-controlled operations. Responsibilities for aircraft separation and arrival flow conformance are transferred to the flight deck, and the pilots use computerized decision-support tools to accomplish these tasks. A research prototype of these tools called the "Autonomous Operations Planner" is being developed at the NASA Langley Research Center. This 14-minute video illustrates Autonomous Flight Management from the airline pilot's perspective.

  11. Optically induced free carrier light modulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruber, C. L.; Richards, W. E.

    1969-01-01

    Signal carrier laser beam is optically modulated by a second laser beam of different frequency acting on a free carrier source to which the signal carrier laser is directed. The second laser beam affects the transmission characteristics of the free carrier source to light from the signal carrier laser, thus modulating it.

  12. 14 CFR 93.219 - Allocation of slots for essential air service operations and applicable limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... SPECIAL AIR TRAFFIC RULES Allocation of Commuter and Air Carrier IFR Operations at High Density Traffic... or from a High Density Traffic Airport under the Department of Transportation's Essential Air...

  13. 14 CFR 93.219 - Allocation of slots for essential air service operations and applicable limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... SPECIAL AIR TRAFFIC RULES Allocation of Commuter and Air Carrier IFR Operations at High Density Traffic... or from a High Density Traffic Airport under the Department of Transportation's Essential Air...

  14. 14 CFR 93.219 - Allocation of slots for essential air service operations and applicable limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... SPECIAL AIR TRAFFIC RULES Allocation of Commuter and Air Carrier IFR Operations at High Density Traffic... or from a High Density Traffic Airport under the Department of Transportation's Essential Air...

  15. 14 CFR 93.219 - Allocation of slots for essential air service operations and applicable limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... SPECIAL AIR TRAFFIC RULES Allocation of Commuter and Air Carrier IFR Operations at High Density Traffic... or from a High Density Traffic Airport under the Department of Transportation's Essential Air...

  16. 14 CFR 93.219 - Allocation of slots for essential air service operations and applicable limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... SPECIAL AIR TRAFFIC RULES Allocation of Commuter and Air Carrier IFR Operations at High Density Traffic... or from a High Density Traffic Airport under the Department of Transportation's Essential Air...

  17. Satellites and Remotely Piloted Aircraft: Two Remotely Operated Ships Passing in the Fight

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    Report (SAR) 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 7 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON a . REPORT unclassified b. ABSTRACT unclassified c . THIS PAGE unclassified...combined air and space operations center, the ground commander, and, of course, the UAS pilot. —Pilot of a remotely piloted aircraft Operation Enduring...US Strategic Command, space operations are “absolutely global in nature and indifferent to physical terrain or lines drawn on a map.”2 Forces able

  18. Consistency of the Relations of Cognitive Ability and Personality Traits to Pilot Training Performance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-22

    Consistency of the Relations of Cognitive Ability and Personality Traits to Pilot Training Performance 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER...examined in large samples of US Air Force pilot trainees. Criterion data were collected between 1995 and 2008 from four training bases across three...training tracks. Analyses also examined consistency in pilot aptitude and training outcomes. Results were consistent with previous research

  19. Consistency of the Relations of Cognitive Ability and Personality Traits to Pilot Training Performance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-22

    of Cognitive Ability and Personality Traits to Pilot Training Performance 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 62202F 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d...predictive validity of cognitive ability and personality traits was examined in large samples of US Air Force pilot trainees. Criterion data were collected...between 1995 and 2008 from four training bases across three training tracks. Analyses also examined consistency in pilot aptitude and training

  20. Umanned Aerial Systems: Actions Needed to Improve DOD Pilot Training

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-01

    of Defense’s (DOD) UAS portfolio has grown over the years to rival traditional manned systems, and, as of July 2013, DOD had acquired over 10,000...rival its traditional manned systems and DOD reported that as of July 2013, it had acquired over 10,000 UASs.2 In its Unmanned Systems Integrated...UAS in a classroom setting. Air Force UAS pilots who the Air Force re-assigns from its manned-aircraft pilot ranks do not attend this first phase