Science.gov

Sample records for air command combat

  1. Air Combat Command deicing/anti-icing operation: Compliance evaluation and requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Fronapfel, P.J.

    1997-12-31

    This paper will present information on Air Combat Command`s (ACC) efforts in evaluating its deicing and anti-icing activities at all applicable ACC bases. This effort, led by Ecology and Environment (E and E), of Lancaster NY, will evaluate the operations, infrastructure, and management of deicing and anti-icing programs at ACC bases and will provide recommendations to each base for maintaining compliance with applicable regulations and minimizing the environmental impact of these operations. In addition to evaluating such operations at ACC bases, E and E, along with subcontractor Jacobs Engineering Group, Inc., will research activities around the nation and the world to assist in developing the best recommendations for each ACC base. Armstrong Laboratory`s Water Quality Branch of the Bioenvironmental Engineering Division (AL/OEBW) is responsible for technical and contractual oversight of this effort. A summary of information gathered to date will be presented in this paper. Although the disposal of deicing fluids has led a somewhat charmed life until recently, these activities are likely to receive increased regulatory scrutiny in the years to come. Air Combat Command has had more than one instance where NOVs or potential NOVs have arisen due to fish kills associated with deicing/anti-icing chemical laden runoff. In an effort to prevent future compliance problems and to foster proper stewardship of the environment, ACC has taken these proactive measures at its bases. ACC`s efforts will also be used at the Air Staff level to assist in making Air Force wide pollution prevention and best management practice (P2/BMP) recommendations.

  2. Artificial immune system approach for air combat maneuvering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneshige, John; Krishnakumar, Kalmanje

    2007-04-01

    Since future air combat missions will involve both manned and unmanned aircraft, the primary motivation for this research is to enable unmanned aircraft with intelligent maneuvering capabilities. During air combat maneuvering, pilots use their knowledge and experience of maneuvering strategies and tactics to determine the best course of action. As a result, we try to capture these aspects using an artificial immune system approach. The biological immune system protects the body against intruders by recognizing and destroying harmful cells or molecules. It can be thought of as a robust adaptive system that is capable of dealing with an enormous variety of disturbances and uncertainties. However, another critical aspect of the immune system is that it can remember how previous encounters were successfully defeated. As a result, it can respond faster to similar encounters in the future. This paper describes how an artificial immune system is used to select and construct air combat maneuvers. These maneuvers are composed of autopilot mode and target commands, which represent the low-level building blocks of the parameterized system. The resulting command sequences are sent to a tactical autopilot system, which has been enhanced with additional modes and an aggressiveness factor for enabling high performance maneuvers. Just as vaccinations train the biological immune system how to combat intruders, training sets are used to teach the maneuvering system how to respond to different enemy aircraft situations. Simulation results are presented, which demonstrate the potential of using immunized maneuver selection for the purposes of air combat maneuvering.

  3. Elevations. March Air Force Base, Riverside, California, Combat Operations Center, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Elevations. March Air Force Base, Riverside, California, Combat Operations Center, Combat Operations Building. By Moffatt and Nichol, Engineers, 122 West Fifth Street, Long Beach, California; for the Corps of Engineers, U.S. Army, Office of the District Engineer, Los Angeles, California. Drawing no. AW-60-02-03, sheet no. 14, approved March, 1962; specifications no. ENG-04-353-62-66; D.O. series AW 1596/14, Rev. "B"; file drawer 77-1/102. Last revised 3 October 1966. Scale one-eighth inch to one foot. 30x36 inches. photocopy on paper - March Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command, Combat Operations Center, 5220 Riverside Drive, Moreno Valley, Riverside County, CA

  4. Sections. March Air Force Base, Riverside, California, Combat Operations Center, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Sections. March Air Force Base, Riverside, California, Combat Operations Center, Combat Operations Building. By Moffatt and Nichol, Engineers, 122 West Fifth Street, Long Beach, California; for the Corps of Engineers, U.S. Army, Office of the District Engineer, Los Angeles, California. Drawing no. AW-60-02-03, sheet no. 14, approved March, 1962; specifications no. ENG-04-353-62-66; D.O. series AW 1596/15, Rev. "A"; file drawer 1290. Last revised 3 October 1966. Scale one-eighth inch to one foot. 30x36 inches. pencil on paper - March Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command, Combat Operations Center, 5220 Riverside Drive, Moreno Valley, Riverside County, CA

  5. 32 CFR Appendix A to Part 286 - Combatant Commands-Processing Procedures for FOIA Appeals

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Combatant Commands-Processing Procedures for FOIA Appeals A Appendix A to Part 286 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT PROGRAM DOD FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT...

  6. Iranian threat: Key concerns for the combatant commander in response. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Jasper, S.

    1996-03-05

    In the aftermath of the Gulf War with Iraq, the Islamic Republic of Iran has emerged as the greatest long-term threat to peace and stability in the Central Region. Through purchase of a wide range of high-tech weapons, Iran now has a formidable military force capable of influencing Gulf economic policy. However, in the event of Iranian aggression, the United States Central Command stands ready to defend vital U.S. interests in the Middle East. The national strategy of Iran is bound by the religious tenets of Islam and an oil based economy struggling to support a population which has exploded over the past sixteen years. Iran seeks to build global alliances for export of oil and liquid petroleum gas while continuing support for Islamic communities under attack. Iran perceives the U.S. and the emerging regional order to be the greatest threat to the republic`s existence and, in response, has bought fast attack missile patrol boats, diesel electric submarines, ballistic missiles and long range strike aircraft. Iran is now capable of conducting terrorist activities, denying international access to the Gulf and threatening the region with chemical/biological weapons. The Combatant Commander`s theater strategy must be tailored to respond rapidly and decisively to the growing Iranian threat.

  7. Offutt Air Force Base, Looking Glass Airborne Command Post, Hydraulic ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Offutt Air Force Base, Looking Glass Airborne Command Post, Hydraulic Fluid Buildings, Northeast of Looking Glass Avenue at southwest side of Project Looking Glass Historic District, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE

  8. ARCHITECTURAL DRAWING, MILITARY AIR COMMAND COMMUNICATION CENTER PRECAST CONCRETE WALL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ARCHITECTURAL DRAWING, MILITARY AIR COMMAND COMMUNICATION CENTER PRECAST CONCRETE WALL DETAILS. DATED 03/15/1971 - Wake Island Airfield, Terminal Building, West Side of Wake Avenue, Wake Island, Wake Island, UM

  9. Offutt Air Force Base, Looking Glass Airborne Command Post, Vehicle ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Offutt Air Force Base, Looking Glass Airborne Command Post, Vehicle Refueling Station, Northeast of AGE Storage Facility at far northwest end of Project Looking Glass Historic District, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE

  10. 107. Air defense command "master plan, basic mission plan," RCA ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    107. Air defense command "master plan, basic mission plan," RCA Service Company tab no. F-1, sheet 2 of 2, dated 1 June, 1963. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  11. A two-dimensional air-to-air combat game - Toward an air-combat advisory system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neuman, Frank

    1987-01-01

    Air-to-air combat is modeled as a discrete differential game, and by constraining the game to searching for the best guidance laws from the sets of those considered for each opponent, feedback and outcome charts are obtained which can be used to turn one of the automatic opponents into an intelligent opponent against a human pilot. A one-on-one two-dimensional fully automatic, or manned versus automatic, air-to-air combat game has been designed which includes both attack and evasion alternatives for both aircraft. Guidance law selection occurs by flooding the initial-condition space with four simulated fights for each initial condition, depicting the various attack/evasion strategies for the two opponents, and recording the outcomes. For each initial condition, the minimax method from differential games is employed to determine the best choice from the available strategies.

  12. A high-fidelity batch simulation environment for integrated batch and piloted air combat simulation analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodrich, Kenneth H.; Mcmanus, John W.; Chappell, Alan R.

    1992-01-01

    A batch air combat simulation environment known as the Tactical Maneuvering Simulator (TMS) is presented. The TMS serves as a tool for developing and evaluating tactical maneuvering logics and to evaluate the tactical implications of perturbations to aircraft performance or supporting systems. The TMS is capable of simulating air combat between any number of engagement participants, with practical limits imposed by computer memory and processing power. Aircraft are modeled using equations of motion, control laws, aerodynamics and propulsive characteristics, and databases representative of a modern high-performance aircraft with and without thrust-vectoring capability are included. A Tactical Autopilot is implemented in the aircraft simulation model to convert guidance commands issued by computerized maneuvering logics in the form of desired angle-of-attack and wind axis-bank angle into inputs to the inner-loop control augmentation system of the aircraft.

  13. Suitability of Agent Technology for Military Command and Control in the Future Combat System Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Potok, TE

    2003-02-13

    The U.S. Army is faced with the challenge of dramatically improving its war fighting capability through advanced technologies. Any new technology must provide significant improvement over existing technologies, yet be reliable enough to provide a fielded system. The focus of this paper is to assess the novelty and maturity of agent technology for use in the Future Combat System (FCS). The FCS concept represents the U.S. Army's ''mounted'' form of the Objective Force. This concept of vehicles, communications, and weaponry is viewed as a ''system of systems'' which includes net-centric command and control (C{sup 2}) capabilities. This networked C{sup 2} is an important transformation from the historically centralized, or platform-based, C{sup 2} function since a centralized command architecture may become a decision-making and execution bottleneck, particularly as the pace of war accelerates. A mechanism to ensure an effective network-centric C{sup 2} capacity (combining intelligence gathering and analysis available at lower levels in the military hierarchy) is needed. Achieving a networked C{sup 2} capability will require breakthroughs in current software technology. Many have proposed the use of agent technology as a potential solution. Agents are an emerging technology, and it is not yet clear whether it is suitable for addressing the networked C{sup 2} challenge, particularly in satisfying battlespace scalability, mobility, and security expectations. We have developed a set of software requirements for FCS based on military requirements for this system. We have then evaluated these software requirements against current computer science technology. This analysis provides a set of limitations in the current technology when applied to the FCS challenge. Agent technology is compared against this set of limitations to provide a means of assessing the novelty of agent technology in an FCS environment. From this analysis we find that existing technologies will not

  14. 33 CFR 334.1280 - Bristol Bay, Alaska; air-to-air weapon range, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Bristol Bay, Alaska; air-to-air weapon range, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force. 334.1280 Section 334.1280 Navigation and Navigable... REGULATIONS § 334.1280 Bristol Bay, Alaska; air-to-air weapon range, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force....

  15. 33 CFR 334.1280 - Bristol Bay, Alaska; air-to-air weapon range, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Bristol Bay, Alaska; air-to-air weapon range, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force. 334.1280 Section 334.1280 Navigation and Navigable... REGULATIONS § 334.1280 Bristol Bay, Alaska; air-to-air weapon range, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force....

  16. 33 CFR 334.1280 - Bristol Bay, Alaska; air-to-air weapon range, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Bristol Bay, Alaska; air-to-air weapon range, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force. 334.1280 Section 334.1280 Navigation and Navigable... REGULATIONS § 334.1280 Bristol Bay, Alaska; air-to-air weapon range, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force....

  17. 33 CFR 334.1280 - Bristol Bay, Alaska; air-to-air weapon range, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Bristol Bay, Alaska; air-to-air weapon range, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force. 334.1280 Section 334.1280 Navigation and Navigable... REGULATIONS § 334.1280 Bristol Bay, Alaska; air-to-air weapon range, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force....

  18. 33 CFR 334.1280 - Bristol Bay, Alaska; air-to-air weapon range, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bristol Bay, Alaska; air-to-air weapon range, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force. 334.1280 Section 334.1280 Navigation and Navigable... REGULATIONS § 334.1280 Bristol Bay, Alaska; air-to-air weapon range, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force....

  19. 78 FR 17185 - U.S. Air Force Space Command Notice of Test

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-20

    ... Department of the Air Force U.S. Air Force Space Command Notice of Test AGENCY: U.S. Air Force Space Command... inform users of an upcoming event related to the GPS satellite constellation. U.S. Air Force Space... process L2C or L5 CNAV. U.S. Air Force Space Command ] expects to conduct one to two CNAV tests per...

  20. 32 CFR Appendix A to Part 286 - Combatant Commands-Processing Procedures for FOIA Appeals

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... FOIA Appeals A Appendix A to Part 286 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE... REGULATION Pt. 286, App. A Appendix A to Part 286—Combatant Commands—Processing Procedures for FOIA Appeals.... AP1.2.4. Consult with other OSD and DoD Components that may have a significant interest in...

  1. Air-to-air combat analysis - Review of differential-gaming approaches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ardema, M. D.

    1981-01-01

    The problem of evaluating the combat performance of fighter/attack aircraft is discussed, and the mathematical nature of the problem is examined. The following approaches to air combat analysis are reviewed: (1) differential-turning differential game and (2) coplanar differential game. Selected numerical examples of these approaches are presented. The relative advantages and disadvantages of each are analyzed, and it is concluded that air combat analysis is an extremely difficult mathematical problem and that no one method of approach is best for all purposes. The paper concludes with a discussion of how the two approaches might be used in a complementary manner.

  2. Air Force Commanders and Barriers to Entry into a Doctoral Business Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Tony; LeMire, Steven D.

    2011-01-01

    The authors examined professionally qualified Air Force commanders' barriers to entry into a business doctoral degree program related to the factors of time, financial means, academics, and motivation. Of the 116 present commanders, 63% were interested in pursuing a doctorate in business. For the commanders interested in obtaining a doctorate…

  3. A High-Fidelity Batch Simulation Environment for Integrated Batch and Piloted Air Combat Simulation Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodrich, Kenneth H.; McManus, John W.; Chappell, Alan R.

    1992-01-01

    A batch air combat simulation environment known as the Tactical Maneuvering Simulator (TMS) is presented. The TMS serves as a tool for developing and evaluating tactical maneuvering logics. The environment can also be used to evaluate the tactical implications of perturbations to aircraft performance or supporting systems. The TMS is capable of simulating air combat between any number of engagement participants, with practical limits imposed by computer memory and processing power. Aircraft are modeled using equations of motion, control laws, aerodynamics and propulsive characteristics equivalent to those used in high-fidelity piloted simulation. Databases representative of a modern high-performance aircraft with and without thrust-vectoring capability are included. To simplify the task of developing and implementing maneuvering logics in the TMS, an outer-loop control system known as the Tactical Autopilot (TA) is implemented in the aircraft simulation model. The TA converts guidance commands issued by computerized maneuvering logics in the form of desired angle-of-attack and wind axis-bank angle into inputs to the inner-loop control augmentation system of the aircraft. This report describes the capabilities and operation of the TMS.

  4. A piloted simulation of helicopter air combat to investigate effects of variations in selected performance and control response characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Michael S.; Mansur, M. Hossein; Chen, Robert T. N.

    1987-01-01

    A piloted simulation study investigating handling qualities and flight characteristics required for helicopter air to air combat is presented. The Helicopter Air Combat system was used to investigate this role for Army rotorcraft. Experimental variables were the maneuver envelope size (load factor and sideslip), directional axis handling qualities, and pitch and roll control-response type. Over 450 simulated, low altitude, one-on-one engagements were conducted. Results from the experiment indicate that a well damped directional response, low sideforce caused by sideslip, and some effective dihedral are all desirable for weapon system performance, good handling qualities, and low pilot workload. An angular rate command system was favored over the attitude type pitch and roll response for most applications, and an enhanced maneuver envelope size over that of current generation aircraft was found to be advantageous. Pilot technique, background, and experience are additional factors which had a significant effect on performance in the air combat tasks investigated. The implication of these results on design requirements for future helicopters is presented.

  5. Standard operating procedure for air quality stationary source management at Air Force installations in the Air Force Materiel Command

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, C.M.; Ryckman, S.J.

    1997-12-31

    To sustain compliance and avoid future enforcement actions associated with air quality stationary sources and to provide installation commanders with a certification process for Title V permitting, and Air Force Materiel Command (AFMC) Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) for Stationary Source Management has been developed. The SOP consists of two major sections: Stationary Source Planning and Administration, and Stationary Source Operations These two main sections are further subdivided into twelve subsections which delineate requirements (e.g. maintaining inventories, applying for and maintaining permits, keeping records, reporting and certifying compliance) and assign ownership of processes and responsibilities (e.g. appointing a manager/alternate for each identified stationary air source). In addition, the SOP suggests training that should be provided from operator to commander levels to ensure that all personnel involved with a stationary air source are aware of their responsibilities. Implementation of the SOP should provide for the essential control necessary for installation commanders to eliminate stationary air source non-compliance and to certify compliance in accordance with the Title V Operating Permit requirements. This paper will discuss: the background and purpose for the SOPs content, the twelve subsections of the SOP, the success of implementation at various installations, the relevance or the recommended training, the success of negotiating with various labor unions for SOP implementation and the success of the SOP in reference to its intended purpose.

  6. Piloted simulation of one-on-one helicopter air combat at NOE flight levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, M. S.; Aiken, E. W.

    1985-01-01

    A piloted simulation designed to examine the effects of terrain proximity and control system design on helicopter performance during one-on-one air combat maneuvering (ACM) is discussed. The NASA Ames vertical motion simulator (VMS) and the computer generated imagery (CGI) systems were modified to allow two aircraft to be independently piloted on a single CGI data base. Engagements were begun with the blue aircraft already in a tail-chase position behind the red, and also with the two aircraft originating from positions unknown to each other. Maneuvering was very aggressive and safety requirements for minimum altitude, separation, and maximum bank angles typical of flight test were not used. Results indicate that the presence of terrain features adds an order of complexiaty to the task performed over clear air ACM and that mix of attitude and rate command-type stability and control augmentation system (SCAS) design may be desirable. The simulation system design, the flight paths flown, and the tactics used were compared favorably by the evaluation pilots to actual flight test experiments.

  7. A qualitative analysis of future air combat with 'fire and forget' missiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shinar, J.; Davidovitz, A.

    1987-01-01

    A set of previous examples have demonstrated that the two-target game formulation is adequate for modeling air-to-air combat between two aggressively motivated fighter aircraft. The present paper describes such an engagement between two aircraft of different speed but equipped with the same 'fire and forget' type guided missiles. The results of the analysis suggest a new concept of air combat tactics for future scenarios.

  8. Commander's conference room (room 202), closet and hallway to bathroom ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Commander's conference room (room 202), closet and hallway to bathroom and bedroom, leading to conference room 211. Viewing windows look down on the display area. View to north - March Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command, Combat Operations Center, 5220 Riverside Drive, Moreno Valley, Riverside County, CA

  9. STS-65 Commander Cabana and PLC Hieb take air sample at IML-2 Rack 7 NIZEMI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    STS-65 Commander Robert D. Cabana (right) and Payload Commander (PLC) Richard J. Hieb take an air sample inside the International Microgravity Laboratory 2 (IML-2) spacelab science module. The two crewmembers are in front of Rack 7 which contains the large isothermal furnace (LIF) and slow rotating centrifuge microscope (NIZEMI). The photo was among the first group released by NASA following the two-week IML-2 mission aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102.

  10. Toward the Twenty-first Century: Air Command and Staff College Curriculum from Theory to Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Stephen L.

    Responding to a perceived need resulting from the collapse of the Soviet Union, the dismantling of the Berlin Wall, and the end of the Cold War, the Air Command and Staff College (ACSC) at Maxwell Air Force Base (Alabama) revised its curriculum. Data for the descriptive study were gathered through interviews of the leadership of the school and…

  11. Conference room 211, adjacent to commander's quarters, with vault door ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Conference room 211, adjacent to commander's quarters, with vault door at right. Projection area at center is equipped with automatic security drapes. Projection room uses a 45 degree mirror to reflect the image onto the frosted glass screen. Door on far left leads to display area senior battle staff viewing bridge, and the commander's quarters - March Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command, Combat Operations Center, 5220 Riverside Drive, Moreno Valley, Riverside County, CA

  12. Air compliance through pollution prevention at Air Force Materiel Command facilities.

    SciTech Connect

    Kolpa, R.; Ryckman, S.J. Jr.; Smith, A.E.

    1999-03-19

    Options for air compliance through pollution prevention (P2) have been identified at 14 facilities of the US Air Force Materiel Command, ranging from depots with significant light industrial activity to laboratories. Previous P2 efforts concentrated on reducing hazardous and solid wastes, with any reduction in air impacts generally being a collateral benefit. This work focused on reducing air emissions and air compliance vulnerabilities. P2 options were identified in three stages. First, potentially applicable P2 options were identified from Internet and published information. Attention was given to identifying the types of sources to which an option could be applied, the option's state of development, and constraints that could limit its application. Traditional P2 options involving technology or equipment changes and material substitution were considered. In addition, newer approaches based on administrative ''controls'' were considered. These included inserting P2 into operating permits in exchange for administrative relief, privatization, derating boilers, and reducing an installation's potential to emit and compliance vulnerability by separating sources not under the Air Force's ''common control.'' Next, criteria and toxic emissions inventories by source category were prepared from inventory data supplied by facilities. The major problems at this stage were differences in the levels of detail provided by facilities and in the categories used by different installations. Emitting categories were matched to P2 option categories to identify candidate options. Candidates were screened to account for local regulations and technical information about sources in the inventories. When possible, emission reductions were estimated to help facility personnel prioritize options. Some options identified are being actively pursued by facilities to determine their site-specific feasibility. Although much work has been done to implement material substitution programs, this

  13. Computer-automated opponent for manned air-to-air combat simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hankins, W. W., III

    1979-01-01

    Two versions of a real-time digital-computer program that operates a fighter airplane interactively against a human pilot in simulated air combat were evaluated. They function by replacing one of two pilots in the Langley differential maneuvering simulator. Both versions make maneuvering decisions from identical information and logic; they differ essentially in the aerodynamic models that they control. One is very complete, but the other is much simpler, primarily characterizing the airplane's performance (lift, drag, and thrust). Both models competed extremely well against highly trained U.S. fighter pilots.

  14. 33 CFR 334.1300 - Blying Sound area, Gulf of Alaska, Alaska; air-to-air gunnery practice area, Alaskan Air Command...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Blying Sound area, Gulf of Alaska, Alaska; air-to-air gunnery practice area, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force. 334.1300 Section 334.1300... AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.1300 Blying Sound area, Gulf of Alaska, Alaska;...

  15. 33 CFR 334.1300 - Blying Sound area, Gulf of Alaska, Alaska; air-to-air gunnery practice area, Alaskan Air Command...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Blying Sound area, Gulf of Alaska, Alaska; air-to-air gunnery practice area, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force. 334.1300 Section 334.1300... AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.1300 Blying Sound area, Gulf of Alaska, Alaska;...

  16. Curriculum Evolution at Air Command and Staff College in the Post-Cold War Era

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donovan, William Robert, II.

    2010-01-01

    This qualitative study used a historical research method to eliminate the gap in the historical knowledge of Air Command and Staff College (ACSC) curriculum evolution in the post-Cold War era. This study is the only known analysis of the forces that influenced the ACSC curriculum and the rationale behind curricular change at ACSC in the post-Cold…

  17. Spacecraft contamination programs within the Air Force Systems Command Laboratories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murad, Edmond

    1990-01-01

    Spacecraft contamination programs exist in five independent AFSC organizations: Geophysics Laboratory (GL), Arnold Engineering and Development Center (AEDC), Rome Air Development Center (RADC/OSCE), Wright Research and Development Center (MLBT), Armament Laboratory (ATL/SAI), and Space Systems Division (SSD/OL-AW). In addition, a sizable program exists at Aerospace Corp. These programs are complementary, each effort addressing a specific area of expertise: GL's effort is aimed at addressing the effects of on-orbit contamination; AEDC's effort is aimed at ground simulation and measurement of optical contamination; RADC's effort addresses the accumulation, measurement, and removal of contamination on large optics; MLBT's effort is aimed at understanding the effect of contamination on materials; ATL's effort is aimed at understanding the effect of plume contamination on systems; SSD's effort is confined to the integration of some contamination experiments sponsored by SSD/CLT; and Aerospace Corp.'s effort is aimed at supporting the needs of the using System Program Offices (SPO) in specific areas, such as contamination during ground handling, ascent phase, laboratory measurements aimed at understanding on-orbit contamination, and mass loss and mass gain in on-orbit operations. These programs are described in some detail, with emphasis on GL's program.

  18. Predictive nosepointing and flightpath displays for air-to-air combat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viken, Sally A.; Burley, James R., II

    1992-01-01

    As part of the High-Angle-of-Attack Technology Program (HATP), two integrated pictorial displays have been developed for piloted simulation evaluations and, ultimately, for flight testing on board the F/A-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV). The first concept is a nosepointing display which illustrates the range of control the pilot has over the aircraft nose. The second concept is a predictive flightpath display that allows the pilot to see how his current control inputs will affect his aircraft's future position and orientation. The development of both display concepts will be discussed, as well as the results from a piloted simulation experiment in which pilots viewed the flightpath display in a wide-field-of-view Helmet-Mounted Display (HMD) while engaged in an air-combat situation.

  19. An adaptive maneuvering logic computer program for the simulation of one-on-one air-to-air combat. Volume 1: General description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burgin, G. H.; Fogel, L. J.; Phelps, J. P.

    1975-01-01

    A technique for computer simulation of air combat is described. Volume 1 decribes the computer program and its development in general terms. Two versions of the program exist. Both incorporate a logic for selecting and executing air combat maneuvers with performance models of specific fighter aircraft. In the batch processing version the flight paths of two aircraft engaged in interactive aerial combat and controlled by the same logic are computed. The realtime version permits human pilots to fly air-to-air combat against the adaptive maneuvering logic (AML) in Langley Differential Maneuvering Simulator (DMS). Volume 2 consists of a detailed description of the computer programs.

  20. Architecture for an integrated real-time air combat and sensor network simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Criswell, Evans A.; Rushing, John; Lin, Hong; Graves, Sara

    2007-04-01

    An architecture for an integrated air combat and sensor network simulation is presented. The architecture integrates two components: a parallel real-time sensor fusion and target tracking simulation, and an air combat simulation. By integrating these two simulations, it becomes possible to experiment with scenarios in which one or both sides in a battle have very large numbers of primitive passive sensors, and to assess the likely effects of those sensors on the outcome of the battle. Modern Air Power is a real-time theater-level air combat simulation that is currently being used as a part of the USAF Air and Space Basic Course (ASBC). The simulation includes a variety of scenarios from the Vietnam war to the present day, and also includes several hypothetical future scenarios. Modern Air Power includes a scenario editor, an order of battle editor, and full AI customization features that make it possible to quickly construct scenarios for any conflict of interest. The scenario editor makes it possible to place a wide variety of sensors including both high fidelity sensors such as radars, and primitive passive sensors that provide only very limited information. The parallel real-time sensor network simulation is capable of handling very large numbers of sensors on a computing cluster of modest size. It can fuse information provided by disparate sensors to detect and track targets, and produce target tracks.

  1. Air Force Technical Objective Document (TOD) C(3)I (command, control, communications and intelligence) - fiscal year 1985

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crocetti, C. P.

    1983-12-01

    This TOD describes the technical programs of the Rome Air Development Center in support of the Air Force Command, Control, Communications, and Intelligence (C3I) mission. The technical objectives have been aligned with the VANGUARD mission areas of Command, Control, and Communications (C3), Reconnaissance and Intelligence, Strategic Systems (Defense), and Technology as a means of focusing the RADC support of VANGUARD. This document is prepared to provide industry and universities with the midterm technical objectives in these areas.

  2. An extended two-target differential game model for medium-range air combat game analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shinar, J.

    1985-01-01

    The first phase of an investigation of a two-target game, representing an air combat with boresight limited all-aspect guided missiles is summarized. The results, obtained by using a line of sight coordinate system, are compared to a similar recently published work. The comparison indicates that improved insight, gained by using line of sight coordinates, allows to discover important new features of the game solution.

  3. Roof plan, Combat Operations Center, Building No. 2605. (Also includes ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Roof plan, Combat Operations Center, Building No. 2605. (Also includes a typical roof section, with new fiberglass and urethane insulation layers.) By Federal Builders, 575 Carreon Drive, Colton, California. Sheet 1 of 1, dated 18 May 1992. Scale one-eighth inch to one foot. 24x36 inches. ink on paper - March Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command, Combat Operations Center, 5220 Riverside Drive, Moreno Valley, Riverside County, CA

  4. Preliminary performance estimates of an oblique, all-wing, remotely piloted vehicle for air-to-air combat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelms, W. P., Jr.; Bailey, R. O.

    1974-01-01

    A computerized aircraft synthesis program has been used to assess the effects of various vehicle and mission parameters on the performance of an oblique, all-wing, remotely piloted vehicle (RPV) for the highly maneuverable, air-to-air combat role. The study mission consists of an outbound cruise, an acceleration phase, a series of subsonic and supersonic turns, and a return cruise. The results are presented in terms of both the required vehicle weight to accomplish this mission and the combat effectiveness as measured by turning and acceleration capability. This report describes the synthesis program, the mission, the vehicle, and results from sensitivity studies. An optimization process has been used to establish the nominal RPV configuration of the oblique, all-wing concept for the specified mission. In comparison to a previously studied conventional wing-body canard design for the same mission, this oblique, all-wing nominal vehicle is lighter in weight and has higher performance.

  5. Thermal Gradient Behavior of TBCs Subjected to a Laser Gradient Test Rig: Simulating an Air-to-Air Combat Flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, Rogerio S.; Marple, Basil R.; Marcoux, P.

    2016-01-01

    A computer-controlled laser test rig (using a CO2 laser) offers an interesting alternative to traditional flame-based thermal gradient rigs in evaluating thermal barrier coatings (TBCs). The temperature gradient between the top and back surfaces of a TBC system can be controlled based on the laser power and a forced air back-face cooling system, enabling the temperature history of complete aircraft missions to be simulated. An air plasma spray-deposited TBC was tested and, based on experimental data available in the literature, the temperature gradients across the TBC system (ZrO2-Y2O3 YSZ top coat/CoNiCrAlY bond coat/Inconel 625 substrate) and their respective frequencies during air-to-air combat missions of fighter jets were replicated. The missions included (i) idle/taxi on the runway, (ii) take-off and climbing, (iii) cruise trajectory to rendezvous zone, (iv) air-to-air combat maneuvering, (v) cruise trajectory back to runway, and (vi) idle/taxi after landing. The results show that the TBC thermal gradient experimental data in turbine engines can be replicated in the laser gradient rig, leading to an important tool to better engineer TBCs.

  6. Basement utility room (room 24; air handling room), near the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Basement utility room (room 24; air handling room), near the west end of the combat operations center, looking southwest towards fan system one, air ducts, and walk-in filter rooms. The exterior equipment well is visible at the left - March Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command, Combat Operations Center, 5220 Riverside Drive, Moreno Valley, Riverside County, CA

  7. Study of a very low cost air combat maneuvering trainer aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, G. C.; Bowles, J. V.

    1976-01-01

    A very low cost aircraft for performing Air Combat Maneuvering (ACM) training was studied using the BD-5J sport plane as a point of departure. The installation of a larger engine and increased fuel capacity were required to meet the performance and mission objectives. Reduced wing area increased the simulation of the ACM engagement, and a comparison with current tactical aircraft is presented. Other factors affecting the training transfer are considered analytically, but a flight evaluation is recommended to determine the concept utility.

  8. TAC BRAWLER - An application of engagement simulation modeling to simulator visual system display requirements for air combat maneuvering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerchner, R. M.; Hughes, R. G.; Lee, A.

    1984-01-01

    The TAC BRAWLER air combat simulation models both the acquisition and use of visual information by the pilot. It was used to provide the designers of manned simulators for air-to-air combat with information regarding the training implications of display system resolution, inherent target contrast, field of view, and transport delay. Various display designs were simulated, and the resulting quantitative and qualitative differences in engagements were considered indicators of possible mistraining. Display resolution was found to alter combats primarily through its effect on detection ranges; the 'pixel averaging' contrast management technique was shown to largely compensate for this problem. Transport delay significantly degrades pilot tracking ability, but the training impact of the effect is unclear.

  9. Impact of new technology weapons on SAC (Strategic Air Command) conventional air operations. Research report

    SciTech Connect

    Bodenheimer, C.E.

    1983-06-01

    Chapter I introduces the issue of conventional-response capability. The point stressed first is that the strategic bomber's primary mission is in support of the single integrated operations plan (SIOP) as a nuclear weapons delivery vehicle. However, as cited by Secretary of Defense Caspar Weinberger, we must have a rapid deployment conventional capability to areas where there are small if any U.S. forces present. The SAC strategic projection force (SPF) is available but with gravity weapons of World War II vintage. New technology can provide answers to the problem by providing highly accurate long-range conventional standoff weapons. Chapter II gives a basic historical perspective on the use of the strategic bomber in past wars. It discusses the development of strategy, weapons, and targets in World War II, Korean War, and Vietnam War. Chapter III presents a very brief look at current US policy, strategy, and guidance. Chapter IV covers the aircraft attrition issue in today's highly lethal defensive environment. Chapter V describes the development of air-to-ground weapons. Chapter VI addresses the potential for the future in the shifting balance of Soviet and US technology. The final chapter makes the point that a decision must be made on weapons-acquisition programs and bomber force structure. New technology-standoff conventional weapons could make AAA and SAM defenses a modern Maginot Line.

  10. Marine Tactical Command and Control System (MTACCS) Field Development System-1 (FDS-1) assessment: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Avery, L.W.; Hunt, S.T.; Savage, S.F. ); McLaughlin, P.D.; Shepdard, A.P.; Worl, J.C. )

    1992-04-01

    The United State Marine Corps (USMC) is continuing the development and fielding of the Marine Corps Tactical Command and Control System (MTACCS), a system which exists in varying states of development, fielding, or modernization. MTACCS is currently composed of the following components: Tactical Combat Operations System (TCO) for ground command and control (C2), Intelligence Analysis System (IAS) with a Genser terminal connected to a TCO workstation for intelligence C2, Marine Integrated Personnel System (MIPS) and a TCO workstation using the Marine Combat Personnel System (MCPERS) software for personnel C2, Marine Integrated Logistics System (MILOGS) which is composed of the Landing Force Asset Distribution System (LFADS), the Marine Air-Ground Task Force (MAGTF) II, and a TCO terminal using the Marine Combat Logistics System (MCLOG) for logistics C2, Marine Corps Fire Support System (MCFSS) for fire support C2, and Advanced Tactical Air Command Central (ATACC) and the Improved Direct Air Support Central for aviation C2.

  11. A piloted simulation investigation of yaw dynamics requirements for turreted gun use in low-level helicopter air combat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, William A.; Morris, Patrick M.; Williams, Jeffrey N.

    1988-01-01

    A piloted, fixed-base simulation study was conducted to investigate the handling qualities requirements for helicopter air-to-air combat using turreted guns in the near-terrain environment. The study used a version of the helicopter air combat system developed at NASA Ames Research Center for one-on-one air combat. The study focused on the potential trade-off between gun angular movement capability and required yaw axis response. Experimental variables included yaw axis response frequency and damping and the size of the gun-movement envelope. A helmet position and sighting system was used for pilot control of gun aim. Approximately 340 simulated air combat engagements were evaluated by pilots from the Army and industry. Results from the experiment indicate that a highly-damped, high frequency yaw response was desired for Level I handling qualities. Pilot preference for those characteristics became more pronounced as gun turret movement was restricted; however, a stable, slow-reacting platform could be used with a large turret envelope. Most pilots preferred to engage with the opponent near the own-ship centerline. Turret elevation restriction affected the engagement more than azimuth restrictions.

  12. A preference-ordered discrete-gaming approach to air-combat analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, H. J.; Lefton, L.

    1978-01-01

    An approach to one-on-one air-combat analysis is described which employs discrete gaming of a parameterized model featuring choice between several closed-loop control policies. A preference-ordering formulation due to Falco is applied to rational choice between outcomes: win, loss, mutual capture, purposeful disengagement, draw. Approximate optimization is provided by an active-cell scheme similar to Falco's obtained by a 'backing up' process similar to that of Kopp. The approach is designed primarily for short-duration duels between craft with large-envelope weaponry. Some illustrative computations are presented for an example modeled using constant-speed vehicles and very rough estimation of energy shifts.

  13. Two-target game model of an air combat with fire-and-forget all-aspect missiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidovitz, A.; Shinar, J.

    1989-01-01

    An air combat duel between similar aggressive fighter aircraft, both equipped with the same type of guided missiles, is formulated as a two-target differential game using the dynamic model of the game of two identical cars. Each of the identical target sets represents the effective firing envelope of an all-aspect fire-and-forget air-to-air missile. The firing range limits depend on the target aspect angle and are approximated by analytical functions. The maximum range, computed by taking into account the optimal missile avoidance maneuver of the target, determines the no-escape firing envelope. The solution consists of the decomposition of the game space into four regions: the respective winning zones of the two opponents, the draw zone, and the region where the game terminates by a mutual kill. The solution provides a new insight for future air combat analysis.

  14. Marine Tactical Command and Control System (MTACCS) Field Development System-1 (FDS-1) assessment: Final report. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Avery, L.W.; Hunt, S.T.; Savage, S.F.; McLaughlin, P.D.; Shepdard, A.P.; Worl, J.C.

    1992-04-01

    The United State Marine Corps (USMC) is continuing the development and fielding of the Marine Corps Tactical Command and Control System (MTACCS), a system which exists in varying states of development, fielding, or modernization. MTACCS is currently composed of the following components: Tactical Combat Operations System (TCO) for ground command and control (C2), Intelligence Analysis System (IAS) with a Genser terminal connected to a TCO workstation for intelligence C2, Marine Integrated Personnel System (MIPS) and a TCO workstation using the Marine Combat Personnel System (MCPERS) software for personnel C2, Marine Integrated Logistics System (MILOGS) which is composed of the Landing Force Asset Distribution System (LFADS), the Marine Air-Ground Task Force (MAGTF) II, and a TCO terminal using the Marine Combat Logistics System (MCLOG) for logistics C2, Marine Corps Fire Support System (MCFSS) for fire support C2, and Advanced Tactical Air Command Central (ATACC) and the Improved Direct Air Support Central for aviation C2.

  15. The effect of a new ejection seat headbox and high G garments on head mobility during air combat.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, G W; Anton, D J; Bayley, N J; Martin, T E; Stallard, N

    1994-03-01

    Full coverage anti-G trousers, a chest counter pressure garment for positive pressure breathing for G tolerance, and a smaller ejection seat headbox have been developed for future agile aircraft. The hypotheses that the new headbox might improve, and that the more restrictive high G garments might compromise, pilot head mobility were tested. The RAF institute of Aviation Medicine Hawk aircraft was equipped with a wide angle video camera facing the front seat pilot. Two experimental conditions were compared to the control air combat sortie: 1. standard garments and the smaller headbox; 2. high G garments and the smaller headbox. Data were recorded from five instructor pilots during three scheduled air combat training sorties. Their helmets were marked with 10-mm white dots in a standardized pattern. Software for recording helmet dot positions from single frame video images, and a trigonometric method for calculating head rotation and translation from changes in the helmet dot positions were devised. No differences were found between headboxes or garments at the three extremes of head movements analyzed. Observed neck rotations were similar to maximal seated norms. Optimal head and neck extension is impeded by the ejection seat headbox. Pilots' head movements are not restricted during air combat at moderate G levels. PMID:8185545

  16. 7. General view of command center, building 501, looking west ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. General view of command center, building 501, looking west - Offutt Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command Headquarters & Command Center, Command Center, 901 SAC Boulevard, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE

  17. 6. General view of command center, building 501, looking east ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. General view of command center, building 501, looking east - Offutt Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command Headquarters & Command Center, Command Center, 901 SAC Boulevard, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE

  18. 13. SAC command center, weather center, underground structure, building 501, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. SAC command center, weather center, underground structure, building 501, undated - Offutt Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command Headquarters & Command Center, Command Center, 901 SAC Boulevard, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE

  19. Design of an all-attitude flight control system to execute commanded bank angles and angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burgin, G. H.; Eggleston, D. M.

    1976-01-01

    A flight control system for use in air-to-air combat simulation was designed. The input to the flight control system are commanded bank angle and angle of attack, the output are commands to the control surface actuators such that the commanded values will be achieved in near minimum time and sideslip is controlled to remain small. For the longitudinal direction, a conventional linear control system with gains scheduled as a function of dynamic pressure is employed. For the lateral direction, a novel control system, consisting of a linear portion for small bank angle errors and a bang-bang control system for large errors and error rates is employed.

  20. Repair Air Conditioning, COC Bldg 2605, First Floor Plan. By ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Repair Air Conditioning, COC Bldg 2605, First Floor Plan. By Strategic Air Command, Civil Engineering. Drawing no. R-156, sheet no. 2 of 4, 15 August 1968; project no. MAR-125-8;CE-572; file drawer 2605-6. Scale one-eighth inch to one foot. 29x41 inches. pencil on paper 405 - March Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command, Combat Operations Center, 5220 Riverside Drive, Moreno Valley, Riverside County, CA

  1. Repair Air Conditioning, COC Bldg 2605, Basement Plan. By Strategic ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Repair Air Conditioning, COC Bldg 2605, Basement Plan. By Strategic Air Command, Civil Engineering. Drawing no. R-156, sheet no. 1 of 4, 15 August 1968; project no. MAR-125-8;CE-572; file drawer 2605-5. Last revised 31 August 1968?. Scale one-eighth inch and one-quarter inch to one foot. 29x41 inches. pencil on paper - March Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command, Combat Operations Center, 5220 Riverside Drive, Moreno Valley, Riverside County, CA

  2. Combat vehicle visualization system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belt, Ronald A.; Hauge, Jim; Kelley, Jim; Knowles, Gary R.; Lewandowski, Ronald J.; Riddle, Larry; Mandelbaum, Robert; Reich, Barry; Girolamo, Henry J.

    2000-06-01

    A combat vehicle visualization system is described that enhances the situation awareness of the vehicle commander. The system consists of a 360 degree(s) panoramic sensor, a gimbaled 8 - 12 micrometers infrared sensor, and a helmet-mounted display with head tracker. The helmet-mounted display can display the fused sensor data to aid the commander in vehicle maneuvering and threat acquisition while buttoned up. It can also display situation awareness information down-loaded from the tactical internet while standing in the hatch. Construction and operation features will be described.

  3. 68. Aerial view of SAC command post, building 500, looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    68. Aerial view of SAC command post, building 500, looking northeast, spring, 1957 - Offutt Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command Headquarters & Command Center, Headquarters Building, 901 SAC Boulevard, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE

  4. 63. Aerial view of SAC command post construction, looking west ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    63. Aerial view of SAC command post construction, looking west - Offutt Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command Headquarters & Command Center, Headquarters Building, 901 SAC Boulevard, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE

  5. 67. Aerial view of SAC command post, building 500, looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    67. Aerial view of SAC command post, building 500, looking northeast, undated - Offutt Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command Headquarters & Command Center, Headquarters Building, 901 SAC Boulevard, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE

  6. 62. Aerial view of SAC command post, building 500, looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    62. Aerial view of SAC command post, building 500, looking east - Offutt Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command Headquarters & Command Center, Headquarters Building, 901 SAC Boulevard, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE

  7. Combatting urban air pollution through Natural Gas Vehicle (NGV) analysis, testing, and demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    1995-03-01

    Deteriorating urban air quality ranks as a top concern worldwide, since air pollution adversely affects both public health and the environment. The outlook for improving air quality in the world`s megacities need not be bleak, however, The use of natural gas as a transportation fuel can measurably reduce urban pollution levels, mitigating chronic threats to health and the environment. Besides being clean burning, natural gas vehicles (NGVs) are economical to operate and maintain. The current cost of natural gas is lower than that of gasoline. Natural gas also reduces the vehicle`s engine wear and noise level, extends engine life, and decreases engine maintenance. Today, about 700,000 NGVs operate worldwide, the majority of them converted from gasoline or diesel fuel. This article discusses the economic, regulatory and technological issues of concern to the NGV industry.

  8. Combat games

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ardema, M. D.; Heymann, M.; Rajan, N.

    1985-01-01

    A mathematical formulation is proposed of a combat game between two opponents with offensive capabilities and offensive objective is proposed. Resolution of the combat involves solving two differential games with state constraints. Depending on the game dynamics and parameters, the combat can terminate in one of four ways: the first player wins; the second player wins; a draw (neither wins); or joint capture. In the first two cases, the optimal strategies of the two players are determined from suitable zero-sum games, whereas in the latter two the relevant games are nonzero-sum. Further, to avoid certain technical difficulties, the concept of a delta-combat game is introduced.

  9. Analysis of a combat problem - The turret game

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ardema, M.; Heymann, M.; Rajan, N.

    1987-01-01

    The turret game is defined and solved to illustrate the nature of games of combat. This game represents a highly simplified version of air combat, yet it is sufficiently complex so as to exhibit a rich variety of combat phenomena. A review of the formulation of delta-combat games is included.

  10. Intelligently interactive combat simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogel, Lawrence J.; Porto, Vincent W.; Alexander, Steven M.

    2001-09-01

    To be fully effective, combat simulation must include an intelligently interactive enemy... one that can be calibrated. But human operated combat simulations are uncalibratable, for we learn during the engagement, there's no average enemy, and we cannot replicate their culture/personality. Rule-based combat simulations (expert systems) are not interactive. They do not take advantage of unexpected mistakes, learn, innovate, and reflect the changing mission/situation. And it is presumed that the enemy does not have a copy of the rules, that the available experts are good enough, that they know why they did what they did, that their combat experience provides a sufficient sample and that we know how to combine the rules offered by differing experts. Indeed, expert systems become increasingly complex, costly to develop, and brittle. They have face validity but may be misleading. In contrast, intelligently interactive combat simulation is purpose- driven. Each player is given a well-defined mission, reference to the available weapons/platforms, their dynamics, and the sensed environment. Optimal tactics are discovered online and in real-time by simulating phenotypic evolution in fast time. The initial behaviors are generated randomly or include hints. The process then learns without instruction. The Valuated State Space Approach provides a convenient way to represent any purpose/mission. Evolutionary programming searches the domain of possible tactics in a highly efficient manner. Coupled together, these provide a basis for cruise missile mission planning, and for driving tank warfare simulation. This approach is now being explored to benefit Air Force simulations by a shell that can enhance the original simulation.

  11. High angle of attack flying qualities criteria for longitudinal rate command systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, David J.; Citurs, Kevin D.; Davidson, John B.

    1994-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate flying qualities requirements of alternate pitch command systems for fighter aircraft at high angle of attack. Flying qualities design guidelines have already been developed for angle of attack command systems at 30, 45, and 60 degrees angle of attack, so this research fills a similar need for rate command systems. Flying qualities tasks that require post-stall maneuvering were tested during piloted simulations in the McDonnell Douglas Aerospace Manned Air Combat Simulation facility. A generic fighter aircraft model was used to test angle of attack rate and pitch rate command systems for longitudinal gross acquisition and tracking tasks at high angle of attack. A wide range of longitudinal dynamic variations were tested at 30, 45, and 60 degrees angle of attack. Pilot comments, Cooper-Harper ratings, and pilot induced oscillation ratings were taken from five pilots from NASA, USN, CAF, and McDonnell Douglas Aerospace. This data was used to form longitudinal design guidelines for rate command systems at high angle of attack. These criteria provide control law design guidance for fighter aircraft at high angle of attack, low speed flight conditions. Additional time history analyses were conducted using the longitudinal gross acquisition data to look at potential agility measures of merit and correlate agility usage to flying qualities boundaries. This paper presents an overview of this research.

  12. A comparative assessment of economic-incentive and command-and-control instruments for air pollution and CO2 control in China's iron and steel sector.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhaoyang; Mao, Xianqiang; Tu, Jianjun; Jaccard, Mark

    2014-11-01

    China's iron and steel sector is faced with increasing pressure to control both local air pollutants and CO2 simultaneously. Additional policy instruments are needed to co-control these emissions in this sector. This study quantitatively evaluates and compares two categories of emission reduction instruments, namely the economic-incentive (EI) instrument of a carbon tax, and the command-and-control (CAC) instrument of mandatory application of end-of-pipe emission control measures for CO2, SO2 and NOx. The comparative evaluation tool is an integrated assessment model, which combines a top-down computable general equilibrium sub-model and a bottom-up technology-based sub-model through a soft-linkage. The simulation results indicate that the carbon tax can co-control multiple pollutants, but the emission reduction rates are limited under the tax rates examined in this study. In comparison, the CAC instruments are found to have excellent effects on controlling different pollutants separately, but not jointly. Such results indicate that no single EI or CAC instrument is overwhelmingly superior. The environmental and economic effectiveness of an instrument highly depends on its specific attributes, and cannot be predicted by the general policy category. These findings highlight the necessity of clearer identification of policy target priorities, and detail-oriented and integrated policy-making among different governmental departments.

  13. A comparative assessment of economic-incentive and command-and-control instruments for air pollution and CO2 control in China's iron and steel sector.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhaoyang; Mao, Xianqiang; Tu, Jianjun; Jaccard, Mark

    2014-11-01

    China's iron and steel sector is faced with increasing pressure to control both local air pollutants and CO2 simultaneously. Additional policy instruments are needed to co-control these emissions in this sector. This study quantitatively evaluates and compares two categories of emission reduction instruments, namely the economic-incentive (EI) instrument of a carbon tax, and the command-and-control (CAC) instrument of mandatory application of end-of-pipe emission control measures for CO2, SO2 and NOx. The comparative evaluation tool is an integrated assessment model, which combines a top-down computable general equilibrium sub-model and a bottom-up technology-based sub-model through a soft-linkage. The simulation results indicate that the carbon tax can co-control multiple pollutants, but the emission reduction rates are limited under the tax rates examined in this study. In comparison, the CAC instruments are found to have excellent effects on controlling different pollutants separately, but not jointly. Such results indicate that no single EI or CAC instrument is overwhelmingly superior. The environmental and economic effectiveness of an instrument highly depends on its specific attributes, and cannot be predicted by the general policy category. These findings highlight the necessity of clearer identification of policy target priorities, and detail-oriented and integrated policy-making among different governmental departments. PMID:24945700

  14. DETAIL OF DOORWAY INTO COMBAT INTELLIGENCE ROOM. view TO WEST. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF DOORWAY INTO COMBAT INTELLIGENCE ROOM. view TO WEST. - Plattsburgh Air Force Base, Target Intelligence Training Building-Combat Center, Off Connecticut Road, east of Idaho Avenue, Plattsburgh, Clinton County, NY

  15. Combating illiteracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    A science course for nonscientists at Columbia University's Columbia College that was created in 1981 as an experiment to combat “the national crisis of scientific illiteracy” has received major new foundation support and has achieved a permanent place in the college's curriculum.The course, The Theory and Practice of Science, has received a $240,000 grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, according to Robert E. Pollack, college dean, professor of biological sciences, and originator of the course. The grant will be used for the preparation and publication in 1985 of a textbook, titled The Scientific Experience, which will permit the course to be taught at other schools around the country.

  16. A formulation and analysis of combat games

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heymann, M.; Ardema, M. D.; Rajan, N.

    1985-01-01

    Combat is formulated as a dynamical encounter between two opponents, each of whom has offensive capabilities and objectives. With each opponent is associated a target in the event space in which he endeavors to terminate the combat, thereby winning. If the combat terminates in both target sets simultaneously or in neither, a joint capture or a draw, respectively, is said to occur. Resolution of the encounter is formulated as a combat game; namely, as a pair of competing event-constrained differential games. If exactly one of the players can win, the optimal strategies are determined from a resulting constrained zero-sum differential game. Otherwise the optimal strategies are computed from a resulting non-zero-sum game. Since optimal combat strategies frequencies may not exist, approximate of delta-combat games are also formulated leading to approximate or delta-optimal strategies. To illustrate combat games, an example, called the turret game, is considered. This game may be thought of as a highly simplified model of air combat, yet it is sufficiently complex to exhibit a rich variety of combat behavior, much of which is not found in pursuit-evasion games.

  17. Detonation command and control

    SciTech Connect

    Mace, Jonathan L.; Seitz, Gerald J.; Echave, John A.; Le Bas, Pierre-Yves

    2015-11-10

    The detonation of one or more explosive charges and propellant charges by a detonator in response to a fire control signal from a command and control system comprised of a command center and instrumentation center with a communications link therebetween. The fire control signal is selectively provided to the detonator from the instrumentation center if plural detonation control switches at the command center are in a fire authorization status, and instruments, and one or more interlocks, if included, are in a ready for firing status. The instrumentation and command centers are desirably mobile, such as being respective vehicles.

  18. Detonation command and control

    DOEpatents

    Mace, Jonathan L.; Seitz, Gerald J.; Echave, John A.; Le Bas, Pierre-Yves

    2016-05-31

    The detonation of one or more explosive charges and propellant charges by a detonator in response to a fire control signal from a command and control system comprised of a command center and instrumentation center with a communications link there between. The fire control signal is selectively provided to the detonator from the instrumentation center if plural detonation control switches at the command center are in a fire authorization status, and instruments, and one or more interlocks, if included, are in a ready for firing status. The instrumentation and command centers are desirably mobile, such as being respective vehicles.

  19. TRAVEL WITH COMMANDER QUALICIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Commander Qualicia is a cartoon character created for an on-line training course that describes the quality system for the National Exposure Research Laboratory. In the training, which was developed by the QA staff and graphics/IT support contractors, Commander Qualicia and the ...

  20. Application of networked unattended ground sensors in urban combat and stability operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sciarretta, Albert A.; Yerace, Gary A.

    2005-05-01

    Increasingly, the U.S. is being drawn into non-traditional military operations in complex terrain, including villages and cities occupied by a combination of non-combatants and hostile forces. This trend will continue, as the world's urban population continues its significant growth. Of all the missions faced by U.S. military forces, combat and peacekeeping operations in urban terrain present the greatest challenges. In response, commanders will need to employ network-/execution-centric combined arms forces and Joint capabilities at the lowest tactical echelons and with minimal staffs. To do so, commanders will need information, especially from networked unattended ground sensors (UGS), to rapidly and effectively plan and rehearse urban operations, synchronize ground and air forces, command and control mixed assets, coordinate effects (from weapons and actions), and determine logistics support. Today, urban terrain operations" tactics, techniques, and procedures (TTPs) are transforming from painstaking ground assaults with large numbers of forces and excessively destructive remote strikes, to more efficient Joint operations which identify, isolate, and assault nodes with precision weapons and smaller forces. Successful employment of such TTPs will support future command and control (C2) concepts; reduce force requirements, civilian casualties and collateral damage; and shorten mission times. These TTPs, future C2 concepts, and the complex urban environment will drive the networked UGS requirements for future operations. This paper will first address these emerging TTPs, future C2 concepts, and the complex urban environment; and identify associated networked UGS challenges. Next, the paper will discuss the recent uses of networked UGS in experiments and demonstrations. Finally, the paper will discuss the innovative employment of networked UGS in these experiments and demonstrations by Warfighters (e.g., for developing situational understanding, mission planning

  1. Evolution of the combat and operational stress control detachment.

    PubMed

    Dailey, Jason I; Ijames, Victoria L

    2014-01-01

    Medical units designed to provide combat and operational stress control services have evolved since World War II into the current Combat and Operational Stress Control (COSC) detachments. Yet the structure of these COSC detachments differ greatly between what is authorized in the table of organization and equipment (TO&E) and what is doctrinally described in the current field manual guiding combat and operational stress control operations. We therefore explore the evolution of the COSC detachment, compare the organizations found in current doctrine with that currently authorized on the TO&E, and conclude with a proposed structure of a modern COSC detachment that is functionally modular with more clear chains of command.

  2. 32 CFR 813.4 - Combat camera operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Combat camera operations. 813.4 Section 813.4 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE SALES AND SERVICES VISUAL INFORMATION DOCUMENTATION PROGRAM § 813.4 Combat camera operations. (a) Air Force COMCAM forces document...

  3. 32 CFR 536.14 - Commanders of major Army commands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... ACCOUNTS CLAIMS AGAINST THE UNITED STATES The Army Claims System § 536.14 Commanders of major Army commands... claims personnel in obtaining qualified expert and technical advice from command units and...

  4. 32 CFR 536.14 - Commanders of major Army commands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... CLAIMS AGAINST THE UNITED STATES The Army Claims System § 536.14 Commanders of major Army commands... claims personnel in obtaining qualified expert and technical advice from command units and...

  5. Lessons learned in command environment development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Daniel F.; Collie, Brad E.

    2000-11-01

    As we consider the issues associated with the development of an Integrated Command Environment (ICE), we must obviously consider the rich history in the development of control rooms, operations centers, information centers, dispatch offices, and other command and control environments. This paper considers the historical perspective of control environments from the industrial revolution through the information revolution, and examines the historical influences and the implications that that has for us today. Environments to be considered are military command and control spaces, emergency response centers, medical response centers, nuclear reactor control rooms, and operations centers. Historical 'lessons learned' from the development and evolution of these environments will be examined to determine valuable models to use, and those to be avoided. What are the pitfalls? What are the assumptions that drive the environment design? Three case histories will be presented, examining (1) the control room of the Three Mile Island power plant, (2) the redesign of the US Naval Space Command operations center, and (3) a testbed for an ICE aboard a naval surface combatant.

  6. Networked sensors for the combat forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klager, Gene

    2004-11-01

    Real-time and detailed information is critical to the success of ground combat forces. Current manned reconnaissance, surveillance, and target acquisition (RSTA) capabilities are not sufficient to cover battlefield intelligence gaps, provide Beyond-Line-of-Sight (BLOS) targeting, and the ambush avoidance information necessary for combat forces operating in hostile situations, complex terrain, and conducting military operations in urban terrain. This paper describes a current US Army program developing advanced networked unmanned/unattended sensor systems to survey these gaps and provide the Commander with real-time, pertinent information. Networked Sensors for the Combat Forces plans to develop and demonstrate a new generation of low cost distributed unmanned sensor systems organic to the RSTA Element. Networked unmanned sensors will provide remote monitoring of gaps, will increase a unit"s area of coverage, and will provide the commander organic assets to complete his Battlefield Situational Awareness (BSA) picture for direct and indirect fire weapons, early warning, and threat avoidance. Current efforts include developing sensor packages for unmanned ground vehicles, small unmanned aerial vehicles, and unattended ground sensors using advanced sensor technologies. These sensors will be integrated with robust networked communications and Battle Command tools for mission planning, intelligence "reachback", and sensor data management. The network architecture design is based on a model that identifies a three-part modular design: 1) standardized sensor message protocols, 2) Sensor Data Management, and 3) Service Oriented Architecture. This simple model provides maximum flexibility for data exchange, information management and distribution. Products include: Sensor suites optimized for unmanned platforms, stationary and mobile versions of the Sensor Data Management Center, Battle Command planning tools, networked communications, and sensor management software. Details

  7. Station Commander Praises AMS

    NASA Video Gallery

    When asked what's the most important International Space Station experiment, Commander Chris Hadfield names the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer-2, a state-of-the-art particle physics detector that coul...

  8. Commanding Constellations (Pipeline Architecture)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Tim; Condron, Jeff

    2003-01-01

    Providing ground command software for constellations of spacecraft is a challenging problem. Reliable command delivery requires a feedback loop; for a constellation there will likely be an independent feedback loop for each constellation member. Each command must be sent via the proper Ground Station, which may change from one contact to the next (and may be different for different members). Dynamic configuration of the ground command software is usually required (e.g. directives to configure each member's feedback loop and assign the appropriate Ground Station). For testing purposes, there must be a way to insert command data at any level in the protocol stack. The Pipeline architecture described in this paper can support all these capabilities with a sequence of software modules (the pipeline), and a single self-identifying message format (for all types of command data and configuration directives). The Pipeline architecture is quite simple, yet it can solve some complex problems. The resulting solutions are conceptually simple, and therefore, reliable. They are also modular, and therefore, easy to distribute and extend. We first used the Pipeline architecture to design a CCSDS (Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems) Ground Telecommand system (to command one spacecraft at a time with a fixed Ground Station interface). This pipeline was later extended to include gateways to any of several Ground Stations. The resulting pipeline was then extended to handle a small constellation of spacecraft. The use of the Pipeline architecture allowed us to easily handle the increasing complexity. This paper will describe the Pipeline architecture, show how it was used to solve each of the above commanding situations, and how it can easily be extended to handle larger constellations.

  9. DSS command software update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stinnett, W. G.

    1980-01-01

    The modifications, additions, and testing results for a version of the Deep Space Station command software, generated for support of the Voyager Saturn encounter, are discussed. The software update requirements included efforts to: (1) recode portions of the software to permit recovery of approximately 2000 words of memory; (2) correct five Voyager Ground data System liens; (3) provide capability to automatically turn off the command processor assembly local printer during periods of low activity; and (4) correct anomalies existing in the software.

  10. A historical overview of combat stress control units of the U.S. Army.

    PubMed

    Bacon, Bryan L; Staudenmeier, James J

    2003-09-01

    Combat stress control units have been deployed to the Gulf War, Somalia, Haiti, Guantanamo Bay, Bosnia, and Kosovo. They have been very flexible and useful mental health tools for commanders in both combat and peacekeeping operations for the past decade. In their operational role they have been effective, but their garrison mission remains unclear. This article summarizes the uses, missions, and lessons learned from the various combat stress control missions around the world. PMID:14529239

  11. Borisenko Hands Over Command to Fossum

    NASA Video Gallery

    Expedition 28 Commander Andrey Borisenko handed over station command duties to Flight Engineer Mike Fossum. Fossum will command Expedition 29. The traditional Change of Command Ceremony took place ...

  12. Automatic Command Sequence Generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Forest; Gladded, Roy; Khanampompan, Teerapat

    2007-01-01

    Automatic Sequence Generator (Autogen) Version 3.0 software automatically generates command sequences for the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) and several other JPL spacecraft operated by the multi-mission support team. Autogen uses standard JPL sequencing tools like APGEN, ASP, SEQGEN, and the DOM database to automate the generation of uplink command products, Spacecraft Command Message Format (SCMF) files, and the corresponding ground command products, DSN Keywords Files (DKF). Autogen supports all the major multi-mission mission phases including the cruise, aerobraking, mapping/science, and relay mission phases. Autogen is a Perl script, which functions within the mission operations UNIX environment. It consists of two parts: a set of model files and the autogen Perl script. Autogen encodes the behaviors of the system into a model and encodes algorithms for context sensitive customizations of the modeled behaviors. The model includes knowledge of different mission phases and how the resultant command products must differ for these phases. The executable software portion of Autogen, automates the setup and use of APGEN for constructing a spacecraft activity sequence file (SASF). The setup includes file retrieval through the DOM (Distributed Object Manager), an object database used to store project files. This step retrieves all the needed input files for generating the command products. Depending on the mission phase, Autogen also uses the ASP (Automated Sequence Processor) and SEQGEN to generate the command product sent to the spacecraft. Autogen also provides the means for customizing sequences through the use of configuration files. By automating the majority of the sequencing generation process, Autogen eliminates many sequence generation errors commonly introduced by manually constructing spacecraft command sequences. Through the layering of commands into the sequence by a series of scheduling algorithms, users are able to rapidly and reliably construct the

  13. Utility Building Plan, elevations and sections. March Air Force Base, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Utility Building Plan, elevations and sections. March Air Force Base, Riverside, California, COmbat Operations Center, Utility Building. By Moffatt and Nichol, Engineers, 122 West Fifth Street, Long Beach, California; for the Corps of Engineers, U.S. Army, Office of the District Engineer, Los Angeles, California. Drawing no. AW-60-02-03, sheet no. 57, approved March, 1962; specifications no. ENG-04-353-62-66; D.O. series AW 1596/57, Rev. "B"; file drawer 1290. Last revised 3 October 1966 "drawings updated." Various scales. 29 x 41 inches. pencil on paper - March Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command, Utility Building, 5220 Riverside Drive, Moreno Valley, Riverside County, CA

  14. Cost efficient command management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandt, Theresa; Murphy, C. W.; Kuntz, Jon; Barlett, Tom

    1996-01-01

    The design and implementation of a command management system (CMS) for a NASA control center, is described. The technology innovations implemented in the CMS provide the infrastructure required for operations cost reduction and future development cost reduction through increased operational efficiency and reuse in future missions. The command management design facilitates error-free operations which enables the automation of the routine control center functions and allows for the distribution of scheduling responsibility to the instrument teams. The reusable system was developed using object oriented methodologies.

  15. 19 CFR 122.36 - Responsibility of aircraft commander.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Responsibility of aircraft commander. 122.36...; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Landing Requirements § 122.36 Responsibility of aircraft commander. If an aircraft lands in the U.S. and Customs officers have not arrived, the aircraft...

  16. 19 CFR 122.36 - Responsibility of aircraft commander.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Responsibility of aircraft commander. 122.36...; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Landing Requirements § 122.36 Responsibility of aircraft commander. If an aircraft lands in the U.S. and Customs officers have not arrived, the aircraft...

  17. 19 CFR 122.36 - Responsibility of aircraft commander.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Responsibility of aircraft commander. 122.36...; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Landing Requirements § 122.36 Responsibility of aircraft commander. If an aircraft lands in the U.S. and Customs officers have not arrived, the aircraft...

  18. 19 CFR 122.36 - Responsibility of aircraft commander.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Responsibility of aircraft commander. 122.36...; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Landing Requirements § 122.36 Responsibility of aircraft commander. If an aircraft lands in the U.S. and Customs officers have not arrived, the aircraft...

  19. 19 CFR 122.36 - Responsibility of aircraft commander.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Responsibility of aircraft commander. 122.36...; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Landing Requirements § 122.36 Responsibility of aircraft commander. If an aircraft lands in the U.S. and Customs officers have not arrived, the aircraft...

  20. Economy of Command

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Medeiros, David Peter

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation proposes a principle of "economy of command", arguing that it provides a simple and natural explanation for some well-known properties of human language syntax. The focus is on the abstract combinatorial system that constructs the hierarchical structure of linguistic expressions, with long-distance dependencies…

  1. Psychiatric nursing liaison in a combat zone: an autoethnography.

    PubMed

    Whybrow, D

    2013-12-01

    Military mental health nurses are tasked with providing psychiatric liaison to British forces deployed to combat zones. This forms part of a wider effort to maintain the combat effectiveness of the fighting force. During a recent deployment, I maintained a reflexive journal of my experience of liaising with the British Chain of Command. I then used line by line coding via the NVIVO 9 software package to formulate the core themes that became a framework for this autoethnography. My personality and social anxieties shaped how I performed the psychiatric liaison role. I was able to develop a template for liaison that accounted for both 'me' and my need to feel authentic or credible as a nurse, yet still enabled me to communicate effectively with the Chain of Command. One template for psychiatric nursing liaison with British combat forces is to focus upon key stakeholders within the Chain of Command, specifically, the Officer Commanding, the Sergeant Major, the Trauma Risk Management co-ordinator (usually the Sergeant Major) and the embedded medical asset. Further research is needed to establish how other nurses approach psychiatric nursing liaison. PMID:23279363

  2. Psychiatric nursing liaison in a combat zone: an autoethnography.

    PubMed

    Whybrow, D

    2013-12-01

    Military mental health nurses are tasked with providing psychiatric liaison to British forces deployed to combat zones. This forms part of a wider effort to maintain the combat effectiveness of the fighting force. During a recent deployment, I maintained a reflexive journal of my experience of liaising with the British Chain of Command. I then used line by line coding via the NVIVO 9 software package to formulate the core themes that became a framework for this autoethnography. My personality and social anxieties shaped how I performed the psychiatric liaison role. I was able to develop a template for liaison that accounted for both 'me' and my need to feel authentic or credible as a nurse, yet still enabled me to communicate effectively with the Chain of Command. One template for psychiatric nursing liaison with British combat forces is to focus upon key stakeholders within the Chain of Command, specifically, the Officer Commanding, the Sergeant Major, the Trauma Risk Management co-ordinator (usually the Sergeant Major) and the embedded medical asset. Further research is needed to establish how other nurses approach psychiatric nursing liaison.

  3. STS-28 Columbia, OV-102, Commander Shaw on middeck

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    At open middeck stowage locker, Commander Brewster H. Shaw pauses to have his picture taken. Behind Shaw on port side wall are solid sorbent air sampler, a plastic storage bag filled with wheat crackers, and various food and beverage containers.

  4. 32 CFR 724.406 - Commander, Naval Medical Command.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Commander, Naval Medical Command. 724.406 Section 724.406 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY PERSONNEL NAVAL..., Naval Medical Command. Custodian of Navy and Marine Corps health records. (See subpart C)....

  5. 32 CFR 724.406 - Commander, Naval Medical Command.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Commander, Naval Medical Command. 724.406 Section 724.406 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY PERSONNEL NAVAL..., Naval Medical Command. Custodian of Navy and Marine Corps health records. (See subpart C)....

  6. 32 CFR 724.406 - Commander, Naval Medical Command.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Commander, Naval Medical Command. 724.406 Section 724.406 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY PERSONNEL NAVAL..., Naval Medical Command. Custodian of Navy and Marine Corps health records. (See subpart C)....

  7. 32 CFR 536.14 - Commanders of major Army commands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Commanders of major Army commands. 536.14 Section 536.14 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY CLAIMS AND ACCOUNTS CLAIMS AGAINST THE UNITED STATES The Army Claims System § 536.14 Commanders of major Army...

  8. 32 CFR 536.14 - Commanders of major Army commands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Commanders of major Army commands. 536.14 Section 536.14 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY CLAIMS AND ACCOUNTS CLAIMS AGAINST THE UNITED STATES The Army Claims System § 536.14 Commanders of major Army...

  9. 32 CFR 724.406 - Commander, Naval Medical Command.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Commander, Naval Medical Command. 724.406 Section 724.406 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY PERSONNEL NAVAL..., Naval Medical Command. Custodian of Navy and Marine Corps health records. (See subpart C)....

  10. 32 CFR 724.406 - Commander, Naval Medical Command.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Commander, Naval Medical Command. 724.406 Section 724.406 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY PERSONNEL NAVAL..., Naval Medical Command. Custodian of Navy and Marine Corps health records. (See subpart C)....

  11. 32 CFR 536.14 - Commanders of major Army commands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Commanders of major Army commands. 536.14 Section 536.14 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY CLAIMS AND ACCOUNTS CLAIMS AGAINST THE UNITED STATES The Army Claims System § 536.14 Commanders of major Army...

  12. Station Change of Command Ceremony

    NASA Video Gallery

    The reins of the International Space Station were passed from Expedition 29 Commander Mike Fossum of NASA to his NASA colleague, newly arrived Expedition 30 Commander Dan Burbank in a ceremony on t...

  13. Multisensor data fusion implementation within a distributed command and control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahbazian, Elisa

    1992-07-01

    The naval forces will encounter air, surface, underwater, electro-optic/infrared (EO/IR), communications, radar, electronic warfare, etc., threats. Technological advancements of future threats to the navy will place heavy demands (quicker reaction to faster, stealth threats) upon the ability to process and interpret tactical data provided by multiple and often dissimilar sensors. This emphasizes the need for a naval platform employing an automated distributed command and control system (CCS) which includes a multi-sensor data fusion (MSDF) function to increase probability of mission success facing the threats of the future. The main advantage of a distributed CCS is redundancy and reconfigurability resulting in a high degree of survivability and flexibility while accomplishing the mission. The MSDF function provides the combat system with a capability to analyze sensor data from multiple sensors and derive contact/track solutions, which would not be derived by the individual sensors. The command and control (C2) functions, including the MSDF function, operate within a number of general purpose C2 processors, communicating with each other and the sensor systems via a high speed data bus. Different sensors are more effective in different environmental conditions and for different geometrical parameters (elevation, distance, bearing, etc.). The MSDF function combines the capabilities of all the sensors providing the operators and other CCS functions with more accurate solutions faster than each sensor system operating alone. An architecture of a distributed CCS using an MSDF function to increase the probability of mission success of a naval platform is presented.

  14. The absolute path command

    2012-05-11

    The ap command traveres all symlinks in a given file, directory, or executable name to identify the final absolute path. It can print just the final path, each intermediate link along with the symlink chan, and the permissions and ownership of each directory component in the final path. It has functionality similar to "which", except that it shows the final path instead of the first path. It is also similar to "pwd", but it canmore » provide the absolute path to a relative directory from the current working directory.« less

  15. The absolute path command

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, A.

    2012-05-11

    The ap command traveres all symlinks in a given file, directory, or executable name to identify the final absolute path. It can print just the final path, each intermediate link along with the symlink chan, and the permissions and ownership of each directory component in the final path. It has functionality similar to "which", except that it shows the final path instead of the first path. It is also similar to "pwd", but it can provide the absolute path to a relative directory from the current working directory.

  16. Injuries due to firearms and air guns among U.S. military members not participating in overseas combat operations, 2002-2011.

    PubMed

    2012-09-01

    During 2002-2011, active component U.S. service members sustained 4,657 firearm-related injuries in circumstances other than deployment to the wars in Iraq/Afghanistan; 35 percent of the injuries were fatal. The highest firearm-related injury rates reflected service members in law enforcement/security and combat occupations. Of fatal injuries, 28 percent and 24 percent were suicides and homicides, respectively; among service members 30 and older, 84 percent of noncombat firearm-related deaths were suicides and 14 percent were homicides. In circumstances other than war, rates of both fatal and nonfatal firearm- related injuries are much lower among military members than civilian males aged 18-44. During the period, rates of nonfatal firearm-related injuries among non-deployed military members increased sharply, peaking in 2008. The trend reflects that among U.S. civilian males aged 18-44. However, firearm-related fatality rates were stable among civilians but increased among military members. The increase in rates of firearm-related fatalities among non-deployed military members reflects the increase in rates of suicides by firearms. Rates of injuries due to BB, pellet or paintball guns also increased during the period.

  17. The eutrophication commandments.

    PubMed

    Fulweiler, R W; Rabalais, N N; Heiskanen, A S

    2012-10-01

    Typically, rising atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations are used to illustrate how humans have impacted the earth. However, we have also dramatically altered the amount of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) cycling through the biosphere. Eventually these nutrients are carried to coastal receiving waters where they cause severe, often negative consequences including increased phytoplankton and macroalgae blooms, loss of submerged aquatic vegetation, low oxygen events, and decreased biodiversity. In many systems mitigation efforts are now underway to return these ecosystems to a less impacted state. While many uncertainties about the best way to manage eutrophic systems remain it is clear that we must take action to lessen our human nutrient footprint. Based on our current understanding of eutrophic systems we present ten eutrophication commandments or guidelines as a tool for scientists, policy makers, managers, and the public. PMID:22889495

  18. Maximizing TDRS Command Load Lifetime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Aaron J.

    2002-01-01

    The GNC software onboard ISS utilizes TORS command loads, and a simplistic model of TORS orbital motion to generate onboard TORS state vectors. Each TORS command load contains five "invariant" orbital elements which serve as inputs to the onboard propagation algorithm. These elements include semi-major axis, inclination, time of last ascending node crossing, right ascension of ascending node, and mean motion. Running parallel to the onboard software is the TORS Command Builder Tool application, located in the JSC Mission Control Center. The TORS Command Builder Tool is responsible for building the TORS command loads using a ground TORS state vector, mirroring the onboard propagation algorithm, and assessing the fidelity of current TORS command loads onboard ISS. The tool works by extracting a ground state vector at a given time from a current TORS ephemeris, and then calculating the corresponding "onboard" TORS state vector at the same time using the current onboard TORS command load. The tool then performs a comparison between these two vectors and displays the relative differences in the command builder tool GUI. If the RSS position difference between these two vectors exceeds the tolerable lim its, a new command load is built using the ground state vector and uplinked to ISS. A command load's lifetime is therefore defined as the time from when a command load is built to the time the RSS position difference exceeds the tolerable limit. From the outset of TORS command load operations (STS-98), command load lifetime was limited to approximately one week due to the simplicity of both the onboard propagation algorithm, and the algorithm used by the command builder tool to generate the invariant orbital elements. It was soon desired to extend command load lifetime in order to minimize potential risk due to frequent ISS commanding. Initial studies indicated that command load lifetime was most sensitive to changes in mean motion. Finding a suitable value for mean motion

  19. Combat Wound Initiative program.

    PubMed

    Stojadinovic, Alexander; Elster, Eric; Potter, Benjamin K; Davis, Thomas A; Tadaki, Doug K; Brown, Trevor S; Ahlers, Stephen; Attinger, Christopher E; Andersen, Romney C; Burris, David; Centeno, Jose; Champion, Hunter; Crumbley, David R; Denobile, John; Duga, Michael; Dunne, James R; Eberhardt, John; Ennis, William J; Forsberg, Jonathan A; Hawksworth, Jason; Helling, Thomas S; Lazarus, Gerald S; Milner, Stephen M; Mullick, Florabel G; Owner, Christopher R; Pasquina, Paul F; Patel, Chirag R; Peoples, George E; Nissan, Aviram; Ring, Michael; Sandberg, Glenn D; Schaden, Wolfgang; Schultz, Gregory S; Scofield, Tom; Shawen, Scott B; Sheppard, Forest R; Stannard, James P; Weina, Peter J; Zenilman, Jonathan M

    2010-07-01

    The Combat Wound Initiative (CWI) program is a collaborative, multidisciplinary, and interservice public-private partnership that provides personalized, state-of-the-art, and complex wound care via targeted clinical and translational research. The CWI uses a bench-to-bedside approach to translational research, including the rapid development of a human extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) study in complex wounds after establishing the potential efficacy, biologic mechanisms, and safety of this treatment modality in a murine model. Additional clinical trials include the prospective use of clinical data, serum and wound biomarkers, and wound gene expression profiles to predict wound healing/failure and additional clinical patient outcomes following combat-related trauma. These clinical research data are analyzed using machine-based learning algorithms to develop predictive treatment models to guide clinical decision-making. Future CWI directions include additional clinical trials and study centers and the refinement and deployment of our genetically driven, personalized medicine initiative to provide patient-specific care across multiple medical disciplines, with an emphasis on combat casualty care. PMID:23634474

  20. Patch models and their applications to multivehicle command and control.

    PubMed

    Rao, Venkatesh G; D'Andrea, Raffaello

    2007-06-01

    We introduce patch models, a computational modeling formalism for multivehicle combat domains, based on spatiotemporal abstraction methods developed in the computer science community. The framework yields models that are expressive enough to accommodate nontrivial controlled vehicle dynamics while being within the representational capabilities of common artificial intelligence techniques used in the construction of autonomous systems. The framework allows several key design requirements of next-generation network-centric command and control systems, such as maintenance of shared situation awareness, to be achieved. Major features include support for multiple situation models at each decision node and rapid mission plan adaptation. We describe the formal specification of patch models and our prototype implementation, i.e., Patchworks. The capabilities of patch models are validated through a combat mission simulation in Patchworks, which involves two defending teams protecting a camp from an enemy attacking team.

  1. Walk-through survey report: HVLV (high velocity low volume) control technology for aircraft bonded wing and radome maintenance at Air Force Logistics Command, McClellan Air Force Base, Sacramento, California

    SciTech Connect

    Hollett, B.A.

    1983-08-01

    A walk through survey was conducted at the Sacramento Air Logistics Center, McClellan Air Force Base, California, on June 13, 1983, to evaluate the use of High Velocity Low Volume (HVLV) technology in the aircraft-maintenance industry. The HVLV system consisted of 65 ceiling drops in the bonded honeycomb shop where grinding and sanding operations created glass fiber and resin dusts. Preemployment and periodic physical examinations were required. Workers were required to wear disposable coveralls, and disposable dust masks were available. Workers walked through decontamination air jet showers before leaving the area to change clothes. Environmental monitoring revealed no significant dust exposures when the HVLV system was in use. Performance of the exhaust system on the eight-inch-diameter nose cone sanding operation was good, but the three-inch-diameter tools were too large and the shrouds too cumbersome for use on many hand-finishing tasks. The author concludes that the HVLV system is partially successful but requires additional shroud design. Further development of small tool shrouds is recommended.

  2. 32 CFR 813.4 - Combat camera operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... COMCAM and visual information support forces for still photographic, motion media, graphics, and other VI... National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE SALES AND SERVICES VISUAL INFORMATION DOCUMENTATION PROGRAM § 813.4 Combat camera operations. (a) Air Force COMCAM forces document...

  3. 32 CFR 813.4 - Combat camera operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... COMCAM and visual information support forces for still photographic, motion media, graphics, and other VI... National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE SALES AND SERVICES VISUAL INFORMATION DOCUMENTATION PROGRAM § 813.4 Combat camera operations. (a) Air Force COMCAM forces document...

  4. 32 CFR 813.4 - Combat camera operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... COMCAM and visual information support forces for still photographic, motion media, graphics, and other VI... National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE SALES AND SERVICES VISUAL INFORMATION DOCUMENTATION PROGRAM § 813.4 Combat camera operations. (a) Air Force COMCAM forces document...

  5. 32 CFR 813.4 - Combat camera operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... COMCAM and visual information support forces for still photographic, motion media, graphics, and other VI... National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE SALES AND SERVICES VISUAL INFORMATION DOCUMENTATION PROGRAM § 813.4 Combat camera operations. (a) Air Force COMCAM forces document...

  6. Air

    MedlinePlus

    ... do to protect yourself from dirty air . Indoor air pollution and outdoor air pollution Air can be polluted indoors and it can ... this chart to see what things cause indoor air pollution and what things cause outdoor air pollution! Indoor ...

  7. Joint Forward Operating Base Elements of Command and Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summers, William C.

    2002-01-01

    Since the 1986 Goldwater-Nichols Act directed the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff to develop doctrine for the joint employment of the armed forces, tactics, techniques, and procedures have evolved at different rates depending on the competency. Whereas the command of joint air forces is well prescribed within the structure of the air operations center and its associated leadership, command of air assets at a joint forward operating base lacks guidance. Today, the United States prosecutes an air war over Afghanistan from bases in Uzbekistan, Pakistan, and Afghanistan. Elements of the United States Army, Air Force, and Marines combine at these geographically minute locations, each bringing a certain complement of support and command and control. Evidence from operations during the 1999 air war for Kosovo at Tirana Rinas Airport in Albania suggests that when these service elements meet at the airfield for the first time, there are problems associated with local procedure. At best, time is wasted creating local joint systems to overcome the difficulties. At worst, safety and mission accomplishment are jeopardized. This thesis will address the need to develop doctrine and a jointly integrated organization to support the command and control function at a forward operating base.

  8. Space vehicle onboard command encoder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A flexible onboard encoder system was designed for the space shuttle. The following areas were covered: (1) implementation of the encoder design into hardware to demonstrate the various encoding algorithms/code formats, (2) modulation techniques in a single hardware package to maintain comparable reliability and link integrity of the existing link systems and to integrate the various techniques into a single design using current technology. The primary function of the command encoder is to accept input commands, generated either locally onboard the space shuttle or remotely from the ground, format and encode the commands in accordance with the payload input requirements and appropriately modulate a subcarrier for transmission by the baseband RF modulator. The following information was provided: command encoder system design, brassboard hardware design, test set hardware and system packaging, and software.

  9. Station Commander Sends Holiday Greetings

    NASA Video Gallery

    Aboard the International Space Station, Expedition 30 Commander Dan Burbank of NASA sends season's greetings to the world and shares his thoughts about being in orbit aboard the space-based laborat...

  10. Network command processing system overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nam, Yon-Woo; Murphy, Lisa D.

    1993-01-01

    The Network Command Processing System (NCPS) developed for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Ground Network (GN) stations is a spacecraft command system utilizing a MULTIBUS I/68030 microprocessor. This system was developed and implemented at ground stations worldwide to provide a Project Operations Control Center (POCC) with command capability for support of spacecraft operations such as the LANDSAT, Shuttle, Tracking and Data Relay Satellite, and Nimbus-7. The NCPS consolidates multiple modulation schemes for supporting various manned/unmanned orbital platforms. The NCPS interacts with the POCC and a local operator to process configuration requests, generate modulated uplink sequences, and inform users of the ground command link status. This paper presents the system functional description, hardware description, and the software design.

  11. 14 CFR 135.109 - Pilot in command or second in command: Designation required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Pilot in command or second in command... ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Flight Operations § 135.109 Pilot in command or second in command: Designation...) Second in command for each flight requiring two pilots. (b) The pilot in command, as designated by...

  12. 14 CFR 91.1031 - Pilot in command or second in command: Designation required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Pilot in command or second in command... RULES Fractional Ownership Operations Program Management § 91.1031 Pilot in command or second in command...; and (2) Second in command for each program flight requiring two pilots. (b) The pilot in command,...

  13. 14 CFR 135.109 - Pilot in command or second in command: Designation required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Pilot in command or second in command... ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Flight Operations § 135.109 Pilot in command or second in command: Designation...) Second in command for each flight requiring two pilots. (b) The pilot in command, as designated by...

  14. 14 CFR 91.1031 - Pilot in command or second in command: Designation required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Pilot in command or second in command... RULES Fractional Ownership Operations Program Management § 91.1031 Pilot in command or second in command...; and (2) Second in command for each program flight requiring two pilots. (b) The pilot in command,...

  15. 14 CFR 135.109 - Pilot in command or second in command: Designation required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Pilot in command or second in command... ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Flight Operations § 135.109 Pilot in command or second in command: Designation...) Second in command for each flight requiring two pilots. (b) The pilot in command, as designated by...

  16. 14 CFR 135.109 - Pilot in command or second in command: Designation required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Pilot in command or second in command... ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Flight Operations § 135.109 Pilot in command or second in command: Designation...) Second in command for each flight requiring two pilots. (b) The pilot in command, as designated by...

  17. 14 CFR 91.1031 - Pilot in command or second in command: Designation required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Pilot in command or second in command... RULES Fractional Ownership Operations Program Management § 91.1031 Pilot in command or second in command...; and (2) Second in command for each program flight requiring two pilots. (b) The pilot in command,...

  18. 14 CFR 135.109 - Pilot in command or second in command: Designation required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pilot in command or second in command... ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Flight Operations § 135.109 Pilot in command or second in command: Designation...) Second in command for each flight requiring two pilots. (b) The pilot in command, as designated by...

  19. Command Process Modeling & Risk Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meshkat, Leila

    2011-01-01

    Commanding Errors may be caused by a variety of root causes. It's important to understand the relative significance of each of these causes for making institutional investment decisions. One of these causes is the lack of standardized processes and procedures for command and control. We mitigate this problem by building periodic tables and models corresponding to key functions within it. These models include simulation analysis and probabilistic risk assessment models.

  20. Prediction model for attrition from a combat unit training program.

    PubMed

    Moran, Daniel S; Evans, Rachel K; Arbel, Yael; Hadid, Amir; Laor, Arie; Fuks, Yael

    2011-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a prediction model for the attrition rate of soldiers from an 8-month advanced military training program based on physical and psychological factors. Two groups of 59 and 61 healthy, fit young men (18.7 ± 0.7 years) entering a rigorous combat unit training program in the Israeli Defense Forces were recruited to participate in this study. Data on anthropometrics, nutrition, blood measures (chemical and hematological), fitness, and bone quality were collected on the induction day. Psychological questionnaires were completed at 3 time points: baseline--upon entry to basic training (BT), after 2 months, and after 4 months (completion of BT). The data of the 2 groups were pooled together for the analysis and to construct a new prediction model for attrition (Patt) as follows: Patt = 11.20 - 0.87Est(Com4) - 0.72Sc - 0.23%BF; where Est(Com4) is commander appreciation as perceived by the soldier after 4-month BT, Sc is a self-confidence grade, and %BF is the % body fat. The new suggested model successfully predicted 75.3% of subject attrition in the combat unit. We therefore concluded that Special Forces recruits with relatively low body fat percentage (%BF), low self-esteem, and who feel unappreciated by their commander are at a higher dropout risk from a rigorous combat training program. PMID:21988903

  1. The SAS-3 delayed command system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, E. J.

    1975-01-01

    To meet the requirements arising from the increased complexity of the power, attitude control and telemetry systems, a full redundant high-performance control section with delayed command capability was designed for the Small Astronomy Satellite-3 (SAS-3). The relay command system of SAS-3 is characterized by 56 bystate relay commands, with capability for handling up to 64 commands in future versions. The 'short' data command service of SAS-1 and SAS-2 consisting of shifting 24-bit words to two users was expanded to five users and augmented with a 'long load' data command service (up to 4080 bits) used to program the telemetry system and the delayed command subsystem. The inclusion of a delayed command service ensures a program of up to 30 relay or short data commands to be loaded for execution at designated times. The design and system operation of the SAS-3 command section are analyzed, with special attention given to the delayed command subsystem.

  2. 40. Upper level, electronic racks, left to rightstatus command message ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    40. Upper level, electronic racks, left to right--status command message processing group, UHF radio, impss rack security, power supply group rack - Ellsworth Air Force Base, Delta Flight, Launch Facility, On County Road T512, south of Exit 116 off I-90, Interior, Jackson County, SD

  3. 10 commandments of smile esthetics.

    PubMed

    Machado, Andre Wilson

    2014-01-01

    The search for esthetic treatment has persisted in the routine of dental professionals. Following this trend, dental patients have sought treatment with the primary aim of improving smile esthetics. The aim of this article is to present a protocol to assess patient's smile: The 10 Commandments of smile esthetics.

  4. 10 commandments of smile esthetics

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Andre Wilson

    2014-01-01

    The search for esthetic treatment has persisted in the routine of dental professionals. Following this trend, dental patients have sought treatment with the primary aim of improving smile esthetics. The aim of this article is to present a protocol to assess patient's smile: The 10 Commandments of smile esthetics. PMID:25279532

  5. Estimated effects of ionizing radiation upon military task performance: individual combat crewmember assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Anno, G.H.; Wilson, D.B.

    1984-04-01

    Quantitative estimates are developed of the performance levels for selected individual Army combat crewmembers exposed to prompt ionizing radiation from nuclear weapons. The performance levels, expressed in percent of normal (baseline) task performance, provide information for military operations planning, combat training, and computer simulation modeling of combat crew and unit effectiveness. The methodology is described where data from two separate bodies of information: acute radiation sickness symptomatology, and judgment of task performance time from Army combat crew questionnaires - are integrated to compute performance levels as a function of dose (free-in-air) and post-exposure time.

  6. Personality, individual differences and command in war: 1982.

    PubMed

    Jolly, R T

    1997-01-01

    In 1982, a small percentage of Great Britain's armed forces was involved in a short but bitter action to recover some territory in the South Atlantic region that had been invaded by another nation. As part of a UK Ministry of Defence-sponsored study, 30 Commanding Officers of British sea, land and air units involved in Operation CORPORATE participated between seven and nine years later in a research study investigating their individual variations in personality and the perceived effects of their experience of Command in War. Ten single-seat, fast jet pilots from a slightly younger age group were also investigated.

  7. Simulation software specification for the Urban Combat Computer Assisted Training System (UCCATS)

    SciTech Connect

    Dobbs, L.A.; Toms, R. Berlin Brigade )

    1990-03-16

    The United States Army, Berlin and its Berlin Brigade have an urgent requirement for a training system that can provide a realistic, stress-filled, simulated combat training environment for an urban battlefield. The simulation system will support the training of division/brigade/battalion commanders and their staffs to exercise procedures and decision making which will be essential to win on a modern urban battlefield. The current manual simulation used by the Berlin Brigade requires an excessive amount of time for pre-exercise set up and training of players and controllers. The manual simulation requires a large training support staff consisting of 40 to 60 personnel per shift. In addition, the current simulation has numerous modeling deficiencies reducing the quality of the combat representation to the extent that realistic training is not feasible in many circumstances. The computer assisted simulation system UCCATS will provide a means to more efficiently support realistic training for combat in the urban environment. UCCATS will support the training of a division/brigade/battalion commander and his staff. It will exercise commanders and staff in the command and control of combined arms operations in an urban terrain environment.

  8. Connecting research to combating desertification.

    PubMed

    Seely, M; Wöhl, H

    2004-12-01

    With and without the encouragement of the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification and its Committee on Science and Technology, scientific research has been undertaken throughout the drylands with the expectation of contributing to combating desertification. Little of this research has been applied in developing countries for its identified purpose. The main reason for this is the limited translation of scientific research into an accessible format for application by development agencies or rural communities.

  9. Collins named First Woman Shuttle Commander

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    Just a few hours after NASA revealed that there is water ice on the Moon, U.S. First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton introduced Air Force Lieutenant Colonel Eileen Collins to a packed auditorium at Dunbar Senior High School in Washington, D.C., as the first woman who will command a NASA space shuttle mission. With students at this school, which is noted for its pre-engineering program, cheering, Clinton said that Collins' selection “is one big step forward for women and one giant step for humanity.” Clinton added, “It doesn't matter if you are a boy or a girl, you can be an astronaut or a pilot, if you get a first-rate education in math and science.”

  10. 32 CFR 724.405 - Commandant of the Marine Corps or the Commander, Naval Military Personnel Command.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., Naval Military Personnel Command. 724.405 Section 724.405 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY PERSONNEL NAVAL DISCHARGE REVIEW BOARD Principal Elements of the Navy Department Discharge Review System § 724.405 Commandant of the Marine Corps or the Commander, Naval...

  11. 32 CFR 724.405 - Commandant of the Marine Corps or the Commander, Naval Military Personnel Command.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., Naval Military Personnel Command. 724.405 Section 724.405 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY PERSONNEL NAVAL DISCHARGE REVIEW BOARD Principal Elements of the Navy Department Discharge Review System § 724.405 Commandant of the Marine Corps or the Commander, Naval...

  12. Sensors as confidence building measures: A demonstration using a combat simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Warshawsky, A.S.; Spinosa, A.; Pimper, J.

    1994-06-01

    Numerous combat simulations have been developed and used to study the consequences of alternative force structures, analyze weapon performance, and train combat force commanders. These same simulations can, with minor modifications, be used to study a suite of arms control issues. To demonstrate this point, a modification of the LLNL Joint Conflict Model (JCM) was used to explain the utility of unattended ground sensors (UGS) as confidence building measures (CBMs) in the context of a regional arms control situation. It was shown that existing simulations (in particular, JCM) have the functionality necessary to easily and readily address regional arms control issues in a meaningful fashion.

  13. Command and control displays for space vehicle operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desjardins, Daniel D.; Zetocha, Paul; Aleva, Denise

    2010-04-01

    This paper shall examine several command and control facility display architectures supporting space vehicle operations, to include TacSat 2, TacSat 3, STPSat 2, and Communications Navigation Outage Forecasting System (CNOFS), located within the Research Development Test & Evaluation Support Complex (RSC) Satellite Operations Center 97 (SOC-97) at Kirtland Air Force Base. A principal focus is to provide an understanding for the general design class of displays currently supporting space vehicle command and control, e.g., custom, commercial-off-the-shelf, or ruggedized commercial-off-the-shelf, and more specifically, what manner of display performance capabilities, e.g., active area, resolution, luminance, contrast ratio, frame/refresh rate, temperature range, shock/vibration, etc., are needed for particular aspects of space vehicle command and control. Another focus shall be to address the types of command and control functions performed for each of these systems, to include how operators interact with the displays, e.g., joystick, trackball, keyboard/mouse, as well as the kinds of information needed or displayed for each function. [Comparison with other known command and control facilities, such as Cheyenne Mountain and NORAD Operations Center, shall be made.] Future, anticipated display systems shall be discussed.

  14. Astronaut Young at the commander's station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Astronaut John W. Young, crew commander, takes notes in the commander's station on the flight deck of the Columbia. The cathode ray tube (CRT) among the forward panels diplays the orbiter's position in relation to the Earth on its monitor.

  15. British Airways' pre-command training program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holdstock, L. F. J.

    1980-01-01

    Classroom, flight simulator, and in-flight sessions of an airline pilot training program are briefly described. Factors discussed include initial command potential assessment, precommand airline management studies course, precommand course, and command course.

  16. Expedition 33/34 Change of Command

    NASA Video Gallery

    Expedition 33 Commander Suni Williams ceremonially handed over command of the International Space Station on Saturday to fellow NASA astronaut Kevin Ford on the eve of her departure from the comple...

  17. STS-93 Commander Eileen Collins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    STS-93 Commander Eileen Collins (pictured) is the first woman to serve as a shuttle mission commander. She was the first woman pilot of a Space Shuttle, on mission STS-63, and also served as pilot on mission STS-84. Collins will command the crew of STS-93 on a five-day mission aboard Space Shuttle Columbia on its newly scheduled launch date July 9. The other STS-93 crew members are Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby and Mission Specialists Steven A. Hawley, Catherine G. Coleman and Michel Tognini of France, representing the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES). The primary mission of STS-93 is the deployment of the Chandra X-ray Observatory. Formerly called the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility, Chandra comprises three major elements: the spacecraft, the science instrument module (SIM), and the world's most powerful X-ray telescope. Chandra will allow scientists from around the world to see previously invisible black holes and high-temperature gas clouds, giving the observatory the potential to rewrite the books on the structure and evolution of our universe.

  18. Voice command weapons launching system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, H. E.

    1984-09-01

    This abstract discloses a voice-controlled weapons launching system for use by a pilot of an aircraft against a plurality of simultaneously appearing (i.e., existing) targets, such as two or more aggressor aircraft (or tanks, or the like) attacking more aggressor aircraft. The system includes, in combination, a voice controlled input device linked to and controlling a computer; apparatus (such as a television camera, receiver, and display), linked to and actuated by the computer by a voice command from the pilot, for acquiring and displaying an image of the multi-target area; a laser, linked to and actuated by the computer by a voice command from the pilot to point to (and to lock on to) any one of the plurality of targets, with the laser emitting a beam toward the designated (i.e., selected) target; and a plurality of laser beam-rider missiles, with a different missile being launched toward and attacking each different designated target by riding the laser beam to that target. Unlike the prior art, the system allows the pilot to use his hands full-time to fly and to control the aircraft, while also permitting him to launch each different missile in rapid sequence by giving a two-word spoken command after he has visually selected each target of the plurality of targets, thereby making it possible for the pilot of a single defender aircraft to prevail against the plurality of simultaneously attacking aircraft, or tanks, or the like.

  19. 32 CFR 700.1053 - Commander of a task force.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Commander of a task force. 700.1053 Section 700... Command Detail to Duty § 700.1053 Commander of a task force. (a) A geographic fleet commander, and any other naval commander, may detail in command of a task force, or other task command, any...

  20. 32 CFR 700.1053 - Commander of a task force.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Commander of a task force. 700.1053 Section 700... Command Detail to Duty § 700.1053 Commander of a task force. (a) A geographic fleet commander, and any other naval commander, may detail in command of a task force, or other task command, any...

  1. 32 CFR 700.1053 - Commander of a task force.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Commander of a task force. 700.1053 Section 700... Command Detail to Duty § 700.1053 Commander of a task force. (a) A geographic fleet commander, and any other naval commander, may detail in command of a task force, or other task command, any...

  2. 32 CFR 700.1053 - Commander of a task force.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Commander of a task force. 700.1053 Section 700... Command Detail to Duty § 700.1053 Commander of a task force. (a) A geographic fleet commander, and any other naval commander, may detail in command of a task force, or other task command, any...

  3. 32 CFR 700.1053 - Commander of a task force.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Commander of a task force. 700.1053 Section 700... Command Detail to Duty § 700.1053 Commander of a task force. (a) A geographic fleet commander, and any other naval commander, may detail in command of a task force, or other task command, any...

  4. 46 CFR 42.05-20 - Commandant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Commandant. 42.05-20 Section 42.05-20 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) LOAD LINES DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN VOYAGES BY SEA Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 42.05-20 Commandant. This term means the Commandant, U.S. Coast Guard, Washington, DC...

  5. 32 CFR 215.7 - Command relationships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... unified or specified commands through the Chief of Staff, U.S. Army, and Task Force Commanders designated by JCS. (c) At objective areas, designated task force commanders will exercise operational control..., through the Chief of Staff, U.S. Army, the direction of those forces assigned or committed to him by...

  6. Opinion dynamics in networked command and control organizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Xiao; Zhang, Shaoyun; Qian, Lidong

    2013-10-01

    An opinion dynamics model for a Command and Control (C2) organization is essential for simulating combat system effectiveness. However, few studies have addressed opinion evolution in C2 simulation. With the goal of overcoming this research gap, this paper proposes an opinion exchange model, which is illustrated through a practical example of an Armored Division network. The model is divided into homogeneous and heterogeneous aspects: the former is mainly characterized by communication rules and types, while the latter is extended with the influence of multi-level opinion leaders. After carrying out the simulation of the two main models, the results show that the opinion evolution of the hierarchical leveled C2 organization with descending influence is much more complex and unpredictable than that of social networks.

  7. Individual combatant simulator for tactics training and mission rehearsal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemire, Kenneth

    1998-04-01

    This individual combatant simulator (ICS) provides ground force leaders opportunities to practice tactical skills on the simulated battlefield by directing dismounted computer- generated forces in combatant and non-combatant exercises. Integrated hardware and software systems allow leaders to operate on the simulated battlefield as they would on the physical battlefield using combinations of voice commands, arm signals, virtual tools, and virtual weapons. Hardware components include image generator, head-mounted display, 3D sound, spatial tracking, instrumented glove, synthesized speech, and voice recognition systems. The training simulator can be operated on a network. Four types of evaluations, including performance of authentic tasks and subjective evaluations, were conducted using dismounted infantry soldiers and university students as participants. The results indicated that the ICS was easy to learn and use, could be used to conduct training exercises, supported skillful performance in training exercises, and was engaging and compelling for the users. These initial evaluations indicated ease of learning and use of the simulator, as well as the potential for training effectiveness.

  8. 14 CFR 91.1031 - Pilot in command or second in command: Designation required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... RULES Fractional Ownership Operations Program Management § 91.1031 Pilot in command or second in command: Designation required. (a) Each program manager must designate a— (1) Pilot in command for each program flight... designated by the program manager, must remain the pilot in command at all times during that flight....

  9. Methodology for determination and use of the no-escape envelope of an air-to-air-missile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neuman, Frank

    1988-01-01

    A large gap exists between optimal control and differential-game theory and their applications. The purpose of this paper is to show how this gap may be bridged. Missile-avoidance of realistically simulated infrared heat-seeking, fire-and-forget missile is studied. In detailed simulations, sweeping out the discretized initial condition space, avoidance methods based on pilot experience are combined with those based on simplified optimal control analysis to derive an approximation to the no-escape missile envelopes. The detailed missile equations and no-escape envelopes were then incorporated into an existing piloted simulation of air-to-air combat to generate missile firing decisions as well as missile avoidance commands. The use of these envelopes was found to be effective in both functions.

  10. Combating Stagefright: Selected Vocal Exercises.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratliff, Gerald Lee

    Noting that stagefright has been the subject of intensive analysis and subjected to almost every conceivable test or measurement without revealing either its "cause" or its "cure," this paper presents vocal exercises to help combat the performance malady. After listing four principles concerning the nature of stagefright (it is not a pathological…

  11. Habeas Corpus and "Enemy Combatants"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pereira, Carolyn; Chavkin, Nisan

    2008-01-01

    The writ of habeas corpus has been a critical tool for balancing the rights of individuals with the government's responsibility to protect the nation's welfare. In this article, the authors discuss the writ of habeas corpus and how it affects the federal government and hundreds of prisoners who are held as enemy combatants. Elementary, middle, and…

  12. Combating Training-Stress Syndromes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voight, Mike

    2002-01-01

    Addresses the nature and ramifications of various training stress syndromes (overtraining, under-recovery, distress, staleness, and burnout) that can accompany inappropriate training practices, examining the interventions that players and coaches can use to combat these syndromes (including physical, psychological, and performance interventions),…

  13. Decentralisation and Combating Educational Exclusion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Langen, Annemarie; Dekkers, Hetty

    2001-01-01

    Describes Dutch policies to combat educational disadvantage arising from economic, social, and cultural factors by funding efforts at the local level. Compares Dutch efforts to success factors and obstacles encountered in similar initiatives in the United States, England and Wales, and Australia, where public education and local authority have…

  14. Teaching Combative Sports through Tactics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kozub, Francis M.; Kozub, Mary L.

    2004-01-01

    Martial arts have become popular in the United States and have transitioned from being spectator sports to avenues for active participation by people of all ages. The purpose of this article is to highlight tactical similarities in selected combative sport activities and to provide martial arts and wrestling instructors with an alternative…

  15. Central Heating Plant site characterization report, Marine Corps Combat Development Command, Quantico, Virginia

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-08-01

    This report presents the methodology and results of a characterization of the operation and maintenance (O M) environment at the US Marine Corps (USMC) Quantico, Virginia, Central Heating Plant (CHP). This characterization is part of a program intended to provide the O M staff with a computerized artificial intelligence (AI) decision support system that will assist the plant staff in more efficient operation of their plant. 3 refs., 12 figs.

  16. Development of a Testbed for Distributed Satellite Command and Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zetocha, Paul; Brito, Margarita

    2002-01-01

    At the Air Force Research Laboratory's Space Vehicles Directorate we are investigating and developing architectures for commanding and controlling a cluster of cooperating satellites through prototype development for the TechSat-21 program. The objective of this paper is to describe a distributed satellite testbed that is currently under development and to summarize near term prototypes being implemented for cluster command and control. To design, develop, and test our architecture we are using eight PowerPC 750 VME-based single board computers, representing eight satellites. Each of these computers is hosting the OSE(TM) real-time operating system from Enea Systems. At the core of our on-board cluster manager is ObjectAgent. ObjectAgent is an agent-based object-oriented framework for flight systems, which is particularly suitable for distributed applications. In order to handle communication with the ground as well as to assist with the cluster management we are using the Spacecraft Command Language (SCL). SCL is also at the centerpiece of our ground control station and handles cluster commanding, telemetry decommutation, state-of-health monitoring, and Fault Detection, Isolation, and Resolution (FDIR). For planning and scheduling activities we are currently using ASPEN from NASA/JPL. This paper will describe each of the above components in detail and then present the prototypes being implemented.

  17. Command and Service Module Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Interbartolo, Michael

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation examines Command and Service Module (CSM) Communications. The communication system's capabilities are defined, including CSM-Earth, CSM-Lunar Module and CSM-Extravehicular crewman communications. An overview is provided for S-band communications, including data transmission and receiving rates, operating frequencies and major system components (pre-modulation processors, unified S-band electronics, S-band power amplifier and S-band antennas). Additionally, data transmission rates, operating frequencies and the capabilities of VHF communications are described. Major VHF components, including transmitters and receivers, and the VHF multiplexer and antennas are also highlighted. Finally, communications during pre-launch, ascent, in-flight and entry are discussed. Overall, the CSM communication system was rated highly by flight controllers and crew. The system was mostly autonomous for both crew and flight controllers and no major issues were encountered during flight.

  18. Breakthrough Cancer Pain: Ten Commandments.

    PubMed

    Mercadante, Sebastiano; Cuomo, Arturo

    2016-01-01

    The term "breakthrough cancer pain" (BTcP) was introduced about 25 years ago. Peaks of pain intensity reported in patients with cancer had been invariably examined in the past years, providing relevant information for a better knowledge of this phenomenon and its treatment. The aim of this critical review was to provide the golden rules, namely, the 10 commandments, for a correct diagnostic pathway of BTcP and a consequent personalized pharmacological treatment. These are as follows: 1) assessment of background analgesia, 2) drugs used for background analgesia, 3) BTcP is a frequent phenomenon, 4) characteristics of BTcP, 5) diagnosis of BTcP, 6) continuous assessment, 7) tailored pharmacological treatment of BTcP, 8) selection of BTcP medication, 9) dosing BTcP medications, and 10) education. These steps may help clinicians to recognize and treat BTcP adequately. PMID:27565269

  19. 33 CFR 334.700 - Choctawhatchee Bay, aerial gunnery ranges, Air Proving Ground Center, Air Research and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Choctawhatchee Bay, aerial gunnery ranges, Air Proving Ground Center, Air Research and Development Command, Eglin Air Force Base, Fla... gunnery ranges, Air Proving Ground Center, Air Research and Development Command, Eglin Air Force Base,...

  20. A content analysis of military commander messages about tobacco and other health issues in military installation newspapers: what do military commanders say about tobacco?

    PubMed

    Poston, Walker S C; Haddock, Christopher K; Jahnke, Sara A; Hyder, Melissa L; Jitnarin, Nattinee

    2015-06-01

    Military installation newspapers are a primary means used by military commanders to communicate information about topics important to military personnel including leadership, training issues, installation events, safety concerns, and vital health issues. We conducted a content analysis of military commanders' messages about health issues that were published in online military installation newspapers/newsfeeds. We identified a total of 75 publicly accessible installation newspapers/newsfeeds with commanders' messages (n = 39 Air Force, n = 19 Army, n = 7 Navy, n = 1 Marine, and n = 9 Joint Bases). Commander messages published from January 2012 to December 2012 were collected, screened, and coded. Coder inter-rater reliability was 98.9%. Among the 2,479 coded commanders' messages, 132 (5.3%) addressed a health topic as the primary focus. There were no significant differences between service branches in the percentage of health-oriented messages (χ(2) = 5.019, p = 0.285). The most commonly addressed health topics were exercise/fitness (23.5%), other mental health concerns (19.7%), alcohol/driving under the influence (13.6%), and suicide (12.1%). Tobacco use was directly addressed as a primary health aim in only two commanders' messages (1.5%). Health topics, and particularly tobacco-related content, are rarely written about by military commanders. The absence of tobacco-related health messages from line leadership contributes to the perception that tobacco control is a low priority. PMID:26032388

  1. Station Commander Congratulates New Flight Directors

    NASA Video Gallery

    Aboard the International Space Station, Expedition 29 Commander Mike Fossum congratulates Judd Frieling, Tomas Gonzalez-Torres and Greg Whitney on being selected as NASA's newest flight directors. ...

  2. Waveform command shaping control of multimode systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alhazza, Khaled A.; Masoud, Ziyad N.

    2016-02-01

    A method for eliminating residual vibrations in multimode systems is presented using a command shaping technique. The proposed command shaping technique captures two main advantages. Namely, the independence of the time length of the shaped command from the resonant frequencies of the system, and the ability to generate the command profile without a full system model. Experiments on systems with partial models represented by their resonant frequencies show that shaped command profiles generated using actual measured resonant frequencies of a system outperform those based on mathematical models. This feature of the proposed command shaping technique makes it very attractive for complicated multimode systems where mathematical models are difficult to build. Profiles of the proposed shaped command are simple and do not require intensive calculations. Performance of the proposed shaped command is validated using numerical simulations and experiments. Numerical simulations prove that the shaped commands are capable of completely eliminating residual vibrations of multimode systems. Experiments show that residual vibration elimination depends on the level of accuracy of the measured resonant frequencies of the system.

  3. 32 CFR 770.31 - List of major naval installations in the State of Hawaii and cognizant commanders authorized to...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, HI 96860. Also see 32 CFR part 763. (2) Kaula. Contact: Commander Naval Base... 96860. (2) Naval Western Oceanography Center, Pearl Harbor. Contact: Commanding Officer, Naval Western Oceanography Center, Box 113, Pearl Harbor, HI 96860. (3) Naval Air Station, Barbers Point. Contact:...

  4. Abductive networks applied to electronic combat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, Gerard J.; Hess, Paul; Hwang, Jong S.

    1990-08-01

    A practical approach to dealing with combinatorial decision problems and uncertainties associated with electronic combat through the use of networks of high-level functional elements called abductive networks is presented. It describes the application of the Abductory Induction Mechanism (AIMTM) a supervised inductive learning tool for synthesizing polynomial abductive networks to the electronic combat problem domain. From databases of historical expert-generated or simulated combat engagements AIM can often induce compact and robust network models for making effective real-time electronic combat decisions despite significant uncertainties or a combinatorial explosion of possible situations. The feasibility of applying abductive networks to realize advanced combat decision aiding capabilities was demonstrated by applying AIM to a set of electronic combat simulations. The networks synthesized by AIM generated accurate assessments of the intent lethality and overall risk associated with a variety of simulated threats and produced reasonable estimates of the expected effectiveness of a group of electronic countermeasures for a large number of simulated combat scenarios. This paper presents the application of abductive networks to electronic combat summarizes the results of experiments performed using AIM discusses the benefits and limitations of applying abductive networks to electronic combat and indicates why abductive networks can often result in capabilities not attainable using alternative approaches. 1. ELECTRONIC COMBAT. UNCERTAINTY. AND MACHINE LEARNING Electronic combat has become an essential part of the ability to make war and has become increasingly complex since

  5. 14 CFR 91.1031 - Pilot in command or second in command: Designation required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pilot in command or second in command: Designation required. 91.1031 Section 91.1031 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... designated by the program manager, must remain the pilot in command at all times during that flight....

  6. 32 CFR 536.12 - Commanding General, U.S. Army Medical Command.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Commanding General, U.S. Army Medical Command. 536.12 Section 536.12 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY CLAIMS AND ACCOUNTS CLAIMS AGAINST THE UNITED STATES The Army Claims System § 536.12 Commanding General,...

  7. 32 CFR 536.12 - Commanding General, U.S. Army Medical Command.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Commanding General, U.S. Army Medical Command. 536.12 Section 536.12 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY CLAIMS AND ACCOUNTS CLAIMS AGAINST THE UNITED STATES The Army Claims System § 536.12 Commanding General,...

  8. 32 CFR 536.12 - Commanding General, U.S. Army Medical Command.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Commanding General, U.S. Army Medical Command. 536.12 Section 536.12 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY CLAIMS AND ACCOUNTS CLAIMS AGAINST THE UNITED STATES The Army Claims System § 536.12 Commanding General,...

  9. 32 CFR 536.12 - Commanding General, U.S. Army Medical Command.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Commanding General, U.S. Army Medical Command. 536.12 Section 536.12 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY CLAIMS AND ACCOUNTS CLAIMS AGAINST THE UNITED STATES The Army Claims System § 536.12 Commanding General,...

  10. 32 CFR 536.12 - Commanding General, U.S. Army Medical Command.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2012-07-01 2009-07-01 true Commanding General, U.S. Army Medical Command. 536.12 Section 536.12 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY CLAIMS AND ACCOUNTS CLAIMS AGAINST THE UNITED STATES The Army Claims System § 536.12 Commanding General,...

  11. 76 FR 19893 - Unified Command Plan 2011

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-08

    ... HOUSE, Washington, April 6, 2011 [FR Doc. 2011-8644 Filed 4-7-11; 11:15 am] Billing code 5000-04-P ...#0;#0; ] Memorandum of April 6, 2011 Unified Command Plan 2011 Memorandum for the Secretary of... the revised Unified Command Plan. Consistent with title 10, United States Code, section 161(b)(2)...

  12. 46 CFR 5.801 - Commandant's review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Commandant's review. 5.801 Section 5.801 Shipping COAST... REGULATIONS-PERSONNEL ACTION Review of Administrative Law Judge's Decisions in Cases Where Charges Have Been Found Proved § 5.801 Commandant's review. Any decision of an Administrative Law Judge, in which...

  13. 32 CFR 637.3 - Installation Commander.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Installation Commander. 637.3 Section 637.3 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS MILITARY POLICE INVESTIGATION Investigations § 637.3 Installation Commander....

  14. 32 CFR 637.3 - Installation Commander.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Installation Commander. 637.3 Section 637.3 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS MILITARY POLICE INVESTIGATION Investigations § 637.3 Installation Commander....

  15. 32 CFR 637.3 - Installation Commander.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Installation Commander. 637.3 Section 637.3 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS MILITARY POLICE INVESTIGATION Investigations § 637.3 Installation Commander....

  16. 32 CFR 637.3 - Installation Commander.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Installation Commander. 637.3 Section 637.3 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS MILITARY POLICE INVESTIGATION Investigations § 637.3 Installation Commander....

  17. 32 CFR 637.3 - Installation Commander.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Installation Commander. 637.3 Section 637.3 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS MILITARY POLICE INVESTIGATION Investigations § 637.3 Installation Commander....

  18. 46 CFR 5.801 - Commandant's review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Commandant's review. 5.801 Section 5.801 Shipping COAST... REGULATIONS-PERSONNEL ACTION Review of Administrative Law Judge's Decisions in Cases Where Charges Have Been Found Proved § 5.801 Commandant's review. Any decision of an Administrative Law Judge, in which...

  19. XTCE. XML Telemetry and Command Exchange Tutorial

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, Kevin; Kizzort, Brad; Simon, Jerry

    2010-01-01

    An XML Telemetry Command Exchange (XTCE) tutoral oriented towards packets or minor frames is shown. The contents include: 1) The Basics; 2) Describing Telemetry; 3) Describing the Telemetry Format; 4) Commanding; 5) Forgotten Elements; 6) Implementing XTCE; and 7) GovSat.

  20. Classical command of quantum systems.

    PubMed

    Reichardt, Ben W; Unger, Falk; Vazirani, Umesh

    2013-04-25

    Quantum computation and cryptography both involve scenarios in which a user interacts with an imperfectly modelled or 'untrusted' system. It is therefore of fundamental and practical interest to devise tests that reveal whether the system is behaving as instructed. In 1969, Clauser, Horne, Shimony and Holt proposed an experimental test that can be passed by a quantum-mechanical system but not by a system restricted to classical physics. Here we extend this test to enable the characterization of a large quantum system. We describe a scheme that can be used to determine the initial state and to classically command the system to evolve according to desired dynamics. The bipartite system is treated as two black boxes, with no assumptions about their inner workings except that they obey quantum physics. The scheme works even if the system is explicitly designed to undermine it; any misbehaviour is detected. Among its applications, our scheme makes it possible to test whether a claimed quantum computer is truly quantum. It also advances towards a goal of quantum cryptography: namely, the use of 'untrusted' devices to establish a shared random key, with security based on the validity of quantum physics.

  1. Classical command of quantum systems.

    PubMed

    Reichardt, Ben W; Unger, Falk; Vazirani, Umesh

    2013-04-25

    Quantum computation and cryptography both involve scenarios in which a user interacts with an imperfectly modelled or 'untrusted' system. It is therefore of fundamental and practical interest to devise tests that reveal whether the system is behaving as instructed. In 1969, Clauser, Horne, Shimony and Holt proposed an experimental test that can be passed by a quantum-mechanical system but not by a system restricted to classical physics. Here we extend this test to enable the characterization of a large quantum system. We describe a scheme that can be used to determine the initial state and to classically command the system to evolve according to desired dynamics. The bipartite system is treated as two black boxes, with no assumptions about their inner workings except that they obey quantum physics. The scheme works even if the system is explicitly designed to undermine it; any misbehaviour is detected. Among its applications, our scheme makes it possible to test whether a claimed quantum computer is truly quantum. It also advances towards a goal of quantum cryptography: namely, the use of 'untrusted' devices to establish a shared random key, with security based on the validity of quantum physics. PMID:23619692

  2. Nanomaterials to Combat NO(x) Pollution.

    PubMed

    Balbuena, J; Cruz-Yusta, M; Sánchez, L

    2015-09-01

    The presence of NO9x) gases (NO+NO2) in the atmosphere is a major concern of society because of their associated adverse and harmful effects. In order to remove the NO(x) gases from the air, photocatalysis arises as an innovative and promising technique. Through the use of photochemical oxidation processes the NO and NO2 gases are oxidised to NO3- form and thus removed from the air. In recent years new nanomaterials are being developed by researchers with the aim to enhance their photocatalytic activity to combat the NO(x) pollution. The main focus is devoted to preparing new TiO2 based compounds with the highest specific surface area (SSA), different morphology and chemical modifications. In order to increase the SSA, different substrates were used to disperse the TiO2 nanoparticles: organic and carbon fibres, mesoporous materials, clays composites and nanoporous microparticles. In the other hand, high photocatalytic performances were obtained with nanotubes, self-orderer nano-tubular films and nanoparticles with the lowest size. Conversely, when TiO2 is doped with ions the oxide exhibited a better photocatalytic performance under visible light, which is related to the creation of intermediate energy states between the conduction band and the valence band. Alternatively, visible light photocatalysts different from titanium oxide have been studied, which exhibit a good De-NO(x) efficiency working under λ > 400 nm visible light irradiation. PMID:26716191

  3. Nanomaterials to Combat NO(x) Pollution.

    PubMed

    Balbuena, J; Cruz-Yusta, M; Sánchez, L

    2015-09-01

    The presence of NO9x) gases (NO+NO2) in the atmosphere is a major concern of society because of their associated adverse and harmful effects. In order to remove the NO(x) gases from the air, photocatalysis arises as an innovative and promising technique. Through the use of photochemical oxidation processes the NO and NO2 gases are oxidised to NO3- form and thus removed from the air. In recent years new nanomaterials are being developed by researchers with the aim to enhance their photocatalytic activity to combat the NO(x) pollution. The main focus is devoted to preparing new TiO2 based compounds with the highest specific surface area (SSA), different morphology and chemical modifications. In order to increase the SSA, different substrates were used to disperse the TiO2 nanoparticles: organic and carbon fibres, mesoporous materials, clays composites and nanoporous microparticles. In the other hand, high photocatalytic performances were obtained with nanotubes, self-orderer nano-tubular films and nanoparticles with the lowest size. Conversely, when TiO2 is doped with ions the oxide exhibited a better photocatalytic performance under visible light, which is related to the creation of intermediate energy states between the conduction band and the valence band. Alternatively, visible light photocatalysts different from titanium oxide have been studied, which exhibit a good De-NO(x) efficiency working under λ > 400 nm visible light irradiation.

  4. Airoscope command system. [pulse code modulation telemetry command system for data link with balloons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrows, W.

    1974-01-01

    A PCM telemetry command system is presented having a capacity of 256 unique commands, an end-to-end actuation time of less than 250 milliseconds, and an address plus complementary command code to provide security against the acceptance of anything but intended commands. The system consists of a ground-based encoder and a balloon-borne decoder, both built using low-current drain, high reliability CMOS logic elements. Commands are normally issued by a simple switch closure to +5VDC on the appropriate input line, however as a backup mode, the 8-bit command may be entered manually on 8 toggle switches and executed via a SEND button. In any case, the command is then serialized into a PCM bit stream and sent via a P-Band radio link to the DECODER aloft. All 256 outputs from the DECODER are buffered through drivers and thus may be used to drive CMOS, TTL, or DTL logic.

  5. Modeling and simulation for collateral damage estimation in combat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Steven C.; Martin, Douglas D.

    2005-05-01

    Modeling and simulation (M&S) is increasingly used for decision support during combat operations: M&S is going to war! One of the key operational uses of M&S in combat is collateral damage estimation (CDE). Reducing undesired collateral damage (CD) in war and in operations other than war is important to the United States of America. Injuries to noncombatants and damage to protected sites are uniformly avoided by our forces whenever possible in planning and executing combat operations. This desire to limit unwanted CD presents unique challenges to command and control (C2), especially for time-sensitive targeting (TST). The challenges begin the moment a target is identified because CD estimates must meet specified criteria before target approval is granted. Therefore, CDE tools must be accurate, responsive, and human-factored, with graphics that aid C2 decisions. This paper will describe how CDE tools are used to build three-dimensional models of potential target areas and select appropriate munitions, fusing, and delivery in order to minimize predicted CD. The paper will cover the evolution of CDE from using only range rings around the target to improvements through Operation Allied Force, Operation Enduring Freedom, and Operation Iraqi Freedom. Positive CDE feedback from various sources, including the Secretary of Defense, lessons learned, and warfighters will be presented. Current CDE tools in the field and CDE tools used in reachback are being improved, and short-term and long-term improvements in those tools and in the CDE methodology will be described in this paper.

  6. 14 CFR § 1214.703 - Chain of command.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... of the Space Shuttle Commander § 1214.703 Chain of command. (a) The Commander is a career NASA... when otherwise designated) the Space Shuttle commander is responsible to the Flight Director, Johnson... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Chain of command. § 1214.703 Section...

  7. 32 CFR 700.1056 - Command of a ship.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Command of a ship. 700.1056 Section 700.1056... Command Detail to Duty § 700.1056 Command of a ship. (a) The officer detailed to command a commissioned ship shall be an officer of the line in the Navy eligible for command at sea. (b) The officer...

  8. 32 CFR 700.1056 - Command of a ship.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Command of a ship. 700.1056 Section 700.1056... Command Detail to Duty § 700.1056 Command of a ship. (a) The officer detailed to command a commissioned ship shall be an officer of the line in the Navy eligible for command at sea. (b) The officer...

  9. 32 CFR 700.1056 - Command of a ship.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Command of a ship. 700.1056 Section 700.1056... Command Detail to Duty § 700.1056 Command of a ship. (a) The officer detailed to command a commissioned ship shall be an officer of the line in the Navy eligible for command at sea. (b) The officer...

  10. 32 CFR 700.1056 - Command of a ship.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Command of a ship. 700.1056 Section 700.1056... Command Detail to Duty § 700.1056 Command of a ship. (a) The officer detailed to command a commissioned ship shall be an officer of the line in the Navy eligible for command at sea. (b) The officer...

  11. 32 CFR 700.1056 - Command of a ship.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Command of a ship. 700.1056 Section 700.1056... Command Detail to Duty § 700.1056 Command of a ship. (a) The officer detailed to command a commissioned ship shall be an officer of the line in the Navy eligible for command at sea. (b) The officer...

  12. The next generation of command post computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, Ross D.; Lieb, Aaron J.; Samuel, Jason M.; Burger, Mitchell A.

    2015-05-01

    The future of command post computing demands an innovative new solution to address a variety of challenging operational needs. The Command Post of the Future is the Army's primary command and control decision support system, providing situational awareness and collaborative tools for tactical decision making, planning, and execution management from Corps to Company level. However, as the U.S. Army moves towards a lightweight, fully networked battalion, disconnected operations, thin client architecture and mobile computing become increasingly essential. The Command Post of the Future is not designed to support these challenges in the coming decade. Therefore, research into a hybrid blend of technologies is in progress to address these issues. This research focuses on a new command and control system utilizing the rich collaboration framework afforded by Command Post of the Future coupled with a new user interface consisting of a variety of innovative workspace designs. This new system is called Tactical Applications. This paper details a brief history of command post computing, presents the challenges facing the modern Army, and explores the concepts under consideration for Tactical Applications that meet these challenges in a variety of innovative ways.

  13. Strategies to Combat Antimicrobial Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Uchil, Rajesh R; Kohli, Gurdeep Singh; Katekhaye, Vijay M

    2014-01-01

    The global burden of antimicrobial resistance is rising and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in clinical and community setting. Spread of antibiotic resistance to different environmental niches and development of superbugs have further complicated the effective control strategies. International, national and local approaches have been advised for control and prevention of antimicrobial resistance. Rational use of antimicrobials, regulation on over-the-counter availability of antibiotics, improving hand hygiene and improving infection prevention and control are the major recommended approaches. Thorough understanding of resistance mechanism and innovation in new drugs and vaccines is the need. A multidisciplinary, collaborative, regulatory approach is demanded for combating antimicrobial resistance. PMID:25177596

  14. Astronaut John Young in Command Module Simulator during Apollo Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    Astronaut John W. Young, command module pilot, inside the Command Module Simulator in bldg 5 during an Apollo Simulation. Astronauts Thomas P. Stafford, commander and Eugene A. Cernan, lunar module pilot are out of the view.

  15. Three astronauts inside Command Module Simulator during Apollo Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    Three astronauts inside the Command Module Simulator in bldg 5 during an Apollo Simulation. Left to right are Astronauts Thomas P. Stafford, commander; John W. Young, command module pilot; and Eugene A. Cernan, lunar module pilot.

  16. Detail of west wall of south wing of commandant's house ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of west wall of south wing of commandant's house with scale Fort Simcoe commandant's house & blockhouse - Fort Simcoe, Commandant's House & Blockhouse, Fort Simcoe Road, White Swan, Yakima County, WA

  17. Expedition 33/34 Change of Command Ceremony

    NASA Video Gallery

    Expedition 33 Commander Suni Williams hands over station command to Expedition 34 Commander Kevin Ford in a ceremony that took place Saturday Nov. 17, 2012. Williams returned to Earth with two crew...

  18. Worldwide actions to combat abuse.

    PubMed

    1998-01-01

    This paper reports several developments on the global efforts to combat abuse and violence against women and children. It is noted that in South Africa, Belem, Brazil, and Lesotho, protest actions were conducted against women and child abuse. Although the protests were made separately, the protests generally called for implementation of initiatives from the government to address the issue of child and women abuse. In the context of preventing abusive behaviors, a study by the University of Cape Town in South Africa on the appropriateness and feasibility of short-term community-based group therapy concluded that such an approach might be effective in treating delinquent behavior. In Indonesia, the Rifka Annisa Women's Crisis Centre is working to combat violence against women by providing services to victims; while in Israel, a media campaign is aiming to increase awareness and support for women's help centers. In addition, the government of Bangladesh has established a Cell Against Violence Against Women that provides legal counseling and assistance for civil and criminal cases related to violence against women. Furthermore, the WHO and the International Federation of Obstetricians and Gynecologists have collaborated to conduct a joint workshop to explore how violence against women can be eliminated. PMID:12348694

  19. Worldwide actions to combat abuse.

    PubMed

    1998-01-01

    This paper reports several developments on the global efforts to combat abuse and violence against women and children. It is noted that in South Africa, Belem, Brazil, and Lesotho, protest actions were conducted against women and child abuse. Although the protests were made separately, the protests generally called for implementation of initiatives from the government to address the issue of child and women abuse. In the context of preventing abusive behaviors, a study by the University of Cape Town in South Africa on the appropriateness and feasibility of short-term community-based group therapy concluded that such an approach might be effective in treating delinquent behavior. In Indonesia, the Rifka Annisa Women's Crisis Centre is working to combat violence against women by providing services to victims; while in Israel, a media campaign is aiming to increase awareness and support for women's help centers. In addition, the government of Bangladesh has established a Cell Against Violence Against Women that provides legal counseling and assistance for civil and criminal cases related to violence against women. Furthermore, the WHO and the International Federation of Obstetricians and Gynecologists have collaborated to conduct a joint workshop to explore how violence against women can be eliminated.

  20. The USAF Systems Command and R and D productivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luchainger, V.

    1985-01-01

    The United States Air Force Systems Command (AFSC) is charged with the development and acquisition of aerospace technology systems. Much of that activity is concerned with space systems development, acquisition, and operations. Heavy emphasis is being placed on productivity in organizational and process functions which will keep aerospace systems on the leading edge of technology, with plans extending capability into the future. The productivity emphasis ranges from people-oriented activities to resource and technological functions which support national aerospace objectives. The AFSC space-related missions is discussed as a special area of productivity efforts.

  1. Spacecraft command and control using expert systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norcross, Scott; Grieser, William H.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes a product called the Intelligent Mission Toolkit (IMT), which was created to meet the changing demands of the spacecraft command and control market. IMT is a command and control system built upon an expert system. Its primary functions are to send commands to the spacecraft and process telemetry data received from the spacecraft. It also controls the ground equipment used to support the system, such as encryption gear, and telemetry front-end equipment. Add-on modules allow IMT to control antennas and antenna interface equipment. The design philosophy for IMT is to utilize available commercial products wherever possible. IMT utilizes Gensym's G2 Real-time Expert System as the core of the system. G2 is responsible for overall system control, spacecraft commanding control, and spacecraft telemetry analysis and display. Other commercial products incorporated into IMT include the SYBASE relational database management system and Loral Test and Integration Systems' System 500 for telemetry front-end processing.

  2. Station Commander Captures Unprecedented View of Comet

    NASA Video Gallery

    International Space Station Commander Dan Burbank captured spectacular imagery of Comet Lovejoy as seen from about 240 miles above the Earth’s horizon on Wednesday, Dec. 21. Burbank described se...

  3. Schema for Spacecraft-Command Dictionary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laubach, Sharon; Garcia, Celina; Maxwell, Scott; Wright, Jesse

    2008-01-01

    An Extensible Markup Language (XML) schema was developed as a means of defining and describing a structure for capturing spacecraft command- definition and tracking information in a single location in a form readable by both engineers and software used to generate software for flight and ground systems. A structure defined within this schema is then used as the basis for creating an XML file that contains command definitions.

  4. ISS Update: Station Command and Data Handling System

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Public Affairs Officer Kylie Clem interviews ODIN flight controller Amy Brezinski, who monitors and commands the Command and Data Handling System for the International Space Station. Brezinski...

  5. STS-29 Commander Coats in commanders seat on OV-103's forward flight deck

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Commander Michael L. Coats, smiling, looks up from his work at the commanders station on Discovery's, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103's, forward flight deck. While in the commanders seat, Coats updates the STS-29 crew activity plan (CAP). Appearing around him are seat back with parachute harness, forward control panels with empty beverage container velcroed to panel F6, checklist clipped to panel O1, and portable laptop computer setup on top of panel F7.

  6. Augmented Reality for Close Quarters Combat

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Sandia National Laboratories has developed a state-of-the-art augmented reality training system for close-quarters combat (CQB). This system uses a wearable augmented reality system to place the user in a real environment while engaging enemy combatants in virtual space (Boston Dynamics DI-Guy). Umbra modeling and simulation environment is used to integrate and control the AR system.

  7. A formulation and analysis of combat games

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heymann, M.; Ardema, M. D.; Rajan, N.

    1984-01-01

    Combat which is formulated as a dynamical encounter between two opponents, each of whom has offensive capabilities and objectives is outlined. A target set is associated with each opponent in the event space in which he endeavors to terminate the combat, thereby winning. If the combat terminates in both target sets simultaneously, or in neither, a joint capture or a draw, respectively, occurs. Resolution of the encounter is formulated as a combat game; as a pair of competing event constrained differential games. If exactly one of the players can win, the optimal strategies are determined from a resulting constrained zero sum differential game. Otherwise the optimal strategies are computed from a resulting nonzero sum game. Since optimal combat strategies may frequently not exist, approximate or delta combat games are also formulated leading to approximate or delta optimal strategies. The turret game is used to illustrate combat games. This game is sufficiently complex to exhibit a rich variety of combat behavior, much of which is not found in pursuit evasion games.

  8. Augmented Reality for Close Quarters Combat

    SciTech Connect

    2013-09-20

    Sandia National Laboratories has developed a state-of-the-art augmented reality training system for close-quarters combat (CQB). This system uses a wearable augmented reality system to place the user in a real environment while engaging enemy combatants in virtual space (Boston Dynamics DI-Guy). Umbra modeling and simulation environment is used to integrate and control the AR system.

  9. Test Telemetry And Command System (TTACS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fogel, Alvin J.

    1994-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory has developed a multimission Test Telemetry and Command System (TTACS) which provides a multimission telemetry and command data system in a spacecraft test environment. TTACS reuses, in the spacecraft test environment, components of the same data system used for flight operations; no new software is developed for the spacecraft test environment. Additionally, the TTACS is transportable to any spacecraft test site, including the launch site. The TTACS is currently operational in the Galileo spacecraft testbed; it is also being provided to support the Cassini and Mars Surveyor Program projects. Minimal personnel data system training is required in the transition from pre-launch spacecraft test to post-launch flight operations since test personnel are already familiar with the data system's operation. Additionally, data system components, e.g. data display, can be reused to support spacecraft software development; and the same data system components will again be reused during the spacecraft integration and system test phases. TTACS usage also results in early availability of spacecraft data to data system development and, as a result, early data system development feedback to spacecraft system developers. The TTACS consists of a multimission spacecraft support equipment interface and components of the multimission telemetry and command software adapted for a specific project. The TTACS interfaces to the spacecraft, e.g., Command Data System (CDS), support equipment. The TTACS telemetry interface to the CDS support equipment performs serial (RS-422)-to-ethernet conversion at rates between 1 bps and 1 mbps, telemetry data blocking and header generation, guaranteed data transmission to the telemetry data system, and graphical downlink routing summary and control. The TTACS command interface to the CDS support equipment is nominally a command file transferred in non-real-time via ethernet. The CDS support equipment is responsible for

  10. Blended Training for Combat Medics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fowlkes, Jennifer; Dickinson, Sandra; Lazarus, Todd

    2010-01-01

    Bleeding from extremity wounds is the number one cause of preventable death on the battlefield and current research stresses the importance of training in preparing every Soldier to use tourniquets. HapMed is designed to provide tourniquet application training to combat medics and Soldiers using a blended training solution encompassing information, demonstration, practice, and feedback. The system combines an instrumented manikin arm, PDA, and computer. The manikin arm provides several training options including stand-alone, hands-on skills training in which soldiers can experience the actual torque required to staunch bleeding from an extremity wound and be timed on tourniquet application. This is more realistic than using a block of wood to act as a limb, which is often how training is conducted today. Combining the manikin arm with the PDA allows instructors to provide scenario based training. In a classroom or field setting, an instructor can specify wound variables such as location, casualty size, and whether the wound is a tough bleed. The PDA also allows more detailed feedback to be provided. Finally, combining the manikin arm with game-based technologies, the third component, provides opportunities to build knowledge and to practice battlefield decision making. Not only do soldiers learn how to apply a tourniquet, but when to apply a tourniquet in combat. The purpose of the paper is to describe the learning science underlying the design of HapMed, illustrate the training system and ways it is being expanded to encompass other critical life-saving tasks, and report on feedback received from instructors and trainees at military training and simulation centers.

  11. Task Force 62 Medical Brigade combat healthcare support system in the mature Iraq theater of operations.

    PubMed

    Sargent, Patrick D

    2008-01-01

    Leading a deployed combat healthcare system is a very complex task and requires a command and control structure that is a unique blend of technical and tactical expertise to efficaciously deliver world-class medical care to America's sons and daughters. The medical task force in Iraq has successfully managed the transformation of the medical footprint from a tactically arrayed set of disparate medical units to a nascent integrated healthcare system with many features similar to the best healthcare systems in the United States. The American public demands, and Soldiers, Marines, Sailors, Airmen, and Coast Guardsmen deserve US quality medical care, whether they are being treated at a military medical center in the US, or a US medical facility in Iraq. This article presents an overview of the 62nd Medical Brigade's development of the combat healthcare support system during its tenure leading the US medical task force in Iraq. PMID:20088050

  12. L to R: STS-98 Mission Specialist Thomas Jones, Pilot Mark Polansky, and Commander Kenneth Cockrell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    L to R: STS-98 Mission Specialist Thomas Jones, Pilot Mark Polansky, and Commander Kenneth Cockrell greet STS-92 Commander Brian Duffy, Dryden Center Director Kevin Petersen, and AFFTC Commander Major General Richard Reynolds after landing on the runway at Edwards Air Force Base, California, where NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center is located. Space Shuttle Atlantis landed at 12:33 p.m. February 20, 2001, on the runway at Edwards Air Force Base, California, where NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center is located. The mission, which began February 7, logged 5.3 million miles as the shuttle orbited earth while delivering the Destiny science laboratory to the International Space Station. Inclement weather conditions in Florida prompted the decision to land Atlantis at Edwards. The last time a space shuttle landed at Edwards was Oct. 24, 2000.

  13. Prompt comprehension in UNIX command production.

    PubMed

    Doane, S M; McNamara, D S; Kintsch, W; Polson, P G; Clawson, D M

    1992-07-01

    We hypothesize that a cognitive analysis based on the construction-integration theory of comprehension (Kintsch, 1988) can predict what is difficult about generating complex composite commands in the UNIX operating system. We provide empirical support for assumptions of the Doane, Kintsch, and Polson (1989, 1990) construction-integration model for generating complex commands in UNIX. We asked users whose UNIX experience varied to produce complex UNIX commands, and then provided help prompts whenever the commands that they produced were erroneous. The help prompts were designed to assist subjects with respect to both the knowledge and the memory processes that our UNIX modeling efforts have suggested are lacking in less expert users. It appears that experts respond to different prompts than do novices. Expert performance is helped by the presentation of abstract information, whereas novice and intermediate performance is modified by presentation of concrete information. Second, while presentation of specific prompts helps less expert subjects, they do not provide sufficient information to obtain correct performance. Our analyses suggest that information about the ordering of commands is required to help the less expert with both knowledge and memory load problems in a manner consistent with skill acquisition theories.

  14. Managing the Risk of Command File Errors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meshkat, Leila; Bryant, Larry W.

    2013-01-01

    Command File Error (CFE), as defined by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's (JPL) Mission Operations Assurance (MOA) is, regardless of the consequence on the spacecraft, either: an error in a command file sent to the spacecraft, an error in the process for developing and delivering a command file to the spacecraft, or the omission of a command file that should have been sent to the spacecraft. The risk consequence of a CFE can be mission ending and thus a concern to space exploration projects during their mission operations. A CFE during space mission operations is often the symptom of some kind of imbalance or inadequacy within the system that comprises the hardware & software used for command generation and the human experts involved in this endeavour. As we move into an era of enhanced collaboration with other NASA centers and commercial partners, these systems become more and more complex and hence it is all the more important to formally model and analyze CFEs in order to manage the risk of CFEs. Here we will provide a summary of the ongoing efforts at JPL in this area and also explain some more recent developments in the area of developing quantitative models for the purpose of managing CFE's.

  15. 46 CFR 50.10-5 - Coast Guard District Commander or District Commander.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Coast Guard District Commander or District Commander. 50.10-5 Section 50.10-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING GENERAL PROVISIONS Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 50.10-5 Coast Guard...

  16. 46 CFR 50.10-5 - Coast Guard District Commander or District Commander.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Coast Guard District Commander or District Commander. 50.10-5 Section 50.10-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING GENERAL PROVISIONS Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 50.10-5 Coast Guard...

  17. 46 CFR 42.05-25 - Coast Guard District Commander or District Commander.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Coast Guard District Commander or District Commander. 42.05-25 Section 42.05-25 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) LOAD LINES DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN VOYAGES BY SEA Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 42.05-25 Coast...

  18. 46 CFR 42.05-25 - Coast Guard District Commander or District Commander.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Coast Guard District Commander or District Commander. 42.05-25 Section 42.05-25 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) LOAD LINES DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN VOYAGES BY SEA Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 42.05-25 Coast...

  19. 46 CFR 50.10-5 - Coast Guard District Commander or District Commander.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Coast Guard District Commander or District Commander. 50.10-5 Section 50.10-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING GENERAL PROVISIONS Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 50.10-5 Coast Guard...

  20. 46 CFR 50.10-5 - Coast Guard District Commander or District Commander.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Coast Guard District Commander or District Commander. 50.10-5 Section 50.10-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING GENERAL PROVISIONS Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 50.10-5 Coast Guard...

  1. 46 CFR 50.10-5 - Coast Guard District Commander or District Commander.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Coast Guard District Commander or District Commander. 50.10-5 Section 50.10-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING GENERAL PROVISIONS Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 50.10-5 Coast Guard...

  2. 46 CFR 42.05-25 - Coast Guard District Commander or District Commander.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Coast Guard District Commander or District Commander. 42.05-25 Section 42.05-25 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) LOAD LINES DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN VOYAGES BY SEA Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 42.05-25 Coast...

  3. 46 CFR 42.05-25 - Coast Guard District Commander or District Commander.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Coast Guard District Commander or District Commander. 42.05-25 Section 42.05-25 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) LOAD LINES DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN VOYAGES BY SEA Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 42.05-25 Coast...

  4. 46 CFR 42.05-25 - Coast Guard District Commander or District Commander.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Coast Guard District Commander or District Commander. 42.05-25 Section 42.05-25 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) LOAD LINES DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN VOYAGES BY SEA Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 42.05-25 Coast...

  5. 32 CFR 700.1058 - Command of a submarine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Command of a submarine. 700.1058 Section 700... Command Detail to Duty § 700.1058 Command of a submarine. The officer detailed to command a submarine... submarines....

  6. 32 CFR 700.1058 - Command of a submarine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Command of a submarine. 700.1058 Section 700... Command Detail to Duty § 700.1058 Command of a submarine. The officer detailed to command a submarine... submarines....

  7. 32 CFR 700.1058 - Command of a submarine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Command of a submarine. 700.1058 Section 700... Command Detail to Duty § 700.1058 Command of a submarine. The officer detailed to command a submarine... submarines....

  8. 32 CFR 700.1058 - Command of a submarine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Command of a submarine. 700.1058 Section 700... Command Detail to Duty § 700.1058 Command of a submarine. The officer detailed to command a submarine... submarines....

  9. 32 CFR 700.1058 - Command of a submarine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Command of a submarine. 700.1058 Section 700... Command Detail to Duty § 700.1058 Command of a submarine. The officer detailed to command a submarine... submarines....

  10. 32 CFR 700.1054 - Command of a naval base.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Command of a naval base. 700.1054 Section 700.1054 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY UNITED STATES NAVY... Command Detail to Duty § 700.1054 Command of a naval base. The officer detailed to command a naval...

  11. 32 CFR 700.1054 - Command of a naval base.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Command of a naval base. 700.1054 Section 700.1054 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY UNITED STATES NAVY... Command Detail to Duty § 700.1054 Command of a naval base. The officer detailed to command a naval...

  12. 32 CFR 700.1054 - Command of a naval base.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Command of a naval base. 700.1054 Section 700.1054 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY UNITED STATES NAVY... Command Detail to Duty § 700.1054 Command of a naval base. The officer detailed to command a naval...

  13. 32 CFR 700.1054 - Command of a naval base.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Command of a naval base. 700.1054 Section 700.1054 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY UNITED STATES NAVY... Command Detail to Duty § 700.1054 Command of a naval base. The officer detailed to command a naval...

  14. 32 CFR 700.1054 - Command of a naval base.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Command of a naval base. 700.1054 Section 700.1054 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY UNITED STATES NAVY... Command Detail to Duty § 700.1054 Command of a naval base. The officer detailed to command a naval...

  15. 46 CFR 147.5 - Commandant (CG-OES); address.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Commandant (CG-OES); address. 147.5 Section 147.5... General Provisions § 147.5 Commandant (CG-OES); address. Commandant (CG-OES) is the Office of Operating... Commandant (CG-OES), U.S. Coast Guard Headquarters, 2100 2nd St. SW., Stop 7126, Washington, DC...

  16. 46 CFR 147.5 - Commandant (CG-522); address.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Commandant (CG-522); address. 147.5 Section 147.5... General Provisions § 147.5 Commandant (CG-522); address. Commandant (CG-522) is the Office of Operating... Commandant (CG-522), U.S. Coast Guard Headquarters, 2100 2nd St. SW., Stop 7126, Washington, DC...

  17. 46 CFR 147.5 - Commandant (CG-522); address.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Commandant (CG-522); address. 147.5 Section 147.5... General Provisions § 147.5 Commandant (CG-522); address. Commandant (CG-522) is the Office of Operating... Commandant (CG-522), U.S. Coast Guard Headquarters, 2100 2nd St. SW., Stop 7126, Washington, DC...

  18. 32 CFR 700.1055 - Command of a naval shipyard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Command of a naval shipyard. 700.1055 Section 700.1055 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY UNITED STATES NAVY... Command Detail to Duty § 700.1055 Command of a naval shipyard. The officer detailed to command a...

  19. 32 CFR 700.1055 - Command of a naval shipyard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Command of a naval shipyard. 700.1055 Section 700.1055 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY UNITED STATES NAVY... Command Detail to Duty § 700.1055 Command of a naval shipyard. The officer detailed to command a...

  20. Photocopy of recent aerial photograph (from U.S. Army Support Command ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of recent aerial photograph (from U.S. Army Support Command Hawaii, Wheeler Army Air Base, Hawaii) Photographer unknown, Circa 1990 AERIAL VIEW SHOWING MAIN SECTION OF BASE, BETWEEN KUNIA ROAD, WILIKINA DRIVE, AND McMAHON ROAD, AS WELL AS ADJACENT PINEAPPLE FIELDS, AND LAKE WILSON. - Schofield Barracks Military Reservation, Wilikina Drive & Kunia Road, Wahiawa, Honolulu County, HI

  1. Photocopy of recent aerial photograph (from U.S. Army Support Command ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of recent aerial photograph (from U.S. Army Support Command Hawaii, Wheeler Army Air Base, Hawaii) Photographer unknown, Circa 1990 OBLIQUE AERIAL VIEW SHOWING MAIN SECTION OF BASE WITH LAKE WILSON IN THE FOREGROUND AND WAIANAE MOUNTAINS IN THE BACKGROUND. - Schofield Barracks Military Reservation, Wilikina Drive & Kunia Road, Wahiawa, Honolulu County, HI

  2. Lessons learned in simulating a command center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mack, Gregory A.; Cantor, Robert M.; Wenzel, Gregory

    1995-06-01

    This paper presents some lessons learned from simulating the operation of a command center in distributed interactive simulations (DIS). We present the design of the Booz Allen Command Center Systems Interface (C2SI) in terms of its functional architecture as well as the technologies used in its implementation. We discuss the design of the distributed component interfaces based on cooperating software agent pairs. We discuss aspects of several issues in simulating command and control systems in the ADS/DIS environment, namely, interoperation of constructive and virtual simulation, situation awareness, communication with adjacent C2 entities, control of subordinate entities and external sensors, terrain/environmental data management, and data collection for after-action reporting.

  3. Robot Task Commander with Extensible Programming Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, Stephen W (Inventor); Yamokoski, John D. (Inventor); Wightman, Brian J (Inventor); Dinh, Duy Paul (Inventor); Gooding, Dustin R (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A system for developing distributed robot application-level software includes a robot having an associated control module which controls motion of the robot in response to a commanded task, and a robot task commander (RTC) in networked communication with the control module over a network transport layer (NTL). The RTC includes a script engine(s) and a GUI, with a processor and a centralized library of library blocks constructed from an interpretive computer programming code and having input and output connections. The GUI provides access to a Visual Programming Language (VPL) environment and a text editor. In executing a method, the VPL is opened, a task for the robot is built from the code library blocks, and data is assigned to input and output connections identifying input and output data for each block. A task sequence(s) is sent to the control module(s) over the NTL to command execution of the task.

  4. Increased productivity in flight with voice commanding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, W. T.

    1985-01-01

    Automatic Speech Recognition technology has matured to the point where it can provide a viable means of increasing productivity by naturalizing the man-machine interface. With ever increasing workloads being placed on astronauts, speech recognition may provide an alternative means of system controlling that would reduce the task burden. Voice commanding, allowing hands-free operation, can be especially effective during operations requiring simultaneous system control. A flight experiment is under development to demonstrate the operational effectiveness of voice control by commanding the Space Shuttle's Closed Circuit Television (CCIV) system. This experiment will help direct future applications of voice entry to space operations.

  5. Visualization for cyber security command and control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langton, John T.; Newey, Brent; Havig, Paul R.

    2010-04-01

    To address the unique requirements of cyber Command and Control (C2), new visualization methods are needed to provide situation awareness and decision support within the cyber domain. A key challenge is the complexity of relevant data: it is immense and multidimensional, includes streaming and log data, and comes from multiple, disparate applications and devices. Decision makers must be afforded a view of a) the current state of the cyber battlespace, b) enemy and friendly capabilities and vulnerabilities, c) correlations between cyber events, and d) potential effects of alternative courses of action within cyberspace. In this paper we present requirements and designs for Visualization for Integrated Cyber Command and Control (VIC3).

  6. Study of PFT (parasail) in air training command.

    PubMed

    Hall, G W

    1977-02-01

    Injuries in pilots following egress from disabled aircraft can be minimized by their ability to maneuver their parachutes during descent and to execute a proper parachute landing fall. USAF pilot and navigator trainees receive extensive ground training in parachute operation and parachute landing falls. They then undergo Parachute Familiarization Training (PFT) during which they experience descents by a parasail after being towed to altitude. The value of PFT was determined by evaluating questionnaires sent to approximately 700 crewmembers, including many ex-prisoners of war, who had made an emergency egress. Areas addressed included contribution of the training to overall confidence, ability to steer the parachute to avoid hazardous obstacles, execution of a proper parachute landing fall, and the role of PFT in avoiding injury or fatality in the post-egress environment. Responses indicated that PFT played a significant role in confidence-building and in avoiding or minimizing post-egress injury.

  7. Air Force Logistics Command (AFLC) solar thermal plant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The plant proved its capability to deliver the desired energy product in a USAF industrial environment. The collector proved capable of energy conversion at insolation levels up to 25% below design minimum. The plant and the project were negatively affected by severe winter weather, with total insolation during the test period 60 percent less than the expected value. Environmental effects reduced plant availability to 55 percent. Only five, minimally good operating days were experienced during the test period. The subsequent lack of performance data prohibits the drawing of general conclusions regarding system performance. System operability was rated generally high. The only inhibiting factor was the difficulty in procuring replacement parts for rapid repair under USAF stockage and procurement policies. No inherently serious system failures were recorded, although a thermostatic valve malfunction in the freeze protection system ultimately took 30 days to repair.

  8. Study of PFT (parasail) in air training command.

    PubMed

    Hall, G W

    1977-02-01

    Injuries in pilots following egress from disabled aircraft can be minimized by their ability to maneuver their parachutes during descent and to execute a proper parachute landing fall. USAF pilot and navigator trainees receive extensive ground training in parachute operation and parachute landing falls. They then undergo Parachute Familiarization Training (PFT) during which they experience descents by a parasail after being towed to altitude. The value of PFT was determined by evaluating questionnaires sent to approximately 700 crewmembers, including many ex-prisoners of war, who had made an emergency egress. Areas addressed included contribution of the training to overall confidence, ability to steer the parachute to avoid hazardous obstacles, execution of a proper parachute landing fall, and the role of PFT in avoiding injury or fatality in the post-egress environment. Responses indicated that PFT played a significant role in confidence-building and in avoiding or minimizing post-egress injury. PMID:871286

  9. Exposure to recurrent combat stress: combat stress reactions among Israeli soldiers in the Lebanon War.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Z; Mikulincer, M; Jakob, B R

    1987-05-01

    This study examined the impact of repeated exposure to combat on combat stress reaction (CSR). Soldiers diagnosed with CSR during the Lebanon War (N = 382) were compared with a matched control group of soldiers who fought in the same units but did not manifest symptoms of CSR (N = 334). CSR in the Lebanon War was found to be related to the psychological outcome the soldier experienced in previous wars. The CSR rate in the Lebanon War was higher in soldiers who had experienced an episode of CSR in a previous war than in soldiers with no past combat experience. However, CSR rates were lower among soldiers who had not had an episode of CSR in a previous war than among soldiers with no prior combat experience. High intensity of combat in Lebanon was found to increase both the detrimental and favourable effects of prior combat experience. PMID:3602235

  10. Combat Neurosis in the Battered Teacher.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science News, 1978

    1978-01-01

    Investigates the effect of school violence on classroom teachers. The study of 253 Los Angeles inner city classroom teachers reveals that many of them have developed conditions similar to the combat neurosis found in soldiers at war. (HM)

  11. iTOUGH2 Command Reference

    SciTech Connect

    Finsterle, Stefan

    2002-06-18

    iTOUGH2 is a program for parameter estimation, sensitivity analysis, and uncertainty propagation analysis. It is based on the TOUGH2 simulator for non-isothermal multiphase flow in fractured and porous media. This report contains a detailed description of all iTOUGH2 commands.

  12. Commander Lousma sleeps on aft flight deck

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Commander Lousma, tethered to panel A12, sleeps on aft flight deck starboard side. Pilots ejection seat (S2) seat back with portable oxygen system (POS) assemby, Onorbit Station control panels, and Mission Station control panels surround Lousma. Window shade is in place in overhead window W7 just above his feet.

  13. A Command Economic System. Lesson Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owens, Kimberly

    This lesson plan features a classroom simulation that helps students understand a command economic system. The lesson plan states a purpose; gives student educational objectives; suggests a time duration for the activity; lists materials needed; and outlines a step-by-step teaching procedure. Instructions for a research and writing homework…

  14. Commander Brand sleeps on aft flight deck

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Commander Brand, with hands folded in front of his chest, sleeps on aft flight deck. Brand's head is just above aft flight deck floor with his back to onorbit station panels. The back and feet of a second crewmember appear next to Brand.

  15. Positive commandable oiler for satellite bearing lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, G. E.

    1977-01-01

    On-orbit commandable lubrication of ball bearings accomplished by direct oil application to the moving ball surfaces was studied. Test results for the lubricant applicator portion of the system are presented in conjunction with a design approach for the reservoir and metering components.

  16. Ten Commandments for the School Nurse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dworak, Esther S.

    2001-01-01

    This 1982 paper presents 10 commandments to guide school nurses, including: never allowing oneself to be ignored; always being included in school functions regarding child health; always participating in kindergarten roundups and similar activities to promote child health; always respecting parents' primary responsibility to the child; and always…

  17. Collaboration and Command Tools for Crises Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saarelainen, Tapio; Jormakka, Jorma

    Present collaboration tools are not suitable for the command process. The Collaboration tools, in the use of military entities, lack the elements for command and control and scheduling of resources. Available collaboration tools concentrate on uncontrolled distribution of information. They represent Situational Awareness (SA) tools for the cooperating entities, not the required solution for traceable and sophisticated Command and Control tools (C2-tools) applicable for the Crises Management Environment (CME) and Military Environment (ME). This paper presents tools for crises management, which enables the use of effective C2-tools, functioning along with the Resource Manager (RM) and scheduler. Given tasks need to be traceable afterwards for various purposes. On the base of collected data from the events, actions and reliability of different collaborating entities, a trustworth database of the characteristics of each entity can be formulated and utilized afterwards as a base knowledge on the collaborating entity. Collected data remains in the information repository and the collected data is used for identification purposes of an entity. C2-tools in ME and CME are systems of systems based on trusted entities, which will execute the commanded tasks reliably and in a given time. Reporting tools are out of the scope of this paper.

  18. Commander Crippen exercises on middeck treadmill

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    On middeck in front of open airlock hatch, Commander Crippen, shirtless and restrained by harness, exercises on treadmill as fellow crew members conduct other activities around him. Mission Specialist (MS) Thagard removes equipment from forward modular locker single tray assembly (ASSY).

  19. APOLLO 11 COMMANDER NEIL ARMSTRONG IN SIMULATOR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    Apollo 11 commander Neil Armstrong is going through flight training in the lunar module simulator situated in the flight crew training building at KSC. Armstrong will pilot the lunar module to a moon landing on July 20, following launch from KSC on July 16.

  20. Command Line Image Processing System (CLIPS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleagle, S. R.; Meyers, G. L.; Kulinski, R. G.

    1985-06-01

    An interactive image processing language (CLIPS) has been developed for use in an image processing environment. CLIPS uses a simple syntax with extensive on-line help to allow even the most naive user perform complex image processing tasks. In addition, CLIPS functions as an interpretive language complete with data structures and program control statements. CLIPS statements fall into one of three categories: command, control,and utility statements. Command statements are expressions comprised of intrinsic functions and/or arithmetic operators which act directly on image or user defined data. Some examples of CLIPS intrinsic functions are ROTATE, FILTER AND EXPONENT. Control statements allow a structured programming style through the use of statements such as DO WHILE and IF-THEN - ELSE. Utility statements such as DEFINE, READ, and WRITE, support I/O and user defined data structures. Since CLIPS uses a table driven parser, it is easily adapted to any environment. New commands may be added to CLIPS by writing the procedure in a high level language such as Pascal or FORTRAN and inserting the syntax for that command into the table. However, CLIPS was designed by incorporating most imaging operations into the language as intrinsic functions. CLIPS allows the user to generate new procedures easily with these powerful functions in an interactive or off line fashion using a text editor. The fact that CLIPS can be used to generate complex procedures quickly or perform basic image processing functions interactively makes it a valuable tool in any image processing environment.

  1. Why Does Military Combat Experience Adversely Affect Marital Relations?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gimbel, Cynthia; Booth, Alan

    1994-01-01

    Describes investigation of ways in which combat decreases marital quality and stability. Results support three models: (1) factors propelling men into combat also make them poor marriage material; (2) combat causes problems that increase marital adversity; and (3) combat intensifies premilitary stress and antisocial behavior which then negatively…

  2. Smart command recognizer (SCR) - For development, test, and implementation of speech commands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, Carol A.; Bunnell, John W.; Krones, Robert R.

    1988-01-01

    The SCR, a rapid prototyping system for the development, testing, and implementation of speech commands in a flight simulator or test aircraft, is described. A single unit performs all functions needed during these three phases of system development, while the use of common software and speech command data structure files greatly reduces the preparation time for successive development phases. As a smart peripheral to a simulation or flight host computer, the SCR interprets the pilot's spoken input and passes command codes to the simulation or flight computer.

  3. STS-94 Commander James D. Halsell suits up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    STS-94 Mission Commander James D. Halsell, Jr., puts his left glove on while he is assisted into his launch/entry suit in the Operations and Checkout (O&C) Building. Halsell is on his fourth space flight, having served as commander of STS-83 and pilot of both STS-74 and STS-65. He is a lieutenant colonel in the Air Force and a former SR-71 Blackbird test pilot and holds masters degrees in management and space operations. Halsell will have uresponsibility for the success of the mission and will operate and maintain Columbia during the Red, or second shift. He will also assist with a materials science experiment and a protein crystal growth payload during the 16-day mission. Halsell and six fellow crew members will shortly depart the O&C and head for Launch Pad 39A, where the Space Shuttle Columbia will lift off during a launch window that opens at 1:50 a.m. EDT, July opportunity to lift off before Florida summer rain showers reached the space center.

  4. STS-94 Commander Halsell in LC-39A White Room

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    STS-94 Mission Commander James D. Halsell, Jr., prepares to enter the Space Shuttle Columbia at Launch Pad 39A in preparation for launch. Halsell is on his fourth space flight, having served as commander of STS-83 and pilot of both STS-74 and STS-65. He is a lieutenant colonel in the Air Force and a former SR-71 Blackbird test pilot and holds masters degrees in management and space operations. Halsell will have responsibility for the success of the mission and will operate and maintain Columbia during the Red, or second shift. He will also assist with a materials science experiment and a protein crystal growth payload during the 16-day mission. Halsell and six fellow crew members will lift off during a launch window that opens at 1:50 a.m. EDT, July 1. The launch window will open 47 minutes early to improve the opportunity to lift off before Florida summer rain showers reach the space center.

  5. Command control group behaviors. Objective 1: A methodology for and identification of command control group behaviors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reaser, J. M.; Stewart, S.; Tiede, R. V.

    1984-08-01

    This report provides the results of the first year's research of a three-year effort to identify the individual and multi-individual non-procedural skills exhibited by battalion command control group members and the commander/staff as a whole. In this project a model of command control group behavior was applied to identify and quantify four general categories of behavior. A methodology was developed for use at the Combined Arms Tactical Training Simulator (CATTS) at Ft. Leavenworth, Kansas. Extensive recordings were made of battalion commanders and their staffs as they underwent training at the facility fighting a highly realistic computer-assisted war game. The methodology was effective in distinguishing between groups in three of the four areas. Preliminary results show that both procedural and nonprocedural, individual, and team behaviors contribute to overall team performance.

  6. Tradeoff Analysis for Combat Service Support Wireless Communications Alternatives

    SciTech Connect

    Burnette, John R.; Thibodeau, Christopher C.; Greitzer, Frank L.

    2002-02-28

    As the Army moves toward more mobile and agile forces and continued sustainment of numerous high-cost legacy logistics management systems, the requirement for wireless connectivity and a wireless network to supporting organizations has become ever more critical. There are currently several Army communications initiatives underway to resolve this wireless connectivity issue. However, to fully appreciate and understand the value of these initiatives, a Tradeoff Analysis is needed. The present study seeks to identify and assess solutions. The analysis identified issues that impede Interim Brigade Combat Team (IBCT) communication system integration and outlined core requirements for sharing of logistics data between the field and Army battle command systems. Then, the analysis examined wireless communication alternatives as possible solutions for IBCT logistics communications problems. The current baseline system was compared with possible alternatives involving tactical radio systems, wireless/near term digital radio, cellular satellite, and third-generation (3G) wireless technologies. Cellular satellite and 3G wireless technologies offer clear advantages and should be considered for later IBCTs.

  7. Remote Task-level Commanding of Centaur over Time Delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreckenghost, Debra; Ngo, Tam; Burridge, Robert; Wang, Lui; Izygon, Michel

    2008-01-01

    Remote operation of robots on the lunar surface by ground controllers poses unique human-robot interaction challenges due to time delay and constrained bandwidth. One strategy for addressing these challenges is to provide task-level commanding of robots by a ground controller. Decision-support tools are being developed at JSC for remote task-level commanding over time-delay. The approach is to provide ground procedures that guide a controller when executing task-level command sequences and aid awareness of the state of command execution in the robot. This approach is being evaluated using the Centaur robot at JSC. The Centaur Central Commander provides a task-level command interface that executes on the robot side of the delay. Decision support tools have been developed for a human Supervisor in the JSC Cockpit to use when interacting with the Centaur Central Commander. Commands to the Central Commander are defined as instructions in a procedure. Sequences of these instructions are grouped into procedures for the Cockpit Supervisor. When a Supervisor is ready to perform a task, a procedure is loaded into the decision support tool. From this tool, the Supervisor can view command sequences and dispatch individual commands to Centaur. Commands are queued for execution on the robot side of the delay. Reliable command sequences can be dispatched automatically upon approval by the Supervisor. The decision support tool provides the Supervisor with feedback about which commands are waiting for execution and which commands have finished. It also informs the Supervisor when a command fails to have its intended effect. Cockpit procedures are defined using the Procedure Representation Language (PRL) developed at JSC for mission operations. The decision support tool is based on a Procedure Sequencer and multi-agent software developed for human-robot interaction. In this paper the approach for remote task-level commanding of robots is described and the results of the evaluation

  8. STS-83 Mission Commander James D. Halsell, Jr. suits up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    STS-83 Mission Commander James D. Halsell, Jr., gives a thumbs-up after he is assisted into his launch/entry suit in the Operations and Checkout (O&C) Building. Halsell is on his third space flight, having served as pilot of both STS-74 and STS-65. He is a lieutenant colonel in the Air Force and a former SR-71 Blackbird test pilot and holds master's degrees in management and space operations. Halsell will have responsibility for the success of the mission and will operate and maintain Columbia during the Red, or second shift. He will also assist with a materials science experiment and a protein crystal growth payload during the 16-day mission. Halsell and six fellow crew members will shortly depart the O&C and head for Launch Pad 39A, where the Space Shuttle Columbia will lift off during a launch window that opens at 2:00 p.m. EST, April 4.

  9. ARAC: A unique command and control resource

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, M.M.; Baskett, R.L.; Ellis, J.S.

    1996-04-01

    The Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is a centralized federal facility designed to provide real-time, world-wide support to military and civilian command and control centers by predicting the impacts of inadvertent or intentional releases of nuclear, biological, or chemical materials into the atmosphere. ARAC is a complete response system consisting of highly trained and experienced personnel, continually updated computer models, redundant data collection systems, and centralized and remote computer systems. With over 20 years of experience responding to domestic and international incidents, strong linkages with the Department of Defense, and the ability to conduct classified operations, ARAC is a unique command and control resource.

  10. Historical approaches to post-combat disorders

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Edgar

    2006-01-01

    Almost every major war in the last century involving western nations has seen combatants diagnosed with a form of post-combat disorder. Some took a psychological form (exhaustion, combat fatigue, combat stress reaction and post-traumatic stress disorder), while others were characterized by medically unexplained symptoms (soldier's heart, effort syndrome, shell shock, non-ulcer dyspepsia, effects of Agent Orange and Gulf War Syndrome). Although many of these disorders have common symptoms, the explanations attached to them showed considerable diversity often reflected in the labels themselves. These causal hypotheses ranged from the effects of climate, compressive forces released by shell explosions, side effects of vaccinations, changes in diet, toxic effects of organophosphates, oil-well fires or depleted-uranium munitions. Military history suggests that these disorders, which coexisted in the civilian population, reflected popular health fears and emerged in the gaps left by the advance of medical science. While the current Iraq conflict has yet to produce a syndrome typified by medically unexplained symptoms, it is unlikely that we have seen the last of post-combat disorders as past experience suggests that they have the capacity to catch both military planners and doctors by surprise. PMID:16687259

  11. Historical approaches to post-combat disorders.

    PubMed

    Jones, Edgar

    2006-04-29

    Almost every major war in the last century involving western nations has seen combatants diagnosed with a form of post-combat disorder. Some took a psychological form (exhaustion, combat fatigue, combat stress reaction and post-traumatic stress disorder), while others were characterized by medically unexplained symptoms (soldier's heart, effort syndrome, shell shock, non-ulcer dyspepsia, effects of Agent Orange and Gulf War Syndrome). Although many of these disorders have common symptoms, the explanations attached to them showed considerable diversity often reflected in the labels themselves. These causal hypotheses ranged from the effects of climate, compressive forces released by shell explosions, side effects of vaccinations, changes in diet, toxic effects of organophosphates, oil-well fires or depleted-uranium munitions. Military history suggests that these disorders, which coexisted in the civilian population, reflected popular health fears and emerged in the gaps left by the advance of medical science. While the current Iraq conflict has yet to produce a syndrome typified by medically unexplained symptoms, it is unlikely that we have seen the last of post-combat disorders as past experience suggests that they have the capacity to catch both military planners and doctors by surprise.

  12. Historical approaches to post-combat disorders.

    PubMed

    Jones, Edgar

    2006-04-29

    Almost every major war in the last century involving western nations has seen combatants diagnosed with a form of post-combat disorder. Some took a psychological form (exhaustion, combat fatigue, combat stress reaction and post-traumatic stress disorder), while others were characterized by medically unexplained symptoms (soldier's heart, effort syndrome, shell shock, non-ulcer dyspepsia, effects of Agent Orange and Gulf War Syndrome). Although many of these disorders have common symptoms, the explanations attached to them showed considerable diversity often reflected in the labels themselves. These causal hypotheses ranged from the effects of climate, compressive forces released by shell explosions, side effects of vaccinations, changes in diet, toxic effects of organophosphates, oil-well fires or depleted-uranium munitions. Military history suggests that these disorders, which coexisted in the civilian population, reflected popular health fears and emerged in the gaps left by the advance of medical science. While the current Iraq conflict has yet to produce a syndrome typified by medically unexplained symptoms, it is unlikely that we have seen the last of post-combat disorders as past experience suggests that they have the capacity to catch both military planners and doctors by surprise. PMID:16687259

  13. Ground-Commanded Television Assembly (GCTA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The characteristics of the Ground-Commanded Television Assembly (GCTA) are discussed. The equipment was used to provide television coverage of lunar surface explorations during Apollo 15, 16, and 17 missions. The subjects include the following; (1) yoke/faceplate qualification data, (2) elevation drive improvement program, (3) Apollo 17 thermal data, (4) equipment status, and (5) drawing status. Illustrations of the components of the assembly are provided. Tables of data are developed to show the performance of the components.

  14. Commander Mattingly prepares meal on middeck

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Commander Mattingly, wearing flight coveralls, opens beverage container using a pair of scissors in front of middeck lockers (covered with spacecrew supplies, meal tray assemblies, and additional food items). Continuous Flow Electrophoresis System (CFES) and control panel ML86B appear on port side wall. CFES is designed to separate biological materials according to their surface electrical charges as they pass through an electrical field.

  15. Haise Commands First Enterprise Test Flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The first crew members for the Space Shuttle Approach and Landing Tests (ALT) are photographed at the Rockwell International Space Division's Orbiter Assembly Facility at Palmdale, California. The Shuttle Enterprise is Commanded by former Apollo 13 Lunar Module pilot, Fred Haise (left) with C. Gordon Fullerton as pilot. The Shuttle Orbiter Enterprise was named after the fictional Starship Enterprise from the popular 1960's television series, Star Trek.

  16. Naval Meteorology and Oceanography Command exhibit entrance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    StenniSphere at NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, Miss., invites visitors to discover why America comes to Stennis Space Center before going into space. Designed to entertain while educating, StenniSphere includes informative displays and exhibits from NASA and other agencies located at Stennis, such as this one from the Naval Meteorology and Oceanography Command. Visitors can 'travel' three-dimensionally under the sea and check on the weather back home in the Weather Center.

  17. Naval Meteorology and Oceanography Command exhibit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Designed to entertain while educating, StenniSphere at the John C. Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, Miss., includes informative displays and exhibits from NASA and other agencies located at Stennis, such as this one from the Naval Meteorology and Oceanography Command. Visitors can 'travel' three-dimensionally under the sea and check on the weather back home in the Weather Center. StenniSphere is open free of charge from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily.

  18. Commander prepares glass columns for electrophoresis experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Commander Jack Lousma prepares on of the glass columns for the electrophoresis test in the middeck area of the Columbia. The experiment, deployed in an L-shaped mode in upper right corner, consists of the processing unit with glass columns in which the separation takes place; a camera (partially obscurred by Lousma's face) to document the process; and a cryogenic freezer to freeze and store the samples after separation.

  19. STS-80 Crew Arrival (Commander Kenneth Cockrell)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    STS-80 Commander Kenneth D. Cockrell and four fellow crew members arrive at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility as preparations continue for launch of the final Shuttle flight of 1996. Tomorrow, Nov. 12, the launch countdown will begin at 1 p.m. with the countdown clock set at T-43 hours. The Space Shuttle Columbia is scheduled for liftoff from Launch Pad 39B at 2:50 p.m. EST, Nov. 15.

  20. Apollo 13 Command Module recovery after splashdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    Crewmen aboard the U.S.S. Iwo Jima, prime recovery ship for the Apollo 13 mission, guide the Command Module (CM) atop a dolly on board the ship. The CM is connected by strong cable to a hoist on the vessel. The Apollo 13 crewmen were already aboard the Iwo Jima when this photograph was taken. The Apollo 13 spacecraft splashed down at 12:07:44 p.m., April 17, 1970 in the South Pacific Ocean.

  1. Astronaut Vance Brand at controls of Apollo Command Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Astronaut Vance D. Brand, command module pilot of the American ASTP crew, is seen at the controls of the Apollo Command Module during the joint U.S.-USSR Apollo Soyuz Test Project (ASTP) docking in Earth orbit mission.

  2. PANORAMA, FROM ULAKTA HEAD COMMAND POST TO THE WEST TOWARDS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PANORAMA, FROM ULAKTA HEAD COMMAND POST TO THE WEST TOWARDS MOUNT BALLYHOO - Naval Operating Base Dutch Harbor & Fort Mears, Ulakta Head Fixed Defense Battery Command Post No. 1, Unalaska, Aleutian Islands, AK

  3. PANORAMA, SHOWING COMMAND POST RELATION TO DUTCH HARBOR AND UNALASKA ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PANORAMA, SHOWING COMMAND POST RELATION TO DUTCH HARBOR AND UNALASKA FROM THE TOP OF LITTLE SOUTH AMERICA - Naval Operating Base Dutch Harbor & Fort Mears, Hill 400 Fixed Defense Battery Command Post, Unalaska, Aleutian Islands, AK

  4. 1. PANORAMA, SHOWING COMMAND POST RELATION TO DUTCH HARBOR AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. PANORAMA, SHOWING COMMAND POST RELATION TO DUTCH HARBOR AND UNALASKA FROM THE TOP OF LITTLE SOUTH AMERICA - Naval Operating Base Dutch Harbor & Fort Mears, Hill 400 Fixed Defense Battery Command Post, Unalaska, Aleutian Islands, AK

  5. 1. PANORAMA, FROM ULAKTA HEAD COMMAND POST TO THE WEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. PANORAMA, FROM ULAKTA HEAD COMMAND POST TO THE WEST TOWARD MOUNT BALLYHOO - Naval Operating Base Dutch Harbor & Fort Mears, Ulakta Head Fixed Defense Battery Command Post No. 1, Unalaska, Aleutian Islands, AK

  6. Expedition 27/28 Change of Command Ceremony

    NASA Video Gallery

    At 11:41 a.m. EDT Sunday, Dmitry Kondratyev, who has been the commander of Expedition 27 aboard the International Space Station, conducted a ceremonial change of command with Andrey Borisenko, who ...

  7. 32 CFR 809a.10 - Military commanders' responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION INSTALLATION ENTRY POLICY, CIVIL DISTURBANCE INTERVENTION AND DISASTER ASSISTANCE Civil Disturbance Intervention and Disaster Assistance § 809a.10 Military commanders' responsibilities. (a... 32 National Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Military commanders' responsibilities....

  8. 32 CFR 809a.10 - Military commanders' responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION INSTALLATION ENTRY POLICY, CIVIL DISTURBANCE INTERVENTION AND DISASTER ASSISTANCE Civil Disturbance Intervention and Disaster Assistance § 809a.10 Military commanders' responsibilities. (a... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Military commanders' responsibilities....

  9. Tactical combat movements: inter-individual variation in performance due to the effects of load carriage.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Andrew P; Tofari, Paul J; Billing, Daniel C; Silk, Aaron J

    2016-09-01

    An examination into the effects of carried military equipment on the performance of two tactical combat movement simulations was conducted. Nineteen Airfield Defence Guards performed a break contact (five 30-m sprints) and a fire and movement simulation (16 6-m bounds) in five load conditions (10-30 kg). Heavier loads significantly increased movement duration on the break contact (0.8%/kg load) and fire and movement (1.1%/kg). Performance deterioration was observed from the beginning to the end of the series of movements (bounds or sprints) with deterioration becoming significantly greater in heavier load conditions. Inter-individual variation between slower and faster participants showed a range in load effects; 0.6, 0.8%/kg for fast and 1.0, 1.4%/kg for slow (break contact, fire and movement, respectively). Velocity profiles revealed that the initial acceleration and peak velocity were the primary determinants of performance. As the duration of these tactical combat movements reflects periods of heightened vulnerability, these findings highlight important implications for commanders. Practitioner Summary: Increasing amounts of carried military equipment impairs the performance of tactical combat movements. Examination of inter-individual variation in velocity profiles identified that the initial acceleration and the peak velocity achieved during sprints and bounds are key determinants of overall performance. PMID:27677344

  10. 14 CFR 1215.106 - User command and tracking data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... one of three locations: (1) For Shuttle payloads which utilize the Shuttle commanding system, command... established for STS services (see § 1215.101). (2) For free flyers and other payloads, command data must enter... and maintain acquisition. This can be accomplished in two ways: (1) The user can provide the...

  11. 14 CFR 125.283 - Second-in-command qualifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Second-in-command qualifications. 125.283... Requirements § 125.283 Second-in-command qualifications. No certificate holder may use any person, nor may any person serve, as second in command of an airplane unless that person— (a) Holds at least a...

  12. 14 CFR 91.531 - Second in command requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Second in command requirements. 91.531...-Powered Multiengine Airplanes and Fractional Ownership Program Aircraft § 91.531 Second in command... following airplanes without a pilot who is designated as second in command of that airplane: (1) A...

  13. 14 CFR 125.283 - Second-in-command qualifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Second-in-command qualifications. 125.283... Requirements § 125.283 Second-in-command qualifications. No certificate holder may use any person, nor may any person serve, as second in command of an airplane unless that person— (a) Holds at least a...

  14. 14 CFR 91.531 - Second in command requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Second in command requirements. 91.531...-Powered Multiengine Airplanes and Fractional Ownership Program Aircraft § 91.531 Second in command... following airplanes without a pilot who is designated as second in command of that airplane: (1) A...

  15. 14 CFR 125.283 - Second-in-command qualifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Second-in-command qualifications. 125.283... Requirements § 125.283 Second-in-command qualifications. No certificate holder may use any person, nor may any person serve, as second in command of an airplane unless that person— (a) Holds at least a...

  16. 14 CFR 125.283 - Second-in-command qualifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Second-in-command qualifications. 125.283... Requirements § 125.283 Second-in-command qualifications. No certificate holder may use any person, nor may any person serve, as second in command of an airplane unless that person— (a) Holds at least a...

  17. 14 CFR 91.531 - Second in command requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Second in command requirements. 91.531...-Powered Multiengine Airplanes and Fractional Ownership Program Aircraft § 91.531 Second in command... following airplanes without a pilot who is designated as second in command of that airplane: (1) A...

  18. 14 CFR 91.531 - Second in command requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Second in command requirements. 91.531...-Powered Multiengine Airplanes and Fractional Ownership Program Aircraft § 91.531 Second in command... following airplanes without a pilot who is designated as second in command of that airplane: (1) A...

  19. 14 CFR 125.283 - Second-in-command qualifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Second-in-command qualifications. 125.283... Requirements § 125.283 Second-in-command qualifications. No certificate holder may use any person, nor may any person serve, as second in command of an airplane unless that person— (a) Holds at least a...

  20. 14 CFR 91.531 - Second in command requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Second in command requirements. 91.531...-Powered Multiengine Airplanes and Fractional Ownership Program Aircraft § 91.531 Second in command... following airplanes without a pilot who is designated as second in command of that airplane: (1) A...

  1. 14 CFR 1215.106 - User command and tracking data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false User command and tracking data. 1215.106 Section 1215.106 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION TRACKING AND DATA... User command and tracking data. (a) User command data shall enter TDRSS via the NISN interface at...

  2. 14 CFR 1215.106 - User command and tracking data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false User command and tracking data. 1215.106 Section 1215.106 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION TRACKING AND DATA... User command and tracking data. (a) User command data may enter the TDRSS via the NASCOM interface...

  3. 14 CFR 1215.106 - User command and tracking data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true User command and tracking data. 1215.106 Section 1215.106 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION TRACKING AND DATA... User command and tracking data. (a) User command data may enter the TDRSS via the NASCOM interface...

  4. 33 CFR 6.01-6 - Area Commander.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Area Commander. 6.01-6 Section 6... AND SECURITY OF VESSELS, HARBORS, AND WATERFRONT FACILITIES Definitions § 6.01-6 Area Commander. Area... command a Coast Guard Area....

  5. 33 CFR 6.01-6 - Area Commander.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Area Commander. 6.01-6 Section 6... AND SECURITY OF VESSELS, HARBORS, AND WATERFRONT FACILITIES Definitions § 6.01-6 Area Commander. Area... command a Coast Guard Area....

  6. 33 CFR 6.01-6 - Area Commander.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Area Commander. 6.01-6 Section 6... AND SECURITY OF VESSELS, HARBORS, AND WATERFRONT FACILITIES Definitions § 6.01-6 Area Commander. Area... command a Coast Guard Area....

  7. 33 CFR 6.01-6 - Area Commander.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Area Commander. 6.01-6 Section 6... AND SECURITY OF VESSELS, HARBORS, AND WATERFRONT FACILITIES Definitions § 6.01-6 Area Commander. Area... command a Coast Guard Area....

  8. 33 CFR 6.01-6 - Area Commander.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Area Commander. 6.01-6 Section 6... AND SECURITY OF VESSELS, HARBORS, AND WATERFRONT FACILITIES Definitions § 6.01-6 Area Commander. Area... command a Coast Guard Area....

  9. Summary of TUTOR Commands and System Variables. Sixth Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avner, Elaine

    This summary is intended for the experienced author who needs a quick reference for the form of a tag and for the restrictions on the TUTOR language commands. Each command includes a brief description of its purpose and a description of the tag. The commands are grouped into the following categories: (1) calculating, (2) data keeping, (3) judging,…

  10. Summary of TUTOR Commands and System Variables. Ninth Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avner, Elaine

    Intended for the experienced TUTOR author who needs a quick reference for the form of a tag and for some of the restrictions on commands, this summary does not discuss the fine details of the TUTOR language. Brief descriptions of the purpose and the tag are provided for each command. The commands are grouped in nine categories: calculating (C),…

  11. Summary of TUTOR Commands and System Variables. Tenth Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avner, Elaine

    Intended for the experienced TUTOR author who needs a quick reference for the form of a tag and for some of the restrictions on commands, this summary does not discuss the fine details of the TUTOR language. Brief descriptions of the purpose and the tag are provided for each command. The commands are grouped in nine categories: calculating (C),…

  12. 14 CFR 125.281 - Pilot-in-command qualifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Pilot-in-command qualifications. 125.281... Requirements § 125.281 Pilot-in-command qualifications. No certificate holder may use any person, nor may any person serve, as pilot in command of an airplane unless that person— (a) Holds at least a...

  13. 14 CFR 135.243 - Pilot in command qualifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Pilot in command qualifications. 135.243... Crewmember Requirements § 135.243 Pilot in command qualifications. (a) No certificate holder may use a person, nor may any person serve, as pilot in command in passenger-carrying operations— (1) Of a...

  14. 46 CFR 30.10-17 - Commandant-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Commandant-TB/ALL. 30.10-17 Section 30.10-17 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-17 Commandant—TB/ALL. The term Commandant means the Commandant of the Coast Guard....

  15. 46 CFR 30.10-17 - Commandant-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Commandant-TB/ALL. 30.10-17 Section 30.10-17 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-17 Commandant—TB/ALL. The term Commandant means the Commandant of the Coast Guard....

  16. 46 CFR 30.10-17 - Commandant-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Commandant-TB/ALL. 30.10-17 Section 30.10-17 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-17 Commandant—TB/ALL. The term Commandant means the Commandant of the Coast Guard....

  17. 46 CFR 30.10-17 - Commandant-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Commandant-TB/ALL. 30.10-17 Section 30.10-17 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-17 Commandant—TB/ALL. The term Commandant means the Commandant of the Coast Guard....

  18. 14 CFR 417.303 - Command control system requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... control system requirements. (a) General. When initiated by a flight safety official, a command control... receipt of the signal by the onboard vehicle flight termination system. A command control system must... flight termination system used for each launch. (f) Electromagnetic interference. Each command...

  19. 14 CFR 417.303 - Command control system requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... control system requirements. (a) General. When initiated by a flight safety official, a command control... receipt of the signal by the onboard vehicle flight termination system. A command control system must... flight termination system used for each launch. (f) Electromagnetic interference. Each command...

  20. 14 CFR 417.305 - Command control system testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH SAFETY Flight Safety System § 417.305 Command control system... for the launch. (2) Coordinated command control system and flight termination system testing. For each... operational command control system; (iii) Verify the performance of each flight safety system......

  1. 14 CFR 417.305 - Command control system testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH SAFETY Flight Safety System § 417.305 Command control system... for the launch. (2) Coordinated command control system and flight termination system testing. For each... operational command control system; (iii) Verify the performance of each flight safety system......

  2. 14 CFR 417.305 - Command control system testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH SAFETY Flight Safety System § 417.305 Command control system... for the launch. (2) Coordinated command control system and flight termination system testing. For each... operational command control system; (iii) Verify the performance of each flight safety system......

  3. 14 CFR 417.305 - Command control system testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH SAFETY Flight Safety System § 417.305 Command control system... for the launch. (2) Coordinated command control system and flight termination system testing. For each... operational command control system; (iii) Verify the performance of each flight safety system......

  4. 14 CFR 417.303 - Command control system requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... control system requirements. (a) General. When initiated by a flight safety official, a command control... receipt of the signal by the onboard vehicle flight termination system. A command control system must... flight termination system used for each launch. (f) Electromagnetic interference. Each command...

  5. 14 CFR 125.281 - Pilot-in-command qualifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pilot-in-command qualifications. 125.281... Requirements § 125.281 Pilot-in-command qualifications. No certificate holder may use any person, nor may any person serve, as pilot in command of an airplane unless that person— (a) Holds at least a...

  6. Is EURONET C.C.L. a "Common" Command Language?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verheijen-Voogd, C.

    1981-01-01

    Presents a chart which compares selected command functions of DIMDI and IRS/ESA, two major versions of the EURONET Common Command Language, with the IRS/ESA-Quest retrieval language and includes specific remarks for most of the commands. (RBF)

  7. View of Apollo 14 crewmen in Command Module simulation training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    The members of the prime crew of the Apollo 14 lunar landing mission participate in Command Module simulation training at the Kennedy Space Center. Left to right, are Astronauts Edgar D. Mitchell, lunar module pilot; Sturat A. Roosa, command module pilot; and Alan B. Shepard Jr., commander.

  8. 46 CFR 30.10-17 - Commandant-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Commandant-TB/ALL. 30.10-17 Section 30.10-17 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-17 Commandant—TB/ALL. The term Commandant means the Commandant of the Coast Guard....

  9. Internal fixation in a combat theater hospital.

    PubMed

    Large, Thomas M; Bonds, Cale; Howard, Michael

    2013-08-01

    Limited data are available on the use of internal fixation in combat zone hospitals. The authors performed a retrospective review of 713 surgical cases during 2 Operation Enduring Freedom deployments to a Level III theater hospital in 2007 and 2009 to 2010. The epidemiology and short- to intermediate-term outcomes of patients treated with internal fixation devices were studied. The authors found that, with judicious use, internal fixation under a damage control protocol in a combat theater hospital can be performed with acceptable complication rates. PMID:23937739

  10. 77 FR 35365 - U.S. Air Force Scientific Advisory Board Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-13

    ... intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance in contested environments; ensuring cyber situational awareness for commanders; and extended uses of Air Force Space Command space-based sensors. The draft FY13...

  11. 77 FR 36492 - U.S. Air Force Scientific Advisory Board Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-19

    ... contested environments; ensuring cyber situational awareness for commanders; and extended uses of Air Force Space Command space-based sensors. The draft FY13 SAB study topic Terms of Reference and potential...

  12. 76 FR 14950 - Closed Meeting of the U.S. Strategic Command Strategic Advisory Group

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-18

    ... Commander, U.S. Strategic Command, during the development of the Nation's strategic war plans. Agenda... Destruction, Intelligence Operations, Cyber Operations, Global Strike, Command and Control, Science...

  13. Is there central fatigue during simulated air combat maneuvering?

    PubMed

    Bain, B; Jacobs, I; Buick, F

    1995-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that repeated exposure to high levels of +Gz acceleration, in conjunction with repeated execution of an Anti-G Straining Maneuver (AGSM), causes central fatigue, presumably by impairing central nervous system (CNS) function. We speculated that central fatigue would impair the ability to recruit sufficient musculature at the intensity required to perform an adequate anti-G straining maneuver. Central fatigue was evaluated by measuring maximal force generation and surface electromyographic activity of leg extensor muscles before, during, and immediately upon termination of an SACM, and comparing these values to those obtained when the muscles were electrically stimulated during maximal voluntary contractions (MVCs). We assumed that any observed increase in force generation during the MVCs, caused by the stimulation, would indicate central fatigue. G-tolerance time was 230 +/- 172 s. Hypoxia was induced by the SACM as the arterial oxygen saturation decreased significantly from 97% to 90%. In spite of this hypoxia, there was no significant change in MVC force when the pre- and post-SACM values were compared. Electrical stimulation during the MVC's did not cause an increase in force generation. The average forces generated during the +7 Gz phase of the SACM were only about 35% of MVC force. This force value did not change significantly during the SACM. The results indicate that the inability to continue to perform the AGSM during an SACM is not likely due to central fatigue or to fatigue of the large skeletal muscle groups we have examined.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Integrated helmet mounted display concepts for air combat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Joseph W.

    1995-01-01

    A piloted simulation study was conducted in a dome simulator to evaluate several Helmet Mounted Display (HMD) formats developed as part of the NASA High Alpha Technology Program (HATP). The display formats conveyed energy management, spatial orientation, and weapons management information. The HMD format was compared to a generic Heads Up Display (HUD) typical of current operational fighter aircraft. Pilots were tasked to spend as much time in a weapon solution as possible, to have the correct weapon selected for the envelope they were in, and to avoid the adversary's weapon envelope as much as possible. Several different displays were tested individually and simultaneously to see how separate display concepts coexisted. Objective results showed that the ability for the pilot to select the correct weapon for the envelope he was in increased by 50% in a moderate workload condition and 90% in a high workload condition with the HMD format. In the post-test comments pilots generally favored the helmet display formats over the HUD formats with a few instances where pilots preferred a simple numeric readout of the parameter. Short term exposure effects of the HMD on visual acuity were also measured and showed no advers results.

  15. Effective inpatient medication reconciliation: The 10 commandments.

    PubMed

    Siu, Henry K

    2015-01-01

    Medication Reconciliation (MedRec) is the comprehensive process of medication verification, clarification and documentation in an effort to avoid medication errors. There are many reasons that contribute to the inadequacies of current day inpatient MedRec. Among these include the limited medical literacy of patients, communication between providers and teams of providers, and the intrinsic difficulties of medical charting. Although the best approach to inpatient MedRec is not known, the following outlines the 10 most important aspects, or "Commandments", for effective inpatient MedRec. The tenets are not listed in any particular order of importance. PMID:25758318

  16. Apollo command module land impact tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccullough, J. E.; Lands, J. F., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    Full-scale-model and actual spacecraft were impact tested to define the emergency land-landing capability of the Apollo command module. Structural accelerations and strains were recorded on analog instrumentation, and a summary to these data is included. The landing kinematics were obtained from high-speed photography. Photographs of the structural damage caused during the tests are included. Even though extensive damage can be expected, the crew will receive nothing more than minor injuries during the majority of the probable landing conditions.

  17. Pythium aphanidermatum Infection following Combat Trauma▿

    PubMed Central

    Calvano, Tatjana P.; Blatz, Peter J.; Vento, Todd J.; Wickes, Brian L.; Sutton, Deanna A.; Thompson, Elizabeth H.; White, Christopher E.; Renz, Evan M.; Hospenthal, Duane R.

    2011-01-01

    Pythium aphanidermatum is a fungus-like plant pathogen which has never been reported as a cause of human infection. We report a case of P. aphanidermatum invasive wound infection in a 21-year-old male injured during combat operations in Afghanistan. PMID:21813724

  18. Pythium aphanidermatum infection following combat trauma.

    PubMed

    Calvano, Tatjana P; Blatz, Peter J; Vento, Todd J; Wickes, Brian L; Sutton, Deanna A; Thompson, Elizabeth H; White, Christopher E; Renz, Evan M; Hospenthal, Duane R

    2011-10-01

    Pythium aphanidermatum is a fungus-like plant pathogen which has never been reported as a cause of human infection. We report a case of P. aphanidermatum invasive wound infection in a 21-year-old male injured during combat operations in Afghanistan. PMID:21813724

  19. Combatives for Alienated Youth: Problems and Prospects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hellison, Don

    Combative activities (boxing, wrestling, kung fu, etc.) are seen as having a positive influence on alienated inner city youth. Potential contributions of such activities in a school curriculum or recreation program include involvement, security, self-concept, and self-realization. Participants may be able to free themselves from such stereotype…

  20. Dynamic networked combat capability (Invited Paper)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, John G.

    2005-05-01

    Dynamic Networked Combat Capability is a transformational concept to enable network centric warfare at the tactical level - the immediate attack of targets of opportunity using any and all assets available: any sensor, any effect generator and any decider against any target. More specifically, the DARPA goal is to provide enabling technologies that will permit the Services to build such a capability.

  1. Program to Combat Stereotyping in Career Choice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Laurie R.

    Divided into three sections which deal with sex, race, and handicap stereotyping in career choice, the twenty-eight programs described here attempt to combat stereotypes among students and/or staff (K-12). Most descriptions list the goals of the program, target population, staffing and management, facilities and activities, program effectiveness…

  2. Postpartum hemorrhage: use of hemostatic combat gauze.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Bernd C; Rezniczek, Günther A; Rolf, Norbert; Maul, Holger

    2012-01-01

    Cheap and simple interventions that are intended to minimize postpartum hemorrhage are of major public health concern. We report a case of postpartum hemorrhage in which conservative interventions had failed. The use of a chitosan-covered gauze that originally was developed for combat trauma allowed us to achieve hemostasis, and a seemingly inevitable hysterectomy was avoided. PMID:22011588

  3. Combating Labour Market Exclusion: Does Training Work?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Descy, Pascaline; Tessaring, Manfred

    2007-01-01

    This article reviews active labour-market policies (ALMP), of which training is prominent. For about 20 years now, they have been one of the most important measures to combat unemployment and exclusion from the labour market. But is training a successful and efficient policy to reduce unemployment, compared to other types of ALMP? We draw some…

  4. Posttraumatic stress disorder in combat veterans.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Nicole R

    2014-05-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) affects up to 18% of combat veterans, many of whom will seek care from clinicians outside the military healthcare system. This article reviews the epidemiology, risk factors, symptoms, diagnosis, treatment, and referral options for PTSD so that PAs in primary care can recognize and appropriately manage patients with PTSD.

  5. An Educational Program to Combat Venereal Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dotterweich, Andrew H., Jr.

    The purpose of this practicum was to develop, implement, and evaluate an educational program to combat venereal disease. The objectives of the program were: (1) to increase public awareness of the problem of venereal disease, (2) to alert parents and students to the dangers of venereal disease, (3) to enable students to make rational judgments…

  6. Transitions: Combat Veterans as College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ackerman, Robert; DiRamio, David; Garza Mitchell, Regina L.

    2009-01-01

    The experience of war makes those who fight a special group within the general population. The purpose of this study was to investigate how combat veterans who become college students make the transition to campus life, in order to identify how administrators can acknowledge and support them. A total of six women and 19 men were interviewed; 24…

  7. Combat exposure and migraine headache: evidence from exogenous deployment assignment.

    PubMed

    Cesur, Resul; Sabia, Joseph J; Tekin, Erdal

    2015-01-01

    Migraine headache is a growing problem for U.S. servicemembers deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan and has been linked to substantial negative socioeconomic consequences. However, there has been no comprehensive examination of the relationship between combat exposure and migraine headache or its stress-related triggers. Analyzing data drawn from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, we use exogenous variation in deployment assignment to estimate the effect of combat exposure on migraine headache. We find that those deployed to a combat zone with enemy firefight are at substantially increased risk for migraine headache relative to those deployed to non-combat zones outside the United States or to combat zones without enemy firefight. We find that combat-induced sleep disorders, stress-related psychological problems, and physical injuries in combat explain approximately 40-45 percent of the relationship between combat exposure and migraine headache.

  8. Combat exposure and migraine headache: evidence from exogenous deployment assignment.

    PubMed

    Cesur, Resul; Sabia, Joseph J; Tekin, Erdal

    2015-01-01

    Migraine headache is a growing problem for U.S. servicemembers deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan and has been linked to substantial negative socioeconomic consequences. However, there has been no comprehensive examination of the relationship between combat exposure and migraine headache or its stress-related triggers. Analyzing data drawn from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, we use exogenous variation in deployment assignment to estimate the effect of combat exposure on migraine headache. We find that those deployed to a combat zone with enemy firefight are at substantially increased risk for migraine headache relative to those deployed to non-combat zones outside the United States or to combat zones without enemy firefight. We find that combat-induced sleep disorders, stress-related psychological problems, and physical injuries in combat explain approximately 40-45 percent of the relationship between combat exposure and migraine headache. PMID:24560382

  9. Wireless Telemetry and Command (T and C) Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Hui; Horan, Stephen

    2000-01-01

    The Wireless Telemetry and Command (T&C) program is to investigate methods of using commercial telecommunications service providers to support command and telemetry services between a remote user and a base station. While the initial development is based on ground networks, the development is being done with an eye towards future space communications needs. Both NASA and the Air Force have indicated a plan to consider the use of commercial telecommunications providers to support their space missions. To do this, there will need to be an understanding of the requirements and limitations of interfacing with the commercial providers. The eventual payoff will be the reduced operations cost and the ability to tap into commercial services being developed by the commercial networks. This should enable easier realization of EP services to the end points, commercial routing of data, and quicker integration of new services into the space mission operations. Therefore, the ultimate goal of this program is not just to provide wireless radio communications for T&C services but to enhance those services through wireless networking and provider enhancements that come with the networks. In the following chapters, the detailed technical procedure will be showed step by step. Chapter 2 will talk about the general idea of simulation as well as the implementation of data acquisition including sensor array data and GPS data. Chapter 3 will talk about how to use LabVEEW and Component Works to do wireless communication simulation and how to distribute the real-time information over the Internet by using Visual Basic and ActiveX controls. Also talk about the test configuration and validation. Chapter 4 will show the test results both from In-Lab test and Networking Test. Chapter 5 will summarize the whole procedure and give the perspective for the future consideration.

  10. Combat internist: the internal medicine experience in a combat hospital in Afghanistan.

    PubMed

    Lee, Rachel U; Parrish, Scott C; Saeed, Omar; Fiedler, Joyce P

    2015-01-01

    Military internists and internal medicine subspecialists are physicians who generally work in traditional internal medicine settings. However, when deployed to combat settings, they must prepare and adapt their skills for a wide spectrum of complex, polytrauma, and multinational patients. There are limitations in personnel, equipment, and technical resources that make the circumstances complex and demanding. This article highlights some of the unique roles, challenges, and experiences of four military internists at the NATO Role 3, a deployed combat hospital in Afghanistan. PMID:25562851

  11. Early adversity and combat exposure interact to influence anterior cingulate cortex volume in combat veterans☆

    PubMed Central

    Woodward, Steven H.; Kuo, Janice R.; Schaer, Marie; Kaloupek, Danny G.; Eliez, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    Objective Childhood and combat trauma have been observed to interact to influence amygdala volume in a sample of U.S. military veterans with and without PTSD. This interaction was assessed in a second, functionally-related fear system component, the pregenual and dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, using the same sample and modeling approach. Method Anterior cingulate cortical tissues (gray + white matter) were manually-delineated in 1.5 T MR images in 87 U.S. military veterans of the Vietnam and Persian Gulf wars. Hierarchical multiple regression modeling was used to assess associations between anterior cingulate volume and the following predictors, trauma prior to age 13, combat exposure, the interaction of early trauma and combat exposure, and PTSD diagnosis. Results As previously observed in the amygdala, unique variance in anterior cingulate cortical volume was associated with both the diagnosis of PTSD and with the interaction of childhood and combat trauma. The pattern of the latter interaction indicated that veterans with childhood trauma exhibited a significant inverse linear relationship between combat trauma and anterior cingulate volume while those without childhood trauma did not. Such associations were not observed in hippocampal or total cerebral tissue volumes. Conclusions In the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, as in the amygdala, early trauma may confer excess sensitivity to later combat trauma. PMID:24179818

  12. 48 CFR 52.222-50 - Combating Trafficking in Persons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Combating Trafficking in....222-50 Combating Trafficking in Persons. As prescribed in 22.1705(a), insert the following clause: Combating Trafficking in Persons (FEB 2009) (a) Definitions. As used in this clause— Coercion means—...

  13. 32 CFR 724.306 - Functions of the Commander, Naval Medical Command.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Functions of the Commander, Naval Medical... PERSONNEL NAVAL DISCHARGE REVIEW BOARD Director, Secretary of the Navy Council of Review Boards and President Naval Discharge Review Board; Responsibilities in Support of the Naval Discharge Review...

  14. 32 CFR 724.306 - Functions of the Commander, Naval Medical Command.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Functions of the Commander, Naval Medical... PERSONNEL NAVAL DISCHARGE REVIEW BOARD Director, Secretary of the Navy Council of Review Boards and President Naval Discharge Review Board; Responsibilities in Support of the Naval Discharge Review...

  15. The Arecibo Remote Command Center Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, Fronefield; Jenet, Fredrick; Siemens, Xavier; Dolch, Timothy; Stovall, Kevin

    2016-07-01

    The Arecibo Remote Command Center (ARCC) is a multi-institution research and education program that introduces undergraduates to the field of pulsar research. Specifically, the program trains students to work in small teams to operate several of the world's largest radio telescopes (both Arecibo and the Green Bank Telescope). Students conduct survey observations for the PALFA Galactic plane pulsar survey and conduct timing observations of millisecond pulsars (MSPs) for the NANOGrav search for gravitational waves using these telescopes. In addition, ARCC students search pulsar candidates generated from processed survey data in order to find both new radio MSPs and non-recycled pulsars. The ARCC program currently operates at four U.S. institutions and involves more than 50 undergraduate students each year. To date, ARCC students have discovered 64 new pulsars in this program.

  16. STS-70 Mission Commander Henricks inspects tire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    STS-70 Mission Commander Terence 'Tom' Henricks inspects the nose wheel landing gear tires of the Space Shuttle Orbiter Discovery along with Mission Specialist Mary Ellen Weber after the spaceplane touched down on KSC's Runway 33 to successfully conclude the nearly nine-day space flight. Main gear touchdown was unofficially listed at 8:02 a.m. EDT on July 22, 1995 on the second landing attempt after the first opportunity was waved off. The orbiter was originally scheduled to land on the 21st, but fog and low visibility at the Shuttle Landing Facility led to the one-day extension. This was the 24th landing at KSC and the 70th Space Shuttle mission. During the space flight, the five-member crew deployed the NASA Tracking and Data Relay Satellite-G (TDRS- G). The other crew members were Pilot Kevin R. Kregel and Mission Specialists Nancy Jane Currie and Donald A. Thomas.

  17. Commander Collins in the White Room

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    STS-93 Commander Eileen M. Collins is checked out by white room closeout crew members before entering the orbiter Columbia. The white room is an environmental chamber at the end of the orbiter access arm that provides entry to the orbiter crew compartment. STS-93 is a five-day mission primarily to release the Chandra X- ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. After Space Shuttle Columbia's July 20 and 22 launch attempts were scrubbed, the launch was again rescheduled for Friday, July 23, at 12:24 a.m. EDT. The target landing date is July 27 at 11:20 p.m. EDT.

  18. STS-113 Crew Interviews: Jim Wetherbee, Commander

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    STS-113 Commander Jim Wetherbee is seen during this preflight interview where he gives a quick overview of the mission before answering questions about his inspiration to become an astronaut and his career path. Wetherbee outlines his role in the mission, what his responsibilities will be, what the crew exchange will be like (transferring the Expedition 6 crew in place of the Expedition 5 crew on the International Space Station (ISS)) and what the importance of the primary payload (the P1 truss) will be. He also provides a detailed account of the three planned extravehicular activities (EVAs) and additional transfer duties. He ends by offering his thoughts on the success of the ISS as the second anniversary of continuous human occupation of the ISS approaches.

  19. Mechanical, physical, and physiological analysis of symmetrical and asymmetrical combat.

    PubMed

    Clemente-Suárez, Vicente J; Robles-Pérez, José J

    2013-09-01

    In current theaters of operation, soldiers had to face a different situation as symmetrical (defined battlefield) and asymmetrical combat (non-defined battlefield), especially in urban areas. The mechanical and organic responses of soldiers in these combats are poorly studied in specific literature. This research aimed to analyze physical, mechanical, and physiological parameters during symmetrical and asymmetrical combat simulations. We analyzed 20 soldiers from the Spanish Army and Spanish Forces and Security Corps (34.5 ± 4.2 years; 176.4 ± 8.4 cm; 74.6 ± 8.7 kg; 63.3 ± 8.0 kg muscular mass; 7.6 ± 3.2 kg fat mass) during a symmetric combat (traditional combat simulation) and during an asymmetrical combat (urban combat simulation). Heart rate (HR), speed, sprints, distances, impact, and body load parameters were measured by a GPS system and a HR belt. Results showed many differences between symmetrical and asymmetrical combat. Asymmetrical combat presented higher maximum velocity movement, number of sprints, sprint distance, and average HR. By contrary, symmetric combat presented higher number of impact and body load. This information could be used to improve specific training programs for each type of combat.

  20. Mechanical, physical, and physiological analysis of symmetrical and asymmetrical combat.

    PubMed

    Clemente-Suárez, Vicente J; Robles-Pérez, José J

    2013-09-01

    In current theaters of operation, soldiers had to face a different situation as symmetrical (defined battlefield) and asymmetrical combat (non-defined battlefield), especially in urban areas. The mechanical and organic responses of soldiers in these combats are poorly studied in specific literature. This research aimed to analyze physical, mechanical, and physiological parameters during symmetrical and asymmetrical combat simulations. We analyzed 20 soldiers from the Spanish Army and Spanish Forces and Security Corps (34.5 ± 4.2 years; 176.4 ± 8.4 cm; 74.6 ± 8.7 kg; 63.3 ± 8.0 kg muscular mass; 7.6 ± 3.2 kg fat mass) during a symmetric combat (traditional combat simulation) and during an asymmetrical combat (urban combat simulation). Heart rate (HR), speed, sprints, distances, impact, and body load parameters were measured by a GPS system and a HR belt. Results showed many differences between symmetrical and asymmetrical combat. Asymmetrical combat presented higher maximum velocity movement, number of sprints, sprint distance, and average HR. By contrary, symmetric combat presented higher number of impact and body load. This information could be used to improve specific training programs for each type of combat. PMID:23254545

  1. Advanced protection technology for ground combat vehicles.

    PubMed

    Bosse, Timothy G

    2012-01-01

    Just as highway drivers use radar detectors to attempt to stay ahead of police armed with the latest radar technology, the Armed Forces are locked in a spiral to protect combat vehicles and their crews against the latest threats in both the contemporary operating environment and the anticipated operating environment (ie, beyond 2020). In response to bigger, heavier, or better-protected vehicles, adversaries build and deploy larger explosive devices or bombs. However, making improvements to combat vehicles is much more expensive than deploying larger explosives. In addition, demand is increasing for lighter-weight vehicles capable of rapid deployment. Together, these two facts give the threat a clear advantage in the future. To protect vehicles and crews, technologies focusing on detection and hit avoidance, denial of penetration, and crew survivability must be combined synergistically to provide the best chance of survival on the modern battlefield. PMID:22865132

  2. Electronic solutions for combating counterfeit drugs

    PubMed Central

    Hemalatha, R.; Rao, A. Srinivasa

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The problem of counterfeiting of drugs is assuming alarming proportions and is getting difficult to combat due to its trans-national character. It is undermining the faith of people on health care system. Therefore, there is a need to adopt zero tolerance approach to combat the problem. The Way Forward: There are many solutions available which are being adopted in piece meal manner by individual manufacturers. However, for wholesalers and resellers it is getting difficult to maintain multiple solutions. Therefore, there is a need to adopt a unified solution preferably with the help of the government. Conclusions: This paper discusses the available solutions, their shortcomings and proposes a comprehensive solution where at each level in the supply chain the authenticity is verified preferable linking it with Unique identification. PMID:26229359

  3. Regenerative medicine applications in combat casualty care.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Mark E; Bharmal, Husain; Valerio, Ian

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe regenerative medicine applications in the management of complex injuries sustained by service members injured in support of the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq. Improvements in body armor, resuscitative techniques and faster transport have translated into increased patient survivability and more complex wounds. Combat-related blast injuries have resulted in multiple extremity injuries, significant tissue loss and amputations. Due to the limited availability and morbidity associated with autologous tissue donor sites, the introduction of regenerative medicine has been critical in managing war extremity injuries with composite massive tissue loss. Through case reports and clinical images, this report reviews the application of regenerative medicine modalities employed to manage combat-related injuries. It illustrates that the novel use of hybrid reconstructions combining traditional and regenerative medicine approaches are an effective tool in managing wounds. Lessons learned can be adapted to civilian care. PMID:24750059

  4. Using HMI Weintek in command of an industrial robot arm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barz, C.; Latinovic, T.; Balan, I. B. A.; Pop-Vadean, A.; Pop, P. P.

    2015-06-01

    The present paper intends to highlight the utility and importance of HMI in the control of the robotic arm, commanding a Siemens PLC. The touch screen HMI Weinteke MT3070a is the user interface in the process command of Siemens PLC, in which the distances and displacement speeds are introduced on the three axes. The interface includes monitoring robotic arm movement but also allows its command by incrementing step by step the motion over axis.

  5. Astronaut Alan Bean assisted with egressing command module after landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    Astronaut Alan L. Bean, lunar module pilot, is assisted with egressing the Apollo 12 Command Module by a U.S. Navy underwater demolition team swimmer during recovery operations in the Pacific Ocean. Already in the life raft are Astronauts Charles Conrad Jr., commander; and Richard F. Gordon Jr., command module pilot. The Apollo 12 splashdown occured at 2:58 p.m., November 24, 1969 near American Samoa.

  6. Data acquisition command interface using VAX/VMS DCL

    SciTech Connect

    Poore, R.V.; Barrus, D.M.; Cort, G.; Goldstone, J.A.; Miller, L.B.; Nelson, R.O.

    1985-01-01

    The user interface to a data acquisition system is being developed at the Los Alamos Weapons Neutron Research Facility using the VAX/VMS command language interface DCL. Commands are being implemented which provide for system initialization and control functions and FASTBUS diagnostics. The data acquisition system incorporates the concept of a data acquisition ''state'' (running, halted, etc.) where a certain subset of input commands is allowed.

  7. XTCE: XML Telemetry and Command Exchange Tutorial, XTCE Version 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, Kevin; Kizzort, Brad

    2008-01-01

    These presentation slides are a tutorial on XML Telemetry and Command Exchange (XTCE). The goal of XTCE is to provide an industry standard mechanism for describing telemetry and command streams (particularly from satellites.) it wiill lower cost and increase validation over traditional formats, and support exchange or native format.XCTE is designed to describe bit streams, that are typical of telemetry and command in the historic space domain.

  8. FIRRE command and control station (C2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laird, R. T.; Kramer, T. A.; Cruickshanks, J. R.; Curd, K. M.; Thomas, K. M.; Moneyhun, J.

    2006-05-01

    The Family of Integrated Rapid Response Equipment (FIRRE) is an advanced technology demonstration program intended to develop a family of affordable, scalable, modular, and logistically supportable unmanned systems to meet urgent operational force protection needs and requirements worldwide. The near-term goal is to provide the best available unmanned ground systems to the warfighter in Iraq and Afghanistan. The overarching long-term goal is to develop a fully-integrated, layered force protection system of systems for our forward deployed forces that is networked with the future force C4ISR systems architecture. The intent of the FIRRE program is to reduce manpower requirements, enhance force protection capabilities, and reduce casualties through the use of unmanned systems. FIRRE is sponsored by the Office of the Under Secretary of Defense, Acquisitions, Technology and Logistics (OUSD AT&L), and is managed by the Product Manager, Force Protection Systems (PM-FPS). The FIRRE Command and Control (C2) Station supports two operators, hosts the Joint Battlespace Command and Control Software for Manned and Unmanned Assets (JBC2S), and will be able to host Mission Planning and Rehearsal (MPR) software. The C2 Station consists of an M1152 HMMWV fitted with an S-788 TYPE I shelter. The C2 Station employs five 24" LCD monitors for display of JBC2S software [1], MPR software, and live video feeds from unmanned systems. An audio distribution system allows each operator to select between various audio sources including: AN/PRC-117F tactical radio (SINCGARS compatible), audio prompts from JBC2S software, audio from unmanned systems, audio from other operators, and audio from external sources such as an intercom in an adjacent Tactical Operations Center (TOC). A power distribution system provides battery backup for momentary outages. The Ethernet network, audio distribution system, and audio/video feeds are available for use outside the C2 Station.

  9. Examining the role of combat loss among Vietnam War Veterans.

    PubMed

    Currier, Joseph M; Holland, Jason M

    2012-02-01

    Military combat often presents service members with a dual burden of coping with traumas of various types while also grappling with the deaths of close personal friends. At present, much less is known about the effects of bereavement in the context of war compared to other combat-related stressors. Studying a sample of combat veterans from the National Vietnam Veterans Readjustment Study (NVVRS), we examined the contribution of combat loss in psychological functioning and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). When controlling for gender, age, ethnicity, educational background, exposure to nonbereavement combat stressors, and recent bereavement experiences, combat loss was uniquely associated with past and current functional impairments among the veterans, βs = .07 and .06, respectively, but was not related to the severity of PTSD. These findings highlight that combat loss might act as a uniquely challenging stressor among many service members and more empirical research is needed on this topic.

  10. Combating isolation: Building mutual mentoring networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Anne J.

    2015-12-01

    Women physicists can often feel isolated at work. Support from a grant through the ADVANCE program of the National Science Foundation (U.S. government funding) created mutual mentoring networks aimed at combating isolation specifically for women faculty at undergraduate-only institutions. This paper will discuss the organization of one such network, what contributed to its success, some of the outcomes, and how it might be implemented in other contexts.

  11. Combating an Epidemic of Prescription Opioid Abuse.

    PubMed

    Pon, Doreen; Awuah, Kwaku; Curi, Danielle; Okyere, Ernest; Stern, Craig S

    2015-11-01

    The past decade has witnessed an alarming increase in the number of deaths due to prescription opioids that has paralleled the rise in the number of opioid prescriptions dispensed. Prescription drug monitoring programs, abuse-deterrent formulations and proper disposal of opioids have been promoted to help combat the opioid epidemic. We discuss changes that dentists, the third most frequent prescribers of opioids, can implement to help reduce the risk of prescription opioid abuse in their communities. PMID:26798885

  12. Combating an Epidemic of Prescription Opioid Abuse.

    PubMed

    Pon, Doreen; Awuah, Kwaku; Curi, Danielle; Okyere, Ernest; Stern, Craig S

    2015-11-01

    The past decade has witnessed an alarming increase in the number of deaths due to prescription opioids that has paralleled the rise in the number of opioid prescriptions dispensed. Prescription drug monitoring programs, abuse-deterrent formulations and proper disposal of opioids have been promoted to help combat the opioid epidemic. We discuss changes that dentists, the third most frequent prescribers of opioids, can implement to help reduce the risk of prescription opioid abuse in their communities.

  13. Electrical power generation systems - Combat aircraft perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moeller, R.

    The electrical power generation system requirements of combat aircraft are briefly examined. In particular, attention is given to customer requirements, development of the installed electrical power in aircraft, electrical load analysis for designing the power generation system, and definition of aircraft electrical power supply characteristics and consumer qualities. The discussion also covers reliability requirements for power generation systems, design of a power generation system, control and protection equipment in power generation systems, and helicopter electrical power systems.

  14. Apollo 16 astronauts in Apollo Command Module Mission Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Astronaut Thomas K. Mattingly II, command module pilot of the Apollo 16 lunar landing mission, participates in extravehicular activity (EVA) training in bldg 5 at the Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC). In the right background is Astronaut Charles M. Duke Jr., lunar module pilot. They are inside the Apollo Command Module Mission Simulator (31046); Mattingly (right foreground) and Duke (right backgroung) in the Apollo Command Module Mission Simulator for EVA simulation and training. Astronaut John W. Young, commander, can be seen in the left background (31047).

  15. Predictors of psychiatric disorders in combat veterans

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Most previous research that has examined mental health among Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom (OEF/OIF) combatants has relied on self-report measures to assess mental health outcomes; few studies have examined predictors of actual mental health diagnoses. The objective of this longitudinal investigation was to identify predictors of psychiatric disorders among Marines who deployed to combat in Iraq and Afghanistan. Methods The study sample consisted of 1113 Marines who had deployed to Iraq or Afghanistan. Demographic and psychosocial predictor variables from a survey that all Marines in the sample had completed were studied in relation to subsequent psychiatric diagnoses. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression were used to determine the influence of the predictors on the occurrence of psychiatric disorders. Results In a sample of Marines with no previous psychiatric disorder diagnoses, 18% were diagnosed with a new-onset psychiatric disorder. Adjusting for other variables, the strongest predictors of overall psychiatric disorders were female gender, mild traumatic brain injury symptoms, and satisfaction with leadership. Service members who expressed greater satisfaction with leadership were about half as likely to develop a mental disorder as those who were not satisfied. Unique predictors of specific types of mental disorders were also identified. Conclusions Overall, the study’s most relevant result was that two potentially modifiable factors, low satisfaction with leadership and low organizational commitment, predicted mental disorder diagnoses in a military sample. Additional research should aim to clarify the nature and impact of these factors on combatant mental health. PMID:23651663

  16. A CONTENT ANALYSIS OF MILITARY COMMANDER MESSAGES ABOUT TOBACCO AND OTHER HEALTH ISSUES IN MILITARY INSTALLATION NEWSPAPERS: WHAT DO MILITARY COMMANDERS SAY ABOUT TOBACCO?

    PubMed Central

    Poston, Walker S.C.; Haddock, Christopher K.; Jahnke, Sara A.; Hyder, Melissa L.; Jitnarin, Nattinee

    2014-01-01

    Military installation newspapers are a primary means used by military commanders to communicate information about topics important to military personnel including leadership, training issues, installation events, safety concerns, and vital health issues. We conducted a content analysis of military commanders’ messages about health issues that were published in online military installation newspapers/newsfeeds. We identified a total of 75 publicly accessible installation newspapers/newsfeeds with commanders’ messages (n=39 Air Force, n=19 Army, n=7 Navy, n=1 Marine, and n=9 Joint Bases). Commander messages published between January 2012–December 2012 were collected, screened, and coded. Coder inter-rater reliability was 98.9%. Among the 2,479 coded commanders’ messages, 132 (5.3%) addressed a health topic as the primary focus. There were no significant differences between service branches in the percentage of health-oriented messages (χ2=5.019, p=0.285). The most commonly addressed health topics were exercise/fitness (23.5%), other mental health concerns (19.7%), alcohol/DUI (13.6%), and suicide (12.1%). Tobacco use was directly addressed as a primary health aim in only two commanders’ messages (1.5%). Health topics, and particularly tobacco-related content, are rarely written about by military commanders. The absence of tobacco-related health messages from line leadership contributes to the perception that tobacco control is a low priority. PMID:26032388

  17. Evaluation of speech recognizers for use in advanced combat helicopter crew station research and development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, Carol A.

    1990-01-01

    The U.S. Army Crew Station Research and Development Facility uses vintage 1984 speech recognizers. An evaluation was performed of newer off-the-shelf speech recognition devices to determine whether newer technology performance and capabilities are substantially better than that of the Army's current speech recognizers. The Phonetic Discrimination (PD-100) Test was used to compare recognizer performance in two ambient noise conditions: quiet office and helicopter noise. Test tokens were spoken by males and females and in isolated-word and connected-work mode. Better overall recognition accuracy was obtained from the newer recognizers. Recognizer capabilities needed to support the development of human factors design requirements for speech command systems in advanced combat helicopters are listed.

  18. Applications of advanced display technology for dismounted combatants (Invited Paper)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huffman, David C.

    2005-05-01

    Current military activity has made great use of small Special Tactics / Special Forces teams operating on the ground in forward areas of battle, directing Battlefield Air Operations (BAO), which include close air support, air traffic control management, and target identification and designation. A recent National Priority has been identified to improve the BAO Kit used by these Special Tactics Groups to reduce errors that may lead to unintended ground casualties. The primary objectives of the upgraded BAO Kit are to 1) improve the range and accuracy of target information; 2) eliminate opportunities for error in weapon delivery; 3) link target coordinate information directly into the weapons computer; and 4) reduce the weight carried by the warfighter by 50%. For these warfighters, L-3 Communications Display Systems and its technology partner, Universal Display Corporation, are utilizing advanced OLED display technology to create a powerful flexible display-based communication device. This will reduce the weight carried by the fighter by combining functions of the present computer, GPS equipment, and radio gear carried into the forward areas of battle. This will give the soldier a larger, higher resolution, increased battery life, and much lighter capability for the viewing of tactical information such as battlefield maps, GIS imaging data, command/control plots, and GPS-assisted navigational maps. Further integration of the device with voice and video messaging options will be explored. Both hand-held roll-up devices and wrist-worn devices are envisioned for the final product.

  19. Command and Control, AFDD2-8, This document compliments Joint Pubs 0-2, 3-30, 3-56-1, and 6-0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-02-01

    Air Force Doctrine Document (AFDD) 2-8, Command and Control, was prepared under the direction of the Chief of Staff of the Air Force (CSAF). It establishes doctrinal guidance for organizing and employing air, space, and informational capabilities at the operational level of conflict across the full range of military operations to produce the desired effects regardless of where the platforms reside, fly, or orbit. This integration provides the synergy needed for decision dominance. It is the essence of our nation's asymmetric advantage. Together, the keystone publications collectively form the foundation from which commanders plan and execute assigned aerospace missions.

  20. Air-Powered Projectile Launcher

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, T.; Bjorklund, R. A.; Elliott, D. G.; Jones, L. K.

    1987-01-01

    Air-powered launcher fires plastic projectiles without using explosive propellants. Does not generate high temperatures. Launcher developed for combat training for U.S. Army. With reservoir pressurized, air launcher ready to fire. When pilot valve opened, sleeve (main valve) moves to rear. Projectile rapidly propelled through barrel, pushed by air from reservoir. Potential applications in seismic measurements, avalanche control, and testing impact resistance of windshields on vehicles.

  1. 33 CFR 334.1290 - In Bering Sea, Shemya Island Area, Alaska; meteorological rocket launching facility, Alaskan Air...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., Alaska; meteorological rocket launching facility, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force. 334.1290 Section...; meteorological rocket launching facility, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force. (a) The danger zone. An arc of a...) Rockets will normally be launched one each day Monday through Friday between 9 a.m. and 3 p.m....

  2. 33 CFR 334.1290 - In Bering Sea, Shemya Island Area, Alaska; meteorological rocket launching facility, Alaskan Air...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., Alaska; meteorological rocket launching facility, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force. 334.1290 Section...; meteorological rocket launching facility, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force. (a) The danger zone. An arc of a...) Rockets will normally be launched one each day Monday through Friday between 9 a.m. and 3 p.m....

  3. 33 CFR 334.1290 - In Bering Sea, Shemya Island Area, Alaska; meteorological rocket launching facility, Alaskan Air...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., Alaska; meteorological rocket launching facility, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force. 334.1290 Section...; meteorological rocket launching facility, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force. (a) The danger zone. An arc of a...) Rockets will normally be launched one each day Monday through Friday between 9 a.m. and 3 p.m....

  4. 33 CFR 334.1290 - In Bering Sea, Shemya Island Area, Alaska; meteorological rocket launching facility, Alaskan Air...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., Alaska; meteorological rocket launching facility, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force. 334.1290 Section...; meteorological rocket launching facility, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force. (a) The danger zone. An arc of a...) Rockets will normally be launched one each day Monday through Friday between 9 a.m. and 3 p.m....

  5. 33 CFR 334.1290 - In Bering Sea, Shemya Island Area, Alaska; meteorological rocket launching facility, Alaskan Air...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., Alaska; meteorological rocket launching facility, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force. 334.1290 Section...; meteorological rocket launching facility, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force. (a) The danger zone. An arc of a...) Rockets will normally be launched one each day Monday through Friday between 9 a.m. and 3 p.m....

  6. An OEF/OIF study of close combat missions using small unmanned aircraft systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lifschitz, Gabriel; Tierney, Richard J.; Vitali, Juan A.

    2007-04-01

    The Small Unmanned Aircraft System (SUAS) is a rucksack portable aerial observation vehicle designed to supplement reconnaissance, surveillance and target acquisition tasks of an infantry company. The Raven is an earlier version of the SUAS. Raven is an Urgent Material Release (UMR) acquisition and has been used for the past two years by selected Army units in Operations Enduring Freedom and Iraqi Freedom (OEF/OIF). Army Test and Evaluation Command-led surveys were used to assess the capabilities and limitations of the Raven in OEF/OIF. Results and analyses of the surveys indicate that Raven enhances situational awareness of a small unit in urban areas and in selected close combat missions. Users of the Raven state it is easy to use, although there are major issues with frequency de-confliction, airspace management, short endurance, and sensor performance. The SUAS is a program of record and completed developmental and operational testing in preparation for full rate production. This paper addresses the SUAS effectiveness, suitability, and survivability evaluation strategy based on actual testing of the system. During the Initial Operational Test (IOT), the SUAS was found to be effective with limitations in a set of 21 closed combat missions and two call for fire tests for which it was tested. Low Mean Time Between Operational Mean Failure (MTBOMF) and human factors issues make the system suitable with limitations. Acoustic (audible to the human ear) and electronic vulnerabilities make the system non-survivable in most combat scenarios. The SUAS was found to be useful as an extra asset usable in certain infantry company close combat missions where terrain and visual line of sight give the system an advantage over traditional reconnaissance patrols. Army aviation and infantry units uncover new ways every day to use this portable "eye in the sky", especially when unmanned aerial reconnaissance assets are in premium demand. A discussion on changes in doctrine with the

  7. Long-term disabilities associated with combat casualties: measuring disability and reintegration in combat veterans.

    PubMed

    Resnik, Linda; Reiber, Gayle

    2012-01-01

    Many physical and mental health problems associated with combat casualties affect the reintegration of service members into home and community life. Quantifying and measuring reintegration is important to answer questions about clinical, research, economic, and policy issues that directly affect combat veterans. Although the construct of participation presented in the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems and in the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health provides a theoretical framework with which to understand and measure community reintegration in general, a measure was needed that specifically addressed the reintegration of combat veterans. To address this need, the Community Reintegration for Service Members global outcomes measure was developed. It consists of three scales, which measure extent of participation, perceived limitations, and satisfaction. The measure was validated in a general sample of veterans and in a sample of severely wounded service members. The computer-adapted test version shows good precision, reliability, construct validity, and predictive validity.

  8. STS-103 Commander Brown DEPARTs PAFB for Houston

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Amidst a flurry of activity, STS-103 Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr. disembarks from the bus which brought him to the runway at Patrick Air Force Base in Cocoa Beach, Fla. The STS-103 crew and their families are preparing to board an airplane that will return them to their home base at the Johnson Space Center in Houston following the successful completion of their mission. Discovery landed in darkness the previous evening, Dec. 27, on runway 33 at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility at 7:00:47 p.m. EST. This was the first time that a Shuttle crew spent the Christmas holiday in space. The other STS-103 crew members are Pilot Scott J. Kelly and Mission Specialists Steven L. Smith, C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.), Claude Nicollier of Switzerland and Jean-Frangois Clervoy of France. The STS-103 mission accomplished outfitting the Hubble Space Telescope with six new gyroscopes, six new voltage/temperature improvement kits, a new onboard computer, a new solid state recorder and new data transmitter, a new fine guidance sensor along with new insulation on parts of the orbiting telescope. This was the 96th flight in the Space Shuttle program and the 27th for the orbiter Discovery.

  9. STS-91 Commander Precourt suits up for launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    STS-91 Mission Commander Charles J. Precourt holds his arms up and smiles during the final checkout of his flight suit in the Operations and Checkout (O&C) Building. The test is conducted prior to the crew walkout and transport to Launch Pad 39A. He is on his fourth space flight and third trip to Mir. Precourt is a colonel in the Air Force and has more than 6,500 hours of flight experience in more than 50 types of civil and military aircraft. He will have overall responsibility for the mission and will perform the final docking with the Russian space station. STS-91 is scheduled to be launched on June 2 with a launch window opening around 6:10 p.m. EDT. The mission will feature the ninth and final Shuttle docking with the Russian space station Mir, the first Mir docking for Discovery, the first on-orbit test of the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS), and the first flight of the new Space Shuttle super lightweight external tank. Astronaut Andrew S. W. Thomas will be returning to Earth as a STS-91 crew member after living more than four months aboard Mir.

  10. 75 FR 8049 - Air University Board of Visitors Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-23

    ... Department of the Air Force Air University Board of Visitors Meeting ACTION: Notice of Meeting of the Air...), and 41 CFR 102-3.150, the Department of Defense announces that the Air University Board of Visitors..., from 8 a.m.-8 p.m. The meeting will be held in the Air University Commander's Conference Room...

  11. 76 FR 62787 - Air University Board of Visitors Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-11

    ... Department of the Air Force Air University Board of Visitors Meeting ACTION: Notice of Meeting of the Air...), and 41 CFR 102-3.150, the Department of Defense announces that the Air University Board of Visitors..., 2011, from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. The meeting will be held in the Air University Commander's Conference...

  12. STS-93 Commander Collins and daughter prepare to board aircraft for return flight to Houston

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    At the Skid Strip at the Cape Canaveral Air Station, Commander Eileen Collins and her daughter, Bridget Youngs, prepare to board an aircraft for their return flight to Houston following the completion of the STS-93 Space Shuttle mission. Landing occurred on runway 33 at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility on July 27 with main gear touchdown at 11:20:35 p.m. EDT. The mission's primary objective was to deploy the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. This was the 95th flight in the Space Shuttle program and the 26th for Columbia. The landing was the 19th consecutive Shuttle landing in Florida and the 12th night landing in Shuttle program history. On this mission, Collins became the first woman to serve as a Shuttle commander.

  13. STS-93 Commander Collins and daughter prepare to board aircraft for return flight to Houston

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    At the Skid Strip at the Cape Canaveral Air Station, Commander Eileen Collins and her daughter Bridget Youngs prepare to board an aircraft for their return flight to Houston following the completion of the STS-93 Space Shuttle mission. Landing occurred on runway 33 at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility with main gear touchdown at 11:20:35 p.m. EDT on July 27. The mission's primary objective was to deploy the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. This was the 95th flight in the Space Shuttle program and the 26th for Columbia. The landing was the 19th consecutive Shuttle landing in Florida and the 12th night landing in Shuttle program history. On this mission, Collins became the first woman to serve as a Shuttle commander.

  14. 32 CFR 700.702 - Responsibility and authority of commanders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... subordinate commands are fully aware of the importance of strong, dynamic leadership and its relationship to the overall efficiency and readiness of naval forces. Commanders shall exercise positive leadership and actively develop the highest qualities of leadership in persons with positions of authority...

  15. 32 CFR 700.702 - Responsibility and authority of commanders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... subordinate commands are fully aware of the importance of strong, dynamic leadership and its relationship to the overall efficiency and readiness of naval forces. Commanders shall exercise positive leadership and actively develop the highest qualities of leadership in persons with positions of authority...

  16. 32 CFR 700.702 - Responsibility and authority of commanders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... subordinate commands are fully aware of the importance of strong, dynamic leadership and its relationship to the overall efficiency and readiness of naval forces. Commanders shall exercise positive leadership and actively develop the highest qualities of leadership in persons with positions of authority...

  17. 14 CFR 1214.703 - Chain of command.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...) the Space Shuttle commander is responsible to the Flight Director, Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Chain of command. 1214.703 Section 1214.703 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION SPACE FLIGHT The Authority of the...

  18. 14 CFR 1214.703 - Chain of command.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...) the Space Shuttle commander is responsible to the Flight Director, Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Chain of command. 1214.703 Section 1214.703 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION SPACE FLIGHT The Authority of the...

  19. 14 CFR 1214.703 - Chain of command.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...) the Space Shuttle commander is responsible to the Flight Director, Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Chain of command. 1214.703 Section 1214.703 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION SPACE FLIGHT The Authority of the...

  20. 14 CFR 1214.703 - Chain of command.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...) the Space Shuttle commander is responsible to the Flight Director, Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Chain of command. 1214.703 Section 1214.703 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION SPACE FLIGHT The Authority of the...

  1. Commander Lousma recieves FDF procedures on forward flight deck

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Commander Jack Lousma reviews Flight Data File (FDF) notebook on forward flight deck commanders ejection seat (S1). Lousma wears the communication kit assembly headset. Forward control panels, crewman optical alignment sight (COAS), forward window, and 16mm camera appear in view.

  2. 46 CFR 4.09-1 - Commandant to designate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... to promote safety of life and property at sea or would be in the public interest, the Commandant may... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Commandant to designate. 4.09-1 Section 4.09-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC MARINE CASUALTIES...

  3. Photocopy of photograph (original located in Command Historian's Archives, Naval ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original located in Command Historian's Archives, Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Port Hueneme, California). George E. Kidder-Smith, photographer, April 1945, Photograph #109-1. BUILDING 10, SOUTH SIDE, FACING NORTHWEST - Roosevelt Base, Fleet Landing Building, Bounded by Richardson & Pratt Avenues, Maryland & West Virginia Streets, Long Beach, Los Angeles County, CA

  4. 32 CFR Appendix A to Part 192 - Checklist for Commanders

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Checklist for Commanders A Appendix A to Part...) MISCELLANEOUS EQUAL OPPORTUNITY IN OFF-BASE HOUSING Pt. 192, App. A Appendix A to Part 192—Checklist for Commanders A. Are all assigned personnel informed of the Equal Opportunity in Off-Base Housing...

  5. Team Cognition in Experienced Command-and-Control Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooke, Nancy J.; Gorman, Jamie C.; Duran, Jasmine L.; Taylor, Amanda R.

    2007-01-01

    Team cognition in experienced command-and-control teams is examined in an UAV (Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle) simulation. Five 3-person teams with experience working together in a command-and-control setting were compared to 10 inexperienced teams. Each team participated in five 40-min missions of a simulation in which interdependent team members…

  6. 32 CFR 536.7 - Responsibilities of the Commander USARCS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... responsible. (o) Assist in developing disaster and maneuver claims plans designed to implement the responsibilities set forth in § 536.9(a)(12). (p) Develop and maintain plans for a disaster or civil disturbance in... to any legal office or command throughout the world. When authorized by the chain of command...

  7. 32 CFR 536.7 - Responsibilities of the Commander USARCS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... responsible. (o) Assist in developing disaster and maneuver claims plans designed to implement the responsibilities set forth in § 536.9(a)(12). (p) Develop and maintain plans for a disaster or civil disturbance in... to any legal office or command throughout the world. When authorized by the chain of command...

  8. 32 CFR 536.7 - Responsibilities of the Commander USARCS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... responsible. (o) Assist in developing disaster and maneuver claims plans designed to implement the responsibilities set forth in § 536.9(a)(12). (p) Develop and maintain plans for a disaster or civil disturbance in... to any legal office or command throughout the world. When authorized by the chain of command...

  9. 32 CFR 536.7 - Responsibilities of the Commander USARCS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... responsible. (o) Assist in developing disaster and maneuver claims plans designed to implement the responsibilities set forth in § 536.9(a)(12). (p) Develop and maintain plans for a disaster or civil disturbance in... to any legal office or command throughout the world. When authorized by the chain of command...

  10. Young Children and Turtle Graphics Programming: Understanding Turtle Commands.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuneo, Diane O.

    The LOGO programing language developed for children includes a set of primitive graphics commands that control the displacement and rotation of a display screen cursor called a turtle. The purpose of this study was to examine 4- to 7-year-olds' understanding of single turtle commands as transformations that connect turtle states and to…

  11. 32 CFR 700.702 - Responsibility and authority of commanders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... subordinate commands are fully aware of the importance of strong, dynamic leadership and its relationship to the overall efficiency and readiness of naval forces. Commanders shall exercise positive leadership and actively develop the highest qualities of leadership in persons with positions of authority...

  12. 32 CFR 700.702 - Responsibility and authority of commanders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... subordinate commands are fully aware of the importance of strong, dynamic leadership and its relationship to the overall efficiency and readiness of naval forces. Commanders shall exercise positive leadership and actively develop the highest qualities of leadership in persons with positions of authority...

  13. 32 CFR 809a.10 - Military commanders' responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Military commanders' responsibilities. 809a.10... Disturbance Intervention and Disaster Assistance § 809a.10 Military commanders' responsibilities. (a... enforced by the military. These will be announced by local proclamation or order, and will be given...

  14. 32 CFR 809a.10 - Military commanders' responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Military commanders' responsibilities. 809a.10... Disturbance Intervention and Disaster Assistance § 809a.10 Military commanders' responsibilities. (a... enforced by the military. These will be announced by local proclamation or order, and will be given...

  15. 32 CFR 809a.10 - Military commanders' responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Military commanders' responsibilities. 809a.10... Disturbance Intervention and Disaster Assistance § 809a.10 Military commanders' responsibilities. (a... enforced by the military. These will be announced by local proclamation or order, and will be given...

  16. 46 CFR 167.05-15 - Coast Guard District Commander.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Coast Guard District Commander. 167.05-15 Section 167.05-15 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS PUBLIC NAUTICAL SCHOOL SHIPS Definitions § 167.05-15 Coast Guard District Commander. This term means an officer of...

  17. 46 CFR 167.05-15 - Coast Guard District Commander.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Coast Guard District Commander. 167.05-15 Section 167.05-15 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS PUBLIC NAUTICAL SCHOOL SHIPS Definitions § 167.05-15 Coast Guard District Commander. This term means an officer of...

  18. 46 CFR 90.10-9 - Coast Guard District Commander.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Coast Guard District Commander. 90.10-9 Section 90.10-9 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CARGO AND MISCELLANEOUS VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 90.10-9 Coast Guard District Commander. This...

  19. 46 CFR 167.05-15 - Coast Guard District Commander.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Coast Guard District Commander. 167.05-15 Section 167.05-15 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS PUBLIC NAUTICAL SCHOOL SHIPS Definitions § 167.05-15 Coast Guard District Commander. This term means an officer of...

  20. 46 CFR 90.10-9 - Coast Guard District Commander.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Coast Guard District Commander. 90.10-9 Section 90.10-9 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CARGO AND MISCELLANEOUS VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 90.10-9 Coast Guard District Commander. This...

  1. 46 CFR 167.05-15 - Coast Guard District Commander.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Coast Guard District Commander. 167.05-15 Section 167.05-15 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS PUBLIC NAUTICAL SCHOOL SHIPS Definitions § 167.05-15 Coast Guard District Commander. This term means an officer of...

  2. 46 CFR 90.10-9 - Coast Guard District Commander.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Coast Guard District Commander. 90.10-9 Section 90.10-9 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CARGO AND MISCELLANEOUS VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 90.10-9 Coast Guard District Commander. This...

  3. 46 CFR 90.10-9 - Coast Guard District Commander.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Coast Guard District Commander. 90.10-9 Section 90.10-9 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CARGO AND MISCELLANEOUS VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 90.10-9 Coast Guard District Commander. This...

  4. 46 CFR 90.10-9 - Coast Guard District Commander.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Coast Guard District Commander. 90.10-9 Section 90.10-9 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CARGO AND MISCELLANEOUS VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 90.10-9 Coast Guard District Commander. This...

  5. 46 CFR 167.05-15 - Coast Guard District Commander.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Coast Guard District Commander. 167.05-15 Section 167.05-15 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS PUBLIC NAUTICAL SCHOOL SHIPS Definitions § 167.05-15 Coast Guard District Commander. This term means an officer of...

  6. 32 CFR 536.3 - Command and organizational relationships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Command and organizational relationships. 536.3 Section 536.3 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY CLAIMS AND ACCOUNTS CLAIMS AGAINST THE UNITED STATES The Army Claims System § 536.3 Command and...

  7. 14 CFR 135.245 - Second in command qualifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Crewmember Requirements § 135.245 Second in command qualifications. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b... instrument experience requirements of part 61 of this chapter. (b) A second in command of a helicopter operated under VFR, other than over-the-top, must have at least a commercial pilot certificate with...

  8. 14 CFR 135.245 - Second in command qualifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Crewmember Requirements § 135.245 Second in command qualifications. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b... instrument experience requirements of part 61 of this chapter. (b) A second in command of a helicopter operated under VFR, other than over-the-top, must have at least a commercial pilot certificate with...

  9. 14 CFR 135.245 - Second in command qualifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Crewmember Requirements § 135.245 Second in command qualifications. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b... instrument experience requirements of part 61 of this chapter. (b) A second in command of a helicopter operated under VFR, other than over-the-top, must have at least a commercial pilot certificate with...

  10. 14 CFR 135.245 - Second in command qualifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Crewmember Requirements § 135.245 Second in command qualifications. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b... instrument experience requirements of part 61 of this chapter. (b) A second in command of a helicopter operated under VFR, other than over-the-top, must have at least a commercial pilot certificate with...

  11. 14 CFR 135.245 - Second in command qualifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Crewmember Requirements § 135.245 Second in command qualifications. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b... instrument experience requirements of part 61 of this chapter. (b) A second in command of a helicopter operated under VFR, other than over-the-top, must have at least a commercial pilot certificate with...

  12. 3 CFR - Disestablishment of United States Joint Forces Command

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 3 The President 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Disestablishment of United States Joint Forces... of United States Joint Forces Command Memorandum for the Secretary of Defense Pursuant to my... States Joint Forces Command, effective on a date to be determined by the Secretary of Defense. I...

  13. STS-82 Commander Kenneth Bowersox in White Room

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    STS-82 Mission Commander Kenneth D. Bowersox gets assistance from white room closeout members before entering the Space Shuttle Discovery at Launch Pad 39A. Making final adjustments to the commanders launch and entry suit are James Davis, facing camera at left, and Jean Alexander.

  14. 78 FR 28125 - Airworthiness Directives; Twin Commander Aircraft LLC Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-14

    ... Aircraft LLC Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule; request for comments. SUMMARY: We are adopting a new airworthiness directive (AD) for certain Twin Commander Aircraft..., contact Twin Commander Aircraft LLC; 1176 Telecom Drive, Creedmoor, NC 27522; telephone: (360)...

  15. SOUTH ELEVATION OF BATTERY COMMAND CENTER WITH GRADUATED MEASURING POLE. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    SOUTH ELEVATION OF BATTERY COMMAND CENTER WITH GRADUATED MEASURING POLE. THE ENTRY STAIRWAY IS IN THE FOREGROUND. THE ABOVE-GROUND SECTION OF THE STRUCTURE IS ON THE RIGHT, UNDERGROUND PORTION ON THE LEFT. VIEW FACING NORTH - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Ford Island 5-Inch Antiaircraft Battery, Battery Command Center, Ford Island, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  16. Implementation of a medical command and control team in Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Carron, Pierre-Nicolas; Reigner, Philippe; Vallotton, Laurent; Clouet, Jean-Gabriel; Danzeisen, Claude; Zürcher, Mathias; Yersin, Bertrand

    2014-04-01

    In case of a major incident or disaster, the advance medical rescue command needs to manage several essential tasks simultaneously. These include the rapid deployment of ambulance, police, fire and evacuation services, and their coordinated activity, as well as triage and emergency medical care on site. The structure of such a medical rescue command is crucial for the successful outcome of medical evacuation at major incidents. However, little data has been published on the nature and structure of the command itself. This study presents a flexible approach to command structure, with two command heads: one emergency physician and one experienced paramedic. This approach is especially suitable for Switzerland, whose federal system allows for different structures in each canton. This article examines the development of these structures and their efficiency, adaptability and limitations with respect to major incident response in the French-speaking part of the country.

  17. Program for Editing Spacecraft Command Sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gladden, Roy; Waggoner, Bruce; Kordon, Mark; Hashemi, Mahnaz; Hanks, David; Salcedo, Jose

    2006-01-01

    Sequence Translator, Editor, and Expander Resource (STEER) is a computer program that facilitates construction of sequences and blocks of sequences (hereafter denoted generally as sequence products) for commanding a spacecraft. STEER also provides mechanisms for translating among various sequence product types and quickly expanding activities of a given sequence in chronological order for review and analysis of the sequence. To date, construction of sequence products has generally been done by use of such clumsy mechanisms as text-editor programs, translating among sequence product types has been challenging, and expanding sequences to time-ordered lists has involved arduous processes of converting sequence products to "real" sequences and running them through Class-A software (defined, loosely, as flight and ground software critical to a spacecraft mission). Also, heretofore, generating sequence products in standard formats has been troublesome because precise formatting and syntax are required. STEER alleviates these issues by providing a graphical user interface containing intuitive fields in which the user can enter the necessary information. The STEER expansion function provides a "quick and dirty" means of seeing how a sequence and sequence block would expand into a chronological list, without need to use of Class-A software.

  18. Coalition command and control: a Canadian perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charpentier, Robert; Demers, David; Gouin, Denis; McCann, Carol; Nourry, Gerard; Pigeau, Ross; Smith, Donald L.; Vezina, Guy; Walker, Robert S.

    1998-08-01

    Canada has been, and remains, committed to participating in coalition operations to promote peace and stability in the post-Cold War world. However, coalition operations challenge traditional command and control concepts, from both the technological and the human perspectives. In the short term, Canada is working closely with traditional NATO and ABCA allies to ensure that the next generation of automated C2 information systems are able to exchange information effectively through structured messages, gateways and standardized data models. Canada is also conducting R&D, and participating in collaborative experiments, to evolve the next generation of systems to permit richer, more dynamic information sharing, along the lines of the Internet and World Wide Web. However, information technology alone will not solve the problems of coalition operations. Research needs to be undertaken to understand task assignment and information flow among coalition partners at the process or operational level. Research is also required at the human level, where differences between coalition partners in culture, personal values, military expectations, religions, and societal values are proving to be less tractable than differences in message formats and communication protocols.

  19. Influence of maneuverability on helicopter combat effectiveness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falco, M.; Smith, R.

    1982-01-01

    A computational procedure employing a stochastic learning method in conjunction with dynamic simulation of helicopter flight and weapon system operation was used to derive helicopter maneuvering strategies. The derived strategies maximize either survival or kill probability and are in the form of a feedback control based upon threat visual or warning system cues. Maneuverability parameters implicit in the strategy development include maximum longitudinal acceleration and deceleration, maximum sustained and transient load factor turn rate at forward speed, and maximum pedal turn rate and lateral acceleration at hover. Results are presented in terms of probability of skill for all combat initial conditions for two threat categories.

  20. Casualties of War: Combat Trauma and the Return of the Combat Veteran

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiely, Denis O.; Swift, Lisa

    2009-01-01

    The experience of the combat soldier and the road back to civilian life are recurrent themes in American literature and cinema. Whether the treatment is tragic (Stephen Crane's "Red Badge of Courage", Tim O'Brien's "The Things They Carried", or Tony Scott's "Blackhawk Down"), satirical (Joseph Heller's "Catch Twenty-Two" and Robert Altman's…

  1. Epidemiology of dermatophytosis in junior combat and non-combat sports participants.

    PubMed

    Döğen, Aylin; Gümral, Ramazan; Oksüz, Zehra; Kaplan, Engin; Serin, Mehmet Sami; Ilkit, Macit

    2013-03-01

    Participation in competitive sports is popular and widely encouraged worldwide. Herein, we investigated 252 male and 67 female sports players, aged 16.4 ± 1.3 years, active in 15 different types of combat (n = 143) and non-combat (n = 176) sports. Of the 319 participants in this study, 11 (3.5%) players, including six wrestlers, four football players and one handball player, all of whom were men, harboured dermatophytic fungi. Briefly, Trichophyton tonsurans was present in three athletes, who were scalp carriers of the fungus. Furthermore, T. rubrum (4), T. interdigitale (3) and Arthroderma simii (1) were recovered from eight participants with tinea inguinalis (4), tinea pedis (2) or both (1). One patient was a trunk carrier of concomitant tinea pedis. All dermatophytic fungi were identified using both direction sequence of the rDNA regions spanning the internal transcribed spacers (ITS1 and ITS2) and 5.8 rRNA gene. Although sports-active individuals are active and sweat more, we observed a low prevalence of dermatophytosis, both in combat (5.2%) and non-combat sports participants (3.4%) (P > 0.05). However, dermatophyte infections require more attention and appropriate management to eradicate the infection and to prevent possible outbreaks. This study also documents the first case of zoophilic A. simii in Turkey.

  2. Medical rescue of naval combat: challenges and future.

    PubMed

    Jin, Hai; Hou, Li-Jun; Fu, Xiao-Bing

    2015-01-01

    There has been no large-scale naval combat in the last 30 years. With the rapid development of battleships, weapons manufacturing and electronic technology, naval combat will present some new characteristics. Additionally, naval combat is facing unprecedented challenges. In this paper, we discuss the topic of medical rescue at sea: what challenges we face and what we could do. The contents discussed in this paper contain battlefield self-aid buddy care, clinical skills, organized health services, medical training and future medical research programs. We also discuss the characteristics of modern naval combat, medical rescue challenges, medical treatment highlights and future developments of medical rescue at sea. PMID:26309738

  3. War leaves an enduring legacy in combatants' lives.

    PubMed

    Smith, Barbara; Parsons, Matthew; Hand, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    The memory of combat experience endures in World War II veterans. As veterans age, traumatic memory that previously may have been suppressed in the busyness of family and everyday life can re-emerge. Combat stress may affect not only the veterans, but also those people closely associated with them. Interviews were conducted with World War II veteran aircrew, wives, children, grandchildren, siblings, and friends to examine the impact of combat experience on the veterans and the family across the life course from the perspectives of the various participants. The combat experience significantly affected the life course of most.

  4. NASIS data base management system: IBM 360 TSS implementation. Volume 5: Retrieval command system reference manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The retrieval command subsystem reference manual for the NASA Aerospace Safety Information System (NASIS) is presented. The command subsystem may be operated conversationally or in the batch mode. Retrieval commands are categorized into search-oriented and output-oriented commands. The characteristics of ancillary commands and their application are reported.

  5. Combat-Related Invasive Fungal Wound Infections

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Carlos J.

    2014-01-01

    Combat-related invasive fungal (mold) wound infections (IFIs) have emerged as an important and morbid complication following explosive blast injuries among military personnel. Similar to trauma-associated IFI cases among civilian populations, as in agricultural accidents and natural disasters, these infections occur in the setting of penetrating wounds contaminated by environmental debris. Specific risk factors for combat-related IFI include dismounted (patrolling on foot) blast injuries occurring mostly in southern Afghanistan, resulting in above knee amputations requiring resuscitation with large-volume blood transfusions. Diagnosis of IFI is based upon early identification of a recurrently necrotic wound following serial debridement and tissue-based histopathology examination with special stains to detect invasive disease. Fungal culture of affected tissue also provides supportive information. Aggressive surgical debridement of affected tissue is the primary therapy. Empiric antifungal therapy should be considered when there is a strong suspicion for IFI. Both liposomal amphotericin B and voriconazole should be considered initially for treatment since many of the cases involve not only Mucorales species but also Aspergillus or Fusarium spp., with narrowing of regimen based upon clinical mycology findings. PMID:25530825

  6. Cell Therapy Strategies to Combat Immunosenescence

    PubMed Central

    Stahl, Elizabeth C; Brown, Bryan N

    2015-01-01

    abstract Declining function of the immune system, termed “immunosenescence,” leads to a higher incidence of infection, cancer, and autoimmune disease related mortalities in the elderly population.1 Increasing interest in the field of immunosenescence is well-timed, as 20% of the United States population is expected to surpass the age of 65 by the year 2030.2 Our current understanding of immunosenescence involves a shift in function of both adaptive and innate immune cells, leading to a reduced capacity to recognize new antigens and widespread chronic inflammation. The present review focuses on changes that occur in haematopoietic stem cells, macrophages, and T-cells using knowledge gained from both rodent and human studies. The review will discuss emerging strategies to combat immunosenescence, focusing on cellular and genetic therapies, including bone marrow transplantation and genetic reprogramming. A better understanding of the mechanisms and implications of immunosenescence will be necessary to combat age-related mortalities in the future. PMID:26588595

  7. Composite structural armor for combat vehicle applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haskell, William E., III; Alesi, A. L.; Parsons, G. R.

    1990-01-01

    Several projects that have demonstrated the advantages of using thick composite armor technology for structural applications in armored combat vehicles are discussed. The first involved composite cargo doors for the Marine Corps LVTP-7 amphibious landing vehicle. Another was a demonstration composite turret that offered a weight reduction of 15.5 percent. The advantages of this composite armor compared to metallic armors used for combat vehicle hull and turret applications are reduced weight at equal ballistic protection; reduced back armor spall; excellent corrosion resistance; reduced production costs by parts consolidation; and inherent thermal and acoustic insulative properties. Based on the encouraging results of these past programs, the Demonstration Composite Hull Program was started in September 1986. To demonstrate this composite armor technology, the Army's newest infantry fighting vehicle, the Bradley Fighting Vehicle (BFV), was selected as a model. A composite infantry fighting vehicle, designated the CIFV for this program, has been designed and fabricated and is currently undergoing a 6000 mile field endurance test. The CIFV demonstration vehicle uses the BFV engine, transmission, suspension, track and other equipment.

  8. Digital control of highly augmented combat rotorcraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tischler, Mark B.

    1987-01-01

    Proposed concepts for the next generation of combat helicopters are to be embodied in a complex, highly maneuverable, multiroled vehicle with avionics systems. Single pilot and nap-of-the-Earth operations require handling qualities which minimize the involvement of the pilot in basic stabilization tasks. To meet these requirements will demand a full authority, high-gain, multimode, multiply-redundant, digital flight-control system. The gap between these requirements and current low-authority, low-bandwidth operational rotorcraft flight-control technology is considerable. This research aims at smoothing the transition between current technology and advanced concept requirements. The state of the art of high-bandwidth digital flight-control systems are reviewed; areas of specific concern for flight-control systems of modern combat are exposed; and the important concepts are illustrated in design and analysis of high-gain, digital systems with a detailed case study involving a current rotorcraft system. Approximate and exact methods are explained and illustrated for treating the important concerns which are unique to digital systems.

  9. 33 CFR 334.730 - Waters of Santa Rosa Sound and Gulf of Mexico adjacent to Santa Rosa Island, Air Force Proving...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Gulf of Mexico adjacent to Santa Rosa Island, Air Force Proving Ground Command, Eglin Air Force Base... Sound and Gulf of Mexico adjacent to Santa Rosa Island, Air Force Proving Ground Command, Eglin Air Force Base, Fla. (a) The danger zones—(1) Prohibited area. Waters of Santa Rosa Sound and Gulf of...

  10. 33 CFR 334.730 - Waters of Santa Rosa Sound and Gulf of Mexico adjacent to Santa Rosa Island, Air Force Proving...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Gulf of Mexico adjacent to Santa Rosa Island, Air Force Proving Ground Command, Eglin Air Force Base... Sound and Gulf of Mexico adjacent to Santa Rosa Island, Air Force Proving Ground Command, Eglin Air Force Base, Fla. (a) The danger zones—(1) Prohibited area. Waters of Santa Rosa Sound and Gulf of...

  11. The new Mobile Command Center at KSC is important addition to emergency preparedness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This new specially equipped vehicle serves as a mobile command center for emergency preparedness staff and other support personnel when needed at KSC or Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. It features a conference room, computer work stations, mobile telephones and a fax machine. It also can generate power with its onboard generator. Besides being ready to respond in case of emergencies during launches, the vehicle must be ready to help address fires, security threats, chemical spills, terrorist attaches, weather damage or other critical situations that might face KSC or CCAFS.

  12. The new Mobile Command Center at KSC is important addition to emergency preparedness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Robert ZiBerna, Roger Scheidt and Charles Street, the Emergency Preparedness team at KSC, practice for an emergency scenario inside the Mobile Command Center, a specially equipped vehicle. It features a conference room, computer work stations, mobile telephones and a fax machine. It also can generate power with its onboard generator. Besides being ready to respond in case of emergencies during launches, the vehicle must be ready to help address fires, security threats, chemical spills, terrorist attaches, weather damage or other critical situations that might face KSC or Cape Canaveral Air Force Station.

  13. The new Mobile Command Center at KSC is important addition to emergency preparedness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Charles Street, Roger Scheidt and Robert ZiBerna, the Emergency Preparedness team at KSC, sit in the conference room inside the Mobile Command Center, a specially equipped vehicle. Nicknamed '''The Brute,''' it also features computer work stations, mobile telephones and a fax machine. It also can generate power with its onboard generator. Besides being ready to respond in case of emergencies during launches, the vehicle must be ready to help address fires, security threats, chemical spills, terrorist attaches, weather damage or other critical situations that might face KSC or Cape Canaveral Air Force Station.

  14. The new Mobile Command Center at KSC is important addition to emergency preparedness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Charles Street, part of the Emergency Preparedness team at KSC, uses a phone on the specially equipped emergency response vehicle. The vehicle, nicknamed '''The Brute,''' serves as a mobile command center for emergency preparedness staff and other support personnel when needed. It features a conference room, computer work stations, mobile telephones and a fax machine. It also can generate power with its onboard generator. Besides being ready to respond in case of emergencies during launches, the vehicle must be ready to help address fires, security threats, chemical spills, terrorist attaches, weather damage or other critical situations that might face KSC or Cape Canaveral Air Force Station.

  15. The new Mobile Command Center at KSC is important addition to emergency preparedness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This camper-equipped truck known as '''Old Blue''' served as mobile field command center for the Emergency Preparedness team at KSC. It has been replaced with a larger vehicle that includes a conference room, computer work stations, mobile telephones and a fax machine, plus its own onboard generator. Besides being ready to respond in case of emergencies during launches, the vehicle must be ready to help address fires, security threats, chemical spills, terrorist attaches, weather damage or other critical situations that might face KSC or Cape Canaveral Air Force Station.

  16. 78 FR 67131 - Notice of Advisory Committee Closed Meeting; U.S. Strategic Command Strategic Advisory Group

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-08

    ... Commander, U.S. Strategic Command, during the development of the Nation's strategic war plans. Agenda... Destruction, Intelligence Operations, Cyber Operations, Global Strike, Command and Control, Science...

  17. 78 FR 17924 - U.S. Strategic Command Strategic Advisory Group; Notice of Federal Advisory Committee Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-25

    ... Commander, U.S. Strategic Command, during the development of the Nation's strategic war plans. Agenda... Destruction, Intelligence Operations, Cyber Operations, Global Strike, Command and Control, Science...

  18. 3 CFR - Combating Noncompliance With Recovery Act Reporting Requirements

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 3 The President 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Combating Noncompliance With Recovery Act Reporting Requirements Presidential Documents Other Presidential Documents Memorandum of April 6, 2010 Combating Noncompliance With Recovery Act Reporting Requirements Memorandum for the Heads of Executive Departments and Agencies My Administration...

  19. Can We Facilitate Posttraumatic Growth in Combat Veterans?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tedeschi, Richard G.; McNally, Richard J.

    2011-01-01

    The Comprehensive Soldier Fitness program, currently under development for the U.S. Army, will include a component designed to increase the possibilities for posttraumatic growth in the aftermath of combat. In this article, we briefly review studies that provide evidence for this phenomenon in combat veterans, and we suggest elements that such a…

  20. Close the Book on Hate: 101 Ways To Combat Prejudice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes & Noble, Inc., New York, NY.

    This pamphlet, which is part of the Close the Book on Hate Campaign, provides definitions, resources, and suggested readings on combating prejudice. The premise of the campaign is the belief that through reading and discussion, children will be better able to counter prejudice and hate. The pamphlet begins with suggestions for combatting prejudice…

  1. 42 CFR 495.368 - Combating fraud and abuse.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Combating fraud and abuse. 495.368 Section 495.368... PROGRAM Requirements Specific to the Medicaid Program § 495.368 Combating fraud and abuse. (a) General... accordance with § 455.15 and § 455.21 of this chapter, refer suspected cases of fraud and abuse to...

  2. 42 CFR 495.368 - Combating fraud and abuse.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Combating fraud and abuse. 495.368 Section 495.368... PROGRAM Requirements Specific to the Medicaid Program § 495.368 Combating fraud and abuse. (a) General... accordance with § 455.15 and § 455.21 of this chapter, refer suspected cases of fraud and abuse to...

  3. 42 CFR 495.368 - Combating fraud and abuse.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Combating fraud and abuse. 495.368 Section 495.368... PROGRAM Requirements Specific to the Medicaid Program § 495.368 Combating fraud and abuse. (a) General... accordance with § 455.15 and § 455.21 of this chapter, refer suspected cases of fraud and abuse to...

  4. Negative Responses to Teacher Commands: An Effective Teaching Strategy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bragger, Jeannette D.

    1982-01-01

    Describes process and gives examples by which contradiction is introduced in a course using Total Physical Response approach. Gives students opportunity to say "no" and come up with an alternative while demonstrating understanding of original command. (BK)

  5. Astronauts Stafford and Brand at controls of Apollo Command Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Two American ASTP crewmen, Astronauts Thomas P. Stafford (foreground) and Vance D. Brand are seen at the controls of the Apollo Command Module during the joint U.S.-USSR Apollo Soyuz Test Project (ASTP) docking in Earth orbit mission.

  6. ISS Commander Plays Alabama Fight Song from Space

    NASA Video Gallery

    Even the International Space Station is abuzz about the BCS Championship game. NASA astronaut Kevin Ford, who is the current commander of the station, is a Notre Dame alumnus, and he’s been havin...

  7. 49. COMMAND INFORMATION CENTER (CIC) AFT LOOKING FORWARD PORT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    49. COMMAND INFORMATION CENTER (CIC) - AFT LOOKING FORWARD PORT TO STARBOARD SHOWING VARIOUS TYPES OF RADAR UNITS, PLOT TABLES AND PLOTTING BOARDS. - U.S.S. HORNET, Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Sinclair Inlet, Bremerton, Kitsap County, WA

  8. STS-85 Commander Curtis Brown arrives at SLF for TCDT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    STS-85 Commander Curtis L. Brown, Jr., arrives at the Shuttle Landing Facility for his mission's Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT), a dress rehearsal for launch. The liftoff of STS-85 is targeted for August 7, 1997.

  9. STS-80 Commander Kenneth D. Cockrell in White Room

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    STS-80 Commander Kenneth D. Cockrell prepares to enter the Space Shuttle Columbia at Launch Pad 39B, with assistance from white room closeout crew members (from left) Ray Villalobos, Troy Stewart and Jim Martin.

  10. Command and Data Handling Branch Internship

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billings, Rachel Mae

    2016-01-01

    Modular Integrated Stackable Layers (MISL) is a computer system designed for simple, fast, and cost effective flexible reconfiguration in space environments such as the ISS and Orion projects for various uses. Existing applications include wireless and wired communications, data acquisition and instrumentation, and camera systems, and potential applications include bus protocol converters and subsystem control. MISL is based on Texas Instruments (TI)' MSP430 16-bit ultra-low-power microcontroller device. The purpose of my project was to integrate the MISL system with a liquid crystal display (LCD) touchscreen. The LCD, manufactured by Crystalfontz and part number CFAF320240F-035T-TS, is a 320 by 240 RGB resistive color screen including an optional carrier board. The vast majority of the project was done with Altium Designer, a tool for printed circuit board (PCB) schematic capture, 3D design, and FPGA (Field Programmable Gate Array) development. The new PCB was to allow the LCD to directly stack to the rest of MISL. Research was done with datasheets for the TI microcontroller and touchscreen display in order to meet desired hardware specifications. Documentation on prior MISL projects was also utilized. The initial step was to create a schematic for the LCD, power bus, and data bus connections between components. A layout was then designed with the required physical dimensions, routed traces and vias, power and ground planes, layer stacks, and other specified design rules such as plane clearance and hole size. Multiple consultation sessions were held with Hester Yim, the technical discipline lead for the Command and Data Handling Branch, and Christy Herring, the lead PCB layout designer in the Electronic Design and Manufacturing Branch in order to ensure proper configuration. At the moment, the PCB is awaiting revision by the latter-mentioned branch. Afterwards, the board will begin to undergo the manufacturing and testing process. Throughout the internship at

  11. Embedded battle command: a vehicle systems integrator's prospective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, Terry L.; Wyrembelski, Rick J.

    1999-07-01

    This paper provides an overview of a major weapon system, the Abrams Main Battle Tank, as it relates to the integration of EMbedded Battle Command and Control element is essential to the tanks future role in the Army as they focus more on increased organizational effectiveness and less on individual platforms. The Abrams is poised to field the Abrams System Enhancement Package with its 2nd generation of Command and Control.

  12. Command shaping for residual vibration free crane maneuvers

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, G.G.; Petterson, B.; Dohrmann, C.; Robinett, R.D.

    1995-07-01

    Cranes used in the construction and transportation industries are generally devices with multiple degrees of freedom including variable load-line length, variable jib length (usually via a trolley), and variable boom angles. Point-to-point payload maneuvers using cranes are performed so as not to excite the spherical pendulum modes of their cable and payload assemblies. Typically, these pendulum modes, although time-varying, exhibit low frequencies. Current crane maneuvers are therefore performed slowly contributing to high construction and transportation costs. This investigation details a general method for applying command shaping to various multiple degree of freedom cranes such that the payload moves to a specified point without residual oscillation. A dynamic programming method is used for general command shaping for optimal maneuvers. Computationally, the dynamic programming approach requires order M calculations to arrive at a solution, where M is the number of discretizations of the input commands. This feature is exploited for the crane command shaping problem allowing for rapid calculation of command histories. Fast generation of commands is a necessity for practical use of command shaping for the applications described in this work. These results are compared to near-optimal solutions where the commands are linear combinations of acceleration pulse basis functions. The pulse shape is required due to hardware requirements. The weights on the basis functions are chosen as the solution to a parameter optimization problem solved using a Recursive Quadratic Programming technique. Simulation results and experimental verification for a variable load-line length rotary crane are presented using both design procedures.

  13. Optimal Repellent Usage to Combat Dengue Fever.

    PubMed

    Dorsett, Chasity; Oh, Hyunju; Paulemond, Marie Laura; Rychtář, Jan

    2016-05-01

    Dengue fever is one of the most important vector-borne diseases. It is transmitted by Aedes Stegomyia aegypti, and one of the most effective strategies to combat the disease is the reduction of exposure to bites of these mosquitoes. In this paper, we present a game-theoretical model in which individuals choose their own level of protection against mosquito bites in order to maximize their own benefits, effectively balancing the cost of protection and the risk of contracting the dengue fever. We find that even when the usage of protection is strictly voluntary, as soon as the cost of protection is about 10,000 times less than the cost of contracting dengue fever, the optimal level of protection will be within 5 % of the level needed for herd immunity.

  14. Optimal Repellent Usage to Combat Dengue Fever.

    PubMed

    Dorsett, Chasity; Oh, Hyunju; Paulemond, Marie Laura; Rychtář, Jan

    2016-05-01

    Dengue fever is one of the most important vector-borne diseases. It is transmitted by Aedes Stegomyia aegypti, and one of the most effective strategies to combat the disease is the reduction of exposure to bites of these mosquitoes. In this paper, we present a game-theoretical model in which individuals choose their own level of protection against mosquito bites in order to maximize their own benefits, effectively balancing the cost of protection and the risk of contracting the dengue fever. We find that even when the usage of protection is strictly voluntary, as soon as the cost of protection is about 10,000 times less than the cost of contracting dengue fever, the optimal level of protection will be within 5 % of the level needed for herd immunity. PMID:27142427

  15. Attempts to combat problems of cleaning fines

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, L.A.; Baxter, J.W.

    1986-01-01

    This paper first discusses the physicochemical cleaning methods used to process fines followed by an analysis of the subprocesses of froth flotation and the adverse effects of slimes and particle oxidation. These subprocesses include the phenomena of interception, contact, adhesion and levitation. Preventive and corrective measures to combat the generation of fines and their effects are suggested. Preventive measures include controlled grinding, limited liberation, flotation at coarser sizes. Means of preventing oxidation and/or removing oxidation products are also discussed. Corrective measure to increase recovery include intensive aeration, aggregation of particles, intensive mixing, increased retention time, and reduction of detachment. Measures leading to improves selectivity involve means to reduce slime coating, achieve selective mineralization of bubbles and minimize entrapment.

  16. Combating Memory Corruption Attacks On Scada Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellettini, Carlo; Rrushi, Julian

    Memory corruption attacks on SCADA devices can cause significant disruptions to control systems and the industrial processes they operate. However, despite the presence of numerous memory corruption vulnerabilities, few, if any, techniques have been proposed for addressing the vulnerabilities or for combating memory corruption attacks. This paper describes a technique for defending against memory corruption attacks by enforcing logical boundaries between potentially hostile data and safe data in protected processes. The technique encrypts all input data using random keys; the encrypted data is stored in main memory and is decrypted according to the principle of least privilege just before it is processed by the CPU. The defensive technique affects the precision with which attackers can corrupt control data and pure data, protecting against code injection and arc injection attacks, and alleviating problems posed by the incomparability of mitigation techniques. An experimental evaluation involving the popular Modbus protocol demonstrates the feasibility and efficiency of the defensive technique.

  17. Engine selection for transport and combat aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dugan, J. F., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    The procedures that are used to select engines for transport and combat aircraft are discussed. In general, the problem is to select the engine parameters including engine size in such a way that all constraints are satisfied and airplane performance is maximized. This is done for four different classes of aircraft: (1) a long haul conventional takeoff and landing (CTOL) transport, (2) a short haul vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) transport, (3) a long range supersonic transport (SST), and (4) a fighter aircraft. For the commercial airplanes the critical constraints have to do with noise while for the fighter, maneuverability requirements define the engine. Generally, the resultant airplane performance (range or payload) is far less than that achievable without these constraints and would suffer more if nonoptimum engines were selected.

  18. Appetitive Aggression in Women: Comparing Male and Female War Combatants

    PubMed Central

    Meyer-Parlapanis, Danie; Weierstall, Roland; Nandi, Corina; Bambonyé, Manassé; Elbert, Thomas; Crombach, Anselm

    2016-01-01

    Appetitive aggression refers to positive feelings being associated with the perpetration of violent behavior and has been shown to provide resilience against the development of PTSD in combatants returning from the battlefield. Until this point, appetitive aggression has been primarily researched in males. This study investigates appetitive aggression in females. Female and male combatants and civilians from Burundi were assessed for levels of appetitive aggression. In contrast to non-combatants, no sex difference in appetitive aggression could be detected for combatants. Furthermore, each of the female and male combatant groups displayed substantially higher levels of appetitive aggression than each of the male and female civilian control groups. This study demonstrates that in violent contexts, such as armed conflict, in which individuals perpetrate numerous aggressive acts against others, the likelihood for an experience of appetitive aggression increases- regardless of whether the individuals are male or female. PMID:26779084

  19. UNEQUAL RISK: COMBAT OCCUPATIONS IN THE VOLUNTEER MILITARY.

    PubMed

    Maclean, Alair; Parsons, Nicholas L

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluates the characteristics of the men who served in the volunteer military in combat occupations. It examines whether these characteristics stem from supply-side or demand-side decisions, or reflect class bias. The findings suggest that, on the supply side, men who had greater academic abilities were more likely to go to college, thereby avoiding military service and the possibility of serving in a combat occupation. On the demand side, the armed forces were more likely to exclude men with lower academic abilities but were more likely to assign such men in the military to combat occupations. Net of the impacts of these supply-side and demand-side decisions, men who served in combat occupations still differed from those who did not in terms of their family background. The impact of family background was stronger on entering the military than on being assigned to combat occupations once in the military.

  20. Appetitive Aggression in Women: Comparing Male and Female War Combatants.

    PubMed

    Meyer-Parlapanis, Danie; Weierstall, Roland; Nandi, Corina; Bambonyé, Manassé; Elbert, Thomas; Crombach, Anselm

    2015-01-01

    Appetitive aggression refers to positive feelings being associated with the perpetration of violent behavior and has been shown to provide resilience against the development of PTSD in combatants returning from the battlefield. Until this point, appetitive aggression has been primarily researched in males. This study investigates appetitive aggression in females. Female and male combatants and civilians from Burundi were assessed for levels of appetitive aggression. In contrast to non-combatants, no sex difference in appetitive aggression could be detected for combatants. Furthermore, each of the female and male combatant groups displayed substantially higher levels of appetitive aggression than each of the male and female civilian control groups. This study demonstrates that in violent contexts, such as armed conflict, in which individuals perpetrate numerous aggressive acts against others, the likelihood for an experience of appetitive aggression increases- regardless of whether the individuals are male or female. PMID:26779084