Science.gov

Sample records for air conduction thresholds

  1. Auditory Brainstem Response Thresholds to Air- and Bone-Conducted CE-Chirps in Neonates and Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cobb, Kensi M.; Stuart, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to compare auditory brainstem response (ABR) thresholds to air- and bone-conducted CE-Chirps in neonates and adults. Method Thirty-two neonates with no physical or neurologic challenges and 20 adults with normal hearing participated. ABRs were acquired with a starting intensity of 30 dB normal hearing level…

  2. Air and Bone Conduction Click and Tone-burst Auditory Brainstem Thresholds using Kalman Adaptive Processing in Non-sedated Normal Hearing Infants

    PubMed Central

    Elsayed, Alaaeldin M.; Hunter, Lisa L.; Keefe, Douglas H.; Feeney, M. Patrick; Brown, David K.; Meinzen-Derr, Jareen K.; Baroch, Kelly; Sullivan-Mahoney, Maureen; Francis, Kara; Schaid, Leigh G.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To study normative thresholds and latencies for click and tone-burst auditory brainstem response (TB-ABR) for air and bone conduction in normal infants and those discharged from neonatal intensive care units (NICU), who passed newborn hearing screening and follow-up DPOAE. An evoked potential system (Vivosonic Integrity™) that incorporates Bluetooth electrical isolation and Kalman-weighted adaptive processing to improve signal to noise ratios was employed for this study. Results were compared with other published data. Research Design One hundred forty-five infants who passed two-stage hearing screening with transient-evoked otoacoustic emission (OAE) or automated ABR were assessed with clicks at 70 dB nHL and threshold TB-ABR. Tone-bursts at frequencies between 500 to 4000 Hz were employed for air and bone conduction ABR testing using a specified staircase threshold search to establish threshold levels and Wave V peak latencies. Results Median air conduction hearing thresholds using TB-ABR ranged from 0-20 dB nHL, depending on stimulus frequency. Median bone conduction thresholds were 10 dB nHL across all frequencies, and median air-bone gaps were 0 dB across all frequencies. There was no significant threshold difference between left and right ears and no significant relationship between thresholds and hearing loss risk factors, ethnicity or gender. Older age was related to decreased latency for air conduction. Compared to previous studies, mean air conduction thresholds were found at slightly lower (better) levels, while bone conduction levels were better at 2000 Hz and higher at 500 Hz. Latency values were longer at 500 Hz than previous studies using other instrumentation. Sleep state did not affect air or bone conduction thresholds. Conclusions This study demonstrated slightly better Wave V thresholds for air conduction than previous infant studies. The differences found in the current study, while statistically significant, were within the test

  3. Air and Bone Conduction Thresholds of Deaf and Normal Hearing Subjects before and during the Elimination of Cutaneous-Tactile Interference with Anesthesia. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nober, E. Harris

    The study investigated whether low frequency air and bone thresholds elicited at high intensity levels from deaf children with a sensory-neural diagnosis reflect valid auditory sensitivity or are mediated through cutaneous-tactile receptors. Subjects were five totally deaf (mean age 17.0) yielding vibrotactile thresholds but with no air and bone…

  4. Thermal Conductivity of Humid Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beirão, S. G. S.; Ribeiro, A. P. C.; Lourenço, M. J. V.; Santos, F. J. V.; Nieto de Castro, C. A.

    2012-09-01

    In this article, measurements of the thermal conductivity of humid air as a function of pressure, temperature, and mole fraction of water, for pressures up to 5 MPa and temperatures up to 430 K, for different water contents (up to 10 % vapor mole fraction) are reported. Measurements were performed using a transient hot-wire apparatus capable of obtaining data with an uncertainty of 0.8 % for gases. However, as moist air becomes corrosive above 373 K and at pressures >5 MPa, the apparatus, namely, the pressure vessel and the cells had to be modified, by coating all stainless-steel parts with a titanium nitride thin film coating, about 4 μm thick, obtained by physical vapor deposition. The expanded uncertainty (coverage factor k = 2) of the present experimental thermal conductivity data is 1.7 %, while the uncertainty in the mole fraction is estimated to be better than 0.0006. Experimental details regarding the preparation of the samples, the precautions taken to avoid condensation in the tubes connected to the measuring cell, and the method developed for obtaining reliable values of the water content for the gas mixtures are discussed. A preliminary analysis of the application of the kinetic theory of transport properties in reacting mixtures to interpret the complex dependence of the thermal conductivity of humid air on water composition is addressed.

  5. Milagro: A low energy threshold extensive air shower array

    SciTech Connect

    Sinnis, G.

    1992-01-01

    Milagro is a proposed extensive air shower (EAS) array with a large water Cerenkov detector at its center. It will have a low energy threshold, {approximately} 500 GeV, and good angular resolution, {approximately} 0.4{degrees}. With the large aperture and duty factor of an EAS array, and the energy threshold of an atmospheric Cerenkov telescope, it will be ideally poised to discover new, steady sources of very high energy gamma radiation similar to the Crab nebula, and transient phenomena analogous to the gamma ray bursts seen at lower energies. Here we describe the Milagro detector and give results of tests performed at the CYGNUS array that demonstrate the capabilities of the water Cerenkov technique in detecting and reconstructing extensive air showers.

  6. Milagro: A low energy threshold extensive air shower array

    SciTech Connect

    Sinnis, G.; CYGNUS and MILAGRO Collaborations

    1992-10-01

    Milagro is a proposed extensive air shower (EAS) array with a large water Cerenkov detector at its center. It will have a low energy threshold, {approximately} 500 GeV, and good angular resolution, {approximately} 0.4{degrees}. With the large aperture and duty factor of an EAS array, and the energy threshold of an atmospheric Cerenkov telescope, it will be ideally poised to discover new, steady sources of very high energy gamma radiation similar to the Crab nebula, and transient phenomena analogous to the gamma ray bursts seen at lower energies. Here we describe the Milagro detector and give results of tests performed at the CYGNUS array that demonstrate the capabilities of the water Cerenkov technique in detecting and reconstructing extensive air showers.

  7. Analysis of Air Showers at the Trigger Threshold of KASCADE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholz, J.; Antoni, T.; Apel, W. D.; Bekk, K.; Bercuci, A.; Blümer, H.; Bozdog, H.; Brancus, I. M.; Büttner, C.; Chilingarian, A.; Daumiller, K.; Doll, P.; Engel, R.; Engler, J.; Feßler, F.; Gils, H. J.; Glasstetter, R.; Haungs, A.; Heck, D.; Hörandel, J. R.; Iwan, A.; Kampert, K-H.; Klages, H. O.; Maier, G.; Mathes, H. J.; Mayer, H. J.; Milke, J.; Müller, M.; Obenland, R.; Oehschläger, J.; Ostapchenko, S.; Petcu, M.; Rebel, H.; Risse, M.; Roth, M.; Schatz, G.; Schieler, H.; Thouw, T.; Ulrich, H.; van Buren, J.; Vardanyan, A.; Weindl, A.; Wochele, J.; Zabierowski, J.

    2003-07-01

    The KASCADE experiment measures extensive air showers. It is 100% efficient for showers which are induced by primary particles with energies above 1015 eV to pursue its main goal, the examination of the knee in the flux spectrum at ≈ 5 · 1015 eV. A specially adapted method to calculate two observables (Nch , the number of charged particles and Nµ , the number of muons) by means of a maximum likelihood estimate will be presented. The estimate combines different detector systems and works already at energies around the trigger threshold of KASCADE at ≈ 1014 eV. These observables are used to reconstruct a preliminary energy flux spectrum which is compared with direct measurements and previous measurements of KASCADE at energies above 1015 eV. The reconstruction of energy spectrum and elemental composition around the trigger threshold of KASCADE is important for two reasons. First the estimated spectrum at higher energies has to be congruent with the results of direct measurements. Second it is a cross-check of the interaction models underlying the analysis of extended air showers.

  8. Detection thresholds of potassium salts are related to the molar conductivity of the anion.

    PubMed

    Schiffman, S S; Manning, M P; Warwick, Z S; Crumbliss, A L

    1995-01-01

    In a previous study, we found that human taste detection thresholds for Na+ salts were linearly correlated with molar conductivity values at infinite dilution of their anions. In the present study, detection threshold concentrations for potassium salts were also found to be linearly correlated (r = -0.92) with the molar conductivity of the anion of the salt. Detection thresholds were determined here for nine potassium salts with the same anions as the sodium salts previously tested. The mean detection thresholds for these potassium salts were found to be: K Acetate (0.00311 M), K Carbonate (0.00286 M), K Chloride (0.00242 M), K Citrate (0.000300 M), K Phosphate (0.00196 M), K Sulfate (0.00090 M), K Tartrate (0.00164 M), K Glutamate (0.00153 M), and K Ascorbate (0.00375 M). The rank order correlation between the detection threshold values for sodium and potassium salts was 0.88. This finding suggests that detection thresholds for both Na+ and K+ salts are determined by the charge mobility of the anion.

  9. Conduction Threshold in Accumulation-Mode InGaZnO Thin Film Transistors.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sungsik; Nathan, Arokia

    2016-01-01

    The onset of inversion in the metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) takes place when the surface potential is approximately twice the bulk potential. In contrast, the conduction threshold in accumulation mode transistors, such as the oxide thin film transistor (TFT), has remained ambiguous in view of the complex density of states distribution in the mobility gap. This paper quantitatively describes the conduction threshold of accumulation-mode InGaZnO TFTs as the transition of the Fermi level from deep to tail states, which can be defined as the juxtaposition of linear and exponential dependencies of the accumulated carrier density on energy. Indeed, this permits direct extraction and visualization of the threshold voltage in terms of the second derivative of the drain current with respect to gate voltage.

  10. Conduction Threshold in Accumulation-Mode InGaZnO Thin Film Transistors

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sungsik; Nathan, Arokia

    2016-01-01

    The onset of inversion in the metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) takes place when the surface potential is approximately twice the bulk potential. In contrast, the conduction threshold in accumulation mode transistors, such as the oxide thin film transistor (TFT), has remained ambiguous in view of the complex density of states distribution in the mobility gap. This paper quantitatively describes the conduction threshold of accumulation-mode InGaZnO TFTs as the transition of the Fermi level from deep to tail states, which can be defined as the juxtaposition of linear and exponential dependencies of the accumulated carrier density on energy. Indeed, this permits direct extraction and visualization of the threshold voltage in terms of the second derivative of the drain current with respect to gate voltage. PMID:26932790

  11. Conduction Threshold in Accumulation-Mode InGaZnO Thin Film Transistors.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sungsik; Nathan, Arokia

    2016-01-01

    The onset of inversion in the metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) takes place when the surface potential is approximately twice the bulk potential. In contrast, the conduction threshold in accumulation mode transistors, such as the oxide thin film transistor (TFT), has remained ambiguous in view of the complex density of states distribution in the mobility gap. This paper quantitatively describes the conduction threshold of accumulation-mode InGaZnO TFTs as the transition of the Fermi level from deep to tail states, which can be defined as the juxtaposition of linear and exponential dependencies of the accumulated carrier density on energy. Indeed, this permits direct extraction and visualization of the threshold voltage in terms of the second derivative of the drain current with respect to gate voltage. PMID:26932790

  12. Conduction Threshold in Accumulation-Mode InGaZnO Thin Film Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sungsik; Nathan, Arokia

    2016-03-01

    The onset of inversion in the metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) takes place when the surface potential is approximately twice the bulk potential. In contrast, the conduction threshold in accumulation mode transistors, such as the oxide thin film transistor (TFT), has remained ambiguous in view of the complex density of states distribution in the mobility gap. This paper quantitatively describes the conduction threshold of accumulation-mode InGaZnO TFTs as the transition of the Fermi level from deep to tail states, which can be defined as the juxtaposition of linear and exponential dependencies of the accumulated carrier density on energy. Indeed, this permits direct extraction and visualization of the threshold voltage in terms of the second derivative of the drain current with respect to gate voltage.

  13. Validity of diagnostic computer-based air and forehead bone conduction audiometry.

    PubMed

    Swanepoel, De Wet; Biagio, Leigh

    2011-04-01

    Computer-based audiometry allows for novel applications, including remote testing and automation, that may improve the accessibility and efficiency of hearing assessment in various clinical and occupational health settings. This study describes the validity of computer-based, diagnostic air and forehead bone conduction audiometry when compared wtih conventional industry standard audiometry in a sound booth environment. A sample of 30 subjects (19 to 77 years of age) was assessed with computer-based (KUDUwave 5000) and industry standard conventional audiometers (GSI 61) to compare air and bone conduction thresholds and test-retest reliability. Air conduction thresholds for the two audiometers corresponded within 5 dB or less in more than 90% of instances, with an average absolute difference of 3.5 dB (3.8 SD) and a 95% confidence interval of 2.6 to 4.5 dB. Bone conduction thresholds for the two audiometers corresponded within 10 dB or less in 92% of instances, with an average absolute difference of 4.9 dB (4.9 SD) and a 95% confidence interval of 3.6 to 6.1 dB. The average absolute test-retest threshold difference for bone conduction on the industry standard audiometer was 5.1 dB (5.3 SD) and for the computer-based audiometer 7.1 dB (6.4 SD). Computer-based audiometry provided air and bone conduction thresholds within the test-retest reliability limits of industry standard audiometry.

  14. Influence of film thickness on laser ablation threshold of transparent conducting oxide thin-films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rung, S.; Christiansen, A.; Hellmann, R.

    2014-06-01

    We report on a comprehensive study of the laser ablation threshold of transparent conductive oxide thin films. The ablation threshold is determined for both indium tin oxide and gallium zinc oxide as a function of film thickness and for different laser wavelengths. By using a pulsed diode pumped solid state laser at 1064 nm, 532 nm, 355 nm and 266 nm, respectively, the relationship between optical absorption length and film thickness is studied. We find that the ablation threshold decreases with increasing film thickness in a regime where the absorption length is larger than the film thickness. In turn, the ablation threshold increases in case the absorption length is smaller than the film thickness. In particular, we observe a minimum of the ablation threshold in a region where the film thickness is comparable to the absorption length. To the best of our knowledge, this behaviour previously predicted for thin metal films, has been unreported for all three regimes in case of transparent conductive oxides, yet. For industrial laser scribing processes, these results imply that the efficiency can be optimized by using a laser where the optical absorption length is close to the film thickness.

  15. Auditory Steady-State Response Thresholds in Adults With Conductive and Mild to Moderate Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Hosseinabadi, Reza; Jafarzadeh, Sadegh

    2014-01-01

    Background: The Auditory steady state response (ASSR) provides a frequency-specific and automatic assessment of hearing sensitivity and is used in infants and difficult-to-test adults. Objectives: The aim of this study was to compare the ASSR thresholds among various types (normal, conductive, and sensorineural), degree (normal, mild, and moderate), and configuration (flat and sloping) of hearing sensitivity, and measuring the cutoff point between normal condition and hearing loss for different frequencies. Patients and Methods: This clinical trial was performed in Iran and included patients who were referred from Ear, Nose, and Throat Department. A total of 54 adults (27 with sensorineural hearing loss, 17 with conductive hearing losses, and 10 with normal hearing) were randomly chosen to participate in our study. The type and degree of hearing loss were determined through testing by otoscopy, tympanometry, acoustic reflex, and pure tone audiometry. Then the ASSR was tested at carrier frequencies of 500, 1000, 2000, and 4000 Hz. Results: The ASSR accurately estimates the behavioral thresholds as well as flat and sloping configurations. There was no correlation between types of hearing loss and difference of behavioral and ASSR thresholds (P = 0.69). The difference between ASSR and behavioral thresholds decreased as severity of hearing loss increased. The 40, 35, 30, and 35 dB could be considered as cutoffs between normal hearing and hearing loss for 500, 1000, 2000, and 4000 Hz, respectively. Conclusions: The ASSR can accurately predict the degree and configuration of hearing loss and discriminate the normal hearing from mild or moderate hearing loss and mild from moderate hearing loss, except for 500 Hz. The Air-conducted ASSR could not define the type of hearing loss. PMID:25763263

  16. Optical breakdown threshold investigation of 1064 nm laser induced air plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Thiyagarajan, Magesh; Thompson, Shane

    2012-04-01

    We present the theoretical and experimental measurements and analysis of the optical breakdown threshold for dry air by 1064 nm infrared laser radiation and the significance of the multiphoton and collisional cascade ionization process on the breakdown threshold measurements over pressures range from 10 to 2000 Torr. Theoretical estimates of the breakdown threshold laser intensities and electric fields are obtained using two distinct theories namely multiphoton and collisional cascade ionization theories. The theoretical estimates are validated by experimental measurements and analysis of laser induced breakdown processes in dry air at a wavelength of 1064 nm by focusing 450 mJ max, 6 ns, 75 MW max high-power 1064 nm IR laser radiation onto a 20 {mu}m radius spot size that produces laser intensities up to 3 - 6 TW/cm{sup 2}, sufficient for air ionization over the pressures of interest ranging from 10 to 2000 Torr. Analysis of the measured breakdown threshold laser intensities and electric fields are carried out in relation with classical and quantum theoretical ionization processes, operating pressures. Comparative analysis of the laser air breakdown results at 1064 nm with corresponding results of a shorter laser wavelength (193 nm) [M. Thiyagarajan and J. E. Scharer, IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 36, 2512 (2008)] and a longer microwave wavelength (10{sup 8} nm) [A. D. MacDonald, Microwave Breakdown in Gases (Wiley, New York, 1966)]. A universal scaling analysis of the breakdown threshold measurements provided a direct comparison of breakdown threshold values over a wide range of frequencies ranging from microwave to ultraviolet frequencies. Comparison of 1064 nm laser induced effective field intensities for air breakdown measurements with data calculated based on the collisional cascade and multiphoton breakdown theories is used successfully to determine the scaled collisional microwave portion. The measured breakdown threshold of 1064 nm laser intensities are then

  17. Estimation of bone conduction skull transmission by hearing thresholds and ear-canal sound pressure.

    PubMed

    Reinfeldt, Sabine; Stenfelt, Stefan; Håkansson, Bo

    2013-05-01

    Bone conduction sound transmission in the human skull and the occlusion effect were estimated from hearing thresholds and ear-canal sound pressure (ECSP) measured by a probe tube microphone when stimulation was at three positions on the skull (ipsilateral mastoid, contralateral mastoid, and forehead). The measurements were done with the ear-canal open as well as occluded by an ear-plug. Depending on the estimation method, transcranial transmission at frequencies below 1 kHz was between -8 and 5 dB, around 0 dB at 1 kHz that decreased with frequency to between -17 and -7 dB at 8 kHz. The forehead transmission was, except at frequencies between 1 and 2 kHz, similar to that proposed in the standard ISO:389-3 (1994) when the threshold measurements were conducted with open ear-canals. Compared with the same measurements using hearing thresholds, the ECSP gave similar transmission results at most frequencies, but differed at 0.5, 0.75, 2 and 3 kHz. One probable reason for the differences between thresholds and ECSP might be a significant perception improvement (lower thresholds) when the stimulation was at the ipsilateral mastoid that was not found at the other positions. This improvement, which also was present in the occlusion effect data, was hypothesized to originate in greater sensitivity of the cochlea for vibration in line with the ipsilateral stimulation direction than from other directions.

  18. Setting limits: Using air pollution thresholds to protect and restore US ecosystems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fenn, Mark E.; Lambert, Kathleen F.; Blett, Tamara F.; Burns, Douglas A.; Pardo, Linda H.; Lovett, Gary M.; Haeuber, Richard A.; Evers, David C.; Driscoll, Charles T.; Jeffries, Dean S.

    2011-01-01

    More than four decades of research provide unequivocal evidence that sulfur, nitrogen, and mercury pollution have altered, and will continue to alter, our nation's lands and waters. The emission and deposition of air pollutants harm native plants and animals, degrade water quality, affect forest productivity, and are damaging to human health. Many air quality policies limit emissions at the source but these control measures do not always consider ecosystem impacts. Air pollution thresholds at which ecological effects are observed, such as critical loads, are effective tools for assessing the impacts of air pollution on essential ecosystem services and for informing public policy. U.S. ecosystems can be more effectively protected and restored by using a combination of emissions-based approaches and science-based thresholds of ecosystem damage.

  19. Age of onset, symptom threshold, and expansion of the nosology of conduct disorder for girls

    PubMed Central

    Keenan, Kate; Wroblewski, Kristen; Hipwell, Alison; Loeber, Rolf; Stouthamer-Loeber, Magda

    2010-01-01

    The study of conduct disorder (CD) in girls is characterized by several nosologic controversies that center on the most common age of onset, the most valid symptom threshold, and potentially including other manifestations of antisocial behavior and dimensions of personality as part of the definition of CD. Data from a prospective, longitudinal study of a community sample of 2,451 racially diverse girls were used to empirically inform these issues. Results revealed that adolescent-onset CD is rare in girls. There was mixed support for the threshold at which symptoms are associated with impairment: parent-reported impairment provided the clearest evidence of maintaining the current DSM-IV threshold of 3 symptoms. The impact of callousness and relational aggression on impairment varied by informant, with small effects for parent-and youth-reported impairment, and larger effects for teacher-rated impairment relative to the effects for CD. These results support arguments for revising the typical age of onset of CD for girls, but for maintaining the current symptom threshold. The results also suggest the need to consider sub-typing according to the presence or absence of callousness. Given its content validity relational aggression requires further study in the context of ODD and CD. PMID:20853913

  20. Percolation threshold and electrical conductivity of a two-phase composite containing randomly oriented ellipsoidal inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Y.; Weng, G. J.; Meguid, S. A.; Bao, W. S.; Zhu, Z.-H.; Hamouda, A. M. S.

    2011-12-01

    An explicit, analytical theory for the percolation threshold, percolation saturation, and effective conductivity of a two-component system involving randomly oriented ellipsoidal inclusions is proposed. The ellipsoids may take the shape of a needle, prolate or oblate spheroid, sphere, or disk. This theory is based upon consideration of Ponte Castañeda--Willis [P. Ponte Castañeda and J. R. Willis, J. Mech. Phys. Solids 43, 1919 (1995)] microstructure in conjunction with Hashin--Shtrikman [Z. Hashin and S. Shtrikman, J. Appl. Phys. 33, 3125 (1962)] upper bound. Two critical volume concentrations, c* and c**, that represent the respective percolation threshold at which the conductive network begins to develop, and the percolation saturation, are identified. During this very short range of concentration, the electrical conductivity of the composite is found to exhibit a very sharp increase, while over the entire range, the calcutilated conductivity exhibits the widely reported sigmoidal shape. Comparison with measurement on a multi-walled carbon nanotube/alumina composite indicates that the theory could capture the major features of the experimentally observed trends sufficiently well.

  1. Setting limits: Using air pollution thresholds to protect and restore U.S. ecosystems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fenn, M.E.; Lambert, K.F.; Blett, T.F.; Burns, Douglas A.; Pardo, L.H.; Lovett, Gary M.; Haeuber, R. A.; Evers, D.C.; Driscoll, C.T.; Jeffries, D.S.

    2011-01-01

    More than four decades of research provide unequivocal evidence that sulfur, nitrogen, and mercury pollution have altered, and will continue to alter, our nation's lands and waters. The emission and deposition of air pollutants harm native plants and animals, degrade water quality, affect forest productivity, and are damaging to human health. Many air quality policies limit emissions at the source but these control measures do not always consider ecosystem impacts. Air pollution thresholds at which ecological effects are observed, such as critical loads, are effective tools for assessing the impacts of air pollution on essential ecosystem services and for informing public policy. U.S. ecosystems can be more effectively protected and restored by using a combination of emissions-based approaches and science-based thresholds of ecosystem damage. Based on the results of a comprehensive review of air pollution thresholds, we conclude: ??? Ecosystem services such as air and water purification, decomposition and detoxification of waste materials, climate regulation, regeneration of soil fertility, production and biodiversity maintenance, as well as crop, timber and fish supplies are impacted by deposition of nitrogen, sulfur, mercury and other pollutants. The consequences of these changes may be difficult or impossible to reverse as impacts cascade throughout affected ecosystems. ??? The effects of too much nitrogen are common across the U.S. and include altered plant and lichen communities, enhanced growth of invasive species, eutrophication and acidification of lands and waters, and habitat deterioration for native species, including endangered species. ??? Lake, stream and soil acidification is widespread across the eastern United States. Up to 65% of lakes within sensitive areas receive acid deposition that exceeds critical loads. ??? Mercury contamination adversely affects fish in many inland and coastal waters. Fish consumption advisories for mercury exist in all 50

  2. Threshold responses of Blackside Dace (Chrosomus cumberlandensis) and Kentucky Arrow Darter (Etheostoma spilotum) to stream conductivity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hitt, Nathaniel P.; Floyd, Michael; Compton, Michael; McDonald, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    Chrosomus cumberlandensis (Blackside Dace [BSD]) and Etheostoma spilotum (Kentucky Arrow Darter [KAD]) are fish species of conservation concern due to their fragmented distributions, their low population sizes, and threats from anthropogenic stressors in the southeastern United States. We evaluated the relationship between fish abundance and stream conductivity, an index of environmental quality and potential physiological stressor. We modeled occurrence and abundance of KAD in the upper Kentucky River basin (208 samples) and BSD in the upper Cumberland River basin (294 samples) for sites sampled between 2003 and 2013. Segmented regression indicated a conductivity change-point for BSD abundance at 343 μS/cm (95% CI: 123–563 μS/cm) and for KAD abundance at 261 μS/cm (95% CI: 151–370 μS/cm). In both cases, abundances were negligible above estimated conductivity change-points. Post-hoc randomizations accounted for variance in estimated change points due to unequal sample sizes across the conductivity gradients. Boosted regression-tree analysis indicated stronger effects of conductivity than other natural and anthropogenic factors known to influence stream fishes. Boosted regression trees further indicated threshold responses of BSD and KAD occurrence to conductivity gradients in support of segmented regression results. We suggest that the observed conductivity relationship may indicate energetic limitations for insectivorous fishes due to changes in benthic macroinvertebrate community composition.

  3. Fluid stimulation elicits hearing in the absence of air and bone conduction--An animal study.

    PubMed

    Perez, Ronen; Adelman, Cahtia; Sohmer, Haim

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion Cochlea can be directly excited by fluid (soft-tissue) stimulation. Objective To determine whether there is no difference in auditory-nerve-brainstem evoked response (ABR) thresholds to fluid stimulation between normal and animal models of post radical-mastoidectomy, as seen in a previous human study. Background It has been shown in humans that hearing can be elicited with stimulation to fluid in the external auditory meatus (EAM), and radical-mastoidectomy cavity. These groups differed in age, initial hearing, and drilling exposure. To overcome this difference, experiments were conducted in sand-rats, first intact, and after inducing a radical-mastoidectomy. Methods The EAM of five sand-rats was filled with 0.3 ml saline. ABR thresholds were determined in response to vibratory stimulation by a clinical bone-vibrator with a plastic rod, applied to the saline in the EAM. Then the tympanic membrane was removed, and malleus dislocated (radical-mastoidectomy model). The cavity was filled with 0.45 ml saline and the ABR threshold was determined in response to vibratory stimulation to the cavity fluid. Results There was no difference in ABR fluid thresholds to EAM and mastoidectomy cavity stimulation. Air-conduction stimulation from the bone-vibrator was not involved (conductive loss due to fluid). Bone-conduction stimulation was not involved (large difference in acoustic impedance between fluid and bone).

  4. Graded boosting of synaptic signals by low-threshold voltage-activated calcium conductance

    PubMed Central

    Carbó Tano, Martín; Vilarchao, María Eugenia

    2015-01-01

    Low-threshold voltage-activated calcium conductances (LT-VACCs) play a substantial role in shaping the electrophysiological attributes of neurites. We have investigated how these conductances affect synaptic integration in a premotor nonspiking (NS) neuron of the leech nervous system. These cells exhibit an extensive neuritic tree, do not fire Na+-dependent spikes, but express an LT-VACC that was sensitive to 250 μM Ni2+ and 100 μM NNC 55-0396 (NNC). NS neurons responded to excitation of mechanosensory pressure neurons with depolarizing responses for which amplitude was a linear function of the presynaptic firing frequency. NNC decreased these synaptic responses and abolished the concomitant widespread Ca2+ signals. Coherent with the interpretation that the LT-VACC amplified signals at the postsynaptic level, this conductance also amplified the responses of NS neurons to direct injection of sinusoidal current. Synaptic amplification thus is achieved via a positive feedback in which depolarizing signals activate an LT-VACC that, in turn, boosts these signals. The wide distribution of LT-VACC could support the active propagation of depolarizing signals, turning the complex NS neuritic tree into a relatively compact electrical compartment. PMID:25972583

  5. Conditioning the middle ear reflex at sensation levels below reflex threshold: air jet and electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    McDaniel-Bacon, L; Fulton, R T; Laskowski, R P

    1980-01-01

    An ABAB functional analysis, conditioning and generalization, design was used in 3 experiments (2 were formal studies and 1 was empirical in nature) to investigate the conditionability of the middle ear reflex. The conditioned stimuli were subreflex threshold pure tones of various frequencies and intensities. The unconditioned stimulus (UCS) was an auricular air jet to the contralateral ear in the first experiment and cutaneous electrical stimulation to the ipsolateral, probe ear in the last 2 experiments. Reflexes were monitored by an otoadmittance meter, storage oscilloscope, and strip chart recorder. In the first experiment (air jet UCS), no subjects met the conditioning criterion within the maximum presentation of 400 paired trials, despite pilot evidence which indicated conditioning was feasible. In the second experiment (electrical stimulation UCS), 2 subjects met conditioning criterion; however, only one subject reconditioned and demonstrated partial generalization to other conditioned stimuli. In the third experiment (electrical stimulation UCS), one of 3 subjects who had previously been unconditionable with the air jet UCS met conditioning and reconditioning criterion and demonstrated partial generalization. Results indicate that the middle ear reflex can be conditioned to be elicited by subreflex threshold pure tones, however, results are limited.

  6. The effect of cryotherapy on nerve conduction velocity, pain threshold and pain tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Algafly, Amin A; George, Keith P

    2007-01-01

    Objectives To determine the impact of the application of cryotherapy on nerve conduction velocity (NCV), pain threshold (PTH) and pain tolerance (PTO). Design A within‐subject experimental design; treatment ankle (cryotherapy) and control ankle (no cryotherapy). Setting Hospital‐based physiotherapy laboratory. Participants A convenience sample of adult male sports players (n = 23). Main outcome measures NCV of the tibial nerve via electromyogram as well as PTH and PTO via pressure algometer. All outcome measures were assessed at two sites served by the tibial nerve: one receiving cryotherapy and one not receiving cryotherapy. Results In the control ankle, NCV, PTH and PTO did not alter when reassessed. In the ankle receiving cryotherapy, NCV was significantly and progressively reduced as ankle skin temperature was reduced to 10°C by a cumulative total of 32.8% (p<0.05). Cryotherapy led to an increased PTH and PTO at both assessment sites (p<0.05). The changes in PTH (89% and 71%) and PTO (76% and 56%) were not different between the iced and non‐iced sites. Conclusions The data suggest that cryotherapy can increase PTH and PTO at the ankle and this was associated with a significant decrease in NCV. Reduced NCV at the ankle may be a mechanism by which cryotherapy achieves its clinical goals. PMID:17224445

  7. Instability of an interface between air and a low conducting liquid subjected to charge injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chicón, Rafael; Pérez, Alberto T.

    2006-10-01

    We study the linear stability of an interface between air and a low conducting liquid in the presence of unipolar injection of charge. As a consequence of charge injection, a volume charge density builds up in the air gap and a surface charge density on the interface. Above a certain voltage threshold the electrical stresses may destabilize the interface, giving rise to a characteristic cell pattern known as rose-window instability. Contrary to what occurs in the classical volume electrohydrodynamic instability in insulating liquids, the typical cell size is several times larger than the liquid depth. We analyze the linear stability through the usual procedure of decomposing an arbitrary perturbation into normal modes. The resulting homogeneous linear system of ordinary differential equations is solved using a commercial software package. Finally, an analytical method is developed that provides a solution valid in the limit of small wavenumbers.

  8. A continuum model with a percolation threshold and tunneling-assisted interfacial conductivity for carbon nanotube-based nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yang; Weng, George J.; Meguid, Shaker A.; Hamouda, Abdel Magid

    2014-05-21

    A continuum model that possesses several desirable features of the electrical conduction process in carbon-nanotube (CNT) based nanocomposites is developed. Three basic elements are included: (i) percolation threshold, (ii) interface effects, and (iii) tunneling-assisted interfacial conductivity. We approach the first one through the selection of an effective medium theory. We approach the second one by the introduction of a diminishing layer of interface with an interfacial conductivity to build a 'thinly coated' CNT. The third one is introduced through the observation that interface conductivity can be enhanced by electron tunneling which in turn can be facilitated with the formation of CNT networks. We treat this last issue in a continuum fashion by taking the network formation as a statistical process that can be represented by Cauchy's probability density function. The outcome is a simple and yet widely useful model that can simultaneously capture all these fundamental characteristics. It is demonstrated that, without considering the interface effect, the predicted conductivity would be too high, and that, without accounting for the additional contribution from the tunneling-assisted interfacial conductivity, the predicted conductivity beyond the percolation threshold would be too low. It is with the consideration of all three elements that the theory can fully account for the experimentally measured data. We further use the developed model to demonstrate that, despite the anisotropy of the intrinsic CNT conductivity, it is its axial component along the CNT direction that dominates the overall conductivity. This theory is also proved that, even with a totally insulating matrix, it is still capable of delivering non-zero conductivity beyond the percolation threshold.

  9. Proteoglycan and collagen expression during human air conducting system development

    PubMed Central

    Godoy-Guzmán, C.; San Martin, S.; Pereda, J.

    2012-01-01

    The lung is formed from a bud that grows and divides in a dichotomous way. A bud is a new growth center which is determined by epithelial-mesenchymal interactions where proteins of the extracellular matrix (ECM) might be involved. To understand this protein participation during human lung development, we examined the expression and distribution of proteoglycans in relation to the different types of collagens during the period in which the air conducting system is installed. Using light microscopy and immunohistochemistry we evaluate the expression of collagens (I, III and VI) and proteoglycans (decorin, biglycan and lumican) between 8 to 10 weeks post fertilization and 11 to 14 weeks of gestational age of human embryo and fetus lungs. We show that decorin, lumican and all the collagen types investigated were expressed at the epithelium-mesenchymal interface, forming a sleeve around the bronchiolar ducts. In addition, biglycan was expressed in both the endothelial cells and the smooth muscle of the blood vessels. Thus, the similar distribution pattern of collagen and proteoglycans in the early developmental stages of the human lung may be closely related to the process of dichotomous division of the bronchial tree. This study provides a new insight concerning the participation of collagens and proteoglycans in the epithelial-mesenchymal interface during the period in which the air conducting system is installed in the human fetal lung. PMID:23027345

  10. 21 CFR 874.3950 - Transcutaneous air conduction hearing aid system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Conduction Hearing Aid System (TACHAS); Guidance for Industry and FDA.” See § 874.1 for the availability of... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Transcutaneous air conduction hearing aid system... Transcutaneous air conduction hearing aid system. (a) Identification. A transcutaneous air conduction hearing...

  11. History of the technological development of air conduction hearing aids.

    PubMed

    Mudry, A; Dodelé, L

    2000-06-01

    This was a study of the history of the technological development of air conduction hearing aids, and a review of international literature on the subject. The technological evolution of amplification devices, from their origin to the present day, can be divided into seven distinct periods: the period of sound collectors, the period of hearing devices constructed from carbon, the period of vacuum tubes, the transistor period, the period of integrated circuits, the microprocessor period and the period of digital hearing instruments. Throughout these different stages, hearing instruments have progressively developed reaching their present state. The current era is itself undergoing constant development and change. With the introduction of new technologies, we expect that the rate of change will increase rapidly in the future.

  12. In-air hearing of a diving duck: A comparison of psychoacoustic and auditory brainstem response thresholds.

    PubMed

    Crowell, Sara E; Wells-Berlin, Alicia M; Therrien, Ronald E; Yannuzzi, Sally E; Carr, Catherine E

    2016-05-01

    Auditory sensitivity was measured in a species of diving duck that is not often kept in captivity, the lesser scaup. Behavioral (psychoacoustics) and electrophysiological [the auditory brainstem response (ABR)] methods were used to measure in-air auditory sensitivity, and the resulting audiograms were compared. Both approaches yielded audiograms with similar U-shapes and regions of greatest sensitivity (2000-3000 Hz). However, ABR thresholds were higher than psychoacoustic thresholds at all frequencies. This difference was least at the highest frequency tested using both methods (5700 Hz) and greatest at 1000 Hz, where the ABR threshold was 26.8 dB higher than the behavioral measure of threshold. This difference is commonly reported in studies involving many different species. These results highlight the usefulness of each method, depending on the testing conditions and availability of the animals. PMID:27250191

  13. Prevalence of permanent threshold shifts in the United States Air Force hearing conservation program by career field, 2005-2011.

    PubMed

    Lloyd Soderlund, Laurel; McKenna, Elizabeth A; Tastad, Katie; Paul, Marika

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe changes in hearing, using the permanent threshold shift metric, among United States Air Force servicemembers, including active duty, Reserve and Air National Guard components, for demographics, job categories, and career fields. In the United States Air Force, only servicemembers who are occupationally exposed routinely to hazardous noise are monitored. Audiogram records and demographic variables were analyzed for servicemembers from 2005-2011 using data from the Department of Defense system that captures occupational hearing tests worldwide. Results suggest that occupational hearing loss was larger in males than females, in officers than enlisted populations, and in Reserve and Air National Guard than in active duty. Compared to similar civilian career fields, active duty has lower prevalence rates for occupational hearing loss overall, although Reserve and Air National Guard prevalence rates were more similar to the civilian reported rates. The proportion of personnel with permanent threshold shifts varied between 4.6-16.7% within active duty career fields, which includes 76% of the population for study timeframe. Permanent threshold shift was larger in small job categories, and in jobs that are not considered exposed to hazardous noise routinely which is comparative with results from civilian data analysis of occupational hearing loss. Further investigation into testing practices for Air Force specific groups, use of the system for nonoccupational hearing testing, and challenges to follow-up compliance is warranted. Increased surveillance procedures for occupational hearing loss are needed to address concerns on the prevalence of servicemember hearing loss, the role of recreational and lifestyle factors to contribute the high reported hearing loss prevalence of veterans compared to nonveterans. PMID:26720128

  14. Alignment of carbon iron into polydimethylsiloxane to create conductive composite with low percolation threshold and high piezoresistivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Shuai; Wang, R.; Wang, Xiaojie

    2016-04-01

    With the development of soft materials for applications in flexible tactile sensors, metal particles/insulated polymer composites have been studied for many years. This article proposes a method to prepare carbon iron particles (CIPs)/polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) conductive composite with low percolation threshold and highly piezoresistive stain sensitivity. CIPs-PDMS composites with various filler volume fraction were cured under a magnetic field over 1.0 T to create chain-like structure resulting in anisotropy of conductive materials. The electrical resistivity for the longitudinal direction were measured as a function of filler volume fraction to understand the electrical percolation behavior. In this study, the percolation threshold of CIPs-PDMS composite cured under a magnetic field can be as low as 0.1 vol.%, which is much less than most of those studies in particulate composites. Meanwhile, the effects of compressive strain on the electrical properties of CIPs-PDMS composites were also investigated. The strain sensitivity depends on filler volume fraction and decreases with the increasing of compressive strain. It has been found that the composites containing a small amount of CI particles curing under a magnetic field exhibit a high strain sensitivity of over 150. The microstructures were measured by using a scanning electron microscope (SEM), and the results were also reported in this paper.

  15. Particle Arrangement Design for Predicting the Percolation Threshold of Silver/Epoxy Composite for Electrically Conductive Adhesive Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zulkarnain, M.; Husaini, Muhammad; Mariatti, M.; Azid, I. A.

    2015-11-01

    The early use of electrically conductive adhesives (ECAs) provided an alternative to solder because of their several advantages, such as good electrical conductivity, low cost, extendability to fine pitch of interconnecting material and environmental friendliness. According to previous works, an optimal particle volume fraction became a major objective of many researchers in order to obtain highly conductive ECAs, realizing that the need for transitions from an insulator to a conductor is controlled by the geometric arrangement of particles. In the current study, particle arrangement models of ECAs are developed by establishing the effects of van der Waals' attraction energy and particle motion, which act as a kind of particle interaction to generate a conducting structure. The methodology is divided into three major parts: the formulation of a particle arrangement technique, and numerical and experimental studies. The formulation of particle arrangement is developed in an epoxy colloidal system. During verification, the particle arrangement model is validated by the theoretical fractal dimension and guided by a morphological study of the experimental assessments. The model was simulated through representative volume elements with the volume fraction factor, which was set in the range of 2-8 vol.%, while electrical conductivity was an observed parameter. The numerical results showed good agreement with the experiments in which the percolation threshold occurred between 4 and 6% of the volume of filler loading.

  16. A Conductivity Device for Measuring Sulfur Dioxide in the Air

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craig, James C.

    1972-01-01

    Described is a general electroconductivity device enabling students to determine sulfur dioxide concentration in a particular location, hopefully leading to a deeper understanding of the problem of air pollution. (DF)

  17. Influence of the angular scattering of electrons on the runaway threshold in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanrion, O.; Bonaventura, Z.; Bourdon, A.; Neubert, T.

    2016-04-01

    The runaway electron mechanism is of great importance for the understanding of the generation of x- and gamma rays in atmospheric discharges. In 1991, terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) were discovered by the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory. Those emissions are bremsstrahlung from high energy electrons that run away in electric fields associated with thunderstorms. In this paper, we discuss the runaway threshold definition with a particular interest in the influence of the angular scattering for electron energy close to the threshold. In order to understand the mechanism of runaway, we compare the outcome of different Fokker-Planck and Monte Carlo models with increasing complexity in the description of the scattering. The results show that the inclusion of the stochastic nature of collisions smooths the probability to run away around the threshold. Furthermore, we observe that a significant number of electrons diffuse out of the runaway regime when we take into account the diffusion in angle due to the scattering. Those results suggest using a runaway threshold energy based on the Fokker-Planck model assuming the angular equilibrium that is 1.6 to 1.8 times higher than the one proposed by [1, 2], depending on the magnitude of the ambient electric field. The threshold also is found to be 5 to 26 times higher than the one assuming forward scattering. We give a fitted formula for the threshold field valid over a large range of electric fields. Furthermore, we have shown that the assumption of forward scattering is not valid below 1 MeV where the runaway threshold usually is defined. These results are important for the thermal runaway and the runaway electron avalanche discharge mechanisms suggested to participate in the TGF generation.

  18. Threshold velocities for input of soil particles into the air by desert soils

    SciTech Connect

    Gillette, D.A.; Adams, J.; Endo, A.; Smith, D.; Kihl, R.

    1980-10-20

    Desert soils mostly from the Mojave Desert were tested for threshold friction velocity (the friction velocity above which soil erosion takes place) with an open-bottomed portable wind tunnel. Several geomorphological settings were chosen to be representative of much of the surface of the Mojave Desert, for example, playas, alluvial fans, and aeolian features. Variables which increase threshold velocity are decreasing proportion of sand, increasing size of dry aggregates of the soil, and increasing fraction of the soil mass larger than 1 mm. Threshold velocity increases with different types of soil surfaces in the following order: disturbed soils (except disturbed heavy clay soils), sand dunes, alluvial and aeolian sand deposits, disturbed playa soils, skirts of playas, playa centers, and desert pavement (alluvial deposits). 21 references, 5 figures, 6 tables.

  19. Between-airport heterogeneity in air toxics emissions associated with individual cancer risk thresholds and population risks

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Airports represent a complex source type of increasing importance contributing to air toxics risks. Comprehensive atmospheric dispersion models are beyond the scope of many applications, so it would be valuable to rapidly but accurately characterize the risk-relevant exposure implications of emissions at an airport. Methods In this study, we apply a high resolution atmospheric dispersion model (AERMOD) to 32 airports across the United States, focusing on benzene, 1,3-butadiene, and benzo [a]pyrene. We estimate the emission rates required at these airports to exceed a 10-6 lifetime cancer risk for the maximally exposed individual (emission thresholds) and estimate the total population risk at these emission rates. Results The emission thresholds vary by two orders of magnitude across airports, with variability predicted by proximity of populations to the airport and mixing height (R2 = 0.74–0.75 across pollutants). At these emission thresholds, the population risk within 50 km of the airport varies by two orders of magnitude across airports, driven by substantial heterogeneity in total population exposure per unit emissions that is related to population density and uncorrelated with emission thresholds. Conclusion Our findings indicate that site characteristics can be used to accurately predict maximum individual risk and total population risk at a given level of emissions, but that optimizing on one endpoint will be non-optimal for the other. PMID:19426510

  20. Interactions among hydraulic conductivity distributions, subsurface topography, and transport thresholds revealed by a multitracer hillslope irrigation experiment

    DOE PAGES

    Jackson, C. Rhett; Du, Enhao; Klaus, Julian; Griffiths, Natalie A.; Bitew, Menberu; McDonnell, Jeffrey J.

    2016-08-12

    Interactions among hydraulic conductivity distributions, subsurface topography, and lateral flow are poorly understood. We applied 407 mm of water and a suite of tracers over 51 h to a 12 by 16.5 m forested hillslope segment to determine interflow thresholds, preferential pathway pore velocities, large-scale conductivities, the time series of event water fractions, and the fate of dissolved nutrients. The 12% hillslope featured loamy sand A and E horizons overlying a sandy clay loam Bt at 1.25 m average depth. Interflow measured from two drains within an interception trench commenced after 131 and 208 mm of irrigation. Cumulative interflow equaledmore » 49% of applied water. Conservative tracer differences between the collection drains indicated differences in flow paths and storages within the plot. Event water fractions rose steadily throughout irrigation, peaking at 50% sixteen h after irrigation ceased. Data implied that tightly held water exchanged with event water throughout the experiment and a substantial portion of preevent water was released from the argillic layer. Surface-applied dye tracers bypassed the matrix, with peak concentrations measured shortly after flow commencement, indicating preferential network conductivities of 864–2240 mm/h, yet no macropore flow was observed. Near steady-state flow conditions indicated average conductivities of 460 mm/h and 2.5 mm/h for topsoils and the Bt horizon, respectively. Low ammonium and phosphorus concentrations in the interflow suggested rapid uptake or sorption, while higher nitrate concentrations suggested more conservative transport. Lastly, these results reveal how hydraulic conductivity variation and subsurface topographic complexity explain otherwise paradoxical solute and flow behaviors.« less

  1. Theoretical and Experimental Investigation of Heat Conduction in Air, Including Effects of Oxygen Dissociation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, C. Frederick; Early, Richard A.; Alzofon, Frederick E.; Witteborn, Fred C.

    1959-01-01

    Solutions are presented for the conduction of beat through a semi-infinite gas medium having a uniform initial temperature and a constant boundary temperature. The coefficients of thermal conductivity and diffusivity are treated as variables, and the solutions are extended to the case of air at temperatures where oxygen dissociation occurs. These solutions are used together with shock-tube measurements to evaluate the integral of thermal conductivity for air as a function of temperature.

  2. Tuning the conductivity threshold and carrier density of two-dimensional electron gas at oxide interfaces through interface engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, H. J. Harsan E-mail: ariando@nus.edu.sg; Zeng, S. W.; Annadi, A.; Ariando E-mail: ariando@nus.edu.sg; Huang, Z.; Venkatesan, T.

    2015-08-15

    The two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) formed at the perovskite oxides heterostructures is of great interest because of its potential applications in oxides electronics and nanoscale multifunctional devices. A canonical example is the 2DEG at the interface between a polar oxide LaAlO{sub 3} (LAO) and non-polar SrTiO{sub 3} (STO). Here, the LAO polar oxide can be regarded as the modulating or doping layer and is expected to define the electronic properties of 2DEG at the LAO/STO interface. However, to practically implement the 2DEG in electronics and device design, desired properties such as tunable 2D carrier density are necessary. Here, we report the tuning of conductivity threshold, carrier density and electronic properties of 2DEG in LAO/STO heterostructures by insertion of a La{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 0.5}TiO{sub 3} (LSTO) layer of varying thicknesses, and thus modulating the amount of polarization of the oxide over layers. Our experimental result shows an enhancement of carrier density up to a value of about five times higher than that observed at the LAO/STO interface. A complete thickness dependent metal-insulator phase diagram is obtained by varying the thickness of LAO and LSTO providing an estimate for the critical thickness needed for the metallic phase. The observations are discussed in terms of electronic reconstruction induced by polar oxides.

  3. 78 FR 37164 - Revisions to the Air Emissions Reporting Requirements: Revisions to Lead (Pb) Reporting Threshold...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-20

    ... of the EPA's air quality planning efforts. Having the model inputs allows the EPA to use the latest... requirement for reporting the input parameters that can ] be used to run the EPA models that generate the... index. Although listed in the index, some information is not publicly available, e.g., CBI or...

  4. Percolation threshold of graphene nanosheets as conductive additives in Li4Ti5O12 anodes of Li-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Biao; Yu, Yang; Liu, Yusi; Huang, Zhen-Dong; He, Yan-bing; Kim, Jang-Kyo

    2013-03-01

    Graphene nanosheets (GNSs) have been considered as potential conductive additives for electrodes in Li-ion batteries to replace the existing carbon black (CB). Graphene has exceptionally high aspect ratio and excellent electrical conductivity, enabling the formation of extensive conductive networks at a much lower content than CB. This paper reports the beneficial effects of GNSs with a low percolation threshold on electrochemical performance of Li(4)Ti(5)O(12) (LTO) anodes. The experimental results show that the GNSs with a diameter of 46 μm and a thickness of 4.5 nm have a percolation threshold of 1.8 wt%. The prediction based on the interparticle distance concept gives a percolation threshold of 0.54 wt% for GNSs, which is almost an order of magnitude lower than that for CB particles. The substantially low percolation along with a high electrical conductivity of GNSs explains why the LTO anodes containing only 5 wt% GNSs deliver a much better rate capability than those with 15 wt% CB. However, a higher GNS content of 10 wt% results in re-stacking GNSs, deteriorating the diffusion of Li ions through the thickness of GNSs. The parametric study indicates that the percolation threshold of GNSs is inversely proportional to the aspect ratio of GNSs.

  5. Highly Conductive, Air-Stable Silver Nanowire@Iongel Composite Films toward Flexible Transparent Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Weiwei; Liu, Hongliang; Chen, Yongzhen; Zheng, Meiling; Zhao, Yuanyuan; Kong, Xiangbin; Wang, Ying; Zhang, Xiqi; Kong, Xiangyu; Wang, Pengfei; Jiang, Lei

    2016-09-01

    A new type of flexible transparent electrode is designed, by employing wettability-induced selective electroless-welding of silver nanowire (AgNW) networks, together with a thin conductive iongel as the protective layer. The obtained electrode exhibits high optical transmittance, and excellent air-stability without sacrificing conductivity. PMID:27296551

  6. Low power ovonic threshold switching characteristics of thin GeTe6 films using conductive atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manivannan, Anbarasu; Myana, Santosh Kumar; Miriyala, Kumaraswamy; Sahu, Smriti; Ramadurai, Ranjith

    2014-12-01

    Minimizing the dimensions of the electrode could directly impact the energy-efficient threshold switching and programming characteristics of phase change memory devices. A ˜12-15 nm AFM probe-tip was employed as one of the electrodes for a systematic study of threshold switching of as-deposited amorphous GeTe6 thin films. This configuration enables low power threshold switching with an extremely low steady state current in the on state of 6-8 nA. Analysis of over 48 different probe locations on the sample reveals a stable Ovonic threshold switching behavior at threshold voltage, VTH of 2.4 ± 0.5 V and the off state was retained below a holding voltage, VH of 0.6 ± 0.1 V. All these probe locations exhibit repeatable on-off transitions for more than 175 pulses at each location. Furthermore, by utilizing longer biasing voltages while scanning, a plausible nano-scale control over the phase change behavior from as-deposited amorphous to crystalline phase was studied.

  7. Low power ovonic threshold switching characteristics of thin GeTe{sub 6} films using conductive atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Manivannan, Anbarasu E-mail: ranjith@iith.ac.in; Sahu, Smriti; Myana, Santosh Kumar; Miriyala, Kumaraswamy; Ramadurai, Ranjith E-mail: ranjith@iith.ac.in

    2014-12-15

    Minimizing the dimensions of the electrode could directly impact the energy-efficient threshold switching and programming characteristics of phase change memory devices. A ∼12–15 nm AFM probe-tip was employed as one of the electrodes for a systematic study of threshold switching of as-deposited amorphous GeTe{sub 6} thin films. This configuration enables low power threshold switching with an extremely low steady state current in the on state of 6–8 nA. Analysis of over 48 different probe locations on the sample reveals a stable Ovonic threshold switching behavior at threshold voltage, V{sub TH} of 2.4 ± 0.5 V and the off state was retained below a holding voltage, V{sub H} of 0.6 ± 0.1 V. All these probe locations exhibit repeatable on-off transitions for more than 175 pulses at each location. Furthermore, by utilizing longer biasing voltages while scanning, a plausible nano-scale control over the phase change behavior from as-deposited amorphous to crystalline phase was studied.

  8. A stably enhanced transparent conductive graphene film obtained using an air-annealing method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Xuefen; Wei, Dapeng; Sun, Tai; Yu, Leyong; Yang, Jun; Zhang, Yongna; Fang, Liang; Wei, Dacheng; Shi, Haofei; Du, Chunlei

    2016-08-01

    A simple and effective air-annealing technique was developed to stably improve both the electrical conductivity and light transmission of pristine graphene. After the graphene film was annealed in air at 250 °C for 80 min, the mobility and carrier concentration were both significantly enhanced, and the sheet resistance was greatly reduced with a decrease rate of ∼33%. Meanwhile, the transparency was also improved by more than 3%. The mechanism is carefully discussed. The reason might be that air-annealing conditions provide a suitable atmosphere to etch and remove amorphous carbons. More importantly, the enhanced transparent conductive properties of the air-annealed graphene films were extraordinarily stable, and remained almost unchanged for 100 days.

  9. A stably enhanced transparent conductive graphene film obtained using an air-annealing method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Xuefen; Wei, Dapeng; Sun, Tai; Yu, Leyong; Yang, Jun; Zhang, Yongna; Fang, Liang; Wei, Dacheng; Shi, Haofei; Du, Chunlei

    2016-08-01

    A simple and effective air-annealing technique was developed to stably improve both the electrical conductivity and light transmission of pristine graphene. After the graphene film was annealed in air at 250 °C for 80 min, the mobility and carrier concentration were both significantly enhanced, and the sheet resistance was greatly reduced with a decrease rate of ˜33%. Meanwhile, the transparency was also improved by more than 3%. The mechanism is carefully discussed. The reason might be that air-annealing conditions provide a suitable atmosphere to etch and remove amorphous carbons. More importantly, the enhanced transparent conductive properties of the air-annealed graphene films were extraordinarily stable, and remained almost unchanged for 100 days.

  10. Quantitative measurement of odor detection thresholds using an air dilution olfactometer, and association with genetic variants in a sample of diverse ancestry

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Gillian R.; Krithika, S; Edwards, Melissa; Kavanagh, Paula

    2014-01-01

    Genetic association studies require a quantitative and reliable method for odor threshold assessment in order to examine the contribution of genetic variants to complex olfactory phenotypes. Our main goal was to assess the feasibility of a portable Scentroid air dilution olfactometer for use in such studies. Using the Scentroid SM110C and the SK5 n-butanol Sensitivity Kit (IDES Canada Inc.), n-butanol odor thresholds were determined for 182 individuals of diverse ancestry (mean age: 20.4 ± 2.5 years; n = 128 female; n = 54 male). Threshold scores from repeat participants were used to calculate a test–retest reliability coefficient, which was statistically significant (r = 0.754, p < 0.001, n = 29), indicating that the Scentroid provides reliable estimates of odor thresholds. In addition, we performed a preliminary genetic analysis evaluating the potential association of n-butanol odor thresholds to six single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) putatively involved in general olfactory sensitivity (GOS). The results of multiple linear regression analysis revealed no significant association between the SNPs tested and threshold scores. However, our sample size was relatively small, and our study was only powered to identify genetic markers with strong effects on olfactory sensitivity. Overall, we find that the Scentroid provides reliable quantitative measures of odor detection threshold and is well suited for genetic studies of olfactory sensitivity. PMID:25392755

  11. 40 CFR 60.2706 - By what date must I conduct the initial air pollution control device inspection?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... air pollution control device inspection? 60.2706 Section 60.2706 Protection of Environment... Requirements § 60.2706 By what date must I conduct the initial air pollution control device inspection? (a) The initial air pollution control device inspection must be conducted within 60 days after installation of...

  12. 40 CFR 60.2141 - By what date must I conduct the initial air pollution control device inspection?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... air pollution control device inspection? 60.2141 Section 60.2141 Protection of Environment... Compliance Requirements § 60.2141 By what date must I conduct the initial air pollution control device inspection? (a) The initial air pollution control device inspection must be conducted within 60 days...

  13. 40 CFR 60.4895 - By what date must I conduct annual air pollution control device inspections and make any...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Compliance Requirements § 60.4895 By what date must I conduct annual air pollution control device inspections and make any necessary repairs? (a) You must conduct an annual inspection of each air pollution... following the previous annual air pollution control device inspection. (b) Within 10 operating...

  14. 40 CFR 60.4895 - By what date must I conduct annual air pollution control device inspections and make any...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Compliance Requirements § 60.4895 By what date must I conduct annual air pollution control device inspections and make any necessary repairs? (a) You must conduct an annual inspection of each air pollution... following the previous annual air pollution control device inspection. (b) Within 10 operating...

  15. 40 CFR 60.4895 - By what date must I conduct annual air pollution control device inspections and make any...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Compliance Requirements § 60.4895 By what date must I conduct annual air pollution control device inspections and make any necessary repairs? (a) You must conduct an annual inspection of each air pollution... following the previous annual air pollution control device inspection. (b) Within 10 operating...

  16. 40 CFR 60.4895 - By what date must I conduct annual air pollution control device inspections and make any...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Compliance Requirements § 60.4895 By what date must I conduct annual air pollution control device inspections and make any necessary repairs? (a) You must conduct an annual inspection of each air pollution... following the previous annual air pollution control device inspection. (b) Within 10 operating...

  17. 40 CFR 60.2141 - By what date must I conduct the initial air pollution control device inspection?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... air pollution control device inspection? 60.2141 Section 60.2141 Protection of Environment... Compliance Requirements § 60.2141 By what date must I conduct the initial air pollution control device inspection? (a) The initial air pollution control device inspection must be conducted within 60 days...

  18. 21 CFR 874.3950 - Transcutaneous air conduction hearing aid system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3950... occluding the ear canal. The device consists of an air conduction hearing aid attached to a surgically... ear canal. (b) Classification. Class II (special controls). The special control for this device is...

  19. 21 CFR 874.3950 - Transcutaneous air conduction hearing aid system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3950... occluding the ear canal. The device consists of an air conduction hearing aid attached to a surgically... ear canal. (b) Classification. Class II (special controls). The special control for this device is...

  20. 21 CFR 874.3305 - Wireless air-conduction hearing aid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Wireless air-conduction hearing aid. 874.3305 Section 874.3305 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3305 Wireless...

  1. 21 CFR 874.3305 - Wireless air-conduction hearing aid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Wireless air-conduction hearing aid. 874.3305 Section 874.3305 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3305 Wireless...

  2. 21 CFR 874.3950 - Transcutaneous air conduction hearing aid system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3950... occluding the ear canal. The device consists of an air conduction hearing aid attached to a surgically... ear canal. (b) Classification. Class II (special controls). The special control for this device is...

  3. 21 CFR 874.3305 - Wireless air-conduction hearing aid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Wireless air-conduction hearing aid. 874.3305 Section 874.3305 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3305 Wireless...

  4. 21 CFR 874.3950 - Transcutaneous air conduction hearing aid system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3950... system is a wearable sound-amplifying device intended to compensate for impaired hearing without occluding the ear canal. The device consists of an air conduction hearing aid attached to a...

  5. Electrical phosphenes: on the influence of conductivity inhomogeneities and small-scale structures of the orbita on the current density threshold of excitation.

    PubMed

    Lindenblatt, G; Silny, J

    2002-05-01

    Electrical and magnetic phosphenes, perceptions of light as a result of non-adequate stimulation of the eye by electrical current or magnetic induction, respectively, are one of the cornerstones to justify limit values for extreme low-frequency fields specified by statutory regulations. However, the mechanism and place of action, as well as the excitation threshold, remain unknown until now. We suggest that the origin of phosphene excitation is the synaptic layer of the eye. The current density threshold value for electrical phosphene excitation was numerically quantified for this area on the basis of a detailed geometrical model in original submillimetre resolution and specifically measured conductivities in the LF range. The threshold values found were 1.8 A m-2 at 60 Hz and 0.3 A m-2 at 25 Hz. These values are comparable with values of other excitable tissues. It has been shown that the current density threshold for phosphene generation depends on small-scale structures not taken into account by previous models. PMID:12195984

  6. Experimental and Theoretical Study of Heat Conduction for Air up to 5000 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peng, Tzy-Cheng; Ahtye, Warren F.

    1961-01-01

    The theoretical value of the integral of thermal conductivity is compared with the experimental values from shock-tube measurements. The particular case considered is the one-dimensional nonsteady flow of heat through air at constant pressure. This approach has been previously described in NASA TR R-27. experiment was uncertain because of the large scatter in the experimental data. In this paper, an attempt is made to improve the correlation by use of a more refined calculation of the integral of thermal conductivity, and by use of improved experimental techniques and instrumentation. As a result of these changes, a much closer correlation is shown between the experimental and theoretical heat-flux potentials. This indicates that the predicted values of the coefficient of thermal conductivity for high-temperature air may be suitably accurate for many engineering needs, up to the limits of the test (4600 K).

  7. Conduction mechanisms in P(VDF-TrFE)/gold nanowire composites: tunnelling and thermally-activated hopping process near the percolation threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramachandran, Laavanya; Lonjon, Antoine; Demont, Philippe; Dantras, Eric; Lacabanne, Colette

    2016-08-01

    High-aspect ratio gold nanowires were dispersed in a P(VDF-TrFE) matrix to form conducting polymer composites. The composites were found to follow a percolation law, with a low percolation threshold of 2.2%vol and attaining a conductivity value of 100 S m‑1. The temperature and frequency dependence of the composites were studied using broadband dielectric spectroscopy. Tunnelling was found to be the main charge transport mechanism at temperatures below ‑100 °C and a thermally-activated hopping mechanism was determined to be responsible for conduction at temperatures above ‑100 °C. The correlated barrier hopping model was found to be the best fit to explain the conduction mechanisms in the composites.

  8. Conduction mechanisms in P(VDF-TrFE)/gold nanowire composites: tunnelling and thermally-activated hopping process near the percolation threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramachandran, Laavanya; Lonjon, Antoine; Demont, Philippe; Dantras, Eric; Lacabanne, Colette

    2016-08-01

    High-aspect ratio gold nanowires were dispersed in a P(VDF-TrFE) matrix to form conducting polymer composites. The composites were found to follow a percolation law, with a low percolation threshold of 2.2%vol and attaining a conductivity value of 100 S m-1. The temperature and frequency dependence of the composites were studied using broadband dielectric spectroscopy. Tunnelling was found to be the main charge transport mechanism at temperatures below -100 °C and a thermally-activated hopping mechanism was determined to be responsible for conduction at temperatures above -100 °C. The correlated barrier hopping model was found to be the best fit to explain the conduction mechanisms in the composites.

  9. Association of Long-Term Air Pollution with Ventricular Conduction and Repolarization Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Van Hee, Victor C; Szpiro, Adam A; Prineas, Ronald; Neyer, Jonathan; Watson, Karol; Siscovick, David; Park, Sung Kyun; Kaufman, Joel D

    2011-01-01

    Background Short-term exposure to air pollution may affect ventricular repolarization, but there is limited information on how long-term exposures might affect the surface ventricular electrocardiographic (ECG) abnormalities associated with cardiovascular events. We carried out a study to determine whether long-term air pollution exposure is associated with abnormalities of ventricular repolarization and conduction in adults without known cardiovascular disease. Methods A total of 4783 participants free of clinical cardiovascular disease in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis underwent 12-lead ECG examinations, cardiac-computed tomography and calcium scoring, as well as estimation of air pollution exposure using a finely resolved spatio-temporal model to determine long-term average individual exposure to fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and proximity to major roadways. We assessed ventricular electrical abnormalities including presence of QT prolongation (Rautaharju QTrr criteria) and intraventricular conduction delay (QRS duration > 120 msec). We used logistic regression to determine the adjusted relationship between air pollution exposures and ECG abnormalities. Results A 10 µg/m3-increase in estimated residential PM2.5 was associated with an increased odds of prevalent QT prolongation (adjusted odds ratio [OR]= 1.6 [95% confidence interval (CI)= 1.2 to 2.2]) and intraventricular conduction delay (OR 1.7, 95% CI: 1.0 to 2.6, independent of coronary-artery calcium score. Living near major roadways was not associated with ventricular electrical abnormalities. No significant evidence of effect modification by traditional risk factors or study site was observed. Conclusions This study demonstrates an association between long-term exposure to air pollution and ventricular repolarization and conduction abnormalities in adults without clinical cardiovascular disease, independent of subclinical coronary arterial calcification. PMID:21918454

  10. Guidelines for Auditory Threshold Measurement for Significant Threshold Shift.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Kathleen; Hammill, Tanisha; Hoffer, Michael; Kil, Jonathan; Le Prell, Colleen

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide guidelines for determining a Significant Noise-Induced Threshold Shift in clinical trials involving human populations. The article reviews recommendations for the standards to be referenced for human subjects, equipment, test environment, and personnel. Additional guidelines for military populations are provided. Guidelines for the calibration of audiometers, sound booth noise levels, and immitance equipment are provided. In addition the guidance provides specific suggestions for the subjects history before study onset, and otoscopy.Test frequencies for threshold determination and methods of threshold determination are reviewed for both air conduction and bone conduction for both baseline testing and later determination of either a temporary (TTS) or permanent threshold shift (PTS). Once a Significant Noise-Induced Threshold Shift has been determined, subjects should be retested, conductive component should be ruled out or addressed, and the subject should be counseled or referred for additional medical evaluation. Guidance for reporting procedures and the computerized study database are described. Finally, experimental designs suggested for noise-induced otoprotection clinical trials are described.

  11. Guidelines for Auditory Threshold Measurement for Significant Threshold Shift.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Kathleen; Hammill, Tanisha; Hoffer, Michael; Kil, Jonathan; Le Prell, Colleen

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide guidelines for determining a Significant Noise-Induced Threshold Shift in clinical trials involving human populations. The article reviews recommendations for the standards to be referenced for human subjects, equipment, test environment, and personnel. Additional guidelines for military populations are provided. Guidelines for the calibration of audiometers, sound booth noise levels, and immitance equipment are provided. In addition the guidance provides specific suggestions for the subjects history before study onset, and otoscopy.Test frequencies for threshold determination and methods of threshold determination are reviewed for both air conduction and bone conduction for both baseline testing and later determination of either a temporary (TTS) or permanent threshold shift (PTS). Once a Significant Noise-Induced Threshold Shift has been determined, subjects should be retested, conductive component should be ruled out or addressed, and the subject should be counseled or referred for additional medical evaluation. Guidance for reporting procedures and the computerized study database are described. Finally, experimental designs suggested for noise-induced otoprotection clinical trials are described. PMID:27518134

  12. Performance and cycle life of carbon- and conductive-based air electrodes for rechargeable Zn-air battery applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chellapandi Velraj, Samgopiraj

    The development of high-performance, cyclically stable bifunctional air electrodes are critical to the commercial deployment of rechargeable Zn-air batteries. The carbon material predominantly used as support material in the air electrodes due to its higher surface area and good electrical conductivity suffers from corrosion at high oxygen evolution overpotentials. This study addresses the carbon corrosion issues and suggests alternate materials to replace the carbon as support in the air electrode. In this study, Sm0.5Sr0.5CoO3-delta with good electrochemical performance and cyclic lifetime was identified as an alternative catalyst material to the commonly used La0.4Ca 0.6CoO3 catalyst for the carbon-based bifunctional electrodes. Also, a comprehensive study on the effects of catalyst morphology, testing conditions on the cycle life as well as the relevant degradation mechanism for the carbon-based electrode was conducted in this dissertation. The cyclic life of the carbon-based electrodes was strongly dependent on the carbon support material, while the degradation mechanisms were entirely controlled by the catalyst particle size/morphology. Some testing conditions like resting time and electrolyte concentration did not change the cyclic life or degradation mechanism of the carbon-based electrode. The current density used for cyclic testing was found to dictate the degradation mechanism leading to the electrode failure. An alternate way to circumvent the carbon corrosion is to replace the carbon support with a suitable electrically-conductive ceramic material. In this dissertation, LaNi0.9Mn0.1O3, LaNi 0.8Co0.2O3, and NiCo2O4 were synthesized and evaluated as prospective support materials due to their good electrical conductivity and their ability to act as the catalyst needed for the bifunctional electrode. The carbon-free electrodes had remarkably higher catalytic activity for oxygen evolution reaction (OER) when compared to the carbon-based electrode. However

  13. Air-pressure tunable depletion width, rectification behavior, and charge conduction in oxide nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Alivov, Yahya; Funke, Hans H; Singh, Vivek; Nagpal, Prashant

    2015-02-01

    Metal-oxide nanotubes provide large surface areas and functionalizable surfaces for a variety of optical and electronic applications. Here we report air-tunable rectifying behavior, depletion width modulation, and two-dimensional (2D) charge conduction in hollow titanium-dioxide nanotubes. The metal contact forms a Schottky-diode in the nanotubes, and the rectification factor (on/off ratio) can be varied by more than 3 orders of magnitude (1-2 × 10(3)) as the air pressure is increased from 2 mTorr to atmospheric pressure. This behavior is explained using a change in depletion width of these thin nanotubes by adsorption of water vapor on both surfaces of a hollow nanotube, and the resulting formation of a metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) junction, which controls the 2D charge conduction properties in thin oxide nanotubes.

  14. Microstructure and DC electrical conductivity of spinel nickel ferrite sintered in air and nitrogen atmospheres

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Baogang; Zhou, Kechao; Li, Zhiyou; Zhang, Dou; Zhang, Lei

    2010-11-15

    In recent years, the development of inert anode materials has gained considerable attention because such materials are capable of producing only environment-friendly O{sub 2} and saving energy during aluminum electrolysis. Nickel ferrite was prepared by a solid-state reaction as the inert anode in this study and its microstructures and direct current conductivities were analyzed in detail regarding the effects of different sintering atmospheres. A single-phase spinel structure was confirmed for all samples by X-ray powder diffraction. The grain sizes and the relative densities of the samples sintered in nitrogen increased by over 7 {mu}m and 10.8%, respectively, compared to those sintered in air. The direct current conductivities of the samples sintered in nitrogen showed a drastic increase compared to those sintered in air, believed to be due to the effects of increased Fe{sup 2+} ion concentration at octahedral sites and the increase of the relative density.

  15. Structural changes and conductance thresholds in metal-free intrinsic SiOx resistive random access memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehonic, Adnan; Buckwell, Mark; Montesi, Luca; Garnett, Leon; Hudziak, Stephen; Fearn, Sarah; Chater, Richard; McPhail, David; Kenyon, Anthony J.

    2015-03-01

    We present an investigation of structural changes in silicon-rich silicon oxide metal-insulator-metal resistive RAM devices. The observed unipolar switching, which is intrinsic to the bulk oxide material and does not involve movement of metal ions, correlates with changes in the structure of the oxide. We use atomic force microscopy, conductive atomic force microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and secondary ion mass spectroscopy to examine the structural changes occurring as a result of switching. We confirm that protrusions formed at the surface of samples during switching are bubbles, which are likely to be related to the outdiffusion of oxygen. This supports existing models for valence-change based resistive switching in oxides. In addition, we describe parallel linear and nonlinear conduction pathways and suggest that the conductance quantum, G0, is a natural boundary between the high and low resistance states of our devices.

  16. Structural changes and conductance thresholds in metal-free intrinsic SiO{sub x} resistive random access memory

    SciTech Connect

    Mehonic, Adnan E-mail: t.kenyon@ucl.ac.uk; Buckwell, Mark; Montesi, Luca; Garnett, Leon; Hudziak, Stephen; Kenyon, Anthony J. E-mail: t.kenyon@ucl.ac.uk; Fearn, Sarah; Chater, Richard; McPhail, David

    2015-03-28

    We present an investigation of structural changes in silicon-rich silicon oxide metal-insulator-metal resistive RAM devices. The observed unipolar switching, which is intrinsic to the bulk oxide material and does not involve movement of metal ions, correlates with changes in the structure of the oxide. We use atomic force microscopy, conductive atomic force microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and secondary ion mass spectroscopy to examine the structural changes occurring as a result of switching. We confirm that protrusions formed at the surface of samples during switching are bubbles, which are likely to be related to the outdiffusion of oxygen. This supports existing models for valence-change based resistive switching in oxides. In addition, we describe parallel linear and nonlinear conduction pathways and suggest that the conductance quantum, G{sub 0}, is a natural boundary between the high and low resistance states of our devices.

  17. 40 CFR 60.2151 - By what date must I conduct the annual air pollution control device inspection?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... air pollution control device inspection? 60.2151 Section 60.2151 Protection of Environment... Compliance Requirements § 60.2151 By what date must I conduct the annual air pollution control device inspection? On an annual basis (no more than 12 months following the previous annual air pollution...

  18. 40 CFR 60.5215 - By what date must I conduct annual air pollution control device inspections and make any...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... air pollution control device inspections and make any necessary repairs? (a) You must conduct an annual inspection of each air pollution control device used to comply with the emission limits, according to § 60.5220(c), no later than 12 months following the previous annual air pollution control...

  19. 40 CFR 60.5215 - By what date must I conduct annual air pollution control device inspections and make any...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... air pollution control device inspections and make any necessary repairs? (a) You must conduct an annual inspection of each air pollution control device used to comply with the emission limits, according to § 60.5220(c), no later than 12 months following the previous annual air pollution control...

  20. 40 CFR 60.2151 - By what date must I conduct the annual air pollution control device inspection?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... air pollution control device inspection? 60.2151 Section 60.2151 Protection of Environment... Compliance Requirements § 60.2151 By what date must I conduct the annual air pollution control device inspection? On an annual basis (no more than 12 months following the previous annual air pollution...

  1. 40 CFR 60.2716 - By what date must I conduct the annual air pollution control device inspection?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... air pollution control device inspection? 60.2716 Section 60.2716 Protection of Environment... Requirements § 60.2716 By what date must I conduct the annual air pollution control device inspection? On an annual basis (no more than 12 months following the previous annual air pollution control...

  2. 40 CFR 60.5215 - By what date must I conduct annual air pollution control device inspections and make any...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... air pollution control device inspections and make any necessary repairs? (a) You must conduct an annual inspection of each air pollution control device used to comply with the emission limits, according to § 60.5220(c), no later than 12 months following the previous annual air pollution control...

  3. 40 CFR 60.5215 - By what date must I conduct annual air pollution control device inspections and make any...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... air pollution control device inspections and make any necessary repairs? (a) You must conduct an annual inspection of each air pollution control device used to comply with the emission limits, according to § 60.5220(c), no later than 12 months following the previous annual air pollution control...

  4. Unconventional but tunable phase transition above the percolation threshold by two-layer conduction in electroless-deposited Au nanofeatures on silicon substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seung-Hoon; Shin, Muncheol; Hwang, Seongpil; Jang, Jae-Won

    2015-12-01

    Previous research has shown that disorder, dislocation, and carrier concentration are the main factors impacting transitions in the traditional metal-insulator transition (MIT) and metal-semiconductor transition (MST). In this study, it is demonstrated that a non-traditional metal-semiconductor transition governed by two-layer conduction is possible by tuning the conducting channel of one layer of the two-layer conduction system. By means of the electroless deposition method we produced Au nanofeatures (AuNFs) on p-type silicon (p-Si) as the two-layer conduction system, controlling AuNF coverage (Au%) below and above the percolation threshold (p c). Even when the AuNF coverage percentage is larger than p c, the resistivities of the AuNFs on p-Si show MST as the temperature increases. To demonstrate this finding, we present a conduction model based upon two predominant parallel conductions by AuNFs and p-Si in the present paper. In the results, we show how the temperature of the MST (T MST) is tuned from 145 to 232 K as Au% is changed from 82.7 to 54.3%.

  5. Unconventional but tunable phase transition above the percolation threshold by two-layer conduction in electroless-deposited Au nanofeatures on silicon substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seung-Hoon; Hwang, Seongpil; Jang, Jaw-Won

    Previous research has shown that disorder, dislocation, and carrier concentration are the main factors impacting transitions in the traditional metal-insulator transition (MIT) and metal-semiconductor transition (MST). In this study, it is demonstrated that a non-traditional MST governed by two-layer conduction is possible by tuning the conducting channel of one layer of the two-layer conduction system. By means of the electroless deposition method we produced Au nanofeatures (AuNFs) on p-type silicon (p-Si) as the two-layer conduction system, controlling AuNF coverage (Au%) below and above the percolation threshold (pc). Even when the AuNF coverage percentage is larger than pc, the resistivities of the AuNFs on p-Si show MST as the temperature increases. We present a conduction model based upon two predominant parallel conductions by AuNFs and p-Si in the present paper. In the results, we show how the temperature of the MST is tuned from 145 to 232 K as Au% is changed from 82.7 to 54.3%. Supported by Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology (no. 2013K1A3A1A32035429 and 2015R1A1A1A05027681).

  6. NanoCapillary Network Proton Conducting Membranes for High Temperature Hydrogen/Air Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pintauro, Peter

    2012-07-09

    The objective of this proposal is to fabricate and characterize a new class of NanoCapillary Network (NCN) proton conducting membranes for hydrogen/air fuel cells that operate under high temperature, low humidity conditions. The membranes will be intelligently designed, where a high density interconnecting 3-D network of nm-diameter electrospun proton conducting polymer fibers is embedded in an inert (uncharged) water/gas impermeable polymer matrix. The high density of fibers in the resulting mat and the high ion-exchange capacity of the fiber polymer will ensure high proton conductivity. To further enhance water retention, molecular silica will be added to the sulfonated polymer fibers. The uncharged matrix material will control water swelling of the high ion-exchange capacity proton conducting polymer fibers and will impart toughness to the final nanocapillary composite membrane. Thus, unlike other fuel cell membranes, the role of the polymer support matrix will be decoupled from that of the proton-conducting channels. The expected final outcome of this 5-year project is the fabrication of fuel cell membranes with properties that exceed the DOE’s technical targets, in particular a proton conductivity of 0.1 S/cm at a temperature less than or equal to120°C and 25-50% relative humidity.

  7. Heat Transfer Investigation of Air Flow in Microtubes-Part II: Scale and Axial Conduction Effects.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ting-Yu; Kandlikar, Satish G

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, the scale effects are specifically addressed by conducting experiments with air flow in different microtubes. Three stainless steel tubes of 962, 308, and 83 μm inner diameter (ID) are investigated for friction factor, and the first two are investigated for heat transfer. Viscous heating effects are studied in the laminar as well as turbulent flow regimes by varying the air flow rate. The axial conduction effects in microtubes are experimentally explored for the first time by comparing the heat transfer in SS304 tube with a 910 μm ID/2005 μm outer diameter nickel tube specifically fabricated using an electrodeposition technique. After carefully accounting for the variable heat losses along the tube length, it is seen that the viscous heating and the axial conduction effects become more important at microscale and the present models are able to predict these effects accurately. It is concluded that neglecting these effects is the main source of discrepancies in the data reported in the earlier literature.

  8. Mathematical equations for heat conduction in the fins of air-cooled engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harper, R R; Brown, W B

    1923-01-01

    The problem considered in this report is that of reducing actual geometrical area of fin-cooling surface, which is, of course, not uniform in temperature, to equivalent cooling area at one definite temperature, namely, that prevailing on the cylinder wall at the point of attachment of the fin. This makes it possible to treat all the cooling surface as if it were part of the cylinder wall and 100 per cent effective. The quantities involved in the equations are the geometrical dimensions of the fin, thermal conductivity of the material composing it, and the coefficient of surface heat dissipation between the fin and the air streams.

  9. Metallic conductivity and air stability in copper chloride intercalated carbon fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oshima, H.; Woollam, J. A.; Yavrouian, A.

    1982-01-01

    Carbon-copper chloride intercalation compounds have been obtained by using variously graphitized carbon fibers as host materials. The resultant conductors are air stable, thermally stable to 450 K, have electrical resistivities as low as 12.9 microohm cm at room temperature, and have metallic conductivity temperature dependencies. These intercalated fibers have tensile strengths of 160000 psi, and Young's moduli of 25 x 10 to the 6th psi. For aerospace use, 1/(resistivity x density) is a figure of merit. On this basis, a reduction in resistivity by a factor of two will make this conductor competitive with copper.

  10. Distribution Characteristics of Normal Pure-Tone Thresholds

    PubMed Central

    Margolis, Robert H.; Wilson, Richard H.; Popelka, Gerald R.; Eikelboom, Robert H.; Swanepoel, De Wet; Saly, George L.

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study examined the statistical properties of normal air-conduction thresholds obtained with automated and manual audiometry to test the hypothesis that thresholds are normally distributed and to examine the distributions for evidence of bias in manual testing. Design Four databases were mined for normal thresholds. One contained audiograms obtained with an automated method. The other three were obtained with manual audiometry. Frequency distributions were examined for four test frequencies (250, 500, 1000, and 2000 Hz). Study Sample The analysis is based on 317,569 threshold determinations of 80,547 subjects from four clinical databases. Results Frequency distributions of thresholds obtained with automated audiometry are normal in form. Corrected for age, the mean thresholds are within 1.5 dB of Reference Equivalent Threshold Sound Pressure Levels. Frequency distributions of thresholds obtained by manual audiometry are shifted toward higher thresholds. Two of the three datasets obtained by manual audiometry are positively skewed. Conclusions The positive shift and skew of the manual audiometry data may result from tester bias. The striking scarcity of thresholds below 0 dB HL suggests that audiologists place less importance on identifying low thresholds than they do for higher-level thresholds. We refer to this as the Good Enough Bias and suggest that it may be responsible for differences in distributions of thresholds obtained by automated and manual audiometry. PMID:25938502

  11. Deep rooting plants influence on soil hydraulic properties and air conductivity over time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uteau, Daniel; Peth, Stephan; Diercks, Charlotte; Pagenkemper, Sebastian; Horn, Rainer

    2014-05-01

    Crop sequences are commonly suggested as an alternative to improve subsoil structure. A well structured soil can be characterized by enhanced transport properties. Our main hypothesis was, that different root systems can modify the soil's macro/mesopore network if enough cultivation time is given. We analyzed the influence of three crops with either shallower roots (Festuca arundinacea, fescue) or taproots (Cichorium intybus, chicory and Medicago sativa, alfalfa). The crops where cultivated on a Haplic Luvisol near Bonn (Germany) for one, two or three years. Undisturbed soil cores were taken for measurement of unsaturated hydraulic conductivity and air permeability. The unsaturated conductivity was measured using the evaporation method, monitoring the water content and tension at two depths of each undisturbed soil core. The van Genuchten-Mualem model (1991) was fitted to the measured data. Air permeability was measured in a permeameter with constant flow at low pressure gradient. The measurements were repeated at -1, -3, -6, -15, -30 and -50 kPa matric tension and the model of Ball et al. (1988) was used to describe permeability as function of matric tension. Furthermore, the cores equilibrated at -15 kPa matric tension were scanned with X-Ray computer tomography. By means of 3D image analysis, geometrical features as pore size distribution, tortuosity and connectivity of the pore network was analyzed. The measurements showed an increased unsaturated hydraulic conductivity associated to coarser pores at the taprooted cultivations. A enhanced pore system (related to shrink-swell processes) under alfalfa was observed in both transport measurements and was confirmed by the 3D image analysis. This highly functional pore system (consisting mainly of root paths, earthworm channels and shrinking cracks) was clearly visible below the 75 cm of depth and differentiated significantly from the other two treatments only after three years of cultivation, which shows the time

  12. Effect of floating conducting objects on critical switching impulse breakdown of air insulation

    SciTech Connect

    Rizk, F.A.M.

    1995-07-01

    The paper analyses the mechanism of breakdown of phase-to-ground and phase-to-phase air insulation in the presence of large conducting floating objects, under critical switching impulse stress. A new physical modeling approach is introduced which involves determination of the potential of the floating object by charge simulation technique, assessment of streamer breakdown and/or leader inception and propagation in the partial gaps and finally predicts the critical breakdown voltage of various configurations. As to phase-to-ground insulation, the investigation covers rod-plane, conductor-plane and conductor-tower leg configurations with different gap spacings as well as different shapes, dimensions and positions of the floating object. The phase-to-phase study additionally includes the effect of negative switching impulse content of the applied stress. The model is in excellent agreement with experiment and provides a novel tool for assessment of the effect of floating objects on switching impulse breakdown of some basic air gap configurations relevant to live line work.

  13. A fast pulsed power source applied to treatment of conducting liquids and air

    SciTech Connect

    Heesch, E.J.M. van; Pemen, A.J.M.; Huijbrechts, P.A.H.J.; Laan, P.C.T. van der; Ptasinski, K.J.; Zanstra, G.J.; Jong, P. de

    2000-02-01

    Two pilot pulsed power sources were developed for fundamental investigations and industrial demonstrations of treatment of conducting liquids. The developed heavy-duty power sources have an output voltage of 100 kV (rise time 10 ns, pulse duration 150 ns, pulse repetition rate maximum 1,000 pps). A pulse energy of 0.5--3 J/pulse and an average pulse power of 1.5 kW have been achieved with an efficiency of about 80%. In addition, adequate electromagnetic compatibility is achieved between the high-voltage pulse sources and the surrounding equipment. Various applications, such as the use of pulsed electric fields (PEF's) or pulsed corona discharges for inactivation of microorganisms in liquids or air, have been tested in the laboratory. For PEF treatment, homogeneous electric fields in the liquid of up to 70 kV/cm at a pulse repetition rate of 10--400 pps could be achieved. The inactivation is found to be 85 kJ/L per log reduction for Pseudomonas fluorescens and 500 kJ/L per log reduction for spores of Bacillus cereus. Corona directly applied to the liquid is found to be more efficient than PEF. With direct corona they achieve 25 kJ/L per log reduction for both Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria. For air disinfection using their corona pulse source, the measured efficiencies are excellent: 2 J/L per log reduction.

  14. Effect of High-Pass Filtering on the Neonatal Auditory Brainstem Response to Air- and Bone-Conducted Clicks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuart, Andrew; Yang, Edward Y.

    1994-01-01

    Simultaneous 3- channel recorded auditory brainstem responses (ABR) were obtained from 20 neonates with various high-pass filter settings and low intensity levels. Results support the advocacy of less restrictive high-pass filtering for neonatal and infant ABR screening to air-conducted and bone-conducted clicks. (Author/JDD)

  15. Effects of ear-canal pressurization on middle-ear bone- and air-conduction responses

    PubMed Central

    Homma, Kenji; Shimizu, Yoshitaka; Kim, Namkeun; Du, Yu; Puria, Sunil

    2014-01-01

    In extremely loud noise environments, it is important to not only protect one’s hearing against noise transmitted through the air-conduction (AC) pathway, but also through the bone-conduction (BC) pathways. Much of the energy transmitted through the BC pathways is concentrated in the mid-frequency range around 1.5–2 kHz, which is likely due to the structural resonance of the middle ear. One potential approach for mitigating this mid-frequency BC noise transmission is to introduce a positive or negative static pressure in the ear canal, which is known to reduce BC as well as AC hearing sensitivity. In the present study, middle-ear ossicular velocities at the umbo and stapes were measured using human cadaver temporal bones in response to both BC and AC excitations, while static air pressures of ±400 mm H2O were applied in the ear canal. For the maximum negative pressure of −400 mm H2O, mean BC stapes-velocity reductions of about 5–8 dB were observed in the frequency range from 0.8 to 2.5 kHz, with a peak reduction of 8.6(± 4.7) dB at 1.6 kHz. Finite-element analysis indicates that the peak BC-response reduction tends to be in the mid-frequency range because the middle-ear BC resonance, which is typically around 1.5–2 kHz, is suppressed by the pressure-induced stiffening of the middle-ear structure. The measured data also show that the BC responses are reduced more for negative static pressures than for positive static pressures. This may be attributable to a difference in the distribution of the stiffening among the middle-ear components depending on the polarity of the static pressure. The characteristics of the BC-response reductions are found to be largely consistent with the available psychoacoustic data, and are therefore indicative of the relative importance of the middle-ear mechanism in BC hearing. PMID:19944139

  16. Adaptive Thresholds

    SciTech Connect

    Bremer, P. -T.

    2014-08-26

    ADAPT is a topological analysis code that allow to compute local threshold, in particular relevance based thresholds for features defined in scalar fields. The initial target application is vortex detection but the software is more generally applicable to all threshold based feature definitions.

  17. 49 CFR 232.217 - Train brake tests conducted using yard air.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... reduction of brake pipe air pressure at the same, or slower, rate as an engineer's brake valve. (b) The yard... (f). (2) At a minimum, yard air pressure shall be 60 psi at the end of the consist or block of cars... device. (3) If the air pressure of the yard test device is less than 80 psi, then a brake pipe leakage...

  18. 49 CFR 232.217 - Train brake tests conducted using yard air.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... reduction of brake pipe air pressure at the same, or slower, rate as an engineer's brake valve. (b) The yard... (f). (2) At a minimum, yard air pressure shall be 60 psi at the end of the consist or block of cars... device. (3) If the air pressure of the yard test device is less than 80 psi, then a brake pipe leakage...

  19. 49 CFR 232.217 - Train brake tests conducted using yard air.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... reduction of brake pipe air pressure at the same, or slower, rate as an engineer's brake valve. (b) The yard... (f). (2) At a minimum, yard air pressure shall be 60 psi at the end of the consist or block of cars... device. (3) If the air pressure of the yard test device is less than 80 psi, then a brake pipe leakage...

  20. 49 CFR 232.217 - Train brake tests conducted using yard air.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... reduction of brake pipe air pressure at the same, or slower, rate as an engineer's brake valve. (b) The yard... (f). (2) At a minimum, yard air pressure shall be 60 psi at the end of the consist or block of cars... device. (3) If the air pressure of the yard test device is less than 80 psi, then a brake pipe leakage...

  1. 49 CFR 232.217 - Train brake tests conducted using yard air.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... reduction of brake pipe air pressure at the same, or slower, rate as an engineer's brake valve. (b) The yard... (f). (2) At a minimum, yard air pressure shall be 60 psi at the end of the consist or block of cars... device. (3) If the air pressure of the yard test device is less than 80 psi, then a brake pipe leakage...

  2. Basilar membrane and osseous spiral lamina motion in human cadavers with air and bone conduction stimuli.

    PubMed

    Stenfelt, Stefan; Puria, Sunil; Hato, Naohito; Goode, Richard L

    2003-07-01

    It is generally accepted that bone conduction (BC) stimuli yield a traveling wave on the basilar membrane (BM) and hence stimulate the cochlea by the same mechanisms as normal air conduction (AC). The basis for this is the ability to cancel or mask a BC tone with an AC tone and the ability to generate two tone distortion products with a BC tone and an AC tone. The hypothesis is proposed that BC stimulates the BM not only through the hydrodynamics of the scala vestibuli and scala tympani, but also through osseous spiral lamina (OSL) vibrations. To test this hypothesis the BM and OSL response with AC as well as BC stimulation was measured with a laser Doppler vibrometer. Human temporal bones mounted on a shaker were used to record the velocities of the bone per se, the BM and the OSL. The measurements were then converted to relative BM and OSL velocities. The results from the basal turn of the cochlea show similar behavior with AC and BC stimulation. The motion of the OSL at the edge where it connects to the BM is in phase and is typically 6 dB lower than the BM motion. With BC stimulation, there is less phase accumulation in the OSL after the cochlea is drained; the OSL moves due to inertial forces and resonates at approximately 7 kHz. Inertial vibration of the OSL may partially contribute to the total response of BC sound, especially at the high frequencies, although current models of the cochlea assume a rigid OSL. The measurements reported here can be used to include a flexible OSL in cochlear models.

  3. Air

    MedlinePlus

    ... do to protect yourself from dirty air . Indoor air pollution and outdoor air pollution Air can be polluted indoors and it can ... this chart to see what things cause indoor air pollution and what things cause outdoor air pollution! Indoor ...

  4. Experimental and theoretical study of the influence of the state of dispersion of graphene on the percolation threshold of conductive graphene/polystyrene nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Tkalya, Evgeniy; Ghislandi, Marcos; Otten, Ronald; Lotya, Mustafa; Alekseev, Alexander; van der Schoot, Paul; Coleman, Jonathan; de With, Gijsbertus; Koning, Cor

    2014-09-10

    The effect of the dispersed state of graphene is studied as a factor influencing the electrical percolation threshold of graphene/polystyrene nanocomposites. We find the percolation threshold of our nanocomposites, prepared with graphene dispersions with different thermodynamic stabilities, degrees of exfoliation, and size polydispersities, to range from 2 to 4.5 wt %. Connectedness percolation theory is applied to calculate percolation thresholds of the corresponding nanocomposites, based on the premise that size polydispersity of graphene platelets in the corresponding solutions must have a strong influence on it. Theory and experimental results agree qualitatively.

  5. Prediction of the percolation threshold and electrical conductivity of self-assembled antimony-doped tin oxide nanoparticles into ordered structures in PMMA/ATO nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Jin, Youngho; Gerhardt, Rosario A

    2014-12-24

    Electrical percolation in nanocomposites consisting of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and antimony tin oxide (ATO) nanoparticles was investigated experimentally using monosize and polydisperse polymer particles. The nanocomposites were fabricated by compression molding at 170 °C. The matrix PMMA was transformed into space filling polyhedra while the ATO nanoparticles distributed along the sharp edges of the matrix, forming a 3D interconnected network. The measured electrical resistivity showed that percolation was achieved in these materials at a very low ATO content of 0.99 wt % ATO when monosize PMMA was used, whereas 1.48 wt % ATO was needed to achieve percolation when the PMMA was polydispersed. A parametric finite element approach was chosen to model this unique microstructure-driven self-assembling percolation behavior. COMSOL Multiphysics was used to solve the effects of phase segregation between the matrix and the filler using a 2D simplified model in the frequency domain of the AC/DC module. It was found that the percolation threshold (pc) is affected by the size ratio between the matrix and the filler in a systematic way. Furthermore, simulations indicate that small deviations from perfect interconnection result mostly in changes in the electrical resistivity while the minimum DC resistivity achievable in any given composite is governed by the electrical conductivity of the filler, which must be accurately known in order to obtain an accurate prediction. The model is quite general and is able to predict percolation behavior in a number of other similarly processed segregated network nanocomposites. PMID:25427537

  6. Occurrence of electrical percolation threshold and observation of phase transition in chitosan(1- x):AgI x (0.05 ≤ x ≤ 0.2)-based ion-conducting solid polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aziz, Shujahadeen B.

    2016-07-01

    This paper reports on the investigation of electrical percolation threshold and ion transport mechanism for ion-conducting solid polymer composites based on chitosan. The composite samples were prepared by solution cast technique. The result of DC conductivity versus percolation threshold (Φ^{ - 1/3} ) confirmed that at low AgI concentration, the tunneling effect governs ionic conduction mechanism. Nevertheless, at high filler concentration, the DC conductivity showed a plateau behavior. The DC conductivity as a function of reciprocal temperature revealed that the ion conduction mechanism is slightly temperature dependent and the ion-ion correlational effect is dominant. A steep increase in DC conductivity above 323 K is observed, which indicated the existence of some phase transition near the beta (β)-phase. The drop of DC conductivity at high temperatures is anticipated from the impedance plots. The AC conductivity spectrum exhibited three distinct regions at low temperatures. The high-frequency regions of AC conductivity spectra were almost temperature independent at low temperatures (303-323 K) and obeyed the Jonscher's power law. The variation in frequency exponent versus temperature reveals that ion conduction mechanism follows QMT and CBH models at low and high temperatures, respectively. The valuable achievement of this work is that the temperature dependence of DC conductivity and the frequency exponent ( s) is correlated to interpret the Ag+ ion dynamic and ion-ion correlational effect. The Argand plots were used to explain the relaxation processes.

  7. Temperature and strain rate effects in high strength high conductivity copper alloys tested in air

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, D.J.

    1998-03-01

    The tensile properties of the three candidate alloys GlidCop{trademark} Al25, CuCrZr, and CuNiBe are known to be sensitive to the testing conditions such as strain rate and test temperature. This study was conducted on GlidCop Al25 (2 conditions) and Hycon 3HP (3 conditions) to ascertain the effect of test temperature and strain rate when tested in open air. The results show that the yield strength and elongation of the GlidCop Al25 alloys exhibit a strain rate dependence that increases with temperature. Both the GlidCop and the Hycon 3 HP exhibited an increase in strength as the strain rate increased, but the GlidCop alloys proved to be the most strain rate sensitive. The GlidCop failed in a ductile manner irrespective of the test conditions, however, their strength and uniform elongation decreased with increasing test temperature and the uniform elongation also decreased dramatically at the lower strain rates. The Hycon 3 HP alloys proved to be extremely sensitive to test temperature, rapidly losing their strength and ductility when the temperature increased above 250 C. As the test temperature increased and the strain rate decreased the fracture mode shifted from a ductile transgranular failure to a ductile intergranular failure with very localized ductility. This latter observation is based on the presence of dimples on the grain facets, indicating that some ductile deformation occurred near the grain boundaries. The material failed without any reduction in area at 450 C and 3.9 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} s{sup {minus}1}, and in several cases failed prematurely.

  8. 40 CFR 60.4875 - By what date must I conduct the initial air pollution control device inspection and make any...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... air pollution control device inspection and make any necessary repairs? 60.4875 Section 60.4875... Initial Compliance Requirements § 60.4875 By what date must I conduct the initial air pollution control device inspection and make any necessary repairs? (a) You must conduct an air pollution control...

  9. 40 CFR 60.4875 - By what date must I conduct the initial air pollution control device inspection and make any...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... air pollution control device inspection and make any necessary repairs? 60.4875 Section 60.4875... Initial Compliance Requirements § 60.4875 By what date must I conduct the initial air pollution control device inspection and make any necessary repairs? (a) You must conduct an air pollution control...

  10. 40 CFR 60.4875 - By what date must I conduct the initial air pollution control device inspection and make any...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... air pollution control device inspection and make any necessary repairs? 60.4875 Section 60.4875... Initial Compliance Requirements § 60.4875 By what date must I conduct the initial air pollution control device inspection and make any necessary repairs? (a) You must conduct an air pollution control...

  11. 40 CFR 60.4875 - By what date must I conduct the initial air pollution control device inspection and make any...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... air pollution control device inspection and make any necessary repairs? 60.4875 Section 60.4875... Initial Compliance Requirements § 60.4875 By what date must I conduct the initial air pollution control device inspection and make any necessary repairs? (a) You must conduct an air pollution control...

  12. 40 CFR 60.5195 - By what date must I conduct the initial air pollution control device inspection and make any...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... air pollution control device inspection and make any necessary repairs? 60.5195 Section 60.5195... air pollution control device inspection and make any necessary repairs? (a) You must conduct an air... approved state plan, Federal plan, or delegation, as applicable. For air pollution control...

  13. 40 CFR 60.5195 - By what date must I conduct the initial air pollution control device inspection and make any...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... air pollution control device inspection and make any necessary repairs? 60.5195 Section 60.5195... air pollution control device inspection and make any necessary repairs? (a) You must conduct an air... approved state plan, Federal plan, or delegation, as applicable. For air pollution control...

  14. 40 CFR 60.5195 - By what date must I conduct the initial air pollution control device inspection and make any...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... air pollution control device inspection and make any necessary repairs? 60.5195 Section 60.5195... air pollution control device inspection and make any necessary repairs? (a) You must conduct an air... approved state plan, Federal plan, or delegation, as applicable. For air pollution control...

  15. 40 CFR 60.5195 - By what date must I conduct the initial air pollution control device inspection and make any...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... air pollution control device inspection and make any necessary repairs? 60.5195 Section 60.5195... air pollution control device inspection and make any necessary repairs? (a) You must conduct an air... approved state plan, Federal plan, or delegation, as applicable. For air pollution control...

  16. The role of biological system other than auditory air-conduction in the emergence of the hypersonic effect.

    PubMed

    Oohashi, Tsutomu; Kawai, Norie; Nishina, Emi; Honda, Manabu; Yagi, Reiko; Nakamura, Satoshi; Morimoto, Masako; Maekawa, Tadao; Yonekura, Yoshiharu; Shibasaki, Hiroshi

    2006-02-16

    Although human beings cannot perceive elastic vibrations in the frequency range above 20 kHz, nonstationary sounds containing a wealth of inaudible high-frequency components (HFC) above the human audible range activate deep-lying brain structures, including the brainstem and thalamus and evoke various physiological, psychological, and behavioral responses. In the previous reports, we have called these phenomena collectively "the hypersonic effect." It remains unclear, however, if vibratory stimuli above the audible range are transduced and perceived solely via the conventional air-conducting auditory system or if other mechanisms also contribute to mediate transduction and perception. In the present study, we have examined the emergence of the hypersonic effect when inaudible HFC and audible low-frequency components (LFC) were presented selectively to the ears, the entrance of an air-conducting auditory system, or to the body surface including the head which might contain some unknown vibratory sensing mechanisms. We used two independent measurements based on differing principles; one physiological (alpha 2 frequency of spontaneous electroencephalogram [alpha-EEG]) and the other behavioral (the comfortable listening level [CLL]). Only when the listener's entire body surface was exposed to HFC, but not when HFC was presented exclusively to the air-conducting auditory system, did both the alpha-EEG and the CLL significantly increase compared to the presentation of LFC alone, that is to say, there was an evident emergence of the hypersonic effect. The present findings suggest that the conventional air-conducting auditory system alone does not bring about the hypersonic effect. We may need to consider the possible involvement of a biological system distinct from the conventional air-conducting auditory nervous system in sensing and transducing high-frequency elastic vibration above the human audible range.

  17. Irregular primary otolith afferents from the guinea pig utricular and saccular maculae respond to both bone conducted vibration and to air conducted sound.

    PubMed

    Curthoys, Ian S; Vulovic, Vedran; Sokolic, Ljiljana; Pogson, Jacob; Burgess, Ann M

    2012-10-01

    This study sought to identify in guinea pig the peripheral sense organ of origin of otolith irregular primary vestibular afferent neurons having a very sensitive response to both air-conducted sound (ACS) and bone-conducted vibration (BCV). Neurons responding to both types of stimuli were labelled by juxtacellular labelling by neurobiotin. Whole mounts of the maculae showed that some vestibular afferents activated by both ACS and BCV originate from the utricular macula and some from the saccular macula - there is no "afferent specificity" by one sense organ for ACS and the other for BCV - instead some afferents from both sense organs have sensitive responses to both stimuli. The clinical implication of this result is that differential evaluation of the functional status of the utricular and saccular maculae cannot rely on stimulus type (ACS vs BCV), however the differential motor projections of the utricular and saccular maculae allow for differential evaluation of each sense organ.

  18. Irregular primary otolith afferents from the guinea pig utricular and saccular maculae respond to both bone conducted vibration and to air conducted sound.

    PubMed

    Curthoys, Ian S; Vulovic, Vedran; Sokolic, Ljiljana; Pogson, Jacob; Burgess, Ann M

    2012-10-01

    This study sought to identify in guinea pig the peripheral sense organ of origin of otolith irregular primary vestibular afferent neurons having a very sensitive response to both air-conducted sound (ACS) and bone-conducted vibration (BCV). Neurons responding to both types of stimuli were labelled by juxtacellular labelling by neurobiotin. Whole mounts of the maculae showed that some vestibular afferents activated by both ACS and BCV originate from the utricular macula and some from the saccular macula - there is no "afferent specificity" by one sense organ for ACS and the other for BCV - instead some afferents from both sense organs have sensitive responses to both stimuli. The clinical implication of this result is that differential evaluation of the functional status of the utricular and saccular maculae cannot rely on stimulus type (ACS vs BCV), however the differential motor projections of the utricular and saccular maculae allow for differential evaluation of each sense organ. PMID:22814095

  19. Air-Stable, High-Conduction Solid Electrolytes of Arsenic-Substituted Li4SnS4

    SciTech Connect

    Sahu, Gayatri; Lin, Zhan; Li, Juchuan; Liu, Zengcai; Dudney, Nancy J; Liang, Chengdu

    2014-01-01

    Lithium-ion-conducting solid electrolytes show promise for enabling high-energy secondary battery chemistries and solving safety issues associated with conventional lithium batteries. Achieving the combination of high ionic conductivity and outstanding chemical stability in solid electrolytes is a grand challenge for the synthesis of solid electrolytes. Herein we report the design of aliovalent substitution of Li4SnS4 to achieve high conduction and excellent air stability based on the hard and soft acids and bases theory. The composition of Li3.833Sn0.833As 0.166S4 has a high ionic conductivity of 1.39 mS/cm 1 at 25 C. Considering the high Li+ transference number, this phase conducts Li+ as well as carbonate-based liquid electrolytes. This research also addresses the compatibility of the sulfide-based solid electrolytes through chemical passivation.

  20. Wind Direction Bias in Generating Wind Roses and Conducting Sector-Based Air-Dispersion Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Droppo, James G.; Napier, Bruce A.

    2008-07-01

    Certain widely used wind rose programs and air dispersion models use an overly-simple data-transfer algorithm that induces a directional bias in their output products. The purpose of this paper is to provide a revised algorithm that corrects the aliasing bias that occurs when the internals in reported wind direction data are on the same order of magnitude, but not equal to the intervals used in the wind direction summaries. The directional bias issue arises when output products in 22.5-degree sectors are produced from 10-degree wind direction data, which affects the results of simulations of air and surface concentrations using widely applied air-dispersion models. Datasets or models with the bias discussed here give consistent positive biases (approximately 30%) for cardinal direction sectors (north, south, east, and west) and consistent negative biases for all the other sectors (approximately -10%). Data summary and air dispersion programs providing outputs in directions sectors that do not match the observational sectors need to be checked for this bias. A revised data-transfer algorithm is provided that corrects the aliasing bias that can occur in transferring wind direction data between different sectors widths.

  1. Bordered pit structure and function determine spatial patterns of air-seeding thresholds in xylem of Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii; Pinaceae) trees.

    PubMed

    Domec, Jean-Christophe; Lachenbruch, Barbara; Meinzer, Frederick C

    2006-11-01

    The air-seeding hypothesis predicts that xylem embolism resistance is linked directly to bordered pit functioning. We tested this prediction in trunks, roots, and branches at different vertical and radial locations in young and old trees of Pseudotsuga menziesii. Dimensions of bordered pits were measured from light and scanning electron micrographs, and physiological data were from published values. Consistent with observations, calculations showed that earlywood tracheids were more resistant to embolism than latewood tracheids, mainly from earlywood having stretchier pit membranes that can distend and cover the pit aperture. Air seeding that occurs in earlywood appears to happen through gaps between the torus edge and pit border, as shown by the similar calculated pressures required to stretch the membrane over the pit aperture and to cause embolism. Although bordered pit functioning was correlated with tracheid hydraulic diameter, pit pore size and above all pit aperture constrained conductivity the most. From roots to branches and from the trunk base to higher on the trunk, hydraulic resistance of the earlywood pit membrane increased significantly because of a decrease in the size of the pit aperture and size and number of margo pores. Moreover, overall wood conductivity decreased, in part due to lower pit conductivity and a decrease in size and frequency of pits. Structural and functional constraints leading to the trade-off of efficiency against safety of water transport were also demonstrated at the individual pit level, with a positive correlation between pit membrane resistance on an area basis and the pressure differential required to cause membrane stretching, a characteristic that is essential for pit aspiration.

  2. Role of conductivity in the electrohydrodynamic patterning of air-liquid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Gambhire, P; Thaokar, R M

    2012-09-01

    The effect of electrical conductivity on the wavelength of an electrohydrodynamic instability of a leaky dielectric-perfect dielectric (LD-PD) fluid interface is investigated. For instabilities induced by dc fields, two models, namely the PD-PD model, which is independent of the conductivity, and the LD-PD model, which shows very weak dependence on the conductivity of the LD fluid, have been previously suggested. In the past, experiments have been compared with either of these two models. In the present work, experiments, analytical theory, and simulations are used to elucidate the dependence of the wavelength obtained under dc fields on the ratio of the instability time (τs=1/smax) and the charge relaxation time (τc=εε0/σ, where ε0 is the permittivity of vacuum, ε is the dielectric constant, and σ is the electrical conductivity). Sensitive dependence of the wavelength on the nondimensional conductivity S2=σ2μ2h0(2)/(ε0(2)φ0(2)δ2) (where σ2 is the electrical conductivity, μ2 is the viscosity, h0 is the thickness of the thin liquid film, φ0 is the rms value of the applied field, and δ is a small parameter) is observed and the PD-PD and the LD-PD cases are observed only as limiting behaviors at very low and very high values of S2, respectively. Under an alternating field, the frequency of the applied voltage can be altered to realize several regimes of relative magnitudes of the three time scales inherent to the system, namely τc, τs, and the time period of the applied field, τf. The wavelength in the various regimes that result from a systematic variation of these three time scales is studied. It is observed that the linear Floquet theory is invalid in most of these regimes and nonlinear analysis is used to complement it. Systematic dependence of the wavelength of the instability on the frequency of the applied field is presented and it is demonstrated that nonlinear simulations are necessary to explain the experimental results.

  3. Thermal Conductivity and Erosion Durability of Composite Two-Phase Air Plasma Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitt, Michael P.; Rai, Amarendra K.; Zhu, Dongming; Dorfman, Mitchell R.; Wolfe, Douglas E.

    2015-01-01

    To enhance efficiency of gas turbines, new thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) must be designed which improve upon the thermal stability limit of 7 wt% yttria stabilized zirconia (7YSZ), approximately 1200 C. This tenant has led to the development of new TBC materials and microstructures capable of improved high temperature performance. This study focused on increasing the erosion durability of cubic zirconia based TBCs, traditionally less durable than the metastable t' zirconia based TBCs. Composite TBC microstructures composed of a low thermal conductivity/high temperature stable cubic Low-k matrix phase and a durable t' Low-k secondary phase were deposited via APS. Monolithic coatings composed of cubic Low-k and t' Low-k were also deposited, in addition to a 7YSZ benchmark. The thermal conductivity and erosion durability were then measured and it was found that both of the Low-k materials have significantly reduced thermal conductivities, with monolithic t' Low-k and cubic Low-k improving upon 7YSZ by approximately 13 and approximately 25%, respectively. The 40 wt% t' Low-k composite (40 wt% t' Low-k - 60 wt% cubic Low-k) showed a approximately 22% reduction in thermal conductivity over 7YSZ, indicating even at high levels, the t' Low-k secondary phase had a minimal impact on thermal in the composite coating. It was observed that a mere 20 wt% t' Low-k phase addition can reduce the erosion of a cubic Low-k matrix phase composite coating by over 37%. Various mixing rules were then investigated to assess this non-linear composite behavior and suggestions were made to further improve erosion durability.

  4. Carrier-envelope phase-dependent electronic conductivity in an air filament driven by few-cycle laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lifeng; Lu, Xin; Teng, Hao; Xi, Tingting; Chen, Shiyou; He, Peng; He, Xinkui; Wei, Zhiyi

    2016-07-01

    The modulation of the electron conductivity in an air filament, which is produced by carrier-envelope phase (CEP) stabilized 7-fs laser pulses, is realized experimentally. Numerical results based on a coupled 3D+1 generalized nonlinear Schrödinger equation including the real electric-field dependent ionization model are in good agreement with those from the experiment. It is demonstrated that the CEP effect on the electron density originates from the CEP-induced modification of the electric field of the laser pulse, and this modification is amplified during nonlinear propagation. The results provide important information to help understand the physical mechanism of the filaments driven by few-cycle femtosecond laser pulses.

  5. 40 CFR 60.2716 - By what date must I conduct the annual air pollution control device inspection?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... air pollution control device inspection? 60.2716 Section 60.2716 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STANDARDS OF PERFORMANCE FOR NEW STATIONARY... annual air pollution control device inspection), you must complete the air pollution control...

  6. 40 CFR 60.2151 - By what date must I conduct the annual air pollution control device inspection?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... air pollution control device inspection? 60.2151 Section 60.2151 Protection of Environment... annual air pollution control device inspection? On an annual basis (no more than 12 months following the previous annual air pollution control device inspection), you must complete the air pollution...

  7. 40 CFR 60.2141 - By what date must I conduct the initial air pollution control device inspection?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... air pollution control device inspection? 60.2141 Section 60.2141 Protection of Environment... initial air pollution control device inspection? (a) The initial air pollution control device inspection... startup. (b) Within 10 operating days following an air pollution control device inspection, all...

  8. 40 CFR 60.2716 - By what date must I conduct the annual air pollution control device inspection?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... air pollution control device inspection? 60.2716 Section 60.2716 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STANDARDS OF PERFORMANCE FOR NEW STATIONARY... annual air pollution control device inspection), you must complete the air pollution control...

  9. 40 CFR 60.2716 - By what date must I conduct the annual air pollution control device inspection?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... air pollution control device inspection? 60.2716 Section 60.2716 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STANDARDS OF PERFORMANCE FOR NEW STATIONARY... annual air pollution control device inspection), you must complete the air pollution control...

  10. 40 CFR 60.2141 - By what date must I conduct the initial air pollution control device inspection?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... air pollution control device inspection? 60.2141 Section 60.2141 Protection of Environment... initial air pollution control device inspection? (a) The initial air pollution control device inspection... startup. (b) Within 10 operating days following an air pollution control device inspection, all...

  11. 40 CFR 60.2151 - By what date must I conduct the annual air pollution control device inspection?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... air pollution control device inspection? 60.2151 Section 60.2151 Protection of Environment... annual air pollution control device inspection? On an annual basis (no more than 12 months following the previous annual air pollution control device inspection), you must complete the air pollution...

  12. An electrical conductivity based method of determining the particle deposition rate in air-liquid interface devices.

    PubMed

    Wiegand, Harald; Meyer, Jörg; Kasper, Gerhard

    2015-08-01

    A new in-situ method of determining the particle deposition rate onto cell cultures inside air-liquid interface devices is described. It is based on depositing a surrogate aerosol of salt particles onto the water filled wells of a culture plate while measuring the resulting change in electrical conductivity of the solution in situ, in order to derive the accumulated particle mass. For evaluation purposes, the wells of a six-well cell culture plate were equipped with custom designed electrodes and calibrated with a series of commercially available standard solutions. After the necessary corrections prescribed by theory, the calibration resulted in an accuracy and comparability between cells of ±3% in terms of measured conductivity. The method was then applied to a specific ALI device consisting essentially of the calibrated six-well culture plate inside an electrostatic cross-flow precipitator, and tested with submicron NaCl aerosol of defined size distribution produced by nebulization of a salt solution. 2h of particle accumulation were sufficient to accumulate between 30 and 10 μg of salt per well, depending on the location in the precipitator. Resulting deposition rates varied narrowly between the wells by about 2 ng min(-1) cm(-2). Factors affecting the overall accuracy and reproducibility are discussed.

  13. Post-fire Changes in Air Permeability and Hydraulic Conductivity of Soils Following 2003 Aspen Fire in Sabino Canyon, AZ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chief, K.; Ferre, T. P.; Nijssen, B.

    2006-12-01

    As part of a project to study the hydrologic effects of fire on the Sabino Canyon Watershed, the Soil Corer Air Permeameter (SCAP) was developed to rapidly measure in-situ air permeability (k_a) of unburned and burned desert soils while providing a standard soil sample for additional laboratory analysis. Twenty-two unburned and burned plots were selected in woodland-chaparral and coniferous zones with low and high slopes, and low, medium, and high fuel loads or burn severities. Air permeability was measured on a 25-point square grid on each 100 m2 plot (n=445). Hydraulic conductivity (Ksat), water permeability (k_w), soil physical properties, and hydrophobicity measurements were made on extracted soil samples in the laboratory. There was a slight decrease in the median k_a from 95 to 80 μm2 for the woodland- chaparral zone as a result of the wildfire. There was a greater decrease for the coniferous zone where the median decreased from 152 to 110 μm2 following the fire. The k_w of woodland-chaparral soils increased from 192 to 425 μm2; but the median k_w decreased for the coniferous zone from 862 to 444 μm2 after the fire. In addition, hydrophobic measurements show that there was a significant increase in hydrophobicity for post-fire woodland-chaparral soils but not for coniferous soils. The log k_a and log Ksat measurements were highly correlated for the unburned woodland-chaparral soils, but this correlation decreased for burned woodland-chaparral soils. The unburned coniferous data set had the least k_a and Ksat correlation, but was reasonable for burned coniferous soils. The decrease in correlation may be due to increases of hydrophobicity, uneven wetting and preferential flow in Ksat measurements, or extremely rocky terrain. However, the overall, log k_a-log Ksat correlation for all unburned and burned soils including previous measurements on agricultural and alluvial soils follow the trend of the Iversen et al. (2001) log k_a-log Ksat correlation.

  14. 40 CFR 60.2706 - By what date must I conduct the initial air pollution control device inspection?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... air pollution control device inspection? 60.2706 Section 60.2706 Protection of Environment... pollution control device inspection? (a) The initial air pollution control device inspection must be... meeting the amended emission limitations. (b) Within 10 operating days following an air pollution...

  15. 40 CFR 60.2706 - By what date must I conduct the initial air pollution control device inspection?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... air pollution control device inspection? 60.2706 Section 60.2706 Protection of Environment... pollution control device inspection? (a) The initial air pollution control device inspection must be... meeting the amended emission limitations. (b) Within 10 operating days following an air pollution...

  16. 40 CFR 60.2706 - By what date must I conduct the initial air pollution control device inspection?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... air pollution control device inspection? 60.2706 Section 60.2706 Protection of Environment... pollution control device inspection? (a) The initial air pollution control device inspection must be... meeting the amended emission limitations. (b) Within 10 operating days following an air pollution...

  17. Ionic Conductivity and Air Stability of Al-Doped Li₇La₃Zr₂O₁₂ Sintered in Alumina and Pt Crucibles.

    PubMed

    Xia, Wenhao; Xu, Biyi; Duan, Huanan; Guo, Yiping; Kang, Hongmei; Li, Hua; Liu, Hezhou

    2016-03-01

    Li7La3Zr2O12 (LLZO) is a promising electrolyte material for all-solid-state battery due to its high ionic conductivity and good stability with metallic lithium. In this article, we studied the effect of crucibles on the ionic conductivity and air stability by synthesizing 0.25Al doped LLZO pellets in Pt crucibles and alumina crucibles, respectively. The results show that the composition and microstructure of the pellets play important roles influencing the ionic conductivity, relative density, and air stability. Specifically, the 0.25Al-LLZO pellets sintered in Pt crucibles exhibit a high relative density (∼96%) and high ionic conductivity (4.48 × 10(-4) S cm(-1)). The ionic conductivity maintains 3.6 × 10(-4) S cm(-1) after 3-month air exposure. In contrast, the ionic conductivity of the pellets from alumina crucibles is about 1.81 × 10(-4) S cm(-1) and drops to 2.39 × 10(-5) S cm(-1) 3 months later. The large grains and the reduced grain boundaries in the pellets sintered in Pt crucibles are favorable to obtain high ionic conductivity and good air stability. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Raman spectroscopy results suggest that the formation of Li2CO3 on the pellet surface is probably another main reason, which is also closely related to the relative density and the amount of grain boundary within the pellets. This work stresses the importance of synthesis parameters, crucibles included, to obtain the LLZO electrolyte with high ionic conductivity and good air stability.

  18. Water temperature effect on upward air-water flow in a vertical pipe: Local measurements database using four-sensor conductivity probes and LDA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monrós-Andreu, G.; Chiva, S.; Martínez-Cuenca, R.; Torró, S.; Juliá, J. E.; Hernández, L.; Mondragón, R.

    2013-04-01

    Experimental work was carried out to study the effects of temperature variation in bubbly, bubbly to slug transition. Experiments were carried out in an upward air-water flow configuration. Four sensor conductivity probes and LDA techniques was used together for the measurement of bubble parameters. The aim of this paper is to provide a bubble parameter experimental database using four-sensor conductivity probes and LDA technique for upward air-water flow at different temperatures and also show transition effect in different temperatures under the boiling point.

  19. 40 CFR 98.351 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ....351 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Industrial Wastewater Treatment § 98.351 Reporting threshold. You must... wastewater treatment sludge. (b) Ethanol production and food processing facilities. (1) The facility...

  20. 40 CFR 98.351 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ....351 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Industrial Wastewater Treatment § 98.351 Reporting threshold. You must... wastewater treatment sludge. (b) Ethanol production and food processing facilities. (1) The facility...

  1. 40 CFR 98.351 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ....351 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Industrial Wastewater Treatment § 98.351 Reporting threshold. You must... wastewater treatment sludge. (b) Ethanol production and food processing facilities. (1) The facility...

  2. 40 CFR 98.351 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ....351 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Industrial Wastewater Treatment § 98.351 Reporting threshold. You must... wastewater treatment sludge. (b) Ethanol production and food processing facilities. (1) The facility...

  3. 40 CFR 98.361 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.361 Section 98.361 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Manure Management § 98.361 Reporting threshold. Livestock facilities...

  4. 40 CFR 98.361 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.361 Section 98.361 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Manure Management § 98.361 Reporting threshold. Livestock facilities...

  5. 40 CFR 98.51 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.51 Section 98.51 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Adipic Acid Production § 98.51 Reporting threshold. You must report...

  6. 40 CFR 98.51 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.51 Section 98.51 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Adipic Acid Production § 98.51 Reporting threshold. You must report...

  7. 40 CFR 98.81 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.81 Section 98.81 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Cement Production § 98.81 Reporting threshold. You must report...

  8. 40 CFR 98.231 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.231 Section 98.231 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Petroleum and Natural Gas Systems § 98.231 Reporting threshold. (a)...

  9. 40 CFR 98.151 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.151 Section 98.151 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING HCFC-22 Production and HFC-23 Destruction § 98.151 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under...

  10. 40 CFR 98.421 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.421 Section 98.421 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Suppliers of Carbon Dioxide § 98.421 Reporting threshold. Any supplier...

  11. 40 CFR 98.421 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.421 Section 98.421 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Suppliers of Carbon Dioxide § 98.421 Reporting threshold. Any supplier...

  12. 40 CFR 98.51 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.51 Section 98.51 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Adipic Acid Production § 98.51 Reporting threshold. You must report...

  13. 40 CFR 98.81 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.81 Section 98.81 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Cement Production § 98.81 Reporting threshold. You must report...

  14. 40 CFR 98.71 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.71 Section 98.71 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Ammonia Manufacturing § 98.71 Reporting threshold. You must report...

  15. 40 CFR 98.111 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.111 Section 98.111 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Ferroalloy Production § 98.111 Reporting threshold. You must report...

  16. 40 CFR 98.71 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.71 Section 98.71 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Ammonia Manufacturing § 98.71 Reporting threshold. You must report...

  17. 40 CFR 98.51 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.51 Section 98.51 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Adipic Acid Production § 98.51 Reporting threshold. You must report...

  18. 40 CFR 98.71 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.71 Section 98.71 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Ammonia Manufacturing § 98.71 Reporting threshold. You must report...

  19. 40 CFR 98.341 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.341 Section 98.341 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Municipal Solid Waste Landfills § 98.341 Reporting threshold. You...

  20. Synthesis of an air-working trilayer artificial muscle using a conductive cassava starch biofilm (manihot esculenta, cranz) and polypyrrole (PPy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Núñez D, Y. E.; Arrieta A, Á. A.; Segura B, J. A.; Bertel H, S. D.

    2016-02-01

    In this study, a methodology for obtaining a conductive cassava starch biofilm doped with lithium perchlorate (LiClO4) is shown, as well as the electrochemical technique for the synthesis of polypyrrole films, which are used for developing the trilayer artificial muscle PPy/Biopolymer/PPy designed to operate in air. Furthermore, results from the trilayer movement using chronoamperometric techniques are shown.

  1. Control of Photosynthesis and Stomatal Conductance in Ricinus communis L. (Castor Bean) by Leaf to Air Vapor Pressure Deficit.

    PubMed

    Dai, Z; Edwards, G E; Ku, M S

    1992-08-01

    Castor bean (Ricinus communis L.) has a high photosynthetic capacity under high humidity and a pronounced sensitivity of photosynthesis to high water vapor pressure deficit (VPD). The sensitivity of photosynthesis to varying VPD was analyzed by measuring CO(2) assimilation, stomatal conductance (g(s)), quantum yield of photosystem II (phi(II)), and nonphotochemical quenching of chlorophyll fluorescence (q(N)) under different VPD. Under both medium (1000) and high (1800 micromoles quanta per square meter per second) light intensities, CO(2) assimilation decreased as the VPD between the leaf and the air around the leaf increased. The g(s) initially dropped rapidly with increasing VPD and then showed a slower decrease above a VPD of 10 to 20 millibars. Over a temperature range from 20 to 40 degrees C, CO(2) assimilation and g(s) were inhibited by high VPD (20 millibars). However, the rate of transpiration increased with increasing temperature at either low or high VPD due to an increase in g(s). The relative inhibition of photosynthesis under photorespiring (atmospheric levels of CO(2) and O(2)) versus nonphotorespiring (700 microbars CO(2) and 2% O(2)) conditions was greater under high VPD (30 millibars) than under low VPD (3 millibars). Also, with increasing light intensity the relative inhibition of photosynthesis by O(2) increased under high VPD, but decreased under low VPD. The effect of high VPD on photosynthesis under various conditions could not be totally accounted for by the decrease in the intercellular CO(2) in the leaf (C(i)) where C(i) was estimated from gas exchange measurements. However, estimates of C(i) from measurements of phi(II) and q(N) suggest that the decrease in photosynthesis and increase in photorespiration under high VPD can be totally accounted for by stomatal closure and a decrease in C(i). The results also suggest that nonuniform closure of stomata may occur in well-watered plants under high VPD, causing overestimates in the calculation

  2. Source analysis of short and long latency vestibular-evoked potentials (VsEPs) produced by left vs. right ear air-conducted 500 Hz tone pips.

    PubMed

    Todd, N P M; Paillard, A C; Kluk, K; Whittle, E; Colebatch, J G

    2014-06-01

    Todd et al. (2014) have recently demonstrated the presence of vestibular dependent changes both in the morphology and in the intensity dependence of auditory evoked potentials (AEPs) when passing through the vestibular threshold as determined by vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs). In this paper we extend this work by comparing left vs. right ear stimulation and by conducting a source analysis of the resulting evoked potentials of short and long latency. Ten healthy, right-handed subjects were recruited and evoked potentials were recorded to both left- and right-ear sound stimulation, above and below vestibular threshold. Below VEMP threshold, typical AEPs were recorded, consisting of mid-latency (MLR) waves Na and Pa followed by long latency AEPs (LAEPs) N1 and P2. In the supra-threshold condition, the expected changes in morphology were observed, consisting of: (1) short-latency vestibular evoked potentials (VsEPs) which have no auditory correlate, i.e. the ocular VEMP (OVEMP) and inion response related potentials; (2) a later deflection, labelled N42/P52, followed by the LAEPs N1 and P2. Statistical analysis of the vestibular dependent responses indicated a contralateral effect for inion related short-latency responses and a left-ear/right-hemisphere advantage for the long-latency responses. Source analysis indicated that the short-latency effects may be mediated by a contralateral projection to left cerebellum, while the long-latency effects were mediated by a contralateral projection to right cingulate cortex. In addition we found evidence of a possible vestibular contribution to the auditory T-complex in radial temporal lobe sources. These last results raise the possibility that acoustic activation of the otolith organs could potentially contribute to auditory processing.

  3. Analyses and estimates of hydraulic conductivity from slug tests in alluvial aquifer underlying Air Force Plant 4 and Naval Air Station-Joint Reserve Base Carswell Field, Fort Worth, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Houston, Natalie A.; Braun, Christopher L.

    2004-01-01

    This report describes the collection, analyses, and distribution of hydraulic-conductivity data obtained from slug tests completed in the alluvial aquifer underlying Air Force Plant 4 and Naval Air Station-Joint Reserve Base Carswell Field, Fort Worth, Texas, during October 2002 and August 2003 and summarizes previously available hydraulic-conductivity data. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Air Force, completed 30 slug tests in October 2002 and August 2003 to obtain estimates of horizontal hydraulic conductivity to use as initial values in a ground-water-flow model for the site. The tests were done by placing a polyvinyl-chloride slug of known volume beneath the water level in selected wells, removing the slug, and measuring the resulting water-level recovery over time. The water levels were measured with a pressure transducer and recorded with a data logger. Hydraulic-conductivity values were estimated from an analytical relation between the instantaneous displacement of water in a well bore and the resulting rate of head change. Although nearly two-thirds of the tested wells recovered 90 percent of their slug-induced head change in less than 2 minutes, 90-percent recovery times ranged from 3 seconds to 35 minutes. The estimates of hydraulic conductivity range from 0.2 to 200 feet per day. Eighty-three percent of the estimates are between 1 and 100 feet per day.

  4. CARA Risk Assessment Thresholds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hejduk, M. D.

    2016-01-01

    Warning remediation threshold (Red threshold): Pc level at which warnings are issued, and active remediation considered and usually executed. Analysis threshold (Green to Yellow threshold): Pc level at which analysis of event is indicated, including seeking additional information if warranted. Post-remediation threshold: Pc level to which remediation maneuvers are sized in order to achieve event remediation and obviate any need for immediate follow-up maneuvers. Maneuver screening threshold: Pc compliance level for routine maneuver screenings (more demanding than regular Red threshold due to additional maneuver uncertainty).

  5. The relation between temperature distribution for lung RFA and electromagnetic wave frequency dependence of electrical conductivity with changing a lung's internal air volumes.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Nozomu; Watanabe, Hiroki; Lu, Xiaowei; Isobe, Yosuke; Kobayashi, Yo; Miyashita, Tomoyuki; Fujie, Masakatsu G

    2013-01-01

    Radio frequency ablation (RFA) for lung cancer has increasingly been used over the past few years because it is a minimally invasive treatment. As a feature of RFA for lung cancer, lung contains air during operation. Air is low thermal and electrical conductivity. Therefore, RFA for this cancer has the advantage that only the cancer is coagulated, and it is difficult for operators to control the precise formation of coagulation lesion. In order to overcome this limitation, we previously proposed a model-based robotic ablation system using finite element method. Creating an accurate thermo physical model and constructing thermal control method were a challenging problem because the thermal properties of the organ are complex. In this study, we measured electromagnetic wave frequency dependence of lung's electrical conductivity that was based on lung's internal air volumes dependence with in vitro experiment. In addition, we validated the electromagnetic wave frequency dependence of lung's electrical conductivity using temperature distribution simulator. From the results of this study, it is confirmed that the electromagnetic wave frequency dependence of lung's electrical conductivity effects on heat generation of RFA.

  6. AIR POLLUTION MEASUREMENTS IN THE VICINITY OF THE WORLD TRADE CENTER - SUMMARY OF MEASUREMENTS CONDUCTED BY EPA-ORD

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Office of Research and Development (EPA-ORD) was requested by EPA's Region 2 office in New York on 9/12/01 to assist with air quality monitoring in response to the collapse of the World Trade Center. Scientists at the U.S. EPA-ORD's Nati...

  7. Threshold quantum cryptography

    SciTech Connect

    Tokunaga, Yuuki; Okamoto, Tatsuaki; Imoto, Nobuyuki

    2005-01-01

    We present the concept of threshold collaborative unitary transformation or threshold quantum cryptography, which is a kind of quantum version of threshold cryptography. Threshold quantum cryptography states that classical shared secrets are distributed to several parties and a subset of them, whose number is greater than a threshold, collaborates to compute a quantum cryptographic function, while keeping each share secretly inside each party. The shared secrets are reusable if no cheating is detected. As a concrete example of this concept, we show a distributed protocol (with threshold) of conjugate coding.

  8. Static and Transient Cavitation Threshold Measurements for Mercury

    SciTech Connect

    Moraga, F.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.

    1999-11-14

    Transient and static cavitation thresholds for mercury as a function of the cover gas (helium or air), and pressure are reported. Both static and transient cavitation onset pressure thresholds increase linearly with cover gas pressure. Additionally, the cavitation thresholds as a function of dissolved gases were also measured and are reported.

  9. Leaf conductance decreased under free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) for three perennials in the Nevada desert

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nowak, Robert S.; Defalco, Lesley A.; Wilcox, Carolyn S.; Jordan, Dean N.; Coleman, James S.; Seemann, Jeffrey R.; Smith, Stanley D.

    2001-01-01

    A common response of plants to elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration (CO2) is decreased leaf conductance. Consequently, leaf temperature is predicted to increase under elevated CO2.Diurnal patterns of leaf conductance and temperature were measured for three desert perennials, the C3 shrub Larrea tridentata, C3 tussock grass Achnatherum hymenoides and C4tussock grass Pleuraphis rigida, at the Nevada Desert FACE facility. Measurements were made on ambient and c. 550 µmol mol−1 CO2 plots through both a wet and dry year.Reductions in conductance were 35%, 20% and 13% for Pleuraphis, Achnatherum and Larrea, respectively. Decreased conductance occurred throughout the day only for Pleuraphis. Both C3species had smaller CO2 effects during dry periods than wet. Leaf temperature did not differ significantly between elevated and ambient CO2 for any species. Comparisons of blower-control and nonring plots indicated that the FACE apparatus did not confound our results.All three species exhibited decreased leaf conductance under elevated CO2, although reductions were not uniform during the day or among years. Nonetheless, leaf energy balance was only minimally changed for these microphyllous desert perennials.

  10. Threshold Concepts in Biochemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loertscher, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    Threshold concepts can be identified for any discipline and provide a framework for linking student learning to curricular design. Threshold concepts represent a transformed understanding of a discipline, without which the learner cannot progress and are therefore pivotal in learning in a discipline. Although threshold concepts have been…

  11. Horizontal coring using air as the circulating fluid: Some prototype studies conducted in G Tunnel at the Nevada Test Site for the Yucca Mountain Project

    SciTech Connect

    Chornack, M.P.; French, C.A.

    1989-12-31

    Horizontal coring using air as the circulating fluid has been conducted in the G Tunnel Underground Facility (GTUF) at the Nevada Test Site. This work is part of the prototype investigations of hydrogeology for the Yucca Mountain Project. The work is being conducted to develop methods and procedures that will be used at the Department of Energy`s Yucca Mountain Site, a candidate site for the nation`s first high-level nuclear waste repository, during the site characterization phase of the investigations. The United States Geological Survey (USGS) is conducting this prototype testing under the guidance of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and in conjunction with Reynolds Electrical & Engineering Company (REECo), the drilling contractor. 7 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs.

  12. Applying Threshold Concepts to Finance Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoadley, Susan; Wood, Leigh N.; Tickle, Leonie; Kyng, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate and identify threshold concepts that are the essential conceptual content of finance programmes. Design/Methodology/Approach: Conducted in three stages with finance academics and students, the study uses threshold concepts as both a theoretical framework and a research methodology. Findings: The…

  13. A perovskite oxide with high conductivities in both air and reducing atmosphere for use as electrode for solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Rong; Cowin, Peter I.; Sengodan, Sivaprakash; Tao, Shanwen

    2016-08-01

    Electrode materials which exhibit high conductivities in both oxidising and reducing atmospheres are in high demand for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) and solid oxide electrolytic cells (SOECs). In this paper, we investigated Cu-doped SrFe0.9Nb0.1O3‑δ finding that the primitive perovskite oxide SrFe0.8Cu0.1Nb0.1O3‑δ (SFCN) exhibits a conductivity of 63 Scm‑1and 60 Scm‑1 at 415 °C in air and 5%H2/Ar respectively. It is believed that the high conductivity in 5%H2/Ar is related to the exsolved Fe (or FeCu alloy) on exposure to a reducing atmosphere. To the best of our knowledge, the conductivity of SrFe0.8Cu0.1Nb0.1O3‑δ in a reducing atmosphere is the highest of all reported oxides which also exhibit a high conductivity in air. Fuel cell performance using SrFe0.8Cu0.1Nb0.1O3‑δ as the anode, (Y2O3)0.08(ZrO2)0.92 as the electrolyte and La0.8Sr0.2FeO3‑δ as the cathode achieved a power density of 423 mWcm‑2 at 700 °C indicating that SFCN is a promising anode for SOFCs.

  14. A perovskite oxide with high conductivities in both air and reducing atmosphere for use as electrode for solid oxide fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Lan, Rong; Cowin, Peter I; Sengodan, Sivaprakash; Tao, Shanwen

    2016-08-22

    Electrode materials which exhibit high conductivities in both oxidising and reducing atmospheres are in high demand for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) and solid oxide electrolytic cells (SOECs). In this paper, we investigated Cu-doped SrFe0.9Nb0.1O3-δ finding that the primitive perovskite oxide SrFe0.8Cu0.1Nb0.1O3-δ (SFCN) exhibits a conductivity of 63 Scm(-1)and 60 Scm(-1) at 415 °C in air and 5%H2/Ar respectively. It is believed that the high conductivity in 5%H2/Ar is related to the exsolved Fe (or FeCu alloy) on exposure to a reducing atmosphere. To the best of our knowledge, the conductivity of SrFe0.8Cu0.1Nb0.1O3-δ in a reducing atmosphere is the highest of all reported oxides which also exhibit a high conductivity in air. Fuel cell performance using SrFe0.8Cu0.1Nb0.1O3-δ as the anode, (Y2O3)0.08(ZrO2)0.92 as the electrolyte and La0.8Sr0.2FeO3-δ as the cathode achieved a power density of 423 mWcm(-2) at 700 °C indicating that SFCN is a promising anode for SOFCs.

  15. A perovskite oxide with high conductivities in both air and reducing atmosphere for use as electrode for solid oxide fuel cells

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Rong; Cowin, Peter I.; Sengodan, Sivaprakash; Tao, Shanwen

    2016-01-01

    Electrode materials which exhibit high conductivities in both oxidising and reducing atmospheres are in high demand for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) and solid oxide electrolytic cells (SOECs). In this paper, we investigated Cu-doped SrFe0.9Nb0.1O3−δ finding that the primitive perovskite oxide SrFe0.8Cu0.1Nb0.1O3−δ (SFCN) exhibits a conductivity of 63 Scm−1and 60 Scm−1 at 415 °C in air and 5%H2/Ar respectively. It is believed that the high conductivity in 5%H2/Ar is related to the exsolved Fe (or FeCu alloy) on exposure to a reducing atmosphere. To the best of our knowledge, the conductivity of SrFe0.8Cu0.1Nb0.1O3−δ in a reducing atmosphere is the highest of all reported oxides which also exhibit a high conductivity in air. Fuel cell performance using SrFe0.8Cu0.1Nb0.1O3−δ as the anode, (Y2O3)0.08(ZrO2)0.92 as the electrolyte and La0.8Sr0.2FeO3−δ as the cathode achieved a power density of 423 mWcm−2 at 700 °C indicating that SFCN is a promising anode for SOFCs. PMID:27545200

  16. Study on lithium/air secondary batteries-Stability of NASICON-type lithium ion conducting glass-ceramics with water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Satoshi; Imanishi, Nobuyuki; Zhang, Tao; Xie, Jian; Hirano, Atsushi; Takeda, Yasuo; Yamamoto, Osamu

    The water stability of the fast lithium ion conducting glass-ceramic electrolyte, Li 1+ x+ yAl xTi 2- xSi yP 3- yO 12 (LATP), has been examined in distilled water, and aqueous solutions of LiNO 3, LiCl, LiOH, and HCl. This glass-ceramics are stable in aqueous LiNO 3 and aqueous LiCl, and unstable in aqueous 0.1 M HCl and 1 M LiOH. In distilled water, the electrical conductivity slightly increases as a function of immersion time in water. The Li-Al/Li 3- xPO 4- yN y/LATP/aqueous 1 M LiCl/Pt cell, where lithium phosphors oxynitrides Li 3- xPO 4- yN y (LiPON) are used to protect the direct reaction of Li and LATP, shows a stable open circuit voltage (OCV) of 3.64 V at 25 °C, and no cell resistance change for 1 week. Lithium phosphors oxynitride is effectively used as a protective layer to suppress the reaction between the LATP and Li metal. The water-stable Li/LiPON/LATP system can be used in Li/air secondary batteries with the air electrode containing water.

  17. Leaf and canopy conductance in aspen and aspen-birch forests under free-air enrichment of carbon dioxide and ozone.

    PubMed

    Uddling, Johan; Teclaw, Ronald M; Pregitzer, Kurt S; Ellsworth, David S

    2009-11-01

    Increasing concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) and tropospheric ozone (O3) have the potential to affect tree physiology and structure, and hence forest feedbacks on climate. Here, we investigated how elevated concentrations of CO2 (+45%) and O3 (+35%), alone and in combination, affected conductance for mass transfer at the leaf and canopy levels in pure aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) and in mixed aspen and birch (Betula papyrifera Marsh.) forests in the free-air CO2-O3 enrichment experiment near Rhinelander, Wisconsin (Aspen FACE). The study was conducted during two growing seasons, when steady-state leaf area index (L) had been reached after > 6 years of exposure to CO2- and O3-enrichment treatments. Canopy conductance (g(c)) was estimated from stand sap flux, while leaf-level conductance of sun leaves in the upper canopy was derived by three different and independent methods: sap flux and L in combination with vertical canopy modelling, leaf 13C discrimination methodology in combination with photosynthesis modelling and leaf-level gas exchange. Regardless of the method used, the mean values of leaf-level conductance were higher in trees growing under elevated CO2 and/or O3 than in trees growing in control plots, causing a CO2 x O3 interaction that was statistically significant (P < or = 0.10) for sap flux- and (for birch) 13C-derived leaf conductance. Canopy conductance was significantly increased by elevated CO2 but not significantly affected by elevated O3. Investigation of a short-term gap in CO2 enrichment demonstrated a +10% effect of transient exposure of elevated CO2-grown trees to ambient CO2 on g(c). All treatment effects were similar in pure aspen and mixed aspen-birch communities. These results demonstrate that short-term primary stomatal closure responses to elevated CO2 and O3 were completely offset by long-term cumulative effects of these trace gases on tree and stand structure in determining canopy- and leaf-level conductance in

  18. Leaf and canopy conductance in aspen and aspen-birch forests under free-air enrichment of carbon dioxide and ozone.

    PubMed

    Uddling, Johan; Teclaw, Ronald M; Pregitzer, Kurt S; Ellsworth, David S

    2009-11-01

    Increasing concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) and tropospheric ozone (O3) have the potential to affect tree physiology and structure, and hence forest feedbacks on climate. Here, we investigated how elevated concentrations of CO2 (+45%) and O3 (+35%), alone and in combination, affected conductance for mass transfer at the leaf and canopy levels in pure aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) and in mixed aspen and birch (Betula papyrifera Marsh.) forests in the free-air CO2-O3 enrichment experiment near Rhinelander, Wisconsin (Aspen FACE). The study was conducted during two growing seasons, when steady-state leaf area index (L) had been reached after > 6 years of exposure to CO2- and O3-enrichment treatments. Canopy conductance (g(c)) was estimated from stand sap flux, while leaf-level conductance of sun leaves in the upper canopy was derived by three different and independent methods: sap flux and L in combination with vertical canopy modelling, leaf 13C discrimination methodology in combination with photosynthesis modelling and leaf-level gas exchange. Regardless of the method used, the mean values of leaf-level conductance were higher in trees growing under elevated CO2 and/or O3 than in trees growing in control plots, causing a CO2 x O3 interaction that was statistically significant (P < or = 0.10) for sap flux- and (for birch) 13C-derived leaf conductance. Canopy conductance was significantly increased by elevated CO2 but not significantly affected by elevated O3. Investigation of a short-term gap in CO2 enrichment demonstrated a +10% effect of transient exposure of elevated CO2-grown trees to ambient CO2 on g(c). All treatment effects were similar in pure aspen and mixed aspen-birch communities. These results demonstrate that short-term primary stomatal closure responses to elevated CO2 and O3 were completely offset by long-term cumulative effects of these trace gases on tree and stand structure in determining canopy- and leaf-level conductance in

  19. Bayesian Threshold Estimation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gustafson, S. C.; Costello, C. S.; Like, E. C.; Pierce, S. J.; Shenoy, K. N.

    2009-01-01

    Bayesian estimation of a threshold time (hereafter simply threshold) for the receipt of impulse signals is accomplished given the following: 1) data, consisting of the number of impulses received in a time interval from zero to one and the time of the largest time impulse; 2) a model, consisting of a uniform probability density of impulse time…

  20. Pausing at the Threshold

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Patrick K.

    2015-01-01

    Since about 2003, the notion of threshold concepts--the central ideas in any field that change how learners think about other ideas--have become difficult to escape at library conferences and in general information literacy discourse. Their visibility will likely only increase because threshold concepts figure prominently in the Framework for…

  1. Threshold Concepts in Economics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shanahan, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine threshold concepts in the context of teaching and learning first-year university economics. It outlines some of the arguments for using threshold concepts and provides examples using opportunity cost as an exemplar in economics. Design/ Methodology/Approach: The paper provides an overview of the…

  2. 40 CFR 98.431 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.431 Section 98.431 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Importers and Exporters of Fluorinated Greenhouse Gases Contained in...

  3. 40 CFR 98.461 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... generation corrected for oxidation as determined using Equation TT-6 of this subpart times the global warming... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.461 Section 98.461 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS...

  4. 40 CFR 98.461 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... generation corrected for oxidation as determined using Equation TT-6 of this subpart times the global warming... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.461 Section 98.461 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS...

  5. 40 CFR 98.461 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... generation corrected for oxidation as determined using Equation TT-6 of this subpart times the global warming... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.461 Section 98.461 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS...

  6. How well do stomatal conductance models perform on closing plant carbon budgets? A test using seedlings grown under current and elevated air temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Way, Danielle A.; Oren, Ram; Kim, Hyun-Seok; Katul, Gabriel G.

    2011-12-01

    Future carbon and water fluxes within terrestrial ecosystems will be determined by how stomatal conductance (gs) responds to rising atmospheric CO2and air temperatures. While both short- and long-term CO2 effects on gs have been repeatedly studied, there are few studies on how gs acclimates to higher air temperatures. Six gs models were parameterized using leaf gas exchange data from black spruce (Picea mariana) seedlings grown from seed at ambient (22/16°C day/night) or elevated (30/24°C) air temperatures. Model performance was independently assessed by how well carbon gain from each model reproduced estimated carbon costs to close the seedlings' seasonal carbon budgets, a `long-term' indicator of success. A model holding a constant intercellular to ambient CO2ratio and the Ball-Berry model (based on stomatal responses to relative humidity) could not close the carbon balance for either treatment, while the Jarvis-Oren model (based on stomatal responses to vapor pressure deficit,D) and a model assuming a constant gs each closed the carbon balance for one treatment. Two models, both based on gs responses to D, performed best overall, estimating carbon uptake within 10% of carbon costs for both treatments: the Leuning model and a linear optimization model that maximizes carbon gain per unit water loss. Since gsresponses in the optimization model are not a priori assumed, this approach can be used in modeling land-atmosphere exchange of CO2 and water in future climates.

  7. The perils of thresholding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Font-Clos, Francesc; Pruessner, Gunnar; Moloney, Nicholas R.; Deluca, Anna

    2015-04-01

    The thresholding of time series of activity or intensity is frequently used to define and differentiate events. This is either implicit, for example due to resolution limits, or explicit, in order to filter certain small scale physics from the supposed true asymptotic events. Thresholding the birth-death process, however, introduces a scaling region into the event size distribution, which is characterized by an exponent that is unrelated to the actual asymptote and is rather an artefact of thresholding. As a result, numerical fits of simulation data produce a range of exponents, with the true asymptote visible only in the tail of the distribution. This tail is increasingly difficult to sample as the threshold is increased. In the present case, the exponents and the spurious nature of the scaling region can be determined analytically, thus demonstrating the way in which thresholding conceals the true asymptote. The analysis also suggests a procedure for detecting the influence of the threshold by means of a data collapse involving the threshold-imposed scale.

  8. Roots at the Percolation Threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroener, E.; Ahmed, M. A.; Kaestner, A.; Vontobel, P.; Zarebanadkouki, M.; Carminati, A.

    2014-12-01

    Much of the carbon assimilated by plants during photosynthesis is lost to the soil via rhizodepositions. One component of rhizopdeposition is mucilage, a hydrogel that dramatically alters the soil physical properties. Mucilage was assumed to explain unexpectedly low rhizosphere rewetting rates during irrigation (Carminati et al. 2010) and temporarily water repellency in the rhizosphere after severe drying (Moradi et al. 2012).Here, we present an experimental and theoretical study for the rewetting behaviour of a soil mixed with mucilage, which was used as an analogue of the rhizosphere. Our samples were made of two layers of untreated soils separated by a thin layer (ca. 1 mm) of soil treated with mucilage. We prepared soil columns of varying particle size, mucilage concentration and height of the middle layer above the water table. The dry soil columns were re-wetted by capillary rise from the bottom.The rewetting of the middle layer showed a distinct dual behavior. For mucilage concentrations lower than a certain threshold, water could cross the thin layer almost immediately after rewetting of bulk soil. At slightly higher mucilage concentrations, the thin layer was almost impermeable. The mucilage concentration at the threshold strongly depended on particle size: the smaller the particle size the larger the soil specific surface and the more mucilage was needed to cover the entire particle surface and to induce water repellency.We applied a classic pore network model to simulate the experimental observations. In the model a certain fraction of nodes were randomly disconnected to reproduce the effect of mucilage in temporarily blocking the flow. The percolation model could qualitatively reproduce well the threshold characteristics of the experiments. Our experiments, together with former observations of water dynamics in the rhizosphere, suggest that the rhizosphere is near the percolation threshold, where small variations in mucilage concentration sensitively

  9. Double Photoionization Near Threshold

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wehlitz, Ralf

    2007-01-01

    The threshold region of the double-photoionization cross section is of particular interest because both ejected electrons move slowly in the Coulomb field of the residual ion. Near threshold both electrons have time to interact with each other and with the residual ion. Also, different theoretical models compete to describe the double-photoionization cross section in the threshold region. We have investigated that cross section for lithium and beryllium and have analyzed our data with respect to the latest results in the Coulomb-dipole theory. We find that our data support the idea of a Coulomb-dipole interaction.

  10. Conductivity Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The Thermal and Electrical Conductivity Probe (TECP) for NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander took measurements in Martian soil and in the air.

    The needles on the end of the instrument were inserted into the Martian soil, allowing TECP to measure the propagation of both thermal and electrical energy. TECP also measured the humidity in the surrounding air.

    The needles on the probe are 15 millimeters (0.6 inch) long.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  11. Investigation of ULF magnetic pulsations, air conductivity changes, and infra red signatures associated with the 30 October Alum Rock M5.4 earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bleier, T.; Dunson, C.; Maniscalco, M.; Bryant, N.; Bambery, R.; Freund, F.

    2009-04-01

    Several electromagnetic signal types were observed prior to and immediately after 30 October 2007 (Local Time) M5.4 earthquake at Alum Rock, Ca with an epicenter ~15 km NE of San Jose Ca. The area where this event occurred had been monitored since November 2005 by a QuakeFinder magnetometer site, unit 609, 2 km from the epicenter. This instrument is one of 53 stations of the QuakeFinder (QF) California Magnetometer Network-CalMagNet. This station included an ultra low frequency (ULF) 3-axis induction magnetometer, a simple air conductivity sensor to measure relative airborne ion concentrations, and a geophone to identify the arrival of the P-wave from an earthquake. Similar in frequency content to the increased ULF activity reported two weeks prior to the Loma Prieta M7.0 quake in 1989 (Fraser-Smith, 1990, 1991), the QF station detected activity in the 0.01-12 Hz bands, but it consisted of an increasing number of short duration (1 to 30 s duration) pulsations. The pulsations peaked around 13 days prior to the event. The amplitudes of the pulses were strong, (3-20 nT), compared to the average ambient noise at the site, (10-250 pT), which included a component arising from the Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) operations. The QF station also detected different pulse shapes, e.g. negative or positive only polarity, with some pulses including a combination of positive and negative. Typical pulse counts over the previous year ranged from 0-15 per day, while the count rose to 176 (east-west channel) on 17 October, 13 days prior to the quake. The air conductivity sensor saturated for over 14 h during the night and morning prior to the quake, which occurred at 20:29 LT. Anomalous IR signatures were also observed in the general area, within 50 km of the epicenter, during the 2 weeks prior to the quake. These three simultaneous EM phenomena were compared with data collected over a 1-2-year period at the site. The data was also compared against accounts of air ionization reported

  12. Using a combination of click- and toneburst-evoked auditory brainstem response measurements to estimate pure-tone thresholds

    PubMed Central

    Gorga, Michael P.; Johnson, Tiffany A.; Kaminski, Jan K.; Beauchaine, Kathryn L.; Garner, Cassie A.; Neely, Stephen T.

    2008-01-01

    Design A retrospective medical-record review of evoked-potential and audiometric data was used to determine the accuracy with which click-evoked and toneburst-evoked ABR thresholds predict pure-tone audiometric thresholds. Methods The medical records were reviewed of a consecutive group of patients who were referred for ABR testing for audiometric purposes over the past four years. ABR thresholds were measured for clicks and for several tonebursts, including a single-cycle, Blackman-windowed, 250-Hz toneburst, which has a broad spectrum with little energy above 600 Hz. Typically, the ABR data were collected because the patients were unable to provide reliable estimates of hearing sensitivity, based on behavioral-test techniques, due to developmental level. Data were included only if subsequently obtained behavioral audiometric data were available to which the ABR data could be compared. Almost invariably, the behavioral data were collected after the ABR results were obtained. Because of this, data were included on only those ears for which middle-ear tests (tympanometry, otoscopic examination, pure-tone air- and bone-conduction thresholds) indicated that middle-ear status was similar at the times of both tests. With these inclusion criteria, data were available on 140 ears of 77 subjects. Results Correlation was 0.94 between click-evoked ABR thresholds and the average pure-tone threshold at 2 and 4 kHz. Correlations exceeded 0.92 between ABR thresholds for the 250-Hz toneburst and low-frequency behavioral thresholds (250 Hz, 500 Hz, and the average pure-tone thresholds at 250 and 500 Hz). Similar or higher correlations were observed when ABR thresholds at other frequencies were compared to the pure-tone thresholds at corresponding frequencies. Differences between ABR and behavioral threshold depended on behavioral threshold, with ABR thresholds overestimating behavioral threshold in cases of normal hearing and underestimating behavioral threshold in cases of

  13. A study on lithium/air secondary batteries-Stability of the NASICON-type lithium ion conducting solid electrolyte in alkaline aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimonishi, Yuta; Zhang, Tao; Imanishi, Nobuyuki; Im, Dongmin; Lee, Dong Joon; Hirano, Atsushi; Takeda, Yasuo; Yamamoto, Osamu; Sammes, Nigel

    The stability of the high lithium ion conducting glass ceramics, Li 1+ x+ yTi 2- xAl xSi yP 3- yO 12 (LTAP) in alkaline aqueous solutions with and without LiCl has been examined. A significant conductivity decrease of the LTAP plate immersed in 0.057 M LiOH aqueous solution at 50 °C for 3 weeks was observed. However, no conductivity change of the LTAP plate immersed in LiCl saturated LiOH aqueous solutions at 50 °C for 3 weeks was observed. The pH value of the LiCl-LiOH-H 2O solution with saturated LiCl was in a range of 7-9. The molarity of LiOH and LiCl in the LiOH and LiCl saturated aqueous solution were estimated to be 5.12 and 11.57 M, respectively, by analysis of Li + and OH -. The high concentration of LiOH and the low pH value of 8.14 in this solution suggested that the dissociation of LiOH into Li + and OH - is too low in the solution with a high concentration of Li +. These results suggest that the water stable LTAP could be used as a protect layer of the lithium metal anode in the lithium/air cell with LiCl saturated aqueous solution as the electrolyte, because the content of OH - ions in the LiCl saturated aqueous solution does not increase via the cell reaction of Li + 1/2O 2 + H 2O → 2LiOH, and LTAP is stable under a deep discharge state.

  14. Evaluation of different methods for determining growing degree-day thresholds in apricot cultivars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruml, Mirjana; Vuković, Ana; Milatović, Dragan

    2010-07-01

    The aim of this study was to examine different methods for determining growing degree-day (GDD) threshold temperatures for two phenological stages (full bloom and harvest) and select the optimal thresholds for a greater number of apricot ( Prunus armeniaca L.) cultivars grown in the Belgrade region. A 10-year data series were used to conduct the study. Several commonly used methods to determine the threshold temperatures from field observation were evaluated: (1) the least standard deviation in GDD; (2) the least standard deviation in days; (3) the least coefficient of variation in GDD; (4) regression coefficient; (5) the least standard deviation in days with a mean temperature above the threshold; (6) the least coefficient of variation in days with a mean temperature above the threshold; and (7) the smallest root mean square error between the observed and predicted number of days. In addition, two methods for calculating daily GDD, and two methods for calculating daily mean air temperatures were tested to emphasize the differences that can arise by different interpretations of basic GDD equation. The best agreement with observations was attained by method (7). The lower threshold temperature obtained by this method differed among cultivars from -5.6 to -1.7°C for full bloom, and from -0.5 to 6.6°C for harvest. However, the “Null” method (lower threshold set to 0°C) and “Fixed Value” method (lower threshold set to -2°C for full bloom and to 3°C for harvest) gave very good results. The limitations of the widely used method (1) and methods (5) and (6), which generally performed worst, are discussed in the paper.

  15. Hydrodynamics of sediment threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Sk Zeeshan; Dey, Subhasish

    2016-07-01

    A novel hydrodynamic model for the threshold of cohesionless sediment particle motion under a steady unidirectional streamflow is presented. The hydrodynamic forces (drag and lift) acting on a solitary sediment particle resting over a closely packed bed formed by the identical sediment particles are the primary motivating forces. The drag force comprises of the form drag and form induced drag. The lift force includes the Saffman lift, Magnus lift, centrifugal lift, and turbulent lift. The points of action of the force system are appropriately obtained, for the first time, from the basics of micro-mechanics. The sediment threshold is envisioned as the rolling mode, which is the plausible mode to initiate a particle motion on the bed. The moment balance of the force system on the solitary particle about the pivoting point of rolling yields the governing equation. The conditions of sediment threshold under the hydraulically smooth, transitional, and rough flow regimes are examined. The effects of velocity fluctuations are addressed by applying the statistical theory of turbulence. This study shows that for a hindrance coefficient of 0.3, the threshold curve (threshold Shields parameter versus shear Reynolds number) has an excellent agreement with the experimental data of uniform sediments. However, most of the experimental data are bounded by the upper and lower limiting threshold curves, corresponding to the hindrance coefficients of 0.2 and 0.4, respectively. The threshold curve of this study is compared with those of previous researchers. The present model also agrees satisfactorily with the experimental data of nonuniform sediments.

  16. How well do stomatal conductance models perform on closing plant carbon budgets? A test using seedlings grown under current and elevated air temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Way, D.; Oren, R.; Kim, H.; Katul, G. G.

    2011-12-01

    Future carbon and water fluxes within terrestrial ecosystems will be determined by how stomatal conductance (gs) responds to rising atmospheric CO2 and air temperatures. While both short- and long-term CO2 effects on gs have been repeatedly studied, there are few studies on how gs acclimates to higher air temperatures. Six gs models were parameterized using leaf gas exchange data from black spruce (Picea mariana) seedlings grown from seed at ambient (22/16 °C day/night) or elevated (30/24 °C) temperatures. Model performance was independently assessed by how well carbon gain from each model reproduced estimated carbon costs to close the seedlings' seasonal carbon budgets, an indicator of the model success at time scales commensurate with biomass changes. A model holding a constant intercellular to ambient CO2 concentration ratio and the Ball-Berry model (based on stomatal responses to relative humidity) could not close the carbon balance for either treatment, while a so-called Jarvis-Oren model (based on stomatal responses to vapor pressure deficit, D) and a model assuming a constant gs each closed the carbon balance for one temperature treatment. Two models, both based on gs responses to D, performed best overall, estimating carbon uptake within 10% of carbon costs for both treatments: the Leuning model (a semi-empirical model that links gs to photosynthetic rates) and a linear optimization model that maximizes carbon gain per unit water loss. Since gs responses in the linear optimization model are not a priori assumed, this approach may be advantageous in modeling gs responses to temperature, especially in future climates.

  17. Results of borehole geophysical logging and hydraulic tests conducted in Area D supply wells, former US Naval Air Warfare Center, Warminster, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sloto, Ronald A.; Grazul, Kevin E.

    1998-01-01

    Borehole geophysical logging, aquifer tests, and aquifer-isolation (packer) tests were conducted in four supply wells at the former U.S. Naval Air Warfare Center (NAWC) in Warminster, PA to identify the depth and yield of water-bearing zones, occurrence of borehole flow, and effect of pumping on nearby wells. The study was conducted as part of an ongoing evaluation of ground-water contamination at the NAWC. Caliper, natural-gamma, single-point resistance, fluid resistivity, and fluid temperature logs and borehole television surveys were run in the supply wells, which range in depth from 242 to 560 ft (feet). Acoustic borehole televiewer and borehole deviation logs were run in two of the wells. The direction and rate of borehole-fluid movement under non-pumping conditions were measured with a high-resolution heatpulse flowmeter. The logs were used to locate water-bearing fractures, determine probable zones of vertical borehole-fluid movement, and determine the depth to set packers. An aquifer test was conducted in each well to determine open-hole specific capacity and the effect of pumping the open borehole on water levels in nearby wells. Specific capacities ranged from 0.21 to 1.7 (gal/min)/ft (gallons per minute per foot) of drawdown. Aquifer-isolation tests were conducted in each well to determine depth-discrete specific capacities and to determine the effect of pumping an individual fracture or fracture zone on water levels in nearby wells. Specific capacities of individual fractures and fracture zones ranged from 0 to 2.3 (gal/min)/ft. Most fractures identified as water-producing or water-receiving zones by borehole geophysical methods produced water when isolated and pumped. All hydrologically active fractures below 250 ft below land surface were identified as water-receiving zones and produced little water when isolated and pumped. In the two wells greater then 540 ft deep, downward borehole flow to the deep water-receiving fractures is caused by a large

  18. Crossing the Writing Threshold.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Carol Lea

    What pushes a writer over the edge of thought into text production--over what may be called "the writing threshold?" This is the moment when the thoughts in a writer's mind, the writing situation, and personal motivations create a momentum that results in a pattern of written words. There is evidence that not everyone crosses the writing threshold…

  19. Elaborating on Threshold Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rountree, Janet; Robins, Anthony; Rountree, Nathan

    2013-01-01

    We propose an expanded definition of Threshold Concepts (TCs) that requires the successful acquisition and internalisation not only of knowledge, but also its practical elaboration in the domains of applied strategies and mental models. This richer definition allows us to clarify the relationship between TCs and Fundamental Ideas, and to account…

  20. Bone sarcoma in humans induced by radium: A threshold response?

    SciTech Connect

    Rowland, R.E.

    1996-08-01

    The radium 226 and radium 228 have induced malignancies in the skeleton (primarily bone sarcomas) of humans. They have also induced carcinomas in the paranasal sinuses and mastoid air cells. There is no evidence that any leukemias or any other solid cancers have been induced by internally deposited radium. This paper discuses a study conducted on the dial painter population. This study made a concerted effort to verify, for each of the measured radium cases, the published values of the skeletal dose and the initial intake of radium. These were derived from body content measurements made some 40 years after the radium intake. Corrections to the assumed radium retention function resulted in a considerable number of dose changes. These changes have changed the shape of the dose response function. It now appears that the induction of bone sarcomas is a threshold process.

  1. Thermal conductivity modeling in variably saturated porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanbarian, B.; Daigle, H.

    2015-12-01

    Modeling effective thermal conductivity under variably saturated conditions is essential to study heat transfer in natural sediments, soils, and rocks. The effective thermal conductivity in completely dry and fully saturated porous media is an integrated quantity representing the complex behavior of two conducting phases, i.e., pore fluid (either air or water) and solid matrix. Under partially saturated conditions, however, the effective thermal conductivity becomes even more complicated since three phases (air, water, and solid matrix) conduct heat simultaneously. In this study, we invoke an upscaling treatment called percolation-based effective-medium approximation to model the effective thermal conductivity in fully and partially saturated porous media. Our theoretical porosity- and saturation-dependent models contain endmember properties, such as air, solid matrix, and saturating fluid thermal conductivities, a percolation exponent t, and a percolation threshold. Comparing our theory with 216 porosity-dependent thermal conductivity measurements and 25 saturation-dependent thermal conductivity datasets indicate excellent match between theory and experiments. Our results show that the effective thermal conductivity under fully and partially saturated conditions follows nonuniversal behavior. This means the value of t changes from medium to medium and depends not only on topological and geometrical properties of the medium but also characteristics of the saturating fluid.

  2. Ultrashort laser pulse ablation of copper, silicon and gelatin: effect of the pulse duration on the ablation thresholds and the incubation coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nathala, Chandra S. R.; Ajami, Ali; Husinsky, Wolfgang; Farooq, Bilal; Kudryashov, Sergey I.; Daskalova, Albena; Bliznakova, Irina; Assion, Andreas

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, the influence of the pulse duration on the ablation threshold and the incubation coefficient was investigated for three different types of materials: metal (copper), semiconductor (silicon) and biopolymer (gelatin). Ablation threshold values and the incubation coefficients have been measured for multiple Ti:sapphire laser pulses (3 to 1000 pulses) and for four different pulse durations (10, 30, 250 and 550 fs). The ablation threshold fluence was determined by extrapolation of curves from squared crater diameter versus fluence plots. For copper and silicon, the experiments were conducted in vacuum and for gelatin in air. For all materials, the ablation threshold fluence increases with the pulse duration. For copper, the threshold increases as τ 0.05, for silicon as τ 0.12 and for gelatin as τ 0.22. By extrapolating the curves of the threshold fluence versus number of pulses, the single-shot threshold fluence was determined for each sample. For 30 fs pulses, the single-shot threshold fluences were found to be 0.79, 0.35, and 0.99 J/cm2 and the incubation coefficients were found to be 0.75, 0.83 and 0.68 for copper, silicon and gelatin, respectively.

  3. Optimizing Stimulus Repetition Rate for Recording Ocular Vestibular Evoked Myogenic Potential Elicited by Air-Conduction Tone Bursts of 500 Hz

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Niraj Kumar; Kadisonga, Peter; Ashitha, Palliyath

    2014-01-01

    Amidst several publications reporting the effects of stimulus-related parameters on ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potential (oVEMP), the effect of the repetition rate on oVEMP responses has largely gone unexplored. Studies have used a repetition rate of ~5.1 Hz mainly due to a presumption that oVEMP, like cervical VEMP, should produce best responses for ~5 Hz, although there is paucity of experimental evidence to support this hypothesis. 52 healthy individuals in the age range of 17-35 years underwent air-conduction oVEMP elicited by 500 Hz tone-bursts using seven different repetition rates (3.1, 5.1, 10.1, 15.1, 20.1, 25.1 and 30.1 Hz). The results revealed a tendency for prolongation of latencies and reduction in amplitude with increasing repetition rate. However, significantly longer latencies were observed only for 20.1 Hz and larger amplitudes for 3.1 and 5.1 Hz (P<0.05). There was no significant difference between the rates of 3.1 Hz and 5.1 Hz. However 3.1 Hz produced poorer signal-to-noise ratio and required considerably longer time and thereby had lesser efficiency than 5.1 Hz (P<0.05). This would also result in higher fatigue and irritation levels considering the physical act of maintaining a supero-medial gaze. Thus the use of 5.1 Hz is recommended for clinical recording of oVEMP. PMID:26557349

  4. Network problem threshold

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gejji, Raghvendra, R.

    1992-01-01

    Network transmission errors such as collisions, CRC errors, misalignment, etc. are statistical in nature. Although errors can vary randomly, a high level of errors does indicate specific network problems, e.g. equipment failure. In this project, we have studied the random nature of collisions theoretically as well as by gathering statistics, and established a numerical threshold above which a network problem is indicated with high probability.

  5. A Review and Analysis of Remote Sensing Capability for Air Quality Measurements as a Potential Decision Support Tool Conducted by the NASA DEVELOP Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, A.; Richards, A.; Keith, K.; Frew, C.; Boseck, J.; Sutton, S.; Watts, C.; Rickman, D.

    2007-01-01

    This project focused on a comprehensive utilization of air quality model products as decision support tools (DST) needed for public health applications. A review of past and future air quality measurement methods and their uncertainty, along with the relationship of air quality to national and global public health, is vital. This project described current and future NASA satellite remote sensing and ground sensing capabilities and the potential for using these sensors to enhance the prediction, prevention, and control of public health effects that result from poor air quality. The qualitative uncertainty of current satellite remotely sensed air quality, the ground-based remotely sensed air quality, the air quality/public health model, and the decision making process is evaluated in this study. Current peer-reviewed literature suggests that remotely sensed air quality parameters correlate well with ground-based sensor data. A satellite remote-sensed and ground-sensed data complement is needed to enhance the models/tools used by policy makers for the protection of national and global public health communities

  6. Tennessee Valley Authority/Bonneville Power Administration Indoor Air Quality Study, Phase II : Final Report for Indoor Air Quality Studies Conducted by TVA During Winters 1983, 1984, and 1985.

    SciTech Connect

    Tennessee Valley Authority. Energy Use Test Facility Staff.

    1985-12-01

    This study expanded the existing data base on indoor-outdoor air quality and provided specific information on the use of wood-burning heaters in a weatherized home having a low air exchange rate. Through research efforts such as these, BPA continues to address the various concerns raised regarding environmental issues related to its conservtion programs.

  7. Manage postharvest deficit irrigation of peach trees using canopy to air temperature

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A field study was conducted to use mid-day canopy to air temperature difference (delta T) to manage postharvest deficit irrigation of peach trees in San Joaquin Valley of California and its performance was evaluated. Delta T thresholds were selected, based on previous years’ stem water potential and...

  8. Source analysis of short and long latency vestibular-evoked potentials (VsEPs) produced by left vs. right ear air-conducted 500 Hz tone pips

    PubMed Central

    Todd, N.P.M.; Paillard, A.C.; Kluk, K.; Whittle, E.; Colebatch, J.G.

    2014-01-01

    Todd et al. (2014) have recently demonstrated the presence of vestibular dependent changes both in the morphology and in the intensity dependence of auditory evoked potentials (AEPs) when passing through the vestibular threshold as determined by vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs). In this paper we extend this work by comparing left vs. right ear stimulation and by conducting a source analysis of the resulting evoked potentials of short and long latency. Ten healthy, right-handed subjects were recruited and evoked potentials were recorded to both left- and right-ear sound stimulation, above and below vestibular threshold. Below VEMP threshold, typical AEPs were recorded, consisting of mid-latency (MLR) waves Na and Pa followed by long latency AEPs (LAEPs) N1 and P2. In the supra-threshold condition, the expected changes in morphology were observed, consisting of: (1) short-latency vestibular evoked potentials (VsEPs) which have no auditory correlate, i.e. the ocular VEMP (OVEMP) and inion response related potentials; (2) a later deflection, labelled N42/P52, followed by the LAEPs N1 and P2. Statistical analysis of the vestibular dependent responses indicated a contralateral effect for inion related short-latency responses and a left-ear/right-hemisphere advantage for the long-latency responses. Source analysis indicated that the short-latency effects may be mediated by a contralateral projection to left cerebellum, while the long-latency effects were mediated by a contralateral projection to right cingulate cortex. In addition we found evidence of a possible vestibular contribution to the auditory T-complex in radial temporal lobe sources. These last results raise the possibility that acoustic activation of the otolith organs could potentially contribute to auditory processing. PMID:24699384

  9. Crossing Thresholds: Identifying Conceptual Transitions in Postsecondary Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilcox, Susan; Leger, Andy B.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we report on research we conducted to begin the process of identifying threshold concepts in the field of postsecondary teaching. Meyer & Land (2006) propose that within all disciplinary fields there seem to be particular "threshold concepts" that serve as gateways, opening up new and previously inaccessible ways of…

  10. Coloring geographical threshold graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Bradonjic, Milan; Percus, Allon; Muller, Tobias

    2008-01-01

    We propose a coloring algorithm for sparse random graphs generated by the geographical threshold graph (GTG) model, a generalization of random geometric graphs (RGG). In a GTG, nodes are distributed in a Euclidean space, and edges are assigned according to a threshold function involving the distance between nodes as well as randomly chosen node weights. The motivation for analyzing this model is that many real networks (e.g., wireless networks, the Internet, etc.) need to be studied by using a 'richer' stochastic model (which in this case includes both a distance between nodes and weights on the nodes). Here, we analyze the GTG coloring algorithm together with the graph's clique number, showing formally that in spite of the differences in structure between GTG and RGG, the asymptotic behavior of the chromatic number is identical: {chi}1n 1n n / 1n n (1 + {omicron}(1)). Finally, we consider the leading corrections to this expression, again using the coloring algorithm and clique number to provide bounds on the chromatic number. We show that the gap between the lower and upper bound is within C 1n n / (1n 1n n){sup 2}, and specify the constant C.

  11. Laser threshold magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeske, Jan; Cole, Jared H.; Greentree, Andrew D.

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new type of sensor, which uses diamond containing the optically active nitrogen-vacancy (NV-) centres as a laser medium. The magnetometer can be operated at room-temperature and generates light that can be readily fibre coupled, thereby permitting use in industrial applications and remote sensing. By combining laser pumping with a radio-frequency Rabi-drive field, an external magnetic field changes the fluorescence of the NV- centres. We use this change in fluorescence level to push the laser above threshold, turning it on with an intensity controlled by the external magnetic field, which provides a coherent amplification of the readout signal with very high contrast. This mechanism is qualitatively different from conventional NV--based magnetometers which use fluorescence measurements, based on incoherent photon emission. We term our approach laser threshold magnetometer (LTM). We predict that an NV--based LTM with a volume of 1 mm3 can achieve shot-noise limited dc sensitivity of 1.86 fT /\\sqrt{{{Hz}}} and ac sensitivity of 3.97 fT /\\sqrt{{{Hz}}}.

  12. Roots at the percolation threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroener, Eva; Ahmed, Mutez Ali; Carminati, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    The rhizosphere is the layer of soil around the roots where complex and dynamic interactions between plants and soil affect the capacity of plants to take up water. The physical properties of the rhizosphere are affected by mucilage, a gel exuded by roots. Mucilage can absorb large volumes of water, but it becomes hydrophobic after drying. We use a percolation model to describe the rewetting of dry rhizosphere. We find that at a critical mucilage concentration the rhizosphere becomes impermeable. The critical mucilage concentration depends on the radius of the soil particle size. Capillary rise experiments with neutron radiography prove that for concentrations below the critical mucilage concentration water could easily cross the rhizosphere, while above the critical concentration water could no longer percolate through it. Our studies, together with former observations of water dynamics in the rhizosphere, suggest that the rhizosphere is near the percolation threshold, where small variations in mucilage concentration sensitively alter the soil hydraulic conductivity. Is mucilage exudation a plant mechanism to efficiently control the rhizosphere conductivity and the access to water?

  13. Roots at the percolation threshold.

    PubMed

    Kroener, Eva; Ahmed, Mutez Ali; Carminati, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    The rhizosphere is the layer of soil around the roots where complex and dynamic interactions between plants and soil affect the capacity of plants to take up water. The physical properties of the rhizosphere are affected by mucilage, a gel exuded by roots. Mucilage can absorb large volumes of water, but it becomes hydrophobic after drying. We use a percolation model to describe the rewetting of dry rhizosphere. We find that at a critical mucilage concentration the rhizosphere becomes impermeable. The critical mucilage concentration depends on the radius of the soil particle size. Capillary rise experiments with neutron radiography prove that for concentrations below the critical mucilage concentration water could easily cross the rhizosphere, while above the critical concentration water could no longer percolate through it. Our studies, together with former observations of water dynamics in the rhizosphere, suggest that the rhizosphere is near the percolation threshold, where small variations in mucilage concentration sensitively alter the soil hydraulic conductivity. Is mucilage exudation a plant mechanism to efficiently control the rhizosphere conductivity and the access to water? PMID:25974526

  14. Crack Growth Behavior in the Threshold Region for High Cycle Fatigue Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, R. G.; Zanganeh, M.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the results of a research program conducted to improve the understanding of fatigue crack growth rate behavior in the threshold growth rate region and to answer a question on the validity of threshold region test data. The validity question relates to the view held by some experimentalists that using the ASTM load shedding test method does not produce valid threshold test results and material properties. The question involves the fanning behavior observed in threshold region of da/dN plots for some materials in which the low R-ratio data fans out from the high R-ratio data. This fanning behavior or elevation of threshold values in the low R-ratio tests is generally assumed to be caused by an increase in crack closure in the low R-ratio tests. Also, the increase in crack closure is assumed by some experimentalists to result from using the ASTM load shedding test procedure. The belief is that this procedure induces load history effects which cause remote closure from plasticity and/or roughness changes in the surface morphology. However, experimental studies performed by the authors have shown that the increase in crack closure is a result of extensive crack tip bifurcations that can occur in some materials, particularly in aluminum alloys, when the crack tip cyclic yield zone size becomes less than the grain size of the alloy. This behavior is related to the high stacking fault energy (SFE) property of aluminum alloys which results in easier slip characteristics. Therefore, the fanning behavior which occurs in aluminum alloys is a function of intrinsic dislocation property of the alloy, and therefore, the fanned data does represent the true threshold properties of the material. However, for the corrosion sensitive steel alloys tested in laboratory air, the occurrence of fanning results from fretting corrosion at the crack tips, and these results should not be considered to be representative of valid threshold properties because the fanning is

  15. New Titan Saltation Threshold Experiments: Investigating Current and Past Climates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridges, N.; Burr, D. M.; Marshall, J.; Smith, J. K.; Emery, J. P.; Horst, S. M.; Nield, E.; Yu, X.

    2015-12-01

    Titan exhibits aeolian sand dunes that cover ~20% of its surface, attesting to significant sediment transport by the wind. Recent experiments in the Titan Wind Tunnel (TWT) at NASA Ames Research Center [1,2] found that the threshold friction speed needed to detach Titanian "sand" is about 50% higher than previous estimates based on theory alone [3], a result that might be explained by the low ratio of particle to fluid density on the body [1]. Following the successful completion of the initial Titan threshold tests, we are conducting new experiments that expand the pressure range above and below current Titan values. The basic experimental techniques are described in [1], with minor updates to the instrumentation as described in [2]. To reproduce the kinematic viscosity and particle friction Reynolds number equivalent to that expected for Titan's nitrogen atmosphere at 1.4 bars and 94 K requires that TWT be pressurized to 12.5 bars for air at 293K. In addition to running experiments at this pressure to reproduce previous results [1] and investigate low density (high density ratio) materials, TWT pressures of 3 and 8 bars are in the experimental matrix to understand threshold under past Titan conditions when the atmospheric pressure may have been lower [4]. Higher pressures, at 15 and 20 bars in TWT, are also being run to understand the putative effects of low density ratio conditions. Our experimental matrix for this follow-on work uses some of the same materials as previously used, including walnut shells, basalt, quartz, glass spheres, and various low density materials to better simulate the gravity-equivalent weight of Titan sand. For these experiments, the TWT is now equipped with a new high pressure Tavis transducer with sufficient sensitivity to measure freestream speeds of less than 0.5 m s-1 at 12.5 bars. New techniques include video documentation of the experiments. We are also investigating methods of measuring humidity of the wind tunnel environment and

  16. Probabilistic Threshold Criterion

    SciTech Connect

    Gresshoff, M; Hrousis, C A

    2010-03-09

    The Probabilistic Shock Threshold Criterion (PSTC) Project at LLNL develops phenomenological criteria for estimating safety or performance margin on high explosive (HE) initiation in the shock initiation regime, creating tools for safety assessment and design of initiation systems and HE trains in general. Until recently, there has been little foundation for probabilistic assessment of HE initiation scenarios. This work attempts to use probabilistic information that is available from both historic and ongoing tests to develop a basis for such assessment. Current PSTC approaches start with the functional form of the James Initiation Criterion as a backbone, and generalize to include varying areas of initiation and provide a probabilistic response based on test data for 1.8 g/cc (Ultrafine) 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TATB) and LX-17 (92.5% TATB, 7.5% Kel-F 800 binder). Application of the PSTC methodology is presented investigating the safety and performance of a flying plate detonator and the margin of an Ultrafine TATB booster initiating LX-17.

  17. A simple method to estimate threshold friction velocity of wind erosion in the field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Junran; Okin, Gregory S.; Herrick, Jeffrey E.; Belnap, Jayne; Munson, Seth M.; Miller, Mark E.

    2010-05-01

    This study provides a fast and easy-to-apply method to estimate threshold friction velocity (TFV) of wind erosion in the field. Wind tunnel experiments and a variety of ground measurements including air gun, pocket penetrometer, torvane, and roughness chain were conducted in Moab, Utah and cross-validated in the Mojave Desert, California. Patterns between TFV and ground measurements were examined to identify the optimum method for estimating TFV. The results show that TFVs were best predicted using the air gun and penetrometer measurements in the Moab sites. This empirical method, however, systematically underestimated TFVs in the Mojave Desert sites. Further analysis showed that TFVs in the Mojave sites can be satisfactorily estimated with a correction for rock cover, which is presumably the main cause of the underestimation of TFVs. The proposed method may be also applied to estimate TFVs in environments where other non-erodible elements such as postharvest residuals are found.

  18. Threshold fatigue and information transfer

    PubMed Central

    Lindner, Benjamin; Longtin, André

    2016-01-01

    Neurons in vivo must process sensory information in the presence of significant noise. It is thus plausible to assume that neural systems have developed mechanisms to reduce this noise. Theoretical studies have shown that threshold fatigue (i.e. cumulative increases in the threshold during repetitive firing) could lead to noise reduction at certain frequencies bands and thus improved signal transmission as well as noise increases and decreased signal transmission at other frequencies: a phenomenon called noise shaping. There is, however, no experimental evidence that threshold fatigue actually occurs and, if so, that it will actually lead to noise shaping. We analyzed action potential threshold variability in intracellular recordings in vivo from pyramidal neurons in weakly electric fish and found experimental evidence for threshold fatigue: an increase in instantaneous firing rate was on average accompanied by an increase in action potential threshold. We show that, with a minor modification, the standard Hodgkin–Huxley model can reproduce this phenomenon. We next compared the performance of models with and without threshold fatigue. Our results show that threshold fatigue will lead to a more regular spike train as well as robustness to intrinsic noise via noise shaping. We finally show that the increased/reduced noise levels due to threshold fatigue correspond to decreased/increased information transmission at different frequencies. PMID:17436067

  19. Learning foraging thresholds for lizards

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, L.A.; Hart, W.E.; Wilson, D.B.

    1996-01-12

    This work gives a proof of convergence for a randomized learning algorithm that describes how anoles (lizards found in the Carribean) learn a foraging threshold distance. This model assumes that an anole will pursue a prey if and only if it is within this threshold of the anole`s perch. This learning algorithm was proposed by the biologist Roughgarden and his colleagues. They experimentally confirmed that this algorithm quickly converges to the foraging threshold that is predicted by optimal foraging theory our analysis provides an analytic confirmation that the learning algorithm converses to this optimal foraging threshold with high probability.

  20. Martian dust threshold measurements: Simulations under heated surface conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Bruce R.; Greeley, Ronald; Leach, Rodman N.

    1991-01-01

    Diurnal changes in solar radiation on Mars set up a cycle of cooling and heating of the planetary boundary layer, this effect strongly influences the wind field. The stratification of the air layer is stable in early morning since the ground is cooler than the air above it. When the ground is heated and becomes warmer than the air its heat is transferred to the air above it. The heated parcels of air near the surface will, in effect, increase the near surface wind speed or increase the aeolian surface stress the wind has upon the surface when compared to an unheated or cooled surface. This means that for the same wind speed at a fixed height above the surface, ground-level shear stress will be greater for the heated surface than an unheated surface. Thus, it is possible to obtain saltation threshold conditions at lower mean wind speeds when the surface is heated. Even though the mean wind speed is less when the surface is heated, the surface shear stress required to initiate particle movement remains the same in both cases. To investigate this phenomenon, low-density surface dust aeolian threshold measurements have been made in the MARSWIT wind tunnel located at NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California. The first series of tests examined threshold values of the 100 micron sand material. At 13 mb surface pressure the unheated surface had a threshold friction speed of 2.93 m/s (and approximately corresponded to a velocity of 41.4 m/s at a height of 1 meter) while the heated surface equivalent bulk Richardson number of -0.02, yielded a threshold friction speed of 2.67 m/s (and approximately corresponded to a velocity of 38.0 m/s at a height of 1 meter). This change represents an 8.8 percent decrease in threshold conditions for the heated case. The values of velocities are well within the threshold range as observed by Arvidson et al., 1983. As the surface was heated the threshold decreased. At a value of bulk Richardson number equal to -0.02 the threshold

  1. Testing the equation of state and electrical conductivity of copper by the electrical wire explosion in air: Experiment and magnetohydrodynamic simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Barysevich, A. E.; Cherkas, S. L.

    2011-05-15

    We perform experiments on testing the equations of state and electrical conductivity of copper in three different regimes of copper wire electrical explosion, when the inserted energy (i) is slightly exceeded, (ii) is approximately equal, and (iii) is substantially exceeded the energy needed for the wire complete evaporation. Magnetohydrodynamic simulation is performed. The results predicted by the two different equations of state are compared with the experiment. Empirical expression for the copper electrical conductivity is presented. Parameters in this expression is fit on every of two equations of state. Map of copper conductivity is plotted.

  2. [Threshold values for chemicals to prevent disease].

    PubMed

    Schweinsberg, F

    1990-05-01

    Proper interpretation of threshold limit values should always take into account that such limits are not absolute, but rather subject to change depending on advances in scientific knowledge. Threshold limit values derived from toxicologic study are best suited to evaluation of health risks of chemicals in the environment. Although more toxicologic information than is currently available would be desirable for the establishment of limit values, this should not prevent agreement on limits for more substances. "Better" threshold limit values would be forthcoming from epidemiologic studies, which are particularly rare in the FRG. Prospective studies measure current exposure; but appearance of detrimental health effects generally requires a lengthy latency period (e.g., decades in the case of cancer or cardiovascular disease). Threshold limit values permit monitoring and, if necessary, restriction of anthropogenic activity. Such restrictions are necessary, as shown by severe health damage which has occurred in the past (e.g., angiosarcoma due to vinyl chloride or neurogenic damage due to mercury in the workplace, tumors due to arsenic in drinking water, and methemoglobinemia in infants due to nitrite or renal damage due to cadmium in food). Evaluation of potential detrimental health effects for threshold limit values in environmental media is difficult because the effective dose cannot be determined. Monitoring of such limit values, which have already been incorporated into West German law, is relatively easy to implement, however (e.g. continuous outdoor air quality sampling and measurement, and periodic analysis of drinking water and foodstuffs). Since such monitoring may be performed close to the source, preventive measures should be easy to implement. Biological threshold limit values (biological monitoring) are essential to effective evaluation of the health effects of chemicals. Such limits should be established for more substances. When biological limit values

  3. Thresholds in Xeric Hydrology and Biogeochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meixner, T.; Brooks, P. D.; Simpson, S. C.; Soto, C. D.; Yuan, F.; Turner, D.; Richter, H.

    2011-12-01

    Due to water limitation, thresholds in hydrologic and biogeochemical processes are common in arid and semi-arid systems. Some of these thresholds such as those focused on rainfall runoff relationships have been well studied. However to gain a full picture of the role that thresholds play in driving the hydrology and biogeochemistry of xeric systems a full view of the entire array of processes at work is needed. Here a walk through the landscape of xeric systems will be conducted illustrating the powerful role of hydrologic thresholds on xeric system biogeochemistry. To understand xeric hydro-biogeochemistry two key ideas need to be focused on. First, it is important to start from a framework of reaction and transport. Second an understanding of the temporal and spatial components of thresholds that have a large impact on hydrologic and biogeochemical fluxes needs to be offered. In the uplands themselves episodic rewetting and drying of soils permits accelerated biogeochemical processing but also more gradual drainage of water through the subsurface than expected in simple conceptions of biogeochemical processes. Hydrologic thresholds (water content above hygroscopic) results in a stop start nutrient spiral of material across the landscape since runoff connecting uplands to xeric perennial riparian is episodic and often only transports materials a short distance (100's of m). This episodic movement results in important and counter-intuitive nutrient inputs to riparian zones but also significant processing and uptake of nutrients. The floods that transport these biogeochemicals also result in significant input to riparian groundwater and may be key to sustaining these critical ecosystems. Importantly the flood driven recharge process itself is a threshold process dependent on flood characteristics (floods greater than 100 cubic meters per second) and antecedent conditions (losing to near neutral gradients). Floods also appear to influence where arid and semi

  4. Percolation Threshold in Polycarbonate Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahuja, Suresh

    2014-03-01

    Nanocomposites have unique mechanical, electrical, magnetic, optical and thermal properties. Many methods could be applied to prepare polymer-inorganic nanocomposites, such as sol-gel processing, in-situ polymerization, particle in-situ formation, blending, and radiation synthesis. The analytical composite models that have been put forth include Voigt and Reuss bounds, Polymer nanocomposites offer the possibility of substantial improvements in material properties such as shear and bulk modulus, yield strength, toughness, film scratch resistance, optical properties, electrical conductivity, gas and solvent transport, with only very small amounts of nanoparticles Experimental results are compared against composite models of Hashin and Shtrikman bounds, Halpin-Tsai model, Cox model, and various Mori and Tanaka models. Examples of numerical modeling are molecular dynamics modeling and finite element modeling of reduced modulus and hardness that takes into account the modulus of the components and the effect of the interface between the hard filler and relatively soft polymer, polycarbonate. Higher nanoparticle concentration results in poor dispersion and adhesion to polymer matrix which results in lower modulus and hardness and departure from the existing composite models. As the level of silica increases beyond a threshold level, aggregates form which results in weakening of the structure. Polymer silica interface is found to be weak as silica is non-interacting promoting interfacial slip at silica-matrix junctions. Our experimental results compare favorably with those of nanocomposites of polyesters where the effect of nanoclay on composite hardness and modulus depended on dispersion of nanoclay in polyester.

  5. Life below the threshold.

    PubMed

    Castro, C

    1991-01-01

    This article explains that malnutrition, poor health, and limited educational opportunities plague Philippine children -- especially female children -- from families living below the poverty threshold. Nearly 70% of households in the Philippines do not meet the required daily level of nutritional intake. Because it is often -- and incorrectly -- assumed that women's nutritional requirements are lower than men's, women suffer higher rates of malnutrition and poor health. A 1987 study revealed that 11.7% of all elementary students were underweight and 13.9% had stunted growths. Among elementary-school girls, 17% were malnourished and 40% suffered from anemia (among lactating mothers, more than 1/2 are anemic). A 1988 Program for Decentralized Educational Development study showed that grade VI students learn only about 1/2 of what they are supposed to learn. 30% of the children enrolled in grade school drop out before they reach their senior year. The Department of Education, Culture and Sports estimates that some 2.56 million students dropped out of school in l989. That same year, some 3.7 million children were counted as part of the labor force. In Manila alone, some 60,000 children work the streets, whether doing odd jobs or begging, or turning to crime or prostitution. the article tells the story of a 12 year-old girl named Ging, a 4th grader at a public school and the oldest child in a poor family of 6 children. The undernourished Ging dreams of a good future for her family and sees education as a way out of poverty; unfortunately, her time after school is spend working in the streets or looking after her family. She considers herself luckier than many of the other children working in the streets, since she at least has a family.

  6. Use of air-pressurized slug tests to estimate hydraulic conductivity at selected piezometers completed in the Santa Fe Group aquifer system, Albuquerque area, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomas, Carole L.; Thorn, Conde R.

    2000-01-01

    The City of Albuquerque Public Works Department, Water Resources Management (City), is interested in quantifying aquifer hydraulic properties in the Albuquerque, New Mexico, area to better understand and manage water resources in the Middle Rio Grande Basin. In 1998, the City and the U.S. Geological Survey entered into a cooperative program to determine hydraulic properties of aquifer material adjacent to screened intervals of piezometers in the Albuquerque area. Investigators conducted slug tests from March 8 through April 8, 1999, to estimate hydraulic conductivity of aquifer material adjacent to the screened intervals of 25 piezometers from 11 nested- piezometer sites in the Albuquerque area. At 20 of the piezometers, slug-test responses were typical; at 2 piezometers, tests were prematurely terminated because the tests were taking too long to complete; and at 3 piezometers, test responses were oscillatory. Methods used to estimate hydraulic conductivity were the Bouwer and Rice method or the Cooper, Bredehoeft, and Papadopulos method for most tests; the Shapiro and Greene method for prematurely terminated tests; and the van der Kamp method for oscillatory tests. Hydraulic-conductivity estimates ranged from about 0.15 to 92 feet per day. In general, the smaller estimated values are associated with fine-grained aquifer materials and the larger estimated hydraulic-conductivity values are associated with coarse- grained aquifer materials adjacent to the screened intervals of the piezometers. Hydraulic-conductivity estimates ranged from 0.15 to 8.2 feet per day for aquifer materials adjacent to the screened intervals at 12 piezometers and from 12 to 41 feet per day for aquifer materials adjacent to the screened intervals at 10 piezometers. Hydraulic-conductivity estimates at four piezometers were greater than 41 feet per day.

  7. The Nature of Psychological Thresholds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rouder, Jeffrey N.; Morey, Richard D.

    2009-01-01

    Following G. T. Fechner (1966), thresholds have been conceptualized as the amount of intensity needed to transition between mental states, such as between a states of unconsciousness and consciousness. With the advent of the theory of signal detection, however, discrete-state theory and the corresponding notion of threshold have been discounted.…

  8. Threshold Concepts and Information Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Townsend, Lori; Brunetti, Korey; Hofer, Amy R.

    2011-01-01

    What do we teach when we teach information literacy in higher education? This paper describes a pedagogical approach to information literacy that helps instructors focus content around transformative learning thresholds. The threshold concept framework holds promise for librarians because it grounds the instructor in the big ideas and underlying…

  9. Threshold Hypothesis: Fact or Artifact?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karwowski, Maciej; Gralewski, Jacek

    2013-01-01

    The threshold hypothesis (TH) assumes the existence of complex relations between creative abilities and intelligence: linear associations below 120 points of IQ and weaker or lack of associations above the threshold. However, diverse results have been obtained over the last six decades--some confirmed the hypothesis and some rejected it. In this…

  10. Pure tone hearing thresholds and leisure noise: Is there a relationship?

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Warwick; Carter, Lyndal; Seeto, Mark

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on the examination of the relationship between self-reported historical noise exposure during leisure activities and audiological indicators: Measured hearing threshold levels (HTLs) and otoacoustic emissions (OAEs). The research was conducted by a cross-sectional survey of 1,432 individuals whose ages ranged from 11 years to 35 years. Methodology included a comprehensive audiometric assessment including otoscopy, pure tone audiometry (PTA) (air- and bone-conduction), OAEs, and tympanometry. A comprehensive questionnaire gathered information on demographics, hearing health status, and participation in work, nonwork, and leisure activities. Using the history of work, nonwork, and leisure noise exposure, a cumulative lifetime noise exposure was estimated. No correlation was found between cumulative lifetime noise exposure and audiometric PTA or OAE parameters. PMID:26356379

  11. Bayesian estimation of dose thresholds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groer, P. G.; Carnes, B. A.

    2003-01-01

    An example is described of Bayesian estimation of radiation absorbed dose thresholds (subsequently simply referred to as dose thresholds) using a specific parametric model applied to a data set on mice exposed to 60Co gamma rays and fission neutrons. A Weibull based relative risk model with a dose threshold parameter was used to analyse, as an example, lung cancer mortality and determine the posterior density for the threshold dose after single exposures to 60Co gamma rays or fission neutrons from the JANUS reactor at Argonne National Laboratory. The data consisted of survival, censoring times and cause of death information for male B6CF1 unexposed and exposed mice. The 60Co gamma whole-body doses for the two exposed groups were 0.86 and 1.37 Gy. The neutron whole-body doses were 0.19 and 0.38 Gy. Marginal posterior densities for the dose thresholds for neutron and gamma radiation were calculated with numerical integration and found to have quite different shapes. The density of the threshold for 60Co is unimodal with a mode at about 0.50 Gy. The threshold density for fission neutrons declines monotonically from a maximum value at zero with increasing doses. The posterior densities for all other parameters were similar for the two radiation types.

  12. Percolation thresholds for rod-like particles: polydispersity effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Avik P.

    2008-06-01

    A model based upon excluded volume considerations is presented for the connectedness percolation thresholds in polydisperse systems of cylindrical rod-like nanoparticles. The dependence of the percolation threshold upon polydispersity index and number-averaged aspect ratio is examined for two different distribution functions for the rod radii and lengths. The importance of accounting for polydispersity is explored in the context of measurements of the elastic moduli and electrical conductance in fibre-filled nanocomposites.

  13. Parton distributions with threshold resummation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonvini, Marco; Marzani, Simone; Rojo, Juan; Rottoli, Luca; Ubiali, Maria; Ball, Richard D.; Bertone, Valerio; Carrazza, Stefano; Hartland, Nathan P.

    2015-09-01

    We construct a set of parton distribution functions (PDFs) in which fixed-order NLO and NNLO calculations are supplemented with soft-gluon (threshold) resummation up to NLL and NNLL accuracy respectively, suitable for use in conjunction with any QCD calculation in which threshold resummation is included at the level of partonic cross sections. These resummed PDF sets, based on the NNPDF3.0 analysis, are extracted from deep-inelastic scattering, Drell-Yan, and top quark pair production data, for which resummed calculations can be consistently used. We find that, close to threshold, the inclusion of resummed PDFs can partially compensate the enhancement in resummed matrix elements, leading to resummed hadronic cross-sections closer to the fixed-order calculations. On the other hand, far from threshold, resummed PDFs reduce to their fixed-order counterparts. Our results demonstrate the need for a consistent use of resummed PDFs in resummed calculations.

  14. Oxygen and carbon isotopic signatures reveal a long-term effect of free-air ozone enrichment on leaf conductance in semi-natural grassland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jäggi, M.; Fuhrer, J.

    The effect of ozone on leaf gas diffusion was investigated by analyzing the stable oxygen isotopic signatures (δ 18O) in leaves of Holcus lanatus L., Plantago lanceolata L., Ranunculus friesianus (Jord.), and Trifolium pratense L. grown in temperate, semi-natural grassland. Dried material from plants exposed to ambient or elevated ozone levels in a long-term free-air experiment was sampled in 2002 and 2003. A general increase in δ 18O in elevated ozone indicated increased limitation to gas diffusion, which was strongest during the driest and warmest period in 2003. In three out of four species, the increase in δ 18O paralleled an increase in δ 13C measured earlier in the same samples, meaning that the dominant effect of ozone was on gas diffusion and not on CO 2 fixation. Only in R. friesianus, ozone affected both processes simultaneously. It is concluded that elevated ozone not only affects productivity, but also the water status of important component species of grassland communities.

  15. Influence of choking and arm lock technique in judo on the acoustic reflex threshold (art) in healthy well-trained male and female judoka.

    PubMed

    Raschka, Christoph; Koch, Horst Josef; Rau, Rüdiger

    2002-05-01

    The objective of this controlled parallel group study was to assess the effects of standardized choke holds (test) and arm lock techniques (controls) in on the acoustic hearing threshold. 104 (test group, 32 female subjects and 72 male subjects, mean age = 28.0 years, SD = 7.9 years) and 51 experienced judoka (controls. 21 female subjects, 30 male subjects; mean age = 26.8 years; SD = 13.2 years) participated. Acoustic reflex thresholds (ART [dB]) were measured separately before and after each manoeuvre both for air and bone conduction of the right and left side. The difference Dart of the ART before and after a manoeuvre (Dart = ARTbefore - ARTafter) was calculated. Data were presented descriptively and nonparametric statistics was applied for nonrelated (Kruskal Wallis ANOVA) or related samples (Friedman ANOVA). Wilcoxon tests were used for pre/post comparisons of original ART values. The effect of choking on Dart was significantly different from the effect of the arm lock technique on Dart independent of the experimental condition. A significant influence of applied frequencies on Dart was ascertained if a choking technique was used. For all frequency ranges applied a highly significant improvement of the ART after choking was found. With regard to bone conduction thresholds increased by an average of 6.1 dB and for air conduction the average increase was 4.9 dB. On the contrary, arm locks induced a slight mean deterioration of the ART for bone conduction of 1.8 dB. The ART for bone conduction also showed a trend towards a reduction after arm locks with a mean decrease of about 1.2 dB. In conclusion, standardized choking manoeuvres reduced the ART corresponding to an improved hearing both with regard to air and bone conduction. Such an effect on hearing ability was not found for arm lock techniques.

  16. Spray-on polyvinyl alcohol separators and impact on power production in air-cathode microbial fuel cells with different solution conductivities.

    PubMed

    Hoskins, Daniel L; Zhang, Xiaoyuan; Hickner, Michael A; Logan, Bruce E

    2014-11-01

    Separators are used to protect cathodes from biofouling and to avoid electrode short-circuiting, but they can adversely affect microbial fuel cell (MFC) performance. A spray method was used to apply a polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) separator to the cathode. Power densities were unaffected by the PVA separator (339±29mW/m(2)), compared to a control lacking a separator in a low conductivity solution (1mS/cm) similar to wastewater. Power was reduced with separators in solutions typical of laboratory tests (7-13mS/cm), compared to separatorless controls. The PVA separator produced more power in a separator assembly (SEA) configuration (444±8mW/m(2)) in the 1mS/cm solution, but power was reduced if a PVA or wipe separator was used in higher conductivity solutions with either Pt or activated carbon catalysts. Spray and cast PVA separators performed similarly, but the spray method is preferred as it was easier to apply and use.

  17. Threshold models in radiation carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Hoel, D.G.; Li, P.

    1998-09-01

    Cancer incidence and mortality data from the atomic bomb survivors cohort has been analyzed to allow for the possibility of a threshold dose response. The same dose-response models as used in the original papers were fit to the data. The estimated cancer incidence from the fitted models over-predicted the observed cancer incidence in the lowest exposure group. This is consistent with a threshold or nonlinear dose-response at low-doses. Thresholds were added to the dose-response models and the range of possible thresholds is shown for both solid tumor cancers as well as the different leukemia types. This analysis suggests that the A-bomb cancer incidence data agree more with a threshold or nonlinear dose-response model than a purely linear model although the linear model is statistically equivalent. This observation is not found with the mortality data. For both the incidence data and the mortality data the addition of a threshold term significantly improves the fit to the linear or linear-quadratic dose response for both total leukemias and also for the leukemia subtypes of ALL, AML, and CML.

  18. Face verification with balanced thresholds.

    PubMed

    Yan, Shuicheng; Xu, Dong; Tang, Xiaoou

    2007-01-01

    The process of face verification is guided by a pre-learned global threshold, which, however, is often inconsistent with class-specific optimal thresholds. It is, hence, beneficial to pursue a balance of the class-specific thresholds in the model-learning stage. In this paper, we present a new dimensionality reduction algorithm tailored to the verification task that ensures threshold balance. This is achieved by the following aspects. First, feasibility is guaranteed by employing an affine transformation matrix, instead of the conventional projection matrix, for dimensionality reduction, and, hence, we call the proposed algorithm threshold balanced transformation (TBT). Then, the affine transformation matrix, constrained as the product of an orthogonal matrix and a diagonal matrix, is optimized to improve the threshold balance and classification capability in an iterative manner. Unlike most algorithms for face verification which are directly transplanted from face identification literature, TBT is specifically designed for face verification and clarifies the intrinsic distinction between these two tasks. Experiments on three benchmark face databases demonstrate that TBT significantly outperforms the state-of-the-art subspace techniques for face verification.

  19. Cooling of Gas Turbines I - Effects of Addition of Fins to Blade Tips and Rotor, Admission of Cooling Air Through Part of Nozzles, and Change in Thermal Conductivity of Turbine Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Byron

    1947-01-01

    An analysis was developed for calculating the radial temperature distribution in a gas turbine with only the temperatures of the gas and the cooling air and the surface heat-transfer coefficient known. This analysis was applied to determine the temperatures of a complete wheel of a conventional single-stage impulse exhaust-gas turbine. The temperatures were first calculated for the case of the turbine operating at design conditions of speed, gas flow, etc. and with only the customary cooling arising from exposure of the outer blade flange and one face of the rotor to the air. Calculations were next made for the case of fins applied to the outer blade flange and the rotor. Finally the effects of using part of the nozzles (from 0 to 40 percent) for supplying cooling air and the effects of varying the metal thermal conductivity from 12 to 260 Btu per hour per foot per degree Farenheit on the wheel temperatures were determined. The gas temperatures at the nozzle box used in the calculations ranged from 1600F to 2000F. The results showed that if more than a few hundred degrees of cooling of turbine blades are required other means than indirect cooling with fins on the rotor and outer blade flange would be necessary. The amount of cooling indicated for the type of finning used could produce some improvement in efficiency and a large increase in durability of the wheel. The results also showed that if a large difference is to exist between the effective temperature of the exhaust gas and that of the blade material, as must be the case with present turbine materials and the high exhaust-gas temperatures desired (2000F and above), two alternatives are suggested: (a) If metal with a thermal conductivity comparable with copper is used, then the blade temperature can be reduced by strong cooling at both the blade tip and root. The center of the blade will be less than 2000F hotter than the ends; (b) With low conductivity materials some method of direct cooling other than

  20. High-resolution photodetachment spectroscopy from the lowest threshold of O{sup -}

    SciTech Connect

    Joiner, Anne; Mohr, Robert H.; Yukich, J. N.

    2011-03-15

    We conducted photodetachment spectroscopy near the lowest detachment threshold from O{sup -} in a 1-T field with sufficient resolution to observe a magnetic field structure similar to that observed in experiments conducted at the threshold of the electron affinity. These observations included not only cyclotron structure but also, to a smaller degree, individual Zeeman thresholds. The experiment was conducted in a Penning ion trap and with a single-mode, tunable, amplified diode laser. Finally, analysis of our results yielded a measurement of the lowest threshold energy.

  1. A longitudinal study on the ammonia threshold in junior cyclists

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Y; Chan, K

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: To identify the effect of a one year non-specific training programme on the ammonia threshold of a group of junior cyclists and to correlate ammonia threshold with other common physiological variables. Methods: The cyclists performed tests at three time points (T1, T2, T3) during the year. Follow up tests were conducted every six months after the original test. Ammonia threshold was obtained from a graded exercise with four minute steps. Results: The relatively non-specific one year training programme was effective in inducing an increase in peak VO2 (60.6 (5.9), 65.9 (7.4), and 64.6 (6.5) ml/min/kg at T1, T2, and T3 respectively) and endurance time (18.3 (4.5), 20.1 (5.2), and 27.0 (6.1) minutes at T1, T2, and T3 respectively), but was not effective for the sprint related variables. Ammonia threshold, together with lactate threshold and ventilatory threshold, was not significantly different at the three test times. Only endurance time correlated significantly with ammonia threshold (r  =  0.915, p  =  0.001). Conclusions: The findings suggest that a relatively non-specific one year training programme does not modify the ammonia threshold of junior cyclists. The significant correlation between ammonia threshold and endurance time further confirms that ammonia threshold is a measure of the ability to sustain exercise at submaximal intensities. PMID:15039242

  2. Cloud-screening for Africa using a geographically and seasonally variable infrared threshold

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eck, T. F.; Kalb, V. L.

    1991-01-01

    A spatially variable monthly, infrared cloud-threshold data base has been used to screen cloud-contaminated observations from radiances measured by the NOAA-9 AVHRR over Africa. Cloud-screening through a monthly average infrared threshold based on measured surface air temperature, which is geographically dependent, shows an improvement over using a seasonally and geographically independent thermal cloud threshold of 287 K. It is found that differences in cloud-screening for these two thresholds occur for cases of lower altitude clouds or subpixel clouds where the radiative temperature is higher than the 287 K infrared threshold, yet colder than the variable threshold developed by Stowe et al. (1988) for the Nimbus-7 global cloud climatology. The variable IR threshold is shown to be effective over persistently cloud-covered regions, such as the coastal region of the Gulf of Guinea, but may introduce some erroneous cloud identifications over mountains.

  3. Optical Damage Threshold of Silicon for Ultrafast Infrared Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, Benjamin M.; /Tech-X, Boulder /SLAC

    2007-11-28

    We present measurements of the optical damage threshold of crystalline silicon in air for ultrafast pulses in the near infrared. The wavelengths tested span a range from the telecommunications band at 1550 nm, extending to 2260 nm. We discuss the motivation for the measurements and give theoretical context. We then describe the experimental setup, diagnostics, and procedure. The results show a breakdown threshold of 0.2J/cm{sup 2} at 1550 nm and 1.06 ps FWHM pulse duration, and a weak dependence on wavelength.

  4. The Influence of Humidity on Assessing Irritation Threshold of Ammonia

    PubMed Central

    Sucker, Kirsten; Jettkant, Birger; Berresheim, Hans; Brüning, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    A large number of occupational exposure limit values (OELs) are based on avoiding of sensory irritation of the eyes and the upper respiratory tract. In order to investigate the chemosensory effect range of a chemical, odor and sensory irritation thresholds (lateralization thresholds, LTs) can be assessed. Humidity affects olfactory function and thus influences odor thresholds; however, a similar effect has not been shown for sensory irritation thresholds. The purpose of the present study was to explore whether LTs for ammonia vapor vary depending on the water vapor content of the inspired stimulus. Eight healthy nonsmoking volunteers were simultaneously exposed to ammonia vapor through one nostril and clean air through the other and were asked to determine which nostril received the chemical. Within experimental runs, ascending ammonia concentrations (60–350 ppm) that were either dry or humidified were administered at fixed time intervals. Geometric mean LTs obtained at wet (181 ppm) or dry (172 ppm) conditions did not differ significantly (P = 0.19) and were within the range of those reported by previous studies. These results suggest that humidity is not a critical factor in determining sensory irritation thresholds for ammonia, and future studies will examine if these findings are transferable to sensory irritation thresholds for other chemicals. PMID:27379250

  5. The Influence of Humidity on Assessing Irritation Threshold of Ammonia.

    PubMed

    Monsé, Christian; Sucker, Kirsten; Hoffmeyer, Frank; Jettkant, Birger; Berresheim, Hans; Bünger, Jürgen; Brüning, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    A large number of occupational exposure limit values (OELs) are based on avoiding of sensory irritation of the eyes and the upper respiratory tract. In order to investigate the chemosensory effect range of a chemical, odor and sensory irritation thresholds (lateralization thresholds, LTs) can be assessed. Humidity affects olfactory function and thus influences odor thresholds; however, a similar effect has not been shown for sensory irritation thresholds. The purpose of the present study was to explore whether LTs for ammonia vapor vary depending on the water vapor content of the inspired stimulus. Eight healthy nonsmoking volunteers were simultaneously exposed to ammonia vapor through one nostril and clean air through the other and were asked to determine which nostril received the chemical. Within experimental runs, ascending ammonia concentrations (60-350 ppm) that were either dry or humidified were administered at fixed time intervals. Geometric mean LTs obtained at wet (181 ppm) or dry (172 ppm) conditions did not differ significantly (P = 0.19) and were within the range of those reported by previous studies. These results suggest that humidity is not a critical factor in determining sensory irritation thresholds for ammonia, and future studies will examine if these findings are transferable to sensory irritation thresholds for other chemicals. PMID:27379250

  6. Taste Detection Thresholds of Resveratrol.

    PubMed

    Koga, Clarissa C; Becraft, Alexandra R; Lee, Youngsoo; Lee, Soo-Yeun

    2015-09-01

    Resveratrol is a polyphenol that is associated with numerous health benefits related to heart disease, cancer, diabetes, and neurological function. The addition of this compound to food products would help to deliver these health benefits to the consumer. However, bitterness associated with resveratrol may impart negative sensory qualities on the food products into which resveratrol is added; thus, decreasing consumer acceptability. This concern may be resolved by encapsulating resveratrol through spray drying, an innovative processing technique. The objectives of this research were to (1) compare taste detection thresholds of unencapsulated resveratrol and encapsulated resveratrol and (2) determine if the inclusion of anhydrous milk fat in the formulation of the encapsulation wall material affects the taste detection threshold of resveratrol within the microcapsules. Resveratrol microcapsules were produced by encapsulating resveratrol in a protein matrix through spray drying. R-index measure by the rating method was used to determine the average taste detection threshold and the pooled group taste detection threshold. The average and pooled group taste detection thresholds of unencapsulated resveratrol, sodium-caseinate-based resveratrol microcapsule without fat (SC), and sodium-caseinate-based resveratrol microcapsule with fat (SCAMF) were 90 and 47 mg resveratrol/L (unencapsulated), 313 and 103 mg resveratrol/L (SC), 334 and 108 mg resveratrol/L (SCAMF), respectively. The findings demonstrate that the encapsulation of resveratrol decreased the detection of the compound and provided a means to incorporate resveratrol into food products without imparting negative sensory properties.

  7. Interactive effects of soil water deficit and air vapour pressure deficit on mesophyll conductance to CO2 in Vitis vinifera and Olea europaea.

    PubMed

    Perez-Martin, A; Flexas, J; Ribas-Carbó, M; Bota, J; Tomás, M; Infante, J M; Diaz-Espejo, A

    2009-01-01

    The present work aims to study the interactive effect of drought stress and high vapour pressure deficit (VPD) on leaf gas exchange, and especially on mesophyll conductance to CO(2) (g(m)), in two woody species of great agronomical importance in the Mediterranean basin: Vitis vinifera L. cv. Tempranillo and Olea europaea L. cv. Manzanilla. Plants were grown in specially designed outdoor chambers with ambient and below ambient VPD, under both well-irrigated and drought conditions. g(m) was estimated by the variable J method from simultaneous measurements of gas exchange and fluorescence. In both species, the response to soil water deficit was larger in g(s) than in g(m), and more important than the response to VPD. Olea europaea was apparently more sensitive to VPD, so that plants growing in more humid chambers showed higher g(s) and g(m). In V. vinifera, in contrast, soil water deficit dominated the response of g(s) and g(m). Consequently, changes in g(m)/g(s) were more related to VPD in O. europaea and to soil water deficit in V. vinifera. Most of the limitations of photosynthesis were diffusional and especially due to stomatal closure. No biochemical limitation was detected. The results showed that structural parameters played an important role in determining g(m) during the acclimation process. Although the relationship between leaf mass per unit area (M(A)) with g(m) was scattered, it imposed a limitation to the maximum g(m) achievable, with higher values of M(A) in O. europaea at lower g(m) values. M(A) decreased under water stress in O. europaea but it increased in V. vinifera. This resulted in a negative relationship between M(A) and the CO(2) draw-down between substomatal cavities and chloroplasts in O. europaea, while being positive in V. vinifera. PMID:19457982

  8. Optimum threshold selection method of centroid computation for Gaussian spot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xuxu; Li, Xinyang; Wang, Caixia

    2015-10-01

    Centroid computation of Gaussian spot is often conducted to get the exact position of a target or to measure wave-front slopes in the fields of target tracking and wave-front sensing. Center of Gravity (CoG) is the most traditional method of centroid computation, known as its low algorithmic complexity. However both electronic noise from the detector and photonic noise from the environment reduces its accuracy. In order to improve the accuracy, thresholding is unavoidable before centroid computation, and optimum threshold need to be selected. In this paper, the model of Gaussian spot is established to analyze the performance of optimum threshold under different Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) conditions. Besides, two optimum threshold selection methods are introduced: TmCoG (using m % of the maximum intensity of spot as threshold), and TkCoG ( usingμn +κσ n as the threshold), μn and σn are the mean value and deviation of back noise. Firstly, their impact on the detection error under various SNR conditions is simulated respectively to find the way to decide the value of k or m. Then, a comparison between them is made. According to the simulation result, TmCoG is superior over TkCoG for the accuracy of selected threshold, and detection error is also lower.

  9. Audiometric thresholds among a Canadian sample of 10 to 17 year old students.

    PubMed

    Marcoux, Andre M; Feder, Katya; Keith, Stephen E; Marro, Leonora; James, Marianne E; Michaud, David S

    2012-04-01

    A total of 237 students, 10 to 17 years of age, from 14 schools underwent hearing evaluations. Otoscopic examination, tympanometry and air-conduction pure tone audiometry was conducted at low (0.5, 1, 2 kHz) and high (4 and 8 kHz) frequencies. In all schools, hearing thresholds were measured with headphones in a portable audiometric booth. Socio-demographic information from students and their parents were collected using questionnaires. Overall, the prevalence of any hearing loss greater than 15 dB was 22.3% for low or high frequency pure tone averages. Self-reported symptoms of hearing loss, such as tinnitus, difficulty following a conversation with background noise, and having to turn up the TV/radio more than in the past, were associated with audiometric thresholds, most notably at 4 kHz. These study findings are among the first to provide a detailed characterization of hearing status in a sample of youth in a Canadian demographic. PMID:22501057

  10. Efficient, low threshold, cryogenic Ho:YAG laser.

    PubMed

    Ganija, Miftar; Simakov, Nikita; Hemming, Alexander; Haub, John; Veitch, Peter; Munch, Jesper

    2016-05-30

    We report the development of an efficient, liquid-nitrogen conduction cooled Ho:YAG slab laser with good beam quality. Detailed measurements resolving the structure of the 1900-1911 nm absorption band in Ho:YAG at 77 K are presented. Stress-free conduction cooled mounting of the Ho:YAG slab was demonstrated and the resulting laser operated with a large mode volume of 42 mm3, a slope efficiency of 75% and a threshold of 0.84 W. To our knowledge this corresponds to the lowest reported threshold intensity for a Ho:YAG laser. PMID:27410084

  11. On computational Gestalt detection thresholds.

    PubMed

    Grompone von Gioi, Rafael; Jakubowicz, Jérémie

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to show some recent developments of computational Gestalt theory, as pioneered by Desolneux, Moisan and Morel. The new results allow to predict much more accurately the detection thresholds. This step is unavoidable if one wants to analyze visual detection thresholds in the light of computational Gestalt theory. The paper first recalls the main elements of computational Gestalt theory. It points out a precision issue in this theory, essentially due to the use of discrete probability distributions. It then proposes to overcome this issue by using continuous probability distributions and illustrates it on the meaningful alignment detector of Desolneux et al.

  12. Thresholds in chemical respiratory sensitisation.

    PubMed

    Cochrane, Stella A; Arts, Josje H E; Ehnes, Colin; Hindle, Stuart; Hollnagel, Heli M; Poole, Alan; Suto, Hidenori; Kimber, Ian

    2015-07-01

    There is a continuing interest in determining whether it is possible to identify thresholds for chemical allergy. Here allergic sensitisation of the respiratory tract by chemicals is considered in this context. This is an important occupational health problem, being associated with rhinitis and asthma, and in addition provides toxicologists and risk assessors with a number of challenges. In common with all forms of allergic disease chemical respiratory allergy develops in two phases. In the first (induction) phase exposure to a chemical allergen (by an appropriate route of exposure) causes immunological priming and sensitisation of the respiratory tract. The second (elicitation) phase is triggered if a sensitised subject is exposed subsequently to the same chemical allergen via inhalation. A secondary immune response will be provoked in the respiratory tract resulting in inflammation and the signs and symptoms of a respiratory hypersensitivity reaction. In this article attention has focused on the identification of threshold values during the acquisition of sensitisation. Current mechanistic understanding of allergy is such that it can be assumed that the development of sensitisation (and also the elicitation of an allergic reaction) is a threshold phenomenon; there will be levels of exposure below which sensitisation will not be acquired. That is, all immune responses, including allergic sensitisation, have threshold requirement for the availability of antigen/allergen, below which a response will fail to develop. The issue addressed here is whether there are methods available or clinical/epidemiological data that permit the identification of such thresholds. This document reviews briefly relevant human studies of occupational asthma, and experimental models that have been developed (or are being developed) for the identification and characterisation of chemical respiratory allergens. The main conclusion drawn is that although there is evidence that the

  13. The Importance of Ecosystem Thresholds in Assessing Safe Concentrations of Greenhouse Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janetos, A. C.

    2007-12-01

    There is a major strategic challenge in the public debate about global environmental change related to concentrations of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere that might lead to environmentally, socially, and economically unacceptable impacts. This project takes one approach to this problem: avoiding "dangerous anthropogenic interference" and "allowing ecosystems to adapt." But these phrases implicitly assume that the influences of climate change are likely to be gradual and that there will be substantial time for natural resources to adapt or for managers to cope with change. The current state of the science suggests that something quite different may be in the offing. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) and other assessments of possible impacts now agree on two important points. One is that there is already well-documented evidence of the biological and ecological consequences of climate change - in the behavior of migratory birds, in corals bleached from the influence of warming ocean temperatures, in the loss of glaciers to warming air temperatures, and in the loss of sea grass beds to sea level rise. The second is that ecological systems may not in fact change gradually. Modeling studies and the historical record both suggest that changes in ecosystems can be rapid, large, and sometimes irreversible, i.e., there are thresholds that, once crossed, will present serious coping challenges to humans. Moreover, as suggested in a recent National Academy of Sciences (NAS) workshop on "Understanding and Responding to Multiple Environmental Stresses," dealing with threshold responses that may lead to sudden and dramatic change in societal or environmental structure and function will also require that we develop ways to proceed with decision-making despite the many uncertainties associated with thresholds. These observations present serious challenges to the modeling frameworks used in integrated assessment. Not only do the models have to characterize the

  14. New states above charm threshold

    SciTech Connect

    Eichten, Estia J.; Lane, Kenneth; Quigg, Chris; /Fermilab

    2005-11-01

    We revise and extend expectations for the properties of charmonium states that lie above charm threshold, in light of new experimental information. We refine the Cornell coupled-channel model for the coupling of c{bar c} levels to two-meson states, defining resonance masses and widths by pole positions in the complex energy plane, and suggest new targets for experiment.

  15. Threshold Concepts and Pedagogic Representation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Jan H. F.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to present a brief exposure to the development of the threshold concepts framework (TCF), the intention being to illuminate for interested readers a broader landscape of research activity than that perhaps conveyed by the individual contributions to this special edition. Design/Methodology/Approach: There is…

  16. Crossing Thresholds in Academic Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abbott, Rob

    2013-01-01

    This paper looks at the conceptual thresholds in relation to academic reading which might be crossed by undergraduate English Literature students. It is part of a wider study following 16 students through three years of undergraduate study. It uses theoretical ideas from Bakhtin and Foucault to analyse interviews with English lecturers. It…

  17. Threshold enhancement of diphoton resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharucha, Aoife; Djouadi, Abdelhak; Goudelis, Andreas

    2016-10-01

    We revisit a mechanism to enhance the decay width of (pseudo-)scalar resonances to photon pairs when the process is mediated by loops of charged fermions produced near threshold. Motivated by the recent LHC data, indicating the presence of an excess in the diphoton spectrum at approximately 750 GeV, we illustrate this threshold enhancement mechanism in the case of a 750 GeV pseudoscalar boson A with a two-photon decay mediated by a charged and uncolored fermion having a mass at the 1/2MA threshold and a small decay width, < 1 MeV. The implications of such a threshold enhancement are discussed in two explicit scenarios: i) the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model in which the A state is produced via the top quark mediated gluon fusion process and decays into photons predominantly through loops of charginos with masses close to 1/2MA and ii) a two Higgs doublet model in which A is again produced by gluon fusion but decays into photons through loops of vector-like charged heavy leptons. In both these scenarios, while the mass of the charged fermion has to be adjusted to be extremely close to half of the A resonance mass, the small total widths are naturally obtained if only suppressed three-body decay channels occur. Finally, the implications of some of these scenarios for dark matter are discussed.

  18. Milagro: A low energy threshold extensive air shower array

    SciTech Connect

    Sinnis, C.

    1994-12-31

    Observations of high-energy gamma rays from astronomical sources have revolutionized our view of the cosmos. Gamma rays with energies up to {approximately}10 GeV can be observed directly with space-based instruments. Above 100 GeV the low flux of gamma rays requires one to utilize ground-based instruments. Milagro is a new type of gamma-ray detector based on water Cerenkov technology. This new design will enable to continuously observe the entire overhead sky, and be sensitive to cosmic rays with energies above {approximately}250 GeV. These attributes make Milagro an ideal detector for the study of high-energy transient phenomenon.

  19. Electrical Conductivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Philip B.

    1979-01-01

    Examines Drude's classical (1900) theory of electrical conduction, details the objections to and successes of the 1900 theory, and investigates the Quantum (1928) theory of conduction, reviewing its successes and limitations. (BT)

  20. Effective thermal conductivity of a thin composite material

    SciTech Connect

    Phelan, P.E.; Niemann, R.C.

    1996-12-31

    The thermal conductivity of a randomly oriented composite material is modeled using a probabilistic approach in order to determine if a size effect exists for the thermal conductivity at small composite thickness. The numerical scheme employs a random number generator to position the filler elements, which have a relatively high thermal conductivity, within a matrix having a relatively low thermal conductivity. Results indicate that, below some threshold thickness, the composite thermal conductivity increases with decreasing thickness, while above the threshold the thermal conductivity is independent of thickness. The threshold thickness increases for increasing filler fraction and increasing k{sub f}/k{sub m}, the ratio between filler and matrix thermal conductivities.

  1. Threshold windspeeds for sand on Mars - Wind tunnel simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greeley, R.; Leach, R.; White, B.; Iversen, J.; Pollack, J. B.

    1980-02-01

    Wind friction threshold speeds for particle movement were determined in a wind tunnel operating at martian surface pressure with a 95 percent CO2 and 5 percent air atmosphere. The relationship between friction speed and free-stream velocity is extended to the critical case for Mars of momentum thickness Reynolds numbers between 425 and 2000. It is determined that the dynamic pressure required to initiate saltation is nearly constant for pressures between 1 bar and 4 mb for atmospheres of both air and CO2.

  2. Aerosol-induced laser breakdown thresholds: wavelength dependence.

    PubMed

    Pinnick, R G; Chylek, P; Jarzembski, M; Creegan, E; Srivastava, V; Fernandez, G; Pendleton, J D; Biswas, A

    1988-03-01

    Aerosol-induced loser breakdown thresholds have been measured for liquid droplets at wavelengths lambda= 1.064, 0.532, 0.355, 0.266 microm using a Nd:YAG laser with 5-10-ns pulse duration. Breakdown thresholds are 2-3 orders of magnitude below those for clean air and range from 4 x 10(7) to 3 x 10(9) W cm(-2) for nominal 50-microm diam droplets, depending on laser wavelength and droplet composition. Thresholds decrease with decreasing wavelength; they also decrease for droplets having a higher real refractive index. For water droplets the breakdown threshold intensity varies approximately as lambda(0.5). The wavelength dependence of breakdown thresholds can be qualitatively explained by considering (1) the effect of enhancement of internal fields and energy density within and near droplets and (2) the increasing importance of multiphoton absorption processes at shorter wavelengths. Laser transmission losses through the breakdown plasma and observations of the suppression of stimulated Raman scattering by the addition of small quantitites of absorbing material to water and carbon tetrachloride droplets are also reported.

  3. Extreme sensitivity and the practical implications of risk assessment thresholds.

    PubMed

    Bukowski, John; Nicolich, Mark; Lewis, R Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    Traditional risk-assessment theory assumes the existence of a threshold for non-cancer health effects. However, a recent trend in environmental regulation rejects this assumption in favor of non-threshold linearity for these endpoints. This trend is driven largely by two related concepts: (1) a theoretical assumption of wide-ranging human sensitivity, and (2) inability to detect thresholds in epidemiologic models. Wide-ranging sensitivity assumes a subpopulation with extreme background vulnerability, so that even trivial environmental exposures are hazardous to someone somewhere. We use examples from the real world of clinical medicine to show that this theoretical assumption is inconsistent with the biology of mammalian systems and the realities of patient care. Using examples from particulate-matter air-pollution research, we further show that failure to reject linearity is usually driven by statistical rather than biological considerations, and that nonlinear/threshold models often have a similar or better fit than their linear counterparts. This evidence suggests the existence of practical, real-world thresholds for most chemical exposures.

  4. Genetic variance of tolerance and the toxicant threshold model.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yoshinari; Mano, Hiroyuki; Tatsuta, Haruki

    2012-04-01

    A statistical genetics method is presented for estimating the genetic variance (heritability) of tolerance to pollutants on the basis of a standard acute toxicity test conducted on several isofemale lines of cladoceran species. To analyze the genetic variance of tolerance in the case when the response is measured as a few discrete states (quantal endpoints), the authors attempted to apply the threshold character model in quantitative genetics to the threshold model separately developed in ecotoxicology. The integrated threshold model (toxicant threshold model) assumes that the response of a particular individual occurs at a threshold toxicant concentration and that the individual tolerance characterized by the individual's threshold value is determined by genetic and environmental factors. As a case study, the heritability of tolerance to p-nonylphenol in the cladoceran species Daphnia galeata was estimated by using the maximum likelihood method and nested analysis of variance (ANOVA). Broad-sense heritability was estimated to be 0.199 ± 0.112 by the maximum likelihood method and 0.184 ± 0.089 by ANOVA; both results implied that the species examined had the potential to acquire tolerance to this substance by evolutionary change.

  5. A threshold for dissipative fission

    SciTech Connect

    Thoennessen, M.; Bertsch, G.F.

    1993-09-21

    The empirical domain of validity of statistical theory is examined as applied to fission data on pre-fission data on pre-fission neutron, charged particle, and {gamma}-ray multiplicities. Systematics are found of the threshold excitation energy for the appearance of nonstatistical fission. From the data on systems with not too high fissility, the relevant phenomenological parameter is the ratio of the threshold temperature T{sub thresh} to the (temperature-dependent) fission barrier height E{sub Bar}(T). The statistical model reproduces the data for T{sub thresh}/E{sub Bar}(T) < 0.26 {plus_minus} 0.05, but underpredicts the multiplicities at higher T{sub thresh}/E{sub Bar}(T) independent of mass and fissility of the systems.

  6. Nanostructured conductive polymeric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Saleh, Mohammed H.

    Conductive polymer composites (CPCs) are a suitable alternative to metals in many applications due to their light-weight, corrosion resistance, low cost, ease of processing and design flexibility. CPCs have been formulated using different types of conductive fillers. In this PhD thesis, the focus is on CPCs for electrostatic discharge (ESD) protection and electromagnetic interference (EMI) attenuation. Despite the versatility of conductive fillers, carbon black (CB) has been the dominant filler to make CPCs for ESD protection applications because CB/polymer composites have a cost advantage over all other CPCs. For EMI shielding, stainless steel fibres and metal coated fibers are the preferred fillers, however CPCs made of those fibers are not the dominant EMI shielding materials. Metal coated and polymer plated polymers are the most widely used EMI shielding options. The limited use of CPCs in the EMI shielding market is because the high filler loading required to formulate a composite with an adequate level of shielding remarkably increases the composite price. In order to increase the competitiveness of CPCs, percolation threshold should be minimized as much as possible and composites with high EMI shielding capabilities at low filler loading should be formulated because all conductive fillers are expensive compared to polymers. In this thesis, two different methodologies to reduce percolation threshold in CPCs have been successfully developed and a CPC with exceptional EMI shielding capability has been formulated using copper nanowires as conductive filler. The first percolation threshold reduction technique is based on the selective localization of CB at the interface of immiscible polymer blend. The technique requires adding a copolymer that prefers the blend's interface and for which CB nanoparticles has the highest affinity. The second method is based on producing a CPC powder and then using this powder as a conductive filler to produce composite by dry

  7. Near-threshold fatigue crack growth in 8090 Al-Li alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, X.J.; Wallace, W.; Koul, A.K.; Raizenne, M.D.

    1995-11-01

    Near-threshold fatigue crack growth was studied in 8090-T8771 Al-Li alloy tested in moist laboratory air. The testing was conducted using (1) the ASTM E-647 load-shedding procedure, (2) a power-law load-shedding procedure, and (3) a constant-amplitude (CA) loading procedure. Crack closure in the three procedures was analyzed. In reconciling fatigue crack growth rates (FCGRs) with different crack closure levels under identical testing parameters, the conventional {Delta}K{sub eff} (=K{sub max} {minus} K{sub op}) fails to correlate the test data and the modified {Delta}K{sub eff} (=K{sub max} {minus} {chi}K{sub op}, where {chi} is the shielding factor, defined by an energy approach) is proven to be the true crack driving force. A parallel slip-rupture model is proposed to describe the mechanism of near-threshold fatigue crack growth in this ally. The model explains the mode transition from crystallographic slip band cracking (SBC) to subgrain boundary cracking (SGC)/brittle fracture (BF) in terms of microstructure-environment synergy. The transition is related to the material`s short-transverse grain size.

  8. Near-threshold fatigue crack growth in 8090 Al-Li alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, X. J.; Wallace, W.; Koul, A. K.; Raizenne, M. D.

    1995-11-01

    Near-threshold fatigue crack growth was studied in 8090-T8771 Al-Li alloy tested in moist laboratory air. The testing was conducted using (1) the ASTM E-647 load-shedding procedure, (2) a power-law load-shedding procedure, and (3) a constant-amplitude (CA) loading procedure. Crack closure in the three procedures was analyzed. In reconciling fatigue crack growth rates (FCGRs) with different crack closure levels under identical testing parameters, the conventional Δ K eff (= K max — K op) fails to correlate the test data and the modified Δ K eff (= K max - χKop, where χ is the shielding factor, defined by an energy approach) is proven to be the true crack driving force. A parallel slip-rupture model is proposed to describe the mechanism of near-threshold fatigue crack growth in this alloy. The model explains the mode transition from crystallographic slip band cracking (SBC) to subgrain boundary cracking (SGC)/brittle fracture (BF) in terms of a microstructure-environment synergy. The transition is related to the material’s short-transverse grain size.

  9. An evaluation of corn earworm damage and thresholds in soybean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Brian Patrick

    Interactions between corn earworm, Helicoverpa zea (Boddie), and soybean, Glycine max L. (Merrill), were investigated in the Mid-South to evaluate thresholds and damage levels. Field studies were conducted in both indeterminate and determinate modern cultivars to evaluate damage, critical injury levels, and soybean response to simulated corn earworm injury. Field studies were also conducted to evaluate the response of indeterminate cultivars to infestations of corn earworm. Field studies were also conducted to investigate the relationship between pyrethroid insecticide application and corn earworm oviposition in soybean. Results of field studies involving simulated corn earworm damage indicated the need for a dynamic threshold that becomes more conservative as soybean phenology progressed through the reproductive growth stages. This suggested that soybean was more tolerant to fruit loss during the earlier reproductive stages and was able to compensate for fruit loss better during this time than at later growth stages. Results of field studies involving infestations of corn earworm indicated that current thresholds are likely too liberal. This resulted in economic injury level tables being constructed based upon a range of crop values and control costs, however, a general action threshold was also recommended for indeterminate soybean in the Mid-South. Field study results investigating the relationship of pyrethroid application and corn earworm oviposition indicated that even in the presence of an insecticide, corn earworm prefers to oviposit in the upper portion of the canopy, as well as on the leaves as opposed to all other plant parts, consistent with all previous literature.

  10. Damage Thresholds and Morphology of the Front- and Back-Irradiated SiO2 Thin Films Containing Gold Nanoparticles as Artificial Absorbing Defects

    SciTech Connect

    Papernov, S.; Schmid, A.W.; Oliver, J.B.; Rigatti, A.L.

    2008-01-30

    Previous ultraviolet-pulsed, laser-damage studies using model thin films with gold nanoparticles as artificial absorbing defects revealed damage morphology in a form of submicrometer-scaled craters. It was also demonstrated that for defects smaller than 20 nm, crater formation is preceded by plasma-ball formation around absorbing defects. In this work an attempt is made to verify symmetry of the plasma ball by conducting film irradiation from the side of the air/film or substrate/film interfaces. In each case, crater-formation thresholds are derived and crater morphology is analyzed by means of atomic force microscopy.

  11. 40 CFR 98.361 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Manure Management § 98.361 Reporting threshold. Livestock facilities must report GHG emissions under this subpart if the facility meets the reporting threshold as defined in...

  12. USE OF THRESHOLDS IN LANDSCAPE ASSESSMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Identification and use of thresholds are potentially important additions to interpretations of ecological monitoring data. However, there are a number of issues related to defining and using thresholds in interpreting ecological data. Most of these issues center around the pauc...

  13. Thresholds for impaired species recovery

    PubMed Central

    Hutchings, Jeffrey A.

    2015-01-01

    Studies on small and declining populations dominate research in conservation biology. This emphasis reflects two overarching frameworks: the small-population paradigm focuses on correlates of increased extinction probability; the declining-population paradigm directs attention to the causes and consequences of depletion. Neither, however, particularly informs research on the determinants, rate or uncertainty of population increase. By contrast, Allee effects (positive associations between population size and realized per capita population growth rate, rrealized, a metric of average individual fitness) offer a theoretical and empirical basis for identifying numerical and temporal thresholds at which recovery is unlikely or uncertain. Following a critique of studies on Allee effects, I quantify population-size minima and subsequent trajectories of marine fishes that have and have not recovered following threat mitigation. The data suggest that threat amelioration, albeit necessary, can be insufficient to effect recovery for populations depleted to less than 10% of maximum abundance (Nmax), especially when they remain depleted for lengthy periods of time. Comparing terrestrial and aquatic vertebrates, life-history analyses suggest that population-size thresholds for impaired recovery are likely to be comparatively low for marine fishes but high for marine mammals. Articulation of a ‘recovering population paradigm’ would seem warranted. It might stimulate concerted efforts to identify generic impaired recovery thresholds across species. It might also serve to reduce the confusion of terminology, and the conflation of causes and consequences with patterns currently evident in the literature on Allee effects, thus strengthening communication among researchers and enhancing the practical utility of recovery-oriented research to conservation practitioners and resource managers. PMID:26213739

  14. Thresholds for impaired species recovery.

    PubMed

    Hutchings, Jeffrey A

    2015-06-22

    Studies on small and declining populations dominate research in conservation biology. This emphasis reflects two overarching frameworks: the small-population paradigm focuses on correlates of increased extinction probability; the declining-population paradigm directs attention to the causes and consequences of depletion. Neither, however, particularly informs research on the determinants, rate or uncertainty of population increase. By contrast, Allee effects (positive associations between population size and realized per capita population growth rate, r(realized), a metric of average individual fitness) offer a theoretical and empirical basis for identifying numerical and temporal thresholds at which recovery is unlikely or uncertain. Following a critique of studies on Allee effects, I quantify population-size minima and subsequent trajectories of marine fishes that have and have not recovered following threat mitigation. The data suggest that threat amelioration, albeit necessary, can be insufficient to effect recovery for populations depleted to less than 10% of maximum abundance (N(max)), especially when they remain depleted for lengthy periods of time. Comparing terrestrial and aquatic vertebrates, life-history analyses suggest that population-size thresholds for impaired recovery are likely to be comparatively low for marine fishes but high for marine mammals.Articulation of a 'recovering population paradigm' would seem warranted. It might stimulate concerted efforts to identify generic impaired recovery thresholds across species. It might also serve to reduce the confusion of terminology, and the conflation of causes and consequences with patterns currently evident in the literature on Allee effects, thus strengthening communication among researchers and enhancing the practical utility of recovery-oriented research to conservation practitioners and resource managers. PMID:26213739

  15. Electrical Conductivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hershey, David R.; Sand, Susan

    1993-01-01

    Explains how electrical conductivity (EC) can be used to measure ion concentration in solutions. Describes instrumentation for the measurement, temperature dependence and EC, and the EC of common substances. (PR)

  16. Compositional threshold for Nuclear Waste Glass Durability

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, Albert A.; Farooqi, Rahmatullah; Hrma, Pavel R.

    2013-04-24

    Within the composition space of glasses, a distinct threshold appears to exist that separates "good" glasses, i.e., those which are sufficiently durable, from "bad" glasses of a low durability. The objective of our research is to clarify the origin of this threshold by exploring the relationship between glass composition, glass structure and chemical durability around the threshold region.

  17. Threshold Concepts in Finance: Student Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoadley, Susan; Kyng, Tim; Tickle, Leonie; Wood, Leigh N.

    2015-01-01

    Finance threshold concepts are the essential conceptual knowledge that underpin well-developed financial capabilities and are central to the mastery of finance. In this paper we investigate threshold concepts in finance from the point of view of students, by establishing the extent to which students are aware of threshold concepts identified by…

  18. [Particulate matter (PM10) air pollution, daily mortality, and hospital admissions: recent findings].

    PubMed

    Colucci, Maria Eugenia; Veronesi, Licia; Roveda, Anna Maria; Marangio, Emilio; Sansebastiano, Giuliano

    2006-01-01

    The first studies conducted to evaluate a possible association between air pollution and mortality date back to the serious events that occurred in the Mosa Valley, Belgium (1930), in the small city of Donora ("killer fog" incident of 1948) and in London (1952). The latter episode led to the introduction of air pollution control policies. Following the introduction of air pollution control measures in economically advanced cities in the 60s and 70s, the concentration levels of pollutants reached were believed, for many years, to be risk free. However, despite improvements in air quality achieved by many industrialized countries the negative effects of air pollution remain today an important public health problem. Among all air pollutants, particulate matter is the type of air pollution that causes the most numerous and serious effects on human health, because of the broad range of diverse toxic substances it contains,. For this reason, when assessing human health risk, PM10 may be considered to be a reliable indicator of the impact of global air pollution. Various epidemiologic studies conducted in the last 10 years, such as the Air Pollution and Health-European Approach (APHEA) project, the National Morbidity, Mortality and Air Pollution (NMMAPS) Study and Italian Meta-analysis of Studies on the short-term effects of Air pollution (MISA), have shown that current ambient concentrations of PM10 may lead to increased mortality and morbidity. Various studies have reported mean increases in mortality below 1% for 10 ?g/mc increases of ambient PM10. Studies have also underscored the role of particulate matter in aggravating cardiorespiratory diseases and consequently increasing hospital admissions. Air quality standards have been recently revised by legislation. The EU has issued a directive that sets limiting values and, where appropriate, threshold values, for the different air pollutants.

  19. Pressure Flammability Thresholds in Oxygen of Selected Aerospace Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirsch, David; Williams, Jim; Harper, Susana; Beeson, Harold; Ruff, Gary; Pedley, Mike

    2010-01-01

    The experimental approach consisted of concentrating the testing in the flammability transition zone following the Bruceton Up-and-Down Method. For attribute data, the method has been shown to be very repeatable and most efficient. Other methods for characterization of critical levels (Karberand Probit) were also considered. The data yielded the upward limiting pressure index (ULPI), the pressure level where approx.50% of materials self-extinguish in a given environment.Parametric flammability thresholds other than oxygen concentration can be determined with the methodology proposed for evaluating the MOC when extinguishment occurs. In this case, a pressure threshold in 99.8% oxygen was determined with the methodology and found to be 0.4 to 0.9 psia for typical spacecraft materials. Correlation of flammability thresholds obtained with chemical, hot wire, and other ignition sources will be conducted to provide recommendations for using alternate ignition sources to evaluate flammability of aerospace materials.

  20. Epidemic threshold in directed networks.

    PubMed

    Li, Cong; Wang, Huijuan; Van Mieghem, Piet

    2013-12-01

    Epidemics have so far been mostly studied in undirected networks. However, many real-world networks, such as the online social network Twitter and the world wide web, on which information, emotion, or malware spreads, are directed networks, composed of both unidirectional links and bidirectional links. We define the directionality ξ as the percentage of unidirectional links. The epidemic threshold τ(c) for the susceptible-infected-susceptible (SIS) epidemic is lower bounded by 1/λ(1) in directed networks, where λ(1), also called the spectral radius, is the largest eigenvalue of the adjacency matrix. In this work, we propose two algorithms to generate directed networks with a given directionality ξ. The effect of ξ on the spectral radius λ(1), principal eigenvector x(1), spectral gap (λ(1)-|λ(2)|), and algebraic connectivity μ(N-1) is studied. Important findings are that the spectral radius λ(1) decreases with the directionality ξ, whereas the spectral gap and the algebraic connectivity increase with the directionality ξ. The extent of the decrease of the spectral radius depends on both the degree distribution and the degree-degree correlation ρ(D). Hence, in directed networks, the epidemic threshold is larger and a random walk converges to its steady state faster than that in undirected networks with the same degree distribution. PMID:24483506

  1. Computational gestalts and perception thresholds.

    PubMed

    Desolneux, Agnès; Moisan, Lionel; Morel, Jean-Michel

    2003-01-01

    In 1923, Max Wertheimer proposed a research programme and method in visual perception. He conjectured the existence of a small set of geometric grouping laws governing the perceptual synthesis of phenomenal objects, or "gestalt" from the atomic retina input. In this paper, we review this set of geometric grouping laws, using the works of Metzger, Kanizsa and their schools. In continuation, we explain why the Gestalt theory research programme can be translated into a Computer Vision programme. This translation is not straightforward, since Gestalt theory never addressed two fundamental matters: image sampling and image information measurements. Using these advances, we shall show that gestalt grouping laws can be translated into quantitative laws allowing the automatic computation of gestalts in digital images. From the psychophysical viewpoint, a main issue is raised: the computer vision gestalt detection methods deliver predictable perception thresholds. Thus, we are set in a position where we can build artificial images and check whether some kind of agreement can be found between the computationally predicted thresholds and the psychophysical ones. We describe and discuss two preliminary sets of experiments, where we compared the gestalt detection performance of several subjects with the predictable detection curve. In our opinion, the results of this experimental comparison support the idea of a much more systematic interaction between computational predictions in Computer Vision and psychophysical experiments. PMID:14766147

  2. Epidemic threshold in directed networks.

    PubMed

    Li, Cong; Wang, Huijuan; Van Mieghem, Piet

    2013-12-01

    Epidemics have so far been mostly studied in undirected networks. However, many real-world networks, such as the online social network Twitter and the world wide web, on which information, emotion, or malware spreads, are directed networks, composed of both unidirectional links and bidirectional links. We define the directionality ξ as the percentage of unidirectional links. The epidemic threshold τ(c) for the susceptible-infected-susceptible (SIS) epidemic is lower bounded by 1/λ(1) in directed networks, where λ(1), also called the spectral radius, is the largest eigenvalue of the adjacency matrix. In this work, we propose two algorithms to generate directed networks with a given directionality ξ. The effect of ξ on the spectral radius λ(1), principal eigenvector x(1), spectral gap (λ(1)-|λ(2)|), and algebraic connectivity μ(N-1) is studied. Important findings are that the spectral radius λ(1) decreases with the directionality ξ, whereas the spectral gap and the algebraic connectivity increase with the directionality ξ. The extent of the decrease of the spectral radius depends on both the degree distribution and the degree-degree correlation ρ(D). Hence, in directed networks, the epidemic threshold is larger and a random walk converges to its steady state faster than that in undirected networks with the same degree distribution.

  3. Epidemic threshold in directed networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Cong; Wang, Huijuan; Van Mieghem, Piet

    2013-12-01

    Epidemics have so far been mostly studied in undirected networks. However, many real-world networks, such as the online social network Twitter and the world wide web, on which information, emotion, or malware spreads, are directed networks, composed of both unidirectional links and bidirectional links. We define the directionality ξ as the percentage of unidirectional links. The epidemic threshold τc for the susceptible-infected-susceptible (SIS) epidemic is lower bounded by 1/λ1 in directed networks, where λ1, also called the spectral radius, is the largest eigenvalue of the adjacency matrix. In this work, we propose two algorithms to generate directed networks with a given directionality ξ. The effect of ξ on the spectral radius λ1, principal eigenvector x1, spectral gap (λ1-λ2), and algebraic connectivity μN-1 is studied. Important findings are that the spectral radius λ1 decreases with the directionality ξ, whereas the spectral gap and the algebraic connectivity increase with the directionality ξ. The extent of the decrease of the spectral radius depends on both the degree distribution and the degree-degree correlation ρD. Hence, in directed networks, the epidemic threshold is larger and a random walk converges to its steady state faster than that in undirected networks with the same degree distribution.

  4. Computational gestalts and perception thresholds.

    PubMed

    Desolneux, Agnès; Moisan, Lionel; Morel, Jean-Michel

    2003-01-01

    In 1923, Max Wertheimer proposed a research programme and method in visual perception. He conjectured the existence of a small set of geometric grouping laws governing the perceptual synthesis of phenomenal objects, or "gestalt" from the atomic retina input. In this paper, we review this set of geometric grouping laws, using the works of Metzger, Kanizsa and their schools. In continuation, we explain why the Gestalt theory research programme can be translated into a Computer Vision programme. This translation is not straightforward, since Gestalt theory never addressed two fundamental matters: image sampling and image information measurements. Using these advances, we shall show that gestalt grouping laws can be translated into quantitative laws allowing the automatic computation of gestalts in digital images. From the psychophysical viewpoint, a main issue is raised: the computer vision gestalt detection methods deliver predictable perception thresholds. Thus, we are set in a position where we can build artificial images and check whether some kind of agreement can be found between the computationally predicted thresholds and the psychophysical ones. We describe and discuss two preliminary sets of experiments, where we compared the gestalt detection performance of several subjects with the predictable detection curve. In our opinion, the results of this experimental comparison support the idea of a much more systematic interaction between computational predictions in Computer Vision and psychophysical experiments.

  5. Toward a new methodology for measuring the threshold Shields number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousseau, Gauthier; Dhont, Blaise; Ancey, Christophe

    2016-04-01

    A number of bedload transport equations involve the threshold Shields number (corresponding to the threshold of incipient motion for particles resting on the streambed). Different methods have been developed for determining this threshold Shields number; they usually assume that the initial streambed is plane prior to sediment transport. Yet, there are many instances in real-world scenarios, in which the initial streambed is not free of bed forms. We are interested in developing a new methodology for determining the threshold of incipient motion in gravel-bed streams in which smooth bed forms (e.g., anti-dunes) develop. Experiments were conducted in a 10-cm wide, 2.5-m long flume, whose initial inclination was 3%. Flows were supercritical and fully turbulent. The flume was supplied with water and sediment at fixed rates. As bed forms developed and migrated, and sediment transport rates exhibited wide fluctuations, measurements had to be taken over long times (typically 10 hr). Using a high-speed camera, we recorded the instantaneous bed load transport rate at the outlet of the flume by taking top-view images. In parallel, we measured the evolution of the bed slope, water depth, and shear stress by filming through a lateral window of the flume. These measurements allowed for the estimation of the space and time-averaged slope, from which we deduced the space and time-averaged Shields number under incipient bed load transport conditions. In our experiments, the threshold Shields number was strongly dependent on streambed morphology. Experiments are under way to determine whether taking the space and time average of incipient motion experiments leads to a more robust definition of the threshold Shields number. If so, this new methodology will perform better than existing approaches at measuring the threshold Shields number.

  6. Air Pollution

    MedlinePlus

    Air pollution is a mixture of solid particles and gases in the air. Car emissions, chemicals from factories, ... Ozone, a gas, is a major part of air pollution in cities. When ozone forms air pollution, it's ...

  7. Odour and flavour thresholds for key aroma components in an orange juice matrix: esters and miscellaneous compounds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thresholds for flavor volatiles have been traditionally calculated in water or air, but they may vary widely in more complex matrices such as milk, gels, or fruit slurries. The data presented is part of a continuing study to provide the industry with threshold guidelines more adequate for the use of...

  8. Effects of moisture content on wind erosion thresholds of biochar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, F. C.; Borrego, C.; Keizer, J. J.; Amorim, J. H.; Verheijen, F. G. A.

    2015-12-01

    Biochar, i.e. pyrolysed biomass, as a soil conditioner is gaining increasing attention in research and industry, with guidelines and certifications being developed for biochar production, storage and handling, as well as for application to soils. Adding water to biochar aims to reduce its susceptibility to become air-borne during and after the application to soils, thereby preventing, amongst others, human health issues from inhalation. The Bagnold model has previously been modified to explain the threshold friction velocity of coal particles at different moisture contents, by adding an adhesive effect. However, it is unknown if this model also works for biochar particles. We measured the threshold friction velocities of a range of biochar particles (woody feedstock) under a range of moisture contents by using a wind tunnel, and tested the performance of the modified Bagnold model. Results showed that the threshold friction velocity can be significantly increased by keeping the gravimetric moisture content at or above 15% to promote adhesive effects between the small particles. For the specific biochar of this study, the modified Bagnold model accurately estimated threshold friction velocities of biochar particles up to moisture contents of 10%.

  9. Femtosecond laser damage threshold and nonlinear characterization in bulk transparent SiC materials

    SciTech Connect

    DesAutels, G. Logan; Finet, Marc; Ristich, Scott; Whitaker, Matt; Brewer, Chris; Juhl, Shane; Walker, Mark; Powers, Peter

    2008-01-15

    Semi-insulating and conducting SiC crystalline transparent substrates were studied after being processed by femtosecond (fs) laser radiation (780 nm at 160 fs). Z-scan and damage threshold experiments were performed on both SiC bulk materials to determine each sample's nonlinear and threshold parameters. 'Damage' in this text refers to an index of refraction modification as observed visually under an optical microscope. In addition, a study was performed to understand the damage threshold as a function of numerical aperture. Presented here for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, are the damage threshold, nonlinear index of refraction, and nonlinear absorption measured values.

  10. Thresholds of cutaneous afferents related to perceptual threshold across the human foot sole.

    PubMed

    Strzalkowski, Nicholas D J; Mildren, Robyn L; Bent, Leah R

    2015-10-01

    Perceptual thresholds are known to vary across the foot sole, despite a reported even distribution in cutaneous afferents. Skin mechanical properties have been proposed to account for these differences; however, a direct relationship between foot sole afferent firing, perceptual threshold, and skin mechanical properties has not been previously investigated. Using the technique of microneurography, we recorded the monofilament firing thresholds of cutaneous afferents and associated perceptual thresholds across the foot sole. In addition, receptive field hardness measurements were taken to investigate the influence of skin hardness on these threshold measures. Afferents were identified as fast adapting [FAI (n = 48) or FAII (n = 13)] or slowly adapting [SAI (n = 21) or SAII (n = 20)], and were grouped based on receptive field location (heel, arch, metatarsals, toes). Overall, perceptual thresholds were found to most closely align with firing thresholds of FA afferents. In contrast, SAI and SAII afferent firing thresholds were found to be significantly higher than perceptual thresholds and are not thought to mediate monofilament perceptual threshold across the foot sole. Perceptual thresholds and FAI afferent firing thresholds were significantly lower in the arch compared with other regions, and skin hardness was found to positively correlate with both FAI and FAII afferent firing and perceptual thresholds. These data support a perceptual influence of skin hardness, which is likely the result of elevated FA afferent firing threshold at harder foot sole sites. The close coupling between FA afferent firing and perceptual threshold across foot sole indicates that small changes in FA afferent firing can influence perceptual thresholds.

  11. Threshold phenomena in soft matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhibin

    Although two different fields are covered, this thesis is mainly focused on some threshold behaviors in both liquid crystal field and fluid dynamic systems. A method of rubbed polyimide is used to obtain pretilt. Sufficiently strong rubbing of a polyimide (SE-1211) results in a large polar pretilt of liquid crystal director with respect to the homeotropic orientation. There exists a threshold rubbing strength required to induce nonzero pretilt. For the homologous liquid crystal series alkyl-cyanobyphenyl, we found that the threshold rubbing strength is a monotonic function of the number of methylene units. A dual easy axis model is then used to explain the results. Freedericksz transition measurements have been used to determine the quadratical and quartic coefficients associated with the molecules' tilt with respect to the layer normal in surface-induced smectic layers in the nematic phase above the smectic-A-nematic phase transition temperature. Both the quadratic and quartic coefficients are consistent with the scaling relationship as predicted in theory, and their ratio is approximately constant. A Rayleigh-Taylor instability experiment is performed by using a magnetic field gradient to draw down a low density but highly paramagnetic fluid below a more dense fluid in a Hele-Shaw cell. When turning off the magnetic field, the RT instability occurs in situ and the growth of the most unstable wavevector is measured as a function of time. The wavelength of the RT instability along with the growth rate was measured as a function of capillary number (which is related to the density difference and interfacial tension between two fluids). A theory for the instability that permits different viscosities for two immiscible fluids was developed, and good agreement was found with the experimental results. The technique of magnetic levitation promises to broaden significantly the accessible parameter space of gravitational interfacial instability experiments. A method is

  12. Appropriate Conduct

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Di Lullo, Louis

    2004-01-01

    Many years ago when the author assumed the role of assistant principal for school climate, discipline, and attendance, he inherited many school policies and guidelines that were outdated, unfair, and without merit in the current school climate. Because the school conduct code had not been revised since the school opened in 1960, many of the…

  13. Detection thresholds of macaque otolith afferents.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiong-Jie; Dickman, J David; Angelaki, Dora E

    2012-06-13

    The vestibular system is our sixth sense and is important for spatial perception functions, yet the sensory detection and discrimination properties of vestibular neurons remain relatively unexplored. Here we have used signal detection theory to measure detection thresholds of otolith afferents using 1 Hz linear accelerations delivered along three cardinal axes. Direction detection thresholds were measured by comparing mean firing rates centered on response peak and trough (full-cycle thresholds) or by comparing peak/trough firing rates with spontaneous activity (half-cycle thresholds). Thresholds were similar for utricular and saccular afferents, as well as for lateral, fore/aft, and vertical motion directions. When computed along the preferred direction, full-cycle direction detection thresholds were 7.54 and 3.01 cm/s(2) for regular and irregular firing otolith afferents, respectively. Half-cycle thresholds were approximately double, with excitatory thresholds being half as large as inhibitory thresholds. The variability in threshold among afferents was directly related to neuronal gain and did not depend on spike count variance. The exact threshold values depended on both the time window used for spike count analysis and the filtering method used to calculate mean firing rate, although differences between regular and irregular afferent thresholds were independent of analysis parameters. The fact that minimum thresholds measured in macaque otolith afferents are of the same order of magnitude as human behavioral thresholds suggests that the vestibular periphery might determine the limit on our ability to detect or discriminate small differences in head movement, with little noise added during downstream processing.

  14. Epidemic thresholds for bipartite networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández, D. G.; Risau-Gusman, S.

    2013-11-01

    It is well known that sexually transmitted diseases (STD) spread across a network of human sexual contacts. This network is most often bipartite, as most STD are transmitted between men and women. Even though network models in epidemiology have quite a long history now, there are few general results about bipartite networks. One of them is the simple dependence, predicted using the mean field approximation, between the epidemic threshold and the average and variance of the degree distribution of the network. Here we show that going beyond this approximation can lead to qualitatively different results that are supported by numerical simulations. One of the new features, that can be relevant for applications, is the existence of a critical value for the infectivity of each population, below which no epidemics can arise, regardless of the value of the infectivity of the other population.

  15. Carbon monoxide exposure and human visual detection thresholds

    SciTech Connect

    Hudnell, H.K.; Benignus, V.A.

    1989-01-01

    In order to test for low level CO exposure effects on vision, a battery of visual tests was administered to male college students. All subjects completed the battery of tests both before and during an exposure period in a double-blind study. Experimental subjects received CO during the exposure period, whereas control subjects received only room air. The battery of visual tests was designed for the assessment of scotopic (dark adapted, rod mediated) vision, photopic (light adapted, cone mediated) vision, the pattern detection process and the motion detection process. Contrast thresholds for the detection of stimulus pattern and for the detection of stimulus motion were measured under both photopic and scotopic viewing conditions, and sensitivity was monitored throughout the course of dark adaptation by measuring luminance thresholds. The results indicated that visual function in healthy, young adult males was not affected by a COHb level of about 17% which was maintained for over 2 hours.

  16. Efficiency and threshold pump intensity of CW solar-pumped solid-state lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, I.H. . Dept. of Physics); Lee, J.H. . Langley Research Center)

    1991-09-01

    This paper reports on the efficiencies and threshold pump intensities of various solid-state laser materials that have been estimated to compare their performance characteristics as direct solar-pumped CW lasers. Among the laser materials evaluated in this research, alexandrite has the highest slope efficiency of about 12.6%; however, it does not seem to be practical for solar-pumped laser application because of its high threshold pump intensity. Cr:Nd:GSGG is the most promising for solar-pumped lasing. Its threshold pump intensity is about 100 air-mass-zero (AMO) solar constants and its slope efficiency is about 12% when thermal deformation is completely prevented.

  17. Electrodeless conductivity.

    PubMed

    Light, T S; McHale, E J; Fletcher, K S

    1989-01-01

    Electrodeless conductivity is a technique for measuring the concentration of electrolytes in solution and utilizes a probe consisting of two toroids in close proximity, both of which are immersed in the solution. In special cases, the toroids may be mounted externally on insulated pipes carrying the solution. One toroid radiates an alternating electric field in the audiofrequency range and the other acts as a receiver to pick up the small current induced by the ions moving in a conducting loop of solution. Coatings which would foul contacting electrodes, such as suspensions, precipitates or oil, have little or no effect. Applications are chiefly to continuous measurement in the chemical processing industries, including pulp and paper, mining and heavy chemical production. The principles and practical details of the method are reviewed and cell-diameter, wall, and temperature effects are discussed. PMID:18964695

  18. Conductive Polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Bohnert, G.W.

    2002-11-22

    Electroluminescent devices such as light-emitting diodes (LED) and high-energy density batteries. These new polymers offer cost savings, weight reduction, ease of processing, and inherent rugged design compared to conventional semiconductor materials. The photovoltaic industry has grown more than 30% during the past three years. Lightweight, flexible solar modules are being used by the U.S. Army and Marine Corps for field power units. LEDs historically used for indicator lights are now being investigated for general lighting to replace fluorescent and incandescent lights. These so-called solid-state lights are becoming more prevalent across the country since they produce efficient lighting with little heat generation. Conductive polymers are being sought for battery development as well. Considerable weight savings over conventional cathode materials used in secondary storage batteries make portable devices easier to carry and electric cars more efficient and nimble. Secondary battery sales represent an $8 billion industry annually. The purpose of the project was to synthesize and characterize conductive polymers. TRACE Photonics Inc. has researched critical issues which affect conductivity. Much of their work has focused on production of substituted poly(phenylenevinylene) compounds. These compounds exhibit greater solubility over the parent polyphenylenevinylene, making them easier to process. Alkoxy substituted groups evaluated during this study included: methoxy, propoxy, and heptyloxy. Synthesis routes for production of alkoxy-substituted poly phenylenevinylene were developed. Considerable emphasis was placed on final product yield and purity.

  19. Embracing thresholds for better environmental management

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Ryan P.; Erickson, Ashley L.; Mease, Lindley A.; Battista, Willow; Kittinger, John N.; Fujita, Rod

    2015-01-01

    Three decades of study have revealed dozens of examples in which natural systems have crossed biophysical thresholds (‘tipping points’)—nonlinear changes in ecosystem structure and function—as a result of human-induced stressors, dramatically altering ecosystem function and services. Environmental management that avoids such thresholds could prevent severe social, economic and environmental impacts. Here, we review management measures implemented in ecological systems that have thresholds. Using Ostrom's social–ecological systems framework, we analysed key biophysical and institutional factors associated with 51 social–ecological systems and associated management regimes, and related these to management success defined by ecological outcomes. We categorized cases as instances of prospective or retrospective management, based upon whether management aimed to avoid a threshold or to restore systems that have crossed a threshold. We find that smaller systems are more amenable to threshold-based management, that routine monitoring is associated with successful avoidance of thresholds and recovery after thresholds have been crossed, and that success is associated with the explicit threshold-based management. These findings are powerful evidence for the policy relevance of information on ecological thresholds across a wide range of ecosystems.

  20. Whole-body vibration perception thresholds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, K. C.; Griffin, M. J.

    1988-03-01

    This paper presents the results of a series of laboratory experiments concerned with perception thresholds for whole-body vibration. The nature of absolute perception thresholds is discussed and a method of determining vibration thresholds, based upon signal detection theory, is proposed. Thresholds of subjects exposed to x-, y- and z-axis sinusoidal vibration were determined for sitting and standing subjects (from 2 to 100 Hz). Perception thresholds have also been determined for supine subjects exposed to vertical ( x-axis) sinusoidal vibration (10-63 Hz). In additional experiments the effects of complex (e.g., random) vibration and the effects of duration on the perception thresholds were investigated. The relation between perception thresholds and vibration levels, said by subjects to be unacceptable if they occurred in their own homes, was investigated as well as the effects of subjects' personality and the visual and acoustic conditions in the laboratory. For the vertical vibration of seated subjects no significant differences were found between the responses of male and female subjects. Significant differences were found between perception thresholds for sitting and standing postures. The median threshold was approximately 0·01 m/s 2 r.m.s. between 2 and 100 Hz. Perception thresholds for x-axis and y-axis vibration were not significantly different in either sitting or standing subjects but significant differences in thresholds were found between sitting and standing positions for both x-axis and y-axis vibration. Subjects tended to be more sensitive to vibration when lying than when sitting or standing. The results suggested that the perception of random vibrations can be predicted from a knowledge of the perception of its component vibrations. The number of cycles of vibration did not affect perception thresholds for vibration durations of more than about 0·25 s. Some assessments suggested that vibration at more than twice the perception threshold may not

  1. Variable percolation threshold of composites with fiber fillers under compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chuan; Wang, Hongtao; Yang, Wei

    2010-07-01

    The piezoresistant effect in conducting fiber-filled composites has been studied by a continuum percolation model. Simulation was performed by a Monte Carlo method that took into account both the deformation-induced fiber bending and rotation. The percolation threshold was found to rise with the compression strain, which explains the observed positive piezoresistive coefficients in such composites. The simulations unveiled the effect of the microstructure evolution during deformation. The fibers are found to align perpendicularly to the compression direction. As the fiber is bended, the effective length in making a conductive network is shortened. Both effects contribute to a larger percolation threshold and imply a positive piezoresistive coefficient according the universal power law.

  2. Difference in Noise-Induced Threshold Shift between Planar and Homeotropic Electroconvections in Nematic Liquid Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huh, Jong-Hoon; Kuribayashi, Akiyuki; Kai, Shoichi

    2009-08-01

    We report the threshold shift induced by externally applied noises for electrohydrodynamic convections (EHCs) in both planarly and homeotropically aligned nematic liquid crystals as well as in both the conduction and dielectric regimes. Owing to the difference in timescales among the intrinsic properties of EHCs, externally applied noises, and deterministic fields, the stabilization or destabilization effects induced by noises are observed. In particular, the difference in the threshold shift between both alignments is found, and discussed in terms of the EHC mechanisms for both alignments. Moreover, a noticeable noise-induced threshold shift is observed in the dielectric regime, which is markedly different from that in the conventional conduction regime.

  3. Health Effects of Air Pollution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Education Report and Newsletter, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Summarizes health hazards associated with air pollution, highlighting the difficulty in establishing acceptable thresholds of exposure. Respiratory disease, asthma, cancer, cardiovascular disease, and other problems are addressed. Indicates that a wide range of effects from any one chemical exists and that there are differences in sensitivity to…

  4. Refinement of a thermal threshold probe to prevent burns.

    PubMed

    Dixon, M J; Taylor, P M; Slingsby, L C; Murrell, J C

    2016-02-01

    Thermal threshold testing is commonly used for pain research. The stimulus may cause burning and merits prevention. Thermal probe modifications hypothesized to reduce burning were evaluated for practicality and effect. Studies were conducted on two humans and eight cats. Unmodified probe 0 was tested on two humans and promising modifications were also evaluated on cats. Probe 1 incorporated rapid cooling after threshold was reached: probe 1a used a Peltier system and probe 1b used water cooling. Probe 2 released skin contact immediately after threshold. Probe 3 (developed in the light of evidence of 'hot spots' in probe 0) incorporated reduced thermal mass and even heating across the skin contact area. Human skin was heated to 48℃ (6℃ above threshold) and the resulting burn was evaluated using area of injury and a simple descriptive scale (SDS). Probe 1a cooled the skin but required further heat dissipation, excessive power, was not 'fail-safe' and was inappropriate for animal mounting. Probe 1b caused less damage than no cooling (27 ± 13 and 38 ± 11 mm(2) respectively, P = 0.0266; median SDS 1.5 and 4 respectively, P = 0.0317) but was cumbersome. Probe 2 was unwieldy and was not evaluated further. Probe 3 produced even heating without blistering in humans. With probe 3 in cats, after opioid treatment, thermal threshold reached cut-out (55℃) on 24 occasions, exceeded 50℃ in a further 32 tests and exceeded 48℃ in the remainder. No skin damage was evident immediately after testing and mild hyperaemia in three cats at 2-3 days resolved rapidly. Probe 3 appeared to be suitable for thermal threshold testing. PMID:25766976

  5. Thresholds for Cenozoic bipolar glaciation.

    PubMed

    Deconto, Robert M; Pollard, David; Wilson, Paul A; Pälike, Heiko; Lear, Caroline H; Pagani, Mark

    2008-10-01

    The long-standing view of Earth's Cenozoic glacial history calls for the first continental-scale glaciation of Antarctica in the earliest Oligocene epoch ( approximately 33.6 million years ago), followed by the onset of northern-hemispheric glacial cycles in the late Pliocene epoch, about 31 million years later. The pivotal early Oligocene event is characterized by a rapid shift of 1.5 parts per thousand in deep-sea benthic oxygen-isotope values (Oi-1) within a few hundred thousand years, reflecting a combination of terrestrial ice growth and deep-sea cooling. The apparent absence of contemporaneous cooling in deep-sea Mg/Ca records, however, has been argued to reflect the growth of more ice than can be accommodated on Antarctica; this, combined with new evidence of continental cooling and ice-rafted debris in the Northern Hemisphere during this period, raises the possibility that Oi-1 represents a precursory bipolar glaciation. Here we test this hypothesis using an isotope-capable global climate/ice-sheet model that accommodates both the long-term decline of Cenozoic atmospheric CO(2) levels and the effects of orbital forcing. We show that the CO(2) threshold below which glaciation occurs in the Northern Hemisphere ( approximately 280 p.p.m.v.) is much lower than that for Antarctica ( approximately 750 p.p.m.v.). Therefore, the growth of ice sheets in the Northern Hemisphere immediately following Antarctic glaciation would have required rapid CO(2) drawdown within the Oi-1 timeframe, to levels lower than those estimated by geochemical proxies and carbon-cycle models. Instead of bipolar glaciation, we find that Oi-1 is best explained by Antarctic glaciation alone, combined with deep-sea cooling of up to 4 degrees C and Antarctic ice that is less isotopically depleted (-30 to -35 per thousand) than previously suggested. Proxy CO(2) estimates remain above our model's northern-hemispheric glaciation threshold of approximately 280 p.p.m.v. until approximately 25 Myr

  6. Thresholds for Cenozoic bipolar glaciation.

    PubMed

    Deconto, Robert M; Pollard, David; Wilson, Paul A; Pälike, Heiko; Lear, Caroline H; Pagani, Mark

    2008-10-01

    The long-standing view of Earth's Cenozoic glacial history calls for the first continental-scale glaciation of Antarctica in the earliest Oligocene epoch ( approximately 33.6 million years ago), followed by the onset of northern-hemispheric glacial cycles in the late Pliocene epoch, about 31 million years later. The pivotal early Oligocene event is characterized by a rapid shift of 1.5 parts per thousand in deep-sea benthic oxygen-isotope values (Oi-1) within a few hundred thousand years, reflecting a combination of terrestrial ice growth and deep-sea cooling. The apparent absence of contemporaneous cooling in deep-sea Mg/Ca records, however, has been argued to reflect the growth of more ice than can be accommodated on Antarctica; this, combined with new evidence of continental cooling and ice-rafted debris in the Northern Hemisphere during this period, raises the possibility that Oi-1 represents a precursory bipolar glaciation. Here we test this hypothesis using an isotope-capable global climate/ice-sheet model that accommodates both the long-term decline of Cenozoic atmospheric CO(2) levels and the effects of orbital forcing. We show that the CO(2) threshold below which glaciation occurs in the Northern Hemisphere ( approximately 280 p.p.m.v.) is much lower than that for Antarctica ( approximately 750 p.p.m.v.). Therefore, the growth of ice sheets in the Northern Hemisphere immediately following Antarctic glaciation would have required rapid CO(2) drawdown within the Oi-1 timeframe, to levels lower than those estimated by geochemical proxies and carbon-cycle models. Instead of bipolar glaciation, we find that Oi-1 is best explained by Antarctic glaciation alone, combined with deep-sea cooling of up to 4 degrees C and Antarctic ice that is less isotopically depleted (-30 to -35 per thousand) than previously suggested. Proxy CO(2) estimates remain above our model's northern-hemispheric glaciation threshold of approximately 280 p.p.m.v. until approximately 25 Myr

  7. Cartilage conduction is characterized by vibrations of the cartilaginous portion of the ear canal.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Tadashi; Hosoi, Hiroshi; Saito, Osamu; Miyamae, Ryosuke; Shimokura, Ryota; Yamanaka, Toshiaki; Kitahara, Tadashi; Levitt, Harry

    2015-01-01

    Cartilage conduction (CC) is a new form of sound transmission which is induced by a transducer being placed on the aural cartilage. Although the conventional forms of sound transmission to the cochlea are classified into air or bone conduction (AC or BC), previous study demonstrates that CC is not classified into AC or BC (Laryngoscope 124: 1214-1219). Next interesting issue is whether CC is a hybrid of AC and BC. Seven volunteers with normal hearing participated in this experiment. The threshold-shifts by water injection in the ear canal were measured. AC, BC, and CC thresholds at 0.5-4 kHz were measured in the 0%-, 40%-, and 80%-water injection conditions. In addition, CC thresholds were also measured for the 20%-, 60%-, 100%-, and overflowing-water injection conditions. The contributions of the vibrations of the cartilaginous portion were evaluated by the threshold-shifts. For AC and BC, the threshold-shifts by the water injection were 22.6-53.3 dB and within 14.9 dB at the frequency of 0.5-4 kHz, respectively. For CC, when the water was filled within the bony portion, the thresholds were elevated to the same degree as AC. When the water was additionally injected to reach the cartilaginous portion, the thresholds at 0.5 and 1 kHz dramatically decreased by 27.4 and 27.5 dB, respectively. In addition, despite blocking AC by the injected water, the CC thresholds in force level were remarkably lower than those for BC. The vibration of the cartilaginous portion contributes to the sound transmission, particularly in the low frequency range. Although the airborne sound is radiated into the ear canal in both BC and CC, the mechanism underlying its generation is different between them. CC generates airborne sound in the canal more efficiently than BC. The current findings suggest that CC is not a hybrid of AC and BC.

  8. Colour thresholding in video imaging.

    PubMed Central

    Fermin, C D; Degraw, S

    1995-01-01

    The basic aspects of video imaging are reviewed as they relate to measurements of histological and anatomical features, with particular emphasis on the advantages and disadvantages of colour and black-and-white imaging modes. In black-and-white imaging, calculations are based on the manipulation of picture elements (pixels) that contain 0-255 levels of information. Black is represented by the absence of light (0) and white by 255 grades of light. In colour imaging, the pixels contain variation of hues for the primary (red, green and blue) and secondary (magenta, yellow, cyan, pink) colours. Manipulation of pixels with colour information is more computer intense than that for black-and-white pixels, because there are over 16 million possible combinations of colour in a system with a 24-bit resolution. The narrow 128 possible grades of separation in black and white often makes distinction between pixels with overlapping intensities difficult. Such difficulty is greatly reduced by colour thresholding of systems that base the representation of colour on a combination of hue-saturation-intensity (HSI) format. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 Fig. 13 Fig. 14 Fig. 15 Fig. 16 Fig. 17 Fig. 18 Fig. 19 Fig. 20 PMID:7559121

  9. Efficient threshold for volumetric segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burdescu, Dumitru D.; Brezovan, Marius; Stanescu, Liana; Stoica Spahiu, Cosmin; Ebanca, Daniel

    2015-07-01

    Image segmentation plays a crucial role in effective understanding of digital images. However, the research on the existence of general purpose segmentation algorithm that suits for variety of applications is still very much active. Among the many approaches in performing image segmentation, graph based approach is gaining popularity primarily due to its ability in reflecting global image properties. Volumetric image segmentation can simply result an image partition composed by relevant regions, but the most fundamental challenge in segmentation algorithm is to precisely define the volumetric extent of some object, which may be represented by the union of multiple regions. The aim in this paper is to present a new method to detect visual objects from color volumetric images and efficient threshold. We present a unified framework for volumetric image segmentation and contour extraction that uses a virtual tree-hexagonal structure defined on the set of the image voxels. The advantage of using a virtual tree-hexagonal network superposed over the initial image voxels is that it reduces the execution time and the memory space used, without losing the initial resolution of the image.

  10. Invasion Threshold in Heterogeneous Metapopulation Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colizza, Vittoria; Vespignani, Alessandro

    2007-10-01

    We study the dynamics of epidemic and reaction-diffusion processes in metapopulation models with heterogeneous connectivity patterns. In susceptible-infected-removed-like processes, along with the standard local epidemic threshold, the system exhibits a global invasion threshold. We provide an explicit expression of the threshold that sets a critical value of the diffusion/mobility rate below, which the epidemic is not able to spread to a macroscopic fraction of subpopulations. The invasion threshold is found to be affected by the topological fluctuations of the metapopulation network. The results presented provide a general framework for the understanding of the effect of travel restrictions in epidemic containment.

  11. Air sampling of nickel in a refinery.

    PubMed

    Harmse, Johannes L; Engelbrecht, Jacobus C

    2007-08-01

    Air monitoring was conducted in a nickel base metal refinery to determine compliance with occupational exposure limits. The hypothesis stated that levels of airborne dust may pose a risk to worker health if compared to the relevant exposure limits. Exposure limits for nickel species are set for the inhalable nickel dust fraction. Personal air samples, representative of three selected areas were collected in the workers' breathing zones, using the Institute of Occupational Medicine (IOM) samplers. Real-time personal samples were collected randomly over a two-month period in three nickel production areas. Filter papers were treated gravimetrically and were analysed for soluble and insoluble nickel through inductive coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Measured concentrations were expressed as time weighted average exposure concentrations. Results were compared to South African occupational exposure limits (OELs) and to the threshold limit values (TLVs) set by the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) to determine compliance. Statistical compliance was also determined using the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health procedure as prescribed by South Africa's Hazardous Chemical Substances Regulations in 1995. In two of the areas it was found that exposure concentrations complied with the OELs. Some exposures exceeded the OEL values and most exposures exceeded the TLV values in the other area concerned. A comprehensive health risk assessment needs to be conducted to determine the cause of non-compliance. PMID:17613095

  12. Properties of air and combustion products of fuel with air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poferl, D. J.; Svehla, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    Thermodynamic and transport properties have been calculated for air, the combustion products of natural gas and air, and combustion products of ASTM-A-1 jet fuel and air. Properties calculated include: ratio of specific heats, molecular weight, viscosity, specific heat, thermal conductivity, Prandtl number, and enthalpy.

  13. Electrically conductive ceramic powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yanxia

    1999-11-01

    moisture was studied. Three classifications of structure were identified for alkali-doped titanium oxides: (1) Pure titanium dioxide phase with alkali ions located in interstitial positions. (2) The titanium bronze phases. (3) Alkali-doped titanium oxides. Highly conductive powders were obtained in the first and second classifications with conductivity of 10-2 to 10° S/cm. Materials in the third classification had poor conductivity below 10-3 S/cm. The conductivity of a powder was determined mainly by the grain conductivity and the grain contact conductivity. The present results of impedance spectroscopy suggested that the grain contact resistance was a major factor of the electrical resistance of the samples. The aging effect at different moisture conditions was also caused by an increase of the contact resistance. Both sodium-doped and reduced titanium oxides showed re-oxidation at elevated temperature (above 140°C) in air, which is most probably caused by oxidizing the Ti3+ ions under those conditions. Lithium doped titanium oxides did not show this re-oxidation at temperatures up to 200°C. Theoretical models were applied to describe the effects of porosity, contact configuration and grain surface on conductivity of powder compacts. Percolation theory was used in the present study to demonstrate the effect of mixtures of conductive and non-conductive powders, which is one of applications for conductive ceramic powders when they are used as filler materials in paper, paints or plastics.

  14. Air Abrasion

    MedlinePlus

    ... delivered directly to your desktop! more... What Is Air Abrasion? Article Chapters What Is Air Abrasion? What Happens? The Pros and Cons Will I Feel Anything? Is Air Abrasion for Everyone? print full article print this ...

  15. Threshold exceedances and cumulative ozone exposure indices at tropical suburban site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beig, G.; Ghude, Sachin D.; Polade, S. D.; Tyagi, B.

    2008-01-01

    This study provides the first analysis of threshold exceedances and cumulative ozone exposure indices from Pune, a tropical suburban site in India. We used the directives on ozone pollution in ambient air provided by the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe, and by the World Health Organization to assess the air quality from in situ measurements of surface ozone (during the years 2003-2006). We find that the exposure-plant response index (Accumulated exposure Over a Threshold of 40 ppb (AOT40)) and target values for protection of human health (8-h > 60 ppb) are regularly surpassed. This is a concern for agricultural and human health. Air-mass classification based on back-air trajectories shows that the excess of AOT40 values is quite plausibly due to long-range transport of background ozone and its precursors to the measurement site.

  16. Measured Rattle Threshold of Residential House Windows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sizov, Natalia; Schultz, Troy; Hobbs, Christopher; Klos, Jacob

    2008-01-01

    Window rattle is a common indoor noise effect in houses exposed to low frequency noise from such sources as railroads, blast noise and sonic boom. Human perception of rattle can be negative that is a motivating factor of the current research effort to study sonic boom induced window rattle. A rattle study has been conducted on residential houses containing windows of different construction at a variety of geographic locations within the United States. Windows in these houses were excited by a portable, high-powered loudspeaker and enclosure specifically designed to be mounted on the house exterior to cover an entire window. Window vibration was measured with accelerometers placed on different window components. Reference microphones were also placed inside the house and inside of the loudspeaker box. Swept sine excitation was used to identify the vibration threshold at which the response of the structure becomes non-linear and begins to rattle. Initial results from this study are presented and discussed. Future efforts will continue to explore the rattle occurrence in windows of residential houses exposed to sonic booms.

  17. Echo thresholds for reflections from acoustically diffusive architectural surfaces.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Philip W; Walther, Andreas; Faller, Christof; Braasch, Jonas

    2013-10-01

    When sound reflects from an irregular architectural surface, it spreads spatially and temporally. Extensive research has been devoted to prediction and measurement of diffusion, but less has focused on its perceptual effects. This paper examines the effect of temporal diffusion on echo threshold. There are several notable differences between the waveform of a reflection identical to the direct sound and one from an architectural surface. The onset and offset are damped and the energy is spread in time; hence, the reflection response has a lower peak amplitude, and is decorrelated from the direct sound. The perceptual consequences of these differences are previously undocumented. Echo threshold tests are conducted with speech and music signals, using direct sound and a simulated reflection that is either identical to the direct sound or has various degrees of diffusion. Results indicate that for a speech signal, diffuse reflections are less easily detectable as a separate auditory event than specular reflections of the same total energy. For a music signal, no differences are observed between the echo thresholds for reflections with and without temporal diffusion. Additionally, echo thresholds are found to be shorter for speech than for music, and shorter for spatialized than for diotic presentation of signals.

  18. Cartilage conduction hearing.

    PubMed

    Shimokura, Ryota; Hosoi, Hiroshi; Nishimura, Tadashi; Yamanaka, Toshiaki; Levitt, Harry

    2014-04-01

    Sound information is known to travel to the cochlea via either air or bone conduction. However, a vibration signal, delivered to the aural cartilage via a transducer, can also produce a clearly audible sound. This type of conduction has been termed "cartilage conduction." The aural cartilage forms the outer ear and is distributed around the exterior half of the external auditory canal. In cartilage conduction, the cartilage and transducer play the roles of a diaphragm and voice coil of a loudspeaker, respectively. There is a large gap between the impedances of cartilage and skull bone, such that cartilage vibrations are not easily transmitted through bone. Thus, these methods of conduction are distinct. In this study, force was used to apply a transducer to aural cartilage, and it was found that the sound in the auditory canal was amplified, especially for frequencies below 2 kHz. This effect was most pronounced at an application force of 1 N, which is low enough to ensure comfort in the design of hearing aids. The possibility of using force adjustments to vary amplification may also have applications for cell phone design.

  19. AIR STRUCTURES FOR SCHOOL SPORTS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ROBERTSON, NAN

    AIR STRUCTURES ARE FABRIC BUILDINGS BLOWN UP AND HELD UP BY AIR PRESSURE. EXPERIMENTS WITH SUCH STRUCTURES WERE CONDUCTED AS EARLY AS 1917. IN 1948 THE UNITED STATES AIR FORCE SOUGHT A NEW WAY OF HOUSING LARGE RADAR ANTENNAE PLANNED FOR THE ARCTIC. AS AN OUTCOME OF THEIR SEARCH, BIRDAIR STRUCTURES, INC., WHICH IS NOW ONE OF SEVERAL COMPANIES…

  20. Air Structures for School Sports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Nan

    Air structures are fabric buildings blown up and held up by air pressure. Experiments with such structures were conducted as early as 1917. In 1948 the United States Air Force sought a new way of housing large radar antennae planned for the arctic. As an outcome of their search, Birdair Structures, Inc., which is now one of several companies…

  1. Threshold effect in lead-induced peripheral neuropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, J.; Landrigan, P.J.; Feldman, R.G.; Silbergeld, E.K.; Baker, E.L. Jr.; von Lindern, I.H.

    1988-01-01

    We previously demonstrated a negative correlation between blood lead level and motor nerve conduction velocity in 202 asymptomatic 5 to 9-year-old children living near a lead smelter in Idaho. Blood lead levels ranged from 13 to 97 micrograms/dL. To determine whether a threshold exists between blood lead level and maximal motor nerve conduction velocity, we conducted three regression analyses on these data: a ''hockey stick'' regression, a logistic regression, and a quadratic regression. We found evidence for a threshold in all three analyses: at a blood level of 30 micrograms/dL in the ''hockey stick'' regression, at 20 micrograms/dL in the logistic, and at 25 to 30 micrograms/dL in the quadratic. Neither age, sex, socioeconomic status, nor duration of residence near the smelter significantly modified the relationship. These analyses confirm that asymptomatic increased lead absorption causes slowing of nerve conduction, but they also indicate that measurement of maximal motor nerve conduction velocity is an insensitive screen for low-level lead toxicity.

  2. Prediction-based threshold for medication alert.

    PubMed

    Kawazoe, Yoshimasa; Miyo, Kengo; Kurahashi, Issei; Sakurai, Ryota; Ohe, Kazuhiko

    2013-01-01

    This study presents a prediction-based approach to determine thresholds for a medication alert in a computerized physician order entry. Traditional static thresholds can sometimes lead to physician's alert fatigue or overlook potentially excessive medication even if the doses are belowthe configured threshold. To address this problem, we applied a random forest algorithm to develop a prediction model for medication doses, and applied a boxplot to determine the thresholds based on the prediction results. An evaluation of the eight drugs most frequently causing alerts in our hospital showed that the performances of the prediction were high, except for two drugs. It was also found that using the thresholds based on the predictions would reduce the alerts to a half of those when using the static thresholds. Notably, some cases were detected only by the prediction thresholds. The significance of the thresholds should be discussed in terms of the trade-offs between gains and losses; however, our approach, which relies on physicians' collective experiences, has practical advantages. PMID:23920550

  3. Intelligence and Creativity: Over the Threshold Together?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welter, Marisete Maria; Jaarsveld, Saskia; van Leeuwen, Cees; Lachmann, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Threshold theory predicts a positive correlation between IQ and creativity scores up to an IQ level of 120 and no correlation above this threshold. Primary school children were tested at beginning (N = 98) and ending (N = 70) of the school year. Participants performed the standard progressive matrices (SPM) and the Test of Creative…

  4. 40 CFR 98.441 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Geologic Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide § 98.441 Reporting threshold. (a... amount of CO2 for long-term containment in subsurface geologic formations. There is no threshold. (b... that current monitoring and model(s) show that the injected CO2 stream is not expected to migrate...

  5. Network Motif Basis of Threshold Responses

    EPA Science Inventory

    There has been a long-running debate over the existence of thresholds for adverse effects. The difficulty stems from two fundamental challenges: (i) statistical analysis by itself cannot prove the existence of a threshold, i.e., a dose below which there is no effect; and (ii) the...

  6. Threshold Concepts, Systems and Learning for Sustainability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandri, Orana Jade

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a framework for understanding the role that systems theory might play in education for sustainability (EfS). It offers a sketch and critique of Land and Meyer's notion of a "threshold concept", to argue that seeing systems as a threshold concept for sustainability is useful for understanding the processes of…

  7. Conducting a thermal conductivity survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, P. B.

    1985-01-01

    A physically transparent approximate theory of phonon decay rates is presented starting from a pair potential model of the interatomic forces in an insulator or semiconductor. The theory applies in the classical regime and relates the 3-phonon decay rate to the third derivative of the pair potential. Phonon dispersion relations do not need to be calculated, as sum rules relate all the needed quantities directly to the pair potential. The Brillouin zone averaged phonon lifetime turns out to involve a dimensionless measure of the anharmonicity multiplied by an effective density of states for 3-phonon decay. Results are given for rare gas and alkali halide crystals. For rare gases, the results are in good agreement with more elaborate perturbation calculations. Comparison to experimental data on phonon linewidths and thermal conductivity are made.

  8. Implications in medical imaging of the new ICRP thresholds for tissue reactions.

    PubMed

    Vañó, E; Miller, D L; Dauer, L

    2015-06-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) statement on tissue reactions, issued by the Commission in April 2011, reviewed epidemiological evidence and suggested that there are some tissue reactions where threshold doses are or may be lower than those previously considered. For the lens of the eye, the threshold is now considered to be 0.5 Gy. The absorbed dose threshold for circulatory disease in the heart and brain may be as low as 0.5 Gy. These values can be reached in some patients during interventional cardiology or neuroradiology procedures. They may also be of concern for repeated computed tomography examinations of the head. The new thresholds should be considered in optimisation strategies for clinical procedures, especially in patients likely to require repeated interventions. The new dose thresholds also affect occupational protection for operators and staff. Some operators do not protect their eyes or their brain adequately. After several years of work without proper protection, the absorbed doses to the lens of the eye and the brain of staff can exceed 0.5 Gy. More research is needed to understand the biological effects of cumulative incident air kerma and the instantaneous air kerma rates currently used in medical imaging. The new thresholds, and the need for specific occupational dosimetry related to lens doses, should be considered in radiation protection programmes, and should be included in the education and training of professionals involved in fluoroscopy guided procedures and computed tomography. PMID:25816265

  9. Methods for automatic trigger threshold adjustment

    DOEpatents

    Welch, Benjamin J; Partridge, Michael E

    2014-03-18

    Methods are presented for adjusting trigger threshold values to compensate for drift in the quiescent level of a signal monitored for initiating a data recording event, thereby avoiding false triggering conditions. Initial threshold values are periodically adjusted by re-measuring the quiescent signal level, and adjusting the threshold values by an offset computation based upon the measured quiescent signal level drift. Re-computation of the trigger threshold values can be implemented on time based or counter based criteria. Additionally, a qualification width counter can be utilized to implement a requirement that a trigger threshold criterion be met a given number of times prior to initiating a data recording event, further reducing the possibility of a false triggering situation.

  10. Pain thresholds are elevated during pseudopregnancy.

    PubMed

    Gintzler, A R; Bohan, M C

    1990-01-22

    Increases in pain thresholds have been observed during gestation in a variety of laboratory animals and humans. The specific events that occur during pregnancy that are responsible for this increase in maternal pain threshold are not known. In order to investigate whether or not the changes in the peripheral concentration of sex steroids that are known to occur during gestation contribute to the analgesia of pregnancy, the effect of pseudopregnancy on jump thresholds was determined. Pseudopregnancy is associated with a significant increase in the mean jump threshold. In contrast, rats treated chronically with the opioid antagonist naltrexone do not manifest an increase in jump threshold during the pseudopregnant condition. These results suggest that peripheral sex steroids whose peripheral concentration profile is altered during pseudopregnancy might be important modulators of opioid systems that regulate responsiveness to aversive stimuli.

  11. A Threshold Continuum for Aeolian Sand Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swann, C.; Ewing, R. C.; Sherman, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    The threshold of motion for aeolian sand transport marks the initial entrainment of sand particles by the force of the wind. This is typically defined and modeled as a singular wind speed for a given grain size and is based on field and laboratory experimental data. However, the definition of threshold varies significantly between these empirical models, largely because the definition is based on visual-observations of initial grain movement. For example, in his seminal experiments, Bagnold defined threshold of motion when he observed that 100% of the bed was in motion. Others have used 50% and lesser values. Differences in threshold models, in turn, result is large errors in predicting the fluxes associated with sand and dust transport. Here we use a wind tunnel and novel sediment trap to capture the fractions of sand in creep, reptation and saltation at Earth and Mars pressures and show that the threshold of motion for aeolian sand transport is best defined as a continuum in which grains progress through stages defined by the proportion of grains in creep and saltation. We propose the use of scale dependent thresholds modeled by distinct probability distribution functions that differentiate the threshold based on micro to macro scale applications. For example, a geologic timescale application corresponds to a threshold when 100% of the bed in motion whereas a sub-second application corresponds to a threshold when a single particle is set in motion. We provide quantitative measurements (number and mode of particle movement) corresponding to visual observations, percent of bed in motion and degrees of transport intermittency for Earth and Mars. Understanding transport as a continuum provides a basis for revaluating sand transport thresholds on Earth, Mars and Titan.

  12. Data Assimilation Experiments using Quality Controlled AIRS Version 5 Temperature Soundings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Susskind, Joel

    2008-01-01

    The AIRS Science Team Version 5 retrieval algorithm has been finalized and is now operational at the Goddard DAAC in the processing (and reprocessing) of all AlRS data. Version 5 contains accurate case-by-case error estimates for most derived products, which are also used for quality control. We have conducted forecast impact experiments assimilating AlRS quality controlled temperature profiles using the NASA GEOS-5 data assimilation system, consisting of the NCEP GSI analysis coupled with the NASA FVGCM. Assimilation of quality controlled temperature profiles resulted in significantly improved forecast skill in both the Northern Hemisphere and Southern Hemisphere Extra-Tropics, compared to that obtained from analyses obtained when all data used operationally by NCEP except for AlRS data is assimilated. Experiments using different Quality Control thresholds for assimilation of AlRS temperature retrievals showed that a medium quality control threshold performed better than a tighter threshold, which provided better overall sounding accuracy; or a looser threshold, which provided better spatial coverage of accepted soundings. We are conducting more experiments to further optimize this balance of spatial coverage and sounding accuracy from the data assimilation perspective. In all cases, temperature soundings were assimilated well below cloud level in partially cloudy cases. The positive impact of assimilating AlRS derived atmospheric temperatures all but vanished when only AIRS stratospheric temperatures were assimilated. Forecast skill resulting from assimilation of AlRS radiances uncontaminated by clouds, instead of AlRS temperature soundings, was only slightly better than that resulting from assimilation of only stratospheric AlRS temperatures. This reduction in forecast skill is most likely the result of significant loss of tropospheric information when only AIRS radiances unaffected by clouds are used in the data assimilation process.

  13. Femtosecond pulse damage thresholds of dielectric coatings in vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Michelle D. Shinn, Duy N. Nguyen, Luke A. Emmert ,Paul Schwoebel, Dinesh Patel, Carmen S. Menoni, Wolfgang Rudolph

    2011-03-01

    At 10-7 Torr, the multiple femtosecond pulse damage threshold, F(?), is about 10% of the single pulse damage fluence F(1) for hafnia and silica films compared to about 65% and 50%, respectively, at 630 Torr. In contrast, the single-pulse damage threshold is pressure independent. The decrease of F(?) with decreasing air pressure correlates with the water vapor and oxygen content of the ambient gas with the former having the greater effect. The decrease in F(?) is likely associated with an accumulation of defects derived from oxygen deficiency, for example vacancies. From atmospheric air pressure to pressures of {approx}3 x 10{sup -6} Torr, the damage 'crater' starts deterministically at the center of the beam and grows in diameter as the fluence increases. At pressure below 3x10-6 Torr, damage is initiated at random 'sites' within the exposed area in hafnia films, while the damage morphology remains deterministic in silica films. A possible explanation is that absorbing centers are created at predisposed sample sites in hafnia, for example at boundaries between crystallites, or crystalline and amorphous phases.

  14. The cessation threshold of continuous sediment transport in Newtontian fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pähtz, Thomas; Duran, Orencio

    One of the classical problems in sediment transport science is to predict the threshold Shields number below which a bed of loose sediment particles sheared by a homogeneous fluid flow ceases to move continuously. Depending on the particle-fluid density ratio (s), it has been believed for many decades that this threshold is a consequence of either fluid forces being just strong enough to dislodge particles resting on the bed (small s, e.g., water) or of particle-bed impacts being just strong enough to eject sufficient bed particles (large s, e.g., air). However, here we find from state-of-the-art numerical simulations that particle-bed impacts play an important role in sustaining sediment transport regardless of s. Guided by these simulations, we propose a simple, unified analytical model of the cessation of continuous sediment transport, which is quantitatively consistent with measurements in water (the famous ''Shields diagram'') and air on Earth and Mars. This model predicts that sediment transport on Pluto (transport of nitrogen ice particles in a very thin nitrogen atmosphere) can be sustained under surface winds comparable to those on Earth and Mars. This might explain wind streaks on Pluto's surface which have puzzled the lead researchers of the New Horizons mission. We acknowledge support from Grants National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 1151101041 and 41376095) and Natural Science Foundation of Zhejiang Province (No. LR16E090001).

  15. Restorative Treatment Thresholds for Proximal Caries in Dental PBRN

    PubMed Central

    Kakudate, N.; Sumida, F.; Matsumoto, Y.; Manabe, K.; Yokoyama, Y.; Gilbert, G.H.; Gordan, V.V.

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted to assess caries treatment thresholds among Japanese dentists and to identify characteristics associated with their decision to intervene surgically in proximal caries lesions within the enamel. Participants (n = 189) were shown radiographic images depicting interproximal caries and asked to indicate the lesion depth at which they would surgically intervene in both high- and low-caries-risk scenarios. Differences in treatment thresholds were then assessed via chi-square tests, and associations between the decision to intervene and dentist, practice, and patient characteristics were analyzed via logistic regression. The proportion of dentists who indicated surgical intervention into enamel was significantly higher in the high-caries-risk scenario (73.8%, N = 138) than in the low-caries-risk scenario (46.5%, N = 87) (p < 0.001). In multivariate analyses for a high-caries-risk scenario, gender of dentist, city population, type of practice, conducting caries-risk assessment, and administering diet counseling were significant factors associated with surgical enamel intervention. However, for a low-caries-risk scenario, city population, type of practice, and use of a dental explorer were the factors significantly associated with surgical enamel intervention. These findings demonstrate that restorative treatment thresholds for interproximal primary caries differ by caries risk. Most participants would restore lesions within the enamel for high-caries-risk individuals (Clinicaltrials.gov registration number NCT01680848). PMID:23053847

  16. Interlaminar shear fracture toughness and fatigue thresholds for composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obrien, T. Kevin; Murri, Gretchen B.; Salpekar, Satish A.

    1987-01-01

    Static and cyclic end notched flexure tests were conducted on a graphite epoxy, a glass epoxy, and graphite thermoplastic to determine their interlaminar shear fracture toughness and fatigue thresholds for delamination in terms of limiting values of the mode II strain energy release rate, G-II, for delamination growth. The influence of precracking and data reduction schemes are discussed. Finite element analysis indicated that the beam theory calculation for G-II with the transverse shear contribution included was reasonably accurate over the entire range of crack lengths. Cyclic loading significantly reduced the critical G-II for delamination. A threshold value of the maximum cyclic G-II below which no delamination occurred after one million cycles was identified for each material. Also, residual static toughness tests were conducted on glass epoxy specimens that had undergone one million cycles without delamination. A linear mixed-mode delamination criteria was used to characterize the static toughness of several composite materials; however, a total G threshold criterion appears to characterize the fatigue delamination durability of composite materials with a wide range of static toughness.

  17. Interlaminar shear fracture toughness and fatigue thresholds for composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Brien, T. Kevin; Murri, Gretchen B.; Salpekar, Satish A.

    1989-01-01

    Static and cyclic end notched flexure tests were conducted on a graphite epoxy, a glass epoxy, and graphite thermoplastic to determine their interlaminar shear fracture toughness and fatigue thresholds for delamination in terms of limiting values of the mode II strain energy release rate, G-II, for delamination growth. The influence of precracking and data reduction schemes are discussed. Finite element analysis indicated that the beam theory calculation for G-II with the transverse shear contribution included was reasonably accurate over the entire range of crack lengths. Cyclic loading significantly reduced the critical G-II for delamination. A threshold value of the maximum cyclic G-II below which no delamination occurred after one million cycles was identified for each material. Also, residual static toughness tests were conducted on glass epoxy specimens that had undergone one million cycles without delamination. A linear mixed-mode delamination criteria was used to characterize the static toughness of several composite materials; however, a total G threshold criterion appears to characterize the fatigue delamination durability of composite materials with a wide range of static toughness.

  18. Effective thermal conductivity of a thin, randomly oriented composite material

    SciTech Connect

    Phelan, P.E.; Niemann, R.C.

    1997-10-01

    The thermal conductivity of a randomly oriented composite material is modeled using a probabilistic approach in order to determine if a size effect exists for the thermal conductivity at small composite thicknesses. The numerical scheme employs a random number generator to position the filler elements, which have a relatively high thermal conductivity, within a matrix having a relative low thermal conductivity. The results indicate that, below some threshold thickness, the composite thermal conductivity is independent of thickness. The threshold thickness increases for increasing filler fraction and increasing k{sub f}/k{sub m}, the ratio between the filler and matrix thermal conductivities.

  19. Step length and individual anaerobic threshold assessment in swimming.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, R J; Sousa, M; Machado, L; Vilas-Boas, J P

    2011-12-01

    Anaerobic threshold is widely used for diagnosis of swimming aerobic endurance but the precise incremental protocols step duration for its assessment is controversial. A physiological and biomechanical comparison between intermittent incremental protocols with different step lengths and a maximal lactate steady state (MLSS) test was conducted. 17 swimmers performed 7×200, 300 and 400 m (30 s and 24 h rest between steps and protocols) in front crawl until exhaustion and an MLSS test. The blood lactate concentration values ([La-]) at individual anaerobic threshold were 2.1±0.1, 2.2±0.2 and 1.8±0.1 mmol.l - 1 in the 200, 300 and 400 m protocols (with significant differences between 300 and 400 m tests), and 2.9±1.2 mmol.l - 1 at MLSS (higher than the incremental protocols); all these values are much lower than the traditional 4 mmol.l - 1 value. The velocities at individual anaerobic threshold obtained in incremental protocols were similar (and highly related) to the MLSS, being considerably lower than the velocity at 4 mmol.l - 1. Stroke rate increased and stroke length decreased throughout the different incremental protocols. It was concluded that it is valid to use intermittent incremental protocols of 200 and 300 m lengths to assess the swimming velocity corresponding to individual anaerobic threshold, the progressive protocols tend to underestimate the [La-] at anaerobic threshold assessed by the MLSS test, and swimmers increase velocity through stroke rate increases.

  20. 40 CFR Table I-1 to Subpart I of... - Default Emission Factors for Threshold Applicability Determination

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Default Emission Factors for Threshold Applicability Determination I Table I-1 to Subpart I of Part 98 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING...

  1. 40 CFR Table I-1 to Subpart I - Default Emission Factors for Threshold Applicability Determination

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Default Emission Factors for Threshold Applicability Determination I Table I-1 to Subpart I Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Electronics Manufacturing Pt....

  2. 40 CFR Table I-1 to Subpart I of... - Default Emission Factors for Threshold Applicability Determination

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Default Emission Factors for Threshold Applicability Determination I Table I-1 to Subpart I of Part 98 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING...

  3. Organic thin film devices with stabilized threshold voltage and mobility, and method for preparing the devices

    DOEpatents

    Nastasi, Michael Anthony; Wang, Yongqiang; Fraboni, Beatrice; Cosseddu, Piero; Bonfiglio, Annalisa

    2013-06-11

    Organic thin film devices that included an organic thin film subjected to a selected dose of a selected energy of ions exhibited a stabilized mobility (.mu.) and threshold voltage (VT), a decrease in contact resistance R.sub.C, and an extended operational lifetime that did not degrade after 2000 hours of operation in the air.

  4. Threshold friction velocity influenced by wetness of soils within the Columbia Plateau

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Windblown dust impacts air quality in the Columbia Plateau of the U.S. Pacific Northwest. Wind erosion of agricultural lands, which is the predominate source of windblown dust in the region, occurs when the friction velocity exceeds the threshold friction velocity (TFV) of the surface. Soil moisture...

  5. Efficiency and threshold pump intensity of CW solar-pumped solid-state lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, In H.; Lee, Ja H.

    1991-01-01

    The authors consider the relation between the threshold pumping intensity, the material properties, the resonator parameters, and the ultimate slope efficiencies of various solid-state laser materials for solar pumping. They clarify the relation between the threshold pump intensity and the material parameters and the relation between the ultimate slope efficiency and the laser resonator parameters such that a design criterion for the solar-pumped solid-state laser can be established. Among the laser materials evaluated, alexandrite has the highest slope efficiency of about 12.6 percent; however, it does not seem to be practical for a solar-pumped laser application because of its high threshold pump intensity. Cr:Nd:GSGG is the most promising for solar-pumped lasing. Its threshold pump intensity is about 100 air-mass-zero (AM0) solar constants and its slope efficiency is about 12 percent when thermal deformation is completely prevented.

  6. Nano-material size dependent laser-plasma thresholds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    EL Sherbini, Ashraf M.; Parigger, Christian G.

    2016-10-01

    The reduction of laser fluence for initiation of plasma was measured for zinc monoxide nanoparticles of diameters in the range of 100 to 20 nm. In a previous work by EL Sherbini and Parigger [Wavelength Dependency and Threshold Measurements for Nanoparticle-enhanced Laser-induced Breakdown Spectroscopy, Spectrochim. Acta Part B 116 (2016) 8-15], the hypothesis of threshold dependence on particle size leads to the interpretation of the experiments for varying excitation wavelengths with fixed, 30 nm nanomaterial. The experimental results presented in this work were obtained with 1064 nm Nd:YAG radiation and confirm and validate the suspected reduction due to quenching of the thermal conduction length to the respective sizes of the nanoparticles.

  7. Sputtering Threshold Energies of Heavy Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mantenieks, Maris A.

    1999-01-01

    Sputter erosion in ion thrusters has been measured in lifetests at discharge voltages as low as 25 V. Thruster operation at this discharge voltage results in component erosion rates sufficiently low to satisfy most mission requirements. It has been recognized that most of the internal sputtering in ion thrusters is done by doubly charged ions. Knowledge of the sputtering threshold voltage of a xenon molybdenum system would be beneficial in understanding the sputtering process as well as making more accurate calculations of the sputtering rates of ion thruster components. Sputtering threshold energies calculated from various formulations found in the literature results in values ranging from 28 to 200 eV. It is evident that some of these formulations cannot be relied upon to provide sputtering thresholds with any degree of accuracy. This paper re-examines the threshold energies measurements made in the early sixties by Askerov and Sena, and Stuart and Wehner. The threshold voltages as derived by Askerov and au have been reevaluated by using a different extrapolation method of sputter yields at low ion energies. The resulting threshold energies are in general similar to those measured by Stuart and Wehner. An empirical relationship is derived,for mercury and xenon ions for the ratio of the sputtering threshold energy to the sublimation energy as a function of the ratio of target to ion atomic mass.

  8. Microstructures, percolation thresholds, and rock physical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guéguen, Y.; Chelidze, T.; Le Ravalec, M.

    1997-09-01

    The physical properties (transport properties and mechanical properties) of porous/cracked rocks are mainly functions of their microstructure. In this connection the problem of critical (threshold) porosity for transport, elasticity and mechanical strength is especially important. Two dominant mathematical formalisms — effective medium theory (EMT) and percolation theory — pretend to give answers to this problem. Some of the EMT models do not predict any threshold (differential effective medium). Other EMT models (self-consistent models) do predict thresholds, but it is shown that these thresholds are fictitious and result from an extension of a theory beyond its limit of validity. The failure of EMT methods at high pores/crack concentrations is the result of clustering effects. The appropriate formalism to correctly describe the phenomenon of clustering of pores and cracks and the behaviour of a system close to its critical porosity is percolation theory. Percolation thresholds can be predicted in that case from classical site or bond percolation on regular or random lattices. The threshold values depend on the density and average size of pores/cracks so that porosity is not sufficient in general to characterize the threshold for a specific physical property. The general term 'critical porosity' should thus be used with caution and it is preferable to specify which property is concerned and what kind of microstructure is present. This term can be more safely used for a population of rocks which have an identical average shape of pores/cracks and for a given physical property.

  9. Comparison of the orthonasal and retronasal detection thresholds for carbon dioxide in humans.

    PubMed

    Melzner, Johannes; Bitter, Thomas; Guntinas-Lichius, Orlando; Gottschall, Reiner; Walther, Mario; Gudziol, Hilmar

    2011-06-01

    Several studies have investigated the orthonasal detection threshold for carbon dioxide (CO(2)) in humans. The aim of current study was to investigate whether 24 healthy young subjects exhibited differences of CO(2) detection thresholds during orthonasal or retronasal stimulation. As nasal mucosa is believed to desensitize to CO(2) concentrations at or below 4% (v/v) during expiration, the second aim of the study was to explore the influence during nasal versus oral breathing on the detection thresholds. CO(2) stimuli of varying concentrations and a duration of 1000 ms were applied with an air-dilution olfactometer in either the anterior nasal cavity or the nasopharynx during nasal respectively oral breathing. In these 4 conditions, the mean CO(2) detection thresholds using the staircase forced-choice procedure were between 3.9% and 5.3% (v/v). Statistical analysis revealed a significant difference between orthonasal and retronasal stimulation. The CO(2) detection threshold was lower in retronasal stimulation. The nasopharyngeal mucosa is more sensitive to perithreshold CO(2) stimuli than the nasal mucosa. The breathing route had no influence on the detection thresholds. The results of this study indicate that the natural contact of the nasal mucosa with approximately 4% (v/v) CO(2) during nasal expiration does not influence CO(2) detection thresholds.

  10. Characterizing multi-pollutant air pollution in China: Comparison of three air quality indices.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jianlin; Ying, Qi; Wang, Yungang; Zhang, Hongliang

    2015-11-01

    high air pollution events. Sensitivity studies were conducted to examine the assumptions used in the AAQI and HAQI approaches. Results show that AAQI is sensitive to the choice of pollutant irrelevant constant. HAQI is sensitive to the choice of both threshold values and pollutants included in total risk calculation.

  11. Accelerated Near-Threshold Fatigue Crack Growth Behavior of an Aluminum Powder Metallurgy Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piascik, Robert S.; Newman, John A.

    2002-01-01

    Fatigue crack growth (FCG) research conducted in the near threshold regime has identified a room temperature creep crack growth damage mechanism for a fine grain powder metallurgy (PM) aluminum alloy (8009). At very low DK, an abrupt acceleration in room temperature FCG rate occurs at high stress ratio (R = Kmin/Kmax). The near threshold accelerated FCG rates are exacerbated by increased levels of Kmax (Kmax less than 0.4 KIC). Detailed fractographic analysis correlates accelerated FCG with the formation of crack-tip process zone micro-void damage. Experimental results show that the near threshold and Kmax influenced accelerated crack growth is time and temperature dependent.

  12. 40 CFR 98.281 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Silicon Carbide Production § 98.281 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a silicon carbide production process...

  13. 40 CFR 98.281 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Silicon Carbide Production § 98.281 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a silicon carbide production process...

  14. 40 CFR 98.281 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Silicon Carbide Production § 98.281 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a silicon carbide production process...

  15. 40 CFR 98.281 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Silicon Carbide Production § 98.281 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a silicon carbide production process...

  16. 40 CFR 98.281 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Silicon Carbide Production § 98.281 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a silicon carbide production process...

  17. 40 CFR 98.81 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Cement Production § 98.81 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a cement production process and the facility...

  18. 40 CFR 98.331 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Zinc Production § 98.331 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a zinc production process and the facility meets...

  19. 40 CFR 98.331 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Zinc Production § 98.331 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a zinc production process and the facility meets...

  20. 40 CFR 98.331 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Zinc Production § 98.331 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a zinc production process and the facility meets...

  1. 40 CFR 98.331 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Zinc Production § 98.331 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a zinc production process and the facility meets...

  2. 40 CFR 98.41 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Electricity Generation § 98.41 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains one or more electricity generating units and...

  3. 40 CFR 98.41 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Electricity Generation § 98.41 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains one or more electricity generating units and...

  4. 40 CFR 98.41 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Electricity Generation § 98.41 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains one or more electricity generating units and...

  5. 40 CFR 98.41 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Electricity Generation § 98.41 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains one or more electricity generating units and...

  6. 40 CFR 98.41 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Electricity Generation § 98.41 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains one or more electricity generating units and...

  7. 40 CFR 98.141 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Glass Production § 98.141 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a glass production process and the facility meets...

  8. 40 CFR 98.141 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Glass Production § 98.141 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a glass production process and the facility meets...

  9. 40 CFR 98.141 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Glass Production § 98.141 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a glass production process and the facility meets...

  10. 40 CFR 98.141 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Glass Production § 98.141 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a glass production process and the facility meets...

  11. 40 CFR 98.141 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Glass Production § 98.141 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a glass production process and the facility meets...

  12. 40 CFR 98.211 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Miscellaneous Uses of Carbonate § 98.211 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions from miscellaneous uses of carbonate if your facility uses carbonates as defined...

  13. 40 CFR 98.391 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Suppliers of Petroleum Products § 98.391 Reporting threshold. Any supplier of petroleum products who meets the requirements of § 98.2(a)(4) must report GHG emissions....

  14. 40 CFR 98.341 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Municipal Solid Waste Landfills § 98.341 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a MSW landfill and the facility...

  15. 40 CFR 98.151 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING HCFC-22 Production and HFC-23 Destruction § 98.151 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains an HCFC-22 production...

  16. 40 CFR 98.221 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Nitric Acid Production § 98.221 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a nitric acid train and the facility meets...

  17. 40 CFR 98.271 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Pulp and Paper Manufacturing § 98.271 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a pulp and paper manufacturing...

  18. 40 CFR 98.191 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Lime Manufacturing § 98.191 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility is a lime manufacturing plant as defined in § 98.190 and...

  19. 40 CFR 98.381 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Suppliers of Coal-based Liquid Fuels § 98.381 Reporting threshold. Any supplier of coal-to-liquid products who meets the requirements of § 98.2(a)(4) must report GHG emissions....

  20. 40 CFR 98.31 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING General Stationary Fuel Combustion Sources § 98.31 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains one or more stationary...

  1. 40 CFR 98.61 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Aluminum Production § 98.61 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains an aluminum production process and the facility...

  2. 40 CFR 98.61 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Aluminum Production § 98.61 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains an aluminum production process and the facility...

  3. 40 CFR 98.61 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Aluminum Production § 98.61 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains an aluminum production process and the facility...

  4. 40 CFR 98.61 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Aluminum Production § 98.61 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains an aluminum production process and the facility...

  5. 40 CFR 98.61 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Aluminum Production § 98.61 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains an aluminum production process and the facility...

  6. Laser damage threshold of diamond films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albin, Sacharia; Cropper, Andre D.; Watkins, Linwood C.; Byvik, Charles E.; Buoncristiani, A. Martin

    1989-01-01

    The possibility that diamond films may inhibit laser-induced damage to optical components in laser systems films was investigated by measuring laser damage thresholds of free-standing diamond film windows, diamond films deposited on silicon substrates, and bare silicon substrate. Polycrystalline diamond films were deposited using a dc plasma-enhanced CVD process. It was found that free-standing diamond films had the highest laser damage threshold at 1064 nm. For a diamond film of 630 nm, the damage threshold was found to be 7 J/sq cm, as compared to a damage threshold of 4.5 J/sq cm for bare silicon, and a low value of 1.5 J/sq cm for the film/substrate combination. The damage mechanism is considered to involve melting or dielectric breakdown induced by laser radiation. The low value of the film/substrate combination is attributed to film stress and conditions of film deposition.

  7. 40 CFR 98.471 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Injection of Carbon Dioxide § 98.471 Reporting threshold. (a) You must... purposes of this subpart, any reference to CO2 emissions in § 98.2(i) shall mean CO2 received....

  8. 40 CFR 98.471 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Injection of Carbon Dioxide § 98.471 Reporting threshold. (a) You must... purposes of this subpart, any reference to CO2 emissions in § 98.2(i) shall mean CO2 received....

  9. 40 CFR 98.151 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING HCFC-22 Production and HFC-23 Destruction § 98.151 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains an HCFC-22 production...

  10. 40 CFR 98.151 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING HCFC-22 Production and HFC-23 Destruction § 98.151 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains an HCFC-22 production...

  11. 40 CFR 98.151 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING HCFC-22 Production and HFC-23 Destruction § 98.151 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains an HCFC-22 production...

  12. Adaptive thresholding of digital subtraction angiography images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sang, Nong; Li, Heng; Peng, Weixue; Zhang, Tianxu

    2005-10-01

    In clinical practice, digital subtraction angiography (DSA) is a powerful technique for the visualization of blood vessels in the human body. Blood vessel segmentation is a main problem for 3D vascular reconstruction. In this paper, we propose a new adaptive thresholding method for the segmentation of DSA images. Each pixel of the DSA images is declared to be a vessel/background point with regard to a threshold and a few local characteristic limits depending on some information contained in the pixel neighborhood window. The size of the neighborhood window is set according to a priori knowledge of the diameter of vessels to make sure that each window contains the background definitely. Some experiments on cerebral DSA images are given, which show that our proposed method yields better results than global thresholding methods and some other local thresholding methods do.

  13. 40 CFR 98.161 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Hydrogen Production § 98.161 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a hydrogen production process and the facility...

  14. 40 CFR 98.241 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Petrochemical Production § 98.241 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a petrochemical process as specified...

  15. 40 CFR 98.241 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Petrochemical Production § 98.241 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a petrochemical process as specified...

  16. 40 CFR 98.241 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Petrochemical Production § 98.241 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a petrochemical process as specified...

  17. 40 CFR 98.241 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Petrochemical Production § 98.241 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a petrochemical process as specified...

  18. 40 CFR 98.241 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Petrochemical Production § 98.241 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a petrochemical process as specified...

  19. 40 CFR 98.331 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Zinc Production § 98.331 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a zinc production process and the facility meets...

  20. 40 CFR 98.71 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Ammonia Manufacturing § 98.71 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains an ammonia manufacturing process and the...

  1. 40 CFR 98.71 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Ammonia Manufacturing § 98.71 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains an ammonia manufacturing process and the...

  2. 40 CFR 98.201 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Magnesium Production § 98.201 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a magnesium production process and the facility...

  3. 40 CFR 98.201 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Magnesium Production § 98.201 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a magnesium production process and the facility...

  4. 40 CFR 98.201 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Magnesium Production § 98.201 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a magnesium production process and the facility...

  5. 40 CFR 98.201 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Magnesium Production § 98.201 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a magnesium production process and the facility...

  6. 40 CFR 98.411 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Suppliers of Industrial Greenhouse Gases § 98.411 Reporting threshold. Any supplier of industrial greenhouse gases who meets the requirements of § 98.2(a)(4) must report...

  7. 40 CFR 98.411 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Suppliers of Industrial Greenhouse Gases § 98.411 Reporting threshold. Any supplier of industrial greenhouse gases who meets the requirements of § 98.2(a)(4) must report...

  8. 40 CFR 98.411 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Suppliers of Industrial Greenhouse Gases § 98.411 Reporting threshold. Any supplier of industrial greenhouse gases who meets the requirements of § 98.2(a)(4) must report...

  9. 40 CFR 98.411 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Suppliers of Industrial Greenhouse Gases § 98.411 Reporting threshold. Any supplier of industrial greenhouse gases who meets the requirements of § 98.2(a)(4) must report...

  10. 40 CFR 98.411 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Suppliers of Industrial Greenhouse Gases § 98.411 Reporting threshold. Any supplier of industrial greenhouse gases who meets the requirements of § 98.2(a)(4) must report...

  11. 40 CFR 98.311 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Titanium Dioxide Production § 98.311 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a titanium dioxide production process...

  12. 40 CFR 98.311 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Titanium Dioxide Production § 98.311 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a titanium dioxide production process...

  13. 40 CFR 98.311 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Titanium Dioxide Production § 98.311 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a titanium dioxide production process...

  14. 40 CFR 98.311 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Titanium Dioxide Production § 98.311 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a titanium dioxide production process...

  15. 40 CFR 98.311 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Titanium Dioxide Production § 98.311 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a titanium dioxide production process...

  16. 40 CFR 98.261 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Phosphoric Acid Production § 98.261 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a phosphoric acid production process...

  17. 40 CFR 98.261 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Phosphoric Acid Production § 98.261 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a phosphoric acid production process...

  18. 40 CFR 98.261 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Phosphoric Acid Production § 98.261 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a phosphoric acid production process...

  19. 40 CFR 98.181 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Lead Production § 98.181 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a lead production process and the facility meets...

  20. 40 CFR 98.171 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Iron and Steel Production § 98.171 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains an iron and steel production process...

  1. Effective theories and thresholds in particle physics

    SciTech Connect

    Gaillard, M.K.

    1991-06-07

    The role of effective theories in probing a more fundamental underlying theory and in indicating new physics thresholds is discussed, with examples from the standard model and more speculative applications to superstring theory. 38 refs.

  2. 40 CFR 98.251 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Petroleum Refineries § 98.251 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a petroleum refineries process and the facility...

  3. 40 CFR 98.251 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Petroleum Refineries § 98.251 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a petroleum refineries process and the facility...

  4. 40 CFR 98.251 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Petroleum Refineries § 98.251 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a petroleum refineries process and the facility...

  5. 40 CFR 98.251 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Petroleum Refineries § 98.251 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a petroleum refineries process and the facility...

  6. 40 CFR 98.251 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Petroleum Refineries § 98.251 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a petroleum refineries process and the facility...

  7. 40 CFR 98.171 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Iron and Steel Production § 98.171 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains an iron and steel production process...

  8. 40 CFR 98.171 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Iron and Steel Production § 98.171 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains an iron and steel production process...

  9. 40 CFR 98.291 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Soda Ash Manufacturing § 98.291 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a soda ash manufacturing process and the...

  10. 40 CFR 98.291 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Soda Ash Manufacturing § 98.291 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a soda ash manufacturing process and the...

  11. 40 CFR 98.291 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Soda Ash Manufacturing § 98.291 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a soda ash manufacturing process and the...

  12. 40 CFR 98.291 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Soda Ash Manufacturing § 98.291 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a soda ash manufacturing process and the...

  13. 40 CFR 98.291 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Soda Ash Manufacturing § 98.291 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a soda ash manufacturing process and the...

  14. 40 CFR 98.321 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Underground Coal Mines § 98.321 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains an active underground coal mine and the...

  15. 40 CFR 98.321 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Underground Coal Mines § 98.321 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains an active underground coal mine and the...

  16. 40 CFR 98.321 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Underground Coal Mines § 98.321 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains an active underground coal mine and the...

  17. 40 CFR 98.321 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Underground Coal Mines § 98.321 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains an active underground coal mine and the...

  18. 40 CFR 98.401 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Suppliers of Natural Gas and Natural Gas Liquids § 98.401 Reporting threshold. Any supplier of natural gas and natural gas liquids that meets the requirements of §...

  19. 40 CFR 98.401 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Suppliers of Natural Gas and Natural Gas Liquids § 98.401 Reporting threshold. Any supplier of natural gas and natural gas liquids that meets the requirements of §...

  20. 40 CFR 98.401 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Suppliers of Natural Gas and Natural Gas Liquids § 98.401 Reporting threshold. Any supplier of natural gas and natural gas liquids that meets the requirements of §...

  1. 40 CFR 98.401 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Suppliers of Natural Gas and Natural Gas Liquids § 98.401 Reporting threshold. Any supplier of natural gas and natural gas liquids that meets the requirements of §...

  2. 40 CFR 98.161 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Hydrogen Production § 98.161 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a hydrogen production process and the facility...

  3. 40 CFR 98.161 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Hydrogen Production § 98.161 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a hydrogen production process and the facility...

  4. 40 CFR 98.161 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Hydrogen Production § 98.161 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a hydrogen production process and the facility...

  5. 40 CFR 98.161 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Hydrogen Production § 98.161 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a hydrogen production process and the facility...

  6. [Nonlinear magnetohydrodynamics]. [Threshold unstable MHD activity

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Theoretical predictions were compared with available data from JET on the threshold unstable MHD activity in toroidal confinement devices. In particular, questions arising as to Hartmans number and the selection of a kinematic viscosity are discussed.

  7. 40 CFR 98.261 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Phosphoric Acid Production § 98.261 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a phosphoric acid production process...

  8. 40 CFR 98.261 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Phosphoric Acid Production § 98.261 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a phosphoric acid production process...

  9. No evidence of dioxin cancer threshold.

    PubMed Central

    Mackie, David; Liu, Junfeng; Loh, Yeong-Shang; Thomas, Valerie

    2003-01-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has developed an estimate of the human cancer risk from dioxin, using the standard low-dose linear extrapolation approach. This estimate has been controversial because of concern that it may overestimate the cancer risk. An alternative approach has been published and was presented to the U.S. EPA Science Advisory Board's Dioxin Review Panel in November 2000. That approach suggests that dioxin is a threshold carcinogen and that the threshold is an order of magnitude above the exposure levels of the general population. We have reexamined the threshold analysis and found that the data have been incorrectly weighted by cohort size. In our reanalysis, without the incorrect weighting, the threshold effect disappears. PMID:12842764

  10. Threshold altitude resulting in decompression sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, K. V.; Waligora, James M.; Calkins, Dick S.

    1990-01-01

    A review of case reports, hypobaric chamber training data, and experimental evidence indicated that the threshold for incidence of altitude decompression sickness (DCS) was influenced by various factors such as prior denitrogenation, exercise or rest, and period of exposure, in addition to individual susceptibility. Fitting these data with appropriate statistical models makes it possible to examine the influence of various factors on the threshold for DCS. This approach was illustrated by logistic regression analysis on the incidence of DCS below 9144 m. Estimations using these regressions showed that, under a noprebreathe, 6-h exposure, simulated EVA profile, the threshold for symptoms occurred at approximately 3353 m; while under a noprebreathe, 2-h exposure profile with knee-bends exercise, the threshold occurred at 7925 m.

  11. Nonlinear theory of kinetic instabilities near threshold

    SciTech Connect

    Berk, H.L.; Pekker, M.S.; Breizman, B.N. |

    1997-05-01

    A new nonlinear equation has been derived and solved for the evolution of an unstable collective mode in a kinetic system close to the threshold of linear instability. The resonant particle response produces the dominant nonlinearity, which can be calculated iteratively in the near-threshold regime as long as the mode doe snot trap resonant particles. With sources and classical relaxation processes included, the theory describes both soft nonlinear regimes, where the mode saturation level is proportional to an increment above threshold, and explosive nonlinear regimes, where the mode grows to a level that is independent of the closeness to threshold. The explosive solutions exhibit mode frequency shifting. For modes that exist in the absence of energetic particles, the frequency shift is both upward and downward. For modes that require energetic particles for their existence, there is a preferred direction of the frequency shift. The frequency shift continues even after the mode traps resonant particles.

  12. Experimental study on 800 nm femtosecond laser ablation of fused silica in air and vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shi-zhen; Yao, Cai-zhen; Liao, Wei; Yuan, Xiao-dong; Wang, Tao; Zu, Xiao-tao

    2016-10-01

    Ablation rates of fused silica were studied as a function of femtosecond laser pulse fluences (0.7-41 J/cm2) in air and vacuum. The experiment was conducted by using a Ti:sapphire laser that emits radiation at 800 nm with a pulse width of 35 fs and a repetition rate of 10 Hz. The morphology and ablation depth of laser-induced damage crater were evaluated by using optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Ablation rates were calculated from the depth of craters induced by multiple laser pulses. Results showed that two ablation regimes, i.e. non-thermal and thermal ablation co-existed in air and vacuum at low and moderate fluences. A drop of ablation rate was observed at high fluence (higher than 9.5 J/cm2) in air. While in vacuum, the ablation rate increased continuously with the increasing of laser fluence and much higher than that in air. The drop of ablation rate observed at high fluence in air was due to the strong defocusing effects associated with the non-equilibrium ionization of air. Furthermore, the laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT), which was determined from the relationship between crater area and the logarithm of laser energy, was found to depend on the number of incident pulses on the same spot, and similar phenomenon was observed in air and vacuum.

  13. A new dual threshold time-over-threshold circuit for fast timing in PET.

    PubMed

    Grant, Alexander M; Levin, Craig S

    2014-07-01

    Time-over-threshold (ToT) is attractive as a method of combined timing and energy encoding in positron emission tomography (PET) due to its simplicity in implementation and readout. However, conventional single threshold ToT has a nonlinear response and generally suffers from a tradeoff between timing and energy resolution. The resulting poor performance is not fit for applications requiring fast timing, such as time-of-flight (ToF) PET. In this work it is shown experimentally that by replacing single threshold ToT with a dual threshold method in a new compact circuit, excellent time resolution can be achieved (154 ps FWHM for 3 × 3 × 5 mm(3) LYSO crystals), suitable for ToF. Dual threshold ToT timing results have been compared to a similar single threshold design, demonstrating that dual threshold ToT performance is far superior to that of single threshold ToT (154 ps versus 418 ps coincidence time resolution for the dual and single threshold cases, respectively). A method of correcting for nonlinearity in dual threshold ToT energy spectra is also demonstrated.

  14. Optimizing Retransmission Threshold in Wireless Sensor Networks.

    PubMed

    Bi, Ran; Li, Yingshu; Tan, Guozhen; Sun, Liang

    2016-01-01

    The retransmission threshold in wireless sensor networks is critical to the latency of data delivery in the networks. However, existing works on data transmission in sensor networks did not consider the optimization of the retransmission threshold, and they simply set the same retransmission threshold for all sensor nodes in advance. The method did not take link quality and delay requirement into account, which decreases the probability of a packet passing its delivery path within a given deadline. This paper investigates the problem of finding optimal retransmission thresholds for relay nodes along a delivery path in a sensor network. The object of optimizing retransmission thresholds is to maximize the summation of the probability of the packet being successfully delivered to the next relay node or destination node in time. A dynamic programming-based distributed algorithm for finding optimal retransmission thresholds for relay nodes along a delivery path in the sensor network is proposed. The time complexity is O n Δ · max 1 ≤ i ≤ n { u i } , where u i is the given upper bound of the retransmission threshold of sensor node i in a given delivery path, n is the length of the delivery path and Δ is the given upper bound of the transmission delay of the delivery path. If Δ is greater than the polynomial, to reduce the time complexity, a linear programming-based ( 1 + p m i n ) -approximation algorithm is proposed. Furthermore, when the ranges of the upper and lower bounds of retransmission thresholds are big enough, a Lagrange multiplier-based distributed O ( 1 ) -approximation algorithm with time complexity O ( 1 ) is proposed. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithms have better performance. PMID:27171092

  15. Computer simulation of the threshold sensitivity determinations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayle, J. B.

    1974-01-01

    A computer simulation study was carried out to evaluate various methods for determining threshold stimulus levels for impact sensitivity tests. In addition, the influence of a number of variables (initial stimulus level, particular stimulus response curve, and increment size) on the apparent threshold values and on the corresponding population response levels was determined. Finally, a critical review of previous assumptions regarding the stimulus response curve for impact testing is presented in the light of the simulation results.

  16. Optimizing Retransmission Threshold in Wireless Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Ran; Li, Yingshu; Tan, Guozhen; Sun, Liang

    2016-01-01

    The retransmission threshold in wireless sensor networks is critical to the latency of data delivery in the networks. However, existing works on data transmission in sensor networks did not consider the optimization of the retransmission threshold, and they simply set the same retransmission threshold for all sensor nodes in advance. The method did not take link quality and delay requirement into account, which decreases the probability of a packet passing its delivery path within a given deadline. This paper investigates the problem of finding optimal retransmission thresholds for relay nodes along a delivery path in a sensor network. The object of optimizing retransmission thresholds is to maximize the summation of the probability of the packet being successfully delivered to the next relay node or destination node in time. A dynamic programming-based distributed algorithm for finding optimal retransmission thresholds for relay nodes along a delivery path in the sensor network is proposed. The time complexity is OnΔ·max1≤i≤n{ui}, where ui is the given upper bound of the retransmission threshold of sensor node i in a given delivery path, n is the length of the delivery path and Δ is the given upper bound of the transmission delay of the delivery path. If Δ is greater than the polynomial, to reduce the time complexity, a linear programming-based (1+pmin)-approximation algorithm is proposed. Furthermore, when the ranges of the upper and lower bounds of retransmission thresholds are big enough, a Lagrange multiplier-based distributed O(1)-approximation algorithm with time complexity O(1) is proposed. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithms have better performance. PMID:27171092

  17. Initiation Pressure Thresholds from Three Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Souers, P C; Vitello, P

    2007-02-28

    Pressure thresholds are minimum pressures needed to start explosive initiation that ends in detonation. We obtain pressure thresholds from three sources. Run-to-detonation times are the poorest source but the fitting of a function gives rough results. Flyer-induced initiation gives the best results because the initial conditions are the best known. However, very thick flyers are needed to give the lowest, asymptotic pressure thresholds used in modern models and this kind of data is rarely available. Gap test data is in much larger supply but the various test sizes and materials are confusing. We find that explosive pressures are almost the same if the distance in the gap test spacers are in units of donor explosive radius. Calculated half-width time pulses in the spacers may be used to create a pressure-time curve similar to that of the flyers. The very-large Eglin gap tests give asymptotic thresholds comparable to extrapolated flyer results. The three sources are assembled into a much-expanded set of near-asymptotic pressure thresholds. These thresholds vary greatly with density: for TATB/LX-17/PBX 9502, we find values of 4.9 and 8.7 GPa at 1.80 and 1.90 g/cm{sup 3}, respectively.

  18. Air heating system

    DOEpatents

    Primeau, John J.

    1983-03-01

    A self-starting, fuel-fired, air heating system including a vapor generator, a turbine, and a condenser connected in a closed circuit such that the vapor output from the vapor generator is conducted to the turbine and then to the condenser where it is condensed for return to the vapor generator. The turbine drives an air blower which passes air over the condenser for cooling the condenser. Also, a condensate pump is driven by the turbine. The disclosure is particularly concerned with the provision of heat exchanger and circuitry for cooling the condensed fluid output from the pump prior to its return to the vapor generator.

  19. Conductivity simulations of field-grading composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, Fritjof; Unge, Mikael

    2016-08-01

    The electrical conductivity and the percolation threshold of field grading polymer composites intended for high voltage applications were examined with representative elementary volume simulation methods based on percolation threshold modeling (PTM) and electrical network modeling (ENM). Comparisons were made with experimental conductivity data for SiC-EPDM composites with spherical and angular particles, using different filler fractions and electrical field strengths. With a known conductivity of the filler particles (powder), the simulations could predict the percolation threshold and the composite conductivity as functions of the electrical field for a wide range of SiC-filler fractions. The effects of morphology, dispersion and filler shape were examined and the simulations were able to explain the experimental difficulty of reaching sufficient reproducibility when designing composites with filler fractions close to a percolation threshold. PTM of composites containing hard-core/soft-shell spheres revealed a y  =  (a  +  bx)(‑1/c) relationship (R 2  =  0.9997) between filler fraction and relative soft-shell thickness.

  20. Air breathing direct methanol fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Ren, Xiaoming; Gottesfeld, Shimshon

    2002-01-01

    An air breathing direct methanol fuel cell is provided with a membrane electrode assembly, a conductive anode assembly that is permeable to air and directly open to atmospheric air, and a conductive cathode assembly that is permeable to methanol and directly contacting a liquid methanol source. Water loss from the cell is minimized by making the conductive cathode assembly hydrophobic and the conductive anode assembly hydrophilic.

  1. Air breathing direct methanol fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Ren, Xiaoming

    2002-01-01

    An air breathing direct methanol fuel cell is provided with a membrane electrode assembly, a conductive anode assembly that is permeable to air and directly open to atmospheric air, and a conductive cathode assembly that is permeable to methanol and directly contacting a liquid methanol source.

  2. Air resources

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    This section describes the ambient (surrounding) air quality of the TVA region, discusses TVA emission contributions to ambient air quality, and identifies air quality impacts to human health and welfare. Volume 2 Technical Document 2, Environmental Consequences, describes how changes in TVA emissions could affect regional air quality, human health, environmental resources, and materials. The primary region of the affected environment is broadly defined as the state of Tennessee, as well as southern Kentucky, western Virginia, southern West Virginia, western North Carolina, and northern Georgia, Alabama, and Mississippi. This area represents the watershed of the Tennessee River and the 201 counties of the greater TVA service area. Emissions from outside the Tennessee Valley region contribute to air quality in the Valley. Also, TVA emissions are transported outside the Valley and have some impact on air quality beyond the primary study area. Although the study area experiences a number of air quality problems, overall air quality is good.

  3. Siamang gibbons exceed the saccular threshold: Intensity of the song of Hylobates syndactylus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAngus Todd, Neil P.; Merker, Bjorn

    2004-06-01

    Measurements are reported of the intensity of the siamang gibbon loud call obtained from the vocal bouts of three family groups at Twycross Zoo, UK. Across 25 samples the maximum intensity ranged from 95 to 113 dB SPL (linear frequency-weighting and fast time-weighting) and exhibited three frequency modes of 250-315 Hz, 630-800 Hz and 1.2-1.6 kHz. The lowest frequency mode, which may correspond to the ``boom'' sound produced by resonance of the siamang inflated vocal sac, had a mean maximum intensity of 99 dB SPL. These values, which are in excess of the saccular acoustic threshold of about 90 dB at 300 Hz for air conducted sound, suggest that primate loud calls recruit a primitive mode of acoustic sensitivity furnished by the sacculus. Thus reproductive vocal behavior of primates may be influenced by a primitive acoustical reward pathway inherited from a common ancestor with anamniotes. In humans such a pathway could explain the compulsion for exposure to loud music.

  4. Thresholds for the onset of fluid and magnetofluid turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, D.

    1982-01-01

    Linear stability calculations conducted in plasma physics are based on the theory of hydrodynamic stability of neutral fluids. The present investigation is concerned with the validity of procedures based on linear stability analysis in six much-studied situations. All have the property that the fluid goes from laminar to turbulent at critical values of some dimensionless number, such as the Reynolds number or the Rayleigh number. The question is, at what threshold values of the dimensionless number do the unstable motions set in, and can these thresholds be predicted by a linear analysis of the stability of the laminar state as the threshold is approached from the stable side. In three cases linear stability analysis clearly seems to fail. These cases include Plane Poiseuille Flow, Plane Couette Flow, and Cylindrical Pipe Flow (Hagen-Poiseuille Flow). Situations in which predictions provided by linear stability analysis are correct are related to Rotating Couette Flow, Thermally-Driven Convection, and Instability of Laminar Boundary Layers.

  5. Fluence thresholds for grazing incidence hard x-ray mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Aquila, A.; Ozkan, C.; Sinn, H.; Tschentscher, T.; Mancuso, A. P.; Gaudin, J.; Sobierajski, R.; Klepka, M. T.; Dłużewski, P.; Morawiec, K.; Störmer, M.; Bajt, S.; Ohashi, H.; Koyama, T.; Tono, K.; Inubushi, Y. [RIKEN and others

    2015-06-15

    X-ray Free Electron Lasers (XFELs) have the potential to contribute to many fields of science and to enable many new avenues of research, in large part due to their orders of magnitude higher peak brilliance than existing and future synchrotrons. To best exploit this peak brilliance, these XFEL beams need to be focused to appropriate spot sizes. However, the survivability of X-ray optical components in these intense, femtosecond radiation conditions is not guaranteed. As mirror optics are routinely used at XFEL facilities, a physical understanding of the interaction between intense X-ray pulses and grazing incidence X-ray optics is desirable. We conducted single shot damage threshold fluence measurements on grazing incidence X-ray optics, with coatings of ruthenium and boron carbide, at the SPring-8 Angstrom compact free electron laser facility using 7 and 12 keV photon energies. The damage threshold dose limits were found to be orders of magnitude higher than would naively be expected. The incorporation of energy transport and dissipation via keV level energetic photoelectrons accounts for the observed damage threshold.

  6. Correlation between experimental human and murine skin sensitization induction thresholds.

    PubMed

    Api, Anne Marie; Basketter, David; Lalko, Jon

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative risk assessment for skin sensitization is directed towards the determination of levels of exposure to known sensitizing substances that will avoid the induction of contact allergy in humans. A key component of this work is the predictive identification of relative skin sensitizing potency, achieved normally by the measurement of the threshold (the "EC3" value) in the local lymph node assay (LLNA). In an extended series of studies, the accuracy of this murine induction threshold as the predictor of the absence of a sensitizing effect has been verified by conduct of a human repeated insult patch test (HRIPT). Murine and human thresholds for a diverse set of 57 fragrance chemicals spanning approximately four orders of magnitude variation in potency have been compared. The results confirm that there is a useful correlation, with the LLNA EC3 value helping particularly to identify stronger sensitizers. Good correlation (with half an order of magnitude) was seen with three-quarters of the dataset. The analysis also helps to identify potential outlier types of (fragrance) chemistry, exemplified by hexyl and benzyl salicylates (an over-prediction) and trans-2-hexenal (an under-prediction).

  7. Uncertainty Estimates of Psychoacoustic Thresholds Obtained from Group Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rathsam, Jonathan; Christian, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Adaptive psychoacoustic test methods, in which the next signal level depends on the response to the previous signal, are the most efficient for determining psychoacoustic thresholds of individual subjects. In many tests conducted in the NASA psychoacoustic labs, the goal is to determine thresholds representative of the general population. To do this economically, non-adaptive testing methods are used in which three or four subjects are tested at the same time with predetermined signal levels. This approach requires us to identify techniques for assessing the uncertainty in resulting group-average psychoacoustic thresholds. In this presentation we examine the Delta Method of frequentist statistics, the Generalized Linear Model (GLM), the Nonparametric Bootstrap, a frequentist method, and Markov Chain Monte Carlo Posterior Estimation and a Bayesian approach. Each technique is exercised on a manufactured, theoretical dataset and then on datasets from two psychoacoustics facilities at NASA. The Delta Method is the simplest to implement and accurate for the cases studied. The GLM is found to be the least robust, and the Bootstrap takes the longest to calculate. The Bayesian Posterior Estimate is the most versatile technique examined because it allows the inclusion of prior information.

  8. Fluence thresholds for grazing incidence hard x-ray mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aquila, A.; Sobierajski, R.; Ozkan, C.; Hájková, V.; Burian, T.; Chalupský, J.; Juha, L.; Störmer, M.; Bajt, S.; Klepka, M. T.; DłuŻewski, P.; Morawiec, K.; Ohashi, H.; Koyama, T.; Tono, K.; Inubushi, Y.; Yabashi, M.; Sinn, H.; Tschentscher, T.; Mancuso, A. P.; Gaudin, J.

    2015-06-01

    X-ray Free Electron Lasers (XFELs) have the potential to contribute to many fields of science and to enable many new avenues of research, in large part due to their orders of magnitude higher peak brilliance than existing and future synchrotrons. To best exploit this peak brilliance, these XFEL beams need to be focused to appropriate spot sizes. However, the survivability of X-ray optical components in these intense, femtosecond radiation conditions is not guaranteed. As mirror optics are routinely used at XFEL facilities, a physical understanding of the interaction between intense X-ray pulses and grazing incidence X-ray optics is desirable. We conducted single shot damage threshold fluence measurements on grazing incidence X-ray optics, with coatings of ruthenium and boron carbide, at the SPring-8 Angstrom compact free electron laser facility using 7 and 12 keV photon energies. The damage threshold dose limits were found to be orders of magnitude higher than would naively be expected. The incorporation of energy transport and dissipation via keV level energetic photoelectrons accounts for the observed damage threshold.

  9. Ultrasonic determination of thermodynamic threshold parameters for irreversible cutaneous burns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, J. H., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    In vivo ultrasonic measurements of the depth of conductive cutaneous burns experimentally induced in anesthetized Yorkshire pigs are reported as a function of burn time for the case in which the skin surface temperature is maintained at 100 C. The data are used in the solution of the one-dimensional heat diffusion equation with time-dependent boundary conditions to obtain the threshold temperature and the energy of transformation per unit mass associated with the transition of the tissue from the state of viability to the state of necrosis. The simplicity of the mathematical model and the expediency of the ultrasonic measurements in studies of thermal injury are emphasized.

  10. Electronic Conduction in Ti/Poly-TiO2/Ti Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossein-Babaei, Faramarz; Alaei-Sheini, Navid

    2016-07-01

    Recent intensive investigations on metal/metal oxide/metal structures have targeted nanometric single grain oxides at high electric fields. Similar research on thicker polycrystalline oxide layers can bridge the results to the prior literature on varistors and may uncover novel ionic/electronic features originating from the conduction mechanisms involving grain boundaries. Here, we investigate electronic conduction in Ti/poly-TiO2-x/Ti structures with different oxygen vacancy distributions and describe the observed features based on the motion and rearrangement of the ionized oxygen vacancies (IOVs) on the grain facets rather than the grain interiors. Containing no interface energy barrier, Ti/poly-TiO2/Ti devices demonstrate high resistance ohmic conduction at biasing fields below 5 × 106 V.m-1 higher fields drive the samples to a distinctly nonlinear and hysteretic low resistance status. The observed threshold is two orders of magnitude smaller than the typical resistance switching fields reported for the nanosized single grain memristors. This is consistent with the smaller activation energies reported for the IOV motion on the rutile facets than its interior. The presented model describes the observed dependence of the threshold field on the relative humidity of the surrounding air based on the lower activation energies reported for the hydroxyl-assisted IOV motion on the rutile facets.

  11. Electronic Conduction in Ti/Poly-TiO2/Ti Structures

    PubMed Central

    Hossein-Babaei, Faramarz; Alaei-Sheini, Navid

    2016-01-01

    Recent intensive investigations on metal/metal oxide/metal structures have targeted nanometric single grain oxides at high electric fields. Similar research on thicker polycrystalline oxide layers can bridge the results to the prior literature on varistors and may uncover novel ionic/electronic features originating from the conduction mechanisms involving grain boundaries. Here, we investigate electronic conduction in Ti/poly-TiO2−x/Ti structures with different oxygen vacancy distributions and describe the observed features based on the motion and rearrangement of the ionized oxygen vacancies (IOVs) on the grain facets rather than the grain interiors. Containing no interface energy barrier, Ti/poly-TiO2/Ti devices demonstrate high resistance ohmic conduction at biasing fields below 5 × 106 V.m−1; higher fields drive the samples to a distinctly nonlinear and hysteretic low resistance status. The observed threshold is two orders of magnitude smaller than the typical resistance switching fields reported for the nanosized single grain memristors. This is consistent with the smaller activation energies reported for the IOV motion on the rutile facets than its interior. The presented model describes the observed dependence of the threshold field on the relative humidity of the surrounding air based on the lower activation energies reported for the hydroxyl-assisted IOV motion on the rutile facets. PMID:27404085

  12. Aeolian Sand Transport in the Planetary Context: Respective Roles of Aerodynamic and Bed-Dilatancy Thresholds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, J. R.; Borucki, J.; Bratton, C.

    1999-09-01

    The traditional view of aeolian sand transport generally estimates flux from the perspective of aerodynamic forces creating the airborne grain population, although it has been recognized that "reptation" causes a significant part of the total airborne flux; reptation involves both ballistic injection of grains into the air stream by the impact of saltating grains as well as the "nudging" of surface grains into a creeping motion. Whilst aerodynamic forces may initiate sand motion, it is proposed here that within a fully-matured grain cloud, flux is actually governed by two thresholds: an aerodynamic threshold, and a bed-dilatancy threshold. It is the latter which controls the reptation population, and its significance increases proportionally with transport energy. Because we only have experience with terrestrial sand transport, extrapolations of aeolian theory to Mars and Venus have adjusted only the aerodynamic factor, taking gravitational forces and atmospheric density as the prime variables in the aerodynamic equations, but neglecting reptation. The basis for our perspective on the importance of reptation and bed dilatancy is a set of experiments that were designed to simulate sand transport across the surface of a martian dune. Using a modified sporting crossbow in which a sand-impelling sabot replaced the bolt-firing mechanism, individual grains of sand were fired at loose sand targets with glancing angles typical of saltation impact; grains were projected at about 80 m/s to simulate velocities commensurate with those predicted for extreme martian aeolian conditions. The sabot impelling method permitted study of individual impacts without the masking effect of bed mobilization encountered in wind-tunnel studies. At these martian impact velocities, grains produced small craters formed by the ejection of several hundred grains from the bed. Unexpectedly, the craters were not elongated, despite glancing impact; the craters were very close to circular in planform

  13. Aeolian Sand Transport in the Planetary Context: Respective Roles of Aerodynamic and Bed-Dilatancy Thresholds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, J. R.; Borucki, J.; Bratton, C.

    1999-01-01

    The traditional view of aeolian sand transport generally estimates flux from the perspective of aerodynamic forces creating the airborne grain population, although it has been recognized that "reptation" causes a significant part of the total airborne flux; reptation involves both ballistic injection of grains into the air stream by the impact of saltating grains as well as the "nudging" of surface grains into a creeping motion. Whilst aerodynamic forces may initiate sand motion, it is proposed here that within a fully-matured grain cloud, flux is actually governed by two thresholds: an aerodynamic threshold, and a bed-dilatancy threshold. It is the latter which controls the reptation population, and its significance increases proportionally with transport energy. Because we only have experience with terrestrial sand transport, extrapolations of aeolian theory to Mars and Venus have adjusted only the aerodynamic factor, taking gravitational forces and atmospheric density as the prime variables in the aerodynamic equations, but neglecting reptation. The basis for our perspective on the importance of reptation and bed dilatancy is a set of experiments that were designed to simulate sand transport across the surface of a martian dune. Using a modified sporting crossbow in which a sand-impelling sabot replaced the bolt-firing mechanism, individual grains of sand were fired at loose sand targets with glancing angles typical of saltation impact; grains were projected at about 80 m/s to simulate velocities commensurate with those predicted for extreme martian aeolian conditions. The sabot impelling method permitted study of individual impacts without the masking effect of bed mobilization encountered in wind-tunnel studies. At these martian impact velocities, grains produced small craters formed by the ejection of several hundred grains from the bed. Unexpectedly, the craters were not elongated, despite glancing impact; the craters were very close to circular in planform

  14. Experimental investigation of plastic finned-tube heat exchangers, with emphasis on material thermal conductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Lin; Li, Zhen; Guo, Zeng-Yuan

    2009-07-15

    In this paper, two modified types of polypropylene (PP) with high thermal conductivity up to 2.3 W/m K and 16.5 W/m K are used to manufacture the finned-tube heat exchangers, which are prospected to be used in liquid desiccant air conditioning, heat recovery, water source heat pump, sea water desalination, etc. A third plastic heat exchanger is also manufactured with ordinary PP for validation and comparison. Experiments are carried out to determine the thermal performance of the plastic heat exchangers. It is found that the plastic finned-tube heat exchanger with thermal conductivity of 16.5 W/m K can achieve overall heat transfer coefficient of 34 W/m{sup 2} K. The experimental results are compared with calculation and they agree well with each other. Finally, the effect of material thermal conductivity on heat exchanger thermal performance is studied in detail. The results show that there is a threshold value of material thermal conductivity. Below this value improving thermal conductivity can considerably improve the heat exchanger performance while over this value improving thermal conductivity contributes very little to performance enhancement. For the finned-tube heat exchanger designed in this paper, when the plastic thermal conductivity can reach over 15 W/m K, it can achieve more than 95% of the titanium heat exchanger performance and 84% of the aluminum or copper heat exchanger performance with the same dimension. (author)

  15. Electrically conductive and thermally conductive materials for electronic packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zongrong

    The aim of this dissertation is to develop electrically or thermally conductive materials that are needed for electronic packaging and microelectronic cooling. These materials are in the form of coatings and are made from pastes. The research work encompasses paste formulation, studying the process of converting a paste to a conductive material, relating the processing conditions to the structure and performance, and evaluating performance attributes that are relevant to the application of these conductive materials. The research has resulted in new information that is valuable to the microelectronic industry. Work on electrically conductive materials emphasizes the development of electrical interconnection materials in the form of air-firable glass-free silver-based electrically conductive thick films, which use the Ti-Al alloy as the binder and are in contrast to conventional films that use glass as the binder. The air-firability, as enabled by minor additions of tin and zinc to the paste, is in contrast to previous glass-free films that are not firable. The recommended firing condition is 930°C in air. The organic vehicle in the paste comprises ethyl cellulose, which undergoes thermal decomposition during burnout of the paste. The ethyl cellulose is dissolved in ether, which facilitates the burnout. Excessive ethyl cellulose hinders the burnout. A higher heating rate results in more residue after burnout. The presence of silver particles facilitates drying and burnout. Firing in air gives lower resistivity than firing in oxygen. Firing in argon gives poor films. Compared to conventional films that use glass as the binder, these films, when appropriately fired, exhibit lower electrical resistivity (2.5 x 10-6 O.cm) and higher scratch resistance. Work on thermally conductive materials addresses thermal interface materials, which are materials placed at the interface between a heat sink and a heat source for the purpose of improving the thermal contact. Heat

  16. Air Pollution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilpin, Alan

    A summary of one of our most pressing environmental problems, air pollution, is offered in this book by the Director of Air Pollution Control for the Queensland (Australia) State Government. Discussion of the subject is not restricted to Queensland or Australian problems and policies, however, but includes analysis of air pollution the world over.…

  17. The variations in visual threshold measurement.

    PubMed

    Hallett, P E

    1969-06-01

    1. This paper presents a statistical analysis of the thresholds of test flashes viewed against zero, steady or transient backgrounds by peripheral vision. The method of threshold measurement is that of the Medical Research Council Report (Pirenne, Marriott & O'Doherty, 1957; Hartline & McDonald, 1943). The data are from the previous paper (Hallett, 1969b) and consist of k days' samples of n threshold measurements on an intensity scale of interval 0.087 log. The collection of a sample required 5-6 min and the samples were spread over a 3-month period.2. The analysis suggests that the nature of biological variations is that the ;instantaneous' frequency-of-seeing curve can occupy a variety of positions, or levels, scattered about its typical position on the log. energy axis. Change of the position of the curve for a given threshold task is most obvious when one compares threshold measurements obtained on different days, but this is not true day-to-day variation; the same sorts of change occur on the same day if the viewing conditions (independent variables) are changed and are perhaps due to shifts in the observer's signal/noise criterion K.3. Two important consequences of the analysis are (i) the errors of visual threshold functions are worse than one method of calculating error suggests and (ii) it is possible to eliminate part of the biological variations from a particular sort of frequency-of-seeing curve and thus obtain a better estimate of the instantaneous curve which is the physiological function of prime interest.4. Some possible causes of the biological variations are considered. The design of experiments is discussed. The method of the M.R.C. Report is to be recommended since it can be applied without prior assumptions about the value of the mean threshold or the nature of the errors. PMID:5784294

  18. Improving Forecast Skill by Assimilation of AIRS Temperature Soundings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Susskind, Joel; Reale, Oreste

    2010-01-01

    AIRS was launched on EOS Aqua on May 4, 2002, together with AMSU-A and HSB, to form a next generation polar orbiting infrared and microwave atmospheric sounding system. The primary products of AIRS/AMSU-A are twice daily global fields of atmospheric temperature-humidity profiles, ozone profiles, sea/land surface skin temperature, and cloud related parameters including OLR. The AIRS Version 5 retrieval algorithm, is now being used operationally at the Goddard DISC in the routine generation of geophysical parameters derived from AIRS/AMSU data. A major innovation in Version 5 is the ability to generate case-by-case level-by-level error estimates delta T(p) for retrieved quantities and the use of these error estimates for Quality Control. We conducted a number of data assimilation experiments using the NASA GEOS-5 Data Assimilation System as a step toward finding an optimum balance of spatial coverage and sounding accuracy with regard to improving forecast skill. The model was run at a horizontal resolution of 0.5 deg. latitude X 0.67 deg longitude with 72 vertical levels. These experiments were run during four different seasons, each using a different year. The AIRS temperature profiles were presented to the GEOS-5 analysis as rawinsonde profiles, and the profile error estimates delta (p) were used as the uncertainty for each measurement in the data assimilation process. We compared forecasts analyses generated from the analyses done by assimilation of AIRS temperature profiles with three different sets of thresholds; Standard, Medium, and Tight. Assimilation of Quality Controlled AIRS temperature profiles significantly improve 5-7 day forecast skill compared to that obtained without the benefit of AIRS data in all of the cases studied. In addition, assimilation of Quality Controlled AIRS temperature soundings performs better than assimilation of AIRS observed radiances. Based on the experiments shown, Tight Quality Control of AIRS temperature profile performs best

  19. Studies in Above- and Below-Threshold Harmonics in Argon with an Infrared Femtosecond Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chew, Andrew; Yin, Yanchun; Li, Jie; Ren, Xiaoming; Cunningham, Eric; Wu, Yi; Chang, Zenghu

    2016-05-01

    We investigate and compare the above- and below-threshold harmonics in Argon gas using our recently-developed 1 kHz, two-cycle (11.4 fs), 3mJ, and carrier-envelope-phase(CEP)-stable laser at 1.6 μm. Such ultraviolet pulses can serve as pump or probe for studying dynamics in atoms and molecules. Unlike high harmonics with photon energy well above the ionization potential, the mechanism for generating harmonics near the ionization threshold is still under intense investigation. Previous work by Chini et al. on below-threshold harmonics was done using a 0.8 μm few-cycle Ti:Sapphire spectrally-broadened source with energy up to 300 μJ. It has been predicted by theory that free-free transitions dominate the below threshold harmonic generation as the laser wavelength increase from near infrared to mid-infrared. We are therefore interested in investigating how using a longer wavelength laser might lead to changes to the behavior of below-threshold harmonics when we vary various parameters. We report the π-periodity CEP dependence and ellipticity dependence of the above- and below-threshold harmonics. This material was based on work supported by National Science Foundation (1068604), Army Research Office (W911NF-14-1-0383), Air Force Office of Scientific Research (FA9550-15-1-0037) and the DARPA PULSE program by a Grant from AMRDEC (W31P4Q1310017).

  20. Framework for determining airport daily departure and arrival delay thresholds: statistical modelling approach.

    PubMed

    Wesonga, Ronald; Nabugoomu, Fabian

    2016-01-01

    The study derives a framework for assessing airport efficiency through evaluating optimal arrival and departure delay thresholds. Assumptions of airport efficiency measurements, though based upon minimum numeric values such as 15 min of turnaround time, cannot be extrapolated to determine proportions of delay-days of an airport. This study explored the concept of delay threshold to determine the proportion of delay-days as an expansion of the theory of delay and our previous work. Data-driven approach using statistical modelling was employed to a limited set of determinants of daily delay at an airport. For the purpose of testing the efficacy of the threshold levels, operational data for Entebbe International Airport were used as a case study. Findings show differences in the proportions of delay at departure (μ = 0.499; 95 % CI = 0.023) and arrival (μ = 0.363; 95 % CI = 0.022). Multivariate logistic model confirmed an optimal daily departure and arrival delay threshold of 60 % for the airport given the four probable thresholds {50, 60, 70, 80}. The decision for the threshold value was based on the number of significant determinants, the goodness of fit statistics based on the Wald test and the area under the receiver operating curves. These findings propose a modelling framework to generate relevant information for the Air Traffic Management relevant in planning and measurement of airport operational efficiency. PMID:27441145

  1. Threshold concepts in finance: conceptualizing the curriculum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoadley, Susan; Tickle, Leonie; Wood, Leigh N.; Kyng, Tim

    2015-08-01

    Graduates with well-developed capabilities in finance are invaluable to our society and in increasing demand. Universities face the challenge of designing finance programmes to develop these capabilities and the essential knowledge that underpins them. Our research responds to this challenge by identifying threshold concepts that are central to the mastery of finance and by exploring their potential for informing curriculum design and pedagogical practices to improve student outcomes. In this paper, we report the results of an online survey of finance academics at multiple institutions in Australia, Canada, New Zealand, South Africa and the United Kingdom. The outcomes of our research are recommendations for threshold concepts in finance endorsed by quantitative evidence, as well as a model of the finance curriculum incorporating finance, modelling and statistics threshold concepts. In addition, we draw conclusions about the application of threshold concept theory supported by both quantitative and qualitative evidence. Our methodology and findings have general relevance to the application of threshold concept theory as a means to investigate and inform curriculum design and delivery in higher education.

  2. Motion parallax thresholds for unambiguous depth perception.

    PubMed

    Holmin, Jessica; Nawrot, Mark

    2015-10-01

    The perception of unambiguous depth from motion parallax arises from the neural integration of retinal image motion and extra-retinal eye movement signals. It is only recently that these parameters have been articulated in the form of the motion/pursuit ratio. In the current study, we explored the lower limits of the parameter space in which observers could accurately perform near/far relative depth-sign discriminations for a translating random-dot stimulus. Stationary observers pursued a translating random dot stimulus containing relative image motion. Their task was to indicate the location of the peak in an approximate square-wave stimulus. We measured thresholds for depth from motion parallax, quantified as motion/pursuit ratios, as well as lower motion thresholds and pursuit accuracy. Depth thresholds were relatively stable at pursuit velocities 5-20 deg/s, and increased at lower and higher velocities. The pattern of results indicates that minimum motion/pursuit ratios are limited by motion and pursuit signals, both independently and in combination with each other. At low and high pursuit velocities, depth thresholds were limited by inaccurate pursuit signals. At moderate pursuit velocities, depth thresholds were limited by motion signals.

  3. Threshold of the precedence effect in noise

    PubMed Central

    Freyman, Richard L.; Griffin, Amanda M.; Zurek, Patrick M.

    2014-01-01

    Three effects that show a temporal asymmetry in the influence of interaural cues were studied through the addition of masking noise: (1) The transient precedence effect—the perceptual dominance of a leading transient over a similar lagging transient; (2) the ongoing precedence effect—lead dominance with lead and lag components that extend in time; and (3) the onset capture effect—determination by an onset transient of the lateral position of an otherwise ambiguous extended trailing sound. These three effects were evoked with noise-burst stimuli and were compared in the presence of masking noise. Using a diotic noise masker, detection thresholds for stimuli with lead/lag interaural delays of 0/500 μs were compared to those with 500/0 μs delays. None of the three effects showed a masking difference between those conditions, suggesting that none of the effects is operative at masked threshold. A task requiring the discrimination between stimuli with 500/0 and 0/500 μs interaural delays was used to determine the threshold for each effect in noise. The results showed similar thresholds in noise (10–13 dB SL) for the transient and ongoing precedence effects, but a much higher threshold (33 dB SL) for onset capture of an ambiguous trailing sound. PMID:24815272

  4. Community air monitoring and Village Green Project

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cost and logistics are practical issues that have historically constrained the number of locations where long-term, active air pollution measurement is possible. In addition, traditional air monitoring approaches are generally conducted by technical experts with limited engageme...

  5. Near threshold fatigue crack growth in ultrafinegrained copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arzaghi, M.; Fintová, S.; Sarrazin-Baudoux, C.; Kunz, L.; Petit, J.

    2014-08-01

    The near threshold fatigue crack growth in ultrafine-grained (UFG) copper at room temperature was studied in comparison to conventional coarse-grained (CG) copper. The fatigue crack growth rates da/dN in UFG copper were enhanced at ΔK <= 7 MPa√m compared to the CG material. The crack closure shielding, as evaluated using the compliance variation technique, was shown to explain these differences. The effective stress intensity factor amplitude AKeff appears to be the same driving force in both materials. Tests performed in high vacuum on UFG copper demonstrate the existence of a huge effect of environment with growth rates higher of about two orders of magnitude in air compared to high vacuum. This environmental effect on the crack path and the related microstructure is discussed on the basis of fractography observations performed using scanning electron microscope and completed with field emission scanning electron microscope combined with the focused ion beam technique.

  6. Effects of pulse duration on magnetostimulation thresholds

    PubMed Central

    Saritas, Emine U.; Goodwill, Patrick W.; Conolly, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Medical imaging techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic particle imaging (MPI) utilize time-varying magnetic fields that are subject to magnetostimulation limits, which often limit the speed of the imaging process. Various human-subject experiments have studied the amplitude and frequency dependence of these thresholds for gradient or homogeneous magnetic fields. Another contributing factor was shown to be number of cycles in a magnetic pulse, where the thresholds decreased with longer pulses. The latter result was demonstrated on two subjects only, at a single frequency of 1.27 kHz. Hence, whether the observed effect was due to the number of cycles or due to the pulse duration was not specified. In addition, a gradient-type field was utilized; hence, whether the same phenomenon applies to homogeneous magnetic fields remained unknown. Here, the authors investigate the pulse duration dependence of magnetostimulation limits for a 20-fold range of frequencies using homogeneous magnetic fields, such as the ones used for the drive field in MPI. Methods: Magnetostimulation thresholds were measured in the arms of six healthy subjects (age: 27 ± 5 yr). Each experiment comprised testing the thresholds at eight different pulse durations between 2 and 125 ms at a single frequency, which took approximately 30–40 min/subject. A total of 34 experiments were performed at three different frequencies: 1.2, 5.7, and 25.5 kHz. A solenoid coil providing homogeneous magnetic field was used to induce stimulation, and the field amplitude was measured in real time. A pre-emphasis based pulse shaping method was employed to accurately control the pulse durations. Subjects reported stimulation via a mouse click whenever they felt a twitching/tingling sensation. A sigmoid function was fitted to the subject responses to find the threshold at a specific frequency and duration, and the whole procedure was repeated at all relevant frequencies and pulse durations

  7. Effects of pulse duration on magnetostimulation thresholds

    SciTech Connect

    Saritas, Emine U.; Goodwill, Patrick W.; Conolly, Steven M.

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Medical imaging techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic particle imaging (MPI) utilize time-varying magnetic fields that are subject to magnetostimulation limits, which often limit the speed of the imaging process. Various human-subject experiments have studied the amplitude and frequency dependence of these thresholds for gradient or homogeneous magnetic fields. Another contributing factor was shown to be number of cycles in a magnetic pulse, where the thresholds decreased with longer pulses. The latter result was demonstrated on two subjects only, at a single frequency of 1.27 kHz. Hence, whether the observed effect was due to the number of cycles or due to the pulse duration was not specified. In addition, a gradient-type field was utilized; hence, whether the same phenomenon applies to homogeneous magnetic fields remained unknown. Here, the authors investigate the pulse duration dependence of magnetostimulation limits for a 20-fold range of frequencies using homogeneous magnetic fields, such as the ones used for the drive field in MPI. Methods: Magnetostimulation thresholds were measured in the arms of six healthy subjects (age: 27 ± 5 yr). Each experiment comprised testing the thresholds at eight different pulse durations between 2 and 125 ms at a single frequency, which took approximately 30–40 min/subject. A total of 34 experiments were performed at three different frequencies: 1.2, 5.7, and 25.5 kHz. A solenoid coil providing homogeneous magnetic field was used to induce stimulation, and the field amplitude was measured in real time. A pre-emphasis based pulse shaping method was employed to accurately control the pulse durations. Subjects reported stimulation via a mouse click whenever they felt a twitching/tingling sensation. A sigmoid function was fitted to the subject responses to find the threshold at a specific frequency and duration, and the whole procedure was repeated at all relevant frequencies and pulse durations

  8. Viral population dynamics and virulence thresholds.

    PubMed

    Lancaster, Karen Z; Pfeiffer, Julie K

    2012-08-01

    Viral factors and host barriers influence virally induced disease, and asymptomatic versus symptomatic infection is governed by a 'virulence threshold'. Understanding modulation of virulence thresholds could lend insight into disease outcome and aid in rational therapeutic and vaccine design. RNA viruses are an excellent system to study virulence thresholds in the context of quasispecies population dynamics. RNA viruses have high error frequencies and our understanding of viral population dynamics has been shaped by quasispecies evolutionary theory. In turn, research using RNA viruses as replicons with short generation times and high mutation rates has been an invaluable tool to test models of quasispecies theory. The challenge and new frontier of RNA virus population dynamics research is to combine multiple theoretical models and experimental data to describe viral population behavior as it changes, moving within and between hosts, to predict disease and pathogen emergence. Several excellent studies have begun to undertake this challenge using novel approaches.

  9. L-H Threshold Studies in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Kaye, S M; Battaglia, D; Bell, R E; Chang, C S; Hosea, J; Kugel, H; LeBlanc, B P; Meyer, H; Park, G Y

    2011-09-06

    Recent experiments in the low aspect ratio National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) have been run in support of the high priority ITER and ITPA issue of access to the H-mode. Specifically, a series of experiments showed reduced power threshold values for deuterium vs helium plasmas, and for plasmas with lower current, lower triangularity and with lithium conditioning. Application of n=3 fields at the plasma edge resulted in higher power thresholds. To within the constraints of temporal and spatial resolutions, no systematic difference in T{sub e}, n{sub e}, p{sub e}, T{sub i}, v or their derivatives was found in discharges that transitioned into the H-mode versus those at slightly lower power that did not. Finally, H{sub 98y,2} {approx} 1 confinement quality could be achieved for powers just above the threshold power in ELM-free conditions.

  10. Starvation drives a threshold triggering communication.

    PubMed

    Mailleux, Anne-Catherine; Detrain, Claire; Deneubourg, Jean-Louis

    2006-11-01

    The decision for an ant forager to launch recruitment is governed by an internal response threshold. Here, we demonstrate that this threshold (the desired volume) triggering trail-laying increases under starvation. As a consequence, highly starved foragers lay a recruitment trail and bring back to the nest higher quantities of food from large unlimited resources. In contrast, when the volume of the food source is under their crop capacity, the percentage of trail-communicating foragers is lower following a prolonged period of starvation. Such starvation-dependent changes in the "desired volume" threshold explain how ants optimize recruitment and select liquid food resources in order to prevent collective exploitation of low profitability. PMID:17050837

  11. Predictability of threshold exceedances in dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bódai, Tamás

    2015-12-01

    In a low-order model of the general circulation of the atmosphere we examine the predictability of threshold exceedance events of certain observables. The likelihood of such binary events-the cornerstone also for the categoric (as opposed to probabilistic) prediction of threshold exceedances-is established from long time series of one or more observables of the same system. The prediction skill is measured by a summary index of the ROC curve that relates the hit- and false alarm rates. Our results for the examined systems suggest that exceedances of higher thresholds are more predictable; or in other words: rare large magnitude, i.e., extreme, events are more predictable than frequent typical events. We find this to hold provided that the bin size for binning time series data is optimized, but not necessarily otherwise. This can be viewed as a confirmation of a counterintuitive (and seemingly contrafactual) statement that was previously formulated for more simple autoregressive stochastic processes. However, we argue that for dynamical systems in general it may be typical only, but not universally true. We argue that when there is a sufficient amount of data depending on the precision of observation, the skill of a class of data-driven categoric predictions of threshold exceedances approximates the skill of the analogous model-driven prediction, assuming strictly no model errors. Therefore, stronger extremes in terms of higher threshold levels are more predictable both in case of data- and model-driven prediction. Furthermore, we show that a quantity commonly regarded as a measure of predictability, the finite-time maximal Lyapunov exponent, does not correspond directly to the ROC-based measure of prediction skill when they are viewed as functions of the prediction lead time and the threshold level. This points to the fact that even if the Lyapunov exponent as an intrinsic property of the system, measuring the instability of trajectories, determines predictability

  12. Effects of nerve impulses on threshold of frog sciatic nerve fibres.

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, S A

    1979-01-01

    persists for at least as long as an absolute superexcitability (with threshold below the resting level) can be measured in the same fibre at rest. 7. The duration of the superexcitable phase interpreted as a relative change in excitability was roughly the same regardless of the level of depression. 8. The magnitude of the oscillation in threshold was give to ten times larger than the grey region (the range of stimuli for which response is probabilistic). It is concluded that at regions of low conduction safety such as axonal branches, where weak forces can influence whether an impulse will pass, such pronounced and long-lasting after-effects of firing can be expected to modulate conduction of nerve impulses. PMID:313985

  13. Results of bone conduction following surgery for chronic ear disease.

    PubMed

    Vartiainen, E; Seppä, J

    1997-01-01

    Preoperative and postoperative bone conduction thresholds were compared in 181 chronic ears operated on over a 5-year period between 1990 to 1994. In the majority (92%) of cases the bone conduction thresholds remained unchanged (+/-10 dB). Nine ears (5%) showed better thresholds after surgery, with improvements ranging from 11 dB to 25 dB. This improvement was especially noted in ears with severe tympanic pathology. One ear with a large labyrinthine fistula became totally deaf after surgery. In 5 ears (3%) bone-conduction thresholds deteriorated, but remained measurable at all frequencies tested. In these latter cases this impairment ranged from 11 dB to 27 dB. Cholesteatomatous ears having intact ossicular chains were found to be at the highest risk of inner ear damage when "canal wall-down" mastoidectomies were performed. Methods for prevention of sensorineural hearing loss following chronic ear surgery are discussed. PMID:9332894

  14. Threshold Things That Think: Authorisation for Resharing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peeters, Roel; Kohlweiss, Markulf; Preneel, Bart

    As we are evolving towards ubiquitous computing, users carry an increasing number of mobile devices with sensitive information. The security of this information can be protected using threshold cryptography, in which secret computations are shared between multiple devices. Threshold cryptography can be made more robust by resharing protocols, which allow recovery from partial compromises. This paper introduces user-friendly and secure protocols for the authorisation of resharing protocols. We present both automatic and manual protocols, utilising a group manual authentication protocol to add a new device. We analyse the security of these protocols: our analysis considers permanent and temporary compromises, denial of service attacks and manual authentications errors of the user.

  15. Methods for threshold determination in multiplexed assays

    SciTech Connect

    Tammero, Lance F. Bentley; Dzenitis, John M; Hindson, Benjamin J

    2014-06-24

    Methods for determination of threshold values of signatures comprised in an assay are described. Each signature enables detection of a target. The methods determine a probability density function of negative samples and a corresponding false positive rate curve. A false positive criterion is established and a threshold for that signature is determined as a point at which the false positive rate curve intersects the false positive criterion. A method for quantitative analysis and interpretation of assay results together with a method for determination of a desired limit of detection of a signature in an assay are also described.

  16. Transport of electrons on liquid helium in a microchannel device near the current threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beysengulov, N. R.; Rees, D. G.; Tayurskii, D. A.; Kono, K.

    2016-09-01

    We study the transport of strongly interacting electrons on the surface of liquid helium confined in a microchannel geometry, near the current threshold point. The current threshold depends on the electrostatic confinement, created by the microchannel electrodes, and on the electrostatic potential of electron system. Depending on the geometry of the microchannel, the current pinch-off can occur at the centre or move to the edges of the microchannel, as confirmed by Finite Element Model calculations. The confining potential dependence of electron conductivity above the current threshold point is consistent with a classical charge continuum model. However, we find that below the threshold point electron transport is suppressed due to charging energy effects.

  17. Near sputter-threshold GaSb nanopatterning

    SciTech Connect

    El-Atwani, Osman; Paul Allain, Jean; Gonderman, Sean

    2013-09-14

    Nanopatterning at sputter-threshold energies with Ar irradiation of GaSb (100) surfaces is presented. Comparison with high-energy irradiations up to 1000 eV is conducted measuring in-situ the composition evolution over irradiation time at early stages (e.g., <10{sup 17} cm{sup −2}) and up to nanostructure saturation (e.g., ∼10{sup 18} cm{sup −2}). Low-energy irradiation is conducted for energies between 15–100 eV and a low-aspect ratio nanostructured dot formation is found. Furthermore, the role of oxide on GaSb is found to delay nanostructure formation and this is predominant at energies below 100 eV. In-situ quartz crystal microbalance measurements collect sputtered particles yielding the sputter rate at threshold energies indicating a correlation between erosion and surface composition consistent with recent theoretical models. Ion-induced segregation is also found and indicated by both compositional measurements of both the surface and the sputtered plume.

  18. Ultralow percolation threshold in aerogel and cryogel templated composites.

    PubMed

    Irin, Fahmida; Das, Sriya; Atore, Francis O; Green, Micah J

    2013-09-10

    We demonstrate a novel concept for preparing percolating composites with ultralow filler content by utilizing nanofiller-loaded aerogel and cryogels as a conductive template. This concept is investigated for several porous systems, including resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF), silica, and polyacrylamide (PAM) gels, and both graphene and carbon nanotubes are utilized as nanofiller. In each case, a stable, aqueous nanofiller dispersion is mixed with a sol-gel precursor and polymerized to form a hydrogel, which can then be converted to an aerogel by critical point drying or cryogel by freeze-drying. Epoxy resin is infused into the pores of the gels by capillary action without disrupting the monolithic structure. We show that conductive graphene/epoxy composites are formed with a very low graphene loading; a percolation threshold as low as 0.012 vol % is obtained for graphene-RF cryogel/epoxy composite. This is the lowest reported threshold of any graphene-based nanocomposites. Similar values are achieved in other aerogel and nanofiller systems, which demonstrates the versatility of this method. PMID:23927050

  19. Air encapsulation during infiltration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Constantz, J.; Herkelrath, W.N.; Murphy, F.

    1988-01-01

    A series of field and laboratory experiments were performed to measure the effects of air encapsulation within the soil's transmission zone upon several infiltration properties. In the field, infiltration rates were measured using a double-cap infiltrometer and soil-water contents were measured using time-domain reflectometry (TDR). In the laboratory, infiltration experiments were peformed using repacked soil columns using TDR and CO 2 flooding. Results suggest that a significant portion of the total encapsulated air resided in interconnected pores within the soil's transmission zone. For the time scale considered, this residual air caused the effective hydraulic conductivity of the transmission zone to remain at a level no greater than 20% of the saturated hydraulic conductivity of the soil. -from Authors

  20. MY 20 YEARS EXPERIENCE IN CONDUCTING ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH STUDIES IN CHINA: (1) STUDIES ON LUNG CANCER AND INDOOR AIR POLLUTION IN YUNNAN AND (2) HEALTH EFFECTS OF ARSENIC EXPOSURE VIA DRINKING WATER IN INNER MONGOLIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    As a research health scientist at U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, I have been very fortunate to have opportunities to work as a principal investigator for two major environmental health research projects. The first study was conducted in 1983-1996 under a formal U.S.-China ...