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Sample records for air core transformer

  1. High-voltage air-core pulse transformers

    SciTech Connect

    Rohwein, G. J.

    1981-01-01

    General types of air core pulse transformers designed for high voltage pulse generation and energy transfer applications are discussed with special emphasis on pulse charging systems which operate up to the multi-megavolt range. The design, operation, dielectric materials, and performance are described. It is concluded that high voltage air core pulse transformers are best suited to applications outside the normal ranges of conventional magnetic core transformers. In general these include charge transfer at high power levels and fast pulse generation with comparatively low energy. When properly designed and constructed, they are capable of delivering high energy transfer efficiency and have demonstrated superior high voltage endurance. The principal disadvantage of high voltage air core transformers is that they are not generally available from commercial sources. Consequently, the potential user must become thoroughly familiar with all aspects of design, fabrication and system application before he can produce a high performance transformer system. (LCL)

  2. High-voltage air-core pulse transformers

    SciTech Connect

    Rohwein, G.J.

    1981-08-01

    High voltage air core pulse transformers are best suited to applications outside the normal ranges of conventional magnetic core transformers. In general these include charge transfer at high power levels and fast pulse generation with comparatively low energy. When properly designed and constructed, they are capable of delivering high energy transfer efficiency and have demonstrated superior high voltage endurance. The general types designed for high voltage pulse generation and energy transfer applications are described. Special emphasis is given to pulse charging systems which operate up to the multi-megavolt range. (WHK)

  3. Thermal analysis of HTS air-core transformer used in voltage compensation type active SFCL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, M.; Tang, Y.; Li, J.; Zhou, Y.; Chen, L.; Ren, L.

    2010-11-01

    The three-phase voltage compensation type active superconducting fault current limiter (SFCL) is composed of three HTS air-core transformers and a three-phase four-wire Pulse Width Modulation (PWM) converter. The primary winding of the each phase HTS air-core transformer is in series with the main system, and the second winding is connected with the PWM converter. The single-phase conduction-cooled HTS air-core transformer is consisting of four double-pancakes wound by the Bi2223/Ag tape. In this paper, according to the electromagnetic analysis on the single-phase HTS air-core transformer, its AC loss corresponding to different operation modes is calculated. Furthermore, the thermal behaviors are studied by the time-stepping numerical simulations. On the basis of the simulation results, the related problems with the HTS air-core transformer's thermal stability are discussed.

  4. Power supply with air core transformer and seperated power supplies for high dynamic range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, Ara (Inventor); Aalami, Dean (Inventor); Darrach, Murray (Inventor); Orient, Otto (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A power supply for a quadrupole mass spectrometer which operates using an RF signal. The RF signal is controllable via a feedback loop. The feedback loop is from the output, through a comparator, and compared to a digital signal. An air core transformer is used to minimize the weight. The air core transformer is driven via two out of phase sawtooth signals which drive opposite ends of the transformer.

  5. Banded transformer cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclyman, C. W. T. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A banded transformer core formed by positioning a pair of mated, similar core halves on a supporting pedestal. The core halves are encircled with a strap, selectively applying tension whereby a compressive force is applied to the core edge for reducing the innate air gap. A dc magnetic field is employed in supporting the core halves during initial phases of the banding operation, while an ac magnetic field subsequently is employed for detecting dimension changes occurring in the air gaps as tension is applied to the strap.

  6. Computation of the Mutual Inductance between Air-Cored Coils of Wireless Power Transformer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anele, A. O.; Hamam, Y.; Chassagne, L.; Linares, J.; Alayli, Y.; Djouani, K.

    2015-09-01

    Wireless power transfer system is a modern technology which allows the transfer of electric power between the air-cored coils of its transformer via high frequency magnetic fields. However, due to its coil separation distance and misalignment, maximum power transfer is not guaranteed. Based on a more efficient and general model available in the literature, rederived mathematical models for evaluating the mutual inductance between circular coils with and without lateral and angular misalignment are presented. Rather than presenting results numerically, the computed results are graphically implemented using MATLAB codes. The results are compared with the published ones and clarification regarding the errors made are presented. In conclusion, this study shows that power transfer efficiency of the system can be improved if a higher frequency alternating current is supplied to the primary coil, the reactive parts of the coils are compensated with capacitors and ferrite cores are added to the coils.

  7. Off-resonance frequency operation for power transfer in a loosely coupled air core transformer

    DOEpatents

    Scudiere, Matthew B

    2012-11-13

    A power transmission system includes a loosely coupled air core transformer having a resonance frequency determined by a product of inductance and capacitance of a primary circuit including a primary coil. A secondary circuit is configured to have a substantially same product of inductance and capacitance. A back EMF generating device (e.g., a battery), which generates a back EMF with power transfer, is attached to the secondary circuit. Once the load power of the back EMF generating device exceeds a certain threshold level, which depends on the system parameters, the power transfer can be achieved at higher transfer efficiency if performed at an operating frequency less than the resonance frequency, which can be from 50% to 95% of the resonance frequency.

  8. Optimization of a pulsed air core transformer for low impedance inductive ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zielinski, Alexander E.; Bennett, John A.

    1990-01-01

    A design analysis was conducted to develop an inductive ignition concept for ordnance. Mathematical models were developed to examine the transformer for optimum performance. Results indicate that significant energy transfer to an electric primer can be obtained using a simple pulse transformer. Experimental results using a capacitive pulsed power supply indicate reasonable agreement with the models for short times. Deviations from the theoretical model can be explained by nonlinear materials effects and field diffusion in the surrounding barrel walls.

  9. Static voltage distribution between turns of secondary winding of air-core spiral strip transformer and its application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hong-bo; Liu, Jin-liang; Cheng, Xin-bing; Zhang, Yu

    2011-09-01

    The static voltage distribution between winding turns has great impact on output characteristics and lifetime of the air-core spiral strip pulse transformer (ACSSPT). In this paper, winding inductance was calculated by electromagnetic theory, so that the static voltage distribution between turns of secondary winding of ACSSPT was analyzed conveniently. According to theoretical analysis, a voltage gradient because of the turn-to-turn capacitance was clearly noticeable across the ground turns. Simulation results of Pspice and CST EM Studio codes showed that the voltage distribution between turns of secondary winding had linear increments from the output turn to the ground turn. In experiment, the difference in increased voltage between the ground turns and the output turns of a 20-turns secondary winding is almost 50%, which is believed to be responsible for premature breakdown of the insulation, particularly between the ground turns. The experimental results demonstrated the theoretical analysis and simulation results, which had important value for stable and long lifetime ACSSPT design. A new ACSSPT with improved structure has been used successfully in intense electron beam accelerators steadily.

  10. The Learning-Focused Transformation of Biology and Physics Core Courses at the U.S. Air Force Academy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sagendorf, Kenneth; Noyd, Robert K.; Morris, D. Brent

    2009-01-01

    An institution-wide focus on deep learning has made significant changes in the biology and physics core course curriculum at the U.S. Air Force Academy. The biology course director has reworked course objectives to reflect the learning-focused approach to teaching, while the physics curriculum has adopted new learning outcomes and ways to…

  11. Bonding core mating surfaces improves transformer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclyman, W. T.

    1978-01-01

    Modifications to assembly procedures for C-core transformers virtually eliminates changes in core end gaps due to temperature cycling during impregnation and potting stages, thus stabilizing magnetization properties of core.

  12. Development of Toroidal Core Transformers

    SciTech Connect

    de Leon, Francisco

    2014-08-01

    The original objective of this project was to design, build and test a few prototypes of single-phase dry-type distribution transformers of 25 kVA, 2.4 kV primary to 120 V transformers using cores made of a continuous steel strip shaped like a doughnut (toroid). At different points during the development of the project, the scope was enhanced to include the more practical case of a 25 kVA transformer for a 13.8 kV primary system voltage. Later, the scope was further expanded to design and build a 50 kVA unit to transformer voltage from 7.62 kV to 2x120 V. This is a common transformer used by Con Edison of New York and they are willing to test it in the field. The project officially started in September 2009 and ended in May 2014. The progress was reported periodically to DOE in eighteen quarterly reports. A Continuation Application was submitted to DOE in June 2010. In May 2011 we have requested a non-cost extension of the project. In December 2011, the Statement of Project Objectives (SOPO) was updated to reflect the real conditions and situation of the project as of 2011. A second Continuation Application was made and funding was approved in 2013 by DOE and the end date was extended to May 2014. The technical challenges that were overcome in this project include: the development of the technology to pass the impulse tests, derive a model for the thermal performance, produce a sound mechanical design, and estimate the inrush current. However, the greatest challenge that we faced during the development of the project was the complications of procuring the necessary parts and materials to build the transformers. The actual manufacturing process is relatively fast, but getting all parts together is a very lengthy process. The main products of this project are two prototypes of toroidal distribution transformers of 7.62 kV (to be used in a 13.8 kV system) to 2x120 V secondary (standard utilization voltage); one is rated at 25 kVA and the other at 50 kVA. The 25 k

  13. Producing gapped-ferrite transformer cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclyman, W. T.

    1980-01-01

    Improved manufacturing techniques make reproducible gaps and minimize cracking. Molded, unfired transformer cores are cut with thin saw and then fired. Hardened semicircular core sections are bonded together, placed in aluminum core box, and fluidized-coated. After winding is run over box, core is potted. Economical method significantly reduces number of rejects.

  14. Transforming air quality management

    SciTech Connect

    Janet McCabe

    2005-04-01

    Earlier this year, the Clean Air Act Advisory Committee submitted to EPA 38 recommendations intended to improve air quality management in the United States. This article summarizes the evaluation process leading up to the Committee's recommendations. 3 refs., 2 figs.

  15. Analysis of specific absorption rate and internal electric field in human biological tissues surrounding an air-core coil-type transcutaneous energy transmission transformer.

    PubMed

    Shiba, Kenji; Zulkifli, Nur Elina Binti; Ishioka, Yuji

    2016-11-21

    In this study, we analyzed the internal electric field E and specific absorption rate (SAR) of human biological tissues surrounding an air-core coil transcutaneous energy transmission transformer. Using an electromagnetic simulator, we created a model of human biological tissues consisting of a dry skin, wet skin, fat, muscle, and cortical bone. A primary coil was placed on the surface of the skin, and a secondary coil was located subcutaneously inside the body. The E and SAR values for the model representing a 34-year-old male subject were analyzed using electrical frequencies of 0.3-1.5 MHz. The transmitting power was 15 W, and the load resistance was 38.4 Ω. The results showed that the E values were below the International Commission on Non-ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) limit for the general public exposure between the frequencies of 0.9 and 1.5 MHz, and SAR values were well below the limit prescribed by the ICNIRP for the general public exposure between the frequencies of 0.3 and 1.2 MHz.

  16. Exploring Function Transformations Using the Common Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Becky; Giacin, Rich

    2013-01-01

    When examining transformations of the plane in geometry, teachers typically have students experiment with transformations of polygons. Students are usually quick to notice patterns with ordered pairs. The Common Core State Standard, Geometry, Congruence 2 (G-CO.2), requires students to describe transformations as functions that take points in the…

  17. KSI's Cross Insulated Core Transformer Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Uhmeyer, Uwe

    2009-08-04

    Cross Insulated Core Transformer (CCT) technology improves on Insulated Core Transformer (ICT) implementations. ICT systems are widely used in very high voltage, high power, power supply systems. In an ICT transformer ferrite core sections are insulated from their neighboring ferrite cores. Flux leakage is present at each of these insulated gaps. The flux loss is raised to the power of stages in the ICT design causing output voltage efficiency to taper off with increasing stages. KSI's CCT technology utilizes a patented technique to compensate the flux loss at each stage of an ICT system. Design equations to calculate the flux compensation capacitor value are presented. CCT provides corona free operation of the HV stack. KSI's CCT based High Voltage power supply systems offer high efficiency operation, high frequency switching, low stored energy and smaller size over comparable ICT systems.

  18. Improved Thermoplastic/Iron-Particle Transformer Cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, Russell A.; Bryant, Robert G.; Namkung, Min

    2004-01-01

    A method of fabricating improved transformer cores from composites of thermoplastic matrices and iron-particles has been invented. Relative to commercially available laminated-iron-alloy transformer cores, the cores fabricated by this method weigh less and are less expensive. Relative to prior polymer-matrix/ iron-particle composite-material transformer cores, the cores fabricated by this method can be made mechanically stronger and more magnetically permeable. In addition, whereas some prior cores have exhibited significant eddy-current losses, the cores fabricated by this method exhibit very small eddy-current losses. The cores made by this method can be expected to be attractive for use in diverse applications, including high-signal-to-noise transformers, stepping motors, and high-frequency ignition coils. The present method is a product of an experimental study of the relationships among fabrication conditions, final densities of iron particles, and mechanical and electromagnetic properties of fabricated cores. Among the fabrication conditions investigated were molding pressures (83, 104, and 131 MPa), and molding temperatures (250, 300, and 350 C). Each block of core material was made by uniaxial-compression molding, at the applicable pressure/temperature combination, of a mixture of 2 weight percent of LaRC (or equivalent high-temperature soluble thermoplastic adhesive) with 98 weight percent of approximately spherical iron particles having diameters in the micron range. Each molded block was cut into square cross-section rods that were used as core specimens in mechanical and electromagnetic tests. Some of the core specimens were annealed at 900 C and cooled slowly before testing. For comparison, a low-carbon-steel core was also tested. The results of the tests showed that density, hardness, and rupture strength generally increased with molding pressure and temperature, though the correlation was rather weak. The weakness of the correlation was attributed to

  19. Saturation current spikes eliminated in saturable core transformers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarz, F. C.

    1971-01-01

    Unsaturating composite magnetic core transformer, consisting of two separate parallel cores designed so impending core saturation causes signal generation, terminates high current spike in converter primary circuit. Simplified waveform, demonstrates transformer effectiveness in eliminating current spikes.

  20. Transforming guided waves with metamaterial waveguide cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viaene, S.; Ginis, V.; Danckaert, J.; Tassin, P.

    2016-04-01

    Metamaterials make use of subwavelength building blocks to enhance our control on the propagation of light. To determine the required material properties for a given functionality, i.e., a set of desired light flows inside a metamaterial device, metamaterial designs often rely on a geometrical design tool known as transformation optics. In recent years, applications in integrated photonics motivated several research groups to develop two-dimensional versions of transformation optics capable of routing surface waves along graphene-dielectric and metal-dielectric interfaces. Although guided electromagnetic waves are highly relevant to applications in integrated optics, no consistent transformation-optical framework has so far been developed for slab waveguides. Indeed, the conventional application of transformation optics to dielectric slab waveguides leads to bulky three-dimensional devices with metamaterial implementations both inside and outside of the waveguide's core. In this contribution, we develop a transformationoptical framework that still results in thin metamaterial waveguide devices consisting of a nonmagnetic metamaterial core of varying thickness [Phys. Rev. B 93.8, 085429 (2016)]. We numerically demonstrate the effectiveness and versatility of our equivalence relations with three crucial functionalities: a beam bender, a beam splitter and a conformal lens. Our devices perform well on a qualitative (comparison of fields) and quantitative (comparison of transmitted power) level compared to their bulky counterparts. As a result, the geometrical toolbox of transformation optics may lead to a plethora of integrated metamaterial devices to route guided waves along optical chips.

  1. Acoustic detection of air shower cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, X.; Liu, Y.; Du, S.

    1985-08-01

    At an altitude of 1890m, a pre-test with an Air shower (AS) core selector and a small acoustic array set up in an anechoic pool with a volume of 20x7x7 cu m was performed, beginning in Aug. 1984. In analyzing the waveforms recorded during the effective working time of 186 hrs, three acoustic signals which cannot be explained as from any source other than AS cores were obtained, and an estimation of related parameters was made.

  2. Field Performance of Three-Phase Amorphous Metal Core Distribution Transformers at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-08-01

    37 Waste water management and sanitary engineering Airfields and pavements 38 O1 pollution removal and recovery3 Air polution ADVANCED BASE AND...utility systems at Ford Island, Barbers Point Naval Air Station, the Naval Shipyard, and the Naval Supply Center at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. The main...Power Meter connected to a three-phase 4-wire amorphous core transformer under test at Barbers Point Naval Air Station. This testing procedure was

  3. Flat-band assembly for toroidal transformer cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclyman, W. T.

    1973-01-01

    Toroidal transformer cores are often banded together by means of strap. Spot welds secure strap. Proper tension is obtained by use of special fixture in conjunction with winding of wire which is placed temporarily on core; winding is excited by dc current to hold core halves together magnetically during alignment.

  4. Transforming the Core Function of Military Intelligence to Knowledge Management

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-05-22

    functions migrate to substantially to the Army’s other BOS. MI must overcome its current culture wrought with the obstacles of compartmentalization and...core function while many of its historic collection functions migrate to weapons platform sensors. Transforming MI’s core function to KM does not imply...functions as Human Intelligence (HUMINT) and counter intelligence since these are ill suited for migration to weapon platforms. MI must develop its

  5. Design considerations for an air core magnetic actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groom, Nelson J.

    1992-01-01

    Equations for the force produced by an air core electromagnet on a permanent magnet core as a function of the coil height, coil inner and outer radii, and core displacement are developed. The magnetization vector of the permanent magnet core is assumed to be aligned with the central axis of the electromagnet and the forces which are produced lie along the same axis. Variations in force due to changes in electromagnet parameters and core displacement are investigated and parameter plots which should be useful for coil design are presented.

  6. Model-based parameterisation of a hydrocyclone air-core

    PubMed

    Podd; Schlaberg; Hoyle

    2000-03-01

    An important metric for the accurate control of a hydrocyclone is the diameter of its air-core. Ultrasonic data from a 16-transducer, 1.5 MHz pulse-echo tomographic system are analysed to determine the variation of the air-core diameter with various operating conditions. The back-projection image reconstruction method is not accurate enough for this task. Sub-millimetre accuracy is obtained, however, by applying a combination of signal processing and model-based reconstruction, using the fact that there is a small variation in the air-core boundary position. The findings correspond well to the results obtained from X-ray and electrical resistance modalities.

  7. Air core poloidal magnetic field system for a toroidal plasma producing device

    DOEpatents

    Marcus, Frederick B.

    1978-01-01

    A poloidal magnetics system for a plasma producing device of toroidal configuration is provided that reduces both the total volt-seconds requirement and the magnitude of the field change at the toroidal field coils. The system utilizes an air core transformer wound between the toroidal field (TF) coils and the major axis outside the TF coils. Electric current in the primary windings of this transformer is distributed and the magnetic flux returned by air core windings wrapped outside the toroidal field coils. A shield winding that is closely coupled to the plasma carries a current equal and opposite to the plasma current. This winding provides the shielding function and in addition serves in a fashion similar to a driven conducting shell to provide the equilibrium vertical field for the plasma. The shield winding is in series with a power supply and a decoupling coil located outside the TF coil at the primary winding locations. The present invention requires much less energy than the usual air core transformer and is capable of substantially shielding the toroidal field coils from poloidal field flux.

  8. Apparatus and method for controlling the temperature of the core of a super-conducting transformer

    SciTech Connect

    Golner, Thomas; Pleva, Edward; Mehta, Shirish

    2006-10-10

    An apparatus for controlling the temperature of a core of a transformer is provided that includes a core, a shield surrounding the core, a cast formed between the core and the shield, and tubing positioned on the shield. The cast directs heat from the core to the shield and cooling fluid is directed through the tubing to cool the shield.

  9. Tunable hollow waveguide distributed Bragg reflectors with variable air core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakurai, Yasuki; Koyama, Fumio

    2004-06-01

    We demonstrate a tunable hollow waveguide distributed Bragg reflector consisting of a grating loaded slab hollow waveguide with a variable air-core. The modeling shows that a change in an air-core thickness enables a large shift of several tens of nanometers in Bragg wavelength due to a change of several percents in a propagation constant. We fabricated a slab hollow waveguide Bragg reflector with 620 μm long and, 190 nm deep 1st-order circular grating composed of SiO2, exhibiting strong Bragg reflection at 1558 nm with an air-core thickness of 10 μm for TM mode. The peak reflectivity is 65% including fiber coupling losses, the 3-dB bandwidth is 2.8 nm and the grating-induced loss is less than 0.5 dB. We demonstrate a 3 nm wavelength tuning of the fabricated hollow waveguide Bragg reflector by changing an air-core thickness from 10 μm to 7.9 μm.

  10. Discrete wavelet transform core for image processing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savakis, Andreas E.; Carbone, Richard

    2005-02-01

    This paper presents a flexible hardware architecture for performing the Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT) on a digital image. The proposed architecture uses a variation of the lifting scheme technique and provides advantages that include small memory requirements, fixed-point arithmetic implementation, and a small number of arithmetic computations. The DWT core may be used for image processing operations, such as denoising and image compression. For example, the JPEG2000 still image compression standard uses the Cohen-Daubechies-Favreau (CDF) 5/3 and CDF 9/7 DWT for lossless and lossy image compression respectively. Simple wavelet image denoising techniques resulted in improved images up to 27 dB PSNR. The DWT core is modeled using MATLAB and VHDL. The VHDL model is synthesized to a Xilinx FPGA to demonstrate hardware functionality. The CDF 5/3 and CDF 9/7 versions of the DWT are both modeled and used as comparisons. The execution time for performing both DWTs is nearly identical at approximately 14 clock cycles per image pixel for one level of DWT decomposition. The hardware area generated for the CDF 5/3 is around 15,000 gates using only 5% of the Xilinx FPGA hardware area, at 2.185 MHz max clock speed and 24 mW power consumption.

  11. Analysis of a ferrofluid core differential transformer tilt measurement sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvegy, T.; Molnár, Á.; Molnár, G.; Gugolya, Z.

    2017-04-01

    In our work, we developed a ferrofluid core differential transformer sensor, which can be used to measure tilt and acceleration. The proposed sensor consisted of three coils, from which the primary was excited with an alternating current. In the space surrounded by the coils was a cell half-filled with ferrofluid, therefore in the horizontal state of the sensor the fluid distributes equally in the three sections of the cell surrounded by the three coils. Nevertheless when the cell is being tilted or accelerated (in the direction of the axis of the coils), there is a different amount of ferrofluid in the three sections. The voltage induced in the secondary coils strongly depends on the amount of ferrofluid found in the core surrounded by them, so the tilt or the acceleration of the cell becomes measurable. We constructed the sensor in several layouts. The linearly coiled sensor had an excellent resolution. Another version with a toroidal cell had almost perfect linearity and a virtually infinite measuring range.

  12. Character of energy flow in air shower core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mizushima, K.; Asakimori, K.; Maeda, T.; Kameda, T.; Misaki, Y.

    1985-01-01

    Energy per charged particle near the core of air showers was measured by 9 energy flow detectors, which were the combination of Cerenkov counters and scintillators. Energy per particle of each detector was normalized to energy at 2m from the core. The following results were obtained as to the energy flow: (1) integral frequency distribution of mean energy per particle (averaged over 9 detectors) is composed of two groups separated distinctly; and (2) showers contained in one group show an anisotropy of arrival direction.

  13. Transforming Department of Defense’s Core Business Processes for Revolutionary Change

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    2015 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2015 to 00-00-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Transforming Department of Defense’s Core Business Processes...WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Defense Business Board,,1155 Defense Pentagon,,Washington,,DC,20301 8. PERFORMING...1 Transforming the Department of Defense’s Core Business Processes for Revolutionary Change 2 3 Transforming DoD’s Core Business Processes for

  14. Investigation of residual core ellipticity induced nonreciprocity in air-core photonic bandgap fiber optical gyroscope.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaobin; Zhang, Zuchen; Zhang, Zhihao; Jin, Jing; Song, Ningfang

    2014-11-03

    Air-core photonic bandgap fiber (PBF) is an excellent choice for fiber optic gyroscope owing to its incomparable adaptability of environment. Strong and continuous polarization mode coupling is found in PBFs with an average intensity of ~-30 dB, but the coupling arrives at the limit when the maximum optical path difference between the primary waves and the polarization-mode-coupling-induced secondary waves reaches ~10mm, which is corresponding to the PBF length of ~110 m according to the birefringence in the PBF. Incident light with the low extinction ratio (ER) can suppress the birth of the polarization-mode-coupling-induced secondary waves, but the low-ER light obtained by the conventional Lyot depolarizers does not work here. Consequently, a large nonreciprocity and a bias error of ~13°/h are caused in the air-core photonic bandgap fiber optical gyroscope (PBFOG) with a PBF coil of ~268 m.

  15. Transformations in Air Transportation Systems For the 21st Century

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Bruce J.

    2004-01-01

    Globally, our transportation systems face increasingly discomforting realities: certain of the legacy air and ground infrastructures of the 20th century will not satisfy our 21st century mobility needs. The consequence of inaction is diminished quality of life and economic opportunity for those nations unable to transform from the 20th to 21st century systems. Clearly, new thinking is required regarding business models that cater to consumers value of time, airspace architectures that enable those new business models, and technology strategies for innovating at the system-of-networks level. This lecture proposes a structured way of thinking about transformation from the legacy systems of the 20th century toward new systems for the 21st century. The comparison and contrast between the legacy systems of the 20th century and the transformed systems of the 21st century provides insights into the structure of transformation of air transportation. Where the legacy systems tend to be analog (versus digital), centralized (versus distributed), and scheduled (versus on-demand) for example, transformed 21st century systems become capable of scalability through technological, business, and policy innovations. Where air mobility in our legacy systems of the 20th century brought economic opportunity and quality of life to large service markets, transformed air mobility of the 21st century becomes more equitable available to ever-thinner and widely distributed populations. Several technological developments in the traditional aircraft disciplines as well as in communication, navigation, surveillance and information systems create new foundations for 21st thinking about air transportation. One of the technological developments of importance arises from complexity science and modern network theory. Scale-free (i.e., scalable) networks represent a promising concept space for modeling airspace system architectures, and for assessing network performance in terms of robustness

  16. Low-loss air-core polarization maintaining terahertz fiber.

    PubMed

    Ren, Guobin; Gong, Yandong; Shum, Ping; Yu, Xia; Hu, JuanJuan; Wang, Guanghui; Ong Ling Chuen, Michael; Paulose, Varghese

    2008-09-01

    We propose a low-loss air-core polarization maintaining polymer fiber for terahertz (THz) wave guiding. The periodic arrangement of square holes with round corners in the cladding offers a bandgap effect for mode guiding. Numerical simulations show that the bandgap effect repels the modal power from the absorbent background polymers, resulting in a significant suppression of absorption loss of the polymers by a factor of more than 25. The phase-index birefringence of the proposed THz fiber is in the order of 10(-3).

  17. Application of Fourier transform spectroscopy to air pollution problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, J. H.; Calvert, J. G.

    1980-11-01

    The nature of information that can be retrieved from spectra obtained with Fourier transform spectroscopy is discussed. Nonlinear, least squares analysis of spectra is capable of retrieving information that is beyond the reach of conventional methods and has improved precision and accuracy. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was used to study quantitatively the kinetics and mechanisms of several chemical reactions that are of interest to atmospheric chemists and are important in the development of air pollution control strategies. The systems studied include the metastable, reactive, gaseous species, peroxynitric acid, hypochlorous acid, and dimethylnitrosamine.

  18. Design and material selection for inverter transformer cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclyman, W. T.

    1973-01-01

    Report is announced which studied magnetic properties of candidate materials for use in spacecraft transformers, static inverters, converters, and transformer-rectifier power supplies. Included are material characteristics for available alloy compositions in tabular form, including: trade names, saturated flux density, dc coercive force, loop squareness, material density, and watts per pound at 3 KHz.

  19. Transport and transformation of air pollutants from Israel's coastal area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luria, M.; Almog, H.; Peleg, M.

    The occasional high ozone levels measured in Jerusalem could not be attributed solely to local sources such as vehicular traffic or industry. A satellite monitoring station was set up outside the city limits to explore the possibility of transport and transformation of air pollutants from the highly populated and industrialized coastal area of Israel to the inland hilly region. This study revealed that the high ozone levels were always associated with a parallel increase of SO 2 and that power plants and/or vehicles operating in the coastal region are a major source for the nitrogen oxides which undergo photochemical transformation to form ozone during inland travel of the air parcel under conditions of intense sunlight.

  20. Improving Air Force Enterprise Resource Planning-Enabled Business Transformation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    5. Business logistics—United States. 6. Reengineering (Management)—United States. I. Title. II. Title: Improving Air Force ERP -enabled business...transformation. UG633.2.R57 2013 358.4�—dc23 2013030449 - iii - Preface Enterprise Resource Planning ( ERP ) systems are configurable...of internal business activities, including procurement, accounting, finance, and human resources. ERP programs tend to be very large, involve a

  1. Air-core grid for scattered x-ray rejection

    DOEpatents

    Logan, C.M.; Lane, S.M.

    1995-10-03

    The invention is directed to a grid used in x-ray imaging applications to block scattered radiation while allowing the desired imaging radiation to pass through, and to process for making the grid. The grid is composed of glass containing lead oxide, and eliminates the spacer material used in prior known grids, and is therefore, an air-core grid. The glass is arranged in a pattern so that a large fraction of the area is open allowing the imaging radiation to pass through. A small pore size is used and the grid has a thickness chosen to provide high scatter rejection. For example, the grid may be produced with a 200 {micro}m pore size, 80% open area, and 4 mm thickness. 2 figs.

  2. Air-core grid for scattered x-ray rejection

    DOEpatents

    Logan, Clinton M.; Lane, Stephen M.

    1995-01-01

    The invention is directed to a grid used in x-ray imaging applications to block scattered radiation while allowing the desired imaging radiation to pass through, and to process for making the grid. The grid is composed of glass containing lead oxide, and eliminates the spacer material used in prior known grids, and is therefore, an air-core grid. The glass is arranged in a pattern so that a large fraction of the area is open allowing the imaging radiation to pass through. A small pore size is used and the grid has a thickness chosen to provide high scatter rejection. For example, the grid may be produced with a 200 .mu.m pore size, 80% open area, and 4 mm thickness.

  3. EMPACT: Electrons Muons Partons with Air Core Toroids

    SciTech Connect

    Marx, M.D. )

    1990-05-25

    The EMPACT experiment utilizes a broad approach to maximize its discovery potential for new phenomena accessible at the SSC. The high resolution detector has a balances emphasis on, and large acceptance for, electrons, muons, jets, and noninteracting particles, and is capable of utilizing the ultimate luminosity of the SSC. The detector emphasizes excellent calorimetry augmented by TRD tracking, and employs an innovative system of superconducting air core toroids for muon measurements. Significant engineering effort has established the feasibility of a baseline detector concept and has addressed the related issues of support facilities, assembly, and detector integration. The design has been tested against the challenges of predicted phenomena, with the expectation that this will optimize the capacity for observing the unexpected. EMPACT's international collaboration has unprecedented support from major aerospace industries who are providing tools and expertise for project design and integration, which will assure that a detector optimized for performance and cost will be available for the first collisions at the new laboratory.

  4. Core testing of zinc/air refuelable battery modules

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, J. F., LLNL

    1998-08-20

    We are developing a refuelable zinc/air battery (6-cells) for evaluation under the five USABC `core` test protocols. In the first half of the two year project ($1OOK, FY1997), an advanced refuelable design was developed, fabricated and tested at power levels up to 415 W. Performance matched or exceeded that of earlier multicell systems. A computer program was developed for automated data acquisition and drive cycle simulation. Small mockup cells (80 cm 2) were constructed for rapid testing of components. In the follow-on effort (FY1998, $1OOK) we will make minor advances in system design and fabrication efficiency, and seek to improve cathode performance and life, before delivery of two final units for test at DOE laboratory.

  5. Principled, Transformational Leadership: Analyzing the Discourse of Leadership in the Development of Librarianship's Core Competences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hicks, Deborah; Given, Lisa M.

    2013-01-01

    Using discourse analysis, this article explores three questions: (a) Why was "principled, transformational leadership" the leadership style added to Core Competences? (b) What was the discourse of leadership in the profession surrounding the development of the Core Competences? (c) How might this competence affect LIS education? And what measures,…

  6. Core Ideas of Democratic Civic Education and the Great Transformation in Central and Eastern Europe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patrick, John J.

    This paper discusses the importance of civic education in the transformation from totalitarian communism to constitutional democracy in Central and Eastern Europe. The primary question of civic education for this great transformation is: What are the few core ideas of democratic civic education that learners must know and support to prepare them…

  7. Development of out-of-core fast Fourier transform software for the connection machine. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sweet, R.; Wilson, J.

    1995-10-01

    This report describes the algorithm and implementation of an out-of-core Fast Fourier Transform routine for the Thinking Machines Corp. CM-5 parallel computer. The software has the capability of transforming multi-dimensional arrays that are both real and complex.

  8. Air Contamination by Mercury, Emissions and Transformations-a Review.

    PubMed

    Gworek, Barbara; Dmuchowski, Wojciech; Baczewska, Aneta H; Brągoszewska, Paulina; Bemowska-Kałabun, Olga; Wrzosek-Jakubowska, Justyna

    2017-01-01

    The present and future air contamination by mercury is and will continue to be a serious risk for human health. This publication presents a review of the literature dealing with the issues related to air contamination by mercury and its transformations as well as its natural and anthropogenic emissions. The assessment of mercury emissions into the air poses serious methodological problems. It is particularly difficult to distinguish between natural and anthropogenic emissions and re-emissions from lands and oceans, including past emissions. At present, the largest emission sources include fuel combustion, mainly that of coal, and "artisanal and small-scale gold mining" (ASGM). The distinctly highest emissions can be found in South and South-East Asia, accounting for 45% of the global emissions. The emissions of natural origin and re-emissions are estimated at 45-66% of the global emissions, with the largest part of emissions originating in the oceans. Forecasts on the future emission levels are not unambiguous; however, most forecasts do not provide for reductions in emissions. Ninety-five percent of mercury occurring in the air is Hg(0)-GEM, and its residence time in the air is estimated at 6 to 18 months. The residence times of its Hg(II)-GOM and that in Hgp-TPM are estimated at hours and days. The highest mercury concentrations in the air can be found in the areas of mercury mines and those of ASGM. Since 1980 when it reached its maximum, the global background mercury concentration in the air has remained at a relatively constant level.

  9. Electrical Core Transformer for Grid Improvement Incorporating Wire Magnetic Components

    SciTech Connect

    Harrie R. Buswell, PhD; Dennis Jacobs, PhD; Steve Meng

    2012-03-26

    The research reported herein adds to the understanding of oil-immersed distribution transformers by exploring and demonstrating potential improvements in efficiency and cost utilizing the unique Buswell approach wherein the unit is redesigned, replacing magnetic sheet with wire allowing for improvements in configuration and increased simplicity in the build process. Exploration of new designs is a critical component in our drive to assure reduction of energy waste, adequate delivery to the citizenry, and the robustness of U.S. manufacturing. By moving that conversation forward, this exploration adds greatly to our base of knowledge and clearly outlines an important avenue for further exploration. This final report shows several advantages of this new transformer type (outlined in a report signed by all of our collaborating partners and included in this document). Although materials development is required to achieve commercial potential, the clear benefits of the technology if that development were a given is established. Exploration of new transformer types and further work on the Buswell design approach is in the best interest of the public, industry, and the United States. Public benefits accrue from design alternatives that reduce the overall use of energy, but it must be acknowledged that new DOE energy efficiency standards have provided some assurance in that regard. Nonetheless the burden of achieving these new standards has been largely shifted to the manufacturers of oil-immersed distribution transformers with cost increasing up to 20% of some units versus 2006 when this investigation was started. Further, rising costs have forced the industry to look closely are far more expensive technologies which may threaten U.S. competitiveness in the distribution transformer market. This concern is coupled with the realization that many units in the nation's grid are beyond their optimal life which suggests that the nation may be headed for an infrastructure crisis

  10. Core excitation effects in halo nuclei using a transformed oscillator basis

    SciTech Connect

    Lay, J. A.; Arias, J. M.; Moro, A. M.; Gomez-Camacho, J.

    2013-06-10

    A recent generalization of the Transformed Harmonic Oscillator basis, intended to consider core excitations in the structure of one nucleon halo nuclei, is applied to the break up of {sup 11}Be. The reaction studied is {sup 11}Be+{sup 208}Pb at 69 MeV/nucleon. The experimental set up is designed to ensure pure dipole Coulomb excitations. Making use of the Equivalent Photon Method and the electromagnetic transition probabilities obtained with the transformed oscillator basis, a relevant contribution of the quadrupole excitations of the core is found. The inclusion of core excitations is, therefore, necessary for the correct extraction of the dipole electromagnetic transition probability of halo nuclei.

  11. 25-KVA Amorphous Metal-Core Transformer Developmental Test Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-08-01

    after the DROP TEST. Tests were also performed in the Dev. Lab . Results S/N P217061 S/N P265882 S/N P265885 1.Elect.* Factry Test Lab Test Factry Test...10 RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS ........ ..................... .. 11 Phase I .......... ........................... . 11 Phase II...characteorist ics of tleo trins formers cilan1ged as a result , of the tests. * Pass/Fail Criteria: Thin transformers had to pass tile commercial

  12. Air Force Space Command: A Transformation Case Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    u soo, rate 1939.1 Wokrld War I saw the intr oduction ofd u ced o r p red icted to o ccu r so o n , create t c n l g e n a t c n a r a ,s b a i e a...erttay e 1W~, rd,"om adngteFuoe rIP ~ v~o ,’ elt ~a ~rod(abig:(m The Transformation itt Air Fitrce Space Cotmiaidr" Aitt hrirdge Uiiersity Press, 1r9r6). The

  13. Transformational Teaching: Theoretical Underpinnings, Basic Principles, and Core Methods

    PubMed Central

    Slavich, George M.; Zimbardo, Philip G.

    2012-01-01

    Approaches to classroom instruction have evolved considerably over the past 50 years. This progress has been spurred by the development of several learning principles and methods of instruction, including active learning, student-centered learning, collaborative learning, experiential learning, and problem-based learning. In the present paper, we suggest that these seemingly different strategies share important underlying characteristics and can be viewed as complimentary components of a broader approach to classroom instruction called transformational teaching. Transformational teaching involves creating dynamic relationships between teachers, students, and a shared body of knowledge to promote student learning and personal growth. From this perspective, instructors are intellectual coaches who create teams of students who collaborate with each other and with their teacher to master bodies of information. Teachers assume the traditional role of facilitating students’ acquisition of key course concepts, but do so while enhancing students’ personal development and attitudes toward learning. They accomplish these goals by establishing a shared vision for a course, providing modeling and mastery experiences, challenging and encouraging students, personalizing attention and feedback, creating experiential lessons that transcend the boundaries of the classroom, and promoting ample opportunities for preflection and reflection. We propose that these methods are synergistically related and, when used together, maximize students’ potential for intellectual and personal growth. PMID:23162369

  14. Transformational Teaching: Theoretical Underpinnings, Basic Principles, and Core Methods.

    PubMed

    Slavich, George M; Zimbardo, Philip G

    2012-12-01

    Approaches to classroom instruction have evolved considerably over the past 50 years. This progress has been spurred by the development of several learning principles and methods of instruction, including active learning, student-centered learning, collaborative learning, experiential learning, and problem-based learning. In the present paper, we suggest that these seemingly different strategies share important underlying characteristics and can be viewed as complimentary components of a broader approach to classroom instruction called transformational teaching. Transformational teaching involves creating dynamic relationships between teachers, students, and a shared body of knowledge to promote student learning and personal growth. From this perspective, instructors are intellectual coaches who create teams of students who collaborate with each other and with their teacher to master bodies of information. Teachers assume the traditional role of facilitating students' acquisition of key course concepts, but do so while enhancing students' personal development and attitudes toward learning. They accomplish these goals by establishing a shared vision for a course, providing modeling and mastery experiences, challenging and encouraging students, personalizing attention and feedback, creating experiential lessons that transcend the boundaries of the classroom, and promoting ample opportunities for preflection and reflection. We propose that these methods are synergistically related and, when used together, maximize students' potential for intellectual and personal growth.

  15. A method for determination of methyl chloride concentration in air trapped in ice cores.

    PubMed

    Saito, Takuya; Yokouchi, Yoko; Aoki, Shuji; Nakazawa, Takakiyo; Fujii, Yoshiyuki; Watanabe, Okitsugu

    2006-05-01

    A method for measuring the concentration of methyl chloride (CH3Cl) in air trapped in an ice core was developed. The method combines the air extraction by milling the ice core samples under vacuum and the analysis of the extracted air with a cryogenic preconcentration/gas chromatograph/mass spectrometry system. The method was applied to air from Antarctic ice core samples estimated to have been formed in the pre-industrial and/or early industrial periods. The overall precision of the method deduced from duplicate ice core analyses was estimated to be better than +/-20 pptv. The measured CH3Cl concentration of 528+/-26 pptv was similar to the present-day concentration in the remote atmosphere as well as the CH3Cl concentration over the past 300 years obtained from Antarctic firn air and ice core analyses.

  16. Effects of magnetomechanical vibrations and bending stresses on three-phase three-leg transformers with amorphous cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Chang-Hung; Chang, Yeong-Hwa; Lee, Chun-Yao; Yao, Chia-Shiang; He, Yan-Lou; Chu, Huei-Lung; Chang, Chia-Wen; Chan, Wei-Shou

    2012-04-01

    This paper explores the influence of bending stresses on the magnetic characteristics of three-phase transformers with amorphous cores. Different types of core structures, including C-cores and toroidal cores, and their magnetic properties are compared using VSM and XRD. The losses in the magnetic core of the three-phase transformer are analyzed using the finite element analysis for both design and measurement. In addition, experimental results indicated that amorphous-core transformers with rectangular corners had higher audible noise and vibration intensities. This is because the condensed distribution of magnetic flux lines in the corners of the core may create high magnetic inductions associated with high magnetostriction. Finally, experiments with three-phase amorphous-core transformers were performed to study the effects of magnetism and magnetostriction on their performance in terms of core loss, vibration, and audible noise.

  17. Energy loss due to eddy current in linear transformer driver cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, A. A.; Mazarakis, M. G.; Manylov, V. I.; Vizir, V. A.; Stygar, W. A.

    2010-07-01

    In linear transformer drivers [Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 12, 050402 (2009)PRABFM1098-440210.1103/PhysRevSTAB.12.050402; Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 12, 050401 (2009)PRABFM1098-440210.1103/PhysRevSTAB.12.050401] as well as any other linear induction accelerator cavities, ferromagnetic cores are used to prevent the current from flowing along the induction cavity walls which are in parallel with the load. But if the core is made of conductive material, the applied voltage pulse generates the eddy current in the core itself which heats the core and therefore also reduces the overall linear transformer driver (LTD) efficiency. The energy loss due to generation of the eddy current in the cores depends on the specific resistivity of the core material, the design of the core, as well as on the distribution of the eddy current in the core tape during the remagnetizing process. In this paper we investigate how the eddy current is distributed in a core tape with an arbitrary shape hysteresis loop. Our model is based on the textbook knowledge related to the eddy current generation in ferromagnetics with rectangular hysteresis loop, and in usual conductors. For the reader’s convenience, we reproduce some most important details of this knowledge in our paper. The model predicts that the same core would behave differently depending on how fast the applied voltage pulse is: in the high frequency limit, the equivalent resistance of the core reduces during the pulse whereas in the low frequency limit it is constant. An important inference is that the energy loss due to the eddy current generation can be reduced by increasing the cross section of the core over the minimum value which is required to avoid its saturation. The conclusions of the model are confirmed with experimental observations presented at the end of the paper.

  18. The Newest Air Force Core Function: Building Partnerships

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-17

    Iraq Training and Advisory Mission – Air Force ( ITAM – AF) This paper investigated a DOTMLPF analysis to determine potential BP capability gaps...Iraq Training and Advisory Mission – Air Force ( ITAM -AF), Combined Air Power Transition Force (CAPTF)-Afghanistan, or even Multi-National Security

  19. Chemical transformations during ambient air sampling for organic vapors

    SciTech Connect

    Pellizzari, E.D.; Drost, K.J.

    1984-09-01

    Potential chemical transformations of olefins in the presence of ozone and high levels (ppm) of halogens (Cl/sub 2/, Br/sub 2/) were demonstrated when sampling ambient air with a sorbent cartridge. The use of stryene-d/sub 8/ and cyclohexene-d/sub 10/ spiked sampling devices and capillary gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis allowed the detection and identification of several deuteriated oxidation and halogenated products. Dimethylamine-d/sub 6/ was converted in trace quantities (5-10 mg) to dimethylnitrosamine-d/sub 6/ when sampling was conducted in the presence of NO/sub x/. Oxidation reactions were prevented when filters (2.5 cm) employed for removing particulates were impregnated with 5-10 mg of sodium thiosulfate and placed in front of the sorbent cartridge. Halogenation reactions were also consideraly reduced.

  20. Wireline-rotary air coring of the Bandelier Tuff, Los Alamos, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Teasdale, W.E.; Pemberton, R.R.

    1984-01-01

    This paper describes experiments using wireline-rotary air-coring techniques conducted in the Bandelier Tuff using a modified standard wireline core-barrel system. The modified equipment was used to collect uncontaminated cores of unconsolidated ash and indurated tuff at Los Alamos, New Mexico. Core recovery obtained from the 210-foot deep test hole was about 92 percent. A standard HQ-size, triple-tube wireline core barrel (designed for the passage of liquid drilling fluids) was modified for air coring as follows: (1) Air passages were milled in the latch body part of the head assembly; (2) the inside dimension of the outer core barrel tube was machined and honed to provide greater clearance between the inner and outer barrels; (3) oversized reaming devices were added to the outer core barrel and the coring bit to allow more clearance for air and cuttings return; (4) the eight discharge ports in the coring bit were enlarged. To control airborne-dust pollution, a dust-and-cuttings discharge subassembly, designed and built by project personnel, was used. (USGS)

  1. Design and performance of a pulse transformer based on Fe-based nanocrystalline core.

    PubMed

    Yi, Liu; Xibo, Feng; Lin, Fuchang

    2011-08-01

    A dry-type pulse transformer based on Fe-based nanocrystalline core with a load of 0.88 nF, output voltage of more than 65 kV, and winding ratio of 46 is designed and constructed. The dynamic characteristics of Fe-based nanocrystalline core under the impulse with the pulse width of several microseconds were studied. The pulse width and incremental flux density have an important effect on the pulse permeability, so the pulse permeability is measured under a certain pulse width and incremental flux density. The minimal volume of the toroidal pulse transformer core is determined by the coupling coefficient, the capacitors of the resonant charging circuit, incremental flux density, and pulse permeability. The factors of the charging time, ratio, and energy transmission efficiency in the resonant charging circuit based on magnetic core-type pulse transformer are analyzed. Experimental results of the pulse transformer are in good agreement with the theoretical calculation. When the primary capacitor is 3.17 μF and charge voltage is 1.8 kV, a voltage across the secondary capacitor of 0.88 nF with peak value of 68.5 kV, rise time (10%-90%) of 1.80 μs is obtained.

  2. Core Principles for Transforming Remediation within a Comprehensive Student Success Strategy: A Joint Statement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Commission of the States, 2015

    2015-01-01

    Colleges and postsecondary systems across the nation have demonstrated remarkable progress since "Core Principles for Transforming Remediation" was published in 2012. States and institutions are phasing out stand alone or multi-course remediation sequences, resulting in tens of thousands of students more quickly enrolling in and…

  3. Advice networks in teams: the role of transformational leadership and members' core self-evaluations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhen; Peterson, Suzanne J

    2011-09-01

    This article examines the team-level factors promoting advice exchange networks in teams. Drawing upon theory and research on transformational leadership, team diversity, and social networks, we hypothesized that transformational leadership positively influences advice network density in teams and that advice network density serves as a mediating mechanism linking transformational leadership to team performance. We further hypothesized a 3-way interaction in which members' mean core self-evaluation (CSE) and diversity in CSE jointly moderate the transformational leadership-advice network density relationship, such that the relationship is positive and stronger for teams with low diversity in CSE and high mean CSE. In addition, we expected that advice network centralization attenuates the positive influence of network density on team performance. Results based on multisource data from 79 business unit management teams showed support for these hypotheses. The results highlight the pivotal role played by transformational leadership and team members' CSEs in enhancing team social networks and, ultimately, team effectiveness.

  4. Post-coring entrapment of modern air in polar ice: Evidence from CFC-12 measurements in Antarctic firn air and shallow ice cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydin, K. M.; Montzka, S. A.; Battle, M. O.; Williams, M. B.; de Bruyn, W. J.; Butler, J. H.; Verhulst, K. R.; Tatum, C.; Gun, B. K.; Plotkin, D. A.; Hall, B. D.; Saltzman, E. S.

    2009-12-01

    This study is a comparison of CFC-12 (CCl2F2) measurements in firn air and ice core samples from three Antarctic sites: South Pole, West Antarctic Ice Sheet Divide (79.46°S, 112.13°W), and Siple Dome (81.65°S, 148.81°W). CFC-12 is a synthetic chlorofluorocarbon manufactured during the mid-late 20th century for use as a refrigerant and an aerosol spray propellant. Its atmospheric history is well established with agreement among instrumental time series measurements and industry-reported production data [Walker et al., 2000], the distribution of dissolved CFC-12 in the oceans [e.g. Weiss et al., 1985], and firn air measurements [Butler et al., 1999]. The atmospheric history indicates that there was no measureable CFC-12 in the atmosphere prior to the 1940’s. The firn air CFC-12 profiles are consistent with the known atmospheric history of this gas. In contrast, the air in ice core samples collected near the close-off depth exhibit anomalously high CFC-12 levels. We propose that this is due to entrapment of modern air in open pores that close after drilling, resulting in elevated CFC-12 mixing ratios. These results demonstrate how the composition of air trapped in shallow ice cores can be altered during the post-drilling period through purely physical processes. Comparison of firn air and ice core bubble composition is one of the commonly used tools for studying the bubble close-off process. The post-drilling entrapment process detected in this study represents a potential complication for such investigations.

  5. Generation of Custom DSP Transform IP Cores: Case Study Walsh-Hadamard Transform

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-09-01

    Ø Solution: - Formula representation of DSP transforms - Automated formula manipulation and mapping ( ) ( )( ) PFIIDIFDFT ⋅⊗⊗⋅⋅⊗= L222428Formula...Register routing q Hard to automate the process Ø Our approach: formula-based matrix factorization How to fold these wires? Folded L28 L2N N ports Q...Synthesis Technology Libary Bit-width (8) HF factor (1,2,3,6) VF factor (1,2,4, ... 32) Xilinx FPGA Place&Route Xilinx FPGA Place&Route Performance

  6. The Yucca Mountain Project prototype air-coring test, U12g tunnel, Nevada test site

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, J.M.; Newsom, J.C.

    1994-12-01

    The Prototype Air-Coring Test was conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) G-Tunnel facility to evaluate standard coring techniques, modified slightly for air circulation, for use in testing at a prospective nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Air-coring technology allows sampling of subsurface lithology with minimal perturbation to ambient characteristic such as that required for exploratory holes near aquifers, environmental applications, and site characterization work. Two horizontal holes were cored, one 50 ft long and the other 150 ft long, in densely welded fractured tuff to simulate the difficult drilling conditions anticipated at Yucca Mountain. Drilling data from seven holes on three other prototype tests in nonwelded tuff were also collected for comparison. The test was used to establish preliminary standards of performance for drilling and dust collection equipment and to assess procedural efficiencies. The Longyear-38 drill achieved 97% recovery for HQ-size core (-2.5 in.), and the Atlas Copco dust collector (DCT-90) captured 1500 lb of fugitive dust in a mine environment with only minor modifications. Average hole production rates were 6-8 ft per 6-h shift in welded tuff and almost 20 ft per shift on deeper holes in nonwelded tuff. Lexan liners were successfully used to encapsulate core samples during the coring process and protect core properties effectively. The Prototype Air-Coring Test demonstrated that horizontal air coring in fractured welded tuff (to at least 150 ft) can be safely accomplished by proper selection, integration, and minor modification of standard drilling equipment, using appropriate procedures and engineering controls. The test also indicated that rig logistics, equipment, and methods need improvement before attempting a large-scale dry drilling program at Yucca Mountain.

  7. Fast switching thyristor applied in nanosecond-pulse high-voltage generator with closed transformer core.

    PubMed

    Li, Lee; Bao, Chaobing; Feng, Xibo; Liu, Yunlong; Fochan, Lin

    2013-02-01

    For a compact and reliable nanosecond-pulse high-voltage generator (NPHVG), the specification parameter selection and potential usage of fast controllable state-solid switches have an important bearing on the optimal design. The NPHVG with closed transformer core and fast switching thyristor (FST) was studied in this paper. According to the analysis of T-type circuit, the expressions for the voltages and currents of the primary and secondary windings on the transformer core of NPHVG were deduced, and the theoretical maximum analysis was performed. For NPHVG, the rise-rate of turn-on current (di/dt) across a FST may exceed its transient rating. Both mean and maximum values of di/dt were determined by the leakage inductances of the transformer, and the difference is 1.57 times. The optimum winding ratio is helpful to getting higher voltage output with lower specification FST, especially when the primary and secondary capacitances have been established. The oscillation period analysis can be effectively used to estimate the equivalent leakage inductance. When the core saturation effect was considered, the maximum di/dt estimated from the oscillating period of the primary current is more accurate than one from the oscillating period of the secondary voltage. Although increasing the leakage inductance of NPHVG can decrease di/dt across FST, it may reduce the output peak voltage of the NPHVG.

  8. Fast switching thyristor applied in nanosecond-pulse high-voltage generator with closed transformer core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lee; Bao, Chaobing; Feng, Xibo; Liu, Yunlong; Fochan, Lin

    2013-02-01

    For a compact and reliable nanosecond-pulse high-voltage generator (NPHVG), the specification parameter selection and potential usage of fast controllable state-solid switches have an important bearing on the optimal design. The NPHVG with closed transformer core and fast switching thyristor (FST) was studied in this paper. According to the analysis of T-type circuit, the expressions for the voltages and currents of the primary and secondary windings on the transformer core of NPHVG were deduced, and the theoretical maximum analysis was performed. For NPHVG, the rise-rate of turn-on current (di/dt) across a FST may exceed its transient rating. Both mean and maximum values of di/dt were determined by the leakage inductances of the transformer, and the difference is 1.57 times. The optimum winding ratio is helpful to getting higher voltage output with lower specification FST, especially when the primary and secondary capacitances have been established. The oscillation period analysis can be effectively used to estimate the equivalent leakage inductance. When the core saturation effect was considered, the maximum di/dt estimated from the oscillating period of the primary current is more accurate than one from the oscillating period of the secondary voltage. Although increasing the leakage inductance of NPHVG can decrease di/dt across FST, it may reduce the output peak voltage of the NPHVG.

  9. Connecting United States Air Force Core Values to Mission Accomplishment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-04

    Resolution, 6 June 2012. Air Force Instruction (AFI) 91-204. Safety Investigations and Reports, 24 September 2008. Ajzen , Icek . “The Theory of...they should act versus the way people actually act ( Ajzen , 1991). Culture, environmental factors, individual factors, and psychological mechanisms

  10. AIRS-observed warm core structures of tropical cyclones over the western North Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Si; Chen, Baiqing; Li, Tim; Wu, Naigeng; Deng, Wenjian

    2017-03-01

    Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) temperature profiles during the period 2003-2013 are used to examine the warm core structures and evolution characteristics associated with the formation and development of western North Pacific (WNP) tropical cyclones (TCs). The warm core with a steady 1.5-K warming in the layer of 500-300 hPa occurs 24 h prior to tropical storm formation. Apparent eye warming extends upward to upper troposphere and downward to near surface after tropical storm formation. TC intensity shows a robust positive correlation with the warm core strength and has a weaker but still significant positive correlation with the warm core height (the weaker correlation is primarily attributed to the scattered warm core heights of weak TCs). Future 24-h intensity change of TCs has little correlation with the warm core height while it has a significant negative correlation with the warm core strength. Weak to moderate warm core at 500-200 hPa may be a necessary but not sufficient initial condition for TC rapid intensification. AIRS-observed warm core structures, in combination with other environmental factors, have the potential to improve the prediction of tropical storm formation and rapid intensification of WNP TCs.

  11. Soft-core potentials in thermodynamic integration: comparing one- and two-step transformations.

    PubMed

    Steinbrecher, Thomas; Joung, InSuk; Case, David A

    2011-11-30

    Molecular dynamics-based free energy calculations allow the determination of a variety of thermodynamic quantities from computer simulations of small molecules. Thermodynamic integration (TI) calculations can suffer from instabilities during the creation or annihilation of particles. This "singularity" problem can be addressed with "soft-core" potential functions which keep pairwise interaction energies finite for all configurations and provide smooth free energy curves. "One-step" transformations, in which electrostatic and van der Waals forces are simultaneously modified, can be simpler and less expensive than "two-step" transformations in which these properties are changed in separate calculations. Here, we study solvation free energies for molecules of different hydrophobicity using both models. We provide recommended values for the two parameters α(LJ) and β(C) controlling the behavior of the soft-core Lennard-Jones and Coulomb potentials and compare one- and two-step transformations with regard to their suitability for numerical integration. For many types of transformations, the one-step procedure offers a convenient and accurate approach to free energy estimates.

  12. Spiritual transformation, relation and radical empathy: core components of the ritual healing process.

    PubMed

    Koss-Chioino, Joan D

    2006-12-01

    Based on studies of spirit healing, this article proposes a model of the process of ritual healing that is focused on the core components of spiritual transformation, relatedness and empathy. It describes the central role of spiritual transformation in healers from which emerges their capacity for relation and empathy. Many spirit healers, following a spiritual transformation, begin to exercise 'radical empathy,' in which individual differences between healer and sufferer are melded into one field of feeling and experience. The model is compared and contrasted with aspects of healing processes in some psychotherapeutic and analytic therapies. These comparisons are offered in the light of the growing interest in incorporating spirituality into psychological and medical treatments.A concluding section briefly explores some implications of aspects of the model of healing process that support the claim that it is widely applicable and identifies foundational components.

  13. Optical refractometer based on large-core air-clad photonic crystal fibers.

    PubMed

    Silva, Susana; Santos, J L; Malcata, F Xavier; Kobelke, Jens; Schuster, Kay; Frazão, O

    2011-03-15

    A large-core air-clad photonic crystal fiber-based sensing structure is described, which is sensitive to refractive index. The sensing head is based on multimodal interference, and relies on a single-mode/large-core air-clad photonic crystal fiber (PCF)/single-mode fiber configuration. Using two distinct large-core air-clad PCF geometries-one for refractive index measurement and the other for temperature compensation, it was possible to implement a sensing head sensitive to refractive index changes in water as induced by temperature variations. The results indicated the high sensitivity of this sensing head to refractive index variations of water, and a resolution of 3.4×10(-5) refractive index units could be achieved.

  14. All-fiber chirped pulse amplification using highly-dispersive air-core photonic bandgap fiber.

    PubMed

    de Matos, C; Taylor, J; Hansen, T; Hansen, K; Broeng, J

    2003-11-03

    We show, for the first time to our knowledge, all-fiber chirped pulse amplification using an air-core photonic bandgap fiber. Pulses from a wavelength- and duration-tunable femtosecond/picosecond source at 10 GHz were dispersed in 100 m of dispersion compensating fiber before being amplified in an erbium-doped fiber amplifier and subsequently recompressed in 10 m of the anomalously dispersive photonic bandgap fiber. Pulses as short as 1.1 ps were obtained. As air-core fibers present negligible nonlinearity, the presented configuration can potentially be used to obtain ultra-high pulse peak powers. A study of the air-core fiber dispersion and dispersion slope is also presented.

  15. A compact high-voltage pulse generator based on pulse transformer with closed magnetic core.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Liu, Jinliang; Cheng, Xinbing; Bai, Guoqiang; Zhang, Hongbo; Feng, Jiahuai; Liang, Bo

    2010-03-01

    A compact high-voltage nanosecond pulse generator, based on a pulse transformer with a closed magnetic core, is presented in this paper. The pulse generator consists of a miniaturized pulse transformer, a curled parallel strip pulse forming line (PFL), a spark gap, and a matched load. The innovative design is characterized by the compact structure of the transformer and the curled strip PFL. A new structure of transformer windings was designed to keep good insulation and decrease distributed capacitance between turns of windings. A three-copper-strip structure was adopted to avoid asymmetric coupling of the curled strip PFL. When the 31 microF primary capacitor is charged to 2 kV, the pulse transformer can charge the PFL to 165 kV, and the 3.5 ohm matched load can deliver a high-voltage pulse with a duration of 9 ns, amplitude of 84 kV, and rise time of 5.1 ns. When the load is changed to 50 ohms, the output peak voltage of the generator can be 165 kV, the full width at half maximum is 68 ns, and the rise time is 6.5 ns.

  16. Determination of radiocarbon in stratospheric CO2, obtained through AirCore sampling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Dipayan; Chen, Huilin; Been, Henk A.; Kivi, Rigel; Meijer, Harro A. J.

    2016-04-01

    The concentration of Greenhouse Gases (GHG), with carbon dioxide as the most prominent example, has been and still is increasing, predominantly due to emissions from fossil fuel combustion. CO2 is also the most important component of the global carbon cycle. Among other tracers, radiocarbon (Carbon-14) is a unique and an important atmospheric tracer used in the understanding of the global carbon cycle. Radiocarbon is a naturally occurring isotope (radioactive, t 1/2 = 5730 ± 40 years) of carbon produced through the interaction of thermalized neutrons and nitrogen in the upper atmosphere. Generally, for performing atmospheric radiocarbon measurements in the higher atmosphere, large samples (few liters of air) were collected using aircrafts and balloons. However, collecting stratospheric samples on a regular basis for radiocarbon analysis is extremely expensive. Here we describe the determination of radiocarbon concentrations in stratospheric CO2, collected using AirCore sampling. AirCore is an innovative sampling technique for obtaining vertical atmospheric profiles and, in Europe, is done on a regular basis at Sodankylä, Finland for CO2, CH4 and CO. The stratospheric parts of two such AirCore profiles were used in this study as a proof-of-principle. CO2 from the stratospheric air samples were extracted and converted to elemental carbon, which were then measured at the Accelerator Mass Spectrometric (AMS) facility of the Centre for Isotope Research (CIO) at the University of Groningen. The stratospheric part of the AirCore profile was divided into six sections, each contained approximately 10 μg C. A detailed description of the extraction, graphitization, AMS analysis and the derivation of the stratospheric radiocarbon profile will be the main focus. Through our results, we will show that AirCore is a viable sampling method for performing high-precision radiocarbon measurements of stratospheric CO2 with reasonably good spatial resolution on a regular basis

  17. High-resolution saturated hydraulic conductivity logging of borehole cores using air permeability measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogiers, B.; Winters, P.; Huysmans, M.; Beerten, K.; Mallants, D.; Gedeon, M.; Batelaan, O.; Dassargues, A.

    2014-09-01

    Saturated hydraulic conductivity ( K s) is one of the most important parameters determining groundwater flow and contaminant transport in both unsaturated and saturated porous media. The hand-held air permeameter technique was investigated for high-resolution hydraulic conductivity determination on borehole cores using a spatial resolution of ˜0.05 m. The suitability of such air permeameter measurements on friable to poorly indurated sediments was tested to improve the spatial prediction of classical laboratory-based K s measurements obtained at a much lower spatial resolution (˜2 m). In total, 368 K s measurements were made on ˜350 m of borehole cores originating from the Campine basin, northern Belgium, while ˜5,230 air permeability measurements were performed on the same cores, resulting in a K s range of seven orders of magnitude. Cross-validation demonstrated that, using air permeameter data as the secondary variable for laboratory based K s measurements, the performance increased from R 2 = 0.35 for ordinary kriging (laboratory K s only) to R 2 = 0.61 for co-kriging. The separate treatment of horizontal and vertical hydraulic conductivity revealed considerable anisotropy in certain lithostratigraphical units, while others were clearly isotropic at the sample scale. Air permeameter measurements on borehole cores provide a cost-effective way to improve spatial predictions of traditional laboratory based K s.

  18. Core-shell to yolk-shell nanostructure transformation by a novel sacrificial template-free strategy.

    PubMed

    Han, Jie; Chen, Rong; Wang, Minggui; Lu, Song; Guo, Rong

    2013-12-21

    Au-conducting polymer core-shell nanostructures have been transformed into yolk-shell nanostructures with enhanced catalytic activity through facile swelling-evaporation processes without any sacrificial template.

  19. Air Force Organizational Transformation: Merging the Active and Reserve Components

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    34Future Total Force." 18 34 Ibid. 35 Ibid. 36 John A. Tirpak, "The Blended Wing Goes to War," Air Force Magazine, October 2003. [ Jounal on-line...Space Power 3 (Fall 2004): 41-53. Tirpak, John A. "The Blended Wing Goes to War," Air Force Magazine, October 2003. Jounal on-line. Available from

  20. PolCat: Modelling submillimetre polarization of molecular cloud cores using successive parametrized coordinate transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franzmann, E. L.; Fiege, J. D.

    2016-12-01

    We introduce a software package called PolCat for modelling magnetized molecular cloud cores using submillimetre linear polarization and continuum intensity maps from thermal dust emission. Our PolCat modelling software builds a three-dimensional triaxial core model via the use of consecutive parametrized coordinate transformations, and produces simulated polarization maps to fit to observational datasets. We utilize a multi-objective evolutionary optimizer to search the parameter space to simultaneously minimize χ2 for the intensity and polarization position angle maps. The aim of this paper is to test PolCat by applying it to several artificial data sets, characterizing the capabilities and performance of the code using approximately 400 test runs. We find that PolCat is able to distinguish between polarization maps of twisted and non-twisted field geometries and identify the symmetry of the twist when one exists in the data. PolCat generally obtains the correct shapes of cores when fit to models with the correct field geometry. We characterized the degeneracy of our models due to orientation, finding that there are at least eight degenerate core orientations that produce identical polarization maps for the case of triaxial cores. The degeneracy increases with core symmetry. We expect PolCat to be a useful tool for modelling observational polarization data sets. Our tests demonstrate that the code can often eliminate incorrect field configurations, while finding a range or potential models that can explain the data. Physical considerations can often further reduce the set of allowed models, resulting in reasonable constraints on field geometry.

  1. Rigorous simulations of a helical core fiber by the use of transformation optics formalism.

    PubMed

    Napiorkowski, Maciej; Urbanczyk, Waclaw

    2014-09-22

    We report for the first time on rigorous numerical simulations of a helical-core fiber by using a full vectorial method based on the transformation optics formalism. We modeled the dependence of circular birefringence of the fundamental mode on the helix pitch and analyzed the effect of a birefringence increase caused by the mode displacement induced by a core twist. Furthermore, we analyzed the complex field evolution versus the helix pitch in the first order modes, including polarization and intensity distribution. Finally, we show that the use of the rigorous vectorial method allows to better predict the confinement loss of the guided modes compared to approximate methods based on equivalent in-plane bending models.

  2. Reflection-induced bias error in an air-core photonic bandgap fiber optic gyroscope.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zuchen; Xu, Xiaobin; Zhang, Zhihao; Song, Ningfang; Zhang, Chunxi

    2016-01-15

    Analysis of the bias error induced by reflections in an air-core photonic bandgap fiber gyroscope is performed by both simulation and experiment. The bias error is sinusoidally periodic under modulation, and its intensity is related to the relative positions of the reflection points. A simple and effective method for the suppression of the error is proposed, and it has been verified experimentally.

  3. Stratospheric Air Sub-sampler (SAS) and its application to analysis of Δ17O(CO2) from small air samples collected with an AirCore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janina Mrozek, Dorota; van der Veen, Carina; Hofmann, Magdalena E. G.; Chen, Huilin; Kivi, Rigel; Heikkinen, Pauli; Röckmann, Thomas

    2016-11-01

    We present the set-up and a scientific application of the Stratospheric Air Sub-sampler (SAS), a device to collect and to store the vertical profile of air collected with an AirCore (Karion et al., 2010) in numerous sub-samples for later analysis in the laboratory. The SAS described here is a 20 m long 1/4 inch stainless steel tubing that is separated by eleven valves to divide the tubing into 10 identical segments, but it can be easily adapted to collect smaller or larger samples. In the collection phase the SAS is directly connected to the outlet of an optical analyzer that measures the mole fractions of CO2, CH4 and CO from an AirCore sampler. The stratospheric part (or if desired any part of the AirCore air) is then directed through the SAS. When the SAS is filled with the selected air, the valves are closed and the vertical profile is maintained in the different segments of the SAS. The segments can later be analysed to retrieve vertical profiles of other trace gas signatures that require slower instrumentation. As an application, we describe the coupling of the SAS to an analytical system to determine the 17O excess of CO2, which is a tracer for photochemical processing of stratospheric air. For this purpose the analytical system described by Mrozek et al. (2015) was adapted for analysis of air directly from the SAS. The performance of the coupled system is demonstrated for a set of air samples from an AirCore flight in November 2014 near Sodankylä, Finland. The standard error for a 25 mL air sample at stratospheric CO2 mole fraction is 0.56 ‰ (1σ) for δ17O and 0.03 ‰ (1σ) for both δ18O and δ13C. Measured Δ17O(CO2) values show a clear correlation with N2O in agreement with already published data.

  4. Air core Bragg fibers for delivery of near-infrared laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelínek, Michal; Frank, Milan; Kubeček, Václav; Matějec, Vlastimil; Kašík, Ivan; Podrazký, Ondřej

    2014-12-01

    Optical fibers designed for high power laser radiation delivery represent important tools in medicine, solar systems, or industry. For such purposes several different types of glass optical fibers such as silica, sapphire, or chalcogenide ones as well as hollow-glass fibers, photonic crystal fibers and Bragg fibers have been investigated. Air-core Bragg fibers or photonic crystal fibers offer us the possibility of light transmission in a low dispersive material - air having a high damage threshold and small non-linear coefficient. However, preforms for drawing Bragg fibers can be fabricated by MCVD method similarly as preforms of standard silica fibers. In this paper we present fundamental characteristics of laboratory-designed and fabricated Bragg fibers with air cores intended for delivery of laser radiation at a wavelength range from 0.9 to 1.5 μm. Bragg fibers with different air core diameters of 5, 45 and 73 mm were prepared. The fiber core was surrounded by three pairs of circular Bragg layers. Each pair was composed of one layer with a high and one layer with a low refractive index with a contrast up to 0.03. Several laser sources emitting at 0.975, 1.06, and 1.55 μm were used as radiation sources. Attenuation coefficients, overall transmissions, bending losses, and spatial profiles of output beams from fibers were determined at these wavelengths. The lowest attenuation coefficient of 70 dB/km was determined for the 45 μm and 73 mm air-core fiber when radiation from a laser was launched into the fibers by using optical lenses. However, multimodal transmission has been observed in such condition. It has also been found that bending losses of such fibers are negligible for bending diameters higher than 15 mm.

  5. Transforming the NAS: The Next Generation Air Traffic Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erzberger, Heinz

    2004-01-01

    The next-generation air traffic control system must be designed to safely and efficiently accommodate the large growth of traffic expected in the near future. It should be sufficiently scalable to contend with the factor of 2 or more increase in demand expected by the year 2020. Analysis has shown that the current method of controlling air traffic cannot be scaled up to provide such levels of capacity. Therefore, to achieve a large increase in capacity while also giving pilots increased freedom to optimize their flight trajectories requires a fundamental change in the way air traffic is controlled. The key to achieving a factor of 2 or more increase in airspace capacity is to automate separation monitoring and control and to use an air-ground data link to send trajectories and clearances directly between ground-based and airborne systems. In addition to increasing capacity and offering greater flexibility in the selection of trajectories, this approach also has the potential to increase safety by reducing controller and pilot errors that occur in routine monitoring and voice communication tasks.

  6. Chemical signals of past climate and environment from polar ice cores and firn air.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Eric W

    2012-10-07

    Chemical and isotopic records obtained from polar ice cores have provided some of the most iconic datasets in Earth system science. Here, I discuss how the different records are formed in the ice sheets, emphasising in particular the contrast between chemistry held in the snow/ice phase, and that which is trapped in air bubbles. Air diffusing slowly through the upper firn layers of the ice sheet can also be sampled in large volumes to give more recent historical information on atmospheric composition. The chemical and geophysical issues that have to be solved to interpret ice core data in terms of atmospheric composition and emission changes are also highlighted. Ice cores and firn air have provided particularly strong evidence about recent changes (last few decades to centuries), including otherwise inaccessible data on increases in compounds that are active as greenhouse gases or as agents of stratospheric depletion. On longer timescales (up to 800,000 years in Antarctica), ice cores reveal major changes in biogeochemical cycling, which acted as feedbacks on the very major changes in climate between glacial and interglacial periods.

  7. Radiocarbon analysis of stratospheric CO2 retrieved from AirCore sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Dipayan; Chen, Huilin; Been, Henk A.; Kivi, Rigel; Meijer, Harro A. J.

    2016-10-01

    Radiocarbon (14C) is an important atmospheric tracer and one of the many used in the understanding of the global carbon budget, which includes the greenhouse gases CO2 and CH4. Measurement of radiocarbon in atmospheric CO2 generally requires the collection of large air samples (a few liters) from which CO2 is extracted and then the concentration of radiocarbon is determined using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). However, the regular collection of air samples from the stratosphere, for example using aircraft and balloons, is prohibitively expensive. Here we describe radiocarbon measurements in stratospheric CO2 collected by the AirCore sampling method. AirCore is an innovative atmospheric sampling system, which comprises a long tube descending from a high altitude with one end open and the other closed, and it has been demonstrated to be a reliable, cost-effective sampling system for high-altitude profile (up to ≈ 30 km) measurements of CH4 and CO2. In Europe, AirCore measurements have been being performed on a regular basis near Sodankylä (northern Finland) since September 2013. Here we describe the analysis of samples from two such AirCore flights made there in July 2014, for determining the radiocarbon concentration in stratospheric CO2. The two AirCore profiles were collected on consecutive days. The stratospheric part of the AirCore was divided into six sections, each containing ≈ 35 µg CO2 ( ≈ 9.6 µgC), and stored in a stratospheric air subsampler constructed from 1/4 in. coiled stainless steel tubing ( ≈ 3 m). A small-volume extraction system was constructed that enabled > 99.5 % CO2 extraction from the stratospheric air samples. Additionally, a new small-volume high-efficiency graphitization system was constructed for graphitization of these extracted CO2 samples, which were measured at the Groningen AMS facility. Since the stratospheric samples were very similar in mass, reference samples were also prepared in the same mass range for

  8. The Core Values: Framing and Resolving Ethical Issues for the Air Force

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-01-01

    stood in terms of the struc ture of moral ity, the core val ues repre sent the core concepts air men need to frame ethical issues. A more troubling...caught lying. For these theories, in fact, the agent’s in ten­ tions would typically matter more than what the agent in fact accomplishes.10...ter traits called “ virtues ” and “vices.” Charac ter and virtue theories ask what the virtues are and how we learn and teach them. West ern philoso

  9. Orbital tuning of deep ice cores using O2/N2 of trapped air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, K.; Aoki, S.; Nakazawa, T.

    2014-12-01

    The chronology of the first Dome Fuji deep ice core (80,000-340,000 yr BP) was established by orbital tuning of measured O2/N2 ratios in trapped air to the past local summer insolation at the drill site (Kawamura et al., 2007). The O2/N2 ratios found in ice cores are generally lower than atmospheric ratio because of size-dependent molecular fractionation during bubble close-off. The magnitude of this gas fractionation appears to be influenced by snow metamorphism when the layer was originally at the surface, which in turn is controlled by local summer insolation (Fujita et al., 2009). The O2/N2 record has little 100,000-yr periodicity (strongest in climatic records), suggesting insignificant climatic influence in the orbital tuning. Agreement of the O2/N2 chronology with U-Th radiometric chronology of speleothems (within ~2000 yr) suggests that O2/N2 and summer insolation are indeed in phase. However, it may not be common to all ice cores that O2/N2 signal only records local summer insolation. For example, the GISP2 ice core (Greenland) has clear imprint of abrupt climate changes in the O2/N2 record, indicating climatic (non-insolation) signal in the record and the possibility of phase variability of O2/N2 relative to the past insolation (Suwa and Bender, 2008). Here we present new O2/N2 record from the second Dome Fuji ice core with significant improvements in ice core storage practice and mass spectrometry. In particular, the ice core had been stored at about -50 ˚C until the air extraction except during transportations, which prevent fractionation due to gas loss during the core storage. The precision of the new O2/N2 data set is improved by a factor of 3 over the previous data, and we do not observe outliers (there were 15% outliers in the previous data). Clear imprint of local insolation is recognizable in the new O2/N2, which would enable us to generate a chronology with accuracy of ~2000 yr towards older periods. Samples from the first core after long

  10. A combined compensation method for the output voltage of an insulated core transformer power supply

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, L.; Yang, J. Liu, K. F.; Qin, B.; Chen, D. Z.

    2014-06-15

    An insulated core transformer (ICT) power supply is an ideal high-voltage generator for irradiation accelerators with energy lower than 3 MeV. However, there is a significant problem that the structure of the segmented cores leads to an increase in the leakage flux and voltage differences between rectifier disks. A high level of consistency in the output of the disks helps to achieve a compact structure by improving the utilization of both the rectifier components and the insulation distances, and consequently increase the output voltage of the power supply. The output voltages of the disks which are far away from the primary coils need to be improved to reduce their inhomogeneity. In this study, by investigating and comparing the existing compensation methods, a new combined compensation method is proposed, which increases the turns on the secondary coils and employs parallel capacitors to improve the consistency of the disks, while covering the entire operating range of the power supply. This method turns out to be both feasible and effective during the development of an ICT power supply. The non-uniformity of the output voltages of the disks is less than 3.5% from no-load to full-load, and the power supply reaches an output specification of 350 kV/60 mA.

  11. A spectral transform dynamical core option within the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM4)

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Katherine J; Mahajan, Salil; Branstetter, Marcia L; McClean, Julie L.; Caron, Julie M.; Maltrud, Matthew E.; Hack, James J; Bader, David C; Neale, Rich

    2014-01-01

    A spectral transform dynamical core with an 85 spectral truncation resolution (T85) within the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM), version 4, is evaluated within the recently released Community Earth System Model, version 1.0 (CESM) global climate model. The spectral dynamical core option provides a well-known base within the climate model community from which to assess climate behavior and statistics, and its relative computational efficiency for smaller computing platforms allows it to be extended to perform climate length simulations using high-resolution configurations in the near term. To establish the characteristics of the CAM4 T85, an ensemble of simulations covering the present day observational period using forced sea surface temperatures and prescribed sea-ice extent are evaluated. Overall, the T85 ensemble attributes and biases are similar to a companion ensemble of simulations using the one degree finite volume (FV1) dynamical core, relative to observed and model derived datasets. Notable improvements with T85 compared to FV1 include the representation of wintertime Arctic sea level pressure and summer precipitation over the Western Indian subcontinent. The mean and spatial patterns of the land surface temperature trends over the AMIP period are generally well simulated with the T85 ensemble relative to observations, however the model is not able to capture the extent nor magnitude of changes in temperature extremes over the boreal summer, where the changes are most dramatic. Biases in the wintertime Arctic surface temperature and annual mean surface stress fields persist with T85 as with the CAM3 version of T85.

  12. Two modes of transformation of amorphous calcium carbonate films in air.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xurong; Han, Joong Tark; Kim, Do Hwan; Cho, Kilwon

    2006-02-16

    Large-area amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) films in air are shown to be transformed into crystalline calcium carbonate (CaCO(3)) films via two modes-dissolution-recrystallization and solid-solid phase transition-depending on the relative humidity of the air and the temperature. Moisture in the air promotes the transformation of ACC into crystalline forms via a dissolution-recrystallization process. Increasing the humidity increases the rate of ACC crystallization and gives rise to films with numerous large pores. As the temperature is increased, the effect of moisture in the air is reduced and solid-solid transition by thermal activation becomes the dominant transformation mechanism. At 100 and 120 degrees C, ACC films are transformed into predominantly (110) oriented crystalline films. Collectively, the results show that calcium carbonate films with different morphologies, crystal phases, and structures can be obtained by controlling the humidity and temperature. This ability to control the transformation of ACC should assist in clarifying the role of ACC in the biomineralization of CaCO(3) and should open new avenues for preparing CaCO(3) films with oriented and fine structure.

  13. Competition and transformation of modes of unidirectional air waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yu-xin; Kong, Xiang-kun; Fang, Yun-tuan

    2016-10-01

    In order to study the mode excitation of the unidirectional air waveguide, we place a line source at different positions in the waveguide. The source position plays an important role in determining the result of the competition of the even mode and the odd mode. For the source at the edge of the waveguide, the odd mode gets advantage over the even mode. As a result, the odd mode is excited, but the even mode is suppressed. For the source at the center of the waveguide, the even mode is excited, but the odd mode is suppressed. With two sources at two edges of the waveguide, the even mode is released because the two odd modes are canceled.

  14. Air bubble migration rates as a proxy for bubble pressure distribution in ice cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dadic, Ruzica; Schneebeli, Martin; Bertler, Nancy

    2015-04-01

    Air bubble migration can be used as a proxy to measure the pressure of individual bubbles and can help constrain the gradual close-off of gas bubbles and the resulting age distribution of gases in ice cores. The close-off depth of single bubbles can vary by tens of meters, which leads to a distribution of pressures for bubbles at a given depth. The age distribution of gases (along with gas-age-ice-age differences) decreases the resolution of the gas level reconstructions from ice cores and limits our ability to determine the phase relationship between gas and ice, and thus, the impact of rapid changes of greenhouse gases on surface temperatures. For times of rapid climate change, including the last 150 years, and abrupt climate changes further back in the past, knowledge of the age distribution of the gases trapped in air bubbles will enable us to refine estimates of atmospheric changes. When a temperature gradient is applied to gas bubbles in an ice sample, the bubbles migrate toward warmer ice. This motion is caused by sublimation from the warm wall and subsequent frost deposition on the cold wall. The migration rate depends on ice temperature and bubble pressure and is proportional to the temperature gradient. The spread in migration rates for bubbles in the same samples at given temperatures should therefore reflect the variations in bubble pressures within a sample. Air bubbles with higher pressures would have been closed off higher in the firn column and thus have had time to equilibrate with the surrounding ice pressure, while air bubbles that have been closed off recently would have pressures that are similar to todays atmospheric pressure above the firn column. For ice under pressures up to ~13-16 bar, the pressure distribution of bubbles from a single depth provides a record of the trapping function of air bubbles in the firn column for a certain time in the past. We will present laboratory experiments on air bubble migration, using Antarctic ice core

  15. Distinctive diamagnetic fabrics in dolostones evolved at fault cores, the Dead Sea Transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, D.; Weinberger, R.; Eyal, Y.; Feinstein, S.; Harlavan, Y.; Levi, T.

    2015-08-01

    We resolve the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) axes along fault planes, cores and damage zones in rocks that crop out next to the Dead Sea Transform (DST) plate boundary. We measured 261 samples of mainly diamagnetic dolostones that were collected from 15 stations. To test the possible effect of the iron content on the AMS we analyzed the Fe concentrations of the samples in different rock phases. Dolostones with mean magnetic susceptibility value lower than -4 × 10-6 SI and iron content less than ∼1000 ppm are suitable for diamagnetic AMS-based strain analysis. The dolostones along fault planes display AMS fabrics that significantly deviate from the primary "sedimentary fabric". The characteristics of these fabrics include well-grouped, sub-horizontal, minimum principal AMS axes (k3) and sub-vertical magnetic foliations commonly defined by maximum and intermediate principal AMS axes (k1 and k2 axes, respectively). These fabrics are distinctive along fault planes located tens of kilometers apart, with strikes ranging between NNW-SSE and NNE-SSW and different senses of motion. The obtained magnetic foliations (k1-k2) are sub-parallel (within ∼20°) to the fault planes. Based on rock magnetic and geochemical analyses, we interpret the AMS fabrics as the product of both shape and crystallographic anisotropy of the dolostones. Preferred shape alignment evolves due to mechanical rotation of subordinate particles and rock fragments at the fault core. Preferred crystallographic orientation results from elevated frictional heating (>300 °C) during faulting, which enhances c-axes alignment in the cement-supported dolomite breccia due to crystal-plastic processes. The penetrative deformation within fault zones resulted from the local, fault-related strain field and does not reflect the regional strain field. The analyzed AMS fabrics together with fault-plane kinematics provide valuable information on faulting characteristics in the uppermost crust.

  16. Development of Yangbajing air shower core detector for a new EAS hybrid experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jin-Sheng; Huang, Jing; Chen, Ding; Zhang, Ying; Zhai, Liu-Ming; Chen, Xu; Hu, Xiao-Bin; Lin, Yu-Hui; Zhang, Xue-Yao; Feng, Cun-Feng; Jia, Huan-Yu; Zhou, Xun-Xiu; Danzengluobu; Chen, Tian-Lu; Li, Hai-Jin; Liu, Mao-Yuan; Yuan, Ai-Fang

    2015-08-01

    Aiming at the observation of cosmic-ray chemical composition in the “knee” energy region, we have been developing a new type of air-shower core detector (YAC, Yangbajing Air shower Core detector array) to be set up at Yangbajing (90.522° E, 30.102° N, 4300 m above sea level, atmospheric depth: 606 g/m2) in Tibet, China. YAC works together with the Tibet air-shower array (Tibet-III) and an underground water Cherenkov muon detector array (MD) as a hybrid experiment. Each YAC detector unit consists of lead plates of 3.5 cm thickness and a scintillation counter which detects the burst size induced by high energy particles in the air-shower cores. The burst size can be measured from 1 MIP (Minimum Ionization Particle) to 106 MIPs. The first phase of this experiment, named “YAC- I”, consists of 16 YAC detectors each with a size of 40 cm×50 cm and distributed in a grid with an effective area of 10 m2. YAC- I is used to check hadronic interaction models. The second phase of the experiment, called “YAC- II”, consists of 124 YAC detectors with coverage of about 500 m2. The inner 100 detectors of 80 cm×50 cm each are deployed in a 10×10 matrix with a 1.9 m separation; the outer 24 detectors of 100 cm×50 cm each are distributed around these to reject non-core events whose shower cores are far from the YAC- II array. YAC- II is used to study the primary cosmic-ray composition, in particular, to obtain the energy spectra of protons, helium and iron nuclei between 5×1013 eV and 1016 eV, covering the “knee” and also connected with direct observations at energies around 100 TeV. We present the design and performance of YAC- II in this paper. Supported by grants from the National Natural Science Foundation of China (11078002, 11275212, 11165013), the Chinese Academy of Sciences (H9291450S3, Y4293211S5) and the Knowledge Innovation Fund of Institute of High Energy Physics (IHEP), China (H95451D0U2, H8515530U1)

  17. Transformational Opportunities: Language and Literacy Instruction for English Language Learners in the Common Core Era in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kibler, Amanda K.; Walqui, Aída; Bunch, George C.

    2015-01-01

    New demands of the Common Core State Standards imply instructional transformations for all classrooms in the United States, but teachers of students designated as English language learners (ELLs) are among those most likely to feel the impact in their daily professional lives. Language is an integral part of classroom learning in all subject…

  18. Inorganic nitrogen transformations in the bed of the Shingobee River, Minnesota: Integrating hydrologic and biological processes using sediment perfusion cores

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sheibley, R.W.; Duff, J.H.; Jackman, A.P.; Triska, F.J.

    2003-01-01

    Inorganic N transformations were examined in streambed sediments from the Shingobee River using sediment perfusion cores. The experimental design simulated groundwater-stream water mixing within sediment cores, which provided a well-defined one-dimensional representation of in situ hydrologic conditions. Two distinct hydrologic and chemical settings were preserved in the sediment cores: the lowermost sediments, perfused with groundwater, remained anaerobic during the incubations, whereas the uppermost sediments, perfused with oxic water pumped from the overlying water column, simulated stream water penetration into the bed. The maintenance of oxic and anoxic zones formed a biologically active aerobic-anaerobic interface. Ammonium (NH4+) dissolved in groundwater was transported conservatively through the lower core zone but was removed as it mixed with aerated recycle water. Concurrently, a small quantity of nitrate (NO3-) equaling ???25% of the NH4+ loss was produced in the upper sediments. The NH4+ and NO3- profiles in the uppermost sediments resulted from coupled nitrification-denitrification, because assimilation and sorption were negligible. We hypothesize that anaerobic microsites within the aerated upper sediments supported denitrification. Rates of nitrification and denitrification in the perfusion cores ranged 42-209 and 53-160 mg N m-2 day-1, respectively. The use of modified perfusion cores permitted the identification and quantification of N transformations and verified process control by surface water exchange into the shallow hyporheic zone of the Shingobee River.

  19. Amplification of 12 OAM Modes in an air-core erbium doped fiber.

    PubMed

    Kang, Qiongyue; Gregg, Patrick; Jung, Yongmin; Lim, Ee Leong; Alam, Shaif-ul; Ramachandran, Siddharth; Richardson, David J

    2015-11-02

    We theoretically propose an air-core erbium doped fiber amplifier capable of providing relatively uniform gain for 12 orbital angular momentum (OAM) modes (|L| = 5, 6 and 7, where |L| is the OAM mode order) over the C-band. Amplifier performance under core pumping conditions for a uniformly doped core for each of the supported pump modes (110 in total) was separately assessed. The differential modal gain (DMG) was found to vary significantly depending on the pump mode used, and the minimum DMG was found to be 0.25 dB at 1550 nm provided by the OAM (8,1) pump mode. A tailored confined doping profile can help to reduce the pump mode dependency for core pumped operation and help to increase the number of pump modes that can support a DMG below 1 dB. For the more practical case of cladding-pumped operation, where the pump mode dependency is almost removed, a DMG of 0.25 dB and a small signal gain of >20 dB can be achieved for the 12 OAM modes across the full C-band.

  20. Behavior of pH-sensitive core shell particles at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Mark D'Souza; Manga, Mohamed S; Hunter, Timothy N; Cayre, Olivier J; Biggs, Simon

    2012-03-20

    In this article, the adsorption of latex core-responsive polymer-shell nanoparticles at the air-water interface is investigated using a Langmuir trough. Phase transition isotherms are used to explore their responsive behavior at the interface as a function of changes in the pH of the subphase. By adjusting the pH of the water prior to particle deposition, we probe the effect of the stabilizing polymer wetting by the water subphase on the stability of these particles at the air-water interface. In addition, by initially compressing a stable film of adsorbed particles and then subsequently changing the pH of the subphase we study desorption of these particles into the water phase.

  1. Tracking the Transformation and Preservation of Organic Biomarkers in a Varved Sediment-Core Series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolu, J.; Bigler, C.; Bindler, R.

    2014-12-01

    An important premise for reconstructing environmental changes using sediment records is to understand which environmental information reaches the lake bottom and how diagenetic processes may affect the proxies, such as terrestrial and aquatic organic biomarkers. We can tackle this question using a unique series of varved sediment cores collected from the lake Nylandssjön (northern Sweden). In addition to limnological and sediment trap sampling since 2001, we have a collection of freeze cores taken in late winter and stored since 1979, which allows us to track individual varve years (e.g., 1978) over time (~30 years). A previous study using this collection showed that 23 % of C and 35 % of N were lost during the first 25 years with a C:N ratio increase of ≈21, suggesting important implications for diagenetic effects on organic biomarkers. To assess the preservation/transformation of organic biomarkers, we developed a new Pyrolysis-Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry method that allows the rapid determination of biomarkers from the common OM classes (e.g., plant waxes, microbial lipids, lignins) using sub-mg sample sizes and thus applicable to high-resolution sampling of the varved sediment (Tolu et al., under review). Our results show that the different biomarkers exhibit a broad spectrum of reactivities over ~30 years -% change determined by ([Peak area at t] - [Peak area at t=0])/ [peak area at t=0] x 100-. For example: 67-80 % of the algal chlorophyll-derived product 'phytene' is lost depending which single varve year is followed over time (e.g., 1979). Only 12-32 % of "pristene", the degraded form of algal chlorophyll, is lost. The guaiacyl and syringyl lignin units are affected by a smaller loss, i.e. 5-15 %, and the S/G ratio, indicative of angiosperm/gymnosperm plant input remains stable, which is contrary to previous work on non-varved lake sediments. Considering all biomarkers, the degradation/production plateaued after ~15 years, which indicates that

  2. Multimodal interference based on large-core air-clad photonic crystal fibres for simultaneous measurement of multiparameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Susana; Santos, J. L.; Malcata, F. X.; Kobelke, Jens; Schuster, Kay; Frazão, O.

    2011-05-01

    This work describes a large-core air-clad photonic crystal fibre-based sensing structure that is sensitive to refractive index, temperature and strain. The sensing head is based on multimodal interference, and relies on a single mode - largecore air-clad photonic crystal fibre - single mode fibre configuration. Using two distinct large-core air-clad PCF geometries it is possible to obtain an optical spectrum with two dominant loss bands, at wavelengths that have different sensitivities to physical parameters. This characteristic is explored to demonstrate a sensing head that permits the straintemperature discrimination functionality. It is also shown the large-core air-clad photonic crystal fibre can be applied to implement a sensing head sensitive to the water refractive index changes induced by temperature variations.

  3. Phase relationships between orbital forcing and the composition of air trapped in Antarctic ice cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazin, Lucie; Landais, Amaelle; Capron, Emilie; Masson-Delmotte, Valérie; Ritz, Catherine; Picard, Ghislain; Jouzel, Jean; Dumont, Marie; Leuenberger, Markus; Prié, Frédéric

    2016-03-01

    Orbital tuning is central for ice core chronologies beyond annual layer counting, available back to 60 ka (i.e. thousands of years before 1950) for Greenland ice cores. While several complementary orbital tuning tools have recently been developed using δ18Oatm, δO2⁄N2 and air content with different orbital targets, quantifying their uncertainties remains a challenge. Indeed, the exact processes linking variations of these parameters, measured in the air trapped in ice, to their orbital targets are not yet fully understood. Here, we provide new series of δO2/N2 and δ18Oatm data encompassing Marine Isotopic Stage (MIS) 5 (between 100 and 160 ka) and the oldest part (340-800 ka) of the East Antarctic EPICA Dome C (EDC) ice core. For the first time, the measurements over MIS 5 allow an inter-comparison of δO2/N2 and δ18Oatm records from three East Antarctic ice core sites (EDC, Vostok and Dome F). This comparison highlights some site-specific δO2/N2 variations. Such an observation, the evidence of a 100 ka periodicity in the δO2/N2 signal and the difficulty to identify extrema and mid-slopes in δO2/N2 increase the uncertainty associated with the use of δO2/N2 as an orbital tuning tool, now calculated to be 3-4 ka. When combining records of δ18Oatm and δO2/N2 from Vostok and EDC, we find a loss of orbital signature for these two parameters during periods of minimum eccentricity (˜ 400 ka, ˜ 720-800 ka). Our data set reveals a time-varying offset between δO2/N2 and δ18Oatm records over the last 800 ka that we interpret as variations in the lagged response of δ18Oatm to precession. The largest offsets are identified during Terminations II, MIS 8 and MIS 16, corresponding to periods of destabilization of the Northern polar ice sheets. We therefore suggest that the occurrence of Heinrich-like events influences the response of δ18Oatm to precession.

  4. Millennial and Sub-millennial Variability of Total Air Content from the WAIS Divide Ice Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Jon; Brook, Edward; Fegyveresi, John; Lee, James; Mitchell, Logan; Sowers, Todd; Alley, Richard; McConnell, Joe; Severinghaus, Jeff; Baggenstos, Daniel

    2014-05-01

    The analysis of ancient air bubbles trapped in ice is integral to the reconstruction of climate over the last 800 ka. While mixing ratios of greenhouse gases along with isotopic ratios are being studied in ever increasing resolution, one aspect of the gas record that continues to be understudied is the total air content (TAC) of the trapped bubbles. Published records of TAC are often too low in temporal resolution to adequately capture sub-millennial scale variability. Here we present a high-resolution TAC record (10-50 year sampling resolution) from the WAIS Divide ice core, measured at Oregon State and Penn State Universities. The records cover a variety of climatic conditions over the last 56 ka and show millennial variability of up to 10% and sub-millennial variability between 2.5 and 3.5%. We find that using the pore close off volume parameterization (Delomotte et al., J. Glaciology, 1999, v.45), along with the site temperature derived from isotopes, our TAC record implies unrealistically large changes in surface pressure or elevation. For example, the TAC decreases by ~10% between 19.5ka and 17.3ka, and would imply an elevation increase of nearly 800m. The total accumulation of ice over this period is just 280m (Fudge et al. Nature 2013), making the calculated elevation interpretation implausible. To resolve this discrepancy, we investigate the millennial and sub-millennial variability in our TAC record as a function of changes in firn densification and particularly layering. The firn is the uppermost layer of an ice sheet where snow is compressed into ice, trapping ancient air. Thus firn processes are important for the interpretation of total air content as well as other gas records. We compare our TAC record with proxies for dust, temperature and accumulation to determine how processes other than elevation affect TAC.

  5. Tunable stop-band hollow waveguide Bragg reflectors with tapered air core for adaptive dispersion-compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakurai, Yasuki; Matsutani, Akihiro; Koyama, Fumio

    2006-03-01

    We propose a tunable stop-band hollow waveguide Bragg reflector with a variable tapered air core for an adjustable dispersion-compensation device. The tapered air-core structure gives us chirped Bragg reflection. The precise control of tapered air-core thickness and angle enables us to achieve the dynamic tuning of both stop-band width and center wavelength of Bragg reflection. We demonstrate center-wavelength tuning of 20.1nm corresponding to 1.3% of propagation constant change and stop-band expansion up to 5nm. Also, we demonstrate dispersion tuning operation either in negative or positive dispersion ranges with delay-time difference of about 10ps.

  6. A series wound air core homopolar generator - SWAC for tactical armor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohst, David; Pavlik, Dennis

    1989-01-01

    The results of a study on generator design for a pulsed electromagnetic (EM) railgun launcher for a 10-shot low-repetition-rate mobile tactical system are presented. A novel design for a series-wound air-core (SWAC) homopolar generator is discussed. A number approaches to the problems associated with multiple-shot operation and high power density are presented. Specifically, designs for a spiral coil group, segmented current collection, active cooling and optimized rotor kinetic energy are addressed. The most significant features of the design are conventional water cooling, low rotational stored energy, and demonstrated materials and fabrication techniques. The resulting power supply consists of two counterrotating SWAC machines with a net energy density of 10 kJ/kg, 60-MJ total stored energy per shot, 2.50 mA peak current at 320 V, and significantly reduced eddy current losses.

  7. A new repulsive magnetic levitation approach using permanent magnets and air-core electromagnets

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, I.Y.A.; Busch-Vishniac, I. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1994-07-01

    This paper introduces a new repulsive magnetic levitation approach using permanent magnets and air-core electromagnets as primary actuating components. The permanent magnets, which are attached to the bottom of a carrier, are repulsively levitated above and by oblong shaped electromagnets, which constitute one part of the guide tracks. Due to the lateral unstable nature of repulsive levitation, the stability of the levitated permanent magnets is regulated by another part of the guide tracks, electromagnetic stabilizers, which are strands of straight wires running through the entire length of the guide tracks above the levitation coils. A state feedback controller with integral compensator is designed for the stability control. The entire levitation system is divided into three subsystems: levitation, stabilization and propulsion. Al the control works with respect to each subsystem are executed extrinsic to the carrier, i.e., there is no electrical circuit on board the carrier.

  8. Mode-based microparticle conveyor belt in air-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Oliver A; Euser, Tijmen G; Russell, Philip St J

    2013-12-02

    We show how microparticles can be moved over long distances and precisely positioned in a low-loss air-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber using a coherent superposition of two co-propagating spatial modes, balanced by a backward-propagating fundamental mode. This creates a series of trapping positions spaced by half the beat-length between the forward-propagating modes (typically a fraction of a millimeter). The system allows a trapped microparticle to be moved along the fiber by continuously tuning the relative phase between the two forward-propagating modes. This mode-based optical conveyor belt combines long-range transport of microparticles with a positional accuracy of 1 µm. The technique also has potential uses in waveguide-based optofluidic systems.

  9. Air fractionation in plate-like inclusions within the EPICA-DML deep ice core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedelcu, A.; Faria, S. H.; Kipfstuhl, S.; Schmidt, B.; Kuhs, W. F.

    2009-04-01

    On ice samples from the ice core recovered in the frame of the European Project for Ice Coring in Antarctica at the deep drilling site in Dronning Maud Land (75°00S; 00°04E) micro-Raman spectrochemical analysis was applied to typical relaxation features appearing after the extraction of an ice core. Essentially, these relaxation microinclusions are little planar polygonal cavities possessing hexagonal symmetry i.e. thin negative crystals lying on the basal plane of the hosting ice crystallite. Usually named plate-like inclusions, PLIs, they tend to change their aspect ratio becoming in general rounder, thicker or thinner depending on the equilibrium established between the structure-composition of the ice and the minute environmental temperature-pressure conditions around a specific PLI, but still preserving a very large aspect ratio (typically 20:1). Muguruma and others (1966) and Mae (1968) have reported studies on plate hexagonal voids, i.e. PLIs, produced (only) in tensile deformation tests of natural and artificial single ice crystals while the first report of PLIs in Antarctic ice cores was presented by Gow (1971). In spite of these early studies and the abundance of PLIs in stored ice core samples, extended investigations of these relaxation features are scarce. We present the results of the first successful study of the chemical composition of PLIs using microfocus Raman spectroscopy (Nedelcu and others, in press). We observe that the relaxation features contain mainly O2 and N2 in their interior, with N2/O2 ratios smaller than 3.7 (the nowadays atmospheric air N2/O2 ratio), indicating a general oxygen enrichment that is not so different from O2 enrichments reported in other investigations on polar ice samples (Nakahara and others, 1988, Ikeda and others, 1999). These results seem to lend support to the current hypothesis that O2 diffuses faster than N2 through the ice matrix (Ikeda-Fukazawa and others, 2001, 2005; Severinghaus and Battle, 2006). More

  10. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Core Strengthening Exercises in U.S. Air Force Helicopter Crewmembers with Low Back Pain

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-13

    Pain Yvonne Brandt, AFGSC/SGP; Linda Currier, 374 MDG; Timothy Plante, 15 AMDS/SGPT; Christine Schubert Kabban, AFIT/ENC; Anthony Tvaryanas...Randomized Controlled Trial of Core Strengthening Exercises in U.S. Air Force Helicopter Crewmembers with Low Back Pain 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b...88ABW-2014-6033, 22 Dec 2014 14. ABSTRACT The purpose of this study was to determine if 5 core strengthening exercises would decrease pain severity

  11. Delivery of 1.9μm laser radiation using air-core Bragg fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Milan; Jelínek, Michal; Kubeček, Václav; Podrazký, Ondřej; Kašík, Ivan; Matějec, Vlastimil

    2016-12-01

    In this paper we have investigated Bragg fibers for the 1.94 μm laser- radiation delivery generated by a thulium fiber laser with a maximal continuous output power 50W. For such investigation laboratory-designed and fabricated hollow-core Bragg fibers have been employed with different diameters of 5, 40, 56 and 73 μm surrounded by three pairs of circular Bragg layers. Fundamental optical characteristics such as overall transmittance, attenuation coefficient, bending losses, and delivered spatial beam profiles at the wavelength of 1.94 μm for all tested fibers are reported and summarized in this contribution. In the case of laser radiation delivery with the intensity of 65 kW/cm2, the lowest attenuation coefficient of 1.278 dB/m was determined for the Bragg fiber with the inner air-core diameter of 56 μm. Moreover, the bending losses for a small bend diameter of 15 mm reached 0.177 dB only. However delivered laser radiation was highly multimode character.

  12. Effects of a Circulating-water Garment and Forced-air Warming on Body Heat Content and Core Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Taguchi, Akiko; Ratnaraj, Jebadurai; Kabon, Barbara; Sharma, Neeru; Lenhardt, Rainer; Sessler, Daniel I.

    2005-01-01

    Background: Forced-air warming is sometimes unable to maintain perioperative normothermia. We therefore compared heat transfer, regional heat distribution, and core rewarming of forced-air warming with a novel circulating-water garment. Methods: Nine volunteers were each evaluated on two randomly ordered study days. They were anesthetized and cooled to a core temperature near 34°C. The volunteers were subsequently warmed for 2.5 hours with either a circulating-water garment or forced-air cover. Overall, heat balance was determined from the difference between cutaneous heat loss (thermal flux transducers) and metabolic heat production (oxygen consumption). Average arm and leg (peripheral) tissue temperatures were determined from 18 intramuscular needle thermocouples, 15 skin thermal flux transducers, and “deep” arm and foot thermometers. Results: Heat production (≈ 60 kcal/h) and loss (≈45 kcal/h) were similar with each treatment before warming. The increase in heat transfer across anterior portions of the skin surface was similar with each warming system (≈65 kcal/h). Forced-air warming had no effect on posterior heat transfer whereas circulating-water transferred 21 ± 9 kcal/h through the posterior skin surface after a half hour of warming. Over 2.5 h, circulating-water thus increased body heat content 56% more than forced air. Core temperatures thus increased faster than with circulating water than forced air, especially during the first hour, with the result that core temperature was 1.1 ± 0.7°C greater after 2.5 h (P < 0.001). Peripheral tissue heat content increased twice as much as core heat content with each device, but the core-to-peripheral tissue temperature gradient remained positive throughout the study. Conclusions: The circulating-water system transferred more heat than forced air, with the difference resulting largely from posterior heating. Circulating water rewarmed patients 0.4°C/h faster than forced air. A substantial peripheral-to-core

  13. The impact of drought and air pollution on metal profiles in peat cores.

    PubMed

    Souter, Laura; Watmough, Shaun A

    2016-01-15

    Peat cores have long been used to reconstruct atmospheric metal deposition; however, debate remains regarding how well historical depositional patterns are preserved in peat. This study examined peat cores sampled from 14 peatlands in the Sudbury region of Ontario, Canada, which has a well-documented history of acid and metal deposition. Copper (Cu) and lead (Pb) concentrations within individual peat cores were strongly correlated and were elevated in the upper 10 cm, especially in the sites closest to the main Copper Cliff smelter. In contrast, nickel (Ni) and cobalt (Co) concentrations were often elevated at depths greater than 10 cm, indicating much greater post-depositional movement of these metals compared with Cu and Pb. Post-depositional movement of metals is supported by the observation that Ni and Co concentrations in peat pore water increased by approximately 530 and 960% for Ni and Co, respectively between spring and summer due to drought-induced acidification, but there was much less change in Cu concentration. Sphagnum cover and (210)Pb activity measured at 10 cm at the 14 sites significantly increased with distance from Copper Cliff, and the surface peat von Post score decreased with distance from Copper Cliff, indicating the rate of peat formation increases with distance from Sudbury presumably as a result of improved Sphagnum survival. This study shows that the ability of peat to preserve deposition histories of some metals is strongly affected by drought-induced post-depositional movement and that loss of Sphagnum due to air pollution impairs the rate of peat formation, further affecting metal profiles in peatlands.

  14. Piezoelectric transformers for low-voltage generation of gas discharges and ionic winds in atmospheric air

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Michael J.; Go, David B.

    2015-12-28

    To generate a gas discharge (plasma) in atmospheric air requires an electric field that exceeds the breakdown threshold of ∼30 kV/cm. Because of safety, size, or cost constraints, the large applied voltages required to generate such fields are often prohibitive for portable applications. In this work, piezoelectric transformers are used to amplify a low input applied voltage (<30 V) to generate breakdown in air without the need for conventional high-voltage electrical equipment. Piezoelectric transformers (PTs) use their inherent electromechanical resonance to produce a voltage amplification, such that the surface of the piezoelectric exhibits a large surface voltage that can generate corona-like discharges on its corners or on adjacent electrodes. In the proper configuration, these discharges can be used to generate a bulk air flow called an ionic wind. In this work, PT-driven discharges are characterized by measuring the discharge current and the velocity of the induced ionic wind with ionic winds generated using input voltages as low as 7 V. The characteristics of the discharge change as the input voltage increases; this modifies the resonance of the system and subsequent required operating parameters.

  15. Piezoelectric transformers for low-voltage generation of gas discharges and ionic winds in atmospheric air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Michael J.; Go, David B.

    2015-12-01

    To generate a gas discharge (plasma) in atmospheric air requires an electric field that exceeds the breakdown threshold of ˜30 kV/cm. Because of safety, size, or cost constraints, the large applied voltages required to generate such fields are often prohibitive for portable applications. In this work, piezoelectric transformers are used to amplify a low input applied voltage (<30 V) to generate breakdown in air without the need for conventional high-voltage electrical equipment. Piezoelectric transformers (PTs) use their inherent electromechanical resonance to produce a voltage amplification, such that the surface of the piezoelectric exhibits a large surface voltage that can generate corona-like discharges on its corners or on adjacent electrodes. In the proper configuration, these discharges can be used to generate a bulk air flow called an ionic wind. In this work, PT-driven discharges are characterized by measuring the discharge current and the velocity of the induced ionic wind with ionic winds generated using input voltages as low as 7 V. The characteristics of the discharge change as the input voltage increases; this modifies the resonance of the system and subsequent required operating parameters.

  16. Measurement of effective air diffusion coefficients for trichloroethene in undisturbed soil cores.

    PubMed

    Bartelt-Hunt, Shannon L; Smith, James A

    2002-06-01

    In this study, we measure effective diffusion coefficients for trichloroethene in undisturbed soil samples taken from Picatinny Arsenal, New Jersey. The measured effective diffusion coefficients ranged from 0.0053 to 0.0609 cm2/s over a range of air-filled porosity of 0.23-0.49. The experimental data were compared to several previously published relations that predict diffusion coefficients as a function of air-filled porosity and porosity. A multiple linear regression analysis was developed to determine if a modification of the exponents in Millington's [Science 130 (1959) 100] relation would better fit the experimental data. The literature relations appeared to generally underpredict the effective diffusion coefficient for the soil cores studied in this work. Inclusion of a particle-size distribution parameter, d10, did not significantly improve the fit of the linear regression equation. The effective diffusion coefficient and porosity data were used to recalculate estimates of diffusive flux through the subsurface made in a previous study performed at the field site. It was determined that the method of calculation used in the previous study resulted in an underprediction of diffusive flux from the subsurface. We conclude that although Millington's [Science 130 (1959) 100] relation works well to predict effective diffusion coefficients in homogeneous soils with relatively uniform particle-size distributions, it may be inaccurate for many natural soils with heterogeneous structure and/or non-uniform particle-size distributions.

  17. Measurement of effective air diffusion coefficients for trichloroethene in undisturbed soil cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartelt-Hunt, Shannon L.; Smith, James A.

    2002-06-01

    In this study, we measure effective diffusion coefficients for trichloroethene in undisturbed soil samples taken from Picatinny Arsenal, New Jersey. The measured effective diffusion coefficients ranged from 0.0053 to 0.0609 cm 2/s over a range of air-filled porosity of 0.23-0.49. The experimental data were compared to several previously published relations that predict diffusion coefficients as a function of air-filled porosity and porosity. A multiple linear regression analysis was developed to determine if a modification of the exponents in Millington's [Science 130 (1959) 100] relation would better fit the experimental data. The literature relations appeared to generally underpredict the effective diffusion coefficient for the soil cores studied in this work. Inclusion of a particle-size distribution parameter, d10, did not significantly improve the fit of the linear regression equation. The effective diffusion coefficient and porosity data were used to recalculate estimates of diffusive flux through the subsurface made in a previous study performed at the field site. It was determined that the method of calculation used in the previous study resulted in an underprediction of diffusive flux from the subsurface. We conclude that although Millington's [Science 130 (1959) 100] relation works well to predict effective diffusion coefficients in homogeneous soils with relatively uniform particle-size distributions, it may be inaccurate for many natural soils with heterogeneous structure and/or non-uniform particle-size distributions.

  18. Diaplectic transformation of minerals: Vorotilov drill core, Puchezh-Katunki impact crater, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, V. I.

    1992-01-01

    The Vorotilov core was drilled in the central uplift of the Puchezh-Katunki astrobleme to a depth of 5.1 km. Impactites are revealed in the rocks of the core beginning from a depth of 366 m: suevites (66 m), allogenic breccias (112 m), and autogenic breccias (deeper than 544 m). These rocks are represented by shocked-metamorphic gneisses, schists, amphibolites of Archean age, and magmatic rocks (dolerites, olivines, and peridotites) that lie between them.

  19. Impact of the Cooling Equipment on the Key Design Parameters of a Core-Form Power Transformer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orosz, Tamás; Tamus, Zoltán Ádám

    2016-12-01

    The first step in the transformer design process is to find the active part's key design parameters. This is a non-linear mathematical optimisation task, which becomes more complex if the economic conditions are considered by the capitalisation of the losses. Geometric programming combined with the method of branch and bound can be an effective and accurate tool for this task even in the case of core-form power transformers, when formulating the short-circuit impedance in the required form is problematic. Most of the preliminary design methods consider only the active part of the transformer and the capitalised costs in order to determine the optimal key design parameters. In this paper, an extension of this meta-heuristic transformer optimisation model, which takes the cost of the insulating oil and the cooling equipment into consideration, is presented. Moreover, the impact of the new variables on the optimal key design parameters of a transformer design is examined and compared with the previous algorithm in two different economic scenarios. Significant difference can be found between the optimal set of key-design parameters if these new factors are considered.

  20. Unsteady three-dimensional natural convection in an inclined air slot with a hexagonal honeycomb core

    SciTech Connect

    Asako, Y.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamanaka, T.

    1995-08-01

    Unsteady three-dimensional natural convection heat transfer in an inclined air slot with a hexagonal honeycomb enclosure is investigated numerically. The numerical methodology is based on an algebraic coordinate transformation technique that maps the hexagonal cross section onto a rectangle. The transformed governing equations are solved with a control volume discretization scheme using a fully implicit method with time. The computations are performed for inclination angles in the range of 60 to 80 deg for Ra = 10{sup 4}, and in the range of 45 to 80 deg for Ra = 10{sup 5}, for Prandtl number of 0.7, and for a fixed aspect ratio of H/L = 5. A conductive thermal boundary condition for the honeycomb side walls is considered. Both periodic and nonperiodic oscillating solutions are obtained depending on the inclination angle and Rayleigh number. The complex flow patterns are presented in form of particle trajectory maps and are compared with the flow visualization results using microcapsulated liquid crystals. 17 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Transformation of Sulfur Species during Steam/Air Regeneration on a Ni Biomass Conditioning Catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Yung, M. M.; Cheah, S.; Magrini-Bair, K.; Kuhn, J. N.

    2012-07-06

    Sulfur K-edge XANES identified transformation of sulfides to sulfates during combined steam and air regeneration on a Ni/Mg/K/Al2O3 catalyst used to condition biomass-derived syngas. This catalyst was tested over multiple reaction/regeneration/reduction cycles. Postreaction catalysts showed the presence of sulfides on H2S-poisoned sites. Although H2S was observed to leave the catalyst bed during regeneration, sulfur remained on the catalyst, and a transformation from sulfides to sulfates was observed. Following the oxidative regeneration, the subsequent H2 reduction led to a partial reduction of sulfates back to sulfides, indicating the difficulty and sensitivity in achieving complete sulfur removal during regeneration for biomass-conditioning catalysts.

  2. Transformations in understanding the health impacts of air pollutants in the 20th century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brimblecombe, P.

    2009-02-01

    The transformations of air pollution in the 20th century are well known. The century opened with urban atmospheres polluted by the combustion products of burning coal: smoke and sulfur dioxide. At the millennium these pollutants had almost vanished, replaced by the pollutants, both primary and secondary, a function of fossil-fuelled vehicles. However transitions in terms of health outcomes have been equally dramatic. Fine particulate matter causes notable cardiovascular problems such as increased incidence of stroke and heart attack, although the mechanism remains somewhat unclear. Cancer inducing air pollutants remain a concern, but in addition more recently there has been a rising interest in the presence of neurotoxins and endocrine disrupting substances in the environment.

  3. Plastome sequences of Lygodium japonicum and Marsilea crenata reveal the genome organization transformation from basal ferns to core leptosporangiates.

    PubMed

    Gao, Lei; Wang, Bo; Wang, Zhi-Wei; Zhou, Yuan; Su, Ying-Juan; Wang, Ting

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that core leptosporangiates, the most species-rich group of extant ferns (monilophytes), have a distinct plastid genome (plastome) organization pattern from basal fern lineages. However, the details of genome structure transformation from ancestral ferns to core leptosporangiates remain unclear because of limited plastome data available. Here, we have determined the complete chloroplast genome sequences of Lygodium japonicum (Lygodiaceae), a member of schizaeoid ferns (Schizaeales), and Marsilea crenata (Marsileaceae), a representative of heterosporous ferns (Salviniales). The two species represent the sister and the basal lineages of core leptosporangiates, respectively, for which the plastome sequences are currently unavailable. Comparative genomic analysis of all sequenced fern plastomes reveals that the gene order of L. japonicum plastome occupies an intermediate position between that of basal ferns and core leptosporangiates. The two exons of the fern ndhB gene have a unique pattern of intragenic copy number variances. Specifically, the substitution rate heterogeneity between the two exons is congruent with their copy number changes, confirming the constraint role that inverted repeats may play on the substitution rate of chloroplast gene sequences.

  4. Transforming powder mechanical properties by core/shell structure: compressible sand.

    PubMed

    Shi, Limin; Sun, Changquan Calvin

    2010-11-01

    Some active pharmaceutical ingredients possess poor mechanical properties and are not suitable for tableting. Using fine sand (silicon dioxide), we show that a core/shell structure, where a core particle (sand) is coated with a thin layer of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), can profoundly improve powder compaction properties. Sand coated with 5% PVP could be compressed into intact tablets. Under a given compaction pressure, tablet tensile strength increases dramatically with the amount of coating. This is in sharp contrast to poor compaction properties of physical mixtures, where intact tablets cannot be made when PVP content is 20% or less. The profoundly improved tabletability of core/shell particles is attributed to the formation of a continuous three-dimensional bonding network in the tablet.

  5. A high-resolution air chemistry record from an Alpine ice core: Fiescherhorn glacier, Swiss Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwikowski, M.; Brütsch, S.; GäGgeler, H. W.; Schotterer, U.

    1999-06-01

    Glaciochemical studies at midlatitudes promise to contribute significantly to the understanding of the atmospheric cycling of species with short atmospheric lifetimes. Here we present results of chemical analyses of environmentally relevant species performed on an ice core from Fiescherhorn glacier, Swiss Alps (3890 m above sea level). This glacier site is unique since it is located near the high-alpine research station Jungfraujoch. There long-term meteorological and air quality measurements exist, which were used to calibrate the paleodata. The 77-m-long ice core was dated by annual layer counting using the seasonally varying signals of tritium and δ18O. It covers the time period 1946-1988 and shows a high net accumulation of water of 1.4 m yr-1 allowing for the reconstruction of high-resolution environmental records. Chemical composition was dominated by secondary aerosol constituents as well as mineral dust components, characterizing the Fiescherhorn site as a relatively unpolluted continental site. Concentrations of species like ammonium, nitrate, and sulfate showed an increasing trend from 1946 until about 1975, reflecting anthropogenic emission trends in western Europe. For mineral dust tracers, no trends were obvious, whereas chloride and sodium showed slightly higher levels from 1965 until 1988, indicating a change in the strength of sea-salt transport. Good agreement between the sulfate paleorecord with direct atmospheric measurements was found (correlation coefficient r2 = 0.41). Thus a "calibration" of the paleorecord over a significant period of time could be conducted, revealing an average scavenging ratio of 180 for sulfate.

  6. Stationary rotary force waves on the liquid-air core interface of a swirl atomizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chinn, J. J.; Cooper, D.; Yule, A. J.; Nasr, G. G.

    2016-10-01

    A one-dimensional wave equation, applicable to the waves on the surface of the air-core of a swirl atomizer is derived analytically, by analogy to the similar one-dimensional wave equation derivation for shallow-water gravity waves. In addition an analogy to the flow of water over a weir is used to produce an analytical derivation of the flow over the lip of the outlet of a swirl atomizer using the principle of maximum flow. The principle of maximum flow is substantiated by reference to continuity of the discharge in the direction of streaming. For shallow-water gravity waves, the phase velocity is the same expression as for the critical velocity over the weir. Similarly, in the present work, the wave phase velocity on the surface of the air-core is shown to be the same expression as for the critical velocity for the flow at the outlet. In addition, this wave phase velocity is shown to be the square root of the product of the radial acceleration and the liquid thickness, as analogous with the wave phase velocity for shallow water gravity waves, which is the square root of the product of the acceleration due to gravity and the water depth. The work revisits the weirs and flumes work of Binnie et al. but using a different methodology. The results corroborate with the work of Binnie. High speed video, Laser Doppler Anemometry and deflected laser beam experimental work has been carried out on an oversize Perspex (Plexiglas) swirl atomizer. Three distinctive types of waves were detected: helical striations, low amplitude random ripples and low frequency stationary waves. It is the latter wave type that is considered further in this article. The experimentally observed waves appear to be stationary upon the axially moving flow. The mathematical analysis allows for the possibility of a negative value for the phase velocity expression. Therefore the critical velocity and the wave phase velocity do indeed lead to stationary waves in the atomizer. A quantitative comparison

  7. Analysis of an Aircraft Honeycomb Sandwich Panel with Circular Face Sheet/Core Disbond Subjected to Ground-Air Pressurization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinker, Martin; Krueger, Ronald; Ratcliffe, James

    2013-01-01

    The ground-air pressurization of lightweight honeycomb sandwich structures caused by alternating pressure differences between the enclosed air within the honeycomb core and the ambient environment is a well-known and controllable loading condition of aerospace structures. However, initial face sheet/core disbonds intensify the face sheet peeling effect of the internal pressure load significantly and can decrease the reliability of the sandwich structure drastically. Within this paper, a numerical parameter study was carried out to investigate the criticality of initial disbonds in honeycomb sandwich structures under ground-air pressurization. A fracture mechanics approach was used to evaluate the loading at the disbond front. In this case, the strain energy release rate was computed via the Virtual Crack Closure Technique. Special attention was paid to the pressure-deformation coupling which can decrease the pressure load within the disbonded sandwich section significantly when the structure is highly deformed.

  8. Transforming the Core Business of Teaching and Learning in Classrooms through ICT

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chandra, Vinesh; Mills, Kathy A.

    2015-01-01

    Information and Communication Technology (ICT) has become an integral part of societies across the globe. This study demonstrates how successful technology integration by 10 experienced teachers in an Australian high school was dependent on teacher-driven change and innovation that influenced the core business of teaching and learning. The…

  9. Balancing the Core Strategies of Institutional Transformation: Toward a "Mobile" Model of Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kezar, Adrianna; Eckel, Peter

    This study examined the micro-level contextual factors that impact the process of large-scale, transformational, intentional change at institutions of higher education. The study used an organizational culture framework to examine use of change strategies from the "general" literature on change, to identify micro-level issues and strategies that…

  10. ZT-P: an advanced air core reversed field pinch prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenberg, K.F.; Buchenauer, C.J.; Burkhardt, L.C.; Caudill, L.D.; Dike, R.S.; Dominguez, T.; Downing, J.N.; Forman, P.R.; Garcia, J.A.; Giger, A.J.

    1986-01-01

    The ZT-P experiment, with a major radius of 0.45 m and a minor radius of 0.07 m, was designed to prototype the next generation of reversed field pinch (RFP) machines at Los Alamos. ZT-P utilizes an air-core poloidal field system, with precisely wound and positioned rigid copper coils, to drive the plasma current and provide plasma equilibrium with intrinsically low magnetic field errors. ZT-P's compact configuration is adaptable to test various first wall and limiter designs at reactor-relevant current densities in the range of 5 to 20 MA/m/sup 2/. In addition, the load assembly design allows for the installation of toroidal field divertors. Design of ZT-P began in October 1983, and assembly was completed in October 1984. This report describes the magnetic, electrical, mechanical, vacuum, diagnostic, data acquisition, and control aspects of the machine design. In addition, preliminary data from initial ZT-P operation are presented. Because of ZT-P's prototypical function, many of its design aspects and experimental results are directly applicable to the design of a next generation RFP. 17 refs., 47 figs.

  11. Locomotion and phenotypic transformation of the amoeboflagellate Naegleria gruberi at the water-air interface.

    PubMed

    Preston, Terence M; King, Conrad A

    2003-01-01

    The protozoon Naegleria gruberi is able to carry out amoeboid locomotion at the water-air interface in a manner indistinguishable from that exhibited on solid substrata with the production of focal contacts and associated filopodia. The speed of locomotion at this interface can be modulated by changes in electrolyte concentrations; these speed changes are identical to those observed at a water-glass interface. The nature of the water-air interface is discussed leading to the hypothesis that surface tension alone could provide suitable properties for the adhesion and translocation of amoebae at this interface without necessitating specific, absorbed molecules. The temporary swimming flagellate stage of Naegleria is able to dock at the interface, make stable adhesions to it, and revert to the amoeboid phenotype. Conversely, amoebae resident at the water-air interface can transform to swimming flagellates and escape into the bulk liquid phase. We report the presence of Naegleria amoebae in the surface microlayers of natural ponds; thus, in freshwater bodies there may be active shuttling of Naegleria amoebae from the benthos to the surface microlayers by means of the non-feeding, swimming flagellate phenotype. The public health implication of this behaviour in the case of the pathogenic relative, Naegleria fowleri, is discussed.

  12. The fibril core of transforming growth factor beta-induced protein (TGFBIp) facilitates aggregation of corneal TGFBIp

    PubMed Central

    Sørensen, Charlotte S.; Runager, Kasper; Scavenius, Carsten; Jensen, Morten M.; Nielsen, Nadia S.; Christiansen, Gunna; Petersen, Steen V.; Karring, Henrik; Sanggaard, Kristian W.; Enghild, Jan J.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the transforming growth factor beta-induced (TGFBI) gene result in a group of hereditary diseases of the cornea that are collectively known as TGFBI corneal dystrophies. These mutations translate into amino acid substitutions mainly within the fourth fasciclin 1 domain (FAS1-4) of the transforming growth factor beta-induced protein (TGFBIp) and cause either amyloid or non-amyloid protein aggregates in the anterior and central parts of the cornea, depending on the mutation. The A546T substitution in TGFBIp causes lattice corneal dystrophy (LCD), which manifests as amyloid-type aggregates in the corneal stroma. We previously showed that the A546T substitution renders TGFBIp and the FAS1-4 domain thermodynamically less stable compared with the wild-type (WT) protein, and the mutant FAS1-4 is prone to amyloid formation in vitro. In the present study, we identified the core of A546T FAS1-4 amyloid fibrils. Significantly, we identified the Y571-R588 region of TGFBIp, which we previously found to be enriched in amyloid deposits in LCD patients. We further found that the Y571-R588 peptide seeded fibrillation of A546T FAS1-4 and, more importantly, we demonstrated that native TGFBIp aggregates in the presence of fibrils formed by the core peptide. Collectively, these data suggest an involvement of the Y571-R588 peptide in LCD pathophysiology. PMID:25910219

  13. Current limiting behavior in three-phase transformer-type SFCLs using an iron core according to variety of fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Yong-Sun; Jung, Byung-Ik; Ha, Kyoung-Hun; Choi, Soo-Geun; Park, Hyoung-Min; Choi, Hyo-Sang

    To apply the superconducting fault current limiter (SFCL) to the power system, the reliability of the fault-current-limiting operation must be ensured in diverse fault conditions. The SFCL must also be linked to the operation of the high-speed recloser in the power system. In this study, a three-phase transformer-type SFCL, which has a neutral line to improve the simultaneous quench characteristics of superconducting elements, was manufactured to analyze the fault-current-limiting characteristic according to the single, double, and triple line-to-ground faults. The transformer-type SFCL, wherein three-phase windings are connected to one iron core, reduced the burden on the superconducting element as the superconducting element on the sound phase was also quenched in the case of the single line-to-ground fault. In the case of double or triple line-to-ground faults, the flux from the faulted phase winding was interlinked with other faulted or sound phase windings, and the fault-current-limiting rate decreased because the windings of three phases were inductively connected by one iron core.

  14. A compact, high-voltage pulsed charging system based on an air-core pulse transformer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tianyang; Chen, Dongqun; Liu, Jinliang; Liu, Chebo; Yin, Yi

    2015-09-01

    Charging systems of pulsed power generators on mobile platforms are expected to be compact and provide high pulsed power, high voltage output, and high repetition rate. In this paper, a high-voltage pulsed charging system with the aforementioned characteristics is introduced, which can be applied to charge a high-voltage load capacitor. The operating principle of the system and the technical details of the components in the system are described in this paper. The experimental results show that a 600 nF load capacitor can be charged to 60 kV at 10 Hz by the high-voltage pulsed charging system for a burst of 0.5 s. The weight and volume of the system are 60 kg and 600 × 500 × 380 mm(3), respectively.

  15. A compact, high-voltage pulsed charging system based on an air-core pulse transformer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tianyang; Chen, Dongqun; Liu, Jinliang; Liu, Chebo; Yin, Yi

    2015-09-01

    Charging systems of pulsed power generators on mobile platforms are expected to be compact and provide high pulsed power, high voltage output, and high repetition rate. In this paper, a high-voltage pulsed charging system with the aforementioned characteristics is introduced, which can be applied to charge a high-voltage load capacitor. The operating principle of the system and the technical details of the components in the system are described in this paper. The experimental results show that a 600 nF load capacitor can be charged to 60 kV at 10 Hz by the high-voltage pulsed charging system for a burst of 0.5 s. The weight and volume of the system are 60 kg and 600 × 500 × 380 mm3, respectively.

  16. Towards constraining the stratosphere-troposphere exchange of radiocarbon: strategies of stratospheric 14CO2 measurements using AirCore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Huilin; Paul, Dipayan; Meijer, Harro; Miller, John; Kivi, Rigel; Krol, Maarten

    2016-04-01

    Radiocarbon (14C) plays an important role in the carbon cycle studies to understand both natural and anthropogenic carbon fluxes, but also in atmospheric chemistry to constrain hydroxyl radical (OH) concentrations in the atmosphere. Apart from the enormous 14C emissions from nuclear bomb testing in the 1950s and 1960s, radiocarbon is primarily produced in the stratosphere due to the cosmogenic production. To this end, better understanding the stratospheric radiocarbon source is very useful to advance the use of radiocarbon for these applications. However, stratospheric 14C observations have been very limited so that there are large uncertainties on the magnitude and the location of the 14C production as well as the transport of radiocarbon from the stratosphere to the troposphere. Recently we have successfully made stratospheric 14C measurements using AirCore samples from Sodankylä, Northern Finland. AirCore is an innovative atmospheric sampling system, which passively collects atmospheric air samples into a long piece of coiled stainless steel tubing during the descent of a balloon flight. Due to the relatively low cost of the consumables, there is a potential to make such AirCore profiling in other parts of the world on a regular basis. In this study, we simulate the 14C in the atmosphere and assess the stratosphere-troposphere exchange of radiocarbon using the TM5 model. The Sodankylä radiocarbon measurements will be used to verify the performance of the model at high latitude. Besides this, we will also evaluate the influence of different cosmogenic 14C production scenarios and the uncertainties in the OH field on the seasonal cycles of radiocarbon and on the stratosphere-troposphere exchange, and based on the results design a strategy to set up a 14C measurement program using AirCore.

  17. TRANSFORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    LACKS,S.A.

    2003-10-09

    Transformation, which alters the genetic makeup of an individual, is a concept that intrigues the human imagination. In Streptococcus pneumoniae such transformation was first demonstrated. Perhaps our fascination with genetics derived from our ancestors observing their own progeny, with its retention and assortment of parental traits, but such interest must have been accelerated after the dawn of agriculture. It was in pea plants that Gregor Mendel in the late 1800s examined inherited traits and found them to be determined by physical elements, or genes, passed from parents to progeny. In our day, the material basis of these genetic determinants was revealed to be DNA by the lowly bacteria, in particular, the pneumococcus. For this species, transformation by free DNA is a sexual process that enables cells to sport new combinations of genes and traits. Genetic transformation of the type found in S. pneumoniae occurs naturally in many species of bacteria (70), but, initially only a few other transformable species were found, namely, Haemophilus influenzae, Neisseria meningitides, Neisseria gonorrheae, and Bacillus subtilis (96). Natural transformation, which requires a set of genes evolved for the purpose, contrasts with artificial transformation, which is accomplished by shocking cells either electrically, as in electroporation, or by ionic and temperature shifts. Although such artificial treatments can introduce very small amounts of DNA into virtually any type of cell, the amounts introduced by natural transformation are a million-fold greater, and S. pneumoniae can take up as much as 10% of its cellular DNA content (40).

  18. TRANSFORMER

    DOEpatents

    Baker, W.R.

    1959-08-25

    Transformers of a type adapted for use with extreme high power vacuum tubes where current requirements may be of the order of 2,000 to 200,000 amperes are described. The transformer casing has the form of a re-entrant section being extended through an opening in one end of the cylinder to form a coaxial terminal arrangement. A toroidal multi-turn primary winding is disposed within the casing in coaxial relationship therein. In a second embodiment, means are provided for forming the casing as a multi-turn secondary. The transformer is characterized by minimized resistance heating, minimized external magnetic flux, and an economical construction.

  19. Fabrication of a polyvinylidene difluoride fiber with a metal core and its application as directional air flow sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Yixiang; Liu, Rongrong; Hui, Shen

    2016-09-01

    We fabricated a sensitive air flow detector that mimic the sensing mechanism found at the tail of some insects. [see Y. Yang, A. Klein, H. Bleckmann and C. Liu, Appl. Phys. Lett. 99(2) (2011); J. J. Heys, T. Gedeon, B. C. Knott and Y. Kim, J. Biomech. 41(5), 977 (2008); J. Tao and X. Yu, Smart Mat. Struct. 21(11) (2012)]. Our bionic airflow sensor uses a polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) microfiber with a molybdenum core which we produced with the hot extrusion tensile method. The surface of the fiber is partially coated with conductive silver adhesive that serve as surface electrodes. A third electrode, the metal core is used to polarize polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) under the surface electrodes. The cantilever beam structure of the prepared symmetric electrodes of metal core piezoelectric fiber (SMPF) is used as the artificial hair airflow sensor. The surface electrodes are used to measure output voltage. Our theoretical and experimental results show that the SMPF responds fast to air flow changes, the output charge has an exponential correlation with airflow velocity and a cosine relation with the direction of airflow. Our bionic airflow sensor with directional sensing ability can also measure air flow amplitude. [see H. Droogendijk, R. G. P. Sanders and G. J. M. Krijnen, New J. Phys. 15 (2013)]. By using two surface electrodes, our sensing circuit further improves sensitivity.

  20. Metglas 2714A for Low Temperature Transformer Core and EMI Filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quach, Hung; Chui, Talso

    2003-01-01

    We have measured the real and imaginary parts of the relative permeability of Metglas 2714A. The magnetization noise density of a toroid made of this material is also measured with a SQUID magnetometer. This noise density is found to agree very well with the fluctuation dissipation theorem, implying that superconducting transformers with predictable noise characteristic can be designed. We also find that the relative permeability is larger than 10,000 at liquid helium temperature and at frequencies from DC to 100 kHz, making it suitable to be used as EMI filter material. Its usage should be similar to that of ferrites, with the exception that it is also effective at low temperatures.

  1. Climatic and insolation control on the high-resolution total air content in the NGRIP ice core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eicher, Olivier; Baumgartner, Matthias; Schilt, Adrian; Schmitt, Jochen; Schwander, Jakob; Stocker, Thomas F.; Fischer, Hubertus

    2016-10-01

    Because the total air content (TAC) of polar ice is directly affected by the atmospheric pressure and temperature, its record in polar ice cores was initially considered as a proxy for past ice sheet elevation changes. However, the Antarctic ice core TAC record is known to also contain an insolation signature, although the underlying physical mechanisms are still a matter of debate. Here we present a high-resolution TAC record over the whole North Greenland Ice Core Project ice core, covering the last 120 000 years, which independently supports an insolation signature in Greenland. Wavelet analysis reveals a clear precession and obliquity signal similar to previous findings on Antarctic TAC, with a different insolation history. In our high-resolution record we also find a decrease of 4-6 % (4-5 mL kg-1) in TAC as a response to Dansgaard-Oeschger events (DO events). TAC starts to decrease in parallel to increasing Greenland surface temperature and slightly before CH4 reacts to the warming but also shows a two-step decline that lasts for several centuries into the warm interstadial. The TAC response is larger than expected considering only changes in air density by local temperature and atmospheric pressure as a driver, pointing to a transient firnification response caused by the accumulation-induced increase in the load on the firn at bubble close-off, while temperature changes deeper in the firn are still small.

  2. Transformation of a Ruptured Giant Pulmonary Artery Aneurysm into an Air Cavity After Transcatheter Embolization in a Behcet's Patient

    SciTech Connect

    Cil, Barbaros E. Turkbey, Baris; Canyigit, Murat; Kumbasar, Ozlem O.; Celik, Gokhan; Demirkazik, Figen B.

    2006-02-15

    Pulmonary artery aneurysms due to Behcet's disease are mainly seen in young males and very rarely in females. To our knowledge there are only 10 cases reported in the related literature. Emergent transcatheter embolization was performed in a female patient with a known history of Behcet's disease in whom massive hemoptysis developed because of rupture of a giant pulmonary artery aneurysm. At 6-month follow-up, transformation of the aneurysm sac into an air cavity was detected. To our knowledge, such a transformation has never been reported in the literature before. Embolization of the pulmonary artery aneurysm and the mechanism of cavity transformation are reviewed and discussed.

  3. Habitable evaporated cores: transforming mini-Neptunes into super-Earths in the habitable zones of M dwarfs.

    PubMed

    Luger, R; Barnes, R; Lopez, E; Fortney, J; Jackson, B; Meadows, V

    2015-01-01

    We show that photoevaporation of small gaseous exoplanets ("mini-Neptunes") in the habitable zones of M dwarfs can remove several Earth masses of hydrogen and helium from these planets and transform them into potentially habitable worlds. We couple X-ray/extreme ultraviolet (XUV)-driven escape, thermal evolution, tidal evolution, and orbital migration to explore the types of systems that may harbor such "habitable evaporated cores" (HECs). We find that HECs are most likely to form from planets with ∼1 M⊕ solid cores with up to about 50% H/He by mass, though whether or not a given mini-Neptune forms a HEC is highly dependent on the early XUV evolution of the host star. As terrestrial planet formation around M dwarfs by accumulation of local material is likely to form planets that are small and dry, evaporation of small migrating mini-Neptunes could be one of the dominant formation mechanisms for volatile-rich Earths around these stars.

  4. A two-dimensional Stockwell transform for gravity wave analysis of AIRS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hindley, Neil P.; Smith, Nathan D.; Wright, Corwin J.; Rees, D. Andrew S.; Mitchell, Nicholas J.

    2016-06-01

    Gravity waves (GWs) play a crucial role in the dynamics of the earth's atmosphere. These waves couple lower, middle and upper atmospheric layers by transporting and depositing energy and momentum from their sources to great heights. The accurate parameterisation of GW momentum flux is of key importance to general circulation models but requires accurate measurement of GW properties, which has proved challenging. For more than a decade, the nadir-viewing Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) aboard NASA's Aqua satellite has made global, two-dimensional (2-D) measurements of stratospheric radiances in which GWs can be detected. However, one problem with current one-dimensional methods for GW analysis of these data is that they can introduce significant unwanted biases. Here, we present a new analysis method that resolves this problem. Our method uses a 2-D Stockwell transform (2DST) to measure GW amplitudes, horizontal wavelengths and directions of propagation using both the along-track and cross-track dimensions simultaneously. We first test our new method and demonstrate that it can accurately measure GW properties in a specified wave field. We then show that by using a new elliptical spectral window in the 2DST, in place of the traditional Gaussian, we can dramatically improve the recovery of wave amplitude over the standard approach. We then use our improved method to measure GW properties and momentum fluxes in AIRS measurements over two regions known to be intense hotspots of GW activity: (i) the Drake Passage/Antarctic Peninsula and (ii) the isolated mountainous island of South Georgia. The significance of our new 2DST method is that it provides more accurate, unbiased and better localised measurements of key GW properties compared to most current methods. The added flexibility offered by the scaling parameter and our new spectral window presented here extend the usefulness of our 2DST method to other areas of geophysical data analysis and beyond.

  5. Evaluation of dust-related health hazards associated with air coring at G-Tunnel, Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Skaggs, B.J.; Ortiz, L.W.; Burton, D.J.; Isom, B.L.; Vigil, E.A.

    1991-03-01

    The Yucca Mountain Project was established to evaluate the potential for storing high-level radioactive wastes in geologic formations. Hydrologists recommended that drilling or coring in support of characterization tests be performed dry. Dry drilling, or air coring, presents a concern about health protection for the drilling personnel. The rock generally has a high silica content, and natural zeolites are abundant. Some zeolites are fibrous, leading to concerns that inhalation may result in asbestos-like lung diseases. An industrial hygiene study (IH) was conducted as part of an air coring technical feasibility test. The IH study found the potential for exposures to airborne silica and nuisance dusts to be within regulatory requirements and determined the commercial dust control equipment monitored to be effective when used in conjunction with a good area ventilation system and sound IH practices. Fibrous zeolites were not detected. Recommendations for the Yucca Mountain studies are (1) dust collection and control equipment equivalent or superior to that monitored must be used for any dry drilling activity and must be used with good general dilution ventilation and local exhaust ventilation provided on major emission sources; (2) good industrial hygiene work practices must be implemented, including monitoring any area where zeolitic fibers are suspect; and (3) a study should be conducted to determine the biological effects of the fibrous zeolite, mordenite. 25 refs., 17 figs., 14 tabs.

  6. Highly active and durable core-corona structured bifunctional catalyst for rechargeable metal-air battery application.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhu; Yu, Aiping; Higgins, Drew; Li, Hui; Wang, Haijiang; Chen, Zhongwei

    2012-04-11

    A new class of core-corona structured bifunctional catalyst (CCBC) consisting of lanthanum nickelate centers supporting nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes (NCNT) has been developed for rechargeable metal-air battery application. The nanostructured design of the catalyst allows the core and corona to catalyze the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) and oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), respectively. These materials displayed exemplary OER and ORR activity through half-cell testing, comparable to state of the art commercial lanthanum nickelate (LaNiO(3)) and carbon-supported platinum (Pt/C), with added bifunctional capabilities allowing metal-air battery rechargeability. LaNiO(3) and Pt/C are currently the most accepted benchmark electrocatalyst materials for the OER and ORR, respectively; thus with comparable activity toward both of these reactions, CCBC are presented as a novel, inexpensive catalyst component for the cathode of rechargeable metal-air batteries. Moreover, after full-range degradation testing (FDT) CCBC retained excellent activity, retaining 3 and 13 times greater ORR and OER current upon comparison to state of the art Pt/C. Zinc-air battery performances of CCBC is in good agreement with the half-cell experiments with this bifunctional electrocatalyst displaying high activity and stability during battery discharge, charge, and cycling processes. Owing to its outstanding performance toward both the OER and ORR, comparable with the highest performing commercial catalysts to date for each of the respective reaction, coupled with high stability and rechargeability, CCBC is presented as a novel class of bifunctional catalyst material that is very applicable to future generation rechargeable metal-air batteries.

  7. Climatic and insolation control on the high-resolution total air content in the NGRIP ice core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eicher, O.; Baumgartner, M.; Schilt, A.; Schmitt, J.; Schwander, J.; Stocker, T. F.; Fischer, H.

    2015-11-01

    Because the total air content (TAC) of polar ice is directly affected by the atmospheric pressure, its record in polar ice cores was considered as a proxy for past ice sheet elevation changes. However the Antarctic ice core TAC record is known to also contain an insolation signature, although the underlying physical mechanisms are still a matter of debate. Here we present a high-resolution TAC record over the whole North Greenland Ice Core Project ice core, covering the last 120 000 years, which independently supports an insolation signature in Greenland. Wavelet analysis reveals a clear precession and obliquity signal similar to previous findings on Antarctic TAC, with different insolation history. In our high-resolution record we also find a decrease of 3-5 % (3-4.2 mL kg-1) in TAC as a response to Dansgaard-Oeschger-Events (DO-events). TAC starts to decrease in parallel to increasing Greenland surface temperature and slightly before CH4 reacts to the warming, but also shows a two-step decline that lasts for several centuries into the warm phase/interstadial. The TAC response is larger than expected considering only local temperature and atmospheric pressure as a driver, pointing to transient firnification response caused by the accumulation-induced increase in the load on the firn at bubble close-off, while temperature changes deeper in the firn are still small.

  8. Nonlinear compression of high energy fiber amplifier pulses in air-filled hypocycloid-core Kagome fiber.

    PubMed

    Guichard, Florent; Giree, Achut; Zaouter, Yoann; Hanna, Marc; Machinet, Guillaume; Debord, Benoît; Gérôme, Frédéric; Dupriez, Pascal; Druon, Frédéric; Hönninger, Clemens; Mottay, Eric; Benabid, Fetah; Georges, Patrick

    2015-03-23

    We report on the generation of 34 fs and 50 µJ pulses from a high energy fiber amplifier system with nonlinear compression in an air-filled hypocycloid-core Kagome fiber. The unique properties of such fibers allow bridging the gap between solid core fibers-based and hollow capillary-based post-compression setups, thereby operating with pulse energies obtained with current state-of-the-art fiber systems. The overall transmission of the compression setup is over 70%. Together with Yb-doped fiber amplifier technologies, Kagome fibers therefore appear as a promising tool for efficient generation of pulses with durations below 50 fs, energies ranging from 10 to several hundreds of µJ, and high average powers.

  9. Air

    MedlinePlus

    ... do to protect yourself from dirty air . Indoor air pollution and outdoor air pollution Air can be polluted indoors and it can ... this chart to see what things cause indoor air pollution and what things cause outdoor air pollution! Indoor ...

  10. Facile transformation of FeO/Fe3O4 core-shell nanocubes to Fe3O4 via magnetic stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lak, Aidin; Niculaes, Dina; Anyfantis, George C.; Bertoni, Giovanni; Barthel, Markus J.; Marras, Sergio; Cassani, Marco; Nitti, Simone; Athanassiou, Athanassia; Giannini, Cinzia; Pellegrino, Teresa

    2016-09-01

    Here, we propose the use of magnetic hyperthermia as a means to trigger the oxidation of Fe1-xO/Fe3-δO4 core-shell nanocubes to Fe3-δO4 phase. As a first relevant consequence, the specific absorption rate (SAR) of the initial core-shell nanocubes doubles after exposure to 25 cycles of alternating magnetic field stimulation. The improved SAR value was attributed to a gradual transformation of the Fe1-xO core to Fe3-δO4, as evidenced by structural analysis including high resolution electron microscopy and Rietveld analysis of X-ray diffraction patterns. The magnetically oxidized nanocubes, having large and coherent Fe3-δO4 domains, reveal high saturation magnetization and behave superparamagnetically at room temperature. In comparison, the treatment of the same starting core-shell nanocubes by commonly used thermal annealing process renders a transformation to γ-Fe2O3. In contrast to other thermal annealing processes, the method here presented has the advantage of promoting the oxidation at a macroscopic temperature below 37 °C. Using this soft oxidation process, we demonstrate that biotin-functionalized core-shell nanocubes can undergo a mild self-oxidation transformation without losing their functional molecular binding activity.

  11. Facile transformation of FeO/Fe3O4 core-shell nanocubes to Fe3O4 via magnetic stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Lak, Aidin; Niculaes, Dina; Anyfantis, George C.; Bertoni, Giovanni; Barthel, Markus J.; Marras, Sergio; Cassani, Marco; Nitti, Simone; Athanassiou, Athanassia; Giannini, Cinzia; Pellegrino, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Here, we propose the use of magnetic hyperthermia as a means to trigger the oxidation of Fe1−xO/Fe3−δO4 core-shell nanocubes to Fe3−δO4 phase. As a first relevant consequence, the specific absorption rate (SAR) of the initial core-shell nanocubes doubles after exposure to 25 cycles of alternating magnetic field stimulation. The improved SAR value was attributed to a gradual transformation of the Fe1−xO core to Fe3−δO4, as evidenced by structural analysis including high resolution electron microscopy and Rietveld analysis of X-ray diffraction patterns. The magnetically oxidized nanocubes, having large and coherent Fe3−δO4 domains, reveal high saturation magnetization and behave superparamagnetically at room temperature. In comparison, the treatment of the same starting core-shell nanocubes by commonly used thermal annealing process renders a transformation to γ-Fe2O3. In contrast to other thermal annealing processes, the method here presented has the advantage of promoting the oxidation at a macroscopic temperature below 37 °C. Using this soft oxidation process, we demonstrate that biotin-functionalized core-shell nanocubes can undergo a mild self-oxidation transformation without losing their functional molecular binding activity. PMID:27665698

  12. Design and fabrication of a metal core PVDF fiber for an air flow sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Yixiang; Liu, Rongrong; Huang, Xiaomei; Hong, Jin; Huang, Huiyu; Hui, Shen

    2015-10-01

    To track prey or avoid predators, many arthropods can detect variations in airflow and pressure gradients using an array of very thin and sensitive filiform hairs. In this study, metal core piezoelectric poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) fibers were prepared to mimic such hair sensors. The flexibility of the fibers was very good, which was helpful for overcoming the typical brittleness of piezoelectric ceramic fibers. At the same time, the diameter of the fibers was very small (down to 50 μm in diameter). In order to mimic the insects’ hairs to the maximum extent, which was expected to greatly improve the sensitivity of such PVDF fiber-based sensors, a feasible process to prepare and extract electrodes on the surface of the fibers had to be developed. Compared with stainless steel filament-core fibers, the molybdenum filament-core PVDF fibers were easy to stretch. The molybdenum filament was then covered by a cylindrical PVDF layer with a diameter of 400 μm. One half of the longitudinal surface of the fibers was spray-coated with a conductive silver adhesive. The metal core was then used as one electrode, and the conductive silver adhesive was used as the other electrode. After polarization, a single metal-core PVDF fiber could be used as an airflow sensor. The surface structure and the sections of the PVDF fiber were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. The results of the mechanical stretching tests showed that the metal core greatly enhanced the mechanical properties of the PVDF fibers. X-ray diffraction revealed that the greater the stretching ratio, the higher the α-to-β-phase conversion rate during the preparation of the PVDF fibers. A single metal-core PVDF fiber was used as a bionic airflow sensor, and a mechanical model of this sensor was derived. The airflow sensing capability of the PVDF fiber was experimentally confirmed in a miniature wind tunnel. The results showed that a cantilevered metal-core PVDF fiber is capable of detecting the range

  13. Effect of silane type and air-drying temperature on bonding fiber post to composite core and resin cement.

    PubMed

    de Rosatto, Camila Maria Peres; Roscoe, Marina Guimarães; Novais, Veridiana Resende; Menezes, Murilo de Sousa; Soares, Carlos José

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of silane type and temperature of silane application on push-out bond strength between fiberglass posts with composite resin core and resin cement. One hundred and sixty fiberglass posts (Exacto, Angelus) had the surface treated with hydrogen peroxide 24%. Posts were divided in 8 groups according to two study factors: air-drying temperature after silane application (room temperature and 60 ºC) and silane type: three pre-hydrolyzed--Silano (Angelus), Prosil (FGM), RelyX Ceramic Primer (3M ESPE) and one two-component silane--Silane Coupling Agent (Dentsply). The posts (n=10) for testing the bond strength between post and composite core were centered on a cylindrical plastic matrix and composite resin (Filtek Z250 XT, 3M ESPE) that was incrementally inserted and photoactivated. Eighty bovine incisor roots (n=10) were prepared for testing the bond strength between post and resin cement (RelyX U100, 3M ESPE) and received the fiberglass posts. Push-out test was used to measure the bond strength. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA followed by Tukey's test (α=0.05). ANOVA revealed that temperature and silane had no influence on bond strength between composite core and post. However, for bond strength between post and resin cement, the temperature increase resulted in a better performance for Silane Coupling Agent, Silano and RelyX Ceramic Primer. At room temperature Silane Coupling Agent showed the lowest bond strength. Effect of the warm air-drying is dependent on the silane composition. In conclusion, the use of silane is influenced by wettability of resinous materials and pre-hydrolyzed silanes are more stable compared with the two-bottle silane.

  14. MEASUREMENT OF EFFECTIVE AIR DIFFUSION COEFFICIENTS FOR TRICHLOROETHENE IN UNDISTURBED SOIL CORES. (R826162)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    In this study, we measure effective diffusion coefficients for trichloroethene in undisturbed soil samples taken from Picatinny Arsenal, New Jersey. The measured effective diffusion coefficients ranged from 0.0053 to 0.0609 cm2/s over a range of air...

  15. The bright-side and the dark-side of CEO personality: examining core self-evaluations, narcissism, transformational leadership, and strategic influence.

    PubMed

    Resick, Christian J; Whitman, Daniel S; Weingarden, Steven M; Hiller, Nathan J

    2009-11-01

    This article reports on an examination of the relationships between chief executive officer (CEO) personality, transformational and transactional leadership, and multiple strategic outcomes in a sample of 75 CEOs of Major League Baseball organizations over a 100-year period. CEO bright-side personality characteristics (core self-evaluations) were positively related to transformational leadership, whereas dark-side personality characteristics (narcissism) of CEOs were negatively related to contingent reward leadership. In turn, CEO transformational and contingent reward leadership were related to 4 different strategic outcomes, including manager turnover, team winning percentage, fan attendance, and an independent rating of influence. CEO transformational leadership was positively related to ratings of influence, team winning percentage, and fan attendance, whereas contingent reward leadership was negatively related to manager turnover and ratings of influence.

  16. Transformer design tradeoffs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclyman, W. T.

    1977-01-01

    Technical memorandum includes transformer area product numbers, which are used to summarize dimensional and electrical properties of C-cores, pot cores, lamination, powder cores, and tape-wound cores. To aid in core selection, comparison of five common core materials is presented to indicate their influence on overall transformer efficiency and weight.

  17. The Fourier transform spectrometer of the Université Pierre et Marie Curie QualAir platform.

    PubMed

    Té, Y; Jeseck, P; Payan, S; Pépin, I; Camy-Peyret, C

    2010-10-01

    A Bruker Optics IFS 125HR Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) and the Laboratoire de Physique Moléculaire pour l'Atmosphère et l'Astrophysique retrieval algorithm were adapted for ground based atmospheric measurements. As one of the major instruments of the experimental research platform QualAir, this FTS is dedicated to study the urban air composition of large megacity such as Paris. The precise concentration measurements of the most important atmospheric pollutants are a key to improve the understanding and modeling of urban air pollution processes. Located in the center of Paris, this remote sensing spectrometer enables to monitor many pollutants. Examples for NO(2) and CO are demonstrating the performances of this new experimental setup.

  18. Accurate age scale of the Dome Fuji ice core, Antarctica from O2/N2 ratio of trapped air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, K.; Aoki, S.; Nakazawa, T.; Suzuki, K.; Parrenin, F.

    2012-04-01

    Chronology of the first Dome Fuji deep ice core (core length: 2,500 m, ice thickness: 3,035 m) for the age range from 80 kyr to 340 kyr ago was established by orbital tuning of measured O2/N2 ratios in trapped air to local summer insolation, with precision better than about 2,000 years (Kawamura et al., 2007). The O2/N2 ratios found in polar ice cores are slightly lower than the atmospheric ratio because of size-dependent molecular fractionation during bubble close-off. The magnitude of this gas fractionation is believed to be governed by the magnitude of snow metamorphism when the layer was originally at the surface, which in turn is controlled by local summer insolation (Fujita et al., 2009). A strong advantage of the O2/N2 chronology is that there is no need to assume a lag between climatic records in the ice core and orbital forcings, becacuse O2/N2 ratios record local insolation through physical processes. Accuracy of the chronology was validated by comparing the O2/N2 chronology with U-Th radiometric chronology of speleothem records (Cheng et al., 2009) for the ends of Terminations II, III and IV, as well as several large climatic events, for which both ice-core CH4 and speleothem δ18O (a proxy for precipitation) show abrupt shifts as seen in the last glacial period. All ages from O2/N2 and U-Th chronology agreed with each other within ~2,000 yr. The O2/N2 chronology permits comparisons between Antarctic climate, greenhouse gases, astronomically calculated orbital parameters, and radiometrically-dated sea level and monsoon records. Here, we completed the measurements of O2/N2 ratios of the second Dome Fuji ice core, which reached bedrock, for the range from 2,400 to 3,028 m (320 - 700 kyr ago) at approximately 2,000-year time resolution. We made significant improvements in ice core storage practices and mass spectrometry. In particular, the ice core samples were stored at about -50 ° C until the air extraction, except during short periods of transportation

  19. Controlled Environment Soil-Core Microcosm Unit (CESMU) for Investigating Fate, Transport, and Transformation of Chemicals in Site-Specific Soils

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-06-01

    34 Acid Rain," Environment Vol. 14, pp 33-44 (1972). 12. The Soil Core Microcosm - A Potential Screening Tool, EPA-600/3-79-089, U.S. Environmental...AD-A284 768 EDGEWOOD U A CN DEMW APUENT & •ENGCWR Dh Ct ZER U.& ARMY CXZWCAL AND WOLOGICAL DErzNu COwLAND ERDEC-TR-088 CONTROLLED ENVIRONMENT SOIL ...CORE MICROCOSM UNIT (CESMU) FOR INVESTIGATING FATE, TRANSPORT, AND TRANSFORMATION OF CHEMICALS IN SITE-SPECIFIC SOILS Ronald T. Checkal Randall S

  20. A Centrifuge-Based Technique for Dry Extraction of Air for Ice Core Studies of Carbon Dioxide.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grachev, A. M.; Brook, E. J.

    2008-12-01

    High resolution CO2 data from the Law Dome ice core document an abrupt ~10 ppm drop in CO2 at about 1600 AD (MacFarling Meure et al., Geophys. Res Lett., v. 33, L14810), which has been attributed to changes in human activities. CO2 measurements in ice cores are difficult, however, making verification of this feature an important task. We are undertaking a high-resolution study of CO2 between 1400 and 1800 AD in the WAIS Divide (Antarctica) ice core with a new dry extraction technique. The need for a dry extraction technique as opposed to a melt-refreeze technique in studies of CO2 from ice cores arises because of the well-documented artifacts in CO2 imposed by the presence of liquid water. Three dry-extraction methods have been employed by previous workers to measure CO2: needle-crushing method, ball-bearings method, and cheese-grater method (B. Stauffer, in: Encyclopedia of Quaternary Science, p. 1181, Elsevier 2007). Each has limitations, and we propose a simpler dry extraction technique, based on a large-capacity refrigerated centrifuge (the "centrifuge technique"), which eliminates the need to employ cryogenic temperatures to collect extracted gas and is more compatible with high sample throughput. The technique is now being tested on ~25-gram WAIS Divide samples in conjunction with CO2 measurements with a gas chromatograph. The technique employs a Beckman J- 6B centrifuge, in which evacuated stainless steel flask is placed: the flask has a weight inside positioned directly over a tall-standing piece of ice whose cross-section is small compared to that of the flask. Upon acceleration to 3000 rpm the weight moves down and presses the ice sample into a thin tablet covering flask's bottom, yielding the air extraction efficiency of ~80%. Preliminary tests suggest that precision and accuracy can be achieved at the level of ~1 ppm once the system is fine-tuned.

  1. A Panchromatic Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer for the NASA Geostationary Coastal and Air Pollution Events Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Yen-Hung; Key, Richard; Sander, Stanley; Blavier, Jean-Francois; Rider, David

    2011-01-01

    This paper summarizes the design and development of the Panchromatic Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (PanFTS) for the NASA Geostationary Coastal and Air Pollution Events (GEO-CAPE) Mission. The PanFTS instrument will advance the understanding of the global climate and atmospheric chemistry by measuring spectrally resolved outgoing thermal and reflected solar radiation. With continuous spectral coverage from the near-ultraviolet through the thermal infrared, this instrument is designed to measure pollutants, greenhouse gases, and aerosols as called for by the U.S. National Research Council Decadal Survey; Earth Science and Applications from Space: National Imperatives for the Next Decade and Beyond1. The PanFTS instrument is a hybrid instrument based on spectrometers like the Tropospheric Emissions Spectrometer (TES) that measures thermal emission, and those like the Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO), and the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) that measure scattered solar radiation. Simultaneous measurements over the broad spectral range from IR to UV is accomplished by a two sided interferometer with separate optical trains and detectors for the ultraviolet-visible and infrared spectral domains. This allows each side of the instrument to be independently optimized for its respective spectral domain. The overall interferometer design is compact because the two sides share a single high precision cryogenic optical path difference mechanism (OPDM) and metrology laser as well as a number of other instrument systems including the line-of-sight pointing mirror, the data management system, thermal control system, electrical system, and the mechanical structure. The PanFTS breadboard instrument has been tested in the laboratory and demonstrated the basic functionality for simultaneous measurements in the visible and infrared. It is set to begin operations in the field at the California Laboratory for Atmospheric Remote Sensing (CLARS) observatory on Mt. Wilson

  2. A Panchromatic Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer for the NASA Geostationary Coastal and Air Pollution Events Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yen-Hung; Key, Richard; Sander, Stanley; Blavier, Jean-Francois; Rider, David

    2011-10-01

    This paper summarizes the design and development of the Panchromatic Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (PanFTS) for the NASA Geostationary Coastal and Air Pollution Events (GEO-CAPE) Mission. The PanFTS instrument will advance the understanding of the global climate and atmospheric chemistry by measuring spectrally resolved outgoing thermal and reflected solar radiation. With continuous spectral coverage from the near-ultraviolet through the thermal infrared, this instrument is designed to measure pollutants, greenhouse gases, and aerosols as called for by the U.S. National Research Council Decadal Survey; Earth Science and Applications from Space: National Imperatives for the Next Decade and Beyond1. The PanFTS instrument is a hybrid based on spectrometers like the Tropospheric Emissions Spectrometer (TES) that measures thermal emission, and those like the Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO), and the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) that measure scattered solar radiation. Simultaneous measurements over the broad spectral range from IR to UV is accomplished by a two sided interferometer with separate optical trains and detectors for the UV-visible and IR spectral domains. This allows each side of the instrument to be independently optimized for its respective spectral domain. The overall interferometer design is compact because the two sides share a single high precision cryogenic optical path difference mechanism (OPDM) and metrology laser as well as a number of other instrument systems including the line-of-sight pointing mirror, the data management system, thermal control system, electrical system, and the mechanical structure. The PanFTS breadboard instrument has been tested in the laboratory and demonstrated the basic functionality for simultaneous measurements in the visible and IR. It is set to begin operations in the field at the California Laboratory for Atmospheric Remote Sensing (CLARS) observatory on Mt. Wilson measuring the atmospheric chemistry

  3. Development of 600 kV triple resonance pulse transformer.

    PubMed

    Li, Mingjia; Zhang, Faqiang; Liang, Chuan; Xu, Zhou

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, a triple-resonance pulse transformer based on an air-core transformer is introduced. The voltage across the high-voltage winding of the air-core transformer is significantly less than the output voltage; instead, the full output voltage appears across the tuning inductor. The maximum ratio of peak load voltage to peak transformer voltage is 2.77 in theory. By analyzing pulse transformer's lossless circuit, the analytical expression for the output voltage and the characteristic equation of the triple-resonance circuit are presented. Design method for the triple-resonance pulse transformer (iterated simulation method) is presented, and a triple-resonance pulse transformer is developed based on the existing air-core transformer. The experimental results indicate that the maximum ratio of peak voltage across the load to peak voltage across the high-voltage winding of the air-core transformer is approximately 2.0 and the peak output voltage of the triple-resonance pulse transformer is approximately 600 kV.

  4. Some Aspects of an Air-Core Single-Coil Magnetic Suspension System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamlet, Irvin L.; Kilgore, Robert A.

    1966-01-01

    This paper presents some of the technical aspects in the development at the Langley Research Center of an air-cove, dual-wound, single-coil, magnetic-suspension system with one-dimensional control. Overall electrical system design features and techniques are discussed in addition to the problems of control and stability. Special treatment is given to the operation of a dual-wound, high-current support coil which provides the bias fields and superimposed modulated field. Other designs features include a six-phase, solid-state power stage for modulation of the relatively large magnitude control current, and an associated six-phase trigger circuit.

  5. Design of solid-core microstructured optical fiber with steering-wheel air cladding for optimal evanescent-field sensing.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yinian; Du, Henry; Bise, Ryan

    2006-04-17

    We present the design of a solid-core microstructured optical fiber with steering-wheel pattern of large holes in cladding as platform for evanescent-field sensing. Both geometry and optical properties of the fiber are numerical computed and analyzed in consideration of manufacturability using sol-gel casting technique as well as by evaluating a triangular lattice of holes with three rings in the design structure so that effective parameters can be established using effective step-index model. We predict less than 0.7 dB/m confinement loss at 850 nm, 29%, 13.7%, and 7.2% of light intensity overlap in air holes at 1500 nm, 1000 nm, and 850 nm wavelength, respectively, in such fiber. With the low loss and high mode-field overlap, the steering-wheel structured fiber is well suited for evanescent-field sensing and detection of chemical and biological species.

  6. Low complexity MIMO method based on matrix transformation for few-mode multi-core optical transmission system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Xiaolong; Liu, Bo; Li, Li; Tian, Qinghua

    2016-07-01

    This paper proposes and demonstrates a low complexity multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) equalization digital signal processing (DSP) method for the few mode multi-core (FMMC) fiber optical transmission system. The MIMO equalization algorithm offers adaptive equalization taps according to the degree of crosstalk in cores or modes, which eliminates the interference among different modes and cores in space division multiplexing (SDM) transmission system. Compared with traditional MIMO method, the proposed scheme has increased the convergence rate by 4 times and reduced the number of finite impulse response (FIR) filters by 55% when the numbers of mode and core are three.

  7. Using High and Low Resolution Profiles of CO2 and CH4 Measured with AirCores to Evaluate Transport Models and Atmospheric Columns Retrieved from Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Membrive, O.; Crevoisier, C. D.; Sweeney, C.; Hertzog, A.; Danis, F.; Picon, L.; Engel, A.; Boenisch, H.; Durry, G.; Amarouche, N.

    2015-12-01

    Over the past decades many methods have been developed to monitor the evolution of greenhouse gases (GHG): ground networks (NOAA, ICOS, TCCON), aircraft campaigns (HIPPO, CARIBIC, Contrail…), satellite observations (GOSAT, IASI, AIRS…). Nevertheless, precise and regular vertical profile measurements are currently still missing from the observing system. To address this need, an original and innovative atmospheric sampling system called AirCore has been developed at NOAA (Karion et al. 2010). This new system allows balloon measurements of GHG vertical profiles from the surface up to 30 km. New versions of this instrument have been developed at LMD: a high-resolution version "AirCore-HR" that differs from other AirCores by its high vertical resolution and two "light" versions (lower resolution) aiming to be flown under meteorological balloon. LMD AirCores were flown on multi-instrument gondolas along with other independent instruments measuring CO2 and CH4 in-situ during the Strato Science balloon campaigns operated by the French space agency CNES in collaboration with the Canadian Space Agency in Timmins (Ontario, Canada) in August 2014 and 2015. First, we will present comparisons of the vertical profiles retrieved with various AirCores (LMD and Frankfurt University) to illustrate repeatability and impact of the vertical resolution as well as comparisons with independent in-situ measurements from other instruments (laser diode based Pico-SDLA). Second, we will illustrate the usefulness of AirCore measurements in the upper troposphere and stratosphere for validating and interpreting vertical profiles from atmospheric transport models as well as observations of total and partial column of methane and carbon dioxide from several current and future spaceborne missions such as: ACE-FTS, IASI and GOSAT.

  8. An Optimized Air-Core Coil Sensor with a Magnetic Flux Compensation Structure Suitable to the Helicopter TEM System

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chen; Liu, Fei; Lin, Jun; Zhu, Kaiguang; Wang, Yanzhang

    2016-01-01

    The air-core coil sensor (ACS) is widely used as a transducer to measure the variation in magnetic fields of a helicopter transient electromagnetic (TEM) system. A high periodic emitting current induces the magnetic field signal of the underground medium. However, such current also generates a high primary field signal that can affect the received signal of the ACS and even damage the receiver. To increase the dynamic range of the received signal and to protect the receiver when emitting current rises/falls, the combination of ACS with magnetic flux compensation structure (bucking coil) is necessary. Moreover, the optimized ACS, which is composed of an air-core coil and a differential pre-amplifier circuit, must be investigated to meet the requirements of the helicopter TEM system suited to rapid surveying for shallow buried metal mine in rough topography. Accordingly, two ACSs are fabricated in this study, and their performance is verified and compared inside a magnetic shielding room. Using the designed ACSs, field experiments are conducted in Baoqing County. The field experimental data show that the primary field response can be compensated when the bucking coil is placed at an appropriate point in the range of allowed shift distance beyond the center of the transmitting coil and that the damage to the receiver induced by the over-statured signal can be solved. In conclusion, a more suitable ACS is adopted and is shown to have better performance, with a mass of 2.5 kg, resultant effective area of 11.6 m2 (i.e., diameter of 0.496 m), 3 dB bandwidth of 66 kHz, signal-to-noise ratio of 4 (i.e., varying magnetic field strength of 0.2 nT/s), and normalized equivalent input noise of 3.62 nV/m2. PMID:27077862

  9. An Optimized Air-Core Coil Sensor with a Magnetic Flux Compensation Structure Suitable to the Helicopter TEM System.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen; Liu, Fei; Lin, Jun; Zhu, Kaiguang; Wang, Yanzhang

    2016-04-12

    The air-core coil sensor (ACS) is widely used as a transducer to measure the variation in magnetic fields of a helicopter transient electromagnetic (TEM) system. A high periodic emitting current induces the magnetic field signal of the underground medium. However, such current also generates a high primary field signal that can affect the received signal of the ACS and even damage the receiver. To increase the dynamic range of the received signal and to protect the receiver when emitting current rises/falls, the combination of ACS with magnetic flux compensation structure (bucking coil) is necessary. Moreover, the optimized ACS, which is composed of an air-core coil and a differential pre-amplifier circuit, must be investigated to meet the requirements of the helicopter TEM system suited to rapid surveying for shallow buried metal mine in rough topography. Accordingly, two ACSs are fabricated in this study, and their performance is verified and compared inside a magnetic shielding room. Using the designed ACSs, field experiments are conducted in Baoqing County. The field experimental data show that the primary field response can be compensated when the bucking coil is placed at an appropriate point in the range of allowed shift distance beyond the center of the transmitting coil and that the damage to the receiver induced by the over-statured signal can be solved. In conclusion, a more suitable ACS is adopted and is shown to have better performance, with a mass of 2.5 kg, resultant effective area of 11.6 m² (i.e., diameter of 0.496 m), 3 dB bandwidth of 66 kHz, signal-to-noise ratio of 4 (i.e., varying magnetic field strength of 0.2 nT/s), and normalized equivalent input noise of 3.62 nV/m².

  10. Zinc blende-oxide phase transformation upon oxygen annealing of ZnSe shell in ZnO-ZnSe core-shell nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jabri, S.; Amiri, G.; Hassani, S.; Lusson, A.; Sallet, V.; Meftah, A.; Galtier, P.; Oueslati, M.

    2017-03-01

    ZnO-ZnSe core-shell nanowires have been grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition and subsequently annealed in an O2 atmosphere. It has been found that the incorporation of oxygen into the ZnSe shell over the 470-580 °C temperature range results in a phase transformation from zinc Blende to orthorhombic and wurtzite. The X-ray diffraction pattern confirms that the heterostructures are composed of a wurtzite ZnO core and an oxide ZnSeO shell. The Raman spectroscopy study shows the appearance of additional peaks at 220 cm-1, 278 cm-1, 480 cm-1, 550 cm-1, and 568 cm-1, which reveal a phase transformation associated with the incorporation of the oxygen into the shell after annealing at 470 °C. This work opens a way to study the structure stability of ZnO-ZnSe core-shell nanowire production and help to understand the mechanisms of the oxidation in ZnO-ZnSe core-shell nanowires.

  11. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering in isolated air-guided modes of a hollow-core photonic-crystal fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Fedotov, A.B.; Zheltikov, A.M.; Konorov, S.O.; Mitrokhin, V.P.; Serebryannikov, E.E

    2004-10-01

    Hollow-core photonic-crystal fibers are shown to offer the unique possibility of coherent excitation and probing of Raman-active vibrations in molecules by isolated air-guided modes of electromagnetic radiation. A 3-cm section of a hollow photonic-crystal fiber is used to prepare isolated air-guided modes of pump and probe fields for a coherent excitation of 2331-cm{sup -1} Q-branch vibrations of molecular nitrogen in the gas filling the fiber core, enhancing coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering through these vibrations by a factor of 15 relative to the regime of tight focusing.

  12. Temperature insensitive one-dimensional bending vector sensor based on eccentric-core fiber and air cavity Fabry-Perot interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Jing; Zhou, Ai; Yuan, Libo

    2017-04-01

    A temperature insensitive directional bending sensor based on an eccentric-core fiber (ECF) cascaded with an air-cavity Fabry–Perot (F-P) interferometer is presented and demonstrated. The ECF-based air cavity F-P interferometer is fabricated by fuse splicing a piece of hollow-core fiber (HCF) in between an ECF and a multi-mode fiber (MMF). The bending sensitivities of the sensor at the two opposite most sensitive directions are 79.5 pm/m‑1 and ‑81.5 pm/m‑1, respectively. The temperature sensitivity of the proposed structure is as low as 1 pm °C‑1.

  13. Coexistence of total internal reflexion and bandgap modes in solid core photonic bandgap fibre with intersticial air holes.

    PubMed

    Perrin, Mathias; Quiquempois, Yves; Bouwmans, Géraud; Douay, Marc

    2007-10-17

    In this article, we deal with new properties of a Solid Core Photonic Bandgap (SC-PBGF) fiber with intersticial air holes (IAHs) in its transverse structure. It has been shown recently, that IAH enlarges its bandgaps (BG), compared to what is observed in a regular SC-PBGF. We shall describe the mechanisms that account for this BG opening, which has not been explained in detail yet. It is then interesting to discuss the role of air holes in the modification of the Bloch modes, at the boundaries of the BG. In particular, we will use a simple method to compute the exact BG diagrams in a faster way, than what is done usually, drawing some parallels between structured fibers and physics of photonic crystals. The very peculiar influence of IAHs on the upper/lower boundaries of the bandgaps will be explained thanks to the difference between mode profiles excited on both boundaries, and linked to the symmetry / asymmetry of the modes. We will observe a modification of the highest index band (n(FSM)) due to IAHs, that will enable us to propose a fiber design to guide by Total Internal Reflection (TIR) effect, as well as by a more common BG confinement. The transmission zone is deeply enlarged, compared to regular photonic bandgap fibers, and consists in the juxtaposition of (almost non overlapping) BG guiding zones and TIR zone.

  14. Transforming Air Force ISR for the Long War and Beyond (Wright Flyer Paper, Number 36)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    Air University Allen G. Peck, Lt Gen, Commander Air Command and Staff College Jimmie C. Jackson, Jr., Brig Gen, Commandant Zoë M . Hale, Col, PhD...component commander ( J /CFACC), firmly believes airpower must operate under the twin tenets of centralized control and decentralized execution to be...critical insight and ISR expertise from tactical level planning and execution. To maintain ISR relevancy at the tactical level, the J /CFACC must

  15. Measurement of nitrophenols in rain and air by two-dimensional liquid chromatography-chemically active liquid core waveguide spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ganranoo, Lucksagoon; Mishra, Santosh K; Azad, Abul K; Shigihara, Ado; Dasgupta, Purnendu K; Breitbach, Zachary S; Armstrong, Daniel W; Grudpan, Kate; Rappenglueck, Bernhard

    2010-07-01

    We report a novel system to analyze atmospheric nitrophenols (NPs). Rain or air sample extracts (1 mL) are preconcentrated on a narrow bore (2 mm) aliphatic anion exchanger. In the absence of strong retention of NPs exhibited by aromatic ion exchangers, retained NPs are eluted as a plug by injection of 100 microL of 0.1 M Na(2)SO(4) on to a short (2 x 50 mm) reverse phase C-18 column packed with 2.2 mum particles. The salt plug passes through the C-18 column unretained while the NPs are separated by an ammonium acetate buffered methanol-water eluent, compatible with mass spectrometry (MS). The eluted NPs are measured with a long path Teflon AF-based liquid core waveguide (0.15 x 1420 mm) illuminated by a 403 nm light emitting diode and detected by a monolithic photodiode-operational amplifier. The waveguide is rendered chemically active by suspending it over concentrated ammonia that permeates into the lumen. The NPs ionize to the yellow anion form (lambda(max) approximately 400 nm). The separation of 4-nitrophenol, 2,4-dinitrophenol, 2-methyl-4-nitrophenol, 3-methyl-4-nitrophenol, and 2-nitrophenol (these are the dominant NPs, typically in that order, in both rain and air of Houston and Arlington, TX, confirmed by tandem MS) takes just over 5 min with respective S/N = 3 limits of detection (LODs) of 60, 12, 30, 67, and 23 pg/mL compared to MS/MS LODs of 20, 49, 11, 20, and 210 pg/mL. Illustrative air and rain data are presented.

  16. The potential of passive-remote Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy to detect organic emissions under the Clean Air Act

    SciTech Connect

    Demirgian, J.C.; Hammer, C.L. ); Kroutil, R.T. )

    1992-01-01

    The Clean Air Act of 1990 regulates the emission of 198 air toxics. Currently, there is no existing technology by which a regulatory agency can independently determine if a facility is in compliance. We have successfully tested the ability of passive-remote Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy to detect chemical plumes released in the field. Additional laboratory releases demonstrated that FTIR spectroscopy can detect target analytes in mixtures containing components which have overlapping absorbances. The FTIR spectrometer was able to identify and quantify each component released with an average quantitative error of less than 20% using partial least squares (PLS) analysis and 40% using classical least squares analysis (CLS) when calibration files containing pure components and mixtures were used. Calibration files containing only pure analytes resulted in CLS outperforming PLS analyses.

  17. The potential of passive-remote Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy to detect organic emissions under the Clean Air Act

    SciTech Connect

    Demirgian, J.C.; Hammer, C.L.; Kroutil, R.T.

    1992-07-01

    The Clean Air Act of 1990 regulates the emission of 198 air toxics. Currently, there is no existing technology by which a regulatory agency can independently determine if a facility is in compliance. We have successfully tested the ability of passive-remote Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy to detect chemical plumes released in the field. Additional laboratory releases demonstrated that FTIR spectroscopy can detect target analytes in mixtures containing components which have overlapping absorbances. The FTIR spectrometer was able to identify and quantify each component released with an average quantitative error of less than 20% using partial least squares (PLS) analysis and 40% using classical least squares analysis (CLS) when calibration files containing pure components and mixtures were used. Calibration files containing only pure analytes resulted in CLS outperforming PLS analyses.

  18. A preliminary investigation into the use of Red Pine (Pinus Resinosa) tree cores as historic passive samplers of POPs in outdoor air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauert, Cassandra; Harner, Tom

    2016-09-01

    The suitability of Red Pine trees (Pinus Resinosa) to act as passive samplers for persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in outdoor air and to provide historic information on air concentration trends was demonstrated in this preliminary investigation. Red Pine tree cores from Toronto, Canada, were tested for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAHs), alkylated-PAHs, nitro and oxy-PAHs, polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and novel brominated flame retardants (novel BFRs). The PBDEs and novel BFRs demonstrated a similar relative contribution in cores representing 30 years of tree growth, to that reported in contemporary air samples. Analysis of tree ring segments of 5-15 years resulted in detectable concentrations of some PAHs and alk-PAHs and demonstrated a transition from petrogenic sources to pyrogenic sources over the period 1960-2015. A simple uptake model was developed that treats the tree rings as linear-phase passive air samplers. The bark infiltration factor, IFBARK, is a key parameter of the model that reflects the permeability of the bark to allow chemicals to be transferred from ambient air to the outer tree layer (cambium). An IFBARK of about 2% was derived for the Red Pine trees based on tree core and air monitoring data.

  19. Stabilized soliton self-frequency shift and 0.1- PHz sideband generation in a photonic-crystal fiber with an air-hole-modified core.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo-Wen; Hu, Ming-Lie; Fang, Xiao-Hui; Li, Yan-Feng; Chai, Lu; Wang, Ching-Yue; Tong, Weijun; Luo, Jie; Voronin, Aleksandr A; Zheltikov, Aleksei M

    2008-09-15

    Fiber dispersion and nonlinearity management strategy based on a modification of a photonic-crystal fiber (PCF) core with an air hole is shown to facilitate optimization of PCF components for a stable soliton frequency shift and subpetahertz sideband generation through four-wave mixing. Spectral recoil of an optical soliton by a red-shifted dispersive wave, generated through a soliton instability induced by high-order fiber dispersion, is shown to stabilize the soliton self-frequency shift in a highly nonlinear PCF with an air-hole-modified core relative to pump power variations. A fiber with a 2.3-microm-diameter core modified with a 0.9-microm-diameter air hole is used to demonstrate a robust soliton self-frequency shift of unamplified 50-fs Ti: sapphire laser pulses to a central wavelength of about 960 nm, which remains insensitive to variations in the pump pulse energy within the range from 60 to at least 100 pJ. In this regime of frequency shifting, intense high- and low-frequency branches of dispersive wave radiation are simultaneously observed in the spectrum of PCF output. An air-hole-modified-core PCF with appropriate dispersion and nonlinearity parameters is shown to provide efficient four-wave mixing, giving rise to Stokes and anti-Stokes sidebands whose frequency shift relative to the pump wavelength falls within the subpetahertz range, thus offering an attractive source for nonlinear Raman microspectroscopy.

  20. Transforming the Air Force: Bridging the Gaps with Servant-Leadership

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-01

    Luther King Jr., demonstrates how the servant-leadership philosophy facilitated greatness among the various people he led. Additionally, highlighted is a...transformation quest, the paper encourages the practice of Servant-Leadership to meet his challenges. A historical look at one influential leader, Dr. Martin

  1. Transformation of Air Quality Monitor Data from the International Space Station into Toxicological Effect Groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, John T.; Zalesak, Selina M.

    2011-01-01

    The primary reason for monitoring air quality aboard the International Space Station (ISS) is to determine whether air pollutants have collectively reached a concentration where the crew could experience adverse health effects. These effects could be near-real-time (e.g. headache, respiratory irritation) or occur late in the mission or even years later (e.g. cancer, liver toxicity). Secondary purposes for monitoring include discovery that a potentially harmful compound has leaked into the atmosphere or that air revitalization system performance has diminished. Typical ISS atmospheric trace pollutants consist of alcohols, aldehydes, aromatic compounds, halo-carbons, siloxanes, and silanols. Rarely, sulfur-containing compounds and alkanes are found at trace levels. Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations (SMACs) have been set in cooperation with a subcommittee of the National Research Council Committee on Toxicology. For each compound and time of exposure, the limiting adverse effect(s) has been identified. By factoring the analytical data from the Air Quality Monitor (AQM), which is in use as a prototype instrument aboard the ISS, through the array of compounds and SMACs, the risk of 16 specific adverse effects can be estimated. Within each adverse-effect group, we have used an additive model proportioned to each applicable 180-day SMAC to estimate risk. In the recent past this conversion has been performed using archival data, which can be delayed for months after an air sample is taken because it must be returned to earth for analysis. But with the AQM gathering in situ data each week, NASA is in a position to follow toxic-effect groups and correlate these with any reported crew symptoms. The AQM data are supplemented with data from real-time CO2 instruments aboard the ISS and from archival measurements of formaldehyde, which the AQM cannot detect.

  2. A centrifugal ice microtome for measurements of atmospheric CO2 on air trapped in polar ice cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bereiter, B.; Stocker, T. F.; Fischer, H.

    2012-10-01

    For atmospheric CO2 reconstructions using ice cores, the technique to release the trapped air from the ice samples is crucial for the precision and accuracy of the measurements. We present here a new dry extraction technique in combination with a new gas analytical system that together show significant improvements with respect to current systems. Ice samples (3-15 g) are pulverized using a novel Centrifugal Ice Microtome (CIM) by shaving the ice in a cooled vacuum chamber (-27 °C) in which no friction occurs due to the use of magnetic bearings. Both, the shaving principle of the CIM and the use of magnetic bearings have not been applied so far in this field. Shaving the ice samples produces finer ice powder and releases a minimum of 90% of the trapped air compared to 50%-70% when needle crushing is employed. In addition, the friction-free motion with an optimized design to reduce contaminations of the inner surfaces of the device result in a reduced system offset of about 2.0 ppmv compared to 4.9ppmv. The gas analytical part shows a factor two higher precision than our corresponding part of the previous system and all processes except the loading and cleaning of the CIM now run automatically. Compared to our previous system the new system shows a 3 times better measurement reproducibility of about 1.1 ppmv (1σ) which is similar to the best reproducibility of other systems applied in this field. With this high reproducibility, replicate measurements are not required anymore for most prospective measurement campaigns resulting in a possible output of 12-20 measurements per day compared to a maximum of 6 with other systems.

  3. A centrifugal ice microtome for measurements of atmospheric CO2 on air trapped in polar ice cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bereiter, B.; Stocker, T. F.; Fischer, H.

    2013-02-01

    For atmospheric CO2 reconstructions using ice cores, the technique to release the trapped air from the ice samples is essential for the precision and accuracy of the measurements. We present here a new dry extraction technique in combination with a new gas analytical system that together show significant improvements with respect to current systems. Ice samples (3-15 g) are pulverised using a novel centrifugal ice microtome (CIM) by shaving the ice in a cooled vacuum chamber (-27 °C) in which no friction occurs due to the use of magnetic bearings. Both, the shaving principle of the CIM and the use of magnetic bearings have not been applied so far in this field. Shaving the ice samples produces finer ice powder and releases a minimum of 90% of the trapped air compared to 50%-70% when needle crushing is employed. In addition, the friction-free motion with an optimized design to reduce contaminations of the inner surfaces of the device result in a reduced system offset of about 2.0 ppmv compared to 4.9 ppmv. The gas analytical part shows a higher precision than the corresponding part of our previous system by a factor of two, and all processes except the loading and cleaning of the CIM now run automatically. Compared to our previous system, the complete system shows a 3 times better measurement reproducibility of about 1.1 ppmv (1 σ) which is similar to the best reproducibility of other systems applied in this field. With this high reproducibility, no replicate measurements are required anymore for most future measurement campaigns resulting in a possible output of 12-20 measurements per day compared to a maximum of 6 with other systems.

  4. Characterization of organic material in ice core samples from North America, Greenland, and Antarctica using ultrahigh resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catanzano, V.; Grannas, A. M.; Sleighter, R. L.; Hatcher, P. G.

    2013-12-01

    Historically, it has been an analytical challenge to detect and identify the organic components present in ice cores, due to the low abundance of organic carbon. In order to detect and characterize the small amounts of organic matter in ice cores, ultra high resolution instrumentation is required. Here we report the use of ultrahigh resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry, coupled with electrospray ionization, to identify the molecular formulas and compound classes of organic matter in both modern and ancient ice core and glacial samples from Wyoming, Greenland, and Antarctica. A suite of 21 samples were analyzed and thousands of distinct molecular species were identified in each sample, providing clues to the nature and sources of organic matter in these regions. Major biochemical classes of compounds were detected such as lignins, tannins, carbohydrates, proteins, lipids, unsaturated hydrocarbons, and condensed aromatic compounds. We will compare the nature of the organic matter present in the samples in order to determine the differences in dominant organic compound classes and in heteroatom (nitrogen and sulfur) abundance. By analyzing these differences, it is possible to investigate the historical patterns of organic matter deposition/source, and begin to investigate the influence of climate change, volcanism, and onset of the industrial revolution on the nature of organic matter preserved in ice cores.

  5. Air-coupled impact-echo damage detection in reinforced concrete using wavelet transforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epp, Tyler; Cha, Young-Jin

    2017-02-01

    Internal damage detection of reinforced concrete (RC) structures is a challenging field that has garnered increasing attention over the past decades due to a decline in the state of infrastructure in North America. As a nondestructive testing mode, the impact-echo method is currently a promising approach. However, it requires intensive testing to cover large-scale civil RC structures with point-by-point inspection. In order to partially overcome this limitation, this study proposes a new impact-echo analysis method using wavelet transforms with dual microphones with 20 kHz resolution to improve damage detection capability. The signals recorded from the microphones are processed to recover spectral data that are further analyzed using percentage of energy information to determine the condition of the specimen and detect in situ damages. In order to validate the performance of the proposed method, the results from traditional signal processing using FFT and wavelet transforms are compared. The proposed wavelet transform based approach showed better accuracy when covering broader areas, which can contribute to reduce testing time significantly when monitoring large-scale civil RC structures.

  6. Flight Operations Centers: Transforming NextGen Air Traffic Management FOC Study Team Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    Traffic Management FOC Study Team Report 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK...decision processes. The FOC’s role is key to initiating trajectories. The FOC should also play an important role in the Air Traffic Management ...formalize data sharing. Uniform rules for data sharing should be developed that address roles, responsibilities, quality , timing, and

  7. Transforming Civil Engineering. Air Force Civil Engineer, Volume 15, Number 1, 2007

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    Darren Gibbs 3D Visualization Brings Floor Plans to Life ................................................... 18 Mr. Mark O. Hunt FROM THE FRONT...Does “Lean” Mean? 18 AIR FORCE CIVIL ENGINEER 3D Visualization Brings Floor Plans to Life Mr. Mark O. Hunt HQ ACC/A7DE Through the use of computer...modeling, rendering, and animation, 3D Visualization brings conventional two-dimensional fl oor plans to life, providing customers with a virtual tour

  8. Computational Assessment of the GT-MHR Graphite Core Support Structural Integrity in Air-Ingress Accident Condition

    SciTech Connect

    Jong B. Lim; Eung S. Kim; Chang H. Oh; Richard R. Schultz; David A. Petti

    2008-10-01

    The objective of this project was to perform stress analysis for graphite support structures of the General Atomics’ 600 MWth GT-MHR prismatic core design using ABAQUS ® (ver. 6.75) to assess their structural integrity in air-ingress accident conditions where the structure weakens over time due to oxidation damages. The graphite support structures of prismatic type GT-MHR was analyzed based on the change of temperature, burn-off and corrosion depth during the accident period predicted by GAMMA, a multi-dimensional gas multi-component mixture analysis code developed in the Republic of Korea (ROK)/United States (US) International –Nuclear Engineering Research Initiative (I-NERI) project. Both the loading and thermal stresses were analyzed, but the thermal stress was not significant, leaving the loading stress to be the major factor. The mechanical strengths are exceeded between 11 to 11.5 days after loss-of-coolant-accident (LOCA), corresponding to 5.5 to 6 days after the start of natural convection.

  9. Small field diode correction factors derived using an air core fibre optic scintillation dosimeter and EBT2 film.

    PubMed

    Ralston, Anna; Liu, Paul; Warrener, Kirbie; McKenzie, David; Suchowerska, Natalka

    2012-05-07

    There is no commercially available real-time dosimeter that can accurately measure output factors for field sizes down to 4 mm without the use of correction factors. Silicon diode detectors are commonly used but are not dosimetrically water equivalent, resulting in energy dependence and fluence perturbation. In contrast, plastic scintillators are nearly dosimetrically water equivalent. A fibre optic dosimeter (FOD) with a 0.8 mm(3) plastic scintillator coupled to an air core light guide was used to measure the output factors for Novalis/BrainLab stereotactic cones of diameter 4-30 mm and Novalis MLC fields of width 5-100 mm. The FOD data matched the output factors measured by a 0.125 cm(3) Semiflex ion chamber for the MLC fields above 30 mm and those measured with the EBT2 radiochromic film for the cones and MLC fields below 30 mm. Relative detector readings were obtained with four diode types (IBA SFD, EFD, PFD, PTW 60012) for the same fields. Empirical diode correction factors were determined by taking the ratio of FOD output factors to diode relative detector readings. The diodes were found to over-respond by 3%-16% for the smallest field. There was good agreement between different diodes of the same model number.

  10. Temperature dependence of beat-length and confinement loss in an air-core photonic band-gap fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhenlong; Li, Xuyou; Hong, Yong; Liu, Pan; Yang, Hanrui; Ling, Weiwei

    2016-05-01

    The temperature dependence of polarization-maintaining (PM) property and loss in a highly-birefringent air-core photonic band-gap fiber (PBF) is investigated. The effects of temperature variation on the effective index, beat-length and confinement loss are studied numerically by using the full-vector finite element method (FEM). It is found that, the PM property of this PBF is insensitive to the temperature, and the temperature-dependent beat-length coefficient can be as low as 2.86×10-8 m/°C, which is typically 200 times less than those of conventional panda fibers, the PBF has a stable confinement loss of 0.01 dB/m over the temperature range of -30 to 20 °C for the slow axis at the wavelength of 1.55 μm. The PBF with ultra-low temperature-dependent PM property and low loss can reduce the thermally induced polarization instability apparently in interferometric applications such as resonant fiber optic gyroscope (RFOG), optical fiber sensors, and so on.

  11. An Investigation into the Implementation of the Common Core State Standards in Mathematics: Teacher Concerns and Understandings of Transformation Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brownell, Christopher S.

    2015-01-01

    The Common Core State Standards in Mathematics (CCSSM) represent a major attempt in a long line of attempts to reform the American Education system surrounding Mathematics. These standards aim to establish a nationwide set of curriculum, seeking to ensure equity for all students in the U.S.A. Some of the standards included are new to all teachers…

  12. Flow Writing in the Liberal Arts Core and across the Disciplines: A Vehicle for Confronting and Transforming Academic Disengagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gute, Deanne; Gute, Gary

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the subjective experience of academic disengagement. Flow theory, which describes an intense form of engagement, structured writing-to-learn activities undergraduates applied in major and liberal arts courses. Results suggest that writing to learn can transform academic anxiety and boredom by facilitating concentration,…

  13. Determination of nitrogen dioxide in ambient air employing diffuse reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Santosh Kumar; Deb, Manas Kanti; Verma, Devsharan

    2008-10-01

    This paper presents the development of a simple and precise analytical method for the determination of nitrogen dioxide in ambient air. In this method nitrogen dioxide is determined in the form of nitrite. The determination of nitrogen dioxide needs no reagents except for a solution of sodium hydroxide mixed with sodium arsenite (NaOH-Na 2As 2O 3) which is used as an absorbing reagent for trapping the nitrogen dioxide from the atmosphere in the form of nitrite, i.e., a prior analysis step. The determination of submicrogram levels of nitrogen dioxide is based on the selection of a strong and sharp quantitative analytical peak at 1380 cm - 1 using diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy (DRS-FTIR). The limit of detection (LOD) and the limit of quantification of the method are found to be 0.008 μg g - 1 NO 2- and 0.05 μg g - 1 NO 2-, respectively. The precision in terms of standard deviation and relative standard deviation value at a level of 2 μg NO 2- / 0.1 g KBr for n = 10 is found to be 0.036 μg NO 2- and 1.8%, respectively. The relative standard deviation ( n = 10) for the determination of nitrogen dioxide in ambient air was observed to be in the range 2.6-3.8%. The method proposed is time-saving and eliminates the slow and cumbersome steps of pH maintenance of the reaction mixture and color formation of the EPA recommended spectrophotometric and other methods for quantitative determination of nitrogen dioxide.

  14. In-situ measurements of volatile toxic organics in indoor air using long-path Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Martina; Seiber, James N.; Biermann, Heinz W.

    1993-03-01

    A Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer interfaced to a 2.5 m base path, open multi- pass cell was used to monitor indoor air in post-fumigation dwellings. The residual chemicals studied were the fumigant, methyl bromide and its odor additive, chloropicrin (Cl3CNO2). Indoor measurements with a time resolution of 15 minutes were performed for two houses of different age. Our results indicate that the newer dwelling, which contained insulation materials, appeared to retain substantial amounts of the fumigant. The highest concentration measured for methyl bromide was 24 ppm, close to five times the allowed TLV (Threshold Limit Value) of 5 ppm. For chloropicrin, we also observed a surprising level of close to 0.4 ppm, four times the TLV of 0.1 ppm. It was noted that the concentrations were very susceptible to any air movement such as that due to door opening. Analyses utilizing the conventional adsorption-desorption/GC technique were performed simultaneously by the Worker Health and Safety Branch of the California EPA. Although the vast difference in time resolution of the two methods precludes direct comparison of the data, averaging our measurements over the same integration time indicated that the FTIR methods gives significantly higher values than those obtained by the conventional method, especially when the pollutant concentrations are low.

  15. Seasonal origins of air masses transported to Mount Wrangell, Alaska, and comparison with the past atmospheric dust and tritium variations in its ice core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasunari, T. J.; Shiraiwa, T.; Kanamori, S.; Fujii, Y.; Igarashi, M.; Yamazaki, K.; Benson, C. S.; Hondoh, T.

    2006-12-01

    The North Pacific region is subject to various climatic phenomena such as the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO), the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO), and the Arctic Oscillation (AO), significantly affecting the ocean and the atmosphere. Additionally, material circulation is also very active in this region such as spring dust storms in the desert and arid regions of East Asia and forest fires in Siberia and Alaska. Understanding the complex connections among the climatic phenomena and the material circulation would help in attempts to predict future climate changes. For this subject, we drilled a 50-m ice core at the summit of Mount Wrangell, which is located near the coast of Alaska (62°162'170"162°171'N, 144°162'170"162;°171'W, and 4100-m). We analyzed dust particle number density, tritium concentration, and 171 171 171 171 170 162 171 D in the core. The ice core spanned the years from 1992 to 2002 and we finally divided the years into five parts (early-spring; late-spring; summer; fall; winter). Dust and tritium amounts varied annually and intra-annually. For further understanding of the factors on those variations, we should know the origins of the seasonal dust and tritium. Hence, we examined their origins by the calculation of everyday 10-days backward trajectory analysis from January 1992 to August 2002 with 3-D wind data of the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecast (ECMWF). In early spring, the air mass from East Asia increased and it also explained dust increases in springtime, although the air contribution in winter increased too. In late spring, the air mass from the stratosphere increased, and it also corresponded to the stratospheric tritium increase in the ice core. The air masses from Siberia and the North Pacific in the mid-latitude always significantly contributed to Mount Wrangell, although those maximum contributions were fall and summer, respectively. The air mass originating in the interior of Alaska and North America did

  16. Practical Guidelines for Ultrasound-Guided Core Needle Biopsy of Soft-Tissue Lesions: Transformation from Beginner to Specialist

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang Yoon; Oh, Tack Sun; Lee, Jong-Seok

    2017-01-01

    Ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy (US-CNB) is an important step in the diagnosis of musculoskeletal soft-tissue lesions. To maximize efficacy and minimize the complications of US-CNB, it is critical to collaborate with a multidisciplinary team and to understand the particular considerations of US-CNB for these lesions. The purpose of this article is to provide a systematic review and step-by-step tips for using US-CNB to diagnose musculoskeletal soft-tissue lesions. PMID:28246516

  17. Analysis of DNA deformation patterns in nucleosome core particles based on isometric feature mapping and continuous wavelet transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xi; Yan, Hong

    2012-09-01

    Based on the anisotropic deformation of DNA structure in nucleosomes, the non-linear dimensionality reduction algorithm Isomap is used to derive a structural signal accounting for most structural variances from the DNA structural data of nucleosome crystals. The analysis of this structural signal by continuous wavelet transform has successfully revealed the common regularity of nucleosome DNA deformation and also the peculiarity of structural configurations in nucleosomes with particular histone or DNA composition, or special ligands. The relationship between the constituent dinucleotides and the signal energy distribution shows that the fluctuation of a structural signal is sensitive to certain dinucleotide types.

  18. Nitrogen Transformations in Wetland Soil Cores Measured by (sup15)N Isotope Pairing and Dilution at Four Infiltration Rates

    PubMed Central

    Stepanauskas, R.; Davidsson, E. T.; Leonardson, L.

    1996-01-01

    The effect of water infiltration rate (IR) on nitrogen cycling in a saturated wetland soil was investigated by applying a (sup15)N isotope dilution and pairing method. Water containing [(sup15)N]nitrate was infiltrated through 10-cm-long cores of sieved and homogenized soil at rates of 72, 168, 267, and 638 mm day(sup-1). Then the frequencies of (sup30)N(inf2), (sup29)N(inf2), (sup15)NO(inf3)(sup-), and (sup15)NH(inf4)(sup+) in the outflow water were measured. This method allowed simultaneous determination of nitrification, coupled and uncoupled denitrification, and nitrate assimilation rates. From 3% (at the highest IR) to 95% (at the lowest IR) of nitrate was removed from the water, mainly by denitrification. The nitrate removal was compensated for by the net release of ammonium and dissolved organic nitrogen. Lower oxygen concentrations in the soil at lower IRs led to a sharper decrease in the nitrification rate than in the ammonification rate, and, consequently, more ammonium leaked from the soil. The decreasing organic-carbon-to-nitrogen ratio (from 12.8 to 5.1) and the increasing light A(inf250)/A(inf365) ratio (from 4.5 to 5.2) indicated an increasing bioavailability of the outflowing dissolved organic matter with increasing IR. The efflux of nitrous oxide was also very sensitive to IR and increased severalfold when a zone of low oxygen concentration was close to the outlet of the soil cores. N(inf2)O then constituted 8% of the total gaseous N lost from the soil. PMID:16535352

  19. Progress report on a new search for free e/3 quarks in the cores of 10(15) - 10(16) eV air showers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodson, A. L.; Bull, R. M.; Taylor, R. S.; Belford, C. H.

    1985-01-01

    The Leeds 3 sq m Wilson cloud chamber is being used in a new search for free e/3 quarks close to the axes of 10 to the 15th power - 10 to the 16th power eV air showers. A ratio trigger circuit is used to detect the incidence of air shower cores; the position of the shower center and the axis direction are determined from photographs of current-limited spark chambers. It is thus possible, for the first time, to know where we have looked for quarks in air showers and to select for scanning only those cloud chamber photographs where we have good evidence that the shower axis was close to the chamber. 250 g/sq cm of lead/concrete absorber above the cloud chamber serve to reduce particle densities and make a quark search possible very close to the shower axes. The current status of the search is given.

  20. Magnetostrictive vibrations model of a three-phase transformer core and the contribution of the fifth harmonic in the grid voltage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorji Ghalamestani, Setareh; Vandevelde, Lieven; Dirckx, Joris J. J.; Melkebeek, Jan A. A.

    2014-05-01

    The effect of the fifth harmonic in the grid voltage (with fundamental frequency of 50 Hz) on the vibrations of a three-phase transformer core is computed, since such harmonic has the largest contribution in the European grid voltage. The computational method is a two-dimensional (2D) finite element technique. The modal vibrations under various magnetisations (viz with different fifth harmonic components) are compared with those obtained under a purely sinusoidal magnetisation and showed that the variations for the 100 Hz harmonic of the vibrations are small. However, the 200 Hz harmonic showed a significant increase when a fifth harmonic was present on the applied voltage. In fact, the presence of a fundamental component with 50 Hz frequency and a fifth harmonic on the magnetisation signal generates a 200 Hz harmonic on the magnetostriction strains (and the magnetic forces), and thus this harmonic increases significantly.

  1. Determining the Concentration Dependent Transformations of Ag Nanoparticles in Complex Media: Using SP-ICP-MS and Au@Ag Core-Shell Nanoparticles as Tracers.

    PubMed

    Merrifield, Ruth C; Stephan, Chady; Lead, Jamie

    2017-03-01

    The fate, behavior, and impact of engineered nanoparticles (NPs) in toxicological and environmental media are driven by complex processes which are difficult to quantify. A key limitation is the ability to perform measurements at low and environmentally relevant concentrations, since concentration may be a key factor determining fate and effects. Here, we use single particle inductively coupled mass spectroscopy (SP-ICP-MS) to measure directly NP diameter and particle number concentration of suspensions containing gold-silver core-shell (Au@Ag) NPs in EPA moderately hard water (MHW) and MHW containing 2.5 mg L(-1) Suwannee River fulvic acid. The Au core of the Au@Ag NPs acts as an internal standard, and aids in the analysis of the complex Ag transformations. The high sensitivity of SP-ICP-MS, along with the Au@Ag NPs, enabled us to track the NP transformations in the range 0.01 and 50 μg L(-1), without further sample preparation. On the basis of the analysis of both Au and Ag parameters (size, size distribution, and particle number), concentration was shown to be a key factor in NP behavior. At higher concentration, NPs were in an aggregation-dominated regime, while at the lower and environmentally representative concentrations, dissolution of Ag was dominant and aggregation was negligible. In addition, further formation of ionic silver as Ag NPs in the form of AgS or AgCl was shown to occur. Between 1 and 10 μg L(-1), both aggregation and dissolution were important. The results suggest that, under realistic conditions, the role of NP homoaggregation may be minimal. In addition, the complexity of exposure and dose in dose-response relationships is highlighted.

  2. Ice core sulfur and methanesulfonic acid (MSA) records from southern Greenland document North American and European air pollution and suggest a decline in regional biogenic sulfur emissions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasteris, D. R.; McConnell, J. R.; Burkhart, J. F.; Saltzman, E. S.

    2014-12-01

    Sulfate aerosols have an important cooling effect on the Earth because they scatter sunlight back to space and form cloud condensation nuclei. However, understanding of the atmospheric sulfur cycle is incomplete, leading to uncertainty in the assessment of past, present and future climate forcing. Here we use annually resolved observations of sulfur and methanesulfonic acid (MSA) concentration in an array of precisely dated Southern Greenland ice cores to assess the history of sulfur pollution emitted from North America and Europe and the history of biogenic sulfate aerosol derived from the North Atlantic Ocean over the last 250 years. The ice core sulfur time series is found to closely track sulfur concentrations in North American and European precipitation since records began in 1965, and also closely tracks estimated sulfur emissions since 1850 within the air mass source region as determined by back trajectory analysis. However, a decline to near-preindustrial sulfur concentrations in the ice cores after 1995 that is not so extensive in the source region emissions indicates that there has been a change in sulfur cycling over the last 150 years. The ice core MSA time series shows a decline of 60% since the 1860s, and is well correlated with declining sea ice concentrations around Greenland, suggesting that the phytoplankton source of biogenic sulfur has declined due to a loss of marginal sea ice zone habitat. Incorporating the implied decrease in biogenic sulfur in our analysis improves the match between the ice core sulfur record and the source region emissions throughout the last 150 years, and solves the problem of the recent return to near-preindustrial levels in the Greenland ice. These findings indicate that the transport efficiency of sulfur air pollution has been relatively stable through the industrial era and that biogenic sulfur emissions in the region have declined.

  3. Atomic Migration Induced Crystal Structure Transformation and Core-Centered Phase Transition in Single Crystal Ge2Sb2Te5 Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jun-Young; Kim, Jeong-Hyeon; Jeon, Deok-Jin; Han, Jaehyun; Yeo, Jong-Souk

    2016-10-12

    A phase change nanowire holds a promise for nonvolatile memory applications, but its transition mechanism has remained unclear due to the analytical difficulties at atomic resolution. Here we obtain a deeper understanding on the phase transition of a single crystalline Ge2Sb2Te5 nanowire (GST NW) using atomic scale imaging, diffraction, and chemical analysis. Our cross-sectional analysis has shown that the as-grown hexagonal close-packed structure of the single crystal GST NW transforms to a metastable face-centered cubic structure due to the atomic migration to the pre-existing vacancy layers in the hcp structure going through iterative electrical switching. We call this crystal structure transformation "metastabilization", which is also confirmed by the increase of set-resistance during the switching operation. For the set to reset transition between crystalline and amorphous phases, high-resolution imaging indicates that the longitudinal center of the nanowire mainly undergoes phase transition. According to the atomic scale analysis of the GST NW after repeated electrical switching, partial crystallites are distributed around the core-centered amorphous region of the nanowire where atomic migration is mainly induced, thus potentially leading to low power electrical switching. These results provide a novel understanding of phase change nanowires, and can be applied to enhance the design of nanowire phase change memory devices for improved electrical performance.

  4. Isotopic Composition of Atmospheric Mercury in China: New Evidence for Sources and Transformation Processes in Air and in Vegetation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ben; Fu, Xuewu; Yin, Runsheng; Zhang, Hui; Wang, Xun; Lin, Che-Jen; Wu, Chuansheng; Zhang, Yiping; He, Nannan; Fu, Pingqing; Wang, Zifa; Shang, Lihai; Sommar, Jonas; Sonke, Jeroen E; Maurice, Laurence; Guinot, Benjamin; Feng, Xinbin

    2016-09-06

    The isotopic composition of atmospheric total gaseous mercury (TGM) and particle-bound mercury (PBM) and mercury (Hg) in litterfall samples have been determined at urban/industrialized and rural sites distributed over mainland China for identifying Hg sources and transformation processes. TGM and PBM near anthropogenic emission sources display negative δ(202)Hg and near-zero Δ(199)Hg in contrast to relatively positive δ(202)Hg and negative Δ(199)Hg observed in remote regions, suggesting that different sources and atmospheric processes force the mass-dependent fractionation (MDF) and mass-independent fractionation (MIF) in the air samples. Both MDF and MIF occur during the uptake of atmospheric Hg by plants, resulting in negative δ(202)Hg and Δ(199)Hg observed in litter-bound Hg. The linear regression resulting from the scatter plot relating the δ(202)Hg to Δ(199)Hg data in the TGM samples indicates distinct anthropogenic or natural influences at the three study sites. A similar trend was also observed for Hg accumulated in broadleaved deciduous forest foliage grown in areas influenced by anthropogenic emissions. The relatively negative MIF in litter-bound Hg compared to TGM is likely a result of the photochemical reactions of Hg(2+) in foliage. This study demonstrates the diagnostic stable Hg isotopic composition characteristics for separating atmospheric Hg of different source origins in China and provides the isotopic fractionation clues for the study of Hg bioaccumulation.

  5. Ultra-large number of transmission channels in space division multiplexing using few-mode multi-core fiber with optimized air-hole-assisted double-cladding structure.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Tatsuhiko; Kokubun, Yasuo

    2014-04-07

    The ultimate number of transmission channels in a fiber for the space division multiplexing (SDM) is shown by designing an air-hole-assisted double-cladding few-mode multi-core fiber. The propagation characteristics such as the dispersion and the mode field diameter are almost equalized for all cores owing to the double cladding structure, and the crosstalk between adjacent cores is extremely suppressed by the heterogeneous arrangement of cores and the air holes surrounding the cores. Optimizing the structure of the air-hole-assisted double-cladding, ultra dense core arrangements, e.g. 129 cores in a core accommodated area with 200 μm diameter, can be realized with low crosstalk of less than -34.3 dB at 100km transmission. In this design, each core supports 3 modes i.e. LP(01), LP(11a), and LP(11b) as the transmission channels, so that the number of transmission channels can be 3-hold greater than the number of cores. Therefore, 387 transmission channels can be realized.

  6. Design of single-winding energy-storage reactors for dc-to-dc converters using air-gapped magnetic-core structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohri, A. K.; Wilson, T. G.; Owen, H. A., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    A procedure is presented for designing air-gapped energy-storage reactors for nine different dc-to-dc converters resulting from combinations of three single-winding power stages for voltage stepup, current stepup and voltage stepup/current stepup and three controllers with control laws that impose constant-frequency, constant transistor on-time and constant transistor off-time operation. The analysis, based on the energy-transfer requirement of the reactor, leads to a simple relationship for the required minimum volume of the air gap. Determination of this minimum air gap volume then permits the selection of either an air gap or a cross-sectional core area. Having picked one parameter, the minimum value of the other immediately leads to selection of the physical magnetic structure. Other analytically derived equations are used to obtain values for the required turns, the inductance, and the maximum rms winding current. The design procedure is applicable to a wide range of magnetic material characteristics and physical configurations for the air-gapped magnetic structure.

  7. A Compact Fiber Inclinometer Using a Thin-Core Fiber with Incorporated an Air-Gap Microcavity Fiber Interferometer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiacheng; Qiao, Xueguang; Rong, Qiangzhou; Sun, An

    2016-01-01

    A compact fiber-optic inclinometer is proposed and experimentally demonstrated based on a Fabry-Perot interference (FFPI). The sensing head consists of a short segment of thin-core fiber (TCF) following with a piece of hollow-core fiber (HCF). High-order cladding modes have been excited because of core diameter mismatch. A clear interference spectrum has been obtained as the consequence of interference among the reflected core modes and cladding modes. Fringe contrast of the interference spectrum is highly sensitive to fiber bending with direction independence, and good linearity has been observed during the bending range from 1° to 3° with a sensitivity of 2.71 dB/deg. PMID:26771614

  8. Face Sheet/Core Disbond Growth in Honeycomb Sandwich Panels Subjected to Ground-Air-Ground Pressurization and In-Plane Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Zhi M.; Krueger, Ronald; Rinker, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Typical damage modes in light honeycomb sandwich structures include face sheet/core disbonding and core fracture, both of which can pose a threat to the structural integrity of a component. These damage modes are of particular interest to aviation certification authorities since several in-service occurrences, such as rudder structural failure and other control surface malfunctions, have been attributed to face sheet/core disbonding. Extensive studies have shown that face sheet/core disbonding and core fracture can lead to damage propagation caused by internal pressure changes in the core. The increasing use of composite sandwich construction in aircraft applications makes it vitally important to understand the effect of ground-air-ground (GAG) cycles and conditions such as maneuver and gust loads on face sheet/core disbonding. The objective of the present study was to use a fracture mechanics based approach developed earlier to evaluate the loading at the disbond front caused by ground-air-ground pressurization and in-plane loading. A honeycomb sandwich panel containing a circular disbond at one face sheet/core interface was modeled with three-dimensional (3D) solid finite elements. The disbond was modeled as a discrete discontinuity and the strain energy release rate along the disbond front was computed using the Virtual Crack Closure Technique (VCCT). Special attention was paid to the pressure-deformation coupling which can decrease the pressure load within the disbonded sandwich section significantly when the structure is highly deformed. The commercial finite element analysis software, Abaqus/Standard, was used for the analyses. The recursive pressure-deformation coupling problem was solved by representing the entrapped air in the honeycomb cells as filled cavities in Abaqus/Standard. The results show that disbond size, face sheet thickness and core thickness are important parameters that determine crack tip loading at the disbond front. Further, the pressure

  9. Transformation of a Water Slug in Free Fall Under the Conditions of Exposure to an Air Flow Orthogonal to the Direction of the Slug Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, R. S.; Zabelin, M. V.; Kuznetsov, G. V.; Strizhak, P. A.

    2016-07-01

    An experimental study has been made of the influence of an orthogonal (side) air flow propagating with a velocity to 5 m/s on the phases of transformation of a water slug with an initial volume of 0.05-0.5 liter in free fall from a height of 3 m. Use was made of Phantom V411 and Phantom Miro M310 high-speed video cameras and a Tema Automotive software system with the function of continuous tracking. The laws of retardation of the phases of transformation of the water slug from the instant of formation to that of formation of a droplet cloud under the action of the air flow orthogonal to the direction of the slug motion, and also of the deceleration, removal, and destruction of the droplets and fragments of water separating from the slug surface, have been established.

  10. Extraction of weak PcP phases using the slant-stacklet transform - II: constraints on lateral variations of structure near the core-mantle boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ventosa, Sergi; Romanowicz, Barbara

    2015-11-01

    Resolving the topography of the core-mantle boundary (CMB) and the structure and composition of the D″ region is key to improving our understanding of the interaction between the Earth's mantle and core. Observations of traveltimes and amplitudes of short-period teleseismic body waves sensitive to lowermost mantle provide essential constraints on the properties of this region. Major challenges are low signal-to-noise ratio of the target phases and interference with other mantle phases. In a previous paper (Part I), we introduced the slant-stacklet transform to enhance the signal of the core-reflected (PcP) phase and to isolate it from stronger signals in the coda of the P wave. Then we minimized a linear misfit between P and PcP waveforms to improve the quality of PcP-P traveltime difference measurements as compared to standard cross-correlation methods. This method significantly increases the quantity and the quality of PcP-P traveltime observations available for the modelling of structure near the CMB. Here we illustrate our approach in a series of regional studies of the CMB and D″ using PcP-P observations with unprecedented resolution from high-quality dense arrays located in North America and Japan for events with magnitude Mw>5.4 and distances up to 80°. In this process, we carefully analyse various sources of errors and show that mantle heterogeneity is the most significant. We find and correct bias due to mantle heterogeneities that is as large as 1 s in traveltime, comparable to the largest lateral PcP-P traveltime variations observed. We illustrate the importance of accurate mantle corrections and the need for higher resolution mantle models for future studies. After optimal mantle corrections, the main signal left is relatively long wavelength in the regions sampled, except at the border of the Pacific large-low shear velocity province (LLSVP). We detect the northwest border of the Pacific LLSVP in the western Pacific from array observations in

  11. Internalization of Air Force Core Values Among Company Grade Officers: Where are We and Where are We Going?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-03-01

    re–inforce their social perception of those core values our senior leadership have articulated. According to Kurt Lewin , “lectures and other abstract...motivated because life in the company has meaning for them.1 —Terrence E. Deal and Allan A. Kennedy Corporate Cultures Kurt Lewin defines re–education as

  12. USEPA Environmental Quality Index (EQI) - Air, Water, Land, Built, and Sociodemographic Domains Transformed Variables Dataset as Input for the USEPA EQI, by County for the United States

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory (NHEERL) in the Environmental Public Health Division (EPHD) is currently engaged in research aimed at developing a measure that estimates overall environmental quality at the county level for the United States. This work is being conducted as an effort to learn more about how various environmental factors simultaneously contribute to health disparities in low-income and minority populations, and to better estimate the total environmental and social context to which humans are exposed. This dataset contains the finalized transformed variables chosen to represent the Air, Water, Land, Built, and Sociodemographic Domains of the total environment. Six criteria air pollutants and 81 hazardous air pollutants are included in this dataset. Data sources are the EPA's Air Quality system (http://www.epa.gov/ttn/airs/airsaqs/) and the National-scale Air Toxics Assessment (http://www.epa.gov/nata/). Variables are average pollutant concentrations or emissions for 2000-2005 at the county level for all counties in the United States. Data on water impairment, waste permits, beach closures, domestic water source, deposition for 9 pollutants, drought status, and 60 chemical contaminants. Data sources are the EPA's WATERS (Watershed Assessment, Tracking and Environmental ResultS) Database (http://www.epa.gov/waters/), the U.S. Geological Survey Estimates of Water Use in the

  13. The impact of the core transformation process on spirituality, symptom experience, and psychological maturity in a mixed age sample in India: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Braganza, Dinesh; Piedmont, Ralph L

    2015-06-01

    Research indicates that spiritual and religious constructs have the potential to influence a broad range of outcomes such as health, well-being, and meaning, both positively and negatively. This study looked at the effect of an under studied psycho-spiritual approach, Core Transformation (CT), in reducing symptoms and promoting well-being. This study also examined whether the impact of CT would be moderated by age, with older participants evidencing better outcomes. Participants from an Indian convenience sample (N = 189) ranging in age from 18 to 65 (M = 34) received group training in CT and completed a battery of measures pretest and 4 weeks post-training, which included personality, spirituality, and psychosocial outcomes scales. Repeated-measures MANOVAs indicated significant improvements over time for both spirituality and symptom experience. Partial correlation analyses, controlling for the predictive effects of personality, reaffirmed the incremental validity of Spiritual Transcendence and religious variables in predicting symptom change and outcome ratings. CT did not appear to effect participants levels of psychological maturity. Age was not found to mediate any of these relationships, indicating the age universality of CT's therapeutic effects.

  14. Solar and volcanic forcing of summer air temperatures - a combined ice core and tree ring perspective form the Carpathian Mts. (Europe)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perşoiu, Aurel; Popa, Ionel

    2014-05-01

    In order to improve our understanding of natural and anthropogenic influences on climate, high resolution reconstruction of the climate changes (and associated forcings) during the recent past (last millennium) are strongly needed. While these types of records are available for numerous regions, they are still scarce and with low resolution in the Eastern half of the European continent. In this paper, we present a high-resolution (decadal and better) reconstruction of summer air temperatures from the Carpathian Mts. (Romania), using water stable isotopes in cave ice cores (from Scărişoara Ice Cave) and tree-rings as proxies for summer air temperatures (late and early, respectively). Our combined results show that periods of low solar activity (Wolf, Spörer and Dalton) and the main volcanic eruptions of the past millennium had had a clearly visible - in both isotope and tree ring data - impact on summer temperatures in the area. Worth to mention is that the "year without a summer" occurred in 1818 in both records, two years later than in most of the reconstructions in the vicinity. The Medieval Warm Period is seen as a relatively warm (~0.5 °C warmer than the 1960-1990 period) and stable period in the ice core data, but it's not clearly recorded by the tree rings, while the Little Ice Age (starting at around 1350 in the 14C-dated ice core chronology, and in 1370 in the annually resolved tree ring data) is marked by lower than present (by ~ 1 °C) air temperatures and increased variability. The ice core record stops at 1870 AD due to enhanced ice melting in the 20th century, associated with drier and warmer summer, as seen in the tree ring reconstruction. Our results provide a unique picture of the climate during the past millennium for a region where such information is mostly missing, strengthening the general view of 1) a relatively variable climate during the past 1000 years and 2) rapid warming during the past ~100 years.

  15. Results from Geothermal Logging, Air and Core-Water Chemistry Sampling, Air Injection Testing and Tracer Testing in the Northern Ghost Dance Fault, YUCCA Mountain, Nevada, November 1996 to August 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Lecain, G.D.; Anna, L.O.; Fahy, M.F.

    1998-08-01

    Geothermal logging, air and core-water chemistry sampling, air-injection testing, and tracer testing were done in the northern Ghost Dance Fault at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, from November 1996 to August 1998. The study was done by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy. The fault-testing drill room and test boreholes were located in the crystal-poor, middle nonlithophysal zone of the Topopah Spring Tuff, a tuff deposit of Miocene age. The drill room is located off the Yucca Mountain underground Exploratory Studies Facility at about 230 meters below ground surface. Borehole geothermal logging identified a temperature decrease of 0.1 degree Celsius near the Ghost Dance Fault. The temperature decrease could indicate movement of cooler air or water, or both, down the fault, or it may be due to drilling-induced evaporative or adiabatic cooling. In-situ pneumatic pressure monitoring indicated that barometric pressure changes were transmitted from the ground surface to depth through the Ghost Dance Fault. Values of carbon dioxide and delta carbon-13 from gas samples indicated that air from the underground drill room had penetrated the tuff, supporting the concept of a well-developed fracture system. Uncorrected carbon-14-age estimates from gas samples ranged from 2,400 to 4,500 years. Tritium levels in borehole core water indicated that the fault may have been a conduit for the transport of water from the ground surface to depth during the last 100 years.

  16. Ambient formic acid in southern California air: A comparison of two methods, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and alkaline trap-liquid chromatography with UV detection

    SciTech Connect

    Grosjean, D. ); Tuazon, E.C. ); Fujita, E. )

    1990-01-01

    Formic acid is an ubiquitous component of urban smog. Sources of formic acid in urban air include direct emissions from vehicles and in situ reaction of ozone with olefins. Ambient levels of formic acid in southern California air were first measured some 15 years ago by Hanst et al. using long-path Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). All subsequent studies of formic acid in the Los Angeles area have involved the use of two methods, either FTIR or collection on alkaline traps followed by gas chromatography, ion chromatography, or liquid chromatography analysis with UV detection, ATLC-UV. The Carbon Species Methods Comparison Study (CSMCS), a multilaboratory air quality study carried out in August 1986 at a southern California smog receptor site, provided an opportunity for direct field comparison of the FTIR and alkaline trap methods. The results of the comparison are presented in this brief report.

  17. Design study of an air pump and integral lift engine ALF-504 using the Lycoming 502 core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauch, D.

    1972-01-01

    Design studies were conducted for an integral lift fan engine utilizing the Lycoming 502 fan core with the final MQT power turbine. The fan is designed for a 12.5 bypass ratio and 1.25:1 pressure ratio, and provides supercharging for the core. Maximum sea level static thrust is 8370 pounds with a specific fuel consumption of 0.302 lb/hr-lb. The dry engine weight without starter is 1419 pounds including full-length duct and sound-attenuating rings. The engine envelope including duct treatment but not localized accessory protrusion is 53.25 inches in diameter and 59.2 inches long from exhaust nozzle exit to fan inlet flange. Detailed analyses include fan aerodynamics, fan and reduction gear mechanical design, fan dynamic analysis, engine noise analysis, engine performance, and weight analysis.

  18. 28-Channel rotary transformer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclyman, W. T.

    1981-01-01

    Transformer transmits power and digital data across rotating interface. Array has many parallel data channels, each with potential l megabaud data rate. Ferrite-cored transformers are spaced along rotor; airgap between them reduces crosstalk.

  19. Air-stable PbSe/PbS and PbSe/PbSexS1-x core-shell nanocrystal quantum dots and their applications.

    PubMed

    Lifshitz, E; Brumer, M; Kigel, A; Sashchiuk, A; Bashouti, M; Sirota, M; Galun, E; Burshtein, Z; Le Quang, A Q; Ledoux-Rak, I; Zyss, J

    2006-12-21

    The optical properties and functionality of air-stable PbSe/PbS core-shell and PbSe/PbSexS1-x core-alloyed shell nanocrystal quantum dots (NQDs) are presented. These NQDs showed chemical robustness over months and years and band-gap tunability in the near infrared spectral regime, with a reliance on the NQD size and composition. Furthermore, these NQDs exhibit high emission quantum efficiencies of up to 65% and an exciton emission band that is narrower than that of the corresponding PbSe NQDs. In addition, the emission bands showed a peculiar energy shift with respect to the relevant absorption band, changing from a Stokes shift to an anti-Stokes shift, with an increase of the NQD diameter. The described core-shell structures and the corresponding PbSe core NQDs were used as passive Q-switches in eye-safe lasers of Er:glass, where they act as saturable absorbers. The absorber saturation investigations revealed a relatively large ground-state cross-section of absorption (sigma gs = 10(-16) - 10(-15) cm2) and a behavior of a "fast" absorber with an effective lifetime of tau eff approximately 4.0 ps is proposed. This lifetime is associated with the formation of multiple excitons at the measured pumping power. The product of sigma gs and tau eff enables sufficient Q-switching performance and tunability in the near infrared spectral regime. The amplified spontaneous emission properties of PbSe NQDs were examined under continuous illumination by a diode laser at room temperature, suitable for standard device conditions. The results revealed a relatively large gain parameter (g = 2.63 - 6.67 cm-1). The conductivity properties of PbSe NQD self-assembled solids, annealed at 200 degrees C, showed an Ohmic behavior at the measured voltages (up to 30 V), which is governed by a variable-range-hopping charge transport mechanism.

  20. Ice core evidence of rapid air temperature increases since 1960 in alpine areas of the Wind River Range, Wyoming, United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Naftz, D.L.; Susong, D.D.; Schuster, P.F.; Cecil, L.D.; Dettinger, M.D.; Michel, R.L.; Kendall, C.

    2002-01-01

    Site-specific transfer functions relating delta oxygen 18 (δ18O) values in snow to the average air temperature (TA) during storms on Upper Fremont Glacier (UFG) were used in conjunction with δ18O records from UFG ice cores to reconstruct long-term trends in air temperature from alpine areas in the Wind River Range, Wyoming. Transfer functions were determined by using data collected from four seasonal snowpacks (1989-1990, 1997-1998, 1998-1999, and 1999-2000). The timing and amount of each storm was determined from an automated snowpack telemetry (SNOTEL) site, 22 km northeast of UFG, and ~1060 m in elevation below UFG. Statistically significant and positive correlations between δ18O values in the snow and TA were consistently found in three of the four seasonal snowpacks. The snowpack with the poor correlation was deposited in 1997-1998 during the 1997-1998 El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO). An ultrasonic snow-depth sensor installed on UFG provided valuable insights into site-specific storms and postdepositional processes that occur on UFG. The timing of storms recorded at the UFG and Cold Springs SNOTEL sites were similar; however, selected storms did not correlate. Snow from storms occurring after mid-October and followed by high winds was most susceptible to redeposition of snow. This removal of lower temperature snowfall could potentially bias the δ18O values preserved in ice core records to environmental conditions reflecting higher air temperatures and lower wind speeds. Transfer functions derived from seasonal snow cover on UFG were used to reconstruct TA values from δ18O values determined from two ice cores collected from UFG. Reconstructed air temperatures from the ice core data indicate an increase in TA of ~3.5oC from the mid-1960s to the early 1990s in the alpine areas of northwestern Wyoming. Reconstructed TA from the ice core records between the end of the Little Ice Age (LIA), mid-1800s, and the early 1990s indicate a TA increase of ~55oC. The

  1. Horizontal coring using air as the circulating fluid: Some prototype studies conducted in G Tunnel at the Nevada Test Site for the Yucca Mountain Project

    SciTech Connect

    Chornack, M.P.; French, C.A.

    1989-12-31

    Horizontal coring using air as the circulating fluid has been conducted in the G Tunnel Underground Facility (GTUF) at the Nevada Test Site. This work is part of the prototype investigations of hydrogeology for the Yucca Mountain Project. The work is being conducted to develop methods and procedures that will be used at the Department of Energy`s Yucca Mountain Site, a candidate site for the nation`s first high-level nuclear waste repository, during the site characterization phase of the investigations. The United States Geological Survey (USGS) is conducting this prototype testing under the guidance of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and in conjunction with Reynolds Electrical & Engineering Company (REECo), the drilling contractor. 7 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs.

  2. Cold-air annular-cascade investigation of aerodynamic performance of core-engine-cooled turbine vanes. 2: Pressure surface trailing edge ejection and split trailing edge ejection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclallin, K. L.; Goldman, L. J.

    1976-01-01

    The aerodynamic performance of two trailing edge ejection cooling configurations of a core-engine stator vane were experimentally determined in an ambient inlet-air full-annular cascade where three-dimensional effects could be obtained. The tests were conducted at the design mean-radius ideal aftermixed critical velocity ratio of 0.778. Overall vane aftermixed thermodynamic and primary efficiencies were obtained over a range of coolant flows to about 10 percent of the primary flow at a primary to coolant total temperature ratio of 1.0. The radial variation in efficiency and the circumferential and radial variations in vane-exit total pressure were determined. Comparisons are made with the solid (uncooled) vane.

  3. EVALUATION OF A PORTABLE FOURIER TRANSFORM INFRARED GAS ANALYZER FOR MEASUREMENTS OF AIR TOXICS IN POLLUTION PREVENTION RESEARCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    A portable Fourier transform infrared gas analyzer with a photoacoustic detector performed reliably during pollution prevention research at two industrial facilities. It exhibited good agreement (within approximately 6%) with other analytical instruments (dispersive infrared and ...

  4. Characterization of the Aldehydes and Their Transformations Induced by UV Irradiation and Air Exposure of White Guanxi Honey Pummelo (Citrus Grandis (L.) Osbeck) Essential Oil.

    PubMed

    Li, Li Jun; Hong, Peng; Chen, Feng; Sun, Hao; Yang, Yuan Fan; Yu, Xiang; Huang, Gao Ling; Wu, Li Ming; Ni, Hui

    2016-06-22

    Aldehydes are key aroma contributors of citrus essential oils. White Guanxi honey pummelo essential oil (WPEO) was investigated in its aldehyde constituents and their transformations induced by UV irradiation and air exposure by GC-MS, GC-O, and sensory evaluation. Nine aldehydes, i.e., octanal, nonanal, citronellal, decanal, trans-citral, cis-citral, perilla aldehyde, dodecanal, and dodecenal, were detected in WPEO. After treatment, the content of citronellal increased, but the concentrations of other aldehydes decreased. The aliphatic aldehydes were transformed to organic acids. Citral was transformed to neric acid, geranic acid, and cyclocitral. Aldehyde transformation caused a remarkable decrease in the minty, herbaceous, and lemon notes of WPEO. In fresh WPEO, β-myrcene, d-limonene, octanal, decanal, cis-citral, trans-citral, and dodecenal had the highest odor dilution folds. After the treatment, the dilution folds of decanal, cis-citral, trans-citral, and dodecenal decreased dramatically. This result provides information for the production and storage of aldehyde-containing products.

  5. Air-snow transfer of nitrate on the East Antarctic Plateau - Part 2: An isotopic model for the interpretation of deep ice-core records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erbland, J.; Savarino, J.; Morin, S.; France, J. L.; Frey, M. M.; King, M. D.

    2015-10-01

    Unraveling the modern budget of reactive nitrogen on the Antarctic Plateau is critical for the interpretation of ice-core records of nitrate. This requires accounting for nitrate recycling processes occurring in near-surface snow and the overlying atmospheric boundary layer. Not only concentration measurements but also isotopic ratios of nitrogen and oxygen in nitrate provide constraints on the processes at play. However, due to the large number of intertwined chemical and physical phenomena involved, numerical modeling is required to test hypotheses in a quantitative manner. Here we introduce the model TRANSITS (TRansfer of Atmospheric Nitrate Stable Isotopes To the Snow), a novel conceptual, multi-layer and one-dimensional model representing the impact of processes operating on nitrate at the air-snow interface on the East Antarctic Plateau, in terms of concentrations (mass fraction) and nitrogen (δ15N) and oxygen isotopic composition (17O excess, Δ17O) in nitrate. At the air-snow interface at Dome C (DC; 75° 06' S, 123° 19' E), the model reproduces well the values of δ15N in atmospheric and surface snow (skin layer) nitrate as well as in the δ15N profile in DC snow, including the observed extraordinary high positive values (around +300 ‰) below 2 cm. The model also captures the observed variability in nitrate mass fraction in the snow. While oxygen data are qualitatively reproduced at the air-snow interface at DC and in East Antarctica, the simulated Δ17O values underestimate the observed Δ17O values by several per mill. This is explained by the simplifications made in the description of the atmospheric cycling and oxidation of NO2 as well as by our lack of understanding of the NOx chemistry at Dome C. The model reproduces well the sensitivity of δ15N, Δ17O and the apparent fractionation constants (15ϵapp, 17Eapp) to the snow accumulation rate. Building on this development, we propose a framework for the interpretation of nitrate records

  6. Close Resemblance Between Local Summer Insolation, O2/N2 and Total Air Content from the Dome Fuji Ice Core, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, K.; Nakazawa, T.; Aoki, S.; Fujii, Y.; Watanabe, O.; Severinghaus, J. P.

    2004-12-01

    O2/N2 ratio from ice cores has shown depleted values compared to the atmosphere due to selective exclusion of O2 during bubble formation at the base of firn. The long record from the Vostok ice core revealed that O2/N2 ratio records the local summer insolation. Insolation may affect physical properties of the firn near the surface, which later determines how much O2/N2 is fractionated the during bubble close-off process. We present here a supportive record of O2/N2 ratio for the last 340 kyr along the Dome Fuji ice core, Antarctica, which shows variations similar to the summer insolation at 77° S. Moreover, the variation of total air content (TAC) in the Dome Fuji core resembles that of O2/N2. High TAC and high O2/N2 ratio appear at times of low summer insolation. Since the TAC variation is too large to be explained by the elevation change at the Dome Fuji site in the past, a possible cause is variation of the so-called ``lock-in zone'' thickness on the orders of several meters. The lock-in zone is a region 0-10 m thick at the bottom of firn where horizontal impermeable layers prevent vertical gas mixing. At times of low insolation, the firn would retain inhomogeneities such as wind crusts and high-density layers. These small-scale inhomogeneities do not affect bulk density very much but may help trap the gases at a lower bulk density (and higher porosity and thus TAC) through formation of a thicker lock-in zone than in times of high insolation. High insolation would homogenize the firn structure through recrystallization. O2/N2 ratio would be less depleted if there is a lock-in zone within the total close-off zone, because O2 molecules once excluded from bubbles would eventually be re-trapped in the ice in the lock-in zone.

  7. Fabrication and characterization of carbon nanofiber@mesoporous carbon core-shell composite for the Li-air battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Myeong Jun; Shin, Moo Whan

    2014-11-01

    In this study, we successfully design and synthesize the mesoporous carbon coated carbon nanofibers (CNF@mesoCs) for the Li-air battery. The composites are fabricated via electrospinning technique and nanocasting strategy. After mesoporous carbon coating process, the composites have retained their original one-dimensional structure as pristine carbon nanofibers. Every nanofiber entangles with each other to form a three-dimensional cross-linked web structure. Because of the mesoporous carbon coating on carbon nanofibers, the surface area increases from 708 m2 g-1 to 2194 m2 g-1. We confirm that the mesoporous carbon coated on carbon nanofibers is well-graphitized by analysis of Raman spectra. The graphitized surface of CNF@mesoCs (4.638 S cm-1) is believed to result in their higher electrical conductivity than that of pristine carbon nanofibers (3.0759 S cm-1). Without employment of any binders and metal foams, the cathode of CNF@mesoCs exhibits high discharge capacity of 4000 mA h g-1, which is much higher than that from pristine carbon nanofibers (2750 mA h g-1). This work demonstrates that the fabricated CNF@mesoCs structures have a great potential to be employed as light-weight and efficient electrode for energy storage and conversion devices.

  8. Air-particle abrasion on zirconia ceramic using different protocols: effects on biaxial flexural strength after cyclic loading, phase transformation and surface topography.

    PubMed

    Souza, Rodrigo O A; Valandro, Luiz F; Melo, Renata M; Machado, João P B; Bottino, Marco A; Ozcan, Mutlu

    2013-10-01

    This study evaluated the effect of different air-particle abrasion protocols on the biaxial flexural strength and structural stability of zirconia ceramics. Zirconia ceramic specimens (ISO 6872) (Lava, 3M ESPE) were obtained (N=336). The specimens (N=118, n=20 per group) were randomly assigned to one of the air-abrasion protocols: Gr1: Control (as-sintered); Gr2: 50 µm Al2O3 (2.5 bar); Gr3: 50 µm Al2O3 (3.5 bar); Gr4: 110 µm Al2O3(2.5 bar); Gr5: 110 µm Al2O3 (3.5 bar); Gr6: 30 µm SiO2 (2.5 bar) (CoJet); Gr7: 30 µm SiO2(3.5 bar); Gr8: 110 µm SiO2 (2.5 bar) (Rocatec Plus); and Gr9: 110 µm SiO2 (3.5 bar) (duration: 20 s, distance: 10 mm). While half of the specimens were tested immediately, the other half was subjected to cyclic loading in water (100,000 cycles; 50 N, 4 Hz, 37 °°C) prior to biaxial flexural strength test (ISO 6872). Phase transformation (t→m), relative amount of transformed monoclinic zirconia (FM), transformed zone depth (TZD) and surface roughness were measured. Particle type (p=0.2746), pressure (p=0.5084) and cyclic loading (p=0.1610) did not influence the flexural strength. Except for the air-abraded group with 110 µm Al2O3 at 3.5 bar, all air-abrasion protocols increased the biaxial flexural strength (MPa) (Controlnon-aged: 1,030 ± 153, Controlaged: 1,138 ± 138; Experimentalnon-aged: 1,307 ± 184-1,554 ± 124; Experimentalaged: 1,308 ± 118-1,451 ± 135) in both non-aged and aged conditions, respectively. Surface roughness (Ra) was the highest with 110 µm Al2O3(0.84 µm. FM values ranged from 0% to 27.21%, higher value for the Rocatec Plus (110 µm SiO2) and 110 µm Al2O3 groups at 3.5 bar pressure. TZD ranged between 0 and 1.43 µm, with the highest values for Rocatec Plus and 110 µm Al2O3 groups at 3.5 bar pressure.

  9. Step-Scan T-Cell Fourier Transform Infrared Photoacoustic Spectroscopy (FTIR-PAS) for Monitoring Environmental Air Pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lixian; Mandelis, Andreas; Melnikov, Alexander; Michaelian, Kirk; Huan, Huiting; Haisch, Christoph

    2016-07-01

    Air pollutants have adverse effects on the Earth's climate system. There is an urgent need for cost-effective devices capable of recognizing and detecting various ambient pollutants. An FTIR photoacoustic spectroscopy (FTIR-PAS) method based on a commercial FTIR spectrometer developed for air contamination monitoring will be presented. A resonant T-cell was determined to be the most appropriate resonator in view of the low-frequency requirement and space limitations in the sample compartment. Step-scan FTIR-PAS theory for regular cylinder resonator has been described as a reference for prediction of T-cell vibration principles. Both simulated amplitude and phase responses of the T-cell show good agreement with measurement data Carbon dioxide IR absorption spectra were used to demonstrate the capacity of the FTIR-PAS method to detect ambient pollutants. The theoretical detection limit for carbon dioxide was found to be 4 ppmv. A linear response to carbon dioxide concentration was found in the range from 2500 ppmv to 5000 ppmv. The results indicate that it is possible to use step-scan FTIR-PAS with a T-cell as a quantitative method for analysis of ambient contaminants.

  10. All Metal Iron Core For A Low Aspect Ratio Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    D.A. Gates, C. Jun, I. Zatz, A. Zolfaghari

    2010-06-02

    A novel concept for incorporating a iron core transformer within a axisymmetric toroidal plasma containment device with a high neutron flux is described. This design enables conceptual design of low aspect ratio devices which employ standard transformer-driven plasma startup by using all-metal high resistance separators between the toroidal field windings. This design avoids the inherent problems of a multiturn air core transformer which will inevitably suffer from strong neutron bombardment and hence lose the integrity of its insulation, both through long term material degradation and short term neutron- induced conductivity.. A full 3-dimensional model of the concept has been developed within the MAXWELL program and the resultant loop voltage calculated. The utility of the result is found to be dependent on the resistivity of the high resistance separators. Useful loop voltage time histories have been obtained using achievable resistivities.

  11. Core assembly storage structure

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Jr., Charles E.; Brunings, Jay E.

    1988-01-01

    A structure for the storage of core assemblies from a liquid metal-cooled nuclear reactor. The structure comprises an enclosed housing having a substantially flat horizontal top plate, a bottom plate and substantially vertical wall members extending therebetween. A plurality of thimble members extend downwardly through the top plate. Each thimble member is closed at its bottom end and has an open end adjacent said top plate. Each thimble member has a length and diameter greater than that of the core assembly to be stored therein. The housing is provided with an inlet duct for the admission of cooling air and an exhaust duct for the discharge of air therefrom, such that when hot core assemblies are placed in the thimbles, the heat generated will by convection cause air to flow from the inlet duct around the thimbles and out the exhaust duct maintaining the core assemblies at a safe temperature without the necessity of auxiliary powered cooling equipment.

  12. Source fingerprint monitoring of air pollutants from petrochemical industry and the determination of their annual emission flux using open path Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Yih-Shiaw Huang; Shih-Yi Chang; Tai-Ly Tso

    1996-12-31

    Toxic air pollutants were investigated in several petrochemical industrial park in Taiwan using a movable open-path Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The results show the qualitative and quantitative analysis of emission gases from plants, and also provide the emission rates of various compounds. More than twenty compounds under usual operation were found from these industrial park. The concentration variation with time could be correlated exactly with the distances from the emission source along the wind direction. This means that by changing the measuring points the source of emission could be unambiguously identified. The point, area and line source (PAL) plume dispersion model has been applied to estimate the emission rate of either a point or an area source. The local atmospheric stability was determined by releasing an SF{sub 6} tracer. The origin of errors came mainly from the uncertainty of the source configuration and the variation of the meteorological condition. Through continuous measurement using a portable open-path Fourier transform infrared (POP-FTIR) spectrometer, the maximum value of the emission rate and the annual amount of emission could be derived. The emission rate of the measured toxic gases was derived by the model technique, and the results show that the emission amount is on the order of ten to hundred tons per year.

  13. The Potential Impact of CO2 and Air Temperature Increases on Krummholz's Transformation into Arborescent Form in the Southern Siberian Mountains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kharuk, V. I.; Dvinskaya, M. L.; Im, S. T.; Ranson, K. J.

    2011-01-01

    Trees in the southern Siberian Mountains forest-tundra ecotone have considerably increased their radial and apical growth increments during the last few decades. This leads to the widespread vertical transformation of mat and prostrate krummholz forms of larch (Larix sibirica Ledeb) and Siberian pine (Pinus sibirica Du Tour). An analysis of the radial growth increments showed that these transformations began in the mid-1980s. Larch showed a greater resistance to the harsh alpine environment and attained a vertical growth form in areas where Siberian pine is still krummholz. Upper larch treeline is about 10 m higher than Siberian pine treeline. Observed apical and radial growth increment increases were correlated with CO2 concentration (r = 0.83-0.87), summer temperatures (r = 0.55-0.64), and "cold period" (i.e. September-May) air temperatures (r = 0.36-0.37). Positive correlation between growth increments and winter precipitation was attributed to snow cover protection for trees during wintertime.

  14. Characterization of the low-temperature triplet state of chlorophyll in photosystem II core complexes: Application of phosphorescence measurements and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zabelin, Alexey A; Neverov, Konstantin V; Krasnovsky, Alexander A; Shkuropatova, Valentina A; Shuvalov, Vladimir A; Shkuropatov, Anatoly Ya

    2016-06-01

    Phosphorescence measurements at 77 K and light-induced FTIR difference spectroscopy at 95 K were applied to study of the triplet state of chlorophyll a ((3)Chl) in photosystem II (PSII) core complexes isolated from spinach. Using both methods, (3)Chl was observed in the core preparations with doubly reduced primary quinone acceptor QA. The spectral parameters of Chl phosphorescence resemble those in the isolated PSII reaction centers (RCs). The main spectral maximum and the lifetime of the phosphorescence corresponded to 955±1 nm and of 1.65±0.05 ms respectively; in the excitation spectrum, the absorption maxima of all core complex pigments (Chl, pheophytin a (Pheo), and β-carotene) were observed. The differential signal at 1667(-)/1628(+)cm(-1) reflecting a downshift of the stretching frequency of the 13(1)-keto C=O group of Chl was found to dominate in the triplet-minus-singlet FTIR difference spectrum of core complexes. Based on FTIR results and literature data, it is proposed that (3)Chl is mostly localized on the accessory chlorophyll that is in triplet equilibrium with P680. Analysis of the data suggests that the Chl triplet state responsible for the phosphorescence and the FTIR difference spectrum is mainly generated due to charge recombination in the reaction center radical pair P680(+)PheoD1(-), and the energy and temporal parameters of this triplet state as well as the molecular environment and interactions of the triplet-bearing Chl molecule are similar in the PSII core complexes and isolated PSII RCs.

  15. USEPA Environmental Quality Index (EQI) - Air, Water, Land, Built, and Sociodemographic Domains Non-Transformed Variables Dataset as Input for the USEPA EQI, by County for the United States

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory (NHEERL) in the Environmental Public Health Division (EPHD) is currently engaged in research aimed at developing a measure that estimates overall environmental quality at the county level for the United States. This work is being conducted as an effort to learn more about how various environmental factors simultaneously contribute to health disparities in low-income and minority populations, and to better estimate the total environmental and social context to which humans are exposed. This dataset contains the finalized non-transformed variables chosen to represent the Air, Water, Land, Built, and Sociodemographic Domains of the total environment. This does not represent the final variables for the EQI. The Transformed dataset was used to create the EQI. This dataset is for information purposes only for those who want to see the original non-transformed variables. Six criteria air pollutants and 81 hazardous air pollutants are included in this dataset. Data sources are the EPA's Air Quality system (http://www.epa.gov/ttn/airs/airsaqs/) and the National-scale Air Toxics Assessment (http://www.epa.gov/nata/). Variables are average pollutant concentrations or emissions for 2000-2005 at the county level for all counties in the United States. Data on water impairment, waste permits, beach closures, domestic water source, deposition for 9 pollutants, drought st

  16. Reading Research on Core Values, Christian Ethos and School Transformation at England's Most Improved Academy: A Reply to Bragg, Allington, Simmons and Jones

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pike, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    This article presents the author's reply to the comments of Bragg, Allington, Simmons and Jones to his article "Transaction and transformation at Trinity" (Pike, 2010) wherein he reported a case study of Trinity Academy, which serves a former mining community and social priority area near Doncaster in South Yorkshire. In 2008, just…

  17. Using an extractive Fourier transform infrared spectrometer for improving cleanroom air quality in a semiconductor manufacturing plant.

    PubMed

    Li, Shou-Nan; Chang, Chin-Ta; Shih, Hui-Ya; Tang, Andy; Li, Alen; Chen, Yin-Yung

    2003-01-01

    A mobile extractive Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer was successfully used to locate, identify, and quantify the "odor" sources inside the cleanroom of a semiconductor manufacturing plant. It was found that ozone (O(3)) gas with a peak concentration of 120 ppm was unexpectedly releasing from a headspace of a drain for transporting used ozonized water and that silicon tetrafluoride (SiF(4)) with a peak concentration of 3 ppm was off-gassed from silicon wafers after dry-etching processing. When the sources of the odors was pinpointed by the FTIR, engineering control measures were applied. For O(3) control, a water-sealed pipeline was added to prevent the O(3) gas (emitting from the ozonized water) from entering the mixing unit. A ventilation system also was applied to the mixing unit in case of O(3) release. For SiF(4) mitigation, before the wafer-out chamber was opened, N(2) gas with a flow rate of 150 L/min was used for 100 sec to purge the wafer-out chamber, and a vacuum system was simultaneously activated to pump away the purging N(2). The effectiveness of the control measures was assured by using the FTIR. In addition, the FTIR was used to monitor the potential hazardous gas emissions during preventative maintenance of the semiconductor manufacturing equipment.

  18. The Rise of IPv6: Benefits and Costs of Transforming Military Cyberspace

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-01

    March–April 2015 Air & Space Power Journal | 103 Feature The Rise of IPv6 Benefits and Costs of Transforming Military Cyberspace Dr. Panayotis A...2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE The Rise of IPv6: Benefits and Costs of Transforming Military Cyberspace 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c...Journal | 104 Yannakogeorgos The Rise of IPv6 Feature loted and autonomous systems that will in time become core mission enablers.1 Too often

  19. Thin-Film Power Transformers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katti, Romney R.

    1995-01-01

    Transformer core made of thin layers of insulating material interspersed with thin layers of ferromagnetic material. Flux-linking conductors made of thinner nonferromagnetic-conductor/insulator multilayers wrapped around core. Transformers have geometric features finer than those of transformers made in customary way by machining and mechanical pressing. In addition, some thin-film materials exhibit magnetic-flux-carrying capabilities superior to those of customary bulk transformer materials. Suitable for low-cost, high-yield mass production.

  20. Effects of isolobal heteroatoms in divanadium-substituted γ-Keggin-type polyoxometalates on (OV)2(μ-OH)2 diamond and (OV)2(μ-O) core structures and the transformation.

    PubMed

    Uehara, Kazuhiro; Taketsugu, Tatsuya; Yonehara, Kazuhiro; Mizuno, Noritaka

    2013-01-18

    Effects of isolobal heteroatoms in divanadium-substituted γ-Keggin-type polyoxometalates, (TBA)(4)[γ-XV(2)W(10)O(38)(μ-OH)(2)] 1(X) and (TBA)(4)[γ-XV(2)W(10)O(38)(μ-O)] 2(X) (where X = Ge or Si), on (OV)(2)(μ-OH)(2) and (OV)(2)(μ-O) core structures and transformations from 2(X) to 1(X) have been investigated. X-ray crystallography of 1(X) and 2(X) reveals that larger Ge (covalent radius 1.22 Å; covalent radius of Si 1.11 Å) induces (a) expansion of (OV)(2)(μ-OH)(2) and (OV)(2)(μ-O) cores, (b) expansion of lacunary sites, and (c) deep location of divanadium cores inside their lacunary sites. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations for anionic moieties of 1(X) and 2(X) reveal that energy levels of the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO)-1 in 1(Ge) and HOMO in 2(Ge) are lower than those in 1(Si) and 2(Si), respectively, because of smaller contribution of p(z) orbitals of oxygen atoms in 1(Ge) and 2(Ge), which would result from shorter V···O(-Ge) distances. Compound 2(Ge) reacts with water vapor to form (TBA)(4)[γ-GeV(2)W(10)O(38)(μ-OH)(2)] 1'(Ge) via a crystal-to-crystal transformation, and the water dissociation proceeds heterolytically. DFT calculations reveal that the reaction proceeds through (1) coordination of water on a coordinatively unsaturated site of vanadium in the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO), followed by (2) proton transfer to the bridging oxo moiety. The order is different from that in 2(Si), which would result from the lower energy level of HOMO of 2(Ge) (i.e., lower nucleophilicity toward a proton of water) than that of 2(Si).

  1. 125. TRANSFORMER SUBSTATIONS ON NORTH SIDE OF TRANSFORMER ROOM (112), ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    125. TRANSFORMER SUBSTATIONS ON NORTH SIDE OF TRANSFORMER ROOM (112), FACING SOUTH - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 West, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  2. Fixture for winding transformers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclyman, M. T.

    1980-01-01

    Bench-mounted fixture assists operator in winding toroid-shaped transformer cores. Toroid is rigidly held in place as wires are looped around. Arrangement frees both hands for rapid winding and untangling of wires that occurs when core is hand held.

  3. Surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization-induced transformation of selenium nanowires into copper selenide@polystyrene core-shell nanowires.

    PubMed

    Wang, Michael C P; Gates, Byron D

    2013-10-09

    This Article reports the first preparation of cuprous and cupric selenide nanowires coated with a ∼5 nm thick sheath of polystyrene (copper selenide@polystyrene). These hybrid nanostructures are prepared by the transformation of selenium nanowires in a one-pot reaction, which is performed under ambient conditions. The composition, purity, and crystallinity of the copper selenide@polystyrene products were assessed by scanning transmission electron microscopy, electron energy-loss spectroscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy techniques. We determined that the single crystalline selenium nanowires are converted into polycrystalline copper selenide@polystyrene nanowires containing both cuprous selenide and cupric selenide. The product is purified through the selective removal of residual, non-transformed selenium nanowires by performing thermal evaporation below the decomposition temperature of these copper selenides. Powder X-ray diffraction of the purified copper selenide nanowires@polystyrene identified the presence of hexagonal, cubic, and orthorhombic phases of copper selenide. These purified cuprous and cupric selenide@polystyrene nanowires have an indirect bandgap of 1.44 eV, as determined by UV-vis absorption spectroscopy. This new synthesis of polymer-encapsulated nanoscale materials may provide a method for preparing other complex hybrid nanostructures.

  4. ‘Building Core Knowledge - Reconstructing Earth History’: Transforming Undergraduate Instruction by Bringing Ocean Drilling Science on Earth History and Global Climate Change into the Classroom (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St. John, K.; Leckie, R. M.; Jones, M. H.; Pound, K. S.; Pyle, E.; Krissek, L. A.

    2009-12-01

    This NSF-funded, Phase 1 CCLI project effectively integrates scientific ocean drilling data and research (DSDP-ODP-IODP-ANDRILL) with education. We have developed, and are currently testing, a suite of data-rich inquiry-based classroom learning materials based on sediment core archives. These materials are suitable for use in introductory geoscience courses that serve general education students, early geoscience majors, and pre-service teachers. 'Science made accessible' is the essence of this goal. Our team consists of research and education specialists from institutions ranging from R1 research to public liberal arts to community college. We address relevant and timely ‘Big Ideas’ with foundational geoscience concepts and climate change case studies, as well transferable skills valued in professional settings. The exercises are divided into separate but inter-related modules including: introduction to cores, seafloor sediments, microfossils and biostratigraphy, paleomagnetism and magnetostratigraphy, climate rhythms, oxygen-isotope changes in the Cenozoic, past Arctic and Antarctic climates, drill site selection, interpreting Arctic and Antarctic sediment cores, onset of Northern Hemisphere glaciation, onset of Antarctic glaciation, and the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum. Each module has several parts, and each is designed to be used in the classroom, laboratory, or assigned as homework. All exercises utilize authentic data. Students work with scientific uncertainty, practice quantitative and problem-solving skills, and expand their basic geologic and geographic knowledge. Students have the opportunity to work individually and in groups, evaluate real-world problems, and formulate hypotheses. Initial exercises in each module are useful to introduce a topic, gauge prior knowledge, and flag possible areas of student misconception. Comprehensive instructor guides provide essential background information, detailed answer keys, and alternative implementation

  5. Step-scan T cell-based differential Fourier transform infrared photoacoustic spectroscopy (DFTIR-PAS) for detection of ambient air contaminants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lixian; Mandelis, Andreas; Huan, Huiting; Melnikov, Alexander

    2016-10-01

    A step-scan differential Fourier transform infrared photoacoustic spectroscopy (DFTIR-PAS) using a commercial FTIR spectrometer was developed theoretically and experimentally for air contaminant monitoring. The configuration comprises two identical, small-size and low-resonance-frequency T cells satisfying the conflicting requirements of low chopping frequency and limited space in the sample compartment. Carbon dioxide (CO2) IR absorption spectra were used to demonstrate the capability of the DFTIR-PAS method to detect ambient pollutants. A linear amplitude response to CO2 concentrations from 100 to 10,000 ppmv was observed, leading to a theoretical detection limit of 2 ppmv. The differential mode was able to suppress the coherent noise, thereby imparting the DFTIR-PAS method with a better signal-to-noise ratio and lower theoretical detection limit than the single mode. The results indicate that it is possible to use step-scan DFTIR-PAS with T cells as a quantitative method for high sensitivity analysis of ambient contaminants.

  6. Analysis of a transformer-less, multi-level DC-DC converter for HVDC operation

    SciTech Connect

    Karady, G.G.; Devarajan, S.

    1998-12-31

    HVDC systems require DC step up and DC step down units. The traditional approach is the application of twelve-pulse thyristor bridges with transformers. The developments of fast switching IGBT devices permit the development of transformer-less, multi-level converters. A multi-level circuit was suggested by Limpaecher. This paper presents a detailed simulation of the proposed circuit together with the analysis of its performance. The converter consists of a set of capacitors, air core inductors and solid state switches arranged in a ladder network. In the step-up mode, the closing of solid state switches resonantly charges the capacitors in parallel through an air-cored inductor. Then solid state switches resonantly charges the capacitors in parallel through an air-cored inductor. Then solid state switches connect the capacitors in series and discharge them through an air-core inductor to the load. In the step-down mode the capacitors are charged in series and discharged in parallel. The circuit has three modes of operation in each cycle: charge, inversion, and discharge. The circuit operation is analyzed in each mode using SPICE simulations. The selection of the components is discussed and output voltage regulation is analyzed. The results show that the proposed circuit promises significant reduction of losses, because of the zero current switching. The investment cost is reduced because of the elimination of transformers.

  7. Transformational Learners: Transformational Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Marguerite

    2009-01-01

    Transformational learning, according to Mezirow (1981), involves transforming taken-for-granted frames of reference into more discriminating, flexible "habits of mind". In teacher education, transformative learning impacts on the development of students' action theories, self-efficacy and professional attributes. Although considered…

  8. Facile One-pot Transformation of Iron Oxides from Fe2O3 Nanoparticles to Nanostructured Fe3O4@C Core-Shell Composites via Combustion Waves.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jungho; Lee, Kang Yeol; Yeo, Taehan; Choi, Wonjoon

    2016-02-23

    The development of a low-cost, fast, and large-scale process for the synthesis and manipulation of nanostructured metal oxides is essential for incorporating materials with diverse practical applications. Herein, we present a facile one-pot synthesis method using combustion waves that simultaneously achieves fast reduction and direct formation of carbon coating layers on metal oxide nanostructures. Hybrid composites of Fe2O3 nanoparticles and nitrocellulose on the cm scale were fabricated by a wet impregnation process. We demonstrated that self-propagating combustion waves along interfacial boundaries between the surface of the metal oxide and the chemical fuels enabled the release of oxygen from Fe2O3. This accelerated reaction directly transformed Fe2O3 into Fe3O4 nanostructures. The distinctive color change from reddish-brown Fe2O3 to dark-gray Fe3O4 confirmed the transition of oxidation states and the change in the fundamental properties of the material. Furthermore, it simultaneously formed carbon layers of 5-20 nm thickness coating the surfaces of the resulting Fe3O4 nanoparticles, which may aid in maintaining the nanostructures and improving the conductivity of the composites. This newly developed use of combustion waves in hybridized nanostructures may permit the precise manipulation of the chemical compositions of other metal oxide nanostructures, as well as the formation of organic/inorganic hybrid nanostructures.

  9. Facile One-pot Transformation of Iron Oxides from Fe2O3 Nanoparticles to Nanostructured Fe3O4@C Core-Shell Composites via Combustion Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Jungho; Lee, Kang Yeol; Yeo, Taehan; Choi, Wonjoon

    2016-02-01

    The development of a low-cost, fast, and large-scale process for the synthesis and manipulation of nanostructured metal oxides is essential for incorporating materials with diverse practical applications. Herein, we present a facile one-pot synthesis method using combustion waves that simultaneously achieves fast reduction and direct formation of carbon coating layers on metal oxide nanostructures. Hybrid composites of Fe2O3 nanoparticles and nitrocellulose on the cm scale were fabricated by a wet impregnation process. We demonstrated that self-propagating combustion waves along interfacial boundaries between the surface of the metal oxide and the chemical fuels enabled the release of oxygen from Fe2O3. This accelerated reaction directly transformed Fe2O3 into Fe3O4 nanostructures. The distinctive color change from reddish-brown Fe2O3 to dark-gray Fe3O4 confirmed the transition of oxidation states and the change in the fundamental properties of the material. Furthermore, it simultaneously formed carbon layers of 5–20 nm thickness coating the surfaces of the resulting Fe3O4 nanoparticles, which may aid in maintaining the nanostructures and improving the conductivity of the composites. This newly developed use of combustion waves in hybridized nanostructures may permit the precise manipulation of the chemical compositions of other metal oxide nanostructures, as well as the formation of organic/inorganic hybrid nanostructures.

  10. Facile One-pot Transformation of Iron Oxides from Fe2O3 Nanoparticles to Nanostructured Fe3O4@C Core-Shell Composites via Combustion Waves

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jungho; Lee, Kang Yeol; Yeo, Taehan; Choi, Wonjoon

    2016-01-01

    The development of a low-cost, fast, and large-scale process for the synthesis and manipulation of nanostructured metal oxides is essential for incorporating materials with diverse practical applications. Herein, we present a facile one-pot synthesis method using combustion waves that simultaneously achieves fast reduction and direct formation of carbon coating layers on metal oxide nanostructures. Hybrid composites of Fe2O3 nanoparticles and nitrocellulose on the cm scale were fabricated by a wet impregnation process. We demonstrated that self-propagating combustion waves along interfacial boundaries between the surface of the metal oxide and the chemical fuels enabled the release of oxygen from Fe2O3. This accelerated reaction directly transformed Fe2O3 into Fe3O4 nanostructures. The distinctive color change from reddish-brown Fe2O3 to dark-gray Fe3O4 confirmed the transition of oxidation states and the change in the fundamental properties of the material. Furthermore, it simultaneously formed carbon layers of 5–20 nm thickness coating the surfaces of the resulting Fe3O4 nanoparticles, which may aid in maintaining the nanostructures and improving the conductivity of the composites. This newly developed use of combustion waves in hybridized nanostructures may permit the precise manipulation of the chemical compositions of other metal oxide nanostructures, as well as the formation of organic/inorganic hybrid nanostructures. PMID:26902260

  11. Strong Lewis acids of air-stable metallocene bis(perfluorooctanesulfonate)s as high-efficiency catalysts for carbonyl-group transformation reactions.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Renhua; Xu, Xinhua; Peng, Lifeng; Zhao, Yalei; Li, Ningbo; Yin, Shuangfeng

    2012-05-14

    Strong Lewis acids of air-stable metallocene bis(perfluorooctanesulfonate)s [M(Cp)(2)][OSO(2)C(8)F(17)](2)⋅nH(2)O⋅THF (M = Zr (2 a⋅3 H(2)O⋅THF), M = Ti (2 b⋅2 H(2)O⋅THF)) were synthesized by the reaction of [M(Cp)(2)]Cl(2) (M = Zr (1 a), M = Ti (1 b)) with nBuLi and C(8)F(17)SO(3)H (2 equiv) or with C(8)F(17)SO(3)Ag (2 equiv). The hydrate numbers (n) of these complexes were variable, changing from 0 to 4 depending on conditions. In contrast to well-known metallocene triflates, these complexes suffered no change in open air for a year. thermogravimetry-differential scanning calorimetry (TG-DSC) analysis showed that 2 a and 2 b were thermally stable at 300 and 180 °C, respectively. These complexes exhibited unusually high solubility in polar organic solvents. Conductivity measurement showed that the complexes (2 a and 2 b) were ionic dissociation in CH(3)CN solution. X-ray analysis result confirmed 2 a⋅3 H(2)O⋅THF was a cationic organometallic Lewis acid. UV/Vis spectra showed a significant red shift due to the strong complex formation between 10-methylacridone and 2 a. Fluorescence spectra showed that the Lewis acidity of 2 a fell between those of Sc(3+) (λ(em)=474 nm) and Fe(3+) (λ(em)=478 nm). ESR spectra showed the Lewis acidity of 2 a (0.91 eV) was at the same level as that of Sc(3+) (1.00 eV) and Y(3+) (0.85 eV), while the Lewis acidity of 2 b (1.06 eV) was larger than that of Sc(3+) (1.00 eV) and Y(3+) (0.85 eV). They showed high catalytic ability in carbonyl-compound transformation reactions, such as the Mannich reaction, the Mukaiyama aldol reaction, allylation of aldehydes, the Friedel-Crafts acylation of alkyl aromatic ethers, and cyclotrimerization of ketones. Moreover, the complexes possessed good reusability. On account of their excellent catalytic efficiency, stability, and reusability, the complexes will find broad catalytic applications in organic synthesis.

  12. Magnetic materials selection for static inverter and converter transformers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclyman, C. W. T.

    1971-01-01

    Different magnetic alloys best suited for high-frequency and high-efficiency applications were comparatively investigated together with an investigation of each alloy's inherent characteristics. One of the characteristics in magnetic materials deterimental in transformer design is the residual flux density, which can be additive on turn-on and cause the transformer to saturate. Investigation of this problem led to the design of a transformer with a very low residual flux. Tests were performed to determine the dc and ac magnetic properties at 2400 Hz using square-wave excitation. These tests were performed on uncut cores, which were then cut for comparison of the gapped and ungapped magnetic properties. The optimum transformer was found to be that with the lowest residual flux and a small amount of air gap in the magnetic material. The data obtained from these tests are described, and the potential uses for the materials are discussed.

  13. Multi-kilowatt, all-fiber integrated chirped-pulse amplification system yielding 40x pulse compression using air-core fiber and conventional erbium-doped fiber amplifier.

    PubMed

    de Matos, C; Taylor, J

    2004-02-09

    We present a totally fiber integrated chirped-pulse amplification system using air-core photonic bandgap fiber and a conventional erbium-doped fiber amplifier. ~40-ps input pulses, generated in a Mach-Zehnder modulator, were stretched and spectrally broadened in a dispersion-shifted fiber before being amplified and subsequently compressed in 10 m of anomalously-dispersive photonic bandgap fiber to yield ~960 fs pulses. The system gives multi-kilowatt peak powers while the amplifier nonlinearity threshold is as low as ~150 W. Higher peak powers could be obtained by the use of an amplifier with higher nonlinearity threshold.

  14. Enhancing Understanding of Transformation Matrices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dick, Jonathan; Childrey, Maria

    2012-01-01

    With the Common Core State Standards' emphasis on transformations, teachers need a variety of approaches to increase student understanding. Teaching matrix transformations by focusing on row vectors gives students tools to create matrices to perform transformations. This empowerment opens many doors: Students are able to create the matrices for…

  15. Effectiveness of Vegetation Index Transformation for Land Use Identifying and Mapping in the Area of Oil palm Plantation based on SPOT-6 Imagery (Case Study: PT.Tunggal Perkasa Plantations, Air Molek, Indragiri Hulu)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setyowati, H. A.; S, S. H. Murti B.; Sukentyas, E. S.

    2016-11-01

    The reflection of land surface, atmosphere and vegetation conditions affect the reflectance value of the object is recorded on remote sensing image so that it can affect the outcome of information extraction from remote sensing imagery one multispectral classification. This study aims to assess the ability of the transformation of generic vegetation index (Wide Dynamic Range Vegetation Index), the vegetation index transformation that is capable reducing the influence of the atmosphere (Atmospherically Resistant Vegetation Index), and the transformation of vegetation index that is capable of reducing the influence of the background soil (Second Modified Soil Adjusted Vegetation Index) for the identification and mapping of land use in the oil palm plantation area based on SPOT-6 archived on June 13, 2013 from LAPAN. The study area selected oil palm plantations PT. Tunggal Perkasa Plantations, Air Molek, Indragiri Hulu, Riau Province. The method is using the transformation of the vegetation index ARVI, MSAVI2, and WDRVI. Sample selection method used was stratified random sampling. The test method used mapping accuracy of the confusion matrix. The results showed that the best transformation of the vegetation index for the identification and mapping of land use in the plantation area is ARVI transformation with a total of accuracy is 96%. Accuracy of mapping land use settlements 100%, replanting 82.35%, 81.25% young oil palm, old oil palm 99.46%, 100% bush, body of water 100%, and 100% bare-soil.

  16. Technical report series on global modeling and data assimilation. Volume 5: Documentation of the AIRES/GEOS dynamical core, version 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suarez, Max J. (Editor); Takacs, Lawrence L.

    1995-01-01

    A detailed description of the numerical formulation of Version 2 of the ARIES/GEOS 'dynamical core' is presented. This code is a nearly 'plug-compatible' dynamics for use in atmospheric general circulation models (GCMs). It is a finite difference model on a staggered latitude-longitude C-grid. It uses second-order differences for all terms except the advection of vorticity by the rotation part of the flow, which is done at fourth-order accuracy. This dynamical core is currently being used in the climate (ARIES) and data assimilation (GEOS) GCMs at Goddard.

  17. Magnetically Controlled Variable Transformer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleiner, Charles T.

    1994-01-01

    Improved variable-transformer circuit, output voltage and current of which controlled by use of relatively small current supplied at relatively low power to control windings on its magnetic cores. Transformer circuits of this type called "magnetic amplifiers" because ratio between controlled output power and power driving control current of such circuit large. This ratio - power gain - can be as large as 100 in present circuit. Variable-transformer circuit offers advantages of efficiency, safety, and controllability over some prior variable-transformer circuits.

  18. The investigation of a compact auto-connected wire-wrapped pulsed transformer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuwei; Zhang, Jiande; Chen, Dongqun; Cao, Shengguang; Li, Da; Zhang, Tianyang

    2012-05-01

    For the power conditioning circuit used to deliver power efficiently from flux compression generator (FCG) to the load with high impedance, an air-cored and wire-wrapped transformer convenient in coaxial connection to the other parts is investigated. To reduce the size and enhance the performance, an auto-connection is adopted. A fast and simple model is used to calculate the electrical parameters of the transformer. To evaluate the high voltage capability, the voltages across turns and the electric field distribution in the transformer are investigated. The calculated and the measured electrical parameters of the transformer show good agreements. And the safe operating voltage is predicted to exceed 500 kV. In the preliminary experiments, the transformer is tested in a power conditioning circuit with a capacitive power supply. It is demonstrated that the output voltage of the transformer reaches -342 kV under the input voltage of -81 kV.

  19. Integrally cored ceramic investment casting mold fabricated by ceramic stereolithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Chang-Jun

    Superalloy airfoils are produced by investment casting (IC), which uses ceramic cores and wax patterns with ceramic shell molds. Hollow cored superalloy airfoils in a gas turbine engine are an example of complex IC parts. The complex internal hollow cavities of the airfoil are designed to conduct cooling air through one or more passageways. These complex internal passageways have been fabricated by a lost wax process requiring several processing steps; core preparation, injection molding for wax pattern, and dipping process for ceramic shell molds. Several steps generate problems such as high cost and decreased accuracy of the ceramic mold. For example, costly tooling and production delay are required to produce mold dies for complex cores and wax patterns used in injection molding, resulting in a big obstacle for prototypes and smaller production runs. Rather than using separate cores, patterns, and shell molds, it would be advantageous to directly produce a mold that has the casting cavity and the ceramic core by one process. Ceramic stereolithography (CerSLA) can be used to directly fabricate the integrally cored ceramic casting mold (ICCM). CerSLA builds ceramic green objects from CAD files from many thin liquid layers of powder in monomer, which are solidified by polymerization with a UV laser, thereby "writing" the design for each slice. This dissertation addresses the integrally cored casting ceramic mold (ICCM), the ceramic core with a ceramic mold shell in a single patternless construction, fabricated by ceramic stereolithography (CerSLA). CerSLA is considered as an alternative method to replace lost wax processes, for small production runs or designs too complex for conventional cores and patterns. The main topic is the development of methods to successfully fabricate an ICCM by CerSLA from refractory silica, as well as related issues. The related issues are the segregation of coarse fused silica powders in a layer, the degree of segregation parameter to

  20. 134. VIEW OF TRANSFORMER CABINETS ON NORTH SIDE OF TRANSFORMER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    134. VIEW OF TRANSFORMER CABINETS ON NORTH SIDE OF TRANSFORMER ROOM (212), LSB (BLDG. 751), FACING SOUTH. POWER PANEL B AT EAST SIDE OF TRANSFORMER ROOM (212), FACING WEST, AT RIGHT IN PHOTOGRAPH. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 East, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  1. CORE SATURATION BLOCKING OSCILLATOR

    DOEpatents

    Spinrad, R.J.

    1961-10-17

    A blocking oscillator which relies on core saturation regulation to control the output pulse width is described. In this arrangement an external magnetic loop is provided in which a saturable portion forms the core of a feedback transformer used with the thermionic or semi-conductor active element. A first stationary magnetic loop establishes a level of flux through the saturation portion of the loop. A second adjustable magnet moves the flux level to select a saturation point giving the desired output pulse width. (AEC)

  2. Core Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.

    2011-01-01

    This presentation is a technical summary of and outlook for NASA-internal and NASA-sponsored external research on core (combustor and turbine) noise funded by the Fundamental Aeronautics Program Subsonic Fixed Wing (SFW) Project. Sections of the presentation cover: the SFW system-level noise metrics for the 2015, 2020, and 2025 timeframes; turbofan design trends and their aeroacoustic implications; the emerging importance of core noise and its relevance to the SFW Reduce-Perceived-Noise Technical Challenge; and the current research activities in the core noise area. Recent work1 on the turbine-transmission loss of combustor noise is briefly described, two2,3 new NRA efforts in the core-noise area are outlined, and an effort to develop CMC-based acoustic liners for broadband noise reduction suitable for turbofan-core application is delineated. The NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program has the principal objective of overcoming today's national challenges in air transportation. The reduction of aircraft noise is critical to enabling the anticipated large increase in future air traffic. The Subsonic Fixed Wing Project's Reduce-Perceived-Noise Technical Challenge aims to develop concepts and technologies to dramatically reduce the perceived aircraft noise outside of airport boundaries.

  3. Series Transmission Line Transformer

    DOEpatents

    Buckles, Robert A.; Booth, Rex; Yen, Boris T.

    2004-06-29

    A series transmission line transformer is set forth which includes two or more of impedance matched sets of at least two transmissions lines such as shielded cables, connected in parallel at one end ans series at the other in a cascading fashion. The cables are wound about a magnetic core. The series transmission line transformer (STLT) which can provide for higher impedance ratios and bandwidths, which is scalable, and which is of simpler design and construction.

  4. Simplifying the ELA Common Core; Demystifying Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmoker, Mike; Jago, Carol

    2013-01-01

    The English Language Arts (ELA) Common Core State Standards ([CCSS], 2010) could have a transformational effect on American education. Though the process seems daunting, one can begin immediately integrating the essence of the ELA Common Core in every subject area. This article shows how one could implement the Common Core and create coherent,…

  5. Toroidal core winder

    DOEpatents

    Potthoff, Clifford M.

    1978-01-01

    The disclosure is directed to an apparatus for placing wire windings on a toroidal body, such as a transformer core, having an orifice in its center. The apparatus comprises a wire storage spool, a wire loop holding continuous belt maintained in a C-shaped loop by a belt supporting structure and provision for turning the belt to place and tighten loops of wire on a toroidal body, which is disposed within the gap of the C-shaped belt loop.

  6. Atmospheric abundance and global emissions of perfluorocarbons CF4, C2F6 and C3F8 since 1800 inferred from ice core, firn, air archive and in situ measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trudinger, Cathy M.; Fraser, Paul J.; Etheridge, David M.; Sturges, William T.; Vollmer, Martin K.; Rigby, Matt; Martinerie, Patricia; Mühle, Jens; Worton, David R.; Krummel, Paul B.; Steele, L. Paul; Miller, Benjamin R.; Laube, Johannes; Mani, Francis S.; Rayner, Peter J.; Harth, Christina M.; Witrant, Emmanuel; Blunier, Thomas; Schwander, Jakob; O'Doherty, Simon; Battle, Mark

    2016-09-01

    Perfluorocarbons (PFCs) are very potent and long-lived greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, released predominantly during aluminium production and semiconductor manufacture. They have been targeted for emission controls under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. Here we present the first continuous records of the atmospheric abundance of CF4 (PFC-14), C2F6 (PFC-116) and C3F8 (PFC-218) from 1800 to 2014. The records are derived from high-precision measurements of PFCs in air extracted from polar firn or ice at six sites (DE08, DE08-2, DSSW20K, EDML, NEEM and South Pole) and air archive tanks and atmospheric air sampled from both hemispheres. We take account of the age characteristics of the firn and ice core air samples and demonstrate excellent consistency between the ice core, firn and atmospheric measurements. We present an inversion for global emissions from 1900 to 2014. We also formulate the inversion to directly infer emission factors for PFC emissions due to aluminium production prior to the 1980s. We show that 19th century atmospheric levels, before significant anthropogenic influence, were stable at 34.1 ± 0.3 ppt for CF4 and below detection limits of 0.002 and 0.01 ppt for C2F6 and C3F8, respectively. We find a significant peak in CF4 and C2F6 emissions around 1940, most likely due to the high demand for aluminium during World War II, for example for construction of aircraft, but these emissions were nevertheless much lower than in recent years. The PFC emission factors for aluminium production in the early 20th century were significantly higher than today but have decreased since then due to improvements and better control of the smelting process. Mitigation efforts have led to decreases in emissions from peaks in 1980 (CF4) or early-to-mid-2000s (C2F6 and C3F8) despite the continued increase in global aluminium production; however, these decreases in emissions appear to have recently halted. We see a temporary reduction of around

  7. Transformer design tradeoffs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclyman, W. T.

    1976-01-01

    Material was presented to assist transformer designers in the transition from long-used English units to the less familiar metric equivalents. A coordination between the area product numbers ap (product of window and core cross-section areas) and current density J was developed for a given regulation and temperature rise. Straight-line relationships for Ap and Volume, Ap and surface area At and, Ap and weight were developed. These relationships can now be used as new tools to simplify and standardize the process of transformer design. They also made it possible to design transformers of small bulk and volume or to optimize efficiency.

  8. Computerized toroidal transformer design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    Computer program designs transformers which have one primary /center tap permissible/ and up to 20 untapped secondaries, and which can handle up to 500 V across any one winding. Computer determines total secondary power, core type, primary turns, secondary turns, and wire sizes for primary and secondary windings.

  9. Cold-air annular-cascade investigation of aerodynamic performance of core-engine-cooled turbine vanes. 1: Solid-vane performance and facility description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, L. J.; Mclallin, K. L.

    1975-01-01

    The aerodynamic performance of a solid (uncooled) version of a core engine cooled stator vane was experimentally determined in a full-annular cascade, where three-dimensional effects could be obtained. The solid vane, which serves as a basis for comparison with subsequent cooled tests, was tested over a range of aftermixed critical velocity ratios of 0.57 to 0.90. Overall vane aftermixed efficiencies were obtained over this critical velocity ratio range and compared with results from a two-dimensional cascade. The variation in vane efficiency and aftermixed flow conditions with circumferential and radial position were obtained and compared with design values. Vane surface static-pressure distributions were also measured and compared with theoretical results.

  10. Core Noise - Increasing Importance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.

    2011-01-01

    This presentation is a technical summary of and outlook for NASA-internal and NASA-sponsored external research on core (combustor and turbine) noise funded by the Fundamental Aeronautics Program Subsonic Fixed Wing (SFW) Project. Sections of the presentation cover: the SFW system-level noise metrics for the 2015, 2020, and 2025 timeframes; turbofan design trends and their aeroacoustic implications; the emerging importance of core noise and its relevance to the SFW Reduced-Perceived-Noise Technical Challenge; and the current research activities in the core-noise area, with additional details given about the development of a high-fidelity combustor-noise prediction capability as well as activities supporting the development of improved reduced-order, physics-based models for combustor-noise prediction. The need for benchmark data for validation of high-fidelity and modeling work and the value of a potential future diagnostic facility for testing of core-noise-reduction concepts are indicated. The NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program has the principal objective of overcoming today's national challenges in air transportation. The SFW Reduced-Perceived-Noise Technical Challenge aims to develop concepts and technologies to dramatically reduce the perceived aircraft noise outside of airport boundaries. This reduction of aircraft noise is critical to enabling the anticipated large increase in future air traffic. Noise generated in the jet engine core, by sources such as the compressor, combustor, and turbine, can be a significant contribution to the overall noise signature at low-power conditions, typical of approach flight. At high engine power during takeoff, jet and fan noise have traditionally dominated over core noise. However, current design trends and expected technological advances in engine-cycle design as well as noise-reduction methods are likely to reduce non-core noise even at engine-power points higher than approach. In addition, future low-emission combustor

  11. 24. A CORE WORKER DISPLAYS THE CORE BOX AND CORES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. A CORE WORKER DISPLAYS THE CORE BOX AND CORES FOR A BRASS GATE VALVE BODY MADE ON A CORE BOX, CA. 1950. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  12. Past atmospheric krypton and xenon over the last 24,000 years from trapped air in polar ice cores: A potential constraint on mean ocean temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, Kenji; Severinghaus, Jeffrey P.; Baggenstos, Daniel; Orsi, Anais; Buizert, Christo; Aoki, Shuji; Nakazawa, Takakiyo

    2015-04-01

    Prior work has shown that atmospheric concentrations of Kr and Xe respond mainly to mean ocean temperature variations, due to their strongly temperature-dependent solubility in liquid water and due to the fact that no significant sources or sinks exist in the ocean-atmosphere system (Headly and Severinghaus, 2007 JGR; Ritz et al., 2011 QSR). Because roughly 80% of the ocean's volume is colder than 4° C, and cold water holds more gas than warm water, the atmospheric noble gases Kr and Xe mainly record changes in deep ocean temperature. Records from the WAIS Divide, GISP2 and Dome Fuji ice cores show a large increase in the Kr/N2 and Xe/N2 over the time interval 19 ka to 15 ka, equivalent to ~1.5 ° C deep ocean warming (from the WAIS data and a box model). This time interval is contemporaneous with Heinrich Stadial 1, a time of strong retreat of southern hemisphere mountain glaciers, rapid warming of southern mid-latitude surface waters, and weak northern hemisphere monsoons, all consistent with a south-shifted ITCZ and weak Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (the 'bipolar see-saw' in its warm-south mode). These new data are consistent with the idea that the initial rise in CO2 at the last Termination was caused by a strong increase in the rate at which the deep ocean is exposed to the atmosphere around Antarctica (known as 'ventilation') and the concomitant release of CO2 to the atmosphere. The WAIS Divide data also suggest a slow-down of ocean warming between 15 ka and 13 ka, and then the second strong warming by about one degree until ~11.5 ka, roughly coincident with Antarctic Cold Reversal and Younger Dryas, respectively.

  13. Spacecraft transformer and inductor design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclyman, W. T.

    1977-01-01

    The conversion process in spacecraft power electronics requires the use of magnetic components which frequently are the heaviest and bulkiest items in the conversion circuit. This handbook pertains to magnetic material selection, transformer and inductor design tradeoffs, transformer design, iron core dc inductor design, toroidal power core inductor design, window utilization factors, regulation, and temperature rise. Relationships are given which simplify and standardize the design of transformers and the analysis of the circuits in which they are used. The interactions of the various design parameters are also presented in simplified form so that tradeoffs and optimizations may easily be made.

  14. Towards high efficiency air-processed near-infrared responsive photovoltaics: bulk heterojunction solar cells based on PbS/CdS core-shell quantum dots and TiO2 nanorod arrays.

    PubMed

    Gonfa, Belete Atomsa; Kim, Mee Rahn; Delegan, Nazar; Tavares, Ana C; Izquierdo, Ricardo; Wu, Nianqiang; El Khakani, My Ali; Ma, Dongling

    2015-06-14

    Near infrared (NIR) PbS quantum dots (QDs) have attracted significant research interest in solar cell applications as they offer several advantages, such as tunable band gaps, capability of absorbing NIR photons, low cost solution processability and high potential for multiple exciton generation. Nonetheless, reports on solar cells based on NIR PbS/CdS core-shell QDs, which are in general more stable and better passivated than PbS QDs and thus more promising for solar cell applications, remain very rare. Herein we report high efficiency bulk heterojunction QD solar cells involving hydrothermally grown TiO2 nanorod arrays and PbS/CdS core-shell QDs processed in air (except for a device thermal annealing step) with a photoresponse extended to wavelengths >1200 nm and with a power conversion efficiency (PCE) as high as 4.43%. This efficiency was achieved by introducing a thin, sputter-deposited, uniform TiO2 seed layer to improve the interface between the TiO2 nanorod arrays and the front electrode, by optimizing TiO2 nanorod length and by conducting QD annealing treatment to enhance charge carrier transport. It was found that the effect of the seed layer became more obvious when the TiO2 nanorods were longer. Although photocurrent did not change much, both open circuit voltage and fill factor clearly changed with TiO2 nanorod length. This was mainly attributed to the variation of charge transport and recombination processes, as evidenced by series and shunt resistance studies. The optimal PCE was obtained at the nanorod length of ∼450 nm. Annealing is shown to further increase the PCE by ∼18%, because of the improvement of charge carrier transport in the devices as evidenced by considerably increased photocurrent. Our results clearly demonstrate the potential of the PbS/CdS core-shell QDs for the achievement of high PCE, solution processable and NIR responsive QD solar cells.

  15. Core layering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, S. A.; Rubie, D. C.; Hernlund, J. W.; Morbidelli, A.

    2015-12-01

    We have created a planetary accretion and differentiation model that self-consistently builds and evolves Earth's core. From this model, we show that the core grows stably stratified as the result of rising metal-silicate equilibration temperatures and pressures, which increases the concentrations of light element impurities into each newer core addition. This stable stratification would naturally resist convection and frustrate the onset of a geodynamo, however, late giant impacts could mechanically mix the distinct accreted core layers creating large homogenous regions. Within these regions, a geodynamo may operate. From this model, we interpret the difference between the planetary magnetic fields of Earth and Venus as a difference in giant impact histories. Our planetary accretion model is a numerical N-body integration of the Grand Tack scenario [1]—the most successful terrestrial planet formation model to date [2,3]. Then, we take the accretion histories of Earth-like and Venus-like planets from this model and post-process the growth of each terrestrial planet according to a well-tested planetary differentiation model [4,5]. This model fits Earth's mantle by modifying the oxygen content of the pre-cursor planetesimals and embryos as well as the conditions of metal-silicate equilibration. Other non-volatile major, minor and trace elements included in the model are assumed to be in CI chondrite proportions. The results from this model across many simulated terrestrial planet growth histories are robust. If the kinetic energy delivered by larger impacts is neglected, the core of each planet grows with a strong stable stratification that would significantly impede convection. However, if giant impact mixing is very efficient or if the impact history delivers large impacts late, than the stable stratification can be removed. [1] Walsh et al. Nature 475 (2011) [2] O'Brien et al. Icarus 223 (2014) [3] Jacobson & Morbidelli PTRSA 372 (2014) [4] Rubie et al. EPSL 301

  16. A transformer of closely spaced pulsed waveforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niedra, J.

    1970-01-01

    Passive circuit, using diodes, transistors, and magnetic cores, transforms the voltage of repetitive positive or negative pulses. It combines a pulse transformer with switching devices to effect a resonant flux reset and can transform various pulsed waveforms that have a nonzero average value and are relatively cosely spaced in time.

  17. Examination of Applying Amorphous Rolled Core to Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amano, Hisato; Enomoto, Yuji; Ito, Motoya; Itabashi, Hiromitsu; Tanigawa, Sigeho; Masaki, Ryoso

    Amorphous alloy exhibits high permeability and extremely low iron loss compared to magnetic steel sheet. Therefore, it is expected to contribute to the efficiency improvement of electromagnetic application products such as motors, generators, and transformers. In this paper, we examined an axial-type motor that uses the rolled amorphous core as a stator core for the purpose of applying amorphous alloy to a motor for air-conditioning equipments. We propose the motor structure to use amorphous alloy as a rolled core without complicated processing, and the evaluation results of the trial motor clarified that this structure is able to meet the target motor efficiency of 85% under the conditions that the size of the motor is below φ100mm × 60mm and that ferrite magnets are used.

  18. In situ study by polarization modulated Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy of the structure and orientation of lipids and amphipathic peptides at the air-water interface.

    PubMed Central

    Cornut, I; Desbat, B; Turlet, J M; Dufourcq, J

    1996-01-01

    Free amphipathic peptides and peptides bound to dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) were studied directly at the air/water interface using polarization modulation infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (PMIRRAS). Such differential reflectivity measurements proved to be a sensitive and efficient technique to investigate in situ the respective conformations and orientations of lipid and peptide molecules in pure and mixed films. Data obtained for melittin, a natural hemolytic peptide, are compared to those of L15K7, an ideally amphipathic synthetic peptide constituted by only apolar Leu and polar Lys residues. For pure peptidic films, the intensity, shape, and position of the amide I and II bands indicate that the L15K7 peptide adopts a totally alpha-helical structure, whereas the structure of melittin is mainly alpha-helical and presents some unordered domains. The L15K7 alpha-helix axis is oriented essentially parallel to the air-water interface plane; it differs for melittin. When injected into the subphase, L15K7 and melittin insert into preformed expanded DMPC monolayers and can be detected by PMIRRAS, even at low peptide content (> 50 DMPC molecules per peptide). In such conditions, peptides have the same secondary structure and orientation as in pure peptidic films. PMID:8770206

  19. High voltage isolation transformer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clatterbuck, C. H.; Ruitberg, A. P. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A high voltage isolation transformer is provided with primary and secondary coils separated by discrete electrostatic shields from the surfaces of insulating spools on which the coils are wound. The electrostatic shields are formed by coatings of a compound with a low electrical conductivity which completely encase the coils and adhere to the surfaces of the insulating spools adjacent to the coils. Coatings of the compound also line axial bores of the spools, thereby forming electrostatic shields separating the spools from legs of a ferromagnetic core extending through the bores. The transformer is able to isolate a high constant potential applied to one of its coils, without the occurrence of sparking or corona, by coupling the coatings, lining the axial bores to the ferromagnetic core and by coupling one terminal of each coil to the respective coating encasing the coil.

  20. Online volatile organic compound measurements using a newly developed proton-transfer ion-trap mass spectrometry instrument during New England Air Quality Study--Intercontinental Transport and Chemical Transformation 2004: performance, intercomparison, and compound identification.

    PubMed

    Warneke, Carsten; Kato, Shuji; De Gouw, Joost A; Goldan, Paul D; Kuster, William C; Shao, Min; Lovejoy, Edward R; Fall, Ray; Fehsenfeld, Fred C

    2005-07-15

    We have used a newly developed proton-transfer ion-trap mass spectrometry (PIT-MS) instrument for online trace gas analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) during the 2004 New England Air Quality Study-Intercontinental Transport and Chemical Transformation study. The PIT-MS instrument uses proton-transfer reactions with H3O+ ions to ionize VOCs, similarto a PTR-MS (proton-transfer reaction mass spectrometry) instrument but uses an ion trap mass spectrometer to analyze the product ions. The advantages of an ion trap are the improved identification of VOCs and a near 100% duty cycle. During the experiment, the PIT-MS instrument had a detection limit between 0.05 and 0.3 pbbv (S/N = 3 (signal-to-noise ratio)) for 2-min integration time for most tested VOCs. PIT-MS was used for ambient air measurements onboard a research ship and agreed well with a gas chromatography mass spectrometer). The comparison included oxygenated VOCs, aromatic compounds, and others such as isoprene, monoterpenes, acetonitrile, and dimethyl sulfide. Automated collision-induced dissociation measurements were used to determine the contributions of acetone and propanal to the measured signal at 59 amu; both species are detected at this mass and are thus indistinguishable in conventional PTR-MS.

  1. Magnetic materials selection for static inverter and converter transformers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclyman, W. T.

    1973-01-01

    A program to study magnetic materials is described for use in spacecraft transformers used in static inverters, converters, and transformer-rectifier supplies. Different magnetic alloys best suited for high-frequency and high-efficiency applications were comparatively investigated together with an investigation of each alloy's inherent characteristics. The materials evaluated were the magnetic alloys: (1) 50% Ni, 50% Fe; (2) 79% Ni, 17% Fe, 4% Mo; (3) 48% Ni, 52% Fe; (4) 78% Ni, 17% Fe, 5% Mo; and (5) 3% Si, 97% Fe. Investigations led to the design of a transformer with a very low residual flux. Tests were performed to determine the dc and ac magnetic properties at 2400 Hz using square-wave excitation. These tests were performed on uncut cores, which were then cut for comparison of the gapped and ungapped magnetic properties. When the data of many transformers in many configurations were compiled the optimum transformer was found to be that with the lowest residual flux and a small amount of air gap in the magnetic material. The data obtained from these tests are described, and the potential uses for the materials are discussed.

  2. DC-Compensated Current Transformer.

    PubMed

    Ripka, Pavel; Draxler, Karel; Styblíková, Renata

    2016-01-20

    Instrument current transformers (CTs) measure AC currents. The DC component in the measured current can saturate the transformer and cause gross error. We use fluxgate detection and digital feedback compensation of the DC flux to suppress the overall error to 0.15%. This concept can be used not only for high-end CTs with a nanocrystalline core, but it also works for low-cost CTs with FeSi cores. The method described here allows simultaneous measurements of the DC current component.

  3. Empower your Smart Grid Transformation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-13

    TWITTER: #seiwebinar © 2011 Carnegie Mellon University Empower your Smart Grid Transformation David White SGMM Project Manager 10 March 2011 Report...2011 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2011 to 00-00-2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Empower your Smart Grid Transformation 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...and a core development team member for the SEI Smart Grid Maturity Model (SGMM), a business tool to assist utilities with planning and tracking

  4. Saturable inductor and transformer structures for magnetic pulse compression

    DOEpatents

    Birx, Daniel L.; Reginato, Louis L.

    1990-01-01

    Saturable inductor and transformer for magnetic compression of an electronic pulse, using a continuous electrical conductor looped several times around a tightly packed core of saturable inductor material.

  5. Transformational Events

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denning, Peter J.; Hiles, John E.

    2006-01-01

    Transformational Events is a new pedagogic pattern that explains how innovations (and other transformations) happened. The pattern is three temporal stages: an interval of increasingly unsatisfactory ad hoc solutions to a persistent problem (the "mess"), an offer of an invention or of a new way of thinking, and a period of widespread adoption and…

  6. Reading Transformation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reeves, Melinda

    2006-01-01

    The parents of students who attend Decatur High School thought that there was little hope of their kids going on to college. After a year or so in Decatur's reading program, their sons and daughters were both transformed and college bound. In this article, the author describes how Decatur was able to successfully transform their students. Seven…

  7. Note: Compact high voltage pulse transformer made using a capacitor bank assembled in the shape of primary.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Rohit; Banerjee, Partha; Sharma, Surender K; Das, Rashmita; Deb, Pankaj; Prabaharan, T; Das, Basanta; Adhikary, Biswajit; Verma, Rishi; Shyam, Anurag

    2011-10-01

    The experimental results of an air-core pulse transformer are presented, which is very compact (<10 Kg in weight) and is primed by a capacitor bank that is fabricated in such a way that the capacitor bank with its switch takes the shape of single-turn rectangular shaped primary of the transformer. A high voltage capacitor assembly (pulse-forming-line capacitor, PFL) of 5.1 nF is connected with the secondary of transformer. The transformer output voltage is 160 kV in its second peak appearing in less than 2 μS from the beginning of the capacitor discharge. The primary capacitor bank can be charged up to a maximum of 18 kV, with the voltage delivery of 360 kV in similar capacitive loads.

  8. Air Research

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA's air research provides the critical science to develop and implement outdoor air regulations under the Clean Air Act and puts new tools and information in the hands of air quality managers and regulators to protect the air we breathe.

  9. [Transformation toughening

    SciTech Connect

    Rafa, M.J.

    1993-04-19

    In NiAl, we have succeeded in determining the complete Ginzburg-Landau strain free energy function necessary to model the cubic to tetragonal martensite transformation in a sample of any size. We believe that this is the first time that the parameters of a Ginzburg-Landau functional and the complete strain spinodal for any three-dimensional displacive transformation were used in simulating the transformation near a crack tip under Mode I loading; the transformation pattern and toughening are different from standard transformation toughening theories. Furthermore, the strain spinodal has an approximately conical shape which can be specified by two material dependent experimentally accessible parameters, rather than the ellipsoidal shape in standard theories. Stress induced martensitic transformation in a polycrystalline sample of NiAl was simulated. In the ZrO[sub 2] system, first principles calculations to determine the semi-empirical potentials for simulating the cubic-tetragonal and tetragonal-monoclinic transformations have been started by doing a more elaborate total energy calculation.In the Al[sub 2]0[sub 3] system, we have discovered that the first principles calculations and semi-empirical potentials have just been completed byanother group in England which we will use instead to base our molecular dynamics simulations on.

  10. High-Voltage Isolation Transformer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clatterbuck, C. H.; Ruitberg, A. P.

    1985-01-01

    Arcing and field-included surface erosion reduced by electrostatic shields around windings and ferromagnetic core of 80-kilovolt isolation transformer. Fabricated from high-resistivity polyurethane-based material brushed on critical surfaces, shields maintained at approximately half potential difference of windings.

  11. Relation between gamma-ray family and EAS core: Monte-Carlo simulation of EAS core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yanagita, T.

    1985-01-01

    Preliminary results of Monte-Carlo simulation on Extensive Air Showers (EAS) (Ne=100,000) core is reported. For the first collision at the top of the atmosphere, high multiplicity (high rapidity, density) and a large Pt (1.5GeV average) model is assumed. Most of the simulated cores show a complicated structure.

  12. Triple transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Farrukh I.; Schinn, Dustin S.

    2013-08-01

    A new business plan that enables policy transformation and resource mobilization at the national and international level, while improving access to resources, will allow the Green Climate Fund to integrate development goals and action on climate change.

  13. Non-linear transformer modeling and simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Archer, W.E.; Deveney, M.F.; Nagel, R.L.

    1994-08-01

    Transformers models for simulation with Pspice and Analogy`s Saber are being developed using experimental B-H Loop and network analyzer measurements. The models are evaluated for accuracy and convergence using several test circuits. Results are presented which demonstrate the effects on circuit performance from magnetic core losses eddy currents and mechanical stress on the magnetic cores.

  14. Transformational leadership.

    PubMed

    Luzinski, Craig

    2011-12-01

    This month, the director of the Magnet Recognition Program® takes an in-depth look at the Magnet® model component transformational leadership. The author examines the expectations for Magnet organizations around this component. What are the qualities that make a nursing leader truly transformational, and what is the best approach to successfully lead a healthcare organization through today's volatile healthcare environment?

  15. An accurate online calibration system based on combined clamp-shape coil for high voltage electronic current transformers

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zhen-hua; Li, Hong-bin; Zhang, Zhi

    2013-07-15

    Electronic transformers are widely used in power systems because of their wide bandwidth and good transient performance. However, as an emerging technology, the failure rate of electronic transformers is higher than that of traditional transformers. As a result, the calibration period needs to be shortened. Traditional calibration methods require the power of transmission line be cut off, which results in complicated operation and power off loss. This paper proposes an online calibration system which can calibrate electronic current transformers without power off. In this work, the high accuracy standard current transformer and online operation method are the key techniques. Based on the clamp-shape iron-core coil and clamp-shape air-core coil, a combined clamp-shape coil is designed as the standard current transformer. By analyzing the output characteristics of the two coils, the combined clamp-shape coil can achieve verification of the accuracy. So the accuracy of the online calibration system can be guaranteed. Moreover, by employing the earth potential working method and using two insulating rods to connect the combined clamp-shape coil to the high voltage bus, the operation becomes simple and safe. Tests in China National Center for High Voltage Measurement and field experiments show that the proposed system has a high accuracy of up to 0.05 class.

  16. An accurate online calibration system based on combined clamp-shape coil for high voltage electronic current transformers.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhen-hua; Li, Hong-bin; Zhang, Zhi

    2013-07-01

    Electronic transformers are widely used in power systems because of their wide bandwidth and good transient performance. However, as an emerging technology, the failure rate of electronic transformers is higher than that of traditional transformers. As a result, the calibration period needs to be shortened. Traditional calibration methods require the power of transmission line be cut off, which results in complicated operation and power off loss. This paper proposes an online calibration system which can calibrate electronic current transformers without power off. In this work, the high accuracy standard current transformer and online operation method are the key techniques. Based on the clamp-shape iron-core coil and clamp-shape air-core coil, a combined clamp-shape coil is designed as the standard current transformer. By analyzing the output characteristics of the two coils, the combined clamp-shape coil can achieve verification of the accuracy. So the accuracy of the online calibration system can be guaranteed. Moreover, by employing the earth potential working method and using two insulating rods to connect the combined clamp-shape coil to the high voltage bus, the operation becomes simple and safe. Tests in China National Center for High Voltage Measurement and field experiments show that the proposed system has a high accuracy of up to 0.05 class.

  17. An accurate online calibration system based on combined clamp-shape coil for high voltage electronic current transformers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhen-hua; Li, Hong-bin; Zhang, Zhi

    2013-07-01

    Electronic transformers are widely used in power systems because of their wide bandwidth and good transient performance. However, as an emerging technology, the failure rate of electronic transformers is higher than that of traditional transformers. As a result, the calibration period needs to be shortened. Traditional calibration methods require the power of transmission line be cut off, which results in complicated operation and power off loss. This paper proposes an online calibration system which can calibrate electronic current transformers without power off. In this work, the high accuracy standard current transformer and online operation method are the key techniques. Based on the clamp-shape iron-core coil and clamp-shape air-core coil, a combined clamp-shape coil is designed as the standard current transformer. By analyzing the output characteristics of the two coils, the combined clamp-shape coil can achieve verification of the accuracy. So the accuracy of the online calibration system can be guaranteed. Moreover, by employing the earth potential working method and using two insulating rods to connect the combined clamp-shape coil to the high voltage bus, the operation becomes simple and safe. Tests in China National Center for High Voltage Measurement and field experiments show that the proposed system has a high accuracy of up to 0.05 class.

  18. 32. Credit JTL. Exterior transformer bank; note lightning arrestors removed ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. Credit JTL. Exterior transformer bank; note lightning arrestors removed from pad and smaller arrestors installed on transformers and in area near air switches. - Dam No. 4 Hydroelectric Plant, Potomac River, Martinsburg, Berkeley County, WV

  19. Split Coil Forms for Rotary Transformers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclyman, C. W. T.

    1982-01-01

    Split cores for rotor and stator windings of rotary transformer mounted around their respective coils (which are in bobbins) and cemented together. This arrangement simplifies winding of stator coil to go in a slot in inner diameter of stator coil. One practical application of rotary transformers fabricated according to this technique is for centrifuges, in which conventional sliprings are of uncertain reliability.

  20. Psychoanalytic transformations.

    PubMed

    Riolo, Fernando

    2007-12-01

    The author describes how Bion took Freud's conception of dreams as a form of thought and used it as the basis of his theory of transformations. Bion developed an expanded theory of 'dream thought', understood as a process of selection and transformation of sensory and emotional experiences. In this theory, the work of analysis is in turn conceived as a process not only of deciphering symbols, of revealing already existing unconscious meanings, but also of symbol production--of a process for generating thoughts and conferring meaning on experiences that have never been conscious and never been repressed because they have never been 'thought'. Analysis, in its specific operational sense, becomes a system of transformation whereby unconscious somatopsychic processes acquire the conditions for representability and become capable of translation into thoughts, words and interpretations. The rules of transformation applied by the patient in his representations and those applied by the analyst in his interpretations have the same importance for the analytic process as those described by Freud for the process of dreaming. The author discusses the broad categories of transformation adduced by Bion (rigid motion, projective, and in hallucinosis) and introduces some further distinctions within them.

  1. Lorentz Transformation from Symmetry of Reference Principle

    SciTech Connect

    Petre, M.; Dima, M.; Dima, A.; Petre, C.; Precup, I.

    2010-01-21

    The Lorentz Transformation is traditionally derived requiring the Principle of Relativity and light-speed universality. While the latter can be relaxed, the Principle of Relativity is seen as core to the transformation. The present letter relaxes both statements to the weaker, Symmetry of Reference Principle. Thus the resulting Lorentz transformation and its consequences (time dilatation, length contraction) are, in turn, effects of how we manage space and time.

  2. Promoting Transformational Leadership Through Air Force Culture

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    consisted of being unusually driven, very humble, and willing to put their organization and people before themselves.20 Daniel Goleman , Richard Boyatzis...19 Ibid. 20 Ibid. 21 Daniel Goleman , Richard Boyatzis, and Annie McKee, Primal Leadership, Learning to Lead with Emotional Intelligence (Boston...masculine term only but the intent is to be gender neutral. 23 Goleman , Boyatzis and McKee, Primal Leadership, 3. 24 Steve Farber, The Radical Leap, a

  3. Accounting for nonlinear material characteristics in modeling ferroresonant transformers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voisine, J. T.

    1985-04-01

    A mathematical model relating core material properties, including nonlinear magnetization characteristics, to the performance of ferroresonant transformers has been developed. In accomplishing this, other factors such as fabrication destruction factors, leakage flux, air gap characteristics, loading, and coil resistances and self-inductances are also accounted for. From a material manufacturer's view, knowing such information facilitates isolating sources of performance variations between units of similar design and is therefore highly desirable. The model predicts the primary induction necessary to establish a specified secondary induction and determines peak induction at other points in the magnetic circuit. A study comparing the model with a transformer indicated that each predicted peak induction was within ±5% of the corresponding measured peak induction. A generalized 4-node magnetic circuit having two shunt paths was chosen and modeled. Such a circuit is easily modified facilitating the analyses of numerous other core designs. A computer program designed to run on an HP-41 programmable calculator was also developed and is briefly described.

  4. Neutrino scattering and flavor transformation in supernovae.

    PubMed

    Cherry, John F; Carlson, J; Friedland, Alexander; Fuller, George M; Vlasenko, Alexey

    2012-06-29

    We argue that the small fraction of neutrinos that undergo direction-changing scattering outside of the neutrinosphere could have significant influence on neutrino flavor transformation in core-collapse supernova environments. We show that the standard treatment for collective neutrino flavor transformation is adequate at late times but could be inadequate in early epochs of core-collapse supernovae, where the potentials that govern neutrino flavor evolution are affected by the scattered neutrinos. Taking account of this effect, and the way it couples to entropy and composition, will require a new approach in neutrino flavor transformation modeling.

  5. Air Pollution

    MedlinePlus

    Air pollution is a mixture of solid particles and gases in the air. Car emissions, chemicals from factories, ... Ozone, a gas, is a major part of air pollution in cities. When ozone forms air pollution, it's ...

  6. Applications of ferro-nanofluid on a micro-transformer.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Tsung-Han; Kuo, Long-Sheng; Chen, Ping-Hei; Lee, Da-Sheng; Yang, Chin-Ting

    2010-01-01

    An on-chip transformer with a ferrofluid magnetic core has been developed and tested. The transformer consists of solenoid-type coil and a magnetic core of ferrofluid, with the former fabricated by MEMS technology and the latter by a chemical co-precipitation method. The performance of the MEMS transformer with a ferrofluid magnetic core was measured and simulated with frequencies ranging from 100 kHz to 100 MHz. Experimental results reveal that the presence of the ferrofluid increases the inductance of coils and the coupling coefficient of transformer; however, it also increases the resistance owing to the lag between the external magnetic field and the magnetization of the material.

  7. AIR COOLED NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Fermi, E.; Szilard, L.

    1958-05-27

    A nuclear reactor of the air-cooled, graphite moderated type is described. The active core consists of a cubicle mass of graphite, approximately 25 feet in each dimension, having horizontal channels of square cross section extending between two of the opposite faces, a plurality of cylindrical uranium slugs disposed in end to end abutting relationship within said channels providing a space in the channels through which air may be circulated, and a cadmium control rod extending within a channel provided in the moderator. Suitable shielding is provlded around the core, as are also provided a fuel element loading and discharge means, and a means to circulate air through the coolant channels through the fuel charels to cool the reactor.

  8. Transforming Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cookson, Peter W., Jr., Ed.; Schneider, Barbara, Ed.

    The authors in this book address the issues that relate to the crisis in American education and review some of the proposed solutions. To transform education, schools must be examined as social systems that are interrelated with families, communities, and the world of work. Following the introduction, section 1, "Conditions for Educational…

  9. Transformation & Metamorphosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lott, Debra

    2009-01-01

    The sculptures of Canadian artist Brian Jungen are a great inspiration for a lesson on creating new forms. Jungen transforms found objects into unique creations without fully concealing their original form or purpose. Frank Stella's sculpture series, including "K.132,2007" made of stainless steel and spray paint, is another great example of…

  10. Transforming Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cronin, C. H.; Feldman, Phillip

    1994-01-01

    Presents comparisons between the traditional curriculum and the essential learnings curriculum implemented at the Moss Point School District in Moss Point, Mississippi. Describes in detail the curriculum transformation process. Provides insight into the role of technology in the reading/language arts curriculum. (RS)

  11. Transformation Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, John N., III

    2007-01-01

    The program for the march by librarians on America's capital for the American Library Association (ALA) conference is predictably loaded with lobbying, legislation, and DC tours. It also abounds with professional opportunity and reflects the impact of Leslie Burger, one of the most activist ALA presidents in recent history. Her "Transformation"…

  12. Transformative Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Popham, W. James

    2008-01-01

    If you're at all skeptical that "formative assessment" is just another buzzword, then here's a book that will change the way you think about the role that formative assessment can play in transforming education into a more powerful and positive process. Renowned expert W. James Popham clarifies what formative assessment really is, why…

  13. Air pollution.

    PubMed

    Le, Nhu D; Sun, Li; Zidek, James V

    2010-01-01

    Toxic air pollutants are continuously released into the air supply. Various pollutants come from chemical facilities and small businesses, such as automobile service stations and dry cleaning establishments. Others, such as nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide and other volatile organic chemicals, arise primarily from the incomplete combustion of fossil fuels (coal and petroleum) and are emitted from sources that include car exhausts, home heating and industrial power plants. Pollutants in the atmosphere also result from photochemical transformations; for example, ozone is formed when molecular oxygen or nitrogen interacts with ultraviolet radiation. An association between air pollution exposure and lung cancer has been observed in several studies. The evidence for other cancers is far less conclusive. Estimates of the population attributable risk of cancer has varied substantially over the last 40 years, reflecting the limitations of studies; these include insufficient information on confounders, difficulties in characterizing associations due to a likely lengthy latency interval, and exposure misclassification. Although earlier estimates were less than one percent, recent cohort studies that have taken into account some confounding factors, such as smoking and education amongst others, suggest that approximately 3.6% of lung cancer in the European Union could be due to air pollution exposure, particularly to sulphate and fine particulates. A separate cohort study estimated 5-7% of lung cancers in European never smokers and ex-smokers could be due to air pollution exposure. Therefore, while cigarette smoking remains the predominant risk factor, the proportion of lung cancers attributable to air pollution may be higher than previously thought. Overall, major weaknesses in all air-pollution-and-cancer studies to date have been inadequate characterization of long-term air pollution exposure and imprecise or no measurements of covariates. It has only been in the last

  14. Proof Systems and Transformation Games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachrach, Yoram; Zuckerman, Michael; Wooldridge, Michael; Rosenschein, Jeffrey S.

    We introduce Transformation Games (TGs), a form of coalitional game in which players are endowed with sets of initial resources, and have capabilities allowing them to derive certain output resources, given certain input resources. The aim of a TG is to generate a particular target resource; players achieve this by forming a coalition capable of performing a sequence of transformations from its combined set of initial resources to the target resource. After presenting the TG model, and discussing its interpretation, we consider possible restrictions on the transformation chain, resulting in different coalitional games. After presenting the basic model, we consider the computational complexity of several problems in TGs, such as testing whether a coalition wins, checking if a player is a dummy or a veto player, computing the core of the game, computing power indices, and checking the effects of possible restrictions on the coalition. Finally, we consider extensions to the model in which transformations have associated costs.

  15. Technology Transformation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Heather; McGilll, Toria

    2011-01-01

    Social networking and other technologies, if used judiciously, present the means to integrate 21st century skills into the classroom curriculum. But they also introduce challenges that educators must overcome. Increased concerns about plagiarism and access to technology can test educators' creativity and school resources. Air Academy High School,…

  16. Variable Cycle Intake for Reverse Core Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suciu, Gabriel L (Inventor); Chandler, Jesse M (Inventor); Staubach, Joseph B (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A gas generator for a reverse core engine propulsion system has a variable cycle intake for the gas generator, which variable cycle intake includes a duct system. The duct system is configured for being selectively disposed in a first position and a second position, wherein free stream air is fed to the gas generator when in the first position, and fan stream air is fed to the gas generator when in the second position.

  17. Core-core and core-valence correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of (1s) core correlation on properties and energy separations was analyzed using full configuration-interaction (FCI) calculations. The Be 1 S - 1 P, the C 3 P - 5 S and CH+ 1 Sigma + or - 1 Pi separations, and CH+ spectroscopic constants, dipole moment and 1 Sigma + - 1 Pi transition dipole moment were studied. The results of the FCI calculations are compared to those obtained using approximate methods. In addition, the generation of atomic natural orbital (ANO) basis sets, as a method for contracting a primitive basis set for both valence and core correlation, is discussed. When both core-core and core-valence correlation are included in the calculation, no suitable truncated CI approach consistently reproduces the FCI, and contraction of the basis set is very difficult. If the (nearly constant) core-core correlation is eliminated, and only the core-valence correlation is included, CASSCF/MRCI approached reproduce the FCI results and basis set contraction is significantly easier.

  18. An accurate continuous calibration system for high voltage current transformer

    SciTech Connect

    Tong Yue; Li Binhong

    2011-02-15

    A continuous calibration system for high voltage current transformers is presented in this paper. The sensor of this system is based on a kind of electronic instrument current transformer, which is a clamp-shape air core coil. This system uses an optical fiber transmission system for its signal transmission and power supply. Finally the digital integrator and fourth-order convolution window algorithm as error calculation methods are realized by the virtual instrument with a personal computer. It is found that this system can calibrate a high voltage current transformer while energized, which means avoiding a long calibrating period in the power system and the loss of power metering expense. At the same time, it has a wide dynamic range and frequency band, and it can achieve a high accuracy measurement in a complex electromagnetic field environment. The experimental results and the on-site operation results presented in the last part of the paper, prove that it can reach the 0.05 accuracy class and is easy to operate on site.

  19. RF transformer

    DOEpatents

    Smith, James L.; Helenberg, Harold W.; Kilsdonk, Dennis J.

    1979-01-01

    There is provided an improved RF transformer having a single-turn secondary of cylindrical shape and a coiled encapsulated primary contained within the secondary. The coil is tapered so that the narrowest separation between the primary and the secondary is at one end of the coil. The encapsulated primary is removable from the secondary so that a variety of different capacity primaries can be utilized with one secondary.

  20. Entrapment of carbon dioxide with chitosan-based core-shell particles containing changeable cores.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yanrui; Fu, Yinghao; Lin, Xia; Xiao, Congming

    2016-08-01

    Water-soluble chitosan-based core-shell particles that contained changeable cores were successfully applied to anchor carbon dioxide. The entrapment capacity of the particles for carbon dioxide (EC) depended on the cores. It was found that EC of the particles contained aqueous cores was higher than that of the beads with water-soluble chitosan gel cores, which was confirmed with thermogravimetric analysis. In addition, calcium ions and sodium hydroxide were introduced within the particles to examine their effect on the entrapment. EC of the particles was enhanced with sodium hydroxide when the cores were WSC gel. The incorporation of calcium ions was helpful for stabilizing carbon dioxide through the formation of calcium carbonate, which was verified with Fourier transform infrared spectra and scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive spectrometry. This phenomenon meant the role of calcium ions for fixating carbon dioxide was significant.

  1. Evaluating Community Health Advisor (CHA) Core Competencies: The CHA Core Competency Retrospective Pretest/Posttest (CCCRP).

    PubMed

    Story, Lachel; To, Yen M

    2016-05-01

    Health care and academic systems are increasingly collaborating with community health advisors (CHAs) to provide culturally relevant health interventions that promote sustained community transformation. Little attention has been placed on CHA training evaluation, including core competency attainment. This study identified common CHA core competencies, generated a theoretically based measure of those competencies, and explored psychometric properties of that measure. A concept synthesis revealed five CHA core competencies (leadership, translation, guidance, advocacy, and caring). The CHA Core Competency Retrospective Pretest/Posttest (CCCRP) resulted from that synthesis, which was administered using multiple approaches to individuals who previously received CHA training (N= 142). Exploratory factor analyses revealed a two-factor structure underlying the posttraining data, and Cronbach's alpha indicated high internal consistency. This study suggested some CHA core competencies might be more interrelated than previously thought, and two major competencies exist rather than five and supported the CCCRP's use to evaluate core competency attainment resulting from training.

  2. Transformation plasmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadic, Muamer; Guenneau, Sébastien; Enoch, Stefan; Huidobro, Paloma A.; Martín-Moreno, Luis; García-Vidal, Francisco J.; Renger, Jan; Quidant, Romain

    2012-07-01

    Surface plasmons polaritons (SPPs) at metal/dielectric interfaces have raised lots of expectations in the on-going quest towards scaling down optical devices. SPP optics offers a powerful and flexible platform for real two-dimensional integrated optics, capable of supporting both light and electrons. Yet, a full exploitation of the features of SPPs is conditioned by an accurate control of their flow. Most efforts have so far focused on the extrapolation of concepts borrowed from guided optics. This strategy has already led to many important breakthroughs but a fully deterministic control of SPP modes remains a challenge. Recently, the field of optics was stimulated by a novel paradigm, transformation optics, which offers the capability to control light flow in any desired fashion. While it has already significantly contributed to the design of metamaterials with unprecedented optical properties, its versatility offers new opportunities towards a fully deterministic control of SPPs and the design of a new class of plasmonic functionalities. Here, we review recent progress in the application of transformation optics to SPPs. We first briefly describe the theoretical formalism of transformation plasmonics, focusing on its specificities over its three-dimensional optical counterpart. Numerical simulations are then used to illustrate its capability to tame SPP flows at a metal interface patterned with a dielectric load. Finally, we review recent experimental implementations leading to unique SPP functionalities at optical frequencies.

  3. A dinuclear manganese(II) complex with the [Mn(2)(mu-O(2)CCH(3))(3)](+) core: synthesis, structure, characterization, electroinduced transformation, and catalase-like activity.

    PubMed

    Romero, Isabel; Dubois, Lionel; Collomb, Marie-Noëlle; Deronzier, Alain; Latour, Jean-Marc; Pécaut, Jacques

    2002-04-08

    Reactions of Mn(II)(PF(6))(2) and Mn(II)(O(2)CCH(3))(2).4H(2)O with the tridentate facially capping ligand N,N-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)ethylamine (bpea) in ethanol solutions afforded the mononuclear [Mn(II)(bpea)](PF(6))(2) (1) and the new binuclear [Mn(2)(II,II)(mu-O(2)CCH(3))(3)(bpea)(2)](PF(6)) (2) manganese(II) compounds, respectively. Both 1 and 2 were characterized by X-ray crystallographic studies. Complex 1 crystallizes in the monoclinic system, space group P2(1)/n, with a = 11.9288(7) A, b = 22.5424(13) A, c =13.0773(7) A, alpha = 90 degrees, beta = 100.5780(10 degrees ), gamma = 90 degrees, and Z = 4. Crystals of complex 2 are orthorhombic, space group C222(1), with a = 12.5686(16) A, b = 14.4059(16) A, c = 22.515(3) A, alpha = 90 degrees, beta = 90 degrees, gamma = 90 degrees, and Z = 4. The three acetates bridge the two Mn(II) centers in a mu(1,3) syn-syn mode, with a Mn-Mn separation of 3.915 A. A detailed study of the electrochemical behavior of 1 and 2 in CH(3)CN medium has been made. Successive controlled potential oxidations at 0.6 and 0.9 V vs Ag/Ag(+) for a 10 mM solution of 2 allowed the selective and nearly quantitative formation of [Mn(III)(2)(mu-O)(mu-O(2)CCH(3))(2)(bpea)(2)](2+) (3) and [Mn(IV)(2)(mu-O)(2)(mu-O(2)CCH(3))(bpea)(2)](3+) (4), respectively. These results have shown that each substitution of an acetate group by an oxo group is induced by a two-electron oxidation of the corresponding dimanganese complexes. Similar transformations have been obtained if 2 is formed in situ either by direct mixing of Mn(2+) cations, bpea ligand, and CH(3)COO(-) anions with a 1:1:3 stoichiometry or by mixing of 1 and CH(3)COO(-) with a 1:1.5 stoichiometry. Associated electrochemical back-transformations were investigated. 2, 3, and the dimanganese [Mn(III)Mn(IV)(mu-O)(2)(mu-O(2)CCH(3))(bpea)(2)](2+) analogue (5) were also studied for their ability to disproportionate hydrogen peroxide. 2 is far more active compared to 3 and 5. The EPR monitoring of the

  4. Information Operations as a Core Competency

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    the emerging American way of war means fighting first for information dominance . Nothing better exemplifies this bold push for transformation and... information dominance than the DoD commitment to make information operations (IO) a core military competency. On October 30, 2003, Secretary Rumsfeld

  5. Academic Rigor: The Core of the Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brunner, Judy

    2013-01-01

    Some educators see the Common Core State Standards as reason for stress, most recognize the positive possibilities associated with them and are willing to make the professional commitment to implementing them so that academic rigor for all students will increase. But business leaders, parents, and the authors of the Common Core are not the only…

  6. Hamlet's Transformation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usher, P. D.

    1997-12-01

    William Shakespeare's Hamlet has much evidence to suggest that the Bard was aware of the cosmological models of his time, specifically the geocentric bounded Ptolemaic and Tychonic models, and the infinite Diggesian. Moreover, Shakespeare describes how the Ptolemaic model is to be transformed to the Diggesian. Hamlet's "transformation" is the reason that Claudius, who personifies the Ptolemaic model, summons Rosencrantz and Guildenstern, who personify the Tychonic. Pantometria, written by Leonard Digges and his son Thomas in 1571, contains the first technical use of the word "transformation." At age thirty, Thomas Digges went on to propose his Perfit Description, as alluded to in Act Five where Hamlet's age is given as thirty. In Act Five as well, the words "bore" and "arms" refer to Thomas' vocation as muster-master and his scientific interest in ballistics. England's leading astronomer was also the father of the poet whose encomium introduced the First Folio of 1623. His oldest child Dudley became a member of the Virginia Company and facilitated the writing of The Tempest. Taken as a whole, such manifold connections to Thomas Digges support Hotson's contention that Shakespeare knew the Digges family. Rosencrantz and Guildenstern in Hamlet bear Danish names because they personify the Danish model, while the king's name is latinized like that of Claudius Ptolemaeus. The reason Shakespeare anglicized "Amleth" to "Hamlet" was because he saw a parallel between Book Three of Saxo Grammaticus and the eventual triumph of the Diggesian model. But Shakespeare eschewed Book Four, creating this particular ending from an infinity of other possibilities because it "suited his purpose," viz. to celebrate the concept of a boundless universe of stars like the Sun.

  7. Rotary Transformer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McLyman, Colonel Wm. T.

    1996-01-01

    None given. From first Par: Many spacecraft (S/C) and surface rovers require the transfer of signals and power across rotating interfaces. Science instruments, antennas and solar arrays are elements needing rotary power transfer for certain (S/C) configurations. Delivery of signal and power has mainly been done by using the simplest means, the slip ring approach. This approach, although simple, leaves debris generating noise over a period of time...The rotary transformer is a good alternative to slip rings for signal and power transfer.

  8. TRANSFORMER APPARATUS

    DOEpatents

    Wolfgang, F.; Nicol, J.

    1962-11-01

    Transformer apparatus is designed for measuring the amount of a paramagnetic substance dissolved or suspended in a diamagnetic liquid. The apparatus consists of a cluster of tubes, some of which are closed and have sealed within the diamagnetic substance without any of the paramagnetic material. The remaining tubes are open to flow of the mix- ture. Primary and secondary conductors are wrapped around the tubes in such a way as to cancel noise components and also to produce a differential signal on the secondaries based upon variations of the content of the paramagnetic material. (AEC)

  9. Suspended core photonic microcells for sensing and device applications.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Jin, Wei; Ma, Jun; Wang, Ying; Ho, Hoi Lut; Shi, Xin

    2013-06-01

    In-line fiber-optic microcells are fabricated by postprocessing NKT LMA10 photonic crystal fibers. The cells are suspended core (SC) elements created by locally inflating some of the air holes while the core is being tapered. Based on a SC microcell with six air holes, a cantilever beam accelerometer is demonstrated. The microcells could also be used as gain and absorption cells for amplifier and spectroscopy applications.

  10. Investigating the relationship between k-core and s-core network decompositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eidsaa, Marius; Almaas, Eivind

    2016-05-01

    Network decomposition methods, such as the much used k-core analysis, are able to identify globally central regions of networks. The decomposition approaches are hierarchical and identify nested sets of nodes with increasing centrality properties. While most studies have been concerned with unweighted networks, i.e. k-core analysis, recent works have introduced network decomposition methods that apply to weighted networks. Here, we investigate the relationship between k-core decomposition for unweighted networks and s-core decomposition for weighted networks by systematically employing a link-weight scheme that gradually discretizes the link weights. We applied this approach to the Erdős-Rényi model and the scale-free configuration model for five different weight distributions, and two empirical networks, the US air traffic network and a Facebook network. We find that (1) both uniformly random and positively correlated link-weight distributions give rise to highly stable s-core decompositions with respect to discretization levels. (2) For negatively correlated link-weight distributions, the resulting s-core decomposition has no similarity to the k-cores. Since several combinations of network topology and link-weight distributions give rise to a core-structure that is highly similar to the full s-core for a large range of link-discretization levels, it is possible to significantly speed up the numerical s-core analysis for these situations.

  11. Next-Generation Assessments Aligned to the Common Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willhoft, Joseph L.

    2012-01-01

    Through the Common Core State Standards and the development of new assessments aligned to the standards, the public education system is undergoing a transformation--and administrators can help make this vision a reality. Today, more than 45 states and the District of Columbia have adopted the Common Core State Standards. The standards, however,…

  12. High temperature co-axial winding transformers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divan, Deepakraj M.; Novotny, Donald W.

    1993-01-01

    The analysis and design of co-axial winding transformers is presented. The design equations are derived and the different design approaches are discussed. One of the most important features of co-axial winding transformers is the fact that the leakage inductance is well controlled and can be made low. This is not the case in conventional winding transformers. In addition, the power density of co-axial winding transformers is higher than conventional ones. Hence, using co-axial winding transformers in a certain converter topology improves the power density of the converter. The design methodology used in meeting the proposed specifications of the co-axial winding transformer specifications are presented and discussed. The final transformer design was constructed in the lab. Co-axial winding transformers proved to be a good choice for high power density and high frequency applications. They have a more predictable performance compared with conventional transformers. In addition, the leakage inductance of the transformer can be controlled easily to suit a specific application. For space applications, one major concern is the extraction of heat from power apparatus to prevent excessive heating and hence damaging of these units. Because of the vacuum environment, the only way to extract heat is by using a cold plate. One advantage of co-axial winding transformers is that the surface area available to extract heat from is very large compared to conventional transformers. This stems from the unique structure of the co-axial transformer where the whole core surface area is exposed and can be utilized for cooling effectively. This is a crucial issue here since most of the losses are core losses.

  13. Direct-Current Monitor With Flux-Reset Transformer Coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canter, Stanley

    1993-01-01

    Circuit measures constant or slowly-varying unidirectional electrical current using flux-reset transformer coupling. Measurement nonintrusive in sense that no need for direct contact with wire that carries load current to be measured, and no need to install series resistive element in load-current path. Toroidal magnetic core wrapped with coil of wire placed around load-current-carrying wire, acts as transformer core, load-current-carrying wire acts as primary winding of transformer, and coil wrapped on core acts as secondary winding.

  14. Transformation of benign fibroadenoma to malignant phyllodes tumor

    PubMed Central

    Daigle, Megan E; Tortora, Matthew; Panasiti, Ryane

    2015-01-01

    The transformation of a benign fibroadenoma into a phyllodes tumor is uncommon and unpredictable. We report the case of a 40-year-old woman with a core biopsy proven fibroadenoma that underwent transformation into a malignant phyllodes tumor after 3 years of size stability. We present ultrasound and magnetic resonance images, as well as pathology slides from core biopsy and surgical excision, to illustrate this transformation. It has been suggested that phyllodes tumors may be misdiagnosed as fibroadenomas by core biopsy. However, in this case, pathology supports correct initial diagnosis of fibroadenoma and demonstrates a portion of the original fibroadenoma along the periphery of the malignant phyllodes tumor. PMID:26331090

  15. Parallel fast gauss transform

    SciTech Connect

    Sampath, Rahul S; Sundar, Hari; Veerapaneni, Shravan

    2010-01-01

    We present fast adaptive parallel algorithms to compute the sum of N Gaussians at N points. Direct sequential computation of this sum would take O(N{sup 2}) time. The parallel time complexity estimates for our algorithms are O(N/n{sub p}) for uniform point distributions and O( (N/n{sub p}) log (N/n{sub p}) + n{sub p}log n{sub p}) for non-uniform distributions using n{sub p} CPUs. We incorporate a plane-wave representation of the Gaussian kernel which permits 'diagonal translation'. We use parallel octrees and a new scheme for translating the plane-waves to efficiently handle non-uniform distributions. Computing the transform to six-digit accuracy at 120 billion points took approximately 140 seconds using 4096 cores on the Jaguar supercomputer. Our implementation is 'kernel-independent' and can handle other 'Gaussian-type' kernels even when explicit analytic expression for the kernel is not known. These algorithms form a new class of core computational machinery for solving parabolic PDEs on massively parallel architectures.

  16. Ferrofluid-based Stretchable Magnetic Core Inductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarus, N.; Meyer, C. D.

    2015-12-01

    Magnetic materials are commonly used in inductor and transformer cores to increase inductance density. The emerging field of stretchable electronics poses a new challenge since typical magnetic cores are bulky, rigid and often brittle. This paper presents, for the first time, stretchable inductors incorporating ferrofluid as a liquid magnetic core. Ferrofluids, suspensions of nanoscale magnetic particles in a carrier liquid, provide enhanced magnetic permeability without changing the mechanical properties of the surrounding elastomer. The inductor tested in this work consisted of a liquid metal solenoid wrapped around a ferrofluid core in separate channels. The low frequency inductance was found to increase from 255 nH before fill to 390 nH after fill with ferrofluid, an increase of 52%. The inductor was also shown to survive uniaxial strains of up to 100%.

  17. Solar core homology, solar neutrinos and helioseismology

    SciTech Connect

    Bludman, S.A.; Kennedy, D.C.

    1995-12-31

    Precise numerical standard solar models (SSMs) now agree with one another and with helioseismological observations in the convective and outer radiative zones. Nevertheless these models obscure how luminosity, neutrino production and g-mode core helioseismology depend on such inputs as opacity and nuclear cross sections. Although the Sun is not homologous, its inner core by itself is chemically evolved and almost homologous, because of its compactness, radiative energy transport, and ppI-dominated luminosity production. We apply luminosity-fixed homology transformations to the core to estimate theoretical uncertainties in the SSM and to obtain a broad class of non-SSMs, parameterized by central temperature and density and purely radiative energy transport in the core. 25 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Design of toroidal transformers for maximum efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dayton, J. A., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    The design of the most efficient toroidal transformer that can be built given the frequency, volt-ampere rating, magnetic flux density, window fill factor, and materials is described. With the above all held constant and only the dimensions of the magnetic core varied, the most efficient design occurs when the copper losses equal 60 percent of the iron losses. When this criterion is followed, efficiency is only slightly dependent on design frequency and fill factor. The ratios of inside diameter to outside diameter and height to build of the magnetic core that result in transformers of maximum efficiency are computed.

  19. Coring Sample Acquisition Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haddad, Nicolas E.; Murray, Saben D.; Walkemeyer, Phillip E.; Badescu, Mircea; Sherrit, Stewart; Bao, Xiaoqi; Kriechbaum, Kristopher L.; Richardson, Megan; Klein, Kerry J.

    2012-01-01

    A sample acquisition tool (SAT) has been developed that can be used autonomously to sample drill and capture rock cores. The tool is designed to accommodate core transfer using a sample tube to the IMSAH (integrated Mars sample acquisition and handling) SHEC (sample handling, encapsulation, and containerization) without ever touching the pristine core sample in the transfer process.

  20. Transformational leadership: visibility, accessibility, and communication.

    PubMed

    Clavelle, Joanne T

    2012-01-01

    The chief nursing officer of a Magnet® organization is a dynamic, transformational leader who develops and communicates a strong vision for nursing excellence and creates a foundation for exemplary nursing practice and excellent patient care. Transformational leadership is a core component of the Magnet Model®. The 3rd subcomponent--visibility, accessibility, and communication--is the focus of this article.

  1. Modeling and testing of ethernet transformers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowen, David

    2011-12-01

    Twisted-pair Ethernet is now the standard home and office last-mile network technology. For decades, the IEEE standard that defines Ethernet has required electrical isolation between the twisted pair cable and the Ethernet device. So, for decades, every Ethernet interface has used magnetic core Ethernet transformers to isolate Ethernet devices and keep users safe in the event of a potentially dangerous fault on the network media. The current state-of-the-art Ethernet transformers are miniature (<5mm diameter) ferrite-core toroids wrapped with approximately 10 to 30 turns of wire. As small as current Ethernet transformers are, they still limit further Ethernet device miniaturization and require a separate bulky package or jack housing. New coupler designs must be explored which are capable of exceptional miniaturization or on-chip fabrication. This dissertation thoroughly explores the performance of the current commercial Ethernet transformers to both increase understanding of the device's behavior and outline performance parameters for replacement devices. Lumped element and distributed circuit models are derived; testing schemes are developed and used to extract model parameters from commercial Ethernet devices. Transfer relation measurements of the commercial Ethernet transformers are compared against the model's behavior and it is found that the tuned, distributed models produce the best transfer relation match to the measured data. Process descriptions and testing results on fabricated thin-film dielectric-core toroid transformers are presented. The best results were found for a 32-turn transformer loaded with 100Ω, the impedance of twisted pair cable. This transformer gave a flat response from about 10MHz to 40MHz with a height of approximately 0.45. For the fabricated transformer structures, theoretical methods to determine resistance, capacitance and inductance are presented. A special analytical and numerical analysis of the fabricated transformer

  2. Preparation of hollow core/shell microspheres of hematite and its adsorption ability for samarium.

    PubMed

    Yu, Sheng-Hui; Yao, Qi-Zhi; Zhou, Gen-Tao; Fu, Sheng-Quan

    2014-07-09

    Hollow core/shell hematite microspheres with diameter of ca. 1-2 μm have been successfully achieved by calcining the precursor composite microspheres of pyrite and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) in air. The synthesized products were characterized by a wide range of techniques including powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution TEM (HRTEM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) gas sorptometry. Temperature- and time-dependent experiments unveil that the precursor pyrite-PVP composite microspheres finally transform into hollow core/shell hematite microspheres in air through a multistep process including the oxidation and sulfation of pyrite, combustion of PVP occluded in the precursor, desulfation, aggregation, and fusion of nanosized hematite as well as mass transportation from the interior to the exterior of the microspheres. The formation of the hollow core/shell microspheres dominantly depends on the calcination temperature under current experimental conditions, and the aggregation of hematite nanocrystals and the core shrinking during the oxidation of pyrite are responsible for the formation of the hollow structures. Moreover, the adsorption ability of the hematite for Sm(III) was also tested. The results exhibit that the hematite microspheres have good adsorption activity for trivalent samarium, and that its adsorption capacity strongly depends on the pH of the solution, and the maximum adsorption capacity for Sm(III) is 14.48 mg/g at neutral pH. As samarium is a typical member of the lanthanide series, our results suggest that the hollow hematite microspheres have potential application in removal of rare earth elements (REEs) entering the water environment.

  3. HYDRATE CORE DRILLING TESTS

    SciTech Connect

    John H. Cohen; Thomas E. Williams; Ali G. Kadaster; Bill V. Liddell

    2002-11-01

    The ''Methane Hydrate Production from Alaskan Permafrost'' project is a three-year endeavor being conducted by Maurer Technology Inc. (MTI), Noble, and Anadarko Petroleum, in partnership with the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The project's goal is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition. The project team plans to design and implement a program to safely and economically drill, core and produce gas from arctic hydrates. The current work scope includes drilling and coring one well on Anadarko leases in FY 2003 during the winter drilling season. A specially built on-site core analysis laboratory will be used to determine some of the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. Prior to going to the field, the project team designed and conducted a controlled series of coring tests for simulating coring of hydrate formations. A variety of equipment and procedures were tested and modified to develop a practical solution for this special application. This Topical Report summarizes these coring tests. A special facility was designed and installed at MTI's Drilling Research Center (DRC) in Houston and used to conduct coring tests. Equipment and procedures were tested by cutting cores from frozen mixtures of sand and water supported by casing and designed to simulate hydrate formations. Tests were conducted with chilled drilling fluids. Tests showed that frozen core can be washed out and reduced in size by the action of the drilling fluid. Washing of the core by the drilling fluid caused a reduction in core diameter, making core recovery very difficult (if not impossible). One successful solution was to drill the last 6 inches of core dry (without fluid circulation). These tests demonstrated that it will be difficult to capture core when drilling in permafrost or hydrates without implementing certain safeguards. Among the coring tests was a simulated hydrate formation comprised of coarse, large

  4. 23. CORE WORKER OPERATING A COREBLOWER THAT PNEUMATICALLY FILLED CORE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. CORE WORKER OPERATING A CORE-BLOWER THAT PNEUMATICALLY FILLED CORE BOXES WITH RESIGN IMPREGNATED SAND AND CREATED A CORE THAT THEN REQUIRED BAKING, CA. 1950. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  5. Core-Cutoff Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gheen, Darrell

    2007-01-01

    A tool makes a cut perpendicular to the cylindrical axis of a core hole at a predetermined depth to free the core at that depth. The tool does not damage the surrounding material from which the core was cut, and it operates within the core-hole kerf. Coring usually begins with use of a hole saw or a hollow cylindrical abrasive cutting tool to make an annular hole that leaves the core (sometimes called the plug ) in place. In this approach to coring as practiced heretofore, the core is removed forcibly in a manner chosen to shear the core, preferably at or near the greatest depth of the core hole. Unfortunately, such forcible removal often damages both the core and the surrounding material (see Figure 1). In an alternative prior approach, especially applicable to toxic or fragile material, a core is formed and freed by means of milling operations that generate much material waste. In contrast, the present tool eliminates the damage associated with the hole-saw approach and reduces the extent of milling operations (and, hence, reduces the waste) associated with the milling approach. The present tool (see Figure 2) includes an inner sleeve and an outer sleeve and resembles the hollow cylindrical tool used to cut the core hole. The sleeves are thin enough that this tool fits within the kerf of the core hole. The inner sleeve is attached to a shaft that, in turn, can be attached to a drill motor or handle for turning the tool. This tool also includes a cutting wire attached to the distal ends of both sleeves. The cutting wire is long enough that with sufficient relative rotation of the inner and outer sleeves, the wire can cut all the way to the center of the core. The tool is inserted in the kerf until its distal end is seated at the full depth. The inner sleeve is then turned. During turning, frictional drag on the outer core pulls the cutting wire into contact with the core. The cutting force of the wire against the core increases with the tension in the wire and

  6. VLBI Observations of the Free Core Nutations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smylie, D. E.

    2012-12-01

    At core scale lengths with periods from a few hours to days, the Coriolis acceleration dominates the Lorentz force density and core modes can be considered as purely mechanical. One of the most interesting core modes is the spin-over mode, which reflects the ability of the outer core to rotate about an axis different from that of either the inner core or the shell. It has a nearly diurnal period. In the Earth frame of reference, this mode produces the nearly diurnal retrograde wobble. In the space frame of reference it is accompanied by the free core nutations. When the flattening of the boundaries of the fluid outer core and the figure-figure gravitational coupling are taken into account, as well as the deformability of the boundaries, both a retrograde free core nutation and a prograde free core nutation are found. The retrograde free core nutation was first predicted by Poincare (1910) for a completly fluid, incompressible core bounded by a rigid shell. In a variational calculation of wobble-nutation modes in realistic Earth models, Jiang (1993) found the classical retrograde free core nutation (RFCN) but discovered a prograde free core nutation (PFCN) as well. VLBI residuals in longitude and obliquity compared to the 1980 IAU nutation series, and their standard errors, were downloaded from the Goddard Space Flight Center website, for the period August 3, 1979 to March 6, 2003, giving 3343 points over a span of 8617 days. In an overlapping segment analysis, the discrete Fourier transform (DFT) for each segment was found for the corresponding series of unequally spaced nutation residuals by singular value decomposition (SVD), with the number of singular values eliminated determined by the satisfaction of Parseval's theorem. Both the RFCN and the PFCN resonances were found in the resulting power spectrum. The nutation resonances were found to be in free decay, the half-life of the PFCN at 2620 days and that of the RFCN at 2229 days, with Ekman boundary layer

  7. Interfaith Dialogue as a Means for Transformational Conversations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krebs, Stephanie Russell

    2015-01-01

    This article reports findings, inspired by the researcher's personal, transformational experience, on students' responses to an interfaith dialogue at an Interfaith Youth Core Interfaith Leadership Institute. Results demonstrated that several factors characterize interfaith dialogue: the environment, individual relationships fostered through…

  8. Transforming giants.

    PubMed

    Kanter, Rosabeth Moss

    2008-01-01

    Large corporations have long been seen as lumbering, inflexible, bureaucratic--and clueless about global developments. But recently some multinationals seem to be transforming themselves: They're engaging employees, moving quickly, and introducing innovations that show true connection with the world. Harvard Business School's Kanter ventured with a research team inside a dozen global giants--including IBM, Procter & Gamble, Omron, CEMEX, Cisco, and Banco Real--to discover what has been driving the change. After conducting more than 350 interviews on five continents, she and her colleagues came away with a strong sense that we are witnessing the dawn of a new model of corporate power: The coordination of actions and decisions on the front lines now appears to stem from widely shared values and a sturdy platform of common processes and technology, not from top-down decrees. In particular, the values that engage the passions of far-flung workforces stress openness, inclusion, and making the world a better place. Through this shift in what might be called their guidance systems, the companies have become as creative and nimble as much smaller ones, even while taking on social and environmental challenges of a scale that only large enterprises could attempt. IBM, for instance, has created a nonprofit partnership, World Community Grid, through which any organization or individual can donate unused computing power to research projects and see what is being done with the donation in real time. IBM has gained an inspiring showcase for its new technology, helped business partners connect with the company in a positive way, and offered individuals all over the globe the chance to contribute to something big.

  9. Zero Carryover Liquid-Desiccant Air Conditioner for Solar Applications: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Lowenstein, A.; Slayzak, S.; Kozubal, E.

    2006-07-01

    A novel liquid-desiccant air conditioner that dries and cools building supply air will transform the use of direct-contact liquid-desiccant systems in HVAC applications, improving comfort, air quality, and providing energy-efficient humidity control.

  10. Transformer coupling for transmitting direct current through a barrier

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Ralph L.; Guilford, Richard P.; Stichman, John H.

    1988-01-01

    The transmission system for transmitting direct current from an energy source on one side of an electrical and mechanical barrier to a load on the other side of the barrier utilizes a transformer comprising a primary core on one side of the transformer and a secondary core on the other side of the transformer. The cores are magnetically coupled selectively by moving a magnetic ferrite coupler in and out of alignment with the poles of the cores. The direct current from the energy source is converted to a time varying current by an oscillating circuit, which oscillating circuit is optically coupled to a secondary winding on the secondary core to interrupt oscillations upon the voltage in the secondary winding exceeding a preselected level.

  11. Transformer coupling for transmitting direct current through a barrier

    DOEpatents

    Brown, R.L.; Guilford, R.P.; Stichman, J.H.

    1987-06-29

    The transmission system for transmitting direct current from an energy source on one side of an electrical and mechanical barrier to a load on the other side of the barrier utilizes a transformer comprising a primary core on one side of the transformer and a secondary core on the other side of the transformer. The cores are magnetically coupled selectively by moving a magnetic ferrite coupler in and out of alignment with the poles of the cores. The direct current from the energy source is converted to a time varying current by an oscillating circuit, which oscillating circuit is optically coupled to a secondary winding on the secondary core to interrupt oscillations upon the voltage in the secondary winding exceeding a preselected level. 4 figs.

  12. Modelling the pulse transformer in SPICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godlewska, Malgorzata; Górecki, Krzysztof; Górski, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    The paper is devoted to modelling pulse transformers in SPICE. It shows the character of the selected models of this element, points out their advantages and disadvantages, and presents the results of experimental verification of the considered models. These models are characterized by varying degrees of complexity - from linearly coupled linear coils to nonlinear electrothermal models. The study was conducted for transformer with ring cores made of a variety of ferromagnetic materials, while exciting the sinusoidal signal of a frequency 100 kHz and different values of load resistance. The transformers operating conditions under which the considered models ensure the acceptable accuracy of calculations are indicated.

  13. Imagining a Transformed UNESCO with Learning at Its Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benavot, Aaron

    2011-01-01

    This paper argues that key aspects of UNESCO's organizational culture are a major impediment to the realization of its important educational agenda. Drawing upon sustained observations over a four-year period, the paper describes the nature and consequences of UNESCO's highly ritualized and "inward-oriented" work activities, especially the weak…

  14. Transformational Teaching: Theoretical Underpinnings, Basic Principles, and Core Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slavich, George M.; Zimbardo, Philip G.

    2012-01-01

    Approaches to classroom instruction have evolved considerably over the past 50 years. This progress has been spurred by the development of several learning principles and methods of instruction, including active learning, student-centered learning, collaborative learning, experiential learning, and problem-based learning. In the present paper, we…

  15. Core sample extractor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akins, James; Cobb, Billy; Hart, Steve; Leaptrotte, Jeff; Milhollin, James; Pernik, Mark

    1989-01-01

    The problem of retrieving and storing core samples from a hole drilled on the lunar surface is addressed. The total depth of the hole in question is 50 meters with a maximum diameter of 100 millimeters. The core sample itself has a diameter of 60 millimeters and will be two meters in length. It is therefore necessary to retrieve and store 25 core samples per hole. The design utilizes a control system that will stop the mechanism at a certain depth, a cam-linkage system that will fracture the core, and a storage system that will save and catalogue the cores to be extracted. The Rod Changer and Storage Design Group will provide the necessary tooling to get into the hole as well as to the core. The mechanical design for the cam-linkage system as well as the conceptual design of the storage device are described.

  16. The core paradox.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, G. C.; Higgins, G. H.

    1973-01-01

    Rebuttal of suggestions from various critics attempting to provide an escape from the seeming paradox originated by Higgins and Kennedy's (1971) proposed possibility that the liquid in the outer core was thermally stably stratified and that this stratification might prove a powerful inhibitor to circulation of the outer core fluid of the kind postulated for the generation of the earth's magnetic field. These suggestions are examined and shown to provide no reasonable escape from the core paradox.

  17. Climatic Variability in Davis Sea Sector (east Antarctica) Over the Past 250 Years Based on the 105 KM Ice Core Geochemical Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vladimirova, Diana; Ekaykin, Alexey

    2014-05-01

    In this study we present the air temperature and snow accumulation rate reconstruction in the Davis sea sector of East Antarctica over the past 250 years based on the geochemical investigations of the ice core from 105 km borehole (105 km inland from Mirny Station) drilled in 1988. The core was dated by the counting of the annual layers in the stable water isotope content (dD and d18O) profile and using the absolute date marker (Tambora volcano layer). The accumulation values were deduced from the thickness of the layers multiplied by the core density. The isotope content was transformed into the air temperature by comparing to the instrumental meteorological data from Mirny station. The reconstructed temperature series demonstrates a 0.5°C warming over the last 250 years. At the same time, snow accumulation rate was decreasing at least since the middle of the XIXth century. The climatic characteristics demonstrate cyclic variability with the periods of 6, 9, 19, 32 and about 120 years. Interestingly, in frames of 19-year cycle the temperature and isotope content are negatively related, which could be explained by a zonal shift of the moisture source area. Based on the data of the sodium concentration and "deuterium excess" values in the ice core, we assumed an increased sea ice extent in the XIXth century comparing to the present day.

  18. Core Research Center

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hicks, Joshua; Adrian, Betty

    2009-01-01

    The Core Research Center (CRC) of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), located at the Denver Federal Center in Lakewood, Colo., currently houses rock core from more than 8,500 boreholes representing about 1.7 million feet of rock core from 35 States and cuttings from 54,000 boreholes representing 238 million feet of drilling in 28 States. Although most of the boreholes are located in the Rocky Mountain region, the geologic and geographic diversity of samples have helped the CRC become one of the largest and most heavily used public core repositories in the United States. Many of the boreholes represented in the collection were drilled for energy and mineral exploration, and many of the cores and cuttings were donated to the CRC by private companies in these industries. Some cores and cuttings were collected by the USGS along with other government agencies. Approximately one-half of the cores are slabbed and photographed. More than 18,000 thin sections and a large volume of analytical data from the cores and cuttings are also accessible. A growing collection of digital images of the cores are also becoming available on the CRC Web site Internet http://geology.cr.usgs.gov/crc/.

  19. Serious Play with Dynamic Plane Transformations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, James

    2011-01-01

    Transformations are a central organizing idea in geometry. They are included in most geometry curricula and are likely to appear with even greater emphasis in the future, given the central role they play in the "Common Core State Standards" for K-12 mathematics. One of the attractions of geometry is the ability to draw and construct the…

  20. Fourier Transform Spectrometer measurements of Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide and Methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kivi, Rigel; Heikkinen, Pauli; Chen, Huilin; Hatakka, Juha; Laurila, Tuomas

    2016-04-01

    Ground based remote sensing measurements of column CO2 and CH4 using Fourier Transform Spectrometers (FTS) within the Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON) are known for high precision and accuracy. These measurements are performed at various locations globally and they have been widely used in carbon cycle studies and validation of space born measurements. The relevant satellite missions include the Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 (OCO-2) by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA); the SCanning Imaging Absorption SpectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY (SCIAMACHY) by the European Space Agency (ESA); the Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT) by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) and the upcoming Sentinel-5 Precursor mission, which is an ESA mission and scheduled for launch in 2016. Results of the column CO2 and CH4 measurements at Sodankylä in northern Finland (at 67.4° N, 26.6° E) are reported in this study. The measurements have been performed on regular basis since the beginning of the program in early 2009. We also present evaluation of the data quality of the ground based measurements and comparisons with the available satellite based retrievals. In case of comparisons between the GOSAT and ground based retrievals of CO2 and CH4 no significant biases were found. Sodankylä is one of the northernmost stations in the TCCON network. However, the data coverage has been relatively good thanks to the progress towards automation of the FTS measurement system. At Sodankylä the retrievals have been also compared with the balloon borne AirCore measurements at the site. AirCore sampling system is directly related to the World Meteorological Organization in situ trace gas measurement scales. The balloon platform allows sampling in both stratosphere and troposphere, which is a benefit, compared to the aircraft in situ measurements.

  1. Advanced air revitalization system testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heppner, D. B.; Hallick, T. M.; Schubert, F. H.

    1983-01-01

    A previously developed experimental air revitalization system was tested cyclically and parametrically. One-button startup without manual interventions; extension by 1350 hours of tests with the system; capability for varying process air carbon dioxide partial pressure and humidity and coolant source for simulation of realistic space vehicle interfaces; dynamic system performance response on the interaction of the electrochemical depolarized carbon dioxide concentrator, the Sabatier carbon dioxide reduction subsystem, and the static feed water electrolysis oxygen generation subsystem, the carbon dioxide concentrator module with unitized core technology for the liquid cooled cell; and a preliminary design for a regenerative air revitalization system for the space station are discussed.

  2. Air Pollution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilpin, Alan

    A summary of one of our most pressing environmental problems, air pollution, is offered in this book by the Director of Air Pollution Control for the Queensland (Australia) State Government. Discussion of the subject is not restricted to Queensland or Australian problems and policies, however, but includes analysis of air pollution the world over.…

  3. Air Pollution

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Climate Change on Children's Health: Session Two: Air Quality Impacts MODERATOR: Susan Anenberg, EPA Meredith McCormack, Johns ... University • Effects of Climate Change on Children’s Health: Air Quality Impacts Frederica Perera, Columbia University • Air quality Impacts ...

  4. Innovative core material produced by infusion process using hemp fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boccarusso, L.; Carrino, L.; Durante, M.; Formisano, A.; Langella, A.; Minutolo, F. Memola Capece

    2016-10-01

    This paper investigates the mechanical properties in term of compression, tensile, flexural and shear strength of a new hemp core based on woven fabric. The hemp core is manufactured by means an innovative vacuum infusion process in which the input both of epoxy resin and of air was allowed. In addition, a comparison among this and others more known materials used as core in sandwich structures was carried out. The results showed that the core under investigation has higher mechanical properties, without shear and indentation failure during the tests on the respective sandwich structures.

  5. Can Psychiatric Rehabilitation Be Core to CORE?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olney, Marjorie F.; Gill, Kenneth J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: In this article, we seek to determine whether psychiatric rehabilitation principles and practices have been more fully incorporated into the Council on Rehabilitation Education (CORE) standards, the extent to which they are covered in four rehabilitation counseling "foundations" textbooks, and how they are reflected in the…

  6. Improved Rotary Transformer For Shaft-Position Indicator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclyman, W. T.

    1991-01-01

    Improved rotary transformer for Inductosyn (or equivalent) shaft-position-indicating circuit has pair of ferrite cores instead of the solid-iron cores. Designed with view toward decreasing excitation power (to maximum allowable 2 W) supplied to shaft-position-indicating circuit to increase its output signal and make tracking system less vulnerable to electromagnetic interference.

  7. Magnetic flux distribution in the amorphous modular transformers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomczuk, B.; Koteras, D.

    2011-06-01

    3D magnetic fluxes in one-phase and three-phase transformers with amorphous modular cores have been studied. Scalar potentials were implemented for the 3D Finite Element field calculation. Due to the inability to simulate each thin amorphous layer, we introduced supplementary permeabilities along the main directions of magnetization. The calculated fluxes in the cores were tested on the prototypes.

  8. Making an Ice Core.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kopaska-Merkel, David C.

    1995-01-01

    Explains an activity in which students construct a simulated ice core. Materials required include only a freezer, food coloring, a bottle, and water. This hands-on exercise demonstrates how a glacier is formed, how ice cores are studied, and the nature of precision and accuracy in measurement. Suitable for grades three through eight. (Author/PVD)

  9. Core Concepts of Kinesiology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudson, Jackie L.

    1995-01-01

    Core concepts of kinesiology are the basis of communication about movement that facilitate progression of skill levels. The article defines and exemplifies each of 10 core concepts: range of motion, speed of motion, number of segments, nature of segments, balance, coordination, compactness, extension at release/contact, path of projection, and…

  10. CORE - Performance Feedback System

    SciTech Connect

    2009-10-02

    CORE is an architecture to bridge the gaps between disparate data integration and delivery of disparate information visualization. The CORE Technology Program includes a suite of tools and user-centered staff that can facilitate rapid delivery of a deployable integrated information to users.

  11. Iowa Core Annual Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa Department of Education, 2015

    2015-01-01

    One central component of a great school system is a clear set of expectations, or standards, that educators help all students reach. In Iowa, that effort is known as the Iowa Core. The Iowa Core represents the statewide academic standards, which describe what students should know and be able to do in math, science, English language arts, and…

  12. Ice Core Investigations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krim, Jessica; Brody, Michael

    2008-01-01

    What can glaciers tell us about volcanoes and atmospheric conditions? How does this information relate to our understanding of climate change? Ice Core Investigations is an original and innovative activity that explores these types of questions. It brings together popular science issues such as research, climate change, ice core drilling, and air…

  13. Modular core holder

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, J.; Cole, C.W.; Hamid, S.; Lucas, J.K.

    1991-03-05

    This patent describes a modular core holder. It comprises: a sleeve, forming an internal cavity for receiving a core. The sleeve including segments; support means, overlying the sleeve, for supporting the sleeve; and access means, positioned between at least two of the segments of the sleeve, for allowing measurement of conditions within the internal cavity.

  14. More on the Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Monnica

    2013-01-01

    From a higher education perspective, new "Common Core" standards could improve student college-readiness levels, reduce institutional remediation rates, and close education gaps in and between states. As a national initiative to create common educational standards for students across multiple states, the Common Core State Standards…

  15. Mercury's core evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deproost, Marie-Hélène; Rivoldini, Attilio; Van Hoolst, Tim

    2016-10-01

    Remote sensing data of Mercury's surface by MESSENGER indicate that Mercury formed under reducing conditions. As a consequence, silicon is likely the main light element in the core together with a possible small fraction of sulfur. Compared to sulfur, which does almost not partition into solid iron at Mercury's core conditions and strongly decreases the melting temperature, silicon partitions almost equally well between solid and liquid iron and is not very effective at reducing the melting temperature of iron. Silicon as the major light element constituent instead of sulfur therefore implies a significantly higher core liquidus temperature and a decrease in the vigor of compositional convection generated by the release of light elements upon inner core formation.Due to the immiscibility in liquid Fe-Si-S at low pressure (below 15 GPa), the core might also not be homogeneous and consist of an inner S-poor Fe-Si core below a thinner Si-poor Fe-S layer. Here, we study the consequences of a silicon-rich core and the effect of the blanketing Fe-S layer on the thermal evolution of Mercury's core and on the generation of a magnetic field.

  16. NFE Core Bibliographies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan State Univ., East Lansing. Inst. for International Studies in Education.

    This collection of core bibliographies, which expands on an initial bibliography published in 1979 of the core resources housed in the Non-Formal Education Information Center at Michigan State University, comprises a basic stock of materials on nonformal education and women in development that have been contributed by development planners,…

  17. Safety Core Insulator Failures Reliability Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-01

    given below: 1. Improper installation a. Installed upside down. Air bubble exposes belt in high field area ( Haiku ) b. Installed with inadequate...ground. Cause – improperly installed spelter socket. New Safety Core Haiku , HI 1 EM-1 Down lead dogleg counterweight insulator exploded. Cause...insulators failed when they hit the ground following the failure of an improperly installed spelter socket. 4. Haiku , HI. Valley span antenna (Dec 1996

  18. Internal core tightener

    DOEpatents

    Brynsvold, Glen V.; Snyder, Jr., Harold J.

    1976-06-22

    An internal core tightener which is a linear actuated (vertical actuation motion) expanding device utilizing a minimum of moving parts to perform the lateral tightening function. The key features are: (1) large contact areas to transmit loads during reactor operation; (2) actuation cam surfaces loaded only during clamping and unclamping operation; (3) separation of the parts and internal operation involved in the holding function from those involved in the actuation function; and (4) preloaded pads with compliant travel at each face of the hexagonal assembly at the two clamping planes to accommodate thermal expansion and irradiation induced swelling. The latter feature enables use of a "fixed" outer core boundary, and thus eliminates the uncertainty in gross core dimensions, and potential for rapid core reactivity changes as a result of core dimensional change.

  19. Lunar Core and Tides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. G.; Boggs, D. H.; Ratcliff, J. T.

    2004-01-01

    Variations in rotation and orientation of the Moon are sensitive to solid-body tidal dissipation, dissipation due to relative motion at the fluid-core/solid-mantle boundary, and tidal Love number k2 [1,2]. There is weaker sensitivity to flattening of the core-mantle boundary (CMB) [2,3,4] and fluid core moment of inertia [1]. Accurate Lunar Laser Ranging (LLR) measurements of the distance from observatories on the Earth to four retroreflector arrays on the Moon are sensitive to lunar rotation and orientation variations and tidal displacements. Past solutions using the LLR data have given results for dissipation due to solid-body tides and fluid core [1] plus Love number [1-5]. Detection of CMB flattening, which in the past has been marginal but improving [3,4,5], now seems significant. Direct detection of the core moment has not yet been achieved.

  20. A Case of Extreme Simplicity of the Core Matrix in Three-Mode Principal Components Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murakami, Takashi; ten Berge, Jos M. F.; Kiers, Henk A. L.

    1998-01-01

    In three-mode principal components analysis, the P x Q x R core matrix "G" can be transformed to simple structure before it is interpreted. This paper shows that, when P=QR-1, G can be transformed to have nearly all the elements equal to values specified a priori. A closed-form solution for this transformation is offered. (SLD)

  1. Typical Phases of Transformative Learning: A Practice-Based Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nohl, Arnd-Michael

    2015-01-01

    Empirical models of transformative learning offer important insights into the core characteristics of this concept. Whereas previous analyses were limited to specific social groups or topical terrains, this article empirically typifies the phases of transformative learning on the basis of a comparative analysis of various social groups and topical…

  2. Amorphous metal distribution transformers: The energy-efficient alternative

    SciTech Connect

    Garrity, T.F.

    1994-12-31

    Amorphous metal distribution transformers have been commercially available for the past 13 years. During that time, they have realized the promise of exceptionally high core efficiency as compared to silicon steel transformer cores. Utility planners today must consider all options available to meet the requirements of load growth. While additional generation capacity will be added, many demand-side initiatives are being undertaken as complementary programs to generation expansion. The efficiency improvement provided by amorphous metal distribution transformers deserves to be among the demand-side options. The key to understanding the positive impact of amorphous metal transformer efficiency is to consider the aggregate contribution those transformers can make towards demand reduction. It is estimated that distribution transformer core losses comprise at least 1% of the utility`s peak demand. Because core losses are continuous, any significant reduction in their magnitude is of great significance to the planner. This paper describes the system-wide economic contributions amorphous metal distribution transformers can make to a utility and suggests evaluation techniques that can be used. As a conservation tool, the amorphous metal transformer contributes to reduced power plant emissions. Calibration of those emissions reductions is also discussed in the paper.

  3. 34. DESPATCH CORE OVENS, GREY IRON FOUNDRY CORE ROOM, BAKES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    34. DESPATCH CORE OVENS, GREY IRON FOUNDRY CORE ROOM, BAKES CORES THAT ARE NOT MADE ON HEATED OR COLD BOX CORE MACHINES, TO SET BINDING AGENTS MIXED WITH THE SAND CREATING CORES HARD ENOUGH TO WITHSTAND THE FLOW OF MOLTEN IRON INSIDE A MOLD. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Grey Iron Foundry, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  4. Physical properties of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) Divide deep core: Development, evolution, and interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fegyveresi, John M.

    The physical properties of the WAIS Divide deep ice core record meteorological conditions during and shortly after deposition, mean temperature during transformation to ice, deformation within the ice, and may retain information on past surface elevations. The WAIS Divide (WDC06A) core was recovered from West Antarctica (79°28.058' S, 112°05.189' W, ˜1760 m elevation, ˜3450 m ice thickness) on the Ross Sea side of the ice-divide with the Amundsen Sea drainage. My observations of the core were supplemented by near-surface studies spanning five consecutive austral summer seasons (2008--2012). Near-surface processes including intense summertime solar heating produce distinct seasonal strata. Prominent "glazed" crusts form very near the surface during times of steep temperature gradients and subsequently develop polygonal cracks, allowing ventilation of deeper firn. The near-surface seasonal contrasts persist to, and beyond the bubble-trapping depth, where they have a weak effect on total trapped air. A new record of total air content also shows that impurities may affect this important parameter, complicating interpretation of past elevation changes. Paleoclimatic interpretation of the number-density of bubbles is extended successfully here through the "brittle ice" zone, providing a record of surface temperature spanning ˜5500 years. This new record reveals relatively stable values through the first half of the interval, with a very-slight warming early, followed by a slight cooling over the most recent two millennia. Bubbles were found to be preferentially elongated parallel to the basal planes of enclosing grains, with less overall elongation of bubbles in grains with lower resolved shear stresses on their basal planes, as expected if grain deformation occurs primarily on basal planes and proportional to the stress.

  5. Multiple Core Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R.H.; Morrison, David (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Nuclei of galaxies often show complicated density structures and perplexing kinematic signatures. In the past we have reported numerical experiments indicating a natural tendency for galaxies to show nuclei offset with respect to nearby isophotes and for the nucleus to have a radial velocity different from the galaxy's systemic velocity. Other experiments show normal mode oscillations in galaxies with large amplitudes. These oscillations do not damp appreciably over a Hubble time. The common thread running through all these is that galaxies often show evidence of ringing, bouncing, or sloshing around in unexpected ways, even though they have not been disturbed by any external event. Recent observational evidence shows yet another phenomenon indicating the dynamical complexity of central regions of galaxies: multiple cores (M31, Markarian 315 and 463 for example). These systems can hardly be static. We noted long-lived multiple core systems in galaxies in numerical experiments some years ago, and we have more recently followed up with a series of experiments on multiple core galaxies, starting with two cores. The relevant parameters are the energy in the orbiting clumps, their relative.masses, the (local) strength of the potential well representing the parent galaxy, and the number of cores. We have studied the dependence of the merger rates and the nature of the final merger product on these parameters. Individual cores survive much longer in stronger background potentials. Cores can survive for a substantial fraction of a Hubble time if they travel on reasonable orbits.

  6. Global Core Plasma Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, Dennis L.; Craven, P. D.; Comfort, R. H.

    1999-01-01

    Abstract. The Global Core Plasma Model (GCPM) provides, empirically derived, core plasma density as a function of geomagnetic and solar conditions throughout the inner magnetosphere. It is continuous in value and gradient and is composed of separate models for the ionosphere, the plasmasphere, the plasmapause, the trough, and the polar cap. The relative composition of plasmaspheric H+, He+, and O+ is included in the GCPM. A blunt plasmaspheric bulge and rotation of the bulge with changing geomagnetic conditions is included. The GCPM is an amalgam of density models, intended to serve as a framework for continued improvement as new measurements become available and are used to characterize core plasma density, composition, and temperature.

  7. Core shroud corner joints

    DOEpatents

    Gilmore, Charles B.; Forsyth, David R.

    2013-09-10

    A core shroud is provided, which includes a number of planar members, a number of unitary corners, and a number of subassemblies each comprising a combination of the planar members and the unitary corners. Each unitary corner comprises a unitary extrusion including a first planar portion and a second planar portion disposed perpendicularly with respect to the first planar portion. At least one of the subassemblies comprises a plurality of the unitary corners disposed side-by-side in an alternating opposing relationship. A plurality of the subassemblies can be combined to form a quarter perimeter segment of the core shroud. Four quarter perimeter segments join together to form the core shroud.

  8. Novel design of hollow-core multi clad fiber for long haul optical communication system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palodiya, Vikram; Raghuwanshi, Sanjeev K.

    2016-09-01

    We have described a dispersion characteristics of hollow-core multi-clad index profiles, which include a hollow core. The designs satisfy the most important requirements for applications in long haul communication. This design fiber shows zero dispersion at 1550 nm can be obtained for the fundamental air core mode over a wide wavelength range by introducing the partial reflector layer around the core, optimizing expanded core size and silica cladding thickness. Also analyze dispersion compensating properties of these fibers. This unique structure of the fundamental air core mode is presented by the introduction of partial reflector cladding around the core. The potential applications of hollow-core multi clad fibers in long-haul optical communication system.

  9. Fluxes of electromagnetic field energy in HTSC transformers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, E. P.; Dzhafarov, E. A.

    2016-12-01

    The transfer of electric power in an HTSC electromagnetic system is considered using the Poynting vector. An analysis of the process of transfer of electromagnetic field energy in HTSC transformers with and without an iron core is given. It is shown that the power of an HTSC transformer increases when its magnetic core is made from amorphous electrical steel. Schemes of HTSC transformers with a localized magnetic field are given with cylindrical and disk symmetrical interleaved windings providing the cost-saving process of transfer of large electromagnetic energy at a high degree of its uniformity and improve the factor of nonuniformity of electromagnetic flux density.

  10. Air Policing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    Iraq. To provide a background for understanding why Britain commenced the policy of air policing, this paper begins with a review of contemporary...7 Omissi, Air Power, XV. 8 policing actions or the pushing home of advantages gained by the air.” Within the context of this paper , the...control operations, and therefore within the context of this paper , the term coercive airpower refers to the threat of harming a population or the threat

  11. Polymer-bonded NiZn ferrite magnetic cores mixed with titanium (IV) isopropoxide (C12H28O4Ti)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, K. W. E.; Ding, Kai; Ho, S. L.; Fu, W. N.; Wang, Junhua; Wang, Shuxiao

    2011-04-01

    For decades, the technology and engineering domains have been constantly demanding high-performance magnetic materials. Recently, polymer bonded NiZn ferrite magnetic materials mixed with titanium (IV) isopropoxide (C12H28O4Ti) for power converter applications have been found to be very promising in reducing the loss, cost, and material weight when compared to their conventional counterparts using air-core technology, conventional soft ferrites, and powder iron. The proposed magnetic core is flexible in both size and shape and is not brittle. The design of a high-frequency transformer for a 100 W two-transistor forward converter-based electric vehicle battery charger operating at a switching frequency of 360 kHz is reported in this paper. Printed circuit board prototyping and experimental results as well as comparisons with conventional converters are provided to validate the application feasibility of the proposed materials.

  12. Facile fabrication of core-shell structured magnetic Fe3O4/cross-linked polyphosphazene nanocomposite particles with high stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xuzhe; Wang, Minghuan; Fu, Jianwei; Zhang, Chao; Xu, Qun

    2013-08-01

    We herein report a facile approach to the fabrication of core-shell structured magnetic Fe3O4/poly(cyclotriphosphazene-co-4,4'-sulfonyldiphenol) nanocomposite particles via precipitation polymerization of comonomers hexachlorocyclotriphosphazene and 4,4'-sulfonyldiphenol in the presence of Fe3O4 nanopaticles. The morphology, composition, thermal property, and magnetic property of the magnetic nanocomposite particles were characterized by scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope, Fourier transform infrared spectra, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis, and vibrating sample magnetometer, respectively. Results indicated that the submicron-sized magnetic nanocomposite particles own core/shell structures, 410 °C of initial decomposition temperature under an air atmosphere, and 6.2 emu/g of saturation magnetization, which should make them have potential applications in biotechnology and catalyst supports. Furthermore, we also proposed a possible formation mechanism of these magnetic Fe3O4/PZS nanocomposite particles.

  13. Regenerative air heater

    DOEpatents

    Hasselquist, P.B.; Baldner, R.

    1980-11-26

    A gas-cooled steel skirt is used to support a refractory cored brick matrix and dome structure in a high temperature regenerative air heater useful in magnetohydrodynamic power generation. The steel skirt thermally expands to accommodate the thermal expansion of the dome structure despite substantial temperature differential thereby reducing relative movement between the dome bricks. Gas cooling of the steel skirt allows the structure to operate above its normal temperature during clean-out cycles and also allows for the control of the thermal expansion of the steel skirt.

  14. Regenerative air heater

    DOEpatents

    Hasselquist, Paul B.; Baldner, Richard

    1982-01-01

    A gas-cooled steel skirt is used to support a refractory cored brick matrix and dome structure in a high temperature regenerative air heater useful in magnetohydrodynamic power generation. The steel skirt thermally expands to accommodate the thermal expansion of the dome structure despite substantial temperature differential thereby reducing relative movement between the dome bricks. Gas cooling of the steel skirt allows the structure to operate above its normal temperature during clean-out cycles and also allows for the control of the thermal expansion of the steel skirt.

  15. The Funk transform as a Penrose transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Toby N.; Eastwood, Michael G.; Gover, A. Rod; Mason, Lionel J.

    1999-01-01

    The Funk transform is the integral transform from the space of smooth even functions on the unit sphere S2[subset or is implied by][open face R]3 to itself defined by integration over great circles. One can regard this transform as a limit in a certain sense of the Penrose transform from [open face C][open face P]2 to [open face C][open face P]*ast;2. We exploit this viewpoint by developing a new proof of the bijectivity of the Funk transform which proceeds by considering the cohomology of a certain involutive (or formally integrable) structure on an intermediate space. This is the simplest example of what we hope will prove to be a general method of obtaining results in real integral geometry by means of complex holomorphic methods derived from the Penrose transform.

  16. Magnetorotational iron core collapse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Symbalisty, E. M. D.

    1984-01-01

    During its final evolutionary stages, a massive star, as considered in current astrophysical theory, undergoes rapid collapse, thereby triggering a sequence of a catastrophic event which results in a Type II supernova explosion. A remnant neutron star or a black hole is left after the explosion. Stellar collapse occurs, when thermonuclear fusion has consumed the lighter elements present. At this stage, the core consists of iron. Difficulties arise regarding an appropriate model with respect to the core collapse. The present investigation is concerned with the evolution of a Type II supernova core including the effects of rotation and magnetic fields. A simple neutrino model is developed which reproduced the spherically symmetric results of Bowers and Wilson (1982). Several two-dimensional computational models of stellar collapse are studied, taking into account a case in which a 15 solar masses iron core was artificially given rotational and magnetic energy.

  17. Contaminated Sediment Core Profiling

    EPA Science Inventory

    Evaluating the environmental risk of sites containing contaminated sediments often poses major challenges due in part to the absence of detailed information available for a given location. Sediment core profiling is often utilized during preliminary environmental investigations ...

  18. INTEGRAL core programme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, N.; Schoenfelder, V.; Ubertini, P.; Winkler, C.

    1997-01-01

    The International Gamma Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL) mission is described with emphasis on the INTEGRAL core program. The progress made in the planning activities for the core program is reported on. The INTEGRAL mission has a nominal lifetime of two years with a five year extension option. The observing time will be divided between the core program (between 30 and 35 percent during the first two years) and general observations. The core program consists of three main elements: the deep survey of the Galactic plane in the central radian of the Galaxy; frequent scans of the Galactic plane in the search for transient sources, and pointed observations of several selected sources. The allocation of the observation time is detailed and the sensitivities of the observations are outlined.

  19. Biospecimen Core Resource - TCGA

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Biospecimen Core Resource centralized laboratory reviews and processes blood and tissue samples and their associated data using optimized standard operating procedures for the entire TCGA Research Network.

  20. Core bounce supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Cooperstein, J.

    1987-01-01

    The gravitational collapse mechanism for Type II supernovae is considered, concentrating on the direct implosion - core bounce - hydrodynamic explosion picture. We examine the influence of the stiffness of the dense matter equation of state and discuss how the shock wave is formed. Its chances of success are determined by the equation of state, general relativistic effects, neutrino transport, and the size of presupernova iron core. 12 refs., 1 tab.

  1. Nuclear core positioning system

    DOEpatents

    Garkisch, Hans D.; Yant, Howard W.; Patterson, John F.

    1979-01-01

    A structural support system for the core of a nuclear reactor which achieves relatively restricted clearances at operating conditions and yet allows sufficient clearance between fuel assemblies at refueling temperatures. Axially displaced spacer pads having variable between pad spacing and a temperature compensated radial restraint system are utilized to maintain clearances between the fuel elements. The core support plates are constructed of metals specially chosen such that differential thermal expansion produces positive restraint at operating temperatures.

  2. Micro coring apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, David; Brooks, Marshall; Chen, Paul; Dwelle, Paul; Fischer, Ben

    1989-01-01

    A micro-coring apparatus for lunar exploration applications, that is compatible with the other components of the Walking Mobile Platform, was designed. The primary purpose of core sampling is to gain an understanding of the geological composition and properties of the prescribed environment. This procedure has been used extensively for Earth studies and in limited applications during lunar explorations. The corer is described and analyzed for effectiveness.

  3. MCNP LWR Core Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, Noah A.

    2012-08-14

    The reactor core input generator allows for MCNP input files to be tailored to design specifications and generated in seconds. Full reactor models can now easily be created by specifying a small set of parameters and generating an MCNP input for a full reactor core. Axial zoning of the core will allow for density variation in the fuel and moderator, with pin-by-pin fidelity, so that BWR cores can more accurately be modeled. LWR core work in progress: (1) Reflectivity option for specifying 1/4, 1/2, or full core simulation; (2) Axial zoning for moderator densities that vary with height; (3) Generating multiple types of assemblies for different fuel enrichments; and (4) Parameters for specifying BWR box walls. Fuel pin work in progress: (1) Radial and azimuthal zoning for generating further unique materials in fuel rods; (2) Options for specifying different types of fuel for MOX or multiple burn assemblies; (3) Additional options for replacing fuel rods with burnable poison rods; and (4) Control rod/blade modeling.

  4. Emergency core cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Schenewerk, William E.; Glasgow, Lyle E.

    1983-01-01

    A liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactor provided with an emergency core cooling system includes a reactor vessel which contains a reactor core comprising an array of fuel assemblies and a plurality of blanket assemblies. The reactor core is immersed in a pool of liquid metal coolant. The reactor also includes a primary coolant system comprising a pump and conduits for circulating liquid metal coolant to the reactor core and through the fuel and blanket assemblies of the core. A converging-diverging venturi nozzle with an intermediate throat section is provided in between the assemblies and the pump. The intermediate throat section of the nozzle is provided with at least one opening which is in fluid communication with the pool of liquid sodium. In normal operation, coolant flows from the pump through the nozzle to the assemblies with very little fluid flowing through the opening in the throat. However, when the pump is not running, residual heat in the core causes fluid from the pool to flow through the opening in the throat of the nozzle and outwardly through the nozzle to the assemblies, thus providing a means of removing decay heat.

  5. Steerable Discrete Fourier Transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fracastoro, Giulia; Magli, Enrico

    2017-03-01

    Directional transforms have recently raised a lot of interest thanks to their numerous applications in signal compression and analysis. In this letter, we introduce a generalization of the discrete Fourier transform, called steerable DFT (SDFT). Since the DFT is used in numerous fields, it may be of interest in a wide range of applications. Moreover, we also show that the SDFT is highly related to other well-known transforms, such as the Fourier sine and cosine transforms and the Hilbert transforms.

  6. Air transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Page, F Handley

    1924-01-01

    I purpose (sic) in this paper to deal with the development in air transport which has taken place since civil aviation between England and the Continent first started at the end of August 1919. A great deal of attention has been paid in the press to air services of the future, to the detriment of the consideration of results obtained up to the present.

  7. Air Pollution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Donald L.

    1989-01-01

    Materials related to air pollution are reviewed for the period January 1987, to October 1988. The topics are pollution monitoring, air pollution, and environmental chemistry. The organization consists of two major analytical divisions: (1) gaseous methods; and (2) aerosol and particulate methods. (MVL)

  8. Air Pollution.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Air quality is affected by many types of pollutants that are emitted from various sources, including stationary and mobile. These sources release both criteria and hazardous air pollutants, which cause health effects, ecological harm, and material damage. They are generally categ...

  9. 136. VIEW OF NORTHWEST CORNER OF TRANSFORMER ROOM (212), LSB ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    136. VIEW OF NORTHWEST CORNER OF TRANSFORMER ROOM (212), LSB (BLDG. 751). JEFFRIES COMPANY TRANSFORMER FOR LIGHTING SYSTEMS ON NORTH WALL, FACING SOUTH; POWER PANEL A AND POWER PANEL B ON EAST WALL, FACING WEST - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 East, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  10. 128. VIEW OF NORTHWEST CORNER OF TRANSFORMER ROOM (112), BUILDING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    128. VIEW OF NORTHWEST CORNER OF TRANSFORMER ROOM (112), BUILDING 751. JEFFRIES COMPANY TRANSFORMER FOR LIGHTING SYSTEMS ON NORTH WALL, FACING SOUTH; POWER PANEL A1 ON EAST WALL, FACING WEST - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 West, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  11. Design of space-type electronic power transformers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahearn, J. F.; Lagadinos, J. C.

    1977-01-01

    Both open and encapsulated varieties of high reliability, low weight, and high efficiency moderate and high voltage transformers were investigated to determine the advantages and limitations of their construction in the ranges of power and voltage required for operation in the hard vacuum environment of space. Topics covered include: (1) selection of the core material; (2) preliminary calculation of core dimensions; (3) selection of insulating materials including magnet wire insulation, coil forms, and layer and interwinding insulation; (4) coil design; (5) calculation of copper losses, core losses and efficiency; (6) calculation of temperature rise; and (7) optimization of design with changes in core selection or coil design as required to meet specifications.

  12. Leak Location in Plates Using Spatial Fourier Transform Based Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, R.; Holland, S.; Strei, M.; Song, J.; Chimenti, D. E.

    2005-04-01

    The location of air leaks in plate-like structures is examined using a spatial Fourier transform based analysis. Noise data is collected over 2-D spatial arrays at sensor locations, from which mean cross-correlations are compiled. Propagation properties, transit times, and energy distribution among modes are extracted through spatial Fourier transformation of these data. A simple algorithm to determine source location using a reduced set of transform data is demonstrated experimentally, based upon extraction of energy propagation direction.

  13. Recent developments in pressure coring

    SciTech Connect

    McFall, A. L.

    1980-01-01

    The current rapid growth in the number of enhanced oil and gas recovery projects has created a strong demand for reservoir data such as true residual oil saturations. The companies providing pressure coring services have moved to fill this need. Two recent developments have emerged with the potential of significantly improving the present performance of pressure coring. Coring bits utilizing synthetic diamond cutters have demonstrated coring rates of one-foot per minute while improving core recovery. It is also apparent that cores of a near-unconsolidated nature are more easily recovered. In addition, a special low invasion fluid that is placed in the core retriever has demonstrated reduced core washing by the drilling mud and a decrease in the complexity of preparing cores for analysis. This paper describes the design, laboratory, and field testing efforts that led to these coring improvements. Also, experience in utilizing these developments while recovering over 100 cores is discussed.

  14. Pressure Core Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santamarina, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    Natural gas hydrates form under high fluid pressure and low temperature, and are found in permafrost, deep lakes or ocean sediments. Hydrate dissociation by depressurization and/or heating is accompanied by a multifold hydrate volume expansion and host sediments with low permeability experience massive destructuration. Proper characterization requires coring, recovery, manipulation and testing under P-T conditions within the stability field. Pressure core technology allows for the reliable characterization of hydrate bearing sediments within the stability field in order to address scientific and engineering needs, including the measurement of parameters used in hydro-thermo-mechanical analyses, and the monitoring of hydrate dissociation under controlled pressure, temperature, effective stress and chemical conditions. Inherent sampling effects remain and need to be addressed in test protocols and data interpretation. Pressure core technology has been deployed to study hydrate bearing sediments at several locations around the world. In addition to pressure core testing, a comprehensive characterization program should include sediment analysis, testing of reconstituted specimens (with and without synthetic hydrate), and in situ testing. Pressure core characterization technology can be used to study other gas-charged formations such as deep sea sediments, coal bed methane and gas shales.

  15. Air-to-air heat exchangers and the indoor environment

    SciTech Connect

    Vine, E.

    1987-02-01

    Air-to-air heat exchangers were installed in 366 energy-efficient homes as part of a demonstration program in the United States. The median incremental cost of AAHX was $1268 ($7.42/mS), and it was less expensive (per square meter) to install this equipment in larger houses than in smaller houses. While most occupants did not notice problems with their AAHX, some households did experience problems related to noise, unpleasant drafts, condensation around the AAHX, and core freezing. Occupants of energy-efficient homes were found to have less problems with their indoor environment (especially mildew/mold and condensation) than a group of control homes.

  16. Synthesis and characterization of self-crosslinking fluorinated polyacrylate soap-free latices with core-shell structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wei; An, Qiufeng; Hao, Lifen; Zhang, Dan; Zhang, Min

    2013-03-01

    Novel self-crosslinking fluorinated polyacrylate soap-free latices (FMBN) with core-shell structure were synthesized by semicontinuous seeded emulsion polymerization method from dodecafluoroheptyl methacrylate (DFMA), methyl methacrylate (MMA), butyl acrylate (BA), and N-methylolamide (NMA) in the presence of a polymerizable emulsifier-ammonium allyloxtmethylate nonylphenol ethoxylates sulfate (DNS-86). Effects of the DNS-86 and DFMA amounts on stability and properties of the FMBN emulsions were studied. Besides, the latices and their film were characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) spectrum, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), laser particle size analyzer, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetry analysis (TGA), contact angle goniometer, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), respectively. FT-IR spectra and 1H NMR spectrum showed that DFMA successfully participated in soap-free emulsion polymerization and monomers formed the fluorinated acrylate copolymer. The resulted latex particles had the core-shell structure. The films formed from the FMBN latices thus had two Tg. Their thermal stability and Tg of the shell phase increased gradually with augment of DFMA amount in polymer. XPS, AFM and hydrophobicity analyses indicated the fluoroalkyl groups had the tendency to enrich at the film-air interface. This enrichment of fluorine at the film-air interface was more evident after the annealing process. Water contact angles of the FMBN film before and after the annealing process could attain 115.5° and 117.5°, individually.

  17. First 1 MVA and 10/0.4 kV HTSC transformer in Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, E. P.; Dzhafarov, E. A.; Fleishman, L. S.; Vysotsky, V. S.; Sukonkin, V. V.

    2016-12-01

    This article describes results of the development, construction, and test of the first three-phase distribution power transformer prototype in Russia with windings made from second-generation HTSC wire and iron core from amorphous electrical steel. The design of its elements is described and improvement of HTSC transformer performance characteristics compared to conventional power transformers with the same power rating is shown.

  18. Molten core retention assembly

    DOEpatents

    Lampe, Robert F.

    1976-06-22

    Molten fuel produced in a core overheating accident is caught by a molten core retention assembly consisting of a horizontal baffle plate having a plurality of openings therein, heat exchange tubes having flow holes near the top thereof mounted in the openings, and a cylindrical, imperforate baffle attached to the plate and surrounding the tubes. The baffle assembly is supported from the core support plate of the reactor by a plurality of hanger rods which are welded to radial beams passing under the baffle plate and intermittently welded thereto. Preferably the upper end of the cylindrical baffle terminates in an outwardly facing lip to which are welded a plurality of bearings having slots therein adapted to accept the hanger rods.

  19. Earth's core iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geophysicist J. Michael Brown of Texas A & M University noted recently at the Spring AGU Meeting in Baltimore that the structure and phase of metallic iron at pressures of the earth's inner core (approximately 3.3 Mbar) could have great significance in defining geometrical aspects of the core itself. Brown worked at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory with R.B. McQueen to redetermine the phase relations of metallic iron in a series of new shock-wave experiments. They found the melting point of iron at conditions equal to those at the boundary of the earth's outer (liquid) and inner (solid) cores to be 6000°±500°C (Geophysical Research Letters, 7, 533-536, 1980).

  20. Air Apparent.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harbster, David A.

    1988-01-01

    Explains the principle upon which a barometer operates. Describes how to construct two barometric devices for use in the classroom that show air's changing pressure. Cites some conditions for predicting weather. (RT)

  1. Air Abrasion

    MedlinePlus

    ... information you need from the Academy of General Dentistry Sunday, April 9, 2017 About | Contact InfoBites Quick ... general dentist, who has been trained in restorative dentistry techniques, will perform any procedures that use air- ...

  2. Equations For Rotary Transformers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salomon, Phil M.; Wiktor, Peter J.; Marchetto, Carl A.

    1988-01-01

    Equations derived for input impedance, input power, and ratio of secondary current to primary current of rotary transformer. Used for quick analysis of transformer designs. Circuit model commonly used in textbooks on theory of ac circuits.

  3. Chemical Transformation Simulator

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Chemical Transformation Simulator (CTS) is a web-based, high-throughput screening tool that automates the calculation and collection of physicochemical properties for an organic chemical of interest and its predicted products resulting from transformations in environmental sy...

  4. Dark matter cores all the way down

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Read, J. I.; Agertz, O.; Collins, M. L. M.

    2016-07-01

    We use high-resolution simulations of isolated dwarf galaxies to study the physics of dark matter cusp-core transformations at the edge of galaxy formation: M200 = 107-109 M⊙. We work at a resolution (˜4 pc minimum cell size; ˜250 M⊙ per particle) at which the impact from individual supernovae explosions can be resolved, becoming insensitive to even large changes in our numerical `sub-grid' parameters. We find that our dwarf galaxies give a remarkable match to the stellar light profile; star formation history; metallicity distribution function; and star/gas kinematics of isolated dwarf irregular galaxies. Our key result is that dark matter cores of size comparable to the stellar half-mass radius r1/2 always form if star formation proceeds for long enough. Cores fully form in less than 4 Gyr for the M200 = 108 M⊙ and ˜14 Gyr for the 109 M⊙ dwarf. We provide a convenient two parameter `CORENFW' fitting function that captures this dark matter core growth as a function of star formation time and the projected stellar half-mass radius. Our results have several implications: (i) we make a strong prediction that if Λcold dark matter is correct, then `pristine' dark matter cusps will be found either in systems that have truncated star formation and/or at radii r > r1/2; (ii) complete core formation lowers the projected velocity dispersion at r1/2 by a factor of ˜2, which is sufficient to fully explain the `too-big-to-fail problem'; and (iii) cored dwarfs will be much more susceptible to tides, leading to a dramatic scouring of the sub-halo mass function inside galaxies and groups.

  5. High-Efficiency, Low-Weight Power Transformer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welsh, J. P.

    1986-01-01

    Technology for design and fabrication of radically new type of conductioncooled high-power (25 kVA) lightweight transformer having outstanding thermal and electrical characteristics. Fulfills longstanding need for conduction-cooled transformers and magnetics with low internal thermal resistances. Development techniques limited to conductive heat transfer, since other techniques such as liquid cooling, forced liquid cooling, and evaporative cooling of transformers impractical in zero-gravity space environment. Transformer uniquely designed: mechanical structure also serves as thermal paths for conduction cooling of magnetic core and windings.

  6. Mechanisms of transformation toughening

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, G.B.

    1992-02-01

    Modelling the thermodynamics and kinetics of isothermal martensitic transformation under stress, transformation toughening in austenitic steels, and dispersed phase transformation plasticity in low alloy steels are discussed briefly in this progress report for Doe Grant DE-FG02-88ER45365.

  7. Improvements in Fabrication of Sand/Binder Cores for Casting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakhitiyarov, Sayavur I.; Overfelt, Ruel A.; Adanur, Sabit

    2005-01-01

    Three improvements have been devised for the cold-box process, which is a special molding process used to make sand/binder cores for casting hollow metal parts. These improvements are: The use of fiber-reinforced composite binder materials (in contradistinction to the non-fiber-reinforced binders used heretofore), The substitution of a directed-vortex core-blowing subprocess for a prior core-blowing process that involved a movable gassing plate, and The use of filters made from filtration-grade fabrics to prevent clogging of vents. For reasons that exceed the scope of this article, most foundries have adopted the cold-box process for making cores for casting metals. However, this process is not widely known outside the metal-casting industry; therefore, a description of pertinent aspects of the cold-box process is prerequisite to a meaningful description of the aforementioned improvements. In the cold-box process as practiced heretofore, sand is first mixed with a phenolic resin (considered to be part 1 of a three-part binder) and an isocyanate resin (part 2 of the binder). Then by use of compressed air, the mixture is blown into a core box, which is a mold for forming the core. Next, an amine gas (part 3 of the binder) that acts as a catalyst for polymerization of parts 1 and 2 is blown through the core box. Alternatively, a liquid amine that vaporizes during polymerization can be incorporated into the sand/resin mixture. Once polymerization is complete, the amine gas is purged from the core box by use of compressed air. The finished core is then removed from the core box.

  8. From cusps to cores: a stochastic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Zant, Amr A.; Freundlich, Jonathan; Combes, Françoise

    2016-09-01

    The cold dark matter model of structure formation faces apparent problems on galactic scales. Several threads point to excessive halo concentration, including central densities that rise too steeply with decreasing radius. Yet, random fluctuations in the gaseous component can `heat' the centres of haloes, decreasing their densities. We present a theoretical model deriving this effect from first principles: stochastic variations in the gas density are converted into potential fluctuations that act on the dark matter; the associated force correlation function is calculated and the corresponding stochastic equation solved. Assuming a power-law spectrum of fluctuations with maximal and minimal cutoff scales, we derive the velocity dispersion imparted to the halo particles and the relevant relaxation time. We further perform numerical simulations, with fluctuations realized as a Gaussian random field, which confirm the formation of a core within a time-scale comparable to that derived analytically. Non-radial collective modes enhance the energy transport process that erases the cusp, though the parametrizations of the analytical model persist. In our model, the dominant contribution to the dynamical coupling driving the cusp-core transformation comes from the largest scale fluctuations. Yet, the efficiency of the transformation is independent of the value of the largest scale and depends weakly (linearly) on the power-law exponent; it effectively depends on two parameters: the gas mass fraction and the normalization of the power spectrum. This suggests that cusp-core transformations observed in hydrodynamic simulations of galaxy formation may be understood and parametrized in simple terms, the physical and numerical complexities of the various implementations notwithstanding.

  9. Navagating the Common Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McShane, Michael Q.

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a debate over the Common Core State Standards Initiative as it has rocketed to the forefront of education policy discussions around the country. The author contends that there is value in having clear cross state standards that will clarify the new online and blended learning that the growing use of technology has provided…

  10. Ultrasonic Drilling and Coring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

    1998-01-01

    A novel drilling and coring device, driven by a combination, of sonic and ultrasonic vibration, was developed. The device is applicable to soft and hard objects using low axial load and potentially operational under extreme conditions. The device has numerous potential planetary applications. Significant potential for commercialization in construction, demining, drilling and medical technologies.

  11. NUCLEAR REACTOR CORE DESIGN

    DOEpatents

    Mahlmeister, J.E.; Peck, W.S.; Haberer, W.V.; Williams, A.C.

    1960-03-22

    An improved core design for a sodium-cooled, graphitemoderated nuclear reactor is described. The improved reactor core comprises a number of blocks of moderator material, each block being in the shape of a regular prism. A number of channels, extending the length of each block, are disposed around the periphery. When several blocks are placed in contact to form the reactor core, the channels in adjacent blocks correspond with each other to form closed conduits extending the length of the core. Fuel element clusters are disposed in these closed conduits, and liquid coolant is forced through the annulus between the fuel cluster and the inner surface of the conduit. In a preferred embodiment of the invention, the moderator blocks are in the form of hexagonal prisms with longitudinal channels cut into the corners of the hexagon. The main advantage of an "edge-loaded" moderator block is that fewer thermal neutrons are absorbed by the moderator cladding, as compared with a conventional centrally loaded moderator block.

  12. Authentic to the Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kukral, Nicole; Spector, Stacy

    2012-01-01

    When educators think about what makes learning relevant to students, often they narrow their thinking to electives or career technical education. While these provide powerful opportunities for students to make relevant connections to their learning, they can also create authentic experiences in the core curriculum. In the San Juan Unified School…

  13. Electromagnetic pump stator core

    DOEpatents

    Fanning, Alan W.; Olich, Eugene E.; Dahl, Leslie R.

    1995-01-01

    A stator core for supporting an electrical coil includes a plurality of groups of circumferentially abutting flat laminations which collectively form a bore and perimeter. A plurality of wedges are interposed between the groups, with each wedge having an inner edge and a thicker outer edge. The wedge outer edges abut adjacent ones of the groups to provide a continuous path around the perimeter.

  14. Theory of core excitons

    SciTech Connect

    Dow, J. D.; Hjalmarson, H. P.; Sankey, O. F.; Allen, R. E.; Buettner, H.

    1980-01-01

    The observation of core excitons with binding energies much larger than those of the valence excitons in the same material has posed a long-standing theoretical problem. A proposed solution to this problem is presented, and Frenkel excitons and Wannier excitons are shown to coexist naturally in a single material. (GHT)

  15. Some Core Contested Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chomsky, Noam

    2015-01-01

    Core concepts of language are highly contested. In some cases this is legitimate: real empirical and conceptual issues arise. In other cases, it seems that controversies are based on misunderstanding. A number of crucial cases are reviewed, and an approach to language is outlined that appears to have strong conceptual and empirical motivation, and…

  16. Core Directions in HRD.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1996

    This document consists of four papers presented at a symposium on core directions in human resource development (HRD) moderated by Verna Willis at the 1996 conference of the Academy of Human Resource Development. "Reengineering the Organizational HRD Function: Two Case Studies" (Neal Chalofsky) reports an action research study in which…

  17. Core Geometry Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirata, Li Ann

    Core Geometry is a course offered in the Option Y sequence of the high school mathematics program described by the Hawaii State Department of Education's guidelines. The emphasis of this course is on the general awareness and use of the relationships among points, lines, and figures in planes and space. This sample course is based on the…

  18. Life from the core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doglioni, Carlo; Coleman, Max; Pignatti, Johannes; Glassmeier, Karl-Heinz

    2010-05-01

    Life on Earth is the result of the chaotic combination of several independent chemical and physical parameters. One of them is the shield from ionizing radiation exerted by the atmosphere and the Earth's magnetic field. We hypothesise that the first few billion years of the Earth's history, dominated by bacteria, were characterized by stronger ionizing radiation. Bacteria can survive under such conditions better than any other organism. During the Archean and early Proterozoic the shield could have been weaker, allowing the development of only a limited number of species, more resistant to the external radiation. The Cambrian explosion of life could have been enhanced by the gradual growth of the solid inner core, which was not existent possibly before 1 Ga. The cooling of the Earth generated the solidification of the iron alloy in the center of the planet. As an hypothesis, before the crystallization of the core, the turbulence in the liquid core could have resulted in a lower or different magnetic field from the one we know today, being absent the relative rotation between inner and external core.

  19. The Earth's Core.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeanloz, Raymond

    1983-01-01

    The nature of the earth's core is described. Indirect evidence (such as that determined from seismological data) indicates that it is an iron alloy, solid toward its center but otherwise liquid. Evidence also suggests that it is the turbulent flow of the liquid that generates the earth's magnetic field. (JN)

  20. Modeling Core Collapse Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezzacappa, Anthony

    2017-01-01

    Core collapse supernovae, or the death throes of massive stars, are general relativistic, neutrino-magneto-hydrodynamic events. The core collapse supernova mechanism is still not in hand, though key components have been illuminated, and the potential for multiple mechanisms for different progenitors exists. Core collapse supernovae are the single most important source of elements in the Universe, and serve other critical roles in galactic chemical and thermal evolution, the birth of neutron stars, pulsars, and stellar mass black holes, the production of a subclass of gamma-ray bursts, and as potential cosmic laboratories for fundamental nuclear and particle physics. Given this, the so called ``supernova problem'' is one of the most important unsolved problems in astrophysics. It has been fifty years since the first numerical simulations of core collapse supernovae were performed. Progress in the past decade, and especially within the past five years, has been exponential, yet much work remains. Spherically symmetric simulations over nearly four decades laid the foundation for this progress. Two-dimensional modeling that assumes axial symmetry is maturing. And three-dimensional modeling, while in its infancy, has begun in earnest. I will present some of the recent work from the ``Oak Ridge'' group, and will discuss this work in the context of the broader work by other researchers in the field. I will then point to future requirements and challenges. Connections with other experimental, observational, and theoretical efforts will be discussed, as well.

  1. University City Core Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Philadelphia City Planning Commission, PA.

    A redevelopment plan for an urban core area of about 300 acres was warranted by--(1) unsuitable building conditions, (2) undesirable land usage, and (3) faulty traffic circulation. The plan includes expansion of two universities and creation of a regional science center, high school, and medical center. Guidelines for proposed land use and zoning…

  2. The Tom Core Complex

    PubMed Central

    Ahting, Uwe; Thun, Clemens; Hegerl, Reiner; Typke, Dieter; Nargang, Frank E.; Neupert, Walter; Nussberger, Stephan

    1999-01-01

    Translocation of nuclear-encoded preproteins across the outer membrane of mitochondria is mediated by the multicomponent transmembrane TOM complex. We have isolated the TOM core complex of Neurospora crassa by removing the receptors Tom70 and Tom20 from the isolated TOM holo complex by treatment with the detergent dodecyl maltoside. It consists of Tom40, Tom22, and the small Tom components, Tom6 and Tom7. This core complex was also purified directly from mitochondria after solubilization with dodecyl maltoside. The TOM core complex has the characteristics of the general insertion pore; it contains high-conductance channels and binds preprotein in a targeting sequence-dependent manner. It forms a double ring structure that, in contrast to the holo complex, lacks the third density seen in the latter particles. Three-dimensional reconstruction by electron tomography exhibits two open pores traversing the complex with a diameter of ∼2.1 nm and a height of ∼7 nm. Tom40 is the key structural element of the TOM core complex. PMID:10579717

  3. Nucleosome Core Particle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Nucleosome Core Particle grown on STS-81. The fundamental structural unit of chromatin and is the basis for organization within the genome by compaction of DNA within the nucleus of the cell and by making selected regions of chromosomes available for transcription and replication. Principal Investigator's are Dr. Dan Carter and Dr. Gerard Bunick of New Century Pharmaceuticals.

  4. From Context to Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campus Technology, 2008

    2008-01-01

    At Campus Technology 2008, Arizona State University Technology Officer Adrian Sannier mesmerized audiences with his mandate to become more efficient by doing only the "core" tech stuff--and getting someone else to slog through the context. This article presents an excerpt from Sannier's hour-long keynote address at Campus Technology '08. Sannier…

  5. The Potential of Digital Technologies to Support Literacy Instruction Relevant to the Common Core State Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchison, Amy C.; Colwell, Jamie

    2014-01-01

    Digital tools have the potential to transform instruction and promote literacies outlined in the Common Core State Standards. Empirical research is examined to illustrate this potential in grades 6-12 instruction.

  6. Arguments for and against the Common Core State Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VanTassel-Baska, Joyce

    2015-01-01

    This article identifies the arguments for and against the common core state standards in English language arts and mathematics. Although the standards need to be differentiated for gifted students, the author suggests that these standards may offer a way to transform education in the classroom, so that all students are able to fulfill their…

  7. Lunar Polar Coring Lander

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angell, David; Bealmear, David; Benarroche, Patrice; Henry, Alan; Hudson, Raymond; Rivellini, Tommaso; Tolmachoff, Alex

    1990-01-01

    Plans to build a lunar base are presently being studied with a number of considerations. One of the most important considerations is qualifying the presence of water on the Moon. The existence of water on the Moon implies that future lunar settlements may be able to use this resource to produce things such as drinking water and rocket fuel. Due to the very high cost of transporting these materials to the Moon, in situ production could save billions of dollars in operating costs of the lunar base. Scientists have suggested that the polar regions of the Moon may contain some amounts of water ice in the regolith. Six possible mission scenarios are suggested which would allow lunar polar soil samples to be collected for analysis. The options presented are: remote sensing satellite, two unmanned robotic lunar coring missions (one is a sample return and one is a data return only), two combined manned and robotic polar coring missions, and one fully manned core retrieval mission. One of the combined manned and robotic missions has been singled out for detailed analysis. This mission proposes sending at least three unmanned robotic landers to the lunar pole to take core samples as deep as 15 meters. Upon successful completion of the coring operations, a manned mission would be sent to retrieve the samples and perform extensive experiments of the polar region. Man's first step in returning to the Moon is recommended to investigate the issue of lunar polar water. The potential benefits of lunar water more than warrant sending either astronauts, robots or both to the Moon before any permanent facility is constructed.

  8. Analytical analysis of particle-core dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Batygin, Yuri K

    2010-01-01

    Particle-core interaction is a well-developed model of halo formation in high-intensity beams. In this paper, we present an analytical solution for averaged, single particle dynamics, around a uniformly charged beam. The problem is analyzed through a sequence of canonical transformations of the Hamiltonian, which describes nonlinear particle oscillations. A closed form expression for maximum particle deviation from the axis is obtained. The results of this study are in good agreement with numerical simulations and with previously obtained data.

  9. BioCore Guide: A Tool for Interpreting the Core Concepts of Vision and Change for Biology Majors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brownell, Sara E.; Freeman, Scott; Wenderoth, Mary Pat; Crowe, Alison J.

    2014-01-01

    "Vision and Change in Undergraduate Biology Education" outlined five core concepts intended to guide undergraduate biology education: 1) evolution; 2) structure and function; 3) information flow, exchange, and storage; 4) pathways and transformations of energy and matter; and 5) systems. We have taken these general recommendations and…

  10. Compartmentalization of Incompatible Catalytic Transformations for Tandem Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jie; Dimroth, Jonas; Weck, Marcus

    2015-10-14

    In Nature, incompatible catalytic transformations are being carried out simultaneously through compartmentalization that allows for the combination of incompatible catalysts in tandem reactions. Herein, we take the compartmentalization concept to the synthetic realm and present an approach that allows two incompatible transition metal catalyzed transformations to proceed in one pot in tandem. The key is the site isolation of both catalysts through compartmentalization using a core-shell micellar support in an aqueous environment. The support is based on amphiphilic triblock copolymers of poly(2-oxazoline)s with orthogonal functional groups on the side chain that can be used to cross-link covalently the micelle and to conjugate two metal catalysts in different domains of the micelle. The micelle core and shell provide different microenvironments for the transformations: Co-catalyzed hydration of an alkyne proceeds in the hydrophobic core, while the Rh-catalyzed asymmetric transfer hydrogenation of the intermediate ketone into a chiral alcohol occurs in the hydrophilic shell.

  11. Efficient Computer Implementations of Fast Fourier Transforms.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-12-01

    TRANSFORMS, THESIS Presented to the Faculty of the School of Engineering of the Air Force Institute of Technology Air University in Partial Fulfillment of...The Algorithm * of S. Winograd", NASA, Jet Propulsion Lab, California Ins.titute of Technology , Pasadena, CA, 15 February 79 (AS N79-19733). 1 ’ 192...M. :- E. ,._T-. OF THE A ’rY TO B E TRANFO:-:F ’. :3:’ -:f1 .QT E:-7T TE:-T FLAG3=1 IF PE :-L TRAN’-FORM :34"(1 TEST FLAG = IF IF ,OMLE. TRA;:FORM 7 T

  12. Air-core hollow optical waveguides with omnidirectional reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Shih-Shou; Chen, Chii-Chang

    2006-04-01

    We have designed and fabricated a hollow optical waveguide with omnidirectional reflectors (ODRs) on a silicon substrate. The pattern is defined by photolithography on a (100) silicon wafer. The groove is etched by inductive coupled plasma. Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition technology is used to deposit six-pair Si/SiO2 (0.111/0.258 µm) multilayer stacks on the sample. Finally, the top of the sample is covered with an identical ODR. Hence, the light is confined in a hollow waveguide.

  13. North Atlantic Deep Water Formation: Information from Ice Cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oeschger, H.

    1984-01-01

    The main results of measurements of the CO2 concentration of air occluded in natural ice during periods of climatic change are presented, as well as other measured ice core parameters. Elements of an interpretation of the data in terms of mechanisms of changing environmental systems are briefly discussed.

  14. Transformation of Atlantic Water in the Nansen Basin of the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Vladimir; Aksenov, Yevgeny

    2015-04-01

    The joint analysis of recent hydrographic observations and high resolution numerical modelling is presented for the segment of the boundary current between Fram Strait and the Lomonosov Ridge in the Nansen Basin of the Arctic Ocean. The process of the Fram Strait branch of Atlantic Water (FAW) transformation on this route is in the focus of this study. Two specific regions are distinguished, where fast transformation of FAW occurs. The first region is located between northern Svalbard and Franz Joseph Land. This is the place where eastward flow of warm and salty FAW encounters pack ice, which moves towards Fram Strait. Intensive ocean-ice-air interaction leads to rapid heat and salt loss from the upper part of FAW, resulting in formation of surface mixed layer and isolation of the warm FAW core from further direct contact with atmosphere. The second crucial region of FAW transformation is located around Severnaya Zemlya Archipelago. In this region deep warm core of FAW rapidly loses heat and salt as a result of intensive vertical and lateral mixing with the Barents Sea AW branch (BAW), which enters the Nansen Basin through St.Anna Trough, submerges the warm core of FAW and pushes it seaward. Dense water, originating on the north-western shelf of the Laptev Sea, cascades down continental slope and also contributes to cooling and freshening of FAW on its way along the Laptev Sea continental margin. The end product of the transformation process in the Laptev Sea is a new water mass, which includes FAW, BAW and shelf water fractions. This water occupies the depth range 200-1000 m. It is characterised by the positive temperature and by the absence of local maxima on salinity vertical profile. Sitting on the continental slope makes this water mass quite mobile and therefore - the major candidate to reach Canadian Basin. This perspective is less likely for the original FAW. In the Laptev Sea this water is detached off the continental margin and is likely to recirculate

  15. Hazardous Air Pollutants

    MedlinePlus

    ... Air Toxics Website Rules and Implementation Related Information Air Quality Data and Tools Clean Air Act Criteria Air ... Resources Visibility and Haze Voluntary Programs for Improving Air Quality Contact Us to ask a question, provide feedback, ...

  16. Application of Core Dynamics Modeling to Core-Mantle Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuang, Weijia

    2003-01-01

    Observations have demonstrated that length of day (LOD) variation on decadal time scales results from exchange of axial angular momentum between the solid mantle and the core. There are in general four core-mantle interaction mechanisms that couple the core and the mantle. Of which, three have been suggested likely the dominant coupling mechanism for the decadal core-mantle angular momentum exchange, namely, gravitational core-mantle coupling arising from density anomalies in the mantle and in the core (including the inner core), the electromagnetic coupling arising from Lorentz force in the electrically conducting lower mantle (e.g. D-layer), and the topographic coupling arising from non-hydrostatic pressure acting on the core-mantle boundary (CMB) topography. In the past decades, most effort has been on estimating the coupling torques from surface geomagnetic observations (kinematic approach), which has provided insights on the core dynamical processes. In the meantime, it also creates questions and concerns on approximations in the studies that may invalidate the corresponding conclusions. The most serious problem is perhaps the approximations that are inconsistent with dynamical processes in the core, such as inconsistencies between the core surface flow beneath the CMB and the CMB topography, and that between the D-layer electric conductivity and the approximations on toroidal field at the CMB. These inconsistencies can only be addressed with numerical core dynamics modeling. In the past few years, we applied our MoSST (Modular, Scalable, Self-consistent and Three-dimensional) core dynamics model to study core-mantle interactions together with geodynamo simulation, aiming at assessing the effect of the dynamical inconsistencies in the kinematic studies on core-mantle coupling torques. We focus on topographic and electromagnetic core-mantle couplings and find that, for the topographic coupling, the consistency between the core flow and the CMB topography is

  17. Air surveillance

    SciTech Connect

    Patton, G.W.

    1995-06-01

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report summarizes the air surveillance and monitoring programs currently in operation at that Hanford Site. Atmospheric releases of pollutants from Hanford to the surrounding region are a potential source of human exposure. For that reason, both radioactive and nonradioactive materials in air are monitored at a number of locations. The influence of Hanford emissions on local radionuclide concentrations was evaluated by comparing concentrations measured at distant locations within the region to concentrations measured at the Site perimeter. This section discusses sample collection, analytical methods, and the results of the Hanford air surveillance program. A complete listing of all analytical results summarized in this section is reported separately by Bisping (1995).

  18. Core processing and first analysis of ice cores from Siple and South Pole stations

    SciTech Connect

    Stauffer, B.; Schwander, J.

    1984-01-01

    Analysis of ice cores from the Antarctic allows the authors to study the history of climatic parameters such as temperature, annual accumulation, and atmospheric composition. The main goal of their laboratory analysis of these of these ice cores is to investigate the preindustrial atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration and its natural variations and to measure the carbon-13/carbon-12 ratio in the preindustrial carbon dioxide and in other atmospheric trace gases such as methane. The cores drilled during 1983-1984 field season at the South Pole will be analyzed during the coming year. Several analyses have been made, however, on such cores drilled in the previous field seasons: the analysis of the carbon dioxide concentration of air extracted from ice cores indicates that the preindustrial atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration was about 280 parts per million by volume as compared to present levels of about 340 parts per million. There is some evidence that this value is more accurate than the lower value reported earlier by a laboratory in Grenoble and by their laboratory. They also measured the carbon-13/carbon-12 ratios of carbon dioxide and of the methane concentration. These results are still preliminary and will be reported later.

  19. Performance of the NASA Digitizing Core-Loss Instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarze, Gene E. (Technical Monitor); Niedra, Janis M.

    2003-01-01

    The standard method of magnetic core loss measurement was implemented on a high frequency digitizing oscilloscope in order to explore the limits to accuracy when characterizing high Q cores at frequencies up to 1 MHz. This method computes core loss from the cycle mean of the product of the exciting current in a primary winding and induced voltage in a separate flux sensing winding. It is pointed out that just 20 percent accuracy for a Q of 100 core material requires a phase angle accuracy of 0.1 between the voltage and current measurements. Experiment shows that at 1 MHz, even high quality, high frequency current sensing transformers can introduce phase errors of a degree or more. Due to the fact that the Q of some quasilinear core materials can exceed 300 at frequencies below 100 kHz, phase angle errors can be a problem even at 50 kHz. Hence great care is necessary with current sensing and ground loops when measuring high Q cores. Best high frequency current sensing accuracy was obtained from a fabricated 0.1-ohm coaxial resistor, differentially sensed. Sample high frequency core loss data taken with the setup for a permeability-14 MPP core is presented.

  20. Magnetic and Electrical Characteristics of Permalloy Thin Tape Bobbin Cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarze, Gene E.; Wieserman, William R.; Niedra, Janis M.

    2005-01-01

    The core loss, that is, the power loss, of a soft ferromagnetic material is a function of the flux density, frequency, temperature, excitation type (voltage or current), excitation waveform (sine, square, etc.) and lamination or tape thickness. In previously published papers we have reported on the specific core loss and dynamic B-H loop results for several polycrystalline, nanocrystalline, and amorphous soft magnetic materials. In this previous research we investigated the effect of flux density, frequency, temperature, and excitation waveform for voltage excitation on the specific core loss and dynamic B-H loop. In this paper, we will report on an experimental study to investigate the effect of tape thicknesses of 1, 1/2, 1/4, and 1/8-mil Permalloy type magnetic materials on the specific core loss. The test cores were fabricated by winding the thin tapes on ceramic bobbin cores. The specific core loss tests were conducted at room temperature and over the frequency range of 10 kHz to 750 kHz using sine wave voltage excitation. The results of this experimental investigation will be presented primarily in graphical form to show the effect of tape thickness, frequency, and magnetic flux density on the specific core loss. Also, the experimental results when applied to power transformer design will be briefly discussed.

  1. Core Outlet Temperature Study

    SciTech Connect

    Moisseytsev, A.; Hoffman, E.; Majumdar, S.

    2008-07-28

    It is a known fact that the power conversion plant efficiency increases with elevation of the heat addition temperature. The higher efficiency means better utilization of the available resources such that higher output in terms of electricity production can be achieved for the same size and power of the reactor core or, alternatively, a lower power core could be used to produce the same electrical output. Since any nuclear power plant, such as the Advanced Burner Reactor, is ultimately built to produce electricity, a higher electrical output is always desirable. However, the benefits of the higher efficiency and electricity production usually come at a price. Both the benefits and the disadvantages of higher reactor outlet temperatures are analyzed in this work.

  2. Dynamics of core accretion

    DOE PAGES

    Nelson, Andrew F.; Ruffert, Maximilian

    2012-12-21

    In this paper, we perform three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of gas flowing around a planetary core of mass Mpl = 10M⊕ embedded in a near Keplerian background flow, using a modified shearing box approximation. We assume an ideal gas behaviour following an equation of state with a fixed ratio of the specific heats, γ = 1.42, consistent with the conditions of a moderate-temperature background disc with solar composition. No radiative heating or cooling is included in the models. We employ a nested grid hydrodynamic code implementing the ‘Piecewise Parabolic Method’ with as many as six fixed nested grids, providing spatial resolutionmore » on the finest grid comparable to the present-day diameters of Neptune and Uranus. We find that a strongly dynamically active flow develops such that no static envelope can form. The activity is not sensitive to plausible variations in the rotation curve of the underlying disc. It is sensitive to the thermodynamic treatment of the gas, as modelled by prescribed equations of state (either ‘locally isothermal’ or ‘locally isentropic’) and the temperature of the background disc material. The activity is also sensitive to the shape and depth of the core's gravitational potential, through its mass and gravitational softening coefficient. Each of these factors influences the magnitude and character of hydrodynamic feedback of the small-scale flow on the background, and we conclude that accurate modelling of such feedback is critical to a complete understanding of the core accretion process. The varying flow pattern gives rise to large, irregular eruptions of matter from the region around the core which return matter to the background flow: mass in the envelope at one time may not be found in the envelope at any later time. No net mass accretion into the envelope is observed over the course of the simulation and none is expected, due to our neglect of cooling. Except in cases of very rapid cooling however, as

  3. Dynamics of core accretion

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Andrew F.; Ruffert, Maximilian

    2012-12-21

    In this paper, we perform three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of gas flowing around a planetary core of mass Mpl = 10M embedded in a near Keplerian background flow, using a modified shearing box approximation. We assume an ideal gas behaviour following an equation of state with a fixed ratio of the specific heats, γ = 1.42, consistent with the conditions of a moderate-temperature background disc with solar composition. No radiative heating or cooling is included in the models. We employ a nested grid hydrodynamic code implementing the ‘Piecewise Parabolic Method’ with as many as six fixed nested grids, providing spatial resolution on the finest grid comparable to the present-day diameters of Neptune and Uranus. We find that a strongly dynamically active flow develops such that no static envelope can form. The activity is not sensitive to plausible variations in the rotation curve of the underlying disc. It is sensitive to the thermodynamic treatment of the gas, as modelled by prescribed equations of state (either ‘locally isothermal’ or ‘locally isentropic’) and the temperature of the background disc material. The activity is also sensitive to the shape and depth of the core's gravitational potential, through its mass and gravitational softening coefficient. Each of these factors influences the magnitude and character of hydrodynamic feedback of the small-scale flow on the background, and we conclude that accurate modelling of such feedback is critical to a complete understanding of the core accretion process. The varying flow pattern gives rise to large, irregular eruptions of matter from the region around the core which return matter to the background flow: mass in the envelope at one time may not be found in the envelope at any later time. No net mass accretion into the envelope is observed over the course of the simulation and none is expected, due to our neglect of cooling. Except in cases of very rapid cooling

  4. Long Valley Coring Project

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sass, John; Finger, John; McConnel, Vicki

    1998-01-01

    In December 1997, the California Energy Commission (CEC) agreed to provide funding for Phase III continued drilling of the Long Valley Exploratory Well (LVEW) near Mammoth Lakes, CA, from its present depth. The CEC contribution of $1 million completes a funding package of $2 million from a variety of sources, which will allow the well to be cored continuously to a depth of between 11,500 and 12,500 feet. The core recovered from Phase III will be crucial to understanding the origin and history of the hydrothermal systems responsible for the filling of fractures in the basement rock. The borehole may penetrate the metamorphic roof of the large magmatic complex that has fed the volcanism responsible for the caldera and subsequent activity.

  5. Geomagnetism of earth's core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benton, E. R.

    1983-01-01

    Instrumentation, analytical methods, and research goals for understanding the behavior and source of geophysical magnetism are reviewed. Magsat, launched in 1979, collected global magnetometer data and identified the main terrestrial magnetic fields. The data has been treated by representing the curl-free field in terms of a scalar potential which is decomposed into a truncated series of spherical harmonics. Solutions to the Laplace equation then extend the field upward or downward from the measurement level through intervening spaces with no source. Further research is necessary on the interaction between harmonics of various spatial scales. Attempts are also being made to analytically model the main field and its secular variation at the core-mantle boundary. Work is also being done on characterizing the core structure, composition, thermodynamics, energetics, and formation, as well as designing a new Magsat or a tethered satellite to be flown on the Shuttle.

  6. Banded electromagnetic stator core

    DOEpatents

    Fanning, Alan W.; Gonzales, Aaron A.; Patel, Mahadeo R.; Olich, Eugene E.

    1996-01-01

    A stator core for an electromagnetic pump includes a plurality of circumferentially adjoining groups of flat laminations disposed about a common centerline axis and collectively defining a central bore and a discontinuous outer perimeter, with adjacent groups diverging radially outwardly to form V-shaped gaps. An annular band surrounds the groups and is predeterminedly tensioned to clamp together the laminations, and has a predetermined flexibility in a radial direction to form substantially straight bridge sections between the adjacent groups.

  7. Banded electromagnetic stator core

    DOEpatents

    Fanning, A.W.; Gonzales, A.A.; Patel, M.R.; Olich, E.E.

    1994-04-05

    A stator core for an electromagnetic pump includes a plurality of circumferentially adjoining groups of flat laminations disposed about a common centerline axis and collectively defining a central bore and a discontinuous outer perimeter, with adjacent groups diverging radially outwardly to form V-shaped gaps. An annular band surrounds the groups and is predeterminedly tensioned to clamp together the laminations, and has a predetermined flexibility in a radial direction to form substantially straight bridge sections between the adjacent groups. 5 figures.

  8. Banded electromagnetic stator core

    DOEpatents

    Fanning, Alan W.; Gonzales, Aaron A.; Patel, Mahadeo R.; Olich, Eugene E.

    1994-01-01

    A stator core for an electromagnetic pump includes a plurality of circumferentially adjoining groups of flat laminations disposed about a common centerline axis and collectively defining a central bore and a discontinuous outer perimeter, with adjacent groups diverging radially outwardly to form V-shaped gaps. An annular band surrounds the groups and is predeterminedly tensioned to clamp together the laminations, and has a predetermined flexibility in a radial direction to form substantially straight bridge sections between the adjacent groups.

  9. Banded electromagnetic stator core

    DOEpatents

    Fanning, A.W.; Gonzales, A.A.; Patel, M.R.; Olich, E.E.

    1996-06-11

    A stator core for an electromagnetic pump includes a plurality of circumferentially adjoining groups of flat laminations disposed about a common centerline axis and collectively defining a central bore and a discontinuous outer perimeter, with adjacent groups diverging radially outwardly to form V-shaped gaps. An annular band surrounds the groups and is predeterminedly tensioned to clamp together the laminations, and has a predetermined flexibility in a radial direction to form substantially straight bridge sections between the adjacent groups. 5 figs.

  10. Electromagnetic pump stator core

    DOEpatents

    Fanning, A.W.; Olich, E.E.; Dahl, L.R.

    1995-01-17

    A stator core for supporting an electrical coil includes a plurality of groups of circumferentially abutting flat laminations which collectively form a bore and perimeter. A plurality of wedges are interposed between the groups, with each wedge having an inner edge and a thicker outer edge. The wedge outer edges abut adjacent ones of the groups to provide a continuous path around the perimeter. 21 figures.

  11. Fissioning Plasma Core Reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albright, Dennis; Butler, Carey; West, Nicole; Cole, John W. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Institute for Scientific Research, Inc. (ISR) research program consist of: 1.Study core physics by adapting existing codes: MCNP4C - Monte Carlo code; COMBINE/VENTURE - diffusion theory; SCALE4 - Monte Carlo, with many utility codes. 2. Determine feasibility and study major design parameters: fuel selection, temperature and reflector sizing. 3. Study reactor kinetics: develop QCALC1 to model point kinetics; study dynamic behavior of the power release.

  12. Variable depth core sampler

    DOEpatents

    Bourgeois, Peter M.; Reger, Robert J.

    1996-01-01

    A variable depth core sampler apparatus comprising a first circular hole saw member, having longitudinal sections that collapses to form a point and capture a sample, and a second circular hole saw member residing inside said first hole saw member to support the longitudinal sections of said first hole saw member and prevent them from collapsing to form a point. The second hole saw member may be raised and lowered inside said first hole saw member.

  13. Some core contested concepts.

    PubMed

    Chomsky, Noam

    2015-02-01

    Core concepts of language are highly contested. In some cases this is legitimate: real empirical and conceptual issues arise. In other cases, it seems that controversies are based on misunderstanding. A number of crucial cases are reviewed, and an approach to language is outlined that appears to have strong conceptual and empirical motivation, and to lead to conclusions about a number of significant issues that differ from some conventional beliefs.

  14. Transformable liquid-metal nanomedicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yue; Hu, Quanyin; Lin, Yiliang; Pacardo, Dennis B.; Wang, Chao; Sun, Wujin; Ligler, Frances S.; Dickey, Michael D.; Gu, Zhen

    2015-12-01

    To date, numerous inorganic nanocarriers have been explored for drug delivery systems (DDSs). However, the clinical application of inorganic formulations has often been hindered by their toxicity and failure to biodegrade. We describe here a transformable liquid-metal nanomedicine, based on a core-shell nanosphere composed of a liquid-phase eutectic gallium-indium core and a thiolated polymeric shell. This formulation can be simply produced through a sonication-mediated method with bioconjugation flexibility. The resulting nanoparticles loaded with doxorubicin (Dox) have an average diameter of 107 nm and demonstrate the capability to fuse and subsequently degrade under a mildly acidic condition, which facilitates release of Dox in acidic endosomes after cellular internalization. Equipped with hyaluronic acid, a tumour-targeting ligand, this formulation displays enhanced chemotherapeutic inhibition towards the xenograft tumour-bearing mice. This liquid metal-based DDS with fusible and degradable behaviour under physiological conditions provides a new strategy for engineering theranostic agents with low toxicity.

  15. Core-collapse Supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Hix, William Raphael; Lentz, E. J.; Baird, Mark L; Chertkow, Merek A; Lee, Ching-Tsai; Blondin, J. M.; Bruenn, S. W.; Messer, Bronson; Mezzacappa, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Marking the inevitable death of a massive star, and the birth of a neutron star or black hole, core-collapse supernovae bring together physics at a wide range in spatial scales, from kilometer-sized hydrodynamic motions (growing to gigameter scale) down to femtometer scale nuclear reactions. Carrying 10$^{51}$ ergs of kinetic energy and a rich-mix of newly synthesized atomic nuclei, core-collapse supernovae are the preeminent foundries of the nuclear species which make up ourselves and our solar system. We will discuss our emerging understanding of the convectively unstable, neutrino-driven explosion mechanism, based on increasingly realistic neutrino-radiation hydrodynamic simulations that include progressively better nuclear and particle physics. Recent multi-dimensional models with spectral neutrino transport from several research groups, which slowly develop successful explosions for a range of progenitors, have motivated changes in our understanding of the neutrino reheating mechanism. In a similar fashion, improvements in nuclear physics, most notably explorations of weak interactions on nuclei and the nuclear equation of state, continue to refine our understanding of how supernovae explode. Recent progress on both the macroscopic and microscopic effects that affect core-collapse supernovae are discussed.

  16. GEOS-CORE

    SciTech Connect

    2014-06-24

    GEOS-CORE is a code that integrates open source Libraries for linear algebra and I/O with two main LLNL-written components: (i) a set of standard finite, discrete, and discontinuous displacement element physics solvers for resolving Darcy fluid flow, explicit mechanics, implicit mechanics, and fluid-mediated fracturing, including resolution of physical behaviors both implicitly and explicitly, and (ii) a MPI-based parallelization implementation for use on generic HPC distributed memory architectures. The resultant code can be used alone for linearly elastic and quasistatic damage problems; problems involving hydraulic fracturing, where the mesh topology is dynamically changed; and general granular materials behavior. The key application domain is for low-rate stimulation and fracture control in subsurface reservoirs (e.g., enhanced geothermal sites and unconventional shale gas stimulation). GEOS-CORE also has interfaces to call external libraries for, e.g., material models and equations fo state; however, LLNL-developed EOS and material models, beyond the aforementioned linear elastic and quasi-static damage models, will not be part of the current release. GEOS-CORE's secondary applications include granular materials behavior under different load paths.

  17. Something in Common: The Common Core Standards and the Next Chapter in American Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothman, Robert

    2011-01-01

    "Something in Common" is the first book to provide a detailed look at the groundbreaking Common Core State Standards and their potential to transform American education. This book tells the story of the unfolding political drama around the making of the Common Core State Standards for math and English language arts, which were adopted by…

  18. Toroidal transformer design program with application to inverter circuitry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dayton, J. A., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    Estimates of temperature, weight, efficiency, regulation, and final dimensions are included in the output of the computer program for the design of transformers for use in the basic parallel inverter. The program, written in FORTRAN 4, selects a tape wound toroidal magnetic core and, taking temperature, materials, core geometry, skin depth, and ohmic losses into account, chooses the appropriate wire sizes and number of turns for the center tapped primary and single secondary coils. Using the program, 2- and 4-kilovolt-ampere transformers are designed for frequencies from 200 to 3200 Hz and the efficiency of a basic transistor inverter is estimated.

  19. 33. BENCH CORE STATION, GREY IRON FOUNDRY CORE ROOM WHERE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    33. BENCH CORE STATION, GREY IRON FOUNDRY CORE ROOM WHERE CORE MOLDS WERE HAND FILLED AND OFTEN PNEUMATICALLY COMPRESSED WITH A HAND-HELD RAMMER BEFORE THEY WERE BAKED. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Grey Iron Foundry, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  20. /Air Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emami, Samar; Sohn, Hong Yong; Kim, Hang Goo

    2014-08-01

    Molten magnesium oxidizes rapidly when exposed to air causing melt loss and handling difficulties. The use of certain additive gases such as SF6, SO2, and CO2 to form a protective MgO layer over a magnesium melt has been proposed. The oxidation behavior of molten magnesium in air containing various concentrations of SF6 was investigated. Measurements of the kinetics of the oxide layer growth at various SF6 concentrations in air and temperatures were made. Experiments were performed using a thermogravimetric analysis unit in the temperature range of 943 K to 1043 K (670 °C to 770 °C). Results showed that a thin, coherent, and protective MgF2 layer was formed under SF6/Air mixtures, with a thickness ranging from 300 nm to 3 μm depending on SF6 concentration, temperature, and exposure time. Rate parameters were calculated and a model for the process was developed. The morphology and composition of the surface films were studied using scanning electron microscope and energy-dispersive spectroscope.

  1. Air Pollution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scorer, Richard S.

    The purpose of this book is to describe the basic mechanisms whereby pollution is transported and diffused in the atmosphere. It is designed to give practitioners an understanding of basic mechanics and physics so they may have a correct basis on which to formulate their decisions related to practical air pollution control problems. Since many…

  2. Residential market transformation: National and regional indicators

    SciTech Connect

    Van Wie McGrory, Laura L.; McNamara, Maureen; Suozzo, Margaret

    2000-06-01

    A variety of programs are underway to address market barriers to the adoption of energy-efficient residential technologies and practices. Most are administered by utilities, states, or regions that rely on the Energy Star as a consistent platform for program marketing and messaging. This paper reviews regional and national market transformation activities for three key residential end-uses -- air conditioning, clothes washing, and lighting -- characterizing current and ongoing programs; reporting on progress; identifying market indicators; and discussing implications.

  3. Transformative environmental governance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chaffin, Brian C.; Garmestani, Ahjond S.; Gunderson, Lance H.; Harm Benson, Melinda; Angeler, David G.; Arnold, Craig Anthony (Tony); Cosens, Barbara; Kundis Craig, Robin; Ruhl, J.B.; Allen, Craig R.

    2016-01-01

    Transformative governance is an approach to environmental governance that has the capacity to respond to, manage, and trigger regime shifts in coupled social-ecological systems (SESs) at multiple scales. The goal of transformative governance is to actively shift degraded SESs to alternative, more desirable, or more functional regimes by altering the structures and processes that define the system. Transformative governance is rooted in ecological theories to explain cross-scale dynamics in complex systems, as well as social theories of change, innovation, and technological transformation. Similar to adaptive governance, transformative governance involves a broad set of governance components, but requires additional capacity to foster new social-ecological regimes including increased risk tolerance, significant systemic investment, and restructured economies and power relations. Transformative governance has the potential to actively respond to regime shifts triggered by climate change, and thus future research should focus on identifying system drivers and leading indicators associated with social-ecological thresholds.

  4. Steerable Discrete Cosine Transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fracastoro, Giulia; Fosson, Sophie M.; Magli, Enrico

    2017-01-01

    In image compression, classical block-based separable transforms tend to be inefficient when image blocks contain arbitrarily shaped discontinuities. For this reason, transforms incorporating directional information are an appealing alternative. In this paper, we propose a new approach to this problem, namely a discrete cosine transform (DCT) that can be steered in any chosen direction. Such transform, called steerable DCT (SDCT), allows to rotate in a flexible way pairs of basis vectors, and enables precise matching of directionality in each image block, achieving improved coding efficiency. The optimal rotation angles for SDCT can be represented as solution of a suitable rate-distortion (RD) problem. We propose iterative methods to search such solution, and we develop a fully fledged image encoder to practically compare our techniques with other competing transforms. Analytical and numerical results prove that SDCT outperforms both DCT and state-of-the-art directional transforms.

  5. Steerable Discrete Cosine Transform.

    PubMed

    Fracastoro, Giulia; Fosson, Sophie M; Magli, Enrico

    2017-01-01

    In image compression, classical block-based separable transforms tend to be inefficient when image blocks contain arbitrarily shaped discontinuities. For this reason, transforms incorporating directional information are an appealing alternative. In this paper, we propose a new approach to this problem, namely, a discrete cosine transform (DCT) that can be steered in any chosen direction. Such transform, called steerable DCT (SDCT), allows to rotate in a flexible way pairs of basis vectors, and enables precise matching of directionality in each image block, achieving improved coding efficiency. The optimal rotation angles for SDCT can be represented as solution of a suitable rate-distortion (RD) problem. We propose iterative methods to search such solution, and we develop a fully fledged image encoder to practically compare our techniques with other competing transforms. Analytical and numerical results prove that SDCT outperforms both DCT and state-of-the-art directional transforms.

  6. Ferrite-Cored Solenoidal Induction Coil Sensor for BUD (MM-1667)

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, F.; Becker, A.; Conti, U.; Gasperikova, E.

    2011-06-15

    We have designed and lab tested a new ferrite cored induction coil sensor for measuring the secondary fields from metallic UXO with the BUD system. The objective was to replace the 5-inch diameter air-cored coils in the BUD system with smaller sensors that would allow the placement of multiple sensors in the smaller package of the new BUD hand-held system. A ferrite-cored solenoidal coil of length L can easily be made to have sensitivity and noise level roughly the same as an air-cored coil of a diameter on the same order as L. A ferrite-cored solenoidal coil can easily have a feedback configuration to achieve critical damping. The feedback configuration leads to a very stable response. Feedback ferrite-cored solenoidal coils show very little interaction as long as they are separated by one half their length.

  7. New directions: Air pollution challenges for developing megacities like Delhi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Prashant; Khare, Mukesh; Harrison, Roy M.; Bloss, William J.; Lewis, Alastair C.; Coe, Hugh; Morawska, Lidia

    2015-12-01

    Most major cities around the world experience periods of elevated air pollution levels, which exceed international health-based air quality standards (Kumar et al., 2013). Although it is a global problem, some of the highest air pollution levels are found in rapidly expanding cities in India and China. The sources, emissions, transformations and broad effects of meteorology on air pollution are reasonably well accounted in air quality control strategies in many developed cities; however these key factors remain poorly constrained in the growing cities of countries with emerging economies. We focus here on Delhi, one of the largest global population centres, which faces particular air pollution challenges, now and in the future.

  8. Transformation Toughening of Ceramics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-03-01

    TRANSFORMATION ZONE SHAPE EFFECTS IN CRACK SHIELDING IN CERIA-PARTIALLY STABILIZED ZIRCONIA (Ce-TZP). ALUMINA COMPOSITES to be published in J. Am. Ceram. Soc. 13 Cl...lS85HWejw TRANSFORMATION ZONE SHAPE EFFECTS ON CRACK SHIELDING IN CERIA-PARTIALLY-STABILIZED ZIRCONIA (Ce-TZP)- ALUMINA S..COMPOSITES Cheng-Sheng Yu...zones in Ce-TZP/Al203 composites, in which the transformation zone sizes were changed significantly by varying the sintering temperature to control

  9. Selenium semiconductor core optical fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, G. W.; Qian, Q. Peng, K. L.; Wen, X.; Zhou, G. X.; Sun, M.; Chen, X. D.; Yang, Z. M.

    2015-02-15

    Phosphate glass-clad optical fibers containing selenium (Se) semiconductor core were fabricated using a molten core method. The cores were found to be amorphous as evidenced by X-ray diffraction and corroborated by Micro-Raman spectrum. Elemental analysis across the core/clad interface suggests that there is some diffusion of about 3 wt % oxygen in the core region. Phosphate glass-clad crystalline selenium core optical fibers were obtained by a postdrawing annealing process. A two-cm-long crystalline selenium semiconductor core optical fibers, electrically contacted to external circuitry through the fiber end facets, exhibit a three times change in conductivity between dark and illuminated states. Such crystalline selenium semiconductor core optical fibers have promising utility in optical switch and photoconductivity of optical fiber array.

  10. Program Transformation in HATS

    SciTech Connect

    Winter, V.L.

    1999-02-24

    HATS is a general purpose syntax derivation tree based transformation system in which transformation sequences are described in special purpose language. A powerful feature of this language is that unification is an explicit operation. By making unification explicit, an elegant framework arises in which to express complex application conditions which in turn enables refined control strategies to be realized. This paper gives an overview of HATS, focusing especially on the framework provided by the transformation language and its potential with respect to control and general purpose transformation.

  11. Air and water cooled modulator

    DOEpatents

    Birx, D.L.; Arnold, P.A.; Ball, D.G.; Cook, E.G.

    1995-09-05

    A compact high power magnetic compression apparatus and method are disclosed for delivering high voltage pulses of short duration at a high repetition rate and high peak power output which does not require the use of environmentally unacceptable fluids such as chlorofluorocarbons either as a dielectric or as a coolant, and which discharges very little waste heat into the surrounding air. A first magnetic switch has cooling channels formed therethrough to facilitate the removal of excess heat. The first magnetic switch is mounted on a printed circuit board. A pulse transformer comprised of a plurality of discrete electrically insulated and magnetically coupled units is also mounted on said printed board and is electrically coupled to the first magnetic switch. The pulse transformer also has cooling means attached thereto for removing heat from the pulse transformer. A second magnetic switch also having cooling means for removing excess heat is electrically coupled to the pulse transformer. Thus, the present invention is able to provide high voltage pulses of short duration at a high repetition rate and high peak power output without the use of environmentally unacceptable fluids and without discharging significant waste heat into the surrounding air. 9 figs.

  12. Air and water cooled modulator

    DOEpatents

    Birx, Daniel L.; Arnold, Phillip A.; Ball, Don G.; Cook, Edward G.

    1995-01-01

    A compact high power magnetic compression apparatus and method for delivering high voltage pulses of short duration at a high repetition rate and high peak power output which does not require the use of environmentally unacceptable fluids such as chlorofluorocarbons either as a dielectric or as a coolant, and which discharges very little waste heat into the surrounding air. A first magnetic switch has cooling channels formed therethrough to facilitate the removal of excess heat. The first magnetic switch is mounted on a printed circuit board. A pulse transformer comprised of a plurality of discrete electrically insulated and magnetically coupled units is also mounted on said printed board and is electrically coupled to the first magnetic switch. The pulse transformer also has cooling means attached thereto for removing heat from the pulse transformer. A second magnetic switch also having cooling means for removing excess heat is electrically coupled to the pulse transformer. Thus, the present invention is able to provide high voltage pulses of short duration at a high repetition rate and high peak power output without the use of environmentally unacceptable fluids and without discharging significant waste heat into the surrounding air.

  13. Hollow-Core Fiber Lamp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yi, Lin (Inventor); Tjoelker, Robert L. (Inventor); Burt, Eric A. (Inventor); Huang, Shouhua (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Hollow-core capillary discharge lamps on the millimeter or sub-millimeter scale are provided. The hollow-core capillary discharge lamps achieve an increased light intensity ratio between 194 millimeters (useful) and 254 millimeters (useless) light than conventional lamps. The capillary discharge lamps may include a cone to increase light output. Hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (HCPCF) may also be used.

  14. Sneak in Some Core Subjects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Lynne

    2011-01-01

    Even if students don't have an aversion to core subjects, they may not see the relationship between the core subjects and their career path. In this article, the author outlines a career path project that can be adapted to work in any career and technical education (CTE) class to highlight the relationship between core subjects and the real world.…

  15. Faculty Supports Communication Core Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kopenhaver, Lillian Lodge; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Asks public relations educators what they think about core classes required for students in their field. Finds they generally support the idea that their students should take core mass communications courses, even if such core courses are developed from a traditional journalism/news-editorial standpoint. (MS)

  16. Compact and Robust Refilling and Connectorization of Hollow Core Photonic Crystal Fiber Gas Reference Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poberezhskiy, Ilya Y.; Meras, Patrick; Chang, Daniel H.; Spiers, Gary D.

    2007-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews a method for refilling and connectorization of hollow core photonic crystal fiber gas reference cells. Thees hollow-core photonic crystal fiber allow optical propagation in air or vacuum and are for use as gas reference cell is proposed and demonstrated. It relies on torch-sealing a quartz filling tube connected to a mechanical splice between regular and hollow-core fibers.

  17. Mercury's inner core size and core-crystallization regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumberry, Mathieu; Rivoldini, Attilio

    2015-03-01

    Earth-based radar observation of Mercury's rotation vector combined with gravity observation by the MESSENGER spacecraft yield a measure of Mercury's moment of inertia and the amplitude of the 88-day libration of its silicate shell. These two geodetic constraints provide information on Mercury's interior structure, including the presence of a fluid core, the radius of the core-mantle boundary and the bulk densities of the core and mantle. In this work, we show how they further provide information on the size of the solid inner core and on the crystallization regime of the fluid core. If Mercury's fluid core is a Fe-FeS alloy with a sulfur concentration on the Fe-rich side of the eutectic, the largest inner core compatible with geodetic observations at the 1σ level is 1325 ± 250 km. Our results further suggest that the crystallization scenario that best fits the geodetic observations involves the formation of Fe-snow within the fluid core, and that this scenario is preferred for models with an iron-poor mantle composition. Consequently, Mercury's dynamo most likely operates in concert with snow formation. For an inner core larger than ∼650 km, snow formation extends to the inner core boundary. If a dynamo cannot be maintained by the dynamics of snow formation, or if such dynamo produces a magnetic field incompatible with observation, Mercury's inner core must then be smaller than 650 km.

  18. Transformation-optical Fan-beam Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Rui; Kong, Xianghui; Wang, Hui; Su, He; Lei, Zhenya; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Aofang; Chen, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Gradient-index dielectric lenses are generated based on the coordinate transformation by compressing the homogeneous air spaces quasi-conformally towards and outwards the primary source. The three-dimensional modeling is then performed through revolving the prescribed transformational media 180 degrees around the focal point to reach the architecture of barrel-vaults. It is found that all these two- and three-dimensional transformation-optical designs are capable of producing fan-beams efficiently over a broad frequency range with their main lobes possessing the narrow beamwidth in one dimension and the wide beamwidth in the other, while having the great ability of the wide angular scanning. Finally, we propose to construct such four types of fan-beam lenses through multiple-layered dielectrics with non-uniformed perforations and experimentally demonstrate their excellent performances in the fan-beam synthesis. PMID:26847048

  19. Transformation-optical Fan-beam Synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Rui; Kong, Xianghui; Wang, Hui; Su, He; Lei, Zhenya; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Aofang; Chen, Lei

    2016-02-01

    Gradient-index dielectric lenses are generated based on the coordinate transformation by compressing the homogeneous air spaces quasi-conformally towards and outwards the primary source. The three-dimensional modeling is then performed through revolving the prescribed transformational media 180 degrees around the focal point to reach the architecture of barrel-vaults. It is found that all these two- and three-dimensional transformation-optical designs are capable of producing fan-beams efficiently over a broad frequency range with their main lobes possessing the narrow beamwidth in one dimension and the wide beamwidth in the other, while having the great ability of the wide angular scanning. Finally, we propose to construct such four types of fan-beam lenses through multiple-layered dielectrics with non-uniformed perforations and experimentally demonstrate their excellent performances in the fan-beam synthesis.

  20. Superconducting shielded core reactor with reduced AC losses

    DOEpatents

    Cha, Yung S.; Hull, John R.

    2006-04-04

    A superconducting shielded core reactor (SSCR) operates as a passive device for limiting excessive AC current in a circuit operating at a high power level under a fault condition such as shorting. The SSCR includes a ferromagnetic core which may be either closed or open (with an air gap) and extends into and through a superconducting tube or superconducting rings arranged in a stacked array. First and second series connected copper coils each disposed about a portion of the iron core are connected to the circuit to be protected and are respectively wound inside and outside of the superconducting tube or rings. A large impedance is inserted into the circuit by the core when the shielding capability of the superconducting arrangement is exceeded by the applied magnetic field generated by the two coils under a fault condition to limit the AC current in the circuit. The proposed SSCR also affords reduced AC loss compared to conventional SSCRs under continuous normal operation.