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Sample records for air counterflow diffusion

  1. Trioxane-Air Counterflow Diffusion Flames in Normal and Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linteris, Gregory T.; Urban, David L.

    2001-01-01

    Trioxane, a weakly bound polymer of formaldehyde (C3H6O3, m.p. 61 C, b.p. 115 C), is a uniquely suited compound for studying material flammability. Like many of the more commonly used materials for such tests (e.g., delrin, polyethylene, acrylic sheet, wood, and paper), it displays relevant phenomena (internal heat conduction, melting, vaporization, thermal decomposition, and gas phase reaction of the decomposition products). Unlike the other materials, however, it is non-sooting and has simple and well-known chemical kinetic pathways for its combustion. Hence it should prove to be much more useful for numerical modeling of surface combustion than the complex fuels typically used. We have performed the first exploratory tests of trioxane combustion in the counterflow configuration to determine its potential as a surrogate solid fuel which allows detailed modeling. The experiments were performed in the spring and summer of 1998 at the National Institute of Standards and Technology in Gaithersburg, MD, and at NASA-GRC in Cleveland. Using counterflow flames at 1-g, we measured the fuel consumption rate and the extinction conditions with added N2 in the air; at mg conditions, we observed the ignition characteristics and flame shape from video images. We have performed numerical calculations of the flame structure, but these are not described here due to space limitations. This paper summarizes some burning characteristics of trioxane relevant to its use for studying flame spread and fire suppression.

  2. Experimental studies on the extinction of hydrogen-air counterflow diffusion flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellett, G. L.; Wilson, L. G.; Northam, G. B.

    1990-01-01

    The paper presents data on the extinction of hydrogen-air counterflow diffusion flames (CFDFs). In the experiments, five coaxial tubular opposed jet burners were used to form dish-shaped CFDFs, centered by opposing laminar jets of N2-diluted H2 and both clean and contaminated air in the argon-purged chamber at 1 atm. Air jet velocities, U(air), characterized extinction of the air-side flame (blowoff) as functions of input H2/N2 (20-100 mole pct) on the fuel side, and air contaminant (0-20 percent) steam, CO2 and O2 (16-30 percent) on the air side.

  3. Experimental studies on the extinction of hydrogen-air counterflow diffusion flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellett, G. L.; Wilson, L. G.; Northam, G. B.

    1990-01-01

    The paper presents data on the extinction of hydrogen-air counterflow diffusion flames (CFDFs). In the experiments, five coaxial tubular opposed jet burners were used to form dish-shaped CFDFs, centered by opposing laminar jets of N2-diluted H2 and both clean and contaminated air in the argon-purged chamber at 1 atm. Air jet velocities, U(air), characterized extinction of the air-side flame (blowoff) as functions of input H2/N2 (20-100 mole pct) on the fuel side, and air contaminant (0-20 percent) steam, CO2 and O2 (16-30 percent) on the air side.

  4. Computations of soot formation in ethylene/air counterflow diffusion flames and its interaction with radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández, Ignacio; Lecocq, Guillaume; Poitou, Damien; Riber, Eléonore; Cuenot, Bénédicte

    2013-01-01

    A methodology is presented which allows to predict soot levels produced in simple, one-dimensional laminar flames. The method is applied to the calculation of a set of well documented ethylene/air counterflow diffusion flames, using a detailed chemical mechanism (Davis et al., 1999 [1]) and a semi-empirical, two-equation soot model from Leung and Lindstedt (1991) [2]. Modifications of the original soot model are made in order to retrieve the experimental measurements of Hwang and Chung (2001) [3]. To account for radiative heat losses, a second series of fully coupled gas/soot/radiation simulations of the counterflow flames is performed. This allows to assess the effect of soot and gas radiation on soot formation and on the flame structure.

  5. Velocity Fields of Axisymmetric Hydrogen-Air Counterflow Diffusion Flames from LDV, PIV, and Numerical Computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellett, Gerald L.; Wilson, Lloyd G.; Humphreys, William M., Jr.; Bartram, Scott M.; Gartrell, Luther R.; Isaac, K. M.

    1995-01-01

    Laminar fuel-air counterflow diffusion flames (CFDFs) were studied using axisymmetric convergent-nozzle and straight-tube opposed jet burners (OJBs). The subject diagnostics were used to probe a systematic set of H2/N2-air CFDFs over wide ranges of fuel input (22 to 100% Ha), and input axial strain rate (130 to 1700 Us) just upstream of the airside edge, for both plug-flow and parabolic input velocity profiles. Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) was applied along the centerline of seeded air flows from a convergent nozzle OJB (7.2 mm i.d.), and Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV) was applied on the entire airside of both nozzle and tube OJBs (7 and 5 mm i.d.) to characterize global velocity structure. Data are compared to numerical results from a one-dimensional (1-D) CFDF code based on a stream function solution for a potential flow input boundary condition. Axial strain rate inputs at the airside edge of nozzle-OJB flows, using LDV and PIV, were consistent with 1-D impingement theory, and supported earlier diagnostic studies. The LDV results also characterized a heat-release hump. Radial strain rates in the flame substantially exceeded 1-D numerical predictions. Whereas the 1-D model closely predicted the max I min axial velocity ratio in the hot layer, it overpredicted its thickness. The results also support previously measured effects of plug-flow and parabolic input strain rates on CFDF extinction limits. Finally, the submillimeter-scale LDV and PIV diagnostics were tested under severe conditions, which reinforced their use with subcentimeter OJB tools to assess effects of aerodynamic strain, and fueVair composition, on laminar CFDF properties, including extinction.

  6. Strain-induced extinction of hydrogen-air counterflow diffusion flames - Effects of steam, CO2, N2, and O2 additives to air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellett, G. L.; Northam, G. B.; Wilson, L. G.

    1992-01-01

    A fundamental study was performed using axisymmetric nozzle and tubular opposed jet burners to measure the effects of laminar plug flow and parabolic input velocity profiles on the extinction limits of H2-air counterflow diffusion flames. Extinction limits were quantified by 'flame strength', (average axial air jet velocity) at blowoff of the central flame. The effects of key air contaminants, on the extinction limits, are characterized and analyzed relative to utilization of combustion contaminated vitiated air in high enthalpy supersonic test facilities.

  7. Strain-induced extinction of hydrogen-air counterflow diffusion flames - Effects of steam, CO2, N2, and O2 additives to air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellett, G. L.; Northam, G. B.; Wilson, L. G.

    1992-01-01

    A fundamental study was performed using axisymmetric nozzle and tubular opposed jet burners to measure the effects of laminar plug flow and parabolic input velocity profiles on the extinction limits of H2-air counterflow diffusion flames. Extinction limits were quantified by 'flame strength', (average axial air jet velocity) at blowoff of the central flame. The effects of key air contaminants, on the extinction limits, are characterized and analyzed relative to utilization of combustion contaminated vitiated air in high enthalpy supersonic test facilities.

  8. Dynamic Weakening (Extinction) of Simple Hydrocarbon-air Counterflow Diffusion Flames by Oscillatory Inflows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellett, G.; Kabaria, A.; Panigrahi, B.; Sammons, K.; Convery, J.; Wilson, L.

    2005-01-01

    This study of laminar non-premixed HC-air flames used an Oscillatory-input Opposed Jet Burner (OOJB) system developed from a previously well-characterized 7.2-mm Pyrex-nozzle OJB system. Over 600 dynamic Flame Strength (FS) measurements were obtained on unanchored (free-floating) laminar Counterflow Diffusion Flames (CFDF's). Flames were stabilized using plug inflows having steady-plus-sinusoidal axial velocities of varied magnitude, frequency, f, up to 1600 Hz, and phase angle from 0 (most data) to 360 degrees. Dynamic FS is defined as the maximum average air input velocity (U(sub air), at nozzle exit) a CFDF can sustain before strain-induced extinction occurs due to prescribed oscillatory peak-to-peak velocity inputs superimposed on steady inputs. Initially, dynamic flame extinction data were obtained at low f, and were supported by 25-120 Hz Hot-Wire cold-flow velocity data at nozzle exits. Later, expanded extinction data were supported by 4-1600 Hz Probe Microphone (PM) pk/pk P data at nozzle exits. The PM data were first obtained without flows, and later with cold stagnating flows, which better represent speaker-diaphragm dynamics during runs. The PM approach enabled characterizations of Dynamic Flame Weakening (DFW) of CFDF's from 8 to 1600 Hz. DFW was defined as % decrease in FS per Pascal of pk/pk P oscillation, namely, DFW = - 100 d(U(sub air) / U(sub air),0Hz) / d(pkpk P). The linear normalization with respect to acoustic pressure magnitude (and steady state (SS) FS) led to a DFW unaffected by strong internal resonances. For the C2H4/N2-air system, from 8 to 20 Hz, DFW is constant at 8.52 plus or minus 0.20 (% weakening)/Pa. This reflects a quasi-steady flame response to an acoustically induced dU(sub air)/dP. Also, it is surprisingly independent of C2H4/N2 mole fraction due to normalization by SS FS. From 20 to approximately 150 Hz, the C2H4/N2 air-flames weakened progressively less, with an inflection at approximately 70 Hz, and became asymptotically

  9. Counterflow diffusion flames of hydrogen, and hydrogen plus methane, ethylene, propane, and silane vs. air - Strain rates at extinction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellett, G. L.; Northam, G. Burton; Wilson, L. G.

    1991-01-01

    Five coaxial tubular opposed jet burners (OJBs) with tube diameter D(T) of 1.8-10 mm and 5 mm conical nozzles were used to form dish-shaped counterflow diffusion flames centered by opposing laminar jets of nitrogen and hydrocarbon-diluted H2 versus air in an argon-purged chamber at 1 atm. Area-averaged air jet velocities at blowoff of the central flame, U(air), characterized extinction of the airside flame as functions of input H2 concentration on the fuelside. A master plot of extensive U(air) data at blowoff versus D(T) shows that U(air) varies linearly with D(T). This and other data sets are used to find that nozzle OJB results for U(air)/diameter average 4.24 + or - 0.28 times larger than tubular OJB results for the same fuel compositions. Critical radial velocity gradients consistent with one-dimensional stagnation point boundary theory and with plug flow inputs are estimated. The results compare favorably with published numerical results based only on potential flow.

  10. Counterflow diffusion flames of hydrogen, and hydrogen plus methane, ethylene, propane, and silane vs. air - Strain rates at extinction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellett, G. L.; Northam, G. Burton; Wilson, L. G.

    1991-01-01

    Five coaxial tubular opposed jet burners (OJBs) with tube diameter D(T) of 1.8-10 mm and 5 mm conical nozzles were used to form dish-shaped counterflow diffusion flames centered by opposing laminar jets of nitrogen and hydrocarbon-diluted H2 versus air in an argon-purged chamber at 1 atm. Area-averaged air jet velocities at blowoff of the central flame, U(air), characterized extinction of the airside flame as functions of input H2 concentration on the fuelside. A master plot of extensive U(air) data at blowoff versus D(T) shows that U(air) varies linearly with D(T). This and other data sets are used to find that nozzle OJB results for U(air)/diameter average 4.24 + or - 0.28 times larger than tubular OJB results for the same fuel compositions. Critical radial velocity gradients consistent with one-dimensional stagnation point boundary theory and with plug flow inputs are estimated. The results compare favorably with published numerical results based only on potential flow.

  11. Effects of H2O, CO2, and N2 air contaminants on critical airside strain rates for extinction of hydrogen-air counterflow diffusion flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellett, G. L.; Northam, G. B.; Wilson, L. G.; Guerra, Rosemary

    1989-01-01

    Dish-shaped counterflow diffusion flames centered by opposing laminar jets of H2 and clean and contaminant O2/N2 mixtures in an argon bath at 1 atm were used to study the effects of contaminants on critical airside strain. The jet velocities for both flame extinction and restoration are found for a wide range of contaminant and O2 concentrations in the air jet. The tests are also conducted for a variety of input H2 concentrations. The results are compared with those from several other studies.

  12. Effects of H2O, CO2, and N2 air contaminants on critical airside strain rates for extinction of hydrogen-air counterflow diffusion flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellett, G. L.; Northam, G. B.; Wilson, L. G.; Guerra, Rosemary

    1989-01-01

    Dish-shaped counterflow diffusion flames centered by opposing laminar jets of H2 and clean and contaminant O2/N2 mixtures in an argon bath at 1 atm were used to study the effects of contaminants on critical airside strain. The jet velocities for both flame extinction and restoration are found for a wide range of contaminant and O2 concentrations in the air jet. The tests are also conducted for a variety of input H2 concentrations. The results are compared with those from several other studies.

  13. Experimental determination of the velocity and strain rate field in a laminar H2/Air counter-flow diffusion flame via LDA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeo, S. H.; Dancey, C. L.

    1991-01-01

    Measurements of the axial and radial components of velocity on the air side of stagnation in an axisymmetric H2/Air laminar counter-flow diffusion flame are reported. Results include the two-dimensional velocity field and computed velocity gradients (strain rates) along the stagnation streamline at two 'characteristic' strain rates, below the extinction limit. The measurements generally verify the modeling assumptions appropriate to the model of Kee et al. (1988). The 'traditional' potential flow model is not consistent with the measured results.

  14. Experimental determination of the velocity and strain rate field in a laminar H2/Air counter-flow diffusion flame via LDA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeo, S. H.; Dancey, C. L.

    1991-01-01

    Measurements of the axial and radial components of velocity on the air side of stagnation in an axisymmetric H2/Air laminar counter-flow diffusion flame are reported. Results include the two-dimensional velocity field and computed velocity gradients (strain rates) along the stagnation streamline at two 'characteristic' strain rates, below the extinction limit. The measurements generally verify the modeling assumptions appropriate to the model of Kee et al. (1988). The 'traditional' potential flow model is not consistent with the measured results.

  15. Effects of H2O, CO2, and N2 Air Contaminants on Critical Airside Strain Rates for Extinction of Hydrogen-Air Counterflow Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellett, G. L.; Wilson, L. G.; Northam, G. B.; Guerra, Rosemary

    1989-01-01

    Coaxial tubular opposed jet burners (OJB) were used to form dish shaped counterflow diffusion flames (CFDF), centered by opposing laminar jets of H2, N2 and both clean and contaminated air (O2/N2 mixtures) in an argon bath at 1 atm. Jet velocities for flame extinction and restoration limits are shown versus wide ranges of contaminant and O2 concentrations in the air jet, and also input H2 concentration. Blowoff, a sudden breaking of CFDF to a stable ring shape, occurs in highly stretched stagnation flows and is generally believed to measure kinetically limited flame reactivity. Restore, a sudden restoration of central flame, is a relatively new phenomenon which exhibits a H2 dependent hysteresis from Blowoff. For 25 percent O2 air mixtures, mole for mole replacement of 25 percent N2 contaminant by steam increased U(air) or flame strength at Blowoff by about 5 percent. This result is consistent with laminar burning velocity results from analogous substitution of steam for N2 in a premixed stoichiometric H2-O2-N2 (or steam) flame, shown by Koroll and Mulpuru to promote a 10 percent increase in experimental and calculated laminar burning velocity, due to enhanced third body efficiency of water in: H + O2 + M yields HO2 + M. When the OJB results were compared with Liu and MacFarlane's experimental laminar burning velocity of premixed stoichiometric H2 + air + steam, a crossover occurred, i.e., steam enhanced OJB flame strength at extinction relative to laminar burning velocity.

  16. KINETIC MODELING OF COUNTERFLOW DIFFUSION FLAMES OF BUTADIENE. (R828193)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A comprehensive, semi-detailed kinetic scheme was used to simulate the chemical structures of counterflow diffusion and fuel-rich premixed 1,3-butadiene flames, to better understand the formation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). The results showed that model predicti...

  17. Laser-Induced Fluorescence Measurements and Modeling of Nitric Oxide in Counterflow Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ravikrishna, Rayavarapu V.

    2000-01-01

    The feasibility of making quantitative nonintrusive NO concentration ([NO]) measurements in nonpremixed flames has been assessed by obtaining laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) measurements of [NO] in counterflow diffusion flames at atmospheric and higher pressures. Comparisons at atmospheric pressure between laser-saturated fluorescence (LSF) and linear LIF measurements in four diluted ethane-air counterflow diffusion flames with strain rates from 5 to 48/s yielded excellent agreement from fuel-lean to moderately fuel-rich conditions, thus indicating the utility of a model-based quenching correction technique, which was then extended to higher pressures. Quantitative LIF measurements of [NO] in three diluted methane-air counterflow diffusion flames with strain rates from 5 to 35/s were compared with OPPDIF model predictions using the GRI (version 2.11) chemical kinetic mechanism. The comparisons revealed that the GRI mechanism underpredicts prompt-NO by 30-50% at atmospheric pressure. Based on these measurements, a modified reaction rate coefficient for the prompt-NO initiation reaction was proposed which causes the predictions to match experimental data. Temperature measurements using thin filament pyrometry (TFP) in conjunction with a new calibration method utilizing a near-adiabatic H2-air Hencken burner gave very good comparisons with model predictions in these counterflow diffusion flames. Quantitative LIF measurements of [NO] were also obtained in four methane-air counterflow partially-premixed flames with fuel-side equivalence ratios (phi(sub B)) of 1.45, 1.6, 1.8 and 2.0. The measurements were in excellent agreement with model predictions when accounting for radiative heat loss. Spatial separation between regions dominated by the prompt and thermal NO mechanisms was observed in the phi(sub B) = 1.45 flame. The modified rate coefficient proposed earlier for the prompt-NO initiation reaction improved agreement between code predictions and measurements in the

  18. Counterflow diffusion flame synthesis of ceramic oxide powders

    DOEpatents

    Katz, Joseph L.; Miquel, Philippe F.

    1997-01-01

    Ceramic oxide powders and methods for their preparation are revealed. Ceramic oxide powders are obtained using a flame process whereby one or more precursors of ceramic oxides are introduced into a counterflow diffusion flame burner wherein the precursors are converted into ceramic oxide powders. The nature of the ceramic oxide powder produced is determined by process conditions. The morphology, particle size, and crystalline form of the ceramic oxide powders may be varied by the temperature of the flame, the precursor concentration ratio, the gas stream and the gas velocity.

  19. Counterflow diffusion flame synthesis of ceramic oxide powders

    DOEpatents

    Katz, J.L.; Miquel, P.F.

    1997-07-22

    Ceramic oxide powders and methods for their preparation are revealed. Ceramic oxide powders are obtained using a flame process whereby one or more precursors of ceramic oxides are introduced into a counterflow diffusion flame burner wherein the precursors are converted into ceramic oxide powders. The nature of the ceramic oxide powder produced is determined by process conditions. The morphology, particle size, and crystalline form of the ceramic oxide powders may be varied by the temperature of the flame, the precursor concentration ratio, the gas stream and the gas velocity. 24 figs.

  20. A counterflow diffusion flame study of branched octane isomers

    SciTech Connect

    Sarathy, S. Mani; Niemann, Ulrich; Yeung, Coleman; Gehmlich, Ryan; Westrbrook, Charles K.; Plomer, Max; Luo, Zhaoyu; Mehl, Marco; Pitz, William J.; Seshadri, Kalyanasundaram; Thomson, Murray J.; Lu, Tianfeng

    2012-09-25

    Conventional petroleum, Fischer–Tropsch (FT), and other alternative hydrocarbon fuels typically contain a high concentration of lightly methylated iso-alkanes. However, until recently little work has been done on this important class of hydrocarbon components. In order to better understand the combustion characteristics of real fuels, this study presents new experimental data for 3-methylheptane and 2,5-dimethylhexane in counterflow diffusion flames. This new dataset includes flame ignition, extinction, and speciation profiles. The high temperature oxidation of these fuels has been modeled using an extended transport database and a high temperature skeletal chemical kinetic model. The skeletal model is generated from a detailed model reduced using the directed relation graph with expert knowledge (DRG-X) methodology. The proposed skeletal model contains sufficient chemical fidelity to accurately predict the experimental speciation data in flames. The predictions are compared to elucidate the effects of number and location of the methyl substitutions. The location is found to have little effect on ignition and extinction in these counterflow diffusion flames. However, increasing the number of methyl substitutions was found to inhibit ignition and promote extinction. Chemical kinetic modelling simulations were used to correlate a fuel’s extinction propensity with its ability to populate the H radical concentration. In conclusion, species composition measurements indicate that the location and number of methyl substitutions was found to particularly affect the amount and type of alkenes observed.

  1. A counterflow diffusion flame study of branched octane isomers

    DOE PAGES

    Sarathy, S. Mani; Niemann, Ulrich; Yeung, Coleman; ...

    2012-09-25

    Conventional petroleum, Fischer–Tropsch (FT), and other alternative hydrocarbon fuels typically contain a high concentration of lightly methylated iso-alkanes. However, until recently little work has been done on this important class of hydrocarbon components. In order to better understand the combustion characteristics of real fuels, this study presents new experimental data for 3-methylheptane and 2,5-dimethylhexane in counterflow diffusion flames. This new dataset includes flame ignition, extinction, and speciation profiles. The high temperature oxidation of these fuels has been modeled using an extended transport database and a high temperature skeletal chemical kinetic model. The skeletal model is generated from a detailed modelmore » reduced using the directed relation graph with expert knowledge (DRG-X) methodology. The proposed skeletal model contains sufficient chemical fidelity to accurately predict the experimental speciation data in flames. The predictions are compared to elucidate the effects of number and location of the methyl substitutions. The location is found to have little effect on ignition and extinction in these counterflow diffusion flames. However, increasing the number of methyl substitutions was found to inhibit ignition and promote extinction. Chemical kinetic modelling simulations were used to correlate a fuel’s extinction propensity with its ability to populate the H radical concentration. In conclusion, species composition measurements indicate that the location and number of methyl substitutions was found to particularly affect the amount and type of alkenes observed.« less

  2. Experimental and Numerical Study of Ammonium Perchlorate Counterflow Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smooke, M. D.; Yetter, R. A.; Parr, T. P.; Hanson-Parr, D. M.; Tanoff, M. A.

    1999-01-01

    Many solid rocket propellants are based on a composite mixture of ammonium perchlorate (AP) oxidizer and polymeric binder fuels. In these propellants, complex three-dimensional diffusion flame structures between the AP and binder decomposition products, dependent upon the length scales of the heterogeneous mixture, drive the combustion via heat transfer back to the surface. Changing the AP crystal size changes the burn rate of such propellants. Large AP crystals are governed by the cooler AP self-deflagration flame and burn slowly, while small AP crystals are governed more by the hot diffusion flame with the binder and burn faster. This allows control of composite propellant ballistic properties via particle size variation. Previous measurements on these diffusion flames in the planar two-dimensional sandwich configuration yielded insight into controlling flame structure, but there are several drawbacks that make comparison with modeling difficult. First, the flames are two-dimensional and this makes modeling much more complex computationally than with one-dimensional problems, such as RDX self- and laser-supported deflagration. In addition, little is known about the nature, concentration, and evolution rates of the gaseous chemical species produced by the various binders as they decompose. This makes comparison with models quite difficult. Alternatively, counterflow flames provide an excellent geometric configuration within which AP/binder diffusion flames can be studied both experimentally and computationally.

  3. Experimental Observations on a Low Strain Counter-Flow Diffusion Flame: Flow and Bouyancy Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutula, J. A.; Torero, J. L.; Ezekoye, O. A.

    1999-01-01

    Diffusion flames are of great interest in fire safety and many industrial processes. The counter-flow configuration provides a constant strain flow, and therefore is ideal to study the structure of diffusion flames. Most studies have concentrated on the high velocity, high strain limit, since buoyantly induced instabilities will disintegrate the planar flame as the velocity decreases. Only recently, experimental studies in microgravity conditions have begun to explore the low strain regimes. Numerical work has shown the coupling between gas phase reaction rates, soot reaction rates, and radiation. For these programs, size, geometry and experimental conditions have been chosen to keep the flame unaffected by the physical boundaries. When the physical boundaries can not be considered infinitely far from the reaction zone discrepancies arise. A computational study that includes boundary effects and accounts for the deviations occurring when the major potential flow assumptions are relaxed was presented by Borlik et al. This development properly incorporates all heat loss terms and shows the possibility of extinction in the low strain regime. A major constraint of studying the low strain regime is buoyancy. Buoyant instabilities have been shown to have a significant effect on the nature of reactants and heat transport, and can introduce instabilities on the flow that result in phenomena such as flickering or fingering. The counter-flow configuration has been shown to provide a flame with no symmetry disrupting instabilities for inlet velocities greater than 50 mm/s. As the velocity approaches this limit, the characteristic length of the experiment has to be reduced to a few millimetres so as to keep the Rayleigh number (Ra(sub L) = (Beta)(g(sub 0))(L(exp 3) del T)/(alpha(v))) below 2000. In this work, a rectangular counter-flow burner was used to study a two-dimensional counter-flow diffusion flame. Flow visualisation and Particle Image Velocimetry served to describe

  4. Experimental Observations on a Low Strain Counter-Flow Diffusion Flame: Flow and Bouyancy Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutula, J. A.; Torero, J. L.; Ezekoye, O. A.

    1999-01-01

    Diffusion flames are of great interest in fire safety and many industrial processes. The counter-flow configuration provides a constant strain flow, and therefore is ideal to study the structure of diffusion flames. Most studies have concentrated on the high velocity, high strain limit, since buoyantly induced instabilities will disintegrate the planar flame as the velocity decreases. Only recently, experimental studies in microgravity conditions have begun to explore the low strain regimes. Numerical work has shown the coupling between gas phase reaction rates, soot reaction rates, and radiation. For these programs, size, geometry and experimental conditions have been chosen to keep the flame unaffected by the physical boundaries. When the physical boundaries can not be considered infinitely far from the reaction zone discrepancies arise. A computational study that includes boundary effects and accounts for the deviations occurring when the major potential flow assumptions are relaxed was presented by Borlik et al. This development properly incorporates all heat loss terms and shows the possibility of extinction in the low strain regime. A major constraint of studying the low strain regime is buoyancy. Buoyant instabilities have been shown to have a significant effect on the nature of reactants and heat transport, and can introduce instabilities on the flow that result in phenomena such as flickering or fingering. The counter-flow configuration has been shown to provide a flame with no symmetry disrupting instabilities for inlet velocities greater than 50 mm/s. As the velocity approaches this limit, the characteristic length of the experiment has to be reduced to a few millimetres so as to keep the Rayleigh number (Ra(sub L) = (Beta)(g(sub 0))(L(exp 3) del T)/(alpha(v))) below 2000. In this work, a rectangular counter-flow burner was used to study a two-dimensional counter-flow diffusion flame. Flow visualisation and Particle Image Velocimetry served to describe

  5. Counterflow diffusion flames of general fluids: Oxygen/hydrogen mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Ribert, Guillaume; Zong, Nan; Yang, Vigor; Pons, Laetitia; Darabiha, Nasser; Candel, Sebastien

    2008-08-15

    A comprehensive framework has been established for studying laminar counterflow diffusion flames for general fluids over the entire regime of thermodynamic states. The model incorporates a unified treatment of fundamental thermodynamic and transport theories into an existing flow solver DMCF to treat detailed chemical kinetic mechanisms and multispecies transport. The resultant scheme can thus be applied to fluids in any state. Both subcritical and supercritical conditions are considered. As a specific example, diluted and undiluted H{sub 2}/O{sub 2} flames are investigated at pressures of 1-25 MPa and oxygen inlet temperatures of 100 and 300 K. The effects of pressure p and strain rate {epsilon}{sub s} on the heat release rate q{sub s}-dot, extinction limit, and flame structure are examined. In addition, the impact of cross-diffusion terms, such as the Soret and Dufour effects, on the flame behavior is assessed. Results indicate that the flame thickness {delta}{sub f} and heat release rate correlate well with the square root of the pressure multiplied by the strain rate. The strain rate at the extinction limit exhibits a quasi-linear dependence on p. Significant real-fluid effects take place in the transcritical regimes, as evidenced by the steep property variations in the local flowfield. However, their net influence on the flame properties appears to be limited due to the ideal-gas behavior of fluids in the high-temperature zone. (author)

  6. Laminar counterflow spray diffusion flames: A comparison between experimental results and complex chemistry calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Darabiha, N.; Lacas, F.; Rolon, J.C.; Candel, S. . Lab. EM2C)

    1993-11-01

    Experimental and numerical studies of laminar flames formed by the counterflow of a monodisperse fuel spray with an air stream are reported in this article. In this simple configuration it is possible to analyze the influence of the phase transfer terms on the flame structure. The experimental setup used to produce such laminar spray diffusion flames is first described. A set of experiments are carried with liquid heptane fuel sprays. The flame is characterized with a laser sheet imaging system and with a particle sizing apparatus based on laser light diffraction. Results of a numerical study are then presented. The two phase-reacting flow equations are solved through Newton iterations and adaptive gridding using detailed transport and complex chemistry. An iterative procedure is devised to solve the gas- and liquid-phase balance equations. Comparison between experimental and numerical values of the diameter are found to be in good agreement.

  7. Review of HxPyOz-Catalyzed H + OH Recombination in Scramjet Nozzle Expansions; and Possible Phosphoric Acid Enhancement of Scramjet Flameholding, from Extinction of H3PO4 + H2 - Air Counterflow Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellett, Gerald

    2005-01-01

    Recent detailed articles by Twarowski indicate that small quantities of phosphorus oxides and acids in the fuel-rich combustion products of H2 + phosphine (PH3) + air should significantly catalyze H, OH and O recombination kinetics during high-speed nozzle expansions -- to reform H2O, release heat, and approach equilibrium more rapidly and closely than uncatalyzed kinetics. This paper is an initial feasibility study to determine (a) if addition of phosphoric acid vapor (H3PO4) to a H2 fuel jet -- which is much safer than using PH3 -- will allow combustion in a high-speed scramjet engine test without adverse effects on localized flameholding, and (b) if phosphorus-containing exhaust emissions are environmentally acceptable. A well-characterized axisymmetric straight-tube opposed jet burner (OJB) tool is used to evaluate H3PO4 addition effects on the air velocity extinction limit (flame strength) of a H2 versus air counterflow diffusion flame. Addition of nitric oxide (NO), also believed to promote catalytic H-atom recombination, was evaluated for comparison. Two to five mass percent H3PO4 in the H2 jet increased flame strength 4.2%, whereas airside addition decreased it 1%. Adding 5% NO to the H2 caused a 2% decrease. Products of H-atom attack on H3PO4 produced an intense green chemiluminescence near the stagnation point. The resultant exothermic production of phosphorus oxides and acids, with accelerated H-atom recombination, released sufficient heat near the stagnation point to increase flame strength. In conclusion, the addition of H3PO4 vapor (or more reactive P sources) to hydrogen in scramjet engine tests may positively affect flameholding stability in the combustor and thrust production during supersonic expansion -- a possible dual benefit with system design / performance implications. Finally, a preliminary assessment of possible environmental effects indicates that scramjet exhaust emissions should consist of phosphoric acid aerosol, with gradual

  8. Modeling of hydrogen-air diffusion flame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Isaac, Kakkattukuzhy

    1988-01-01

    The present research objective is to determine the effects of contaminants on extinction limits of simple, well defined, counterflow Hydrogen 2-air diffusion flames, with combustion at 1 atmosphere. Results of extinction studies and other flame characterizations, with appropriate mechanistic modeling (presently underway), will be used to rationalize the observed effects of contamination over a reasonably wide range of diffusion flame conditions. The knowledge gained should help efforts to anticipate the effects of contaminants on combustion processes in Hydrogen 2-fueled scramjets.

  9. Lean and ultralean stretched propane-air counterflow flames

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Zhongxian; Pitz, Robert W.; Wehrmeyer, Joseph A.

    2006-06-15

    Stretched laminar flame structures for a wide range of C{sub 3}H{sub 8}-air mixtures vs hot products are investigated by laser-based diagnostics and numerical simulation. The hot products are produced by a lean H{sub 2}-air premixed flame. The effect of stretch rate and equivalence ratio on four groups of C{sub 3}H{sub 8}-air flame structures is studied in detail by Raman scattering measurements and by numerical calculations of the major species concentration and temperature profiles. The equivalence ratio, f, is varied from a near-stoichiometric condition (f=0.86) to the sublean limit (f=0.44) and the stretch rate varies from 90 s{sup -1} to near extinction. For most of these C{sub 3}H{sub 8}-air lean mixtures, hot products are needed to maintain the flame. The significant feature of these flames is the relatively low flame temperatures (1200-1800 K). For this temperature range, the predicted C{sub 3}H{sub 8}-air flame structure is sensitive to the specific chemical kinetic mechanism. Two types of flame structures (a lean self-propagating flame and a lean diffusion-controlled flame) are obtained based on the combined effect of stretch and equivalence ratio. Three different mechanisms, the M5 mechanism, the Optimized mechanism, and the San Diego mechanism, are chosen for the numerical simulations. None of the propane chemical mechanisms give good agreement with the data over the entire range of flame conditions. (author)

  10. Effects of equivalence ratio variation on lean, stratified methane-air laminar counterflow flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, E. S.; Granet, V. E.; Eyssartier, A.; Chen, J. H.

    2010-11-01

    The effects of equivalence ratio variations on flame structure and propagation have been studied computationally. Equivalence ratio stratification is a key technology for advanced low emission combustors. Laminar counterflow simulations of lean methane-air combustion have been presented which show the effect of strain variations on flames stabilized in an equivalence ratio gradient, and the response of flames propagating into a mixture with a time-varying equivalence ratio. 'Back supported' lean flames, whose products are closer to stoichiometry than their reactants, display increased propagation velocities and reduced thickness compared with flames where the reactants are richer than the products. The radical concentrations in the vicinity of the flame are modified by the effect of an equivalence ratio gradient on the temperature profile and thermal dissociation. Analysis of steady flames stabilized in an equivalence ratio gradient demonstrates that the radical flux through the flame, and the modified radical concentrations in the reaction zone, contribute to the modified propagation speed and thickness of stratified flames. The modified concentrations of radical species in stratified flames mean that, in general, the reaction rate is not accurately parametrized by progress variable and equivalence ratio alone. A definition of stratified flame propagation based upon the displacement speed of a mixture fraction dependent progress variable was seen to be suitable for stratified combustion. The response times of the reaction, diffusion, and cross-dissipation components which contribute to this displacement speed have been used to explain flame response to stratification and unsteady fluid dynamic strain.

  11. Modeling of hydrogen-air diffusion flame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Isaac, K. M.

    1989-01-01

    An analytical and computational study of opposed jet diffusion flame for the purpose of understanding the effects of contaminants in the reactants and thermal diffusion of light species on extinction and reignition of diffusion flames is in progress. The methodologies that have been attempted so far are described. Results using a simple, one-step reaction for the hydrogen-air counterflow diffusion flame are presented. These results show the correct trends in the profiles of chemical species and temperature. The extinction limit can be clearly seen in the plot of temperature vs. Damkohler number.

  12. Formation of soot and nitrogen oxides in unsteady counterflow diffusion flames

    SciTech Connect

    Cuoci, A.; Frassoldati, A.; Faravelli, T.; Ranzi, E.

    2009-10-15

    The formation of pollutant species in turbulent diffusion flames is strongly affected by turbulence/chemistry interactions. Unsteady counterflow diffusion flames can be conveniently used to address the unsteady effects of hydrodynamics on the pollutant chemistry, because they exhibit a larger range of combustion conditions than those observed in steady flames. In this paper, unsteady effects on the formation of soot (and its main precursors) and nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) are investigated by imposing harmonic oscillations on the strain rate of several counterflow diffusion flames fed with propane. Numerical results confirm that the dynamic response of each species is strongly affected by the strain rate oscillations and the characteristic time governing its chemistry. At low frequencies of imposed oscillations the soot and NO{sub x} profiles show strong deviations from the steady-state profile. At large frequencies a decoupling between the concentration and the velocity field is evident. In particular, the formation of soot and NO{sub x} is found less sensitive to velocity fluctuations for flames with large initial strain rate. The significant increase of soot and NO{sub x} concentrations in unsteady conditions appears to be a function of both forcing frequency and flame global strain rate. Moreover, the cut-off frequency, defined as the minimum frequency above which the strain rate oscillations have negligible effects on the formation of each species, was found to be strongly dependent on the chemical characteristic time and the flame global strain rate, but only marginally affected by the amplitude of imposed oscillations. (author)

  13. EFFECT OF OXYGEN ADDITION ON POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON FORMATION IN 1,3 BUTADIENE COUNTER-FLOW DIFFUSION FLAMES. (R828193)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of 3% O2 addition to the fuel on detailed chemical structure of a 1,3 butadiene counter-flow diffusion flame has been investigated by using heated microprobe sampling and online gas chromatography mass spectrometry. Centerline gas temperature and species ...

  14. Computational and Experimental Study of Ammonium Perchlorate/Ethylene Counterflow Diffusion Flames

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-08-04

    0.09 NH3 0.08 NO2 0.06 N2O 0.03 ClO 0.03 Cl2 0.03 ClO2 0.02 HClO4 0.02 NO 0.01 Fig. 2. Comparison between experimentally measured and calculated...the reactions NH3 OH→NH2 H2O and HCl OH → H2O Cl. In addition, most surface oxychlorine compounds ( ClO2 , HClO4) disappear within 0.1–0.2 mm of...and ClO2 and forma- tion of HCl. Conclusions The counterflow geometry has been demonstrated as a well-suited configuration, both experimentally and

  15. Observations of Shock Diffusion and Interactions in Supersonic Freestreams with Counterflowing Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daso, Endwell O.; Pritchett, Victor E.; Wang, Ten-See; Blankson, Isiah M.; Auslender, Aaron H.

    2006-01-01

    One of the technical challenges in long-duration space exploration and interplanetary missions is controlled entry and re-entry into planetary and Earth atmospheres, which requires the dissipation of considerable kinetic energy as the spacecraft decelerates and penetrates the atmosphere. Efficient heat load management of stagnation points and acreage heating remains a technological challenge and poses significant risk, particularly for human missions. An innovative approach using active flow control concept is proposed to significantly modify the external flow field about the spacecraft in planetary atmospheric entry and re-entry in order to mitigate the harsh aerothermal environments, and significantly weaken and disperse the shock-wave system to reduce aerothermal loads and wave drag, as well as improving aerodynamic performance. To explore the potential benefits of this approach, we conducted fundamental experiments in a trisonic blow down wind tunnel to investigate the effects of counterflowing sonic and supersonic jets against supersonic freestreams to gain a better understanding of the flow physics of the interactions of the opposing flows and the resulting shock structure.

  16. Moist air state above counterflow wet-cooling tower fill based on Merkel, generalised Merkel and Klimanek & Białecky models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyhlík, Tomáš

    2017-09-01

    The article deals with an evaluation of moist air state above counterflow wet-cooling tower fill. The results based on Klimanek & Białecky model are compared with results of Merkel model and generalised Merkel model. Based on the numerical simulation it is shown that temperature is predicted correctly by using generalised Merkel model in the case of saturated or super-saturated air above the fill, but the temperature is underpredicted in the case of unsaturated moist air above the fill. The classical Merkel model always under predicts temperature above the fill. The density of moist air above the fill, which is calculated using generalised Merkel model, is strongly over predicted in the case of unsaturated moist air above the fill.

  17. Combustion mechanism of ultralean rotating counterflow twin premixed flame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uemichi, Akane; Nishioka, Makihito

    2015-01-01

    In our previous numerical studies [Nishioka Makihito, Zhenyu Shen, and Akane Uemichi. "Ultra-lean combustion through the backflow of burned gas in rotating counterflow twin premixed flames." Combustion and Flame 158.11 (2011): 2188-2198. Uemichi Akane, and Makihito Nishioka. "Numerical study on ultra-lean rotating counterflow twin premixed flame of hydrogen-air." Proceedings of the Combustion Institute 34.1 (2013): 1135-1142]. we found that methane- and hydrogen-air rotating counterflow twin flames (RCTF) can achieve ultralean combustion when backward flow of burned gas occurs due to the centrifugal force created by rotation. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms of ultralean combustion in these flames by the detailed numerical analyses of the convective and diffusive transport of the main species. We found that, under ultralean conditions, the diffusive transport of fuel exceeds its backward convective transport in the flame zone, which is located on the burned-gas side of the stagnation point. In contrast, the relative magnitudes of diffusive and convective transport for oxygen are reversed compared to those for the fuel. The resulting flows for fuel and oxygen lead to what we call a 'net flux imbalance'. This net flux imbalance increases the flame temperature and concentrations of active radicals. For hydrogen-air RCTF, a very large diffusivity of hydrogen enhances the net flux imbalance, significantly increasing the flame temperature. This behaviour is intrinsic to a very lean premixed flame in which the reaction zone is located in the backflow of its own burned gas.

  18. Analysis of opposed-jet hydrogen-air counter flow diffusion flame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, Y. H.; Isaac, K. M.; Pellett, G. L.; Northam, G. B.

    1991-01-01

    An opposed-jet counterflow diffusion-flame configuration is considered for the analysis of a nitrogen-diluted hydrogen-air diffusion flame. A boundary-layer similarity solution is employed in order to reduce the governing equations to a set of equations in one independent variable. The equation set is written in the time-dependent form and solved by the finite-volume time-marching technique. This model uses detailed chemistry and accounts for the variations of Prandtl number and Lewis number as well as the effect of thermal diffusion on the flame. It is noted that a one-step model can predict several features of the flame, while the detailed-chemistry model can be used for fine-tuning the results. The present results indicate that thermal diffusion has negligible effect on the characteristics of the flame.

  19. Experimental and computational study of methane counterflow diffusion flames perturbed by trace amounts of either jet fuel or a 6-component surrogate under non-sooting conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Bufferand, H.; Tosatto, L.; La Mantia, B.; Smooke, M.D.; Gomez, A.

    2009-08-15

    The chemical structure of a methane counterflow diffusion flame and of the same flame doped with 1000 ppm (molar) of either jet fuel or a 6-component jet fuel surrogate was analyzed experimentally, by gas sampling via quartz microprobes and subsequent GC/MS analysis, and computationally using a semi-detailed kinetic mechanism for the surrogate blend. Conditions were chosen to ensure that all three flames were non-sooting, with identical temperature profiles and stoichiometric mixture fraction, through a judicious selection of feed stream composition and strain rate. The experimental dataset provides a glimpse of the pyrolysis and oxidation behavior of jet fuel in a diffusion flame. The jet fuel initial oxidation is consistent with anticipated chemical kinetic behavior, based on thermal decomposition of large alkanes to smaller and smaller fragments and the survival of ring-stabilized aromatics at higher temperatures. The 6-component surrogate captures the same trend correctly, but the agreement is not quantitative with respect to some of the aromatics such as benzene and toluene. Various alkanes, alkenes and aromatics among the jet fuel components are either only qualitatively characterized or could not be identified, because of the presence of many isomers and overlapping spectra in the chromatogram, leaving 80% of the carbon from the jet fuel unaccounted for in the early pyrolysis history of the parent fuel. Computationally, the one-dimensional code adopted a semi-detailed kinetic mechanism for the surrogate blend that is based on an existing hierarchically constructed kinetic model for alkanes and simple aromatics, extended to account for the presence of tetralin and methylcyclohexane as reference fuels. The computational results are in reasonably good agreement with the experimental ones for the surrogate behavior, with the greatest discrepancy in the concentrations of aromatics and ethylene. (author)

  20. Effects of water-contaminated air on blowoff limits of opposed jet hydrogen-air diffusion flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellett, Gerald L.; Jentzen, Marilyn E.; Wilson, Lloyd G.; Northam, G. Burton

    1988-01-01

    The effects of water-contaminated air on the extinction and flame restoration of the central portion of N2-diluted H2 versus air counterflow diffusion flames are investigated using a coaxial tubular opposed jet burner. The results show that the replacement of N2 contaminant in air by water on a mole for mole basis decreases the maximum sustainable H2 mass flow, just prior to extinction, of the flame. This result contrasts strongly with the analogous substitution of water for N2 in a relatively hot premixed H2-O2-N2 flame, which was shown by Koroll and Mulpuru (1986) to lead to a significant, kinetically controlled increase in laminar burning velocity.

  1. Absolute, spatially resolved, in situ CO profiles in atmospheric laminar counter-flow diffusion flames using 2.3 μm TDLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Steven; Klein, Moritz; Kathrotia, Trupti; Riedel, Uwe; Kissel, Thilo; Dreizler, Andreas; Ebert, Volker

    2012-11-01

    We developed a new, spatially traversing, direct tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer (TDLAS) for quantitative, calibration-free, and spatially resolved in situ measurements of CO profiles in atmospheric, laminar, non-premixed CH4/air model flames stabilized at a Tsuji counter-flow burner. The spectrometer employed a carefully characterized, room temperature distributed feedback diode laser to detect the R20 line of CO near 2,313 nm (4,324.4 cm-1), which allows to minimize spectral CH4 interference and detect CO even in very fuel-rich zones of the flame. The burner head was traversed through the 0.5 mm diameter laser beam in order to derive spatially resolved CO profiles in the only 60-mm wide CH4/air flame. Our multiple Voigt line Levenberg-Marquardt fitting algorithm and the use of highly efficient optical disturbance correction algorithms for treating transmission and background emission fluctuations as well as careful fringe interference suppression permitted to achieve a fractional optical resolution of up to 2.4 × 10-4 OD (1σ) in the flame ( T up to 1,965 K). Highly accurate, spatially resolved, absolute gas temperature profiles, needed to compute mole fraction and correct for spectroscopic temperature dependencies, were determined with a spatial resolution of 65 μm using ro-vibrational N2-CARS (Coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy). With this setup we achieved temperature-dependent CO detection limits at the R20 line of 250-2,000 ppmv at peak CO concentrations of up to 4 vol.%. This permitted local CO detection with signal to noise ratios of more than 77. The CO TDLAS spectrometer was then used to determine absolute, spatially resolved in situ CO concentrations in the Tsuji flame, investigate the strain dependence of the CO Profiles and favorably compare the results to a new flame-chemistry model.

  2. Experimental study of ethylene counterflow diffusion flames perturbed by trace amounts of jet fuel and jet fuel surrogates under incipiently sooting conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Jahangirian, Saeed; Gomez, Alessandro; McEnally, Charles S.

    2009-09-15

    The structure of an ethylene counterflow diffusion flame doped with 2000 ppm on a molar basis of either jet fuel or two jet fuel surrogates is studied under incipient sooting conditions. The doped flames have identical stoichiometric mixture fractions (z{sub f} = 0.18) and strain rates (a = 92 s{sup -1}), resulting in a well-defined and fixed temperature/time history for all of the flames. Gas samples are extracted from the flame with quartz microprobes for subsequent GC/MS analysis. Profiles of critical fuel decomposition products and soot precursors, such as benzene and toluene, are compared. The data for C7-C12 alkanes are consistent with typical decomposition of large alkanes with both surrogates showing good qualitative agreement with jet fuel in their pyrolysis trends. Olefins are formed as the fuel alkanes decompose, with agreement between the surrogates and jet fuel that improves for small alkenes, probably because of an increase in kinetic pathways which makes the specifics of the alkane structure less important. Good agreement between jet fuel and the surrogates is found with respect to critical soot precursors such as benzene and toluene. Although the six-component Utah/Yale surrogate performs better than the Aachen surrogate, the latter performs adequately and retains the advantage of simplicity, since it consists of only two components. The acetylene profiles present a unique multimodal behavior that can be attributed to acetylene's participation in early stages of formation of soot precursors, such as benzene and other large pyrolysis products, as well as in the surface growth of soot particles. (author)

  3. Sensitive and comprehensive detection of chemical warfare agents in air by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap tandem mass spectrometry with counterflow introduction.

    PubMed

    Seto, Yasuo; Sekiguchi, Hiroshi; Maruko, Hisashi; Yamashiro, Shigeharu; Sano, Yasuhiro; Takayama, Yasuo; Sekioka, Ryoji; Yamaguchi, Shintaro; Kishi, Shintaro; Satoh, Takafumi; Sekiguchi, Hiroyuki; Iura, Kazumitsu; Nagashima, Hisayuki; Nagoya, Tomoki; Tsuge, Kouichiro; Ohsawa, Isaac; Okumura, Akihiko; Takada, Yasuaki; Ezawa, Naoya; Watanabe, Susumu; Hashimoto, Hiroaki

    2014-05-06

    A highly sensitive and specific real-time field-deployable detection technology, based on counterflow air introduction atmospheric pressure chemical ionization, has been developed for a wide range of chemical warfare agents (CWAs) comprising gaseous (two blood agents, three choking agents), volatile (six nerve gases and one precursor agent, five blister agents), and nonvolatile (three lachrymators, three vomiting agents) agents in air. The approach can afford effective chemical ionization, in both positive and negative ion modes, for ion trap multiple-stage mass spectrometry (MS(n)). The volatile and nonvolatile CWAs tested provided characteristic ions, which were fragmented into MS(3) product ions in positive and negative ion modes. Portions of the fragment ions were assigned by laboratory hybrid mass spectrometry (MS) composed of linear ion trap and high-resolution mass spectrometers. Gaseous agents were detected by MS or MS(2) in negative ion mode. The limits of detection for a 1 s measurement were typically at or below the microgram per cubic meter level except for chloropicrin (submilligram per cubic meter). Matrix effects by gasoline vapor resulted in minimal false-positive signals for all the CWAs and some signal suppression in the case of mustard gas. The moisture level did influence the measurement of the CWAs.

  4. Diffusion of air (1); phosgene (2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkelmann, J.

    This document is part of Subvolume A `Gases in Gases, Liquids and their Mixtures' of Volume 15 `Diffusion in Gases, Liquids and Electrolytes' of Landolt-Börnstein Group IV `Physical Chemistry'. It is part of the chapter of the chapter `Diffusion in Pure Gases' and contains data on diffusion of (1) air; (2) phosgene

  5. Counterflowing Jet Subsystem Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farr, Rebecca; Daso, Endwell; Pritchett, Victor; Wang, Ten-See

    2010-01-01

    A counterflowing jet design (a spacecraft and trans-atmospheric subsystem) employs centrally located, supersonic cold gas jets on the face of the vehicle, ejecting into the oncoming free stream. Depending on the supersonic free-stream conditions and the ejected mass flow rate of the counterflowing jets, the bow shock of the vehicle is moved upstream, further away from the vehicle. This results in an increasing shock standoff distance of the bow shock with a progressively weaker shock. At a critical jet mass flow rate, the bow shock becomes so weak that it is transformed into a series of compression waves spread out in a much wider region, thus significantly modifying the flow that wets the outer surfaces, with an attendant reduction in wave and skin friction drag and aerothermal loads.

  6. Counterflow Regolith Heat Exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zubrin, Robert; Jonscher, Peter

    2013-01-01

    A problem exists in reducing the total heating power required to extract oxygen from lunar regolith. All such processes require heating a great deal of soil, and the heat energy is wasted if it cannot be recycled from processed material back into new material. The counterflow regolith heat exchanger (CoRHE) is a device that transfers heat from hot regolith to cold regolith. The CoRHE is essentially a tube-in-tube heat exchanger with internal and external augers attached to the inner rotating tube to move the regolith. Hot regolith in the outer tube is moved in one direction by a right-hand - ed auger, and the cool regolith in the inner tube is moved in the opposite direction by a left-handed auger attached to the inside of the rotating tube. In this counterflow arrangement, a large fraction of the heat from the expended regolith is transferred to the new regolith. The spent regolith leaves the heat exchanger close to the temperature of the cold new regolith, and the new regolith is pre-heated close to the initial temperature of the spent regolith. Using the CoRHE can reduce the heating requirement of a lunar ISRU system by 80%, reducing the total power consumption by a factor of two. The unique feature of this system is that it allows for counterflow heat exchange to occur between solids, instead of liquids or gases, as is commonly done. In addition, in variants of this concept, the hydrogen reduction can be made to occur within the counterflow heat exchanger itself, enabling a simplified lunar ISRU (in situ resource utilization) system with excellent energy economy and continuous nonbatch mode operation.

  7. Sensitive monitoring of volatile chemical warfare agents in air by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry with counter-flow introduction.

    PubMed

    Seto, Yasuo; Kanamori-Kataoka, Mieko; Tsuge, Koichiro; Ohsawa, Isaac; Iura, Kazumitsu; Itoi, Teruo; Sekiguchi, Hiroyuki; Matsushita, Koji; Yamashiro, Shigeharu; Sano, Yasuhiro; Sekiguchi, Hiroshi; Maruko, Hisashi; Takayama, Yasuo; Sekioka, Ryoji; Okumura, Akihiko; Takada, Yasuaki; Nagano, Hisashi; Waki, Izumi; Ezawa, Naoya; Tanimoto, Hiroyuki; Honjo, Shigeru; Fukano, Masumi; Okada, Hidehiro

    2013-03-05

    A new method for sensitively and selectively detecting chemical warfare agents (CWAs) in air was developed using counter-flow introduction atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (MS). Four volatile and highly toxic CWAs were examined, including the nerve gases sarin and tabun, and the blister agents mustard gas (HD) and Lewisite 1 (L1). Soft ionization was performed using corona discharge to form reactant ions, and the ions were sent in the direction opposite to the airflow by an electric field to eliminate the interfering neutral molecules such as ozone and nitrogen oxide. This resulted in efficient ionization of the target CWAs, especially in the negative ionization mode. Quadrupole MS (QMS) and ion trap tandem MS (ITMS) instruments were developed and investigated, which were movable on the building floor. For sarin, tabun, and HD, the protonated molecular ions and their fragment ions were observed in the positive ion mode. For L1, the chloride adduct ions of L1 hydrolysis products were observed in negative ion mode. The limit of detection (LOD) values in real-time or for a 1 s measurement monitoring the characteristic ions were between 1 and 8 μg/m(3) in QMS instrument. Collision-induced fragmentation patterns for the CWAs were observed in an ITMS instrument, and optimized combinations of the parent and daughter ion pairs were selected to achieve real-time detection with LOD values of around 1 μg/m(3). This is a first demonstration of sensitive and specific real-time detection of both positively and negatively ionizable CWAs by MS instruments used for field monitoring.

  8. Combustion rate limits of hydrogen plus hydrocarbon fuel: Air diffusion flames from an opposed jet burner technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellett, Gerald L.; Guerra, Rosemary; Wilson, Lloyd G.; Reeves, Ronald N.; Northam, G. Burton

    1987-01-01

    Combustion of H2/hydrocarbon (HC) fuel mixtures may be considered in certain volume-limited supersonic airbreathing propulsion applications. Effects of HC addition to H2 were evaluated, using a recent argon-bathed, coaxial, tubular opposed jet burner (OJB) technique to measure the extinction limits of counterflow diffusion flames. The OJB flames were formed by a laminar jet of (N2 and/or HC)-diluted H2 mixture opposed by a similar jet of air at ambient conditions. The OJB data, derived from respective binary mixtures of H2 and methane, ethylene, or propane HCs, were used to characterize BLOWOFF and RESTORE. BLOWOFF is a sudden breaking of the dish-shaped OJB flame to a stable torus or ring shape, and RESTORE marks sudden restoration of the central flame by radial inward flame propagation. BLOWOFF is a measure of kinetically-limited flame reactivity/speed under highly stretched, but relatively ideal impingement flow conditions. RESTORE measures inward radial flame propagation rate, which is sensitive to ignition processes in the cool central core. It is concluded that relatively small molar amounts of added HC greatly reduce the reactivity characteristics of counterflow hydrogen-air diffusion flames, for ambient initial conditions.

  9. Combustion rate limits of hydrogen plus hydrocarbon fuel: Air diffusion flames from an opposed jet burner technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellett, Gerald L.; Guerra, Rosemary; Wilson, Lloyd G.; Reeves, Ronald N.; Northam, G. Burton

    1987-01-01

    Combustion of H2/hydrocarbon (HC) fuel mixtures may be considered in certain volume-limited supersonic airbreathing propulsion applications. Effects of HC addition to H2 were evaluated, using a recent argon-bathed, coaxial, tubular opposed jet burner (OJB) technique to measure the extinction limits of counterflow diffusion flames. The OJB flames were formed by a laminar jet of (N2 and/or HC)-diluted H2 mixture opposed by a similar jet of air at ambient conditions. The OJB data, derived from respective binary mixtures of H2 and methane, ethylene, or propane HCs, were used to characterize BLOWOFF and RESTORE. BLOWOFF is a sudden breaking of the dish-shaped OJB flame to a stable torus or ring shape, and RESTORE marks sudden restoration of the central flame by radial inward flame propagation. BLOWOFF is a measure of kinetically-limited flame reactivity/speed under highly stretched, but relatively ideal impingement flow conditions. RESTORE measures inward radial flame propagation rate, which is sensitive to ignition processes in the cool central core. It is concluded that relatively small molar amounts of added HC greatly reduce the reactivity characteristics of counterflow hydrogen-air diffusion flames, for ambient initial conditions.

  10. Counterflow absorber for an absorption refrigeration system

    DOEpatents

    Reimann, Robert C.

    1984-01-01

    An air-cooled, vertical tube absorber for an absorption refrigeration system is disclosed. Strong absorbent solution is supplied to the top of the absorber and refrigerant vapor is supplied to the bottom of the absorber to create a direct counterflow of refrigerant vapor and absorbent solution in the absorber. The refrigeration system is designed so that the volume flow rate of refrigerant vapor in the tubes of the absorber is sufficient to create a substantially direct counterflow along the entire length of each tube in the absorber. This provides several advantages for the absorber such as higher efficiency and improved heat transfer characteristics, and allows improved purging of non-condensibles from the absorber.

  11. Opposed jet burner studies of effects of CO, CO2, and N2 air-contaminants on hydrogen-air diffusion flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guerra, Rosemary; Pellett, Gerald L.; Northam, G. Burton; Wilson, Lloyd G.

    1987-01-01

    The blowoff/restore characteristics for jets of various H2/N2 mixtures opposed to jets of air contaminated by N2, CO, and CO2 have been determined using a counterflow diffusion flame formed by a tubular opposed jet burner. Both blowoff and restore limits are found to be sensitive to fuel and air composition. Empirically derived variations in the limits of the average mass flux of incoming H2 with percent contaminant, at fixed incoming fuel and H2/O2 inputs, are used to quantify the effects of oxygen dilution, flame augmentation, and flame retardation by N2, CO, and CO2 contaminants. The implications of the results are discussed.

  12. Opposed jet burner studies of effects of CO, CO2, and N2 air-contaminants on hydrogen-air diffusion flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guerra, Rosemary; Pellett, Gerald L.; Northam, G. Burton; Wilson, Lloyd G.

    1987-01-01

    The blowoff/restore characteristics for jets of various H2/N2 mixtures opposed to jets of air contaminated by N2, CO, and CO2 have been determined using a counterflow diffusion flame formed by a tubular opposed jet burner. Both blowoff and restore limits are found to be sensitive to fuel and air composition. Empirically derived variations in the limits of the average mass flux of incoming H2 with percent contaminant, at fixed incoming fuel and H2/O2 inputs, are used to quantify the effects of oxygen dilution, flame augmentation, and flame retardation by N2, CO, and CO2 contaminants. The implications of the results are discussed.

  13. Trapping of Individual Airborne Absorbing Particles Using a Counterflow Nozzle and Photophoretic Trap for Continuous Sampling and Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-19

    particles from air. The key parts of the system are a conical photophoretic optical trap and a counter-flow coaxial-double- nozzle that concentrates and then...distribution is unlimited. Trapping of individual airborne absorbing particles using a counterflow nozzle and photophoretic trap for continuous...airborne absorbing particles using a counterflow nozzle and photophoretic trap for continuous sampling and analysis Report Title We describe an

  14. Isotope effect of mercury diffusion in air

    PubMed Central

    Koster van Groos, Paul G.; Esser, Bradley K.; Williams, Ross W.; Hunt, James R.

    2014-01-01

    Identifying and reducing impacts from mercury sources in the environment remains a considerable challenge and requires process based models to quantify mercury stocks and flows. The stable isotope composition of mercury in environmental samples can help address this challenge by serving as a tracer of specific sources and processes. Mercury isotope variations are small and result only from isotope fractionation during transport, equilibrium, and transformation processes. Because these processes occur in both industrial and environmental settings, knowledge of their associated isotope effects is required to interpret mercury isotope data. To improve the mechanistic modeling of mercury isotope effects during gas phase diffusion, an experimental program tested the applicability of kinetic gas theory. Gas-phase elemental mercury diffusion through small bore needles from finite sources demonstrated mass dependent diffusivities leading to isotope fractionation described by a Rayleigh distillation model. The measured relative atomic diffusivities among mercury isotopes in air are large and in agreement with kinetic gas theory. Mercury diffusion in air offers a reasonable explanation of recent field results reported in the literature. PMID:24364380

  15. Opposed jet diffusion flames of nitrogen-diluted hydrogen vs air - Axial LDA and CARS surveys; fuel/air rates at extinction

    SciTech Connect

    Pellett, G.L.; Northam, G.B.; Wilson, L.G.; Jarrett, O. Jr.; Antcliff, R.R.

    1989-01-01

    An experimental study of H-air counterflow diffusion flames (CFDFs) is reported. Coaxial tubular opposed jet burners were used to form dish-shaped CFDFs centered by opposing laminar jets of H2/N2 and air in an argon bath at 1 atm. Jet velocities for extinction and flame restoration limits are shown versus input H2 concentration. LDA velocity data and CARS temperature and absolute N2, O2 density data give detailed flame structure on the air side of the stagnation point. The results show that air jet velocity is a more fundamental and appropriate measure of H2-air CFDF extinction than input H2 mass flux or fuel jet velocity. It is proposed that the observed constancy of air jet velocity for fuel mixtures containing 80 to 100 percent H2 measure a maximum, kinetically controlled rate at which the CFDF can consume oxygen in air. Fuel velocity mainly measures the input jet momentum required to center an H2/N2 versus air CFDF. 42 refs.

  16. Opposed jet diffusion flames of nitrogen-diluted hydrogen vs air - Axial LDA and CARS surveys; fuel/air rates at extinction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellett, G. L.; Northam, G. B.; Wilson, L. G.; Jarrett, Olin, Jr.; Antcliff, R. R.

    1989-01-01

    An experimental study of H-air counterflow diffusion flames (CFDFs) is reported. Coaxial tubular opposed jet burners were used to form dish-shaped CFDFs centered by opposing laminar jets of H2/N2 and air in an argon bath at 1 atm. Jet velocities for extinction and flame restoration limits are shown versus input H2 concentration. LDA velocity data and CARS temperature and absolute N2, O2 density data give detailed flame structure on the air side of the stagnation point. The results show that air jet velocity is a more fundamental and appropriate measure of H2-air CFDF extinction than input H2 mass flux or fuel jet velocity. It is proposed that the observed constancy of air jet velocity for fuel mixtures containing 80 to 100 percent H2 measure a maximum, kinetically controlled rate at which the CFDF can consume oxygen in air. Fuel velocity mainly measures the input jet momentum required to center an H2/N2 versus air CFDF.

  17. Opposed jet diffusion flames of nitrogen-diluted hydrogen vs air - Axial LDA and CARS surveys; fuel/air rates at extinction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellett, G. L.; Northam, G. B.; Wilson, L. G.; Jarrett, Olin, Jr.; Antcliff, R. R.

    1989-01-01

    An experimental study of H-air counterflow diffusion flames (CFDFs) is reported. Coaxial tubular opposed jet burners were used to form dish-shaped CFDFs centered by opposing laminar jets of H2/N2 and air in an argon bath at 1 atm. Jet velocities for extinction and flame restoration limits are shown versus input H2 concentration. LDA velocity data and CARS temperature and absolute N2, O2 density data give detailed flame structure on the air side of the stagnation point. The results show that air jet velocity is a more fundamental and appropriate measure of H2-air CFDF extinction than input H2 mass flux or fuel jet velocity. It is proposed that the observed constancy of air jet velocity for fuel mixtures containing 80 to 100 percent H2 measure a maximum, kinetically controlled rate at which the CFDF can consume oxygen in air. Fuel velocity mainly measures the input jet momentum required to center an H2/N2 versus air CFDF.

  18. Vertical counterflow evaporative cooler

    DOEpatents

    Bourne, Richard C.; Lee, Brian Eric; Callaway, Duncan

    2005-01-25

    An evaporative heat exchanger having parallel plates that define alternating dry and wet passages. A water reservoir is located below the plates and is connected to a water distribution system. Water from the water distribution system flows through the wet passages and wets the surfaces of the plates that form the wet passages. Air flows through the dry passages, mixes with air below the plates, and flows into the wet passages before exiting through the top of the wet passages.

  19. Real-time air monitoring of mustard gas and Lewisite 1 by detecting their in-line reaction products by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap tandem mass spectrometry with counterflow ion introduction.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Akihiko; Takada, Yasuaki; Watanabe, Susumu; Hashimoto, Hiroaki; Ezawa, Naoya; Seto, Yasuo; Sekiguchi, Hiroshi; Maruko, Hisashi; Takayama, Yasuo; Sekioka, Ryoji; Yamaguchi, Shintaro; Kishi, Shintaro; Satoh, Takafumi; Kondo, Tomohide; Nagashima, Hisayuki; Nagoya, Tomoki

    2015-01-20

    A new method enabling sensitive real-time air monitoring of highly reactive chemical warfare agents, namely, mustard gas (HD) and Lewisite 1 (L1), by detecting ions of their in-line reaction products instead of intact agents, is proposed. The method is based on corona discharge-initiated atmospheric pressure chemical ionization coupled with ion trap tandem mass spectrometry (MS(n)) via counterflow ion introduction. Therefore, it allows for highly sensitive and specific real-time detection of a broad range of airborne compounds. In-line chemical reactions, ionization reactions, and ion fragmentations of these agents were investigated. Mustard gas is oxygenated in small quantity by reactive oxygen species generated in the corona discharge. With increasing air humidity, the MS(2) signal intensity of protonated molecules of mono-oxygenated HD decreases but exceeds that of dominantly existing intact HD. This result can be explained in view of proton affinity. Lewisite 1 is hydrolyzed and oxidized. As the humidity increases from zero, the signal of the final product, namely, didechlorinated, dihydroxylated, and mono-oxygenated L1, quickly increases and reaches a plateau, giving the highest MS(2) and MS(3) signals among those of L1 and its reaction products. The addition of minimal moisture gives the highest signal intensity, even under low humidity. The method was demonstrated to provide sufficient analytical performance to meet the requirements concerning hygienic management and counter-terrorism. It will be the first practical method, in view of sensitivity and specificity, for real-time air monitoring of HD and L1 without sample pretreatment.

  20. Diffusion of buta-1,3-diene (1); air (2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkelmann, J.

    This document is part of Subvolume A `Gases in Gases, Liquids and their Mixtures' of Volume 15 `Diffusion in Gases, Liquids and Electrolytes' of Landolt-Börnstein Group IV `Physical Chemistry'. It is part of the chapter of the chapter `Diffusion in Pure Gases' and contains data on diffusion of (1) buta-1,3-diene; (2) air

  1. Diffusion of air (1); furan-2-yl-methanethiol (2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkelmann, J.

    This document is part of Subvolume A `Gases in Gases, Liquids and their Mixtures' of Volume 15 `Diffusion in Gases, Liquids and Electrolytes' of Landolt-Börnstein Group IV `Physical Chemistry'. It is part of the chapter of the chapter `Diffusion in Pure Gases' and contains data on diffusion of (1) air; (2) furan-2-yl-methanethiol

  2. Modeling of hydrogen-air diffusion flame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Isaac, K. M.

    1988-01-01

    Work performed during the first six months of the project duration for NASA Grant (NAG-1-861) is reported. An analytical and computational study of opposed jet diffusion flame for the purpose of understanding the effects of contaminants in the reactants and thermal diffusion of light species on extinction and reignition of diffusion flames is in progress. The methodologies attempted so far are described.

  3. Sooting Limits Of Diffusion Flames With Oxygen-Enriched Air And Diluted Fuel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sunderland, P. B.; Urban, D. L.; Stocker, D. P.; Chao, B. H.; Axelbaum, R. L.

    2003-01-01

    Oxygen-enhanced combustion permits certain benefits and flexibility that are not otherwise available in the design of practical combustors, as discussed by Baukal. The cost of pure and enriched oxygen has declined to the point that oxygen-enhanced combustion is preferable to combustion in air for many applications. Carbon sequestration is greatly facilitated by oxygen enrichment because nitrogen can be eliminated from the product stream. For example, when natural gas (or natural gas diluted with CO2) is burned in pure oxygen, the only significant products are water and CO2. Oxygen-enhanced combustion also has important implications for soot formation, as explored in this work. We propose that soot inception in nonpremixed flames requires a region where C/O ratio, temperature, and residence time are above certain critical values. Soot does not form at low temperatures, with the threshold in nonpremixed flames ranging from about 1250-1650 K, a temperature referred to here as the critical temperature for soot inception, Tc. Soot inception also can be suppressed when residence time is short (equivalently, when the strain rate in counterflow flames is high). Soot induction times of 0.8-15 ms were reported by Tesner and Shurupov for acetylene/nitrogen mixtures at 1473 K. Burner stabilized spherical microgravity flames are employed in this work for two main reasons. First, this configuration offers unrestricted control over convection direction. Second, in steady state these flames are strain-free and thus can yield intrinsic sooting limits in diffusion flames, similar to the way past work in premixed flames has provided intrinsic values of C/O ratio associated with soot inception limits.

  4. Nosehouse: heat-conserving ventilators based on nasal counterflow exchangers.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Steven

    2009-12-01

    Small birds and mammals commonly minimize respiratory heat loss with reciprocating counterflow exchangers in their nasal passageways. These animals extract heat from the air in an exhalation to warm those passageways and then use that heat to warm the subsequent inhalation. Although the near-constant volume of buildings precludes direct application of the device, a pair of such exchangers located remotely from each other circumvents that problem. A very simple and crudely constructed small-scale physical model of the device worked well enough as a heat conserver to suggest utility as a ventilator for buildings.

  5. Soot Formation in Hydrocarbon/Air Laminar Jet Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sunderland, P. B.; Faeth, G. M.

    1994-01-01

    Soot processes within hydrocarbon/air diffusion flames are important because they affect the durability and performance of propulsion systems, the hazards of unwanted fires, the pollutant and particulate emissions from combustion processes, and the potential for developing computational combustion. Motivated by these observations, this investigation involved an experimental study of the structure and soot properties of round laminar jet diffusion flames, seeking an improved understanding of soot formation (growth and nucleation) within diffusion flames. The present study extends earlier work in this laboratory concerning laminar smoke points (l) and soot formation in acetylene/air laminar jet diffusion flames (2), emphasizing soot formation in hydrocarbon/air laminar jet diffusion flames for fuels other than acetylene. In the flame system, acetylene is the dominant gas species in the soot formation region and both nucleation and growth were successfully attributed to first-order reactions of acetylene, with nucleation exhibiting an activation energy of 32 kcal/gmol while growth involved negligible activation energy and a collision efficiency of O.53%. In addition, soot growth in the acetylene diffusion flames was comparable to new soot in premixed flame (which also has been attributed to first-order acetylene reactions). In view of this status, a major issue is the nature of soot formation processes in diffusion flame involving hydrocarbon fuels other than acetylene. In particular, information is needed about th dominant gas species in the soot formation region and the impact of gas species other than acetylene on soot nucleation and growth.

  6. Diffusion barriers in modified air brazes

    DOEpatents

    Weil, Kenneth Scott [Richland, WA; Hardy, John S [Richland, WA; Kim, Jin Yong [Richland, WA; Choi, Jung-Pyung [Richland, WA

    2010-04-06

    A method for joining two ceramic parts, or a ceramic part and a metal part, and the joint formed thereby. The method provides two or more parts, a braze consisting of a mixture of copper oxide and silver, a diffusion barrier, and then heats the braze for a time and at a temperature sufficient to form the braze into a bond holding the two or more parts together. The diffusion barrier is an oxidizable metal that forms either a homogeneous component of the braze, a heterogeneous component of the braze, a separate layer bordering the braze, or combinations thereof. The oxidizable metal is selected from the group Al, Mg, Cr, Si, Ni, Co, Mn, Ti, Zr, Hf, Pt, Pd, Au, lanthanides, and combinations thereof.

  7. Diffusion barriers in modified air brazes

    DOEpatents

    Weil, Kenneth Scott; Hardy, John S; Kim, Jin Yong; Choi, Jung-Pyung

    2013-04-23

    A method for joining two ceramic parts, or a ceramic part and a metal part, and the joint formed thereby. The method provides two or more parts, a braze consisting of a mixture of copper oxide and silver, a diffusion barrier, and then heats the braze for a time and at a temperature sufficient to form the braze into a bond holding the two or more parts together. The diffusion barrier is an oxidizable metal that forms either a homogeneous component of the braze, a heterogeneous component of the braze, a separate layer bordering the braze, or combinations thereof. The oxidizable metal is selected from the group Al, Mg, Cr, Si, Ni, Co, Mn, Ti, Zr, Hf, Pt, Pd, Au, lanthanides, and combinations thereof.

  8. Computational Investigation of Fluidic Counterflow Thrust Vectoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Craig A.; Deere, Karen A.

    1999-01-01

    A computational study of fluidic counterflow thrust vectoring has been conducted. Two-dimensional numerical simulations were run using the computational fluid dynamics code PAB3D with two-equation turbulence closure and linear Reynolds stress modeling. For validation, computational results were compared to experimental data obtained at the NASA Langley Jet Exit Test Facility. In general, computational results were in good agreement with experimental performance data, indicating that efficient thrust vectoring can be obtained with low secondary flow requirements (less than 1% of the primary flow). An examination of the computational flowfield has revealed new details about the generation of a countercurrent shear layer, its relation to secondary suction, and its role in thrust vectoring. In addition to providing new information about the physics of counterflow thrust vectoring, this work appears to be the first documented attempt to simulate the counterflow thrust vectoring problem using computational fluid dynamics.

  9. Computational and Experimental Study of Energetic Material in a Counterflow Microgravity Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smooke, Mitchell D.; Yetter, R. A.; Parr, T. P.; Hanson-Parr, D. M.; Tanoff, M. A.

    1999-01-01

    Ground based (normal gravity) combustion studies can provide important information on the processes by which monopropellants and composite systems burn. The effects of gravitational forces, however, can often complicate the interpretation of the models and the implementation of experiments designed to help elucidate complex issues. We propose to utilize a combined computational/experimental approach in a microgravity environment to understand the interaction of oxidizer-binder diffusion flames in composite propellants. By operating under microgravity conditions we will be able to increase the length scales and suppress the gravitational forces on melting binders such that increased resolution of both major and minor species will be possible thus reducing the demands placed on both the computational and diagnostic tools. Results of a detailed transport/finite rate chemistry model will be compared with nonintrusive optical diagnostic measurements of the structure and extinction of diffusion flames in which oxidizers such as ammonium perchlorate (AP) and ammonium dinitramide (ADN) are counterflowed against realistic binders such as hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB) and 3,3-bis(azidomethyl)oxetane (BAMO). The work proposed herein represents a collaborative effort among the research groups at Yale University, Princeton University and the Combustion Diagnostics Laboratory at the Naval Air Warfare Center in China Lake, CA.

  10. Computational and Experimental Study of Energetic Material in a Counterflow Microgravity Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smooke, Mitchell D.; Yetter, R. A.; Parr, T. P.; Hanson-Parr, D. M.; Tanoff, M. A.

    1999-01-01

    Ground based (normal gravity) combustion studies can provide important information on the processes by which monopropellants and composite systems burn. The effects of gravitational forces, however, can often complicate the interpretation of the models and the implementation of experiments designed to help elucidate complex issues. We propose to utilize a combined computational/experimental approach in a microgravity environment to understand the interaction of oxidizer-binder diffusion flames in composite propellants. By operating under microgravity conditions we will be able to increase the length scales and suppress the gravitational forces on melting binders such that increased resolution of both major and minor species will be possible thus reducing the demands placed on both the computational and diagnostic tools. Results of a detailed transport/finite rate chemistry model will be compared with nonintrusive optical diagnostic measurements of the structure and extinction of diffusion flames in which oxidizers such as ammonium perchlorate (AP) and ammonium dinitramide (ADN) are counterflowed against realistic binders such as hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB) and 3,3-bis(azidomethyl)oxetane (BAMO). The work proposed herein represents a collaborative effort among the research groups at Yale University, Princeton University and the Combustion Diagnostics Laboratory at the Naval Air Warfare Center in China Lake, CA.

  11. Practical method for diffusion welding of steel plate in air.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, T. J.; Holko, K. H.

    1972-01-01

    Description of a simple and easily applied method of diffusion welding steel plate in air which does not require a vacuum furnace or hot press. The novel feature of the proposed welding method is that diffusion welds are made in air with deadweight loading. In addition, the use of an autogenous (self-generated) surface-cleaning principle (termed 'auto-vac cleaning') to reduce the effects of surface oxides that normally hinder diffusion welding is examined. A series of nine butt joints were diffusion welded in thick sections of AISI 1020 steel plate. Diffusion welds were attempted at three welding temperatures (1200, 1090, and 980 C) using a deadweight pressure of 34,500 N/sq m (5 psi) and a two-hour hold time at temperature. Auto-vac cleaning operations prior to welding were also studied for the same three temperatures. Results indicate that sound welds were produced at the two higher temperatures when the joints were previously fusion seal welded completely around the periphery. Also, auto-vac cleaning at 1200 C for 2-1/2 hours prior to diffusion welding was highly beneficial, particularly when subsequent welding was accomplished at 1090 C.

  12. Thermal Counterflow in a Periodic Channel with Solid Boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baggaley, Andrew W.; Laurie, Jason

    2015-01-01

    We perform numerical simulations of finite temperature quantum turbulence produced through thermal counterflow in superfluid He, using the vortex filament model. We investigate the effects of solid boundaries along one of the Cartesian directions, assuming a laminar normal fluid with a Poiseuille velocity profile, whilst varying the temperature and the normal fluid velocity. We analyze the distribution of the quantized vortices, reconnection rates, and quantized vorticity production as a function of the wall-normal direction. We find that the quantized vortex lines tend to concentrate close to the solid boundaries with their position depending only on temperature and not on the counterflow velocity. We offer an explanation of this phenomenon by considering the balance of two competing effects, namely the rate of turbulent diffusion of an isotropic tangle near the boundaries and the rate of quantized vorticity production at the center. Moreover, this yields the observed scaling of the position of the peak vortex line density with the mutual friction parameter. Finally, we provide evidence that upon the transition from laminar to turbulent normal fluid flow, there is a dramatic increase in the homogeneity of the tangle, which could be used as an indirect measure of the transition to turbulence in the normal fluid component for experiments.

  13. Characterization of gas diffusion electrodes for metal-air batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danner, Timo; Eswara, Santhana; Schulz, Volker P.; Latz, Arnulf

    2016-08-01

    Gas diffusion electrodes are commonly used in high energy density metal-air batteries for the supply of oxygen. Hydrophobic binder materials ensure the coexistence of gas and liquid phase in the pore network. The phase distribution has a strong influence on transport processes and electrochemical reactions. In this article we present 2D and 3D Rothman-Keller type multiphase Lattice-Boltzmann models which take into account the heterogeneous wetting behavior of gas diffusion electrodes. The simulations are performed on FIB-SEM 3D reconstructions of an Ag model electrode for predefined saturation of the pore space with the liquid phase. The resulting pressure-saturation characteristics and transport correlations are important input parameters for modeling approaches on the continuum scale and allow for an efficient development of improved gas diffusion electrodes.

  14. Bacterial populations growth under co- and counter-flow condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tesser, Francesca; Zeegers, Jos C. H.; Clercx, Herman J. H.; Toschi, Federico

    2014-11-01

    For organisms living in a liquid ecosystem, flow and flow gradients play a major role on the population level: the flow has a dual role as it transports the nutrient while dispersing the individuals. In absence of flow and under homogeneous conditions, the growth of a population towards an empty region is usually described by a reaction diffusion equation. The solution predicts the expansion as a wave front (Fisher wave) proceeding at constant speed, till the carrying capacity is reached everywhere. The effect of fluid flow, however, is not well understood and the interplay between transport of individuals and nutrient opens a wide scenario of possible behaviors. In this work, we experimentally observe non-motile E. coli bacteria spreading inside rectangular channels in a PDMS microfluidic device. By use of a fluorescent microscope we analyze the dynamics of the population density subjected to different co- and counter-flow conditions and shear rates.

  15. Urban air pollution and atmospheric diffusion research in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Datong; Whitney, Joseph B.; Yap, David

    1987-11-01

    Air pollution has become a serious problem in China as a result of that country's efforts in the last 30 years to become a great industrial power. The burning of coal, which currently provides over 70% of all China's energy needs, is a major source of air pollution. Because Chinese coal is high in sulfur and ash content and because most combustion devices in China have low efficiencies, SO2 and particulate emissions are a serious problem and are comparable to or exceed those found in many countries that are much more industrialized. Although most coal is burned in North China, acid precipitation is most severe in South China because of the lack of buffering loess dust found in the former region. The Chinese government has already taken major steps to mitigate air pollution, such as relocating polluting industries, supplying coal with lower sulfur content, using gas instead of coal for residential heating, and levying fines on industries that exceed pollution standards. Atmospheric environmental impact assessment (AEIA) is also required for all major new projects. This article describes three types of mathematical diffusion models and field and wind-tunnel experiments that are used in such assessments. The Chinese authorities believe that a range of technological, managerial, locational, and behavioral changes must be effected before the air of Chinese cities can be significantly improved.

  16. Studies of Methane Counterflow Flames at Low Pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burrell, Robert Roe

    Methane is the smallest hydrocarbon molecule, the fuel most widely studied in fundamental flame structure studies, and a major component of natural gas. Despite many decades of research into the fundamental chemical kinetics involved in methane oxidation, ongoing advancements in research suggest that more progress can be made. Though practical combustors of industrial and commercial significance operate at high pressures and turbulent flow conditions, fundamental understanding of combustion chemistry in flames is more readily obtained for low pressure and laminar flow conditions. Measurements were performed from 1 to 0.1 atmospheres for premixed methane/air and non-premixed methane-nitrogen/oxygen flames in a counterflow. Comparative modeling with quasi-one-dimensional strained flame codes revealed bias-induced errors in measured velocities up to 8% at 0.1 atmospheres due to tracer particle phase velocity slip in the low density gas reacting flow. To address this, a numerically-assisted correction scheme consisting of direct simulation of the particle phase dynamics in counterflow was implemented. Addition of reactions describing the prompt dissociation of formyl radicals to an otherwise unmodified USC Mech II kinetic model was found to enhance computed flame reactivity and substantially improve the predictive capability of computed results for measurements at the lowest pressures studied. Yet, the same modifications lead to overprediction of flame data at 1 atmosphere where results from the unmodified USC Mech II kinetic mechanism agreed well with ambient pressure flame data. The apparent failure of a single kinetic model to capture pressure dependence in methane flames motivates continued skepticism regarding the current understanding of pressure dependence in kinetic models, even for the simplest fuels.

  17. Simulation of counterflow pedestrian dynamics using spheropolygons.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Marroquín, Fernando; Busch, Jonathan; Chiew, Coraline; Lozano, Celia; Ramírez-Gómez, Álvaro

    2014-12-01

    Pedestrian dynamic models are typically designed for comfortable walking or slightly congested conditions and typically use a single disk or combination of three disks for the shape of a pedestrian. Under crowd conditions, a more accurate pedestrian shape has advantages over the traditional single or three-disks model. We developed a method for simulating pedestrian dynamics in a large dense crowd of spheropolygons adapted to the cross section of the chest and arms of a pedestrian. Our numerical model calculates pedestrian motion from Newton's second law, taking into account viscoelastic contact forces, contact friction, and ground-reaction forces. Ground-reaction torque was taken to arise solely from the pedestrians' orientation toward their preferred destination. Simulations of counterflow pedestrians dynamics in corridors were used to gain insight into a tragic incident at the Madrid Arena pavilion in Spain, where five girls were crushed to death. The incident took place at a Halloween Celebration in 2012, in a long, densely crowded hallway used as entrance and exit at the same time. Our simulations reconstruct the mechanism of clogging in the hallway. The hypothetical case of a total evacuation order was also investigated. The results highlights the importance of the pedestrians' density and the effect of counterflow in the onset of avalanches and clogging and provides an estimation of the number of injuries based on a calculation of the contact-force network between the pedestrians.

  18. Simulation of counterflow pedestrian dynamics using spheropolygons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso-Marroquín, Fernando; Busch, Jonathan; Chiew, Coraline; Lozano, Celia; Ramírez-Gómez, Álvaro

    2014-12-01

    Pedestrian dynamic models are typically designed for comfortable walking or slightly congested conditions and typically use a single disk or combination of three disks for the shape of a pedestrian. Under crowd conditions, a more accurate pedestrian shape has advantages over the traditional single or three-disks model. We developed a method for simulating pedestrian dynamics in a large dense crowd of spheropolygons adapted to the cross section of the chest and arms of a pedestrian. Our numerical model calculates pedestrian motion from Newton's second law, taking into account viscoelastic contact forces, contact friction, and ground-reaction forces. Ground-reaction torque was taken to arise solely from the pedestrians' orientation toward their preferred destination. Simulations of counterflow pedestrians dynamics in corridors were used to gain insight into a tragic incident at the Madrid Arena pavilion in Spain, where five girls were crushed to death. The incident took place at a Halloween Celebration in 2012, in a long, densely crowded hallway used as entrance and exit at the same time. Our simulations reconstruct the mechanism of clogging in the hallway. The hypothetical case of a total evacuation order was also investigated. The results highlights the importance of the pedestrians' density and the effect of counterflow in the onset of avalanches and clogging and provides an estimation of the number of injuries based on a calculation of the contact-force network between the pedestrians.

  19. Air-coupled ultrasonic testing of diffusion bonds.

    PubMed

    Windels, Filip; Leroy, O

    2002-05-01

    The diffusion bond between two steel plates can be ultrasonically evaluated, at normal incidence in an immersion experiment, by analyzing the frequency dependence of the echo reflected from the imperfect bond. The interfacial stiffness, derived from the echo amplitude, correlates well with the bond-strength. However, a non-contact method is desirable for applications where immersion or contact is not wanted or even dangerous for damaging the material. This above mentioned bond-echo technique would not work in the situation of air-coupling as the reflected echo becomes then too weak due to the high impedance mismatch at the air-solid interface. Therefore we propose a theoretical method based on the study of two neighbouring resonance frequencies of the diffusion bonded plate-plate structure. In this way the physical signal sensitive to the adhesion status is not the (too weak) echo reflected from the bond, but the resonance frequency of the whole plate-plate system, and this frequency is detectable as working at resonance ensures high enough signal levels. It was shown that the odd resonance is as well sensitive to the plate thickness as to the interfacial bond parameter, whereas the even resonance feels only the plate thickness. On the basis of a theoretical formula, it is possible to extract, from a single point measurement, out of these two resonance frequencies both the plate thickness and the interfacial stiffness. In this way bond information is separated from geometrical information. Finally it is shown that thickness differences between the plates did not affect the reliability of the bonding-strength predictions.

  20. Numerical investigation of biogas diffusion flames characteristics under several operation conditions in counter-flow configuration with an emphasis on thermal and chemical effects of CO2 in the fuel mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mameri, A.; Tabet, F.; Hadef, A.

    2017-08-01

    This study addresses the influence of several operating conditions (composition and ambient pressure) on biogas diffusion flame structure and NO emissions with particular attention on thermal and chemical effect of CO2. The biogas flame is modeled by a counter flow diffusion flame and analyzed in mixture fraction space using flamelet approach. The GRI Mech-3.0 mechanism that involves 53 species and 325 reactions is adopted for the oxidation chemistry. It has been observed that flame properties are very sensitive to biogas composition and pressure. CO2 addition decreases flame temperature by both thermal and chemical effects. Added CO2 may participate in chemical reaction due to thermal dissociation (chemical effect). Excessively supplied CO2 plays the role of pure diluent (thermal effect). The ambient pressure rise increases temperature and reduces flame thickness, radiation losses and dissociation amount. At high pressure, recombination reactions coupled with chain carrier radicals reduction, diminishes NO mass fraction.

  1. Numerical investigation of biogas diffusion flames characteristics under several operation conditions in counter-flow configuration with an emphasis on thermal and chemical effects of CO2 in the fuel mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mameri, A.; Tabet, F.; Hadef, A.

    2017-03-01

    This study addresses the influence of several operating conditions (composition and ambient pressure) on biogas diffusion flame structure and NO emissions with particular attention on thermal and chemical effect of CO2. The biogas flame is modeled by a counter flow diffusion flame and analyzed in mixture fraction space using flamelet approach. The GRI Mech-3.0 mechanism that involves 53 species and 325 reactions is adopted for the oxidation chemistry. It has been observed that flame properties are very sensitive to biogas composition and pressure. CO2 addition decreases flame temperature by both thermal and chemical effects. Added CO2 may participate in chemical reaction due to thermal dissociation (chemical effect). Excessively supplied CO2 plays the role of pure diluent (thermal effect). The ambient pressure rise increases temperature and reduces flame thickness, radiation losses and dissociation amount. At high pressure, recombination reactions coupled with chain carrier radicals reduction, diminishes NO mass fraction.

  2. Diffusion of 2-methyl-buta-1,3-diene (1); air (2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkelmann, J.

    This document is part of Subvolume A `Gases in Gases, Liquids and their Mixtures' of Volume 15 `Diffusion in Gases, Liquids and Electrolytes' of Landolt-Börnstein Group IV `Physical Chemistry'. It is part of the chapter of the chapter `Diffusion in Pure Gases' and contains data on diffusion of (1) 2-methyl-buta-1,3-diene; (2) air

  3. Towards Direct Simulations of Counterflow Flames with Consistent Differential-Algebraic Boundary Conditions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-05

    coordinate,  is the mass density of the fluid ,  is the -th component of the velocity vector,  is the mass fraction of species ,  is the pressure...performed with a fluid having a density of O(10) larger compared to that of H2 used in the previous two simulations. The same high fidelity in maintaining...N., Yang, V., Pons, L., Darabiha, N., and Candel, S., “Counterflow diffusion flames of general fluids : Oxygen/hydrogen mixtures,” Combust. and Flame

  4. Some effects of non-condensible gas in geothermal reservoirs with steam-water counterflow

    SciTech Connect

    McKibbin, Robert; Pruess, Karsten

    1988-01-01

    A mathematical model is developed for fluid and heat flow in two-phase geothermal reservoirs containing non-condensible gas (CO{sub 2}). Vertical profiles of temperature, pressures and phase saturations in steady-state conditions are obtained by numerically integrating the coupled ordinary differential equations describing conservation of water, CO{sub 2}, and energy. Solutions including binary diffusion effects in the gas phase are generated for cases with net mass throughflow as well as for balanced liquid-vapor counterflow. Calculated examples illustrate some fundamental characteristics of two-phase heat transmission systems with non-condensible gas.

  5. Counterflow co-flocculation flotation for water purification.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jinlong; Wang, Yil; Li, Dapeng; Tang, Hongxiao

    2003-05-01

    A new method for potable water treatment was brought forward and studied in this research. The treatment process was named as counterflow co-flocculation flotation (CC-FF). Pilot experiment was conducted and the operational parameters were presented. The optimized operational conditions are as follows: the detention time is 6-11 min with hydraulic load of 9-16 m3/(m2 h); the recycle ratio should be no less than 8% while the distance between the inlet of source water and recycle water should be greater than 1200 mm. If the source water turbidity was lower than 100 NTU, 0.12-0.35 mmol/L Al dosage is enough to maintain efficient turbidity removal. Since the flocculation and flotation processes were carried out in the same tank, this new technique has some advantages than the conventional flocculation-flotation methods. Firstly, the microbubbles released from recycle water will participate in the flocculation of suspended particles, hence the low-density but high shear-force-resistance flocci could be formed. Secondly, the microflocci or suspended particles will be functioned as 'nucleus' during the bubble formation from air-dissolved recycle water. Thirdly, in the midsection of the tank a blanket of bubble-microfloc aggregates could be formed, which will intercept the downward-flow flocci and upward-flow bubbles efficiently, thus keep the renovation and stability of the blanket.

  6. Measurements and modeling of nitric oxide formation in counterflow, premixed, methane/oxygen/nitrogen flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomsen, Duane Douglas

    1999-10-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) measurements of NO concentration in a variety of CH4/O2/N2 flames are used to evaluate the chemical kinetics of NO formation. The analysis begins with previous measurements in flat, laminar, premixed CH4/O2/N 2 flames stabilized on a water-cooled McKenna burner at pressures ranging from 1 to 14.6 atm, equivalence ratios from 0.5 to 1.6, and volumetric nitrogen/oxygen dilution ratios of 2.2, 3.1 and 3.76. These measured results are compared to predictions to determine the capabilities and limitations of the comprehensive kinetic mechanism developed by the Gas Research Institute (GRI), version 2.11. The model is shown to predict well the qualitative trends of NO formation in lean-premixed flames, while quantitatively underpredicting NO concentration by 30-50%. For rich flames, the model is unable to even qualitatively match the experimental results. These flames were found to be limited by low temperatures and an inability to separate the flame from the burner surface. In response to these limitations, a counterflow burner was designed for use in opposed premixed flame studies. A new LIF calibration technique was developed and applied to obtain quantitative measurements of NO concentration in laminar, counterflow premixed, CH 4/O2/N2 flames at pressures ranging from 1 to 5.1 atm, equivalence ratios of 0.6 to 1.5, and an N2/O2 dilution ratio of 3.76. The counterflow premixed flame measurements are combined with measurements in burner-stabilized premixed flames and counterflow diffusion flames to build a comprehensive database for analysis of the GRI kinetic mechanism. Pathways, quantitative reaction path and sensitivity analyses are applied to the GRI mechanism for these flame conditions. The prompt NO mechanism is found to severely underpredict the amount of NO formed in rich premixed and nitrogen-diluted diffusion flames. This underprediction is traced to uncertainties in the CH kinetics as well as in the nitrogen oxidation chemistry

  7. Modeling exposure close to air pollution sources in naturally ventilated residences: association of turbulent diffusion coefficient with air change rate.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Kai-Chung; Acevedo-Bolton, Viviana; Jiang, Ruo-Ting; Klepeis, Neil E; Ott, Wayne R; Fringer, Oliver B; Hildemann, Lynn M

    2011-05-01

    For modeling exposure close to an indoor air pollution source, an isotropic turbulent diffusion coefficient is used to represent the average spread of emissions. However, its magnitude indoors has been difficult to assess experimentally due to limitations in the number of monitors available. We used 30-37 real-time monitors to simultaneously measure CO at different angles and distances from a continuous indoor point source. For 11 experiments involving two houses, with natural ventilation conditions ranging from <0.2 to >5 air changes per h, an eddy diffusion model was used to estimate the turbulent diffusion coefficients, which ranged from 0.001 to 0.013 m² s⁻¹. The model reproduced observed concentrations with reasonable accuracy over radial distances of 0.25-5.0 m. The air change rate, as measured using a SF₆ tracer gas release, showed a significant positive linear correlation with the air mixing rate, defined as the turbulent diffusion coefficient divided by a squared length scale representing the room size. The ability to estimate the indoor turbulent diffusion coefficient using two readily measurable parameters (air change rate and room dimensions) is useful for accurately modeling exposures in close proximity to an indoor pollution source.

  8. Experimental study of the short diffuser design influence on the efficiency of air cooled condenser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fil'kin, N. Yu.; Yusha, V. L.

    2017-08-01

    The article is devoted to increase in efficiency of refrigerators air condensers by improvement of a flowing part in the so-called short diffusers incorporated in their design. The installation of the flowing part guiding short diffusers which improves the distribution of the cooling air stream on the condenser heat exchange surface is offered. This decision allows to increase the condenser power that is confirmed by the results of the experimental studies presented in the article.

  9. MEASUREMENT OF EFFECTIVE AIR DIFFUSION COEFFICIENTS FOR TRICHLOROETHENE IN UNDISTURBED SOIL CORES. (R826162)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    In this study, we measure effective diffusion coefficients for trichloroethene in undisturbed soil samples taken from Picatinny Arsenal, New Jersey. The measured effective diffusion coefficients ranged from 0.0053 to 0.0609 cm2/s over a range of air...

  10. MEASUREMENT OF EFFECTIVE AIR DIFFUSION COEFFICIENTS FOR TRICHLOROETHENE IN UNDISTURBED SOIL CORES. (R826162)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    In this study, we measure effective diffusion coefficients for trichloroethene in undisturbed soil samples taken from Picatinny Arsenal, New Jersey. The measured effective diffusion coefficients ranged from 0.0053 to 0.0609 cm2/s over a range of air...

  11. Experimental analysis of the velocity field of the air flowing through the swirl diffusers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaszczur, M.; Branny, M.; Karch, M.; Borowski, M.

    2016-09-01

    The article presents the results of experimental studies of flow of air through diffusers. Presented laboratory model is a simplification of the real system and was made in a geometric scale 1:10. Simplifying refer both to the geometry of the object and conditions of air flow. The aim of the study is to determine the actual velocity fields of air flowing out of the swirl diffuser. The results obtained for the diffuser various settings are presented. We have tested various flow rates of air. Stereo Particle Image Velocimetry (SPIV) method was used to measure all velocity vector components. The experimental results allow to determine the actual penetration depth of the supply air into the room. This will allow for better definition of the conditions of ventilation in buildings.

  12. Characterizing He II flow through porous materials using counterflow data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddocks, J. R.; Van Sciver, S. W.

    1991-01-01

    An empirical extension of the two-fluid model is used to characterize He II flow through porous materials. It is shown that four empirical parameters are necessary to describe the pressure and temperature differences induced by He II flow through a porous sample. The three parameters required to determine pressure differences are measured in counterflow and found to compare favorably with those for isothermal flow. The fourth parameter, the Gorter-Mellink constant, differs substantially from smooth tube values. It is concluded that parameter values determined from counterflow can be used to predict pressure and temperature differences in a variety of flows to an accuracy of about +/- 20 percent.

  13. Characterizing He II flow through porous materials using counterflow data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddocks, J. R.; Van Sciver, S. W.

    1991-01-01

    An empirical extension of the two-fluid model is used to characterize He II flow through porous materials. It is shown that four empirical parameters are necessary to describe the pressure and temperature differences induced by He II flow through a porous sample. The three parameters required to determine pressure differences are measured in counterflow and found to compare favorably with those for isothermal flow. The fourth parameter, the Gorter-Mellink constant, differs substantially from smooth tube values. It is concluded that parameter values determined from counterflow can be used to predict pressure and temperature differences in a variety of flows to an accuracy of about +/- 20 percent.

  14. Three-Dimensional Model for Electrospinning Processes in Controlled Gas Counterflow.

    PubMed

    Lauricella, Marco; Pisignano, Dario; Succi, Sauro

    2016-07-14

    We study the effects of a controlled gas flow on the dynamics of electrified jets in the electrospinning process. The main idea is to model the air drag effects of the gas flow by using a nonlinear Langevin-like approach. The model is employed to investigate the dynamics of electrified polymer jets at different conditions of air drag force, showing that a controlled gas counterflow can lead to a decrease of the average diameter of electrospun fibers, and potentially to an improvement of the quality of electrospun products. We probe the influence of air drag effects on the bending instabilities of the jet and on its angular fluctuations during the process. The insights provided by this study might prove useful for the design of future electrospinning experiments and polymer nanofiber materials.

  15. Three-Dimensional Model for Electrospinning Processes in Controlled Gas Counterflow

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We study the effects of a controlled gas flow on the dynamics of electrified jets in the electrospinning process. The main idea is to model the air drag effects of the gas flow by using a nonlinear Langevin-like approach. The model is employed to investigate the dynamics of electrified polymer jets at different conditions of air drag force, showing that a controlled gas counterflow can lead to a decrease of the average diameter of electrospun fibers, and potentially to an improvement of the quality of electrospun products. We probe the influence of air drag effects on the bending instabilities of the jet and on its angular fluctuations during the process. The insights provided by this study might prove useful for the design of future electrospinning experiments and polymer nanofiber materials. PMID:26859532

  16. Prediction of Air Mixing From High Sidewall Diffusers in Cooling Mode: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Ridouane, E. H.; Gawlik, K.

    2011-02-01

    Computational fluid dynamics modeling was used to evaluate the performance of high sidewall air supply in cooling mode. The research focused on the design, placement, and operation of air supply diffusers located high on a sidewall and return grilles located near the floor on the same sidewall. Parameters of the study are the supply velocity, supply temperature, diffuser dimensions and room dimensions. Thermal loads characteristic of high performance homes were applied at the walls and room temperature was controlled via a thermostat. The results are intended to provide information to guide the selection of high sidewall supply diffusers to provide proper room mixing for cooling of high performance homes.

  17. Nitrogen-doped carbonaceous catalysts for gas-diffusion cathodes for alkaline aluminum-air batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davydova, E. S.; Atamanyuk, I. N.; Ilyukhin, A. S.; Shkolnikov, E. I.; Zhuk, A. Z.

    2016-02-01

    Cobalt tetramethoxyphenyl porphyrin and polyacrylonitrile - based catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction were synthesized and characterized by means of SEM, TEM, XPS, BET, limited evaporation method, rotating disc and rotating ring-disc electrode methods. Half-cell and Al-air cell tests were carried out to determine the characteristics of gas-diffusion cathodes. Effect of active layer thickness and its composition on the characteristics of the gas-diffusion cathodes was investigated. Power density of 300 mW cm-2 was achieved for alkaline Al-air cell with an air-breathing polyacrylonitrile-based cathode.

  18. PASSIVE/DIFFUSIVE SAMPLERS FOR PESTICIDES IN RESIDENTIAL INDOOR AIR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pesticides applied indoors vaporize from treated surfaces (e.g., carpets and baseboards) resulting in elevated air concentrations that may persist for long periods after applications. Estimating long-term respiratory exposures to pesticide vapors in residential indoor environme...

  19. Measurements of the Growth of Air Bubbles by Rectified Diffusion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-08-01

    enough each cycle to cause a significant increase in the amount of gas containea within the bubble. The observations 32 by Liebermann that diffusion rates...32. L. Liebermann , J. Appl. Phys. 28, 205-211 (1957). 33. Lord Rayleiyh, Proc. Roy. Soc. 47, 231-287 (1890). -25- Ii. DISTRIBUTION LIST Director 3

  20. Counterflow heat exchanger with core and plenums at both ends

    DOE PAGES

    Bejan, A.; Alalaimi, M.; Lorente, S.; ...

    2016-04-22

    Here, this paper illustrates the morphing of flow architecture toward greater performance in a counterflow heat exchanger. The architecture consists of two plenums with a core of counterflow channels between them. Each stream enters one plenum and then flows in a channel that travels the core and crosses the second plenum. The volume of the heat exchanger is fixed while the volume fraction occupied by each plenum is variable. Performance is driven by two objectives, simultaneously: low flow resistance and low thermal resistance. The analytical and numerical results show that the overall flow resistance is the lowest when the coremore » is absent, and each plenum occupies half of the available volume and is oriented in counterflow with the other plenum. In this configuration, the thermal resistance also reaches its lowest value. These conclusions hold for fully developed laminar flow and turbulent flow through the core. The curve for effectiveness vs number of heat transfer units (Ntu) is steeper (when Ntu < 1) than the classical curves for counterflow and crossflow.« less

  1. Counterflow heat exchanger with core and plenums at both ends

    SciTech Connect

    Bejan, A.; Alalaimi, M.; Lorente, S.; Sabau, A. S.; Klett, J. W.

    2016-04-22

    Here, this paper illustrates the morphing of flow architecture toward greater performance in a counterflow heat exchanger. The architecture consists of two plenums with a core of counterflow channels between them. Each stream enters one plenum and then flows in a channel that travels the core and crosses the second plenum. The volume of the heat exchanger is fixed while the volume fraction occupied by each plenum is variable. Performance is driven by two objectives, simultaneously: low flow resistance and low thermal resistance. The analytical and numerical results show that the overall flow resistance is the lowest when the core is absent, and each plenum occupies half of the available volume and is oriented in counterflow with the other plenum. In this configuration, the thermal resistance also reaches its lowest value. These conclusions hold for fully developed laminar flow and turbulent flow through the core. The curve for effectiveness vs number of heat transfer units (Ntu) is steeper (when Ntu < 1) than the classical curves for counterflow and crossflow.

  2. Counterflow heat exchanger with core and plenums at both ends

    SciTech Connect

    Bejan, A.; Alalaimi, M.; Lorente, S.; Sabau, A. S.; Klett, J. W.

    2016-04-22

    Here, this paper illustrates the morphing of flow architecture toward greater performance in a counterflow heat exchanger. The architecture consists of two plenums with a core of counterflow channels between them. Each stream enters one plenum and then flows in a channel that travels the core and crosses the second plenum. The volume of the heat exchanger is fixed while the volume fraction occupied by each plenum is variable. Performance is driven by two objectives, simultaneously: low flow resistance and low thermal resistance. The analytical and numerical results show that the overall flow resistance is the lowest when the core is absent, and each plenum occupies half of the available volume and is oriented in counterflow with the other plenum. In this configuration, the thermal resistance also reaches its lowest value. These conclusions hold for fully developed laminar flow and turbulent flow through the core. The curve for effectiveness vs number of heat transfer units (Ntu) is steeper (when Ntu < 1) than the classical curves for counterflow and crossflow.

  3. Large volume continuous counterflow dialyzer has high efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandeles, S.; Woods, E. C.

    1967-01-01

    Dialyzer separates macromolecules from small molecules in large volumes of solution. It takes advantage of the high area/volume ratio in commercially available 1/4-inch dialysis tubing and maintains a high concentration gradient at the dialyzing surface by counterflow.

  4. Effect of pressure on structure and NO sub X formation in CO-air diffusion flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maahs, H. G.; Miller, I. M.

    1979-01-01

    A study was made of nitric oxide formation in a laminar CO-air diffusion flame over a pressure range from 1 to 50 atm. The carbon monoxide (CO) issued from a 3.06 mm diameter port coaxially into a coflowing stream of air confined within a 20.5 mm diameter chimney. Nitric oxide concentrations from the flame were measured at two carbon monoxide (fuel) flow rates: 73 standard cubic/min and 146 sccm. Comparison of the present data with data in the literature for a methane-air diffusion flame shows that for flames of comparable flame height (8 to 10 mm) and pseudoequivalence ratio (0.162), the molar emission index of a CO-air flame is significantly greater than that of a methane-air flame.

  5. Characterisation and airborne deployment of a new counterflow virtual impactor inlet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shingler, T.; Dey, S.; Sorooshian, A.; Brechtel, F. J.; Wang, Z.; Metcalf, A.; Coggon, M.; Mülmenstädt, J.; Russell, L. M.; Jonsson, H. H.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2012-06-01

    A new counterflow virtual impactor (CVI) inlet is introduced with details of its design, laboratory characterisation tests and deployment on an aircraft during the 2011 Eastern Pacific Emitted Aerosol Cloud Experiment (E-PEACE). The CVI inlet addresses three key issues in previous designs; in particular, the inlet operates with: (i) negligible organic contamination; (ii) a significant sample flow rate to downstream instruments (∼15 l min-1) that reduces the need for dilution; and (iii) a high level of accessibility to the probe interior for cleaning. Wind tunnel experiments characterised the cut size of sampled droplets and the particle size-dependent transmission efficiency in various parts of the probe. For a range of counter-flow rates and air velocities, the measured cut size was between 8.7-13.1 μm. The mean percentage error between cut size measurements and predictions from aerodynamic drag theory is 1.7%. The CVI was deployed on the Center for Interdisciplinary Remotely Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS) Twin Otter for thirty flights during E-PEACE to study aerosol-cloud-radiation interactions off the central coast of California in July and August 2011. Results are reported to assess the performance of the inlet including comparisons of particle number concentration downstream of the CVI and cloud drop number concentration measured by two independent aircraft probes. Measurements downstream of the CVI are also examined from one representative case flight coordinated with shipboard-emitted smoke that was intercepted in cloud by the Twin Otter.

  6. Characterization and airborne deployment of a new counterflow virtual impactor inlet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shingler, T.; Dey, S.; Sorooshian, A.; Brechtel, F. J.; Wang, Z.; Metcalf, A.; Coggon, M.; Mülmenstädt, J.; Russell, L. M.; Jonsson, H. H.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2012-02-01

    A new counterflow virtual impactor (CVI) inlet is introduced with details of its design, laboratory characterization tests, and deployment on an aircraft during the 2011 Eastern Pacific Emitted Aerosol Cloud Experiment (E-PEACE). The CVI inlet addresses three key issues in previous designs; in particular, the inlet operates with: (i) negligible organic contamination; (ii) a significant sample flow rate to downstream instruments (~15 l min-1) that reduces the need for dilution; and (iii) a high level of accessibility to the probe interior for cleaning. Wind tunnel experiments characterized the cut size of sampled droplets and the particle size-dependent transmission efficiency in various parts of the probe. For a range of counter-flow rates and air velocities, the measured cut size was between 8.7-13.1 μm. The percentage error between cut size measurements and predictions from aerodynamic drag theory are less than 13%. The CVI was deployed on the Center for Interdisciplinary Remotely-Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS) Twin Otter for thirty flights during E-PEACE to study aerosol-cloud-radiation interactions off the central coast of California between July and August 2011. Results are reported to assess the performance of the inlet including comparisons of particle number concentration downstream of the CVI and cloud drop number concentration measured by two independent aircraft probes. Measurements downstream the CVI are also examined from one representative case flight coordinated with shipboard-emitted smoke that was intercepted in cloud by the Twin Otter.

  7. Drag reduction for the combination of spike and counterflow jet on blunt body at high Mach number flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eghlima, Z.; Mansour, K.

    2017-04-01

    Drag reduction at high speed flows around blunt bodies is one of the major challenges in the field of aerodynamics. Using of spikes and counterflow jets each of them separately for reducing of drag force is well known. The present work is description of flow field around a hemispherical nose cylinder with a new combination of spike and counterflow jet at free stream of Mach number of 6.The air gas was injected through the nozzle at the nose of the hemispherical model at sonic speed. In this numerical analysis, axisymmetric Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations was solved by k-ω (SST) turbulence model. The results were validated with experimental results for spiked body without jet condition. Then the results presented for different lengths of spike and different pressures of counterflow jets. The results show a significant reduction in the drag coefficient about 86-90% compared to the spherical cylinder model without jet and spike for practical models (L/D=1.5 and 2). Furthermore also our results indicate that the drag reduction is increased even more with increasing of the length of the spike.

  8. Measurement of effective air diffusion coefficients for trichloroethene in undisturbed soil cores.

    PubMed

    Bartelt-Hunt, Shannon L; Smith, James A

    2002-06-01

    In this study, we measure effective diffusion coefficients for trichloroethene in undisturbed soil samples taken from Picatinny Arsenal, New Jersey. The measured effective diffusion coefficients ranged from 0.0053 to 0.0609 cm2/s over a range of air-filled porosity of 0.23-0.49. The experimental data were compared to several previously published relations that predict diffusion coefficients as a function of air-filled porosity and porosity. A multiple linear regression analysis was developed to determine if a modification of the exponents in Millington's [Science 130 (1959) 100] relation would better fit the experimental data. The literature relations appeared to generally underpredict the effective diffusion coefficient for the soil cores studied in this work. Inclusion of a particle-size distribution parameter, d10, did not significantly improve the fit of the linear regression equation. The effective diffusion coefficient and porosity data were used to recalculate estimates of diffusive flux through the subsurface made in a previous study performed at the field site. It was determined that the method of calculation used in the previous study resulted in an underprediction of diffusive flux from the subsurface. We conclude that although Millington's [Science 130 (1959) 100] relation works well to predict effective diffusion coefficients in homogeneous soils with relatively uniform particle-size distributions, it may be inaccurate for many natural soils with heterogeneous structure and/or non-uniform particle-size distributions.

  9. Measurement of effective air diffusion coefficients for trichloroethene in undisturbed soil cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartelt-Hunt, Shannon L.; Smith, James A.

    2002-06-01

    In this study, we measure effective diffusion coefficients for trichloroethene in undisturbed soil samples taken from Picatinny Arsenal, New Jersey. The measured effective diffusion coefficients ranged from 0.0053 to 0.0609 cm 2/s over a range of air-filled porosity of 0.23-0.49. The experimental data were compared to several previously published relations that predict diffusion coefficients as a function of air-filled porosity and porosity. A multiple linear regression analysis was developed to determine if a modification of the exponents in Millington's [Science 130 (1959) 100] relation would better fit the experimental data. The literature relations appeared to generally underpredict the effective diffusion coefficient for the soil cores studied in this work. Inclusion of a particle-size distribution parameter, d10, did not significantly improve the fit of the linear regression equation. The effective diffusion coefficient and porosity data were used to recalculate estimates of diffusive flux through the subsurface made in a previous study performed at the field site. It was determined that the method of calculation used in the previous study resulted in an underprediction of diffusive flux from the subsurface. We conclude that although Millington's [Science 130 (1959) 100] relation works well to predict effective diffusion coefficients in homogeneous soils with relatively uniform particle-size distributions, it may be inaccurate for many natural soils with heterogeneous structure and/or non-uniform particle-size distributions.

  10. Centrifugal Compressor Surge Margin Improved With Diffuser Hub Surface Air Injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skoch, Gary J.

    2002-01-01

    Aerodynamic stability is an important parameter in the design of compressors for aircraft gas turbine engines. Compression system instabilities can cause compressor surge, which may lead to the loss of an aircraft. As a result, engine designers include a margin of safety between the operating line of the engine and the stability limit line of the compressor. The margin of safety is typically referred to as "surge margin." Achieving the highest possible level of surge margin while meeting design point performance objectives is the goal of the compressor designer. However, performance goals often must be compromised in order to achieve adequate levels of surge margin. Techniques to improve surge margin will permit more aggressive compressor designs. Centrifugal compressor surge margin improvement was demonstrated at the NASA Glenn Research Center by injecting air into the vaned diffuser of a 4:1-pressure-ratio centrifugal compressor. Tests were performed using injector nozzles located on the diffuser hub surface of a vane-island diffuser in the vaneless region between the impeller trailing edge and the diffuser-vane leading edge. The nozzle flow path and discharge shape were designed to produce an air stream that remained tangent to the hub surface as it traveled into the diffuser passage. Injector nozzles were located near the leading edge of 23 of the 24 diffuser vanes. One passage did not contain an injector so that instrumentation located in that passage would be preserved. Several orientations of the injected stream relative to the diffuser vane leading edge were tested over a range of injected flow rates. Only steady flow (nonpulsed) air injection was tested. At 100 percent of the design speed, a 15-percent improvement in the baseline surge margin was achieved with a nozzle orientation that produced a jet that was bisected by the diffuser vane leading edge. Other orientations also improved the baseline surge margin. Tests were conducted at speeds below the

  11. Effects of test facility contaminants on supersonic hydrogen-air diffusion flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, R. Clayton

    1986-01-01

    Results are presented from an analytical assessment of the effects of NO and H2O in air on the ignition and reaction of hydrogen. Three flow models of the burning process were used, each including a 32 reaction chemistry mechanism. These models were a plug flow reactor to determine ignition and reaction times; a well-stirred reactor to assess flame stability or blow-off; and a parabolic Navier-Stokes code to examine the diffusion flame combustion. The diffusion flame was computed for a cold supersonic H2 jet coaxial with a supersonic air stream at a static temperature of 1100 K and a pressure of 1 atmosphere.

  12. Effects of test facility contaminants on supersonic hydrogen-air diffusion flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, R. Clayton

    1986-01-01

    Results are presented from an analytical assessment of the effects of NO and H2O in air on the ignition and reaction of hydrogen. Three flow models of the burning process were used, each including a 32 reaction chemistry mechanism. These models were a plug flow reactor to determine ignition and reaction times; a well-stirred reactor to assess flame stability or blow-off, and a parabolic Navier Stokes code to examine the diffusion flame combustion. The diffusion flame was computed for a cold supersonic H2 jet coaxial with a supersonic air stream at a static temperature of 1100 K and a pressure of 1 atmosphere.

  13. Long-term calibration monitoring of Spectralon diffusers BRDF in the air-ultraviolet.

    PubMed

    Georgiev, Georgi T; Butler, James J

    2007-11-10

    Long-term calibration monitoring of the bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) of Spectralon diffusers in the air-ultraviolet is presented. Four Spectralon diffusers were monitored in this study. Three of the diffusers, designated as H1, H2, and H3, were used in the prelaunch radiance calibration of the Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet/2 (SBUV/2) satellite instruments on National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) 14 and 16. A fourth diffuser, designated as the 400 diffuser, was used in the prelaunch calibration of the Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite (OMPS) instrument scheduled for initial flight in 2009 on the National Polar Orbiting Environmental Satellite System Preparatory Project. The BRDF data of this study were obtained between 1994 and 2005 using the scatterometer located in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Space Flight Center Diffuser Calibration Laboratory. The diffusers were measured at 13 wavelengths between 230 and 425 nm at the incident and scatter angles used in the prelaunch calibrations of SBUV/2 and OMPS. Spectral features in the BRDF of Spectralon are also discussed. The comparison shows how the air-ultraviolet BRDF of these Spectralon samples changed over time under clean room deployment conditions.

  14. Long-term calibration monitoring of Spectralon diffusers BRDF in the air-ultraviolet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiev, Georgi T.; Butler, James J.

    2007-11-01

    Long-term calibration monitoring of the bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) of Spectralon diffusers in the air-ultraviolet is presented. Four Spectralon diffusers were monitored in this study. Three of the diffusers, designated as H1, H2, and H3, were used in the prelaunch radiance calibration of the Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet/2 (SBUV/2) satellite instruments on National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) 14 and 16. A fourth diffuser, designated as the 400 diffuser, was used in the prelaunch calibration of the Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite (OMPS) instrument scheduled for initial flight in 2009 on the National Polar Orbiting Environmental Satellite System Preparatory Project. The BRDF data of this study were obtained between 1994 and 2005 using the scatterometer located in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Space Flight Center Diffuser Calibration Laboratory. The diffusers were measured at 13 wavelengths between 230 and 425 nm at the incident and scatter angles used in the prelaunch calibrations of SBUV/2 and OMPS. Spectral features in the BRDF of Spectralon are also discussed. The comparison shows how the air-ultraviolet BRDF of these Spectralon samples changed over time under clean room deployment conditions.

  15. Effects of Coaxial Air on Nitrogen-Diluted Hydrogen Jet Diffusion Flame Length and NOx Emission

    SciTech Connect

    Weiland, N.T.; Chen, R.-H.; Strakey, P.A.

    2007-10-01

    Turbulent nitrogen-diluted hydrogen jet diffusion flames with high velocity coaxial air flows are investigated for their NOx emission levels. This study is motivated by the DOE turbine program’s goal of achieving 2 ppm dry low NOx from turbine combustors running on nitrogen-diluted high-hydrogen fuels. In this study, effects of coaxial air velocity and momentum are varied while maintaining low overall equivalence ratios to eliminate the effects of recirculation of combustion products on flame lengths, flame temperatures, and resulting NOx emission levels. The nature of flame length and NOx emission scaling relationships are found to vary, depending on whether the combined fuel and coaxial air jet is fuel-rich or fuel-lean. In the absence of differential diffusion effects, flame lengths agree well with predicted trends, and NOx emissions levels are shown to decrease with increasing coaxial air velocity, as expected. Normalizing the NOx emission index with a flame residence time reveals some interesting trends, and indicates that a global flame strain based on the difference between the fuel and coaxial air velocities, as is traditionally used, is not a viable parameter for scaling the normalized NOx emissions of coaxial air jet diffusion flames.

  16. A non-equilibrium diffuse discharge in atmospheric pressure air* A non-equilibrium diffuse discharge in atmospheric pressure air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laroussi, Mounir; Lu, Xinpei; Malott, Chad M.

    2003-02-01

    The generation and maintenance of non-thermal air plasmas at atmospheric pressure with low power requirements remain formidable challenges. Here, we report on a promising method allowing the production of an air plasma between a planar disc-shaped metal electrode and a second electrode made of a static volume of water contained in a shallow glass dish. Currently, we have used only tap water as one of the electrodes. However, other liquids with low conductivity could also be used. In this paper, the power requirements, gas temperature measurements, and atomic and molecular emission bands of the discharge will be presented. Potential applications of this atmospheric pressure discharge include decontamination, radiation sources, etc.

  17. Observations of a helium-air gas-confined barrier discharge operated in diffuse mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shuqun; Dong, Xi; Mao, Wenhao; Yue, Yuanfu; Jiang, Jun; Zhang, Chaohai; Lu, Xinpei

    2017-08-01

    With ambient air instead of solid dielectric operating as the insulating layer, a diffuse helium/air gas-confined barrier discharge with a coaxial jet configuration is demonstrated for the first time. The effects of the helium gas flow rate, the diameter, and the vertical position of the helium gas flow on the breakdown characteristics of the diffuse mode are investigated. As the applied voltage increases, a diffuse plasma layer is first ignited within the helium gas column followed by a typical filamentary discharge bridging the whole gap. With the replacement of ambient air by N2 or O2 gas, the diffuse mode can be achieved with relatively lower breakdown voltage in the case of N2 gas while it is not observable in the case of O2 gas. The dynamics of the diffuse discharge show that the plasma front crosses the helium gas column vertically at an average velocity of ˜104 m/s, and then splits into two horizontally counter-propagating plasma fronts with the dark channel left behind.

  18. Research on the numerical simulation of secondary air diffusion angle to the swirl burners combustion process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Lei; Chang, Zhen; Liu, He; Yang, Guotian; Li, Xinli

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, the combustion process of swirl burners during 660 MW unit power plant is simulated. The influence of secondary air diffusion angle on the furnace temperature and furnace slagging is studied. In detail the temperature field and the carbon concentration field and velocity field inside the furnace are analysed when the secondary air diffusion angle is set as 30 °, 45 ° and 60 ° respectively. The simulation results show that when the secondary air diffusion angle is set as 30°, the center temperature of the furnace is highest, and at this time the pulverized coal combustion is sufficient, the carbon concentration near the water wall is the lowest, moreover, it is not easy to slag in the furnace. With the increase of secondary air diffusion angle, the center temperature of boiler burning zone gradually decline, carbon concentration near the water wall increase, it is the more prone to coking inside the furnace. The numerical simulation results not only provide a reference basis for the boiler operation, but also provide an important reference value for exquisite combustion research of the boiler.

  19. High pressure flame system for pollution studies with results for methane-air diffusion flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, I. M.; Maahs, H. G.

    1977-01-01

    A high pressure flame system was designed and constructed for studying nitrogen oxide formation in fuel air combustion. Its advantages and limitations were demonstrated by tests with a confined laminar methane air diffusion flame over the pressure range from 1 to 50 atm. The methane issued from a 3.06 mm diameter port concentrically into a stream of air contained within a 20.5 mm diameter chimney. As the combustion pressure is increased, the flame changes in shape from wide and convex to slender and concave, and there is a marked increase in the amount of luminous carbon. The height of the flame changes only moderately with pressure.

  20. Traveling waves in natural counterflow filtration combustion and their stability

    SciTech Connect

    Schult, D.A.; Bayliss, A.; Matkowsky, B.J.

    1998-06-01

    The authors consider two-dimensional filtration combustion in a porous medium in which an exothermic reaction takes place between the solid and a pure gaseous oxidant which is delivered to the reaction zone by filtration through the pores of the medium. As a result of the reaction, oxidant is consumed and a solid product is formed. The consumption of gas in the reaction causes a pressure gradient which drives filtration. Since no external forcing is required, this arrangement is termed natural filtration combustion. The samples are assumed to be open to gas permeation at one end with ignition at the other end so that gas flow is opposite to the direction of reaction propagation. This configuration is termed counterflow, so they study natural counterflow filtration combustion. This reaction scheme and configuration describe conditions of self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS), in which combustion waves are employed to synthesize advanced materials.

  1. Measurements of He II Thermal Counterflow Using PIV Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, T.; Van Sciver, S.W.

    2004-06-23

    Our previous experiments on the measurements of He II thermal counterflow using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) have shown that there exists a substantial discrepancy between the measured and theoretical values of normal fluid velocity. It was assumed that this is due to the slip velocity between tracer particles and liquid helium. In the present work, tracer particles with a much smaller mean diameter and a more uniform size distribution were selected in order to reduce the effect of slip velocity, and an improved two phase fluidized bed technique was used to introduce the particles into liquid helium. The normal fluid velocity of thermal counterflow was then measured using the PIV technique at various heat fluxes and bath temperatures. The experimental results, however, still show the existence of discrepancy between PIV measured particle velocities and the theoretical normal fluid velocity. A preliminary explanation of these results is given based on an interaction of tracer particles with the superfluid component in the He II.

  2. A Cellular Automaton model for pedestrian counterflow with swapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Y. Z.; Dong, L. Y.

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, we propose a new floor field Cellular Automaton (CA) model with considering the swapping behaviors of pedestrians. The neighboring pedestrians in opposite directions take swapping in a probability decided by the linear density of pedestrian flow. The swapping which happens simultaneously with the normal movement is introduced to eliminate the gridlock in low density region. Numerical results show that the fundamental diagram is in good agreement with the measured data. Then the model is applied to investigate the counterflow and four typical states such as free flow, lane, intermediate and congestion states are found. More attention is paid on the intermediate state which lane-formation and local congestions switch in an irregular manner. The swapping plays a vital role in reducing the gridlock. Furthermore, the influence of the corridor size and individual's eyesight on counterflow are discussed in detail.

  3. Towards Direct Simulations of Counterflow Flames with Consistent Numerical Differential-Algebraic Boundary Conditions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-18

    Towards direct simulations of counterflow flames with consistent numerical differential-algebraic boundary conditions The views, opinions and/or...Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 counterflow laminar flame model REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE 11. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S REPORT NUMBER(S) 10. SPONSOR...simulations of counterflow flames with consistent numerical differential-algebraic boundary conditions Report Title A new approach for the

  4. Coprocessing of waste hydrocarbon feedstocks using counterflow reactor technology

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, R.J.; Carson, D.W.

    1995-12-01

    Counterflow Reactor (CFR) Technology has proven to be successful for processing bituminous and subbituminous coals in both coal liquefaction and in coprocessing with heavy oils. The technology has the potential for a variety of processing options including coprocessing of waste hydrocarbons (used plastics and rubber tires) with coal. Preliminary testing of plastics and rubber crumb has been completed using a batch autoclave (1 litre) procedure. Solubilization of low density polyethylene in a coal derived solvent was enhanced by the presence of coal.

  5. Influences of flame-vortex interactions on formation of oxides of nitrogen in curved methane-air diffusion flamelets

    SciTech Connect

    Card, J.M.; Ryden, R.; Williams, F.A.

    1996-05-01

    Previous work has identified a parabolic flamelet in a uniform flow as a useful model for studying flame-vortex interactions and has presented an asymptotic analysis of this flamelet structure for two-step reduced chemistry of the methane-air system. The present paper addresses production rates of oxides of nitrogen in this flamelet by one-step reduced-chemistry descriptions of both thermal and prompt mechanisms, for both two-step and three-step methane-air reduced chemistry, and also reports some results of calculations of production rates with a full-chemistry description of planar counterflow flames, for purposes of comparison. The comparisons suggest that the asymptotic approximations significantly overestimate production rates and fail as extinction is approached but give qualitatively correct trends away from extinction. These trends show that increasing the tip curvature of the flamelet increases the prompt contribution while decreasing the thermal contribution. It is concluded that more research is needed on both elementary rates and asymptotic descriptions, especially for the prompt mechanism.

  6. Precipitation and Hydrology Experiment Counter-Flow Spectrometer and Impactor Field Campaign Report

    SciTech Connect

    Poellot, Michael

    2016-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility Aerial Facility (ARM AAF) counter-flow spectrometer and impactor (CSI) probe was flown on the University of North Dakota Cessna Citation research aircraft during the Integrated Precipitation and Hydrology Experiment (IPHEX). The field campaign took place during May and June of 2014 over North Carolina and its coastal waters as part of a National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Global Precipitation Measurement validation campaign. The CSI was added to the Citation instrument suite to support the involvement of Jay Mace through the NASA Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) satellite program and flights of the NASA ER-2 aircraft, which is a civilian version of the Air Force’s U2-S reconnaissance platform. The ACE program funded extra ER-2 flights to focus on clouds that are weakly precipitating, which are also of interest to the Atmospheric System Research program sponsored by DOE.

  7. Measurements and Modeling of Nitric Oxide Formation in Counterflow, Premixed CH4/O2/N2 Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomsen, D. Douglas; Laurendeau, Normand M.

    2000-01-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) measurements of NO concentration in a variety of CH4/O2/N2 flames are used to evaluate the chemical kinetics of NO formation. The analysis begins with previous measurements in flat, laminar, premixed CH4/O2/N2 flames stabilized on a water-cooled McKenna burner at pressures ranging from 1 to 14.6 atm, equivalence ratios from 0.5 to 1.6, and volumetric nitrogen/oxygen dilution ratios of 2.2, 3.1 and 3.76. These measured results are compared to predictions to determine the capabilities and limitations of the comprehensive kinetic mechanism developed by the Gas Research Institute (GRI), version 2.11. The model is shown to predict well the qualitative trends of NO formation in lean-premixed flames, while quantitatively underpredicting NO concentration by 30-50%. For rich flames, the model is unable to even qualitatively match the experimental results. These flames were found to be limited by low temperatures and an inability to separate the flame from the burner surface. In response to these limitations, a counterflow burner was designed for use in opposed premixed flame studies. A new LIF calibration technique was developed and applied to obtain quantitative measurements of NO concentration in laminar, counterflow premixed, CH4/O2/N2 flames at pressures ranging from 1 to 5.1 atm, equivalence ratios of 0.6 to 1.5, and an N2/O2 dilution ratio of 3.76. The counterflow premixed flame measurements are combined with measurements in burner-stabilized premixed flames and counterflow diffusion flames to build a comprehensive database for analysis of the GRI kinetic mechanism. Pathways, quantitative reaction path and sensitivity analyses are applied to the GRI mechanism for these flame conditions. The prompt NO mechanism is found to severely underpredict the amount of NO formed in rich premixed and nitrogen-diluted diffusion flames. This underprediction is traced to uncertainties in the CH kinetics as well as in the nitrogen oxidation chemistry

  8. Thermoelectric Generation Using Counter-Flows of Ideal Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Xiangning; Lu, Baiyi; Zhu, Miaoyong; Suzuki, Ryosuke O.

    2017-08-01

    Thermoelectric (TE) performance of a three-dimensional (3-D) TE module is examined by exposing it between a pair of counter-flows of ideal fluids. The ideal fluids are thermal sources of TE module flow in the opposite direction at the same flow rate and generate temperature differences on the hot and cold surfaces due to their different temperatures at the channel inlet. TE performance caused by different inlet temperatures of thermal fluids are numerically analyzed by using the finite-volume method on 3-D meshed physical models and then compared with those using a constant boundary temperature. The results show that voltage and current of the TE module increase gradually from a beginning moment to a steady flow and reach a stable value. The stable values increase with inlet temperature of the hot fluid when the inlet temperature of cold fluid is fixed. However, the time to get to the stable values is almost consistent for all the temperature differences. Moreover, the trend of TE performance using a fluid flow boundary is similar to that of using a constant boundary temperature. Furthermore, 3-D contours of fluid pressure, temperature, enthalpy, electromotive force, current density and heat flux are exhibited in order to clarify the influence of counter-flows of ideal fluids on TE generation. The current density and heat flux homogeneously distribute on an entire TE module, thus indicating that the counter-flows of thermal fluids have high potential to bring about fine performance for TE modules.

  9. Energy spectrum of thermal counterflow turbulence in superfluid helium-4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, J.; Varga, E.; Guo, W.; Vinen, W. F.

    2017-09-01

    Recent preliminary experiments [A. Marakov et al., Phys. Rev. B 91, 094503 (2015)., 10.1103/PhysRevB.91.094503] using triplet-state He2 excimer molecules as tracers of the motion of the normal fluid have shown that, in thermal counterflow turbulence in superfluid 4He, small-scale turbulence in the superfluid component is accompanied, above a critical heat flux, by partially coupled large-scale turbulence in both fluids, with an energy spectrum proportional to k-m, where m is greater than the Kolmogorov value of 5/3. Here we report the results of a more detailed study of this spectrum over a range of temperatures and heat fluxes using the same experimental technique. We show that the exponent m varies systematically with heat flux but is always greater than 5/3. We interpret this as arising from the steady counterflow, which causes large-scale eddies in the two fluids to be pulled in opposite directions, giving rise to dissipation by mutual friction at all wave numbers, mutual friction tending also to oppose the effect of the counterflow. Comparison of the experimental results with a simple theory suggests that this process may be more complicated than we might have hoped, but experiments covering a wider range of heat fluxes, which are technically very difficult, will probably be required before we can arrive at a convincing theory.

  10. Air purifiers that diffuse reactive oxygen species potentially cause DNA damage in the lung.

    PubMed

    Kawamoto, Kosuke; Sato, Itaru; Yoshida, Midori; Tsuda, Shuji

    2010-12-01

    Several appliance manufacturers have recently released new type air purifiers that can disinfect bacteria, fungi and viruses by diffusing reactive oxygen species (ROS) into the air. In this study, mice were exposed to the outlet air from each of 3 air purifiers from different manufacturers (A, B, C), and the lung was examined for DNA damage, lipid peroxidation and histopathology to confirm the safety of these air purifiers. Neither abnormal behavior during exposure nor gross abnormality at necropsy was observed. No histopathological changes were also observed in the lung. However, significant increase of DNA damage was detected by the comet assay in the lung immediately after the direct exposure for 48 hr to models A and B, and for 16 hr to model B. As for model B, DNA migration was also increased by 2 hr exposure in a 1 m(3) plastic chamber but not by 48 hr exposure in a room (12.6 m(3)). Model C did not cause DNA damage. Lipid peroxidation and 8-hydroxy deoxyguanosine (8-OH-dG) was not increased under the conditions DNA damage was detected by the comet assay. The present results revealed that some models of air purifiers that diffuse ROS potentially cause DNA damage in the lung although the mechanism was left unsolved.

  11. Contribution of Atmospheric Diffusion Conditions to the Recent Improvement in Air Quality in China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoyan; Wang, Kaicun; Su, Liangyuan

    2016-11-02

    This study analyzed hourly mass concentration observations of PM2.5 (particulate matters with diameter less than 2.5 μm) at 512 stations in China from December 2013 to May 2015. We found that the mean concentrations of PM2.5 during the winter and spring of 2015 Dec. 2014 to Feb. 2015 and Mar. 2015 to May 2015) decreased by 20% and 14% compared to the previous year, respectively. Hazardous air-quality days decreased by 11% in 2015 winter, with more frequent good to unhealthy days; and the good and moderate air-quality days in 2015 spring increased by 9% corresponding to the less occurrence of unhealthy conditions. We compared the atmospheric diffusion conditions during these two years and quantified its contribution to the improvement of air quality during the first half of 2015 over China. Our results show that during the 2015 winter and spring, 70% and 57% of the 512 stations experienced more favorable atmospheric diffusion conditions compared to those of previous year. Over central and northern China, approximately 40% of the total decrease in PM2.5 during the 2015 winter can be attributed to the favorable atmospheric diffusion conditions. The atmospheric diffusion conditions during the spring of 2015 were not as favorable as in winter; and the average contributions of the atmospheric conditions were slight.

  12. Contribution of Atmospheric Diffusion Conditions to the Recent Improvement in Air Quality in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoyan; Wang, Kaicun; Su, Liangyuan

    2016-11-01

    This study analyzed hourly mass concentration observations of PM2.5 (particulate matters with diameter less than 2.5 μm) at 512 stations in China from December 2013 to May 2015. We found that the mean concentrations of PM2.5 during the winter and spring of 2015 Dec. 2014 to Feb. 2015 and Mar. 2015 to May 2015) decreased by 20% and 14% compared to the previous year, respectively. Hazardous air-quality days decreased by 11% in 2015 winter, with more frequent good to unhealthy days; and the good and moderate air-quality days in 2015 spring increased by 9% corresponding to the less occurrence of unhealthy conditions. We compared the atmospheric diffusion conditions during these two years and quantified its contribution to the improvement of air quality during the first half of 2015 over China. Our results show that during the 2015 winter and spring, 70% and 57% of the 512 stations experienced more favorable atmospheric diffusion conditions compared to those of previous year. Over central and northern China, approximately 40% of the total decrease in PM2.5 during the 2015 winter can be attributed to the favorable atmospheric diffusion conditions. The atmospheric diffusion conditions during the spring of 2015 were not as favorable as in winter; and the average contributions of the atmospheric conditions were slight.

  13. Contribution of Atmospheric Diffusion Conditions to the Recent Improvement in Air Quality in China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoyan; Wang, Kaicun; Su, Liangyuan

    2016-01-01

    This study analyzed hourly mass concentration observations of PM2.5 (particulate matters with diameter less than 2.5 μm) at 512 stations in China from December 2013 to May 2015. We found that the mean concentrations of PM2.5 during the winter and spring of 2015 Dec. 2014 to Feb. 2015 and Mar. 2015 to May 2015) decreased by 20% and 14% compared to the previous year, respectively. Hazardous air-quality days decreased by 11% in 2015 winter, with more frequent good to unhealthy days; and the good and moderate air-quality days in 2015 spring increased by 9% corresponding to the less occurrence of unhealthy conditions. We compared the atmospheric diffusion conditions during these two years and quantified its contribution to the improvement of air quality during the first half of 2015 over China. Our results show that during the 2015 winter and spring, 70% and 57% of the 512 stations experienced more favorable atmospheric diffusion conditions compared to those of previous year. Over central and northern China, approximately 40% of the total decrease in PM2.5 during the 2015 winter can be attributed to the favorable atmospheric diffusion conditions. The atmospheric diffusion conditions during the spring of 2015 were not as favorable as in winter; and the average contributions of the atmospheric conditions were slight. PMID:27805030

  14. Morphological bubble evolution induced by air diffusion on submerged hydrophobic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Pengyu; Xiang, Yaolei; Xue, Yahui; Lin, Hao; Duan, Huiling

    2017-03-01

    Bubbles trapped in the cavities always play important roles in the underwater applications of structured hydrophobic surfaces. Air exchange between bubbles and surrounding water has a significant influence on the morphological bubble evolution, which in turn frequently affects the functionalities of the surfaces, such as superhydrophobicity and drag reduction. In this paper, air diffusion induced bubble evolution on submerged hydrophobic micropores under reduced pressures is investigated experimentally and theoretically. The morphological behaviors of collective and single bubbles are observed using confocal microscopy. Four representative evolution phases of bubbles are captured in situ. After depressurization, bubbles will not only grow and coalesce but also shrink and split although the applied pressure remains negative. A diffusion-based model is used to analyze the evolution behavior and the results are consistent with the experimental data. A criterion for bubble growth and shrinkage is also derived along with a phase diagram, revealing that the competition of effective gas partial pressures across the two sides of the diffusion layer dominates the bubble evolution process. Strategies for controlling the bubble evolution behavior are also proposed based on the phase diagram. The current work provides a further understanding of the general behavior of bubble evolution induced by air diffusion and can be employed to better designs of functional microstructured hydrophobic surfaces.

  15. Surface hardening of stainless steel by runaway electrons preionized diffuse discharge in air atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erofeev, M. V.; Shulepov, M. A.; Oskomov, K. V.; Tarasenko, V. F.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper we present microhardness measurements of stainless steel surface treated by diffuse discharge in air atmosphere. The cleaning from carbon in comparison to the initial sample was observed at a depth exceeding 20 nm. The oxygen concentration was also increased in comparison to that in the initial sample at a depth of up to about 50 nm. Comparative analysis shows that after treatment the microhardness of stainless steel surface increased in 2 times due to interaction of near-surface layers with product of plasma chemical reactions produced in diffuse discharge.

  16. Template-directed fabrication of porous gas diffusion layer for magnesium air batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Yejian; Miao, He; Sun, Shanshan; Wang, Qin; Li, Shihua; Liu, Zhaoping

    2015-11-01

    The uniform micropore distribution in the gas diffusion layers (GDLs) of the air-breathing cathode is very important for the metal air batteries. In this work, the super-hydrophobic GDL with the interconnected regular pores is prepared by a facile silica template method, and then the electrochemical properties of the Mg air batteries containing these GDLs are investigated. The results indicate that the interconnected and uniform pore structure, the available water-breakout pressure and the high gas permeability coefficient of the GDL can be obtained by the application of 30% silica template. The maximum power density of the Mg air battery containing the GDL with 30% regular pores reaches 88.9 mW cm-2 which is about 1.2 times that containing the pristine GDL. Furthermore, the GDL with 30% regular pores exhibits the improved the long term hydrophobic stability.

  17. [Measurement of Chemical Compounds in Indoor and Outdoor Air in Chiba City Using Diffusive Sampling Devices].

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Hironari; Uchiyama, Shigehisa; Kihara, Akiko; Tsutake, Toyoshige; Bekki, Kanae; Inaba, Yohei; Nakagome, Hideki; Kunugita, Naoki

    2015-01-01

    Indoor air quality (IAQ) is a major concern, because people on average spend the vast majority of their time indoors and they are repeatedly exposed to indoor air pollutants. In this study, to assess indoor air quality in Chiba City, gaseous chemical compounds were surveyed using four types of diffusive sampler. Gaseous chemical compounds such as carbonyls, volatile organic compounds (VOC), acid gases, basic gases, and ozone were measured in indoor and outdoor air of 50 houses throughout Chiba City in winter and summer. Four types of diffusive sampler were used in this study: DSD-BPE/DNPH packed with 2,4-dinitrophenyl hydrazine and trans-1,2-bis(2-pyridyl)ethylene-coated silica for ozone and carbonyls; VOC-SD packed with Carboxen 564 particles for volatile organic compounds; DSD-TEA packed with triethanolamine-impregnated silica for acid gases; and DSD-NH3 packed with phosphoric acid-impregnated silica for basic gases. Almost all compounds in indoor air were detected at higher concentrations in summer than in winter. However, the nitrogen dioxide concentration in indoor air particularly increased only in winter, which well correlated with the formic acid concentration (correlation coefficient=0.974). The compound with the highest concentrations in indoor air was p-dichlorobenzene, with recorded levels of 13,000 μg m(-3) in summer and 1,100 μg m(-3) in winter in indoor air. p-Dichlorobenzene in summer and nitrogen dioxide in winter are detected at markedly high concentrations. Pollution control and continuous monitoring of IAQ are indispensable for human health.

  18. Active flow control integrated diffuser (afcid) for increased energy efficiency in variable air volume systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Der Schijff, Hermanus P.

    Variable air volume (VAV) air terminals are designed to save energy by reducing airflow into a given space based on occupancy and required load. Systems are typically designed to operate at peak load, however as load is reduced, performance is compromised due to inadequate throw. As a result, fans are installed to adjust for the losses, negating many of the energy savings. Additionally flow is vectored by the use of vanes, a basic passive type of flow control. An experimental investigation was performed to study the application of flow control on that of a HVAC diffuser using synthetic jets distributed evenly along the diffuser edge parallel to the flow field. The study was conducted on a 1:3 scale typical office space (150 ft2), which included a simulated scale HVAC system supplied by compressed air. Two different jet blowing ratios were investigated for system loads of 60% and 90%. The flow field was established using hot wire anemometry and Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). This study demonstrates the effectiveness of synthetic jet based active flow control at controlling airflow, showing ability to affect throw parameters for changing flow rates within the test chamber. Vectoring of up to 20% and improvement in jet spread of 200% was demonstrated. The use of such devices has the potential to improve air quality and air distribution in building while simultaneously lowering energy demands of HVAC systems.

  19. Quantitative Passive Diffusive Sampling for Assessing Soil Vapor Intrusion to Indoor Air

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-28

    4/11/2012 1 Quantitative Passive Diffusive Sampling for Assessing Soil Vapor Intrusion to Indoor Air Todd McAlary and Hester Groenevelt, Geosyntec... Intrusion to Indoor Air 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK...10-6 risk (ppb) Vapour pressure (atm) Water solubility (g/l) 1,1,1-Trichloroethane 110 400 0.16 1.33 1,2,4-Trimethylbenzene

  20. Hydrogen diffusivity in oxide layers formed in Zr alloy in air or steam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Taro; Takagi, Ikuji; Sakamoto, Kan; Aomi, Masaki

    2017-10-01

    The effect of the oxidation conditions on hydrogen diffusion in oxide layers in Zr alloy was experimentally studied. Samples of GNF-Ziron (high-iron Zircaloy-2-type alloy) sheets were oxidized in air or steam and then exposed to deuterium plasma to charge them with deuterium. Deuterium depth profiles in each sample were observed by nuclear reaction analysis during plasma exposure, and the deuterium diffusion coefficient D was estimated. The results showed that the D values of the steam-oxidized samples were high, whereas that of a steam-oxidized sample that was subsequently heated in vacuum was as low as those of air-oxidized samples. The difference in D was not attributed to the structure but is probably due to the presence of OH groups absorbed during steam oxidation.

  1. Partitioned airs at microscale and nanoscale: thermal diffusivity in ultrahigh porosity solids of nanocellulose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Koh; Kobayashi, Yuri; Saito, Tsuguyuki; Isogai, Akira

    2016-02-01

    High porosity solids, such as plastic foams and aerogels, are thermally insulating. Their insulation performance strongly depends on their pore structure, which dictates the heat transfer process in the material. Understanding such a relationship is essential to realizing highly efficient thermal insulators. Herein, we compare the heat transfer properties of foams and aerogels that have very high porosities (97.3–99.7%) and an identical composition (nanocellulose). The foams feature rather closed, microscale pores formed with a thin film-like solid phase, whereas the aerogels feature nanoscale open pores formed with a nanofibrous network-like solid skeleton. Unlike the aerogel samples, the thermal diffusivity of the foam decreases considerably with a slight increase in the solid fraction. The results indicate that for suppressing the thermal diffusion of air within high porosity solids, creating microscale spaces with distinct partitions is more effective than directly blocking the free path of air molecules at the nanoscale.

  2. Air diffusion biocathode with CueO as electrocatalyst adsorbed on carbon particle-modified electrodes.

    PubMed

    Kontani, Ryota; Tsujimura, Seiya; Kano, Kenji

    2009-09-01

    The current density of biofuel cells which use dissolved O(2) as electron acceptor is limited by O(2) supply to the electrode surface due to the low solubility and small diffusion coefficient of O(2) in the electrolyte solution. In order to increase the current density, we constructed an air diffusion biocathode which uses O(2) directly from the air. As cathodic biocatalyst, we utilized CueO from Escherichia coli, which belongs to the family of multi-copper oxidases. O(2) reduction was catalyzed by CueO adsorbed on Ketjen black-modified carbon paper electrodes. The hydrophobic electrode surface was obtained by optimizing the weight ratio of polytetrafluoroethylene binder to Ketjen black. The current density of O(2) reduction reached values as high as 20 mA cm(-2) at 0 V vs. Ag|AgCl, KCl(sat.) in a citrate buffer (1.0 M, pH 5.0, 25 degrees C).

  3. Partitioned airs at microscale and nanoscale: thermal diffusivity in ultrahigh porosity solids of nanocellulose

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, Koh; Kobayashi, Yuri; Saito, Tsuguyuki; Isogai, Akira

    2016-01-01

    High porosity solids, such as plastic foams and aerogels, are thermally insulating. Their insulation performance strongly depends on their pore structure, which dictates the heat transfer process in the material. Understanding such a relationship is essential to realizing highly efficient thermal insulators. Herein, we compare the heat transfer properties of foams and aerogels that have very high porosities (97.3–99.7%) and an identical composition (nanocellulose). The foams feature rather closed, microscale pores formed with a thin film-like solid phase, whereas the aerogels feature nanoscale open pores formed with a nanofibrous network-like solid skeleton. Unlike the aerogel samples, the thermal diffusivity of the foam decreases considerably with a slight increase in the solid fraction. The results indicate that for suppressing the thermal diffusion of air within high porosity solids, creating microscale spaces with distinct partitions is more effective than directly blocking the free path of air molecules at the nanoscale. PMID:26830144

  4. Temperature Measurements in an Ethylene-Air-Opposed Flow Diffusion Flame

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    Temperature Measurements in an Ethylene-Air-Opposed Flow Diffusion Flame by Matthew S. Kurman, John M. Densmore, Chol -Bum M. Kweon, and...Oak Ridge Associated Universities John M. Densmore Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Chol -Bum M. Kweon Vehicle Technology Directorate... Chol -Bum M. Kweon, and Kevin L. McNesby 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 1VP2J1 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND

  5. Exciton diffusion, end quenching, and exciton-exciton annihilation in individual air-suspended carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, A.; Yoshida, M.; Kato, Y. K.

    2015-03-01

    Luminescence properties of carbon nanotubes are strongly affected by exciton diffusion, which plays an important role in various nonradiative decay processes. Here we perform photoluminescence microscopy on hundreds of individual air-suspended carbon nanotubes to elucidate the interplay between exciton diffusion, end quenching, and exciton-exciton annihilation processes. A model derived from random-walk theory as well as Monte Carlo simulations are utilized to analyze nanotube length dependence and excitation power dependence of emission intensity. We have obtained the values of exciton diffusion length and absorption cross section for different chiralities, and diameter-dependent photoluminescence quantum yields have been observed. The simulations have also revealed the nature of a one-dimensional coalescence process, and an analytical expression for the power dependence of emission intensity is given.

  6. Characteristics of Gaseous Diffusion Flames with High Temperature Combustion Air in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghaderi, M.; Gupta, A. K.

    2003-01-01

    The characteristics of gaseous diffusion flames have been obtained using high temperature combustion air under microgravity conditions. The time resolved flame images under free fall microgravity conditions were obtained from the video images obtained. The tests results reported here were conducted using propane as the fuel and about 1000 C combustion air. The burner included a 0.686 mm diameter central fuel jet injected into the surrounding high temperature combustion air. The fuel jet exit Reynolds number was 63. Several measurements were taken at different air preheats and fuel jet exit Reynolds number. The resulting hybrid color flame was found to be blue at the base of the flame followed by a yellow color flame. The length and width of flame during the entire free fall conditions has been examined. Also the relative flame length and width for blue and yellow portion of the flame has been examined under microgravity conditions. The results show that the flame length decreases and width increases with high air preheats in microgravity condition. In microgravity conditions the flame length is larger with normal temperature combustion air than high temperature air.

  7. High-temperature counter-flow recuperator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudloff, F.

    1981-05-01

    The commercial potential of a helical recuperator design in recovering waste heat from industrial furnaces is reported. The helical recuperator concept consists of a cylindrical column with an interior helical interface which separates the preheat air and the combustion gas. The column operates in a teer flow mode and is formed from modular sections. The material evaluation consisted of exposing material samples to a soda-lime glass furnace environment for a fifteen week period. ECP-3, X-81, and Unichrome were the best suited for use in a soda-lime environment and ECP-3 was the best candidate with respect to manufacturing. Two potential design modifications were identified: a finned design and a double helix design. For materials that showed the greatest potential for use in the glass environment, the double helix design made from ECP-3 was the most economical producing payback periods of 6 to 14 years.

  8. Investigation of structure of superconducting power transmission cables with LN2 counter-flow cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furuse, Mitsuho; Fuchino, Shuichiro; Higuchi, Noboru

    2003-04-01

    Establishment of long-distance cooling techniques and design of a compact cross section are required for development of HTC superconducting underground power cables. To save space of return coolant, a counter-flow cooling system appears promising. However, it is difficult to cool down long cables because of heat exchange between counter-flows due to high thermal conductivity of dielectric materials which separate both flows in range of liquid nitrogen temperature. We estimated temperature distributions analytically along model HTS power cables with counter-flow. Results of calculation showed that when liquid-nitrogen-impregnated polypropylene laminated paper was chosen for a dielectric material, great thickness was required to reduce heat exchange between counter-flows. We investigated various cable structures to optimize the counter-flow cooling system and cable size.

  9. Reynolds number and geometry effects in laminar axisymmetric isothermal counterflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scribano, Gianfranco; Bisetti, Fabrizio

    2016-12-01

    The counterflow configuration is a canonical stagnation flow, featuring two opposed impinging round jets and a mixing layer across the stagnation plane. Although counterflows are used extensively in the study of reactive mixtures and other applications where mixing of two streams is required, quantitative data on the scaling properties of the flow field are lacking. The aim of this work is to characterize the velocity and mixing fields in isothermal counterflows over a wide range of conditions. The study features both experimental data from particle image velocimetry and results from detailed axisymmetric simulations. The scaling laws for the nondimensional velocity and mixture fraction are obtained as a function of an appropriate Reynolds number and the ratio of the separation distance of the nozzles to their diameter. In the range of flow configurations investigated, the nondimensional fields are found to depend primarily on the separation ratio and, to a lesser extent, the Reynolds number. The marked dependence of the velocity field with respect to the separation ratio is linked to a high pressure region at the stagnation point. On the other hand, Reynolds number effects highlight the role played by the wall boundary layer on the interior of the nozzles, which becomes less important as the separation ratio decreases. The normalized strain rate and scalar dissipation rate at the stagnation plane are found to attain limiting values only for high values of the Reynolds number. These asymptotic values depend markedly on the separation ratio and differ significantly from the values produced by analytical models. The scaling of the mixing field does not show a limiting behavior as the separation ratio decreases to the smallest practical value considered.

  10. Design and experimental analysis of counter-flow heat and mass exchanger incorporating (M-cycle) for evaporative cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalid, Omar; Butt, Zubair; Tanveer, Waqas; Rao, Hasan Iqbal

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, the functioning of dew-point cooler is improved in terms of its thermal effectiveness. For this reason, a heat and mass exchanger has been designed by using a counter-flow pattern incorporating Maisotsenko cycle (M-cycle) having effective absorbing material called Kraft paper on wet channel side and improved width to height ratio. Experimentation has been performed under various inlet air working parameters such as humidity, velocity and temperature in addition with changing feed water temperature. The results from the experiments specify that the dew-point and the wet-bulb effectiveness is achieved between 67-87 % and 104-120 % respectively. Analysis is performed with temperature variation between 25 and 45 °C at different absolute humidity levels ranging from 14.4 to 18 g/kg, while the inlet air velocity is varied between 0.88 and 1.50 m/s. Thus, the working ability of the improved design has been found 5 % more effective in terms of wet bulb effectiveness as compared to previous counter-flow designs.

  11. Design and experimental analysis of counter-flow heat and mass exchanger incorporating (M-cycle) for evaporative cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalid, Omar; Butt, Zubair; Tanveer, Waqas; Rao, Hasan Iqbal

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, the functioning of dew-point cooler is improved in terms of its thermal effectiveness. For this reason, a heat and mass exchanger has been designed by using a counter-flow pattern incorporating Maisotsenko cycle (M-cycle) having effective absorbing material called Kraft paper on wet channel side and improved width to height ratio. Experimentation has been performed under various inlet air working parameters such as humidity, velocity and temperature in addition with changing feed water temperature. The results from the experiments specify that the dew-point and the wet-bulb effectiveness is achieved between 67-87 % and 104-120 % respectively. Analysis is performed with temperature variation between 25 and 45 °C at different absolute humidity levels ranging from 14.4 to 18 g/kg, while the inlet air velocity is varied between 0.88 and 1.50 m/s. Thus, the working ability of the improved design has been found 5 % more effective in terms of wet bulb effectiveness as compared to previous counter-flow designs.

  12. Numerical Investigation of Thermal Counterflow of He II Past Cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soulaine, Cyprien; Quintard, Michel; Baudouy, Bertrand; Van Weelderen, Rob

    2017-02-01

    We investigate numerically, for the first time, the thermal counterflow of superfluid helium past a cylinder by solving with a finite volume method the complete so-called two-fluid model. In agreement with existing experimental results, we obtain symmetrical eddies both up- and downstream of the obstacle. The generation of these eddies is a complex transient phenomenon that involves the friction of the normal fluid component with the solid walls and the mutual friction between the superfluid and normal components. Implications for flow in a more realistic porous medium are also investigated.

  13. Investigation of Counter-Flow in a Heat Pipe-Thermoelectric Generator (HPTEG)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remeli, Muhammad Fairuz; Singh, Baljit; Affandi, Nor Dalila Nor; Ding, Lai Chet; Date, Abhijit; Akbarzadeh, Aliakbar

    2017-05-01

    This study explores a method of generating electricity while recovering waste heat through the integration of heat pipes and thermoelectric generators (i.e. HPTEG system). The simultaneous waste heat recovery and power generation processes are achieved without the use of any moving parts. The HPTEG system consists of bismuth telluride thermoelectric generators (TEG), which are sandwiched between two finned pipes to achieve a temperature gradient across the TEG for electricity generation. A counter-flow heat exchanger was built using two separate air ducts. The air ducts were thermally coupled using the HPTEG modules. The evaporator section of the heat pipe absorbed the waste heat in a hot air duct. The heat was then transferred across the TEG surfaces. The condenser section of the HPTEG collected the excess heat from the TEG cold side before releasing it to the cold air duct. A 2-kW electrical heater was installed in the hot air duct to simulate the exhaust gas. An air blower was installed at the inlet of each duct to direct the flow of air into the ducts. A theoretical model was developed for predicting the performance of the HPTEG system using the effectiveness-number of transfer units method. The developed model was able to predict the thermal and electrical output of the HPTEG, along with the rate of heat transfer. The results showed that by increasing the cold air velocity, the effectiveness of the heat exchanger was able to be increased from approximately 52% to 58%. As a consequence of the improved heat transfer, maximum power output of 4.3 W was obtained.

  14. Investigation of Counter-Flow in a Heat Pipe-Thermoelectric Generator (HPTEG)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remeli, Muhammad Fairuz; Singh, Baljit; Affandi, Nor Dalila Nor; Ding, Lai Chet; Date, Abhijit; Akbarzadeh, Aliakbar

    2016-12-01

    This study explores a method of generating electricity while recovering waste heat through the integration of heat pipes and thermoelectric generators (i.e. HPTEG system). The simultaneous waste heat recovery and power generation processes are achieved without the use of any moving parts. The HPTEG system consists of bismuth telluride thermoelectric generators (TEG), which are sandwiched between two finned pipes to achieve a temperature gradient across the TEG for electricity generation. A counter-flow heat exchanger was built using two separate air ducts. The air ducts were thermally coupled using the HPTEG modules. The evaporator section of the heat pipe absorbed the waste heat in a hot air duct. The heat was then transferred across the TEG surfaces. The condenser section of the HPTEG collected the excess heat from the TEG cold side before releasing it to the cold air duct. A 2-kW electrical heater was installed in the hot air duct to simulate the exhaust gas. An air blower was installed at the inlet of each duct to direct the flow of air into the ducts. A theoretical model was developed for predicting the performance of the HPTEG system using the effectiveness-number of transfer units method. The developed model was able to predict the thermal and electrical output of the HPTEG, along with the rate of heat transfer. The results showed that by increasing the cold air velocity, the effectiveness of the heat exchanger was able to be increased from approximately 52% to 58%. As a consequence of the improved heat transfer, maximum power output of 4.3 W was obtained.

  15. Diffusion of clean indoor air ordinances in the southwestern United States.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Everett M; Peterson, Jeffery C

    2008-10-01

    The authors investigate the process through which clean indoor air ordinances were considered in 10 communities in the southwestern United States and key factors that influenced diffusion and adoption. Clean indoor air ordinances, which ban smoking in public places, were adopted in approximately 1,409 U.S. communities from 1986 to April 2004. The authors gathered data from 10 communities in New Mexico and Texas by means of face-to-face interview, e-mail, and telephone interviews and by analyzing archival materials. Important influences on the adoption or rejection of clean indoor air ordinances were (a) personal experiences of policy champions, (b) local framing of the ordinance as a public health issue versus as an economic/ business or an individual rights issue, and (c) interpersonal networks connecting a community to previously adopting communities. The policies that were adopted ranged in comprehensiveness, with each community of study reinventing model policies obtained from other communities.

  16. Measurement of the radon diffusion through a nylon foil for different air humidities

    SciTech Connect

    Mamedov, Fadahat; Štekl, Ivan; Smolek, Karel

    2015-08-17

    The dependency of the radon penetration through a nylon foil on air humidity was measured. Such information is needed for the tracking part of the SuperNEMO detector, which is planned to be shielded against radon by nylon foil and in which the air humidity is not negligible. The long term measurements of radon penetration through nylon foils for different air humidities were performed with the radon diffusion setup constructed at the IEAP, CTU in Prague. The setup consists of two stainless steel hemispheres with Si detector in each of them. Both hemispheres are separated by the tested foil. While the left hemisphere contains high Rn activity, the right part contains only activity caused by the radon penetration through the tested foil. Obtained results of this study with a nylon foil with the thickness of 50 µm are presented.

  17. Measurement of the radon diffusion through a nylon foil for different air humidities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamedov, Fadahat; Štekl, Ivan; Smolek, Karel

    2015-08-01

    The dependency of the radon penetration through a nylon foil on air humidity was measured. Such information is needed for the tracking part of the SuperNEMO detector, which is planned to be shielded against radon by nylon foil and in which the air humidity is not negligible. The long term measurements of radon penetration through nylon foils for different air humidities were performed with the radon diffusion setup constructed at the IEAP, CTU in Prague. The setup consists of two stainless steel hemispheres with Si detector in each of them. Both hemispheres are separated by the tested foil. While the left hemisphere contains high Rn activity, the right part contains only activity caused by the radon penetration through the tested foil. Obtained results of this study with a nylon foil with the thickness of 50 µm are presented.

  18. Effects of plume spacing and flowrate on destratification efficiency of air diffusers.

    PubMed

    Yum, Kyungtaek; Kim, Sung Hoon; Park, Heekyung

    2008-07-01

    This study adopts techniques of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to analyze the combined effect of adjacent plumes of an air-diffuser system on its destratification efficiency. Lab experiments were carried out to calibrate and verify the CFD models in thermally stratified freshwater. The CFD simulation and lab experiment results were analyzed to relate destratification efficiency with four non-dimensional variables. The results indicate that destratification number, D(N), has the best relationship that includes air flowrate, stratification frequency, water depth, and bubble slip velocity. Since plume spacing and air flowrate are the major control variables of the system, especially in the field, two charts showing the relationships between destratification efficiency, plume spacing, and destratification number are developed for guiding their control in its design and operation.

  19. Extinction of premixed H{sub 2}/air flames: Chemical kinetics and molecular diffusion effects

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Yufei; Holley, Adam T.; Andac, Mustafa G.; Egolfopoulos, Fokion N.; Wang, Hai; Davis, Scott G.; Middha, Prankul

    2005-09-01

    Laminar flame speed has traditionally been used for the partial validation of flame kinetics. In most cases, however, its accurate determination requires extensive data processing and/or extrapolations, thus rendering the measurement of this fundamental flame property indirect. Additionally, the presence of flame front instabilities does not conform to the definition of laminar flame speed. This is the case for Le<1 flames, with the most notable example being ultralean H{sub 2}/air flames, which develop cellular structures at low strain rates so that determination of laminar flame speeds for such mixtures is not possible. Thus, this low-temperature regime of H{sub 2} oxidation has not been validated systematically in flames. In the present investigation, an alternative/supplemental approach is proposed that includes the experimental determination of extinction strain rates for these flames, and these rates are compared with the predictions of direct numerical simulations. This approach is meaningful for two reasons: (1) Extinction strain rates can be measured directly, as opposed to laminar flame speeds, and (2) while the unstretched lean H{sub 2}/air flames are cellular, the stretched ones are not, thus making comparisons between experiment and simulations meaningful. Such comparisons revealed serious discrepancies between experiments and simulations for ultralean H{sub 2}/air flames by using four kinetic mechanisms. Additional studies were conducted for lean and near-stoichiometric H{sub 2}/air flames diluted with various amounts of N{sub 2}. Similarly to the ultralean flames, significant discrepancies between experimental and predicted extinction strain rates were also found. To identify the possible sources of such discrepancies, the effect of uncertainties on the diffusion coefficients was assessed and an improved treatment of diffusion coefficients was advanced and implemented. Under the conditions considered in this study, the sensitivity of diffusion

  20. Arduino-based control system for measuring ammonia in air using conditionally-deployed diffusive samplers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ham, J. M.; Williams, C.; Shonkwiler, K. B.

    2012-12-01

    Arduino microcontrollers, wireless modules, and other low-cost hardware were used to develop a new type of air sampler for monitoring ammonia at strong areal sources like dairies, cattle feedlots, and waste treatment facilities. Ammonia was sampled at multiple locations on the periphery of an operation using Radiello diffusive passive samplers (Cod. RAD168- and RAD1201-Sigma-Aldrich). However, the samplers were not continuously exposed to the air. Instead, each sampling station included two diffusive samplers housed in specialized tubes that sealed the cartridges from the atmosphere. If a user-defined set of wind and weather conditions were met, the Radiellos were deployed into the air using a micro linear actuator. Each station was solar-powered and controlled by Arduinos that were linked to a central weather station using Xbee wireless modules (Digi International Inc.). The Arduinos also measured the total time of exposure using hall-effect sensors to verify the position of the cartridge (i.e., deployed or retracted). The decision to expose or retract the samplers was made every five minutes based on wind direction, wind speed, and time of day. Typically, the diffusive samplers were replaced with fresh cartridges every two weeks and the used samplers were analyzed in the laboratory using ion chromatography. Initial studies were conducted at a commercial dairy in northern Colorado. Ammonia emissions along the Front Range of Colorado can be transported into the mountains where atmospheric deposition of nitrogen can impact alpine ecosystems. Therefore, low-cost air quality monitoring equipment is needed that can be widely deployed in the region. Initial work at the dairy showed that ammonia concentrations ranged between 600 to 1200 ppb during the summer; the highest concentrations were downwind of a large anaerobic lagoon. Time-averaged ammonia concentrations were also used to approximate emissions using inverse dispersion models. This methodology provides a

  1. Characterizing He 2 flow through porous materials using counterflow data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vansciver, Steven W.; Maddocks, J. R.

    1991-01-01

    Proposed space applications, such as the cooling of infrared and x ray telescopes, have generated substantial interest in the behavior of He(2) flowing in porous materials. For design purposes, classical porous media correlations and room temperature data are often used to obtain order of magnitude estimates of expected pressure drops, while the attendant temperature differences are either ignored or estimated using smooth tube correlations. A more accurate alternative to this procedure is suggested by an empirical extension of the two fluid models. It is shown that four empirical parameters are necessary to describe the pressure and temperature differences induced by He(2) flow through a porous sample. The three parameters required to determine pressure differences are measured in counterflow and found to compare favorably with those for isothermal flow. The fourth parameter, the Gorter-Mellink constant, differs substantially from smooth tube values. It is concluded that parameter values determined from counterflow can be used to predict pressure and temperature differences in a variety of flows to an accuracy of about + or - 20 percent.

  2. Characterizing He II flow through porous materials using counterflow data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddocks, J. R., Jr.; Vansciver, Steven W.

    1990-01-01

    Proposed space applications, such as the cooling of infrared and x ray telescopes, have generated substantial interest in the behavior of He II flowing in porous materials. For design purposes, classical porous media correlations and room temperature data are often used to obtain order of magnitude estimates of expected pressure drops, while the attendant temperature differences are either ignored or estimated using smooth tube correlations. A more accurate alternative to this procedure is suggested by an empirical extension of the two fluid model. It is shown that four empirical parameters are necessary to describe the pressure and temperature differences induced by He II flow through a porous sample. The three parameters required to determine pressure differences are measured in counterflow and found to compare favorably with those for isothermal flow. The fourth parameter, the Gorter-Mellink constant, differs substantially from smooth tube values. It is concluded that parameter values determined from counterflow can be used to predict pressure and temperature differences in a variety of flows to an accuracy of about + or - 20 pct.

  3. Effect of Counterflow Jet on a Supersonic Reentry Capsule

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Chau-Lyan; Venkatachari, Balaji Shankar; Cheng, Gary C.

    2006-01-01

    Recent NASA initiatives for space exploration have reinvigorated research on Apollo-like capsule vehicles. Aerothermodynamic characteristics of these capsule configurations during reentry play a crucial role in the performance and safety of the planetary entry probes and the crew exploration vehicles. At issue are the forebody thermal shield protection and afterbody aeroheating predictions. Due to the lack of flight or wind tunnel measurements at hypersonic speed, design decisions on such vehicles would rely heavily on computational results. Validation of current computational tools against experimental measurement thus becomes one of the most important tasks for general hypersonic research. This paper is focused on time-accurate numerical computations of hypersonic flows over a set of capsule configurations, which employ a counterflow jet to offset the detached bow shock. The accompanying increased shock stand-off distance and modified heat transfer characteristics associated with the counterflow jet may provide guidance for future design of hypersonic reentry capsules. The newly emerged space-time conservation element solution element (CESE) method is used to perform time-accurate, unstructured mesh Navier-Stokes computations for all cases investigated. The results show good agreement between experimental and numerical Schlieren pictures. Surface heat flux and aerodynamic force predictions of the capsule configurations are discussed in detail.

  4. Development of active and diffusive sampling methods for determination of 3-methoxybutyl acetate in workplace air.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Akito; Takigawa, Tomoko; Kawasumi, Yaeko; Yasugi, Tomojiro; Endo, Yoko; Wang, Da-Hong; Takaki, Jiro; Sakurai, Haruhiko; Ogino, Keiki

    2007-11-01

    Monitoring of the workplace concentration of 3-methoxybutyl acetate (MBA), which is used in printer's ink and thinner for screen-printing and as an organic solvent to dissolve various resins, is important for health reasons. An active and a diffusive sampling method, using a gas chromatograph equipped with a flame ionization detector, were developed for the determination of MBA in workplace air. For the active sampling method using an activated charcoal tube, the overall desorption efficiency was 101%, the overall recovery was 104%, and the recovery after 8 days of storage in a refrigerator was more than 90%. For the diffusive sampling method using the 3M 3500 organic vapor monitor, the MBA sampling rate was 19.89 cm(3) min(-1). The linear range was from 0.01 to 96.00 microg ml(-1), with a correlation coefficient of 0.999, and the detection limits of the active and diffusive samplers were 0.04 and 0.07 microg sample(-1), respectively. The geometric mean of stationary sampling and personal sampling in a screen-printing factory were 12.61 and 16.52 ppm, respectively, indicating that both methods can be used to measure MBA in workplace air.

  5. Two-dimensional diffusion of amphiphiles in phospholipid monolayers at the air-water interface.

    PubMed Central

    Caruso, F; Grieser, F; Thistlethwaite, P J; Almgren, M

    1993-01-01

    Steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy has been used to examine lateral diffusion in dipalmitoyl-L-alpha-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and dimyristoyl-L-alpha-phosphatidylcholine (DMPC) monolayers at the air-water interface, by studying the fluorescence quenching of a pyrene-labeled phospholipid (pyrene-DPPE) by two amphiphilic quenchers. Steady-state fluorescence measurements revealed pyrene-DPPE to be homogeneously distributed in the DMPC lipid matrix for all measured surface pressures and only in the liquid-expanded (LE) phase of the DPPC monolayer. Time-resolved fluorescence decays for pyrene-DPPE in DMPC and DPPC (LE phase) in the absence of quencher were best described by a single-exponential function, also suggesting a homogeneous distribution of pyrene-DPPE within the monolayer films. Addition of quencher to the monolayer film produced nonexponential decay behavior, which is adequately described by the continuum theory of diffusion-controlled quenching in a two-dimensional environment. Steady-state fluorescence measurements yielded lateral diffusion coefficients significantly larger than those obtained from time-resolved data. The difference in these values was ascribed to the influence of static quenching in the case of the steady-state measurements. The lateral diffusion coefficients obtained in the DMPC monolayers were found to decrease with increasing surface pressure, reflecting a decrease in monolayer fluidity with compression. PMID:8312487

  6. Analysis of opposed jet hydrogen-air counter flow diffusion flame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, Y. H.; Isaac, K. M.

    1989-01-01

    A computational simulation of the opposed-jet diffusion flame is performed to study its structure and extinction limits. The present analysis concentrates on the nitrogen-diluted hydrogen-air diffusion flame, which provides the basic information for many vehicle designs such as the aerospace plane for which hydrogen is a candidate as the fuel. The computer program uses the time-marching technique to solve the energy and species equations coupled with the momentum equation solved by the collocation method. The procedure is implemented in two stages. In the first stage, a one-step forward overal chemical reaction is chosen with the gas phase chemical reaction rate determined by comparison with experimental data. In the second stage, a complete chemical reaction mechanism is introduced with detailed thermodynamic and transport property calculations. Comparison between experimental extinction data and theoretical predictions is discussed. The effects of thermal diffusion as well as Lewis number and Prandtl number variations on the diffusion flame are also presented.

  7. Diffusion-driven growth of a spherical gas bubble in gelatin gels supersaturated with air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirota, Eriko; Ando, Keita

    2016-11-01

    We experimentally and theoretically study diffusion-driven growth of laser-induced gas bubbles in gelatin gels supersaturated with air. The supersaturation in the gels is realized by using a large separation between heat and mass diffusion rates. An optical system is developed to induce bubble nucleation by laser focusing and visualize the subsequent bubble growth. To evaluate the effect of the gel elasticity on the bubble growth rate, we propose the extended Epstein-Plesset theory that considers bubble pressure modifications due to linear/nonlinear elasticity (in addition to Laplace pressure). From comparisons between the experiments and the proposed theory, the bubble growth rate is found to be hindered by the elasticity. This study is supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 25709008.

  8. In situ TDLAS measurement of absolute acetylene concentration profiles in a non-premixed laminar counter-flow flame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, S.; Klein, M.; Kathrotia, T.; Riedel, U.; Kissel, T.; Dreizler, A.; Ebert, V.

    2012-06-01

    Acetylene (C2H2), as an important precursor for chemiluminescence species, is a key to understand, simulate and model the chemiluminescence and the related reaction paths. Hence we developed a high resolution spectrometer based on direct Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (TDLAS) allowing the first quantitative, calibration-free and spatially resolved in situ C2H2 measurement in an atmospheric non-premixed counter-flow flame supported on a Tsuji burner. A fiber-coupled distributed feedback diode laser near 1535 nm was used to measure several absolute C2H2 concentration profiles (peak concentrations up to 9700 ppm) in a laminar non-premixed CH4/air flame ( T up to 1950 K) supported on a modified Tsuji counter-flow burner with N2 purge slots to minimize end flames. We achieve a fractional optical resolution of up to 5×10-5 OD (1 σ) in the flame, resulting in temperature-dependent acetylene detection limits for the P17e line at 6513 cm-1 of up to 2.1 ppmṡm. Absolute C2H2 concentration profiles were obtained by translating the burner through the laser beam using a DC motor with 100 μm step widths. Intercomparisons of the experimental C2H2 profiles with simulations using our new hydrocarbon oxidation mechanisms show excellent agreement in position, shape and in the absolute C2H2 values.

  9. Diffusive exchange of PAHs across the air-water interface of the Kaohsiung Harbor lagoon, Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Fang, Meng-Der; Lee, Chon-Lin; Jiang, Jheng-Jie; Ko, Fung-Chi; Baker, Joel E

    2012-11-15

    Instantaneous air-water polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) exchange fluxes were calculated in 22 pairs of ambient air and water samples from Kaohsiung Harbor lagoon, from December 2003 to January 2005. The highest net volatilization (3135 ng m(-2) day(-1)) and absorptive (-1150 ng m(-2) day(-1)) fluxes in the present study were obtained for the three-ring PAH phenanthrene on 7 April and 27 January 2004, respectively. All PAH diffusive fluxes for three-ring PAHs except phenanthrene were mainly volatilization exchange across the air-water interface. Phenanthrene and the four-ring PAHs were absorbed primarily from the atmosphere and deposited to the surface water, although some minor volatilization fluxes were also observed. Differences in flux magnitude and direction between the dry and wet seasons were also evident for PAHs. Strong absorptive/weaker volatilization PAH fluxes occurred in the dry season, but the opposite was found in the wet season. The mean daily PAH diffusive fluxes were an in flux of -635 ng m(-2) day(-1) in the dry season and an efflux of 686 ng m(-2) day(-1) in the wet season. The integrated absorbed and emitted fluxes of PAHs for harbor lagoon surface waters in the dry and wet seasons were 3.1 kg and 3.4 kg, respectively. Different from water bodies located in temperate zone, phenanthrene diffusive fluxes in Kaohsiung Harbor lagoon was favored in volatilization from surface waters during the wet season (April to September) because of scavenging by precipitation and dilution by prevailing southwesterly winds. In addition, this study used both of salinity and temperature to improve estimation of Henry's law constants (H) of PAHs in a tropical coastal area and show that correction for salinity produced 13-15% of differences in H values. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Diffuse discharge produced by repetitive nanosecond pulses in open air, nitrogen, and helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Tao; Tarasenko, Victor F.; Zhang, Cheng; Baksht, Evgeni Kh.; Zhang, Dongdong; Erofeev, Mikhail V.; Ren, Chengyan; Shutko, Yuliya V.; Yan, Ping

    2013-03-01

    Atmospheric-pressure gas discharge driven by high voltage pulses with fast rise-time and short duration has attracted significant attention for various plasma applications. In this paper, discharges were generated in a highly non-uniform electric field by point-plane gaps in open air by four repetitive nanosecond-pulse generators with repetition rate up to 1 kHz. The rise time of generators was 25 (generator #1), 15 (generator #2), 3 (generator #3), and 0.2 ns (generator #4) and a full width at half maximum was 40, 30-40, 5, and 1 ns, respectively. The experimental results show that there were typical discharge fashions, i.e., corona, diffuse, spark, or arc modes. The variables affecting the discharge characteristics, including the gap spacing and applied pulse parameters, were investigated. Especially, the diffuse discharges were investigated and discussed. With generator #1 at voltage 70-120 kV, characteristics of measured x-rays on the discharge modes were studied, and it indicates that counts of x-rays in a diffuse discharge are up to a peak value under the experimental conditions. With amplitude of voltage pulses in incident wave up to 18 (generator #3) and 12.5 kV (generator #4), runaway electron beam in low pressure helium, nitrogen, and air in a pulse-periodic mode of discharge with repetition rate up to 1 kHz was obtained. Electron beam was registered behind a thin foil in a pressure range from several to tens of Torr. X-ray radiation was obtained in a wide range of pressures, as well as at atmospheric pressure of helium, nitrogen, and air. Voltage pulses of positive and negative polarities were used. Generation of runaway electrons with pulses of positive polarity appeared because of reflected voltage pulses of reverse polarity.

  11. Generation of Dark-Bright Soliton Trains in Superfluid-Superfluid Counterflow

    SciTech Connect

    Hamner, C.; Chang, J. J.; Engels, P.; Hoefer, M. A.

    2011-02-11

    The dynamics of two penetrating superfluids exhibit an intriguing variety of nonlinear effects. Using two distinguishable components of a Bose-Einstein condensate, we investigate the counterflow of two superfluids in a narrow channel. We present the first experimental observation of trains of dark-bright solitons generated by the counterflow. Our observations are theoretically interpreted by three-dimensional numerical simulations for the coupled Gross-Pitaevskii equations and the analysis of a jump in the two relatively flowing components' densities. Counterflow-induced modulational instability for this miscible system is identified as the central process in the dynamics.

  12. Generation of dark-bright soliton trains in superfluid-superfluid counterflow.

    PubMed

    Hamner, C; Chang, J J; Engels, P; Hoefer, M A

    2011-02-11

    The dynamics of two penetrating superfluids exhibit an intriguing variety of nonlinear effects. Using two distinguishable components of a Bose-Einstein condensate, we investigate the counterflow of two superfluids in a narrow channel. We present the first experimental observation of trains of dark-bright solitons generated by the counterflow. Our observations are theoretically interpreted by three-dimensional numerical simulations for the coupled Gross-Pitaevskii equations and the analysis of a jump in the two relatively flowing components' densities. Counterflow-induced modulational instability for this miscible system is identified as the central process in the dynamics.

  13. Diffuse scattering from hemispherical nanoparticles at the air-silicon interface.

    PubMed

    Centeno, Anthony; Ahmed, Badar; Reehal, Haricharan; Xie, Fang

    2013-10-18

    There has been much recent interest in the application of plasmonics to improve the efficiency of silicon solar cells. In this paper we use finite difference time domain calculations to investigate the placement of hemispherical gold nanoparticles on the rear surface of a silicon solar cell. The results indicate that nanoparticles protruding into the silicon, rather than into air, have a larger scattering efficiency and diffuse scattering into the semiconductor. This finding could lead to improved light trapping within a thin silicon solar cell device.

  14. Diffuse scattering from hemispherical nanoparticles at the air-silicon interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Centeno, Anthony; Ahmed, Badar; Reehal, Haricharan; Xie, Fang

    2013-10-01

    There has been much recent interest in the application of plasmonics to improve the efficiency of silicon solar cells. In this paper we use finite difference time domain calculations to investigate the placement of hemispherical gold nanoparticles on the rear surface of a silicon solar cell. The results indicate that nanoparticles protruding into the silicon, rather than into air, have a larger scattering efficiency and diffuse scattering into the semiconductor. This finding could lead to improved light trapping within a thin silicon solar cell device.

  15. Pulmonary cryptococcosis manifesting as diffuse air-space consolidations in an immunocompetent patient

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hye Won; Kim, Mi Kyung; Park, In Won

    2017-01-01

    Pulmonary cryptococcosis is an opportunity infection commonly occurred in the immunocompromised patients. However pulmonary cryptococcosis in the immunocompetent was reported up to 35% and these cases tend to show confined and localized radiologic findings than in immunocompromised patients. To our knowledge, extensive air-space consolidations have not frequently occurred in the immunocompetent patient. Therefore, in this case, we report a rare case of a 73-year-old woman who was diagnosed with pulmonary cryptococcosis, manifesting as diffuse air-space consolidations even though normal immune status. Thus, the possibility of pulmonary cryptococcosis should be considered when a patient with a normal immune status presents without respiratory symptoms are accompanied by consolidation on imaging. PMID:28275498

  16. Pulmonary cryptococcosis manifesting as diffuse air-space consolidations in an immunocompetent patient.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hye Won; Chong, Semin; Kim, Mi Kyung; Park, In Won

    2017-02-01

    Pulmonary cryptococcosis is an opportunity infection commonly occurred in the immunocompromised patients. However pulmonary cryptococcosis in the immunocompetent was reported up to 35% and these cases tend to show confined and localized radiologic findings than in immunocompromised patients. To our knowledge, extensive air-space consolidations have not frequently occurred in the immunocompetent patient. Therefore, in this case, we report a rare case of a 73-year-old woman who was diagnosed with pulmonary cryptococcosis, manifesting as diffuse air-space consolidations even though normal immune status. Thus, the possibility of pulmonary cryptococcosis should be considered when a patient with a normal immune status presents without respiratory symptoms are accompanied by consolidation on imaging.

  17. A large-area diffuse air discharge plasma excited by nanosecond pulse under a double hexagon needle-array electrode.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhi-Jie; Wang, Wen-Chun; Yang, De-Zheng; Wang, Sen; Zhang, Shuai; Tang, Kai; Jiang, Peng-Chao

    2014-01-01

    A large-area diffuse air discharge plasma excited by bipolar nanosecond pulse is generated under a double hexagon needle-array electrode at atmospheric pressure. The images of the diffuse discharge, electric characteristics, and the optical emission spectra emitted from the diffuse air discharge plasma are obtained. Based on the waveforms of pulse voltage and current, the power consumption, and the power density of the diffuse air discharge plasma are investigated under different pulse peak voltages. The electron density and the electron temperature of the diffuse plasma are estimated to be approximately 1.42×10(11) cm(-3) and 4.4 eV, respectively. The optical emission spectra are arranged to determine the rotational and vibrational temperatures by comparing experimental with simulated spectra. Meanwhile, the rotational and vibrational temperatures of the diffuse discharge plasma are also discussed under different pulse peak voltages and pulse repetition rates, respectively. In addition, the diffuse air discharge plasma can form an area of about 70×50 mm(2) on the surface of dielectric layer and can be scaled up to the required size.

  18. Counterflow Dielectrophoresis for Trypanosome Enrichment and Detection in Blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menachery, Anoop; Kremer, Clemens; Wong, Pui E.; Carlsson, Allan; Neale, Steven L.; Barrett, Michael P.; Cooper, Jonathan M.

    2012-10-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis or sleeping sickness is a deadly disease endemic in sub-Saharan Africa, caused by single-celled protozoan parasites. Although it has been targeted for elimination by 2020, this will only be realized if diagnosis can be improved to enable identification and treatment of afflicted patients. Existing techniques of detection are restricted by their limited field-applicability, sensitivity and capacity for automation. Microfluidic-based technologies offer the potential for highly sensitive automated devices that could achieve detection at the lowest levels of parasitemia and consequently help in the elimination programme. In this work we implement an electrokinetic technique for the separation of trypanosomes from both mouse and human blood. This technique utilises differences in polarisability between the blood cells and trypanosomes to achieve separation through opposed bi-directional movement (cell counterflow). We combine this enrichment technique with an automated image analysis detection algorithm, negating the need for a human operator.

  19. Thermal Equilibrium of Vortex Lines in Counterflowing He II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemirovskii, Sergey K.

    2016-12-01

    The problem of the statistics of a set of chaotic vortex lines in counterflowing superfluid helium is studied. We introduced a Langevin-type force into the equation of motion of the vortex line in the presence of relative velocity {v_{ns}}. This random force is supposed to be Gaussian satisfying the fluctuation-dissipation theorem. The corresponding Fokker-Planck equation for probability functional in the vortex loop configuration space is shown to have a solution in the form of Gibbs distribution with the substitution E{{s}→ }E({{s}-P(vn-vs)}, where E{{s}} is the energy of the vortex configuration s and P is the Lamb impulse. Some physical consequences of this fact are discussed.

  20. OLYMPEX Counterflow Spectrometer and Impactor Field Campaign Report

    SciTech Connect

    Poellot, Michael

    2016-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility’s ARM Aerial Facility (AAF) Counterflow Spectrometer and Impactor (CSI) probe was flown on the University of North Dakota Cessna Citation research aircraft during the Olympic Mountain Experiment (OLYMPEX). The field campaign took place from November 12 through December 19, 2015, over the Olympic Mountains and coastal waters of Washington State as part of a National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) validation campaign. The CSI was added to the Citation instrument suite to support the NASA Aerosol-Cloud Ecosystem (ACE) satellite program and flights of the NASA Lockheed Earth Resources (ER-2) aircraft. ACE funded extra ER-2 flights to focus on clouds that are weakly precipitating, which are also of interest to the DOE Atmospheric System Research (ASR) program.

  1. Characterization of various losses in a cryogenic counterflow heat exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aminuddin, Mohammad; Zubair, Syed M.

    2014-11-01

    A detailed assessment of irreversibility, predominantly heat in-leak and axial wall conduction, is essential in accurately predicting the performance of high effectiveness heat exchangers employed in cryogenic applications. Integration into a refrigeration system as well requires consideration of parasitic heat loss by conduction from exchanger cold end to the adjacent components. Governing equations incorporating these effects in a counterflow exchanger are solved numerically and the model predictions evaluated for heat exchanger ineffectiveness and heat loss by conduction. The optimum performance mandates minimization of both. Although ineffectiveness decreases at higher longitudinal conduction, cold end loss increases with deterioration of the overall performance. Utilizing lower heat capacity rate hot fluid, nevertheless, reduces the cold end loss. Heat in-leak is relatively high with concurrent consideration of axial wall conduction and has adverse consequence on heat exchanger effectiveness. Analysis of the net heat transferred to lower stages of refrigeration reveals a critical NTU.

  2. Critical transport parameters for porous media subjected to counterflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederking, T. H. K.; Afifi, F. A.; Ono, D. Y.

    1989-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies have been conducted to determine critical parameters at the onset of nonlinear counterflow in He II below the lambda point of He-4. Critical temperature differences have been measured in porous media for zero net mass flow and for Darcy permeabilities in the order of magnitude range from 10 to the -10th to 10 to the -8th sq cm. The normalized critical temperature gradients, which covered the liquid temperature range of 1.5 K to the lambda temperature, are found to vary with T proportional to the ratio of the superfluid density to the normal fluid density. This liquid temperature dependence appears to be consistent with duct data which are limited at low temperature by a Reynolds number criterion.

  3. Film fill fouling in counterflow cooling towers: Research results

    SciTech Connect

    Mortensen, K.P.; Conley, S.N.

    1994-12-31

    High-efficiency cross-corrugated PVC film packing materials, first introduced in the US for new counterflow cooling tower products in the 1970`s, have in a number of instances recently been used to improve the thermal performance of older splash and flat-sheet-filled counterflow towers. These highly interfaced PVC packs in new tower and retrofit service have been applied in a variety of circumstances and conditions. In some locations raw waters have fouled packs. This fouling process can, if left unchecked, reverse performance gains from the tower upgrade and add substantially to cooling tower structural loadings. This paper details a significant effort to understand and reproduce that primary fouling mechanism in a controlled and accelerated laboratory regimen, and to conduct equal basis comparative fouling tests on a number of fill configurations to optimize geometry. These efforts proceeded in specially constructed lab cells which did not risk customer tower installations while defining optimum fill design features. Considerable effort went into evaluating their customers` descriptions of field fouling and to duplicate field observations in the lab process. Field low-clog fill testing results are correlated with lab results. Many alternative fill shapes, spacings, texturings, support schemes, and materials are compared here in order to define the best geometry for the end user. Water conditions, particularly biological characterization and the relation of any circulating water biopotential to suspended solids concentration are discussed because of their specific causal relation in pack fouling. Low-Clog fill application criteria are established. Water treatment needs are discussed. Washing of existing fouled packing is also considered. Finally, a laboratory method for thermal comparison of various packs in fouled condition is described.

  4. Film fill fouling in counterflow cooling towers: Continuing research results

    SciTech Connect

    Mortensen, K.P.; Conely, S.N.

    1995-02-01

    High-efficiency crosscorrugated PVC film packing materials-first introduced in the U.S. for new counterflow cooling tower products in the 1970s-have in a number of instances of older splash and flat-sheet-filled counterflow towers. These highly interfaced PVC packs in new tower and retrofit service have been applied in a variety of circumstances and conditions. In some locations raw waters have fouled packs. This fouling process can, if left unchecked, reverse performance gains from the tower upgrade and add substantially to cooling tower structural loading. This paper details an effort to understand and reproduce that primary fouling mechanism in a controlled and accelerated laboratory regimen, and to conduct equal basis comparative fouling tests on a number of fill configurations to optimize geometry. These efforts proceeded in specially constructed lab cells which did not risk customer tower installations while defining optimum fill design features. Considerable effort went into evaluating our customer`s descriptions of field fouling and to duplicate field observations in the lab process. Field low-clog fill testing results are correlated with lab results. Many alternative fill shapes, spacing, texturing, support schemes, and materials are compared here in order to define the best geometry for the end user. Water conditions, particularly biological characterization and the relation of any circulating water biopotential to suspended solids concentration are discussed because of their specific casual relation in pack fouling. Low-clog fill application criteria are established. Water treatment needs are discussed. Washing of existing fouled packing is also considered. Finally, a laboratory method for thermal comparison of various packs in fouled condition is described.

  5. A stellar-interstellar counterflow configuration with transversal plasma compressibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherer, Klaus; Fahr, Hans J.; Ratkiewicz, Roma

    1994-07-01

    In general, a stellar wind system is in relative motion with respect to its ambient intersellar medium. Thus the stellar wind plasma eventually has to enter into an asymptotic outflow geometry appropriately adapted to this counterflow situation. We start out from a general description of the flow configuration describing the interaction of a subsonic interstellar plasma with the stellar wind plasma which either is subsonic from the very beginning (stellar breeze solution) or has already undergone an inner-shock transition before its encounter with the outer medium. We assume irrotational flows and allow for a transversal plasma compressibility, i.e. density gradients normal to the flowlines. This enables the determination of the velocity field as solution of the Laplacian differential equation. With the associated specific solutions of the density field, the pressure can consistently be calculated, providing the complete hydrodynamical data field of the counterflow configuration. From this theoretical hydrodynamical context it can then be proven that a finite net momentum loss of the stellar wind source is naturally connected with this form of an adapted wind, as was already shown for the case of incompressible plasmas by Fahr & Scherer (1993). The associated force acting upon the wind-driving star is calculated here and shows that such stars accelerate with respect to the ambient interstellar medium. Hereby, of course, the net reaction force has to be mediated through the stellar wind regime down to its source (i.e. the stellar corona). In case that, close to the star, a supersonic wind prevails, it has to adapt to the associated, asymmetric, outer boundary conditions which the distant stellar wind has to meet. Thus the adapted inner supersonic stellar wind has to be developed in an asymmetric form if the outer wind pattern is to be maintained in its calculated form.

  6. Shapes of Nonbuoyant Round Luminous Laminar-Jet Diffusion Flames in Coflowing Air. Appendix F

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, K.-C.; Faeth, G. M.; Urban, David L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The shapes (luminous flame boundaries) of steady nonbuoyant round luminous hydrocarbon-fueled laminar-jet diffusion flames in coflowing air were studied both experimentally and theoretically. Flame shapes were measured from photographs of flames burning at low pressures in order to minimize the effects of buoyancy. Test conditions involved acetylene-, propylene. and 1,3-butadiene-fueled flames having initial reactant temperatures of 300 K, ambient pressures of 19-50 kPa, jet-exit Reynolds numbers of 18-121, and initial air/fuel velocity ratios of 0.22-32.45 to yield luminous flame lengths of 21-198 mm. The present flames were close to the laminar smoke point but were not soot emitting. Simple expressions to estimate the shapes of nonbuoyant laminar-jet diffusion flames in coflow were found by extending an earlier analysis of Mahalingam et al. These formulas provided a good correlation of present measurements except near the burner exit where self-similar approximations used in the simplified analysis are no longer appropriate.

  7. Effects of radiation on NO kinetics in turbulent hydrogen/air diffusion flames

    SciTech Connect

    Sivathanu, Y.R.; Gore, J.P.; Laurendeau, N.M.

    1997-07-01

    The authors describe a coupled radiation and NO kinetics calculation of turbulent hydrogen/air diffusion flame properties. Transport equations for mass, momentum, mixture fraction, enthalpy (sensible + chemical) including gas band radiation, and NO mass fraction are solved. NO kinetics is described by a one step thermal production mechanism. The local temperature is obtained by solving the enthalpy equation taking radiation loss from H{sub 2}O into consideration. Radiation/turbulence and chemical kinetics/turbulence interactions are treated using a clipped Gaussian probability density function (PDF) for the mixture fraction, and a delta PDF for the enthalpy. The source terms in the enthalpy and mass fraction of NO equations are treated using assumed PDF integration over the mixture fraction space. The results of the simulation are compared with existing measurements of the Emission Indices of NO (EINO) in turbulent H{sub 2}/air diffusion flames. The major conclusion of the paper is that coupled turbulence/radiation interactions should be taken into account while computing the EINO.

  8. Diffuse plasma treatment of polyamide 66 fabric in atmospheric pressure air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lee; Peng, Ming-yang; Teng, Yun; Gao, Guozhen

    2016-01-01

    The polyamide 66 (PA66) fabrics are hard to be colored or glued in industrial production due to the poor hydrophily. Diffuse plasma is a kind of non-thermal plasma generated at atmospheric pressure in air. This paper proposes that large-scale diffuse plasma generated between wire electrodes can be employed for improving the hydrophily of PA66 fabrics. A repetitive nanosecond-pulse diffuse-discharge reactor using a cylindrical wire electrode configuration is presented, which can generate large-scale non-thermal plasmas steadily at atmospheric pressure without any barrier dielectric. Then the reactor is used to treat PA66 fabrics in different discharge conditions. The hydrophilicity property of modified PA66 is measured by wicking test method. The modified PA66 is also analyzed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to prove the surface changes in physical microstructure and chemical functional groups, respectively. What's more, the effects of treatment time and treatment frequency on surface modification are investigated and discussed.

  9. Mixed cellulose ester filter as a separator for air-diffusion cathode microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zejie; Lim, Bongsu

    2017-04-01

    Separator is important to prevent bio-contamination of the catalyst layer of air-diffusion cathode microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Mixed cellulose ester filter (MCEF) was examined as a separator for an air-cathode MFC in the present study. The MCEF-MFC produced a maximum power density of 780.7 ± 18.7 mW/m(2), which was comparable to 770.9 ± 35.9 mW/m(2) of MFC with Nafion membrane (NFM) as a separator. Long-term examination demonstrated a more stable performance of the MCEF-MFC than NFM-MFC. After 25 cycles, the maximum voltage of the MCEF-MFC decreased by only 1.3% from 425.1 ± 4.3 mV (initial 5 cycles) to 419.5 ± 2.3 mV (last 5 cycles). However, it was decreased by 9.1% from 424.8 ± 5.7 to 386 ± 2.5 mV for the NFM-MFC. The coulombic efficiency (CE) of the MCEF-MFC did not change (from 3.11 ± 0.09% to 3.13 ± 0.02%), while it decreased by 9.12% from 3.18 ± 0.04% to 2.89 ± 0.02% for the NFM-MFC. The MCEF separator was with less biofouling than the NFM separator over 60 days' operation, which might be the reason for the more table long-term performance of the MCEF-MFC. The results demonstrated that MCEF was feasible as a separator to set up good-performing and cost-effective air-diffusion cathode MFC.

  10. Nonluminous diffusion flame of diluted acetylene in oxygen-enriched air

    SciTech Connect

    Sugiyama, G.

    1994-12-31

    A soot-reducing mechanism of fuel dilution and oxygen enrichment in laminar diffusion flames is suggested. Analysis using the Burke-Schumann theory for the shape of over ventilated diffusion flames has shown that there is a critical ratio of stoichiometric coefficients of the fuel and the oxidizer under which the gas flows from the fuel side to the oxidizer side throughout the flame. When this condition is satisfied, the soot growth region vanishes. A similar result is also found in a numerical simulation for diffusion flames that do not satisfy the Burke-Schumann assumption of uniform flow field. KIVA code is used for that purpose. The theoretically predicted direction of gas-flow across the flame sheet is verified in an experiment in a coaxial-flow diffusion flame. Soot cloud and velocity fields are visualized through a laser sheet method in the experiment. The fuel is a mixture of acetylene and nitrogen. The oxidizer is a mixture of oxygen and nitrogen. The compositions of the reactants are controlled so that the adiabatic flame temperature is kept constant to avoid the effect of temperature change. Experimental results show substantial reduction of scattered light intensity by fuel dilution and oxygen enrichment. When a sufficient amount of nitrogen is added to the fuel, nonluminous blue flames are obtained. At higher oxygen concentrations, blue flames are obtained at higher flame temperature region. When oxygen concentration in the oxidizer is 70 vol.%, blue flames are obtained up to 2,250 K. The critical condition of the reactants for nonluminous flames agrees with the theoretical prediction when the oxidizer is ordinary air. In oxygen-enriched conditions, the fuel must be diluted more, than theoretically predicted.

  11. Continuous flow membrane-less air cathode microbial fuel cell with spunbonded olefin diffusion layer.

    PubMed

    Tugtas, Adile Evren; Cavdar, Pelin; Calli, Baris

    2011-11-01

    The power production performance of a membrane-less air-cathode microbial fuel cell was evaluated for 53 days. Anode and cathode electrodes and the micro-fiber cloth separator were configured by sandwiching the separator between two electrodes. In addition, the air-facing side of the cathode was covered with a spunbonded olefin sheet instead of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) coating to control oxygen diffusion and water loss. The configuration resulted in a low resistance of about 4Ω and a maximum power density of 750 mW/m2. However, as a result of a gradual decrease in the cathode potential, maximum power density decreased to 280 mW/m2. The declining power output was attributed to loss of platinum catalyst (8.26%) and biomass growth (38.44%) on the cathode. Coulombic efficiencies over 55% and no water leakage showed that the spunbonded olefin sheet covering the air-facing side of the cathode can be a cost-effective alternative to PTFE coating.

  12. Laser filamentation induced air-flow motion in a diffusion cloud chamber.

    PubMed

    Sun, Haiyi; Liu, Jiansheng; Wang, Cheng; Ju, Jingjing; Wang, Zhanxin; Wang, Wentao; Ge, Xiaochun; Li, Chuang; Chin, See Leang; Li, Ruxin; Xu, Zhizhan

    2013-04-22

    We numerically simulated the air-flow motion in a diffusion cloud chamber induced by femtosecond laser filaments for different chopping rates. A two dimensional model was employed, where the laser filaments were treated as a heat flux source. The simulated patterns of flow fields and maximum velocity of updraft compare well with the experimental results for the chopping rates of 1, 5, 15 and 150 Hz. A quantitative inconsistency appears between simulated and experimental maximum velocity of updraft for 1 kHz repetition rate although a similar pattern of flow field is obtained, and the possible reasons were analyzed. Based on the present simulated results, the experimental observation of more water condensation/snow at higher chopping rate can be explained. These results indicate that the specific way of laser filament heating plays a significant role in the laser-induced motion of air flow, and at the same time, our previous conclusion of air flow having an important effect on water condensation/snow is confirmed.

  13. Gas Diffusivity And Air Permeability In Sandy Soils: Effect Of Particle Size, Compaction And Sample Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamamoto, S.; Kawamoto, K.; Moldrup, P.; Komatsu, T.

    2007-12-01

    The transport and fate of gases in soils is mainly governed by gas diffusion and advection. The gas diffusivity (Dp/D0) is the transport parameter for the gas diffusion due to gas concentration gradient, while the air permeability (ka) is the transport parameter for advective gas transport due to soil-air pressure gradient. Hence, those gas transport parameters play a crucial role in simulating transport of gaseous contaminants such as volatile organic chemicals and in quantifying emission and exchange of greenhouse gases from/at the soil- atmosphere interface. In this study, we measured Dp/D0 and ka for total of six sandy soils and examined the effects of soil physical properties such as particle size, soil compaction, and sample scale on the gas transport parameters. Toyoura sand (0.106-0.50 mm) and Narita sands with three different particle size fractions (0.106-0.25, 0.25- 0.425, 0.425-0.85 mm) were used as experimental materials for the measurements of Dp/D0 and ka. The sand materials were repacked with given bulk densities into small-scale cores of 100 cm3 (for all materials) and large-scale cores of 2120 cm3 (only for Toyoura sand) at given water contents. In addition to the measurements, Dp/D0 and ka of Oso Flaco fine sand and Oakley sand from literature were also analyzed in this study. For all sand materials, we observed the threshold soil-air content (ɛth) below which Dp/D0 and ka are negligible, and measured Dp/D0 and ka increased linearly with increasing air-filled porosity (ɛ) from ɛth to soil total porosity (Φ). At high ɛ, sand materials with larger average particle diameter (APD) gave higher Dp/D0 and ka than those with smaller APD sands at a given ɛ due to the existence of rapid air flow through the highly continuous large pores. At low ɛ near the ɛth however, the measured Dp/D0 for large APD sands were lower than those for small APD sands. The measurements for Narita sand fractions with different bulk densities indicated that soil

  14. Experimental and Computational Study of Nonpremixed Ignition of Dimethyl Ether in Counterflow

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, X L; Lu, T F; Law, C K; Westbrook, C K

    2003-12-19

    The ignition temperature of nitrogen-diluted dimethyl ether (DME) by heated air in counterflow was experimentally determined for DME concentration from 5.9 to 30%, system pressure from 1.5 to 3.0 atmospheres, and pressure-weighted strain rate from 110 to 170/s. These experimental data were compared with two mechanisms that were respectively available in 1998 and 2003, with the latter being a substantially updated version of the former. The comparison showed that while the 1998-mechanism uniformly over-predicted the ignition temperature, the 2003-mechanism yielded surprisingly close agreement for all experimental data. Sensitivity analysis for the near-ignition state based on both mechanisms identified the deficiencies of the 1998-mechanism, particularly the specifics of the low-temperature cool flame chemistry in effecting ignition at higher temperatures, as the fuel stream is being progressively heated from its cold boundary to the high-temperature ignition region around the hot-stream boundary. The 2003-mechanism, consisting of 79 species and 398 elementary reactions, was then systematically simplified by using the directed relation graph method to a skeletal mechanism of 49 species and 251 elementary reactions, which in turn was further simplified by using computational singular perturbation method and quasi-steady-state species assumption to a reduced mechanism consisting of 33 species and 28 lumped reactions. It was demonstrated that both the skeletal and reduced mechanisms mimicked the performance of the detailed mechanism with high accuracy.

  15. A reactive and sensitive diffusion sampler for the determination of aldehydes and ketones in ambient air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchiyama, Shigehisa; Hasegawa, Shuji

    We developed a diffusive sampling device (DSD-carbonyl) for organic carbonyl compounds (aldehydes and ketones) which is suitable for collection and analysis of low concentration levels. This sampling device is composed of three parts, an exposure part made of a porous polytetrafluoroethylene (PPTFE) tube, an analysis part made of polypropylene (PP) tubing and an absorbent part made of 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH) coated silica gel (DNPH-silica). Aldehydes and ketones diffuse to the DSD-carbonyl through PPTFE-tube by the mechanism of molecular diffusion and react specifically with DNPH to form a stable DNPH-derivatives. Collection is controlled by moving the absorbent from the exposure part to the analysis part by changing the posture of the DSD-carbonyl. DNPH-derivatives were eluted from an analysis part of DSD-carbonyl with acetonitrile directly and analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The advantages of the DSD-carbonyl are the following: (1) The DSD-carbonyl can be used in a wide range of concentration of aldehydes and ketones in atmosphere, as the DSD-carbonyl exposure part has a variable diffusion area, (2) DNPH-derivatives are eluted from DNPH-silica without contamination of air. (3) The sampler can be applied to active sampling by connecting it with a pump. The limit of detection (LOD) for concentrations of major aldehydes and ketones ranged from 0.072 to 0.13 ppb, and the limit of quantitation (LOQ) ranged from 0.24 to 0.42 ppb. The coefficient variation (CV) for concentrations of major aldehydes and ketones ranged from 2.5 to 3.0% in laboratory air. The DSD-carbonyl method and active sampling method (US EPA method IP-6A) showed a good correlation (formaldehyde, r2=0.995). The uptake rates for formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, and acetone were estimated as 0.078, 0.062 and 0.079 nmol ppb -1 h -1, respectively. It is possible to estimate atmospheric aldehydes and ketones at parts per billion (ppb), with high sensitivity and precision, by

  16. Diffusion-weighted 19F-MRI of lung periphery: Influence of pressure and air-SF6 composition on apparent diffusion coefficients.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Cabello, Jesús; Pérez-Sánchez, José Manuel; Pérez de Alejo, Rigoberto; Rodríguez, Ignacio; González-Mangado, Nicolás; Peces-Barba, Germán; Cortijo, Manuel

    2005-08-25

    Lung functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become a reality using different inert hyperpolarized gases, such as 3He and 129Xe, which have provided an extraordinary boost in lung imaging and has also attracted interest to other chemically inert gaseous contrast agents. In this context, we have recently demonstrated the first diffusion-weighted images using thermally polarized inhaled sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) in small animals. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether or not the diffusion coefficient of this fluorinated gas is sensitive to pulmonary structure, gas concentration and air pressure in the airways. Diffusion coefficients of SF6 (both pure and in air mixtures) measured in vitro at different pressures and 20 degrees C showed an excellent agreement with theoretical values. Measurements of diffusion coefficients were also performed in vivo and post-mortem on healthy rats, achieving satisfactory signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs), and SF6 gas was found to be in an almost completely restricted diffusion regime in the lung, i.e., the transport by molecular diffusion is delayed by collisions with barriers such as the alveolar septa. This observed low diffusivity means that this gas will be less sensitive to structural changes in the lungs than other magnetic resonance sensitive gas such as 3He, particularly at human scale. However, it is still possible that SF6 plays a role since it opens a new structural window. Thus, the interest of researchers in delimiting the important limiting technical factors that makes this process very challenging is obvious. Among them, T2 relaxation is very fast, so gradient systems with very fast switching rate and probably large radiofrequency (RF) power and high field systems will be needed for hexafluoride to be used in human studies.

  17. Exploratory investigation of the use of area suction to eliminate air-flow separation in diffusers having large expansion angles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holzhauser, Curt A; Hall, Leo P

    1956-01-01

    Tests were made at a mean inlet Mach number of 0.2 with area suction applied to conical diffusers with expansion angles of 30 degrees and 50 degrees and exit to inlet area ratios of 2. Air-flow separation was eliminated with suction mass flows of 3 and 4 percent of the inlet mass flows for the 30 degrees and 50 degrees diffusers, respectively.

  18. An atmospheric air gas-liquid diffuse discharge excited by bipolar nanosecond pulse in quartz container used for water sterilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Sen; Yang, De-Zheng; Wang, Wen-Chun; Zhang, Shuai; Liu, Zhi-Jie; Tang, Kai; Song, Ying

    2013-12-01

    In this Letter, we report that the air gas-liquid diffuse discharge plasma excited by bipolar nanosecond pulse in quartz container with different bottom structures at atmospheric pressure. Optical diagnostic measurements show that bountiful chemically and biologically active species, which are beneficial for effective sterilization in some areas, are produced. Such diffuse plasmas are then used to treat drinking water containing the common microorganisms (Candida albicans and Escherichia coli). It is found that these plasmas can sterilize the microorganisms efficiently.

  19. Improving design factors of air diffuser systems based on field conditions of dam reservoirs: CFD simulation approach.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sangmin; Lee, Seungjae; Lee, Sangeun; Yum, Kyungtaek; Park, Heekyung

    2012-01-01

    This study aims to improve the design factors of air diffuser systems that have been analyzed in laboratory experiments, with consideration of the field conditions of dam reservoirs. In this study, the destratification number (D(N)), destratification radius, and efficiency are considered as design factors. The computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation experiment is performed in diverse field conditions in order to analyze these factors. The results illustrate the wider range of D(N) values in field conditions and the relationship of the destratification radius and efficiency to D(N). The results can lead to better performance of air diffuser systems and water quality management in dam reservoir sites.

  20. Analysis of oxygen reduction and microbial community of air-diffusion biocathode in microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zejie; Zheng, Yue; Xiao, Yong; Wu, Song; Wu, Yicheng; Yang, Zhaohui; Zhao, Feng

    2013-09-01

    Microbes play irreplaceable role in oxygen reduction reaction of biocathode in microbial fuel cells (MFCs). In this study, air-diffusion biocathode MFCs were set up for accelerating oxygen reduction and microbial community analysis. Linear sweep voltammetry and Tafel curve confirmed the function of cathode biofilm to catalyze oxygen reduction. Microbial community analysis revealed higher diversity and richness of community in plankton than in biofilm. Proteobacteria was the shared predominant phylum in both biofilm and plankton (39.9% and 49.8%) followed by Planctomycetes (29.9%) and Bacteroidetes (13.3%) in biofilm, while Bacteroidetes (28.2%) in plankton. Minor fraction (534, 16.4%) of the total operational taxonomic units (3252) was overlapped demonstrating the disproportionation of bacterial distribution in biofilm and plankton. Pseudomonadales, Rhizobiales and Sphingobacteriales were exoelectrogenic orders in the present study. The research obtained deep insight of microbial community and provided more comprehensive information on uncultured rare bacteria.

  1. Enhanced soot formation in flickering CH{sub 4}/air diffusion flames

    SciTech Connect

    Shaddix, C.R.; Harrington, J.E.; Smyth, K.C.

    1994-12-31

    Optical methods are used to examine soot production in a co-flowing, axisymmetric CH{sub 4}/air diffusion flame in which the fuel flow rate is acoustically forced to create a time-varying flowfield. For a particular forcing condition in which tip clipping occurs (0.75 V loudspeaker excitation), elastic scattering of vertically polarized light from the soot particles increases by nearly an order of magnitude with respect to that observed for a steady flame with the same mean fuel flow rate. Peak soot volume fractions, as measured by time-resolved laser extinction/tomography at 632.8 and 454.5 run and calibrated laser-induced incandescence (LII), show a factor of 4-5 enhancement in this flickering flame. A Mie analysis suggests that most of the enhanced soot production results from the formation of larger particles in the time-varying flowfield.

  2. Magnetically Diffused Radial Electric-Arc Air Heater Employing Water-Cooled Copper Electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayo, R. F.; Davis, D. D., Jr.

    1962-01-01

    A magnetically rotated electric-arc air heater has been developed that is novel in that an intense magnetic field of the order of 10,000 to 25,000 gauss is employed. This field is supplied by a coil that is connected in series with the arc. Experimentation with this heater has shown that the presence of an intense magnetic field transverse to the arc results in diffusion of the arc and that the arc has a positive effective resistance. With the field coil in series with the arc, highly stable arc operation is obtained from a battery power supply. External ballast is not required to stabilize the arc when it is operating at maximum power level. The electrode erosion rate is so low that the airstream contamination is no more than 0.07 percent and may be substantially less.

  3. Extensive air showers and diffused Cherenkov light detection: The ULTRA experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agnetta, G.; Assis, P.; Biondo, B.; Brogueira, P.; Cappa, A.; Catalano, O.; Chauvin, J.; D'Alí Staiti, G.; Dattoli, M.; Espirito-Santo, M. C.; Fava, L.; Galeotti, P.; Giarrusso, S.; Gugliotta, G.; La Rosa, G.; Lebrun, D.; Maccarone, M. C.; Mangano, A.; Melo, L.; Moreggia, S.; Pimenta, M.; Russo, F.; Saavedra, O.; Segreto, A.; Silva, J. C.; Stassi, P.; Tomè, B.; Vallania, P.; Vigorito, C.; ULTRA Collaboration

    2007-01-01

    The Uv Light Transmission and Reflection in the Atmosphere (ULTRA) experiment has been designed to provide quantitative measurements of the backscattered Cherenkov signal associated to the Extensive Air Showers (EAS) at the impact point on the Earth surface. The knowledge of such information will test the possibility to detect the diffused Cherenkov light spot from space within the Ultra high-energy cosmic ray observation. The Cherenkov signal is necessary to give an absolute reference for the track, allowing the measurement of the shower maximum and easing the separation between neutrino and hadronic showers. In this paper we discuss the experimental set-up with detailed information on the detection method; the in situ and laboratory calibrations; the simulation of the expected detector response and finally the preliminary results on the detector performance.

  4. Soot Oxidation in Hydrocarbon/Air Diffusion Flames at Atmospheric Pressure. Appendix K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, F.; El-Leathy, A. M.; Faeth, G. M.; Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Soot oxidation was studied experimentally in laminar hydrocarbon/air diffusion flames at atmospheric pressure. Measurements were carried out along the axes of round jets burning in coflowing air considering acetylene, ethylene, propylene and propane as fuels. Measurements were limited to the initial stages of soot oxidation (carbon consumption less than 70%) where soot oxidation mainly occurs at the surface of primary soot particles. The following properties were measured as a function of distance above the burner exit: soot concentrations by deconvoluted laser extinction, soot temperatures by deconvoluted multiline emission, soot structure by thermophoretic sampling and analysis using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), concentrations of stable major gas species (N2, H2O, H2, O2, CO, CO2, CH4, C2H2,C2H4, C2H6, C3H6, and C3H8) by sampling and gas chromatography, concentrations of some radical species (H, OH, O) by the deconvoluted Li/LiOH atomic absorption technique and flow velocities by laser velocimetry. It was found that soot surface oxidation rates are not particularly affected by fuel type for laminar diffusion flames and are described reasonably well by the OH surface oxidation mechanism with a collision efficiency of 0.10, (standard deviation of 0.07) with no significant effect of fuel type in this behavior; these findings are in good agreement with the classical laminar premixed flame measurements of Neoh et al. Finally, direct rates of surface oxidation by O2 were small compared to OH oxidation for present conditions, based on estimated O2 oxidation rates due to Nagle and Strickland-Constable (1962), because soot oxidation was completed near the flame sheet where O2 concentrations were less than 1.2% by volume.

  5. Soot Oxidation in Laminar Hydrocarbon/Air Diffusion Flames at Atmospheric Pressure. Appendix D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, F.; El-Leathy, A. M.; Faeth, G. M.

    2000-01-01

    Soot oxidation was studied experimentally in laminar hydrocarbon/air diffusion flames at atmospheric pressure. Measurements were carried out along the axes of round jets burning in coflowing air considering acetylene, ethylene, proplyene and propane as fuels. Measurements were limited to the initial stages of soot oxidation (carbon consumption less than 70%) where soot oxidation mainly occurs at the surface of primary soot particles. The following properties were measured as a function of distance above the burner exit: soot concentrations by deconvoluted laser extinction, soot temperatures by deconvoluted multiline emission, soot structure by thermophoretic sampling and analysis using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), concentrations of stable major gas species (N2, H2O, H2, 02, CO, CO2, CH4, C2H2, C2H4, C2H6, C3H6, and C3H8) by sampling and gas chromatography, concentrations of some radical species (H, OH, O) by the deconvoluted Li/LiOH atomic absorption technique and flow velocities by laser velocimetry. It was found that soot surface oxidation rates are not particularly affected by fuel type for laminar diffusion flames and are described reasonably well by the OH surface oxidation mechanism with a collision efficiency of 0.10, (standard deviation of 0.07) with no significant effect of fuel type in this behavior; these findings are in good agreement with the classical laminar premixed flame measurements of Neoh et al. Finally, direct rates of surface oxidation by O2 were small compared to OH oxidation for present conditions, based on estimated O2 oxidation rates due to Nagle and Strickland-Constable, because soot oxidation was completed near the flame sheet where O2 concentrations were less than 1.2% by volume.

  6. Soot Surface Oxidation in Laminar Hydrocarbon/Air Diffusion Flames at Atmospheric Pressure. Appendix I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, F.; El-Leathy, A. M.; Kim, C. H.; Faeth, G. M.; Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor); Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Soot surface oxidation was studied experimentally in laminar hydrocarbon/air diffusion flames at atmospheric pressure. Measurements were carried out along the axes of round fuel jets burning in coflowing dry air considering acetylene-nitrogen, ethylene, propyiene-nitrogen, propane and acetylene-benzene-nitrogen in the fuel stream. Measurements were limited to the initial stages of soot oxidation (carbon consumption less than 70%) where soot oxidation occurs at the surface of primary soot particles. The following properties were measured as a function of distance above the burner exit: soot concentrations by deconvoluted laser extinction, soot temperatures by deconvoluted multiline emission, soot structure by thermophoretic sampling and analysis using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), concentrations of major stable gas species (N2, H2O, H2, O2, CO, CO2, CH4, C2H2, C2H6, C3H6, C3H8, and C6H6) by sampling and gas chromatography, concentrations of some radical species (H, OH, O) by deconvoluted Li/LiOH atomic absorption and flow velocities by laser velocimetry. For present test conditions, it was found that soot surface oxidation rates were not affected by fuel type, that direct rates of soot surface oxidation by O2 estimated from Nagle and Strickland-Constable (1962) were small compared to observed soot surface oxidation rates because soot surface oxidation was completed near the flame sheet where O2 concentrations were less than 3% by volume, and that soot surface oxidation rates were described by the OH soot surface oxidation mechanism with a collision efficiency of 0.14 and an uncertainty (95% confidence) of +/- 0.04 when allowing for direct soot surface oxidation by O2, which is in reasonably good agreement with earlier observations of soot surface oxidation rates in both premixed and diffusion flames at atmospheric pressure.

  7. Shapes of Nonbuoyant Round Luminous Hydrocarbon/Air Laminar Jet Diffusion Flames. Appendix H

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, K.-C.; Faeth, G. M.; Sunderland, P. B.; Urban, D. L.; Yuan, Z.-G.; Ross, Howard B. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The shapes (luminous flame boundaries) of round luminous nonbuoyant soot-containing hydrocarbon/air laminar jet diffusion flames at microgravity were found from color video images obtained on orbit in the Space Shuttle Columbia. Test conditions included ethylene- and propane-fueled flames burning in still air at an ambient temperature of 300 K ambient pressures of 35-130 kPa, initial jet diameters of 1.6 and 2.7 mm, and jet exit Reynolds numbers of 45-170. Present test times were 100-200 s and yielded steady axisymmetric flames that were close to the laminar smoke point (including flames both emitting and not emitting soot) with luminous flame lengths of 15-63 mm. The present soot-containing flames had larger luminous flame lengths than earlier ground-based observations having similar burner configurations: 40% larger than the luminous flame lengths of soot-containing low gravity flames observed using an aircraft (KC-135) facility due to reduced effects of accelerative disturbances and unsteadiness; roughly twice as large as the luminous flame lengths of soot-containing normal gravity flames due to the absence of effects of buoyant mixing and roughly twice as large as the luminous flame lengths of soot-free low gravity flames observed using drop tower facilities due to the presence of soot luminosity and possible reduced effects of unsteadiness, Simplified expressions to estimate the luminous flame boundaries of round nonbuoyant laminar jet diffusion flames were obtained from the classical analysis of Spalding; this approach provided successful correlations of flame shapes for both soot-free and soot-containing flames, except when the soot-containing flames were in the opened-tip configuration that is reached at fuel flow rates near and greater than the laminar smoke point fuel flow rate.

  8. Shapes of Nonbuoyant Round Luminous Hydrocarbon/Air Laminar Jet Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, K.-C.; Faeth, G. M.; Sunderland, P. B.; Urban, D. L.; Yuan, Z.-G.

    1999-01-01

    The shapes (luminous flame boundaries) of round luminous nonbuoyant soot-containing hydrocarbon/air laminar jet diffusion flames at microgravity were found from color video images obtained on orbit in the Space Shuttle Columbia. Test conditions included ethylene- and propane-fueled flames burning in still air at an ambient temperature of 300 K, ambient pressures of 35-130 kPa, initial jet diameters of 1.6 and 2.7 mm, and jet exit Reynolds numbers of 45-170. Present test times were 100-200 s and yielded steady axisymmetric flames that were close to the laminar smoke point (including flames both emitting and not emitting soot) with luminous flame lengths of 15-63 mm. The present soot-containing flames had larger luminous flame lengths than earlier ground-based observations having similar burner configurations: 40% larger than the luminous flame lengths of soot-containing low gravity flames observed using an aircraft (KC-135) facility due to reduced effects of accelerative disturbances and unsteadiness; roughly twice as large as the luminous flame lengths of soot-containing normal gravity flames due to the absence of effects of buoyant mixing and roughly twice as large as the luminous flame lengths of soot-free low gravity flames observed using drop tower facilities due to the presence of soot luminosity and possible reduced effects of unsteadiness. Simplified expressions to estimate the luminous flame boundaries of round nonbuoyant laminar jet diffusion flames were obtained from the classical analysis of Spalding (1979); this approach provided Successful Correlations of flame shapes for both soot-free and soot-containing flames, except when the soot-containing flames were in the opened-tip configuration that is reached at fuel flow rates near and greater than the laminar smoke point fuel flow rate.

  9. 24-HOUR DIFFUSIVE SAMPLING OF TOXIC VOCS IN AIR ONTO CARBOPACK X SOLID ADSORBENT FOLLOWED BY THERMAL DESORPTION/GC/MS ANALYSIS - LABORATORY STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Diffusive sampling of a mixture of 42 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in humidified, purified air onto the solid adsorbent Carbopack X was evaluated under controlled laboratory conditions. The evaluation included variations in sample air temperature, relative humidity, and ozon...

  10. 24-HOUR DIFFUSIVE SAMPLING OF TOXIC VOCS IN AIR ONTO CARBOPACK X SOLID ADSORBENT FOLLOWED BY THERMAL DESORPTION/GC/MS ANALYSIS - LABORATORY STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Diffusive sampling of a mixture of 42 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in humidified, purified air onto the solid adsorbent Carbopack X was evaluated under controlled laboratory conditions. The evaluation included variations in sample air temperature, relative humidity, and ozon...

  11. H2S and VOCs abatement robustness in biofilters and air diffusion bioreactors: A comparative study.

    PubMed

    Lebrero, Raquel; Rodríguez, Elisa; Martin, María; García-Encina, Pedro A; Muñoz, Raúl

    2010-07-01

    The robustness of a conventional biofilter and an air diffusion bioreactor (ADB) was comparatively evaluated in laboratory-scale plants treating a mixture of H2S, butanone, toluene and alpha-pinene at gas residence times of 50 s. Under steady state conditions, H2S, butanone and toluene were almost completely degraded, while alpha-pinene removal did not exhibit removal efficiencies (REs) higher than 11.0 +/- 2.3%. Fluctuations in temperature from 8 degrees C to 30 degrees C did not impact significantly process performance in any of the biotechnologies tested. However, while the ADB unit was able to cope with three and six fold step increases in pollutant loadings, volatile organic compounds (VOCs) REs noticeably decreased in the biofilter when subjected to a six fold step change (i.e. 90% reduction for butanone and 30% for toluene). A process shutdown of five days resulted in the temporary loss of butanone and toluene RE in the ADB system. A lack of irrigation during five days caused a slight decrease in the biofilter REs, while a failure in the pH control system drastically affected the ADB performance. Finally, process robustness was quantified. The calculated overall risks showed that both biotechnologies were reliable for H2S and VOCs treatment in wastewater treatment plants, ADB diffusion exhibiting a higher robustness towards fluctuations commonly found under routine operation. This robustness was further confirmed by the high stability of the DGGE profiles.

  12. Numerical simulation of air pollutant transport and diffusion in a mountainous city

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tielin, Zu; Qiang, Zu; Ye, Wang

    The Monte-Carlo model is used to predict the ground-level concentration distribution (GLCD) of SO 2 in a mountainous city—Guiyang (107°E, 26° 43'N). The transformation of an instantaneous source and other problems of the model are improved. The wind fields are obtained from the objective analysis of three-dimensional wind observations and the turbulent parameters are determined by the parameterized formulae which were adjusted with the local experimental data. It shows the wind profile does not follow strictly the ordinary log-law and the extreme values of wind often occur in the layer of 50-500 m above ground level. The spectral peak of the velocity components u and v shifts to the lower frequencies and the horizontal diffusion increases remarkably. For the daily average values of GCLD in winter, the correlation coefficient between prediction and observation is 0.96. The GLCD simulation shows that the air-pollutant transport and diffusion in Guiyang is mainly dependent on the unstable weather conditions or the aeration effect of the extreme wind layer.

  13. Development and field evaluation of a new diffusive sampler for hydrogen sulphide in the ambient air.

    PubMed

    De Santis, F; Allegrini, I; Bellagotti, R; Vichi, F; Zona, D

    2006-02-01

    A diffusive sampler for the determination of hydrogen sulphide (H2S) based on collection on a paper filter coated with silver nitrate followed by optical densitometric determination of the metal sulphide was developed. Laboratory tests were conducted in controlled atmosphere to evaluate linearity, uptake rate, face velocity effects, sample stability, influence of relative humidity and of interferents, precision and accuracy. The measured uptake rate for H2S was determined in experiments involving sampling at different concentration levels in comparison to a wet standard colorimetric technique. The precision of the measurements for co-located passive samplers was lower than 15%. The accuracy of the data collected is within 20% of the actual value measured by the wet method. The sampler is capable of reliable measurements of H2S at common levels of a polluted atmosphere in urban settings yielding average concentration levels over one month and beyond. Diffusive sampling can be adopted to analyse in detail the temporal and spatial trends of H2S concentration in ambient air and in specific historic buildings or in museums.

  14. Soot Surface Growth in Laminar Hydrocarbon/Air Diffusion Flames. Appendix J

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Leathy, A. M.; Xu, F.; Kim, C. H.; Faeth, G. M.; Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor); Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    The structure and soot surface growth properties of round laminar jet diffusion flames were studied experimentally. Measurements were made along the axes of ethylene-, propylene-propane- and acetylene-benzene-fueled flames burning in coflowing air at atmospheric pressure with the reactants at normal temperature. The measurements included soot structure, soot concentrations, soot temperatures, major gas species concentrations, some radial species (H, OH and 0) concentrations, and gas velocities. These measurements yielded the local flame properties that are thought to affect soot surface growth as well as local soot surface growth rates. When present results were combined with similar earlier observations of acetylene-fueled laminar jet diffusion flames, the results suggested that soot surface growth involved decomposition of the original fuel to form acetylene and H, which were the main reactants for soot surface growth, and that the main effect of the parent fuel on soot surface growth involved its yield of acetylene and H for present test conditions. Thus, as the distance increased along the axes of the flames, soot formation (which was dominated by soot surface growth) began near the cool core of the flow once acetylene and H appeared together and ended near the flame sheet when acetylene disappeared. Species mainly responsible for soot oxidation - OH and 02 were present throughout the soot formation region so that soot surface growth and oxidation proceeded at the same time. Present measurements of soot surface growth rates (corrected for soot surface oxidation) in laminar jet diffusion flames were consistent with earlier measurements of soot surface growth rates in laminar premixed flames and exhibited good agreement with existing Hydrogen-Abstraction/Carbon-Addition (HACA) soot surface growth mechanisms in the literature with steric factors in these mechanisms having values on the order of unity, as anticipated.

  15. Soot Formation in Laminar Acetylene/Air Diffusion Flames at Atmospheric Pressure. Appendix H

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, F.; Faeth, G. M.; Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor); Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The flame structure and soot-formation (soot nucleation and growth) properties of axisymmetric laminar coflowing jet diffusion flames were studied experimentally. Test conditions involved acetylene-nitrogen jets burning in coflowing air at atmospheric pressure. Measurements were limited to the axes of the flames and included soot concentrations, soot temperatures, soot structure, major gas species concentrations, radical species (H, OH, and O) concentrations, and gas velocities. The results show that as distance increases along the axes of the flames, detectable soot formation begins when significant H concentrations are present, and ends when acetylene concentrations become small. Species potentially associated with soot oxidation-O2, CO2, H2O, O, and OH-are present throughout the soot-formation region so that soot formation and oxidation proceed at the same time. Strong rates of soot growth compared to soot nucleation early in the soot-formation process, combined with increased rates of soot nucleation and oxidation as soot formation proceeds, causes primary soot particle diameters to reach a maximum relatively early in the soot-formation process. Aggregation of primary soot particles proceeds, however, until the final stages of soot oxidation. Present measurements of soot growth (corrected for soot oxidation) in laminar diffusion flames were consistent with earlier measurements of soot growth in laminar premixed flames and exhibited encouraging agreement with existing hydrogen-abstraction/carbon-addition (HACA) soot growth mechanisms in the literature that were developed based on measurements within laminar premixed flames. Measured primary soot particle nucleation rates in the present laminar diffusion flames also were consistent with corresponding rates measured in laminar premixed flames and yielded a crude correlation in terms of acetylene and H concentrations and the temperature.

  16. Soot Formation in Laminar Acetylene/Air Diffusion Flames at Atmospheric Pressure. Appendix J

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, F.; Faeth, G. M.; Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The flame structure and soot-formation (soot nucleation and growth) properties of axisymmetric laminar coflowing jet diffusion flames were studied experimentally. Test conditions involved acetylene-nitrogen jets burning in coflowing air at atmospheric pressure. Measurements were limited to the axes of the flames and included soot concentrations, soot temperatures, soot structure, major gas species concentrations, radical species (H, OH, and O) concentrations, and gas velocities. The results show that as distance increases along the axes of the flames, detectable soot formation begins when significant H concentrations are present, and ends when acetylene concentrations become small. Species potentially associated with soot oxidation--O2, CO2, H2O, O, and OH-are present throughout the soot-formation region so that soot formation and oxidation proceed at the same time. Strong rates of soot growth compared to soot nucleation early in the soot-formation process, combined with increased rates of soot nucleation and oxidation as soot formation proceeds, causes primary soot particle diameters to reach a maximum relatively early in the soot-formation process. Aggregation of primary soot particles proceeds, however, until the final stages of soot oxidation. Present measurements of soot growth (corrected for soot oxidation) in laminar diffusion flames were consistent with earlier measurements of soot growth in laminar premixed flames and exhibited encouraging agreement with existing hydrogen-abstraction/carbon-addition (HACA) soot growth mechanisms in the literature that were developed based on measurements within laminar premixed flames. Measured primary soot particle nucleation rates in the present laminar diffusion flames also were consistent with corresponding rates measured in laminar premixed flames and yielded a crude correlation in terms of acetylene and H concentrations and the temperature.

  17. Soot Formation in Laminar Acetylene/Air Diffusion Flames at Atmospheric Pressure. Appendix C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, F.; Faeth, G. M.; Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The flame structure and soot-formation (soot nucleation and growth) properties of axisymmetric laminar coflowing jet diffusion flames were studied experimentally. Test conditions involved acetylene-nitrogen jets burning in coflowing air at atmospheric pressure. Measurements were limited to the axes of the flames and included soot concentrations, soot temperatures, soot structure, major gas species concentrations, radical species (H, OH, and O) concentrations, and gas velocities. The results show that as distance increases along the axes of the flames, detectable soot formation begins when significant H concentrations are present, and ends when acetylene concentrations become small. Species potentially associated with soot oxidation-O2, CO2, H2O, O, and OH-are present throughout the soot-formation region so that soot formation and oxidation proceed at the same time. Strong rates of soot growth compared to soot nucleation early in the soot-formation process, combined with increased rates of soot nucleation and oxidation as soot formation proceeds, causes primary soot particle diameters to reach a maximum relatively early in the soot-formation process. Aggregation of primary soot particles proceeds, however, until the final stages of soot oxidation. Present measurements of soot growth (corrected for soot oxidation) in laminar diffusion flames were consistent with earlier measurements of soot growth in laminar premixed flames and exhibited encouraging agreement with existing hydrogen-abstraction/carbon-addition (HACA) soot growth mechanisms in the literature that were developed based on measurements within laminar premixed flames. Measured primary soot particle nucleation rates in the present laminar diffusion flames also were consistent with corresponding rates measured in laminar premixed flames and yielded a crude correlation in terms of acetylene and H concentrations and the temperature.

  18. Soot Surface Growth in Laminar Hydrocarbon/Air Diffusion Flames. Appendix B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Leathy, A. M.; Xu, F.; Kim, C. H.; Faeth, G. M.; Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The structure and soot surface growth properties of round laminar jet diffusion flames were studied experimentally. Measurements were made along the axes of ethylene-, propylene-propane- and acetylene-benzene-fueled flames burning in coflowing air at atmospheric pressure with the reactants at normal temperature. The measurements included soot structure, soot concentrations, soot temperatures, major gas species concentrations, some radial species (H, OH and O) concentrations, and gas velocities. These measurements yielded the local flame properties that are thought to affect soot surface growth as well as local soot surface growth rates. When present results were combined with similar earlier observations of acetylene-fueled laminar jet diffusion flames, the results suggested that soot surface growth involved decomposition of the original fuel to form acetylene and H, which were the main reactants for soot surface growth, and that the main effect of the parent fuel on soot surface growth involved its yield of acetylene and H for present test conditions. Thus, as the distance increased along the axes of the flames, soot formation (which was dominated by soot surface growth) began near the cool core of the flow once acetylene and H appeared together and ended near the flame sheet when acetylene disappeared. Species mainly responsible for soot oxidation - OH and O2 were present throughout the soot formation region so that soot surface growth and oxidation proceeded at the same time. Present measurements of soot surface growth rates (corrected for soot surface oxidation) in laminar jet diffusion flames were consistent with earlier measurements of soot surface growth rates in laminar premixed flames and exhibited good agreement with existing Hydrogen-Abstraction/Carbon-Addition (HACA) soot surface growth mechanisms in the literature with steric factors in these mechanisms having values on the order of unity, as anticipated.

  19. High fidelity radiative heat transfer models for high-pressure laminar hydrogen-air diffusion flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Jian; Lei, Shenghui; Dasgupta, Adhiraj; Modest, Michael F.; Haworth, Daniel C.

    2014-11-01

    Radiative heat transfer is studied numerically for high-pressure laminar H2-air jet diffusion flames, with pressure ranging from 1 to 30 bar. Water vapour is assumed to be the only radiatively participating species. Two different radiation models are employed, the first being the full spectrum k-distribution model together with conventional Radiative Transfer Equation (RTE) solvers. Narrowband k-distributions of water vapour are calculated and databased from the HITEMP 2010 database, which claims to retain accuracy up to 4000 K. The full-spectrum k-distributions are assembled from their narrowband counterparts to yield high accuracy with little additional computational cost. The RTE is solved using various spherical harmonics methods, such as P1, simplified P3 (SP3) and simplified P5 (SP5). The resulting partial differential equations as well as other transport equations in the laminar diffusion flames are discretized with the finite-volume method in OpenFOAM®. The second radiation model is a Photon Monte Carlo (PMC) method coupled with a line-by-line spectral model. The PMC absorption coefficient database is derived from the same spectroscopy database as the k-distribution methods. A time blending scheme is used to reduce PMC calculations at each time step. Differential diffusion effects, which are important in laminar hydrogen flames, are also included in the scalar transport equations. It was found that the optically thin approximation overpredicts radiative heat loss at elevated pressures. Peak flame temperature is less affected by radiation because of faster chemical reactions at high pressures. Significant cooling effects are observed at downstream locations. As pressure increases, the performance of RTE models starts to deviate due to increased optical thickness. SPN models perform only marginally better than P1 because P1 is adequate except at very high pressure.

  20. Influence of air diffusion on the OH radicals and atomic O distribution in an atmospheric Ar (bio)plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikiforov, A.; Li, L.; Britun, N.; Snyders, R.; Vanraes, P.; Leys, C.

    2014-02-01

    Treatment of samples with plasmas in biomedical applications often occurs in ambient air. Admixing air into the discharge region may severely affect the formation and destruction of the generated oxidative species. Little is known about the effects of air diffusion on the spatial distribution of OH radicals and O atoms in the afterglow of atmospheric-pressure plasma jets. In our work, these effects are investigated by performing and comparing measurements in ambient air with measurements in a controlled argon atmosphere without the admixture of air, for an argon plasma jet. The spatial distribution of OH is detected by means of laser-induced fluorescence diagnostics (LIF), whereas two-photon laser-induced fluorescence (TALIF) is used for the detection of atomic O. The spatially resolved OH LIF and O TALIF show that, due to the air admixture effects, the reactive species are only concentrated in the vicinity of the central streamline of the afterglow of the jet, with a characteristic discharge diameter of ˜1.5 mm. It is shown that air diffusion has a key role in the recombination loss mechanisms of OH radicals and atomic O especially in the far afterglow region, starting up to ˜4 mm from the nozzle outlet at a low water/oxygen concentration. Furthermore, air diffusion enhances OH and O production in the core of the plasma. The higher density of active species in the discharge in ambient air is likely due to a higher electron density and a more effective electron impact dissociation of H2O and O2 caused by the increasing electrical field, when the discharge is operated in ambient air.

  1. Experimental investigation of characteristics of a diffusion flame established over liquid ethanol surface under opposed air flow

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, Anirudh; Raghavan, Vasudevan; Shet, U.S.P.

    2009-03-15

    A preliminary study of the shape and the extinction characteristics of a diffusion flame established over a circular liquid fuel surface under the influence of an opposed air flow, is presented. Renewable liquid fuel such as ethanol is employed. A simple heterogeneous combustion setup, which consists of a cylindrical tube containing ethanol located at the bottom, is exposed to an opposed air flow from a coaxial circular pipe of same size located at the top at a fixed separation distance. Axial and radial extents of flame for different air flow rates are qualitatively analyzed. Burning rates of ethanol for different separation distances and air flow rates are recorded. For a fixed separation distance, at a particular air flow rate the flame extinction takes place. Extinction air flow rates and corresponding strain rates for different separation distances are presented. (author)

  2. International Diffusion of Open Path FTIR Technology and Air Monitoring Methods: Taiwan (Republic of China).

    PubMed

    Giese-Bogdan, Stefan It; Levine, Steven P

    1996-08-01

    International cooperation and diffusion of environmental technologies is a central goal of the U.S. EPA Environmental Technology Initiative, and is of great interest to many countries. One objective is to exchange knowledge and skills concerning new monitoring technologies. In this case, the technology was open path Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometry (op-FTIR). Taiwan is a high-technology, newly industrialized country. Because of air pollution problems, it is interested in obtaining skills, knowledge, and instrumentation for monitoring air pollutants. In April 1994, the Industrial Technology Research Institute, Center for Industrial Safety and Health Technology (ITRI/CISH) in Hsinchu, Taiwan, requested intensive training in op-FTIR. Training was held between September 30,1994 and October 29,1994. During the stay, the instructor provided intensive training on op-FTIR theory as well as an introduction to available instrumentation and software. The training concluded with a field demonstration of the instrumentation in a manufacturing facility. This report gives an overview of the training methods, structure, and materials in the op-FTIR training course. It will also address various problems encountered while teaching this course. In addition, the potential use for this technology in industry as well as by the Taiwanese government will be explained.

  3. Quantitative measurements of enhanced soot production in a flickering methane/air diffusion flame

    SciTech Connect

    Shaddix, C.R.; Harrington, J.E.; Smyth, K.C. . Building and Fire Research Lab.)

    1994-12-01

    Integrated models of soot production and oxidation are based upon experimental results obtained in steady, laminar flames. For successful application of these descriptions to turbulent combustion, it is instructive to test predictions of soot concentrations against experimental measurements obtained in time-varying flowfields. This paper reports quantitative measurements of the local soot volume fraction in a co-flowing, flickering CH[sub 4]/air diffusion flame burning at atmospheric pressure. Acoustic forcing of the fuel flow rate is used to phase lock the periodic flame flicker close to the natural flicker frequency. Measurements show that soot production is four time greater for a forcing condition in which flame tip clipping occurs, compared with a steady flame burning with the same mean fuel flow velocity. The soot field in the flickering flame has been characterized using tomographic reconstruction of extinction data obtained at 632.8 nm, laser-induced incandescence (LII) images calibrated against steady CH[sub 4]/air extinction results, and vertically polarized scattering data. The LII method is found to track the soot volume fraction closely and to give better signal-to-noise than the extinction measurements in both the steady and time-varying flowfields. A Mie analysis of these results suggests that the flickering flame exhibits similar number densities but larger particle sizes that the corresponding steady flame.

  4. Gas diffusion-type oxygen electrode using perovskite-type oxides for metal-air batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Hyodo, Takeo; Miura, Norio; Yamazoe, Noboru

    1995-12-31

    In order to develop an air cathode of metal-air batteries, oxygen reduction behavior of gas diffusion-type carbon electrodes loaded with perovskite-type oxides, La{sub 1{minus}x}A{prime}{sub x}FeO{sub 3} (A{prime} = Ca, Sr, Ba, 0 {le} x {le} 1.0), was examined in 8 M KOH at 60 C. Among the oxide catalysts tested, La{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 0.5}FeO{sub 3} (specific surface area: 21.5 m{sup 2}{center_dot}g{sup {minus}1}) gave the highest electrode performance. On the basis of electrode reaction kinetics, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} decomposition rates, and temperature programmed desorption of oxygen, it was concluded that such a performance was attributable to the active sites of the oxide for the direct 4-electron reduction of oxygen. Moreover, the electrode using La{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 0.5}FeO{sub 3} was found to be rather stable in a short-term operation for 90 h at 300 mA{center_dot}cm{sup {minus}2}.

  5. Chemical response of methane/air diffusion flames to unsteady strain rate

    SciTech Connect

    Im, H.G.; Chen, J.H.; Chen, J.Y.

    1998-03-01

    Effects of unsteady strain rate on the response of methane/air diffusion flames are studied. The authors use the finite-domain opposed flow configuration in which the nozzle exit velocity is imposed as a function of time. The GRI mechanism v2.11 is used for the detailed methane/air chemistry. The response of individual species to monochromatic oscillation in strain rate with various frequencies reveals that the fluctuation of slow species, such as CO and NO{sub x}, is more rapidly suppressed as the flow time scale decreases. It is also observed that the maximum CO concentration is very insensitive to the variation in the scalar dissipation rate. An extinction event due to an abrupt imposition of high strain rates is also simulated by an impulsive velocity with various frequencies. For a fast impulse, a substantial overshoot in NO{sub 2} concentration is observed after extinction. Finally, the overall fuel burning rate shows a nonmonotonic response to the variation in characteristic unsteady time scale, while the emission indices for NO{sub x} shows monotonic decay in response as frequency is increased.

  6. Steady Counterflow he II Heat Transfer Through Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalban-Canassy, M.; Van Sciver, S. W.

    2010-04-01

    We present steady state counterflow measurements performed on porous samples saturated in He II. The experiment is composed of a vacuum insulated open channel whose top extremity is closed to a Minco® heater. The temperature and pressure differences across the plug are measured by two germanium TTR-G Microsensors® thermometers and a Validyne DP10-20 differential pressure sensor. Applied heat fluxes range up to 0.5 kW/m2 of sample cross section. Measurements were performed at temperatures ranging from 1.7 to 2.1 K on highly anisotropic samples provided by Composite Technology Development Inc.: circular pellets (3.08 mm thick and 28.58 mm in diameter) of 20 compressed layers of pre-impregnated woven magnet insulation. In the laminar regime, the permeability is estimated from the pressure drop measurements for comparison with room temperature data. In the turbulent regime, the model based on tortuosity developed previously fails to describe the heat transfer behavior of He II in this type of porous medium.

  7. Counterflow laminar gas jets issuing from aligned planar nozzles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Adam; Coenen, Wilfried; Sanchez, Antonio L.

    2016-11-01

    The laminar flow resulting from the impingement of two gaseous jets issuing from aligned planar nozzles of semi-width R separated a distance 2 H is investigated by numerical and analytical methods, with specific consideration given to the high-Reynolds and low-Mach number conditions typically present in counterflow-flame experiments. The resulting flow, nearly inviscid and effectively incompressible, can be described by using a density-weighted stream-function/vorticity formulation that removes the need to consider specifically the boundary separating the two jet streams. Besides the geometric parameter H / R , the solution depends only on the shape of the velocity profiles in the feed streams and on the jet momentum-flux ratio Λ. While conformal mapping can be used to determine the potential solution corresponding to uniform feed-stream velocity profiles, numerical integration is required in general to compute vortical flows, including those arising with Poiseuille velocity profiles, with simplified solutions found in the limits H / R << 1 and H / R >> 1 .

  8. The counterflow transport of sterols and PI4P.

    PubMed

    Mesmin, Bruno; Antonny, Bruno

    2016-08-01

    Cholesterol levels in intracellular membranes are constantly adjusted to match with specific organelle functions. Cholesterol is kept high in the plasma membrane (PM) because it is essential for its barrier function, while low levels are found in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) where cholesterol mediates feedback control of its own synthesis by sterol-sensor proteins. The ER→Golgi→PM concentration gradient of cholesterol in mammalian cells, and ergosterol in yeast, appears to be sustained by specific intracellular transport processes, which are mostly mediated by lipid transfer proteins (LTPs). Here we review a recently described function of two LTPs, OSBP and its yeast homolog Osh4p, which consists in creating a sterol gradient between membranes by vectorial transport. OSBP also contributes to the formation of ER/Golgi membrane contact sites, which are important hubs for the transfer of several lipid species. OSBP and Osh4p organize a counterflow transport of lipids whereby sterols are exchanged for the phosphoinositide PI4P, which is used as a fuel to drive sterol transport. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: The cellular lipid landscape edited by Tim P. Levine and Anant K. Menon.

  9. STEADY COUNTERFLOW HE II HEAT TRANSFER THROUGH POROUS MEDIA

    SciTech Connect

    Dalban-Canassy, M.; Van Sciver, S. W.

    2010-04-09

    We present steady state counterflow measurements performed on porous samples saturated in He II. The experiment is composed of a vacuum insulated open channel whose top extremity is closed to a Minco registered heater. The temperature and pressure differences across the plug are measured by two germanium TTR-G Microsensors registered thermometers and a Validyne DP10-20 differential pressure sensor. Applied heat fluxes range up to 0.5 kW/m{sup 2} of sample cross section. Measurements were performed at temperatures ranging from 1.7 to 2.1 K on highly anisotropic samples provided by Composite Technology Development Inc.: circular pellets (3.08 mm thick and 28.58 mm in diameter) of 20 compressed layers of pre-impregnated woven magnet insulation. In the laminar regime, the permeability is estimated from the pressure drop measurements for comparison with room temperature data. In the turbulent regime, the model based on tortuosity developed previously fails to describe the heat transfer behavior of He II in this type of porous medium.

  10. Experimental Method Development for Estimating Solid-phase Diffusion Coefficients and Material/Air Partition Coefficients of SVOCs

    EPA Science Inventory

    The solid-phase diffusion coefficient (Dm) and material-air partition coefficient (Kma) are key parameters for characterizing the sources and transport of semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) in the indoor environment. In this work, a new experimental method was developed to es...

  11. Experimental Method Development for Estimating Solid-phase Diffusion Coefficients and Material/Air Partition Coefficients of SVOCs

    EPA Science Inventory

    The solid-phase diffusion coefficient (Dm) and material-air partition coefficient (Kma) are key parameters for characterizing the sources and transport of semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) in the indoor environment. In this work, a new experimental method was developed to es...

  12. Investigation of ambient air species diffusion into the effluent of an atmospheric pressure plasma jet by measurements and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt-Bleker, Ansgar; Reuter, Stephan; Winter, Jörn; Lange, Hartmut; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; Leibniz InstitutePlasma Science; Technology (INP) Greifswald Team

    2011-10-01

    The diffusion of ambient air species into the effluent of a cold atmospheric pressure plasma (CAP) jet operated with pure argon is quantified using both experimental methods and theoretical estimations by a convection-diffusion approach. In the effluent of CAP jets operated in ambient air, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) are generated. ROS and RNS are believed to play a central role in biomedical applications of low temperature atmospheric pressure plasmas. The inflow of atmospheric oxygen is determined by a novel absorption technique in the VUV spectral range, where emission originating from within the discharge is used as light source. An analytic expression for the estimation of the on-axis density of ambient species was obtained assuming a stationary drift-diffusion equation and is compared to complete numerical results. The easy to use expression correlates well with the experimental results obtained.

  13. Evaluation of passive diffusion bag and dialysis samplers in selected wells at Hickam Air Force Base, Hawaii, July 2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vroblesky, Don A.; Pravecek, Tasha

    2002-01-01

    Field comparisons of chemical concentrations obtained from dialysis samplers, passive diffusion bag samplers, and low-flow samplers showed generally close agreement in most of the 13 wells tested during July 2001 at Hickam Air Force Base, Hawaii. The data for chloride, sulfate, iron, alkalinity, arsenic, and methane appear to show that the dialysis samplers are capable of accurately collecting a passive sample for these constituents. In general, the comparisons of volatile organic compound concentrations showed a relatively close correspondence between the two different types of diffusion samples and between the diffusion samples and the low-flow samples collected in most wells. Divergence appears to have resulted primarily from the pumping method, either producing a mixed sample or water not characteristic of aquifer water moving through the borehole under ambient conditions. The fact that alkalinity was not detected in the passive diffusion bag samplers, highly alkaline waters without volatilization loss from effervescence, which can occur when a sample is acidified for preservation. Both dialysis and passive diffusion bag samplers are relatively inexpensive and can be deployed rapidly and easily. Passive diffusion bag samplers are intended for sampling volatile organic compounds only, but dialysis samplers can be used to sample both volatile organic compounds and inorganic solutes. Regenerated cellulose dialysis samplers, however, are subject to biodegradation and probably should be deployed no sooner than 2 weeks prior to recovery. 1 U.S. Geological Survey, Columbia, South Carolina. 2 Air Florce Center for Environmental Excellence, San Antionio, Texas.

  14. A QSPR model for prediction of diffusion coefficient of non-electrolyte organic compounds in air at ambient condition.

    PubMed

    Mirkhani, Seyyed Alireza; Gharagheizi, Farhad; Sattari, Mehdi

    2012-03-01

    Evaluation of diffusion coefficients of pure compounds in air is of great interest for many diverse industrial and air quality control applications. In this communication, a QSPR method is applied to predict the molecular diffusivity of chemical compounds in air at 298.15K and atmospheric pressure. Four thousand five hundred and seventy nine organic compounds from broad spectrum of chemical families have been investigated to propose a comprehensive and predictive model. The final model is derived by Genetic Function Approximation (GFA) and contains five descriptors. Using this dedicated model, we obtain satisfactory results quantified by the following statistical results: Squared Correlation Coefficient=0.9723, Standard Deviation Error=0.003 and Average Absolute Relative Deviation=0.3% for the predicted properties from existing experimental values. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Double diffusion, convection de Boussinesq et convection profonde en air atmosphérique pollué ou humide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bois, Pierre-Antoine

    2006-11-01

    We derive the molecular diffusion equations, and we show how the determination of the molecular diffusion coefficients of passive scalars (pollutants or moisture) in the atmospheric air may be performed, in first approximation, by means of data of pressure, temperature and densities in the medium at the rest. These approximations are sufficient in order to write the equations of shallow convection (Boussinesq equations), whatever be the Brunt-Väisälä frequency of the medium (as well as in the troposphere and in the stratosphere). In the case of deep convection, which is possible in the troposphere only, the weakness of the Brunt-Väisälä frequency modifies the molecular diffusion equations, and these equations also modify the equations of convection. More accurate evaluations of the diffusion coefficients must also be made, using, for instance, static datas associated with several temperature distributions. To cite this article: P.-A. Bois, C. R. Mecanique 334 (2006).

  16. Determination of nitrogen dioxide in ambient air employing diffuse reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Santosh Kumar; Deb, Manas Kanti; Verma, Devsharan

    2008-10-01

    This paper presents the development of a simple and precise analytical method for the determination of nitrogen dioxide in ambient air. In this method nitrogen dioxide is determined in the form of nitrite. The determination of nitrogen dioxide needs no reagents except for a solution of sodium hydroxide mixed with sodium arsenite (NaOH-Na 2As 2O 3) which is used as an absorbing reagent for trapping the nitrogen dioxide from the atmosphere in the form of nitrite, i.e., a prior analysis step. The determination of submicrogram levels of nitrogen dioxide is based on the selection of a strong and sharp quantitative analytical peak at 1380 cm - 1 using diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy (DRS-FTIR). The limit of detection (LOD) and the limit of quantification of the method are found to be 0.008 μg g - 1 NO 2- and 0.05 μg g - 1 NO 2-, respectively. The precision in terms of standard deviation and relative standard deviation value at a level of 2 μg NO 2- / 0.1 g KBr for n = 10 is found to be 0.036 μg NO 2- and 1.8%, respectively. The relative standard deviation ( n = 10) for the determination of nitrogen dioxide in ambient air was observed to be in the range 2.6-3.8%. The method proposed is time-saving and eliminates the slow and cumbersome steps of pH maintenance of the reaction mixture and color formation of the EPA recommended spectrophotometric and other methods for quantitative determination of nitrogen dioxide.

  17. Fabrication, Operation and Flow Visualization in Surface-acoustic-wave-driven Acoustic-counterflow Microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Travagliati, Marco; Shilton, Richie; Beltram, Fabio; Cecchini, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Surface acoustic waves (SAWs) can be used to drive liquids in portable microfluidic chips via the acoustic counterflow phenomenon. In this video we present the fabrication protocol for a multilayered SAW acoustic counterflow device. The device is fabricated starting from a lithium niobate (LN) substrate onto which two interdigital transducers (IDTs) and appropriate markers are patterned. A polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) channel cast on an SU8 master mold is finally bonded on the patterned substrate. Following the fabrication procedure, we show the techniques that allow the characterization and operation of the acoustic counterflow device in order to pump fluids through the PDMS channel grid. We finally present the procedure to visualize liquid flow in the channels. The protocol is used to show on-chip fluid pumping under different flow regimes such as laminar flow and more complicated dynamics characterized by vortices and particle accumulation domains. PMID:24022515

  18. Study on electrical characteristics of barrier-free atmospheric air diffuse discharge generated by nanosecond pulses and long wire electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Lee Liu, Yun-Long; Teng, Yun; Liu, Lun; Pan, Yuan

    2014-07-15

    In room-temperature atmospheric air, the large-scale diffuse plasmas can be generated via high-voltage nanosecond pulses with short rise-time and wire electrodes. Diffuse discharge with the wire electrode length up to 110.0 cm and the discharge spacing of several centimeters has been investigated in this paper. Electrical characteristics of diffuse discharge have been analyzed by their optical photographs and measuring of the voltage and current waveforms. Experimental results show the electrode spacing, and the length of wire electrodes can influence the intensity and mode transition of diffuse discharge. The characteristic of current waveforms is that there are several current oscillation peaks at the time of applied pulsed voltage peak, and at the tail of applied pulse, the conduction current component will compensate the displacement one so that the measured current is unidirectional in diffuse discharge mode. The transition from diffuse discharge to arc discharge is always with the increasing of conduction current density. As for nanosecond pulses with long tail, the long wire electrodes are help for generating non-equilibrium diffuse plasmas.

  19. Counter-flow Microfluidics for Stable Flow Thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crews, Niel

    2010-10-01

    Microfluidic thermal reactors are able to achieve high temperature ramping rates due to their low thermal mass. Of these, the most thermodynamically efficient are flow systems that rely on a steady-state temperature distribution to induce temperature change of the moving fluid. Rather than inserting or extracting heat at controlled time intervals, the fluids are heated and cooled only through local heat transfer with the substrate material in which the microchannels are embedded. In addition to accelerated ramping and reduced energy consumption, such systems have the potential to provide greater control of the heating rates. This is because the temperature change is simply a function of the fluid velocity vector with respect to the stable temperature distribution within the material. However, the operation of such a system is complicated by the thermal perturbation that the fluid flow introduces into the system. When predicting the temperature change of the fluid, it is common to ignore the effect of the fluid flow on the original temperature distribution within the substrate. However, this has been shown to be the dominant behavior in many scenarios. This behavior is particularly problematic in polymeric microfluidic devices, where thermal conductivities are on the order of 0.2 W/m-K. This presentation will address a powerful solution to this thermal instability. By implementing a counter-flow microfluidic geometry, it will be shown how the temperature smearing common to microflow thermal reactors can be virtually eliminated. The deleterious effect of the insulative properties of popular polymer substrates is minimized, allowing for higher flow rates and temperature ramp rates. This is achieved by creating a preferred heat path for the thermal energy that is being driven into or out of the fluid during flow. Theory will be presented; experimental data will be discussed; application to lab-on-a-chip systems will be demonstrated.

  20. Diffusive-to-ballistic transition of the modulated heat transport in a rarefied air chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Heredia, C. L.; Macias, J.; Ordonez-Miranda, J.; Ares, O.; Alvarado-Gil, J. J.

    2017-01-01

    Modulated heat transfer in air subject to pressures from 760 Torr to 10-4 Torr is experimentally studied by means of a thermal-wave resonant cavity placed in a vacuum chamber. This is done through the analysis of the amplitude and phase delay of the photothermal signal as a function of the cavity length and pressure through of the Knudsen's number. The viscous, transitional, and free molecular regimes of heat transport are observed for pressures P>1.5 Torr, 25 mTorrdiffusive and ballistic heat transport.

  1. Structure and Soot Properties of Nonbuoyant Ethylene/Air Laminar Jet Diffusion Flames. Appendix I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urban, D. L.; Yuan, Z.-G.; Sunderland, P. B.; Linteris, G. T.; Voss, J. E.; Lin, K.-C.; Dai, Z.; Sun, K.; Faeth, G. M.; Ross, Howard D. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The structure and soot properties of round, soot-emitting, nonbuoyant, laminar jet diffusion flames are described, based on long-duration (175-230/s) experiments at microgravity carried out on orbit In the Space Shuttle Columbia. Experiments] conditions included ethylene-fueled flames burning in still air at nominal pressures of 50 and 100 kPa and an ambient temperature of 300 K with luminous Annie lengths of 49-64 mm. Measurements included luminous flame shapes using color video imaging, soot concentration (volume fraction) distributions using deconvoluted laser extinction imaging, soot temperature distributions using deconvoluted multiline emission imaging, gas temperature distributions at fuel-lean (plume) conditions using thermocouple probes, not structure distributions using thermophoretic sampling and analysis by transmission electron microscopy, and flame radiation using a radiometer. The present flames were larger, and emitted soot men readily, than comparable observed during ground-based microgravity experiments due to closer approach to steady conditions resulting from the longer test times and the reduced gravitational disturbances of the space-based experiments.

  2. Validation and modelling of a novel diffusive sampler for determining concentrations of volatile organic compounds in air.

    PubMed

    Ballesta, Pascual Pérez; Grandesso, Emanuela; Field, Robert A; Cabrerizo, Ana

    2016-02-18

    A novel diffusive sampler that combines radial and axial diffusion has been developed that improves upon existing commercially available designs. The POcket Diffusive (POD) sampler has been validated under laboratory and field conditions for the measurements of VOCs in ambient air. Laboratory tests varied sampling conditions of temperature (-30-40 C), humidity (10-80%), wind velocity (0.1-4 m s(-1)), and concentration (0.5-50 μg m(-3)) for a number of specific VOCs. An overall uncertainty of circa 9% for the measurement of benzene is calculated for the validation tests, in compliance with the data quality objectives of the EU air quality directive 2008/50/EC. A semi-empirical diffusion model has been developed to estimate sampling rates for compounds that were not tested, and for conditions outside of tested ranges during validation. The diffusion model (and validation tests) shows a low influence of environmental conditions on the sampling rate for the POD sampler. Average reproducibility values of circa 3% are reported with overall sampling uncertainties ranging from 9% to 15%, for the whole range of tested conditions, depending on the compound. The adsorbent cartridge is compatible with existing thermal desorption systems in the market. The diffusive sampler can modify the sampling rate by changing the diffusive body within a range of different porosities. Field tests, conducted in parallel with independent quality controlled canister sampling, confirmed the ease of use and quality of VOC measurements with the POD sampler, for compounds that were, and were not, evaluated during laboratory tests.

  3. Computational and Experimental Study of Energetic Materials in a Counterflow Microgravity Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takahashi, Fumiaki (Technical Monitor); Urban, David (Technical Monitor); Smooke, M. D.; Parr, T. P.; Hanson-Parr, D. M.; Yetter, R. A.; Risha, G.

    2004-01-01

    Counterflow diffusion flames are studied for various fuels flowing against decomposition products from solid ammonium perchlorate (AP) pellets in order to obtain fundamental understanding of composite propellant flame structure and chemistry. We illustrate this approach through a combined experimental and numerical study of a fuel mixture consisting of C2H4 CO + H2, and C2H2 + C2H4 flowing against solid AP. For these particular AP-fuel systems, the resulting flame zone simulates the various flame structures that are ex+ to exist between reaction products from Ap crystals and a hydrocarbon binder. As in all our experimental studies, quantitative species and temperature profiles have been measured between the fuel exit and AP surface. Species measured included CN, NH, NO, OH, N2, CO2, CO, H2, CO, HCl, and H2O. Temperature was measured using a thermocouple at the exit, spontaneous Raman scattering measurements throughout the flame, OH rotational population distributions, and NO vibrational population distributions. The burning rate of AP was also measured as a function of strain rate, given by the separation distance between the AP surface and the gaseous hydrocarbon fuel tube exit plane. This distance was nominally set at 5 mm, although studies have been performed for variations in separation distance. The measured 12 scalars are compared with predictions from a detailed gas-phase kinetics model consisting of 86 species and 531 reactions. Model predictions are found to be in good agreement with experiment and illustrate the type of kinetic features that may be expected to occur in propellants when AP particle size distributions are varied. Furthermore, the results constitute the continued development of a necessary database and validation of a comprehensive model for studying more complex AP-solid fuel systems in microgravity. Exploratory studies have also been performed with liquid and solid fuels at normal gravity. Because of melting (and hence dripping) and deep

  4. Perspectives of advanced thermal management in solar thermochemical syngas production using a counter-flow solid-solid heat exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falter, Christoph; Sizmann, Andreas; Pitz-Paal, Robert

    2017-06-01

    A modular reactor model is presented for the description of solar thermochemical syngas production involving counter-flow heat exchangers that recuperate heat from the solid phase. The development of the model is described including heat diffusion within the reactive material as it travels through the heat exchanger, which was previously identified to be a possibly limiting factor in heat exchanger design. Heat transfer within the reactive medium is described by conduction and radiation, where the former is modeled with the three-resistor model and the latter with the Rosseland diffusion approximation. The applicability of the model is shown by the analysis of heat exchanger efficiency for different material thicknesses and porosities in a system with 8 chambers and oxidation and reduction temperatures of 1000 K and 1800 K, respectively. Heat exchanger efficiency is found to rise strongly for a reduction of material thickness, as the element mass is reduced and a larger part of the elements takes part in the heat exchange process. An increase of porosity enhances radiation heat exchange but deteriorates conduction. The overall heat exchange in the material is improved for high temperatures in the heat exchanger, as radiation dominates the energy transfer. The model is shown to be a valuable tool for the development and analysis of solar thermochemical reactor concepts involving heat exchange from the solid phase.

  5. Effects of molecular transport on turbulence-chemistry interactions in a hydrogen-argon-air jet diffusion flame

    SciTech Connect

    Menon, S.; Calhoon, W.H. Jr.; Goldin, G.; Kerstein, A.R.

    1994-01-01

    A numerical simulation of entrainment, turbulent advection, molecular import and chemical kinetics in a turbulent diffusion flame is used to investigate effects of molecular transport on turbulence-chemistry interactions. A fun finite-rate chemical mechanism is used to represent the combustion of a hydrogen-argon mixture issuing into air. Results based on incorporation of differential diffusion and variable Lewis number are compared to cases with the former effect, or both-effects, suppressed. Significant impact on radical species production and on NO emission index (based on a reduced mechanism for thermal NO) is found. A reduced mechanism for hydrogen-air combustion, omitting both effects and incorporating other simplifications, performs comparably except that its NO predictions agree well with the case of full chemistry and molecular transport, possibly due to cancellation of errors.

  6. Development of a diffuse air-argon plasma source using a dielectric-barrier discharge at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Tang Jie; Jiang Weiman; Zhao Wei; Wang Yishan; Li Shibo; Wang Haojing; Duan Yixiang

    2013-01-21

    A stable diffuse large-volume air plasma source was developed by using argon-induced dielectric-barrier discharges at atmospheric pressure. This plasma source can be operated in a filamentary discharge with the average areal power density of 0.27 W/cm{sup 2} and the gas temperature of 315{+-}3 K. Spatial measurement of emission spectrum and temperature indicates that this plasma is uniform in the central region along the transverse direction. It is also found that the formation of diffuse air plasma mainly lies in the creation of sufficient seed electrons by the Penning effect through collisions between two argon or nitrogen metastables at low electric fields.

  7. Occupational dimethylformamide exposure. 1. Diffusive sampling of dimethylformamide vapor for determination of time-weighted average concentration in air.

    PubMed

    Yasugi, T; Kawai, T; Mizunuma, K; Horiguchi, S; Iguchi, H; Ikeda, M

    1992-01-01

    A diffusive sampling method with water as absorbent was examined in comparison with 3 conventional methods of diffusive sampling with carbon cloth as absorbent, pumping through National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) charcoal tubes, and pumping through NIOSH silica gel tubes to measure time-weighted average concentration of dimethylformamide (DMF). DMF vapors of constant concentrations at 3-110 ppm were generated by bubbling air at constant velocities through liquid DMF followed by dilution with fresh air. Both types of diffusive samplers could either absorb or adsorb DMF in proportion to time (0.25-8 h) and concentration (3-58 ppm), except that the DMF adsorbed was below the measurable amount when carbon cloth samplers were exposed at 3 ppm for less than 1 h. When both diffusive samplers were loaded with DMF and kept in fresh air, the DMF in water samplers stayed unchanged for at least for 12 h. The DMF in carbon cloth samplers showed a decay with a half-time of 14.3 h. When the carbon cloth was taken out immediately after termination of DMF exposure, wrapped in aluminum foil, and kept refrigerated, however, there was no measurable decrease in DMF for at least 3 weeks. When the air was drawn at 0.2 l/min, a breakthrough of the silica gel tube took place at about 4,000 ppm.min (as the lower 95% confidence limit), whereas charcoal tubes could tolerate even heavier exposures, suggesting that both tubes are fit to measure the 8-h time-weighted average of DMF at 10 ppm.

  8. Determination of mass diffusion coefficients of oxygenated fuel additives in air using digital real-time holographic interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Maogang; Guo, Ying; Zhong, Qiu; Zhang, Ying

    2009-02-01

    In this work, an experimental system based on digital real-time holographic interferometry for measuring the mass diffusion coefficients of fluid is introduced. The method of processing interference fringe hologram is also introduced thoroughly. By uncertainties analysis and experimental verification, the accuracy of this system is validated. The experimental uncertainties in temperature and mass diffusion coefficient are estimated to be no greater than ± 0.16 K and ± 0.2 %, respectively. On this basis, the mass diffusion coefficients of three fuel additives, diethyl 1,6-hexanedioate (diethyl adipate, DEA), dimethyl carbonate (DMC) and diethyl carbonate (DEC) in air were measured at T = (278.15 to 338.15) K under atmospheric pressure, and polynomial was fitted by the experimental data.

  9. Field-scale tests for determining mixing patterns associated with coarse-bubble air diffuser configurations, Egan Quarry, Illinois

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hornewer, N.J.; Johnson, G.P.; Robertson, Dale M.; Hondzo, Miki

    1997-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Chicago District did field-scale tests in August-September 1996 to determine mixing patterns associated with different configurations of coarse-bubble air diffusers. The tests were done in an approximately 13-meter deep quarry near Chicago, Ill. Three-dimensional velocity, water-temperature, dissolved oxygen concentration, and specific-conductivity profiles were collected from locations between approximately 2 to 30 meters from the diffusers for two sets of five test configurations; one set for stratified and one set for destratified conditions in the quarry. The data-collection methods and instrumentation used to characterize mixing patterns and interactions of coarse-bubble diffusers were successful. An extensive data set was collected and is available to calibrate and verify aeration and stratification models, and to characterize basic features of bubble-plume interaction.

  10. Effect of dynamic diffusion of air, nitrogen, and helium gaseous media on the microhardness of ionic crystals with juvenile surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klyavin, O. V.; Fedorov, V. Yu.; Chernov, Yu. M.; Shpeizman, V. V.

    2015-09-01

    The load dependences of the microhardness of surface layers of NaCl and LiF ionic single crystals with juvenile surfaces and surfaces exposed to air for a long time measured in the air, nitrogen, and helium gaseous media have been investigated. It has been found that there is a change in the sign of the derivative of the microhardness as a function of the load for LiF crystals indented in helium and after their aging in air, as well as a weaker effect of the nitrogen and air gaseous media on the studied dependences as compared to NaCl crystals. It has also been found that, after the aging of the surface of NaCl crystals in air, there is a change in the sign of the derivative of the microhardness in the nitrogen and air gaseous media, as well as a pronounced change in the microhardness as a function of the time of aging the samples in air as compared to the weaker effect of the gaseous medium for LiF crystals. The obtained data have been analyzed in terms of the phenomenon of dislocation-dynamic diffusion of particles from the external medium into crystalline materials during their plastic deformation along the nucleating and moving dislocations. It has been shown that this phenomenon affects the microhardness through changes in the intensity of dislocation multiplication upon the formation of indentation rosettes in different gaseous media. The performed investigation of the microhardness of the juvenile surface of NaCl and LiF crystals in different gaseous media has revealed for the first time a different character of dislocation-dynamic diffusion of these media in a "pure" form.

  11. Long Penetration Mode Counterflowing Jets for Supersonic Slender Configurations - A Numerical Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatachari, Balaji Shankar; Cheng, Gary; Chang, Chau-Layn; Zichettello, Benjamin; Bilyeu, David L.

    2013-01-01

    A novel approach of using counterflowing jets positioned strategically on the aircraft and exploiting its long penetration mode (LPM) of interaction towards sonic-boom mitigation forms the motivation for this study. Given that most previous studies on the counterflowing LPM jet have all been on blunt bodies and at high supersonic or hypersonic flow conditions, exploring the feasibility to obtain a LPM jet issuing from a slender body against low supersonic freestream conditions is the main focus of this study. Computational fluid dynamics computations of axisymmetric models (cone-cylinder and quartic geometry), of relevance to NASA's High Speed project, are carried out using the space-time conservation element solution element viscous flow solver with unstructured meshes. A systematic parametric study is conducted to determine the optimum combination of counterflowing jet size, mass flow rate, and nozzle geometry for obtaining LPM jets. Details from these computations will be used to assess the potential of the LPM counterflowing supersonic jet as a means of active flow control for enabling supersonic flight over land and to establish the knowledge base for possible future implementation of such technologies.

  12. Experimental Study of a Nozzle Using Fluidic Counterflow for Thrust Vectoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flamm, Jeffrey D.

    1998-01-01

    A static experimental investigation of a counterflow thrust vectoring nozzle concept was performed. The study was conducted in the NASA Langley Research Center Jet Exit Test Facility. Internal performance characteristics were defined over a nozzle pressure ratio (jet total to ambient) range of 3.5 to 10.0. The effects of suction collar geometry and suction slot height on nozzle performance were examined. In the counterflow concept, thrust vectoring is achieved by applying a vacuum to a slot adjacent to a primary jet that is shrouded by a suction collar. Two flow phenomena work to vector the primary jet depending upon the test conditions and configuration. In one case, the vacuum source creates a secondary reverse flowing stream near the primary jet. The shear layers between the two counterflowing streams mix and entrain mass from the surrounding fluid. The presence of the collar inhibits mass entrainment and the flow near the collar accelerates, causing a drop in pressure on the collar. The second case works similarly except that the vacuum is not powerful enough to create a counterflowing stream and instead a coflowing stream is present. The primary jet is vectored if suction is applied asymmetrically on the top or bottom of the jet.

  13. Effect of traffic rule breaking behavior on pedestrian counterflow in a channel with a partition line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Y. F.; Song, W. G.

    2007-08-01

    In this paper a partition line is used in the counterflow system to present the default (conventional) traffic rule: pedestrians prefer to walk on a certain side on the road during movement, e.g., the right-hand side in China or the left-hand side in Japan. Based on the counterflow model of Takimoto (model A), we introduced two modified models, i.e., model B and C, to study the effects of a partition line in the consideration of people who do not obey the default traffic rule. Model B represents that factor in time scale, while model C in space scale. In model B, there are pedestrians who cross the partition line but choose not to obey the default traffic rule with a probability pnor , while in model C, if a pedestrian crosses the partition line and goes away from it further than a certain nonobeying-rule threshold distance dt , he will not obey the traffic rule. It is found that the behavior of traffic rule breaking influences much the counterflow when it is at the choking flow state rather than at the free moving or stopped state. Furthermore, it is shown that the default traffic rule is not always positive to the counterflow in all situations. It depends on the game result of these two opposite sides: to use the channel width as much as possible and to avoid the interference from the other group as far as possible.

  14. Silver nanoparticle-decorated carbon nanotubes as bifunctional gas-diffusion electrodes for zinc-air batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, T.; Kaempgen, M.; Nopphawan, P.; Wee, G.; Mhaisalkar, S.; Srinivasan, M.

    Thin, lightweight, and flexible gas-diffusion electrodes (GDEs) based on freestanding entangled networks of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) decorated with Ag nanoparticles (AgNPs) are tested as the air-breathing cathode in a zinc-air battery. The SWNT networks provide a highly porous surface for active oxygen absorption and diffusion. The high conductivity of SWNTs coupled with the catalytic activity of AgNPs for oxygen reduction leads to an improvement in the performance of the zinc-air cell. By modulating the pH value and the reaction time, different sizes of AgNPs are decorated uniformly on the SWNTs, as revealed by transmission electron microscopy and powder X-ray diffraction. AgNPs with sizes of 3-5 nm double the capacity and specific energy of a zinc-air battery as compared with bare SWNTs. The simplified, lightweight architecture shows significant advantages over conventional carbon-based GDEs in terms of weight, thickness and conductivity, and hence may be useful for mobile and portable applications.

  15. Prediction of Drag Reduction in Supersonic and Hypersonic Flows with Counterflow Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daso, Endwell O.; Beaulieu, Warren; Hager, James O.; Turner, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics solutions of the flowfield of a truncated cone-cylinder with and without counterflow jets have been obtained for the short penetration mode (SPM) and long penetration mode (LPM) of the freestream-counterflow jet interaction flowfield. For the case without the counterflow jet, the comparison of the normalized surface pressures showed very good agreement with experimental data. For the case with the SPM jet, the predicted surface pressures did not compare as well with the experimental data upstream of the expansion corner, while aft of the expansion corner, the comparison of the solution and the data is seen to give much better agreement. The difference in the prediction and the data could be due to the transient character of the jet penetration modes, possible effects of the plasma physics that are not accounted for here, or even the less likely effect of flow turbulence, etc. For the LPM jet computations, one-dimensional isentropic relations were used to derived the jet exit conditions in order to obtain the LPM solutions. The solution for the jet exit Mach number of 3 shows a jet penetration several times longer than that of the SPM, and therefore much weaker bow shock, with an attendant reduction in wave drag. The LPM jet is, in essence, seen to be a "pencil" of fluid, with much higher dynamic pressure, embedded in the oncoming supersonic or hypersonic freestream. The methodology for determining the conditions for the LPM jet could enable a practical approach for the design and application of counterflow LPM jets for the reduction of wave drag and heat flux, thus significantly enhancing the aerodynamic characteristics and aerothermal performance of supersonic and hypersonic vehicles. The solutions show that the qualitative flow structure is very well captured. The obtained results, therefore, suggest that counterflowing jets are viable candidate technology concepts that can be employed to give significant reductions in wave drag, heat

  16. Second-sound studies of coflow and counterflow of superfluid {sup 4}He in channels

    SciTech Connect

    Varga, Emil; Skrbek, L.; Babuin, Simone

    2015-06-15

    We report a comprehensive study of turbulent superfluid {sup 4}He flow through a channel of square cross section. We study for the first time two distinct flow configurations with the same apparatus: coflow (normal and superfluid components move in the same direction), and counterflow (normal and superfluid components move in opposite directions). We realise also a variation of counterflow with the same relative velocity, but where the superfluid component moves while there is no net flow of the normal component through the channel, i.e., pure superflow. We use the second-sound attenuation technique to measure the density of quantised vortex lines in the temperature range 1.2 K ≲ T ≲ T{sub λ} ≈ 2.18 K and for flow velocities from about 1 mm/s up to almost 1 m/s in fully developed turbulence. We find that both the steady-state and temporal decay of the turbulence significantly differ in the three flow configurations, yielding an interesting insight into two-fluid hydrodynamics. In both pure superflow and counterflow, the same scaling of vortex line density with counterflow velocity is observed, L∝V{sub cf}{sup 2}, with a pronounced temperature dependence; in coflow instead, the vortex line density scales with velocity as L ∝ V{sup 3/2} and is temperature independent; we provide theoretical explanations for these observations. Further, we develop a new promising technique to use different second-sound resonant modes to probe the spatial distribution of quantised vortices in the direction perpendicular to the flow. Preliminary measurements indicate that coflow is less homogeneous than counterflow/superflow, with a denser concentration of vortices between the centre of the channel and its walls.

  17. Diffusion of Pneumocystis jirovecii in the surrounding air of patients with Pneumocystis colonization: frequency and putative risk factors.

    PubMed

    Fréalle, Emilie; Valade, Sandrine; Guigue, Nicolas; Hamane, Samia; Chabé, Magali; Le Gal, Solène; Damiani, Céline; Totet, Anne; Aliouat, El Moukhtar; Nevez, Gilles; Menotti, Jean

    2017-07-01

    In a prospective bicentric study, Pneumocystis jirovecii excretion and diffusion was explored in air samples collected in the rooms occupied by 17 Pneumocystis-colonized patients. P. jirovecii DNA was detected by real-time PCR in the air collected from 3 patients' rooms (17.6%), with identical genotypes in corresponding clinical and air samples. Pneumocystis DNA was detected for 2/3 patients with autoimmune disease treated with corticosteroids versus 1/6 patients with hematologic disease and 0/5 kidney transplant recipients. These data confirm the possible excretion of the fungus by Pneumocystis-colonized patients and thus bring additional arguments for the prevention of airborne transmission in hospital wards. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The International Society for Human and Animal Mycology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Diffusion sampler testing at Naval Air Station North Island, San Diego County, California, November 1999 to January 2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vroblesky, Don A.; Peters, Brian C.

    2000-01-01

    Volatile organic compound concentrations in water from diffusion samplers were compared to concentrations in water obtained by low-flow purging at 15 observation wells at the Naval Air Station North Island, San Diego, California. Multiple diffusion samplers were installed in the wells. In general, comparisons using bladder pumps and diffusion samplers showed similar volatile organic carbon concentrations. In some wells, sharp concentration gradients were observed, such as an increase in cis-1,2-dichloroethene concentration from 100 to 2,600 micrograms per liter over a vertical distance of only 3.4 feet. In areas where such sharp gradients were observed, concentrations in water obtained by low-flow sampling at times reflected an average concentration over the area of influence; however, concentrations obtained by using the diffusion sampler seemed to represent the immediate vicinity of the sampler. When peristaltic pumps were used to collect ground-water samples by low-flow purging, the volatile organic compound concentrations commonly were lower than concentrations obtained by using diffusion samplers. This difference may be due to loss of volatiles by degassing under negative pressures in the sampling lines induced while using the peristaltic pump, mixing in the well screen, or possible short-circuiting of water from an adjacent depth. Diffusion samplers placed in buckets of freephase jet fuel (JP-5) and Stoddard solvent from observation wells did not show evidence of structural integrity loss during the 2 months of equilibration, and volatile organic compounds detected in the free-phase fuel also were detected in the water from the diffusion samplers.

  19. Surface diffusion control of the photocatalytic oxidation in air/TiO2 heterogeneous reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsekov, R.; Evstatieva, E.; Smirniotis, P. G.

    2002-10-01

    The diffusion of superoxide radical anions on the surface of TiO 2 catalysts is theoretically considered as an important step in the kinetics of photocatalytic oxidation of toxic pollutants. A detailed analysis is performed to discriminate the effects of rotation and adsorption bond vibrations on the diffusion coefficient. A resonant dependence of the diffusivity on the lattice parameters of the TiO 2 surface is discovered showing that the most rapid diffusion takes place when the lattice parameters are twice as large as the the bond length of the superoxide radical anions. Whereas the rotation and vibrations normal to the catalyst surface are important, the anion bond vibrations do not affect the diffusivity due to their low amplitudes as compared to the lattice parameters.

  20. The roles of scattering, absorption, and air mass on the diffuse-to-global correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Vazquez, M. ); Ruiz, V. ); Perez, R. )

    1991-01-01

    Monthly plots of the ratio K{sub d} of daily diffuse to daily total extraterrestrial irradiation versus the daily clearness index K{sub t}, have shown that points of large K{sub t} tend to be placed nearly on a straight line K{sub t} + K{sub d} = C (constant C < 1). This straight line exhibits a parallel displacement for different periods of the year. The same line is found in monthly plots of hourly K{sub d} versus K{sub t} values. A possible physical interpretation for this linear relationship is that on days of low cloudiness level, nearly half of the direct solar irradiance stopped by cloudiness is scattered downward and nearly half upward. However, cloudiness in the paper stopped by cloudiness is scattered downward and nearly half upward. However, cloudiness in this paper includes both turbidity (haze) and actual clouds. It is shown that the entire shape of the K{sub d} versus K{sub t} relationship can be explained by scattering alone. Variations in absorption caused by air mass, or by changes in absorbing constituents, account for seasonal variability, and for variations as a function of solar altitude. An apparent anomaly at very high K{sub t} accompanied by high K{sub d} is shown to be a natural consequence of unshaded sun periods during partly cloudy conditions. This region of the correlation is also found to tend to a straight line but with a positive slope: K{sub t} {minus} K{sub d} = C. It is shown that for space or time averaged data this anomalous stretch tends to disappear. A useful distinction is made between local correlations and regional correlations, the former display the anomalous extension but latter do not. The authors recommend the use of the K{sub d} = H{sub d}/H{sub o} versus K{sub t} graphs instead of the K = H{sub d}/H{sub t} versus K{sub t} for future investigations.

  1. High-pressure soot formation and diffusion flame extinction characteristics of gaseous and liquid fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karatas, Ahmet Emre

    High-pressure soot formation and flame stability characteristics were studied experimentally in laminar diffusion flames. For the former, radially resolved soot volume fraction and temperature profiles were measured in axisymmetric co-flow laminar diffusion flames of pre-vaporized n-heptane-air, undiluted ethylene-air, and nitrogen and carbon dioxide diluted ethylene-air at elevated pressures. Abel inversion was used to re-construct radially resolved data from the line-of-sight spectral soot emission measurements. For the latter, flame extinction strain rate was measured in counterflow laminar diffusion flames of C1-4 alcohols and hydrocarbon fuels of n-heptane, n-octane, iso-octane, toluene, Jet-A, and biodiesel. The luminous flame height, as marked by visible soot radiation, of the nitrogen- and helium-diluted n-heptane and nitrogen- and carbon dioxide-diluted ethylene flames stayed constant at all pressures. In pure ethylene flames, flame heights initially increased with pressure, but changed little above 5 atm. The maximum soot yield as a function of pressure in nitrogen-diluted n-heptane diffusion flames indicate that n-heptane flames are slightly more sensitive to pressure than gaseous alkane hydrocarbon flames at least up to 7 atm. Ethylene's maximum soot volume fractions were much higher than those of ethane and n-heptane diluted with nitrogen (fuel to nitrogen mass flow ratio is about 0.5). Pressure dependence of the peak carbon conversion to soot, defined as the percentage of fuel's carbon content converted to soot, was assessed and compared to previous measurements with other gaseous fuels. Maximum soot volume fractions were consistently lower in carbon dioxide-diluted flames between 5 and 15 atm but approached similar values to those in nitrogen-diluted flames at 20 atm. This observation implies that the chemical soot suppression effect of carbon dioxide, previously demonstrated at atmospheric pressure, is also present at elevated pressures up to 15 atm

  2. Dual gas-diffusion membrane- and mediatorless dihydrogen/air-breathing biofuel cell operating at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Hong-qi; So, Keisei; Kitazumi, Yuki; Shirai, Osamu; Nishikawa, Koji; Higuchi, Yoshiki; Kano, Kenji

    2016-12-01

    A membraneless direct electron transfer (DET)-type dihydrogen (H2)/air-breathing biofuel cell without any mediator was constructed wherein bilirubin oxidase from Myrothecium verrucaria (BOD) and membrane-bound [NiFe] hydrogenase from Desulfovibrio vulgaris Miyazaki F (MBH) were used as biocatalysts for the cathode and the anode, respectively, and Ketjen black-modified water proof carbon paper (KB/WPCC) was used as an electrode material. The KB/WPCC surface was modified with 2-aminobenzoic acid and p-phenylenediamine, respectively, to face the positively charged electron-accepting site of BOD and the negatively charged electron-donating site of MBH to the electrode surface. A gas-diffusion system was employed for the electrodes to realize high-speed substrate supply. As result, great improvement in the current density of O2 reduction with BOD and H2 reduction with MBH were realized at negatively and postively charged surfaces, respectively. Gas diffusion system also suppressed the oxidative inactivation of MBH at high electrode potentials. Finally, based on the improved bioanode and biocathode, a dual gas-diffusion membrane- and mediatorless H2/air-breathing biofuel cell was constructed. The maximum power density reached 6.1 mW cm-2 (at 0.72 V), and the open circuit voltage was 1.12 V using 1 atm of H2 gas as a fuel at room temperature and under passive and quiescent conditions.

  3. On the air-filled effective porosity parameter of Rogers and Nielson's (1991) bulk radon diffusion coefficient in unsaturated soils.

    PubMed

    Saâdi, Zakaria

    2014-05-01

    The radon exhalation rate at the earth's surface from soil or rock with radium as its source is the main mechanism behind the radon activity concentrations observed in both indoor and outdoor environments. During the last two decades, many subsurface radon transport models have used Rogers and Nielson's formula for modeling the unsaturated soil bulk radon diffusion coefficient. This formula uses an "air-filled effective porosity" to account for radon adsorption and radon dissolution in the groundwater. This formula is reviewed here, and its hypotheses are examined for accuracy in dealing with subsurface radon transport problems. The author shows its limitations by comparing one dimensional steady-state analytical solutions of the two-phase (air/water) transport equation (Fick's law) with Rogers and Nielson's formula. For radon diffusion-dominated transport, the calculated Rogers and Nielson's radon exhalation rate is shown to be unrealistic as it is independent of the values of the radon adsorption and groundwater dissolution coefficients. For convective and diffusive transport, radon exhalation rates calculated using Fick's law and this formula agree only for high values of gas-phase velocity and groundwater saturation. However, these conditions are not usually met in most shallow subsurface environments where radon migration takes place under low gas phase velocities and low water saturation.

  4. COMPARISON OF 24H AVERAGE VOC MONITORING RESULTS FOR RESIDENTIAL INDOOR AND OUTDOOR AIR USING CARBOPACK X-FILLED DIFFUSIVE SAMPLERS AND ACTIVE SAMPLING - A PILOT STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Analytical results obtained by thermal desorption GC/MS for 24h diffusive sampling of 11 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are compared with results of time-averaged active sampling at a known constant flow rate. Air samples were collected with co-located duplicate diffusive samp...

  5. COMPARISON OF 24H AVERAGE VOC MONITORING RESULTS FOR RESIDENTIAL INDOOR AND OUTDOOR AIR USING CARBOPACK X-FILLED DIFFUSIVE SAMPLERS AND ACTIVE SAMPLING - A PILOT STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Analytical results obtained by thermal desorption GC/MS for 24h diffusive sampling of 11 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are compared with results of time-averaged active sampling at a known constant flow rate. Air samples were collected with co-located duplicate diffusive samp...

  6. Spray combustion at normal and reduced gravity in counterflow and co-flow configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gomez, Alessandro; Chen, Gung

    1995-01-01

    1688) in which the ES was used as a research tool to examine spray combustion in counter-flow and co-flow spray diffusion flames, as summarized below. The ultimate objective of this investigation is to examine the formation and burning of sprays of liquid fuels, at both normal and reduced gravity, first in laminar regimes and then in turbulent ones.

  7. Analysis and experimental study on formation conditions of large-scale barrier-free diffuse atmospheric pressure air plasmas in repetitive pulse mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lee; Liu, Lun; Liu, Yun-Long; Bin, Yu; Ge, Ya-Feng; Lin, Fo-Chang

    2014-01-01

    Atmospheric air diffuse plasmas have enormous application potential in various fields of science and technology. Without dielectric barrier, generating large-scale air diffuse plasmas is always a challenging issue. This paper discusses and analyses the formation mechanism of cold homogenous plasma. It is proposed that generating stable diffuse atmospheric plasmas in open air should meet the three conditions: high transient power with low average power, excitation in low average E-field with locally high E-field region, and multiple overlapping electron avalanches. Accordingly, an experimental configuration of generating large-scale barrier-free diffuse air plasmas is designed. Based on runaway electron theory, a low duty-ratio, high voltage repetitive nanosecond pulse generator is chosen as a discharge excitation source. Using the wire-electrodes with small curvature radius, the gaps with highly non-uniform E-field are structured. Experimental results show that the volume-scaleable, barrier-free, homogeneous air non-thermal plasmas have been obtained between the gap spacing with the copper-wire electrodes. The area of air cold plasmas has been up to hundreds of square centimeters. The proposed formation conditions of large-scale barrier-free diffuse air plasmas are proved to be reasonable and feasible.

  8. Analysis and experimental study on formation conditions of large-scale barrier-free diffuse atmospheric pressure air plasmas in repetitive pulse mode

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Lee Liu, Lun; Liu, Yun-Long; Bin, Yu; Ge, Ya-Feng; Lin, Fo-Chang

    2014-01-14

    Atmospheric air diffuse plasmas have enormous application potential in various fields of science and technology. Without dielectric barrier, generating large-scale air diffuse plasmas is always a challenging issue. This paper discusses and analyses the formation mechanism of cold homogenous plasma. It is proposed that generating stable diffuse atmospheric plasmas in open air should meet the three conditions: high transient power with low average power, excitation in low average E-field with locally high E-field region, and multiple overlapping electron avalanches. Accordingly, an experimental configuration of generating large-scale barrier-free diffuse air plasmas is designed. Based on runaway electron theory, a low duty-ratio, high voltage repetitive nanosecond pulse generator is chosen as a discharge excitation source. Using the wire-electrodes with small curvature radius, the gaps with highly non-uniform E-field are structured. Experimental results show that the volume-scaleable, barrier-free, homogeneous air non-thermal plasmas have been obtained between the gap spacing with the copper-wire electrodes. The area of air cold plasmas has been up to hundreds of square centimeters. The proposed formation conditions of large-scale barrier-free diffuse air plasmas are proved to be reasonable and feasible.

  9. Study on Flows inside and outside an Air Diffuser for Membrane Bioreactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kira, Fumihiro; Furuno, Shinsuke; Hayashi, Kosuke; Sampei, Tomoyuki; Tomiyama, Akio

    Effects of the total gas flow rate on the water level in a diffuser pipe for a membrane bioreactor, the gas flow rate from each aeration hole and the bubble diameter are investigated. The diffuser has evenly positioned five aeration holes on the top and a larger hole on the bottom for introducing the liquid into the pipe. The gas flow rate from each aeration hole is measured by capturing generated bubbles. The water level and gas velocity inside the diffuser are computed by processing video images. The bubble diameter is calculated using the gas flow rate and the bubble generation frequency measured from the video images. The conclusions obtained are as follows: (1) the gas flow rate from the aeration hole depends on the water level inside the diffuser and becomes constant for all the holes as the total gas flow rate increases since the high total gas flow rate make the water level uniform, which results in a constant gas pressure in the diffuser, (2) the onset of slugging in the diffuser is well correlated in terms of the local gas velocity and the Mishima-Ishii's slugging model, (3) the increase in the total gas flow rate decreases the water level, causing suppression of the onset of slugging, (4) the diameter of aeration hole strongly affects the gas flow rate from each aeration hole and water level, and (5) the Davidson-Schuler correlation gives reasonable estimations of the bubble diameter, provided that the influence of slugging is not significant.

  10. Numerical Study of Unsteady Properties of Ethylene/Air Turbulent Jet Diffusion Flame with Detached Eddy Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Sugang; Zhong, Fengquan; Zhang, Xinyu

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, unsteady process of ignition and combustion of turbulent plane-jet diffusion flame of ethylene/air is numerically simulated with detached eddy simulation (DES) and a reduced kinetic mechanism of ethylene. The kinetic mechanism consisting of 25 species and 131 steps is reduced from a 25 species/131 steps detailed mechanism via the method of error-propagation-based directed relation graph (DRGEP). The DES results of averaged temperature profiles at varied downstream locations are compared with the DNS results of Yoo et al. and satisfactory agreement between them is found. Ignition and combustion of ethylene plane-jet diffusion flame is simulated and dynamic changes of temperature field and OH radical are obtained. The present numerical study shows that DES method with a qualified reduced mechanism of hydrocarbon fuels can effectively simulate temporal and spatial evolution of ignition and combustion process.

  11. Air

    MedlinePlus

    ... do to protect yourself from dirty air . Indoor air pollution and outdoor air pollution Air can be polluted indoors and it can ... this chart to see what things cause indoor air pollution and what things cause outdoor air pollution! Indoor ...

  12. Monitoring of ozone precursors in ambient air using pumped and diffusive sampling on the sorbent Carbopack X

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quincey, Paul; Butterfield, David; D'Souza, Hansa; Henderson, Malcolm

    EU legislation for ambient ozone concentrations puts a requirement on Member States to monitor a large set of ozone precursor species, mostly hydrocarbons. We describe an investigation into how much of this information is readily available from manual methods used routinely for benzene monitoring in the United Kingdom, using pumped or diffusive sampling of ambient air onto the sorbent Carbopack X, followed by thermal desorption and gas chromatography with a flame ionisation detector. Identifiable peaks were assessed for reliability by comparison with independent automated measurements and emissions inventories. We conclude that 21 of the 29 specified hydrocarbons can be usefully monitored without any change to the methods used.

  13. Sublimation kinetics and diffusion coefficients of TNT, PETN, and RDX in air by thermogravimetry.

    PubMed

    Hikal, Walid M; Weeks, Brandon L

    2014-07-01

    The diffusion coefficients of explosives are crucial in their trace detection and lifetime estimation. We report on the experimental values of diffusion coefficients of three of the most important explosives in both military and industry: TNT, PETN, and RDX. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) was used to determine the sublimation rates of TNT, PETN, and RDX powders in the form of cylindrical billets. The TGA was calibrated using ferrocene as a standard material of well-characterized sublimation rates and vapor pressures to determine the vapor pressures of TNT, PETN, and RDX. The determined sublimation rates and vapor pressures were used to indirectly determine the diffusion coefficients of TNT, PETN, and RDX for the first time. A linear log-log dependence of the diffusion coefficients on temperature is observed for the three materials. The diffusion coefficients of TNT, PETN, and RDX at 273 K were determined to be 5.76×10(-6)m(2)/sec, 4.94×10(-6)m(2)/s, and 5.89×10(-6)m(2)/s, respectively. Values are in excellent agreement with the theoretical values in literature.

  14. Determination of Solar Cycle and Natural Climate Variation Using Both Surface Air/Soil Temperature and Thermal Diffusion Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, X.; Gosnold, W.

    2005-12-01

    Daily air and soil temperatures over KS, NE, SD and ND were obtained from High Plains Regional Climate Center (HPRCC) in Lincoln, NE from May 19, 1981 to December 31, 2003. A least-squares fit of the first five years of data is performed to determine the initial model temperature. A 2-D, finite-difference, conductive heat flow model was used with an initial condition T(x, 0) = 0 and boundary conditions of T(0, t) = the daily air/soil temperatures. The output of the model is a time series matrix of temperature vs. depth. The daily air/soil temperatures were averaged to compile a single record for each state and these data were used as the forcing signals in the model. The key to detection of the solar cycle and natural climate change is the filtering power of thermal diffusion which removes the short period signals (interannual) and retains the long period signals (decadal and centennial) in the upper 100 m. The temperature at a depth of 10 m has a good signal-to-noise ratio and represents 23 percent of its surface amplitude for the period of a solar cycle. There are two findings from this study: (1) Solar cycle, the temperature variations match the variations of the observed solar irradiance. This indicates that we can predict 11-yr solar cycles using both the surface air/soil temperatures as forcing signals in our thermal diffusion model. (2) Natural climate variation over the NGP during an 11-yr cycle ranges from 0.22 to 0.5 oC at 10 m deep and 0.42 to 0.94 oC at surface. This research is supported by NSF ATM-038384.

  15. Analysis of heat transfers inside counterflow plate heat exchanger augmented by an auxiliary fluid flow.

    PubMed

    Khaled, A-R A

    2014-01-01

    Enhancement of heat transfers in counterflow plate heat exchanger due to presence of an intermediate auxiliary fluid flow is investigated. The intermediate auxiliary channel is supported by transverse conducting pins. The momentum and energy equations for the primary fluids are solved numerically and validated against a derived approximate analytical solution. A parametric study including the effect of the various plate heat exchanger, and auxiliary channel dimensionless parameters is conducted. Different enhancement performance indicators are computed. The various trends of parameters that can better enhance heat transfer rates above those for the conventional plate heat exchanger are identified. Large enhancement factors are obtained under fully developed flow conditions. The maximum enhancement factors can be increased by above 8.0- and 5.0-fold for the step and exponential distributions of the pins, respectively. Finally, counterflow plate heat exchangers with auxiliary fluid flows are recommended over the typical ones if these flows can be provided with the least cost.

  16. Analysis of Heat Transfers inside Counterflow Plate Heat Exchanger Augmented by an Auxiliary Fluid Flow

    PubMed Central

    Khaled, A.-R. A.

    2014-01-01

    Enhancement of heat transfers in counterflow plate heat exchanger due to presence of an intermediate auxiliary fluid flow is investigated. The intermediate auxiliary channel is supported by transverse conducting pins. The momentum and energy equations for the primary fluids are solved numerically and validated against a derived approximate analytical solution. A parametric study including the effect of the various plate heat exchanger, and auxiliary channel dimensionless parameters is conducted. Different enhancement performance indicators are computed. The various trends of parameters that can better enhance heat transfer rates above those for the conventional plate heat exchanger are identified. Large enhancement factors are obtained under fully developed flow conditions. The maximum enhancement factors can be increased by above 8.0- and 5.0-fold for the step and exponential distributions of the pins, respectively. Finally, counterflow plate heat exchangers with auxiliary fluid flows are recommended over the typical ones if these flows can be provided with the least cost. PMID:24719572

  17. Multi-Axis Fluidic Thrust Vectoring of a Supersonic Jet Using Counterflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barber, Edward L.; Alvi, Farrukh; Krothapalli, Anjanevulu

    1997-01-01

    The most common techniques currently used to efficiently vector supersonic jets require external flaps and or pivoting devices. Fluidic thrust vectoring using counterflow eliminates the need for such complex hardware. Thus, the promise of decreases in both weight and drag as well as increased maneuverability makes this technique an attractive alternative. This technique has been successfully employed to achieve single axis fluidic thrust vectoring of a Mach 2 rectangular jet. To better compete with contemporary systems the current study extends this technique to multi-axis thrust vectoring of a Mach 2 diamond-shaped jet by applying counterflow to one of its four sides. To evaluate the performance of this technique the Planar Laser Scattering (PLS) technique is used to show the continuous vectoring of the diamond jet up to 20 degrees. Also, cross-stream PLS images are acquired to show the vectoring can be achieved off all four surfaces of the diamond jet.

  18. Development of More Cost-Effective Methods for Long-Term Monitoring of Soil Vapor Intrusion to Indoor Air Using Quantitative Passive Diffusive-Adsorptive Sampling Techniques

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-01

    ER-200830) Development of More Cost-Effective Methods for Long-Term Monitoring of Soil Vapor Intrusion to Indoor Air Using...Methods for Long-Term Monitoring of Soil Vapor Intrusion to Indoor Air Using Quantitative Passive Diffusive-Adsorptive Sampling Techniques W912HQ-08-C...volatile organic compounds (VOCs) at sites with potential human health risks. These risks were attributable to subsurface vapor intrusion to indoor air by

  19. Effect Of Pressure On Structure And Extinction Of Near Limit Hydrogen Counterflow Diffusion Flames

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-19

    O + OH, and of the recombina- tion step H + O2 + M HO2 + M. The lower prediction of the mechanism of [12] may arise from the fact that their rate...M HO2 + M. Even though past theoretical findings and pres- ent chemical-kinetic mechanisms already exhibit a high level of understanding of this

  20. An Experimental/Modeling Study of Jet Attachment during Counterflow Thrust Vectoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strykowski, Paul J.

    1997-01-01

    Recent studies have shown the applicability of vectoring rectangular jets using asymmetrically applied counterflow in the presence of a short collar. This novel concept has applications in the aerospace industry where counterflow can be used to vector the thrust of a jet's exhaust, shortening take-off and landing distances and enhancing in-flight maneuverability of the aircraft. Counterflow thrust vectoring, 'CFTV' is desirable due to its fast time response, low thrust loss, and absence of moving parts. However, implementation of a CFTV system is only possible if bistable jet attachment can be prevented. This can be achieved by properly designing the geometry of the collar. An analytical model is developed herein to predict the conditions under which a two-dimensional jet will attach to an offset curved wall. Results from this model are then compared with experiment; for various jet exit Mach numbers, collar offset distances, and radii of curvature. Their excellent correlation permits use of the model as a tool for designing a CFTV system.

  1. Particle dynamics in wall-bounded thermal counterflow of superfluid helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Mantia, M.

    2017-06-01

    The motions of relatively small particles in wall-bounded thermal counterflow of superfluid helium are experimentally investigated, above 1 K, by using the particle tracking velocimetry technique. The effect of a solid boundary on this quantum flow has received little attention to date, and the focus here is on the corresponding flow-induced particle dynamics. The velocity and velocity difference statistical distributions of the particles are computed at length scales straddling two orders of magnitude across the mean distance between quantized vortices, the quantum length scale of the flow. The imposed counterflow velocity ranges between about 2 and 7 mm/s, resulting in suitably defined Reynolds numbers up to 20 000. The distributions are found to be wider in the bulk than close to the solid boundary, at small enough scales, and this suggests that the mean distance between the vortices increases with the distance from the wall. The outcome reinforces the view, supported to date solely by numerical simulations, that in thermal counterflow quantized vortices are not homogenously distributed in the channel and that they preferentially concentrate close to its walls. Boundary layers might therefore also exist in quantum flows, although some of their features appear to be significantly different from those attributed to wall-bounded flows of viscous fluids, due to the presence of quantized vortices.

  2. Particle trajectories in thermal counterflow of superfluid helium in a wide channel of square cross section

    SciTech Connect

    La Mantia, Marco

    2016-02-15

    The motion of micrometer-sized solid hydrogen particles in thermal counterflow of superfluid helium is studied experimentally by using the particle tracking velocimetry technique. The investigated quantum flow occurs in a square channel of 25 mm sides and 100 mm length, appreciably wider than those employed in previous related experiments. Flow velocities up to 10 mm/s are obtained, corresponding to temperatures between about 1.3 K and 2.1 K, and applied heat fluxes between ca. 50 W/m{sup 2} and 500 W/m{sup 2}. The character of the obtained particle trajectories changes significantly as the imposed mean flow velocity increases. At thermal counterflow velocities lower than approximately 1 mm/s, the particle tracks appear straighter than at larger velocities. On the basis of the current understanding of the underlying physics, it is argued that the outcome is most likely due to the transition to the turbulent state of the investigated flow as, for narrower channels, this transition was reported to occur at larger velocities. The present results confirm that, at least in the parameter ranges investigated to date, the transition to turbulence in thermal counterflow depends on the geometry of the channel where this quantum flow develops.

  3. On the effect of carbon monoxide addition on soot formation in a laminar ethylene/air coflow diffusion flame

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Hongsheng; Thomson, Kevin A.; Smallwood, Gregory J.

    2009-06-15

    The effect of carbon monoxide addition on soot formation in an ethylene/air diffusion flame is investigated by experiment and detailed numerical simulation. The paper focuses on the chemical effect of carbon monoxide addition by comparing the results of carbon monoxide and nitrogen diluted flames. Both experiment and simulation show that although overall the addition of carbon monoxide monotonically reduces the formation of soot, the chemical effect promotes the formation of soot in an ethylene/air diffusion flame. The further analysis of the details of the numerical result suggests that the chemical effect of carbon monoxide addition may be caused by the modifications to the flame temperature, soot surface growth and oxidation reactions. Flame temperature increases relative to a nitrogen diluted flame, which results in a higher surface growth rate, when carbon monoxide is added. Furthermore, the addition of carbon monoxide increases the concentration of H radical owing to the intensified forward rate of the reaction CO + OH = CO{sub 2} + H and therefore increases the surface growth reaction rates. The addition of carbon monoxide also slows the oxidation rate of soot because the same reaction CO + OH = CO{sub 2} + H results in a lower concentration of OH. (author)

  4. Contribution of emission control and atmospheric diffusion ability to the improved air quality in 2015 of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Wang, K.

    2015-12-01

    China experiences extremely severe and frequent PM2.5 (fine particulate matters with diameters less than 2.5 µm) pollution in recent years, arousing unprecedented public concern. Tough targets have been set for three particularly smog-ridden regions: JingJinJi area, the Yangtze River Delta and Pearl River Delta, requiring these regions to reduce their atmospheric levels of PM2.5 by 25%, 20% and 15% respectively by the year 2017. A lot of mitigation actions have been taken to improve the air quality in China. In January 2013, China began to deploy instruments to measure PM2.5 nationally and released hourly observational data to the public. Observed PM2.5 concentrations showed a significant decrease in 2015 comparing to that of 2014 as shown in Fig.1. Many studies have attributed this kind of air quality improvement to the effect of emission control. However, air quality not only depends on the original emission, the atmospheric abilities of contaminant transfer, spread and wet deposition play a big role in reducing the ambient air pollutants and directly determined by the occurrence of pollution episodes. Here we used the first 2 years PM2.5 observation data in China to quantify the contribution of the effect of emission control and atmospheric ability of diffusing on reducing ambient PM2.5 concentrations. We found that PM2.5 decreased by 24% in 2015 winter (Dec. 2014-Feb. 2015) comparing to that in 2014; and 12% of decrease occurred for the spring time. The inconsistent seasonal improvement of air quality is mainly due to the favorable atmospheric background in 2015, with its frequent precipitation, infrequency of surface calm wind during the wintertime.

  5. Extinguishment of a Methane Air Diffusion Flame by Using Blast Wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torikai, H.; Saito, S.; Ito, A.

    After the occurrence of a large-scale disaster such as the Great East Japan Earthquake, multiple simultaneous fires, consisting of diffusion flames, often break out. At the same time, infrastructure, such as water utilization for firefighting, roads and etc., is destroyed violently by the disaster impact. Therefore, it is difficult to use conventional firefighting techniques against the post-disaster fires. To mitigate and minimize the damages, the development of a new firefighting method which can extinguish each fire promptly is needed.

  6. Influence of cathode opening size and wetting properties of diffusion layers on the performance of air-breathing PEMFCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, A.; Tranitz, M.; Eccarius, S.; Weil, A.; Hebling, C.

    Air-breathing PEMFCs consist of an open cathodic side to allow an entirely passive supply of oxygen by diffusion. Furthermore, a large fraction of the produced water is removed by evaporation from the open cathode. Gas diffusion layers (GDLs) and the opening size of the cathode have a crucial influence on the performance of an air-breathing PEMFC. In order to assure an unobstructed supply of oxygen the water has to be removed efficiently and condensation in the GDL has to be avoided. On the other hand good humidification of the membrane has to be achieved to obtain high protonic conductivity. In this paper the influence of varying cathodic opening sizes (33%, 50% and 80% opening ratios) and of GDLs with different wetting properties are analysed. GDLs with hydrophobic and hydrophilic properties are prepared by coating of untreated GDLs (Toray ® carbon paper TGP-H-120, thickness of 350 μm). The air-breathing PEMFC test samples are realised using printed circuit board (PCB) technology. The cell samples were characterised over the entire potential range (0-0.95 V) by extensive measurements of the current density, the temperature and the cell impedance at 1 kHz. Additionally, measurements of the water balance were carried out at distinct operation points. The best cell performance was achieved with the largest opening ratio (80%) and an untreated GDL. At the maximum power point, this cell sample achieved a power density of 100 mW cm -2 at a moderate cell temperature of 43 °C. Furthermore, it could be shown that GDLs with hydrophilic or intense hydrophobic properties do not improve the performance of an air-breathing PEMFC. Based on the extensive characterisations, two design rules for air-breathing PEMFCs could be formulated. Firstly, it is crucial to maximise the cathode opening as far as an appropriate compression pressure of the cell assembly and therewith low contact resistance can be assured. Secondly, it is advantageous to use an untreated, slightly hydrophobic

  7. Diffusive flux of PAHs across sediment-water and water-air interfaces at urban superfund sites.

    PubMed

    Minick, D James; Anderson, Kim A

    2017-09-01

    Superfund sites may be a source of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) to the surrounding environment. These sites can also act as PAH sinks from present-day anthropogenic activities, especially in urban locations. Understanding PAH transport across environmental compartments helps to define the relative contributions of these sources and is therefore important for informing remedial and management decisions. In the present study, paired passive samplers were co-deployed at sediment-water and water-air interfaces within the Portland Harbor Superfund Site and the McCormick and Baxter Superfund Site. These sites, located along the Willamette River (Portland, OR, USA), have PAH contamination from both legacy and modern sources. Diffusive flux calculations indicate that the Willamette River acts predominantly as a sink for low molecular weight PAHs from both the sediment and the air. The sediment was also predominantly a source of 4- and 5-ring PAHs to the river, and the river was a source of these same PAHs to the air, indicating that legacy pollution may be contributing to PAH exposure for residents of the Portland urban center. At the remediated McCormick and Baxter Superfund Site, flux measurements highlight locations within the sand and rock sediment cap where contaminant breakthrough is occurring. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:2281-2289. © 2017 SETAC. © 2017 SETAC.

  8. Raman measurement of mixing and finite-rate chemistry in a supersonic hydrogen-air diffusion flame

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, T.S.; Wehrmeyer, J.A.; Pitz, R.W. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Jarrett, O. Jr.; Northam, G.B. . Langley Research Center)

    1994-10-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) spontaneous vibrational Raman scattering and laser-induced predissociative fluorescence (LIPF) from a KrF excimer laser are combined to simultaneously measure temperature, major species concentrations (H[sub 2], O[sub 2], N[sub 2], H[sub 2]O), and OH radical concentration in a supersonic lifted co-flowing hydrogen-air diffusion flame. The axisymmetric flame is formed when a sonic jet of hydrogen mixes with a Mach 2 annular jet of vitiated air. Mean and rms profiles of temperature, species concentrations, and mixture fraction are obtained throughout the supersonic flame. Simultaneous measurements of the chemical species and temperature are compared with frozen chemistry and equilibrium chemistry limits to assess the local state of the mixing and chemistry. Upstream of the lifted flame base, a very small amount of reaction occurs form mixing with hot vitiated air. Downstream of the lifted flame base, strong turbulent mixing leads to sub equilibrium values of temperature and OH concentration. Due to the interaction of velocity and temperature in supersonic compressible flames, the fluctuations of temperature and species concentrations are found to be higher than subsonic flames. Farther downstream, slow three-body recombination reactions result in super equilibrium OH concentrations that depress temperatures below their equilibrium values.

  9. Liquid-phase thermal diffusion isotope separation apparatus and method having tapered column

    DOEpatents

    Rutherford, William M.

    1988-05-24

    A thermal diffusion counterflow method and apparatus for separating isotopes in solution in which the solution is confined in a long, narrow, vertical slit which tapers from bottom to top. The variation in the width of the slit permits maintenance of a stable concentration distribution with relatively long columns, thus permitting isotopic separation superior to that obtainable in the prior art.

  10. Liquid-phase thermal diffusion isotope separation apparatus and method having tapered column

    DOEpatents

    Rutherford, W.M.

    1985-12-04

    A thermal diffusion counterflow method and apparatus for separating isotopes in solution in which the solution is confined in a long, narrow, vertical slit which tapers from bottom to top. The variation in the width of the slit permits maintenance of a stable concentration distribution with relatively long columns, thus permitting isotopic separation superior to that obtained in the prior art.

  11. Technology diffusion and environmental regulation: Evidence from electric power plants under the Clean Air Act

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, Elaine F.

    Even though environmental policy can greatly affect the path of technology diffusion, the economics literature contains limited empirical evidence of this relationship. My research will contribute to the available evidence by providing insight into the technology adoption decisions of electric generating firms. Since policies are often evaluated based on the incentives they provide to promote adoption of new technologies, it is important that policy makers understand the relationship between technological diffusion and regulation structure to make informed decisions. Lessons learned from this study can be used to guide future policies such as those directed to mitigate climate change. I first explore the diffusion of scrubbers, a sulfur dioxide (SO 2) abatement technology, in response to federal market-based regulations and state command-and-control regulations. I develop a simple theoretical model to describe the adoption decisions of scrubbers and use a survival model to empirically test the theoretical model. I find that power plants with strict command-and-control regulations have a high probability of installing a scrubber. These findings suggest that although market-based regulations have encouraged diffusion, many scrubbers have been installed because of state regulatory pressure. Although tradable permit systems are thought to give firms more flexibility in choosing abatement technologies, I show that interactions between a permit system and pre-existing command-and-control regulations can limit that flexibility. In a separate analysis, I explore the diffusion of combined cycle (CC) generating units, which are natural gas-fired generating units that are cleaner and more efficient than alternative generating units. I model the decision to consider adoption of a CC generating unit and the extent to which the technology is adopted in response to environmental regulations imposed on new sources of pollutants. To accomplish this, I use a zero-inflated Poisson

  12. Optimization of heat and mass transfers in counterflow corrugated-plate liquid-gas exchangers used in a greenhouse dehumidifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentounes, N.; Jaffrin, A.

    1998-09-01

    Heat and mass transfers occuring in a counterflow direct contact liquid-gas exchanger determine the performance of a new greenhouse air dehumidifier designed at INRA. This prototype uses triethylene glycol (TEG) as the desiccant fluid which extracts water vapor from the air. The regeneration of the TEG desiccant fluid is then performed by direct contact with combustion gas from a high efficiency boiler equipped with a condensor. The heat and mass transfers between the thin film of diluted TEG and the hot gas were simulated by a model which uses correlation formula from the literature specifically relevant to the present cross-corrugated plates geometry. A simple set of analytical solutions is first derived, which explains why some possible processes can clearly be far from optimal. Then, more exact numerical calculations confirm that some undesirable water recondensations on the upper part of the exchanger were limiting the performance of this prototype. More suitable conditions were defined for the process, which lead to a new design of the apparatus. In this second prototype, a gas-gas exchanger provides dryer and cooler gas to the basis of the regenerators, while a warmer TEG is fed on the top. A whole range of operating conditions was experimented and measured parameters were compared with numerical simulations of this new configuration: recondensation did not occur any more. As a consequence, this second prototype was able to concentrate the desiccant fluid at the desired rate of 20 kg H_{2O}/hour, under temperature and humidity conditions which correspond to the dehumidification of a 1000 m2 greenhouse heated at night during the winter season.

  13. Sensitivity of Urban Airshed Model (UAM-IV) calculated air pollutant concentrations to the vertical diffusion parameterization during convective meteorological situations

    SciTech Connect

    Nowacki, P.; Samson, P.J.; Sillman, S.

    1996-10-01

    It is shown that Urban Airshed Model (UAM-IV) calculated air pollutant concentrations during photochemical smog episodes in Atlanta, Georgia, depend strongly on the numerical parameterization of the daytime vertical diffusivity. Results found suggest that vertical mixing is overestimated by the UAM-IV during unstable daytime conditions, as calculated vertical diffusivity values exceed measured and comparable literature values. Although deviations between measured and UAM-IV calculated air pollutant concentrations may only in part be due the UAM-IV diffusivity parameterization, results indicate the large error potential in vertical diffusivity parameterization. Easily implemented enhancements to UAM-IV algorithms are proposed, thus improving UAM-IV modeling performance during unstable stratification. 38 refs., 14 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Air Quality Impact of Diffuse and Inefficient Combustion Emissions in Africa (DICE-Africa).

    PubMed

    Marais, Eloise A; Wiedinmyer, Christine

    2016-10-04

    Anthropogenic pollution in Africa is dominated by diffuse and inefficient combustion sources, as electricity access is low and motorcycles and outdated cars proliferate. These sources are missing, out-of-date, or misrepresented in state-of-the-science emission inventories. We address these deficiencies with a detailed inventory of Diffuse and Inefficient Combustion Emissions in Africa (DICE-Africa) for 2006 and 2013. Fuelwood for energy is the largest emission source in DICE-Africa, but grows from 2006 to 2013 at a slower rate than charcoal production and use, and gasoline and diesel for motorcycles, cars, and generators. Only kerosene use and gas flaring decline. Increase in emissions from 2006 to 2013 in this work is consistent with trends in satellite observations of formaldehyde and NO2, but much slower than the explosive growth projected with a fuel consumption model. Seasonal biomass burning is considered a large pollution source in Africa, but we estimate comparable emissions of black carbon and higher emissions of nonmethane volatile organic compounds from DICE-Africa. Nitrogen oxide (NOx ≡ NO + NO2) emissions are much lower than from biomass burning. We use GEOS-Chem to estimate that the largest contribution of DICE-Africa to annual mean surface fine particulate matter (PM2.5) is >5 μg m(-3) in populous Nigeria.

  15. Depth-dependent rifting and lithospheric counterflow control on magmatism at passive margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Gang; Huismans, Ritske

    2017-04-01

    Extension of continental lithosphere may result in the formation of passive margins with various structural styles and magmatic activities. Classical models of rifting, such as pure-shear or simple-shear extension, often predict a simple breakup of the lithosphere and therefore associate the variation of magmatism to temperature change of sub-lithospheric mantle. However, observations have shown complex, depth-dependent extension and revealed large lateral variation of magmatism that is not explained by thermal effect alone. Type examples of depth-dependent rifting are defined at (1) the Iberia-Newfoundland conjugate margins (Type I, narrow) and (2) some central South Atlantic margins (Type II, wide). Here we use 2-D numerical models to investigate melt generation for margins with various rifting styles. We consider four end-member models (I-A/C, II-A/C) that focus on the effects of margin width (Type I versus Type II) and lithospheric counterflow (C models). We show that the crustal rheology is the key factor that controls the width of margin, and that both margin width and lithospheric counterflow have significant influence on magmatism. Model I-A develops narrow margins with normal magmatism, whereas model II-A develops wide margins with thick (>18 km) igneous crust without the presence of high temperature anomaly. Lithospheric counterflow may suppress magmatic activity, leading to the formation of narrow margins with exhumed continental mantle (model I-C) or non-volcanic wide margins with hyper-extended crust (model II-C). We illustrate that our models are comparable with observations at the Gulf of Aden, Iberia-Newfoundland and some central and southern South Atlantic conjugate margins.

  16. Numerical Simulation of Transient Development of Flame, Temperature and Velocity under Reduced Gravity in a Methane Air Diffusion Flame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhowal, Arup Jyoti; Mandal, Bijan Kumar

    2017-02-01

    A methane air co flow diffusion flame has been numerically simulated with the help of an in-house developed code at normal gravity, 0.5 G, and 0.0001 G (microgravity) for the study of transient behavior of the flame in terms of flame shape, temperature profile and velocity (streamlines). The study indicates that lower is the gravity level, the higher is the time of early transience. The flame developments during transience are marked by the formation of a secondary flamelet at different heights above the primary flame at all gravity levels. The development of temperature profile at microgravity takes a much longer time to stabilize than the flame development. At normal gravity and 0.5 G gravity level, streamlines, during transience, show intermediate vortices which are finally replaced by recirculation of ambient air from the exit plane. At microgravity, neither any vortex nor any recirculation at any stage is observed. Centerline temperature plots, at all gravity levels during transience, demonstrate a secondary peak at some instants as a consequence of the secondary flamelet formation. The centerline velocity at microgravity decreases gradually during transience, unlike at other two gravity levels where the fall is very sharp and is indicative of negligible buoyancy at microgravity.

  17. Modeling aerosol formation in opposed-flow diffusion flames.

    PubMed

    Violi, Angela; D'Anna, Andrea; D'Alessio, Antonio; Sarofim, Adel F

    2003-06-01

    The microstructures of atmospheric pressure, counter-flow, sooting, flat, laminar ethylene diffusion flames have been studied numerically by using a new kinetic model developed for hydrocarbon oxidation and pyrolysis. Modeling results are in reasonable agreement with experimental data in terms of concentration profiles of stable species and gas-phase aromatic compounds. Modeling results are used to analyze the controlling steps of aromatic formation and soot growth in counter-flow configurations. The formation of high molecular mass aromatics in diffusion controlled conditions is restricted to a narrow area close to the flame front where these species reach a molecular weight of about 1000 u. Depending on the flame configuration, soot formation is controlled by the coagulation of nanoparticles or by the addition of PAH to soot nuclei.

  18. The Dynamics of Shock Dispersion and Interactions in Supersonic Freestreams with Counterflowing Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daso, Endwell O.; Pritchett, Victor E.; Wang, Ten-See; Ota, Dale K.; Blankson, Isaiah M.; Auslender, Aaron H.

    2007-01-01

    An active flow control concept using counterflowing jets to significantly modify the external flowfields and strongly weaken or disperse the shock-waves of supersonic and hypersonic vehicles to reduce the aerothermal loads and wave drag was investigated. Experiments were conducted in a trisonic blow-down wind-tunnel, complemented by pre-test computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis of a 2.6% scale model of Apollo capsule, with and without counterflowing jets, in Mach 3.48 and 4.0 freestreams, to assess the potential aerothermal and aerodynamic benefits of this concept. The model was instrumented with heat flux gauges, thermocouples and pressure taps, and employed five counterflowing jet nozzles (three sonic and other two supersonic with design Mach numbers of 2.44 and 2.94) and nozzle exit diameters ranging from 0.25 to 0.5 inch. Schlieren data show that at low jet flow rates of 0.05 and 0.1lb(sub m)/sec, the interactions result in a long penetration mode (LPM) jet, while the short penetration mode (SPM) jet is observed at flow rates greater than 0.1 lb(sub m)/sec., consistent with the pre-test CFD predictions. For the LPM, the jet appears to be nearly fully-expanded, resulting in a very unsteady and oscillatory flow structure in which the bow shock becomes highly dispersed such that it is no longer discernable. Higher speed camera Schlieren data reveal the shock to be dispersed into striations of compression waves, which suddenly coalesce to a weaker bow shock with a larger standoff distance as the flow rate reached a critical value. The pronounced shock dispersion could significantly impact the aerodynamic performance (L/D) and heat flux reduction of spacecraft in atmospheric entry and re-entry, and could also attenuate the entropy layer in hypersonic blunt body flows. For heat transfer, the results show significant reduction in heat flux, even giving negative heat flux for some of the SPM interactions, indicating that the flow wetting the model is cooling

  19. A simple counter-flow cooling system for a supersonic free-jet beam source assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barr, M.; Fahy, A.; Martens, J.; Dastoor, P. C.

    2016-05-01

    A simple design for an inexpensive, cooled, free-jet beam source is described. The source assembly features an integrated cooling system as supplied by a counter-flow of chilled nitrogen, and is composed primarily of off-the-shelf tube fittings. The design facilitates rapid implementation and eases subsequent alignment with respect to any downstream beamline aperture. The source assembly outlined cools the full length of the stagnation volume, offering temperature control down to 100 K and long-term temperature stability better than ±1 K.

  20. Parallel-flow and counter-flow conjugate convection from a vertical insulated pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Libera, J.; Poulikakos, D.

    1990-07-01

    The coupling of forced convection inside a vertical pipe and natural convection outside the pipe is investigated for the case where the pipe is surrounded by permeable insulation. This analysis is pertinent to the design of insulation jackets for pipes, where the insulation can be modeled as an isotropic porous medium. Attention is given to the cases of both parallel flow and counterflow. The heat transfer through the pipe wall is a direct result of the interaction between the forced convection outside the pipe and the natural convection outside the pipe.

  1. Transition to Quantum Turbulence and Streamwise Inhomogeneity of Vortex Tangle in Thermal Counterflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varga, E.; Babuin, S.; L'vov, V. S.; Pomyalov, A.; Skrbek, L.

    2017-06-01

    We report preliminary results of the complementary experimental and numerical studies on spatiotemporal tangle development and streamwise vortex line density (VLD) distribution in counterflowing ^4He. The experiment is set up in a long square channel with VLD and local temperature measured in three streamwise locations. In the steady state, we observe nearly streamwise-homogeneous VLD. Experimental second-sound data as well as numerical data (vortex filament method in a long planar channel starting with seeding vortices localized in multiple locations) show that the initial build-up pattern of VLD displays complex features depending on the position in the channel, but some tangle properties appear uniform along its length.

  2. Stellar fibril magnetic systems. II - Two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic equations. III - Convective counterflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, E. N.

    1985-01-01

    The dynamics of magnetic fibrils in the convective zone of a star is investigated analytically, deriving mean-field equations for the two-dimensional transverse motion of an incompressible fluid containing numerous small widely spaced circular cylinders. The equations of Parker (1982) are extended to account for the inertial effects of local flow around the cylinders. The linear field equation for the stream function at the onset of convection is then rewritten, neglecting large-scale heat transport, and used to construct a model of convective counterflow. The Kelvin impulse and fluid momentum, convective motion initiated by a horizontal impulse, and the effects of a viscous boundary layer are considered in appendices.

  3. Enhancement in counterflow drag reduction by supersonic jet in high enthalpy flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Vinayak; Reddy, K. P. J.

    2008-01-01

    Counterflow drag reduction by supersonic jet for a 60° apex angle blunt cone flying at hypersonic Mach number is investigated for two different flow enthalpies using conventional and free piston driven hypersonic shock tunnels. Enhancement in drag reduction has been observed with increase in freestream stagnation enthalpy. It is shown that the percentage of drag reduction goes up by a factor of 2 when the flow enthalpy increases by a factor of 2.5 for a given ratio of total pressure of supersonic jet and freestream flow.

  4. A simple counter-flow cooling system for a supersonic free-jet beam source assembly.

    PubMed

    Barr, M; Fahy, A; Martens, J; Dastoor, P C

    2016-05-01

    A simple design for an inexpensive, cooled, free-jet beam source is described. The source assembly features an integrated cooling system as supplied by a counter-flow of chilled nitrogen, and is composed primarily of off-the-shelf tube fittings. The design facilitates rapid implementation and eases subsequent alignment with respect to any downstream beamline aperture. The source assembly outlined cools the full length of the stagnation volume, offering temperature control down to 100 K and long-term temperature stability better than ±1 K.

  5. Hydrodynamics of Spherical Flows and Geometry of Premixed Flames near the Stagnation Point of Axisymmetric Viscous Counterflows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sohrab, Siavash H.

    1999-01-01

    Counterflow premixed flames play a significant role in the modeling of laminar flames. This is in part motivated by the fact that stretched premixed flames simulate local flamelet dynamics within turbulent premixed flames. In the present study, the modified form of the Navier-Stokes equation for reactive fields introduced earlier is employed to investigate the hydrodynamics of spherical flows embedded within counterflows. The geometry of premixed flames near the stagnation point is also determined. The predictions are in favorable agreement with the experimental observations and prior numerical studies.

  6. Spectroscopic analysis of the excitation transfer from background air to diffusing aluminum laser produced plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribière, M.; Karabourniotis, D.; Chéron, B. G.

    2009-04-01

    During the relaxation of the plasma plume generated by laser ablation of an aluminum target, a pronounced intensity enhancement is observed at the central wavelength of the 396.15 nm self-reversed resonant line. This spectral special feature is analyzed and related to the interaction of the plasma edge with the background air excited by the shockwave, prompt electrons, and extreme ultraviolet radiation produced at the earliest times of the ablation. In this article, the electron density, the aluminum ground state, and resonant level populations are determined from the fitting of the 396.15 nm calculated line profile to the experimental one at two background pressures (100 and 1000 Pa). The evolution of these densities is derived from experiments performed at delays, after the laser pulse arrival, ranging from 120 to 180 ns.

  7. Soft X-ray radiation due to a nanosecond diffuse discharge in atmospheric-pressure air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostyrya, I. D.; Tarasenko, V. F.

    2010-02-01

    A source of soft X-rays with an effective photon energy of 9 keV and a subnanosecond pulse width is built around a gas diode filled with atmospheric-pressure air and a UAEB-150 generator. A collector placed behind a grounded mesh electrode detects an electron beam and a pulse with positive polarity, the latter being due to an electric field surrounding the mesh. It is shown that the intensity of soft X-rays from the gas-diode-based source depends on the material of a massive potential anode; namely, it grows with an increase in the atomic number of the cathode material. In the case of a tantalum anode, X-ray photons with an effective energy of 9 and 17 keV contribute to the exposure dose.

  8. Application of a Reynolds Stress turbulence model to a supersonic hydrogen-air diffusion flame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandrasekhar, R.; Tiwari, S. N.

    1991-01-01

    A second-order differential Reynolds Stress turbulence model has been applied to the Favre-averaged Navier-Stokes equations for the study of supersonic flows undergoing hydrogen-air chemical reactions. An assumed Beta Probability Density Function is applied to account for the chemical source terms in the conservation equations. An algebraic Reynolds Flux model is used for the fluctuating density-velocity as well as the species mass fraction-velocity correlations. The variances of temperature and species fluctuations are also modelled using an algebraic flux technique. A seven-species, seven-reaction finite rate chemistry mechanism is used to simulate the combustion processes. The resulting formulation is validated by comparison with experimental data on reacting supersonic axisymmetric jets. Results obtained for specific conditions indicate that the effect of chemical reaction on the turbulence is significant.

  9. Black carbon in cloud residual nuclei during PACDEX: Combining the single particle soot photometer and the counterflow virtual impactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kok, G.; Subramanian, R.; Twohy, C.; Baumgardner, D.

    2007-12-01

    The single particle soot photometer (SP2) measures black carbon (BC) using laser incandescence. In the PACific Dust EXperiment (PACDEX), the SP2 was operated downstream of a counterflow virtual impactor (CVI) during flight portions when the aircraft was passing through a cloud. The CVI collects cloud droplets and ice crystals larger than 5 μm and evaporates the water content, so that residual nuclei are sampled. The CVI also concentrates the incoming air-stream by as much as a factor of 30 or more. The combination of the SP2 with the CVI enables BC measurements below a few ng/m3. Preliminary results indicate that compared to aerosol in the surrounding air mass, black carbon concentrations (per unit volume air) were generally lower in cloud, but a greater fraction of cloud residual particles contain BC. Cloud residual nuclei also seem to contain more BC mass/particle than the ambient aerosol. The May 5 flight made a number of passes through a Pacific frontal system. During one such pass at 8.3 km ASL, BC in residual nuclei sampled through the CVI was on average 0.4 ng/m3 with a mean incandescent particle concentration of 0.1 particles/cm3, compared to over 7 ng/m3 and 2.5 particles/cm3 in ambient aerosol behind the front. For total concentrations over 0.2 particles/cm3 as detected by the SP2, the fraction of cloud nuclei that incandesced or contained BC was often greater than the incandescing fraction of the ambient aerosol at the same altitude, with up to 40% of cloud nuclei incandescing compared to ~10-25% for ambient aerosol. BC mass distributions peaked around 5 fg-BC/particle in ambient air. Inside the front, BC mass distributions in cloud nuclei were broader with peaks between 10-23 fg-BC/particle. Possible explanations for these results are that either BC-containing particles are scavenged by clouds, or these particles are good cloud nuclei, with larger aerosol containing more BC mass/particle preferentially forming cloud droplets and ice crystals.

  10. Spherical Ethylene/Air Diffusion Flames Subject to Concentric DC Electric Field in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, Z. -G.; Hegde, U.; Faeth, G. M.

    2001-01-01

    It is well known that microgravity conditions, by eliminating buoyant flow, enable many combustion phenomena to be observed that are not possible to observe at normal gravity. One example is the spherical diffusion flame surrounding a porous spherical burner. The present paper demonstrates that by superimposing a spherical electrical field on such a flame, the flame remains spherical so that we can study the interaction between the electric field and flame in a one-dimensional fashion. Flames are susceptible to electric fields that are much weaker than the breakdown field of the flame gases owing to the presence of ions generated in the high temperature flame reaction zone. These ions and the electric current of the moving ions, in turn, significantly change the distribution of the electric field. Thus, to understand the interplay between the electric field and the flame is challenging. Numerous experimental studies of the effect of electric fields on flames have been reported. Unfortunately, they were all involved in complex geometries of both the flow field and the electric field, which hinders detailed study of the phenomena. In a one-dimensional domain, however, the electric field, the flow field, the thermal field and the chemical species field are all co-linear. Thus the problem is greatly simplified and becomes more tractable.

  11. The Effects of Flame Structure on Extinction of CH4-O2-N2 Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Du, J.; Axelbaum, R. L.; Gokoglu, S. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    The effects of flame structure on the extinction limits of CH4-O2-N2 counterflow diffusion flames were investigated experimentally and numerically by varying the stoichiometric mixture fraction Z(sub st), Z(sub st) was varied by varying free-stream concentrations, while the adiabatic flame temperature T(sub ad) was held fixed by maintaining a fixed amount of nitrogen at the flame. Z(sub st) was varied between 0.055 (methane-air flame) and 0.78 (diluted- methane-oxygen flame). The experimental results yielded an extinction strain rate K(sub ext) of 375/s for the methane-air flame, increasing monotonically to 1042/s for the diluted-methane-oxygen flame. Numerical results with a 58-step Cl mechanism yielded 494/s and 1488/s, respectively. The increase in K(sub ext) with Z(sub st) for a fixed T(sub ad) is explained by the shift in the O2 profile toward the region of maximum temperature and the subsequent increase in rates for chain-branching reactions. The flame temperature at extinction reached a minimum at Z(sub st) = 0.65, where it was 200 C lower than that of the methane-air flame. This significant increase in resistance to extinction is seen to correspond to the condition in which the OH and O production zones are centered on the location of maximum temperature.

  12. Atomic oxygen in a cold argon plasma jet: TALIF spectroscopy in ambient air with modelling and measurements of ambient species diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reuter, S.; Winter, J.; Schmidt-Bleker, A.; Schroeder, D.; Lange, H.; Knake, N.; Schulz-von der Gathen, V.; Weltmann, K.-D.

    2012-04-01

    By investigating the atomic oxygen density in its effluent, two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence (TALIF) spectroscopy measurements are for the first time performed in a cold argon/oxygen atmospheric pressure plasma jet. The measurements are carried out in ambient air and quenching by inflowing air species is considered. We propose a novel absorption technique in the VUV spectral range, where emission originating from within the discharge is used as light source to determine the inflow of atmospheric oxygen into the effluent. Furthermore, we propose a modelling solution for the on-axis density of inflowing ambient air based on the stationary convection-diffusion equation.

  13. Extinction and Autoignition of n-Heptane in Counterflow Configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Seiser, R.; Pitsch, H.; Seshadri, K.; Pitz, W.J.; Curran, H.J.

    2000-01-12

    A study is performed to elucidate the mechanisms of extinction and autoignition of n-heptane in strained laminar flows under nonpremixed conditions. A previously developed detailed mechanism made UP of 2540 reversible elementary reactions among 557 species is the starting point for the study. The detailed mechanism was previously used to calculate ignition delay times in homogeneous reactors, and concentration histories of a number of species in plug-flow and jet-stirred reactors. An intermediate mechanism made up of 1282 reversible elementary reactions among 282 species and a short mechanism made up of 770 reversible elementary reactions among 160 species are assembled from this detailed mechanism. Ignition delay times in an isochoric homogeneous reactor calculated using the intermediate and the short mechanism are found to agree well with those calculated using the detailed mechanism. The intermediate and the short mechanism are used to calculate extinction and autoignition of n-heptane in strained laminar flows. Steady laminar flow of two counter flowing Streams toward a stagnation plane is considered. One stream made up of prevaporized n-heptane and nitrogen is injected from the fuel boundary and the other stream made up of air and nitrogen is injected from the oxidizer boundary. Critical conditions of extinction and autoignition given by the strain rate, temperature and concentrations of the reactants at the boundaries, are calculated. The results are found to agree well with experiments. Sensitivity analysis is carried out to evaluate the influence of various elementary reactions on autoignition. At all values of the strain rate investigated here, high temperature chemical processes are found to control autoignition. In general, the influence of low temperature chemistry is found to increase with decreasing strain. A key finding of the present study is that strain has more influence on low temperature chemistry than the temperature of the reactants.

  14. Gas Diffusion Electrodes Manufactured by Casting Evaluation as Air Cathodes for Microbial Fuel Cells (MFC)

    PubMed Central

    Srikanth, Sandipam; Pant, Deepak; Dominguez-Benetton, Xochitl; Genné, Inge; Vanbroekhoven, Karolien; Vermeiren, Philippe; Alvarez-Gallego, Yolanda

    2016-01-01

    One of the most intriguing renewable energy production methods being explored currently is electrical power generation by microbial fuel cells (MFCs). However, to make MFC technology economically feasible, cost efficient electrode manufacturing processes need to be proposed and demonstrated. In this context, VITO has developed an innovative electrode manufacturing process based on film casting and phase inversion. The screening and selection process of electrode compositions was done based on physicochemical properties of the active layer, which in turn maintained a close relation with their composition A dual hydrophilic-hydrophobic character in the active layer was achieved with values of εhydrophilic up to 10% while εTOTAL remained in the range 65 wt % to 75 wt %. Eventually, selected electrodes were tested as air cathodes for MFC in half cell and full cell modes. Reduction currents, up to −0.14 mA·cm2− at −100 mV (vs. Ag/AgCl) were reached in long term experiments in the cathode half-cell. In full MFC, a maximum power density of 380 mW·m−2 was observed at 100 Ω external load. PMID:28773723

  15. Gas Diffusion Electrodes Manufactured by Casting Evaluation as Air Cathodes for Microbial Fuel Cells (MFC).

    PubMed

    Srikanth, Sandipam; Pant, Deepak; Dominguez-Benetton, Xochitl; Genné, Inge; Vanbroekhoven, Karolien; Vermeiren, Philippe; Alvarez-Gallego, Yolanda

    2016-07-21

    One of the most intriguing renewable energy production methods being explored currently is electrical power generation by microbial fuel cells (MFCs). However, to make MFC technology economically feasible, cost efficient electrode manufacturing processes need to be proposed and demonstrated. In this context, VITO has developed an innovative electrode manufacturing process based on film casting and phase inversion. The screening and selection process of electrode compositions was done based on physicochemical properties of the active layer, which in turn maintained a close relation with their composition A dual hydrophilic-hydrophobic character in the active layer was achieved with values of εhydrophilic up to 10% while εTOTAL remained in the range 65 wt % to 75 wt %. Eventually, selected electrodes were tested as air cathodes for MFC in half cell and full cell modes. Reduction currents, up to -0.14 mA·cm(2-) at -100 mV (vs. Ag/AgCl) were reached in long term experiments in the cathode half-cell. In full MFC, a maximum power density of 380 mW·m(-2) was observed at 100 Ω external load.

  16. Analysis of turbulent free jet hydrogen-air diffusion flames with finite chemical reaction rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sislian, J. P.

    1978-01-01

    The nonequilibrium flow field resulting from the turbulent mixing and combustion of a supersonic axisymmetric hydrogen jet in a supersonic parallel coflowing air stream is analyzed. Effective turbulent transport properties are determined using the (K-epsilon) model. The finite-rate chemistry model considers eight reactions between six chemical species, H, O, H2O, OH, O2, and H2. The governing set of nonlinear partial differential equations is solved by an implicit finite-difference procedure. Radial distributions are obtained at two downstream locations of variables such as turbulent kinetic energy, turbulent dissipation rate, turbulent scale length, and viscosity. The results show that these variables attain peak values at the axis of symmetry. Computed distributions of velocity, temperature, and mass fraction are also given. A direct analytical approach to account for the effect of species concentration fluctuations on the mean production rate of species (the phenomenon of unmixedness) is also presented. However, the use of the method does not seem justified in view of the excessive computer time required to solve the resulting system of equations.

  17. Analysis of turbulent free-jet hydrogen-air diffusion flames with finite chemical reaction rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sislian, J. P.; Glass, I. I.; Evans, J. S.

    1979-01-01

    A numerical analysis is presented of the nonequilibrium flow field resulting from the turbulent mixing and combustion of an axisymmetric hydrogen jet in a supersonic parallel ambient air stream. The effective turbulent transport properties are determined by means of a two-equation model of turbulence. The finite-rate chemistry model considers eight elementary reactions among six chemical species: H, O, H2O, OH, O2 and H2. The governing set of nonlinear partial differential equations was solved by using an implicit finite-difference procedure. Radial distributions were obtained at two downstream locations for some important variables affecting the flow development, such as the turbulent kinetic energy and its dissipation rate. The results show that these variables attain their peak values on the axis of symmetry. The computed distribution of velocity, temperature, and mass fractions of the chemical species gives a complete description of the flow field. The numerical predictions were compared with two sets of experimental data. Good qualitative agreement was obtained.

  18. Financial price dynamics and pedestrian counterflows: a comparison of statistical stylized facts.

    PubMed

    Parisi, Daniel R; Sornette, Didier; Helbing, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    We propose and document the evidence for an analogy between the dynamics of granular counterflows in the presence of bottlenecks or restrictions and financial price formation processes. Using extensive simulations, we find that the counterflows of simulated pedestrians through a door display eight stylized facts observed in financial markets when the density around the door is compared with the logarithm of the price. Finding so many stylized facts is very rare indeed among all agent-based models of financial markets. The stylized properties are present when the agents in the pedestrian model are assumed to display a zero-intelligent behavior. If agents are given decision-making capacity and adapt to partially follow the majority, periods of herding behavior may additionally occur. This generates the very slow decay of the autocorrelation of absolute return due to an intermittent dynamics. Our findings suggest that the stylized facts in the fluctuations of the financial prices result from a competition of two groups with opposite interests in the presence of a constraint funneling the flow of transactions to a narrow band of prices with limited liquidity.

  19. Numerical Investigation of the Interaction of Counterflowing Jets and Supersonic Capsule Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatachari, Balaji Shankar; Ito, Yasushi; Cheng, Gary; Chang, Chau-Lyan

    2011-01-01

    Use of counterflowing jets ejected into supersonic freestreams as a flow control concept to modify the external flowfield has gained renewed interest with regards to potential retropropulsion applications pertinent to entry, descent, and landing investigations. This study describes numerical computations of such a concept for a scaled wind-tunnel capsule model by employing the space-time conservation element solution element viscous flow solver with unstructured meshes. Both steady-state and time-accurate computations are performed for several configurations with different counterflowing jet Mach numbers. Axisymmetric computations exploring the effect of the jet flow rate and jet Mach number on the flow stability, jet interaction with the bow shock and its subsequent impact on the aerodynamic and aerothermal loads on the capsule body are carried out. Similar to previous experimental findings, both long and short penetration modes exist at a windtunnel Mach number of 3.48. It was found that both modes exhibit non-stationary behavior and the former is much more unstable than the latter. It was also found that the unstable long penetration mode only exists in a relatively small range of the jet mass flow rate. Solution-based mesh refinement procedures are used to improve solution accuracy and provide guidelines for a more effective mesh generation procedure for parametric studies. Details of the computed flowfields also serve as a means to broaden the knowledge base for future retropropulsion design studies.

  20. Compact counter-flow cooling system with subcooled gravity-fed circulating liquid nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Yu.; Radovinsky, A.; Zhukovsky, A.; Sasaki, A.; Watanabe, H.; Kawahara, T.; Hamabe, M.; Yamaguchi, S.

    2010-11-01

    A liquid nitrogen (LN2) is usually used to keep the high-temperature superconducting (HTS) cable low temperature. A pump is utilized to circulate LN2 inside the cryopipes. In order to minimize heat leakage, a thermal siphon circulation scheme can be realized instead. Here, we discuss the effectiveness of thermal siphon with counter-flow circulation loop composed of cryogen flow channel and inner cable channel. The main feature of the system is the existence of essential parasitic heat exchange between upwards and downwards flows. Feasibility of the proposed scheme for cable up to 500 m in length has been investigated numerically. Calculated profiles of temperature and pressure show small differences of T and p in the inner and the outer flows at the same elevation, which allows not worrying about mechanical stability of the cable. In the case under consideration the thermal insulating properties of a conventional electrical insulating material (polypropylene laminated paper, PPLP) appear to be sufficient. Two interesting effects were disclosed due to analysis of subcooling of LN2. In case of highly inclined siphon subcooling causes significant increase of temperature maximum that can breakup of superconductivity. In case of slightly inclined siphon high heat flux from outer flow to inner flow causes condensation of nitrogen gas in outer channel. It leads to circulation loss. Results of numerical analyses indicate that counter-flow thermosiphon cooling system is a promising way to increase performance of short-length power transmission (PT) lines, but conventional subcooling technique should be applied carefully.

  1. Comparison of experimental and numerical studies of the performance characteristics of a pumped counterflow virtual impactor

    SciTech Connect

    Kulkarni, Gourihar R.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Afchine, Armin; Murphy, Daniel M.; Cziczo, Daniel J.

    2011-01-03

    Experiments and Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) simulations were performed to evaluate the performance characteristics of a Pumped Counterflow Virtual Impactor (PCVI). Tests were conducted for various flow configurations for which the diameter at which 50% of the particles were transmitted was determined. Experimentally determined 50% cutpoints varied from 2.2 to 4.8 micrometers and CFD predicted diameters agreed within ± 0.4 microns. Both experimental and CFD results showed similar transmission efficiency (TE) curves. CFD TE was always greater than experimental results, most likely due to impaction losses in fittings not included in the simulations. Ideal transmission, corresponding to 100% TE, was never realized in either case due to impaction losses and small scale flow features such as eddies. Areas where CFD simulations showed such flow recirculation zones were also found to be the locations where particulate residue was deposited during experiments. CFD parametric tests showed that PCVI performance can be affected by the nozzle geometry and misalignment between the nozzle and collector orifice. We conclude that CFD can be used with confidence for counterflow virtual impactor (CVI) design. Modifications to improve the performance characteristics of the PCVI are suggested.

  2. Study of Particle Motion in He II Counterflow Across a Wide Heat Flux Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mastracci, Brian; Takada, Suguru; Guo, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Some discrepancy exists in the results of He II counterflow experiments obtained using particle image velocimetry (PIV) when compared with those obtained using particle tracking velocimetry (PTV): using PIV, it was observed that tracer particles move at roughly half the expected normal fluid velocity, v_n/2 , while tracer particles observed using PTV moved at approximately v_n . A suggested explanation is that two different flow regimes were examined since the range of heat flux applied in each experiment was adjacent but non-overlapping. Another PTV experiment attempted to test this model, but the applied heat flux did not overlap with any PIV experiments. We report on the beginnings of a study of solid D_2 particle motion in counterflow using PTV, and the heat flux range overlaps that of all previous visualization studies. The observed particle velocity distribution transitions from a two-peak structure to a single peak as the heat flux is increased. Furthermore, the mean value of one peak in the bi-modal distributions grows at approximately the same rate as v_n , while the mean value of the single-peak distributions grows at roughly 0.4v_n , in reasonable agreement with both previous experiments and with the suggested model.

  3. Financial price dynamics and pedestrian counterflows: A comparison of statistical stylized facts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parisi, Daniel R.; Sornette, Didier; Helbing, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    We propose and document the evidence for an analogy between the dynamics of granular counterflows in the presence of bottlenecks or restrictions and financial price formation processes. Using extensive simulations, we find that the counterflows of simulated pedestrians through a door display eight stylized facts observed in financial markets when the density around the door is compared with the logarithm of the price. Finding so many stylized facts is very rare indeed among all agent-based models of financial markets. The stylized properties are present when the agents in the pedestrian model are assumed to display a zero-intelligent behavior. If agents are given decision-making capacity and adapt to partially follow the majority, periods of herding behavior may additionally occur. This generates the very slow decay of the autocorrelation of absolute return due to an intermittent dynamics. Our findings suggest that the stylized facts in the fluctuations of the financial prices result from a competition of two groups with opposite interests in the presence of a constraint funneling the flow of transactions to a narrow band of prices with limited liquidity.

  4. Experimental study of vortex diffusers

    SciTech Connect

    Shakerin, S.; Miller, P.L.

    1995-11-01

    This report documents experimental research performed on vortex diffusers used in ventilation and air-conditioning systems. The main objectives of the research were (1) to study the flow characteristics of isothermal jets issuing from vortex diffusers, (2) to compare the vortex diffuser`s performance with that of a conventional diffuser, and (3) to prepare a report that disseminates the results to the designers of ventilation and air-conditioning systems. The researchers considered three diffusers: a conventional round ceiling diffuser and two different styles of vortex diffusers. Overall, the vortex diffusers create slightly more induction of ambient air in comparison to the conventional diffuser.

  5. Sub-nanosecond time resolved light emission study for diffuse discharges in air under steep high voltage pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tardiveau, P.; Magne, L.; Marode, E.; Ouaras, K.; Jeanney, P.; Bournonville, B.

    2016-10-01

    Pin-to-plane discharges in centimetre air gaps and standard conditions of pressure and temperature are generated under very high positive nanosecond scale voltage pulses. The experimental study is based on recordings of sub-nanosecond time resolved and Abel-processed light emission profiles and their complete correlation to electrical current waveforms. The effects of the voltage pulse features (amplitude between 20 and 90 kV, rise time between 2 and 5.2 ns, and time rate between 4 and 40 kV · ns-1) and the electrode configuration (gap distance between 10 and 30 mm, pin radius between 10 and 200 µm, copper, molybdenum or tungsten pin material) are described. A three time period development can be found: a glow-like structure with monotonic light profiles during the first 1.5 ns whose size depends on time voltage rate, a shell-like structure with bimodal profiles whose duration and extension in space depends on rise time, and either diffuse or multi-channel regime for the connection to the cathode plane according to gap distance. The transition of the light from monotonic to bimodal patterns reveals the relative effects and dynamics of streamer space charge and external laplacian field. A classical 2D-fluid model for streamer propagation has been used and adapted for very high and steep voltage pulses. It shows the formation of a strong space charge (streamer) very close to the pin, but also a continuity of emission between the pin and the streamer, and electric fields higher than the critical ionization field (28 kV · cm-1 in air) almost in the whole gap and very early in the discharge propagation.

  6. Comparison of passive diffusion bag samplers and submersible pump sampling methods for monitoring volatile organic compounds in ground water at Area 6, Naval Air Station, Whidbey Island, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huffman, Raegan L.

    2002-01-01

    Ground-water samples were collected in April 1999 at Naval Air Station Whidbey Island, Washington, with passive diffusion samplers and a submersible pump to compare concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in water samples collected using the two sampling methods. Single diffusion samplers were installed in wells with 10-foot screened intervals, and multiple diffusion samplers were installed in wells with 20- to 40-foot screened intervals. The diffusion samplers were recovered after 20 days and the wells were then sampled using a submersible pump. VOC concentrations in the 10-foot screened wells in water samples collected with diffusion samplers closely matched concentrations in samples collected with the submersible pump. Analysis of VOC concentrations in samples collected from the 20- to 40-foot screened wells with multiple diffusion samplers indicated vertical concentration variation within the screened interval, whereas the analysis of VOC concentrations in samples collected with the submersible pump indicated mixing during pumping. The results obtained using the two sampling methods indicate that the samples collected with the diffusion samplers were comparable with and can be considerably less expensive than samples collected using a submersible pump.

  7. The interaction between soot and NO formation in a laminar axisymmetric coflow ethylene/air diffusion flame

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Hongsheng; Smallwood, Gregory J.

    2007-04-15

    The interaction between soot and NO formation in a laminar axisymmetric coflow ethylene/air diffusion flame was investigated by numerical simulation. A detailed gas-phase reaction scheme and a simplified soot model were employed. The results show that the formation of NO has little effect on that of soot. However, the formation of soot in the flame significantly suppresses the formation of NO. The peak NO concentration and NO emission index are reduced by 28 and 46%, respectively, due to the formation of soot. The influence of soot on NO formation is caused by not only the radiation-induced thermal effect, but also the reaction-induced chemical effect. Relatively the thermal effect is more significant, causing 25 and 38% reduction, respectively, in peak NO concentration and NO emission index. The chemical effect is caused by the competition for acetylene (C{sub 2}H{sub 2}) between soot and NO formation. The formation of soot consumes acetylene in the flame and thus lowers the formation rate of radical CH. This reduces the reaction rate of CH + N{sub 2} = HCN + N, which is the rate-limiting step of the prompt NO formation route, the dominant route in the studied flame. (author)

  8. A Computational Study of Soot Formation in Methane Air Co-Flow Diffusion Flame Under Microgravity Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhowal, Arup Jyoti; Mandal, Bijan Kumar

    2016-08-01

    An in-house developed code has been used to predict soot formation in a methane air co flow diffusion flame at normal gravity and at lower gravity levels of 0.5 G, and 0.0001 G (microgravity). There is an augmentation of soot formation at lower gravity levels because of lower buoyancy induced acceleration leading to an increased residence time. The peak temperature at microgravity is reduced by about 50 K than that at normal gravity level. The axial velocity under normal gravity and reduced gravity show negative values (relatively small in magnitude) near the wall at axial height beyond 15 cm; but axial velocity is never negative in microgravity condition. Peak value of soot volume fraction at 0.5 G and microgravity multiplies by a factor of ˜3 and ˜7, respectively of that at normal gravity. The zone of peak soot volume fraction shifts away from the axis towards the wings, as gravity level is lowered. In comparison to soot volume fraction, the factors of amplification of soot number density at reduced gravity and at microgravity are comparatively lower at 1.2 and 1.5 of that at normal gravity respectively. On the other hand, mean soot particle sizes at reduced gravity and microgravity increase to 1.5 and 2 times of that at normal gravity respectively.

  9. Feedback control for counterflow thrust vectoring with a turbine engine: Experiment design and robust control design and implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dores, Delfim Zambujo Das

    2005-11-01

    Engineering research over the last few years has successfully demonstrated the potential of thrust vector control using counterflow at conditions up to Mach 2. Flow configurations that include the pitch vectoring of rectangular jets and multi-axis vector control in diamond and axisymmetric nozzle geometries have been studied. Although bistable (on-off) fluid-based control has been around for some time, the present counterflow thrust vector control is unique because proportional and continuous jet response can be achieved in the absence of moving parts, while avoiding jet attachment, which renders most fluidic approaches unacceptable for aircraft and missile control applications. However, before this study, research had been limited to open-loop studies of counterflow thrust vectoring. For practical implementation it was vital that the counterflow scheme be used in conjunction with feedback control. Hence, the focus of this research was to develop and experimentally demonstrate a feedback control design methodology for counterflow thrust vectoring. This research focused on 2-D (pitch) thrust vectoring and addresses four key modeling issues. The first issue is to determine the measured variable to be commanded since the thrust vector angle is not measurable in real time. The second related issue is to determine the static mapping from the thrust vector angle to this measured variable. The third issue is to determine the dynamic relationship between the measured variable and the thrust vector angle. The fourth issue is to develop dynamic models with uncertainty characterizations. The final and main goal was the design and implementation of robust controllers that yield closed-loop systems with fast response times, and avoid overshoot in order to aid in the avoidance of attachment. These controllers should be simple and easy to implement in real applications. Hence, PID design has been chosen. Robust control design is accomplished by using ℓ1 control theory in

  10. Comparison of three vertical diffusion schemes in the SARMAP air quality model with integrated process rate analysis method and continuous process composition and source receptor methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zion Shay

    The purpose of this research is to explain how three different vertical diffusion schemes in the SARMAP Air Quality Model (SAQM) affect simulation results. Vertical diffusion describes turbulent mixing of species in the vertical direction. The three vertical diffusion schemes used here are the K-theory, the asymmetrical convective mixing, and the turbulent transilient theory. I have also implemented the Integrated Process Rate Analysis method (IPRAM) and the Continuous Process Composition and Source Receptor (CPCSR) methodology into SAQM to explain the origins of the differences among these three vertical diffusion schemes for the August 3-6, 1990 ozone episode in the San Joaquin Valley, CA. I show that the use of different vertical diffusion schemes has a major impact on model predictions. Vertical diffusion redistributes the species mixing ratios in the vertical and thus affects advection in the horizontal, as well as the vertical direction. Eventually, the chemistry in each grid cell was impacted by the different species mixing ratio that resulted from the differences in transport. The results also show that the two non-local methods (turbulent transilient and asymmetrical convective methods) are more vertically diffusive than the local K- theory. The asymmetrical convective model caused most vertical diffusion and the semi-implicit K-theory caused least vertical diffusion. A three-dimensional analysis is necessary to determine the area that influenced ozone mixing ratio at a particular region. Due to the nonlinear nature of ozone formation, it is insufficient to only examine species mixing ratios. All model processes need to be examined to provide a full explanation of the model's results. My IPRAM results revealed that the mass correction and ozone deposition processes were sometimes the dominate processes in the model's predictions. This had not been previously understood in the model's evaluation. My results suggest that the CPCSR methodology is very useful

  11. Effects of Structure and Hydrodynamics on the Sooting Behavior of Spherical Microgravity Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sunderland, P. B.; Axelbaum, R. L.; Urban, D. L.

    1999-01-01

    Recent experimental, numerical and analytical work has shown that the stoichiometric mixture fraction (Z(sub st)) can have a profound effect on soot formation in diffusion flames. These findings were obtained at constant flame temperature (T(sub ad)), employing the approach described in Du and Axelbaum (1995, 1996). For example, a fuel mixture containing 1 mole of ethylene and 11.28 moles of nitrogen burning in pure oxygen ((Z(sub st)) = 0.78) has the same adiabatic flame temperature (2370 K) as that of pure ethylene burning in air ((Z(sub st)) = 0.064). An important finding of these works was that at sufficiently high (Z(sub st)), flames remain blue as strain rate approaches zero in counterflow flames, or as flame height and residence time approach infinity in coflowing flames. Lin and Faeth (1996a) coined the term permanently blue to describe such flames. Two theories have been proposed to explain the appearance of permanently-blue flames at high (Z(sub st)). They are based on (1) hydrodynamics and (2) flame structure. Previous experimental studies in normal gravity are not definitive as to which, if either, mechanism is dominant because both hydrodynamics and structure suppress soot formation at high (Z(sub st)) in coflowing and counterflowing diffusion flames. In counterflow flames with (Z(sub st)) < 0.5 streamlines at the flame sheet are directed toward the fuel. Newly formed soot is convected into richer regions, favoring soot growth over oxidation. For (Z(sub st)) > 0.5, convection at the flame is toward the oxidizer, thus enhancing soot oxidization. Thus, in counterflow flames, hydrodynamics causes soot to be convected towards the oxidizer at high (Z(sub st)) which suppresses soot formation. Axelbaum and co-workers maintain that while the direction of convection can impact soot growth and oxidation, these processes alone cannot cause permanently-blue flames. Soot growth and oxidation are dependent on the existence of soot particles and the presence of soot

  12. Effects of Structure and Hydrodynamics on the Sooting Behavior of Spherical Microgravity Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sunderland, P. B.; Axelbaum, R. L.; Urban, D. L.

    1999-01-01

    Recent experimental, numerical and analytical work has shown that the stoichiometric mixture fraction (Z(sub st)) can have a profound effect on soot formation in diffusion flames. These findings were obtained at constant flame temperature (T(sub ad)), employing the approach described in Du and Axelbaum (1995, 1996). For example, a fuel mixture containing 1 mole of ethylene and 11.28 moles of nitrogen burning in pure oxygen ((Z(sub st)) = 0.78) has the same adiabatic flame temperature (2370 K) as that of pure ethylene burning in air ((Z(sub st)) = 0.064). An important finding of these works was that at sufficiently high (Z(sub st)), flames remain blue as strain rate approaches zero in counterflow flames, or as flame height and residence time approach infinity in coflowing flames. Lin and Faeth (1996a) coined the term permanently blue to describe such flames. Two theories have been proposed to explain the appearance of permanently-blue flames at high (Z(sub st)). They are based on (1) hydrodynamics and (2) flame structure. Previous experimental studies in normal gravity are not definitive as to which, if either, mechanism is dominant because both hydrodynamics and structure suppress soot formation at high (Z(sub st)) in coflowing and counterflowing diffusion flames. In counterflow flames with (Z(sub st)) < 0.5 streamlines at the flame sheet are directed toward the fuel. Newly formed soot is convected into richer regions, favoring soot growth over oxidation. For (Z(sub st)) > 0.5, convection at the flame is toward the oxidizer, thus enhancing soot oxidization. Thus, in counterflow flames, hydrodynamics causes soot to be convected towards the oxidizer at high (Z(sub st)) which suppresses soot formation. Axelbaum and co-workers maintain that while the direction of convection can impact soot growth and oxidation, these processes alone cannot cause permanently-blue flames. Soot growth and oxidation are dependent on the existence of soot particles and the presence of soot

  13. One-dimensional turbulence modeling of a turbulent counterflow flame with comparison to DNS

    SciTech Connect

    Jozefik, Zoltan; Kerstein, Alan R.; Schmidt, Heiko; Lyra, Sgouria; Kolla, Hemanth; Chen, Jackie H.

    2015-06-01

    The one-dimensional turbulence (ODT) model is applied to a reactant-to-product counterflow configuration and results are compared with DNS data. The model employed herein solves conservation equations for momentum, energy, and species on a one dimensional (1D) domain corresponding to the line spanning the domain between nozzle orifice centers. The effects of turbulent mixing are modeled via a stochastic process, while the Kolmogorov and reactive length and time scales are explicitly resolved and a detailed chemical kinetic mechanism is used. Comparisons between model and DNS results for spatial mean and root-meansquare (RMS) velocity, temperature, and major and minor species profiles are shown. The ODT approach shows qualitatively and quantitatively reasonable agreement with the DNS data. Scatter plots and statistics conditioned on temperature are also compared for heat release rate and all species. ODT is able to capture the range of results depicted by DNS. However, conditional statistics show signs of underignition.

  14. Counter-flow instability of a quantum mixture of two superfluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abad, Marta; Recati, Alessio; Stringari, Sandro; Chevy, Frédéric

    2015-05-01

    We study the instability of a mixture of two interacting counter-flowing superfluids. For a homogeneous system, we show that superfluid hydrodynamics leads to the existence of a dynamical instability at a critical value of the relative velocity vcr. When the interspecies coupling is small the critical value approaches the value vcr = c1 + c2, given by the sum of the sound velocities of the two uncoupled superfluids, in agreement with the recent prediction of [Y. Castin, I. Ferrier-Barbut, C. Salomon, arXiv:1408.1326 (2014)] based on Landau's argument. The crucial dependence of the critical velocity on the interspecies coupling is explicitly discussed. Our results agree with previous predictions for weakly interacting Bose-Bose mixtures and applies to Bose-Fermi superfluid mixtures as well. Results for the stability of transversally trapped mixtures are also presented.

  15. Backreaction of Tracer Particles on Vortex Tangle in Helium II Counterflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varga, E.; Barenghi, C. F.; Sergeev, Y. A.; Skrbek, L.

    2016-05-01

    We report computer simulations of the interaction of seeding particles with quantized vortices and with the normal fluid flow in thermal counterflow of superfluid ^4He. We show that if the number of particles is too large, the vortex tangle is significantly affected, posing problems in the interpretation of visualization experiments. The main effects are an increase in vortex line density and a change in polarization of the vortex tangle, caused by the action of the Stokes drag of the viscous normal fluid on the trapped particles. We argue that in the case of large particle number, typically used for the particle image velocimetry technique, the tangle properties might become significantly changed. On the contrary, the particle tracking velocimetry technique that uses smaller particle concentration should not be appreciably affected.

  16. Evaluation of passive diffusion bag samplers, dialysis samplers, and nylon-screen samplers in selected wells at Andersen Air Force Base, Guam, March-April 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vroblesky, Don A.; Joshi, Manish; Morrell, Jeff; Peterson, J.E.

    2003-01-01

    During March-April 2002, the U.S. Geological Survey, Earth Tech, and EA Engineering, Science, and Technology, Inc., in cooperation with the Air Force Center for Environmental Excellence, tested diffusion samplers at Andersen Air Force Base, Guam. Samplers were deployed in three wells at the Main Base and two wells at Marianas Bonins (MARBO) Annex as potential ground-water monitoring alternatives. Prior to sampler deployment, the wells were tested using a borehole flowmeter to characterize vertical flow within each well. Three types of diffusion samplers were tested: passive diffusion bag (PDB) samplers, dialysis samplers, and nylon-screen samplers. The primary volatile organic compounds (VOCs) tested in ground water at Andersen Air Force Base were trichloroethene and tetrachloroethene. In most comparisons, trichloroethene and tetrachloroethene concentrations in PDB samples closely matched concentrations in pumped samples. Exceptions were in wells where the pumping or ambient flow produced vertical translocation of water in a chemically stratified aquifer. In these wells, PDB samplers probably would be a viable alternative sampling method if they were placed at appropriate depths. In the remaining three test wells, the trichloroethene or tetrachloroethene concentrations obtained with the diffusion samplers closely matched the result from pumped sampling. Chloride concentrations in nylon-screen samplers were compared with chloride concentrations in dialysis and pumped samples to test inorganic-solute diffusion into the samplers across a range of concentrations. The test showed that the results from nylon-screen samplers might have underestimated chloride concentrations at depths with elevated chloride concentrations. The reason for the discrepancy in this investigation is unknown, but may be related to nylon-screen-mesh size, which was smaller than that used in previous investigations.

  17. Development of a method for the determination of naphthalene and phenanthrene in workplace air using diffusive sampling and thermal desorption GC-MS analysis.

    PubMed

    Lindahl, Roger; Claesson, Anna-Sara; Khan, Muhammad Akhtar; Levin, Jan-Olof

    2011-07-01

    Diffusive sampling methods have been validated for the determination of naphthalene and phenanthrene in workplace air. The diffusive sampler tested was the Perkin Elmer ATD tube, and the analysis was performed with thermal desorption, gas chromatography, and mass spectrometric detection. The sampling methods were validated in controlled test atmospheres, mainly according to the protocol proposed in the European standard EN 838. For the determination of naphthalene, the diffusive sampling rate was 0.41 ml min(-1) with a coefficient of variation (CV) of 19%. The mean sampling rate for phenanthrene was 0.49 ml min(-1) with a CV of 21%. Field tests confirmed the naphthalene results but could not be used to confirm the phenanthrene results. The method is not recommended for phenanthrene sampling unless the method has been tested in the specific environment and the results confirm the laboratory tests.

  18. Tackling agricultural diffuse pollution: What might uptake of farmer-preferred measures deliver for emissions to water and air?

    PubMed

    Collins, A L; Zhang, Y S; Winter, M; Inman, A; Jones, J I; Johnes, P J; Cleasby, W; Vrain, E; Lovett, A; Noble, L

    2016-03-15

    Mitigation of agricultural diffuse pollution poses a significant policy challenge across Europe and particularly in the UK. Existing combined regulatory and voluntary approaches applied in the UK continue to fail to deliver the necessary environmental outcomes for a variety of reasons including failure to achieve high adoption rates. It is therefore logical to identify specific on-farm mitigation measures towards which farmers express positive attitudes for higher future uptake rates. Accordingly, a farmer attitudinal survey was undertaken during phase one of the Demonstration Test Catchment programme in England to understand those measures towards which surveyed farmers are most receptive to increasing implementation in the future. A total of 29 on-farm measures were shortlisted by this baseline farm survey. This shortlist comprised many low cost or cost-neutral measures suggesting that costs continue to represent a principal selection criterion for many farmers. The 29 measures were mapped onto relevant major farm types and input, assuming 95% uptake, to a national scale multi-pollutant modelling framework to predict the technically feasible impact on annual agricultural emissions to water and air, relative to business as usual. Simulated median emission reductions, relative to current practise, for water management catchments across England and Wales, were estimated to be in the order sediment (20%)>ammonia (16%)>total phosphorus (15%) ≫ nitrate/methane (11%)>nitrous oxide (7%). The corresponding median annual total cost of the modelled scenario to farmers was £3 ha(-1)yr(-1), with a corresponding range of -£84 ha(-1)yr(-1) (i.e. a net saving) to £33 ha(-1)yr(-1). The results suggest that those mitigation measures which surveyed farmers are most inclined to implement in the future would improve the environmental performance of agriculture in England and Wales at minimum to low cost per hectare. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect of dielectric material on bipolar nanosecond pulse diffuse dielectric barrier discharge in air at atmospheric pressure.

    PubMed

    Tang, Kai; Wang, Wenchun; Yang, Dezheng; Zhang, Shuai; Yang, Yang; Liu, Zhijie

    2013-08-01

    In this paper, dielectric plates made by ceramic, quartz and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) respectively are employed to generate low gas temperature, diffuse dielectric barrier discharge plasma by using a needle-plate electrode configuration in air at atmospheric pressure. Both discharge images and the optical emission spectra are obtained while ceramic, quartz and PTFE are used as dielectric material. Plasma gas temperature is also calculated by comparing the experimental emission spectra with the best fitted spectra of N2 (C(3)Πu→B(3)Πg 1-3) and N2 (C(3)Πu→B(3)Πg 0-2). The effects of different pulse peak voltages and gas gap distances on the emission intensity of N2 (C(3)Πu→B(3)Πg, 0-0, 337.1 nm) and the plasma area on dielectric surface are investigated while ceramic, quartz and PTFE are used as dielectric material. It is found that the permittivity of dielectric material plays an important role in the discharge homogeneity, plasma gas temperature, emission spectra intensity of the discharge, etc. Dielectric with higher permittivity i.e., ceramic means brighter discharge luminosity and stronger emission spectra intensity of N2 (C(3)Πu→B(3)Πg, 0-0, 337.1 nm) among the three dielectric materials. However, more homogeneous, larger plasma area on dielectric surface and lower plasma gas temperature can be obtained under dielectric with lower permittivity i.e., PTFE. The emission spectra intensity and plasma gas temperature of the discharge while the dielectric plate is made by quartz are smaller than that while ceramic is used as dielectric material and bigger than that when PTFE is used as dielectric material. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Degradation of the insecticide propoxur by electrochemical advanced oxidation processes using a boron-doped diamond/air-diffusion cell.

    PubMed

    Guelfi, Diego Roberto Vieira; Gozzi, Fábio; Sirés, Ignasi; Brillas, Enric; Machulek, Amílcar; de Oliveira, Silvio César

    2017-03-01

    A solution with 0.38 mM of the pesticide propoxur (PX) at pH 3.0 has been comparatively treated by electrochemical oxidation with electrogenerated H2O2 (EO-H2O2), electro-Fenton (EF), and photoelectro-Fenton (PEF). The trials were carried out with a 100-mL boron-doped diamond (BDD)/air-diffusion cell. The EO-H2O2 process had the lowest oxidation ability due to the slow reaction of intermediates with (•)OH produced from water discharge at the BDD anode. The EF treatment yielded quicker mineralization due to the additional (•)OH formed between added Fe(2+) and electrogenerated H2O2. The PEF process was the most powerful since it led to total mineralization by the combined oxidative action of hydroxyl radicals and UVA irradiation. The PX decay agreed with a pseudo-first-order kinetics in EO-H2O2, whereas in EF and PEF, it obeyed a much faster pseudo-first-order kinetics followed by a much slower one, which are related to the oxidation of its Fe(II) and Fe(III) complexes, respectively. EO-H2O2 showed similar oxidation ability within the pH range 3.0-9.0. The effect of current density and Fe(2+) and substrate contents on the performance of the EF process was examined. Two primary aromatic products were identified by LC-MS during PX degradation.

  1. Influences of flame-vortex interactions on formation of oxides of nitrogen in curved methane-air diffusion flamelets

    SciTech Connect

    Card, J.M.; Ryden, R.; Williams, F.A.

    1994-01-01

    To improve knowledge of production rates of nitrogen oxides in turbulent diffusion flames in reaction-sheet regimes, an analytical investigation is made of the structure of a parabolic flamelet. The mixture-fraction field, scalar dissipation rate and gas velocity relative to the flamelet in the vortex are related to flame curvature at the parabolic tip. Flame structure for major species and temperature is described by rate-ratio asymptotics based on two-step and three-step reduced chemical-kinetic mechanisms. Production rates by prompt, thermal and nitrous-oxide mechanisms are obtained from one-step reduced-chemistry approximations that employ steady states for all reaction intermediaries. For sufficiently large streamwise separation distances between isoscalar surfaces, it is found that equilibrium conditions are closely approached near the flame tip, and the thermal mechanism dominates there, but the prompt mechanism always dominates in the wings, away from the tip, where the highest rates of scalar dissipation occur. Increasing the tip curvature increases the Peclet number and the prompt contribution while decreasing the thermal contribution. At 1 atm and ambient temperatures of 300 K, the prompt mechanism always dominates the total production rate in the parabolic flamelet, and, perhaps surprisingly, the rate of the nitrous-oxide mechanism is faster than that of the thermal mechanism and varies with the tip curvature and with scalar dissipation in the same manner as that of the prompt mechanism, different from that of the thermal mechanism. Conclusion reached is that Zel`dovich NO is relatively insignificant in hydrocarbon-air mixtures in reaction-sheet regimes.

  2. A compartment model of alveolar-capillary oxygen diffusion with ventilation-perfusion gradient and dynamics of air transport through the respiratory tract.

    PubMed

    Jaworski, Jacek; Redlarski, Grzegorz

    2014-08-01

    This paper presents a model of alveolar-capillary oxygen diffusion with dynamics of air transport through the respiratory tract. For this purpose electrical model representing the respiratory tract mechanics and differential equations representing oxygen membrane diffusion are combined. Relevant thermodynamic relations describing the mass of oxygen transported into the human body are proposed as the connection between these models, as well as the influence of ventilation-perfusion mismatch on the oxygen diffusion. The model is verified based on simulation results of varying exercise intensities and statistical calculations of the results obtained during various clinical trials. The benefit of the approach proposed is its application in simulation-based research aimed to generate quantitative data of normal and pathological conditions. Based on the model presented, taking into account many essential physiological processes and air transport dynamics, comprehensive and combined studies of the respiratory efficiency can be performed. The impact of physical exercise, precise changes in respiratory tract mechanics and alterations in breathing pattern can be analyzed together with the impact of various changes in alveolar-capillary oxygen diffusion. This may be useful in simulation of effects of many severe medical conditions and increased activity level.

  3. Determination of primary, secondary, and tertiary amines in air by direct or diffusion sampling followed by determination with liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Rampfl, Michael; Mair, Stefan; Mayer, Florian; Sedlbauer, Klaus; Breuer, Klaus; Niessner, Reinhard

    2008-07-15

    Two different methods for sampling of primary, secondary, and tertiary aliphatic and aromatic amines in air have been developed for improving amine analysis in air. The aim was to have a quick method for direct sampling of amines at defined times, for example, for material testing as well as for long-term measurements of amines by diffusive sampling during field studies without sampling instrumentation. The goal of the study was chemical analysis of amines, especially focusing on an analytical method suitable for tertiary amines besides primary and secondary amines. For both direct and diffusive sampling, samplers working with phosphoric acid impregnated glass wool for trapping of amines by formation of quaternary ammonium salts have been designed and tested. Direct sampling was applied for in-car emission measurement and for polyurethane exhalation monitoring by drawing air from 1 m3 test chambers through amine sampling devices. Diffusive sampling was applied for the same in-car measurement and for field measurement at a landfill leachate uptake with an obnoxious smell. Quantification of sampled analytes was achieved by LCMS/MS analysis.

  4. A Diffuse Interface Model for solid-liquid-air dissolution problems based on a porous medium theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, H.; Quintard, M.; Debenest, G.; Laouafa, F.

    2011-12-01

    The underground cavities may be dissolved by the flows of groundwater where the dissolution mainly happens at the liquid-solid interface. In many real cases, the cavities are not occupied only by the water, but also the gas phase, e.g., air, or other gases. In this case, there are solid-liquid-gas three phases. Normally, the air does not participate the dissolution. However, it may influence the dissolution as the position of the solid-liquid interface may gradually lower down with the dissolution process. Simulating the dissolution problems with multi- moving interfaces is a difficult task but rather interesting to study the evolution of the underground cavities. In this paper, we propose a diffuse interface model (DIM) to simulate the three-phase dissolution problem, based on a porous medium theory and a volume averaging theory te{Whitaker1999,Golfier2002,Quintard1994}. The interface is regarded as a continuous layer where the phase indicator (mainly for solid-liquid interface) and phase saturation (mainly for liquid-gas interface) vary rapidly but smoothly. The DIM equations enable us to simulate the moving interface under a fixed mesh system, instead of a deformed or moving mesh. Suppose we have three phases, solid, liquid and gas. The solid phase contains only species A. The gas phase contains only the air. The volume averaging theory is used to upscale the balance equations. The final DIM equations are presented below. The balance equation of solid phase can be written as {partialrho_{s}(1-\\varepsilon_{f})}/{partial t}=-K_{sl} where \\varepsilonf represents the volume fraction of the fluids (liquid+gas) and Ksl refers to the mass exchange between the solid phase and the liquid phase. Ksl cam be expressed as K_{sl}=rho_{l}alpha(omega_{eq}-Omega_{Al}). The balance equations of liquid phase can be written as {partialrho_{l}\\varepsilon_{f}S_{l}}/{partial t}+nabla\\cdot(rho_{l}{V}_{l})= K_{sl}. The balance equation of liquid phase can be written as {partialrho

  5. Generation of large-scale, barrier-free diffuse plasmas in air at atmospheric pressure using array wire electrodes and nanosecond high-voltage pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, Yun; Li, Lee; Liu, Yun-Long; Liu, Lun; Liu, Minghai

    2014-10-01

    This paper introduces a method to generate large-scale diffuse plasmas by using a repetition nanosecond pulse generator and a parallel array wire-electrode configuration. We investigated barrier-free diffuse plasmas produced in the open air in parallel and cross-parallel array line-line electrode configurations. We found that, when the distance between the wire-electrode pair is small, the discharges were almost extinguished. Also, glow-like diffuse plasmas with little discharge weakening were obtained in an appropriate range of line-line distances and with a cathode-grounding cross-electrode configuration. As an example, we produced a large-scale, stable diffuse plasma with volumes as large as 18 × 15 × 15 cm3, and this discharge region can be further expanded. Additionally, using optical and electrical measurements, we showed that the electron temperature was higher than the gas temperature, which was almost the same as room temperature. Also, an array of electrode configuration with more wire electrodes had helped to prevent the transition from diffuse discharge to arc discharge. Comparing the current waveforms of configurations with 1 cell and 9 cells, we found that adding cells significantly increased the conduction current and the electrical energy delivered in the electrode gaps.

  6. Generation of large-scale, barrier-free diffuse plasmas in air at atmospheric pressure using array wire electrodes and nanosecond high-voltage pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Teng, Yun; Li, Lee Liu, Yun-Long; Liu, Lun; Liu, Minghai

    2014-10-15

    This paper introduces a method to generate large-scale diffuse plasmas by using a repetition nanosecond pulse generator and a parallel array wire-electrode configuration. We investigated barrier-free diffuse plasmas produced in the open air in parallel and cross-parallel array line-line electrode configurations. We found that, when the distance between the wire-electrode pair is small, the discharges were almost extinguished. Also, glow-like diffuse plasmas with little discharge weakening were obtained in an appropriate range of line-line distances and with a cathode-grounding cross-electrode configuration. As an example, we produced a large-scale, stable diffuse plasma with volumes as large as 18 × 15 × 15 cm{sup 3}, and this discharge region can be further expanded. Additionally, using optical and electrical measurements, we showed that the electron temperature was higher than the gas temperature, which was almost the same as room temperature. Also, an array of electrode configuration with more wire electrodes had helped to prevent the transition from diffuse discharge to arc discharge. Comparing the current waveforms of configurations with 1 cell and 9 cells, we found that adding cells significantly increased the conduction current and the electrical energy delivered in the electrode gaps.

  7. Separation and sampling of ice nucleation chamber generated ice particles by means of the counterflow virtual impactor technique for the characterization of ambient ice nuclei.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schenk, Ludwig; Mertes, Stephan; Kästner, Udo; Schmidt, Susan; Schneider, Johannes; Frank, Fabian; Nillius, Björn; Worringen, Annette; Kandler, Konrad; Ebert, Martin; Stratmann, Frank

    2014-05-01

    In 2011, the German research foundation (DFG) research group called Ice Nuclei Research Unit (INUIT (FOR 1525, project STR 453/7-1) was established with the objective to achieve a better understanding concerning heterogeneous ice formation. The presented work is part of INUIT and aims for a better microphysical and chemical characterization of atmospheric aerosol particles that have the potential to act as ice nuclei (IN). For this purpose a counterflow virtual impactor (Kulkarni et al., 2011) system (IN-PCVI) was developed and characterized in order to separate and collect ice particles generated in the Fast Ice Nucleus Chamber (FINCH; Bundke et al., 2008) and to release their IN for further analysis. Here the IN-PCVI was used for the inertial separation of the IN counter produced ice particles from smaller drops and interstitial particles. This is realized by a counterflow that matches the FINCH output flow inside the IN-PCVI. The choice of these flows determines the aerodynamic cut-off diameter. The collected ice particles are transferred into the IN-PCVI sample flow where they are completely evaporated in a particle-free and dry carrier air. In this way, the aerosol particles detected as IN by the IN counter can be extracted and distributed to several particle sensors. This coupled setup FINCH, IN-PCVI and aerosol instrumentation was deployed during the INUIT-JFJ joint measurement field campaign at the research station Jungfraujoch (3580m asl). Downstream of the IN-PCVI, the Aircraft-based Laser Ablation Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (ALABAMA; Brands et al., 2011) was attached for the chemical analysis of the atmospheric IN. Also, number concentration and size distribution of IN were measured online (TROPOS) and IN impactor samples for electron microscopy (TU Darmstadt) were taken. Therefore the IN-PCVI was operated with different flow settings than known from literature (Kulkarni et al., 2011), which required a further characterisation of its cut

  8. Development of a new real-time method for measuring S(IV) in cloud water using a counter-flow virtual impactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, Roy W.; Charlson, Robert J.

    1994-07-01

    A new method of analysis for S(IV) is described incorporating a counter-flow virtual impactor for collection and evaporation of cloud droplets with an SO2 analyzer. This technique allows analysis of aqueous S(IV) concentration in real-time and overcomes some sampling or analysis problems of conventional sampling with bulk cloud water collectors and wet chemical analysis methods. The technique is demonstrated by the correlated responses of the S(IV) instrument and instruments measuring physical properties of clouds while passing in and out of clouds. Measured aqueous S(IV) concentrations ranged from the detection limit (0.1nmol per m3 of air) to 1.8nmol m-3 in clouds in Ohio. S(IV) molar concentrations (moles/l of cloud water) were not calculable from these measurements, but can be calculated when a measurement of the liquid water content of the collected cloud water is made simultaneously.

  9. Opposed jet burner studies of hydrogen combustion with pure and N2, NO-contaminated air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guerra, Rosemary; Pellett, Gerald L.; Northam, G. Burton; Wilson, Lloyd G.

    1987-01-01

    A counterflow diffusion flame formed by an argon-bathed tubular-opposed jet burner (OJB) was used to determine the 'blowoff' and 'restore' combustion characteristics for jets of various H2/N2 mixtures and for jets of air contaminated by NO (which normally occurs in high-enthalpy airflows supplied to hypersonic test facilities for scramjet combustors). Substantial divergence of 'blowoff' and 'restore' limits occurred as H2 mass flux, M(H)2, increased, the H2 jet became richer, and the M(air)/M(H2 + N2) ratio increased from 1 to 3 (molar H2/O2 from 1 to 16). Both OJB limits were sensitive to reactant composition. One to six percent NO in air led to significant N2-corrected decreases in the M(H2) values for 'blowoff' (2-8 percent) and 'restore' (6-12 percent) for mole fractions of H2 ranging from 0.5 to 0.95. However, when H2/O2 was held constant, all N2-corrected changes in M(H2) were negligible.

  10. Testing the performance of a cryogenic visualization system on thermal counterflow by using hydrogen and deuterium solid tracers.

    PubMed

    La Mantia, M; Chagovets, T V; Rotter, M; Skrbek, L

    2012-05-01

    An experimental apparatus has been designed to analyze by visualization cryogenic flows of liquid (4)He and consequently address unresolved problems of quantum turbulence. The newly implemented flow visualization setup is described and its specific features discussed. Thermal counterflow experiments have been performed and the motion of solid hydrogen and deuterium tracers studied by using the particle tracking velocimetry technique in order to probe the system capabilities. It is shown that the obtained results are consistent with the two-fluid model describing the behavior of superfluid (4)He. A number of technical and fundamental issues, such as particles' aggregation, role of rotating particles in counterflow and evidence of non-Gaussian distribution of tracers' velocities, are also discussed. The apparatus appears to be well-suited to the task of analyzing cryogenic flows and potentially capable of obtaining new results stimulating further understanding of the underlying physics.

  11. Light-Absorbing Carbon in Cloud Residual Nuclei During ICE-L: Combining the Single Particle Soot Photometer and the Counterflow Virtual Impactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanian, R.; Kok, G. L.; Baumgardner, D.; Twohy, C.

    2008-12-01

    The single particle soot photometer (SP2) measures strongly-light absorbing (black) carbon (LAC) using laser incandescence. During the Ice in Clouds Experiment (ICE-L) conducted over Colorado and Wyoming in November/December 2007, the SP2 was operated downstream of a counterflow virtual impactor (CVI) onboard the NCAR C-130 aircraft, when the plane passed through a cloud. The CVI collects cloud droplets and ice crystals larger than 8 μm and evaporates the water content, so that residual nuclei are sampled. The CVI also concentrates the incoming air-stream by as much as a factor of 30 or more. The combination enables measurements of LAC much lower than 1 ng/m3. Results indicate that compared to aerosol in the surrounding air mass, LAC concentrations (per unit volume air) were generally lower in cloud. On November 16, two wave clouds were sampled near Riverton and Wheatland, WY at altitudes between 6-8 km above sea level. LAC mass concentrations upwind of the clouds averaged 5.6 and 4 ng/m3, while in- cloud averages were 0.6 and 0.3 ng/m3 respectively. Average number scavenging ratios of LAC- containing particles measured by the SP2 were 17% and 14% for the two mixed liquid/ice cloud events. In- cloud LAC mass normalized to cloud water content (CWC) was 19 ng/g-CWC in the Riverton cloud, and lower over Wheaton. Multiple passes at different altitudes through the cloud nearer Wheaton did not show a dependence of LAC/CWC on altitude. In a wave cloud over the Wind River Range on November 29, ice-only portions showed LAC/CWC about a factor-of-4 lower than smaller mixed-phase regions of the cloud. Data on LAC measurements in upslope conditions will also be presented.

  12. Experimental Study of Counterflow Cooling Using a Test Loop to Simulate the Thermal Characteristics of a HTS Cable System

    SciTech Connect

    Demko, Jonathan A

    2012-01-01

    The counterflow cooling configuration is a compact, efficient, and relatively low cost thermal management approach for long-length HTS cable systems. In the counter-flow cooling configuration the coolant flow, typically liquid nitrogen, is initially supplied through the center of the cable turning around at the far end of the cable and returning through the annular space between the cable and the inner cryostat wall, using a single cryostat. The temperature distributions along the cable and the nitrogen flow streams are extremely difficult to measure in an operating HTS cable because of the issues associated with installing thermometers on high voltage components. A 5-meter long test loop has been built that simulates a counter-flow cooled, HTS cable using a heated metal tube to simulate the cable. The test loop contains calibrated thermometers to measure the temperature distribution along the tube and the return liquid nitrogen stream. Measured temperature distributions in the return flow stream and along the tube wall for varying flow rates and heating conditions to simulate a HTS cable are presented and discussed.

  13. Interfacial diffusion of metal atoms during air annealing of chemically deposited ZnS-CuS and PbS-CuS thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, L.; Zingaro, R.A.; Meyers, E.A. . Dept. of Chemistry); Nair, P.K.; Nair, M.T.S. . Lab. de Energia Solar)

    1994-09-01

    The authors report on the interfacial diffusion of metal ions occurring during air annealing of multilayer CuS films (0.15-0.6[mu]m) deposited on thin coating of ZnS or PbS ([approximately]0.06 [mu]m) on glass substrates. All the films are deposited from chemical baths at room temperature. The interfacial diffusion on the metal atoms during the air annealing is illustrate by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies. A multilayer of 0.3 [mu]m thick CuS film deposited over a thin film of ZnS upon annealing at 150 C shows atomic ratios of Zn to Cu of [approximately]0.15 and [approximately]0.48 at the surface layers of the samples annealed for 12 and 24 h, respectively. In the case of CuS on PbS film, the corresponding Pb to Cu atomic ratios at the surface layers are 0.43 and 0.83. The optical transmittance spectra and sheet resistance of these multilayer films indicate thermal stabilities superior to that of the CuS-only coatings. Application of the interfacial diffusion process in the production of thermally stable solar control coatings, solar absorber coating, or p-type films for solar cell structures is discussed.

  14. Assessment of diffusion parameters of new passive samplers using optical chemical sensor for on-site measuring formaldehyde in indoor air: experimental and numerical studies.

    PubMed

    Vignau-Laulhere, Jane; Mocho, Pierre; Plaisance, Hervé; Raulin, Katarzyna; Desauziers, Valérie

    2016-03-01

    New passive samplers using a sensor consisting of a sol-gel matrix entrapping Fluoral-P as sampling media were developed for the determination of formaldehyde in indoor air. The reaction between Fluoral-P and formaldehyde produces a colored compound which is quantified on-site by means of a simple optical reading module. The advantages of this sensor are selectivity, low cost, ppb level limit of detection, and on-site direct measurement. In the development process, it is necessary to determine the sampling rate, a key parameter that cannot be directly assessed in the case of diffusive samplers using optical chemical sensor. In this study, a methodology combining experimental tests and numerical modeling is proposed and applied at five different radial diffusive samplers equipped with the same optical chemical sensor to assess the sampled material flows and sampling rates. These radial diffusive samplers differ in the internal volume of the sampler (18.97 and 6.14 cm(3)), the position of sensor inside the sampler (in front and offset of 1.2 cm above the membrane) and the width of the diffusion slot (1.4 and 5.9 mm). The influences of these three parameters (internal volume, position of sensor inside the sampler, and width of the diffusion slot) were assessed and discussed with regard to the formaldehyde sampling rate and water uptake by sensor (potential interference of measure). Numerical simulations based on Fick's laws are in agreement with the experimental results and provide to estimate the effective diffusion coefficient of formaldehyde through the membrane (3.50 × 10(-6) m(2) s(-1)). Conversion factors between the sensor response, sampled formaldehyde mass and sampling rate were also assessed.

  15. Three-dimensional visualization of morphology and ventilation procedure (air flow and diffusion) of a subdivision of the acinus using synchrotron radiation microtomography of the human lung specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Kenji; Ikura, Hirohiko; Ikezoe, Junpei; Nagareda, Tomofumi; Yagi, Naoto; Umetani, Keiji; Imai, Yutaka

    2004-04-01

    We have previously reported a synchrotron radiation (SR) microtomography system constructed at the bending magnet beamline at the SPring-8. This system has been applied to the lungs obtained at autopsy and inflated and fixed by Heitzman"s method. Normal lung and lung specimens with two different types of pathologic processes (fibrosis and emphysema) were included. Serial SR microtomographic images were stacked to yield the isotropic volumetric data with high-resolution (12 μm3 in voxel size). Within the air spaces of a subdivision of the acinus, each voxel is segmented three-dimensionally using a region growing algorithm ("rolling ball algorithm"). For each voxel within the segmented air spaces, two types of voxel coding have been performed: single-seeded (SS) coding and boundary-seeded (BS) coding, in which the minimum distance from an initial point as the only seed point and all object boundary voxels as a seed set were calculated and assigned as the code values to each voxel, respectively. With these two codes, combinations of surface rendering and volume rendering techniques were applied to visualize three-dimensional morphology of a subdivision of the acinus. Furthermore, sequentially filling process of air into a subdivision of the acinus was simulated under several conditions to visualize the ventilation procedure (air flow and diffusion). A subdivision of the acinus was reconstructed three-dimensionally, demonstrating the normal architecture of the human lung. Significant differences in appearance of ventilation procedure were observed between normal and two pathologic processes due to the alteration of the lung architecture. Three-dimensional reconstruction of the microstructure of a subdivision of the acinus and visualization of the ventilation procedure (air flow and diffusion) with SR microtomography would offer a new approach to study the morphology, physiology, and pathophysiology of the human respiratory system.

  16. Magmatism at passive margins: Effect of depth-dependent rifting and depleted continental lithospheric counterflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Gang; Huismans, Ritske

    2016-04-01

    Rifted continental margins may have a variety of structural and magmatic styles, resulting in narrow or wide, magma-dominated or magma-poor conjugate margins. Some magma-poor margins differ from the classical uniform extension (McKenzie) model in that continental crust breaks up significantly earlier or later than continental mantle lithosphere and establishment of mature mid-ocean ridge is significantly delayed. The best-known examples are observed at: 1) the Iberia-Newfoundland conjugate margins (Type I) with a narrow transition between oceanic and continental crust; and 2) ultra-wide central South Atlantic margins (Type II) where the continental crust spans wide regions while the mantle lithosphere beneath has been removed. These margins are explained by depth-dependent extension. In this study, we perform 2D thermo-mechanical finite element numerical experiments to investigate magmatism at passive margins with depth-dependent extension. A melting prediction model is coupled with the thermo-mechanical model, in which temperature, density and viscosity feedbacks are considered. For the standard models, the crust is either strong and coupled (Type I-A models), or weak and decoupled (Type II-A models) with mantle lithosphere. In addition, models with a buoyant, depleted (cratonic) lower mantle lithosphere (referred as C models) are also investigated. We illustrate that Type I-A/C models develop Type I narrow margins, whereas Type II-A/C models develop Type II wide margins. In the C models, the buoyant lower mantle lithosphere flows laterally towards the ridge (i.e. the counterflow), resulting in the exhumation (in Type I-C models) or underplating (in Type II-C models) of the continental mantle lithosphere. Magmatic productivity is strongly prohibited when counterflow is developed. We argue that Type I-A and I-C models are comparable with the Aden Gulf rifted margins and the Iberia-Newfoundland conjugate margins, respectively. The Type II-A/C models are consistent

  17. Extinction Dynamics of a Co-flow Diffusion Flame by Very Small Water Droplets Injected into the Air Stream

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-07-28

    flame extinction with UFM are available in the literature. Ndubizu et al. [18-20] conducted experiments on the effects of UFM on a forced convection ...injected air Reynolds number of 4 x 105 (Re=650). This suggests that the bulk of the air is affected by the natural convection and deviates...significantly from the streamlines of the injected air at the bottom of the burner. Therefore, the fluid flow set up by the natural convection is

  18. Studies of Contaminant Diffusion in an Aquitard and Groundwater Remediation by Reactive Metals at Dover Air Force Base, Delaware

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    and-treat remediation in sheet-pile " test cells" at Dover AFB, DE. Another aspect was the conduct of exploratory long-term column investigations of...post-pumping contaminant movement (multi-layer diffusion modeling). Results were used to (1) test the assumption that diffusion alone affected...chlorinated hydrocarbons) in an aquitard underlying the site of a prior field-scale investigation of pump-and-treat remediation in sheet-pile " test cells" at

  19. Evaluation of the use of diffusive air samplers for determining temporal and spatial variation of volatile organic compounds in the ambient air of urban communities.

    PubMed

    Stock, Thomas H; Morandi, Maria T; Afshar, Masoud; Chung, Kuenja C

    2008-10-01

    The Houston-Galveston metropolitan area has a relatively high density of point and mobile sources of air toxics, and determining and understanding the relationship between emissions and ambient air concentrations of air toxics is important for evaluating potential impacts on public health and formulating effective regulatory policies to control this impact, both in this region and elsewhere. However, conventional ambient air monitoring approaches are limited with regard to expense, siting limitations, and representative sampling necessary for adequate exposure assessment. The overall goal of this multiphase study is to evaluate the use of simple passive air samplers to determine temporal and spatial variability of the ambient air concentrations of selected volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in urban areas. Phase 1 of this study, reported here, was a field evaluation of 3M organic vapor monitors (OVMs) involving limited comparisons with commonly used active sampling methods, an assessment of sampler precision, a determination of optimal sampling duration, and an investigation of the utility of a simple modification of the commercial sampler. The results indicated that a sampling duration of 72 hr exhibited generally low bias relative to automated continuous gas chromatography measurements, good overall precision, and an acceptable number of measurements above detection limits. The modified sampler showed good correlation with the commercial sampler, with higher sampling rates, although lower than expected.

  20. Effects of Flame Structure and Hydrodynamics on Soot Particle Inception and Flame Extinction in Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Axelbaum, R. L.; Chen, R.; Sunderland, P. B.; Urban, D. L.; Liu, S.; Chao, B. H.

    2001-01-01

    This paper summarizes recent studies of the effects of stoichiometric mixture fraction (structure) and hydrodynamics on soot particle inception and flame extinction in diffusion flames. Microgravity experiments are uniquely suited for these studies because, unlike normal gravity experiments, they allow structural and hydrodynamic effects to be independently studied. As part of this recent flight definition program, microgravity studies have been performed in the 2.2 second drop tower. Normal gravity counterflow studies also have been employed and analytical and numerical models have been developed. A goal of this program is to develop sufficient understanding of the effects of flame structure that flames can be "designed" to specifications - consequently, the program name Flame Design. In other words, if a soot-free, strong, low temperature flame is required, can one produce such a flame by designing its structure? Certainly, as in any design, there will be constraints imposed by the properties of the available "materials." For hydrocarbon combustion, the base materials are fuel and air. Additives could be considered, but for this work only fuel, oxygen and nitrogen are considered. Also, the structure of these flames is "designed" by varying the stoichiometric mixture fraction. Following this line of reasoning, the studies described are aimed at developing the understanding of flame structure that is needed to allow for optimum design.

  1. Two-dimensional imaging of molecular hydrogen in H2-air diffusion flames using two-photon laser-induced fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lempert, W.; Kumar, V.; Glesk, I.; Miles, R.; Diskin, G.

    1991-01-01

    The use of a tunable ArF laser at 193.26 nm to record simultaneous single-laser-shot, planar images of molecular hydrogen and hot oxygen in a turbulent H2-air diffusion flame. Excitation spectra of fuel and oxidant-rich flame zones confirm a partial overlap of the two-photon H2 and single-photon O2 Schumann-Runge absorption bands. UV Rayleigh scattering images of flame structure and estimated detection limits for the H2 two-photon imaging are also presented.

  2. A computational study of radiation and gravity effect on temperature and soot formation in a methane air co-flow diffusion flame

    SciTech Connect

    Bhowal, Arup Jyoti; Mandal, Bijan Kumar

    2016-07-12

    An effort has been made for a quantitative assessment of the soot formed under steady state in a methane air co flow diffusion flame by a numerical simulation at normal gravity and at lower gravity levels of 0.5 G, 0.1 G and 0.0001 G (microgravity). The peak temperature at microgravity is reduced by about 50 K than that at normal gravity level. There is an augmentation of soot formation at lower gravity levels. Peak value at microgravity multiplies by a factor of ∼7 of that at normal gravity. However, if radiation is not considered, soot formation is found to be much more.

  3. Self-organized phenomena of pedestrian counterflow through a wide bottleneck in a channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Li-Yun; Lan, Dong-Kai; Li, Xiang

    2016-09-01

    The pedestrian counterflow through a bottleneck in a channel shows a variety of flow patterns due to self-organization. In order to reveal the underlying mechanism, a cellular automaton model was proposed by incorporating the floor field and the view field which reflects the global information of the studied area and local interactions with others. The presented model can well reproduce typical collective behaviors, such as lane formation. Numerical simulations were performed in the case of a wide bottleneck and typical flow patterns at different density ranges were identified as rarefied flow, laminar flow, interrupted bidirectional flow, oscillatory flow, intermittent flow, and choked flow. The effects of several parameters, such as the size of view field and the width of opening, on the bottleneck flow are also analyzed in detail. The view field plays a vital role in reproducing self-organized phenomena of pedestrian. Numerical results showed that the presented model can capture key characteristics of bottleneck flows. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2012CB725404) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11172164 and 11572184).

  4. Simulation of pedestrian counter-flow with right-moving preference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lizhong; Li, Jian; Liu, Shaobo

    2008-05-01

    People prefer to walk on the right-hand side of the road for physical and social reasons. In this paper, pedestrian counter-flow in a channel is simulated with the Cellular Automata (CA) Model, with focus on right-preference. Two types of pedestrians are taken into account, walking leftward and rightward along the channel. Circular and open boundaries are adopted respectively. The right-preference intensity, k, is introduced, defined as the ratio of the right-moving probability to left-moving probability. In simulations, the dynamical transition between fluid and jammed phase is presented. With a fixed k, the critical density is independent of the channel size. According to research results on physiology and sociology [O. Guentuerkuen, Nature 421 (2003) 711; M. Reiss, G. Reiss, Percept. Mot. Skill 85 (1997) 569; M.C. Corballis, Psychol. Rev. 104 (1997) 714], k=1,2,8 have been discussed, and k=8 is satisfied in this work. Furthermore, simulation results are compared with the ideal calculation, and other researchers’ experiments [M. Isobe, T. Adachi, T. Nagatani, Physica A 336 (2004) 638]. It is found that right-preference is effective when the density is below critical. The model is shown to be useful to simulate and analyze this situation numerically.

  5. Matter-wave solitons in the counterflow of two immiscible superfluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsitoura, F.; Achilleos, V.; Malomed, B. A.; Yan, D.; Kevrekidis, P. G.; Frantzeskakis, D. J.

    2013-06-01

    We study formation of solitons induced by counterflows of immiscible superfluids. Our setting is based on a quasi-one-dimensional binary Bose-Einstein condensate, composed of two immiscible components with large and small numbers of atoms in them. Assuming that the “small” component moves with constant velocity, either by itself, or being dragged by a moving trap, and intrudes into the “large” counterpart, the following results are obtained. Depending on the velocity, and on whether the small component moves in the absence or in the presence of the trap, two-component dark-bright solitons, scalar dark solitons, or multiple dark solitons may emerge, the last outcome taking place due to breakdown of the superfluidity. We present two sets of analytical results to describe this phenomenology. In an intermediate velocity regime, where dark-bright solitons form, a reduction of the two-component Gross-Pitaevskii system to an integrable Mel'nikov system is developed, demonstrating that solitary waves of the former are very accurately described by analytically available solitons of the latter. In the high-velocity regime, where the breakdown of the superfluidity induces the formation of dark solitons and multisoliton trains, an effective single-component description, in which a strongly localized wave packet of the “small” component acts as an effective potential for the “large” one, allows us to estimate the critical velocity beyond which the coherent structures emerge in good agreement with the numerical results.

  6. One-dimensional turbulence modeling of a turbulent counterflow flame with comparison to DNS

    DOE PAGES

    Jozefik, Zoltan; Kerstein, Alan R.; Schmidt, Heiko; ...

    2015-06-01

    The one-dimensional turbulence (ODT) model is applied to a reactant-to-product counterflow configuration and results are compared with DNS data. The model employed herein solves conservation equations for momentum, energy, and species on a one dimensional (1D) domain corresponding to the line spanning the domain between nozzle orifice centers. The effects of turbulent mixing are modeled via a stochastic process, while the Kolmogorov and reactive length and time scales are explicitly resolved and a detailed chemical kinetic mechanism is used. Comparisons between model and DNS results for spatial mean and root-meansquare (RMS) velocity, temperature, and major and minor species profiles aremore » shown. The ODT approach shows qualitatively and quantitatively reasonable agreement with the DNS data. Scatter plots and statistics conditioned on temperature are also compared for heat release rate and all species. ODT is able to capture the range of results depicted by DNS. However, conditional statistics show signs of underignition.« less

  7. NO{sub x} emissions of a jet diffusion flame which is surrounded by a shroud of combustion air

    SciTech Connect

    Tran, P.X.; White, F.P.; Mathur, M.P.; Ekmann, J.M.

    1996-08-01

    The present work reports an experimental study on the behavior of a jet flame surrounded by a shroud of combustion air. Measurements focussed on the flame length and the emissions of NO{sub x}, total unburned hydrocarbons, CO{sub 2}, and O{sub 2}. Four different fuel flow rates (40.0, 78.33, 138.33, and 166.6 cm/s), air flow rates up to 2500 cm{sup 3}/s and four different air injector diameters (0.079 cm, 0. 158 cm, 0.237 cm, and 0.316 cm) were used. The shroud of combustion air causes the flame length to decrease by a factor proportional to 1/[p{sub a}/p{sub f} + C{sub 2}({mu}{sub a}Re,a/{mu}{sub f}Re,f){sup 2}]{sup {1/2}}. A substantial shortening of the flame length occurred by increasing the air injection velocity keeping fuel rate fixed or conversely by lowering the fuel flow rate keeping air flow rate constant. NO{sub x} emissions ranging from 5 ppm to 64 ppm were observed and the emission of NO{sub x} decreased strongly with the increased air velocity. The decrease of NO{sub x} emissions was found to follow a similar scaling law as does the flame length. However, the emission of the total hydrocarbons increased with the increased air velocity or the decreased fuel flow rate. A crossover condition where both NO{sub x} and unburned- hydrocarbon emissions are low, was identified. At an air-to-fuel velocity ratio of about 1, the emissions of NO{sub x} and the total hydrocarbons were found to be under 20 ppm.

  8. A numerical study on the effect of hydrogen/reformate gas addition on flame temperature and NO formation in strained methane/air diffusion flames

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Hongsheng; Neill, W. Stuart

    2009-02-15

    This paper investigates the effects of hydrogen/reformate gas addition on flame temperature and NO formation in strained methane/air diffusion flames by numerical simulation. The results reveal that flame temperature changes due to the combined effects of adiabatic temperature, fuel Lewis number and radiation heat loss, when hydrogen/reformate gas is added to the fuel of a methane/air diffusion flame. The effect of Lewis number causes the flame temperature to increase much faster than the corresponding adiabatic equilibrium temperature when hydrogen is added, and results in a qualitatively different variation from the adiabatic equilibrium temperature as reformate gas is added. At some conditions, the addition of hydrogen results in a super-adiabatic flame temperature. The addition of hydrogen/reformate gas causes NO formation to change because of the variations in flame temperature, structure and NO formation mechanism, and the effect becomes more significant with increasing strain rate. The addition of a small amount of hydrogen or reformate gas has little effect on NO formation at low strain rates, and results in an increase in NO formation at moderate or high strain rates. However, the addition of a large amount of hydrogen increases NO formation at all strain rates, except near pure hydrogen condition. Conversely, the addition of a large amount of reformate gas results in a reduction in NO formation. (author)

  9. Photoluminescence and visible diffuse-reflection spectroscopic evidence of samarium reduction in air-fired samples of mixed samarium: strontium tetraborate precipitates.

    PubMed

    Brown, Telvin M; Jeffreys, Mareo C; Pehaire, Mario; Stump, Nathan A

    2013-03-01

    Photoluminescence and visible diffuse-reflection spectroscopies have provided evidence of the reduction of samarium to the divalent state in samarium-doped strontium borate and pure samarium borate samples. The samples were prepared by the air firing of homogeneous precipitates of divalent strontium and trivalent samarium ions from aqueous solutions with saturated sodium tetraborate. The use of this method in the preparation of divalent lanthanide ions has not been reported previously. Reduced samarium was observed in fired tetraborate precipitates prepared with solutions containing 1, 5, 10, 25, 50, 75, and 90 mole percent samarium versus strontium. Divalent samarium also was identified in fired precipitates of trivalent samarium solutions precipitated with tetraborate. Sm(2+) was identified as the primary emitting species in each of the eight compositions. However, diffuse-reflection spectroscopy indicated the presence of trivalent samarium in the studied samples, ranging from minimal for samples prepared with low samarium concentrations to nearly exclusive when pure samarium was studied. Quenching of the characteristic emission associated with the trivalent species is believed to result in the absence of the emission features arising from residual samarium(III) in the products. Although the absence of trivalent samarium emission enhanced the ability of emission spectroscopy to identify small amounts of divalent samarium, indicating that reduction had occurred, it limited the ability of this method to determine the extent of the reduction. Diffuse-reflection spectroscopy's ability to look at both species provided a much better analysis of the extent of samarium reduction.

  10. Stereological estimation of the surface area and oxygen diffusing capacity of the respiratory stomach of the air-breathing armored catfish Pterygoplichthys anisitsi (Teleostei: Loricariidae).

    PubMed

    da Cruz, André Luis; Pedretti, Ana Carolina Elias; Fernandes, Marisa Narciso

    2009-05-01

    The stomach of Pterygoplichthys anisitsi has a thin, translucent wall and a simple squamous epithelium with an underlying dense capillary network. In the cardiac and pyloric regions, most cells have short microvilli distributed throughout the cell surface and their edges are characterized by short, densely packed microvilli. The mucosal layer of the stomach has two types of pavement epithelial cells that are similar to those in the aerial respiratory organs. Type 1 pavement epithelial cells, resembling the Type I pneumocyte in mammal lungs, are flat, with a large nucleus, and extend a thin sheet of cytoplasm on the underlying capillary. Type 2 cells, resembling the Type II pneumocyte, possess numerous mitochondria, a well-developed Golgi complex, rough endoplasmic reticulum, and numerous lamellar bodies in different stages of maturation. The gastric glands, distributed throughout the mucosal layer, also have several cells with many lamellar bodies. The total volume (air + tissue), tissue, and air capacity of the stomach when inflated, increase along with body mass. The surface-to-tissue-volume ratio of stomach varies from 108 cm(-1) in the smallest fish (0.084 kg) to 59 cm(-1) in the largest fish (0.60 kg). The total stomach surface area shows a low correlation to body mass. Nevertheless, the body-mass-specific surface area varied from 281.40 cm(2) kg(-1) in the smallest fish to 68.08 cm(2) kg(-1) in the largest fish, indicating a negative correlation to body mass (b = -0.76). The arithmetic mean barrier thickness between air and blood was 1.52 +/- 0.07 microm, whereas the harmonic mean thickness (tau(h)) of the diffusion barrier ranged from 0.40 to 0.74 microm. The anatomical diffusion factor (ADF = cm(2) microm(-1) kg(-1)) and the morphological O(2) diffusion capacity (D(morphol)O(2) = cm(3) min(-1) mmHg(-1) kg(-1)) are higher in the smallest specimen and lower in the largest one. In conclusion, the structure and morphometric data of P. anisitsi stomach indicate

  11. Development of a low-pressure "counterflow exchanging virtual impactor" for aerosol analysis, and, Measurement of ozone mixing ratios and meteorological parameters through the boundary layer at Summit, Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulter, James Edward

    Trace atmospheric gases may provide significant interferences for in situ chemical analyses of atmospheric particles. Hence, a continuous technique to selectively remove the aerosol fraction from ambient air is desirable. A low-pressure "counterflow exchanging virtual impactor" (LP-CEVI), based upon the principle of inertial particle impaction, was developed to exchange aerosol particles larger than a certain aerodynamic size into a stream of inert gas while excluding atmospheric gases. Impactor particle transmission was characterized by two experimental techniques, one utilizing condensation particle counting of size-selected, nebulized salt particles and the other utilizing filter collection and extraction of monodisperse fluorescent microspheres. The impactor was also characterized for the ability to exclude ambient air, using the detection of nitric oxide by gas-phase chemiluminescence resulting from its reaction with ozone. Within certain pressure and counterflow regimes, the LP-CEVI was found to reproducibly transmit particles greater than approximately 0.2 mum in diameter while excluding more than 99.9% of ambient gas from the particle stream. Potential applications of the impactor to laboratory and field studies are discussed. Chemical processes occurring in firn air, interstitial air within the top several centimeters of snowpack, are important to understanding the composition of the Arctic troposphere. Research was conducted at Summit, Greenland in June 2000 to measure vertical profiles of the ozone mixing ratio and various meteorological parameters through the top of the boundary layer from tethered helium balloon platforms. Ozone mixing ratio profiles were measured using electrochemical ozonesondes in addition to a compact, lightweight, single-beam UV absorbance ozone instrument designed for field use. Profiles of meteorological parameters such as temperature, water vapor pressure, wind speed, and wind direction were measured using radiosondes and

  12. Ignition of hydrogen/air mixing layer in turbulent flows

    SciTech Connect

    Im, H.G.; Chen, J.H.; Law, C.K.

    1998-03-01

    Autoignition of a scalar hydrogen/air mixing layer in homogeneous turbulence is studied using direct numerical simulation. An initial counterflow of unmixed nitrogen-diluted hydrogen and heated air is perturbed by two-dimensional homogeneous turbulence. The temperature of the heated air stream is chosen to be 1,100 K which is substantially higher than the crossover temperature at which the rates of the chain branching and termination reactions become equal. Three different turbulence intensities are tested in order to assess the effect of the characteristic flow time on the ignition delay. For each condition, a simulation without heat release is also performed. The ignition delay determined with and without heat release is shown to be almost identical up to the point of ignition for all of the turbulence intensities tested, and the predicted ignition delays agree well within a consistent error band. It is also observed that the ignition kernel always occurs where hydrogen is focused, and the peak concentration of HO{sub 2} is aligned well with the scalar dissipation rate. The dependence of the ignition delay on turbulence intensity is found to be nonmonotonic. For weak to moderate turbulence the ignition is facilitated by turbulence via enhanced mixing, while for stronger turbulence, whose timescale is substantially smaller than the ignition delay, the ignition is retarded due to excessive scalar dissipation, and hence diffusive loss, at the ignition location. However, for the wide range of initial turbulence fields studied, the variation in ignition delay due to the corresponding variation in turbulence intensity appears to be quite small.

  13. Acoustofluidics and whole-blood manipulation in surface acoustic wave counterflow devices.

    PubMed

    Travagliati, Marco; Shilton, Richie J; Pagliazzi, Marco; Tonazzini, Ilaria; Beltram, Fabio; Cecchini, Marco

    2014-11-04

    On-chip functional blocks for sample preprocessing are necessary elements for the implementation of fully portable micrototal analysis systems (μTAS). We demonstrate and characterize the microparticle and whole-blood manipulation capabilities of surface acoustic wave (SAW) driven counterflow micropumps. The motion of suspended cells in this system is governed by the two dominant acoustic forces associated with the scattered SAW (of wavelength λf): acoustic-radiation force and acoustic-streaming Stokesian drag force. We show that by reducing the microchannel height (h) beyond a threshold value the balance of these forces is shifted toward the acoustic-radiation force and that this yields control of two different regimes of microparticle dynamics. In the regime dominated by the acoustic radiation force (h ≲ λf), microparticles are collected in the seminodes of the partial standing sound-wave arising from reflections off microchannel walls. This enables the complete separation of plasma and corpuscular components of whole blood in periodical predetermined positions without any prior sample dilution. Conversely, in the regime dominated by acoustic streaming (h ≫ λf), the microbeads follow vortical streamlines in a pattern characterized by three different phases during microchannel filling. This makes it possible to generate a cell-concentration gradient within whole-blood samples, a behavior not previously reported in any acoustic-streaming device. By careful device design, a new class of SAW pumping devices is presented that allows the manipulation and pretreatment of whole-blood samples for portable and integrable biological chips and is compatible with hand-held battery-operated devices.

  14. Air-tough: A fully 3-dimensional linking of atmosphere with soil using eddy diffusivity concept and V-TOUGH

    SciTech Connect

    Montazer, P.

    1995-03-01

    In arid climates, evapotranspiration is a strongly-coupled thermodynamic process that is controlled by the interaction of the atmospheric boundary layer and the upper soil surface. Simulation of this process requires a fully-coupled thermodynamic multi-phase fluid-flow and energy-transport code. Such a code was developed in a previous investigation using V-TOUGH. The resulting efficient computer code, A-TOUGH, simulates the effect of dynamic atmospheric fluctuations on vapor movement between the soil and the atmosphere and the resulting moisture movement in the soil. However, the coupling between the atmosphere and soil employed eddy diffusivity which was only a function of time and not a function of space. In the present study the code is extended to allow spatial as well as temporal variation of eddy diffusivity.

  15. Evaluation of two adsorbents for diffusive sampling and thermal desorption-gas chromatographic analysis of monoterpenes in air.

    PubMed

    Sunesson, A L; Sundgren, M; Levin, J O; Eriksson, K; Carlson, R

    1999-02-01

    Tube type samplers with two different adsorbents, Chromosorb 106 and Tenax TA, were evaluated by laboratory experiments and field tests for simultaneous diffusive sampling of alpha-pinene, beta-pinene and delta 3-carene and subsequent thermal desorption-gas chromatographic analysis. No statistically significant effects of exposure time, concentrations of monoterpenes or relative humidity were found for samplers with Chromosorb 106 when running a factorial design, with the exception of the adsorption of delta 3-carene, for which some weak effects were noted. Samplers with Tenax TA were affected by the sampling time as well as the concentration for all terpenes, with a strong interaction effect between these two factors. The terpenes showed good storage stability on both adsorbents. No effect of back-diffusion was noted when using Chromosorb 106, while Tenax TA showed some back-diffusion effects. The uptake rates, in ml min-1, for the terpenes on Chromosorb 106 were 0.36 for alpha-pinene, 0.36 for beta-pinene and 0.40 for delta 3-carene. The corresponding average values on Tenax TA were 0.30 for alpha-pinene, 0.32 for beta-pinene and 0.38 for delta 3-carene. The field validation proved that diffusive sampling on Chromosorb 106 agreed well with pumped sampling on charcoal for stationary samples, while the personal samples indicated a discrepancy of 25% between Chromosorb 106 and charcoal samples. Tenax TA generally gave lower results than Chromosorb 106 in all field samples. Samplers packed with Chromosorb 106 could be used to monitor terpene levels in workplaces such as sawmills. The major advantages with this method are the sampling procedure, which is simple to perform compared to other techniques, the easily automated analysis procedure and the possibility to reuse the samplers.

  16. Badge-type diffusive sampler using 3-methyl-2-benzothiazolinone hydrazone for measuring formaldehyde in indoor air.

    PubMed

    Yim, Bongbeen; Jung, Euisuk

    2006-07-01

    The evaluation of a badge-type diffusive sampler for measuring formaldehyde using 3-methyl-2-benzothiazolinone hydrazone (MBTH) was investigated. On average, the formaldehyde concentration in blanks was reduced by approximately 31% by cleaning procedures. The cleaning techniques did not significantly differ in effectiveness. The maximum sampling rate was 22.4 +/- 3.5 mL min(-1) at MBTH concentrations of 0.05%. The formaldehyde concentration in blanks did not appreciably increase over a period of about 1 month at room temperature, and was 0.36 +/- 0.03 microg, with a relative standard deviation of 8%. The diffusive sampler had good precision and accuracy for measuring formaldehyde in indoor environments. For a 24-h exposure time, the limits of detection and quantification calculated with the field blanks were 9.7 and 13.8 ppb, respectively. The minimum exposure times were calculated based on the measured and calculated limits of quantification, the sampling rate, and the atmospheric formaldehyde concentration. The capacity of the diffusive sampler with 0.5% MBTH was 3 ppm h(-1), approximately 1.5-times the capacity when the MBTH concentrations were 0.05%.

  17. Development of Non-Equilibrium Plasma-Flame Kinetic Mechanism and its Validation Using Gliding Arc Integrated with Counterflow Burner

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-21

    FINAL REPORT: FA9550-07-1-0136, Dec. 2006 – Nov. 2009 Development of Non-Equilibrium Plasma-Flame Kinetic Mechanism and its...U) Development of Non-Equilibrium Plasma-Flame Kinetic Mechanism and its Validation Using Gliding Arc Integrated with Counterflow Burner 5a...13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Kinetic enhancements of NOx, O3, and O2(a1Δg) on ignition and flame propagation of CH4 and H2, C3H8 and

  18. Effect of weave tightness and structure on the in-plane and through-plane air permeability of woven carbon fibers for gas diffusion layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caston, Terry B.; Murphy, Andrew R.; Harris, Tequila A. L.

    In this study, woven gas diffusion layers (GDLs) with varying weave type and tightness are investigated. Plain and twill weave patterns were manufactured in-house. The in-plane and through-plane air permeability of the woven samples were tested, and mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) tests were performed to study the pore structure. It was found that the twill weave has a higher permeability than the plain weave, which is consistent with literature. Like non-woven carbon papers, woven GDLs have higher in-plane permeability than through-plane permeability; however it has been shown that it is possible to manufacture a GDL with higher through-plane permeability than in-plane permeability. It was also concluded that the percentage of macropores in the weave is the driving factor in determining the through-plane air permeability. This work lays the groundwork for future studies to attempt to characterize the relationship between the weave structure and the air permeability in woven GDLs.

  19. Diffusive sampling of 25 volatile organic compounds in indoor air: Uptake rate determination and application in Flemish homes for the elderly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walgraeve, C.; Demeestere, K.; Dewulf, J.; Van Huffel, K.; Van Langenhove, H.

    2011-10-01

    Passive sampling of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in air has received increasing attention in recent years. However, in order to use passive sampling as a reliable sampling technique a compound and sampler specific uptake rate is needed. Therefore, the scope of our study was threefold. First, uptake rates for 25 VOCs were determined under real indoor and outdoor conditions using axial-sampling tube-type samplers filled with Tenax TA, and active (pumped) sampling as a reference technique. Secondly, the mechanisms of passive sampling were investigated by comparing the experimentally determined uptake rates (0.13-0.46 ml min-1) to the ideal uptake rates, calculated based on Fick's first law of diffusion and sampler geometry. Sampling efficiency SE, defined as the ratio between the experimental and ideal uptake rate, was introduced as a correction factor and showed that ideal uptake rates may underestimate VOC concentrations by a factor up to 4. This compound dependent SE is explained in terms of the partitioning coefficient K, i.e. the compound's Tenax TA to air concentration equilibrium ratio. Compounds with a low K-value showed the most pronounced non-ideal sorptive behavior. Third, the experimentally determined uptake rates were used to determine VOC concentrations (between 12 and 311 μg m-3) in 6 homes for the elderly in Antwerp (Belgium). This study provides unique data for indoor air quality at care centers in Flanders.

  20. Steady-state solution of the semi-empirical diffusion equation for area sources. [air pollution studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lebedeff, S. A.; Hameed, S.

    1975-01-01

    The problem investigated can be solved exactly in a simple manner if the equations are written in terms of a similarity variable. The exact solution is used to explore two questions of interest in the modelling of urban air pollution, taking into account the distribution of surface concentration downwind of an area source and the distribution of concentration with height.

  1. Associations of autophagy with lung diffusion capacity and oxygen saturation in severe COPD: effects of particulate air pollution

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kang-Yun; Chiang, Ling-Ling; Ho, Shu-Chuan; Liu, Wen-Te; Chen, Tzu-Tao; Feng, Po-Hao; Su, Chien-Ling; Chuang, Kai-Jen; Chang, Chih-Cheng; Chuang, Hsiao-Chi

    2016-01-01

    Although traffic exposure has been associated with the development of COPD, the role of particulate matter <10 μm in aerodynamic diameter (PM10) in the pathogenesis of COPD is not yet fully understood. We assessed the 1-year effect of exposure to PM10 on the pathogenesis of COPD in a retrospective cohort study. We recruited 53 subjects with COPD stages III and IV and 15 healthy controls in a hospital in Taiwan. We estimated the 1-year annual mean levels of PM10 at all residential addresses of the cohort participants. Changes in PM10 for the 1-year averages in quintiles were related to diffusion capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide levels (r=−0.914, P=0.029), changes in the pulse oxygen saturation (ΔSaO2; r=−0.973, P=0.005), receptor for advanced glycation end-products (r=−0.881, P=0.048), interleukin-6 (r=0.986, P=0.002), ubiquitin (r=0.940, P=0.017), and beclin 1 (r=0.923, P=0.025) in COPD. Next, we observed that ubiquitin was correlated with ΔSaO2 (r=−0.374, P=0.019). Beclin 1 was associated with diffusion capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide (r=−0.362, P=0.028), ΔSaO2 (r=−0.354, P=0.032), and receptor for advanced glycation end-products (r=−0.471, P=0.004). Autophagy may be an important regulator of the PM10-related pathogenesis of COPD, which could cause deterioration in the lung diffusion capacity and oxygen saturation. PMID:27468231

  2. Associations of autophagy with lung diffusion capacity and oxygen saturation in severe COPD: effects of particulate air pollution.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kang-Yun; Chiang, Ling-Ling; Ho, Shu-Chuan; Liu, Wen-Te; Chen, Tzu-Tao; Feng, Po-Hao; Su, Chien-Ling; Chuang, Kai-Jen; Chang, Chih-Cheng; Chuang, Hsiao-Chi

    2016-01-01

    Although traffic exposure has been associated with the development of COPD, the role of particulate matter <10 μm in aerodynamic diameter (PM10) in the pathogenesis of COPD is not yet fully understood. We assessed the 1-year effect of exposure to PM10 on the pathogenesis of COPD in a retrospective cohort study. We recruited 53 subjects with COPD stages III and IV and 15 healthy controls in a hospital in Taiwan. We estimated the 1-year annual mean levels of PM10 at all residential addresses of the cohort participants. Changes in PM10 for the 1-year averages in quintiles were related to diffusion capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide levels (r=-0.914, P=0.029), changes in the pulse oxygen saturation (ΔSaO2; r=-0.973, P=0.005), receptor for advanced glycation end-products (r=-0.881, P=0.048), interleukin-6 (r=0.986, P=0.002), ubiquitin (r=0.940, P=0.017), and beclin 1 (r=0.923, P=0.025) in COPD. Next, we observed that ubiquitin was correlated with ΔSaO2 (r=-0.374, P=0.019). Beclin 1 was associated with diffusion capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide (r=-0.362, P=0.028), ΔSaO2 (r=-0.354, P=0.032), and receptor for advanced glycation end-products (r=-0.471, P=0.004). Autophagy may be an important regulator of the PM10-related pathogenesis of COPD, which could cause deterioration in the lung diffusion capacity and oxygen saturation.

  3. Seasonality of diffusive exchange of polychlorinated biphenyls and hexachlorobenzene across the air-sea interface of Kaohsiung Harbor, Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Fang, Meng-Der; Ko, Fung-Chi; Baker, Joel E; Lee, Chon-Lin

    2008-12-15

    Gaseous and dissolved concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and hexachlorobenzene (HCB) were measured in the ambient air and water of Kaohsiung Harbor lagoon, Taiwan, from December 2003 to January 2005. During the rainy season (April to September), gaseous PCB and HCB concentrations were low due to both scavenging by precipitation and dilution by prevailing southwesterly winds blown from the atmosphere of the South China Sea. In contrast, trace precipitation and prevailing northeasterly winds during the dry season (October to March) resulted in higher gaseous PCB and HCB concentrations. Instantaneous air-water exchange fluxes of PCB homologues and HCB were calculated from 22 pairs of air and water samples from Kaohsiung Harbor lagoon. All net fluxes of PCB homologues and HCB in this study are from water to air (net volatilization). The highest net volatile flux observed was +172 ng m(-)(2) day(-1) (dichlorobiphenyls) in December, 2003 due to the high wind speed and high dissolved concentration. The PCB homologues and HCB fluxes were significantly governed by dissolved concentrations in Kaohsiung Harbor lagoon. For low molecular weight PCBs (LMW PCBs), their fluxes were also significantly correlated with wind speed. The net PCB and HCB fluxes suggest that the annual sums of 69 PCBs and HCB measured in this study were mainly volatile (57.4 x 10(3) and 28.3 x 10(3) ng m(-2) yr(-1), respectively) and estimated yearly, 1.5 kg and 0.76 kg of PCBs and HCB were emitted from the harbor lagoon surface waters to the ambient atmosphere. The average tPCB flux in this study was about one-tenth of tPCB fluxes seen in New York Harbor and in the Delaware River, which are reported to be greatly impacted by PCBs.

  4. Seasonal variation in diffusive exchange of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons across the air-seawater interface in coastal urban area.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seung-Kyu; Chae, Doo Hyun

    2016-08-15

    Concentrations of 15 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in air-seawater interface were measured over 1year in the coastal region of Incheon, South Korea. Most individual PAHs and total PAHs in air displayed statistically significant negative correlations with temperature, but not significant in seawater. Less hydrophobic compounds with three rings were at or near equilibrium in summer, while PAHs with four to six rings were in disequilibrium in all seasons, with higher fugacity gradients in colder seasons and for more hydrophobic compounds. Differently from fugacity gradients, the highest net fluxes occurred for some three- and four-ring PAHs showing the highest atmospheric concentrations. Net gaseous exchange, which was higher in winter, occurred from air to seawater with an annual cumulative flux of 2075μg/m(2)/year (for Σ15PAHs), indicating that atmospheric PAHs in this region, originating from coal/biomass combustion, can deteriorate the quality of seawater and sediment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. On the Comparison of the Long Penetration Mode (LPM) Supersonic Counterflowing Jet to the Supersonic Screech Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farr, Rebecca A.; Chang, Chau-Lyan.; Jones, Jess H.; Dougherty, N. Sam

    2015-01-01

    The authors provide a brief overview of the classic tonal screech noise problem created by underexpanded supersonic jets, briefly describing the fluid dynamic-acoustics feedback mechanism that has been long established as the basis for this well-known aeroacoustics problem. This is followed by a description of the Long Penetration Mode (LPM) supersonic underexpanded counterflowing jet phenomenon which has been demonstrated in several wind tunnel tests and modeled in several computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. The authors provide evidence from test and CFD analysis of LPM that indicates that acoustics feedback and fluid interaction seen in LPM are analogous to the aeroacoustics interactions seen in screech jets. Finally, the authors propose applying certain methodologies to LPM which have been developed and successfully demonstrated in the study of screech jets and mechanically induced excitation in fluid oscillators for decades. The authors conclude that the large body of work done on jet screech, other aeroacoustic phenomena, and fluid oscillators can have direct application to the study and applications of LPM counterflowing supersonic cold flow jets.

  6. Statistics, distillation, and ordering emergence in a two-dimensional stochastic model of particles in counterflowing streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stock, Eduardo Velasco; da Silva, Roberto; Fernandes, H. A.

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, we propose a stochastic model which describes two species of particles moving in counterflow. The model generalizes the theoretical framework that describes the transport in random systems by taking into account two different scenarios: particles can work as mobile obstacles, whereas particles of one species move in the opposite direction to the particles of the other species, or particles of a given species work as fixed obstacles remaining in their places during the time evolution. We conduct a detailed study about the statistics concerning the crossing time of particles, as well as the effects of the lateral transitions on the time required to the system reaches a state of complete geographic separation of species. The spatial effects of jamming are also studied by looking into the deformation of the concentration of particles in the two-dimensional corridor. Finally, we observe in our study the formation of patterns of lanes which reach the steady state regardless of the initial conditions used for the evolution. A similar result is also observed in real experiments involving charged colloids motion and simulations of pedestrian dynamics based on Langevin equations, when periodic boundary conditions are considered (particles counterflow in a ring symmetry). The results obtained through Monte Carlo simulations and numerical integrations are in good agreement with each other. However, differently from previous studies, the dynamics considered in this work is not Newton-based, and therefore, even artificial situations of self-propelled objects should be studied in this first-principles modeling.

  7. Field evaluation of two diffusive samplers and two adsorbent media to determine 1,3-butadiene and benzene levels in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strandberg, Bo; Sunesson, Anna-Lena; Sundgren, Margit; Levin, Jan-Olof; Sällsten, Gerd; Barregard, Lars

    Two types of diffusive samplers, both of which are compatible with thermal desorption, but differ in their geometry—SKC-Ultra (badge-type) and Radiello (radial symmetry-type)—were evaluated indoors and outdoors under varying temperature, humidity and wind speed conditions, using the graphitized adsorbents Carbopack X or Carbograph 5 to measure 1,3-butadiene and benzene in ambient air. The results obtained by diffusive sampling were compared with results obtained using a conventional active sampling method over both long (1 week) and shorter periods (6-24 h). Analysis and detection were performed using an automatic thermal desorber (ATD) connected to a gas chromatograph-flame ionization detector (GC/FID). Results from each sampler and adsorbent combination were examined using ordinary or multiple linear regression analysis. The overall uncertainty (OU) was also determined. In general, the results obtained with both samplers showed good agreement with those obtained by active sampling. Carbopack X appeared to be a more efficient adsorbent than Carbograph 5 for 1,3-butadiene, but the two adsorbents were equivalent for benzene. No effects of either humidity or air velocity were observed. Minor temperature effects were observed for both samplers for 1,3-butadiene. In summary, the results confirmed the accuracy of sampling rates previously determined for the two samplers and adsorbents. We consider the two samplers to be suitable for stationary and personal monitoring for the general population of 1,3-butadiene and benzene in various environments, indoors and outdoors. They are almost independent of meteorological conditions and may be suitable for monitoring industrial atmospheres.

  8. Neuroinflammation, hyperphosphorylated tau, diffuse amyloid plaques, and down-regulation of the cellular prion protein in air pollution exposed children and young adults.

    PubMed

    Calderón-Garcidueñas, Lilian; Kavanaugh, Michael; Block, Michelle; D'Angiulli, Amedeo; Delgado-Chávez, Ricardo; Torres-Jardón, Ricardo; González-Maciel, Angelica; Reynoso-Robles, Rafael; Osnaya, Norma; Villarreal-Calderon, Rodolfo; Guo, Ruixin; Hua, Zhaowei; Zhu, Hongtu; Perry, George; Diaz, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Air pollution exposures have been linked to neuroinflammation and neuropathology. Autopsy samples of the frontal cortex from control (n = 8) and pollution-exposed (n = 35) children and young adults were analyzed by RT-PCR (n = 43) and microarray analysis (n = 12) for gene expression changes in oxidative stress, DNA damage signaling, NFκB signaling, inflammation, and neurodegeneration pathways. The effect of apolipoprotein E (APOE) genotype on the presence of protein aggregates associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology was also explored. Exposed urbanites displayed differential (>2-fold) regulation of 134 genes. Forty percent exhibited tau hyperphosphorylation with pre-tangle material and 51% had amyloid-β (Aβ) diffuse plaques compared with 0% in controls. APOE4 carriers had greater hyperphosphorylated tau and diffuse Aβ plaques versus E3 carriers (Q = 7.82, p = 0.005). Upregulated gene network clusters included IL1, NFκB, TNF, IFN, and TLRs. A 15-fold frontal down-regulation of the prion-related protein (PrP(C)) was seen in highly exposed subjects. The down-regulation of the PrP(C) is critical given its important roles for neuroprotection, neurodegeneration, and mood disorder states. Elevation of indices of neuroinflammation and oxidative stress, down-regulation of the PrP(C) and AD-associated pathology are present in young megacity residents. The inducible regulation of gene expression suggests they are evolving different mechanisms in an attempt to cope with the constant state of inflammation and oxidative stress related to their environmental exposures. Together, these data support a role for air pollution in CNS damage and its impact upon the developing brain and the potential etiology of AD and mood disorders.

  9. Highly efficient electro-generation of hydrogen peroxide using NCNT/NF/CNT air diffusion electrode for electro-Fenton degradation of p-nitrophenol.

    PubMed

    Tang, Q; Wang, D; Yao, D M; Yang, C W; Sun, Y C

    2016-01-01

    To promote the in situ generation of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in electro-Fenton system, a new air diffusion electrode (ADE) was put forward in the present work using N-doped multi-walled carbon nanotubes (NCNT) as the catalyst layer, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNT) as the diffusion layer, and nickel foam (NF) as the supporting material, respectively. The catalyst layer in ADE was characterized by transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Then the performances of H2O2 accumulation and p-nitrophenol (p-NP) degradation with the electrode (NCNT/NF/CNT ADE) were investigated. The experimental results showed that H2O2 accumulation on the NCNT/NF/CNT ADE was greatly improved by the presence of N doping, and H2O2 accumulation concentration could reach 307 mg L(-1) after 120 min at the current intensity of 100 mA. Moreover, the NCNT/NF/CNT ADE presented more effective performance on p-NP degradation than the CNT/NF/CNT ADE or the NF ADE. p-NP of initial 50 mg L(-1) could be almost completely removed after 30 min, and the total organic carbon removal efficiency reached 62.61% after 120 min when 0.4 mM Fe(2+) was added into the system. The repeatability test suggested that the stability of the NCNT/NF/CNT ADE was very good.

  10. Diffusive sampling of C7-C16 hydrocarbons in workplace air: uptake rates, wall effects and use in oil mist measurements.

    PubMed

    Simpson, A T; Wright, M D

    2008-06-01

    The measurement of semi-volatile hydrocarbons in workplace air is complicated by their readiness to condense to form aerosols or adsorb on to surfaces. The diffusive sampling and analysis by thermal desorption of alkanes up to hexadecane was investigated with the aim of quantifying vapour from petroleum distillate fractions and possibly differentiating particles from vapour in oil mist measurements of light mineral oil-based metalworking fluids. Diffusive uptake rates were measured on Perkin Elmer thermal desorption tube samplers packed with Tenax TA, and the potential for deposition within the tubes was examined. Hydrocarbon vapour was found to adsorb on the oxide layer that can develop on the sampler's internal walls. General measurements of mixed hydrocarbon vapours (i.e. petroleum distillate fractions) should not be unduly affected if concentrations are greater than approximately 5 mg m(-3) and the tubes are in good condition. For the purposes of differentiating light mineral oil mist and vapour from a total hydrocarbon measurement, it is unlikely that measuring the vapour separately could be used to calculate mist concentrations <3 mg m(-3) with sufficient accuracy.

  11. Effects of heat loss, preferential diffusion, and flame stretch on flame-front instability and extinction of propane/air mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ishizuka, S.; Miyasaka, K.; Law, C. K.

    1982-01-01

    Flame configurations, flame-front cellular instability, and extinction of propane/air mixtures in the stagnation-point flow are experimentally studied for their dependence on downstream heat loss, preferential diffusion, and flame stretch. Boundaries for lean- and rich-limit extinction, stabilization of corrugated flames, and local extinction caused by sharp curvatures are mapped for varying propane concentrations and freestream velocities. Flame location and temperature at extinction are determined as functions of stagnation surface temperature, extent of preheating, propane concentration, and freestream velocity. Results substantiate the theoretical predictions of the different extinction modes for lean and rich flames in the absence of downstream heat loss, and yield useful insight on the extinction characteristics when finite downstream heat loss does exist. It is further shown that flame-front instability occurs only for rich mixtures in accordance with preferential diffusion considerations, and that flame stretch has a stabilizing effect such that flame-front instability is completely inhibited before the onset of extinction.

  12. Effects of heat loss, preferential diffusion, and flame stretch on flame-front instability and extinction of propane/air mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ishizuka, S.; Miyasaka, K.; Law, C. K.

    1982-01-01

    Flame configurations, flame-front cellular instability, and extinction of propane/air mixtures in the stagnation-point flow are experimentally studied for their dependence on downstream heat loss, preferential diffusion, and flame stretch. Boundaries for lean- and rich-limit extinction, stabilization of corrugated flames, and local extinction caused by sharp curvatures are mapped for varying propane concentrations and freestream velocities. Flame location and temperature at extinction are determined as functions of stagnation surface temperature, extent of preheating, propane concentration, and freestream velocity. Results substantiate the theoretical predictions of the different extinction modes for lean and rich flames in the absence of downstream heat loss, and yield useful insight on the extinction characteristics when finite downstream heat loss does exist. It is further shown that flame-front instability occurs only for rich mixtures in accordance with preferential diffusion considerations, and that flame stretch has a stabilizing effect such that flame-front instability is completely inhibited before the onset of extinction.

  13. Experimental and computational investigation of supersonic counterflow jet interaction in atmospheric conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanchenko, Oleksandr

    The flow field generated by the interaction of a converging-diverging nozzle (exit diameter, D=26 mm M=1.5) flow and a choked flow from a minor jet (exit diameter, d=2.6 mm) in a counterflow configuration was investigated. During the tests both the main C-D nozzle and the minor jet stagnation pressures were varied as well as the region of interaction. Investigations were made in the near field, at most about 2D distance, and in the far field, where the repeated patterns of shock waves were eliminated by turbulence. Both nozzles exhausted to the atmospheric pressure conditions. The flow physics was studied using Schlieren imaging techniques, Pitot-tube, conical Mach number probe, Digital Particle Image Velocimetry (DPIV) and acoustic measurement methods. During the experiments in the far field the jets interaction was observed as the minor jet flow penetrates into the main jet flow. The resulting shock structure caused by the minor jet's presence was dependent on the stagnation pressure ratio between the two jets. The penetration length of the minor jet into the main jet was also dependent on the stagnation pressure ratio. In the far field, increasing the minor jet stagnation pressure moved the bow shock forward, towards the main jet exit. In the near field, the minor jet flow penetrates into the main jet flow, and in some cases modified the flow pattern generated by the main jet, revealing a new effect of jet flow interaction that was previously unknown. A correlation function between the flow modes and the jet stagnation pressure ratios was experimentally determined. Additionally the flow interaction between the main and minor jets was simulated numerically using FLUENT. The optimal mesh geometry was found and the k-epsilon turbulence model was defined as the best fit. The results of the experimental and computational studies were used to describe the shock attenuation effect as self-sustain oscillations in supersonic flow. The effects described here can be used

  14. Opposed jet burner studies of silane-methane, silane-hydrogen and hydrogen diffusion flames with air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellett, G. L.; Guerra, Rosemary; Wilson, L. G.; Northam, G. B.

    1986-01-01

    An atmospheric pressure tubular opposed jet burner technique was used to characterize certain diffusion-flame transitions and associated burning rates for N2-diluted mixtures of highly-reactive fuels. Presented are: (1) details of the technique, with emphasis on features permitting the study of flames involving pyrophoric gases and particle-forming combustion reactions: (2) discoveries on the properties of these flames which correspond to physically and chemically distinct stages of silane and hydrogen combustion; and (3) unburnt gas velocity data obtained from flames based on SiH4-CH4-N2, SiH4-H2-N2, and H2-N2 fuel mixtures, and plotted as functions of combustible-fuel mole fraction and fuel/oxygen molar input flow ratios. In addition, these burning velocity results are analyzed and interpreted.

  15. Opposed jet burner studies of silane-methane, silane-hydrogen, and hydrogen diffusion flames with air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellett, G. L.; Guerra, Rosemary; Wilson, L. G.; Northam, G. B.

    1986-01-01

    An atmospheric pressure tubular opposed jet burner technique was used to characterize certain diffusion-flame transitions and associated burning rates for N2-diluted mixtures of highly-reactive fuels. The paper presents: (1) details of the technique, with emphasis on features permitting the study of flames involving pyrophoric gases and particle-forming combustion reactions; (2) discoveries on the properties of these flames which correspond to physically and chemically distinct stages of silane and hydrogen combustion; and (3) unburnt gas velocity data obtained from flames based on SiH4-CH4-N2, SiH4-H2-N2, and H2-N2 fuel mixtures, and plotted as functions of combustible-fuel mole fraction and fuel/oxygen molar input flow ratios. In addition, these burning velocity results are analyzed and interpreted.

  16. Opposed jet burner studies of silane-methane, silane-hydrogen and hydrogen diffusion flames with air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellett, G. L.; Guerra, Rosemary; Wilson, L. G.; Northam, G. B.

    1986-01-01

    An atmospheric pressure tubular opposed jet burner technique was used to characterize certain diffusion-flame transitions and associated burning rates for N2-diluted mixtures of highly-reactive fuels. Presented are: (1) details of the technique, with emphasis on features permitting the study of flames involving pyrophoric gases and particle-forming combustion reactions: (2) discoveries on the properties of these flames which correspond to physically and chemically distinct stages of silane and hydrogen combustion; and (3) unburnt gas velocity data obtained from flames based on SiH4-CH4-N2, SiH4-H2-N2, and H2-N2 fuel mixtures, and plotted as functions of combustible-fuel mole fraction and fuel/oxygen molar input flow ratios. In addition, these burning velocity results are analyzed and interpreted.

  17. Opposed jet burner studies of silane-methane, silane-hydrogen, and hydrogen diffusion flames with air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellett, G. L.; Guerra, Rosemary; Wilson, L. G.; Northam, G. B.

    1986-01-01

    An atmospheric pressure tubular opposed jet burner technique was used to characterize certain diffusion-flame transitions and associated burning rates for N2-diluted mixtures of highly-reactive fuels. The paper presents: (1) details of the technique, with emphasis on features permitting the study of flames involving pyrophoric gases and particle-forming combustion reactions; (2) discoveries on the properties of these flames which correspond to physically and chemically distinct stages of silane and hydrogen combustion; and (3) unburnt gas velocity data obtained from flames based on SiH4-CH4-N2, SiH4-H2-N2, and H2-N2 fuel mixtures, and plotted as functions of combustible-fuel mole fraction and fuel/oxygen molar input flow ratios. In addition, these burning velocity results are analyzed and interpreted.

  18. [Environmental and indoor air exposure to asbestos fiber dust as a risk and causal factor of diffuse malignant pleural mesothelioma].

    PubMed

    Schneider, J; Rödelsperger, K; Pohlabeln, H; Woitowitz, H J

    1996-11-01

    In an interdisciplinary, multicentre case control study of the causal factors of the diffuse malignant mesothelioma (DMM) standardised histories where taken from n = 324 Patients suffering from DMM, n = 315 hospital control patients (KK) and n = 182 population controls (PK). For 66 DMM, 149 KK and 107 PK a risk from asbestos fibre dust at the workplace was not detectable. For latter persons indoor and outdoor asbestos exposure outside of the workplace were investigated. The following factors were examined: neighbourhood exposure from companies using asbestos, living in big cities and nearby main traffic roads, building materials containing asbestos, electric storage heaters and household contacts. For using electric storage heaters a statistically significant increased odds ratio (OR) was observed for DMM as well in comparison with KK (OR = 2.42; 95%-CI: 1.01-5.72) and in comparison for PK (OR = 2.91; 95%-CI: 1.08-7.80). Only outside of Hamburg an increased OR compared to KK was observed for people living in the neighbourhood of asbestos factories (OR = 16.3; 95%-CI: 1.35-196.8) and also, but only in Hamburg, compared to PK living nearby main traffic roads. There is only a trend for a mesothelioma-risk for household-contacts based on a few cases. In one DMM-patient without an occupational asbestos exposure the lung dust fibre analysis yielded 2.912 FB and 1.459 x 10(3) crocydolithe fibres per gram dried lung tissue. As a child he lived in the immediate vicinity of the blue asbestos mine in Wittenoom, Australia. Therefore in special cases a para-occupational asbestos or a neighbourhood asbestos exposure can be demonstrated as a risk factor of diffuse malignant mesothelioma.

  19. Ignition in convective-diffusive systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fotache, Catalin Grig

    The main goal of this work is understanding the controlling mechanisms and responses of forced ignition in an environment where chemistry and transport phenomena are intimately coupled. To analyze systematically this interaction the well-characterized counterflow configuration is selected whereupon a cold fuel jet impinges on a heated air jet, and ignites as the air temperature is raised gradually. In this configuration the ignition response is studied experimentally and numerically with extensive variations of the fuel dilution, flow strain rate, and ambient pressure, for hydrogen and Csb1{-}Csb4 paraffins. Experimentally, the temperatures are measured by thermocouple and Raman spectroscopy, while flow strain rates are determined through laser Doppler velocimetry. The experimental envelope comprises pressures of 0.1-8.0 atm, fuel concentrations from 0 to 100%, and strain rates between 50 and 700 ssp{-1}. Computations are performed using various detailed kinetic and transport models, whose adequacy is assessed by comparison with the experimental results. Through computational simulations, the controlling ignition mechanisms are isolated and analyzed. Simplified kinetic models are derived and evaluated, by using sensitivity/flux analyses and the Computational Singular Perturbation (CSP) method. The investigation demonstrates that the coupling chemistry-transport can produce unexpected responses, even for the arguably simplest Hsb2-air kinetic system. Here, up to three stable steady-states are identified experimentally for identical boundary conditions, corresponding to the distinct regimes of frozen flow, mild oxidation, and flaming combustion, respectively. These states can be accessed in a dual-staged ignition sequence, with radical runaway followed by thermokinetic ignition. The pattern, however, depends on the imposed parameters. Specifically, three ignition limits are found when pressure is varied; the first two are characterized by radical runaway only

  20. Study of roughness-induced diffuse and specular reflectance at silver-air and silver-liquid interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sari, S. O.

    1980-07-01

    Surface plasma wave absorption and roughness induced optical scattering from an interface of silver and air were investigated. The position of the surface plasma resonance minimum in reflectivity for a stochastically roughened metal silver surface was studied as a function of a number of distinct roughness perturbations. In the case of a transparent liquid-silver boundary the frequency red shift of the resonance minimum was determined and the location of the surface plasmon dip for various liquids is shown to agree well with a simple roughness theory. The additional interfacial properties due to the formation of a thin inhomogeneous oxide layer occurring either spontaneously or due to application of a small interfacial electrical potential are more complex. The optical constants of the interlayer were determined from differential specular reflectance measurements at the boundary.

  1. Microbial community changes during different empty bed residence times and operational fluctuations in an air diffusion reactor for odor abatement.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Elisa; García-Encina, Pedro A; Muñoz, Raúl; Lebrero, Raquel

    2017-03-08

    The succession of bacterial and fungal populations was assessed in an activated sludge (AS) diffusion bioreactor treating a synthetic malodorous emission containing H2S, toluene, butanone and alpha-pinene. Microbial community characteristics (bacterial and fungal diversity, richness, evenness and composition) and bioreactor function relationships were evaluated at different empty bed residence times (EBRTs) and after process fluctuations and operational failures (robustness test). For H2S, butanone and toluene, the bioreactor showed a stable and efficient abatement performance regardless of the EBRT and fluctuations applied, while low alpha-pinene removals were observed. While no clear positive or negative relationship between community characteristics and bioreactor functions was observed, ecological parameters such as evenness and community dynamics seemed to be of importance for maintaining reactor stability. The optimal degree of evenness of the inoculum likely contributed to the high robustness of the system towards the fluctuations imposed. Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria and Fungi (Hypocreales, Chaeatothyriales) were the most abundant groups retrieved from the AS system with a putative key role in the degradation of butanone and toluene. Typical H2S and alpha-pinene degraders were not retrieved from the system. The inoculation of P. fluorescens, a known alpha-pinene degrader, to the system did not result in the enhancement of the degradation of this compound. This strain was likely outcompeted by the microorganisms already adapted to the AS environment.

  2. NO{sub x} mechanisms in rich methane-air flames

    SciTech Connect

    Dupont, V.; Williams, A.

    1998-07-01

    Local production rates of NO have been derived from experiments in vertical flames on a burner commonly used in central heating equipment. The fuel-air equivalence ratio of around 1.9 caused a double-flame structure to develop above the burner, a phenomenon reflected by the temperature and OH concentration fields. The production rate of NO was a maximum in regions of low temperature and low OH concentration, located in the inner premixed flame and prior to the higher temperatures and OH concentrations of the outer diffusion flame. In addition, the peak rate of disappearance of NO was at the core of the premixed flame. These experimental results supported the assumption that the main mechanism of NO formation was the Fenimore Prompt route; also, an important internal reburn mechanism was operating. The opposed flow flame code was used here in the largest part of the simulations with the GRI 2.11 mechanism and with two additional mechanisms for a particular condition of flow and fuel-air equivalence ratio. The code was applied for fuel streams containing methane in air and oxidizer streams containing air only; the aim was to draw analogies with the experimental two-dimensional flame. Results from local rates of production and sensitivity analyses and quantitative reaction path diagrams (QRPD) for the nitrogenous species are presented for conditions representative of domestic appliances (cookers, space and water heaters, and central heating units) fired with natural gas. The co-flow experimental flame and the counter-flow theoretical flame at similar strain rates and fuel richness showed significant similarities.

  3. Strain-Rate-Free Diffusion Flames: Initiation, Properties, and Quenching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fendell, Francis; Rungaldier, Harald; Gokoglu, Suleyman; Schultz, Donald

    1997-01-01

    For about a half century, the stabilization of a steady planar deflagration on a heat-sink-type flat-flame burner has been of extraordinary service for the theoretical modeling and diagnostic probing of combusting gaseous mixtures. However, most engineering devices and most unwanted fire involve the burning of initially unmixed reactants. The most vigorous burning of initially separated gaseous fuel and oxidizer is the diffusion flame. In this useful idealization (limiting case), the reactants are converted to product at a mathematically thin interface, so no interpenetration of fuel and oxidizer occurs. This limit is of practical importance because it often characterizes the condition of optimal performance (and sometimes environmentally objectionable operation) of a combustor. A steady planar diffusion flame is most closely approached in the laboratory in the counterflow apparatus. The utility of this simple-strain-rate flow for the modeling and probing of diffusion flames was noted by Pandya and Weinberg 35 years ago, though only in the last decade or so has its use become internationally common place. However, typically, as the strain rate a is reduced below about 20 cm(exp -1), and the diffusion-flame limit (reaction rate much faster than the flow rate) is approached, the burning is observed to become unstable in earth gravity. The advantageous steady planar flow is not available in the diffusion-flame limit in earth gravity. This is unfortunate because the typical spatial scale in a counterflow is (k/a)(sup 1/2), where k denotes a characteristic diffusion coefficient; thus, the length scale becomes large, and the reacting flow is particularly amenable to diagnostic probing, as the diffusion-flame limit is approached. The disruption of planar symmetry is owing the fact that, as the strain rate a decreases, the residence time (l/a) of the throughput in the counterflow burner increases. Observationally, when the residence time exceeds about 50 msec, the

  4. Strain-Rate-Free Diffusion Flames: Initiation, Properties, and Quenching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fendell, Francis; Rungaldier, Harald; Gokoglu, Suleyman; Schultz, Donald

    1997-01-01

    For about a half century, the stabilization of a steady planar deflagration on a heat-sink-type flat-flame burner has been of extraordinary service for the theoretical modeling and diagnostic probing of combusting gaseous mixtures. However, most engineering devices and most unwanted fire involve the burning of initially unmixed reactants. The most vigorous burning of initially separated gaseous fuel and oxidizer is the diffusion flame. In this useful idealization (limiting case), the reactants are converted to product at a mathematically thin interface, so no interpenetration of fuel and oxidizer occurs. This limit is of practical importance because it often characterizes the condition of optimal performance (and sometimes environmentally objectionable operation) of a combustor. A steady planar diffusion flame is most closely approached in the laboratory in the counterflow apparatus. The utility of this simple-strain-rate flow for the modeling and probing of diffusion flames was noted by Pandya and Weinberg 35 years ago, though only in the last decade or so has its use become internationally common place. However, typically, as the strain rate a is reduced below about 20 cm(exp -1), and the diffusion-flame limit (reaction rate much faster than the flow rate) is approached, the burning is observed to become unstable in earth gravity. The advantageous steady planar flow is not available in the diffusion-flame limit in earth gravity. This is unfortunate because the typical spatial scale in a counterflow is (k/a)(sup 1/2), where k denotes a characteristic diffusion coefficient; thus, the length scale becomes large, and the reacting flow is particularly amenable to diagnostic probing, as the diffusion-flame limit is approached. The disruption of planar symmetry is owing the fact that, as the strain rate a decreases, the residence time (l/a) of the throughput in the counterflow burner increases. Observationally, when the residence time exceeds about 50 msec, the

  5. Numerical analysis of reaction-diffusion effects on species mixing rates in turbulent premixed methane-air combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, E.S.; Grout, R.W.; Chen, J.H.; Sankaran, R.

    2010-03-15

    The scalar mixing time scale, a key quantity in many turbulent combustion models, is investigated for reactive scalars in premixed combustion. Direct numerical simulations (DNS) of three-dimensional, turbulent Bunsen flames with reduced methane-air chemistry have been analyzed in the thin reaction zones regime. Previous conclusions from single step chemistry DNS studies are confirmed regarding the role of dilatation and turbulence-chemistry interactions on the progress variable dissipation rate. Compared to the progress variable, the mixing rates of intermediate species is found to be several times greater. The variation of species mixing rates are explained with reference to the structure of one-dimensional premixed laminar flames. According to this analysis, mixing rates are governed by the strong gradients which are imposed by flamelet structures at high Damkoehler numbers. This suggests a modeling approach to estimate the mixing rate of individual species which can be applied, for example, in transported probability density function simulations. Flame-turbulence interactions which modify the flamelet based representation are analyzed. (author)

  6. Theoretical model for diffusive greenhouse gas fluxes estimation across water-air interfaces measured with the static floating chamber method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Shangbin; Wang, Chenghao; Wilkinson, Richard Jeremy; Liu, Defu; Zhang, Cheng; Xu, Wennian; Yang, Zhengjian; Wang, Yuchun; Lei, Dan

    2016-07-01

    Aquatic systems are sources of greenhouse gases on different scales, however the uncertainty of gas fluxes estimated using popular methods are not well defined. Here we show that greenhouse gas fluxes across the air-water interface of seas and inland waters are significantly underestimated by the currently used static floating chamber (SFC) method. We found that the SFC CH4 flux calculated with the popular linear regression (LR) on changes of gas concentration over time only accounts for 54.75% and 35.77% of the corresponding real gas flux when the monitoring periods are 30 and 60 min respectively based on the theoretical model and experimental measurements. Our results do manifest that nonlinear regression models can improve gas flux estimations, while the exponential regression (ER) model can give the best estimations which are close to true values when compared to LR. However, the quadratic regression model is proved to be inappropriate for long time measurements and those aquatic systems with high gas emission rate. The greenhouse gases effluxes emitted from aquatic systems may be much more than those reported previously, and models on future scenarios of global climate changes should be adjusted accordingly.

  7. Seasonal, anthropogenic, air mass, and meteorological influences on the atmospheric concentrations of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs): Evidence for the importance of diffuse combustion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, R.G.M.; Green, N.J.L.; Lohmann, R.; Jones, K.C.

    1999-09-01

    Sampling programs were undertaken to establish air polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/F) concentrations at a semirural site on the northwest coast of England in autumn and summer and to investigate factors causing their variability. Changing source inputs, meteorological parameters, air masses, and the impact of a festival when it is customary to light fireworks and bonfires were investigated. Various lines of evidence from the study point to diffuse, combustion-related sources being a major influence on ambient air concentrations. Higher PCDD/F concentrations were generally associated with air masses that had originated and moved over land, particularly during periods of low ambient temperature. Low concentrations were associated with air masses that had arrived from the Atlantic Ocean/Irish Sea to the west of the sampling site and had little or no contact with urban/industrialized areas. Concentrations in the autumn months were 2 to 10 times higher than those found in the summer.

  8. The Maximum Drop-Height of a Droplet in a Vertical Countercurrent Water-Air Heat and Moisture Exchange Tower Attached to a Main Fan Diffuser in a Coal Mine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S.; Cui, H.; Wang, H.; Zhao, J.

    2014-10-01

    A vertical countercurrent water-air heat and moisture exchange tower attached to a main fan diffuser is designed. To reduce water loss blown away by the airflow from the exchange tower, the forces acting on droplets are analysed. Droplet motion may be classified under four conditions: (1) downward initial acceleration; (2) upward initial acceleration; (3) droplet blown away by airflow; (4) droplet suspension. With droplet break-up neglected, a general equation for the maximum droplet drop-height is presented and numerical calculations are performed. Equations for the maximum drop-height under Conditions 3 and 4 are deduced, and the equation for Condition 3 is applied to an engineering case study. The effect of air velocity on the maximum drop-height is more significant than that of other factors. The conclusions provide a novel approach to optimizing the design of vertical countercurrent water-air heat and moisture exchange towers attached to main fan diffusers.

  9. Generation Of Atmospheric Pressure Non-Thermal Plasma By Diffusive And Constricted Discharges In Rest And Flowing Gases (Air And Nitrogen)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akishev, Y.; Grushin, M.; Karalnik, V.; Kochetov, I.; Napartovich A.; Trushkin N.

    2010-07-01

    Weekly ionized non-thermal plasma (NTP) is of great interest for many applications because of its strong non-equilibrium state wherein an average electron energy Te exceeds markedly gas temperature Tg, i.e. electrons in the NTP are strongly overheated compared to neutral gas. Energetic electrons due to frequent collisions with the neutrals excite and dissociate effectively atoms and molecules of the plasma-forming gas that results in a creation of physically-, and bio-chemically active gaseous medium in a practically cold background gas. At present there are many kinds of plasma sources working at low and atmospheric pressure and using MW, RF, low frequency, pulsed and DC power supplies for NTP generation. The NTP at atmospheric pressure is of considerable interest for practice. A reason is that sustaining the NTP at atmospheric pressure at first allows us to avoid the use of expensive vacuum equipment and second gives opportunity to use the NTP for treatment of the exhausted gases and polluted liquids. The second opportunity cannot be realized at all with use of the NTP at low pressure. Main subject of this talk is low current atmospheric pressure gas discharges powering with DC power supplies. Plasma forming gases are air and nitrogen which are much cheaper compared to rare gases like He or Ar. Besides, great interest to molecular nitrogen as plasma forming gas is caused first of all its unique capability to accumulate huge energy in vibration, electron (metastables) and dissociated (atomic) states providing high chemical reactivity of the activated nitrogen. All active particles mentioned above have a long lifetime, and they can be therefore transported for a long distance away from place of their generation. Different current modes (diffusive and constricted) of these discharges are discussed. Experimental and numerical results on generation of chemically active species in the diffusive and constricted mode are presented. Some data on the usage of the

  10. Separation and concentration of murine hematopoietic stem cells (CFUS) using a combination of density gradient sedimentation and counterflow centrifugal elutriation.

    PubMed

    Inoue, T; Carsten, A L; Cronkite, E P; Kelley, J E

    1981-07-01

    To obtain concentrated suspensions of pluripotent hematopoietic stem cells *CFUS) from murine bone marrow, density gradient centrifugal sedimentation (DGCS) was combined with counterflow centrifugal elutriation (CE). This combination provided a 7.6 fold enrichment of the CFUS concentration. For DGCS, Percoll a suspension of silica particles coated with polyvinylpyrrolidone was used. For fractionation by the CE an elutriator rotor (JE-6, Beckman) was used for further concentration of the cells harvested from the DGCS. Bone marrow erythropoiesis was suppressed by transfusion plethora initiated 5-6 days before the bone marrow was harvested. These two physical separation procedures combined with transfusion plethora to suppress erythropoiesis are effective in producing an enriched fraction of CFUS without change in distribution of the histologic type of colonies.

  11. On the Comparison of the Long Penetration Mode (LPM) Supersonic Counterflowing Jet to the Supersonic Screech Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farr, Rebecca A.; Chang, Chau-Lyan; Jones, Jess H.; Dougherty, N. Sam

    2015-01-01

    Classic tonal screech noise created by under-expanded supersonic jets; Long Penetration Mode (LPM) supersonic phenomenon -Under-expanded counter-flowing jet in supersonic free stream -Demonstrated in several wind tunnel tests -Modeled in several computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations; Discussion of LPM acoustics feedback and fluid interactions -Analogous to the aero-acoustics interactions seen in screech jets; Lessons Learned: Applying certain methodologies to LPM -Developed and successfully demonstrated in the study of screech jets -Discussion of mechanically induced excitation in fluid oscillators in general; Conclusions -Large body of work done on jet screech, other aero-acoustic phenomenacan have direct application to the study and applications of LPM cold flow jets

  12. Temperature and pressure measurements at cold exit of counter-flow vortex tube with flow visualization of reversed flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusof, Mohd Hazwan bin; Katanoda, Hiroshi; Morita, Hiromitsu

    2015-02-01

    In order to clarify the structure of the cold flow discharged from the counter-flow vortex tube (VT), the temperature and pressure of the cold flow were measured, and the existence and behavior of the reversed flow at the cold exit was studied using a simple flow visualization technique consisting of a 0.75mm-diameter needle, and an oil paint droplet. It is observed through this experiment that the Pitot pressure at the cold exit center can either be lower or higher than atmospheric pressure, depending on the inlet pressure and the cold fraction, and that a reversed flow is observed when the Pitot pressure at the cold exit center is lower than atmospheric pressure. In addition, it is observed that when reducing the cold fraction from unity at any arbitrary inlet pressure, the region of reversed and colder flow in the central part of cold exit extends in the downstream direction.

  13. On the Comparison of the Long Penetration Mode (LPM) Supersonic Counterflowing Jet to the Supersonic Screech Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farr, Rebecca A.; Chang, Chau-Lyan; Jones, Jess H.; Dougherty, N. Sam

    2015-01-01

    Classic tonal screech noise created by under-expanded supersonic jets; Long Penetration Mode (LPM) supersonic phenomenon -Under-expanded counter-flowing jet in supersonic free stream -Demonstrated in several wind tunnel tests -Modeled in several computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations; Discussion of LPM acoustics feedback and fluid interactions -Analogous to the aero-acoustics interactions seen in screech jets; Lessons Learned: Applying certain methodologies to LPM -Developed and successfully demonstrated in the study of screech jets -Discussion of mechanically induced excitation in fluid oscillators in general; Conclusions -Large body of work done on jet screech, other aero-acoustic phenomenacan have direct application to the study and applications of LPM cold flow jets

  14. Some new results on electron transport in the atmosphere. [Monte Carlo calculation of penetration, diffusion, and slowing down of electron beams in air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, M. J.; Seltzer, S. M.; Maeda, K.

    1972-01-01

    The penetration, diffusion and slowing down of electrons in a semi-infinite air medium has been studied by the Monte Carlo method. The results are applicable to the atmosphere at altitudes up to 300 km. Most of the results pertain to monoenergetic electron beams injected into the atmosphere at a height of 300 km, either vertically downwards or with a pitch-angle distribution isotropic over the downward hemisphere. Some results were also obtained for various initial pitch angles between 0 deg and 90 deg. Information has been generated concerning the following topics: (1) the backscattering of electrons from the atmosphere, expressed in terms of backscattering coefficients, angular distributions and energy spectra of reflected electrons, for incident energies T(o) between 2 keV and 2 MeV; (2) energy deposition by electrons as a function of the altitude, down to 80 km, for T(o) between 2 keV and 2 MeV; (3) the corresponding energy depostion by electron-produced bremsstrahlung, down to 30 km; (4) the evolution of the electron flux spectrum as function of the atmospheric depth, for T(o) between 2 keV and 20 keV. Energy deposition results are given for incident electron beams with exponential and power-exponential spectra.

  15. Electro-fenton and photoelectro-fenton degradation of sulfanilic acid using a boron-doped diamond anode and an air diffusion cathode.

    PubMed

    El-Ghenymy, Abdellatif; Garrido, José Antonio; Centellas, Francesc; Arias, Conchita; Cabot, Pere Lluís; Rodríguez, Rosa María; Brillas, Enric

    2012-04-05

    The mineralization of sulfanilic acid has been studied by electro-Fenton (EF) and photoelectro-Fenton (PEF) reaction with UVA light using an undivided electrochemical cell with a boron-doped diamond (BDD) anode and an air diffusion cathode able to generate H(2)O(2). Organics were then oxidized by hydroxyl radicals formed at the anode surface from water oxidation and in the bulk from Fenton's reaction between generated H(2)O(2) and added Fe(2+). The UVA irradiation in PEF enhanced the production of hydroxyl radicals in the bulk, accelerating the removal of organics and photodecomposed intermediates like Fe(III)-carboxylate complexes. Partial decontamination of 1.39 mM sulfanilic acid solutions was achieved by EF until 100 mA cm(-2) at optimum conditions of 0.4 mM Fe(2+) and pH 3.0. The increase in current density and substrate content led to an almost total mineralization. In contrast, the PEF process was more powerful, yielding almost complete mineralization in less electrolysis time under comparable conditions. The kinetics for sulfanilic acid decay always followed a pseudo-first-order reaction. Hydroquinone and p-benzoquinone were detected as aromatic intermediates, whereas acetic, maleic, formic, oxalic, and oxamic acids were identified as generated carboxylic acids. NH(4)(+) ion was preferentially released in both treatments, along with NO(3)(-) ion in smaller proportion.

  16. Structure and Soot Properties of Nonbuoyant Ethylene/Air Laminar Jet Diffusion Flames. Appendix E; Repr. from AIAA Journal, v. 36 p 1346-1360

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urban, D. L.; Yuan, Z.-G.; Sunderland, P. B.; Linteris, G. T.; Voss, J. E.; Lin, K.-C.; Dai, Z.; Sun, K.; Faeth, G. M.; Ross, Howard D. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The structure and soot properties of round, soot-emitting, nonbuoyant, laminar jet diffusion flames are described, based on long-duration (175-230-s) experiments at microgravity carried out on orbit in the Space Shuttle Columbia. Experimental conditions included ethylene-fueled flames burning in still air at nominal pressures of 50 and 100 kPa and an ambient temperature of 300 K with luminous flame lengths of 49-64 mm Measurements included luminous flame shapes using color video imaging soot concentration (volume fraction) distributions using deconvoluted laser extinction imaging, soot temperature distributions using deconvoluted multiline emission imaging, gas temperature distributions at fuel-lean (plume) conditions using thermocouple probes, soot structure distributions using thermophoretic sampling and analysis by transmission electron microscopy, and flame radiation using a radiometer.The present flames were larger, and emitted soot more readily, than comparable flames observed during ground-based microgravity experiments due to closer approach to steady conditions resulting from the longer test times and the reduced gravitational disturbances of the space-based experiments.

  17. Structure and Soot Properties of Nonbuoyant Ethylene/Air Laminar Jet Diffusion Flames. Appendix E; Repr. from AIAA Journal, v. 36 p 1346-1360

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urban, D. L.; Yuan, Z.-G.; Sunderland, P. B.; Linteris, G. T.; Voss, J. E.; Lin, K.-C.; Dai, Z.; Sun, K.; Faeth, G. M.; Ross, Howard D. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The structure and soot properties of round, soot-emitting, nonbuoyant, laminar jet diffusion flames are described, based on long-duration (175-230-s) experiments at microgravity carried out on orbit in the Space Shuttle Columbia. Experimental conditions included ethylene-fueled flames burning in still air at nominal pressures of 50 and 100 kPa and an ambient temperature of 300 K with luminous flame lengths of 49-64 mm Measurements included luminous flame shapes using color video imaging soot concentration (volume fraction) distributions using deconvoluted laser extinction imaging, soot temperature distributions using deconvoluted multiline emission imaging, gas temperature distributions at fuel-lean (plume) conditions using thermocouple probes, soot structure distributions using thermophoretic sampling and analysis by transmission electron microscopy, and flame radiation using a radiometer.The present flames were larger, and emitted soot more readily, than comparable flames observed during ground-based microgravity experiments due to closer approach to steady conditions resulting from the longer test times and the reduced gravitational disturbances of the space-based experiments.

  18. Onset of freezing in residential air-to-air heat exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisk, W. J.; Chant, R.; Archer, K.; Hekmat, D.; Offermann, F.; Pedersen, B.

    1984-11-01

    Mechanical ventilation of residences, with heat recovery in air-to-air heat exchangers, is an increasingly common practice. When this technique of ventilation is used in cold climates, however, freezing can occur in the air-to-air heat exchanger and substantially reduce its performance. A laboratory investigation was conducted to determine the indoor and outdoor environmental conditions that lead to freezing. In a cross flow, counterflow, and enthalpy-type cross flow heat exchanger, respectively, freezing was observed when the inlet temperature of the cold airstream was below -7 to -3 C, approximately -6 C, and -8 to 12 C, for a typical range of indoor humidities. These results are in fair agreement with the theoretical predictions presented and with data from two field studies conducted with similar heat exchangers. Data from a previous laboratory study of a counterflow heat exchanger and tabulated data supplied by ASHRAE, however, indicate that freezing is initiated at significantly lower cold airstream temperatures, particularly when the warm airstream is humid.

  19. New sensitive micro-measurements of dynamic surface tension and diffusion coefficients: Validated and tested for the adsorption of 1-Octanol at a microscopic air-water interface and its dissolution into water.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Koji; Parra, Elisa; Needham, David

    2017-02-15

    Currently available dynamic surface tension (DST) measurement methods, such as Wilhelmy plate, droplet- or bubble-based methods, still have various experimental limitations such as the large size of the interface, convection in the solution, or a certain "dead time" at initial measurement. These limitations create inconsistencies for the kinetic analysis of surfactant adsorption/desorption, especially significant for ionic surfactants. Here, the "micropipette interfacial area-expansion method" was introduced and validated as a new DST measurement having a high enough sensitivity to detect diffusion controlled molecular adsorption at the air-water interfaces. To validate the new technique, the diffusion coefficient of 1-Octanol in water was investigated with existing models: the Ward Tordai model for the long time adsorption regime (1-100s), and the Langmuir and Frumkin adsorption isotherm models for surface excess concentration. We found that the measured diffusion coefficient of 1-Octanol, 7.2±0.8×10(-6)cm(2)/s, showed excellent agreement with the result from an alternative method, "single microdroplet catching method", to measure the diffusion coefficient from diffusion-controlled microdroplet dissolution, 7.3±0.1×10(-6)cm(2)/s. These new techniques for determining adsorption and diffusion coefficients can apply for a range of surface active molecules, especially the less-characterized ionic surfactants, and biological compounds such as lipids, peptides, and proteins. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. A Computational and Experimental Study of Coflow Laminar Methane/Air Diffusion Flames: Effects of Fuel Dilution, Inlet Velocity, and Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cao, S.; Ma, B.; Bennett, B. A. V.; Giassi, D.; Stocker, D. P.; Takahashi, F.; Long, M. B.; Smooke, M. D.

    2014-01-01

    The influences of fuel dilution, inlet velocity, and gravity on the shape and structure of laminar coflow CH4-air diffusion flames were investigated computationally and experimentally. A series of nitrogen-diluted flames measured in the Structure and Liftoff in Combustion Experiment (SLICE) on board the International Space Station was assessed numerically under microgravity (mu g) and normal gravity (1g) conditions with CH4 mole fraction ranging from 0.4 to 1.0 and average inlet velocity ranging from 23 to 90 cm/s. Computationally, the MC-Smooth vorticity-velocity formulation was employed to describe the reactive gaseous mixture, and soot evolution was modeled by sectional aerosol equations. The governing equations and boundary conditions were discretized on a two-dimensional computational domain by finite differences, and the resulting set of fully coupled, strongly nonlinear equations was solved simultaneously at all points using a damped, modified Newton's method. Experimentally, flame shape and soot temperature were determined by flame emission images recorded by a digital color camera. Very good agreement between computation and measurement was obtained, and the conclusions were as follows. (1) Buoyant and nonbuoyant luminous flame lengths are proportional to the mass flow rate of the fuel mixture; computed and measured nonbuoyant flames are noticeably longer than their 1g counterparts; the effect of fuel dilution on flame shape (i.e., flame length and flame radius) is negligible when the flame shape is normalized by the methane flow rate. (2) Buoyancy-induced reduction of the flame radius through radially inward convection near the flame front is demonstrated. (3) Buoyant and nonbuoyant flame structure is mainly controlled by the fuel mass flow rate, and the effects from fuel dilution and inlet velocity are secondary.

  1. Asthenospheric counterflows beneath the moving lithosphere of Central and East Asia in the past 90 Ma: volcanic and tomographic evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasskazov, Sergei; Chuvashova, Irina; Kozhevnikov, Vladimir

    2015-04-01

    Asthenospheric counterflows, accompanied motions of the lithosphere in Central and East Asia, are defined on basis of spatial-temporal activity of mantle sources [Rasskazov et al., 2012; Rasskazov, Chuvashova, 2013; Chuvashova, Rasskazov, 2014] and the tomographic model of the Rayleigh wave group velocities [Kozhevnikov et al., 2014]. The opposite fluxes are defined relative to centers of convective instability (low-velocity anomalies), expressed by thinning of the mantle transition layer under Southwestern Gobi (44 °N, 95 °E) and Northern Baikal (52 °N, 108 °E). Cretaceous-Paleogene volcanic fields in Southern Gobi are shifted eastwards relative to the former anomaly over 600 km with the opposite sub-lithospheric flux at depths of 150-300 km. Likewise, the Late Tertiary Vitim volcanic field is shifted relative to the latter anomaly over 100-200 km. We suggest that the Gobi and Baikal asthenospheric counterflows contributed to the rollback mechanism of downgoing slab material from the Pacific under the eastern margin of Asia in the Cretaceous-Paleogene and Early-Middle Miocene. The east-west Gobi reverse flux, caused by differential block motions in front of the Indo-Asian convergence, resulted in the oblique Honshu-Korean flexure of the Pacific slab that propagated beneath the continental margin, while the Japan Sea was quickly opening at about 15 Ma. The Baikal N60°W reverse flux, originated due to oncoming traffic between Eurasia and the Pacific plate, entailed the formation of the Baikal Rift Zone and direct Hokkaido Amur slab flexure [Rasskazov et al., 2004]. The study is supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research (Grant 14-05-31328). References Chuvashova I.S., Rasskazov S.V. Magmatic sources in the mantle of the evolving Earth. Irkutsk: Publishing House of the Irkutsk State University, 2014. 310 p. (in Russian) Kozhevnikov V.M., Seredkina A.I., Solovei O.A. 3D mantle structure of Central Asia from Rayleigh wave group velocity dispersion

  2. Development and characterization of an ice-selecting pumped counterflow virtual impactor (IS-PCVI) to study ice crystal residuals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiranuma, Naruki; Möhler, Ottmar; Kulkarni, Gourihar; Schnaiter, Martin; Vogt, Steffen; Vochezer, Paul; Järvinen, Emma; Wagner, Robert; Bell, David M.; Wilson, Jacqueline; Zelenyuk, Alla; Cziczo, Daniel J.

    2016-08-01

    Separation of particles that play a role in cloud activation and ice nucleation from interstitial aerosols has become necessary to further understand aerosol-cloud interactions. The pumped counterflow virtual impactor (PCVI), which uses a vacuum pump to accelerate the particles and increase their momentum, provides an accessible option for dynamic and inertial separation of cloud elements. However, the use of a traditional PCVI to extract large cloud hydrometeors is difficult mainly due to its small cut-size diameters (< 5 µm). Here, for the first time we describe a development of an ice-selecting PCVI (IS-PCVI) to separate ice in controlled mixed-phase cloud system based on the particle inertia with the cut-off diameter ≥ 10 µm. We also present its laboratory application demonstrating the use of the impactor under a wide range of temperature and humidity conditions. The computational fluid dynamics simulations were initially carried out to guide the design of the IS-PCVI. After fabrication, a series of validation laboratory experiments were performed coupled with the Aerosol Interaction and Dynamics in the Atmosphere (AIDA) expansion cloud simulation chamber. In the AIDA chamber, test aerosol particles were exposed to the ice supersaturation conditions (i.e., RHice > 100 %), where a mixture of droplets and ice crystals was formed during the expansion experiment. In parallel, the flow conditions of the IS-PCVI were actively controlled, such that it separated ice crystals from a mixture of ice crystals and cloud droplets, which were of diameter ≥ 10 µm. These large ice crystals were passed through the heated evaporation section to remove the water content. Afterwards, the residuals were characterized with a suite of online and offline instruments downstream of the IS-PCVI. These results were used to assess the optimized operating parameters of the device in terms of (1) the critical cut-size diameter, (2) the transmission efficiency and (3) the counterflow

  3. Development and characterization of an ice-selecting pumped counterflow virtual impactor (IS-PCVI) to study ice crystal residuals

    SciTech Connect

    Hiranuma, Naruki; Möhler, Ottmar; Kulkarni, Gourihar; Schnaiter, Martin; Vogt, Steffen; Vochezer, Paul; Järvinen, Emma; Wagner, Robert; Bell, David M.; Wilson, Jacqueline; Zelenyuk, Alla; Cziczo, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    Separation of particles that play a role in cloud activation and ice nucleation from interstitial aerosols has become necessary to further understand aerosol-cloud interactions. The pumped counterflow virtual impactor (PCVI), which uses a vacuum pump to accelerate the particles and increase their momentum, provides an accessible option for dynamic and inertial separation of cloud elements. However, the use of a traditional PCVI to extract large cloud hydrometeors is difficult mainly due to its small cut-size diameters (< 5 µm). Here, for the first time we describe a development of an ice-selecting PCVI (IS-PCVI) to separate ice in controlled mixed-phase cloud system based on the particle inertia with the cut-off diameter ≥ 10 µm. We also present its laboratory application demonstrating the use of the impactor under a wide range of temperature and humidity conditions. The computational fluid dynamics simulations were initially carried out to guide the design of the IS-PCVI. After fabrication, a series of validation laboratory experiments were performed coupled with the Aerosol Interaction and Dynamics in the Atmosphere (AIDA) expansion cloud simulation chamber. In the AIDA chamber, test aerosol particles were exposed to the ice supersaturation conditions (i.e., RHice > 100 %), where a mixture of droplets and ice crystals was formed during the expansion experiment. In parallel, the flow conditions of the IS-PCVI were actively controlled, such that it separated ice crystals from a mixture of ice crystals and cloud droplets, which were of diameter ≥ 10 µm. These large ice crystals were passed through the heated evaporation section to remove the water content. Afterwards, the residuals were characterized with a suite of online and offline instruments downstream of the IS-PCVI. These results were used to assess the optimized operating parameters of the device in terms of (1) the critical cut-size diameter, (2) the transmission efficiency and (3)

  4. Preliminary assessment of using tree-tissue analysis and passive-diffusion samplers to evaluate trichloroethene contamination of ground water at Site SS-34N, McChord Air Force Base, Washington, 2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cox, S.E.

    2002-01-01

    Two low-cost innovative sampling procedures for characterizing trichloroethene (TCE) contamination in ground water were evaluated for use at McChord Air Force Base (AFB) by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Air Force McChord Air Force Base Installation Restoration Program, in 2001. Previous attempts to characterize the source of ground-water contamination in the heterogeneous glacial outwash aquifer at McChord site SS-34N using soil-gas surveys, direct-push exploration, and more than a dozen ground-water monitoring wells have had limited success. The procedures assessed in this study involved analysis of tree-tissue samples to map underlying ground-water contamination and deploying passive-diffusion samplers to measure TCE concentrations in existing monitoring wells. These procedures have been used successfully at other U.S. Department of Defense sites and have resulted in cost avoidance and accelerated site characterization. Despite the presence of TCE in ground water at site SS-34N, TCE was not detected in any of the 20 trees sampled at the site during either early spring or late summer sampling. The reason the tree tissue procedure was not successful at the McChord AFB site SS-34N may have been due to an inability of tree roots to extract moisture from a water table 30 feet below the land surface, or that concentrations of TCE in ground water were not large enough to be detectable in the tree tissue at the sampling point. Passive-diffusion samplers were placed near the top, middle, and bottom of screened intervals in three monitoring wells and TCE was observed in all samplers. Concentrations of TCE from the passive-diffusion samplers were generally similar to concentrations found in samples collected in the same wells using conventional pumping methods. In contrast to conventional pumping methods, the collection of ground-water samples using the passive-diffusion samples did not generate waste purge water that would require hazardous

  5. Influence of boundary slip on the dynamics and stability of thermocapillary spreading with a significant gravitational counterflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Naveen; Davis, Jeffrey M.

    2014-10-01

    Applied temperature gradients produce thermocapillary stresses that can force liquid films to spread along solid surfaces. These films are susceptible to a rivulet instability at the advancing solid-liquid-vapor contact line, which is linked to the development of a capillary ridge near the advancing front. The application of a sufficiently strong gravitational counterflow has been shown to drain fluid from the ridge and stabilize the film against rivulet formation and lead to interesting spreading dynamics. In this work, the dynamics and stability of thermocapillary driven films are analyzed for the entire range of drainage. Boundary slip is allowed at the solid-liquid interface, which introduces the static contact angle and slip coefficient as parameters that can typically be specified independently. The contact angle of the spreading film is allowed to depend on the velocity of the contact line, and the effects of this dependence on the film profile, linear stability, and transient response of perturbations are examined. Increasing the influence of gravitational drainage relative to the thermocapillary stress from zero has a stabilizing influence on the traveling wave solutions but is accompanied by an increase in the amplitude of the capillary ridge, which is contrary to stability results for spreading films with only one driving force. Results for the different spreading regimes are generally consistent with predictions based on the more extensively used precursor film model of the contact line, although some differences are observed due to the additional parameters in the slip model that are relevant to partially wetting fluids.

  6. Ice Nuclei in Mid-Latitude Cirrus: Preliminary Results from a New Counterflow Virtual Impactor (CVI) Aircraft Inlet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froyd, K. D.; Cziczo, D. J.; Murphy, D. M.; Kulkarni, G.; Lawson, P.

    2011-12-01

    Cirrus cloud properties are strongly governed by the mechanism of ice particle formation and by the number and effectiveness of ambient ice nuclei. Airborne measurements of ice nuclei reveal new nucleation mechanisms, provide constraints on microphysical models, and guide laboratory investigations. For over two decades the Counterflow Virtual Impactor (CVI) inlet has remained the prevailing approach for sampling cloud particles to measure ice nuclei from an aircraft platform. However, traditional CVI inlets have fundamental limitations when operating on high speed aircraft, where only a small fraction of ambient cloud particles are typically sampled. A novel 'folded' CVI was constructed and deployed during the NASA MACPEX 2011 campaign. The flow design of this inlet effectively doubles the CVI length and thereby increases the size range of captured cirrus particles. Additional design elements such as an internal vortex flow, a neon carrier gas, and an infrared laser further improve the capture and evaporation of ice crystals. Preliminary results of ice nuclei composition measured by the PALMS single-particle mass spectrometer are presented from the MACPEX campaign. Examples of ice nuclei from mid-latitude cirrus are shown, including mineral dust, organic-rich aerosol with amine and diacid components, and lead-containing aerosol.

  7. Drag and heat reduction mechanism induced by a combinational novel cavity and counterflowing jet concept in hypersonic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xi-wan; Guo, Zhen-yun; Huang, Wei; Li, Shi-bin; Yan, Li

    2016-09-01

    The drag and heat reduction problem of hypersonic reentry vehicles has always attracted the attention worldwide, and many novel schemes have been proposed recently. In the current study, the research progress of the combinational configuration of the forward-facing cavity and the counterflowing jet has been reviewed, and the conventional cavity configuration has been substituted by an approximate maximum thrust nozzle contour for better heat and surface pressure reduction efficiency. The Reynolds-average of Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations coupled with the SST k-ω turbulence model have been employed to calculate its surrounding flow fields. A validation metric and the grid convergence index (GCI) have been employed to conduct the turbulence model assessment and the grid independence analysis respectively. The axisymmetric assumption has been verified by three-dimensional computational results as well. The obtained results show that the SST k-ω model is more suitable for the novel drag and heat flux reduction scheme proposed in this article, and the axisymmetric assumption is approximately reasonable. After investigating the influence of jet pressure ratio, the novel combinational configuration has been verified to be more effective in heat and surface pressure reduction, and this is because the approximate maximum thrust nozzle contour contributes to better expansion and avoids total pressure loss of the jet.

  8. Diffusion Flame Stabilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takahashi, Fumiaki; Katta, Viswanath R.

    2007-01-01

    Diffusion flames are commonly used for industrial burners in furnaces and flares. Oxygen/fuel burners are usually diffusion burners, primarily for safety reasons, to prevent flashback and explosion in a potentially dangerous system. Furthermore, in most fires, condensed materials pyrolyze, vaporize, and burn in air as diffusion flames. As a result of the interaction of a diffusion flame with burner or condensed-fuel surfaces, a quenched space is formed, thus leaving a diffusion flame edge, which plays an important role in flame holding in combustion systems and fire spread through condensed fuels. Despite a long history of jet diffusion flame studies, lifting/blowoff mechanisms have not yet been fully understood, compared to those of premixed flames. In this study, the structure and stability of diffusion flames of gaseous hydrocarbon fuels in coflowing air at normal earth gravity have been investigated experimentally and computationally. Measurements of the critical mean jet velocity (U(sub jc)) of methane, ethane, or propane at lifting or blowoff were made as a function of the coflowing air velocity (U(sub a)) using a tube burner (i.d.: 2.87 mm) (Fig. 1, left). By using a computational fluid dynamics code with 33 species and 112 elementary reaction steps, the internal chemical-kinetic structures of the stabilizing region of methane and propane flames were investigated (Fig. 1, right). A peak reactivity spot, i.e., reaction kernel, is formed in the flame stabilizing region due to back-diffusion of heat and radical species against an oxygen-rich incoming flow, thus holding the trailing diffusion flame. The simulated flame base moved downstream under flow conditions close to the measured stability limit.

  9. Diffusion Flame Stabilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takahashi, Fumiaki; Katta, V. R.

    2006-01-01

    Diffusion flames are commonly used for industrial burners in furnaces and flares. Oxygen/fuel burners are usually diffusion burners, primarily for safety reasons, to prevent flashback and explosion in a potentially dangerous system. Furthermore, in most fires, condensed materials pyrolyze, vaporize, and burn in air as diffusion flames. As a result of the interaction of a diffusion flame with burner or condensed-fuel surfaces, a quenched space is formed, thus leaving a diffusion flame edge, which plays an important role in flame holding in combustion systems and fire spread through condensed fuels. Despite a long history of jet diffusion flame studies, lifting/blowoff mechanisms have not yet been fully understood, compared to those of premixed flames. In this study, the structure and stability of diffusion flames of gaseous hydrocarbon fuels in coflowing air at normal earth gravity have been investigated experimentally and computationally. Measurements of the critical mean jet velocity (U(sub jc)) of methane, ethane, or propane at lifting or blowoff were made as a function of the coflowing air velocity (U(sub a)) using a tube burner (i.d.: 2.87 mm). By using a computational fluid dynamics code with 33 species and 112 elementary reaction steps, the internal chemical-kinetic structures of the stabilizing region of methane and propane flames were investigated. A peak reactivity spot, i.e., reaction kernel, is formed in the flame stabilizing region due to back-diffusion of heat and radical species against an oxygen-rich incoming flow, thus holding the trailing diffusion flame. The simulated flame base moved downstream under flow conditions close to the measured stability limit.

  10. Air Pollution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scorer, Richard S.

    The purpose of this book is to describe the basic mechanisms whereby pollution is transported and diffused in the atmosphere. It is designed to give practitioners an understanding of basic mechanics and physics so they may have a correct basis on which to formulate their decisions related to practical air pollution control problems. Since many…

  11. Air Pollution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scorer, Richard S.

    The purpose of this book is to describe the basic mechanisms whereby pollution is transported and diffused in the atmosphere. It is designed to give practitioners an understanding of basic mechanics and physics so they may have a correct basis on which to formulate their decisions related to practical air pollution control problems. Since many…

  12. Relative sedimentation of hematopoietic progenitors in human cord blood, peripheral blood, and bone marrow as determined by counterflow centrifugal elutriation.

    PubMed

    Gengozian, N; Hill, R J; Caudle, M R; Panella, T J

    1998-04-15

    The current use of cord blood (CB) and peripheral blood (PB) stem cells as alternatives or adjunctives to bone marrow (BM) for hematopoietic reconstitution in the treatment of various diseases prompted an examination of the progenitors of these tissues by counterflow centrifugal elutriation (CCE). The cells, obtained from normal donors not primed with colony-stimulating factors, were centrifuged at 3000 rpm in a Beckman Sanderson Chamber. Fractions (Frs.) were collected at (1) 18 ml/min, (2) 25 ml/min, (3) 32 ml/min, (4) 40 ml/min, and (5) the rotor-off fraction. Clonogenic assays revealed differences in the fraction localizations for CB and PB when compared to BM, i.e., recovery of the colony-forming units for CB and PB was greater in the small-medium cell size CCE fractions, and those from BM were found primarily among the medium-large cell size fractions. Thus, although colony-forming unit granulocyte/macrophage colonies were distributed throughout Frs. 2-5 of BM, CB and PB showed 80% of the total to be in Frs. 2 and 3. Further, although burst-forming unit erythroid colonies of BM were distributed equally in Frs. 2 and 3, greater than 70% of the total burst-forming unit erythroid colonies in CB and PB were found in Fr. 2. Distribution of the CD34 cells in the fractions correlated with the colony-forming units in that these were found primarily in Frs. 2 and 3 of CB and PB, whereas they were present in significant numbers throughout Frs. 1-5 of BM. We interpret these findings to indicate CB and PB to be qualitatively similar in their hematopoietic lineage development and to contain a greater proportion of early versus late progenitors relative to those found in BM.

  13. Characterization and first results of an ice nucleating particle measurement system based on counterflow virtual impactor technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schenk, L. P.; Mertes, S.; Kästner, U.; Frank, F.; Nillius, B.; Bundke, U.; Rose, D.; Schmidt, S.; Schneider, J.; Worringen, A.; Kandler, K.; Bukowiecki, N.; Ebert, M.; Curtius, J.; Stratmann, F.

    2014-10-01

    A specific instrument combination was developed to achieve a better microphysical and chemical characterization of atmospheric aerosol particles that have the potential to act as ice nucleating particles (INP). For this purpose a pumped counterflow virtual impactor system called IN-PCVI was set up and characterized to separate ice particles that had been activated on INP in the Fast Ice Nucleus Chamber (FINCH) from interstitial, non-activated particles. This coupled setup consisting of FINCH (ice particle activation and counting), IN-PCVI (INP separation and preparation), and further aerosol instrumentation (INP characterization) had been developed for the application in field experiments. The separated INP were characterized on-line with regard to their total number concentration, number size distribution and chemical composition, especially with the Aircraft-based Laser Ablation Aerosol Mass Spectrometer ALABAMA. Moreover, impactor samples for electron microscopy were taken. Due to the coupling the IN-PCVI had to be operated with different flow settings than known from literature, which required a further characterization of its cut-off-behavior. Taking the changed cut-off-behavior into account, the INP number concentration measured by the IN-PCVI system was in good agreement with the one detected by the FINCH optics for water saturation ratios up to 1.01 (ice saturation ratios between 1.21-1.34 and temperatures between -18 and -26 °C). First field results of INP properties are presented which were gained during the INUIT-JFJ/CLACE 2013 campaign at the high altitude research station Jungfraujoch in the Bernese Alps, Switzerland (3580 m a.s.l.).

  14. Counterflow quantum turbulence of He-II in a square channel: Numerical analysis with nonuniform flows of the normal fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yui, Satoshi; Tsubota, Makoto

    2015-05-01

    We perform a numerical analysis of counterflow quantum turbulence of superfluid 4He with nonuniform flows by using the vortex filament model. In recent visualization experiments nonuniform laminar flows of the normal fluid, namely, Hagen-Poiseuille flow and tail-flattened flow, have been observed. Tail-flattened flow is a laminar flow in which the outer part of the Hagen-Poiseuille flow becomes flat. In our simulation, the velocity field of the normal fluid is prescribed to be two nonuniform profiles. This work addresses a square channel to obtain important physics not revealed in the preceding numerical works. In the studies of the two profiles we analyze the statistics of the physical quantities. Under Hagen-Poiseuille flow, inhomogeneous quantum turbulence appears as a statistically steady state. The vortex tangle shows a characteristic space-time oscillation. Under tail-flattened flow, the nature of the quantum turbulence depends strongly on that flatness. Vortex line density increases significantly as the profile becomes flatter, being saturated above a certain flatness. The inhomogeneity is significantly reduced in comparison to the case of Hagen-Poiseuille flow. Investigating the behavior of quantized vortices reveals that tail-flattened flow is an intermediate state between Hagen-Poiseuille flow and uniform flow. In both profiles we obtain a characteristic inhomogeneity in the physical quantities, which suggests that a boundary layer of superfluid appears near a solid boundary. The vortex tangle produces a velocity field opposite to the applied superfluid flow, and, consequently, the superfluid flow becomes smaller than the applied one.

  15. Lung diffusion testing

    MedlinePlus

    ... the blood from the lungs, and to allow carbon dioxide to "diffuse" from the blood into the lungs. How the Test is Performed You breathe in (inhale) air containing a very small amount of carbon monoxide and a tracer gas, such as methane ...

  16. Flammability measurements of difluoromethane in air at 100 C

    SciTech Connect

    Grosshandler, W.L.; Donnelly, M.K.; Womeldorf, C.

    1999-07-01

    Difluoromethane (CH{sub 2}F{sub 2}, or R-32) is a candidate to replace currently used ozone-depleting chlorofluorocarbon refrigerants. Because CH{sub 2}F{sub 2} is flammable, it is necessary to assess the hazard posed by a leak in a refrigeration machine. The currently accepted method for determining flammability, ASTM E 681, has difficulty discerning the flammability boundary for weak fuels such as CH{sub 2}F{sub 2}. This paper describes an alternative approach to identify the limits of flammability, using a twin, premixed counter-flow flame. By using the extinction of an already established flame, the point dividing flammable from non-flammable becomes unambiguous. The limiting extinction mixture changes with stretch rate, so it is convenient to report the flammability limit as the value extrapolated to a zero stretch condition. In the burner, contoured nozzles with outlet diameters of 12 mm are aligned counter to each other and spaced 12 mm apart. The lean flammability limit of CH{sub 2}F{sub 2} in dry air at room temperature was previously reported by the authors to be a mole fraction of 0.14, using the twin counter-flow flame method. In the current study, relative humidity was not found to affect the lean limit. Increasing the temperature of the premixed fuel and air to 100 C is shown to extend the flammability limit in the lean direction to 0.13. The rich limit of CH{sub 2}F{sub 2} found using the counter-flow method is around 0.27. The uncertainties of the measurements are presented and the results compared to data in the literature.

  17. Opposed Jet Burner Extinction Limits: Simple Mixed Hydrocarbon Scramjet Fuels vs Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellett, Gerald L.; Vaden, Sarah N.; Wilson, Lloyd G.

    2007-01-01

    Opposed Jet Burner tools have been used extensively by the authors to measure Flame Strength (FS) of laminar non-premixed H2 air and simple hydrocarbon (HC) air counterflow diffusion flames at 1-atm. FS represents a strain-induced extinction limit based on air jet velocity. This paper follows AIAA-2006-5223, and provides new HC air FSs for global testing of chemical kinetics, and for characterizing idealized flameholding potentials during early scramjet-like combustion. Previous FS data included six HCs, pure and N2-diluted; and three HC-diluted H2 fuels, where FS decayed very nonlinearly as HC was added to H2, due to H-atom scavenging. This study presents FSs on mixtures of (candidate surrogate) HCs, some with very high FS ethylene. Included are four binary gaseous systems at 300 K, and a hot ternary system at approx. 600 K. The binaries are methane + ethylene, ethane + ethylene, methane + ethane, and methane + propylene. The first three also form two ternary systems. The hot ternary includes both 10.8 and 21.3 mole % vaporized n-heptane and full ranges of methane + ethylene. Normalized FS data provide accurate means of (1) validating, globally, chemical kinetics for extinction of non-premixed flames, and (2) estimating (scaling by HC) the loss of incipient flameholding in scramjet combustors. The n-heptane is part of a proposed baseline simulant (10 mole % with 30% methane + 60% ethylene) that mimics the ignition of endothermically cracked JP-7 like kerosene fuel, as suggested by Colket and Spadaccini in 2001 in their shock tube Scramjet Fuels Autoignition Study. Presently, we use FS to gauge idealized flameholding, and define HC surrogates. First, FS was characterized for hot nheptane + methane + ethylene; then a hot 36 mole % methane + 64% ethylene surrogate was defined that mimics FS of the baseline simulant system. A similar hot ethane + ethylene surrogate can also be defined, but it has lower vapor pressure at 300 K, and thus exhibits reduced gaseous

  18. 24-HOUR DIFFUSIVE SAMPLING OF 1,3-BUTADIENE IN AIR ONTO CARBONPAK X SOLID ADSORBENT WITH THEMAL DESORPTION/GC/MS ANALYSIS - FEASIBILITY STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Diffusive sampling of 1,3-butadiene for 24 hours onto the graphitic adsorbent Carbopack X contained in a stainless steel tube badge (6.3 mm OD, 5 mm ID, and 90 mm in length) with analysis by thermal desorption/GC/MS has been evaluated in controlled tests. A test matrix of 42 tr...

  19. 24-HOUR DIFFUSIVE SAMPLING OF 1,3-BUTADIENE IN AIR ONTO CARBOPACK X SOLID ADSORBENT FOLLOWED BY THERMAL DESORPTION/GC/MS ANALYSIS - FEASIBILITY STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Diffusive sampling of 1,3-butadiene for 24 hr onto the graphitic adsorbent Carbopack X packed in a stainless steel tube badge (6.3 mm o.d., 5 mm i.d., and 90 mm in length) with analysis by thermal desorption/gas chromatography (GC)/mass spectrometry (MS) has been evaluated in con...

  20. 24-HOUR DIFFUSIVE SAMPLING OF 1,3-BUTADIENE IN AIR ONTO CARBOPACK X SOLID ADSORBENT FOLLOWED BY THERMAL DESORPTION/GC/MS ANALYSIS - FEASIBILITY STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Diffusive sampling of 1,3-butadiene for 24 hr onto the graphitic adsorbent Carbopack X packed in a stainless steel tube badge (6.3 mm o.d., 5 mm i.d., and 90 mm in length) with analysis by thermal desorption/gas chromatography (GC)/mass spectrometry (MS) has been evaluated in con...

  1. 24-HOUR DIFFUSIVE SAMPLING OF 1,3-BUTADIENE IN AIR ONTO CARBONPAK X SOLID ADSORBENT WITH THEMAL DESORPTION/GC/MS ANALYSIS - FEASIBILITY STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Diffusive sampling of 1,3-butadiene for 24 hours onto the graphitic adsorbent Carbopack X contained in a stainless steel tube badge (6.3 mm OD, 5 mm ID, and 90 mm in length) with analysis by thermal desorption/GC/MS has been evaluated in controlled tests. A test matrix of 42 tr...

  2. Diffusion MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuyama, Hidenao

    Recent advances of magnetic resonance imaging have been described, especially stressed on the diffusion sequences. We have recently applied the diffusion sequence to functional brain imaging, and found the appropriate results. In addition to the neurosciences fields, diffusion weighted images have improved the accuracies of clinical diagnosis depending upon magnetic resonance images in stroke as well as inflammations.

  3. Adsorption of ionic surfactants at microscopic air-water interfaces using the micropipette interfacial area-expansion method: Measurement of the diffusion coefficient and renormalization of the mean ionic activity for SDS.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Koji; Parra, Elisa; Needham, David

    2017-10-15

    The dynamic adsorption of ionic surfactants at air-water interfaces have been less-well studied than that of the simpler non-ionics since experimental limitations on dynamic surface tension (DST) measurements create inconsistencies in their kinetic analysis. Using our newly designed "Micropipette interfacial area-expansion method", we have measured and evaluated both equilibrium and dynamic adsorption of a well-known anionic surfactant, sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS), in the absence or presence of 100mM NaCl. Our focus was to determine if and to what extent the inclusion of a new correction parameter for the "ideal ionic activity", A±i, can renormalize both equilibrium and dynamic surface tension measurements and provide better estimates of the diffusion coefficient of ionic surfactants in aqueous media obtained from electroneutral models, namely extended Frumkin isotherm and Ward-Tordai adsorption models. We found that the estimated value of the new parameter, A±i=0.29, is key to obtain the diffusion coefficient D=5.3±0.3×10(-6)cm(2)/s for SDS, in excellent agreement with the literature. These new technique and analyses can now be applied to study the interfacial adsorption of a range of both ionic and non-ionic surface-active molecules, including the potentially slower-diffusing polymers and biological materials like lipids, peptides, and proteins. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Plasmapause diffusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horwitz, J. L.

    1983-01-01

    The Bohm diffusion coefficient and observed electrostatic wave scattering are used as the bases of estimates of the smoothing effect that diffusion may have on steep plasmapause density gradients. The estimate for diffusion resulting from scattering by observed electrostatic waves is found to be much lower than that of the perpendicular Bohm diffusion coefficient for characteristic plasma temperatures and magnetic fields. This diffusion rate estimate may be too small, however, if the wave amplitudes are significantly higher for steep plasmapauses. The effects are therefore negligible for most considerations of macroscopic plasmapause dynamics, but may be significant in limiting drift wave instabilities and similar phenomena driven by the steepness of the plasmapause density gradient.

  5. Improving Best Air Conditioner Efficiency by 20-30% through a High Efficiency Fan and Diffuser Stage Coupled with an Evaporative Condenser Pre-Cooler

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, Danny S; Sherwin, John R; Raustad, Richard

    2014-04-10

    The Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) conducted a research project to improve the best residential air conditioner condenser technology currently available on the market by retrofitting a commercially-available unit with both a high efficiency fan system and an evaporative pre-cooler. The objective was to integrate these two concepts to achieve an ultra-efficient residential air conditioner design. The project produced a working prototype that was 30% more efficient compared to the best currently-available technologies; the peak the energy efficiency ratio (EER) was improved by 41%. Efficiency at the Air-Conditioning and Refrigeration Institute (ARI) standard B-condition which is used to estimate seasonal energy efficiency ratio (SEER), was raised from a nominal 21 Btu/Wh to 32 Btu/Wh.

  6. Methane, Ethane, And Ethylene Laminar Counterflow Diffusion Flames At Elevated Pressures: Experimental And Computational Investigations Up To 2.0MPa

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-27

    predicted computationally by Sohn and Chung [2]. In addition, Figura and Gomez [ 3 ] successfully stabi- lized non-premixed methane flames at elevated... Figura and Gomez [ 3 ]. As indicated by the previously stated values of the stoichiome- tric mixture fractions, the peak temperatures are expected to lie on...Niemann, K. Seshadri, F. Williams, Proc. Combust. Inst. 34 (2013) 881–886. [2] C.H. Sohn, S.H. Chung, Combust. Flame 121 (2000) 288–300. [ 3 ] L. Figura , A

  7. Griffith diffusers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, T.-T.; Nelson, C. D.

    1979-01-01

    Contoured wall diffusers are designed by using an inverse method. The prescribed wall velocity distribution(s) was taken from the high lift airfoil designed by A. A. Griffith in 1938; therefore, such diffusers are named Griffith diffusers. First the formulation of the inverse problem and the method of solution are outlined. Then the typical contour of a two-dimensional diffuser and velocity distributions across the flow channel at various stations are presented. For a Griffith diffuser to operate as it is designed, boundary layer suction is necessary. Discussion of the percentage of through-flow required to be removed for the purpose of boundary layer control is given. Finally, reference is made to the latest version of a computer program for a two-dimensional diffuser requiring only area ratio, nondimensional length and suction percentage as inputs.

  8. Griffith diffusers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, T.-T.; Nelson, C. D.

    1979-01-01

    Contoured wall diffusers are designed by using an inverse method. The prescribed wall velocity distribution(s) was taken from the high lift airfoil designed by A. A. Griffith in 1938; therefore, such diffusers are named Griffith diffusers. First the formulation of the inverse problem and the method of solution are outlined. Then the typical contour of a two-dimensional diffuser and velocity distributions across the flow channel at various stations are presented. For a Griffith diffuser to operate as it is designed, boundary layer suction is necessary. Discussion of the percentage of through-flow required to be removed for the purpose of boundary layer control is given. Finally, reference is made to the latest version of a computer program for a two-dimensional diffuser requiring only area ratio, nondimensional length and suction percentage as inputs.

  9. Energy cascade with small-scale thermalization, counterflow metastability, and anomalous velocity of vortex rings in Fourier-truncated Gross-Pitaevskii equation

    SciTech Connect

    Krstulovic, Giorgio; Brachet, Marc

    2011-06-15

    The statistical equilibria of the (conservative) dynamics of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation (GPE) with a finite range of spatial Fourier modes are characterized using a new algorithm, based on a stochastically forced Ginzburg-Landau equation (SGLE), that directly generates grand-canonical distributions. The SGLE-generated distributions are validated against finite-temperature GPE-thermalized states and exact (low-temperature) results obtained by steepest descent on the (grand-canonical) partition function. A standard finite-temperature second-order {lambda} transition is exhibited. A mechanism of GPE thermalization through a direct cascade of energy is found using initial conditions with mass and energy distributed at large scales. A long transient with partial thermalization at small scales is observed before the system reaches equilibrium. Vortices are shown to disappear as a prelude to final thermalization and their annihilation is related to the contraction of vortex rings due to mutual friction. Increasing the amount of dispersion at the truncation wave number is shown to slow thermalization and vortex annihilation. A bottleneck that produces spontaneous effective self-truncation with partial thermalization is characterized in the limit of large dispersive effects. Metastable counterflow states, with nonzero values of momentum, are generated using the SGLE algorithm. Spontaneous nucleation of the vortex ring is observed and the corresponding Arrhenius law is characterized. Dynamical counterflow effects on vortex evolution are investigated using two exact solutions of the GPE: traveling vortex rings and a motionless crystal-like lattice of vortex lines. Longitudinal effects are produced and measured on the crystal lattice. A dilatation of vortex rings is obtained for counterflows larger than their translational velocity. The vortex ring translational velocity has a dependence on temperature that is an order of magnitude above that of the crystal lattice, an

  10. Energy cascade with small-scale thermalization, counterflow metastability, and anomalous velocity of vortex rings in Fourier-truncated Gross-Pitaevskii equation.

    PubMed

    Krstulovic, Giorgio; Brachet, Marc

    2011-06-01

    The statistical equilibria of the (conservative) dynamics of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation (GPE) with a finite range of spatial Fourier modes are characterized using a new algorithm, based on a stochastically forced Ginzburg-Landau equation (SGLE), that directly generates grand-canonical distributions. The SGLE-generated distributions are validated against finite-temperature GPE-thermalized states and exact (low-temperature) results obtained by steepest descent on the (grand-canonical) partition function. A standard finite-temperature second-order λ transition is exhibited. A mechanism of GPE thermalization through a direct cascade of energy is found using initial conditions with mass and energy distributed at large scales. A long transient with partial thermalization at small scales is observed before the system reaches equilibrium. Vortices are shown to disappear as a prelude to final thermalization and their annihilation is related to the contraction of vortex rings due to mutual friction. Increasing the amount of dispersion at the truncation wave number is shown to slow thermalization and vortex annihilation. A bottleneck that produces spontaneous effective self-truncation with partial thermalization is characterized in the limit of large dispersive effects. Metastable counterflow states, with nonzero values of momentum, are generated using the SGLE algorithm. Spontaneous nucleation of the vortex ring is observed and the corresponding Arrhenius law is characterized. Dynamical counterflow effects on vortex evolution are investigated using two exact solutions of the GPE: traveling vortex rings and a motionless crystal-like lattice of vortex lines. Longitudinal effects are produced and measured on the crystal lattice. A dilatation of vortex rings is obtained for counterflows larger than their translational velocity. The vortex ring translational velocity has a dependence on temperature that is an order of magnitude above that of the crystal lattice, an effect

  11. Temperature dependence of Soret and diffusion coefficients for toluene-cyclohexane mixture measured in convection-free environment.

    PubMed

    Mialdun, A; Shevtsova, V

    2015-12-14

    We report on the measurement of diffusion (D), Soret (S(T)), and thermodiffusion (D(T)) coefficients in toluene-cyclohexane mixture with mass fraction of toluene 0.40 onboard of the International Space Station. The coefficients were measured in the range of the mean temperatures between 20 °C and 34 °C. The Soret coefficient is negative within the investigated temperature range and its absolute value |S(T)| decreases with increasing temperature. The diffusion coefficient for this system increases with temperature rising. For comparison, the temperature dependence of diffusion coefficient was measured in ground laboratory using counter-flow cell technique and revealed a good agreement with microgravity results. A non-direct comparison of the measured onboard Soret coefficients with different systems indicated a similar trend for the temperature dependent behavior. Unexpected experimental finding is that for this system the thermodiffusion coefficient D(T) does not depend on temperature.

  12. Determination of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes in indoor air at environmental levels using diffusive samplers in combination with headspace solid-phase microextraction and high-resolution gas chromatography-flame ionization detection.

    PubMed

    Elke, K; Jermann, E; Begerow, J; Dunemann, L

    1998-11-27

    An improved analytical method for passive air sampling is presented based on a combination of commercially available diffusive samplers with headspace solid-phase microextraction and high-resolution gas chromatography with flame ionization detection (HRGC-FID). This procedure is targeted for short-term BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and o-, m- and p-xylenes) determinations at environmental concentrations and can be applied for sampling intervals between 30 min and 24 h. The analytes are adsorbed onto the charcoal pad of a passive sampler and then extracted with carbon disulphide-methanol. After removal of the carbon disulphide by xanthation, the BTEXs are enriched on a Carboxen SPME fiber, thermally desorbed and analysed by HRGC-FID. Detection limits for a sampling interval of 2 h are between 0.4 and 2 micrograms/m3, within-series precision ranges between 6.6 and 12.8%, day-to-day precision is between 11.1 and 15.2%. The results obtained with this procedure are validated by comparison with active sampling. Detection limits and a further reduction of the sampling time are limited by blanks of the chemicals and the diffusive samplers. Procedures to eliminate these blanks are described in detail. Applications such as the determination of BTEXs in indoor air inside buildings, inside a train and a car are presented, indicating the usefulness of the described procedure for short-term measurements of environmental BTEX concentrations. An advantage of passive samplers is the storage stability for at least six months, which is essential for its use in large epidemiological studies.

  13. Numerical Evaluation of the "Dual-Kernel Counter-flow" Matric Convolution Integral that Arises in Discrete/Continuous (D/C) Control Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nixon, Douglas D.

    2009-01-01

    Discrete/Continuous (D/C) control theory is a new generalized theory of discrete-time control that expands the concept of conventional (exact) discrete-time control to create a framework for design and implementation of discretetime control systems that include a continuous-time command function generator so that actuator commands need not be constant between control decisions, but can be more generally defined and implemented as functions that vary with time across sample period. Because the plant/control system construct contains two linear subsystems arranged in tandem, a novel dual-kernel counter-flow convolution integral appears in the formulation. As part of the D/C system design and implementation process, numerical evaluation of that integral over the sample period is required. Three fundamentally different evaluation methods and associated algorithms are derived for the constant-coefficient case. Numerical results are matched against three available examples that have closed-form solutions.

  14. Thickness engineering of atomic layer deposited Al2O3 films to suppress interfacial reaction and diffusion of Ni/Au gate metal in AlGaN/GaN HEMTs up to 600 °C in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suria, Ateeq J.; Yalamarthy, Ananth Saran; Heuser, Thomas A.; Bruefach, Alexandra; Chapin, Caitlin A.; So, Hongyun; Senesky, Debbie G.

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, we describe the use of 50 nm atomic layer deposited (ALD) Al2O3 to suppress the interfacial reaction and inter-diffusion between the gate metal and semiconductor interface, to extend the operation limit up to 600 °C in air. Suppression of diffusion is verified through Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) depth profiling and X-ray diffraction (XRD) and is further supported with electrical characterization. An ALD Al2O3 thin film (10 nm and 50 nm), which functions as a dielectric layer, was inserted between the gate metal (Ni/Au) and heterostructure-based semiconductor material (AlGaN/GaN) to form a metal-insulator-semiconductor high electron mobility transistor (MIS-HEMT). This extended the 50 nm ALD Al2O3 MIS-HEMT (50-MIS) current-voltage (Ids-Vds) and gate leakage (Ig,leakage) characteristics up to 600 °C. Both, the 10 nm ALD Al2O3 MIS-HEMT (10-MIS) and HEMT, failed above 350 °C, as evidenced by a sudden increase of approximately 50 times and 5.3 × 106 times in Ig,leakage, respectively. AES on the HEMT revealed the formation of a Ni-Au alloy and Ni present in the active region. Additionally, XRD showed existence of metal gallides in the HEMT. The 50-MIS enables the operation of AlGaN/GaN based electronics in oxidizing high-temperature environments, by suppressing interfacial reaction and inter-diffusion of the gate metal with the semiconductor.

  15. Coupled diffusion in aqueous weak acid + alkanolamine absorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Leaist, D.G.; Li, Y.; Poissant, R.

    1998-11-01

    Taylor dispersion and differential refractometry are used to measure ternary interdiffusion coefficients (D{sub ik}) for aqueous solutions of acetic acid + triethanolamine (TEA) and aqueous solutions of oxalic acid + TEA at 25 C. The D{sub ik} coefficients give the coupled fluxes of acid and TEA driven by the gradient in the concentration of each solute. Ternary Fick equations with variable D{sub ik} coefficients are integrated numerically to calculate accurate concentration profiles and the moving reaction front produced by the interdiffusion of TEA and acetic or oxalic acid. Ternary diffusion coefficients are also used to predict the rate of dissolution of oxalic acid in 1.00 mol/dm{sup 3} aqueous TEA, a process analogous to the absorption of a diprotic acid gas by an alkanolamine absorbent. The diffusion of oxalic acid drives a significant counterflow of TEA. The resulting buildup of TEA at the surface of the dissolving acid increases the interfacial concentration of TEA from 1.00 to 1.20 mol/dm{sup 3}, which in turn increases the solubility of the acid by 0.20 mol/dm{sup 3}. Nernst-Planck equations are used to predict D{sub ik} coefficients for aqueous weak acid + alkanolamine solutions. The fluxes of these solutes are shown to be strongly coupled by the electric field that is generated by the diffusing ions.

  16. Diffusive exchange of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons across the air-water interface of the Patapsco River, an urbanized subestuary of the Chesapeake Bay

    SciTech Connect

    Bamford, H.A.; Offenberg, J.H.; Larsen, R.K.; Ko, F.C.; Baker, J.E.

    1999-07-01

    Air-water exchange fluxes of 13 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were determined along a transect in the Patapsco River from the Inner Harbor of Baltimore, MD, to the mainstem of the northern Chesapeake Bay. Sampling took place at six sites during three sampling intensives (June 1996, February 1997, and July 1997) and at one site every ninth day between March 1997 and March 1998 to measure spatial, daily, and annual variability in the fluxes. The direction and magnitude of the daily fluxes of individual PAHs were strongly influenced by the wind speed and direction, by the air temperature, and by the highly variable PAH concentrations in the gas and dissolved phases. Individual fluxes ranged from 14,200 ng m{sup {minus}2} day{sup {minus}1} net volatilization of fluorene during high winds to 11,400 ng m{sup {minus}2} day{sup {minus}1} net absorption of phenanthrene when prevailing winds blowing from the northwest across the city of Baltimore elevated gaseous PAH concentrations over the water. The largest PAH volatilization fluxes occurred adjacent to the stormwater discharges, driven by elevated dissolved PAH concentrations in surface waters. Estimated annual volatilization fluxes ranged from 1.1 {micro}g m{sup {minus}2} yr{sup {minus}1} for chrysene to 800 {micro}g m{sup {minus}2} yr{sup {minus}1} for fluorene.

  17. Diffusion barriers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicolet, M. A.

    1983-01-01

    The choice of the metallic film for the contact to a semiconductor device is discussed. One way to try to stabilize a contact is by interposing a thin film of a material that has low diffusivity for the atoms in question. This thin film application is known as a diffusion barrier. Three types of barriers can be distinguished. The stuffed barrier derives its low atomic diffusivity to impurities that concentrate along the extended defects of a polycrystalline layer. Sacrificial barriers exploit the fact that some (elemental) thin films react in a laterally uniform and reproducible fashion. Sacrificial barriers have the advantage that the point of their failure is predictable. Passive barriers are those most closely approximating an ideal barrier. The most-studied case is that of sputtered TiN films. Stuffed barriers may be viewed as passive barriers whose low diffusivity material extends along the defects of the polycrystalline host.

  18. Diffuse radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    A diffuse celestial radiation which is isotropic at least on a course scale were measured from the soft X-ray region to about 150 MeV, at which energy the intensity falls below that of the galactic emission for most galactic latitudes. The spectral shape, the intensity, and the established degree of isotropy of this diffuse radiation already place severe constraints on the possible explanations for this radiation. Among the extragalactic theories, the more promising explanations of the isotropic diffuse emission appear to be radiation from exceptional galaxies from matter antimatter annihilation at the boundaries of superclusters of galaxies of matter and antimatter in baryon symmetric big bang models. Other possible sources for extragalactic diffuse gamma radiation are discussed and include normal galaxies, clusters of galaxies, primordial cosmic rays interacting with intergalactic matter, primordial black holes, and cosmic ray leakage from galaxies.

  19. DESCRIPTION OF ATMOSPHERIC TRANSPORT PROCESSES IN EULERIAN AIR QUALITY MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Key differences among many types of air quality models are the way atmospheric advection and turbulent diffusion processes are treated. Gaussian models use analytical solutions of the advection-diffusion equations. Lagrangian models use a hypothetical air parcel concept effecti...

  20. Heat transfer, diffusion, and evaporation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nusselt, Wilhelm

    1954-01-01

    Although it has long been known that the differential equations of the heat-transfer and diffusion processes are identical, application to technical problems has only recently been made. In 1916 it was shown that the speed of oxidation of the carbon in iron ore depends upon the speed with which the oxygen of the combustion air diffuses through the core of gas surrounding the carbon surface. The identity previously referred to was then used to calculate the amount of oxygen diffusing to the carbon surface on the basis of the heat transfer between the gas stream and the carbon surface. Then in 1921, H. Thoma reversed that procedure; he used diffusion experiments to determine heat-transfer coefficients. Recently Lohrisch has extended this work by experiment. A technically very important application of the identity of heat transfer and diffusion is that of the cooling tower, since in this case both processes occur simultaneously.

  1. Air cycle machine for an aircraft environmental control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decrisantis, Angelo A. (Inventor); O'Coin, James R. (Inventor); Taddey, Edmund P. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An ECS system includes an ACM mounted adjacent an air-liquid heat exchanger through a diffuser that contains a diffuser plate. The diffuser plate receives airflow from the ACM which strikes the diffuser plate and flows radially outward and around the diffuser plate and into the air-liquid heat exchanger to provide minimal pressure loss and proper flow distribution into the air-liquid heat exchanger with significantly less packaging space.

  2. Radial diffusive samplers for determination of 8-h concentration of BTEX, acetone, ethanol and ozone in ambient air during a sea breeze event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roukos, Joelle; Locoge, Nadine; Sacco, Paolo; Plaisance, Hervé

    2011-01-01

    The radial diffusive sampler Radiello ® filled with Carbograph 4 was evaluated for monitoring BTEX, ethanol and acetone concentrations for 8-hour exposure time. The sampling rates were first evaluated in an exposure chamber under standard conditions. Benzene and toluene showed the highest sampling rates with satisfactory standard deviations. Ethylbenzene and xylenes showed medium sampling rates but higher standard deviations that can be attributed to a low affinity of these compounds with the adsorbent medium for short sampling time. Acetone has a fair result because of the increase of its partial pressure in the vicinity of the adsorbent surface in the course of sampling. The Carbograph 4 adsorbent does not seem to be suitable for sampling ethanol, likely because of its high volatility. The influences of three environmental factors (temperature (T), relative humidity (RH) and concentration level (C)) on the sampling rates were also evaluated, following a fractional factorial design at two factor levels (low and high). Results were only investigated on benzene, toluene and acetone. Temperature and relative humidity are found to be the most important factors leading to variability of the benzene and toluene sampling rates. The applicability of the sampler for 8-hour sampling was demonstrated by the results of a measurement campaign carried out during a sea breeze event. Mapping of benzene, toluene and acetone concentrations showed the highest concentrations in the industrial zone following the wind direction coming from the North. Nevertheless, the sea breeze tends to reduce the spread of the industrial plumes. On the contrary, the ozone map presents the lowest concentrations at the same industrial area indicating a net consumption of ozone. The highest ozone concentrations were found in the southeastern zone suggesting a local ozone formation.

  3. Diffuser Test

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-09-13

    Tests begun at Stennis Space Center's E Complex Sept. 13 evaluated a liquid oxygen lead for engine start performance, part of the A-3 Test Facility Subscale Diffuser Risk Mitigation Project at SSC's E-3 Test Facility. Phase 1 of the subscale diffuser project, completed Sept. 24, was a series of 18 hot-fire tests using a 1,000-pound liquid oxygen and gaseous hydrogen thruster to verify maximum duration and repeatability for steam generation supporting the A-3 Test Stand project. The thruster is a stand-in for NASA's developing J-2X engine, to validate a 6 percent scale version of A-3's exhaust diffuser. Testing the J-2X at altitude conditions requires an enormous diffuser. Engineers will generate nearly 4,600 pounds per second of steam to reduce pressure inside A-3's test cell to simulate altitude conditions. A-3's exhaust diffuser has to be able to withstand regulated pressure, temperatures and the safe discharge of the steam produced during those tests. Before the real thing is built, engineers hope to work out any issues on the miniature version. Phase 2 testing is scheduled to begin this month.

  4. Flame Propagation of Butanol Isomers/Air Mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Veloo, Peter S.; Egolfopoulos, Fokion N.

    2011-01-01

    An experimental and computational study was conducted on the propagation of flames of saturated butanol isomers. The experiments were performed in the counterflow configuration under atmospheric pressure, unburned mixture temperature of 343 K, and for a wide range of equivalence ratios. The experiments were simulated using a recent kinetic model for the four isomers of butanol. Results indicate that n-butanol/air flames propagate somewhat faster than both sec-butanol/air and iso-butanol/air flames, and that tert-butanol/air flames propagate notably slower compared to the other three isomers. Reaction path analysis of tert-butanol/air flames revealed that iso-butene is a major intermediate, which subsequently reacts to form the resonantly stable iso-butenyl radical retarding thus the overall reactivity of tert-butanol/air flames relatively to the other three isomers. Through sensitivity analysis, it was determined that the mass burning rates of sec-butanol/air and iso-butanol/air flames are sensitive largely to hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and C{sub 1}–C{sub 2} hydrocarbon kinetics and not to fuel-specific reactions similarly to n-butanol/air flames. However, for tert-butanol/air flames notable sensitivity to fuel-specific reactions exists. While the numerical results predicted closely the experimental data for n-butanol/air and sec-butanol/air flames, they overpredicted and underpredicted the laminar flame speeds for iso-butanol/air and tert-butanol/air flames respectively. It was demonstrated further that the underprediction of the laminar flame speeds of tert-butanol/air flames by the model was most likely due to deficiencies of the C{sub 4}-alkene kinetics.

  5. Effects of sodium meta bisulfite on diffusion fermentation of fodder beets for fuel ethanol production. [Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbons, W.R.; Westby, C.A.

    1987-01-01

    The authors designed and tested a new process for converting fodder beets to ethanol: continuous diffusion-fermentation. This process utilizes the simultaneous diffusion-fermentation concept of the EX-FERM design; however, it overcomes the material handling problems inherent in that system by utilizing a counterflow tubular auger system. This process also eliminates the need for roller mills or presses and dryers which are required for alcohol recovery from solid phase fermentation. The latter is the only other currently feasible procedure for producing distillably worthwhile amounts of ethanol from fodder beets, sweet sorghum, and other similar feedstocks. Results on the use of sodium meta bisulfite (SMB) for contamination control with fermenting fodder beet cubes are reported.

  6. Defusing Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dou, Remy; Hogan, DaNel; Kossover, Mark; Spuck, Timothy; Young, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Diffusion has often been taught in science courses as one of the primary ways by which molecules travel, particularly within organisms. For years, classroom teachers have used the same common demonstrations to illustrate this concept (e.g., placing drops of food coloring in a beaker of water). Most of the time, the main contributor to the motion…

  7. Demonstrating Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foy, Barry G.

    1977-01-01

    Two demonstrations are described. Materials and instructions for demonstrating movement of molecules into cytoplasm using agar blocks, phenolphthalein, and sodium hydroxide are given. A simple method for demonstrating that the rate of diffusion of a gas is inversely proportional to its molecular weight is also presented. (AJ)

  8. Defusing Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dou, Remy; Hogan, DaNel; Kossover, Mark; Spuck, Timothy; Young, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Diffusion has often been taught in science courses as one of the primary ways by which molecules travel, particularly within organisms. For years, classroom teachers have used the same common demonstrations to illustrate this concept (e.g., placing drops of food coloring in a beaker of water). Most of the time, the main contributor to the motion…

  9. Demonstrating Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foy, Barry G.

    1977-01-01

    Two demonstrations are described. Materials and instructions for demonstrating movement of molecules into cytoplasm using agar blocks, phenolphthalein, and sodium hydroxide are given. A simple method for demonstrating that the rate of diffusion of a gas is inversely proportional to its molecular weight is also presented. (AJ)

  10. Carbon Diffusion in Zircon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherniak, D. J.; Watson, E. B.; Boehnke, P.; Harrison, T. M.

    2016-12-01

    With the recent discovery of potentially biogenic carbon in 4.1 billion-year-old zircon (Bell et al., 2015), it is important to understand diffusion of C in zircon in order to assess the potential of these carbonaceous inclusions to preserve isotopic evidence of Earth's early history. In this study, we have characterized carbon diffusion in natural zircon at 1-atm and under high-pressure conditions in the presence of hydrous species. The 1-atm experiments were conducted by implanting 13C into polished, oriented slabs of zircon, with implanted samples heated in air or under buffered conditions in silica glass ampoules sealed under vacuum. High-pressure experiments (1 GPa) were conducted in a piston-cylinder apparatus, using 13C labeled glycine as the starting source (this breaks down at run conditions). In all cases, 13C distributions in zircon were measured by Nuclear Reaction Analysis (NRA) using the reaction 13C(p,γ)14N. In addition to the NRA measurements, we have also conducted analyses of carbon in zircon by ion microprobe. For diffusion parallel to c we obtain a well-constrained Arrhenius relation over the temperature range 600-1100°C. Diffusion normal to c is similar. Data from the high-pressure experiments and those run under buffered conditions also yield similar diffusivities, suggesting that carbon diffusion is not significantly affected by these parameters over the range of conditions studied. Carbon diffuses more rapidly than most cations in zircon, with the exception of lithium, but several orders of magnitude more slowly than helium. Zircon will therefore be moderately retentive of carbon. For example, diffusion distances on Gyr timescales would be on order of nm at 200°C, μm at 350°C and mm at 650°C, suggesting that carbon isotopic signatures contained within carbonaceous inclusions in zircon may be retained over long timeframes if zircons experience only moderate heating. E.A. Bell, P. Boehnke, T. M. Harrison, W.L. Mao (2015) PNAS 47, 14518-14521

  11. Rare earth element diffusion in natural enstatite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherniak, Daniele J.; Liang, Yan

    2007-03-01

    Chemical diffusion coefficients of La, Nd, Eu, Gd, and Yb in natural enstatite have been measured at 850-1250 °C and 1 atm. Anhydrous diffusion experiments were run in Pt capsules in air, or in sealed silica glass capsules under an iron-wüstite (IW) solid buffer. The sources of diffusant were pre-reacted mixtures of synthetic enstatite powder and microcrystalline rare-earth aluminate garnet. Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) was used to measure diffusion profiles. For Gd diffusion in air over the temperature range 1000-1250 °C, the following Arrhenius relation is found for diffusion normal to (210): D=2.55×10-9exp(321±85mol /RT)ms-1. There is no significant difference between Gd diffusion in air and under IW-buffered conditions. Behavior similar to Gd is also noted for Nd. The Arrhenius relationship for Eu diffusion in enstatite, normal to (210) and at 850-1150 °C and IW-buffered conditions, is D=6.93×10-6exp(-384±29mol /RT)ms-1. For Eu diffusion in air over the temperature range 1000-1200 °C for the same orientation, the following Arrhenius relation is found: D=1.70×10-8exp(-350±42mol /RT)ms-1. For Eu diffusion under IW-buffered conditions and for experiments run in air, diffusivities normal to (001) are similar to those for diffusion normal to (210). Eu diffusion under IW-buffered conditions is more than an order of magnitude faster than Eu diffusion in air. It is likely that majority of Eu is in the divalent state for diffusion under IW-buffered conditions, but Eu is in the trivalent state for diffusion in air. In the case of Nd and Gd, where valence state does not change under the investigated fO 2 conditions, diffusivities measured for experiments run both in air and under IW-buffered conditions are comparable to those obtained for trivalent Eu. Further, measurements of La, Nd, Eu +3, Gd, and Yb diffusion suggest that diffusion of trivalent REE in enstatite is not sensitive to ionic size, in contrast to that observed for REE diffusion in

  12. Diffusion bonding

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Robert C.

    1976-06-22

    1. A method for joining beryllium to beryllium by diffusion bonding, comprising the steps of coating at least one surface portion of at least two beryllium pieces with nickel, positioning a coated surface portion in a contiguous relationship with an other surface portion, subjecting the contiguously disposed surface portions to an environment having an atmosphere at a pressure lower than ambient pressure, applying a force upon the beryllium pieces for causing the contiguous surface portions to abut against each other, heating the contiguous surface portions to a maximum temperature less than the melting temperature of the beryllium, substantially uniformly decreasing the applied force while increasing the temperature after attaining a temperature substantially above room temperature, and maintaining a portion of the applied force at a temperature corresponding to about maximum temperature for a duration sufficient to effect the diffusion bond between the contiguous surface portions.

  13. Flow/Soot-Formation Interactions in Nonbuoyant Laminar Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dai, Z.; Lin, K.-C.; Sunderland, P. B.; Xu, F.; Faeth, G. M.

    2002-01-01

    This is the final report of a research program considering interactions between flow and soot properties within laminar diffusion flames. Laminar diffusion flames were considered because they provide model flame systems that are far more tractable for theoretical and experimental studies than more practical turbulent diffusion flames. In particular, understanding the transport and chemical reaction processes of laminar flames is a necessary precursor to understanding these processes in practical turbulent flames and many aspects of laminar diffusion flames have direct relevance to turbulent diffusion flames through application of the widely recognized laminar flamelet concept of turbulent diffusion flames. The investigation was divided into three phases, considering the shapes of nonbuoyant round laminar jet diffusion flames in still air, the shapes of nonbuoyant round laminar jet diffusion flames in coflowing air, and the hydrodynamic suppression of soot formation in laminar diffusion flames.

  14. Mathematical model for radon diffusion in earthen materials

    SciTech Connect

    Nielson, K.K.; Rogers, V.C.

    1982-10-01

    Radon migration in porous, earthen materials is characterized by diffusion in both the air and water components of the system as well as by the interaction of the radon between the air and water. The size distribution and configuration of the pore spaces and their moisture distributions are key parameters in determining the radon diffusion coefficient for the bulk material. A mathematical model is developed and presented for calculating radon diffusion coefficients solely from the moisture content and pore size distribution of a soil, reducing the need for resorting to radon diffusion measurements. The resulting diffusion coefficients increase with the median pore diameter of the soil and decrease with increasing widths of the pore size distribution. The calculated diffusion coefficients are suitable for use in simple homogeneous-medium diffusion expressions for predicting radon transport and compare well with measured diffusion coefficients and with empirical diffusion coefficient correlations.

  15. Double Diffusive Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutherland, Bruce; Lee, Brace

    2008-11-01

    Sour gas flares attempt to dispose of deadly H2S gas through combustion. What does not burn rises as a buoyant plume. But the gas is heavier than air at room temperature, so as the rising gas cools eventually it becomes negatively buoyant and descends back to the ground. Ultimately, our intent is to predict the concentrations of the gas at ground level in realistic atmospheric conditions. As a first step towards this goal we have performed laboratory experiments examining the structure of a steady state plume of hot and salty water that rises buoyantly near the source and descends as a fountain after it has cooled sufficiently. We call this a double-diffusive plume because its evolution is dictated by the different (turbulent) diffusivities of heat and salt. A temperature and conductivity probe measures both the salinity and temperature along the centreline of the plume. The supposed axisymmetric structure of the salinity concentration as it changes with height is determined by light-attenuation methods. To help interpret the results, a theory has been successfully adapted from the work of Bloomfield and Kerr (2000), who developed coupled equations describing the structure of fountains. Introducing a new empirical parameter for the relative rates of turbulent heat and salt diffusion, the predictions are found to agree favourably with experimental results.

  16. DIFFUSION PUMP

    DOEpatents

    Levenson, L.

    1963-09-01

    A high-vacuum diffusion pump is described, featuring a novel housing geometry for enhancing pumping speed. An upright, cylindrical lower housing portion is surmounted by a concentric, upright, cylindrical upper housing portion of substantially larger diameter; an uppermost nozzle, disposed concentrically within the upper portion, is adapted to eject downwardly a conical sheet of liquid outwardly to impinge upon the uppermost extremity of the interior wall of the lower portion. Preferably this nozzle is mounted upon a pedestal rising coaxially from within the lower portion and projecting up into said upper portion. (AEC)

  17. An Air Quality Data Analysis System for Interrelating Effects, Standards and Needed Source Reductions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larsen, Ralph I.

    1973-01-01

    Makes recommendations for a single air quality data system (using average time) for interrelating air pollution effects, air quality standards, air quality monitoring, diffusion calculations, source-reduction calculations, and emission standards. (JR)

  18. An Air Quality Data Analysis System for Interrelating Effects, Standards and Needed Source Reductions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larsen, Ralph I.

    1973-01-01

    Makes recommendations for a single air quality data system (using average time) for interrelating air pollution effects, air quality standards, air quality monitoring, diffusion calculations, source-reduction calculations, and emission standards. (JR)

  19. Kinetic Effects of Aromatic Molecular Structures on Diffusion Flame Extinction

    SciTech Connect

    Won, Sang Hee; Dooley, S.; Dryer, F. L.; Ju, Yiguang

    2011-01-01

    Kinetic effects of aromatic molecular structures for jet fuel surrogates on the extinction of diffusion flames have been investigated experimentally and numerically in the counterflow configuration for toluene, n-propylbenzene, 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene, and 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene. Quantitative measurement of OH concentration for aromatic fuels was conducted by directly measuring the quenching rate from the emission lifetimes of OH planar laser induced fluorescence (LIF). The kinetic models for toluene and 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene were validated against the measurements of extinction strain rates and LIF measurements. A semi-detailed n-propylbenzene kinetic model was developed and tested. The experimental results showed that the extinction limits are ranked from highest to lowest as n-propylbenzene, toluene, 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene, and 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene. The present models for toluene and n-propylbenzene agree reasonably well with the measurements, whereas the model for 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene under-estimates extinction limits. Kinetic pathways of OH production and consumption were analyzed to investigate the impact of fuel fragmentation on OH formation. It was found that, for fuels with different molecular structures, the fuel decomposition pathways and their propagation into the formation of radical pool play an important role to determine the extinction limits of diffusion flames. Furthermore, OH concentrations were found to be representative of the entire radical pool concentration, the balance between chain branching and propagation/termination reactions and the balance between heat production from the reaction zone and heat losses to the fuel and oxidizer sides. Finally, a proposed “OH index,” was defined to demonstrate a linear correlation between extinction strain rate and OH index and fuel mole fraction, suggesting that the diffusion flame extinctions for the tested aromatic fuels can be determined by the capability of a fuel to establish a radical pool

  20. Air Research

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA's air research provides the critical science to develop and implement outdoor air regulations under the Clean Air Act and puts new tools and information in the hands of air quality managers and regulators to protect the air we breathe.

  1. Correlation of flame speed with stretch in turbulent premixed methane/air flames

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.H.; Im, H.G.

    1998-03-01

    Direct numerical simulations of two-dimensional unsteady premixed methane/air flames are performed to determine the correlation of flame speed with stretch over a wide range of curvatures and strain rates generated by intense two-dimensional turbulence. Lean and stoichiometric premixtures are considered with a detailed C{sub 1}-mechanism for methane oxidation. The computed correlation shows the existence of two distinct stable branches. It further shows that exceedingly large negative values of stretch can be obtained solely through curvature effects which give rise to an overall nonlinear correlation of the flame speed with stretch. Over a narrower stretch range, {minus}1 {le} Ka {le} 1, which includes 90% of the sample, the correlation is approximately linear, and hence, the asymptotic theory for stretch is practically applicable. Overall, one-third of the sample has negative stretch. In this linear range, the Markstein number associated with the positive branch is determined and is consistent with values obtained from comparable steady counterflow computations. In addition to this conventional positive branch, a negative branch is identified. This negative branch occurs when a flame cusp, with a center of curvature in the burnt gases, is subjected to intense compressive strain, resulting in a negative displacement speed. Negative flame speeds are also encountered for extensive tangential strain rates exceeding a Karlovitz number of unity, a value consistent with steady counterflow computations.

  2. Diffusion archeology for diffusion progression history reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Sefer, Emre; Kingsford, Carl

    2016-11-01

    Diffusion through graphs can be used to model many real-world processes, such as the spread of diseases, social network memes, computer viruses, or water contaminants. Often, a real-world diffusion cannot be directly observed while it is occurring - perhaps it is not noticed until some time has passed, continuous monitoring is too costly, or privacy concerns limit data access. This leads to the need to reconstruct how the present state of the diffusion came to be from partial diffusion data. Here, we tackle the problem of reconstructing a diffusion history from one or more snapshots of the diffusion state. This ability can be invaluable to learn when certain computer nodes are infected or which people are the initial disease spreaders to control future diffusions. We formulate this problem over discrete-time SEIRS-type diffusion models in terms of maximum likelihood. We design methods that are based on submodularity and a novel prize-collecting dominating-set vertex cover (PCDSVC) relaxation that can identify likely diffusion steps with some provable performance guarantees. Our methods are the first to be able to reconstruct complete diffusion histories accurately in real and simulated situations. As a special case, they can also identify the initial spreaders better than the existing methods for that problem. Our results for both meme and contaminant diffusion show that the partial diffusion data problem can be overcome with proper modeling and methods, and that hidden temporal characteristics of diffusion can be predicted from limited data.

  3. NIST Diffusion Data Center

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    NIST Diffusion Data Center (Web, free access)   The NIST Diffusion Data Center is a collection of over 14,100 international papers, theses, and government reports on diffusion published before 1980.

  4. Parallel flow diffusion battery

    DOEpatents

    Yeh, Hsu-Chi; Cheng, Yung-Sung

    1984-08-07

    A parallel flow diffusion battery for determining the mass distribution of an aerosol has a plurality of diffusion cells mounted in parallel to an aerosol stream, each diffusion cell including a stack of mesh wire screens of different density.

  5. Parallel flow diffusion battery

    DOEpatents

    Yeh, H.C.; Cheng, Y.S.

    1984-01-01

    A parallel flow diffusion battery for determining the mass distribution of an aerosol has a plurality of diffusion cells mounted in parallel to an aerosol stream, each diffusion cell including a stack of mesh wire screens of different density.

  6. Dual-pump CARS temperature and major species concentration measurements in counter-flow methane flames using narrowband pump and broadband Stokes lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Thariyan, Mathew P.; Ananthanarayanan, Vijaykumar; Bhuiyan, Aizaz H.; Naik, Sameer V.; Gore, Jay P.; Lucht, Robert P.

    2010-07-15

    Dual-pump coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) is used to measure temperature and species profiles in representative non-premixed and partially-premixed CH{sub 4}/O{sub 2}/N{sub 2} flames. A new laser system has been developed to generate a tunable single-frequency beam for the second pump beam in the dual-pump N{sub 2}-CO{sub 2} CARS process. The second harmonic output ({proportional_to}532 nm) from an injection-seeded Nd:YAG laser is used as one of the narrowband pump beams. The second single-longitudinal-mode pump beam centered near 561 nm is generated using an injection-seeded optical parametric oscillator, consisting of two non-linear {beta}-BBO crystals, pumped using the third harmonic output ({proportional_to}355 nm) of the same Nd:YAG laser. A broadband dye laser (BBDL), pumped using the second harmonic output of an unseeded Nd:YAG laser, is employed to produce the Stokes beam centered near 607 nm with full-width-at-half-maximum of {proportional_to}250 cm{sup -1}. The three beams are focused between two opposing nozzles of a counter-flow burner facility to measure temperature and major species concentrations in a variety of CH{sub 4}/O{sub 2}/N{sub 2} non-premixed and partially-premixed flames stabilized at a global strain rate of 20 s{sup -1} at atmospheric-pressure. For the non-premixed flames, excellent agreement is observed between the measured profiles of temperature and CO{sub 2}/N{sub 2} concentration ratios with those calculated using an opposed-flow flame code with detailed chemistry and molecular transport submodels. For partially-premixed flames, with the rich side premixing level beyond the stable premixed flame limit, the calculations overestimate the distance between the premixed and the non-premixed flamefronts. Consequently, the calculated temperatures near the rich, premixed flame are higher than those measured. Accurate prediction of the distance between the premixed and the non-premixed flames provides an interesting challenge for

  7. Cold air systems: Sleeping giant

    SciTech Connect

    MacCracken, C.D. )

    1994-04-01

    This article describes how cold air systems help owners increase the profits from their buildings by reducing electric costs and improving indoor air quality through lower relative humidity levels. Cold air distribution involves energy savings, cost savings, space savings, greater comfort, cleaner air, thermal storage, tighter ducting, coil redesign, lower relative humidities, retrofitting, and improved indoor air quality (IAQ). It opens a door for architects, engineers, owners, builders, environmentalists, retrofitters, designers, occupants, and manufacturers. Three things have held up cold air's usage: multiple fan-powered boxes that ate up the energy savings of primary fans. Cold air room diffusers that provided inadequate comfort. Condensation from ducts, boxes, and diffusers. Such problems have been largely eliminated through research and development by utilities and manufacturers. New cold air diffusers no longer need fan powered boxes. It has also been found that condensation is not a concern so long as the ducts are located in air conditioned space, such as drop ceilings or central risers, where relative humidity falls quickly during morning startup.

  8. Flame Velocities over a Wide Composition Range for Pentane-air, Ethylene-air, and Propyne-air Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Dorothy M; Wong, Edgar, L

    1951-01-01

    Fundamental flame velocities are reported for pentane air, ethylene-air, and propylene-air mixtures for the concentration range 60 to 130 percent of stoichiometric. A form of the Tanford and Pease equation, which includes a small constant velocity term independent of diffusion, will predict the observed changes in flame velocity.

  9. Air Pollution

    MedlinePlus

    Air pollution is a mixture of solid particles and gases in the air. Car emissions, chemicals from factories, ... Ozone, a gas, is a major part of air pollution in cities. When ozone forms air pollution, it's ...

  10. FRACTIONAL PEARSON DIFFUSIONS.

    PubMed

    Leonenko, Nikolai N; Meerschaert, Mark M; Sikorskii, Alla

    2013-07-15

    Pearson diffusions are governed by diffusion equations with polynomial coefficients. Fractional Pearson diffusions are governed by the corresponding time-fractional diffusion equation. They are useful for modeling sub-diffusive phenomena, caused by particle sticking and trapping. This paper provides explicit strong solutions for fractional Pearson diffusions, using spectral methods. It also presents stochastic solutions, using a non-Markovian inverse stable time change.

  11. FRACTIONAL PEARSON DIFFUSIONS

    PubMed Central

    Leonenko, Nikolai N.; Meerschaert, Mark M.

    2013-01-01

    Pearson diffusions are governed by diffusion equations with polynomial coefficients. Fractional Pearson diffusions are governed by the corresponding time-fractional diffusion equation. They are useful for modeling sub-diffusive phenomena, caused by particle sticking and trapping. This paper provides explicit strong solutions for fractional Pearson diffusions, using spectral methods. It also presents stochastic solutions, using a non-Markovian inverse stable time change. PMID:23626377

  12. H+ diffusion and electrochemical stability of Li1+x+yAlxTi2-xSiyP3-yO12 glass in aqueous Li/air battery electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Fei; Xu, Wu; Shao, Yuyan; Chen, Xilin; Wang, Zhiguo; Gao, Fei; Liu, Xingjiang; Zhang, Ji-Guang

    2012-09-01

    It is well known that LATP (Li1+x+yAlxTi2-xSiyP3-yO12) glass is a good lithium ion conductor. However, the interaction between LATP glass and H+ ions (including its diffusion and surface adsorption) needs to be well understood before the long-term application of LATP glass in an aqueous electrolyte based Li-air batteries where H+ always present. In this work, we investigate the H+ ion diffusion properties in LATP glass and their surface interactions using both experimental and modeling approaches. Our analysis indicates that the apparent H+ related current observed in the initial cyclic voltammetry scan should be attributed to the adsorption of H+ ions on the LATP glass rather than the bulk diffusion of H+ ions in the glass. Furthermore, the density functional theory calculations indicate that the H+ ion diffusion energy barrier (3.21 eV) is much higher than that of Li+ ion (0.79 eV) and Na+ ion (0.79 eV) in NASICON type LiTi2(PO4)3 material. As a result, the H+ ion conductivity in LATP glass is negligible at room temperature. However, significant surface corrosion was found after the LATP glass was soaked in strong alkaline electrolyte for extended time. Therefore, appropriate electrolytes have to be developed to prevent the corrosion of LATP glass before its practical application for Li-air batteries using aqueous electrolyte.

  13. Fuel cell stack with passive air supply

    DOEpatents

    Ren, Xiaoming; Gottesfeld, Shimshon

    2006-01-17

    A fuel cell stack has a plurality of polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) where each PEFC includes a rectangular membrane electrode assembly (MEA) having a fuel flow field along a first axis and an air flow field along a second axis perpendicular to the first axis, where the fuel flow field is long relative to the air flow field. A cathode air flow field in each PEFC has air flow channels for air flow parallel to the second axis and that directly open to atmospheric air for air diffusion within the channels into contact with the MEA.

  14. Diffusing diffusivity: Rotational diffusion in two and three dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Rohit; Sebastian, K. L.

    2017-06-01

    We consider the problem of calculating the probability distribution function (pdf) of angular displacement for rotational diffusion in a crowded, rearranging medium. We use the diffusing diffusivity model and following our previous work on translational diffusion [R. Jain and K. L. Sebastian, J. Phys. Chem. B 120, 3988 (2016)], we show that the problem can be reduced to that of calculating the survival probability of a particle undergoing Brownian motion, in the presence of a sink. We use the approach to calculate the pdf for the rotational motion in two and three dimensions. We also propose new dimensionless, time dependent parameters, αr o t ,2 D and αr o t ,3 D, which can be used to analyze the experimental/simulation data to find the extent of deviation from the normal behavior, i.e., constant diffusivity, and obtain explicit analytical expressions for them, within our model.

  15. Prediction Models are Basis for Rational Air Quality Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniels, Anders; Bach, Wilfrid

    1973-01-01

    An air quality control scheme employing meteorological diffusion, time averaging and frequency, and cost-benefit models is discussed. The methods outlined provide a constant feedback system for air quality control. Flow charts and maps are included. (BL)

  16. Prediction Models are Basis for Rational Air Quality Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniels, Anders; Bach, Wilfrid

    1973-01-01

    An air quality control scheme employing meteorological diffusion, time averaging and frequency, and cost-benefit models is discussed. The methods outlined provide a constant feedback system for air quality control. Flow charts and maps are included. (BL)

  17. Examination of the effect of differential molecular diffusion in DNS of turbulent non-premixed flames

    DOE PAGES

    Han, Chao; Lignell, David O.; Hawkes, Evatt R.; ...

    2017-02-09

    Here, the effect of differential molecular diffusion (DMD) in turbulent non-premixed flames is studied by examining two previously reported DNS of temporally evolving planar jet flames, one with CO/H2 as the fuel and the other with C2H4 as the fuel. The effect of DMD in the CO/H2 DNS flames in which H2 is part of fuel is found to behave similar to laminar flamelet, while in the C2H4 DNS flames in which H2 is not present in the fuel it is similar to laminar flamelet in early stages but becomes different from laminar flamelet later. The scaling of the effectmore » of DMD with respect to the Reynolds number Re is investigated in the CO/H2 DNS flames, and an evident power law scaling (~Re–a with a a positive constant) is observed. The scaling of the effect of DMD with respect to the Damkohler number Da is explored in both laminar counter-flow jet C2H4 diffusion flames and the C2H4 DNS flames. A power law scaling (~Daa with a a positive constant) is clearly demonstrated for C2H4 nonpremixed flames.« less

  18. Development of PIV for Microgravity Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenberg, Paul S.; Wernet, Mark P.; Yanis, William; Urban, David L.; Sunderland, Peter B.

    2003-01-01

    Results are presented from the application of Particle Image Velocimetry(PIV) to the overfire region of a laminar gas jet diffusion flame in normal gravity. A methane flame burning in air at 0.98 bar was considered. The apparatus demonstrated here is packaged in a drop rig designed for use in the 2.2 second drop tower.

  19. Automated semiconductor diffusion and oxidation facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    A semiconductor diffusion and oxidation facility (totally automated) was developed. Wafers arrived on an air track, automatically loaded into a furnace tube, processed, returned to track, and sent on to the next process. The entire process was controlled by a computer.

  20. Diffusion processes in freely suspended smectic films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Śliwa, I.; Zakharov, A. V.

    2017-08-01

    A molecular model describing translational diffusion in freely suspended smectic films (FSSFs) in air is proposed. This model is based on the random walk theory and allows calculation of the translational diffusion coefficient (TDC) across smectic layers (along the director). All values necessary for calculating the TDC are obtained within the generalized mean-field model considering not only anisotropic interactions between nearest neighbors of molecules forming FSSFs, but also the stabilizing effect of the smectic/air interface. The spatial inhomogeneity of order parameters over the FSSF section, arising in this case, results in the fact that the surface tension at the smectic/air interface not only suppresses thermal fluctuations in surface layers, but also completely suppresses translational diffusion of molecules from the FSSF to air. The results of calculations of dimensional translational diffusion in the bulk of the FSSF formed by 5- n-alkyl-2-(4- n-(perfluoroalkyl-metyleneoxy))pentyl molecules during its thinning show that the TDC monotonically increases as the smectic film is thinned.