Science.gov

Sample records for air coupled acoustic

  1. Air Coupled Acoustic Thermography (acat) Inspection Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalameda, J. N.; Winfree, W. P.; Yost, W. T.

    2008-02-01

    The scope of this effort is to determine the viability of a new heating technique using a noncontact acoustic excitation source. Because of low coupling between air and the structure, a synchronous detection method is employed. Any reduction in the out of plane stiffness improves the acoustic coupling efficiency and as a result, defective areas have an increase in temperature relative to the surrounding area. Hence a new measurement system, based on air-coupled acoustic energy and synchronous detection is presented. An analytical model of a clamped circular plate is given, experimentally tested, and verified. Repeatability confirms the technique with a measurement uncertainty of +/-6.2 percent. The range of frequencies used was 800-2,000 Hertz. Acoustic excitation and consequent thermal detection of flaws in a helicopter blade is examined and results indicate that air coupled acoustic excitation enables the detection of core damage in sandwich honeycomb structures.

  2. Air Coupled Acoustic Thermography (ACAT) Inspection Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zalameda, Joseph; Winfree, William P.; Yost, William T.

    2007-01-01

    The scope of this effort is to determine the viability of a new heating technique using a noncontact acoustic excitation source. Because of low coupling between air and the structure, a synchronous detection method is employed. Any reduction in the out of plane stiffness improves the acoustic coupling efficiency and as a result, defective areas have an increase in temperature relative to the surrounding area. Hence a new measurement system, based on air-coupled acoustic energy and synchronous detection is presented. An analytical model of a clamped circular plate is given, experimentally tested, and verified. Repeatability confirms the technique with a measurement uncertainty of plus or minus 6.2 percent. The range of frequencies used was 800-2,000 Hertz. Acoustic excitation and consequent thermal detection of flaws in a helicopter blade is examined and results indicate that air coupled acoustic excitation enables the detection of core damage in sandwich honeycomb structures.

  3. Air-coupled acoustic thermography for in-situ evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zalameda, Joseph N. (Inventor); Winfree, William P. (Inventor); Yost, William T. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Acoustic thermography uses a housing configured for thermal, acoustic and infrared radiation shielding. For in-situ applications, the housing has an open side adapted to be sealingly coupled to a surface region of a structure such that an enclosed chamber filled with air is defined. One or more acoustic sources are positioned to direct acoustic waves through the air in the enclosed chamber and towards the surface region. To activate and control each acoustic source, a pulsed signal is applied thereto. An infrared imager focused on the surface region detects a thermal image of the surface region. A data capture device records the thermal image in synchronicity with each pulse of the pulsed signal such that a time series of thermal images is generated. For enhanced sensitivity and/or repeatability, sound and/or vibrations at the surface region can be used in feedback control of the pulsed signal applied to the acoustic sources.

  4. Application of Air Coupled Acoustic Thermography (ACAT) for Inspection of Honeycomb Sandwich Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winfree, William P.; Zalameda, Joseph N.; Pergantis, Charles; Flanagan, David; Deschepper, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    The application of a noncontact air coupled acoustic heating technique is investigated for the inspection of advanced honeycomb composite structures. A weakness in the out of plane stiffness of the structure, caused by a delamination or core damage, allows for the coupling of acoustic energy and thus this area will have a higher temperature than the surrounding area. Air coupled acoustic thermography (ACAT) measurements were made on composite sandwich structures with damage and were compared to conventional flash thermography. A vibrating plate model is presented to predict the optimal acoustic source frequency. Improvements to the measurement technique are also discussed.

  5. Air-ground interface: Surface waves, surface impedance and acoustic-to-seismic coupling coefficient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daigle, Gilles; Embleton, Tony

    1990-01-01

    In atmospheric acoustics, the subject of surface waves has been an area of discussion for many years. The existence of an acoustic surface wave is now well established theoretically. The mathematical solution for spherical wave propagation above an impedance boundary includes the possibility of a contribution that possesses all the standard properties for a surface wave. Surface waves exist when the surface is sufficiently porous, relative to its acoustical resistance, that it can influence the airborne particle velocity near the surface and reduce the phase velocity of sound waves in air at the surface. This traps some of the sound energy in the air to remain near the surface as it propagates. Above porous grounds, the existence of surface waves has eluded direct experimental confirmation (pulse experiments have failed to show a separate arrival expected from the reduced phase speed) and indirect evidence for its existence has appeared contradictory. The experimental evidence for the existence of an acoustical surface wave above porous boundaries is reviewed. Recent measurements including pulse experiments are also described. A few years ago the acoustic impedance of a grass-covered surface was measured in the frequency range 30 to 300 Hz. Here, further measurements on the same site are discussed. These measurements include core samples, a shallow refractive survey to determine the seismic velocities, and measurements of the acoustic-to-seismic coupling coefficient.

  6. Mechanical property characterization of bilayered tablets using nondestructive air-coupled acoustics.

    PubMed

    Akseli, Ilgaz; Dey, Dipankar; Cetinkaya, Cetin

    2010-03-01

    A noncontact/nondestructive air-coupled acoustic technique to be potentially used in mechanical property determination of bilayer tablets is presented. In the reported experiments, a bilayer tablet is vibrated via an acoustic field of an air-coupled transducer in a frequency range sufficiently high to excite several vibrational modes (harmonics) of the tablet. The tablet vibrational transient responses at a number of measurement points on the tablet are acquired by a laser vibrometer in a noncontact manner. An iterative computational procedure based on the finite element method is utilized to extract the Young's modulus, the Poisson's ratio, and the mass density values of each layer material of a bilayer tablet from a subset of the measured resonance frequencies. For verification purposes, a contact ultrasonic technique based on the time-of-flight data of the longitudinal (pressure) and transverse (shear) acoustic waves in each layer of a bilayer tablet is also utilized. The extracted mechanical properties from the air-coupled acoustic data agree well with those determined from the contact ultrasonic measurements. The mechanical properties of solid oral dosage forms have been shown to impact its mechanical integrity, disintegration profile and the release rate of the drug in the digestive tract, thus potentially affecting its therapeutic response. The presented nondestructive technique provides greater insight into the mechanical properties of the bilayer tablets and has the potential to identify quality and performance problems related to the mechanical properties of the bilayer tablets early on the production process and, consequently, reduce associated cost and material waste. PMID:20063078

  7. Detection of defect parameters using nonlinear air-coupled emission by ultrasonic guided waves at contact acoustic nonlinearities.

    PubMed

    Delrue, Steven; Van Den Abeele, Koen

    2015-12-01

    Interaction of ultrasonic guided waves with kissing bonds (closed delaminations and incipient surface breaking cracks) gives rise to nonlinear features at the defect location. This causes higher harmonic frequency ultrasonic radiation into the ambient air, often referred to as Nonlinear Air-Coupled Emission (NACE), which may serve as a nonlinear tag to detect the defects. This paper summarizes the results of a numerical implementation and simulation study of NACE. The developed model combines a 3D time domain model for the nonlinear Lamb wave propagation in delaminated samples with a spectral solution for the nonlinear air-coupled emission. A parametric study is conducted to illustrate the potential of detecting defect location, size and shape by studying the NACE acoustic radiation patterns in different orientation planes. The simulation results prove that there is a good determination potential for the defect parameters, especially when the radiated frequency matches one of the resonance frequencies of the delaminated layer, leading to a Local Defect Resonance (LDR). PMID:26208725

  8. Air-Coupled Vibrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Döring, D.; Solodov, I.; Busse, G.

    Sound and ultrasound in air are the products of a multitude of different processes and thus can be favorable or undesirable phenomena. Development of experimental tools for non-invasive measurements and imaging of airborne sound fields is of importance for linear and nonlinear nondestructive material testing as well as noise control in industrial or civil engineering applications. One possible solution is based on acousto-optic interaction, like light diffraction imaging. The diffraction approach usually requires a sophisticated setup with fine optical alignment barely applicable in industrial environment. This paper focuses on the application of the robust experimental tool of scanning laser vibrometry, which utilizes commercial off-the-shelf equipment. The imaging technique of air-coupled vibrometry (ACV) is based on the modulation of the optical path length by the acoustic pressure of the sound wave. The theoretical considerations focus on the analysis of acousto-optical phase modulation. The sensitivity of the ACV in detecting vibration velocity was estimated as ~1 mm/s. The ACV applications to imaging of linear airborne fields are demonstrated for leaky wave propagation and measurements of ultrasonic air-coupled transducers. For higher-intensity ultrasound, the classical nonlinear effect of the second harmonic generation was measured in air. Another nonlinear application includes a direct observation of the nonlinear air-coupled emission (NACE) from the damaged areas in solid materials. The source of the NACE is shown to be strongly localized around the damage and proposed as a nonlinear "tag" to discern and image the defects.

  9. Acoustical coupling of lizard eardrums.

    PubMed

    Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jakob; Manley, Geoffrey A

    2008-12-01

    Lizard ears are clear examples of two-input pressure-difference receivers, with up to 40-dB differences in eardrum vibration amplitude in response to ipsi- and contralateral stimulus directions. The directionality is created by acoustical coupling of the eardrums and interaction of the direct and indirect sound components on the eardrum. The ensuing pressure-difference characteristics generate the highest directionality of any similar-sized terrestrial vertebrate ear. The aim of the present study was to measure the gain of the direct and indirect sound components in three lizard species: Anolis sagrei and Basiliscus vittatus (iguanids) and Hemidactylus frenatus (gekkonid) by laser vibrometry, using either free-field sound or a headphone and coupler for stimulation. The directivity of the ear of these lizards is pronounced in the frequency range from 2 to 5 kHz. The directivity is ovoidal, asymmetrical across the midline, but largely symmetrical across the interaural axis (i.e., front-back). Occlusion of the contralateral ear abolishes the directionality. We stimulated the two eardrums with a coupler close to the eardrum to measure the gain of the sound pathways. Within the frequency range of maximal directionality, the interaural transmission gain (compared to sound arriving directly) is close to or even exceeds unity, indicating a pronounced acoustical transparency of the lizard head and resonances in the interaural cavities. Our results show that the directionality of the lizard ear is caused by the acoustic interaction of the two eardrums. The results can be largely explained by a simple acoustical model based on an electrical analog circuit. PMID:18648878

  10. Acoustical Coupling of Lizard Eardrums

    PubMed Central

    Manley, Geoffrey A.

    2008-01-01

    Lizard ears are clear examples of two-input pressure-difference receivers, with up to 40-dB differences in eardrum vibration amplitude in response to ipsi- and contralateral stimulus directions. The directionality is created by acoustical coupling of the eardrums and interaction of the direct and indirect sound components on the eardrum. The ensuing pressure-difference characteristics generate the highest directionality of any similar-sized terrestrial vertebrate ear. The aim of the present study was to measure the gain of the direct and indirect sound components in three lizard species: Anolis sagrei and Basiliscus vittatus (iguanids) and Hemidactylus frenatus (gekkonid) by laser vibrometry, using either free-field sound or a headphone and coupler for stimulation. The directivity of the ear of these lizards is pronounced in the frequency range from 2 to 5 kHz. The directivity is ovoidal, asymmetrical across the midline, but largely symmetrical across the interaural axis (i.e., front–back). Occlusion of the contralateral ear abolishes the directionality. We stimulated the two eardrums with a coupler close to the eardrum to measure the gain of the sound pathways. Within the frequency range of maximal directionality, the interaural transmission gain (compared to sound arriving directly) is close to or even exceeds unity, indicating a pronounced acoustical transparency of the lizard head and resonances in the interaural cavities. Our results show that the directionality of the lizard ear is caused by the acoustic interaction of the two eardrums. The results can be largely explained by a simple acoustical model based on an electrical analog circuit. PMID:18648878

  11. Acoustic wave coupled magnetoelectric effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, J. S.; Zhang, N.

    2016-07-01

    Magnetoelectric (ME) coupling by acoustic waveguide was developed. Longitudinal and transversal ME effects of larger than 44 and 6 (V cm-1 Oe-1) were obtained with the waveguide-coupled ME device, respectively. Several resonant points were observed in the range of frequency lower than 47 kHz. Analysis showed that the standing waves in the waveguide were responsible for those resonances. The frequency and size dependence of the ME effects were investigated. A resonant condition about the geometrical size of the waveguide was obtained. Theory and experiments showed the resonant frequencies were closely influenced by the diameter and length of the waveguide. A series of double-peak curves of longitudinal magnetoelectric response were obtained, and their significance was discussed initially.

  12. Coupling between plate vibration and acoustic radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frendi, Abdelkader; Maestrello, Lucio; Bayliss, Alvin

    1992-01-01

    A detailed numerical investigation of the coupling between the vibration of a flexible plate and the acoustic radiation is performed. The nonlinear Euler equations are used to describe the acoustic fluid while the nonlinear plate equation is used to describe the plate vibration. Linear, nonlinear, and quasi-periodic or chaotic vibrations and the resultant acoustic radiation are analyzed. We find that for the linear plate response, acoustic coupling is negligible. However, for the nonlinear and chaotic responses, acoustic coupling has a significant effect on the vibration level as the loading increases. The radiated pressure from a plate undergoing nonlinear or chaotic vibrations is found to propagate nonlinearly into the far-field. However, the nonlinearity due to wave propagation is much weaker than that due to the plate vibrations. As the acoustic wave propagates into the far-field, the relative difference in level between the fundamental and its harmonics and subharmonics decreases with distance.

  13. Noncontact Acoustic Manipulation in Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozuka, Teruyuki; Yasui, Kyuichi; Tuziuti, Toru; Towata, Atsuya; Iida, Yasuo

    2007-07-01

    A noncontact manipulation technique is useful for micromachine technology, biotechnology, and new materials processing. In this paper, we describe an advanced manipulation technique for transporting small objects in air. A standing wave field was generated by two sound beams crossing each other generated by bolted Langevin transducers. Expanded polystyrene particles were trapped at the nodes of the sound pressure in the standing wave field. The position of a trapped particle was shifted by changing the phase difference between the two sound beams. When the trapped particle is transported, it spatially oscillate periodically in a direction perpendicular to that of particle transportation. The numerical calculation of an acoustic field revealed that it is caused by the reflection of an ultrasonic wave at each transducer surface.

  14. Air-coupled acoustic radiation force for non-contact generation of broadband mechanical waves in soft media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambroziński, Łukasz; Pelivanov, Ivan; Song, Shaozhen; Yoon, Soon Joon; Li, David; Gao, Liang; Shen, Tueng T.; Wang, Ruikang K.; O'Donnell, Matthew

    2016-07-01

    A non-contact method for efficient, non-invasive excitation of mechanical waves in soft media is proposed, in which we focus an ultrasound (US) signal through air onto the surface of a medium under study. The US wave reflected from the air/medium interface provides radiation force to the medium surface that launches a transient mechanical wave in the transverse (lateral) direction. The type of mechanical wave is determined by boundary conditions. To prove this concept, a home-made 1 MHz piezo-ceramic transducer with a matching layer to air sends a chirped US signal centered at 1 MHz to a 1.6 mm thick gelatin phantom mimicking soft biological tissue. A phase-sensitive (PhS)-optical coherence tomography system is used to track/image the mechanical wave. The reconstructed transient displacement of the mechanical wave in space and time demonstrates highly efficient generation, thus offering great promise for non-contact, non-invasive characterization of soft media, in general, and for elasticity measurements in delicate soft tissues and organs in bio-medicine, in particular.

  15. Evaluation of Air Coupled Ultrasound for Composite Aerospace Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tat, H.; Georgeson, G.; Bossi, R.

    2009-03-01

    Non-contact air coupled ultrasound suffers from the high acoustic impedance mismatch characteristics of air to solid interfaces. Advances in transducer technology, particularly MEMS, have improved the acoustic impedance match at the transmission stage and the signal to noise at the reception stage. Comparisons of through transmission (TTU) scanning of laminate and honeycomb test samples using conventional piezoelectric air coupled transducers, new MEMS air coupled transducers, and standard water coupled inspections have been performed to assess the capability. An additional issue for air coupled UT inspection is the need for a lean implementation for both manufacturing and in-service operations. Concepts and applications utilizing magnetic coupling of transducers have been developed that allows air coupled inspection operations in compact low cost configurations.

  16. Acoustic detection of air shower cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, X.; Liu, Y.; Du, S.

    1985-01-01

    At an altitude of 1890m, a pre-test with an Air shower (AS) core selector and a small acoustic array set up in an anechoic pool with a volume of 20x7x7 cu m was performed, beginning in Aug. 1984. In analyzing the waveforms recorded during the effective working time of 186 hrs, three acoustic signals which cannot be explained as from any source other than AS cores were obtained, and an estimation of related parameters was made.

  17. Review of air-coupled ultrasonic materials characterization.

    PubMed

    Chimenti, D E

    2014-09-01

    This article presents a review of air-coupled ultrasonics employed in the characterization or nondestructive inspection of industrial materials. Developments in air-coupled transduction and electronics are briefly treated, although the emphasis here is on methods of characterization and inspection, and in overcoming limitations inherent in the use of such a tenuous sound coupling medium as air. The role of Lamb waves in plate characterization is covered, including the use of air-coupled acoustic beams to measure the elastic and/or viscoelastic properties of a material. Air-coupled acoustic detection, when other methods are employed to generate high-amplitude sound beams is also reviewed. Applications to civil engineering, acoustic tomography, and the characterization of both paper and wood are dealt with here. A brief summary of developments in air-coupled acoustic arrays and the application of air-coupled methods in nonlinear ultrasonics complete the review. In particular, the work of Professor Bernard Hosten and his collaborators at Bordeaux is carefully examined. PMID:24650685

  18. Acoustic-to-seismic coupling variations in cold regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, Donald G.

    2002-05-01

    Experiments were conducted to investigate the variations that may occur in acoustic-to-seismic coupling arising from changes in local near-surface conditions. The emphasis of the investigations was on cold regions, where many different surface conditions exist and where conditions may change over a short time period from wind, precipitation, freezing, or thawing. The measurements were conducted by recording blank pistol shots with surface geophones and microphones. Results are presented for grassland, thin and thick seasonal snow covers, polar firn, thin grounded ice, thick glacier ice, and floating river ice. The ratio of induced ground motion to acoustic pressure ranged from 0.5 to 20 micro-meters per second per Pascal. Often two arrivals were detected on the geophones, a high-speed seismic compressional wave followed by the air wave. [Work funded by the U.S. Army.

  19. Magnetoelectric coupling by acoustic wave guide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X. Y.; Liu, J.; Zhang, N.

    2016-04-01

    Magnetoelectric (ME) coupling by acoustic waveguide was developed. A very strong axial ME response was observed. The dependences of the sample size and the frequency of the ac field on the ME coupling were investigated. Several resonant points were observed in the frequency range applied (<50 kHz). Analysis shows that the standing waves transmitted in the waveguide were responsible for those resonances. And the resonant frequencies were closely influenced by the geometrical size of the waveguide. A resonant condition related to the size of the sample was obtained. The axial (or longitudinal) and transversal ME coefficients were observed to be up to 62 and 6 (V cm-1 Oe-1) at resonant points, respectively, indicating that the axial ME effect in this device was much higher than its transversal ones. A series of double-peak curves of axial ME coefficient versus magnetic field were observed. The significance of the double-peak curves was discussed.

  20. Measurements of thermo-acoustic coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pun, Winston

    The problem of combustion instabilities has existed since the early 1940s, when they were observed during the development of solid and liquid rocket engines. While various engineering solutions have served well in these fields, the problem is revisited in modern gas-turbine engines. The purpose of this work is to provide experimental measurements of laboratory devices that exhibit thermo-acoustic coupling, similar to the interaction observed during combustion instabilities, which will aid in the design and development of stable systems. Possibly the simplest device which exhibits these characteristics is a Rijke tube. An electrical, horizontally mounted, 1 m long version of the original Rijke tube is presented, with measurements taken during unstable and stable operation. An accurate stability boundary with uncertainty is determined for a heater position of x/L = ¼, as a function of mass flow rate and heater power. Hysteresis, not previously reported, is observed at flow rates above 3 g/s. A one-dimensional model of the stability boundary with linear acoustics is shown to have qualitative agreement with experimental data. A novel technique has also been devised which can provide insight into the local dynamic response of a flame to an acoustic field. In the experiments, a test chamber is acoustically excited by a pair of low-frequency drivers. The response of the flame is visualized by two techniques; chemiluminescence and planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) of the hydroxyl (OH) radical, both of which are well-known indicators for heat release in flames. The resulting images are phase-resolved and averaged to yield a qualitative picture of the fluctuation of the heat release. The images are correlated with a pressure transducer near the flame, which allows stability to be evaluated using Rayleigh's criterion and a combustion response function. This is the first known measurement of the combustion dynamics of a flame over a range of frequencies. Results

  1. Computational and experimental techniques for coupled acoustic/structure interactions.

    SciTech Connect

    Sumali, Anton Hartono; Pierson, Kendall Hugh; Walsh, Timothy Francis; Dohner, Jeffrey Lynn; Reese, Garth M.; Day, David Minot

    2004-01-01

    This report documents the results obtained during a one-year Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) initiative aimed at investigating coupled structural acoustic interactions by means of algorithm development and experiment. Finite element acoustic formulations have been developed based on fluid velocity potential and fluid displacement. Domain decomposition and diagonal scaling preconditioners were investigated for parallel implementation. A formulation that includes fluid viscosity and that can simulate both pressure and shear waves in fluid was developed. An acoustic wave tube was built, tested, and shown to be an effective means of testing acoustic loading on simple test structures. The tube is capable of creating a semi-infinite acoustic field due to nonreflecting acoustic termination at one end. In addition, a micro-torsional disk was created and tested for the purposes of investigating acoustic shear wave damping in microstructures, and the slip boundary conditions that occur along the wet interface when the Knudsen number becomes sufficiently large.

  2. Structural-acoustic coupling in aircraft fuselage structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathur, Gopal P.; Simpson, Myles A.

    1992-01-01

    Results of analytical and experimental investigations of structural-acoustic coupling phenomenon in an aircraft fuselage are described. The structural and acoustic cavity modes of DC-9 fuselage were determined using a finite element approach to vibration analysis. Predicted structural and acoustic dispersion curves were used to determine possible occurrences of structural-acoustic coupling for the fuselage. An aft section of DC-9 aircraft fuselage, housed in an anechoic chamber, was used for experimental investigations. The test fuselage was excited by a shaker and vibration response and interior sound field were measured using accelerometer and microphone arrays. The wavenumber-frequency structural and cavity response maps were generated from the measured data. Analysis and interpretation of the spatial plots and wavenumber maps provided the required information on modal characteristics, fuselage response and structural-acoustic coupling.

  3. Atypical Applications for Gas-coupled Laser Acoustic Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caron, J. N.; Kunapareddy, P.

    2014-06-01

    Gas-coupled laser acoustic detection (GCLAD) was primarily developed to sense laser-generated ultrasound in composite materials. In a typical setup, a laser beam is directed parallel to the material surface. Radiated ultrasound waves deflect or displace the probe beam resulting from changes in the air's index of refraction. A position-sensitive photodetector senses the beam movement, and produces a signal proportional to the ultrasound wave. In this paper, we discuss three applications of GCLAD that take advantage of the unique detection characteristics. Directivity patterns of ultrasound amplitude in water demonstrate the use of GCLAD as a directional hydrophone. We also demonstrate the sensing of waveforms from a gelatin. The gelatin mimics ultrasound propagation through skin tissues. Lastly, we show how GCLAD can be used as a line receiver for continuous laser generation of ultrasound. CLGU may enable ultrasound scanning at rates that are orders of magnitude faster than current methods.

  4. Progress in air-coupled ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayaraman, Subash; Pellkofer, Dominik; Lucas, Ian; Bezdek, Michal; Tittmann, Bernhard

    2007-04-01

    A variety of industrial and everyday non-destructive inspection applications exist where the target material/product is inaccessible or, contact with the material is prohibited. In such cases, air-coupled ultrasonic techniques play a major role but commonly significant transmission loss is known to occur. Therefore, it becomes imperative to know the amount of absolute wave mechanical strain achieved in materials embedded in gaseous medium, for certain applications. Thus, the overall objective of this work was to establish simulated results and specific experimental verifications of the numerical modeling, and develop guidelines in the use of matching layers to maximize the wave mechanical strain imparted to materials. A Laser Doppler Vibrometer was used to obtain the displacements/strains induced in the materials. Coupled Acoustic Piezoelectric Analysis (CAPA), coupled field finite element method software was used to perform the simulations. The applications considered in this work include metallic targets inside an enclosed container, food products and also elastomeric composites such as automotive tires.

  5. Acoustic focusing by an array of heat sources in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Yong; Sun, Hong-xiang; Liu, Chen; Qian, Jiao; Yuan, Shou-qi; Xia, Jian-ping; Guan, Yi-jun; Zhang, Shu-yi

    2016-06-01

    We report on a broadband acoustic focusing lens comprising 20 heat sources of different temperatures, 10 on each side of the array, in air. This focusing phenomenon is attributed to temperature gradients inducing the desired refractive index in one medium (air) and to the continuously changing acoustic impedance, which avoids any acoustic impedance difference that would occur between a lens and air. The results indicate that this focusing lens has a broader bandwidth (>3.5 kHz), higher intensity amplification (about 5.0 times), and a simpler structure. This focusing lens has great potential for applications in ultrasonic devices.

  6. In situ high temperature oxidation analysis of Zircaloy-4 using acoustic emission coupled with thermogravimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omar, Al Haj; Véronique, Peres; Eric, Serris; François, Grosjean; Jean, Kittel; François, Ropital; Michel, Cournil

    2015-06-01

    Zircaloy-4 oxidation behavior at high temperature (900 °C), which can be reached in case of severe accidental situations in nuclear pressurised water reactor, was studied using acoustic emission analysis coupled with thermogravimetry. Two different atmospheres were used to study the oxidation of Zircaloy-4: (a) helium and pure oxygen, (b) helium and oxygen combined with slight addition of air. The experiments with 20% of oxygen confirm the dependence on oxygen anions diffusion in the oxide scale. Under a mixture of oxygen and air in helium, an acceleration of the corrosion was observed due to the detrimental effect of nitrogen. The kinetic rate increased significantly after a kinetic transition (breakaway). This acceleration was accompanied by an acoustic emission activity. Most of the acoustic emission bursts were recorded after the kinetic transition (post-transition) or during the cooling of the sample. The characteristic features of the acoustic emission signals appear to be correlated with the different populations of cracks and their occurrence in the ZrO2 layer or in the α-Zr(O) layer. Acoustic events were recorded during the isothermal dwell time at high temperature under air. They were associated with large cracks in the zirconia porous layer. Acoustic events were also recorded during cooling after oxidation tests both under air or oxygen. For the latter, cracks were observed in the oxygen enriched zirconium metal phase and not in the dense zirconia layer after 5 h of oxidation.

  7. Coupled resonator filter with single-layer acoustic coupler.

    PubMed

    Jamneala, Tiberiu; Small, Martha; Ruby, Rich; Larson, John D

    2008-10-01

    We discuss the operation of novel coupled-resonator filters with single-layer acoustic couplers. Our analysis employs the physical Mason model for acoustic resonators. Their simpler fabrication process is counterbalanced by the high acoustic attenuation of suitable coupler materials. At high levels of attenuation, both the phase and the acoustic impedance must be treated as complex quantities to accurately predict the filter insertion loss. We demonstrate that the typically poor near-band rejection of coupled resonator filters can be improved at the die level by connecting a small capacitance between the input and output of the filter to produce a pair of tunable transmission minima. We make use of these theoretical findings to fabricate coupled resonators filters operating at 2.45 GHz. PMID:18986880

  8. Coupled vibro-acoustic model updating using frequency response functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nehete, D. V.; Modak, S. V.; Gupta, K.

    2016-03-01

    Interior noise in cavities of motorized vehicles is of increasing significance due to the lightweight design of these structures. Accurate coupled vibro-acoustic FE models of such cavities are required so as to allow a reliable design and analysis. It is, however, experienced that the vibro-acoustic predictions using these models do not often correlate acceptably well with the experimental measurements and hence require model updating. Both the structural and the acoustic parameters addressing the stiffness as well as the damping modeling inaccuracies need to be considered simultaneously in the model updating framework in order to obtain an accurate estimate of these parameters. It is also noted that the acoustic absorption properties are generally frequency dependent. This makes use of modal data based methods for updating vibro-acoustic FE models difficult. In view of this, the present paper proposes a method based on vibro-acoustic frequency response functions that allow updating of a coupled FE model by considering simultaneously the parameters associated with both the structural as well as the acoustic model of the cavity. The effectiveness of the proposed method is demonstrated through numerical studies on a 3D rectangular box cavity with a flexible plate. Updating parameters related to the material property, stiffness of joints between the plate and the rectangular cavity and the properties of absorbing surfaces of the acoustic cavity are considered. The robustness of the method under presence of noise is also studied.

  9. Extraordinary acoustic transmission through annuluses in air and its applications in acoustic beam splitter and concentrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Yong; Sun, Hong-xiang; Liu, Shu-sen; Yuan, Shou-qi; Xia, Jian-ping; Guan, Yi-jun; Zhang, Shu-yi

    2016-08-01

    We report an extraordinary acoustic transmission through two layer annuluses made of metal cylinders in air both numerically and experimentally. The effect arises from the enhancement and reconstruction of the incident source induced by different Mie-resonance modes of the annuluses. The proposed system takes advantages of the consistency in the waveform between the input and output waves, the high amplitude amplification of output waves, and the easy adjustment of structure. More interestingly, we investigate the applications of the extraordinary acoustic transmission in the acoustic beam splitter and acoustic concentrator. Our finding should have an impact on ultrasonic applications.

  10. Extraordinary acoustic transmission through annuluses in air and its applications in acoustic beam splitter and concentrator.

    PubMed

    Ge, Yong; Sun, Hong-Xiang; Liu, Shu-Sen; Yuan, Shou-Qi; Xia, Jian-Ping; Guan, Yi-Jun; Zhang, Shu-Yi

    2016-08-01

    We report an extraordinary acoustic transmission through two layer annuluses made of metal cylinders in air both numerically and experimentally. The effect arises from the enhancement and reconstruction of the incident source induced by different Mie-resonance modes of the annuluses. The proposed system takes advantages of the consistency in the waveform between the input and output waves, the high amplitude amplification of output waves, and the easy adjustment of structure. More interestingly, we investigate the applications of the extraordinary acoustic transmission in the acoustic beam splitter and acoustic concentrator. Our finding should have an impact on ultrasonic applications. PMID:27587144

  11. Investigation of acoustic emission coupling techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jolly, W. D.

    1988-01-01

    A three-phase research program was initiated by NASA in 1983 to investigate the use of acoustic monitoring techniques to detect incipient failure in turbopump bearings. Two prototype acoustic coupler probes were designed and evaluated, and four units of the final probe design were fabricated. Success in this program could lead to development of an on-board monitor which could detect bearing damage in flight and reduce or eliminate the need for disassembly after each flight. This final report reviews the accomplishments of the first two phases and presents the results of fabrication and testing completed in the final phase of the research program.

  12. Vibrations of three-dimensional pipe systems with acoustic coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Raheb, M.

    1981-01-01

    A general algorithm is developed to calculate the beam-type dynamic response of three dimensional multiplane finite length pipe systems, consisting of elbow and straight ducts with continuous interfaces. Emphasis is on secondary acoustic wave effects giving rise to coupling mechanisms; and the simulation accounts for one-dimensional elastoacoustic coupling from a plane acoustic wave and secondary loads resulting from wave asymmetries. The transfer matrix approach is adopted in modeling the elastodynamics of each duct, with allowance for distribution loads. Secondary loads from plane wave distortion are considered with a solution of the Helmholtz equation in an equivalent rigid waveguide, and effects of path imperfection are introduced as a perturbation from the hypothetical perfectly straight pipe. Computations indicate that the one-dimensional acoustic assumption is valid for frequencies below one-half the first cut-off frequency, and the three-dimensional acoustic effects produce an increase in response levels near and above cut-off.

  13. Interaction of acoustic waves generated by coupled plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuschieri, J. M.

    1990-01-01

    When two substructures are coupled, the acoustic field generated by the motion of each of the substructures will interact with the motion of the other substructure. This would be the case of a structure enclosing an acoustic cavity. A technique to model the interaction of the generated sound fields from the two components of a coupled structure, and the influence of this interaction on the vibration of the structural components is presented. Using a mobility power flow approach, each element of the substructure is treated independently both when developing the structural response and when determining the acoustic field generated by this component. The presence of the other substructural components is introduced by assuming these components to be rigid baffles. The excitation of one of the substructures is assumed to be by an incident acoustic wave which is dependent of the motion of the substructure. The sound field generated by the motion of the substructure is included in the solution of the response.

  14. Helicopter detection using harmonics and seismic-acoustic coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damarla, T. Raju; Ufford, David

    2008-04-01

    Unattended ground sensors (UGS) are routinely used to collect intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR) information. Unattended ground sensors consisting of microphone array and geophone are employed to detect rotary wing aircraft. This paper presents an algorithm for the detection of helicopters based on a fusion of rotor harmonics and acoustic-seismic coupling. The main rotor blades of helicopters operate at a fixed RPM to prevent stalling or mechanical damage. In addition, the seismic spectrum is dominated by the acoustic-seismic coupling generated by these rotors; much more so than ground vehicles and other targets where mechanical coupling and a more broadband acoustic source are strong factors. First, an autocorrelation detection method identifies the constant fundamental generated by the helicopter main rotor. Second, key matching frequencies between the acoustic and seismic spectrum are used to locate possible coupled components. Detection can then be based on the ratio of the coupled seismic energy to total seismic energy. The results of the two methods are fused over a few seconds time to provide an initial and continued detection of a helicopter within the sensor range. Performance is measured on data as a function of range and sound pressure level (SPL).

  15. Linear coupling of acoustic and cyclotron waves in plasma flows

    SciTech Connect

    Rogava, Andria; Gogoberidze, Grigol

    2005-05-15

    It is found that in magnetized electrostatic plasma flows the velocity shear couples ion-acoustic waves with ion-cyclotron waves and leads, under favorable conditions, to their efficient reciprocal transformations. It is shown that in a two-dimensional setup this coupling has a remarkable feature: it is governed by equations that are mathematically equal to the ones describing coupling of sound waves with internal gravity waves [Rogava and Mahajan, Phys. Rev. E 55, 1185 (1997)] in neutral fluids. For flows with low shearing rates a fully analytic, quantitative description of the coupling efficiency, based on a noteworthy quantum-mechanical analogy, is given and transformation coefficients are calculated.

  16. Linear coupling of acoustic and cyclotron waves in plasma flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogava, Andria; Gogoberidze, Grigol

    2005-05-01

    It is found that in magnetized electrostatic plasma flows the velocity shear couples ion-acoustic waves with ion-cyclotron waves and leads, under favorable conditions, to their efficient reciprocal transformations. It is shown that in a two-dimensional setup this coupling has a remarkable feature: it is governed by equations that are mathematically equal to the ones describing coupling of sound waves with internal gravity waves [Rogava and Mahajan, Phys. Rev. E 55, 1185 (1997)] in neutral fluids. For flows with low shearing rates a fully analytic, quantitative description of the coupling efficiency, based on a noteworthy quantum-mechanical analogy, is given and transformation coefficients are calculated.

  17. Liquid-membrane coupling response of submersible electrostatic acoustic transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, John H.; Yost, William T.

    1989-01-01

    A mathematical model was developed for the liquid-membrane coupling response of the submersible electrostatic acoustic transducer (ESAT) described by Cantrell et al. (1979). The model accounts for the ESAT's rolloff response and predicts the essential features of the ESAT frequency response. Model predictions were found to agree well with measurements taken over the frequency range from 1 to 11 MHz.

  18. Observation of the coupling of the driven dust acoustic wave

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Jeremiah D.; Duff, James

    2010-03-15

    In this study, the coupling between the naturally occurring dust acoustic wave (DAW) and the discharge current modulation is examined. It is confirmed that, when the wave is driven by modulating the discharge current, the DAW is driven at the same frequency as the current modulation.

  19. Focusing of ferroelectret air-coupled ultrasound transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaal, Mate; Bartusch, Jürgen; Dohse, Elmar; Schadow, Florian; Köppe, Enrico

    2016-02-01

    Air-coupled ultrasound has been applied increasingly as a non-destructive testing method for lightweight construction in recent years. It is particularly appropriate for composite materials being used in automotive and aviation industry. Air-coupled ultrasound transducers mostly consist of piezoelectric materials and matching layers. However, their fabrication is challenging and their signal-to-noise ratio often not sufficient for many testing requirements. To enhance the efficiency, air-coupled ultrasound transducers made of cellular polypropylene have been developed. Because of its small density and sound velocity, this piezoelectric ferroelectret matches the small acoustic impedance of air much better than matching layers applied in conventional transducers. In our contribution, we present two different methods of spherical focusing of ferroelectret transducers for the further enhancement of their performance in NDT applications. Measurements on carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) samples and on metal adhesive joints performed with commercially available focused air-coupled ultrasound transducers are compared to measurements executed with self-developed focused ferroelectret transducers.

  20. Effect of acoustic coupling on random and harmonic plate vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frendi, Abdelkader; Robinson, Jay

    1993-01-01

    The effect of acoustic coupling on random and harmonic plate vibrations is studied using two numerical models. In the coupled model, the plate response is obtained by integration of the nonlinear plate equation coupled with the nonlinear Euler equations for the surrounding acoustic fluid. In the uncoupled model, the nonlinear plate equation with an equivalent linear viscous damping term is integrated to obtain the response of the plate subject to the same excitation field. For a low-level, narrow-band excitation, the two models predict the same plate response spectra. As the excitation level is increased, the response power spectrum predicted by the uncoupled model becomes broader and more shifted towards the high frequencies than that obtained by the coupled model. In addition, the difference in response between the coupled and uncoupled models at high frequencies becomes larger. When a high intensity harmonic excitation is used, causing a nonlinear plate response, both models predict the same frequency content of the response. However, the level of the harmonics and subharmonics are higher for the uncoupled model. Comparisons to earlier experimental and numerical results show that acoustic coupling has a significant effect on the plate response at high excitation levels. Its absence in previous models may explain the discrepancy between predicted and measured responses.

  1. In situ measurements of the fragipan acoustic to seismic coupling signature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Wheeler; Hickey, Craig J.

    2002-05-01

    The phenomena of acoustic to seismic (A/S) coupling, observed and studied since the 1950s, has most recently been used to detect shallow buried objects [Sabatier and Xiang, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 105, 1383 (1999); 106, 2143 (1999)] and monitor detonation of nuclear weapons [Orcutt, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 105, 1038 (1999)]. At an air-surface interface airborne acoustic energy is coupled into the ground as seismic energy. The ratio of the seismic and airborne waves constitutes the A/S coupling signature, which is distinctive to the underlying structure. Seismic energy received by a geophone at the interface contains information, via reflected waves, about the underlying subsurface layer, media, and boundaries. Of particular interest in the Mississippi River Valley is the fragipan layer. The fragipan is the layer that directly affects the growth of crops, rate of soil erosion, and rate of water absorption in underlying layers. In this presentation, the A/S coupling signature data taken at an agricultural field station and forward model are discussed.

  2. Acoustic Coupling Effects in ST Paul's Cathedral, London

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ANDERSON, J. S.; BRATOS-ANDERSON, M.

    2000-09-01

    In St Paul's Cathedral there are many arches, columns and cornices which enable the internal space to be divided into subspaces. The subspaces may be considered to be acoustically coupled via areas which connect the rooms. Two of the most acoustically important subspaces in the Cathedral are the choir and the space under the dome. The choir, the space within the wooden choir stalls, has more sound absorption than the rest of the building, which is mostly marble and Portland stone. In the model of coupled subspaces an acoustic energy balance equation, applied to a diffuse field, is derived for each subspace. In St Paul's Cathedral the internal space is divided into 70 acoustical subspaces. The initial-value problem which is formulated by the system of 70 acoustic energy balance equations with initial conditions has been reduced to the eigenvalue problem. The decay of sound energy density has been obtained for different locations in the Cathedral and for different positions of the sound source. Experimentally obtained sound decay curves are in good agreement with numerical results. Both the experimental and numerical results demonstrate the fine structure of reverberation.

  3. Dust-acoustic shocks in strongly coupled dusty plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cousens, S. E.; Yaroshenko, V. V.; Sultana, S.; Hellberg, M. A.; Verheest, F.; Kourakis, I.

    2014-04-01

    Electrostatic dust-acoustic shock waves are investigated in a viscous, complex plasma consisting of dust particles, electrons, and ions. The system is modelled using the generalized hydrodynamic equations, with strong coupling between the dust particles being accounted for by employing the effective electrostatic temperature approach. Using a reductive perturbation method, it is demonstrated that this model predicts the existence of weakly nonlinear dust-acoustic shock waves, arising as solutions to Burgers's equation, in which the nonlinear forces are balanced by dissipative forces, in this case, associated with viscosity. The evolution and stability of dust-acoustic shocks is investigated via a series of numerical simulations, which confirms our analytical predictions on the shock characteristics.

  4. Apparatus for acoustically coupling an ultrasonic transducer with a body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, Scot H. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    An apparatus for acoustically coupling an ultrasonic transducer with a body along whose surface waves are to be transmitted includes a wedge having a first surface for acoustically contacting a subject surface area of a body to be measured, on which surface waves are to be transmitted, and a second surface for accoustically contacting an ultrasonic transducer. The wedge includes a cylinder in which the second surface is present and which is movably disposed in a recess in a block in which the first surface is present, for orienting the first surface and the second surface relative to each other so that ultrasonic waves emitted by the ultrasonic transducer generate surface waves which travel on the subject surface area of the body when the ultrasonic transducer is in acoustic contact with the second surface and the first surface is in acoustic contact with the subject surface area of the body. In the preferred embodiment, there is a third surface which is orientable relative to the first surface so that ultrasonic waves emitted by an ultrasonic transducer in contact with the third surface generate surface waves which travel on the subject surface area of the body when the first surface is an acoustic contact with the subject surface area of the body.

  5. Prospects for coupling Surface Acoustic Waves to superconducting qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustafsson, Martin

    2013-03-01

    Recent years have seen great development in the quantum control of mechanical resonators. These usually consist of membranes, cantilevers or suspended beams, whose vibrational modes can be cooled to the quantum ground state. This presentation will focus on a different kind of micromechanical system, where the motion is not confined to a mode with fixed boundaries, but propagates along the surface of a microchip. These modes are known as Surface Acoustic Waves (SAWs), and superficially resemble ripples on water, moving with low loss along the surfaces of solids. On a piezoelectric substrate, electrode gratings known as Interdigital Transducers (IDTs) can be used to convert power between the electric and acoustic domains. Devices based on this effect are of profound technological importance as filters and analog signal processors in the RF domain. In the realm of quantum information processing, SAWs have primarily been used to transport carriers and excitons through piezoelectric semiconductors, in the electric potential wells propagating along with the mechanical wave. Our approach, however, is different in that we aim to explore the mechanical wave itself as a carrier of quantum information. We have previously shown that a single-electron transistor can be used as a local probe for SAWs, with encouraging sensitivity levels. Building on this, we now investigate the prospects for coupling a SAW beam directly to a superconducting qubit. By merging a circuit model for an IDT with a quasi-classical description of a transmon qubit, we estimate that the qubit can couple to an acoustic transmission line with approximately the same strength as to an electrical one. This type of coupling opens for acoustic analogs of recent experiments in microwave quantum optics, including the generation of non-classical acoustic states.

  6. Nonresonant Referenced Laser-Induced Thermal Acoustics Thermometry in Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, Roger C.; Balla, R. Jeffrey; Herring, Gregory C.

    1999-01-01

    We report a detailed investigation of nonresonant laser-induced thermal acoustics (LITA) for the single-shot measurement of the speed of sound ( v S ) in an oven containing room air. A model for the speed of sound that includes important acoustic relaxation effects is used to convert the speed of sound into temperature. A reference LITA channel is used to reduce uncertainties in v S . Comparing thermocouple temperatures with temperatures deduced from our v S measurements and model, we find the mean temperature difference from 300 to 650 K to be 1% ( 2 ). The advantages of using a reference LITA channel are discussed.

  7. Adiabatic trapping in coupled kinetic Alfven-acoustic waves

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, H. A.; Ali, Z.; Masood, W.

    2013-03-15

    In the present work, we have discussed the effects of adiabatic trapping of electrons on obliquely propagating Alfven waves in a low {beta} plasma. Using the two potential theory and employing the Sagdeev potential approach, we have investigated the existence of arbitrary amplitude coupled kinetic Alfven-acoustic solitary waves in both the sub and super Alfvenic cases. The results obtained have been analyzed and presented graphically and can be applied to regions of space where the low {beta} assumption holds true.

  8. Air-coupled ultrasonic measurements in composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kommareddy, Vamshi; Peters, John J.; Hsu, David K.

    2005-04-01

    Air-coupled ultrasound is a non-contact technique and has clear advantages over water-coupled testing. This work aims at gaining quantitative understanding of the principles underlining air-coupled ultrasonic measurement. The transmission of air-coupled ultrasonic energy through a plate is measured experimentally; model calculation of the transmission coefficient, taking into account the real transducer characteristics, is compared with the experimental results. The occurrence of "Poisson bright spot" in the flaw images of thin laminates and honeycomb composites were investigated; A qualitative comparison with a model based on the Fresnel's wave theory of light is discussed. Through transmission C-scans at 120 and 400 kHz using focused transmitter and receiver were studied.

  9. 2-D modeling of laterally acoustically coupled thin film bulk acoustic wave resonator filters.

    PubMed

    Pensala, Tuomas; Meltaus, Johanna; Kokkonen, Kimmo; Ylilammi, Markku

    2010-11-01

    A 2-D model is developed for calculating lateral acoustical coupling between adjacent thin film BAW resonators forming an electrical N-port. The model is based on solution and superposition of lateral eigenmodes and eigenfrequencies in a structure consisting of adjacent regions with known plate wave dispersion properties. Mechanical and electrical response of the device are calculated as a superposition of eigenmodes according to voltage drive at one electrical port at a time while extracting current induced in the other ports, leading to a full Y-parameter description of the device. Exemplary cases are simulated to show the usefulness of the model in the study of the basic design rules of laterally coupled thin film BAW resonator filters. Model predictions are compared to an experimental 1.9-GHz band-pass filter based on aluminum nitride thin film technology and lateral acoustical coupling. Good agreement is obtained in prediction of passband behavior. The eigenmode-based model forms a useful tool for fast simulation of laterally coupled acoustic devices. It allows one to gain insight into basic device physics in a very intuitive fashion compared with more detailed but heavier finite element method. Shortcomings of this model and possible improvements are discussed. PMID:21041141

  10. A superconducting qubit coupled to propagating acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustafsson, Martin V.; Aref, Thomas; Frisk Kockum, Anton; Ekström, Maria K.; Johansson, Göran; Delsing, Per

    2015-03-01

    Mechanical devices in the quantum regime have so far consisted mainly of suspended resonators, where standing modes can be populated with quanta of vibrational energy. We present a fundamentally different system, where the mechanical excitation is not restricted to a specific mode and location. Instead, we demonstrate strong non-classical coupling between propagating phonons and a superconducting qubit. The qubit is fabricated on a piezoelectric substrate, and is designed to interact with Surface Acoustic Waves (SAWs) in the gigahertz frequency range. A separate on-chip transducer allows us to launch SAWs toward the qubit from a distance and pick up SAW phonons that the qubit reflects and emits. In a series of experiments where the qubit is addressed both electrically and acoustically, we show that the qubit couples much more strongly to SAWs than to any electrical modes. The low speed of sound sets phonons apart from photons as a medium for transporting quantum information, and should enable real-time manipulation of propagating quanta. The short acoustic wavelength and strong piezoelectric coupling should also allows regimes of interaction to be explored which cannot be reached in photonic systems.

  11. An efficient model for coupling structural vibrations with acoustic radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frendi, Abdelkader; Maestrello, Lucio; Ting, LU

    1993-01-01

    The scattering of an incident wave by a flexible panel is studied. The panel vibration is governed by the nonlinear plate equations while the loading on the panel, which is the pressure difference across the panel, depends on the reflected and transmitted waves. Two models are used to calculate this structural-acoustic interaction problem. One solves the three dimensional nonlinear Euler equations for the flow-field coupled with the plate equations (the fully coupled model). The second uses the linear wave equation for the acoustic field and expresses the load as a double integral involving the panel oscillation (the decoupled model). The panel oscillation governed by a system of integro-differential equations is solved numerically and the acoustic field is then defined by an explicit formula. Numerical results are obtained using the two models for linear and nonlinear panel vibrations. The predictions given by these two models are in good agreement but the computational time needed for the 'fully coupled model' is 60 times longer than that for 'the decoupled model'.

  12. Dust acoustic instability in a strongly coupled dusty plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, M.; Kalman, G. J.; Hartmann, P.; Goree, J.

    2013-10-01

    Dusty plasmas are plasmas containing charged micron to sub-micron size dust grains (solid particulates). Because the grains can be multiply charged and are much more massive than the ions, the presence of dust can lead to novel waves such as the dust acoustic wave, which is a compressional wave that can be excited by a flow of ions that is driven by an electric field. Moreover, the large dust charge can result in strong Coulomb coupling between the dust grains, where the electrostatic energy between neighboring grains is larger than their thermal (kinetic) energy. When the coupling between dust grains is strong, but not large enough for crystallization, the dust is in the strongly coupled liquid phase. This poster theoretically investigates the dust acoustic instability, which is driven by sub-thermal ion flow, in a three-dimensional dusty plasma in the strongly coupled liquid phase. It is found that strong coupling enhances the instability. The application is to microgravity experiments with dusty plasma planned for the PK-4 and PlasmaLab instruments, which are in development for the International Space Station. Microgravity conditions enable the preparation of dust clouds under these sub-thermal ion flow conditions by avoiding the need for strong electric fields to levitate the dust grains.

  13. Flow-flame interactions causing acoustically coupled heat release fluctuations in a thermo-acoustically unstable gas turbine model combustor

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, A.M.; Boxx, I.; Stoehr, M.; Meier, W.; Carter, C.D.

    2010-12-15

    A detailed analysis of the flow-flame interactions associated with acoustically coupled heat-release rate fluctuations was performed for a 10 kW, CH{sub 4}/air, swirl stabilized flame in a gas turbine model combustor exhibiting self-excited thermo-acoustic oscillations at 308 Hz. High-speed stereoscopic particle image velocimetry, OH planar laser induced fluorescence, and OH* chemiluminescence measurements were performed at a sustained repetition rate of 5 kHz, which was sufficient to resolve the relevant combustor dynamics. Using spatio-temporal proper orthogonal decomposition, it was found that the flow-field contained several simultaneous periodic motions: the reactant flux into the combustion chamber periodically oscillated at the thermo-acoustic frequency (308 Hz), a helical precessing vortex core (PVC) circumscribed the burner nozzle at 515 Hz, and the PVC underwent axial contraction and extension at the thermo-acoustic frequency. The global heat release rate fluctuated at the thermo-acoustic frequency, while the heat release centroid circumscribed the combustor at the difference between the thermo-acoustic and PVC frequencies. Hence, the three-dimensional location of the heat release fluctuations depended on the interaction of the PVC with the flame surface. This motivated the compilation of doubly phase resolved statistics based on the phase of both the acoustic and PVC cycles, which showed highly repeatable periodic flow-flame configurations. These include flames stabilized between the inflow and inner recirculation zone, large-scale flame wrap-up by the PVC, radial deflection of the inflow by the PVC, and combustion in the outer recirculation zones. Large oscillations in the flame surface area were observed at the thermo-accoustic frequency that significantly affected the total heat-release oscillations. By filtering the instantaneous reaction layers at different scales, the importance of the various flow-flame interactions affecting the flame area was

  14. Acoustically-coupled flow-induced vibration of a computational vocal fold model

    PubMed Central

    Daily, David Jesse; Thomson, Scott L.

    2012-01-01

    The flow-induced vibration of synthetic vocal fold models has been previously observed to be acoustically-coupled with upstream flow supply tubes. This phenomenon was investigated using a finite element model that included flow–structure–acoustic interactions. The length of the upstream duct was varied to explore the coupling between model vibration and subglottal acoustics. Incompressible and slightly compressible flow models were tested. The slightly compressible model exhibited acoustic coupling between fluid and solid domains in a manner consistent with experimental observations, whereas the incompressible model did not, showing the slightly compressible approach to be suitable for simulating acoustically-coupled vocal fold model flow-induced vibration. PMID:23585700

  15. Acoustically-coupled flow-induced vibration of a computational vocal fold model.

    PubMed

    Daily, David Jesse; Thomson, Scott L

    2013-01-15

    The flow-induced vibration of synthetic vocal fold models has been previously observed to be acoustically-coupled with upstream flow supply tubes. This phenomenon was investigated using a finite element model that included flow-structure-acoustic interactions. The length of the upstream duct was varied to explore the coupling between model vibration and subglottal acoustics. Incompressible and slightly compressible flow models were tested. The slightly compressible model exhibited acoustic coupling between fluid and solid domains in a manner consistent with experimental observations, whereas the incompressible model did not, showing the slightly compressible approach to be suitable for simulating acoustically-coupled vocal fold model flow-induced vibration. PMID:23585700

  16. Effect of strong coupling on dust acoustic waves and instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, M. Kalman, G.

    1998-10-01

    The presence of charged dust in a plasma can lead to very low frequency dust acoustic waves and instabilities. In certain laboratory plasmas the dust is strongly coupled, as characterized by the condition {Gamma}{sub d}=Q{sub d}{sup 2} exp({minus}d/{lambda}{sub D})/dT{sub d}{ge}1, where Q{sub d} is the dust charge, {ital d} is the intergrain spacing, T{sub d} is the dust thermal energy, and {lambda}{sub D} is the plasma screening length. When the dust is strongly coupled, the spatial correlation of the grains can affect the dispersion relation of these waves. We review our recent work [1] on the dispersion properties of dust acoustic waves in the strongly coupled (liquid) phase in a dusty plasma, including also the effects of dust-neutral collisions. We then discuss a preliminary analysis of the effect of strong dust coupling on an ion dust two-stream instability in a collisional dusty plasma. Applications to laboratory dusty plasmas are discussed. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  17. Effect of strong coupling on dust acoustic waves and instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, M.; Kalman, G.

    1998-10-21

    The presence of charged dust in a plasma can lead to very low frequency dust acoustic waves and instabilities. In certain laboratory plasmas the dust is strongly coupled, as characterized by the condition {gamma}{sub d}=Q{sub d}{sup 2} exp(-d/{lambda}{sub D})/dT{sub d}{>=}1, where Q{sub d} is the dust charge, d is the intergrain spacing, T{sub d} is the dust thermal energy, and {lambda}{sub D} is the plasma screening length. When the dust is strongly coupled, the spatial correlation of the grains can affect the dispersion relation of these waves. We review our recent work [1] on the dispersion properties of dust acoustic waves in the strongly coupled (liquid) phase in a dusty plasma, including also the effects of dust-neutral collisions. We then discuss a preliminary analysis of the effect of strong dust coupling on an ion dust two-stream instability in a collisional dusty plasma. Applications to laboratory dusty plasmas are discussed.

  18. Coupling of dust acoustic and shear mode through velocity shear in a strongly coupled dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Garai, S. Janaki, M. S.; Chakrabarti, N.

    2015-07-15

    In the strongly coupled limit, the generalized hydrodynamic model shows that a dusty plasma, acquiring significant rigidity, is able to support a “shear” like mode. It is being demonstrated here that in presence of velocity shear gradient, this shear like mode gets coupled with the dust acoustic mode which is generated by the compressibility effect of the dust fluid due to the finite temperatures of the dust, electron, and ion fluids. In the local analysis, the dispersion relation shows that velocity shear gradient not only couples the two modes but is also responsible for the instabilities of that coupled mode which is confirmed by nonlocal analysis with numerical techniques.

  19. Nde of Lumber and Natural Fiber Based Products with Air Coupled Ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, David K.; Utrata, David; Kuo, Monlin

    2010-02-01

    Due to the porous nature of wood and natural fiber based products, conventional fluid or gel coupled ultrasonic inspection is unsuitable. Air-coupled ultrasonic transmission scanning, being non-contact, is ideally suited for inspecting lumber, wood and natural fiber based products. We report here several successful applications of air-coupled ultrasound for the inspection of wood. Air-coupled ultrasonic scan at 120 kHz can easily detect "sinker-stock" lumber in which bacterial damage of ray tissue cells had occurred during anaerobic pond storage. Channels in ash lumber board caused by insect bore were imaged in transmission scan. Delamination and material inhomogeneities were mapped out in manufactured wood and natural fiber products including medium density fiberboards, compression molded shredded waste wood with formaldehyde resin, and acoustic panels molded with kenaf fibers. The study has demonstrated some of the capabilities of air-coupled ultrasound in the NDE of forest products.

  20. An experimental study on antipersonnel landmine detection using acoustic-to-seismic coupling.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Ning; Sabatier, James M

    2003-03-01

    An acoustic-to-seismic system to detect buried antipersonnel mines exploits airborne acoustic waves penetrating the surface of the ground. Acoustic waves radiating from a sound source above the ground excite Biot type I and II compressional waves in the porous soil. The type I wave and type II waves refract toward the normal and cause air and soil particle motion. If a landmine is buried below the surface of the insonified area, these waves are scattered or reflected by the target, resulting in distinct changes to the acoustically coupled ground motion. A scanning laser Doppler vibrometer measures the motion of the ground surface. In the past, this technique has been employed with remarkable success in locating antitank mines during blind field tests [Sabatier and Xiang, IEEE Trans. Geosci. Remote Sens. 39, 1146-1154 (2001)]. The humanitarian demining mission requires an ability to locate antipersonnel mines, requiring a surmounting of additional challenges due to a plethora of shapes and smaller sizes. This paper describes an experimental study on the methods used to locate antipersonnel landmines in recent field measurements. PMID:12656368

  1. Coupled dynamics of translation and collapse of acoustically driven microbubbles.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Anil J; Szeri, Andrew J

    2002-10-01

    Pressure gradients drive the motion of microbubbles relative to liquids in which they are suspended. Examples include the hydrostatic pressure due to a gravitational field, and the pressure gradients in a sound field, useful for acoustic levitation. In this paper, the equations describing the coupled dynamics of radial oscillation and translation of a microbubble are given. The formulation is based on a recently derived expression for the hydrodynamic force on a bubble of changing size in an incompressible liquid [J. Magnaudet and D. Legendre, Phys. Fluids 10, 550-556 (1998)]. The complex interaction between radial and translation dynamics is best understood by examination of the added momentum associated with the liquid motion caused by the moving bubble. Translation is maximized when the bubble collapses violently. The new theory for coupled collapse and translation dynamics is compared to past experiments and to previous theories for decoupled translation dynamics. Special attention is paid to bubbles of relevance in biomedical applications. PMID:12398441

  2. Dust acoustic waves in strongly coupled dusty plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, M. Kalman, G.

    1997-12-01

    Dust grains, or solid particles of {mu}m to sub-{mu}m sizes, are observed in various low-temperature laboratory plasmas such as process plasmas and dust plasma crystals. The massive dust grains are generally highly charged, and it has been shown within the context of standard plasma theory that their presence can lead to new low-frequency modes such as dust acoustic waves. In certain laboratory plasmas, however, the dust may be strongly coupled, as characterized by the condition {Gamma}{sub d}=Q{sub d}{sup 2}exp({minus}d/{lambda}{sub D})/dT{sub d}{ge}1, where Q{sub d} is the dust charge, d is the intergrain spacing, T{sub d} is the dust thermal energy, and {lambda}{sub D} is the plasma screening length. This paper investigates the dispersion relation for dust acoustic waves in a strongly coupled dusty plasma comprised of strongly coupled negatively charged dust grains, and weakly correlated classical ions and electrons. The dust grains are assumed to interact via a (screened Coulomb) Yukawa potential. The strongly coupled gas phase (liquid phase) is considered, and a quasilocalized charge approximation scheme is used, generalized to take into account electron and/or ion screening of the dust grains. The scheme relates the small-k dispersion to the total correlation energy of the system, which is obtained from the results of published numerical simulations. Some effects of collisions of charged particles with neutrals are taken into account. Applications to laboratory dusty plasmas are discussed. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  3. Electron - acoustic phonon coupling in colloidal lead sulfide quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Byungmoon; Tiwari, Vivek; Spencer, Austin; Baranov, Dmitry; Park, Samuel; Jonas, David

    2014-03-01

    Lead chalcogenide quantum dots (QDs) with bandgaps in the shortwave infrared are candidate materials for next generation photovoltaics exceeding the Shockley-Queisser limit. Despite ongoing controversy, multiple exciton generation (MEG) in QDs offers potential for improved photovoltaic efficiency. Hot carriers from high energy photoexcitation dissipate excess energy via coupled phonons; this is detrimental to MEG. The electron-phonon coupling (EPC) magnitude, partitioning among modes and dependence on the size/shape are poorly understood. We performed degenerate femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy to investigate Auger recombination dynamics, a reverse process of MEG. We observe a quantum beat due to coherent acoustic phonons in femtosecond pump-probe signals from oleate capped colloidal lead sulfide QDs in toluene. A 3.4 ps period oscillation decays with 4.6 ps damping constant in 8 nm diameter dots; the amplitude increases linearly with pump energy and modulation is weaker than reported in smaller dots. An elastic continuum model for acoustic phonon frequency vs. dot diameter suggests a not yet understood quantitative discrepancy with prior work. These relaxation processes have important implications for QD photovoltaics.

  4. Acoustic impedance rhinometry (AIR): a technique for monitoring dynamic changes in nasal congestion.

    PubMed

    Patuzzi, Robert; Cook, Alison

    2014-04-01

    We describe a simple and inexpensive method for monitoring nasal air flow resistance using measurement of the small-signal acoustic input impedance of the nasal passage, similar to the audiological measurement of ear drum compliance with acoustic tympanometry. The method requires generation of a fixed sinusoidal volume-velocity stimulus using ear-bud speakers, and an electret microphone to monitor the resultant pressure fluctuation in the nasal passage. Both are coupled to the nose via high impedance silastic tubing and a small plastic nose insert. The acoustic impedance is monitored in real-time using a laptop soundcard and custom-written software developed in LabView 7.0 (National Instruments). The compact, lightweight equipment and fast time resolution lends the technique to research into the small and rapid reflexive changes in nasal resistance caused by environmental and local neurological influences. The acoustic impedance rhinometry technique has the potential to be developed for use in a clinical setting, where the need exists for a simple and inexpensive objective nasal resistance measurement technique. PMID:24577261

  5. Advances in Fast Response Acoustically Derived Air Temperature Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogoev, Ivan; Jacobsen, Larry; Horst, Thomas; Conrad, Benjamin

    2016-04-01

    Fast-response accurate air-temperature measurements are required when estimating turbulent fluxes of heat, water and carbon dioxide by open-path eddy-covariance technique. In comparison with contact thermometers like thermocouples, ultra-sonic thermometers do not suffer from solar radiation loading, water vapor condensation and evaporative cooling effects. Consequently they have the potential to provide more accurate true air temperature measurements. The absolute accuracy of the ultrasonic thermometer is limited by the following parameters: the distance between the transducer pairs, transducer delays associated with the electrical-acoustic signal conversion that vary with temperature, components of the wind vector that are normal to the ultrasonic paths, and humidity. The distance between the transducer pairs is commonly obtained by coordinate measuring machine. Improved accuracy demonstrated in this study results from increased stiffness in the anemometer head to better maintain the ultrasonic path-length distances. To further improve accuracy and account for changes in transducer delays and distance as a function of temperature, these parameters are characterized in a zero-wind chamber over the entire operating temperature range. When the sonic anemometer is combined with a co-located fast-response water vapor analyzer, like in the IRGASON instrument, speed of sound can be compensated for humidity effects on a point-by-point basis resulting in a true fast-response air temperature measurement. Laboratory test results show that when the above steps are implemented in the calibration of the ultrasonic thermometer air-temperature accuracy better than ±0.5 degrees Celsius can be achieved over the entire operating range. The approach is also validated in a field inter-comparison with an aspirated thermistor probe mounted in a radiation shield.

  6. Tapered acoustical directional couplers for integrated acousto-optical mode converters with weighted coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, Harald; Rust, Ulrich; Schafer, Klaus

    1995-03-01

    Weighted coupling for strong sidelobe suppression of integrated acoustooptical mode converters in LiNbO3 using acoustical directional couplers has been studied theoretically and experimentally. A parameter free model for the propagation of surface acoustic waves in guiding structures has been developed based on a step-like variation of the acoustic velocity. Comparisons of theoretical results with experimental ones for acoustic waveguides and directional coupler structures confirm the applicability of the model. A coupled mode description of the acousto-optical polarization conversion in converters with acoustical directional couplers has been developed and applied to several tapered acoustical directional couplers. The model reveals that the conversion characteristics are usually strongly asymmetric. If the directional coupler is appropriately designed, a sidelobe suppression of about 30 dB can be achieved. First experimental results with tapered directional couplers confirm within some limits the theoretical predictions.

  7. Coupling of Acoustic Vibrations to Plasmon Resonances in Metal Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Aftab; Pelton, Matthew; Guest, Jeffrey

    Measurements of acoustic vibrations in nanoparticles provide a unique opportunity to study mechanical phenomena at nanometer length scales and picosecond time scales. Phonon vibrations of plasmonic nanoparticles are of particular interest, due to their large extinction efficiencies, and high sensitivity to surrounding medium. There are two mechanisms that transduce the mechanical oscillations into plasmon resonance shift: (1) changes in polarizability; and (2) changes in electron density. These mechanisms have been used to explain qualitatively the origin of the transient-absorption signals, however, a quantitative connection has not yet been made except for simple geometries. Here, we present a method to quantitatively determine the coupling between vibrational modes and plasmon modes in noble-metal nanoparticles including spheres, shells, rods and cubes. We separately determine the parts of the optical response that are due to shape changes and to changes in electron density, and we relate the optical signals to the symmetries of the vibrational and plasmon modes. These results clarify reported experimental results, and should help guide the optimization of future experiments.

  8. Acoustic signatures of sound source-tract coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arneodo, Ezequiel M.; Perl, Yonatan Sanz; Mindlin, Gabriel B.

    2011-04-01

    Birdsong is a complex behavior, which results from the interaction between a nervous system and a biomechanical peripheral device. While much has been learned about how complex sounds are generated in the vocal organ, little has been learned about the signature on the vocalizations of the nonlinear effects introduced by the acoustic interactions between a sound source and the vocal tract. The variety of morphologies among bird species makes birdsong a most suitable model to study phenomena associated to the production of complex vocalizations. Inspired by the sound production mechanisms of songbirds, in this work we study a mathematical model of a vocal organ, in which a simple sound source interacts with a tract, leading to a delay differential equation. We explore the system numerically, and by taking it to the weakly nonlinear limit, we are able to examine its periodic solutions analytically. By these means we are able to explore the dynamics of oscillatory solutions of a sound source-tract coupled system, which are qualitatively different from those of a sound source-filter model of a vocal organ. Nonlinear features of the solutions are proposed as the underlying mechanisms of observed phenomena in birdsong, such as unilaterally produced “frequency jumps,” enhancement of resonances, and the shift of the fundamental frequency observed in heliox experiments.

  9. Bubbles trapped at the coupling surface of the treatment head significantly reduce acoustic energy delivered in shock wave lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pishchalnikov, Yuri A.; McAteer, James A.; Pishchalnikova, Irina V.; Beard, Spencer; Williams, James C.; Bailey, Michael R.

    2006-05-01

    The coupling efficiency of a "dry head" electromagnetic lithotripter (Dornier Compact Delta) was studied in vitro. A fiber-optic probe hydrophone (FOPH-500) was positioned in a test tank filled with degassed water. The tank was coupled through a semi-transparent latex membrane to the water-filled cushion of the lithotripter head, so that bubbles (air pockets) trapped between the two coupling surfaces could be easily observed and photographed. When gel was applied to both the latex membrane and the water cushion, numerous bubbles (some several millimeters in diameter) could be seen at the coupling interface. Hydrophone measurements in the geometric focus of the lithotripter showed that the acoustic pressure could be two times lower when bubbles were present than when they were manually removed. In our in vitro design, trapped bubbles could be easily observed and therefore removed from the acoustic path. However, during patient treatment with a dry-head lithotripter one cannot see whether bubbles are trapped against the skin. This study provides a demonstration of the dramatic effect that trapped bubbles can have on the amount of acoustic energy actually delivered for treatment.

  10. Application of gas-coupled laser acoustic detection to gelatins and underwater sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Caron, James N.; Kunapareddy, Pratima

    2014-02-18

    Gas-coupled Laser Acoustic Detection (GCLAD) has been used as a method to sense ultrasound waves in materials without contact of the material surface. To sense the waveform, a laser beam is directed parallel to the material surface and displaced or deflected when the radiated waveform traverses the beam. We present recent tests that demonstrate the potential of using this technique for detecting ultrasound in gelatin phantoms and in water. As opposed to interferometric detection, GCLAD operates independently of the optical surface properties of the material. This allows the technique to be used in cases where the material is transparent or semi-transparent. We present results on sensing ultrasound in gelatin phantoms that are used to mimic biological materials. As with air-coupled transducers, the frequency response of GCLAD at high frequencies is limited by the high attenuation of ultrasound in air. In contrast, water has a much lower attenuation. Here we demonstrate the use of a GCLAD-like system in water, measuring the directivity response at 1 MHz and sensing waveforms with higher frequency content.

  11. Passive focusing techniques for piezoelectric air-coupled ultrasonic transducers.

    PubMed

    Gómez Álvarez-Arenas, Tomás E; Camacho, Jorge; Fritsch, Carlos

    2016-04-01

    This paper proposes a novel passive focusing system for Air-Coupled Ultrasonic (ACU) piezoelectric transducers which is inspired by the Newtonian-Cassegrain (NC) telescope concept. It consist of a primary spherical mirror with an output hole and a flat secondary mirror, normal to the propagation axis, that is the transducer surface itself. The device is modeled and acoustic field is calculated showing a collimated beam with a symmetrical focus. A prototype according to this design is built and tested with an ACU piezoelectric transducer with center frequency at 400 kHz, high-sensitivity, wideband and 25 mm diameter flat aperture. The acoustic field is measured and compared with calculations. The presented prototype exhibit a 1.5 mm focus width and a collimated beam up to 15 mm off the output hole. In addition, the performance of this novel design is compared, both theoretically and experimentally, with two techniques used before for electrostatic transducers: the Fresnel Zone Plate - FZP and the off-axis parabolic or spherical mirror. The proposed NC arrangement has a coaxial design, which eases the transducers positioning and use in many applications, and is less bulky than off-axis mirrors. Unlike in off-axis mirrors, it is now possible to use a spherical primary mirror with minimum aberrations. FZP provides a more compact solution and is easy to build, but presents some background noise due to interference of waves diffracted at out of focus regions. By contrast, off-axis parabolic mirrors provide a well defined focus and are free from background noise, although they are bulky and more difficult to build. Spherical mirrors are more easily built, but this yields a non symmetric beam and a poorly defined focus. PMID:26799129

  12. Determination of surface density of nonporous membranes with air-coupled ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerch, T. P.

    2015-03-01

    The surface density or mass per unit area of a membrane is an important material property often used in acoustics and ultrasonics. In this paper, a new measurement and analysis technique for estimating the surface density as a function of frequency for a nonporous membrane or foil is introduced. This new, broadband technique is derived from the Thompson-Gray measurement model which can be simplified to the fluid layer transfer function commonly used in acoustics. The fluid layer transfer function can be further simplified to the limp-wall mass law for acoustically 'thin' membranes whose thickness is much less than a wavelength. The transfer function of the membrane can be efficiently measured with commercially available air-coupled ultrasonic transducers from which the surface density can be computed. Surface density estimates are presented for four membrane-like materials: aluminum foil, brass shim, polyester and polyethylene sheets.

  13. Reverberant acoustic energy in auditoria that comprise systems of coupled rooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summers, Jason E.

    2003-11-01

    A frequency-dependent model for reverberant energy in coupled rooms is developed and compared with measurements for a 1:10 scale model and for Bass Hall, Ft. Worth, TX. At high frequencies, prior statistical-acoustics models are improved by geometrical-acoustics corrections for decay within sub-rooms and for energy transfer between sub-rooms. Comparisons of computational geometrical acoustics predictions based on beam-axis tracing with scale model measurements indicate errors resulting from tail-correction assuming constant quadratic growth of reflection density. Using ray tracing in the late part corrects this error. For mid-frequencies, the models are modified to account for wave effects at coupling apertures by including power transmission coefficients. Similarly, statical-acoustics models are improved through more accurate estimates of power transmission measurements. Scale model measurements are in accord with the predicted behavior. The edge-diffraction model is adapted to study transmission through apertures. Multiple-order scattering is theoretically and experimentally shown inaccurate due to neglect of slope diffraction. At low frequencies, perturbation models qualitatively explain scale model measurements. Measurements confirm relation of coupling strength to unperturbed pressure distribution on coupling surfaces. Measurements in Bass Hall exhibit effects of the coupled stage house. High frequency predictions of statistical acoustics and geometrical acoustics models and predictions of coupling apertures all agree with measurements.

  14. Efficient estimation of decay parameters in acoustically coupled-spaces using slice sampling.

    PubMed

    Jasa, Tomislav; Xiang, Ning

    2009-09-01

    Room-acoustic energy decay analysis of acoustically coupled-spaces within the Bayesian framework has proven valuable for architectural acoustics applications. This paper describes an efficient algorithm termed slice sampling Monte Carlo (SSMC) for room-acoustic decay parameter estimation within the Bayesian framework. This work combines the SSMC algorithm and a fast search algorithm in order to efficiently determine decay parameters, their uncertainties, and inter-relationships with a minimum amount of required user tuning and interaction. The large variations in the posterior probability density functions over multidimensional parameter spaces imply that an adaptive exploration algorithm such as SSMC can have advantages over the exiting importance sampling Monte Carlo and Metropolis-Hastings Markov Chain Monte Carlo algorithms. This paper discusses implementation of the SSMC algorithm, its initialization, and convergence using experimental data measured from acoustically coupled-spaces. PMID:19739741

  15. Structural-Acoustic Coupling Effects on the Non-Vacuum Packaging Vibratory Cylinder Gyroscope

    PubMed Central

    Xi, Xiang; Wu, Xuezhong; Wu, Yulie; Zhang, Yongmeng; Tao, Yi; Zheng, Yu; Xiao, Dingbang

    2013-01-01

    The resonant shells of vibratory cylinder gyroscopes are commonly packaged in metallic caps. In order to lower the production cost, a portion of vibratory cylinder gyroscopes do not employ vacuum packaging. However, under non-vacuum packaging conditions there can be internal acoustic noise leading to considerable acoustic pressure which is exerted on the resonant shell. Based on the theory of the structural-acoustic coupling, the dynamical behavior of the resonant shell under acoustic pressure is presented in this paper. A finite element (FE) model is introduced to quantitatively analyze the effect of the structural-acoustic coupling. Several main factors, such as sealing cap sizes and degree of vacuum which directly affect the vibration of the resonant shell, are studied. The results indicate that the vibration amplitude and the operating frequency of the resonant shell will be changed when the effect of structural-acoustic coupling is taken into account. In addition, an experiment was set up to study the effect of structural-acoustic coupling on the sensitivity of the gyroscope. A 32.4 mV/°/s increase of the scale factor and a 6.2 Hz variation of the operating frequency were observed when the radial gap size between the resonant shell and the sealing cap was changed from 0.5 mm to 20 mm. PMID:24351631

  16. The 90 deg Acoustic Spectrum of a High Speed Air Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, Marvin E.

    2004-01-01

    Tam and Auriault successfully predicted the acoustic spectrum at 90deg to the axis of a high speed air jet by using an acoustic equation derived from ad hoc kinetic theory-type arguments. The present paper shows that similar predictions can be obtained by using a rigorous acoustic analogy approach together with actual measurements of the relevant acoustic source correlations. This puts the result on a firmer basis and enables its extension to new situations and to the prediction of sound at other observation angles.

  17. Acoustic vs. Magnetic Coupling for Telephone Listening of Hearing-Impaired Subjects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, Alice E.

    1985-01-01

    The study investigated the effects of six telephone conditions on discrimination in 19 hearing impaired adults. No significant differences were found among the unaided, acoustically coupled, and magnetically coupled listening modes. Ss understood words significantly better using an amplifier handset, regardless of listening mode. (Author/CL)

  18. An iterative algorithm for analysis of coupled structural-acoustic systems subject to random excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Guo-Zhong; Chen, Gang; Kang, Zhan

    2012-04-01

    This paper analyzes the random response of structural-acoustic coupled systems. Most existing works on coupled structural-acoustic analysis are limited to systems under deterministic excitations due to high computational cost required by a random response analysis. To reduce the computational burden involved in the coupled random analysis, an iterative procedure based on the Pseudo excitation method has been developed. It is found that this algorithm has an overwhelming advantage in computing efficiency over traditional methods, as demonstrated by some numerical examples given in this paper.

  19. Coupling of an acoustic wave to shear motion due to viscous heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bin; Goree, J.

    2016-07-01

    Viscous heating due to shear motion in a plasma can result in the excitation of a longitudinal acoustic wave, if the shear motion is modulated in time. The coupling mechanism is a thermal effect: time-dependent shear motion causes viscous heating, which leads to a rarefaction that can couple into a longitudinal wave, such as an acoustic wave. This coupling mechanism is demonstrated in an electrostatic three-dimensional (3D) simulation of a dusty plasma, in which a localized shear flow is initiated as a pulse, resulting in a delayed outward propagation of a longitudinal acoustic wave. This coupling effect can be profound in plasmas that exhibit localized viscous heating, such as the dusty plasma we simulated using parameters typical of the PK-4 experiment. We expect that a similar phenomenon can occur with other kinds of plasma waves.

  20. Analysis of random structure-acoustic interaction problems using coupled boundary element and finite element methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mei, Chuh; Pates, Carl S., III

    1994-01-01

    A coupled boundary element (BEM)-finite element (FEM) approach is presented to accurately model structure-acoustic interaction systems. The boundary element method is first applied to interior, two and three-dimensional acoustic domains with complex geometry configurations. Boundary element results are very accurate when compared with limited exact solutions. Structure-interaction problems are then analyzed with the coupled FEM-BEM method, where the finite element method models the structure and the boundary element method models the interior acoustic domain. The coupled analysis is compared with exact and experimental results for a simplistic model. Composite panels are analyzed and compared with isotropic results. The coupled method is then extended for random excitation. Random excitation results are compared with uncoupled results for isotropic and composite panels.

  1. An intermode-coupled thin-film micro-acoustic resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arapan, Lilia; Katardjiev, Ilia; Yantchev, Ventsislav

    2012-08-01

    A novel concept for the development of thin-film micro-acoustic resonators based on the coupling between different plate acoustic modes is demonstrated. The basic principles for the design and fabrication of intermode-coupled plate acoustic wave resonators on c-textured thin aluminum nitride films are presented. More specifically, the lowest order symmetric S0 Lamb wave is excited and then coupled to the fundamental thickness shear bulk resonance by means of a metal strip grating with specific periodicity. The experimental results demonstrate that the grating-assisted intermode coupling can be employed in high-frequency resonators inheriting the low dispersive nature of the S0 mode in combination with the energy localization in the plate bulk typical for the fundamental thickness shear resonance.

  2. Ultrasonic imaging using air-coupled P(VDF/TrFE) transducers at 2 MHz.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Sadayuki; Ohigashi, Hiroji

    2009-05-01

    A reflection non-contact ultrasonic microscope system working both in amplitude and phase difference modes at 2 MHz has been developed using an air-coupled concave transducer made of piezoelectric polymer films of poly(vinylidene fluoride/trifluoroethylene) [P(VDF/TrFE)]. The transducer is composed of three 95 microm-thick P(VDF/TrFE) films stacked together, each of which is activated electrically in parallel by a driving source. The transducer has a wide aperture angle of 140 degrees and a focal length of 10mm. The measured two-way transducer insertion loss is 80 dB at 1.83 MHz. Despite 20 dB higher insertion loss than that estimated from Mason's equivalent circuit, we have obtained clear amplitude acoustic images of a coin with transverse resolution of 150 microm, and clear phase difference acoustic images of the rough surface of a paper currency bill with depth resolution of sub-micrometer. Using two planar transducers of P(VDF/TrFE), we have also successfully measured in through-transmission mode the sound velocity and absorption of a 3mm-thick silicone-rubber plate. The present study proves that, owing to its low acoustic impedance and flexibility, P(VDF/TrFE) piezoelectric film is very useful for high frequency acoustic imaging in air in the MHz range. PMID:19215951

  3. An experimental study on resonance of oscillating air/vapor bubbles in water using a two-frequency acoustic apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohsaka, K.

    2003-05-01

    A two-frequency acoustic apparatus is employed to study the growth behavior of vapor-saturated bubbles driven in a volumetric mode. A unique feature of the apparatus is its capability of trapping a bubble by an ultrasonic standing wave while independently driving it into oscillations by a second lower-frequency acoustic wave. It is observed that the growing vapor bubbles exhibit a periodic shape transition between the volumetric and shape modes due to resonant coupling. In order to explain this observation, we performed an experimental investigation on resonant coupling of air bubbles and obtained the following results: First, the induced shape oscillations are actually a mixed mode that contains the volume component, thus, vapor bubbles can grow while they exhibit shape oscillations. Second, the acoustically levitated bubbles are deformed and therefore, degeneracy in resonant frequency is partially removed. As a result, the vapor bubbles exhibit the shape oscillations in both the axisymmetric mode and asymmetric (three-dimensional) modes. Nonlinear effects in addition to the frequency shift and split due to deformation creates overlapping of the coupling ranges for different modes, which leads to the continuous shape oscillations above a certain bubble radius as the bubble grows.

  4. Experimental and analytical investigations of fuselage modal characteristics and structural-acoustic coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, Myles A.; Mathur, Gopal P.

    1992-01-01

    Measurements conducted on a DC-9 aircraft test section to define the shell and cavity modes of the fuselage, understand its structural-acoustic coupling characteristics, and measure its response to different types of acoustic and vibration excitations are reported. The data were processed to generate spatial plots and wavenumber maps of the shell acceleration and cabin acoustic pressure field. Analysis and interpretation of the spatial plots and wavenumber maps showed that the only structural-acoustic coupling occurred at 105 Hz between the N=2 circumferential structural mode and the (n=2, p=0) circumferential cavity mode. The fuselage response to vibration excitation was found to be dominated by modes whose order increases with frequency.

  5. Mobility power flow analysis of coupled plate structure subjected to mechanical and acoustic excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuschieri, J. M.

    1992-01-01

    The mobility power flow approach that was previously applied in the derivation of expressions for the vibrational power flow between coupled plate substructures forming an L configuration and subjected to mechanical loading is generalized. Using the generalized expressions, both point and distributed mechanical loads on one or both of the plates can be considered. The generalized approach is extended to deal with acoustic excitation of one of the plate substructures. In this case, the forces (acoustic pressures) acting on the structure are dependent on the response of the structure because of the scattered pressure component. The interaction between the plate structure and the acoustic fluid leads to the derivation of a corrected mode shape for the plates' normal surface velocity and also for the structure mobility functions. The determination of the scattered pressure components in the expressions for the power flow represents an additional component in the power flow balance for the source plate and the receiver plate. This component represents the radiated acoustical power from the plate structure. For a number of coupled plate substrates, the acoustic pressure generated by one substructure will interact with the motion of another substructure. That is, in the case of the L-shaped plate, acoustic interaction exists between the two plate substructures due to the generation of the acoustic waves by each of the substructures. An approach to deal with this phenomena is described.

  6. Distinct effects of moisture and air contents on acoustic properties of sandy soil.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Takuya; Hiraguri, Yasuhiro; Okuzono, Takeshi

    2015-09-01

    Knowledge of distinct effects of moisture content and air volume on acoustic properties of soil is sought to predict the influence of human activities such as cultivation on acoustic propagation outdoors. This work used an impedance tube with the two-thickness method to investigate such effects. For a constant moisture weight percentage, the magnitude of the characteristic impedance became smaller and the absorption coefficient became higher with increase of the air space ratio. For a constant air space ratio, the absorption coefficient became larger and the magnitude of the propagation constant became smaller with increasing moisture weight percentage. PMID:26428823

  7. Computer Simulation for Air-coupled Ultrasonic Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamawaki, H.

    2014-06-01

    Air-coupled ultrasound is used as non-contact ultrasonic testing method. For wider application of air-coupled ultrasonic technique, it is required to know situation of ultrasonic propagation between air and solid. Transmittance of the ultrasonic waves from air to solids is extremely small with 10-5 however it was revealed that, by using computer simulation methods based on the two-stage elastic wave equation in which two independent variables of stress and particle velocity are used, visualization calculation of ultrasonic propagation between air and solid was possible. In this report, the calculation of air-coupled ultrasound using the new Improved-FDM for computer simulation of ultrasonic propagation in solids is shown. Waveforms obtained by 1-dimensional calculation are discussed for principle and performance of the calculation. Visualization of ultrasonic incidence to cylindrical steel pipe is demonstrated as an example to show availability for ultrasonic testing.

  8. Unique gel-coupled acoustic sensor array monitors human voice and physiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scanlon, Michael

    2002-11-01

    The health and performance of soldiers, firefighters, and other first responders in strenuous and hazardous environments can be continuously and remotely monitored with body-worn acoustic sensors. The Army Research Laboratory's gel-coupled acoustic physiological monitoring sensor has acoustic impedance properties similar to the skin that facilitate the transmission of body sounds into the sensor pad, yet significantly repel ambient airborne noises due to an impedance mismatch. Acoustic signal processing detects physiological events such as heartbeats, breaths, wheezes, coughs, blood pressure, activity, motion, and voice for communication and automatic speech recognition. Acoustic sensors can be in a helmet or in a strap around the neck, chest, and wrist. Although the physiological sounds have high SNR, the acoustic sensor also responds to motion-induced artifacts that sometimes obscure meaningful physiology. A noise-canceling sensor array configuration helps remove motion noise by using two acoustic sensors on the front sides of the neck and 2 additional acoustic sensors on each wrist. The motion noise detected on all 4 sensors will be dissimilar and out of phase, yet the physiology on all 4 sensors is covariant. Pulse wave transit time between neck and wrist will indicate systolic blood pressure. Data from a firefighter experiment will be presented.

  9. Permanent bilateral acoustic trauma due to air bag deployment in a young female adult.

    PubMed

    Kastanioudakis, Ioannis; Exarchakos, Georgios; Ziavra, Nausica; Skevas, Antonios

    2003-02-01

    Air bag safety systems have significantly reduced the number of occupant injuries from road traffic accidents (RTA). However air bag deployment is also associated with unavoidable risks. We report the acoustic trauma incurred by a young female driver who was a heavy smoker as a consequence of air-bag deployment in a low speed RTA and the sparing of her child seated in the rear. PMID:12625890

  10. Direct calculation of acoustic streaming including the boundary layer phenomena in an ultrasonic air pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, Yuji; Koyama, Daisuke; Nakamura, Kentaro

    2012-05-01

    Direct finite difference fluid simulation of acoustic streaming on the fine-meshed three-dimensiona model by graphics processing unit (GPU)-oriented calculation array is discussed. Airflows due to the acoustic traveling wave are induced when an intense sound field is generated in a gap between a bending transducer and a reflector. Calculation results showed good agreement with the measurements in the pressure distribution. In addition to that, several flow-vortices were observed near the boundary of the reflector and the transducer, which have been often discussed in acoustic tube near the boundary, and have never been observed in the calculation in the ultrasonic air pump of this type.

  11. Enhanced acoustoelectric coupling in acoustic energy harvester using dual Helmholtz resonators.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xiao; Wen, Yumei; Li, Ping; Yang, Aichao; Bai, Xiaoling

    2013-10-01

    In this paper, enhanced acoustoelectric transduction in an acoustic energy harvester using dual Helmholtz resonators has been reported. The harvester uses a pair of cavities mechanically coupled with a compliant perforated plate to enhance the acoustic coupling between the cavity and the plate. The experimental results show that the volume optimization of the second cavity can significantly increase the generated electric voltage up to 400% and raise the output power to 16 times as large as that of a harvester using a single Helmholtz resonator at resonant frequencies primarily related to the plate. PMID:24081260

  12. Acoustic method for measuring air temperature and humidity in rooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanev, N. G.

    2014-05-01

    A method is proposed to determine air temperature and humidity in rooms with a system of sound sources and receivers, making it possible to find the sound velocity and reverberation time. Nomograms for determining the air temperature and relative air humidity are constructed from the found sound velocity and time reverberation values. The required accuracy of measuring these parameters is estimated.

  13. Photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging with a gas-coupled laser acoustic line detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Jami L.; van Wijk, Kasper; Caron, James N.; Timmerman, Miriam

    2016-03-01

    Conventional contacting transducers are highly sensitive and readily available for ultrasonic and photoacoustic imaging. On the other hand, optical detection can be advantageous when a small sensor footprint, large bandwidth and no contact are essential. However, most optical methods utilizing interferometry or Doppler vibrometry rely on the reflection of light from the object. We present a non-contact detection method for photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging--termed Gas-Coupled Laser Acoustic Detection (GCLAD)--that does not involve surface reflectivity. GCLAD measures the displacement along a line in the air parallel to the object. Information about point displacements along the line is lost with this method, but resolution is increased over techniques that utilize finite point-detectors when used as an integrating line detector. In this proceeding, we present a formula for quantifying surface displacement remotely with GCLAD. We will validate this result by comparison with a commercial vibrometer. Finally, we will present two-dimensional imaging results using GCLAD as a line detector for photoacoustic and laser-ultrasound imaging.

  14. Three-dimensional coupled mode analysis of internal-wave acoustic ducts.

    PubMed

    Shmelev, Alexey A; Lynch, James F; Lin, Ying-Tsong; Schmidt, Henrik

    2014-05-01

    A fully three-dimensional coupled mode approach is used in this paper to describe the physics of low frequency acoustic signals propagating through a train of internal waves at an arbitrary azimuth. A three layer model of the shallow water waveguide is employed for studying the properties of normal modes and their coupled interaction due to the presence of nonlinear internal waves. Using a robust wave number integration technique for Fourier transform computation and a direct global matrix approach, an accurate three-dimensional coupled mode full field solution is obtained for the tonal signal propagation through straight and parallel internal waves. This approach provides accurate results for arbitrary azimuth and includes the effects of backscattering. This enables one to provide an azimuthal analysis of acoustic propagation and separate the effects of mode coupled transparent resonance, horizontal reflection and refraction, the horizontal Lloyd's mirror, horizontal ducting and anti-ducting, and horizontal tunneling and secondary ducting. PMID:24815234

  15. Dispersion of Plasma Dust Acoustic Waves in the Strong-Coupling Regime

    SciTech Connect

    Pieper, J.B.; Goree, J.

    1996-10-01

    Low-frequency compressional waves were observed in a suspension of strongly coupled 9.4 {mu}m spheres in an rf Kr plasma. Both parts of the complex wave number were measured to determine the dispersion relation, which agreed with a theoretical model of damped dust acoustic waves, ignoring strong coupling, but not with a strongly coupled dust-lattice wave model. The results yield experimental values for the dust plasma frequency, charge, Debye length, and damping rate, and support the applicability of fluid-based dispersion relations to strongly coupled dusty plasmas, which has been a controversy. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  16. Intelligibility of Telephone Speech for the Hearing Impaired When Various Microphones Are Used for Acoustic Coupling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janota, Claus P.; Janota, Jeanette Olach

    1991-01-01

    Various candidate microphones were evaluated for acoustic coupling of hearing aids to a telephone receiver. Results from testing by 9 hearing-impaired adults found comparable listening performance with a pressure gradient microphone at a 10 decibel higher level of interfering noise than with a normal pressure-sensitive microphone. (Author/PB)

  17. Coupling of electrostatic ion cyclotron and ion acoustic waves in the solar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreeraj, T.; Singh, S. V.; Lakhina, G. S.

    2016-08-01

    The coupling of electrostatic ion cyclotron and ion acoustic waves is examined in three component magnetized plasma consisting of electrons, protons, and alpha particles. In the theoretical model relevant to solar wind plasma, electrons are assumed to be superthermal with kappa distribution and protons as well as alpha particles follow the fluid dynamical equations. A general linear dispersion relation is derived for such a plasma system which is analyzed both analytically and numerically. For parallel propagation, electrostatic ion cyclotron (proton and helium cyclotron) and ion acoustic (slow and fast) modes are decoupled. For oblique propagation, coupling between the cyclotron and acoustic modes occurs. Furthermore, when the angle of propagation is increased, the separation between acoustic and cyclotron modes increases which is an indication of weaker coupling at large angle of propagation. For perpendicular propagation, only cyclotron modes are observed. The effect of various parameters such as number density and temperature of alpha particles and superthermality on dispersion characteristics is examined in details. The coupling between various modes occurs for small values of wavenumber.

  18. Coupled RANS/LES for SOFIA Cavity Acoustic Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodruff, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    A fast but accurate computation is described for the aero-acoustic properties of a large cavity at subsonic flight speeds. This computation employs a detached-eddy simulation model in the free-shear layer at the cavity opening and the surrounding boundary layer, but assumes inviscid flow in the cavity and in the far field. The reduced gridding requirements in the cavity, in particular, lead to dramatic improvements in the time required for the computation. The results of these computations are validated against wind-tunnel data. This approach will permit significantly more flight test points to be evaluated computationally in support of the Stratospheric Observatory For Infrared Astronomy flight-test program being carried out at NASA s Dryden Flight Research Center.

  19. Coupled RANS/LES for SOFIA Cavity Acoustic Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodruff, Stephen L.

    2010-01-01

    A fast but accurate approach is described for the determination of the aero-acoustic properties of a large cavity at subsonic flight speeds. This approach employs a detachededdy simulation model in the free-shear layer at the cavity opening and the surrounding boundary layer, but assumes inviscid flow in the cavity and in the far field. The reduced gridding requirements in the cavity, in particular, lead to dramatic improvements in the time required for the computation. Results of these computations are validated against wind-tunnel data. This approach will permit significantly more flight test points to be evaluated computationally in support of the Stratospheric Observatory For Infrared Astronomy flight-test program being carried out at NASA s Dryden Flight Research Center.

  20. Design of an air ejector for boundary-layer bleed of an acoustically treated turbofan engine inlet during ground testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stakolich, E. G.

    1978-01-01

    An air ejector was designed and built to remove the boundary-layer air from the inlet a turbofan engine during an acoustic ground test program. This report describes; (1) how the ejector was sized; (2) how the ejector performed; and (3) the performance of a scale model ejector built and tested to verify the design. With proper acoustic insulation, the ejector was effective in reducing boundary layer thickness in the inlet of the turbofan engine while obtaining the desired acoustic test conditions.

  1. On the effect of acoustic coupling on random and harmonic plate vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frendi, A.; Robinson, J. H.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of acoustic coupling on random and harmonic plate vibrations is studied using two numerical models. In the coupled model, the plate response is obtained by integration of the nonlinear plate equation coupled with the nonlinear Euler equations for the surrounding acoustic fluid. In the uncoupled model, the nonlinear plate equation with an equivalent linear viscous damping term is integrated to obtain the response of the plate subject to the same excitation field. For a low-level, narrow-band excitation, the two models predict the same plate response spectra. As the excitation level is increased, the response power spectrum predicted by the uncoupled model becomes broader and more shifted towards the high frequencies than that obtained by the coupled model. In addition, the difference in response between the coupled and uncoupled models at high frequencies becomes larger. When a high intensity harmonic excitation is used, causing a nonlinear plate response, both models predict the same frequency content of the response. However, the level of the harmonics and subharmonics are higher for the uncoupled model. Comparisons to earlier experimental and numerical results show that acoustic coupling has a significant effect on the plate response at high excitation levels. Its absence in previous models may explain the discrepancy between predicted and measured responses.

  2. Acoustic wave propagation in air-bubble curtains in water. Part 1. History and theory

    SciTech Connect

    Domenico, S.N.

    1982-03-01

    Air bubbles in water increase the compressibility several orders of magnitude above that in bubble-free water, thereby greatly reducing the velocity and increasing attenuation of acoustic waves. Currently, air bubble curtains are used to prevent damage of submerged structures (e.g., dams) by shock waves from submarine explosives. Also, air-bubble curtains are used to reduce damage to water-filler tanks in which metals are formed by explosives. Published results of laboratory experiments confirm theoretic velocity and attenuation functions and demonstrate that these quantities are dependent principally upon frequency, bubble size, and fractional volume of air. 31 references.

  3. Coupling between air travel and climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karnauskas, Kristopher B.; Donnelly, Jeffrey P.; Barkley, Hannah C.; Martin, Jonathan E.

    2015-12-01

    The airline industry closely monitors the midlatitude jet stream for short-term planning of flight paths and arrival times. In addition to passenger safety and on-time metrics, this is due to the acute sensitivity of airline profits to fuel cost. US carriers spent US$47 billion on jet fuel in 2011, compared with a total industry operating revenue of US$192 billion. Beyond the timescale of synoptic weather, the El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO), Arctic Oscillation (AO) and other modes of variability modulate the strength and position of the Aleutian low and Pacific high on interannual timescales, which influence the tendency of the exit region of the midlatitude Pacific jet stream to extend, retract and meander poleward and equatorward. The impact of global aviation on climate change has been studied for decades owing to the radiative forcing of emitted greenhouse gases, contrails and other effects. The impact of climate variability on air travel, however, has only recently come into focus, primarily in terms of turbulence. Shifting attention to flight durations, here we show that 88% of the interannual variance in domestic flight times between Hawaii and the continental US is explained by a linear combination of ENSO and the AO. Further, we extend our analysis to CMIP5 model projections to explore potential feedbacks between anthropogenic climate change and air travel.

  4. Anisotropy-induced coupling in borehole acoustic modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norris, Andrew N.; Sinha, Bikash K.

    1996-07-01

    The guided wave modes of a circular borehole in a weakly anisotropic formation are composed of linear superpositions of the associated modes for an isotropic formation. At moderate frequencies the major modes of concern are the quasi-Stoneley and quasi-flexural modes. These guided modes in anisotropic formations can be estimated from a perturbation analysis in terms of the unperturbed solutions for an isotropic formation. When the formation anisotropy is of monoclinic or lower symmetry, the normal and shear stresses become functions of both normal and shear strains through some additional anisotropic constants that are not present in materials with orthorhombic or higher symmetry. These additional elastic constants cause a coupling between the Stoneley and flexural modes. Under these circumstances, an on-axis monopole or dipole source excites both modes. Coupling coefficients account for the excitation of quasi-flexural motion by a monopole source, and of the quasi-Stoneley mode by a dipole. A transversely isotropic (TI) formation with its symmetry axis obliquely inclined with the borehole exhibits monoclinic symmetry in its rotated constants referred to the borehole axis. The monoclinic symmetry of the surrounding formation in such cases causes a coupling between the Stoneley and flexural modes. Computational results show that a borehole inclined at an angle of 60° from the symmetry axis of Austin chalk, a slow TI medium, exhibits coupling between the Stoneley and qSV-polarized flexural mode acceleration amplitudes of the order of 20 dB or less in the frequency range of interest. A similar obliquely inclined borehole in Bakken shale, a fast TI formation, exhibits a far weaker coupling between the Stoneley and qSV-polarized flexural modes. The stronger coupling in the case of Austin chalk is a result of relatively large anisotropic constants together with close proximity of the Stoneley and qSV-polarized flexural dispersions. On the other hand, weaker coupling in

  5. High-performance air acoustic detection and classification sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, Richard; Raines, Robert; Jones, Barry

    2009-05-01

    Acoustic signals are a principal detection modality for unattended sensor systems. However, the performance of these systems is frequently suboptimal due to insufficient dynamic range in small systems or excess power consumption in larger systems. This paper discusses an approach to developing an unattended ground sensor (UGS) system that has the best features of both worlds. This system, developed by McQ Inc., has exceptional dynamic range (> 100 dB) while operating at power levels of 1.5-5 watts. The system also has a user definable signal parameter library and automated detection methodology that will be described.

  6. An automated system for the acoustical and aerodynamic characterization of small air moving devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Jeff G.; Nelson, David A.; Phillips, John

    2005-09-01

    A plenum fixture for use in the measurement of acoustic emissions of air moving devices used to cool electronic equipment under the actual aerodynamic conditions of operation has been standardized in ISO 10302 and ANSI S12.11. This fixture has proven to be a valuable tool for use in the characterization of these devices. However, as many in industry have discovered, the construction of the plenum to the standardized specifications can quite complex, and the use of the plenum to fully characterize air moving devices can be quite laborious and tedious. Under contract to the NASA Glenn Research Center, which has a significant interest in the acoustic emissions of the air moving devices it uses to cool racks and payloads that are installed on the International Space Station, the authors have developed a fully automated fan test plenum that operates under software control. This plenum has been developed to facilitate rapid acoustic characterization of fans and other air moving devices, both independently and when operating into real world inlet conditions, obstructions and aerodynamic loads. The plenum slider has been calibrated to allow full development of fan curve data in parallel with acoustic emission data.

  7. Tongue-Palate Contact Pressure, Oral Air Pressure, and Acoustics of Clear Speech

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Searl, Jeff; Evitts, Paul M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The authors compared articulatory contact pressure (ACP), oral air pressure (Po), and speech acoustics for conversational versus clear speech. They also assessed the relationship of these measures to listener perception. Method: Twelve adults with normal speech produced monosyllables in a phrase using conversational and clear speech.…

  8. Modeling of Structural-Acoustic Interaction Using Coupled FE/BE Method and Control of Interior Acoustic Pressure Using Piezoelectric Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mei, Chuh; Shi, Yacheng

    1997-01-01

    A coupled finite element (FE) and boundary element (BE) approach is presented to model full coupled structural/acoustic/piezoelectric systems. The dual reciprocity boundary element method is used so that the natural frequencies and mode shapes of the coupled system can be obtained, and to extend this approach to time dependent problems. The boundary element method is applied to interior acoustic domains, and the results are very accurate when compared with limited exact solutions. Structural-acoustic problems are then analyzed with the coupled finite element/boundary element method, where the finite element method models the structural domain and the boundary element method models the acoustic domain. Results for a system consisting of an isotropic panel and a cubic cavity are in good agreement with exact solutions and experiment data. The response of a composite panel backed cavity is then obtained. The results show that the mass and stiffness of piezoelectric layers have to be considered. The coupled finite element and boundary element equations are transformed into modal coordinates, which is more convenient for transient excitation. Several transient problems are solved based on this formulation. Two control designs, a linear quadratic regulator (LQR) and a feedforward controller, are applied to reduce the acoustic pressure inside the cavity based on the equations in modal coordinates. The results indicate that both controllers can reduce the interior acoustic pressure and the plate deflection.

  9. Monolithic phononic crystals with a surface acoustic band gap from surface phonon-polariton coupling.

    PubMed

    Yudistira, D; Boes, A; Djafari-Rouhani, B; Pennec, Y; Yeo, L Y; Mitchell, A; Friend, J R

    2014-11-21

    We theoretically and experimentally demonstrate the existence of complete surface acoustic wave band gaps in surface phonon-polariton phononic crystals, in a completely monolithic structure formed from a two-dimensional honeycomb array of hexagonal shape domain-inverted inclusions in single crystal piezoelectric Z-cut lithium niobate. The band gaps appear at a frequency of about twice the Bragg band gap at the center of the Brillouin zone, formed through phonon-polariton coupling. The structure is mechanically, electromagnetically, and topographically homogeneous, without any physical alteration of the surface, offering an ideal platform for many acoustic wave applications for photonics, phononics, and microfluidics. PMID:25479504

  10. Acoustic coupling between oral tract and diatonic harmonica: Recent observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antaki, James; Bahnson, Henry; Burgreen, Greg

    2002-05-01

    The diatonic harmonica is arguably one of the most ``vocal'' of all reed instruments. Due to the relatively short distance, thus tight coupling, between the player's oral cavity and the instrument, relatively subtle changes in the oral tract may effect dramatic modulations of both frequency and spectral content of the sound produced. Over the past several years we have endeavored to improve the understanding of this interaction, as well as the coupling between reeds of a given cell. This presentation will discuss our most recent observations. Benchtop experiments were conducted by laser vibrometer to measure the simultaneous motion of the reeds. Studies on human subjects were based on x-ray, ultrasonographic, and laryngoscopic imaging of players while sounding notes on the harmonica. Evidence of torsional instability has been observed, and analyzed by subsequent computational fluid dynamics simulation.

  11. Aerodynamic excitation and sound production of blown-closed free reeds without acoustic coupling: The example of the accordion reed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricot, Denis; Caussé, René; Misdariis, Nicolas

    2005-04-01

    The accordion reed is an example of a blown-closed free reed. Unlike most oscillating valves in wind musical instruments, self-sustained oscillations occur without acoustic coupling. Flow visualizations and measurements in water show that the flow can be supposed incompressible and potential. A model is developed and the solution is calculated in the time domain. The excitation force is found to be associated with the inertial load of the unsteady flow through the reed gaps. Inertial effect leads to velocity fluctuations in the reed opening and then to an unsteady Bernoulli force. A pressure component generated by the local reciprocal air movement around the reed is added to the modeled aerodynamic excitation pressure. Since the model is two-dimensional, only qualitative comparisons with air flow measurements are possible. The agreement between the simulated pressure waveforms and measured pressure in the very near-field of the reed is reasonable. In addition, an aeroacoustic model using the permeable Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings integral method is presented. The integral expressions of the far-field acoustic pressure are also computed in the time domain. In agreement with experimental data, the sound is found to be dominated by the dipolar source associated by the strong momentum fluctuations of the flow through the reed gaps. .

  12. Acoustic mode coupling due to subaqueous sand dunes in the South China Sea.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Linus Y S; Reeder, D Benjamin

    2013-08-01

    The large subaqueous sand dunes on the upper continental slope of the South China Sea are expected to couple acoustic propagating normal modes. In this letter, the criterion of adiabatic invariance is extended to the case of a waveguide possessing bedforms. Using the extended criterion to examine mode propagation over the bedforms observed in the sand dune field in 2012, results demonstrate that bedforms increase mode coupling strength such that the criterion for adiabatic propagation is exceeded for waveguides with small bedform amplitude to water depth ratios; increasing bedform amplitude enhances mode coupling. Numerical simulations confirm the extended criterion parameterization. PMID:23927225

  13. BLF-SSH polarons coupled to acoustic phonons in the adiabatic limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandler, Carl J.; Marsiglio, F.

    2014-12-01

    We survey polaron formation in the Barisić-Labbé-Friedel and Su-Schrieffer-Heeger (BLF-SSH) model using acoustic phonons in the adiabatic limit. Multiple different numerical optimization routines and strong-coupling analytical calculations are used to find a robust ground-state energy for a wide range of coupling strengths. The electronic configuration and accompanying ionic distortions of the polaron were determined, as well as a nonzero critical coupling strength for polaron formation in two and three dimensions.

  14. Plate Wave Resonance with Air-Coupled Ultrasonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bar, H. N.; Dayal, V.; Barnard, D.; Hsu, D. K.

    2010-02-01

    Air-coupled ultrasonic transducers can excite plate waves in metals and composites. The coincidence effect, i.e., the wave vector of plate wave coincides with projection of exciting airborne sound vector, leads to a resonance which strongly amplifies the sound transmission through the plate. The resonance depends on the angle of incidence and the frequency. In the present study, the incidence angle for maximum transmission (θmax) is measured in plates of steel, aluminum, carbon fiber reinforced composites and honeycomb sandwich panels. The variations of (θmax) with plate thickness are compared with theoretical values in steel, aluminum and quasi-isotropic carbon fiber composites. The enhanced transmission of air-coupled ultrasound at oblique incidence can substantially improve the probability of flaw detection in plates and especially in honeycomb structures. Experimental air-coupled ultrasonic scan of subtle flaws in CFRP laminates showed definite improvement of signal-to-noise ratio with oblique incidence at θmax.

  15. Observation of dust acoustic shock wave in a strongly coupled dusty plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Sumita K.; Boruah, A.; Nakamura, Y.; Bailung, H.

    2016-05-01

    Dust acoustic shock wave is observed in a strongly coupled laboratory dusty plasma. A supersonic flow of charged microparticles is allowed to perturb a stationary dust fluid to excite dust acoustic shock wave. The evolution process beginning with steepening of initial wave front and then formation of a stable shock structure is similar to the numerical results of the Korteweg-de Vries-Burgers equation. The measured Mach number of the observed shock wave agrees with the theoretical results. Reduction of shock amplitude at large distances is also observed due to the dust neutral collision and viscosity effects. The dispersion relation and the spatial damping of a linear dust acoustic wave are also measured and compared with the relevant theory.

  16. Localization using ground- and air-based acoustic arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, Geoffrey H.; Reiff, Chris

    2011-06-01

    Techniques were developed to localize acoustic quasiperiodic signals using microphone arrays located on the ground and on an aerostat. The direction of arrival (DOA) was computed at each array and then the position of the source was estimated using algorithms based upon triangulation. Differential time delays between the microphones in a tetrahedral array were estimated in the frequency domain, and then DOA estimates were calculated using a weighted least squares approach. The location of the target was calculated by minimizing the weighted squared error of a cost function for different combinations of DOA estimates. The algorithms were tested offline using data collected by the U.S. Army Research Laboratory on an aircraft. The ground-truth position of the target was recorded using a GPS system as it maneuvered and compared to the results obtained from the localization algorithms. The algorithms performed well when estimating the x and y positions, but had difficulty obtaining consistently good z positions, or equivalently, height estimates.

  17. Acoustic Source Modeling for High Speed Air Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, Marvin E.; Khavaran, Abbas

    2005-01-01

    The far field acoustic spectra at 90deg to the downstream axis of some typical high speed jets are calculated from two different forms of Lilley s equation combined with some recent measurements of the relevant turbulent source function. These measurements, which were limited to a single point in a low Mach number flow, were extended to other conditions with the aid of a highly developed RANS calculation. The results are compared with experimental data over a range of Mach numbers. Both forms of the analogy lead to predictions that are in excellent agreement with the experimental data at subsonic Mach numbers. The agreement is also fairly good at supersonic speeds, but the data appears to be slightly contaminated by shock-associated noise in this case.

  18. Air-Coupled Piezoelectric Transducers with Active Polypropylene Foam Matching Layers

    PubMed Central

    Gómez Álvarez-Arenas, Tomás E.

    2013-01-01

    This work presents the design, construction and characterization of air-coupled piezoelectric transducers using 1–3 connectivity piezocomposite disks with a stack of matching layers being the outer one an active quarter wavelength layer made of polypropylene foam ferroelectret film. This kind of material has shown a stable piezoelectric response together with a very low acoustic impedance (<0.1 MRayl). These features make them a suitable candidate for the dual use or function proposed here: impedance matching layer and active material for air-coupled transduction. The transducer centre frequency is determined by the λ/4 resonance of the polypropylene foam ferroelectret film (0.35 MHz), then, the rest of the transducer components (piezocomposite disk and passive intermediate matching layers) are all tuned to this frequency. The transducer has been tested in several working modes including pulse-echo and pitch-catch as well as wide and narrow band excitation. The performance of the proposed novel transducer is compared with that of a conventional air-coupled transducers operating in a similar frequency range. PMID:23666129

  19. Cellular polypropylene polymer foam as air-coupled ultrasonic transducer materials.

    PubMed

    Satyanarayan, L; Haberman, Michael R; Berthelot, Yves H

    2010-10-01

    Cellular polypropylene polymer foams, also known as ferroelectrets, are compelling candidates for air-coupled ultrasonic transducer materials because of their excellent acoustic impedance match to air and because they have a piezoelectric d(33) coefficient superior to that of PVDF. This study investigates the performance of ferroelectret transducers in the generation and reception of ultrasonic waves in air. As previous studies have noted, the piezoelectric coupling coefficients of these foams depend on the number, size, and distribution of charged voids in the microstructure. The present work studies the influence of these parameters both theoretically and experimentally. First, a three-dimensional model is employed to explain the variation of piezoelectric coupling coefficients, elastic stiffness, and dielectric permittivity as a function of void fraction based on void-scale physics and void geometry. Laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) measurements of the effective d(33) coefficient of a specially fabricated prototype transmitting transducer are then shown which clearly indicate that the charged voids in the ferroelectret material are randomly distributed in the plane of the foam. The frequency-dependent dynamic d(33) coefficient is then reported from 50 to 500 kHz for different excitation voltages and shown to be largely insensitive to drive voltage. Lastly, two ferroelectret transducers are operated in transmit-receive mode and the received signal is shown to accurately represent the corresponding signal generated by the transmitting transducer as measured using LDV. PMID:20889422

  20. Formation of Hydro-acoustic Waves in Dissipative Coupled Weakly Compressible Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdolali, A.; Kirby, J. T., Jr.; Bellotti, G.

    2014-12-01

    Recent advances in deep sea measurement technology provide an increasing opportunity to detect and interpret hydro-acoustic waves as a component in improved Tsunami Early Warning Systems (TEWS). For the idealized case of a homogeneous water column above a moving but otherwise rigid bottom (in terms of assessing acoustic wave interaction), the description of the infinite family of acoustic modes is characterized by local water depth at source area; i.e. the period of the first acoustic mode is given by four times the required time for sound to travel from the seabed to the surface. Spreading off from earthquake zone, the dominant spectrum is filtered and enriched by seamounts and barriers. This study focuses on the characteristics of hydro-acoustic waves generated by sudden sea bottom motion in a weakly compressible fluid coupled with an underlying sedimentary layer, where the added complexity of the sediment layer rheology leads to both the lowering of dominant spectral peaks and wave attenuation across the full spectrum. To overcome the computational difficulties of three-dimensional models, we derive a depth integrated equation valid for varying water depth and sediment thickness. Damping behavior of the two layered system is initially taken into account by introducing the viscosity of fluid-like sedimentary layer. We show that low frequency pressure waves which are precursor components of tsunamis contain information of seafloor motion.

  1. Laplace-domain waveform modeling and inversion for the 3D acoustic-elastic coupled media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Jungkyun; Shin, Changsoo; Calandra, Henri

    2016-06-01

    Laplace-domain waveform inversion reconstructs long-wavelength subsurface models by using the zero-frequency component of damped seismic signals. Despite the computational advantages of Laplace-domain waveform inversion over conventional frequency-domain waveform inversion, an acoustic assumption and an iterative matrix solver have been used to invert 3D marine datasets to mitigate the intensive computing cost. In this study, we develop a Laplace-domain waveform modeling and inversion algorithm for 3D acoustic-elastic coupled media by using a parallel sparse direct solver library (MUltifrontal Massively Parallel Solver, MUMPS). We precisely simulate a real marine environment by coupling the 3D acoustic and elastic wave equations with the proper boundary condition at the fluid-solid interface. In addition, we can extract the elastic properties of the Earth below the sea bottom from the recorded acoustic pressure datasets. As a matrix solver, the parallel sparse direct solver is used to factorize the non-symmetric impedance matrix in a distributed memory architecture and rapidly solve the wave field for a number of shots by using the lower and upper matrix factors. Using both synthetic datasets and real datasets obtained by a 3D wide azimuth survey, the long-wavelength component of the P-wave and S-wave velocity models is reconstructed and the proposed modeling and inversion algorithm are verified. A cluster of 80 CPU cores is used for this study.

  2. Flame-acoustic coupling of combustion instability in a non-premixed backward-facing step combustor: the role of acoustic-Reynolds stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannan, Ashwin; Chellappan, Balaji; Chakravarthy, Satyanarayanan

    2016-07-01

    Combustion instability in a laboratory scale backward-facing step combustor is numerically investigated by carrying out an acoustically coupled incompressible large eddy simulation of turbulent reacting flow for various Reynolds numbers with fuel injection at the step. The problem is mathematically formulated as a decomposition of the full compressible Navier-Stokes equations using multi-scale analysis by recognising the small length scale and large time scale of the flow field relative to a longitudinal mode acoustic field for low mean Mach numbers. The equations are decomposed into those for an incompressible flow with temperature-dependent density to zeroth order and linearised Euler equations for acoustics as a first order compressibility correction. Explicit coupling terms between the two equation sets are identified to be the flow dilatation as a source of acoustic energy and the acoustic Reynolds stress (ARS) as a source of flow momentum. The numerical simulations are able to capture the experimentally observed flow-acoustic lock-on that signifies the onset of combustion instability, marked by a shift in the dominant frequency from an acoustic to a hydrodynamic mode and accompanied by a nonlinear variation of pressure amplitude. Attention is devoted to flow conditions at two Reynolds numbers before and after lock-on to show that, after lock-on, the ARS causes large-scale vortical rollup resulting in the evolution of a compact flame. As compared to acoustically uncoupled simulations at these Reynolds numbers that show an elongated flame with no significant roll up and disturbance in the upstream flow field, the ARS is seen to alter the shear layer dynamics by affecting the flow field upstream of the step as well, when acoustically coupled.

  3. AUV Positioning Method Based on Tightly Coupled SINS/LBL for Underwater Acoustic Multipath Propagation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tao; Shi, Hongfei; Chen, Liping; Li, Yao; Tong, Jinwu

    2016-01-01

    This paper researches an AUV (Autonomous Underwater Vehicle) positioning method based on SINS (Strapdown Inertial Navigation System)/LBL (Long Base Line) tightly coupled algorithm. This algorithm mainly includes SINS-assisted searching method of optimum slant-range of underwater acoustic propagation multipath, SINS/LBL tightly coupled model and multi-sensor information fusion algorithm. Fuzzy correlation peak problem of underwater LBL acoustic propagation multipath could be solved based on SINS positional information, thus improving LBL positional accuracy. Moreover, introduction of SINS-centered LBL locating information could compensate accumulative AUV position error effectively and regularly. Compared to loosely coupled algorithm, this tightly coupled algorithm can still provide accurate location information when there are fewer than four available hydrophones (or within the signal receiving range). Therefore, effective positional calibration area of tightly coupled system based on LBL array is wider and has higher reliability and fault tolerance than loosely coupled. It is more applicable to AUV positioning based on SINS/LBL. PMID:26978361

  4. AUV Positioning Method Based on Tightly Coupled SINS/LBL for Underwater Acoustic Multipath Propagation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tao; Shi, Hongfei; Chen, Liping; Li, Yao; Tong, Jinwu

    2016-01-01

    This paper researches an AUV (Autonomous Underwater Vehicle) positioning method based on SINS (Strapdown Inertial Navigation System)/LBL (Long Base Line) tightly coupled algorithm. This algorithm mainly includes SINS-assisted searching method of optimum slant-range of underwater acoustic propagation multipath, SINS/LBL tightly coupled model and multi-sensor information fusion algorithm. Fuzzy correlation peak problem of underwater LBL acoustic propagation multipath could be solved based on SINS positional information, thus improving LBL positional accuracy. Moreover, introduction of SINS-centered LBL locating information could compensate accumulative AUV position error effectively and regularly. Compared to loosely coupled algorithm, this tightly coupled algorithm can still provide accurate location information when there are fewer than four available hydrophones (or within the signal receiving range). Therefore, effective positional calibration area of tightly coupled system based on LBL array is wider and has higher reliability and fault tolerance than loosely coupled. It is more applicable to AUV positioning based on SINS/LBL. PMID:26978361

  5. Acoustical and Optical Characterization of Air Entrapment in Piezo-Driven Inkjet Printheads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jong, Jos; Reinten, Hans; Versluis, Michel

    2005-11-01

    Air entrapment leads to malfunctioning of jet formation in a piezo-driven inkjet printhead. The entrapped air bubbles disturb the acoustics and in many cases cause the droplet formation to stop. Here we will focus on piezo inkjet devices where a voltage pulse applied to a piezo-electric element causes an ink-filled channel to deform, thereby creating a pressure waveform in the ink. The nozzle diameter is typically 30 μm. Droplets are jetted every 50 μs and it is essential that the droplet formation remains stable for an extensive period. Here we detect air entrapment, reveal the air entrapment process, and the time evolution of the entrapped air bubble. The acoustical signal is monitored by using the piezo actuator as a sensor to measure the pressure in the channel after the pulse is applied. This signal is employed to detect air bubbles inside the ink channel and to trigger the optical setup. High speed imaging is employed to perfom optical measurements at microsecond timescales. Once entrapped, the air bubble has an initial radius of 10 μm and oscillates with a frequency near 200 kHz. The radial growth of the bubble is found to be 0.3 μm/ms.

  6. Reverberant acoustic energy in auditoria that comprise systems of coupled rooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summers, Jason Erik

    A frequency-dependent model for levels and decay rates of reverberant energy in systems of coupled rooms is developed and compared with measurements conducted in a 1:10 scale model and in Bass Hall, Fort Worth, TX. Schroeder frequencies of subrooms, fSch, characteristic size of coupling apertures, a, relative to wavelength lambda, and characteristic size of room surfaces, l, relative to lambda define the frequency regions. At high frequencies [HF (f >> f Sch, a >> lambda, l >> lambda)], this work improves upon prior statistical-acoustics (SA) coupled-ODE models by incorporating geometrical-acoustics (GA) corrections for the model of decay within subrooms and the model of energy transfer between subrooms. Previous researchers developed prediction algorithms based on computational GA. Comparisons of predictions derived from beam-axis tracing with scale-model measurements indicate that systematic errors for coupled rooms result from earlier tail-correction procedures that assume constant quadratic growth of reflection density. A new algorithm is developed that uses ray tracing rather than tail correction in the late part and is shown to correct this error. At midfrequencies [MF (f >> f Sch, a ˜ lambda)], HF models are modified to account for wave effects at coupling apertures by including analytically or heuristically derived power transmission coefficients tau. This work improves upon prior SA models of this type by developing more accurate estimates of random-incidence tau. While the accuracy of the MF models is difficult to verify, scale-model measurements evidence the expected behavior. The Biot-Tolstoy-Medwin-Svensson (BTMS) time-domain edge-diffraction model is newly adapted to study transmission through apertures. Multiple-order BTMS scattering is theoretically and experimentally shown to be inaccurate due to the neglect of slope diffraction. At low frequencies (f ˜ f Sch), scale-model measurements have been qualitatively explained by application of

  7. Acoustic-Seismic Coupling in Porous Ground - Measurements and Analysis for On-Site-Inspection Support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebsch, Mattes; Gorschlüter, Felix; Altmann, Jürgen

    2014-05-01

    During on-site inspections (OSI) of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty Organisation (CTBTO) a local seismic network can be installed to measure seismic aftershock signals of an assumed underground nuclear explosion. These signals are caused by relaxation processes in and near the cavity created by the explosion and when detected can lead to a localisation of the cavity. This localisation is necessary to take gas samples from the ground which are analysed for radioactive noble gas isotopes to confirm or dismiss the suspicion of a nuclear test. The aftershock signals are of very low magnitude so they can be masked by different sources, in particular periodic disturbances caused by vehicles and aircraft in the inspection area. Vehicles and aircraft (mainly helicopters) will be used for the inspection activities themselves, e.g. for overhead imagery or magnetic-anomaly sensing. While vehicles in contact with the ground can excite soil vibrations directly, aircraft and vehicles alike emit acoustic waves which excite soil vibrations when hitting the ground. These disturbing signals are of periodic nature while the seismic aftershock signals are pulse-shaped, so their separation is possible. The understanding of the coupling of acoustic waves to the ground is yet incomplete, a better understanding is necessary to improve the performance of an OSI, e.g. to address potential consequences for the sensor placement, the helicopter trajectories etc. In a project funded by the Young Scientist Research Award of the CTBTO to one of us (ML), we investigated the acoustic-seismic coupling of airborne signals of jet aircraft and artificially induced ones by a speaker. During a measurement campaign several acoustic and seismic sensors were placed below the take-off trajectory of an airport at 4 km distance. Therefore taking off and landing jet aircraft passed nearly straightly above the setup. Microphones were placed close to the ground to record the sound pressure of incident

  8. T-phase Observations in Northern California: Acoustic to Seismic Coupling at a Weakly Elastic Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    deGroot-Hedlin, C.; Orcutt, J.

    - Plans for a hydroacoustic network intended to monitor compliance with the CTBT call for the inclusion of five T-phase stations situated at optimal locations for the detection of seismic phases converted from ocean-borne T phases. We examine factors affecting the sensitivity of land-based stations to the seismic T phase. The acoustic to seismic coupling phenomenon is described by upslope propagation of an acoustic ray impinging at a sloping elastic wedge. We examine acoustic to seismic coupling characteristics for two cases; the first in which the shear velocity of the bottom is greater than the compressional velocity of the fluid (i.e., vp > vs > vw), the second is a weakly elastic solid in which vs<< vw< vp. The former is representative of velocities in solid rock, which might be encountered at volcanic islands; the latter is representative of marine sediments. For the case where vs > vw, we show that acoustic energy couples primarily to shear wave energy, except at very high slope angles. We show that the weakly elastic solid (i.e., vs << vw) behaves nearly like a fluid bottom, with acoustic energy coupling to both P and S waves even at low slope angles.We examine converted T-wave arrivals at northern California seismic stations for two event clusters; one a series of earthquakes near the Hawaiian Islands, the other a series of nuclear tests conducted near the Tuamoto archipelago. Each cluster yielded characteristic arrivals at each station which were consistent from event to event within a cluster, but differed between clusters. The seismic T-phases consisted of both P- and S-wave arrivals, consistent with the conversion of acoustic to seismic energy at a gently sloping sediment-covered seafloor. In general, the amplitudes of the seismic T phases were highest for stations nearest the continental slope, where seafloor slopes are greatest, however noise levels decrease rapidly with increasing distance from the coastline, so that T-wave arrivals were observable

  9. Surface acoustic wave regulated single photon emission from a coupled quantum dot-nanocavity system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiß, M.; Kapfinger, S.; Reichert, T.; Finley, J. J.; Wixforth, A.; Kaniber, M.; Krenner, H. J.

    2016-07-01

    A coupled quantum dot-nanocavity system in the weak coupling regime of cavity-quantumelectrodynamics is dynamically tuned in and out of resonance by the coherent elastic field of a fSAW ≃ 800 MHz surface acoustic wave. When the system is brought to resonance by the sound wave, light-matter interaction is strongly increased by the Purcell effect. This leads to a precisely timed single photon emission as confirmed by the second order photon correlation function, g(2). All relevant frequencies of our experiment are faithfully identified in the Fourier transform of g(2), demonstrating high fidelity regulation of the stream of single photons emitted by the system.

  10. The direct and inverse problems of an air-saturated porous cylinder submitted to acoustic radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogam, Erick; Depollier, Claude; Fellah, Z. E. A.

    2010-09-01

    Gas-saturated porous skeleton materials such as geomaterials, polymeric and metallic foams, or biomaterials are fundamental in a diverse range of applications, from structural materials to energy technologies. Most polymeric foams are used for noise control applications and knowledge of the manner in which the energy of sound waves is dissipated with respect to the intrinsic acoustic properties is important for the design of sound packages. Foams are often employed in the audible, low frequency range where modeling and measurement techniques for the recovery of physical parameters responsible for energy loss are still few. Accurate acoustic methods of characterization of porous media are based on the measurement of the transmitted and/or reflected acoustic waves by platelike specimens at ultrasonic frequencies. In this study we develop an acoustic method for the recovery of the material parameters of a rigid-frame, air-saturated polymeric foam cylinder. A dispersion relation for sound wave propagation in the porous medium is derived from the propagation equations and a model solution is sought based on plane-wave decomposition using orthogonal cylindrical functions. The explicit analytical solution equation of the scattered field shows that it is also dependent on the intrinsic acoustic parameters of the porous cylinder, namely, porosity, tortuosity, and flow resistivity (permeability). The inverse problem of the recovery of the flow resistivity and porosity is solved by seeking the minima of the objective functions consisting of the sum of squared residuals of the differences between the experimental and theoretical scattered field data.

  11. Acoustic levitator for contactless motion and merging of large droplets in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjelobrk, Nada; Nabavi, Majid; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2012-09-01

    Large droplet transport in a line-focussed acoustic manipulator in terms of maximum droplet size is achieved by employing a driving voltage control mechanism. The maximum volume of the transported droplets in the order of few microliters is thereby increased by three orders of magnitude compared to the constant voltage case, widening the application field of this method significantly. A drop-on-demand droplet generator is used to supply the liquid droplets into the system. The ejected sequence of picoliter-size droplets is guided along trajectories by the acoustic field and accumulates at the selected pressure node, merging into a single large droplet. Droplet movement is achieved by varying the reflector height. This also changes the intensity of the radiation pressure during droplet movement, which in turn could atomise the droplet. The acoustic force is adjusted by regulating the driving voltage of the actuator to keep the liquid droplet suspended in air and to prevent atomisation. In the herein presented levitation concept, liquids with a wide range of surface tension (water and tetradecane were tested) can be transported over distances of several mm. The aspect ratio of the droplet in the acoustic field is shown to be a good indicator for radiation pressure intensity and is kept between 1.1 and 1.4 during droplet transport. Despite certain limitations with volatile liquids, the presented acoustic levitator concept has the potential to expand the range of analytical characterisation and manipulation methods in applications ranging from chemistry and biology.

  12. Acoustic analysis of primate air sacs and their effect on vocalization.

    PubMed

    de Boer, Bart

    2009-12-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the acoustic impedance of primate air sacs and their interaction with the vocal tract. A lumped element model is derived and it is found that the inertance of the neck and the volume of the air sac are relevant, as well as the mass and stiffness of the walls (depending on the tissue). It is also shown that at low frequencies, radiation from the air sac can be non-negligible, even if the mouth is open. It is furthermore shown that an air sac can add one or two low resonances to the resonances of the oral tract, and that it shifts up the oral tract's resonances below approximately 2000 Hz, and shifts them closer together. The theory was verified by acoustic measurements and applied to the red howler monkey (Alouatta seniculus) and the siamang (Symphalangus syndactylus). The theory describes the physical models and the siamang calls correctly, but appears incomplete for the howler monkey vocalizations. The relation between air sacs and the evolution of speech is discussed briefly, and it is proposed that an air sac would reduce the ability to produce distinctive speech, but would enhance the impression of size of the vocalizer. PMID:20000947

  13. Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The acoustics research activities of the DLR fluid-mechanics department (Forschungsbereich Stroemungsmechanik) during 1988 are surveyed and illustrated with extensive diagrams, drawings, graphs, and photographs. Particular attention is given to studies of helicopter rotor noise (high-speed impulsive noise, blade/vortex interaction noise, and main/tail-rotor interaction noise), propeller noise (temperature, angle-of-attack, and nonuniform-flow effects), noise certification, and industrial acoustics (road-vehicle flow noise and airport noise-control installations).

  14. Breath air measurement using wide-band frequency tuning IR laser photo-acoustic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kistenev, Yury V.; Borisov, Alexey V.; Kuzmin, Dmitry A.; Bulanova, Anna A.; Boyko, Andrey A.; Kostyukova, Nadezhda Y.; Karapuzikov, Alexey A.

    2016-03-01

    The results of measuring of biomarkers in breath air of patients with broncho-pulmonary diseases using wide-band frequency tuning IR laser photo-acoustic spectroscopy and the methods of data mining are presented. We will discuss experimental equipment and various methods of intellectual analysis of the experimental spectra in context of above task. The work was carried out with partial financial support of the FCPIR contract No 14.578.21.0082 (ID RFMEFI57814X0082).

  15. On the location of frequencies of maximum acoustic-to-seismic coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Sabatier, J.M.; Bass, H.E.; Elliott, G.R.

    1986-10-01

    Measurements of the acoustic-to-seismic transfer function (ratio of the normal soil particle velocity at a depth d to the acoustic pressure at the surface) for outdoor ground surfaces quite typically reveal a series of maxima and minima. In a publication (Sabatier et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 80, 646--649 (1986)), the location and magnitude of these maxima are measured and predicted for several outdoor ground surfaces using a layered poroelastic model of the ground surface. In this paper, the seismic transfer function for a desert site is compared to the seismic transfer function for holes dug in the desert floor which were filled with pumice (volcanic rock). The hole geometry was rectangular and the hole depths varied from 0.25--2.0 m. The p- and s-wave speeds, densities, porosities, and flow resistivities for the desert floor and pumice were all measured. By varying the hole depth and the fill material, the maxima in the seismic transfer function can be shifted in frequency and the locations of the maxima compare reasonably with that of a hard-backed layer calculation. The area or extent of the acoustic-to-seismic coupling for pumice was determined to be less than 1 m/sup 2/.

  16. Nonlinear coupling of acoustic and shear mode in a strongly coupled dusty plasma with a density dependent viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garai, S.; Janaki, M. S.; Chakrabarti, N.

    2016-09-01

    The nonlinear propagation of low frequency waves, in a collisionless, strongly coupled dusty plasma (SCDP) with a density dependent viscosity, has been studied with a proper Galilean invariant generalized hydrodynamic (GH) model. The well known reductive perturbation technique (RPT) has been employed in obtaining the solutions of the longitudinal and transverse perturbations. It has been found that the nonlinear propagation of the acoustic perturbations govern with the modified Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation and are decoupled from the sheared fluctuations. In the regions, where transversal gradients of the flow exists, coupling between the longitudinal and transverse perturbations occurs due to convective nonlinearity which is true for the homogeneous case also. The results, obtained here, can have relative significance to astrophysical context as well as in laboratory plasmas.

  17. Parameter estimation in a structural acoustic system with fully nonlinear coupling conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Smith, Ralph C.

    1994-01-01

    A methodology for estimating physical parameters in a class of structural acoustic systems is presented. The general model under consideration consists of an interior cavity which is separated from an exterior noise source by an enclosing elastic structure. Piezoceramic patches are bonded to or embedded in the structure; these can be used both as actuators and sensors in applications ranging from the control of interior noise levels to the determination of structural flaws through nondestructive evaluation techniques. The presence and excitation of patches, however, changes the geometry and material properties of the structure as well as involves unknown patch parameters, thus necessitating the development of parameter estimation techniques which are applicable in this coupled setting. In developing a framework for approximation, parameter estimation and implementation, strong consideration is given to the fact that the input operator is unbonded due to the discrete nature of the patches. Moreover, the model is weakly nonlinear. As a result of the coupling mechanism between the structural vibrations and the interior acoustic dynamics. Within this context, an illustrating model is given, well-posedness and approximations results are discussed and an applicable parameter estimation methodology is presented. The scheme is then illustrated through several numerical examples with simulations modeling a variety of commonly used structural acoustic techniques for systems excitations and data collection.

  18. Investigation of acoustically coupled enclosures using a diffusion-equation model.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Ning; Jing, Yun; Bockman, Alexander C

    2009-09-01

    Recent application of coupled-room systems in performing arts spaces has prompted active research on sound fields in these complex geometries. This paper applies a diffusion-equation model to the study of acoustics in coupled-rooms. Acoustical measurements are conducted on a scale-model of two coupled-rooms. Using the diffusion model and the experimental results the current work conducts in-depth investigations on sound pressure level distributions, providing further evidence supporting the valid application of the diffusion-equation model. Analysis of the results within the Bayesian framework allows for quantification of the double-slope characteristics of sound-energy decays obtained from the diffusion-equation numerical modeling and the experimental measurements. In particular, Bayesian decay analysis confirms sound-energy flux modeling predictions that time-dependent sound-energy flows in coupled-room systems experience feedback in the form of energy flow-direction change across the aperture connecting the two rooms in cases where the dependent room is more reverberant than the source room. PMID:19739732

  19. Air-coupled MUMPs capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers with resonant cavities.

    PubMed

    Octavio Manzanares, Alberto; Montero de Espinosa, Francisco

    2012-04-01

    This work reports performance improvements of air-coupled capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers (CMUTs) using resonant cavities. In order to perform this work, we have designed and manufactured a CMUT employing multi-user microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) processes (MUMPs). The transducer was designed using Helmholtz resonator principles. This was characterised by the dimensions of the cavity and several acoustic ports, which had the form of holes in the CMUT plate. The MUMPs process has the advantage of being low cost which allows the manufacture of economic prototypes. In this paper we show the effects of the resonant cavities and acoustic ports in CMUTs using laser Doppler vibrometry and acoustical measurements. We also use Finite Element (FE) simulations in order to support experimental measurements. The results show that it is possible to enhance the output pressure and bandwidth in air by tuning the resonance frequency of the plate (f(p)) with that of the Helmholtz resonator (f(H)). The experimental measurements show the plate resonance along with an additional resonance in the output pressure spectrum. This appears due to the effect of the new resonant cavities in the transducer. FE simulations show an increase of 11 dB in the output pressure with respect to that of a theoretical vacuum-sealed cavity MUMPs CMUT by properly tuning the transducer. The bandwidth has been also analyzed by calculating the mechanical Q factor of the tuned CMUT. This has been estimated as 4.5 compared with 7.75 for the vacuum-sealed cavity MUMPs CMUT. PMID:22099252

  20. Demonstration of a directional sonic prism in two dimensions using an air-acoustic leaky wave antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Naify, Christina J. Rohde, Charles A.; Calvo, David C.; Orris, Gregory J.; Guild, Matthew D.

    2015-09-28

    Analysis and experimental demonstration of a two-dimensional acoustic leaky wave antenna is presented for use in air. The antenna is comprised of a two-dimensional waveguide patterned with radiating acoustic shunts. When excited using a single acoustic source within the waveguide, the antenna acts as a sonic prism that exhibits frequency steering. This design allows for control of acoustic steering angle using only a single source transducer and a patterned aperture. Aperture design was determined using transmission line analysis and finite element methods. The designed antenna was fabricated and the steering angle measured. The performance of the measured aperture was within 9% of predicted angle magnitudes over all examined frequencies.

  1. Demonstration of a directional sonic prism in two dimensions using an air-acoustic leaky wave antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naify, Christina J.; Guild, Matthew D.; Rohde, Charles A.; Calvo, David C.; Orris, Gregory J.

    2015-09-01

    Analysis and experimental demonstration of a two-dimensional acoustic leaky wave antenna is presented for use in air. The antenna is comprised of a two-dimensional waveguide patterned with radiating acoustic shunts. When excited using a single acoustic source within the waveguide, the antenna acts as a sonic prism that exhibits frequency steering. This design allows for control of acoustic steering angle using only a single source transducer and a patterned aperture. Aperture design was determined using transmission line analysis and finite element methods. The designed antenna was fabricated and the steering angle measured. The performance of the measured aperture was within 9% of predicted angle magnitudes over all examined frequencies.

  2. Air-coupled seismic waves at long range from Apollo launchings.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donn, W. L.; Dalins, I.; Mccarty, V.; Ewing, M.; Kaschak , G.

    1971-01-01

    Microphones and seismographs were co-located in arrays on Skidaway Island, Georgia, for the launchings of Apollo 13 and 14, 374 km to the south. Simultaneous acoustic and seismic waves were recorded for both events at times appropriate to the arrival of the acoustic waves from the source. The acoustic signal is relatively broadband compared to the nearly monochromatic seismic signal; the seismic signal is much more continuous than the more pulse-like acoustic signal; ground loading from the pressure variations of the acoustic waves is shown to be too small to account for the seismic waves; and the measured phase velocities of both acoustic and seismic waves across the local instrument arrays differ by less than 6 per cent and possibly 3 per cent if experimental error is included. It is concluded that the seismic waves are generated by resonant coupling to the acoustic waves along some 10 km of path on Skidaway Island.

  3. Development of a Fieldable Air-Coupled Ultrasonic Inspection System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, J. J.; Barnard, D. J.; Hsu, D. K.

    2004-02-01

    This paper describes the development of a non-mechanically encoded, simple, field-worthy air-coupled ultrasonic scanning system that gives quantitative information about the size of damage and underlying structure in composite and aluminum aerospace structures. The system consists of the AIRSCAN® air-coupled ultrasonic testing system, the Flock of Birds® real-time motion tracking equipment, a lightweight composite yoke, and laptop PC with data acquisition and processing software. Through transmission C-scan images are generated manually by moving transducers attached to a yoke across the part's surface. The prototype has produced images for a variety of aircraft composite and metal honeycomb structures containing flaws, damages, and repairs. Field tests on commercial and military aircraft as well as rotor blades have begun. Initial test results are shown.

  4. Linear and nonlinear coupled drift and ion acoustic waves in collisional pair ion-electron magnetoplasma

    SciTech Connect

    Mushtaq, A.; Saeed, R.; Haque, Q.

    2011-04-15

    Linear and nonlinear coupled electrostatic drift and ion acoustic waves are studied in inhomogeneous, collisional pair ion-electron plasma. The Korteweg-de Vries-Burgers (KdVB) equation for a medium where both dispersion and dissipation are present is derived. An attempt is made to obtain exact solution of KdVB equation by using modified tanh-coth method for arbitrary velocity of nonlinear drift wave. Another exact solution for KdVB is obtained, which gives a structure of shock wave. Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) and Burgers equations are derived in limiting cases with solitary and monotonic shock solutions, respectively. Effects of species density, magnetic field, obliqueness, and the acoustic to drift velocity ratio on the solitary and shock solutions are investigated. The results discussed are useful in understanding of low frequency electrostatic waves at laboratory pair ion plasmas.

  5. Enhancement of effective electromechanical coupling factor by mass loading in layered surface acoustic wave device structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Gongbin; Han, Tao; Teshigahara, Akihiko; Iwaki, Takao; Hashimoto, Ken-ya

    2016-07-01

    This paper describes a drastic enhancement of the effective coupling factor K\\text{e}2 by mass loading in layered surface acoustic wave (SAW) device structures such as the ScAlN film/Si substrate structure. This phenomenon occurs when the piezoelectric layer exhibits a high acoustic wave velocity. The mass loading decreases the SAW velocity and causes SAW energy confinement close to the top surface where an interdigital transducer is placed. It is shown that this phenomenon is obvious even when an amorphous SiO2 film is deposited on the top surface for temperature compensation. This K\\text{e}2 enhancement was also found in various combinations of electrode, piezoelectric layer, and/or substrate materials. The existence of this phenomenon was verified experimentally using the ScAlN film/Si substrate structure.

  6. Analysis of the STS-126 Flow Control Valve Structural-Acoustic Coupling Failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Trevor M.; Larko, Jeffrey M.; McNelis, Mark E.

    2010-01-01

    During the Space Transportation System mission STS-126, one of the main engine's flow control valves incurred an unexpected failure. A section of the valve broke off during liftoff. It is theorized that an acoustic mode of the flowing fuel, coupled with a structural mode of the valve, causing a high cycle fatigue failure. This report documents the analysis efforts conducted in an attempt to verify this theory. Hand calculations, computational fluid dynamics, and finite element methods are all implemented and analyses are performed using steady-state methods in addition to transient analysis methods. The conclusion of the analyses is that there is a critical acoustic mode that aligns with a structural mode of the valve

  7. Method and apparatus for air-coupled transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, Junho (Inventor); Chimenti, Dale E. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An air-coupled transducer includes a ultrasonic transducer body having a radiation end with a backing fixture at the radiation end. There is a flexible backplate conformingly fit to the backing fixture and a thin membrane (preferably a metallized polymer) conformingly fit to the flexible backplate. In one embodiment, the backing fixture is spherically curved and the flexible backplate is spherically curved. The flexible backplate is preferably patterned with pits or depressions.

  8. Efficient high voltage pulser for piezoelectric air coupled transducer.

    PubMed

    Svilainis, Linas; Chaziachmetovas, Andrius; Dumbrava, Vytautas

    2013-01-01

    The design of high voltage pulser for air coupled ultrasound imaging is presented. It is dedicated for air-coupled ultrasound applications when piezoelectric transducer design is used. Two identical N-channel MOSFETs are used together with 1200V high and low side driver IC. Simple driving pulses' delay and skew circuit is used to reduce the cross-conduction. Analysis of switch peak current and channel resistance relation to maximum operation frequency and load capacitance is given. PSPICE simulation was used to analyze the gate driver resistance, gate pulse skew, pulse amplitude influence on energy consumption when loaded by capacitive load. Experimental investigation was verified against simulation and theoretical predictions. For 500pF capacitance, which is most common for piezoelectric air coupled transducers, pulser consumes 650μJ at 1kV pulse and 4μJ at 50V. Pulser is capable to produce up to 1MHz pulse trains with positive 50V-1kV pulses with up to 10A peak output current. When loaded by 200kHz transducer at 1kV pulse amplitude rise time is 40ns and fall time is 32ns which fully satisfies desired 1MHz bandwidth. PMID:22742963

  9. Development and Evaluation of New Coupling System for Lower Limb Prostheses with Acoustic Alarm System

    PubMed Central

    Eshraghi, Arezoo; Osman, Noor Azuan Abu; Gholizadeh, Hossein; Ahmadian, Jalil; Rahmati, Bizhan; Abas, Wan Abu Bakar Wan

    2013-01-01

    Individuals with lower limb amputation need a secure suspension system for their prosthetic devices. A new coupling system was developed that is capable of suspending the prosthesis. The system's safety is ensured through an acoustic alarm system. This article explains how the system works and provides an in vivo evaluation of the device with regard to pistoning during walking. The system was designed to be used with silicone liners and is based on the requirements of prosthetic suspension systems. Mechanical testing was performed using a universal testing machine. The pistoning during walking was measured using a motion analysis system. The new coupling device produced significantly less pistoning compared to a common suspension system (pin/lock). The safety alarm system would buzz if the suspension was going to fail. The new coupling system could securely suspend the prostheses in transtibial amputees and produced less vertical movement than the pin/lock system. PMID:23881340

  10. Acoustic emission (AE) health monitoring of diaphragm type couplings using neural network analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godinez-Azcuaga, Valery F.; Shu, Fong; Finlayson, Richard D.; O'Donnell, Bruce

    2005-05-01

    This paper presents the latest results obtained from Acoustic Emission (AE) monitoring and detection of cracks and/or damage in diaphragm couplings, which are used in some aircraft and engine drive systems. Early detection of mechanical failure in aircraft drive train components is a key safety and economical issue with both military and civil sectors of aviation. One of these components is the diaphragm-type coupling, which has been evaluated as the ideal drive coupling for many application requirements such as high speed, high torque, and non-lubrication. Its flexible axial and angular displacement capabilities have made it indispensable for aircraft drive systems. However, diaphragm-type couplings may develop cracks during their operation. The ability to monitor, detect, identify, and isolate coupling cracks on an operational aircraft system is required in order to provide sufficient advance warning to preclude catastrophic failure. It is known that metallic structures generate characteristic Acoustic Emission (AE) during crack growth/propagation cycles. This phenomenon makes AE very attractive among various monitoring techniques for fault detection in diaphragm-type couplings. However, commercially available systems capable of automatic discrimination between signals from crack growth and normal mechanical noise are not readily available. Positive classification of signals requires experienced personnel and post-test data analysis, which tend to be a time-consuming, laborious, and expensive process. With further development of automated classifiers, AE can become a fully autonomous fault detection technique requiring no human intervention after implementation. AE has the potential to be fully integrated with automated query and response mechanisms for system/process monitoring and control.

  11. Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Jerry R.; Grosveld, Ferdinand

    2007-01-01

    The acoustics environment in space operations is important to maintain at manageable levels so that the crewperson can remain safe, functional, effective, and reasonably comfortable. High acoustic levels can produce temporary or permanent hearing loss, or cause other physiological symptoms such as auditory pain, headaches, discomfort, strain in the vocal cords, or fatigue. Noise is defined as undesirable sound. Excessive noise may result in psychological effects such as irritability, inability to concentrate, decrease in productivity, annoyance, errors in judgment, and distraction. A noisy environment can also result in the inability to sleep, or sleep well. Elevated noise levels can affect the ability to communicate, understand what is being said, hear what is going on in the environment, degrade crew performance and operations, and create habitability concerns. Superfluous noise emissions can also create the inability to hear alarms or other important auditory cues such as an equipment malfunctioning. Recent space flight experience, evaluations of the requirements in crew habitable areas, and lessons learned (Goodman 2003; Allen and Goodman 2003; Pilkinton 2003; Grosveld et al. 2003) show the importance of maintaining an acceptable acoustics environment. This is best accomplished by having a high-quality set of limits/requirements early in the program, the "designing in" of acoustics in the development of hardware and systems, and by monitoring, testing and verifying the levels to ensure that they are acceptable.

  12. Acoustical transmission-line model of the middle-ear cavities and mastoid air cells

    PubMed Central

    Keefe, Douglas H.

    2015-01-01

    An acoustical transmission line model of the middle-ear cavities and mastoid air cell system (MACS) was constructed for the adult human middle ear with normal function. The air-filled cavities comprised the tympanic cavity, aditus, antrum, and MACS. A binary symmetrical airway branching model of the MACS was constructed using an optimization procedure to match the average total volume and surface area of human temporal bones. The acoustical input impedance of the MACS was calculated using a recursive procedure, and used to predict the input impedance of the middle-ear cavities at the location of the tympanic membrane. The model also calculated the ratio of the acoustical pressure in the antrum to the pressure in the middle-ear cavities at the location of the tympanic membrane. The predicted responses were sensitive to the magnitude of the viscothermal losses within the MACS. These predicted input impedance and pressure ratio functions explained the presence of multiple resonances reported in published data, which were not explained by existing MACS models. PMID:25920840

  13. Instability of nonplanar modulated dust acoustic wave packets in a strongly coupled nonthermal dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    El-Labany, S. K. Zedan, N. A.; El-Taibany, W. F. E-mail: eltaibany@du.edu.eg

    2015-07-15

    Cylindrical and spherical amplitude modulations of dust acoustic (DA) solitary wave envelopes in a strongly coupled dusty plasma containing nonthermal distributed ions are studied. Employing a reductive perturbation technique, a modified nonlinear Schrödinger equation including the geometrical effect is derived. The influences of nonthermal ions, polarization force, and the geometries on the modulational instability conditions are analyzed and the possible rogue wave structures are discussed in detail. It is found that the spherical DA waves are more structurally stable to perturbations than the cylindrical ones. Possible applications of these theoretical findings are briefly discussed.

  14. Oblique collision of dust acoustic solitons in a strongly coupled dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Boruah, A.; Sharma, S. K. Bailung, H.; Nakamura, Y.

    2015-09-15

    The oblique collision between two equal amplitude dust acoustic solitons is observed in a strongly coupled dusty plasma. The solitons are subjected to oblique interaction at different colliding angles. We observe a resonance structure during oblique collision at a critical colliding angle which is described by the idea of three wave resonance interaction modeled by Kadomtsev-Petviashvili equation. After collision, the solitons preserve their identity. The amplitude of the resultant wave formed during interaction is measured for different collision angles as well as for different colliding soliton amplitudes. At resonance, the maximum amplitude of the new soliton formed is nearly 3.7 times the initial soliton amplitude.

  15. MEMS Microphone Array Sensor for Air-Coupled Impact-Echo

    PubMed Central

    Groschup, Robin; Grosse, Christian U.

    2015-01-01

    Impact-Echo (IE) is a nondestructive testing technique for plate like concrete structures. We propose a new sensor concept for air-coupled IE measurements. By using an array of MEMS (micro-electro-mechanical system) microphones, instead of a single receiver, several operational advantages compared to conventional sensing strategies in IE are achieved. The MEMS microphone array sensor is cost effective, less sensitive to undesired effects like acoustic noise and has an optimized sensitivity for signals that need to be extracted for IE data interpretation. The proposed sensing strategy is justified with findings from numerical simulations, showing that the IE resonance in plate like structures causes coherent surface displacements on the specimen under test in an area around the impact location. Therefore, by placing several MEMS microphones on a sensor array board, the IE resonance is easier to be identified in the recorded spectra than with single point microphones or contact type transducers. A comparative measurement between the array sensor, a conventional accelerometer and a measurement microphone clearly shows the suitability of MEMS type microphones and the advantages of using these microphones in an array arrangement for IE. The MEMS microphone array will make air-coupled IE measurements faster and more reliable. PMID:26121610

  16. MEMS Microphone Array Sensor for Air-Coupled Impact-Echo.

    PubMed

    Groschup, Robin; Grosse, Christian U

    2015-01-01

    Impact-Echo (IE) is a nondestructive testing technique for plate like concrete structures. We propose a new sensor concept for air-coupled IE measurements. By using an array of MEMS (micro-electro-mechanical system) microphones, instead of a single receiver, several operational advantages compared to conventional sensing strategies in IE are achieved. The MEMS microphone array sensor is cost effective, less sensitive to undesired effects like acoustic noise and has an optimized sensitivity for signals that need to be extracted for IE data interpretation. The proposed sensing strategy is justified with findings from numerical simulations, showing that the IE resonance in plate like structures causes coherent surface displacements on the specimen under test in an area around the impact location. Therefore, by placing several MEMS microphones on a sensor array board, the IE resonance is easier to be identified in the recorded spectra than with single point microphones or contact type transducers. A comparative measurement between the array sensor, a conventional accelerometer and a measurement microphone clearly shows the suitability of MEMS type microphones and the advantages of using these microphones in an array arrangement for IE. The MEMS microphone array will make air-coupled IE measurements faster and more reliable. PMID:26121610

  17. Gas-coupled laser acoustic detection as a non-contact line detector for photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Jami L.; van Wijk, Kasper; Caron, James N.; Timmerman, Miriam

    2016-02-01

    Conventional contacting transducers for ultrasonic wave detection are highly sensitive and tuned for real-time imaging with fixed array geometries. However, optical detection provides an alternative to contacting transducers when a small sensor footprint, a large frequency bandwidth, or non-contacting detection is required. Typical optical detection relies on a Doppler-shifted reflection of light from the target, but gas coupled-laser acoustic detection (GCLAD) provides an alternative optical detection method for photoacoustic (PA) and ultrasound imaging that does not involve surface reflectivity. Instead, GCLAD is a line-detector that measures the deflection of an optical beam propagating parallel to the sample, as the refractive index of the air near the sample is affected by particle displacement on the sample surface. We describe the underlying principles of GCLAD and derive a formula for quantifying the surface displacement from a remote GCLAD measurement. We discuss a design for removing the location-dependent displacement bias along the probe beam and a method for measuring the attenuation coefficient of the surrounding air. GCLAD results are used to quantify the surface displacement in a laser-ultrasound experiment, which shows 94% agreement to line-integrated data from a commercial laser vibrometer point detector. Finally, we demonstrate the feasibility of PA imaging of an artery-sized absorber using a detector 5.8 cm from a phantom surface.

  18. Coupled acoustic-gravity field for dynamic evaluation of ion exchange with a single resin bead.

    PubMed

    Kanazaki, Takahiro; Hirawa, Shungo; Harada, Makoto; Okada, Tetsuo

    2010-06-01

    A coupled acoustic-gravity field is efficient for entrapping a particle at the position determined by its acoustic properties rather than its size. This field has been applied to the dynamic observation of ion-exchange reactions occurring in a single resin bead. The replacement of counterions in an ion-exchange resin induces changes in its acoustic properties, such as density and compressibility. Therefore, we can visually trace the advancement of an ion-exchange reaction as a time change in the levitation position of a resin bead entrapped in the field. Cation-exchange reactions occurring in resin beads with diameters of 40-120 microm are typically completed within 100-200 s. Ion-exchange equilibrium or kinetics is often evaluated with off-line chemical analyses, which require a batch amount of ion exchangers. Measurements with a single resin particle allow us to evaluate ion-exchange dynamics and kinetics of ions including those that are difficult to measure by usual off-line analyses. The diffusion properties of ions in resins have been successfully evaluated from the time change in the levitation positions of resin beads. PMID:20462180

  19. Diffraction aperture non-ideal behaviour of air coupled transducers array elements designed for NDT.

    PubMed

    Prego Borges, J L; Montero de Espinosa, F; Salazar, J; Garcia-Alvarez, J; Chávez, J A; Turó, A; Garcia-Hernandez, M J

    2006-12-22

    Air coupled piezoelectric ultrasonic array transducers are a novel tool that could lead to interesting advances in the area of non-contact laminar material testing using Lamb wave's propagation techniques. A key issue on the development of such transducers is their efficient coupling to air media (impedance mismatch between the piezoelectric material and air is 90 dB or more). Adaptation layers are used in order to attain good matching and avoid possible serious signal degradation. However, the introduction of these matching layers modify the transducer surface behaviour and, consequently, radiation characteristics are altered, making the usual idealization criteria (of uniform surface movement) adopted for field simulation purposes inaccurate. In our system, we have a concave linear-array transducer of 64 elements (electrically coupled by pairs) working at 0.8 MHz made of PZ27 rectangular piezoceramics (15 mm x 0.3 mm) with two matching layers made of polyurethane and porous cellulose bonded on them. Experimental measurements of the acoustic aperture of single excited array elements have shown an increment on the geometrical dimensions of its active surface. A sub-millimeter vibrometer laser scan has revealed an extension of the aperture beyond the supposed physical single array element dimensions. Non-uniform symmetric apodized velocity surface vibration amplitude profile with a concave delay contour indicates the presumed existence of travelling wave phenomena over the surface of the outer array matching layer. Also, asymptotic propagation velocities around 2500 m/s and attenuation coefficient between 15 and 20 dB/mm has been determined for the travelling waves showing clear tendencies. Further comparisons between the experimental measurements of single array element field radiation diagram and simulated equivalent aperture counterpart reveal good agreement versus the ideal (uniform displaced) rectangular aperture. For this purpose an Impulse Response Method

  20. A high-order discontinuous Galerkin method for wave propagation through coupled elastic-acoustic media

    SciTech Connect

    Wilcox, Lucas C.; Stadler, Georg; Burstedde, Carsten; Ghattas, Omar

    2010-12-10

    We introduce a high-order discontinuous Galerkin (dG) scheme for the numerical solution of three-dimensional (3D) wave propagation problems in coupled elastic-acoustic media. A velocity-strain formulation is used, which allows for the solution of the acoustic and elastic wave equations within the same unified framework. Careful attention is directed at the derivation of a numerical flux that preserves high-order accuracy in the presence of material discontinuities, including elastic-acoustic interfaces. Explicit expressions for the 3D upwind numerical flux, derived as an exact solution for the relevant Riemann problem, are provided. The method supports h-non-conforming meshes, which are particularly effective at allowing local adaptation of the mesh size to resolve strong contrasts in the local wavelength, as well as dynamic adaptivity to track solution features. The use of high-order elements controls numerical dispersion, enabling propagation over many wave periods. We prove consistency and stability of the proposed dG scheme. To study the numerical accuracy and convergence of the proposed method, we compare against analytical solutions for wave propagation problems with interfaces, including Rayleigh, Lamb, Scholte, and Stoneley waves as well as plane waves impinging on an elastic-acoustic interface. Spectral rates of convergence are demonstrated for these problems, which include a non-conforming mesh case. Finally, we present scalability results for a parallel implementation of the proposed high-order dG scheme for large-scale seismic wave propagation in a simplified earth model, demonstrating high parallel efficiency for strong scaling to the full size of the Jaguar Cray XT5 supercomputer.

  1. A high-order discontinuous Galerkin method for wave propagation through coupled elastic-acoustic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcox, Lucas C.; Stadler, Georg; Burstedde, Carsten; Ghattas, Omar

    2010-12-01

    We introduce a high-order discontinuous Galerkin (dG) scheme for the numerical solution of three-dimensional (3D) wave propagation problems in coupled elastic-acoustic media. A velocity-strain formulation is used, which allows for the solution of the acoustic and elastic wave equations within the same unified framework. Careful attention is directed at the derivation of a numerical flux that preserves high-order accuracy in the presence of material discontinuities, including elastic-acoustic interfaces. Explicit expressions for the 3D upwind numerical flux, derived as an exact solution for the relevant Riemann problem, are provided. The method supports h-non-conforming meshes, which are particularly effective at allowing local adaptation of the mesh size to resolve strong contrasts in the local wavelength, as well as dynamic adaptivity to track solution features. The use of high-order elements controls numerical dispersion, enabling propagation over many wave periods. We prove consistency and stability of the proposed dG scheme. To study the numerical accuracy and convergence of the proposed method, we compare against analytical solutions for wave propagation problems with interfaces, including Rayleigh, Lamb, Scholte, and Stoneley waves as well as plane waves impinging on an elastic-acoustic interface. Spectral rates of convergence are demonstrated for these problems, which include a non-conforming mesh case. Finally, we present scalability results for a parallel implementation of the proposed high-order dG scheme for large-scale seismic wave propagation in a simplified earth model, demonstrating high parallel efficiency for strong scaling to the full size of the Jaguar Cray XT5 supercomputer.

  2. Uniaxial strain-induced Kohn anomaly and electron-phonon coupling in acoustic phonons of graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cifuentes-Quintal, M. E.; de la Peña-Seaman, O.; Heid, R.; de Coss, R.; Bohnen, K.-P.

    2016-08-01

    Recent advances in strain engineering at the nanoscale have shown the feasibility to modulate the properties of graphene. Although the electron-phonon (e-ph) coupling and Kohn anomalies in graphene define the phonon branches contributing to the resonance Raman scattering and are relevant to the electronic and thermal transport as a scattering source, the evolution of the e-ph coupling as a function of strain has been less studied. In this work, the Kohn anomalies and the e-ph coupling in uniaxially strained graphene along armchair and zigzag directions were studied by means of density functional perturbation theory calculations. In addition to the phonon anomaly at the transversal optical (TO) phonon branch in the K point for pristine graphene, we found that uniaxial strain induces a discontinuity in the frequency derivative of the longitudinal acoustic phonon branch. This behavior corresponds to the emergence of a Kohn anomaly, as a consequence of a strain-enhanced e-ph coupling. Thus, the present results for uniaxially strained graphene contrast with the commonly assumed view that the e-ph coupling around the K point is only present in the TO phonon branch.

  3. Numerical investigation of implementation of air-earth boundary by acoustic-elastic boundary approach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xu, Y.; Xia, J.; Miller, R.D.

    2007-01-01

    The need for incorporating the traction-free condition at the air-earth boundary for finite-difference modeling of seismic wave propagation has been discussed widely. A new implementation has been developed for simulating elastic wave propagation in which the free-surface condition is replaced by an explicit acoustic-elastic boundary. Detailed comparisons of seismograms with different implementations for the air-earth boundary were undertaken using the (2,2) (the finite-difference operators are second order in time and space) and the (2,6) (second order in time and sixth order in space) standard staggered-grid (SSG) schemes. Methods used in these comparisons to define the air-earth boundary included the stress image method (SIM), the heterogeneous approach, the scheme of modifying material properties based on transversely isotropic medium approach, the acoustic-elastic boundary approach, and an analytical approach. The method proposed achieves the same or higher accuracy of modeled body waves relative to the SIM. Rayleigh waves calculated using the explicit acoustic-elastic boundary approach differ slightly from those calculated using the SIM. Numerical results indicate that when using the (2,2) SSG scheme for SIM and our new method, a spatial step of 16 points per minimum wavelength is sufficient to achieve 90% accuracy; 32 points per minimum wavelength achieves 95% accuracy in modeled Rayleigh waves. When using the (2,6) SSG scheme for the two methods, a spatial step of eight points per minimum wavelength achieves 95% accuracy in modeled Rayleigh waves. Our proposed method is physically reasonable and, based on dispersive analysis of simulated seismographs from a layered half-space model, is highly accurate. As a bonus, our proposed method is easy to program and slightly faster than the SIM. ?? 2007 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  4. Planning a brand new ED? Study up on acoustics, air quality, and patient wish-lists.

    PubMed

    2012-01-01

    Hospitals planning to construct new EDs have a golden opportunity to integrate designs and materials that can please both patients and providers. Experts say attention to acoustics, privacy, and air quality can lower stress levels and boost satisfaction. Further, designs that prioritize efficient work flows get high marks from providers. Experts advise hospital leaders to get considerable input from patients before designing a new ED facility. Privacy, quiet, and a connection to nature are top priorities for patients. Use design to enhance patient flow. PMID:22413731

  5. Attenuation of a hydrogen-air detonation by acoustic absorbing covering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bivol, G. Yu; Golovastov, S. V.; Golub, V. V.; Ivanov, K. V.; Korobov, A. E.

    2015-11-01

    Using of sound-absorbing surfaces to weaken and decay of a detonation wave in hydrogen-air mixtures was investigated experimentally. Experiments were carried out in a cylindrical detonation tube open at one end. Initiation of the explosive mixture was carried out by a spark discharge, which is located at the closed end of the detonation tube. Acoustical sound absorbing foam element of a specific weight of 0.035 g/cm3 with open pores of 0.5 mm was used. The degree of attenuation of the intensity of the detonation wave front was determined.

  6. Air-sea coupling in the Hawaiian Archipelago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza, J. M.; Powell, B.; Mattheus, D.

    2014-12-01

    A coupled numerical model is used to investigate the ocean-atmosphere interaction in the lee of the Hawaiian archipelago. The wind curl generated by the island blocking of the trade winds is known to give rise to ocean eddies; however, the impact of the sea surface temperature (SST) and velocity fronts associated with these eddies on the atmosphere is less understood. The main coupling mechanisms are: (i) changes in the near-surface stability and surface stress, (ii) vertical transfer of momentum from higher atmospheric levels to the ocean surface due to an increase of the turbulence in the boundary layer, (iii) secondary circulations associated with perturbations in the surface atmospheric pressure over the SST fronts, and (iv) the impact of the oceanic eddy currents on the net momentum transferred between the atmosphere and the ocean. To assess the relative contribution from each process, a coupled simulation between the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) and the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) models is conducted for the main Hawaiian Islands. The impact of the coupling, the perturbation of the mean wind pattern, and the different spatial scales involved in the air-sea exchanges of momentum and heat are explored.

  7. Tunneling effects in resonant acoustic scattering of an air bubble in unbounded water.

    PubMed

    Simão, André G; Guimarães, Luiz G

    2016-01-01

    The problem of acoustic scattering of a gaseous spherical bubble immersed within unbounded liquid surrounding is considered in this work. The theory of partial wave expansion related to this problem is revisited. A physical model based on the analogy between acoustic scattering and potential scattering in quantum mechanics is proposed to describe and interpret the acoustical natural oscillation modes of the bubble, namely, the resonances. In this context, a physical model is devised in order to describe the air water interface and the implications of the high density contrast on the various regimes of the scattering resonances. The main results are presented in terms of resonance lifetime periods and quality factors. The explicit numerical calculations are undertaken through an asymptotic analysis considering typical bubble dimensions and underwater sound wavelengths. It is shown that the resonance periods are scaled according to the Minnaert's period, which is the short lived resonance mode, called breathing mode of the bubble. As expected, resonances with longer lifetimes lead to impressive cavity quality Q-factor ranging from 1010 to 105. The present theoretical findings lead to a better understanding of the energy storage mechanism in a bubbly medium. PMID:27331803

  8. Optical acoustic experimental investigation of propagation femtosecond laser radiation in air and biological tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bochkarev, N. N.; Kabanov, A. M.; Protasevich, E. S.; Stepanov, A. N.

    2008-01-01

    Using two optical acoustic approaches we experimentally investigated spatial location of filament zone of propagation channel of focused laser radiation. For femtosecond pulses passing in air it was shown that nonlinear focus length had spatial scale of 1/P at initial power P moderate for self-focusing and at optical system focus distance significantly lower than Rayleigh beam length. The results of experimental optical acoustic investigation of femto- and nanosecond pulses attenuation by some biological tissues (muscular tissue, adipose tissue, cutaneous covering, and milk) and optical breakdown thresholds on these one are presented. It was shown that penetration depth of short laser pulse radiation into biological tissues is the same as for longer one. However, amplitude of acoustic response to a process of interaction of femtosecond laser pulse with biological tissue is larger in several times than that to interaction with nanosecond pulses of the same power and spectral distribution. The obtained threshold values can be interesting for tabulation of limit allowable levels of irradiation at work with laser radiation. Such values are unknown for femtosecond laser pulses today.

  9. Metal cap flexural transducers for air-coupled ultrasonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksson, T. J. R.; Dixon, S.; Ramadas, S. N.

    2015-03-01

    Ultrasonic generation and detection in fluids is inefficient due to the large difference in acoustic impedance between the piezoelectric element and the propagation medium, leading to large internal reflections and energy loss. One way of addressing the problem is to use a flexural transducer, which uses the bending modes in a thin plate or membrane. As the plate bends, it displaces the medium in front of it, hence producing sound waves. A piezoelectric flexural transducer can generate large amplitude displacements in fluid media for relatively low excitation voltages. Commercially available flexural transducers for air applications operate at 40 kHz, but there exists ultrasound applications that require significantly higher frequencies, e.g. flow measurements. Relatively little work has been done to date to understand the underlying physics of the flexural transducer, and hence how to design it to have specific properties suitable for particular applications. This paper investigates the potential of the flexural transducer and its operating principles. Two types of actuation methods are considerd: piezoelectric and electrodynamic. The piezoelectrically actuated transducer is more energy efficient and intrinsically safe, but the electrodynamic transducer has the advantage of being less sensitive to high temperature environments. The theory of vibrating plates is used to predict transducer frequency in addition to front face amplitude, which shows good correlation with experimental results.

  10. Air-coupled ultrasonic NDE of automotive tires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tittmann, Bernhard R.; Du, Jikai; Lucas, Ian

    2005-05-01

    Evaluating the elastic properties of rubber is important for improving tire performance. Here, new ultrasonic techniques and results are reported for both soft rubber and real tire materials. First, on soft rubber, immersion C-Scan images revealed high attenuation and non-uniform grain size distribution. Through the application of new broadband, high power, high resolution transducers, air-coupled ultrasound succeeded in traveling through the soft rubber showing the efficiency of the new air coupled technique for imaging and evaluation of rubber materials. Secondly, sections of three tires were tested: (1) new, (2) 3 year-20,000 miles, (3) a 5 year-40,000 miles. Each tire section consists of three layers made of different rubber materials, separated by wire mesh. Because of the complexity of the tire"s structure and its high attenuation, evaluation of all three layers, but especially the middle layer, is difficult. High power tone-bursts at 1 MHz were applied to a high impedance immersion transducer. Layer reflections could be separated such that the middle layer and the wire belts at the interfaces could be interrogated. This report will detail our new techniques and provide examples for the results obtained.

  11. Vibro-acoustic characterization of flexible hose in CO2 car air conditioning systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelini, F.; Bergami, A.; Martarelli, M.; Tomasini, E. P.

    2008-06-01

    Following the EU directive 2006/40/EC proscribing from 2011 that refrigerant fluids must have a global warming potential not higher than 150, it will not be allowed anymore to employ the current R134a on car air conditioning systems. Maflow s.p.a (automotive hose maker) is developing products for each possible new refrigerant. This paper is focused on hoses for CO2 refrigerants operating in the worst conditions because of the high pressures and temperatures at which they are working (with R134a the high pressure is 18 bar and low pressure is 3 bar; with CO2 the high pressure is 100 bar and low pressure is 35 bar). Therefore the noise emission control of the CO2 air conditioning systems is very important. The aim of this study is to develop a standard measurement method for the vibro - acoustic characterization of High Pressure (HP - Shark F4) and Low Pressure (LP - ULEV) hoses to reduce noise emission and raise car passenger comfort; in particular deep research on high pressure hose. The method is based on the measurement of the vibration level of the hoses in a standard test bench by means of a Laser Doppler Vibrometer (LDV) and its acoustic emission by a sound intensity probe.

  12. Heterogeneous interplate coupling along the Nankai Trough, Japan, detected by GPS-acoustic seafloor geodetic observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokota, Yusuke; Ishikawa, Tadashi; Sato, Mariko; Watanabe, Shun-ichi; Saito, Hiroaki; Ujihara, Naoto; Matsumoto, Yoshihiro; Toyama, Shin-ichi; Fujita, Masayuki; Yabuki, Tetsuichiro; Mochizuki, Masashi; Asada, Akira

    2015-12-01

    The recurring devastating earthquake that occurs in the Nankai Trough subduction zone between the Philippine Sea plate and the Eurasian plate has the potential to cause an extremely dangerous natural disaster in the foreseeable future. Many previous studies have assumed interplate-coupling ratios for this region along the trench axis using onshore geodetic data in order to understand this recursive event. However, the offshore region that has the potential to drive a devastating tsunami cannot be resolved sufficiently because the observation network is biased to the land area. Therefore, the Hydrographic and Oceanographic Department of Japan constructed a geodetic observation network on the seafloor along the Nankai Trough using a GPS-acoustic combination technique and has used it to observe seafloor crustal movements directly above the Nankai Trough subduction zone. We have set six seafloor sites and cumulated enough data to determine the displacement rate from 2006 to January 2011. Our seafloor geodetic observations at these sites revealed a heterogeneous interplate coupling that has three particular features. The fast displacement rates observed in the easternmost area indicate strong interplate coupling (>75%) around not only the future Tokai earthquake source region but also the Paleo-Zenisu ridge. The slow displacement rates near the trench axis in the Kumano-nada Sea, a shallow part of the 1944 Tonankai earthquake source region, show a lower coupling ratio (50% to 75%). The slow displacement rate observed in the area shallower than the 1946 Nankaido earthquake source region off Cape Muroto-zaki reflects weakening interplate coupling (about 50%) probably due to a subducting seamount. Our observations above the subducting ridge and seamount indicate that the effect of a subducting seamount on an interplate-coupling region depends on various conditions such as the geometry of the seamount and the friction parameters on the plate boundary.

  13. Coupling of Excitons and Discrete Acoustic Phonons in Vibrationally Isolated Quantum Emitters.

    PubMed

    Werschler, Florian; Hinz, Christopher; Froning, Florian; Gumbsheimer, Pascal; Haase, Johannes; Negele, Carla; de Roo, Tjaard; Mecking, Stefan; Leitenstorfer, Alfred; Seletskiy, Denis V

    2016-09-14

    The photoluminescence emission by mesoscopic condensed matter is ultimately dictated by the fine-structure splitting of the fundamental exciton into optically allowed and dipole-forbidden states. In epitaxially grown semiconductor quantum dots, nonradiative equilibration between the fine-structure levels is mediated by bulk acoustic phonons, resulting in asymmetric spectral broadening of the excitonic luminescence. In isolated colloidal quantum dots, spatial confinement of the vibrational motion is expected to give rise to an interplay between the quantized electronic and phononic degrees of freedom. In most cases, however, zero-dimensional colloidal nanocrystals are strongly coupled to the substrate such that the charge relaxation processes are still effectively governed by the bulk properties. Here we show that encapsulation of single colloidal CdSe/CdS nanocrystals into individual organic polymer shells allows for systematic vibrational decoupling of the semiconductor nanospheres from the surroundings. In contrast to epitaxially grown quantum dots, simultaneous quantization of both electronic and vibrational degrees of freedom results in a series of strong and narrow acoustic phonon sidebands observed in the photoluminescence. Furthermore, an individual analysis of more than 200 compound particles reveals that enhancement or suppression of the radiative properties of the fundamental exciton is controlled by the interaction between fine-structure states via the discrete vibrational modes. For the first time, pronounced resonances in the scattering rate between the fine-structure states are directly observed, in good agreement with a quantum mechanical model. The unambiguous assignment of mediating acoustic modes to the observed scattering resonances complements the experimental findings. Thus, our results form an attractive basis for future studies on subterahertz quantum opto-mechanics and efficient laser cooling at the nanoscale. PMID:27550902

  14. Coupling of head and body movements to acoustic flow in sighted adults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoffregen, Thomas A.; Kim, Chunggon; Ito, Kiyohide; Bardy, Benoit G.

    2005-09-01

    Blindfolded sighted persons were found to detect acoustic flow patterns and use this information to control action. A moving room (a large box on wheels, with no floor, that moved in the subject's fore-aft axis) was used. Blindfolded sighted persons (1) stood comfortably or (2) moved their head backward and forward to track audible room motion. Pink noise was presented through four speakers attached to the room, or mounted on stationary stands. Room motion was a sinusoid at 0.2 Hz, 22 cm, along subject's fore-aft axis. When standing comfortably, participants exhibited weak but consistent coupling of body sway with room motion. Tracking of room motion with head movements was robust, matching both the frequency and amplitude of room motion. This was true even when the only information about room motion came from reflected sound (i.e., when the speakers were stationary). The results suggest a strong ability of sighted persons to use acoustic flow in the perception and control of their own action. [Work supported by NSF (BCS-0236627).

  15. Coherent coupling between radiofrequency, optical and acoustic waves in piezo-optomechanical circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balram, Krishna C.; Davanço, Marcelo I.; Song, Jin Dong; Srinivasan, Kartik

    2016-05-01

    Optomechanical cavities have been studied for applications ranging from sensing to quantum information science. Here, we develop a platform for nanoscale cavity optomechanical circuits in which optomechanical cavities supporting co-localized 1,550 nm photons and 2.4 GHz phonons are combined with photonic and phononic waveguides. Working in GaAs facilitates manipulation of the localized mechanical mode either with a radiofrequency field through the piezo-electric effect, which produces acoustic waves that are routed and coupled to the optomechanical cavity by phononic-crystal waveguides, or optically through the strong photoelastic effect. Together with mechanical state preparation and sensitive readout, we use this to demonstrate an acoustic wave interference effect, similar to atomic coherent population trapping, in which radiofrequency-driven coherent mechanical motion is cancelled by optically driven motion. Manipulating cavity optomechanical systems with equal facility through both photonic and phononic channels enables new architectures for signal transduction between the optical, electrical and mechanical domains.

  16. Experimental analysis of the aero-acoustic coupling in a plane impinging jet on a slotted plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assoum, Hassan H.; El Hassan, Mouhammad; Abed-Meraïm, Kamel; Martinuzzi, Robert; Sakout, Anas

    2013-08-01

    Impinging jets are encountered in many industrial applications and suppression of the noise generated by these jets is of great fundamental and practical interest. The vortex dynamics and the interaction between the vortical structures and the impinging wall should be understood in order to control the aero-acoustic coupling between shear layer oscillation and the acoustic modes (self-sustained tones). In this study, a plane jet issuing from a rectangular nozzle and impinging on a plate is considered for Re = 3900. The sound pressure, the vibration of the impinged plate and the spatial velocity field are obtained simultaneously using a microphone, an accelerometer and the time-resolved particle image velocimetry technique, respectively. Spectra and cross-correlations are used to educe the role of different vortical structures leading to the aero-acoustic coupling. The results show the evolution of the correlation between acoustic and transverse velocity fields in the longitudinal direction. A pre-whitening technique is used to investigate the coupling between the acoustic and the velocity signals. This method shows that the correlation between the two signals has a centred peak that is not directly related to the passage of the dominant Kelvin-Helmholtz vortices.

  17. HART-II Acoustic Predictions using a Coupled CFD/CSD Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, D. Douglas, Jr.

    2009-01-01

    This paper documents results to date from the Rotorcraft Acoustic Characterization and Mitigation activity under the NASA Subsonic Rotary Wing Project. The primary goal of this activity is to develop a NASA rotorcraft impulsive noise prediction capability which uses first principles fluid dynamics and structural dynamics. During this effort, elastic blade motion and co-processing capabilities have been included in a recent version of the computational fluid dynamics code (CFD). The CFD code is loosely coupled to computational structural dynamics (CSD) code using new interface codes. The CFD/CSD coupled solution is then used to compute impulsive noise on a plane under the rotor using the Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings solver. This code system is then applied to a range of cases from the Higher Harmonic Aeroacoustic Rotor Test II (HART-II) experiment. For all cases presented, the full experimental configuration (i.e., rotor and wind tunnel sting mount) are used in the coupled CFD/CSD solutions. Results show good correlation between measured and predicted loading and loading time derivative at the only measured radial station. A contributing factor for a typically seen loading mean-value offset between measured data and predictions data is examined. Impulsive noise predictions on the measured microphone plane under the rotor compare favorably with measured mid-frequency noise for all cases. Flow visualization of the BL and MN cases shows that vortex structures generated in the prediction method are consist with measurements. Future application of the prediction method is discussed.

  18. Accuracy of acoustic ear canal impedances: finite element simulation of measurement methods using a coupling tube.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Sebastian; Hudde, Herbert

    2009-06-01

    Acoustic impedances measured at the entrance of the ear canal provide information on both the ear canal geometry and the terminating impedance at the eardrum, in principle. However, practical experience reveals that measured results in the audio frequency range up to 20 kHz are frequently not very accurate. Measurement methods successfully tested in artificial tubes with varying area functions often fail when applied to real ear canals. The origin of these errors is investigated in this paper. To avoid mixing of systematical and other errors, no real measurements are performed. Instead finite element simulations focusing on the coupling between a connecting tube and the ear canal are regarded without simulating a particular measuring method in detail. It turns out that realistic coupling between the connecting tube and the ear canal causes characteristic shifts of the frequencies of measured pressure minima and maxima. The errors in minima mainly depend on the extent of the area discontinuity arising at the interface; the errors in maxima are determined by the alignment of the tube with respect to the ear canal. In summary, impedance measurements using coupling tubes appear questionable beyond 3 kHz. PMID:19507964

  19. Strongly nonlinear dynamics and acoustics of coupled granular sonic vacua: Theoretical and experimental studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, Md Arif

    these nonlinear energy transfer mechanisms are addressed in the present work, and their potential for future predictive designs of highly discontinuous and adaptive granular acoustic metamaterials for shock wave redirection and control are discussed. Then we focus on another class of granular acoustic metamaterials, namely, one-dimensional single or coupled granular chains embedded in elastic matrix, and present experimental and theoretical studies on pulse transmission and non-linear energy exchange in these systems. Three different matrices are considered in the experiments: Poly-di-methyl-siloxane (PDMS), polyurethane and geopolymer. Specifically, we examine two rows of granular chains embedded in elastic matrix and show that when an impulse is applied to one of the chains, the resulting pulse gets partially transferred to a neighboring chain and energy gets distributed among the entire embedded granular network. Based on our experimental measurements we validate a theoretical model and then use it for predictive design. Then, we experimentally study and verify the existence of acoustic pass- and stop-bands in harmonically excited embedded granular chains, and prove the existence of traveling breathers in these systems. We report a very rich structure of nonlinear acoustic phenomena in these highly discontinuous and strongly nonlinear granular metamaterials, and prove conclusively that traveling breathers are realized robustly in granular chains embedded in three widely different types of matrices, over wide frequency and energy ranges. In addition to experimentally confirming prior theoretical predictions regarding the existence of breathers in these media, we provide a new avenue for exploring the highly complex dynamics and acoustics of granular metamaterials for a variety of practical applications. Finally, we study the propagatory and oscillatory dynamics of two-dimensional coupled granular networks with discontinuous lateral boundary conditions. We numerically

  20. Non-conforming curved finite element schemes for time-dependent elastic-acoustic coupled problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Rozas, Ángel; Diaz, Julien

    2016-01-01

    High-order numerical methods for solving time-dependent acoustic-elastic coupled problems are introduced. These methods, based on Finite Element techniques, allow for a flexible coupling between the fluid and the solid domain by using non-conforming meshes and curved elements. Since characteristic waves travel at different speeds through different media, specific levels of granularity for the mesh discretization are required on each domain, making impractical a possible conforming coupling in between. Advantageously, physical domains may be independently discretized in our framework due to the non-conforming feature. Consequently, an important increase in computational efficiency may be achieved compared to other implementations based on conforming techniques, namely by reducing the total number of degrees of freedom. Differently from other non-conforming approaches proposed so far, our technique is relatively simpler and requires only a geometrical adjustment at the coupling interface at a preprocessing stage, so that no extra computations are necessary during the time evolution of the simulation. On the other hand, as an advantage of using curvilinear elements, the geometry of the coupling interface between the two media of interest is faithfully represented up to the order of the scheme used. In other words, higher order schemes are in consonance with higher order approximations of the geometry. Concerning the time discretization, we analyze both explicit and implicit schemes. These schemes are energy conserving and, for the explicit case, the stability is guaranteed by a CFL condition. In order to illustrate the accuracy and convergence of these methods, a set of representative numerical tests are presented.

  1. Measurement of the acoustic-to-optical phonon coupling in multicomponent systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caretta, Antonio; Donker, Michiel C.; Perdok, Diederik W.; Abbaszadeh, Davood; Polyakov, Alexey O.; Havenith, Remco W. A.; Palstra, Thomas T. M.; van Loosdrecht, Paul H. M.

    2015-02-01

    In this paper we investigate the acoustic-to-optical up-conversion phonon processes in a multicomponent system. These processes take place during heat transport and limit the efficiency of heat flow. By combining time-resolved optical and heat capacity experiments we quantify the thermal coupling constant to be g ˜0.4 1017 W/Km3 . The method is based on selective excitation of a part of a multicomponent system, and the measurement of the thermalization dynamics by probing the linear birefringence of the sample with femtosecond resolution. In particular, we study a layered multiferroic organic-inorganic hybrid, in the vicinity of the ferroelectric phase transition. A diverging term of the heat capacity is associated to soft-mode dynamics, in agreement with previous spectroscopy measurements.

  2. Head-on-collision of modulated dust acoustic waves in strongly coupled dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    El-Labany, S. K.; El-Depsy, A.; Zedan, N. A.; El-Taibany, W. F.; El-Shamy, E. F.

    2012-10-15

    The derivative expansion perturbation method is applied to a strongly coupled dusty plasma system consisting of negatively charged dust grains, electrons, and ions. The basic equations are reduced to a nonlinear Schroedinger type equation appropriate for describing the modulated dust acoustic (DA) waves. We have examined the modulation (in) stability and the dependence of the system physical parameters (angular frequency and group velocity) on the polarization force variation. Finally, the extended Poincare-Lighthill-Kuo technique is employed to investigate the head-on collision (HoC) between two DA dark solitons. The analytical phase shifts and the trajectories of these dark solitons after the collision are derived. The numerical illustrations show that the polarization effect has strong influence on the nature of the phase shifts and the trajectories of the two DA dark solitons after collision.

  3. Microstructure-Sensitive Investigation of Fracture Using Acoustic Emission Coupled With Electron Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wisner, Brian; Cabal, Mike; Vanniamparambiland, Prashanth A.; Leser, William; Hochhalter, Jacob; Kontsos, Antonios

    2015-01-01

    A novel technique using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) in conjunction with Acoustic Emission (AE) monitoring is proposed to investigate microstructure-sensitive fatigue and fracture of metals. The coupling between quasi in situ microscopy with actual in situ nondestructive evaluation falls into the ICME framework and the idea of quantitative data-driven characterization of material behavior. To validate the use of AE monitoring inside the SEM chamber, Aluminum 2024-B sharp notch specimen were tested both inside and outside the microscope using a small scale mechanical testing device. Subsequently, the same type of specimen was tested inside the SEM chamber. Load data were correlated with both AE information and observations of microcracks around grain boundaries as well as secondary cracks, voids, and slip bands. The preliminary results are in excellent agreement with similar findings at the mesoscale. Extensions of the application of this novel technique are discussed.

  4. Nonplanar dust acoustic solitary waves in a strongly coupled dusty plasma with superthermal ions

    SciTech Connect

    El-Labany, S. K. Zedan, N. A.; El-Taibany, W. F. E-mail: eltaibany@du.edu.eg; El-Shamy, E. F.

    2014-12-15

    The nonplanar amplitude modulation of dust acoustic (DA) envelope solitary waves in a strongly coupled dusty plasma (SCDP) has been investigated. By using a reductive perturbation technique, a modified nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLSE) including the effects of geometry, polarization, and ion superthermality is derived. The modulational instability (MI) of the nonlinear DA wave envelopes is investigated in both planar and nonplanar geometries. There are two stable regions for the DA wave propagation strongly affected by polarization and ion superthermality. Moreover, it is found that the nonlinear DA waves in spherical geometry are the more structurally stable. The larger growth rate of the nonlinear DA MI is observed in the cylindrical geometry. The salient characteristics of the MI in the nonplanar geometries cannot be found in the planar one. The DA wave propagation and the NLSE solutions are investigated both analytically and numerically.

  5. Spatiotemporal chaos and the dynamics of coupled Langmuir and ion-acoustic waves in plasmas.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, S; Misra, A P; Shukla, P K; Rondoni, L

    2010-04-01

    A simulation study is performed to investigate the dynamics of coupled Langmuir waves (LWs) and ion-acoustic waves (IAWs) in an unmagnetized plasma. The effects of dispersion due to charge separation and the density nonlinearity associated with the IAWs are considered to modify the properties of Langmuir solitons, as well as to model the dynamics of relatively large amplitude wave envelopes. It is found that the Langmuir wave electric field, indeed, increases by the effect of ion-wave nonlinearity (IWN). Use of a low-dimensional model, based on three Fourier modes, shows that a transition to temporal chaos is possible, when the length scale of the linearly excited modes is larger than that of the most unstable ones. The chaotic behaviors of the unstable modes are identified by the analysis of Lyapunov exponent spectra. The space-time evolution of the coupled LWs and IAWs shows that the IWN can cause the excitation of many unstable harmonic modes and can lead to strong IAW emission. This occurs when the initial wave field is relatively large or the length scale of IAWs is larger than the soliton characteristic size. Numerical simulation also reveals that many solitary patterns can be excited and generated through the modulational instability of unstable harmonic modes. As time goes on, these solitons are seen to appear in the spatially partial coherence state due to the free ion-acoustic radiation as well as in the state of spatiotemporal chaos due to collision and fusion in the stochastic motion. The latter results in the redistribution of initial wave energy into a few modes with small length scales, which may lead to the onset of Langmuir turbulence in laboratory as well as space plasmas. PMID:20481845

  6. An FRF bounding method for randomly uncertain structures with or without coupling to an acoustic cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunne, L. W.; Dunne, J. F.

    2009-04-01

    An efficient frequency response function (FRF) bounding method is proposed using asymptotic extreme-value theory. The method exploits a small random sample of realised FRFs obtained from nominally identical structures to predict corresponding FRF bounds for a substantially larger batch. This is useful for predicting forced-vibration levels in automotive vehicle bodies when parameters are assumed to vary statistically. Small samples are assumed to come either from Monte Carlo simulation using a vibration model, or via measurements from real structures. The basis of the method is to undertake a hypothesis test and if justified, repeatedly fit inverted Type I asymptotic threshold exceedance models at discrete frequencies, for which the models are not locked to a block size (as in classical extreme-value models). The chosen FRF 'bound' is predicted from the inverse model in the form of the ' m-observational return level', namely the level that will be exceeded on average once in every m structures realised. The method is tested on simulated linear structures, initially to establish its scope and limitations. Initial testing is performed on a sdof system followed by small and medium-sized uncoupled mdof grillages. Testing then continues to: (i) a random acoustically coupled grillage structure; and (ii) a partially random industrial-scale box structure which exhibits similar dynamic characteristics to a small vehicle structure and is analysed in NASTRAN. In both cases, structural and acoustic responses to a single deterministic load are examined. The paper shows that the method is not suitable for very small uncoupled systems but rapidly becomes very appropriate for both uncoupled and coupled mdof structures.

  7. Modulation instability and ion-acoustic rogue waves in a strongly coupled collisional plasma with nonthermal nonextensive electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Shimin; Mei, Liquan; He, Yaling; Li, Ying

    2016-02-01

    The nonlinear propagation of ion-acoustic waves is theoretically reported in a collisional plasma containing strongly coupled ions and nonthermal electrons featuring Tsallis distribution. For this purpose, the nonlinear integro-differential form of the generalized hydrodynamic model is used to investigate the strong-coupling effect. The modified complex Ginzburg-Landau equation with a linear dissipative term is derived for the potential wave amplitude in the hydrodynamic regime, and the modulation instability of ion-acoustic waves is examined. When the dissipative effect is neglected, the modified complex Ginzburg-Landau equation reduces to the nonlinear Schrödinger equation. Within the unstable region, two different types of second-order ion-acoustic rogue waves including single peak type and rogue wave triplets are discussed. The effect of the plasma parameters on the rogue waves is also presented.

  8. Air-wood coupling and the Swiss-cheese violin.

    PubMed

    Weinreich, G; Holmes, C; Mellody, M

    2000-11-01

    Some problems with the conventional formalism for describing the coupling of fluid vibrations to those of an enclosing shell are examined. An alternative ("dynamic") basis for expanding the normal modes, in which the "pure shell modes" include incompressible motion of the fluid, is proposed. This new approach is applied to Hutchins's "Swiss-cheese violin," the behavior of whose air modes for the case of a rigid shell have been calculated by Shaw. Measurements are presented of various response functions of this instrument as a function of both frequency and the number of open rib holes. These results show the predicted "mode veering" behavior, and can be easily matched to theory with the assumption of plausible parameters. PMID:11108379

  9. Coupling and simulation of acoustic fluid-structure interaction systems using localized Lagrange multipliers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Mike R.

    This thesis presents a new coupling method for treating the interaction of an acoustic fluid with a flexible structure, with emphasis on handling spatially non-matching meshes. It is based on the Localized Lagrange Multiplier (LLM) method. A frame is introduced as a "mediator" or "information relay" device between the fluid and the structure at the interaction surface. The frame is discretized in terms of kinematic variables. A Lagrange multiplier field is introduced between the frame and the structure, and another one between the frame and the fluid. The function of the multiplier pair is weak enforcement of kinematic continuity. This configuration completely decouples the structure and fluid models, because each model communicates to the frame through node collocated multipliers and not directly to each other. In order to assure proper communication, energy formulations of the fluid and structure models are in terms of displacements and associated time derivatives. A novel transformation of the fluid displacement model into a fluid displacement potential model enforces the irrotational condition of the acoustic fluid. This transformation reduces the number of degrees of freedom in two and three-dimensions and is suitable for both vibration and transient analyses. The LLM method facilitates the construction of separate discretizations using different mesh generation programs, as well as use of customized time integration methods. To advance the solution in time, the LLM coupling method is combined with a partitioned solution procedure. The time-stepping computations are organized in a way that eliminates the traditional prediction step characteristic of staggered solution procedures. This is accomplished by solving for the interface variables: Lagrange multipliers and frame states, and then feeding this solution back to the coupled components. This sequence forestalls the well-known stability degradation caused by prediction, yet it retains the desirable

  10. Acoustical interaction between vibrating lips, downstream air column, and upstream airways in trombone performance.

    PubMed

    Fréour, Vincent; Scavone, Gary P

    2013-11-01

    This paper presents experimental results on the acoustical influence of the vocal tract in trombone performance. The experimental approach makes use of measurements at the interface between the player and instrument, allowing a relative comparison between upstream airways and the downstream air column impedances, as well as an estimation of the phase of the impedance of the upstream and downstream systems. Measurements were conducted over the full traditional range of playing, during sustained tones with varying dynamic, as well as in special effects such as pitch bending. Subjects able to play over the full range demonstrated significant upstream influence in the higher register of the instrument. These players were categorized in two groups according to their ability to control the phase of the upstream impedance and their ability to generate powerful downstream acoustic energy. Sustained tones played with varying dynamics showed a general tendency of a decrease in vocal-tract support with increase in loudness. Although pitch bends did not involve significant upstream influence at f0, results suggest modification of the lip behavior during bending. Vocal-tract tuning at tone transitions was also investigated and found to potentially contribute to slur articulations. PMID:24180797

  11. Acoustic interferometers based on two-dimensional arrays of rigid cylinders in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchis, Lorenzo; Håkansson, Andreas; Cervera, Francisco; Sánchez-Dehesa, José

    2003-01-01

    This work presents a comprehensive study of acoustic interferometers based on sonic crystals, such as the one reported by Cervera et al. in Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 023902 (2002). This kind of interferometers consist of a slab of rigid cylinders in air put in a periodic configuration. Their performance as a function of thickness and symmetry configuration (square and hexagonal) is analyzed by our setup, which obtains the reflectance spectra using the standing wave ratio technique. Experimental observations are fairly well simulated by a self-consistent wave theory that incorporates all orders of multiple scattering. An homogenization procedure shows that sound propagation inside the hexagonal-based crystals is isotropic while it is biaxial inside the square-based crystals. A method able to extract the acoustic band structure from the reflectance spectra of the finite crystals under study is also described. Finally, the robustness of the interference effects is also studied as a function of positional disorder inside the unit cells in the lattice.

  12. Geothermally Coupled Well-Based Compressed Air Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, Casie L.; Bearden, Mark D.; Horner, Jacob A.; Cabe, James E.; Appriou, Delphine; McGrail, B. Peter

    2015-12-20

    . This project assessed the technical and economic feasibility of implementing geothermally coupled well-based CAES for grid-scale energy storage. Based on an evaluation of design specifications for a range of casing grades common in U.S. oil and gas fields, a 5-MW CAES project could be supported by twenty to twenty-five 5,000-foot, 7-inch wells using lower-grade casing, and as few as eight such wells for higher-end casing grades. Using this information, along with data on geothermal resources, well density, and potential future markets for energy storage systems, The Geysers geothermal field was selected to parameterize a case study to evaluate the potential match between the proven geothermal resource present at The Geysers and the field’s existing well infrastructure. Based on calculated wellbore compressed air mass, the study shows that a single average geothermal production well could provide enough geothermal energy to support a 15.4-MW (gross) power generation facility using 34 to 35 geothermal wells repurposed for compressed air storage, resulting in a simplified levelized cost of electricity (sLCOE) estimated at 11.2 ¢/kWh (Table S.1). Accounting for the power loss to the geothermal power project associated with diverting geothermal resources for air heating results in a net 2-MW decrease in generation capacity, increasing the CAES project’s sLCOE by 1.8 ¢/kWh.

  13. Geothermally Coupled Well-Based Compressed Air Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, C L; Bearden, Mark D; Horner, Jacob A; Appriou, Delphine; McGrail, B Peter

    2015-12-01

    . This project assessed the technical and economic feasibility of implementing geothermally coupled well-based CAES for grid-scale energy storage. Based on an evaluation of design specifications for a range of casing grades common in U.S. oil and gas fields, a 5-MW CAES project could be supported by twenty to twenty-five 5,000-foot, 7-inch wells using lower-grade casing, and as few as eight such wells for higher-end casing grades. Using this information, along with data on geothermal resources, well density, and potential future markets for energy storage systems, The Geysers geothermal field was selected to parameterize a case study to evaluate the potential match between the proven geothermal resource present at The Geysers and the field’s existing well infrastructure. Based on calculated wellbore compressed air mass, the study shows that a single average geothermal production well could provide enough geothermal energy to support a 15.4-MW (gross) power generation facility using 34 to 35 geothermal wells repurposed for compressed air storage, resulting in a simplified levelized cost of electricity (sLCOE) estimated at 11.2 ¢/kWh (Table S.1). Accounting for the power loss to the geothermal power project associated with diverting geothermal resources for air heating results in a net 2-MW decrease in generation capacity, increasing the CAES project’s sLCOE by 1.8 ¢/kWh.

  14. High accuracy acoustic relative humidity measurement in duct flow with air.

    PubMed

    van Schaik, Wilhelm; Grooten, Mart; Wernaart, Twan; van der Geld, Cees

    2010-01-01

    An acoustic relative humidity sensor for air-steam mixtures in duct flow is designed and tested. Theory, construction, calibration, considerations on dynamic response and results are presented. The measurement device is capable of measuring line averaged values of gas velocity, temperature and relative humidity (RH) instantaneously, by applying two ultrasonic transducers and an array of four temperature sensors. Measurement ranges are: gas velocity of 0-12 m/s with an error of ± 0.13 m/s, temperature 0-100 °C with an error of ± 0.07 °C and relative humidity 0-100% with accuracy better than 2 % RH above 50 °C. Main advantage over conventional humidity sensors is the high sensitivity at high RH at temperatures exceeding 50 °C, with accuracy increasing with increasing temperature. The sensors are non-intrusive and resist highly humid environments. PMID:22163610

  15. High Accuracy Acoustic Relative Humidity Measurement in Duct Flow with Air

    PubMed Central

    van Schaik, Wilhelm; Grooten, Mart; Wernaart, Twan; van der Geld, Cees

    2010-01-01

    An acoustic relative humidity sensor for air-steam mixtures in duct flow is designed and tested. Theory, construction, calibration, considerations on dynamic response and results are presented. The measurement device is capable of measuring line averaged values of gas velocity, temperature and relative humidity (RH) instantaneously, by applying two ultrasonic transducers and an array of four temperature sensors. Measurement ranges are: gas velocity of 0–12 m/s with an error of ±0.13 m/s, temperature 0–100 °C with an error of ±0.07 °C and relative humidity 0–100% with accuracy better than 2 % RH above 50 °C. Main advantage over conventional humidity sensors is the high sensitivity at high RH at temperatures exceeding 50 °C, with accuracy increasing with increasing temperature. The sensors are non-intrusive and resist highly humid environments. PMID:22163610

  16. Linear and nonlinear heavy ion-acoustic waves in a strongly coupled plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ema, S. A. Mamun, A. A.; Hossen, M. R.

    2015-09-15

    A theoretical study on the propagation of linear and nonlinear heavy ion-acoustic (HIA) waves in an unmagnetized, collisionless, strongly coupled plasma system has been carried out. The plasma system is assumed to contain adiabatic positively charged inertial heavy ion fluids, nonextensive distributed electrons, and Maxwellian light ions. The normal mode analysis is used to study the linear behaviour. On the other hand, the well-known reductive perturbation technique is used to derive the nonlinear dynamical equations, namely, Burgers equation and Korteweg-de Vries (K-dV) equation. They are also numerically analyzed in order to investigate the basic features of shock and solitary waves. The adiabatic effects on the HIA shock and solitary waves propagating in such a strongly coupled plasma are taken into account. It has been observed that the roles of the adiabatic positively charged heavy ions, nonextensivity of electrons, and other plasma parameters arised in this investigation have significantly modified the basic features (viz., polarity, amplitude, width, etc.) of the HIA solitary/shock waves. The findings of our results obtained from this theoretical investigation may be useful in understanding the linear as well as nonlinear phenomena associated with the HIA waves both in space and laboratory plasmas.

  17. Head-on collision of dust-acoustic shock waves in strongly coupled dusty plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    EL-Shamy, E. F.; Al-Asbali, A. M.

    2014-09-01

    A theoretical investigation is carried out to study the propagation and the head-on collision of dust-acoustic (DA) shock waves in a strongly coupled dusty plasma consisting of negative dust fluid, Maxwellian distributed electrons and ions. Applying the extended Poincaré-Lighthill-Kuo method, a couple of Korteweg-deVries-Burgers equations for describing DA shock waves are derived. This study is a first attempt to deduce the analytical phase shifts of DA shock waves after collision. The impacts of physical parameters such as the kinematic viscosity, the unperturbed electron-to-dust density ratio, parameter determining the effect of polarization force, the ion-to-electron temperature ratio, and the effective dust temperature-to-ion temperature ratio on the structure and the collision of DA shock waves are examined. In addition, the results reveal the increase of the strength and the steepness of DA shock waves as the above mentioned parameters increase, which in turn leads to the increase of the phase shifts of DA shock waves after collision. The present model may be useful to describe the structure and the collision of DA shock waves in space and laboratory dusty plasmas.

  18. Linear and nonlinear heavy ion-acoustic waves in a strongly coupled plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ema, S. A.; Hossen, M. R.; Mamun, A. A.

    2015-09-01

    A theoretical study on the propagation of linear and nonlinear heavy ion-acoustic (HIA) waves in an unmagnetized, collisionless, strongly coupled plasma system has been carried out. The plasma system is assumed to contain adiabatic positively charged inertial heavy ion fluids, nonextensive distributed electrons, and Maxwellian light ions. The normal mode analysis is used to study the linear behaviour. On the other hand, the well-known reductive perturbation technique is used to derive the nonlinear dynamical equations, namely, Burgers equation and Korteweg-de Vries (K-dV) equation. They are also numerically analyzed in order to investigate the basic features of shock and solitary waves. The adiabatic effects on the HIA shock and solitary waves propagating in such a strongly coupled plasma are taken into account. It has been observed that the roles of the adiabatic positively charged heavy ions, nonextensivity of electrons, and other plasma parameters arised in this investigation have significantly modified the basic features (viz., polarity, amplitude, width, etc.) of the HIA solitary/shock waves. The findings of our results obtained from this theoretical investigation may be useful in understanding the linear as well as nonlinear phenomena associated with the HIA waves both in space and laboratory plasmas.

  19. Head-on collision of dust-acoustic shock waves in strongly coupled dusty plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    EL-Shamy, E. F.; Al-Asbali, A. M.

    2014-09-15

    A theoretical investigation is carried out to study the propagation and the head-on collision of dust-acoustic (DA) shock waves in a strongly coupled dusty plasma consisting of negative dust fluid, Maxwellian distributed electrons and ions. Applying the extended Poincaré–Lighthill–Kuo method, a couple of Korteweg–deVries–Burgers equations for describing DA shock waves are derived. This study is a first attempt to deduce the analytical phase shifts of DA shock waves after collision. The impacts of physical parameters such as the kinematic viscosity, the unperturbed electron-to-dust density ratio, parameter determining the effect of polarization force, the ion-to-electron temperature ratio, and the effective dust temperature-to-ion temperature ratio on the structure and the collision of DA shock waves are examined. In addition, the results reveal the increase of the strength and the steepness of DA shock waves as the above mentioned parameters increase, which in turn leads to the increase of the phase shifts of DA shock waves after collision. The present model may be useful to describe the structure and the collision of DA shock waves in space and laboratory dusty plasmas.

  20. Application of Air-Coupled Ultrasound in NDE of Composite Space Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, David K.; Barnard, Daniel J.; Peters, John J.; Polis, Daniel L.

    2004-02-01

    This paper describes the use of air-coupled ultrasound for inspecting flight-like composite components for NASA's next Hubble Space Telescope servicing mission. Air-coupled ultrasonic scan has the advantage of being non-contact and hence non-contaminating. Engineered flaws in solid laminates and honeycomb sandwiches are detected and imaged. Relatively thick inserts made of both composite and metal in the honeycomb panels are inspected using air-coupled through-transmission ultrasonic scans; unbond conditions are detected. In preparation for scanning large components with air-coupled ultrasound, the instrument is taken out of the laboratory and integrated with a gantry system.

  1. Lithosphere-Atmosphere coupling: Spectral element modeling of the evolution of acoustic waves in the atmosphere from an underground source.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Averbuch, Gil; Price, Colin

    2015-04-01

    Lithosphere-Atmosphere coupling: Spectral element modeling of the evolution of acoustic waves in the atmosphere from an underground source. G. Averbuch, C. Price Department of Geosciences, Tel Aviv University, Israel Infrasound is one of the four Comprehensive Nuclear-Test Ban Treaty technologies for monitoring nuclear explosions. This technology measures the acoustic waves generated by the explosions followed by their propagation through the atmosphere. There are also natural phenomena that can act as an infrasound sources like sprites, volcanic eruptions and earthquakes. The infrasound waves generated from theses phenomena can also be detected by the infrasound arrays. In order to study the behavior of these waves, i.e. the physics of wave propagation in the atmosphere, their evolution and their trajectories, numerical methods are required. This presentation will deal with the evolution of acoustic waves generated by underground sources (earthquakes and underground explosions). A 2D Spectral elements formulation for lithosphere-atmosphere coupling will be presented. The formulation includes the elastic wave equation for the seismic waves and the momentum, mass and state equations for the acoustic waves in a moving stratified atmosphere. The coupling of the two media is made by boundary conditions that ensures the continuity of traction and velocity (displacement) in the normal component to the interface. This work has several objectives. The first is to study the evolution of acoustic waves in the atmosphere from an underground source. The second is to derive transmission coefficients for the energy flux with respect to the seismic magnitude and earth density. The third will be the generation of seismic waves from acoustic waves in the atmosphere. Is it possible?

  2. Optimality criteria-based topology optimization of a bi-material model for acoustic-structural coupled systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Linyuan; Zhao, Guozhong

    2016-06-01

    This article investigates topology optimization of a bi-material model for acoustic-structural coupled systems. The design variables are volume fractions of inclusion material in a bi-material model constructed by the microstructure-based design domain method (MDDM). The design objective is the minimization of sound pressure level (SPL) in an interior acoustic medium. Sensitivities of SPL with respect to topological design variables are derived concretely by the adjoint method. A relaxed form of optimality criteria (OC) is developed for solving the acoustic-structural coupled optimization problem to find the optimum bi-material distribution. Based on OC and the adjoint method, a topology optimization method to deal with large calculations in acoustic-structural coupled problems is proposed. Numerical examples are given to illustrate the applications of topology optimization for a bi-material plate under a low single-frequency excitation and an aerospace structure under a low frequency-band excitation, and to prove the efficiency of the adjoint method and the relaxed form of OC.

  3. Sub-Poissonian phonon statistics in an acoustical resonator coupled to a pumped two-level emitter

    SciTech Connect

    Ceban, V. Macovei, M. A.

    2015-11-15

    The concept of an acoustical analog of the optical laser has been developed recently in both theoretical and experimental works. We here discuss a model of a coherent phonon generator with a direct signature of the quantum properties of sound vibrations. The considered setup is made of a laser-driven quantum dot embedded in an acoustical nanocavity. The system dynamics is solved for a single phonon mode in the steady-state and in the strong quantum dot—phonon coupling regime beyond the secular approximation. We demonstrate that the phonon statistics exhibits quantum features, i.e., is sub-Poissonian.

  4. Original coupled FEM/BIE numerical model for analyzing infinite periodic surface acoustic wave transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hecht, Frédéric; Ventura, Pascal; Dufilié, Pierre

    2013-08-01

    This paper proposes a new numerical coupled Finite Element Method/Boundary Integral Equations (FEM/BIE) technique which allows the 2D physical simulation of Surface Acoustic Waves (SAWs) transducers infinitely periodic in one direction. This new technique could be generalized to various periodic acoustic 2D simulations. This new method uses an original Variational Formulation (VF) which formally includes harmonic periodic boundary conditions, and, efficient boundary integral formulations allowing to account for the semi-infinite dielectric and piezoelectric spaces. In the case of the piezoelectric semi-space, the Green's functions are efficiently computed using Fahmy-Adler's method [8]. Only periodic boundary conditions are needed, which greatly simplifies the code implementation. This numerical model has been developed to analyze an Inter-Digital Transducer (IDT) with complex electrode shape (unburied, buried or raised electrodes). The use of buried electrodes in SAW transducer designs on quartz has important advantages when compared with unburied metal electrodes on the surface. One important property is the suppression of transverse waveguide modes in transducers. A second advantage is the ability to use thicker metal thereby reducing the resistive losses. Buried electrodes have also been shown to increase the quality factor of Surface Transverse Wave (STW) resonators [15]. This numerical model is a very useful tool for optimizing the electrode geometry. Analysis of raised electrodes is useful for predicting the effects of Reactive Ion Etch (RIE) on the SAW or STW electrical filter characteristics. RIE is commonly used as a frequency trimming technique for SAW or STW filters on Quartz. The first part of the paper presents the theory, and, the second part is devoted to numerical validations and numerical results.

  5. Turbulent Fluxes of Suspended Sediment from Coupled Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoitink, T.; Sassi, M.; Vermeulen, B.

    2014-12-01

    Turbulent diffusion is a cornerstone in geophysical fluid mechanics, controlling the exchange of momentum, heat and mass in surface flows occurring in the atmosphere, in rivers and in the ocean. In fluvial and coastal systems, modeling turbulent diffusion of momentum and suspended sediment requires knowledge about turbulent diffusivities, which is generally derived from parameterizations based on laboratory experiments. Field determinations of momentum and sediment diffusivities are cumbersome, requiring an instrumental array to simultaneously sample turbulence and mean flow quantities in time and in space. Recently, a new technique to analyze geophysical surface flow turbulence was introduced, appropriate for large scale systems, based on coupling of acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs). Here, we extend this approach to obtain collocated profiles of both the Reynolds stress tensor and eddy covariance fluxes, to derive vertical profiles of turbulent momentum and sediment diffusivity in a tidal river. Shear and normal stresses are obtained by combining the variances in radial velocities measured by the ADCP beams. The covariances between radial velocities and calibrated acoustic backscatter allow to determine the three Cartesian components of the turbulent flux of suspended sediment. The main advantage of this new approach is that flow velocity and sediment concentration measurements are exactly collocated, and that it allows to profile over longer ranges, in comparison to existing techniques. Results show that vertical profiles of the inverse turbulent Prandtl-Schmidt number is coherent with corresponding profiles of the sediment diffusivity, rather than with profiles of the eddy viscosity. This implies modelling suspended sediment dynamics requires knowledge about the sediment diffusivity, as the Prandtl-Schmidt number cannot be estimated from the eddy viscosity alone.

  6. Integrable parameter regimes and stationary states of nonlinearly coupled electromagnetic and ion-acoustic waves

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, N.N.

    1998-01-01

    A systematic analysis of the stationary propagation of nonlinearly coupled electromagnetic and ion-acoustic waves in an unmagnetized plasma via the ponderomotive force is carried out. For small but finite amplitudes, the governing equations have a Hamiltonian structure, but with a kinetic energy term that is not positive definite. The Hamiltonian is similar to the well-known H{acute e}non{endash}Heiles Hamiltonian of nonlinear dynamics, and is completely integrable in three regimes of the allowed parameter space. The corresponding second invariants of motion are also explicitly obtained. The integrable parameter regimes correspond to supersonic values of the Mach number, which characterizes the propagation speed of the coupled waves. On the other hand, in the sub- as well as near-sonic regimes, the coupled mode equations admit different types of exact analytical solutions, which represent nonlinear localized eigenstates of the electromagnetic field trapped in the density cavity due to the ponderomotive potential. While the density cavity has always a single-dip structure, for larger amplitudes it can support higher-order modes having a larger number of nodes in the electromagnetic field. In particular, we show the existence of a new type of localized electromagnetic wave whose field intensity has a triple-hump structure. For typical parameter values, the triple-hump solitons propagate with larger Mach numbers that are closer to the sonic limit than the single- as well as the double-hump solitons, but carry a lesser amount of the electromagnetic field energy. A comparison between the different types of solutions is carried out. The possibility of the existence of trapped electromagnetic modes having a larger number of humps is also discussed. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  7. Wide Bandwidth Air-Coupled Ultrasonic Testing of Food Containers in Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, T. H.; Hutchins, D. A.; Billson, D. R.

    2003-03-01

    Air-coupled NDE has been used to perform measurements on food containers. This relies on the broad bandwidth available from polymer-filmed capacitive transducers, combined with pulse compression techniques. The first experiments involve liquids within cylindrical polymer containers. It will be demonstrated that transmission through the drinks bottles can be used to measure liquid level, either from monitoring the through-transmitted signal directly, or by observation of a reflection from the liquid surface. This can be achieved without contact to the container. By scanning the transducers around the container, it is also possible to collect tomographic data. It will be demonstrated that this can be used to reconstruct air-coupled cross-sectional images of such containers, so that contaminants can be located. It is also shown that the temperature of a liquid can be estimated successfully, using time-of-flight measurements. The result is a powerful method for the NDE of such materials, which could be applied to production-line situations.

  8. Advances in Fast-response Acoustically Derived Air-temperature Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogoev, I.; Jacobsen, L.; Horst, T. W.; Conrad, B.

    2015-12-01

    Fast-response accurate air-temperature measurements are required when estimating turbulent fluxes of heat, water and carbon dioxide by open-path eddy-covariance technique. In comparison with contact thermometers like thermocouples, ultra-sonic thermometers do not suffer from solar radiation loading, water vapor condensation and evaporative cooling effects. Consequently they have the potential to provide more accurate true air temperature measurements. The absolute accuracy of the ultrasonic thermometer is limited by the following parameters: the distance between the transducer pairs, transducer delays associated with the electrical-acoustic signal conversion that vary with temperature, components of the wind vector that are normal to the ultrasonic paths, and humidity.The distance between the transducer pairs is commonly obtained by coordinate measuring machine. Improved accuracy demonstrated in this study results from increased stiffness in the anemometer head to better maintain the ultrasonic path-length distances. To further improve accuracy and account for changes in transducer delays and distance as a function of temperature, these parameters are characterized in a zero-wind chamber over the entire operating temperature range. When the sonic anemometer is combined with a co-located fast-response water vapor analyzer, like in the IRGASON instrument, speed of sound can be compensated for humidity effects on a point-by-point basis resulting in a true fast-response air temperature measurement. Laboratory test results show that when the above steps are implemented in the calibration of the ultrasonic thermometer air-temperature accuracy better than ±0.5 degrees Celsius can be achieved over the entire operating range. The approach is also validated in a field inter-comparison with an aspirated thermistor probe mounted in a radiation shield.

  9. Performance of Spherically Focused Air-Coupled Ultrasonic Transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chimenti, D. E.; Song, Junho

    2007-03-01

    This paper reports the development, testing, and performance evaluation of spherically focused capacitive air-coupled ultrasonic transducers 1 and 5 cm in diameter. A flexible micro-machined copper/polyimide backplate permits a conformal fit to a spherically shaped fixture, forming the rear capacitor plate. A spherically deformed 6-μm aluminized Mylar foil forms the front capacitor plate, completing the transducer. The device's frequency spectrum is centered near 800 kHz with -6dB points at about 400 and 1200 kHz. The device's focal-plane behavior is successfully modeled theoretically as a focused piston radiator. The imaging and defect detection capabilities of the new transducer are demonstrated in a series of critical tests: a 250-μm wire is easily imaged in a confocal geometry with a second device. Composite, honeycomb, and wood samples are imaged in through-transmission C-scans, showing internal defects. A printed circuit board is imaged, showing features as small as 200-μm.

  10. An Air-Coupled Multiple Moving Membrane Micromachined Ultrasonic Transducer With Inverse Biasing Functionality.

    PubMed

    Emadi, Arezoo; Buchanan, Douglas A

    2016-08-01

    A novel air-coupled multiple moving membrane-capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer ( [Formula: see text]-CMUT) with individually biased deflectable plates has been developed. Unlike the conventional capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer, this device cell structure includes an additional deflectable plate that is suspended underneath the transducer top plate. This added flexible plate contributes to the device signal transmission and reception. It is demonstrated that due to the presence of this added moving plate, the transducer is capable of operating under inverse bias condition, where the driving voltage is sandwiched between two grounded electrodes. COMSOL electromechanical simulations were conducted to investigate the influence of the transducer additional moving plate. A set of three individuals and an array of [Formula: see text]-CMUT transducers were fabricated using a sacrificial technique and with resonant frequencies ranging from 0.8 to 2.1 MHz. Electrical, optical, and pitch-catch acoustic measurements were performed to characterize the transducers properties under inverse bias condition. The experimental results are shown to be in good agreement with the simulation results for all of the fabricated transducers. It is shown that these transducers are fully functional under both normal and inverse bias conditions without any degradation in the transducer performance. PMID:27254861

  11. Non-Destructive Evaluation of Grain Structure Using Air-Coupled Ultrasonics

    SciTech Connect

    Belvin, A. D.; Burrell, R. K.; Cole, E.G.

    2009-08-01

    Cast material has a grain structure that is relatively non-uniform. There is a desire to evaluate the grain structure of this material non-destructively. Traditionally, grain size measurement is a destructive process involving the sectioning and metallographic imaging of the material. Generally, this is performed on a representative sample on a periodic basis. Sampling is inefficient and costly. Furthermore, the resulting data may not provide an accurate description of the entire part's average grain size or grain size variation. This project is designed to develop a non-destructive acoustic scanning technique, using Chirp waveforms, to quantify average grain size and grain size variation across the surface of a cast material. A Chirp is a signal in which the frequency increases or decreases over time (frequency modulation). As a Chirp passes through a material, the material's grains reduce the signal (attenuation) by absorbing the signal energy. Geophysics research has shown a direct correlation with Chirp wave attenuation and mean grain size in geological structures. The goal of this project is to demonstrate that Chirp waveform attenuation can be used to measure grain size and grain variation in cast metals (uranium and other materials of interest). An off-axis ultrasonic inspection technique using air-coupled ultrasonics has been developed to determine grain size in cast materials. The technique gives a uniform response across the volume of the component. This technique has been demonstrated to provide generalized trends of grain variation over the samples investigated.

  12. Calibration Methods for Air Coupled Antennas - COST Action TU1208

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marecos, Vânia; Solla, Mercedes; Fontul, Simona; Pajewski, Lara

    2016-04-01

    This work focuses on the comparison of different methods for calibrating air coupled antennas: Coring, Surface Reflection Method (SRM) and Common Mid-Point (CMP) through the analysis of GPR data collected in a test site with different pavement solutions. Research activities have been carried out during a Short Term Scientific Mission (STSM) funded by the COST (European Cooperation in Science and Technology) Action TU1208 "Civil Engineering Applications of Ground Penetrating Radar" in December 2015. The use of GPR in transport infrastructures represents one of the most significant advances for obtaining continuous data along the road, with the advantage of operation at traffic speed and being a non-destructive technique. Its main application has been the evaluation of layer thickness. For the determination of layer thickness, it is necessary to know the velocity of the signal, which depends on the dielectric constant of the material, and the two-way travel time of the reflected signal that is recorded by the GPR system. The calculation of the dielectric value of the materials can be done using different approaches such as: using fixed values based on experience, laboratory determination of dielectric values, applying the SRM, performing back calculation from ground truth references such as cores and test pits, or using the CMP method. The problem with using ground truth is that it is time consuming, labour intensive and intrusive to traffic, in addition, a drill core is not necessarily representative of the whole surveyed area. Regarding the surface reflection technique, one of the problems is that it only measures the dielectric value from the layer surface and not from the whole layer. Recent works already started to address some of these challenges proposing new approaches for GPR layer thickness measurements using multiple antennas to calculate the average dielectric value of the asphalt layer, taking advantage of significant hardware improvements in GPR

  13. Strain coupling, microstructure dynamics, and acoustic mode softening in germanium telluride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, D.; Chatterji, T.; Schiemer, J. A.; Carpenter, M. A.

    2016-04-01

    GeTe is a material of intense topical interest due to its potential in the context of phase-change and nanowire memory devices, as a base for thermoelectric materials, and as a ferroelectric. The combination of a soft optic mode and a Peierls distortion contributes large strains at the cubic-rhombohedral phase transition near 625 K and the role of these has been investigated through their influence on elastic and anelastic properties by resonant ultrasound spectroscopy. The underlying physics is revealed by softening of the elastic constants by ˜30%-45%, due to strong coupling of shear and volume strains with the driving order parameter and consistent with an improper ferroelastic transition which is weakly first order. The magnitude of the softening is permissive of the transition mechanism involving a significant order/disorder component. A Debye loss peak in the vicinity of 180 K is attributed to freezing of the motion of ferroelastic twin walls and the activation energy of ˜0.07 eV is attributed to control by switching of the configuration of long and short Ge-Te bonds in the first coordination sphere around Ge. Precursor softening as the transition is approached from above can be described with a Vogel-Fulcher expression with a similar activation energy, which is attributed to coupling of acoustic modes with an unseen central mode that arises from dynamical clusters with local ordering of the Peierls distortion. The strain relaxation and ferroelastic behavior of GeTe depend on both displacive and order/disorder effects but the dynamics of switching will be determined by changes in the configuration of distorted GeT e6 octahedra, with a rather small activation energy barrier.

  14. Dispersive Alfven waves and Ion-acoustic Turbulence: M-I coupling at the Smallest Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semeter, J. L.; Zettergren, M. D.; Diaz, M.; Stromme, A.; Nicolls, M. J.; Heinselman, C. J.

    2010-12-01

    Auroral displays exhibit coherence across multiple scales, beginning with the global auroral oval and extending down to packets of discrete arcs of <100-m width related to dispersive Alfven waves. The latter have been found to be magnetically conjugate to regions of non-thermal backscatter from the ionospheric F-region recorded by incoherent scatter radar (ISR). The phenomenological relationship between auroral morphology and ISR spectral distortions has been well established, at least in a static sense, but the theory connecting these disparate observational domains is incomplete. It is argued that considerable insight into magnetosphere-ionosphere (M-I) coupling is obtained by understanding auroral physics at these elemental scales. The purpose of this paper is twofold: (1) to provide observational evidence that not all arc-related ISR distortions fit neatly into a single category (e.g., the “Naturally Enhanced Ion-Acoustic Line” or NEIAL), and (2) to provide a critical review of candidate theoretical models to simultaneously account for the time-dependent optical and radar measurements. Evidentiary support focuses on observations of a substorm onset on 23 March 2007 (11:20 UT) by a narrow-field video-rate camera and the electronically steerable Poker Flat ISR (PFISR). Examples of ISR spectra as a function of altitude. 1: thermal backscatter, 2 and 3: enhanced backscatter conjugate to discrete aurora.

  15. A simple model for coupled acoustic-structure resonance in Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginsberg, Jerry H.

    2005-04-01

    The Stratospheric Observatory For Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) is a joint project of NASA and the Deutsches Zentrum fur Luft- und Raumfahrt that has mounted a 2.5 m, 20 000 kg infrared telescope on a bulkhead of a specially modified Boeing 747-SP. A large sliding door will expose the observation bay to the exterior flow field at Mach 0.85 and 13 km altitude. In the open configuration the interaction of turbulence vortices generated at the leading and trailing edges of the opening has the possibility of inducing a strong acoustic signal. A concern has been raised that the peak frequencies of such a signal might coincide with the cavity resonances. The present work examines the transfer function for a known source in order to identify the cavity resonances. Simplistic reasoning argues that the worst case would occur if the cavity resonant frequencies are close to structural resonances. However, the structure's impedance is very low at its resonances, which means that the cavity resonant frequencies are shifted from their nominal values. The present work uses a simple one-dimensional waveguide model, in which one end is terminated by a damped single-degree-of-freedom oscillator, to explain the coupled-fluid structure resonance. The characteristic equation and formulas for the pressure and displacement transfer functions are derived. Analysis of these results leads to some surprising insights regarding the role of a structure's stiffness and mass. [Work supported by the NASA.

  16. Coupled ion acoustic and drift waves in magnetized superthermal electron-positron-ion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Adnan, Muhammad; Qamar, Anisa; Mahmood, S.

    2014-09-15

    Linear and nonlinear coupled drift-ion acoustic waves are investigated in a nonuniform magnetoplasma having kappa distributed electrons and positrons. In the linear regime, the role of kappa distribution and positron content on the dispersion relation has been highlighted; it is found that strong superthermality (low value of κ) and addition of positrons lowers the phase velocity via decreasing the fundamental scalelengths of the plasmas. In the nonlinear regime, first, coherent nonlinear structure in the form of dipoles and monopoles are obtained and the boundary conditions (boundedness) in the context of superthermality and positron concentrations are discussed. Second, in case of scalar nonlinearity, a Korteweg–de Vries-type equation is obtained, which admit solitary wave solution. It is found that both compressive and rarefactive solitons are formed in the present model. The present work may be useful to understand the low frequency electrostatic modes in inhomogeneous electron positron ion plasmas, which exist in astrophysical plasma situations such as those found in the pulsar magnetosphere.

  17. Investigation of Hydraulic Fracture Propagation Using a Post-Peak Control System Coupled with Acoustic Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Li-Hsien; Chen, Wei-Chih; Chen, Yao-Chung; Benyamin, Leo; Li, An-Jui

    2015-05-01

    This study investigates the fracture mechanism of fluid coupled with a solid resulting from hydraulic fracture. A new loading machine was designed to improve upon conventional laboratory hydraulic fracture testing and to provide a means of better understanding fracture behavior of solid media. Test specimens were made of cement mortar. An extensometer and acoustic emission (AE) monitoring system recorded the circumferential deformation and crack growth location/number during the test. To control the crack growth at the post-peak stage the input fluid rate can be adjusted automatically according to feedback from the extensometer. The complete stress-deformation curve, including pre- and post-peak stages, was therefore obtained. The crack extension/growth developed intensively after the applied stress reached the breakdown pressure. The number of cracks recorded by the AE monitoring system was in good agreement with the amount of deformation (expansion) recorded by the extensometer. The results obtained in this paper provide a better understanding of the hydraulic fracture mechanism which is useful for underground injection projects.

  18. Experimental Studies of the Acoustic Properties of a Finite Elastic Pipe Filled with Water/air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, L.

    1996-02-01

    Vibration of, and sound power radiated from, a water/air-filled steel pipe are measured and analyzed. Two types of pipe terminal are employed in the experiments: embedded in sand boxes or without any absorption treatment. Comparisons are made between experiments and theoretical analysis. The measured wavenumbers agree well with those predicted as do modal responses are sound power of the air-filled pipe. For the water-filled steel pipe used in the test (inner diameter 150 mm), measured modal responses and sound power at high frequencies (higher than 4·5 kHz) are much lower than expected for the lossless model. Influences of pipe terminals on the coupling between the water and pipe are also examined.

  19. Evidence of Longitudinal Acoustic Phonon Generation in Si Doping Superlattices by Ge Prism-Coupled THz Laser Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, T.; Kasper, E.; Oehme, M.; Schulze, J.; Korolev, K.

    2014-11-01

    We report on the direct excitation of 246 GHz longitudinal acoustic phonons in silicon doping superlattices by the resonant absorption of nanosecond-pulsed far-infrared laser radiation of the same frequency. A longitudinally polarized evanescent laser light field is coupled to the superlattice through a germanium prism providing total internal reflection at the superlattice interface. The ballistic phonon signal is detected by a superconducting aluminum bolometer. The sample is immersed in low-temperature liquid helium.

  20. Acoustical properties of air-saturated porous material with periodically distributed dead-end pores.

    PubMed

    Leclaire, P; Umnova, O; Dupont, T; Panneton, R

    2015-04-01

    A theoretical and numerical study of the sound propagation in air-saturated porous media with straight main pores bearing lateral cavities (dead-ends) is presented. The lateral cavities are located at "nodes" periodically spaced along each main pore. The effect of periodicity in the distribution of the lateral cavities is studied, and the low frequency limit valid for the closely spaced dead-ends is considered separately. It is shown that the absorption coefficient and transmission loss are influenced by the viscous and thermal losses in the main pores as well as their perforation rate. The presence of long or short dead-ends significantly alters the acoustical properties of the material and can increase significantly the absorption at low frequencies (a few hundred hertz). These depend strongly on the geometry (diameter and length) of the dead-ends, on their number per node, and on the periodicity along the propagation axis. These effects are primarily due to low sound speed in the main pores and to thermal losses in the dead-end pores. The model predictions are compared with experimental results. Possible designs of materials of a few cm thicknesses displaying enhanced low frequency absorption at a few hundred hertz are proposed. PMID:25920830

  1. Analysis and experimental validation of the middle-frequency vibro-acoustic coupling property for aircraft structural model based on the wave coupling hybrid FE-SEA method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Yunju; Li, Pengbo; Lin, Huagang

    2016-06-01

    The finite element (FE) method is suitable for low frequency analysis and the statistical energy analysis (SEA) for high frequency analysis, but the vibro-acoustic coupling analysis at middle frequency, especially with a certain range of uncertainty system, requires some new methods. A hybrid FE-SEA method is proposed in this study and the Monte Carlo method is used to check the hybrid FE-SEA method through the energy response analysis of a beam-plate built-up structure with some uncertainty, and the results show that two kinds of calculation results match well consistently. Taking the advantage of the hybrid FE-SEA method, the structural vibration and the cabin noise field responses under the vibro-acoustic coupling for an aircraft model are numerically analyzed, and, also, the corresponding experiment is carried out to verify the simulated results. Results show that the structural vibration responses at low frequency accord well with the experiment, but the error at high frequency is greater. The error of sound pressure response level in cabin throughout the spectrum is less than 3 dB. The research proves the reliability of the method proposed in this paper. This indicates that the proposed method can overcome the strict limitations of the traditional method for a large complex structure with uncertainty factors, and it can also avoid the disadvantages of solving complex vibro-acoustic system using the finite element method or statistical energy analysis in the middle frequency.

  2. Acoustic-Seismic Coupling of Broadband Signals - Analysis of Potential Disturbances during CTBT On-Site Inspection Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebsch, Mattes; Altmann, Jürgen

    2015-04-01

    For the verification of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) the precise localisation of possible underground nuclear explosion sites is important. During an on-site inspection (OSI) sensitive seismic measurements of aftershocks can be performed, which, however, can be disturbed by other signals. To improve the quality and effectiveness of these measurements it is essential to understand those disturbances so that they can be reduced or prevented. In our work we focus on disturbing signals caused by airborne sources: When the sound of aircraft (as often used by the inspectors themselves) hits the ground, it propagates through pores in the soil. Its energy is transferred to the ground and soil vibrations are created which can mask weak aftershock signals. The understanding of the coupling of acoustic waves to the ground is still incomplete. However, it is necessary to improve the performance of an OSI, e.g. to address potential consequences for the sensor placement, the helicopter trajectories etc. We present our recent advances in this field. We performed several measurements to record sound pressure and soil velocity produced by various sources, e.g. broadband excitation by jet aircraft passing overhead and signals artificially produced by a speaker. For our experimental set-up microphones were placed close to the ground and geophones were buried in different depths in the soil. Several sensors were shielded from the directly incident acoustic signals by a box coated with acoustic damping material. While sound pressure under the box was strongly reduced, the soil velocity measured under the box was just slightly smaller than outside of it. Thus these soil vibrations were mostly created outside the box and travelled through the soil to the sensors. This information is used to estimate characteristic propagation lengths of the acoustically induced signals in the soil. In the seismic data we observed interference patterns which are likely caused by the

  3. Coupling Laser Diode Thermal Desorption with Acoustic Sample Deposition to Improve Throughput of Mass Spectrometry-Based Screening.

    PubMed

    Haarhoff, Zuzana; Wagner, Andrew; Picard, Pierre; Drexler, Dieter M; Zvyaga, Tatyana; Shou, Wilson

    2016-02-01

    The move toward label-free screening in drug discovery has increased the demand for mass spectrometry (MS)-based analysis. Here we investigated the approach of coupling acoustic sample deposition (ASD) with laser diode thermal desorption (LDTD)-tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). We assessed its use in a cytochrome P450 (CYP) inhibition assay, where a decrease in metabolite formation signifies CYP inhibition. Metabolite levels for 3 CYP isoforms were measured as CYP3A4-1'-OH-midazolam, CYP2D6-dextrorphan, and CYP2C9-4'-OH-diclofenac. After incubation, samples (100 nL) were acoustically deposited onto a stainless steel 384-LazWell plate, then desorbed by an infrared laser directly from the plate surface into the gas phase, ionized by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI), and analyzed by MS/MS. Using this method, we achieved a sample analysis speed of 2.14 s/well, with bioanalytical performance comparable to the current online solid-phase extraction (SPE)-based MS method. An even faster readout speed was achieved when postreaction sample multiplexing was applied, where three reaction samples, one for each CYP, were transferred into the same well of the LazWell plate. In summary, LDTD coupled with acoustic sample deposition and multiplexing significantly decreased analysis time to 0.7 s/sample, making this MS-based approach feasible to support high-throughput screening (HTS) assays. PMID:26420787

  4. Fan Noise Prediction System Development: Source/Radiation Field Coupling and Workstation Conversion for the Acoustic Radiation Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, H. D.

    1993-01-01

    The Acoustic Radiation Code (ARC) is a finite element program used on the IBM mainframe to predict far-field acoustic radiation from a turbofan engine inlet. In this report, requirements for developers of internal aerodynamic codes regarding use of their program output an input for the ARC are discussed. More specifically, the particular input needed from the Bolt, Beranek and Newman/Pratt and Whitney (turbofan source noise generation) Code (BBN/PWC) is described. In a separate analysis, a method of coupling the source and radiation models, that recognizes waves crossing the interface in both directions, has been derived. A preliminary version of the coupled code has been developed and used for initial evaluation of coupling issues. Results thus far have shown that reflection from the inlet is sufficient to indicate that full coupling of the source and radiation fields is needed for accurate noise predictions ' Also, for this contract, the ARC has been modified for use on the Sun and Silicon Graphics Iris UNIX workstations. Changes and additions involved in this effort are described in an appendix.

  5. The effects of air gap reflections during air-coupled leaky Lamb wave inspection of thin plates.

    PubMed

    Fan, Zichuan; Jiang, Wentao; Cai, Maolin; Wright, William M D

    2016-02-01

    Air-coupled ultrasonic inspection using leaky Lamb waves offers attractive possibilities for non-contact testing of plate materials and structures. A common method uses an air-coupled pitch-catch configuration, which comprises a transmitter and a receiver positioned at oblique angles to a thin plate. It is well known that the angle of incidence of the ultrasonic bulk wave in the air can be used to preferentially generate specific Lamb wave modes in the plate in a non-contact manner, depending on the plate dimensions and material properties. Multiple reflections of the ultrasonic waves in the air gap between the transmitter and the plate can produce additional delayed waves entering the plate at angles of incidence that are different to those of the original bulk wave source. Similarly, multiple reflections of the leaky Lamb waves in the air gap between the plate and an inclined receiver may then have different angles of incidence and propagation delays when arriving at the receiver and hence the signal analysis may become complex, potentially leading to confusion in the identification of the wave modes. To obtain a better understanding of the generation, propagation and detection of leaky Lamb waves and the effects of reflected waves within the air gaps, a multiphysics model using finite element methods was established. This model facilitated the visualisation of the propagation of the reflected waves between the transducers and the plate, the subsequent generation of additional Lamb wave signals within the plate itself, their leakage into the adjacent air, and the reflections of the leaky waves in the air gap between the plate and receiver. Multiple simulations were performed to evaluate the propagation and reflection of signals produced at different transducer incidence angles. Experimental measurements in air were in good agreement with simulation, which verified that the multiphysics model can provide a convenient and accurate way to interpret the signals in

  6. Simulation of air gap vibration on aerostatic bearing under flow/structure coupled conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qian; Wu, Jianjin; Li, Dongsheng

    2008-10-01

    The vibration of aerostatic bearing air gap is one of the main factors, which restricts the precision of nano-processing and nano-measurement. Finite volume method was employed to obtain the air gap steady flow of different air gap thicknesses for the demonstration of vibrations under flow/structure coupled conditions. The unsteady flow of air gap was analyzed numerically by using the air gap flow & boundary movement control equations to get the pressure distribution on the slide surface and the amplitude of air gap for further study on the self-excited vibration of aerostatic bearings. Numerical analyses show that the highest aerostatic bearing amplitude is relative to the difference between load capacity and gravity at the initial moment as air gap rises, and the final air gap thickness has nothing to do with the initial air gap thickness. The results presented a new analytic demonstration for the research on the reduction of aerostatic bearing vibration.

  7. The direct problem of acoustic diffraction of an audible probe radiation by an air-saturated porous cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogam, Erick; Depollier, Claude; Fellah, Z. E. A.

    2010-12-01

    Gas-saturated, solid skeleton, porous media like geomaterials, polymeric and metallic foams or biomaterials are fundamental in a diverse range of applications, from structural materials to energy technologies. Most polymeric foams are used for noise control applications and knowledge of the manner in which the energy of sound waves is dissipated with respect to the intrinsic acoustic properties is important for the design of sound packages. Foams are often employed in the audible, low frequency range where modeling and measurement techniques for the recovery of physical parameters responsible for energy loss, are still few. Accurate acoustic methods for the characterization of porous media are based on the measurement of the transmitted and/or reflected acoustic waves by platelike specimens at ultrasonic frequencies. In this study we have developed a method based on the theory and experiment of diffraction of acoustic waves by a rigid-frame, air-saturated polymeric foam in cylindrical form in the audible frequency regime. A dispersion relation for sound wave propagation in the porous medium is derived from the propagation equations and a model solution is sought based on plane-wave decomposition using orthogonal cylindrical functions. The explicit analytical solution equation of the scattered field show that it is also dependent on the intrinsic microstructural parameters of the porous cylinder namely, porosity, tortuosity, and the flow resistivity (related to permeability).

  8. A correlation of air-coupled ultrasonic and thermal diffusivity data for CFCC materials

    SciTech Connect

    Pillai, T.A.K.; Easler, T.E.; Szweda, A.

    1997-01-01

    An air-coupled (non contact) through-transmission ultrasonic investigation has been conducted on 2D multiple ply Nicalon{trademark} SiC fiber/SiNC CFCC panels as a function of number of processing cycles. Corresponding thermal diffusivity imaging was also conducted. The results of the air-coupled ultrasonic investigation correlated with thermal property variations determined via infrared methods. Areas of delaminations were detected and effects of processing cycles were also detected.

  9. Non-Contact Inspection of Composites Using Air-Coupled Ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, J.; Kommareddy, V.; Liu, Z.; Fei, D.; Hsu, D.

    2003-03-01

    Conventional ultrasonic tests are conducted using water as a transmitting medium. Water coupled ultrasound cannot be applied to certain water-sensitive or porous materials and is more difficult to use in the field. In contrast, air-coupled ultrasound is non-contact and has clear advantages over water-coupled testing. The technology of air-coupled ultrasound has gained maturity in recent years. Some systems have become commercially available and researchers are pursuing several different modalities of air-coupled transduction. This paper reports our experience of applying air-coupled ultrasound to the inspection of flaws, damage, and normal internal structures of composite parts. Through-transmission C-scans at 400 kHz using a focused receiver has resolution sufficient to image honeycomb cells in the sandwich core. With the transmitter and receiver on the same side of a laminate. Lamb waves were generated and used for the imaging of substructures. Air-coupled scan results are presented for flaw detection and damage in aircraft composite structures.

  10. Performance comparison of air- and ground-coupled heat pump systems. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, J.D.; Kavanaugh, S.; Ramanathan, R.

    1984-01-01

    Research initiated in 1979 to compare the performance of air-coupled and ground-coupled heat pumps is described. Three heat pump systems were installed in small, neighboring all-electric residences served by the Oklahoma Gas and Electric Company in Perkins, Oklahoma. An air-coupled heat pump and two ground-coupled heat pumps - one with solar assistance - were field tested. However, equipment and instrumentation problems precluded gathering meaningful data for the solar-assisted ground-coupled system. Generally, the unassisted ground-coupled heat pump system proved superior to the air-coupled system, both in reducing peak demand and in consuming less energy on an annual basis. The unassisted ground-coupled system reduced summer and winter peak demand, and experienced no performance degradation due to buildup of rejected waste heat in the ground well. A polyethylene U-tube ground heat exchanger was installed in both ground-coupled systems midway through the project, replacing a five-inch annular PVC pipe arrangement that had functioned poorly. The U-tube performed well throughout the remainder of research. Differing lifestyles and thermostat changes by building occupants during the monitoring period produced quite different demands and loads in the test houses, but when results were normalized through simulation, the superior performance of the unassisted ground-coupled heat pump was confirmed.

  11. A process to control light in a micro resonator through a coupling modulation by surface acoustic waves

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Guofang; Li, Yuan; Hu, Chunguang; Lei, Lihua; Guo, Yanchuan

    2016-01-01

    A novel process to control light through the coupling modulation by surface acoustic wave (SAW) is presented in an optical micro resonator. An optical waveguide modulator of a racetrack resonator on silicon-on-insulator (SOI) technology is took as an example to explore the mechanism. A finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) is developed to simulate the acousto-optical (AO) modulator using the mechanism. An analytical method is presented to verify our proposal. The results show that the process can work well as an optical modulator by SAW. PMID:27485470

  12. A process to control light in a micro resonator through a coupling modulation by surface acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Guofang; Li, Yuan; Hu, Chunguang; Lei, Lihua; Guo, Yanchuan

    2016-08-01

    A novel process to control light through the coupling modulation by surface acoustic wave (SAW) is presented in an optical micro resonator. An optical waveguide modulator of a racetrack resonator on silicon-on-insulator (SOI) technology is took as an example to explore the mechanism. A finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) is developed to simulate the acousto-optical (AO) modulator using the mechanism. An analytical method is presented to verify our proposal. The results show that the process can work well as an optical modulator by SAW.

  13. A process to control light in a micro resonator through a coupling modulation by surface acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    Fan, Guofang; Li, Yuan; Hu, Chunguang; Lei, Lihua; Guo, Yanchuan

    2016-01-01

    A novel process to control light through the coupling modulation by surface acoustic wave (SAW) is presented in an optical micro resonator. An optical waveguide modulator of a racetrack resonator on silicon-on-insulator (SOI) technology is took as an example to explore the mechanism. A finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) is developed to simulate the acousto-optical (AO) modulator using the mechanism. An analytical method is presented to verify our proposal. The results show that the process can work well as an optical modulator by SAW. PMID:27485470

  14. Well-posedness of a model for structural acoustic coupling in a cavity enclosed by a thin cylindrical shell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Smith, R. C.

    1993-01-01

    A fully coupled mathematical model describing the interactions between a vibrating thin cylindrical shell and enclosed acoustic field is presented. Because the model will ultimately be used in control applications involving piezoceramic actuators, the loads and material contributions resulting from piezoceramic patches bonded to the shell are included in the discussion. Theoretical and computational issues lead to the consideration of a weak form of the modeling set of partial differential equations (PDE's) and through the use of a semigroup formulation, well-posedness results for the system model are obtained.

  15. FIELD TEST OF AIR SPARGING COUPLED WITH SOIL VAPOR EXTRACTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A controlled field study was designed and conducted to assess the performance of air sparging for remediation of petroleum fuel and solvent contamination in a shallow (3-m deep) groundwater aquifer. Sparging was performed in an insolation test cell (5 m by 3 m by 8-m deep). A soi...

  16. Quantum theory of the emission spectrum from quantum dots coupled to structured photonic reservoirs and acoustic phonons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy-Choudhury, Kaushik; Hughes, Stephen

    2015-11-01

    Electron-phonon coupling in semiconductor quantum dots plays a significant role in determining the optical properties of excited excitons, especially the spectral nature of emitted photons. This paper presents a comprehensive theory and analysis of emission spectra from artificial atoms or quantum dots coupled to structured photon reservoirs and acoustic phonons, when excited with incoherent pump fields. As specific examples of structured reservoirs, we chose a Lorentzian cavity and a slow-light coupled-cavity waveguide, which have both been explored experimentally. For the case of optical cavities, we directly compare and contrast the spectra from three well-known and distinct theoretical approaches to treat electron-phonon coupling, including a Markovian polaron master equation, a non-Markovian phonon correlation expansion technique, and a semiclassical linear susceptibility approach, and we point out the limitations of these models. For the cavity-QED polaron master equation, which treats the cavity-mode operator at the level of a system operator, we give closed form analytical solutions to the phonon-assisted scattering rates in the weak excitation approximation, fully accounting for temperature, cavity-exciton detuning, and cavity-dot coupling. We also show explicitly why the semiclassical linear susceptibility approach fails to correctly account for phonon-mediated cavity feeding. For weakly coupled cavities, we calculate the optical spectra using a more general photon reservoir polaron master-equation approach, and explain its differences from the above approaches in the low-Q limit of a Lorentzian cavity. We subsequently use this general reservoir approach to calculate the emission spectra from quantum dots coupled to slow-light photonic crystal waveguides, which demonstrate a number of striking photon-phonon coupling effects.

  17. The nonadiabatic dust charge variation on dust acoustic solitary and shock waves in strongly coupled dusty plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yunliang; Guo, Xiaoyan; Lu, Yanzhen; Wang, Xiaodan

    2016-01-01

    The combined effects of nonadiabatic dust charge fluctuation and strongly coupled dust particles on the nonlinear propagation of dust acoustic (DA) waves in dusty plasma consisting of nonthermal electrons and trapped ions with vortex-like distribution are presented here. We use generalized viscoelastic hydrodynamic model for dust particles. In the weak nonlinearity limit, a modified Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation with a damping term and a KdV-Burger equation have been derived in the kinetic regime and hydrodynamic regime, respectively. The approximate analytical solitary solution of modified KdV equation is derived in the weak nonadiabatic dust charge variation limit, which shows that the amplitude of DA solitary waves decreases with time. The presence of viscosity due to strong coupling stands for the formation of DA shock waves in the hydrodynamic regime. The results show that the DA shock waves will be oscillating one for weak viscosity and will become monotonic ones for large viscosity.

  18. A surface acoustic wave (SAW)-enhanced grating-coupling phase-interrogation surface plasmon resonance (SPR) microfluidic biosensor.

    PubMed

    Sonato, A; Agostini, M; Ruffato, G; Gazzola, E; Liuni, D; Greco, G; Travagliati, M; Cecchini, M; Romanato, F

    2016-03-23

    A surface acoustic wave (SAW)-enhanced, surface plasmon resonance (SPR) microfluidic biosensor in which SAW-induced mixing and phase-interrogation grating-coupling SPR are combined in a single lithium niobate lab-on-a-chip is demonstrated. Thiol-polyethylene glycol adsorption and avidin/biotin binding kinetics were monitored by exploiting the high sensitivity of grating-coupling SPR under azimuthal control. A time saturation binding kinetics reduction of 82% and 24% for polyethylene and avidin adsorption was obtained, respectively, due to the fluid mixing enhancement by means of the SAW-generated chaotic advection. These results represent the first implementation of a nanostructured SAW-SPR microfluidic biochip capable of significantly improving the molecule binding kinetics on a single, portable device. In addition, the biochip here proposed is suitable for a great variety of biosensing applications. PMID:26932784

  19. Circuit-field coupled finite element analysis method for an electromagnetic acoustic transducer under pulsed voltage excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Kuan-Sheng; Huang, Song-Ling; Zhao, Wei; Wang, Shen

    2011-06-01

    This paper presents an analytical method for electromagnetic acoustic transducers (EMATs) under voltage excitation and considers the non-uniform distribution of the biased magnetic field. A complete model of EMATs including the non-uniform biased magnetic field, a pulsed eddy current field and the acoustic field is built up. The pulsed voltage excitation is transformed to the frequency domain by fast Fourier transformation (FFT). In terms of the time harmonic field equations of the EMAT system, the impedances of the coils under different frequencies are calculated according to the circuit-field coupling method and Poynting's theorem. Then the currents under different frequencies are calculated according to Ohm's law and the pulsed current excitation is obtained by inverse fast Fourier transformation (IFFT). Lastly, the sequentially coupled finite element method (FEM) is used to calculate the Lorentz force in the EMATs under the current excitation. An actual EMAT with a two-layer two-bundle printed circuit board (PCB) coil, a rectangular permanent magnet and an aluminium specimen is analysed. The coil impedances and the pulsed current are calculated and compared with the experimental results. Their agreement verified the validity of the proposed method. Furthermore, the influences of lift-off distances and the non-uniform static magnetic field on the Lorentz force under pulsed voltage excitation are studied.

  20. Sensitivity of Air-sea Exchange In A Regional Scale Coupled Ice/ocean/atmosphere Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrum, C.; Hübner, U.; Jacob, D.; Podzun, R.

    The sub-systems ice, ocean and atmosphere are coupled on the global as well as the regional scale. However, regional coupled modeling is only in the beginning, full cou- pled models which are able to describe the interaction on the regional scale and the feedback mechanism are rare at the moment. For the North Sea and the Baltic Sea such a coupled model has been developed and exemplary integrated over a full seasonal cy- cle. By comparison of different regionalization studies the impact of the regional at- mospheric modeling and coupling on the air sea fluxes have been investigated. It was shown that the regionalization as well as the coupling show strong influence on the air/sea fluxes and thus on the oceanic conditions. Further problems in regional mod- eling like the description of storm track variability and its influence on the regional ocean model were identified.

  1. Application of wavelet filtering and Barker-coded pulse compression hybrid method to air-coupled ultrasonic testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhenggan; Ma, Baoquan; Jiang, Jingtao; Yu, Guang; Liu, Kui; Zhang, Dongmei; Liu, Weiping

    2014-10-01

    Air-coupled ultrasonic testing (ACUT) technique has been viewed as a viable solution in defect detection of advanced composites used in aerospace and aviation industries. However, the giant mismatch of acoustic impedance in air-solid interface makes the transmission efficiency of ultrasound low, and leads to poor signal-to-noise (SNR) ratio of received signal. The utilisation of signal-processing techniques in non-destructive testing is highly appreciated. This paper presents a wavelet filtering and phase-coded pulse compression hybrid method to improve the SNR and output power of received signal. The wavelet transform is utilised to filter insignificant components from noisy ultrasonic signal, and pulse compression process is used to improve the power of correlated signal based on cross-correction algorithm. For the purpose of reasonable parameter selection, different families of wavelets (Daubechies, Symlet and Coiflet) and decomposition level in discrete wavelet transform are analysed, different Barker codes (5-13 bits) are also analysed to acquire higher main-to-side lobe ratio. The performance of the hybrid method was verified in a honeycomb composite sample. Experimental results demonstrated that the proposed method is very efficient in improving the SNR and signal strength. The applicability of the proposed method seems to be a very promising tool to evaluate the integrity of high ultrasound attenuation composite materials using the ACUT.

  2. Air-coupled ultrasound: a novel technique for monitoring the curing of thermosetting matrices.

    PubMed

    Lionetto, Francesca; Tarzia, Antonella; Maffezzoli, Alfonso

    2007-07-01

    A custom-made, air-coupled ultrasonic device was applied to cure monitoring of thick samples (7-10 mm) of unsaturated polyester resin at room temperature. A key point was the optimization of the experimental setup in order to propagate compression waves during the overall curing reaction by suitable placement of the noncontact transducers, placed on the same side of the test material, in the so-called pitch-catch configuration. The progress of polymerization was monitored through the variation of the time of flight of the propagating longitudinal waves. The exothermic character of the polymerization was taken into account by correcting the measured value of time of flight with that one in air, obtained by sampling the air velocity during the experiment. The air-coupled ultrasonic results were compared with those obtained from conventional contact ultrasonic measurements. The good agreement between the air-coupled ultrasonic results and those obtained by the rheological analysis demonstrated the reliability of air-coupled ultrasound in monitoring the changes of viscoelastic properties at gelation and vitrification. The position of the transducers on the same side of the sample makes this technique suitable for on-line cure monitoring during several composite manufacturing technologies. PMID:17718333

  3. Acoustic streaming in an ultrasonic air pump with three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain analysis and comparison to the measurement.

    PubMed

    Wada, Yuji; Koyama, Daisuke; Nakamura, Kentaro

    2014-12-01

    The direct finite-difference fluid simulation of acoustic streaming on a fine-meshed three-dimensional model using a graphics processing unit (GPU)-based calculation array is discussed. Airflows are induced by an acoustic traveling wave when an intense sound field is generated in a gap between a bending transducer and a reflector. The calculation results showed good agreement with measurements in a pressure distribution. Several flow vortices were observed near the boundary layer of the reflector and the transducer, which have often been observed near the boundary of acoustic tubes, but have not been observed in previous calculations for this type of ultrasonic air pump. PMID:25001051

  4. Generation of ion-acoustic waves in an inductively coupled, low-pressure discharge lamp

    SciTech Connect

    Camparo, J. C.; Klimcak, C. M.

    2006-04-15

    For a number of years it has been known that the alkali rf-discharge lamps used in atomic clocks can exhibit large amplitude intensity oscillations. These oscillations arise from ion-acoustic plasma waves and have typically been associated with erratic clock behavior. Though large amplitude ion-acoustic plasma waves are clearly deleterious for atomic clock operation, it does not follow that small amplitude oscillations have no utility. Here, we demonstrate two easily implemented methods for generating small amplitude ion-acoustic plasma waves in alkali rf-discharge lamps. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the frequency of these waves is proportional to the square root of the rf power driving the lamp and therefore that their examination can provide an easily accessible parameter for monitoring and controlling the lamp's plasma conditions. This has important consequences for precise timekeeping, since the atomic ground-state hyperfine transition, which is the heart of the atomic clock signal, can be significantly perturbed by changes in the lamp's output via the ac-Stark shift.

  5. Coupling of acoustic emission and electrochemical noise measurement techniques in slurry erosion-corrosion studies

    SciTech Connect

    Oltra, R.; Chapey, B.; Huet, F.; Renaud, L.

    1996-12-31

    This study deals with the measurement and the subsequent signal analysis of acoustic emission and current noise recorded during continuous slurry erosion of a metallic target in a corrosive environment. According to a phenomenologic model, the localized corrosion results from the repetitive damage caused by particle impacts. The fluctuations of the acoustic signal and of the electrochemical signal both can be modeled as a shot-noise-like process. The main purpose of this work is to compare two processing techniques for the fluctuating signals: time analysis (mean value) and spectral analysis (power spectral density [PSD] spectrum) to determine the more suitable signal treatment. Another purpose is also to quantify the balance between the mechanical wear and the corrosive damage of the abraded metallic target. It will be shown that the mean value of the RMS acoustic signal, A(t), and also the PSD of A(t), are related to the mechanical wear of the target and allow real-time measurement of the actual mechanical perturbation in terms of the mass of the ablated material.

  6. Control of low-frequency noise for piping systems via the design of coupled band gap of acoustic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yanfei; Shen, Huijie; Zhang, Linke; Su, Yongsheng; Yu, Dianlong

    2016-07-01

    Acoustic wave propagation and sound transmission in a metamaterial-based piping system with Helmholtz resonator (HR) attached periodically are studied. A transfer matrix method is developed to conduct the investigation. Calculational results show that the introduction of periodic HRs in the piping system could generate a band gap (BG) near the resonant frequency of the HR, such that the bandwidth and the attenuation effect of HR improved notably. Bragg type gaps are also exist in the system due to the systematic periodicity. By plotting the BG as functions of HR parameters, the effect of resonator parameters on the BG behavior, including bandwidth, location and attenuation performance, etc., is examined. It is found that Bragg-type gap would interplay with the resonant-type gap under some special situations, thereby giving rise to a super-wide coupled gap. Further, explicit formulation for BG exact coupling is extracted and some key parameters on modulating the width and the attenuation coefficient of coupled gaps are investigated. The coupled gap can be located to any frequency range as one concerned, thus rendering the low-frequency noise control feasible in a broad band range.

  7. Influence of surrounding structures upon the aerodynamic and acoustic performance of the outdoor unit of a split air-conditioner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chengjun; Liu, Jiang; Pan, Jie

    2014-07-01

    DC-inverter split air-conditioner is widely used in Chinese homes as a result of its high-efficiency and energy-saving. Recently, the researches on its outdoor unit have focused on the influence of surrounding structures upon the aerodynamic and acoustic performance, however they are only limited to the influence of a few parameters on the performance, and practical design of the unit requires more detailed parametric analysis. Three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics(CFD) and computational aerodynamic acoustics(CAA) simulation based on FLUENT solver is used to study the influence of surrounding structures upon the aforementioned properties of the unit. The flow rate and sound pressure level are predicted for different rotating speed, and agree well with the experimental results. The parametric influence of three main surrounding structures(i.e. the heat sink, the bell-mouth type shroud and the outlet grille) upon the aerodynamic performance of the unit is analyzed thoroughly. The results demonstrate that the tip vortex plays a major role in the flow fields near the blade tip and has a great effect on the flow field of the unit. The inlet ring's size and throat's depth of the bell-mouth type shroud, and the through-flow area and configuration of upwind and downwind sections of the outlet grille are the most important factors that affect the aerodynamic performance of the unit. Furthermore, two improved schemes against the existing prototype of the unit are developed, which both can significantly increase the flow rate more than 6 %(i.e. 100 m3·h-1) at given rotating speeds. The inevitable increase of flow noise level when flow rate is increased and the advantage of keeping a lower rotating speed are also discussed. The presented work could be a useful guideline in designing the aerodynamic and acoustic performance of the split air-conditioner in engineering practice.

  8. Non-contact optoacoustic imaging with focused air-coupled transducers

    SciTech Connect

    Deán-Ben, X. Luís; Pang, Genny A.; Razansky, Daniel; Montero de Espinosa, Francisco

    2015-08-03

    Non-contact optoacoustic imaging employing raster-scanning of a spherically focused air-coupled ultrasound transducer is showcased herein. Optoacoustic excitation with laser fluence within the maximal permissible human exposure limits in the visible and near-infrared spectra is applied to objects with characteristic dimensions smaller than 1 mm and absorption properties representative of the whole blood at near-infrared wavelengths, and these signals are shown to be detectable without contact to the sample using an air-coupled transducer with reasonable signal averaging. Optoacoustic images of vessel-mimicking tubes embedded in an agar phantom captured with this non-contact sensing technique are also showcased. These initial results indicate that an air-coupled ultrasound detection approach can be suitable for non-contact biomedical imaging with optoacoustics.

  9. Nonlinear propagation of spark-generated N-waves in air: modeling and measurements using acoustical and optical methods.

    PubMed

    Yuldashev, Petr; Ollivier, Sébastien; Averiyanov, Mikhail; Sapozhnikov, Oleg; Khokhlova, Vera; Blanc-Benon, Philippe

    2010-12-01

    The propagation of nonlinear spherically diverging N-waves in homogeneous air is studied experimentally and theoretically. A spark source is used to generate high amplitude (1.4 kPa) short duration (40 μs) N-waves; acoustic measurements are performed using microphones (3 mm diameter, 150 kHz bandwidth). Numerical modeling with the generalized Burgers equation is used to reveal the relative effects of acoustic nonlinearity, thermoviscous absorption, and oxygen and nitrogen relaxation on the wave propagation. The results of modeling are in a good agreement with the measurements in respect to the wave amplitude and duration. However, the measured rise time of the front shock is ten times longer than the calculated one, which is attributed to the limited bandwidth of the microphone. To better resolve the shock thickness, a focused shadowgraphy technique is used. The recorded optical shadowgrams are compared with shadow patterns predicted by geometrical optics and scalar diffraction model of light propagation. It is shown that the geometrical optics approximation results in overestimation of the shock rise time, while the diffraction model allows to correctly resolve the shock width. A combination of microphone measurements and focused optical shadowgraphy is therefore a reliable way of studying evolution of spark-generated shock waves in air. PMID:21218866

  10. Evaluation of the resolution of a metamaterial acoustic leaky wave antenna.

    PubMed

    Naify, Christina J; Rogers, Jeffery S; Guild, Matthew D; Rohde, Charles A; Orris, Gregory J

    2016-06-01

    Acoustic antennas have long been utilized to directionally steer acoustic waves in both air and water. Typically, these antennas are comprised of arrays of active acoustic elements, which are electronically phased to steer the acoustic profile in the desired direction. A new technology, known as an acoustic leaky wave antenna (LWA), has recently been shown to achieve directional steering of acoustic waves using a single active transducer coupled to a transmission line passive aperture. The LWA steers acoustic energy by preferential coupling to an input frequency and can be designed to steer from backfire to endfire, including broadside. This paper provides an analysis of resolution as a function of both input frequency and antenna length. Additionally, the resolution is compared to that achieved using an array of active acoustic elements. PMID:27369149

  11. Numerical study on air-structure coupling dynamic characteristics of the axial fan blade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Q. G.; Xie, B.; Li, F.; Gu, W. G.

    2013-12-01

    In order to understand the dynamic characteristics of the axial-flow fan blade due to the effect of rotating stress and the action of unsteady aerodynamic forces caused by the airflow, a numerical simulation method for air-structure coupling in an axial-flow fan with fixed rear guide blades was performed. The dynamic characteristics of an axial-flow fan rotating blade were studied by using the two-way air-structure coupling method. Based on the standard k-ε turbulence model, and using weak coupling method, the preceding six orders modal parameters of the rotating blade were obtained, and the distributions of stress and strain on the rotating blade were presented. The results show that the modal frequency from the first to the sixth order is 3Hz higher than the modal frequency without considering air-structure coupling interaction; the maximum stress and the maximum strain are all occurred in the vicinity of root area of the blade no matter the air-structure coupling is considered or not, thus, the blade root is the dangerous location subjected to fatigue break; the position of maximum deformation is at the blade tip, so the vibration of the blade tip is significant. This study can provide theoretical references for the further study on the strength analysis and mechanical optimal design.

  12. Effects of obliqueness and strong electrostatic interaction on linear and nonlinear propagation of dust-acoustic waves in a magnetized strongly coupled dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Shahmansouri, M.; Mamun, A. A.

    2014-03-15

    Linear and nonlinear propagation of dust-acoustic waves in a magnetized strongly coupled dusty plasma is theoretically investigated. The normal mode analysis (reductive perturbation method) is employed to investigate the role of ambient/external magnetic field, obliqueness, and effective electrostatic dust-temperature in modifying the properties of linear (nonlinear) dust-acoustic waves propagating in such a strongly coupled dusty plasma. The effective electrostatic dust-temperature, which arises from strong electrostatic interactions among highly charged dust, is considered as a dynamical variable. The linear dispersion relation (describing the linear propagation characteristics) for the obliquely propagating dust-acoustic waves is derived and analyzed. On the other hand, the Korteweg-de Vries equation describing the nonlinear propagation of the dust-acoustic waves (particularly, propagation of dust-acoustic solitary waves) is derived and solved. It is shown that the combined effects of obliqueness, magnitude of the ambient/external magnetic field, and effective electrostatic dust-temperature significantly modify the basic properties of linear and nonlinear dust-acoustic waves. The results of this work are compared with those observed by some laboratory experiments.

  13. Aerogel as a Soft Acoustic Metamaterial for Airborne Sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guild, Matthew D.; García-Chocano, Victor M.; Sánchez-Dehesa, José; Martin, Theodore P.; Calvo, David C.; Orris, Gregory J.

    2016-03-01

    Soft acoustic metamaterials utilizing mesoporous structures have been proposed recently as a means for tuning the overall effective properties of the metamaterial and providing better coupling to the surrounding air. In this paper, the use of silica aerogel is examined theoretically and experimentally as part of a compact soft acoustic metamaterial structure, which enables a wide range of exotic effective macroscopic properties to be demonstrated, including negative density, density near zero, and nonresonant broadband slow-sound propagation. Experimental data are obtained on the effective density and sound speed using an air-filled acoustic impedance tube for flexural metamaterial elements, which have been investigated previously only indirectly due to the large contrast in acoustic impedance compared to that of air. Experimental results are presented for silica aerogel arranged in parallel with either one or two acoustic ports and are in very good agreement with the theoretical model.

  14. Quantitative measures of air-gun pulses recorded on sperm whales (Physeter macrocephalus) using acoustic tags during controlled exposure experiments.

    PubMed

    Madsen, P T; Johnson, M; Miller, P J O; Aguilar Soto, N; Lynch, J; Tyack, P

    2006-10-01

    The widespread use of powerful, low-frequency air-gun pulses for seismic seabed exploration has raised concern about their potential negative effects on marine wildlife. Here, we quantify the sound exposure levels recorded on acoustic tags attached to eight sperm whales at ranges between 1.4 and 12.6 km from controlled air-gun array sources operated in the Gulf of Mexico. Due to multipath propagation, the animals were exposed to multiple sound pulses during each firing of the array with received levels of analyzed pulses falling between 131-167 dB re. 1 microPa (pp) [111-147 dB re. 1 microPa (rms) and 100-135 dB re. 1 microPa2 s] after compensation for hearing sensitivity using the M-weighting. Received levels varied widely with range and depth of the exposed animal precluding reliable estimation of exposure zones based on simple geometric spreading laws. When whales were close to the surface, the first arrivals of air-gun pulses contained most energy between 0.3 and 3 kHz, a frequency range well beyond the normal frequencies of interest in seismic exploration. Therefore air-gun arrays can generate significant sound energy at frequencies many octaves higher than the frequencies of interest for seismic exploration, which increases concern of the potential impact on odontocetes with poor low frequency hearing. PMID:17069331

  15. Low-frequency Acoustic/Seismic Coupling in Deep Sediments: Skyquakes Look Like Earthquakes in the Mississippi Embayment (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langston, C. A.

    2010-12-01

    Space Shuttle Discovery passed over the southern Mississippi River valley on November 7, 2007, and again on April 20, 2010, creating audible sonic booms that were recorded by seismic stations and infrasound sensors in the area. The seismoacoustic interaction of the infrasound N-wave with the deep, unconsolidated sediments of the Mississippi embayment created large 1-3 sec period fundamental and higher mode surface waves that were precursory to the atmospheric acoustic wave arrival at many stations. Seismoacoustic coupling was facilitated by the very low S and P wave velocity structure of the sediments, the relatively uniform regional extent of sedimentary strata, and the relatively high horizontal phase velocity of the N-wave as it interacted with the Earth's surface within 20 km of the trajectory ground track. These unusual data are used to infer the physical properties of the sediments to depths of approximately a kilometer. Analysis of the particle motion of the acoustic wave arrival gives additional information on the near-surface site response of individual stations for the upper 10's of meters. The complexity and duration of seismic signals from these large sonic boom sources are similar in character to shallow earthquakes and explosions within nearby seismic zones and provide useful information that can be used in wave propagation and site response studies for evaluating local earthquake shaking hazards.

  16. Unsteady Analysis of Inlet-Compressor Acoustic Interactions Using Coupled 3-D and 1-D CFD Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suresh, A.; Cole, G. L.

    2000-01-01

    It is well known that the dynamic response of a mixed compression supersonic inlet is very sensitive to the boundary condition imposed at the subsonic exit (engine face) of the inlet. In previous work, a 3-D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) inlet code (NPARC) was coupled at the engine face to a 3-D turbomachinery code (ADPAC) simulating an isolated rotor and the coupled simulation used to study the unsteady response of the inlet. The main problem with this approach is that the high fidelity turbomachinery simulation becomes prohibitively expensive as more stages are included in the simulation. In this paper, an alternative approach is explored, wherein the inlet code is coupled to a lesser fidelity 1-D transient compressor code (DYNTECC) which simulates the whole compressor. The specific application chosen for this evaluation is the collapsing bump experiment performed at the University of Cincinnati, wherein reflections of a large-amplitude acoustic pulse from a compressor were measured. The metrics for comparison are the pulse strength (time integral of the pulse amplitude) and wave form (shape). When the compressor is modeled by stage characteristics the computed strength is about ten percent greater than that for the experiment, but the wave shapes are in poor agreement. An alternate approach that uses a fixed rise in duct total pressure and temperature (so-called 'lossy' duct) to simulate a compressor gives good pulse shapes but the strength is about 30 percent low.

  17. Analysis of Inlet-Compressor Acoustic Interactions Using Coupled CFD Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suresh, A.; Townsend, S. E.; Cole, G. L.; Slater, J. W.; Chima, R.

    1998-01-01

    A problem that arises in the numerical simulation of supersonic inlets is the lack of a suitable boundary condition at the engine face. In this paper, a coupled approach, in which the inlet computation is coupled dynamically to a turbomachinery computation, is proposed as a means to overcome this problem. The specific application chosen for validation of this approach is the collapsing bump experiment performed at the University of Cincinnati. The computed results are found to be in reasonable agreement with experimental results. The coupled simulation results could also be used to aid development of a simplified boundary condition.

  18. PALLADIUM CATALYZED COUPLING OF ARYL HALIDES WITH ARYLHALOSILANES IN AIR AND WATER. (R828129)

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the presence of a palladium catalyst, various aryl halides reacted with arylhalosilanes in aqueous media and under an air atmosphere to give the corresponding unsymmetrical aryl–aryl coupling products conveniently.

    Coupling dynamics and chemistry in the air pollution modelling of street canyons: A review.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Jian; Cai, Xiao-Ming; Bloss, William James

    2016-07-01

    Air pollutants emitted from vehicles in street canyons may be reactive, undergoing mixing and chemical processing before escaping into the overlying atmosphere. The deterioration of air quality in street canyons occurs due to combined effects of proximate emission sources, dynamical processes (reduced dispersion) and chemical processes (evolution of reactive primary and formation of secondary pollutants). The coupling between dynamics and chemistry plays a major role in determining street canyon air quality, and numerical model approaches to represent this coupling are reviewed in this article. Dynamical processes can be represented by Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) techniques. The choice of CFD approach (mainly the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) and Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) models) depends on the computational cost, the accuracy required and hence the application. Simplified parameterisations of the overall integrated effect of dynamics in street canyons provide capability to handle relatively complex chemistry in practical applications. Chemical processes are represented by a chemical mechanism, which describes mathematically the chemical removal and formation of primary and secondary species. Coupling between these aspects needs to accommodate transport, dispersion and chemical reactions for reactive pollutants, especially fast chemical reactions with time scales comparable to or shorter than those of typical turbulent eddies inside the street canyon. Different approaches to dynamical and chemical coupling have varying strengths, costs and levels of accuracy, which must be considered in their use for provision of reference information concerning urban canopy air pollution to stakeholders considering traffic and urban planning policies. PMID:27149146

  19. Electric power generating plant having direct-coupled steam and compressed-air cycles

    DOEpatents

    Drost, M.K.

    1981-01-07

    An electric power generating plant is provided with a Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) system which is directly coupled to the steam cycle of the generating plant. The CAES system is charged by the steam boiler during off peak hours, and drives a separate generator during peak load hours. The steam boiler load is thereby levelized throughout an operating day.

  1. Electric power generating plant having direct coupled steam and compressed air cycles

    DOEpatents

    Drost, Monte K.

    1982-01-01

    An electric power generating plant is provided with a Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) system which is directly coupled to the steam cycle of the generating plant. The CAES system is charged by the steam boiler during off peak hours, and drives a separate generator during peak load hours. The steam boiler load is thereby levelized throughout an operating day.

  2. On the acoustic model of lithosphere-atmosphere-ionosphere coupling before earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meister, C.-V.; Mayer, B.; Dziendziel, P.; Fülbert, F.; Hoffmann, D. H. H.; Liperovsky, V. A.

    2011-04-01

    In this work, the many-fluid magnetohydrodynamic theory is applied to describe the modification of the electromagnetic field of the ionospheric E-layer by acoustic-type waves. There, altitudinal profiles of the electromagnetic field and the plasma parameters of the atmosphere and ionosphere are taken into account. It is concluded that at E-region altitudes above seismo-active regions, magnetohydrodynamic waves as Alfvén and magnetoacoustic ones might change their amplitude and direction of propagation. Waves of the Farley-Buneman type might also be excited a few days before very strong earthquakes. The collisions between the neutral and charged particles of the E-layer also cause diffusion and heating processes. Thus, changes of the characteristic foE-frequency might be obtained.

  3. Resonant coupling of ionization waves and acoustic gravity waves in the presence of a magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eun, H.; Gross, S. H.

    1976-01-01

    The nature of the two resonant directions that occur for a single frequency in the presence of a magnetic field is demonstrated, along with the manner in which the resonances change with the dip angle and the angle of propagation from the meridian plane. The conditions under which acoustic branch resonances may occur are outlined. It is found that the calculated frequencies and directions for resonance are in the range of observed values for TID's obtained from ground and satellite measurements. This result is indicative of a possible connection between TID's and the resonance phenomenon. It is shown that a strong resonance type of response may be possible in the F region at a particular frequency from a region that can be as great as 100 km in altitude.

  4. Monitoring of binder removal from injection molded ceramics using air-coupled ultrasound at high temperature.

    PubMed

    Wright, W D; Hutchins, D A

    1999-01-01

    A pair of capacitance-type air-coupled ultrasonic transducers have been constructed that were capable of operating in air at temperatures of 500 to 600 degrees C. These devices were then used to monitor the pyrolytic removal of organic binder from injection molded silicon nitride ceramic components using air-coupled ultrasound inside a furnace at elevated temperatures. Through-thickness waveforms were obtained in the ceramic and compared with simultaneous measurements of the mass of the sample. Both the ultrasonic velocity and signal amplitudes could be used to monitor the change in mass of the injection molded ceramic, and other phenomena (such as softening and redistribution of the binder) were observed. PMID:18238465

  5. Coupling of Helmholtz resonators to improve acoustic liners for turbofan engines at low frequency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, L. W.

    1975-01-01

    An analytical and test program was conducted to evaluate means for increasing the effectiveness of low frequency sound absorbing liners for aircraft turbine engines. Three schemes for coupling low frequency absorber elements were considered. These schemes were analytically modeled and their impedance was predicted over a frequency range of 50 to 1,000 Hz. An optimum and two off-optimum designs of the most promising, a parallel coupled scheme, were fabricated and tested in a flow duct facility. Impedance measurements were in good agreement with predicted values and validated the procedure used to transform modeled parameters to hardware designs. Measurements of attenuation for panels of coupled resonators were consistent with predictions based on measured impedance. All coupled resonator panels tested showed an increase in peak attenuation of about 50% and an increase in attenuation bandwidth of one one-third octave band over that measured for an uncoupled panel. These attenuation characteristics equate to about 35% greater reduction in source perceived noise level (PNL), relative to the uncoupled panel, or a reduction in treatment length of about 24% for constant PNL reduction. The increased effectiveness of the coupled resonator concept for attenuation of low frequency broad spectrum noise is demonstrated.

  6. Laser Imaging of Airborne Acoustic Emission by Nonlinear Defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solodov, Igor; Döring, Daniel; Busse, Gerd

    2008-06-01

    Strongly nonlinear vibrations of near-surface fractured defects driven by an elastic wave radiate acoustic energy into adjacent air in a wide frequency range. The variations of pressure in the emitted airborne waves change the refractive index of air thus providing an acoustooptic interaction with a collimated laser beam. Such an air-coupled vibrometry (ACV) is proposed for detecting and imaging of acoustic radiation of nonlinear spectral components by cracked defects. The photoelastic relation in air is used to derive induced phase modulation of laser light in the heterodyne interferometer setup. The sensitivity of the scanning ACV to different spatial components of the acoustic radiation is analyzed. The animated airborne emission patterns are visualized for the higher harmonic and frequency mixing fields radiated by planar defects. The results confirm a high localization of the nonlinear acoustic emission around the defects and complicated directivity patterns appreciably different from those observed for fundamental frequencies.

  7. Application of laser-induced thermal acoustics in air to measurement of shock-induced temperature changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizukaki, Toshiharu; Matsuzawa, Toyoki

    2009-10-01

    The laser-induced thermal acoustics (LITA) method was used to measure the temperature profiles induced behind spherical shock waves, generated by high-voltage discharge in air with an energy of 6 J. A Nd:YAG laser (wavelength 532 nm, energy 300 mJ, pulse duration 10 ns, line width 0.005 cm-1) and an Ar-ion laser (wavelength 488 nm, power 4 W) served as the pump and probe lasers, respectively for the LITA measurements. The peak temperatures were in good agreement with results calculated with the Euler equations. The temperature profiles behind the shock, however, differed in decay rates. The peak temperatures behind the shock wave were determined by reflected overpressure and agreed with those from the LITA measurements within a maximum error of 5%.

  8. On an invariance property of acoustic waveguides. [for air breathing propulsion system design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, S. S.

    1976-01-01

    The acoustic power transmitted by a variable-area duct section which carries a steady subsonic flow is investigated under the conditions of both upstream- and downstream-propagating incident plane waves. It is found that the ratio of the power transmitted by incident waves moving against the flow to the power transmitted by incident waves moving with the flow is equal to the ratio of the difference between the Mach number and unity to the square of the sum of the Mach number and unity.

  9. Pressure measurement in supersonic air flow by differential absorptive laser-induced thermal acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, Roger C.; Herring, G. C.; Balla, R. Jeffrey

    2007-06-01

    Nonintrusive, off-body flow barometry in Mach 2 airflow has been demonstrated in a large-scale supersonic wind tunnel using seedless laser-induced thermal acoustics (LITA). The static pressure of the gas flow is determined with a novel differential absorption measurement of the ultrasonic sound produced by the LITA pump process. Simultaneously, the streamwise velocity and static gas temperature of the same spatially resolved sample volume were measured with this nonresonant time-averaged LITA technique. Mach number, temperature, and pressure have 0.2%, 0.4%, and 4% rms agreement, respectively, in comparison with known free-stream conditions.

  10. Pressure Measurement in Supersonic Air Flow by Differential Absorptive Laser-Induced Thermal Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, Roger C.; Herring, Gregory C.; Balla, Robert J.

    2007-01-01

    Nonintrusive, off-body flow barometry in Mach-2 airflow has been demonstrated in a large-scale supersonic wind tunnel using seedless laser-induced thermal acoustics (LITA). The static pressure of the gas flow is determined with a novel differential absorption measurement of the ultrasonic sound produced by the LITA pump process. Simultaneously, stream-wise velocity and static gas temperature of the same spatially-resolved sample volume were measured with this nonresonant time-averaged LITA technique. Mach number, temperature and pressure have 0.2%, 0.4%, and 4% rms agreement, respectively, in comparison with known free-stream conditions.

  11. High performance AlScN thin film based surface acoustic wave devices with large electromechanical coupling coefficient

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wenbo; He, Xingli; Ye, Zhi E-mail: jl2@bolton.ac.uk; Wang, Xiaozhi; Mayrhofer, Patrick M.; Gillinger, Manuel; Bittner, Achim; Schmid, Ulrich

    2014-09-29

    AlN and AlScN thin films with 27% scandium (Sc) were synthesized by DC magnetron sputtering deposition and used to fabricate surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices. Compared with AlN-based devices, the AlScN SAW devices exhibit much better transmission properties. Scandium doping results in electromechanical coupling coefficient, K{sup 2}, in the range of 2.0% ∼ 2.2% for a wide normalized thickness range, more than a 300% increase compared to that of AlN-based SAW devices, thus demonstrating the potential applications of AlScN in high frequency resonators, sensors, and high efficiency energy harvesting devices. The coupling coefficients of the present AlScN based SAW devices are much higher than that of the theoretical calculation based on some assumptions for AlScN piezoelectric material properties, implying there is a need for in-depth investigations on the material properties of AlScN.

  12. Dynamics and acoustics of a cavitating Venturi flow using a homogeneous air-propylene glycol mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarrete, M.; Naude, J.; Mendez, F.; Godínez, F. A.

    2015-12-01

    Dynamics and acoustics generated in a cavitating Venturi tube are followed up as a function of the input power of a centrifugal pump. The pump of 5 hp with a modified impeller to produce uniform bubbly flow, pumps 70 liters of propylene glycol in a closed loop (with a water cooling system), in which the Venturi is arranged. The goal was to obtain correlations among acoustical emission, dynamics of the shock waves and the light emission from cavitation bubbles. The instrumentation includes: two piezoelectric transducers, a digital camera, a high-speed video camera, and photomultipliers. As results, we show the cavitation patterns as function of the pump power, and a graphical template of the distribution of the Venturi conditions as a function of the cavitation parameter. Our observations show for the first time the sudden formation of bubble clouds in the straight portion of the pipe after the diverging section of the Venturi. We assume that this is due to pre-existing of nuclei-cloud structures which suddenly grow up by the tensile tails of propagating shock waves (producing a sudden drop in pressure).

  13. Design and analysis of air acoustic vector-sensor configurations for two-dimensional geometry.

    PubMed

    Wajid, Mohd; Kumar, Arun; Bahl, Rajendar

    2016-05-01

    Acoustic vector-sensors (AVS) have been designed using the P-P method for different microphone configurations. These configurations have been used to project the acoustic intensity on the orthogonal axes through which the direction of arrival (DoA) of a sound source has been estimated. The analytical expressions for the DoA for different microphone configurations have been derived for two-dimensional geometry. Finite element method simulation using COMSOL-Multiphysics has been performed, where the microphone signals for AVS configurations have been recorded in free field conditions. The performance of all the configurations has been evaluated with respect to angular error and root-mean-square angular error. The simulation results obtained with ideal geometry for different configurations have been corroborated experimentally with prototype AVS realizations and also compared with microphone-array method, viz., Multiple Signal Classification and Generalized Cross Correlation. Experiments have been performed in an anechoic room using different prototype AVS configurations made from small size microphones. The DoA performance using analytical expressions, simulation studies, and experiments with prototype AVS in anechoic chamber are presented in the paper. The square and delta configurations are found to perform better in the absence and presence of noise, respectively. PMID:27250174

  14. Three-dimensional mid-air acoustic manipulation by ultrasonic phased arrays.

    PubMed

    Ochiai, Yoichi; Hoshi, Takayuki; Rekimoto, Jun

    2014-01-01

    The essence of levitation technology is the countervailing of gravity. It is known that an ultrasound standing wave is capable of suspending small particles at its sound pressure nodes. The acoustic axis of the ultrasound beam in conventional studies was parallel to the gravitational force, and the levitated objects were manipulated along the fixed axis (i.e. one-dimensionally) by controlling the phases or frequencies of bolted Langevin-type transducers. In the present study, we considered extended acoustic manipulation whereby millimetre-sized particles were levitated and moved three-dimensionally by localised ultrasonic standing waves, which were generated by ultrasonic phased arrays. Our manipulation system has two original features. One is the direction of the ultrasound beam, which is arbitrary because the force acting toward its centre is also utilised. The other is the manipulation principle by which a localised standing wave is generated at an arbitrary position and moved three-dimensionally by opposed and ultrasonic phased arrays. We experimentally confirmed that expanded-polystyrene particles of 0.6 mm, 1 mm, and 2 mm in diameter could be manipulated by our proposed method. PMID:24849371

  15. Three-Dimensional Mid-Air Acoustic Manipulation by Ultrasonic Phased Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Ochiai, Yoichi; Hoshi, Takayuki; Rekimoto, Jun

    2014-01-01

    The essence of levitation technology is the countervailing of gravity. It is known that an ultrasound standing wave is capable of suspending small particles at its sound pressure nodes. The acoustic axis of the ultrasound beam in conventional studies was parallel to the gravitational force, and the levitated objects were manipulated along the fixed axis (i.e. one-dimensionally) by controlling the phases or frequencies of bolted Langevin-type transducers. In the present study, we considered extended acoustic manipulation whereby millimetre-sized particles were levitated and moved three-dimensionally by localised ultrasonic standing waves, which were generated by ultrasonic phased arrays. Our manipulation system has two original features. One is the direction of the ultrasound beam, which is arbitrary because the force acting toward its centre is also utilised. The other is the manipulation principle by which a localised standing wave is generated at an arbitrary position and moved three-dimensionally by opposed and ultrasonic phased arrays. We experimentally confirmed that expanded-polystyrene particles of 0.6 mm, 1 mm, and 2 mm in diameter could be manipulated by our proposed method. PMID:24849371

  16. Coupled nonlinear drift and ion acoustic waves in dense dissipative electron-positron-ion magnetoplasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Masood, W.; Siddiq, M.; Karim, S.; Shah, H. A.

    2009-11-15

    Linear and nonlinear propagation characteristics of drift ion acoustic waves are investigated in an inhomogeneous electron-positron-ion (e-p-i) quantum magnetoplasma with neutrals in the background using the well known quantum hydrodynamic model. In this regard, Korteweg-de Vries-Burgers (KdVB) and Kadomtsev-Petviashvili-Burgers (KPB) equations are obtained. Furthermore, the solutions of KdVB and KPB equations are presented by using the tangent hyperbolic (tanh) method. The variation in the shock profile with the quantum Bohm potential, collision frequency, and the ratio of drift to shock velocity in the comoving frame, v{sub *}/u, is also investigated. It is found that increasing the positron concentration and collision frequency decreases the strength of the shock. It is also shown that when the localized structure propagates with velocity greater than the diamagnetic drift velocity (i.e., u>v{sub *}), the shock strength decreases. However, the shock strength is observed to increase when the localized structure propagates with velocity less than that of drift velocity (i.e., u

  17. Phononic crystal surface mode coupling and its use in acoustic Doppler velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Cicek, Ahmet; Salman, Aysevil; Kaya, Olgun Adem; Ulug, Bulent

    2016-02-01

    It is numerically shown that surface modes of two-dimensional phononic crystals, which are Bloch modes bound to the interface between the phononic crystal and the surrounding host, can couple back and forth between the surfaces in a length scale determined by the separation of two surfaces and frequency. Supercell band structure computations through the finite-element method reveal that the surface band of an isolated surface splits into two bands which support either symmetric or antisymmetric hybrid modes. When the surface separation is 3.5 times the lattice constant, a coupling length varying between 30 and 48 periods can be obtained which first increases linearly with frequency and, then, decreases rapidly. In the linear regime, variation of coupling length can be used as a means of measuring speeds of objects on the order of 0.1m/s by incorporating the Doppler shift. Speed sensitivity can be improved by increasing surface separation at the cost of larger device sizes. PMID:26565078

  18. Modeling the receptivity of an air jet to transverse acoustic disturbance with application to musical instruments.

    PubMed

    Blanc, F; François, V; Fabre, B; de la Cuadra, P; Lagrée, P-Y

    2014-06-01

    A simple analytical model for the interaction between a plane jet issued from a flue and a transverse acoustic disturbance is developed in this paper. The model is inspired by direct flow simulation results confronted to experimental data. The interaction is expected to take place in the vicinity of the separation points of the jet. The influence of the detailed geometry of the channel end on the jet receptivity is discussed, and more specifically the chamfer geometries found in flute-like musical instruments. The simplified model explains quite well the difference between the jet response of a flue with square edges compared to a chamfered flue exit. The effect of rounded, lip-like flue exit is not well captured by the model. PMID:24907787

  19. Experimental and Mathematical Evaluation of Dynamic Behaviour of AN Oil-Air Coupling Shock Absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    PING, Y.

    2003-11-01

    The physical mechanism of the actual shock absorber with multi-types of damping and non-linear stiffness through coupling the oil, air, rubber and spring by ingenious devices is systematically investigated. The experimental results of the key-model machine in multi-parameter coupling dynamic test show complex non-linearity dynamic characteristics. Based on this, the non-linear dynamic model for the shock absorber is presented by analysing the internal fluid dynamic phenomenon with respect to the shock absorber. Comparisons with experimental data confirm the validity of the model. Using the model, it is possible to evaluate the importance of different factors for designing the shock absorber.

  20. Air-coupled ultrasonic investigation of multi-layered composite materials.

    PubMed

    Kazys, R; Demcenko, A; Zukauskas, E; Mazeika, L

    2006-12-22

    Air-coupled ultrasonics is fine alternative for the immersion testing technique. Usually a through transmission and a pitch-catch arrangement of ultrasonic transducers are used. The pitch-catch arrangement is very attractive for non-destructive testing and evaluation of materials, because it allows one-side access to the object. However, this technique has several disadvantages. It is sensitive to specularly reflected and edge waves. A spatial resolution depends on a distance between the transducers. A new method for detection and visualisation of inhomogeneities in composite materials using one-side access air-coupled ultrasonic measurement technique is described. Numerical predictions of Lamb wave interaction with a defect in a composite material are carried out and the interaction mechanism is explained. Experimental measurements are carried out with different arrangements of the transducers. The proposed method enables detect delamination and impact type defects in honeycomb materials. PMID:16797664

  1. Resonant Transmission of Air-Coupled Ultrasound Through Metallic Inserts in Honeycomb Sandwich Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, J. J.; Dayal, V.; Barnard, D. J.; Hsu, D. K.

    2005-04-01

    Metallic inserts are embedded into composite honeycomb sandwiches as hard points for mechanical connections. Air-coupled ultrasound can be used for detecting disbonds between the insert and the facesheet. It was discovered in such inspections that a surprisingly large amplitude could be transmitted through thick metallic inserts (e.g. 0.75″ thick and 1.5″ diameter), whereas a thin plate of the same material will transmit a much weaker signal. This paper reports an experimental and analytic study of the geometrical effect of inserts on transmitted UT signals. Modal analyses of cylindrical inserts were made using the finite element code ANSYS. The transmission efficiency or air-coupled ultrasound correlated well with the longitudinal vibration mode of the cylinder.

  2. Application of PMN-32PT Piezoelectric Crystals for Novel Air-coupled Ultrasonic Transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazys, Rymantas Jonas; Sliteris, Reimondas; Sestoke, Justina

    Due to very high piezoelectric properties of PMN-PT crystals they may significantly improve performance of air-coupled ultrasonic transducers. For these purpose vibrations of PMN-PT rectangular plates and strips were investigated. An air-coupled ultrasonic transducer and array consisting of 8 single piezoelectric strips were designed. Operation of the transducer was simulated by the finite element method using ANSYS Mechanical APDL Product Launcher software. Spatial distributions of displacements inside piezoelectric elements and matching strip were obtained. Experimental investigations were carried out by the laser Doppler vibrometer Polytec OFV-5000 and the Bruel&Kjaer microphone 4138 with the measurement amplifier NEXUS WH 3219. It was found that performance of the ultrasonic transducer with PMN-32PT crystals was a few times better than of a PZT based ultrasonic transducer.

  3. Underwater Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuperman, William A.; Roux, Philippe

    It is well underwater established that sound waves, compared to electromagnetic waves, propagate long distances in the ocean. Hence, in the ocean as opposed to air or a vacuum, one uses sound navigation and ranging (SONAR) instead navigation and ranging (SONAR) of radar, acoustic communication instead of radio, and acoustic imaging and tomography instead of microwave or optical imaging or X-ray tomography. Underwater acoustics is the science of sound in water (most commonly in the ocean) and encompasses not only the study of sound propagation, but also the masking of sound signals by interfering phenomenon and signal processing for extracting these signals from interference. This chapter we will present the basics physics of ocean acoustics and then discuss applications.

  4. Acoustic energy density distribution and sound intensity vector field inside coupled spaces.

    PubMed

    Meissner, Mirosław

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, the modal expansion method supported by a computer implementation has been used to predict steady-state distributions of the potential and kinetic energy densities, and the active and reactive sound intensities inside two coupled enclosures. The numerical study was dedicated to low-frequency room responses. Calculation results have shown that the distribution of energetic quantities in coupled spaces is strongly influenced by the modal localization. Appropriate descriptors of the localization effect were introduced to identify localized modes. As was evidenced by numerical data, the characteristic objects in the active intensity field are vortices positioned irregularly inside the room. It was found that vortex centers lie exactly on the lines corresponding to zeros of the eigenfunction for a dominant mode. Finally, an impact of the wall impedance on the quantitative relationship between the active and reactive intensities was analyzed and it was concluded that for very small sound damping the behavior of the sound intensity inside the room space is essentially only oscillatory. PMID:22779472

  5. Perfect and broadband acoustic absorption by critically coupled sub-wavelength resonators.

    PubMed

    Romero-García, V; Theocharis, G; Richoux, O; Merkel, A; Tournat, V; Pagneux, V

    2016-01-01

    Perfect absorption is an interdisciplinary topic with a large number of applications, the challenge of which consists of broadening its inherently narrow frequency-band performance. We experimentally and analytically report perfect and broadband absorption for audible sound, by the mechanism of critical coupling, with a sub-wavelength multi-resonant scatterer (SMRS) made of a plate-resonator/closed waveguide structure. In order to introduce the role of the key parameters, we first present the case of a single resonant scatterer (SRS) made of a Helmholtz resonator/closed waveguide structure. In both cases the controlled balance between the energy leakage of the several resonances and the inherent losses of the system leads to perfect absorption peaks. In the case of the SMRS we show that systems with large inherent losses can be critically coupled using resonances with large leakage. In particular, we show that in the SMRS system, with a thickness of λ/12 and diameter of λ/7, several perfect absorption peaks overlap to produce absorption bigger than 93% for frequencies that extend over a factor of 2 in audible frequencies. The reported concepts and methodology provide guidelines for the design of broadband perfect absorbers which could contribute to solve the major issue of noise reduction. PMID:26781863

  6. Perfect and broadband acoustic absorption by critically coupled sub-wavelength resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero-García, V.; Theocharis, G.; Richoux, O.; Merkel, A.; Tournat, V.; Pagneux, V.

    2016-01-01

    Perfect absorption is an interdisciplinary topic with a large number of applications, the challenge of which consists of broadening its inherently narrow frequency-band performance. We experimentally and analytically report perfect and broadband absorption for audible sound, by the mechanism of critical coupling, with a sub-wavelength multi-resonant scatterer (SMRS) made of a plate-resonator/closed waveguide structure. In order to introduce the role of the key parameters, we first present the case of a single resonant scatterer (SRS) made of a Helmholtz resonator/closed waveguide structure. In both cases the controlled balance between the energy leakage of the several resonances and the inherent losses of the system leads to perfect absorption peaks. In the case of the SMRS we show that systems with large inherent losses can be critically coupled using resonances with large leakage. In particular, we show that in the SMRS system, with a thickness of λ/12 and diameter of λ/7, several perfect absorption peaks overlap to produce absorption bigger than 93% for frequencies that extend over a factor of 2 in audible frequencies. The reported concepts and methodology provide guidelines for the design of broadband perfect absorbers which could contribute to solve the major issue of noise reduction.

  7. Perfect and broadband acoustic absorption by critically coupled sub-wavelength resonators

    PubMed Central

    Romero-García, V.; Theocharis, G.; Richoux, O.; Merkel, A.; Tournat, V.; Pagneux, V.

    2016-01-01

    Perfect absorption is an interdisciplinary topic with a large number of applications, the challenge of which consists of broadening its inherently narrow frequency-band performance. We experimentally and analytically report perfect and broadband absorption for audible sound, by the mechanism of critical coupling, with a sub-wavelength multi-resonant scatterer (SMRS) made of a plate-resonator/closed waveguide structure. In order to introduce the role of the key parameters, we first present the case of a single resonant scatterer (SRS) made of a Helmholtz resonator/closed waveguide structure. In both cases the controlled balance between the energy leakage of the several resonances and the inherent losses of the system leads to perfect absorption peaks. In the case of the SMRS we show that systems with large inherent losses can be critically coupled using resonances with large leakage. In particular, we show that in the SMRS system, with a thickness of λ/12 and diameter of λ/7, several perfect absorption peaks overlap to produce absorption bigger than 93% for frequencies that extend over a factor of 2 in audible frequencies. The reported concepts and methodology provide guidelines for the design of broadband perfect absorbers which could contribute to solve the major issue of noise reduction. PMID:26781863

  8. Animal study assessing safety of an acoustic coupling fluid that holds the potential to avoid surgically induced artifacts in 3D ultrasound guided operations

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Use of ultrasound in brain tumor surgery is common. The difference in attenuation between brain and isotonic saline may cause artifacts that degrade the ultrasound images, potentially affecting resection grades and safety. Our research group has developed an acoustic coupling fluid that attenuates ultrasound energy like the normal brain. We aimed to test in animals if the newly developed acoustic coupling fluid may have harmful effects. Methods Eight rats were included for intraparenchymal injection into the brain, and if no adverse reactions were detected, 6 pigs were to be included with injection of the coupling fluid into the subarachnoid space. Animal behavior, EEG registrations, histopathology and immunohistochemistry were used in assessment. Results In total, 14 animals were included, 8 rats and 6 pigs. We did not detect any clinical adverse effects, seizure activity on EEG or histopathological signs of tissue damage. Conclusion The novel acoustic coupling fluid intended for brain tumor surgery appears safe in rats and pigs under the tested circumstances. PMID:24666721

  9. Coupled High Speed Imaging and Seismo-Acoustic Recordings of Strombolian Explosions at Etna, July 2014: Implications for Source Processes and Signal Inversions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taddeucci, J.; Del Bello, E.; Scarlato, P.; Ricci, T.; Andronico, D.; Kueppers, U.; Cannata, A.; Sesterhenn, J.; Spina, L.

    2015-12-01

    Seismic and acoustic surveillance is routinely performed at several persistent activity volcanoes worldwide. However, interpretation of the signals associated with explosive activity is still equivocal, due to both source variability and the intrinsically limited information carried by the waves. Comparison and cross-correlation of the geophysical quantities with other information in general and visual recording in particular is therefore actively sought. At Etna (Italy) in July 2014, short-lived Strombolian explosions ejected bomb- to lapilli-sized, molten pyroclasts at a remarkably repeatable time interval of about two seconds, offering a rare occasion to systematically investigate the seismic and acoustic fields radiated by this common volcanic source. We deployed FAMoUS (FAst, MUltiparametric Setup for the study of explosive activity) at 260 meters from the vents, recording more than 60 explosions in thermal and visible high-speed videos (50 to 500 frames per second) and broadband seismic and acoustic instruments (1 to 10000 Hz for the acoustic and from 0.01 to 30 Hz for the seismic). Analysis of this dataset highlights nonlinear relationships between the exit velocity and mass of ejecta and the amplitude and frequency of the acoustic signals. It also allows comparing different methods to estimate source depth, and to validate existing theory on the coupling of airwaves with ground motion.

  10. Thin broadband noise absorption through acoustic reactance control by electro-mechanical coupling without sensor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yumin; Chan, Yum-Ji; Huang, Lixi

    2014-05-01

    Broadband noise with profound low-frequency profile is prevalent and difficult to be controlled mechanically. This study demonstrates effective broadband sound absorption by reducing the mechanical reactance of a loudspeaker using a shunt circuit through electro-mechanical coupling, which induces reactance with different signs from that of loudspeaker. An RLC shunt circuit is connected to the moving coil to provide an electrically induced mechanical impedance which counters the cavity stiffness at low frequencies and reduces the system inertia above the resonance frequency. A sound absorption coefficient well above 0.5 is demonstrated across frequencies between 150 and 1200 Hz. The performance of the proposed device is superior to existing passive absorbers of the same depth (60 mm), which has lower frequency limits of around 300 Hz. A passive noise absorber is further proposed by paralleling a micro-perforated panel with shunted loudspeaker which shows potentials in absorbing band-limit impulse noise. PMID:24815257

  11. An investigation of polarization cross-coupling in air-core photonic bandgap fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaobin; Song, Ningfang; Zhang, Zhihao; Zhang, Zuchen; Jin, Jing; Zhang, Chunxi

    2016-05-01

    Polarization cross-coupling is one of the most important problems in air-core photonic bandgap fibers (PBF). In this research, polarization cross-coupling is investigated for PBFs of different lengths. The analyzing and simulation results show that the orientation of the birefringent axes induced by residual core ellipticity fluctuates with an average period of ~2.5 cm and random angles uniformly distributed over approximately [-7.5°, 7.5°]. The birefringent orientation in PBF varies much more frequently and strongly than that in any conventional fiber because of the difference in drawing process, and this is the most important factor causing the strong polarization cross-coupling in PBFs.

  12. Ground-coupled acoustic airwaves from Mount St. Helens provide constraints on the May 18, 1980 eruption

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, J.B.; Malone, S.D.

    2007-01-01

    The May 18, 1980 Mount St. Helens eruption perturbed the atmosphere and generated atmosphere-to-ground coupled airwaves, which were recorded on at least 35 seismometers operated by the Pacific Northwest Seismograph Network (PNSN). From 102 distinct travel time picks we identify coherent airwaves crossing Washington State primarily to the north and east of the volcano. The travel time curves provide evidence for both stratospheric refractions (at 200 to 300 km from the volcano) as well as probable thermospheric refractions (at 100 to 350 km). The very few first-hand reports of audible volcano sounds within about 80 km of the volcano coincide with a general absence of ground-coupled acoustic arrivals registered within about 100 km and are attributed to upward refraction of sound waves. From the coherent refracted airwave arrivals, we identify at least four distinct sources which we infer to originate 10 s, 114 s, ∼ 180 s and 319 s after the onset of an 8:32:11 PDT landslide. The first of these sources is attributed to resultant depressurization and explosion of the cryptodome. Most of the subsequent arrivals also appear to be coincident with a source located at or near the presumed volcanic conduit, but at least one of the later arrivals suggests an epicenter displaced about 9 km to the northwest of the vent. This dislocation is compatible with the direction of the sector collapse and lateral blast. We speculate that this concussion corresponds to a northern explosion event associated with hot cryptodome entering the Toutle River Valley.

  13. Ground-coupled acoustic airwaves from Mount St. Helens provide constraints on the May 18, 1980 eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Jeffrey B.; Malone, Stephen D.

    2007-06-01

    The May 18, 1980 Mount St. Helens eruption perturbed the atmosphere and generated atmosphere-to-ground coupled airwaves, which were recorded on at least 35 seismometers operated by the Pacific Northwest Seismograph Network (PNSN). From 102 distinct travel time picks we identify coherent airwaves crossing Washington State primarily to the north and east of the volcano. The travel time curves provide evidence for both stratospheric refractions (at 200 to 300 km from the volcano) as well as probable thermospheric refractions (at 100 to 350 km). The very few first-hand reports of audible volcano sounds within about 80 km of the volcano coincide with a general absence of ground-coupled acoustic arrivals registered within about 100 km and are attributed to upward refraction of sound waves. From the coherent refracted airwave arrivals, we identify at least four distinct sources which we infer to originate 10 s, 114 s, ˜ 180 s and 319 s after the onset of an 8:32:11 PDT landslide. The first of these sources is attributed to resultant depressurization and explosion of the cryptodome. Most of the subsequent arrivals also appear to be coincident with a source located at or near the presumed volcanic conduit, but at least one of the later arrivals suggests an epicenter displaced about 9 km to the northwest of the vent. This dislocation is compatible with the direction of the sector collapse and lateral blast. We speculate that this concussion corresponds to a northern explosion event associated with hot cryptodome entering the Toutle River Valley.

  14. Inverse material identification in coupled acoustic-structure interaction using a modified error in constitutive equation functional

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, James E.; Diaz, Manuel I.; Aquino, Wilkins; Bonnet, Marc

    2014-09-01

    This work focuses on the identification of heterogeneous linear elastic moduli in the context of frequency-domain, coupled acoustic-structure interaction (ASI), using either solid displacement or fluid pressure measurement data. The approach postulates the inverse problem as an optimization problem where the solution is obtained by minimizing a modified error in constitutive equation (MECE) functional. The latter measures the discrepancy in the constitutive equations that connect kinematically admissible strains and dynamically admissible stresses, while incorporating the measurement data as additional quadratic error terms. We demonstrate two strategies for selecting the MECE weighting coefficient to produce regularized solutions to the ill-posed identification problem: 1) the discrepancy principle of Morozov, and 2) an error-balance approach that selects the weight parameter as the minimizer of another functional involving the ECE and the data misfit. Numerical results demonstrate that the proposed methodology can successfully recover elastic parameters in 2D and 3D ASI systems from response measurements taken in either the solid or fluid subdomains. Furthermore, both regularization strategies are shown to produce accurate reconstructions when the measurement data is polluted with noise. The discrepancy principle is shown to produce nearly optimal solutions, while the error-balance approach, although not optimal, remains effective and does not need a priori information on the noise level.

  15. Semi-real-time monitoring of cracking on couplings by neural network analysis of acoustic emission signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godinez-Azcuaga, Valery F.; Shu, Fong; Finlayson, Richard D.; O'Donnell, Bruce W.

    2004-07-01

    This paper presents the results obtained during the development of a semi-real-time monitoring methodology based on Neural Network Pattern Recognition of Acoustic Emission (AE) signals for early detection of cracks in couplings used in aircraft and engine drive systems. AE signals were collected in order to establish a baseline of a gear-testing fixture background noise and its variations due to rotational speed and torque. Also, simulated cracking signals immersed in background noise were collected. EDM notches were machined in the driving gear and the load on the gearbox was increased until damaged was induced. Using these data, a Neural Network Signal Classifier (NNSC) was implemented and tested. The testing showed that the NNSC was capable of correctly identifying six different classes of AE signals corresponding to different gearbox operation conditions. Also, a semi-real-time classification software was implemented. This software includes functions that allow the user to view and classify AE data from a dynamic process as they are recorded at programmable time intervals. The software is capable of monitoring periodic statistics of AE data, which can be used as an indicator of damage presence and severity in a dynamic system. The semi-real-time classification software was successfully tested in situations where a delay of 10 seconds between data acquisition and classification was achieved with a hit rate of 50 hits/second per channel on eight active AE channels.

  16. Treatment of acoustic fluid-structure interaction by Localized Lagrange Multipliers and comparison to alternative interface coupling methods.

    SciTech Connect

    Felippa, Carlos A.; Sprague, Michael A.; Ross, Michael R.; Park, K. C.

    2008-11-01

    This paper is a sequel on the topic of localized Lagrange multipliers (LLM) for applications of fluid-structure interaction (FSI) between finite-element models of an acoustic fluid and an elastic structure. The prequel paper formulated the spatial-discretization methods, the LLM interface treatment, the time-marching partitioned analysis procedures, and the application to 1D benchmark problems. Here, we expand on formulation aspects required for successful application to more realistic 2D and 3D problems. Additional topics include duality relations at the fluid-structure interface, partitioned vibration analysis, reduced-order modeling, handling of curved interface surfaces, and comparison of LLM with other coupling methods. Emphasis is given to non-matching fluid-structure meshes. We present benchmark examples that illustrate the benefits and drawbacks of competing interface treatments. Realistic application problems involving the seismic response of two existing dams are considered. These include 2D modal analyses of the Koyna gravity dam, transient-response analyses of that dam with and without reduced-order modeling, incorporation of nonlinear cavitation effects, and the 3D transient-response analysis of the Morrow Point arch dam.

  17. Inverse Material Identification in Coupled Acoustic-Structure Interaction using a Modified Error in Constitutive Equation Functional

    PubMed Central

    Warner, James E.; Diaz, Manuel I.; Aquino, Wilkins; Bonnet, Marc

    2014-01-01

    This work focuses on the identification of heterogeneous linear elastic moduli in the context of frequency-domain, coupled acoustic-structure interaction (ASI), using either solid displacement or fluid pressure measurement data. The approach postulates the inverse problem as an optimization problem where the solution is obtained by minimizing a modified error in constitutive equation (MECE) functional. The latter measures the discrepancy in the constitutive equations that connect kinematically admissible strains and dynamically admissible stresses, while incorporating the measurement data as additional quadratic error terms. We demonstrate two strategies for selecting the MECE weighting coefficient to produce regularized solutions to the ill-posed identification problem: 1) the discrepancy principle of Morozov, and 2) an error-balance approach that selects the weight parameter as the minimizer of another functional involving the ECE and the data misfit. Numerical results demonstrate that the proposed methodology can successfully recover elastic parameters in 2D and 3D ASI systems from response measurements taken in either the solid or fluid subdomains. Furthermore, both regularization strategies are shown to produce accurate reconstructions when the measurement data is polluted with noise. The discrepancy principle is shown to produce nearly optimal solutions, while the error-balance approach, although not optimal, remains effective and does not need a priori information on the noise level. PMID:25339790

  18. Comparison of air-coupled GPR data analysis results determined by multiple analysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martino, Nicole; Maser, Ken

    2016-04-01

    Current bridge deck condition assessments using ground penetrating radar (GPR) requires a trained analyst to manually interpret substructure layering information from B-scan images in order to proceed with an intended analysis (pavement thickness, concrete cover, effects of rebar corrosion, etc.) For example, a recently developed method to rapidly and accurately analyze air-coupled GPR data based on the effects of rebar corrosion, requires that a user "picks" a layer of rebar reflections in each B-scan image collected along the length of the deck. These "picks" have information like signal amplitude and two way travel time. When a deck is new, or has little rebar corrosion, the resulting layer of rebar reflections is readily evident and there is little room for subjectivity. However, when a deck is severely deteriorated, the rebar layer may be difficult to identify, and different analysts may make different interpretations of the appropriate layer to analyze. One highly corroded bridge deck, was assessed with a number of nondestructive evaluation techniques including 2GHz air-coupled GPR. Two trained analysts separately selected the rebar layer in each B-scan image, choosing as much information as possible, even in areas of significant deterioration. The post processing of the selected data points was then completed and the results from each analyst were contour plotted to observe any discrepancies. The paper describes the differences between ground coupled and air-coupled GPR systems, the data collection and analysis methods used by two different analysts for one case study, and the results of the two different analyses.

  19. Acoustic calibration apparatus for calibrating plethysmographic acoustic pressure sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, Allan J. (Inventor); Davis, David C. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    An apparatus for calibrating an acoustic sensor is described. The apparatus includes a transmission material having an acoustic impedance approximately matching the acoustic impedance of the actual acoustic medium existing when the acoustic sensor is applied in actual in-service conditions. An elastic container holds the transmission material. A first sensor is coupled to the container at a first location on the container and a second sensor coupled to the container at a second location on the container, the second location being different from the first location. A sound producing device is coupled to the container and transmits acoustic signals inside the container.

  20. The effect of the coupling between the top plate and the fingerboard on the acoustic power radiated by a classical guitar (L).

    PubMed

    García-Mayén, Héctor; Santillán, Arturo

    2011-03-01

    An experimental investigation on the coupling between the fingerboard and the top plate of a classical guitar at low frequencies is presented. The study was carried out using a finished top plate under fixed boundary conditions and a commercial guitar. Radiated sound power was determined in one-third octave bands up to the band of 1 kHz based on measurements of sound intensity. The results provide evidence that the way in which the fingerboard and top plate are coupled is not a relevant factor in the radiated acoustic power of the classical guitar in the studied frequency range. PMID:21428477

  1. Acoustic transducer for acoustic microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T.; Chou, Ching H.

    1990-01-01

    A shear acoustic transducer-lens system in which a shear polarized piezoelectric material excites shear polarized waves at one end of a buffer rod having a lens at the other end which excites longitudinal waves in a coupling medium by mode conversion at selected locations on the lens.

  2. Acoustic transducer for acoustic microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Khuri-Yakub, B.T.; Chou, C.H.

    1990-03-20

    A shear acoustic transducer-lens system is described in which a shear polarized piezoelectric material excites shear polarized waves at one end of a buffer rod having a lens at the other end which excites longitudinal waves in a coupling medium by mode conversion at selected locations on the lens. 9 figs.

  3. Sub-10-fs population inversion in N2+ in air lasing through multiple state coupling

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Huailiang; Lötstedt, Erik; Iwasaki, Atsushi; Yamanouchi, Kaoru

    2015-01-01

    Laser filamentation generated when intense laser pulses propagate in air has been an attractive phenomenon having a variety of potential applications such as detection and spectroscopy of gases at far distant places. It was discovered recently that the filamentation in air induces ‘lasing', showing that electronically excited N2+ is population-inverted, exhibiting marked contrast to the common understanding that molecular ions generated by intense laser fields are prepared mostly in their electronic ground states. Here, to clarify the mechanism of the population inversion, we adopt few-cycle laser pulses, and experimentally demonstrate that the lasing at 391 nm occurs instantaneously after N2+ is produced. Numerical simulations clarify that the population inversion is realized by the post-ionization couplings among the lowest three electronic states of N2+. Our results shed light on the controversy over the mechanism of the air lasing, and show that this post-ionization coupling can be a general mechanism of the atmospheric lasing. PMID:26403139

  4. Damage imaging in a laminated composite plate using an air-coupled time reversal mirror

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Le Bas, P. -Y.; Remillieux, M. C.; Pieczonka, L.; Ten Cate, J. A.; Anderson, B. E.; Ulrich, T. J.

    2015-11-03

    We demonstrate the possibility of selectively imaging the features of a barely visible impact damage in a laminated composite plate by using an air-coupled time reversal mirror. The mirror consists of a number of piezoelectric transducers affixed to wedges of power law profiles, which act as unconventional matching layers. The transducers are enclosed in a hollow reverberant cavity with an opening to allow progressive emission of the ultrasonic wave field towards the composite plate. The principle of time reversal is used to focus elastic waves at each point of a scanning grid spanning the surface of the plate, thus allowingmore » localized inspection at each of these points. The proposed device and signal processing removes the need to be in direct contact with the plate and reveals the same features as vibrothermography and more features than a C-scan. More importantly, this device can decouple the features of the defect according to their orientation, by selectively focusing vector components of motion into the object, through air. For instance, a delamination can be imaged in one experiment using out-of-plane focusing, whereas a crack can be imaged in a separate experiment using in-plane focusing. As a result, this capability, inherited from the principle of time reversal, cannot be found in conventional air-coupled transducers.« less

  5. Damage imaging in a laminated composite plate using an air-coupled time reversal mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Le Bas, P. -Y.; Remillieux, M. C.; Pieczonka, L.; Ten Cate, J. A.; Anderson, B. E.; Ulrich, T. J.

    2015-11-03

    We demonstrate the possibility of selectively imaging the features of a barely visible impact damage in a laminated composite plate by using an air-coupled time reversal mirror. The mirror consists of a number of piezoelectric transducers affixed to wedges of power law profiles, which act as unconventional matching layers. The transducers are enclosed in a hollow reverberant cavity with an opening to allow progressive emission of the ultrasonic wave field towards the composite plate. The principle of time reversal is used to focus elastic waves at each point of a scanning grid spanning the surface of the plate, thus allowing localized inspection at each of these points. The proposed device and signal processing removes the need to be in direct contact with the plate and reveals the same features as vibrothermography and more features than a C-scan. More importantly, this device can decouple the features of the defect according to their orientation, by selectively focusing vector components of motion into the object, through air. For instance, a delamination can be imaged in one experiment using out-of-plane focusing, whereas a crack can be imaged in a separate experiment using in-plane focusing. As a result, this capability, inherited from the principle of time reversal, cannot be found in conventional air-coupled transducers.

  6. Damage imaging in a laminated composite plate using an air-coupled time reversal mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Bas, P.-Y.; Remillieux, M. C.; Pieczonka, L.; Ten Cate, J. A.; Anderson, B. E.; Ulrich, T. J.

    2015-11-01

    We demonstrate the possibility of selectively imaging the features of a barely visible impact damage in a laminated composite plate by using an air-coupled time reversal mirror. The mirror consists of a number of piezoelectric transducers affixed to wedges of power law profiles, which act as unconventional matching layers. The transducers are enclosed in a hollow reverberant cavity with an opening to allow progressive emission of the ultrasonic wave field towards the composite plate. The principle of time reversal is used to focus elastic waves at each point of a scanning grid spanning the surface of the plate, thus allowing localized inspection at each of these points. The proposed device and signal processing removes the need to be in direct contact with the plate and reveals the same features as vibrothermography and more features than a C-scan. More importantly, this device can decouple the features of the defect according to their orientation, by selectively focusing vector components of motion into the object, through air. For instance, a delamination can be imaged in one experiment using out-of-plane focusing, whereas a crack can be imaged in a separate experiment using in-plane focusing. This capability, inherited from the principle of time reversal, cannot be found in conventional air-coupled transducers.

  7. Acoustic radiation force on an air bubble and soft fluid spheres in ideal liquids: Example of a high-order Bessel beam of quasi-standing waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitri, F. G.

    2009-04-01

    The partial wave series for the scattering of a high-order Bessel beam (HOBB) of acoustic quasi-standing waves by an air bubble and fluid spheres immersed in water and centered on the axis of the beam is applied to the calculation of the acoustic radiation force. A HOBB refers to a type of beam having an axial amplitude null and an azimuthal phase gradient. Radiation force examples obtained through numerical evaluation of the radiation force function are computed for an air bubble, a hexane, a red blood and mercury fluid spheres in water. The examples were selected to illustrate conditions having progressive, standing and quasi-standing waves with appropriate selection of the waves’ amplitude ratio. An especially noteworthy result is the lack of a specific vibrational mode contribution to the radiation force determined by appropriate selection of the HOBB parameters.

  8. Non-contact optoacoustic imaging by raster scanning a piezoelectric air-coupled transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deán-Ben, X. Luís.; Pang, Genny A.; Montero de Espinosa, Francisco; Razansky, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    Optoacoustic techniques rely on ultrasound transmission between optical absorbers within tissues and the measurement location. Much like in echography, commonly used piezoelectric transducers require either direct contact with the tissue or through a liquid coupling medium. The contact nature of this detection approach then represents a disadvantage of standard optoacoustic systems with respect to other imaging modalities (including optical techniques) in applications where non-contact imaging is needed, e.g. in open surgeries or when burns or other lesions are present in the skin. Herein, non-contact optoacoustic imaging using raster-scanning of a spherically-focused piezoelectric air-coupled ultrasound transducer is demonstrated. When employing laser fluence levels not exceeding the maximal permissible human exposure, it is shown possible to attain detectable signals from objects as small as 1 mm having absorption properties representative of blood at near-infrared wavelengths with a relatively low number of averages. Optoacoustic images from vessel-mimicking tubes embedded in an agar phantom are further showcased. The initial results indicate that the air-coupled ultrasound detection approach can be potentially made suitable for non-contact biomedical imaging with optoacoustics.

  9. Effect of Air-Sea coupling on the Frequency Distribution of Intense Tropical Cyclones over the Northwestern Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogata, Tomomichi; Mizuta, Ryo; Adachi, Yukimasa; Murakami, Hiroyuki; Ose, Tomomaki

    2016-04-01

    Effect of air-sea coupling on the frequency distribution of intense tropical cyclones (TCs) over the northwestern Pacific (NWP) region is investigated using an atmosphere and ocean coupled general circulation model (AOGCM). Monthly varying flux adjustment enables AOGCM to simulate both subseasonal air-sea interaction and realistic seasonal to interannual SST variability. The maximum of intense TC distribution around 20-30°N in the AGCM shifts equatorward in the AOGCM due to the air-sea coupling. Hence AOGCM reduces northward intense TC distribution bias seen in AGCM. Over the NWP, AOGCM-simulated SST variability is large around 20-30°N where the warm mixed layer becomes shallower rapidly. Active entrainment from subsurface water over this region causes stronger SST cooling and hence TC intensity decreases. These results suggest that air-sea coupling characterized by subsurface oceanic condition causes more realistic distribution of intense TCs over the NWP.

  10. Effect of air-sea coupling on the frequency distribution of intense tropical cyclones over the northwestern Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogata, Tomomichi; Mizuta, Ryo; Adachi, Yukimasa; Murakami, Hiroyuki; Ose, Tomoaki

    2015-12-01

    Effect of air-sea coupling on the frequency distribution of intense tropical cyclones (TCs) over the northwestern Pacific (NWP) region is investigated using an atmosphere and ocean coupled general circulation model (AOGCM). Monthly varying flux adjustment enables AOGCM to simulate both subseasonal air-sea interaction and realistic seasonal to interannual sea surface temperature (SST) variability. The maximum of intense TC distribution around 20-30°N in the AGCM shifts equatorward in the AOGCM due to the air-sea coupling. Hence, AOGCM reduces northward intense TC distribution bias seen in AGCM. Over the NWP, AOGCM-simulated SST variability is large around 20-30°N where the warm mixed layer becomes shallower rapidly. Active entrainment from subsurface water over this region causes stronger SST cooling, and hence, TC intensity decreases. These results suggest that air-sea coupling characterized by subsurface oceanic condition causes more realistic distribution of intense TCs over the NWP.

  11. 3-D Surface Depression Profiling Using High Frequency Focused Air-Coupled Ultrasonic Pulses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Don J.; Kautz, Harold E.; Abel, Phillip B.; Whalen, Mike F.; Hendricks, J. Lynne; Bodis, James R.

    1999-01-01

    Surface topography is an important variable in the performance of many industrial components and is normally measured with diamond-tip profilometry over a small area or using optical scattering methods for larger area measurement. This article shows quantitative surface topography profiles as obtained using only high-frequency focused air-coupled ultrasonic pulses. The profiles were obtained using a profiling system developed by NASA Glenn Research Center and Sonix, Inc (via a formal cooperative agreement). (The air transducers are available as off-the-shelf items from several companies.) The method is simple and reproducible because it relies mainly on knowledge and constancy of the sound velocity through the air. The air transducer is scanned across the surface and sends pulses to the sample surface where they are reflected back from the surface along the same path as the incident wave. Time-of-flight images of the sample surface are acquired and converted to depth/surface profile images using the simple relation (d = V*t/2) between distance (d), time-of-flight (t), and the velocity of sound in air (V). The system has the ability to resolve surface depression variations as small as 25 microns, is useable over a 1.4 mm vertical depth range, and can profile large areas only limited by the scan limits of the particular ultrasonic system. (Best-case depth resolution is 0.25 microns which may be achievable with improved isolation from vibration and air currents.) The method using an optimized configuration is reasonably rapid and has all quantitative analysis facilities on-line including 2-D and 3-D visualization capability, extreme value filtering (for faulty data), and leveling capability. Air-coupled surface profilometry is applicable to plate-like and curved samples. In this article, results are shown for several proof-of-concept samples, plastic samples burned in microgravity on the STS-54 space shuttle mission, and a partially-coated cylindrical ceramic

  12. Optimal coupling and feasibility of a solar-powered year-round ejector air conditioner

    SciTech Connect

    Sokolov, M.; Hershgal, D. )

    1993-06-01

    An ejector refrigeration system that uses a conventional refrigerant (R-114) is introduced as a possible mechanism for providing solar-based air-conditioning. Optimal coupling conditions between the collectors' energy output and energy requirements of the cooling system, are investigated. Operation at such optimal conditions assures maximized overall efficiency. Procedures leading to the evaluation of the performance of a real system are disclosed. Design curves for such a system with R-114 as refrigerant are provided. A multi-ejectors arrangement that provides an efficient adjustment for variations of ambient conditions, is described. Year-round air-conditioning is facilitated by rerouting the refrigerant flow through a heating mode of the system. Calculations are carried out for illustrative configurations in which relatively low condensing temperature (water reservoirs, cooling towers, or moderate climate) can be maintained.

  13. Coupling of phytoplankton uptake and air-water exchange of persistent organic pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Dachs, J.; Eisenreich, S.J.; Baker, J.E.; Ko, F.C.; Jeremiason, J.D.

    1999-10-15

    A dynamic model that couples air-water exchange and phytoplankton uptake of persistent organic pollutants has been developed and then applied to PCB data from a small experimental lake. A sensitivity analysis of the model, taking into account the influence of physical environmental conditions such as temperature, wind speed, and mixing depth as well as plankton-related parameters such as biomass and growth rate was carried out for a number of PCBs with different physical-chemical properties. The results indicate that air-water exchange dynamics are influenced not only by physical parameters but also by phytoplankton biomass and growth rate. New phytoplankton production results in substantially longer times to reach equilibrium. Phytoplankton uptake-induced depletion of the dissolved phase concentration maintains air and water phases out of equilibrium. Furthermore, PCBs in phytoplankton also take longer times to reach equilibrium with the dissolved water phase when the latter is supported by diffusive air-water exchange. However, both model analysis and model application to the Experimental Lakes Area of northwestern Ontario (Canada) suggest that the gas phase supports the concentrations of persistent organic pollutants, such as PCBs, in atmospherically driven aquatic environments.

  14. Humidity and aggregate content correction factors for air-coupled ultrasonic evaluation of concrete.

    PubMed

    Berriman, J; Purnell, P; Hutchins, D A; Neild, A

    2005-02-01

    This paper describes the use of non-contact ultrasound for the evaluation of concrete. Micromachined capacitance transducers are used to transmit ultrasonic longitudinal chirp signals through concrete samples using air as the coupling medium, and a pulse compression technique is then employed for measurement of time of flight through the sample. The effect on the ultrasonic wave speed of storing concrete samples, made with the same water/cement ratio, at different humidity levels is investigated. It is shown that there is a correlation between humidity and speed of sound, allowing a correction factor for humidity to be derived. A strong positive linear correlation between aggregate content and speed of sound was then observed; there was no obvious correlation between compressive strength and speed of sound. The results from the non-contact system are compared with that from a contact system, and conclusions drawn concerning coupling of energy into the samples. PMID:15567195

  15. An air-coupled actuator array for active modal control of timpani

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rollow, Douglas; Sparrow, Victor W.; Swanson, David C.

    2005-09-01

    The timbral characteristics of kettledrums can be described by a modal formulation of the vibration of a thin, air-loaded membrane. Modification of the modal time history can be brought about with the use of a control system which has independent influence on each structural mode. By replacing the usual kettle with a shallow chamber and a planar array of piston sources, a modal controller is created when driving the sources in appropriate linear combinations. A theoretical formulation of active control of structural vibration by means of fluid-coupled actuators is expressed, and a Boundary Element simulation provides insight to the coupled modes, independence of control, and constraints due to the geometry of the chamber. Advantages and limitations of this type of control source to general problems in actively controlled musical instruments are explored.

  16. Air-coupled ultrasonic tomographic imaging of high-temperature flames.

    PubMed

    Gan, Tat Hean; Hutchins, David A

    2003-09-01

    This paper illustrates the use of air-coupled ultrasonic tomography for the measurement of a high-temperature flame from a natural gas burner, using capacitive ultrasonic transducers in through transmission. This uses a transducer pair, which is scanned in two-dimensional sections at several angles to the jet axis. Travel-time data then is recorded along various paths in counter-propagating directions. By processing the data obtained from propagation times, images have been formed of variations in temperature within the flame, using the tomographic reconstruction approach. PMID:14561039

  17. Noncontact monitoring of incision depth in laser surgery with air-coupled ultrasound transducers.

    PubMed

    Landa, Francisco Javier Oyaga; Deán-Ben, Xosé Luís; Montero de Espinosa, Francisco; Razansky, Daniel

    2016-06-15

    Lack of haptic feedback during laser surgery makes it difficult to control the incision depth, leading to high risk of undesired tissue damage. Here, we present a new feedback sensing method that accomplishes noncontact real-time monitoring of laser ablation procedures by detecting shock waves emanating from the ablation spot with air-coupled transducers. Experiments in soft and hard tissue samples attained high reproducibility in real-time depth estimation of the laser-induced cuts. The advantages derived from the noncontact nature of the suggested monitoring approach are expected to advance the general applicability of laser-based surgeries. PMID:27304268

  18. Acoustic background noise variation in Air Force platforms and its effect on noise removal algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafollette, Philip A.

    1991-06-01

    In this study of short-term noise variation in Air Force platforms, we followed two avenues of investigation. First, we applied quantitative measures of variation to individual noise recordings, and compared the results across various aircraft. Some measures used were simple descriptive statistics, but we also measured attenuation obtained by spectral restoration (spectral subtraction), applied to the noise signal alone. The noise attenuation obtained for real aircraft environments was in most cases about the same as predicted theoretically for white Gaussian noise, but in some instances was considerably higher, especially in the presence of propeller noise. Second, we applied the nonparametric Mann-Whitney statistic to test the stationarity of power spectrum estimates on time scales of 200 to 800 ms. There was little or no evidence of nonstationarity in large jet or turboprop aircraft. In fighter aircraft and helicopters, there was some evidence of nonstationarity confined to more or less narrow frequency ranges. The nonstationarity found did not appear to limit the performance of special restoration algorithms. The noise recordings used were taken from the RADC/EEV database of field recordings made in the E-3A, E-4B, EC-135, E-130, P-3C, F-15, F-16, F-4, A-10, HH-53 and Tornado aircraft.

  19. Air-structure coupling features analysis of mining contra-rotating axial flow fan cascade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Q. G.; Sun, W.; Li, F.; Zhang, Y. J.

    2013-12-01

    The interaction between contra-rotating axial flow fan blade and working gas has been studied by means of establishing air-structure coupling control equation and combining Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) and Computational solid mechanics (CSM). Based on the single flow channel model, the Finite Volume Method was used to make the field discrete. Additionally, the SIMPLE algorithm, the Standard k-ε model and the Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian dynamic grids technology were utilized to get the airflow motion by solving the discrete governing equations. At the same time, the Finite Element Method was used to make the field discrete to solve dynamic response characteristics of blade. Based on weak coupling method, data exchange from the fluid solver and the solid solver was processed on the coupling interface. Then interpolation was used to obtain the coupling characteristics. The results showed that the blade's maximum amplitude was on the tip of the last-stage blade and aerodynamic force signal could reflect the blade working conditions to some extent. By analyzing the flow regime in contra-rotating axial flow fan, it could be found that the vortex core region was mainly in the blade surface, the hub and the blade clearance. In those regions, the turbulence intensity was very high. The last-stage blade's operating life is shorter than that of the pre-stage blade due to the fatigue fracture occurs much more easily on the last-stage blade which bears more stress.

  20. Capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers based on annular cell geometry for air-coupled applications.

    PubMed

    Na, Shuai; Chen, Albert I H; Wong, Lawrence L P; Li, Zhenhao; Macecek, Mirek; Yeow, John T W

    2016-09-01

    A novel design of an air-coupled capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (CMUT) with annular cell geometry (annular CMUT) is proposed. Finite element analysis shows that an annular cell has a ratio of average-to-maximum displacement (RAMD) of 0.52-0.58 which is 58-76% higher than that of a conventional circular cell. The increased RAMD leads to a larger volume displacement which results in a 48.4% improved transmit sensitivity and 127.3% improved power intensity. Single-cell annular CMUTs were fabricated with 20-μm silicon plates on 13.7-μm deep and 1.35-mm wide annular cavities using the wafer bonding technique. The measured RAMD of the fabricated CMUTs is 0.54. The resonance frequency was measured to be 94.5kHz at 170-V DC bias. The transmit sensitivity was measured to be 33.83Pa/V and 25.85Pa/V when the CMUT was excited by a continuous wave and a 20-cycle burst, respectively. The receive sensitivity at 170-V DC bias was measured to be 7.7mV/Pa for a 20-cycle burst, and 15.0mV/Pa for a continuous incident wave. The proposed annular CMUT design demonstrates a significant improvement in transmit efficiency, which is an important parameter for air-coupled ultrasonic transducers. PMID:27352025

  1. Air-coupled ultrasonic testing of metal adhesively bonded joints using cellular polypropylene transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaal, Mate; Bartusch, Jürgen; Dohse, Elmar; Kreutzbruck, Marc; Amos, Jay

    2014-02-01

    Adhesively bonded aluminum components have been widely used in the aerospace industry for weight-efficient and damage-tolerant structures. Automated squirter jet immersion ultrasonic testing is a common inspection technique to assure the bond integrity of large, contoured assemblies. However, squirter jet inspection presents several limitations in scanning speed, related to water splash noise over protruding stiffeners and splash interference crosstalk in multi-channel inspection systems. Air-coupled ultrasonic testing has been evaluated as an alternative, possibly offering the benefits of increased throughput by enabling higher speeds, and eliminating the contamination concerns and maintenance issues of water couplant systems. Adhesive joints of multi-layer aluminum plates with artificial disbonds were inspected with novel air-coupled ultrasonic probes based on cellular polypropylene. Disbonds of various sizes were engineered in several multi-layer configurations and at various depths. Results were compared with squirter jet immersion and conventional piezoelectric transducer designs in terms of scan contrast, resolution and inspection time.

  2. Thermal imaging and air-coupled ultrasound characterization of a continuous-fiber ceramic composite panels.

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, J. G.; Easler, T. E.; Szweda, A.; Pillai, T. A. K.; Deemer, C.; Ellingson, W. A.

    1998-04-01

    SYLRAMIC{trademark} continuous fiber ceramic-matrix composites (Nicalon{trademark} fiber/SiNC matrix) were fabricated by Dow Corning Corporation with the polymer-impregnation and pyrolysis (PIP) process. The composite microstructure and its uniformity, and the completeness of infiltration during processing were studied as a function of number of PIP cycles. Two nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methods, i.e., infrared thermal imaging and air-coupled ultrasound (UT), were used to investigate flat composite panels of two thicknesses and various sizes. The thermal imaging method provided two-dimensional (2D) images of through-thickness thermal diffusivity distributions, and the air-coupled UT method provided 2D images of through-thickness ultrasonic transmission of the panel components. Results from both types of NDEs were compared at various PIP cycles during fabrication of the composites. A delaminated region was clearly detected and its progressive repair was monitored during processing. The NDE data were also correlated to results obtained from destructive characterization.

  3. Air

    MedlinePlus

    ... do to protect yourself from dirty air . Indoor air pollution and outdoor air pollution Air can be polluted indoors and it can ... this chart to see what things cause indoor air pollution and what things cause outdoor air pollution! Indoor ...

  4. Effects of strong electrostatic interaction on multi-dimensional instability of dust-acoustic solitary waves in a magnetized strongly coupled dusty plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahmansouri, M.; Mamun, A. A.

    2015-07-01

    The effects of strong electrostatic interaction among highly charged dust on multi-dimensional instability of dust-acoustic (DA) solitary waves in a magnetized strongly coupled dusty plasma by small- k perturbation expansion method have been investigated. We found that a Zakharov-Kuznetsov equation governs the evolution of obliquely propagating small amplitude DA solitary waves in such a strongly coupled dusty plasma. The parametric regimes for which the obliquely propagating DA solitary waves become unstable are identified. The basic properties, viz., amplitude, width, instability criterion, and growth rate, of these obliquely propagating DA solitary structures are found to be significantly modified by the effects of different physical strongly coupled dusty plasma parameters. The implications of our results in some space/astrophysical plasmas and some future laboratory experiments are briefly discussed.

  5. Acoustic biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Fogel, Ronen; Seshia, Ashwin A.

    2016-01-01

    Resonant and acoustic wave devices have been researched for several decades for application in the gravimetric sensing of a variety of biological and chemical analytes. These devices operate by coupling the measurand (e.g. analyte adsorption) as a modulation in the physical properties of the acoustic wave (e.g. resonant frequency, acoustic velocity, dissipation) that can then be correlated with the amount of adsorbed analyte. These devices can also be miniaturized with advantages in terms of cost, size and scalability, as well as potential additional features including integration with microfluidics and electronics, scaled sensitivities associated with smaller dimensions and higher operational frequencies, the ability to multiplex detection across arrays of hundreds of devices embedded in a single chip, increased throughput and the ability to interrogate a wider range of modes including within the same device. Additionally, device fabrication is often compatible with semiconductor volume batch manufacturing techniques enabling cost scalability and a high degree of precision and reproducibility in the manufacturing process. Integration with microfluidics handling also enables suitable sample pre-processing/separation/purification/amplification steps that could improve selectivity and the overall signal-to-noise ratio. Three device types are reviewed here: (i) bulk acoustic wave sensors, (ii) surface acoustic wave sensors, and (iii) micro/nano-electromechanical system (MEMS/NEMS) sensors. PMID:27365040

  6. Acoustic biosensors.

    PubMed

    Fogel, Ronen; Limson, Janice; Seshia, Ashwin A

    2016-06-30

    Resonant and acoustic wave devices have been researched for several decades for application in the gravimetric sensing of a variety of biological and chemical analytes. These devices operate by coupling the measurand (e.g. analyte adsorption) as a modulation in the physical properties of the acoustic wave (e.g. resonant frequency, acoustic velocity, dissipation) that can then be correlated with the amount of adsorbed analyte. These devices can also be miniaturized with advantages in terms of cost, size and scalability, as well as potential additional features including integration with microfluidics and electronics, scaled sensitivities associated with smaller dimensions and higher operational frequencies, the ability to multiplex detection across arrays of hundreds of devices embedded in a single chip, increased throughput and the ability to interrogate a wider range of modes including within the same device. Additionally, device fabrication is often compatible with semiconductor volume batch manufacturing techniques enabling cost scalability and a high degree of precision and reproducibility in the manufacturing process. Integration with microfluidics handling also enables suitable sample pre-processing/separation/purification/amplification steps that could improve selectivity and the overall signal-to-noise ratio. Three device types are reviewed here: (i) bulk acoustic wave sensors, (ii) surface acoustic wave sensors, and (iii) micro/nano-electromechanical system (MEMS/NEMS) sensors. PMID:27365040

  7. North Pacific Mesoscale Coupled Air-Ocean Simulations Compared with Observations

    SciTech Connect

    Koracin, Darko; Cerovecki, Ivana; Vellore, Ramesh; Mejia, John; Hatchett, Benjamin; McCord, Travis; McLean, Julie; Dorman, Clive

    2013-04-11

    Executive summary The main objective of the study was to investigate atmospheric and ocean interaction processes in the western Pacific and, in particular, effects of significant ocean heat loss in the Kuroshio and Kuroshio Extension regions on the lower and upper atmosphere. It is yet to be determined how significant are these processes are on climate scales. The understanding of these processes led us also to development of the methodology of coupling the Weather and Research Forecasting model with the Parallel Ocean Program model for western Pacific regional weather and climate simulations. We tested NCAR-developed research software Coupler 7 for coupling of the WRF and POP models and assessed its usability for regional-scale applications. We completed test simulations using the Coupler 7 framework, but implemented a standard WRF model code with options for both one- and two-way mode coupling. This type of coupling will allow us to seamlessly incorporate new WRF updates and versions in the future. We also performed a long-term WRF simulation (15 years) covering the entire North Pacific as well as high-resolution simulations of a case study which included extreme ocean heat losses in the Kuroshio and Kuroshio Extension regions. Since the extreme ocean heat loss occurs during winter cold air outbreaks (CAO), we simulated and analyzed a case study of a severe CAO event in January 2000 in detail. We found that the ocean heat loss induced by CAOs is amplified by additional advection from mesocyclones forming on the southern part of the Japan Sea. Large scale synoptic patterns with anomalously strong anticyclone over Siberia and Mongolia, deep Aleutian Low, and the Pacific subtropical ridge are a crucial setup for the CAO. It was found that the onset of the CAO is related to the breaking of atmospheric Rossby waves and vertical transport of vorticity that facilitates meridional advection. The study also indicates that intrinsic parameterization of the surface fluxes

  8. Acoustic Emissions Reveal Combustion Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramohalli, D. N. R.; Seshan, P. K.

    1983-01-01

    Turbulent-flame acoustic emissions change with air/fuel ratio variations. Acoustic emissions sensed and processed to detect inefficient operation; control system responds by adjusting fuel/air mixture for greater efficiency. Useful for diagnosis of combustion processes and fuel/air control.

  9. High-order Hybridized Discontinuous Galerkin (HDG) method for wave propagation simulation in complex geophysical media (elastic, acoustic and hydro-acoustic); an unifying framework to couple continuous Spectral Element and Discontinuous Galerkin Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrana, Sebastien; Vilotte, Jean-Pierre; Guillot, Laurent; Mariotti, Christian

    2015-04-01

    Today seismological observation systems combine broadband seismic receivers, hydrophones and micro-barometers antenna that provide complementary observations of source-radiated waves in heterogeneous and complex geophysical media. Exploiting these observations requires accurate and multi-physics - elastic, hydro-acoustic, infrasonic - wave simulation methods. A popular approach is the Spectral Element Method (SEM) (Chaljub et al, 2006) which is high-order accurate (low dispersion error), very flexible to parallelization and computationally attractive due to efficient sum factorization technique and diagonal mass matrix. However SEMs suffer from lack of flexibility in handling complex geometry and multi-physics wave propagation. High-order Discontinuous Galerkin Methods (DGMs), i.e. Dumbser et al (2006), Etienne et al. (2010), Wilcox et al (2010), are recent alternatives that can handle complex geometry, space-and-time adaptativity, and allow efficient multi-physics wave coupling at interfaces. However, DGMs are more memory demanding and less computationally attractive than SEMs, especially when explicit time stepping is used. We propose a new class of higher-order Hybridized Discontinuous Galerkin Spectral Elements (HDGSEM) methods for spatial discretization of wave equations, following the unifying framework for hybridization of Cockburn et al (2009) and Nguyen et al (2011), which allows for a single implementation of conforming and non-conforming SEMs. When used with energy conserving explicit time integration schemes, HDGSEM is flexible to handle complex geometry, computationally attractive and has significantly less degrees of freedom than classical DGMs, i.e., the only coupled unknowns are the single-valued numerical traces of the velocity field on the element's faces. The formulation can be extended to model fractional energy loss at interfaces between elastic, acoustic and hydro-acoustic media. Accuracy and performance of the HDGSEM are illustrated and

  10. Off-resonance frequency operation for power transfer in a loosely coupled air core transformer

    DOEpatents

    Scudiere, Matthew B

    2012-11-13

    A power transmission system includes a loosely coupled air core transformer having a resonance frequency determined by a product of inductance and capacitance of a primary circuit including a primary coil. A secondary circuit is configured to have a substantially same product of inductance and capacitance. A back EMF generating device (e.g., a battery), which generates a back EMF with power transfer, is attached to the secondary circuit. Once the load power of the back EMF generating device exceeds a certain threshold level, which depends on the system parameters, the power transfer can be achieved at higher transfer efficiency if performed at an operating frequency less than the resonance frequency, which can be from 50% to 95% of the resonance frequency.

  11. Characterization of waviness in wind turbine blades using air coupled ultrasonics

    SciTech Connect

    Chakrapani, Sunil Kishore; Dayal, Vinay; Hsu, David K.; Barnard, Daniel J.; Gross, Andrew

    2011-06-23

    Waviness in glass fiber reinforced composite is of great interest in composite research, since it results in the loss of stiffness. Several NDE techniques have been used previously to detect waviness. This work is concerned with waves normal to the plies in a composite. Air-coupled ultrasonics was used to detect waviness in thick composites used in the manufacturing of wind turbine blades. Composite samples with different wave aspect ratios were studied. Different wavy samples were characterized, and a three step process was developed to make sure the technique is field implementable. This gives us a better understanding of the effect of waviness in thick composites, and how it affects the life and performance of the composite.

  12. Limitations of symmetry in FE modeling: A comparison of fem and air-coupled resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livings, R. A.; Dayal, V.; Barnard, D. J.; Hsu, D. K.

    2012-05-01

    It has long been an accepted practice to use symmetry in Finite Element Modeling. Whenever modeling a large structure, we turn to symmetry in order to significantly reduce the model size and computation time. But is symmetry always the solution to long computation times, and is it always accurate? This study is aimed at modeling a whole ceramic tile and several possible symmetric models under several different loading cases and comparing them to each other and Air-Coupled Ultrasonic scans to determine if the Finite Element Models can accurately predict the vibrational resonance patterns. The reason for the accuracy or inaccuracy will also be examined. The understanding of the limitations of using symmetry to model large structures will be very useful in all future modeling.

  13. Monitoring of Plant Light/Dark Cycles Using Air-coupled Ultrasonic Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fariñas, M. D.; Sancho-Knapik, D.; Peguero-Pina, J.; Gil-Pelegrín, E.; Álvarez-Arenas, T. E. G.

    This work presents the application of a technique based on the excitation, sensing and spectral analysis of leaves thickness resonances using air-coupled and wide-band ultrasound to monitor variations in leaves properties due to the plant response along light/dark cycles. The main features of these resonances are determined by the tautness of the cells walls in such a way that small modifications produced by variations in the transpiration rate, stomata aperture or water potential have a direct effect on the thickness resonances that can be measured in a completely non-invasive and contactless way. Results show that it is possible to monitor leaves changes due to variations in light intensity along the diurnal cycle, moreover, the technique reveals differences in the leaf response for different species and also within the same species but for specimens grown under different conditions that present different cell structures at the tissue level.

  14. Rapid non-contact inspection of composite ailerons using air-coupled ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panda, Rabi Sankar; Karpenko, Oleksii; Udpa, Lalita; Haq, Mahmoodul; Rajagopal, Prabhu; Balasubramaniam, Krishnan

    2016-02-01

    This paper demonstrates an approach for rapid non-contact air-coupled ultrasonic inspection of composite ailerons with complex cross-sectional profile including thickness changes, curvature and the presence of a number of stiffeners. Low-frequency plate guided ultrasonic modes are used in B-scan mode for the measurements in pitch-catch mode. Appropriate probe holder angles suitable for generating and receiving lower order guided wave modes are discussed. Different embodiments of the pitch-catch tandem positions along and across stiffener and curved regions of the test sample enable a rapid test campaign capturing the feature-rich sample profile. Techniques to distinguish special features in the stiffener are presented.

  15. Coupled Inertial Navigation and Flush Air Data Sensing Algorithm for Atmosphere Estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karlgaard, Christopher D.; Kutty, Prasad; Schoenenberger, Mark

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes an algorithm for atmospheric state estimation that is based on a coupling between inertial navigation and flush air data sensing pressure measurements. In this approach, the full navigation state is used in the atmospheric estimation algorithm along with the pressure measurements and a model of the surface pressure distribution to directly estimate atmospheric winds and density using a nonlinear weighted least-squares algorithm. The approach uses a high fidelity model of atmosphere stored in table-look-up form, along with simplified models of that are propagated along the trajectory within the algorithm to provide prior estimates and covariances to aid the air data state solution. Thus, the method is essentially a reduced-order Kalman filter in which the inertial states are taken from the navigation solution and atmospheric states are estimated in the filter. The algorithm is applied to data from the Mars Science Laboratory entry, descent, and landing from August 2012. Reasonable estimates of the atmosphere and winds are produced by the algorithm. The observability of winds along the trajectory are examined using an index based on the discrete-time observability Gramian and the pressure measurement sensitivity matrix. The results indicate that bank reversals are responsible for adding information content to the system. The algorithm is then applied to the design of the pressure measurement system for the Mars 2020 mission. The pressure port layout is optimized to maximize the observability of atmospheric states along the trajectory. Linear covariance analysis is performed to assess estimator performance for a given pressure measurement uncertainty. The results indicate that the new tightly-coupled estimator can produce enhanced estimates of atmospheric states when compared with existing algorithms.

  16. Comment on paper entitled, "An inversion of Freedman's 'image pulse' model in air". Acoust. Soc. Am. 119(2), 965-975 (2006).

    PubMed

    Hickling, Robert; Gaunaurd, Guillermo C

    2006-08-01

    Echolocation (i.e., perceiving objects using acoustic echoes) is well-known in underwater detection and to a lesser extent in robot guidance and machine perception. The paper by Tsakiris and McKerrow is concerned with machine perception in air using Freedman's asymptotic model, which was originally developed to predict the backscattering multiple-echo effect observed in sonar detection. This effect was subsequently shown to be due to the elastic response of underwater targets. Freedman's model can be used in air because the acoustic target is assumed to be rigid. Also, the model's prediction of multiple echoes can be used to obtain information about the shape of the target. This is the so-called inversion of the Freedman model by Tsakiris and McKerrow. In their paper, various simple bodies are tested in air using ultrasound and it is shown that the model provides relatively poor information about body shape. Several explanations are given. However, one explanation is not considered, namely that the model itself is not satisfactory. First, there is poor agreement with exact backscattering theory. Second, deriving information about target shape from the multiple echoes predicted by the model is a highly questionable procedure. Both these aspects are examined here. PMID:16938943

  17. Acoustic neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    Vestibular schwannoma; Tumor - acoustic; Cerebellopontine angle tumor; Angle tumor ... Acoustic neuromas have been linked with the genetic disorder neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2). Acoustic neuromas are uncommon.

  18. Experimental investigation and modeling of a direct-coupled PV/T air collector

    SciTech Connect

    Shahsavar, A.; Ameri, M.

    2010-11-15

    Photovoltaic/thermal (PV/T) systems refer to the integration of photovoltaic and solar thermal technologies into one single system, in that both useful heat energy and electricity are produced. The impetus of this paper is to model a direct-coupled PV/T air collector which is designed, built, and tested at a geographic location of Kerman, Iran. In this system, a thin aluminum sheet suspended at the middle of air channel is used to increase the heat exchange surface and consequently improve heat extraction from PV panels. This PV/T system is tested in natural convection and forced convection (with two, four and eight fans operating) and its unsteady results are presented in with and without glass cover cases. A theoretical model is developed and validated against experimental data, where good agreement between the measured values and those calculated by the simulation model were achieved. Comparisons are made between electrical performance of the different modes of operation, and it is concluded that there is an optimum number of fans for achieving maximum electrical efficiency. Also, results show that setting glass cover on photovoltaic panels leads to an increase in thermal efficiency and decrease in electrical efficiency of the system. (author)

  19. Electromagnetic wave attenuation measurements in a ring-shaped inductively coupled air plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xiaolong; Xu, Haojun; Li, Jianhai; Lin, Min; Su; Chen

    2015-05-01

    An aerocraft with the surface, inlet and radome covered large-area inductive coupled plasma (ICP) can attenuate its radar echo effectively. The shape, thickness, and electron density ( N e ) distribution of ICP are critical to electromagnetic wave attenuation. In the paper, an air all-quartz ICP generator in size of 20 × 20 × 7 cm3 without magnetic confinement is designed. The discharge results show that the ICP is amorphous in E-mode and ring-shaped in H-mode. The structure of ICP stratifies into core region and edge halo in H-mode, and its width and thickness changes from power and pressure. Such phenomena are explained by the distribution of RF magnetic field, the diffusion of negative ions plasma and the variation of skin depth. In addition, the theoretical analysis shows that the N e achieves nearly uniform within the electronegative core and sharply steepens in the edge. The N e of core region is diagnosed by microwave interferometer under varied conditions (pressure in range of 10-50 Pa, power in 300-700 W). Furthermore, the electromagnetic wave attenuation measurements were carried out with the air ICP in the frequencies of 4-5 GHz. The results show that the interspaced ICP is still effective to wave attenuation, and the wave attenuation increases with the power and pressure. The measured attenuation is approximately in accordance with the calculation data of finite-different time-domain simulations.

  20. Remediation of arsenic contaminated soil by coupling oxalate washing with subsequent ZVI/Air treatment.

    PubMed

    Cao, Menghua; Ye, Yuanyao; Chen, Jing; Lu, Xiaohua

    2016-02-01

    The application of a novel coupled process with oxalate washing and subsequent zero-valent iron (ZVI)/Air treatment for remediation of arsenic contaminated soil was investigated in the present study. Oxalate is biodegradable and widely present in the environment. With addition of 0.1 mol L(-1) oxalate under circumneutral condition, 83.7% and 52.6% of arsenic could be removed from a spiked kaolin and an actual contaminated soil respectively. Much more oxalate adsorption on the actual soil was attributed to the higher soil organic matter and clay content. Interestingly, oxalate retained in the washing effluent could act as an organic ligand to promote the oxidation efficiency of ZVI/Air at near neutral pH. Compared with the absence of oxalate, much more As(III) was oxidized. Arsenic was effectively adsorbed on iron (hydr)oxides as the consumption of oxalate and the increase of pH value. For the actual soil washing effluent, about 94.9% of total arsenic was removed after 120 min's treatment without pH adjustment. It has been demonstrated that As(V) was the dominant arsenic speciation adsorbed on iron (hydr)oxides. This study provides a promising alternative for remediation of arsenic contaminated soil in view of its low cost and environmental benign. PMID:26476769

  1. Imaging of Acoustically Coupled Oscillations Due to Flow Past a Shallow Cavity: Effect of Cavity Length Scale

    SciTech Connect

    P. Oshkai; M. Geveci; D. Rockwell; M. Pollack

    2002-12-12

    Flow-acoustic interactions due to fully turbulent inflow past a shallow axisymmetric cavity mounted in a pipe are investigated using a technique of high-image-density particle image velocimetry in conjunction with unsteady pressure measurements. This imaging leads to patterns of velocity, vorticity, streamline topology, and hydrodynamic contributions to the acoustic power integral. Global instantaneous images, as well as time-averaged images, are evaluated to provide insight into the flow physics during tone generation. Emphasis is on the manner in which the streamwise length scale of the cavity alters the major features of the flow structure. These image-based approaches allow identification of regions of the unsteady shear layer that contribute to the instantaneous hydrodynamic component of the acoustic power, which is necessary to maintain a flow tone. In addition, combined image analysis and pressure measurements allow categorization of the instantaneous flow patterns that are associated with types of time traces and spectra of the fluctuating pressure. In contrast to consideration based solely on pressure spectra, it is demonstrated that locked-on tones may actually exhibit intermittent, non-phase-locked images, apparently due to low damping of the acoustic resonator. Locked-on flow tones (without modulation or intermittency), locked-on flow tones with modulation, and non-locked-on oscillations with short-term, highly coherent fluctuations are defined and represented by selected cases. Depending on which of,these regimes occur, the time-averaged Q (quality)-factor and the dimensionless peak pressure are substantially altered.

  2. Performance analysis of small capacity liquid nitrogen generator based on Joule-Thomson refrigerator coupled with air separation membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piotrowska-Hajnus, Agnieszka; Chorowski, Maciej

    2012-06-01

    Joule - Thomson small capacity refrigerators supplied with gas mixture are studied theoretically and experimentally for a variety of applications. They can be especially promising when coupled with membrane air separators. We present liquid nitrogen generation system based on Joule - Thomson cooler joined with air separation membrane. Hollow fiber membrane is used for nitrogen separation from compressed and purified atmospheric air. Joule-Thomson refrigerator operates with a dedicated nitrogen - hydrocarbons mixture and provides a cooling power used for the separated nitrogen liquefaction. Special attention has been paid to a heat exchanger coupling the Joule- Thomson refrigerator with the membrane air separator. This paper describes the system design, the procedure of its working parameters optimization and tests results.

  3. Experimental validation of coupled heat, air and moisture transfer modeling in multilayer building components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferroukhi, M. Y.; Abahri, K.; Belarbi, R.; Limam, K.; Nouviaire, A.

    2015-12-01

    The present paper lies to study the coupled heat, air and moisture transfer in multi-layer building materials. Concerning the modeling part, the interest is to predict the hygrothermal behavior, by developing a macroscopic model that incorporates simultaneously the diffusive, convective and conductive effects on the building elements. Heat transfer is considered in the strongly coupled situation where the mass and heat flux are temperature, vapor pressure and total pressure dependents. The model input parameters are evaluated experimentally through the development of various experimental prototypes in the laboratory. Thereafter, an experimental setup has been established in order to evaluate the hygrothermal process of several multilayer walls configurations. The experimental procedure consists to follow the temperature and relative humidity evolutions within the samples thickness, submitted to controlled and fixed boundary conditions. This procedure points out diverging conclusion between different testing materials combinations (e.g. red-brick and polystyrene). In fact, the hygrothermal behavior of the tested configurations is completely dependent on both materials selection and their thermophysical properties. Finally, comparison between numerical and experimental results showed good agreement with acceptable errors margins with an average of 3 %.

  4. High-Order Hybridized Discontinuous Galerkin (HDG) Method for Wave Propagation Simulation in Complex Geophysical Media - Elastic, Acoustic and Hydro-Acoustic - an Unifying Framework to Couple Continuous Spectral Element and Discontinuous Galerkin Methods.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sébastien, T.; Vilotte, J. P.; Guillot, L.; Mariotti, C.

    2014-12-01

    Today seismological observation systems combine broadband seismic receivers, hydrophones and micro-barometers antenna that provide complementary observations of source-radiated waves in heterogeneous and complex geophysical media. Exploiting these observations requires accurate and multi-physics - elastic, hydro-acoustic, infrasonic - wave simulation methods. A popular approach is the Spectral Element Method (SEM) (Chaljub et al, 2006) which is high-order accurate (low dispersion error), very flexible to parallelization and computationally attractive due to efficient sum factorization technique and diagonal mass matrix. However SEMs suffer from lack of flexibility in handling complex geometry and multi-physics wave propagation. High-order Discontinuous Galerkin Methods (DGMs), i.e. Dumbser et al (2006), Etienne et al. (2010), Wilcox et al (2010), are recent alternatives that can handle complex geometry, space-and-time adaptativity, and allow efficient multi-physics wave coupling at interfaces. However, DGMs are more memory demanding and less computationally attractive than SEMs, especially when explicit time stepping is used. We propose a new class of higher-order Hybridized Discontinuous Galerkin Spectral Elements (HDGSEM) methods for spatial discretization of wave equations, following the unifying framework for hybridization of Cockburn et al (2009) and Nguyen et al (2011), which allows for a single implementation of conforming and non-conforming SEMs. When used with energy conserving explicit time integration schemes, HDGSEM is flexible to handle complex geometry, computationally attractive and has significantly less degrees of freedom than classical DGMs, i.e., the only coupled unknowns are the single-valued numerical traces of the velocity field on the element's faces. The formulation can be extended to model fractional energy loss at interfaces between elastic, acoustic and hydro-acoustic media. Accuracy and performance of the HDGSEM are illustrated and

  5. A fully coupled regional atmospheric numerical model for integrated air quality and weather forecasting.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitas, S. R.; Longo, K. M.; Marecal, V.; Pirre, M.; Gmai, T.

    2012-04-01

    A new numerical modelling tool devoted to local and regional studies of atmospheric chemistry from surface to the lower stratosphere designed for both operational and research purposes will be presented. This model is based on the limited-area model CATT-BRAMS (Coupled Aerosol-Tracer Transport model to the Brazilian developments on the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System, Freitas et al. 2009, Longo et al. 2010) which is a meteorological model (BRAMS) including transport processes of gaseous and aerosols (CATT model). BRAMS is a version of the RAMS model (Walko et al. 2000) adapted to better represent tropical and subtropical processes and several new features. CATT-BRAMS has been used operationally at CPTEC (Brazilian Center for Weather Prediction and Climate Studies) since 2003 providing coupled weather and air quality forecast. In the Chemistry-CATT-BRAMS (called hereafter CCATT-BRAMS) a chemical module is fully coupled to the meteorological/tracer transport model CATT-BRAMS. This module includes gaseous chemistry, photochemistry, scavenging and dry deposition. The CCATT-BRAMS model takes advantages of the BRAMS specific development for the tropics/subtropics and of the recent availability of preprocessing tools for chemical mechanisms and of fast codes for photolysis rates. Similarly to BRAMS this model is conceived to run for horizontal resolutions ranging from a few meters to more than a hundred kilometres depending on the chosen scientific objective. In the last decade CCATT-BRAMS has being broadly (or extensively) used for applications mainly over South America, with strong emphasis over the Amazonia area and the main South American megacities. An overview of the model development and main applications will be presented.

  6. The NEMO-AROME WMED high-resolution air-sea coupled system: impact on dense water formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Léger, Fabien; Lebeaupin Brossier, Cindy; Giordani, Hervé; Arsouze, Thomas; Beuvier, Jonathan; Bouin, Marie-Noëlle; Ducrocq, Véronique; Fourrié, Nadia

    2016-04-01

    The North-Western Mediterranean Sea is a key location where intense air-sea exchanges occur, especially during winter when the succession of strong northerly and north-westerly wind boosts the dense water formation. The second Special Observation Period (SOP2) of the HyMeX program, which took place between 1st February and 15th March 2013, was dedicated to the observation of the dense water formation and ocean deep convection processes. During this period, several platforms sampled the area, providing a unique dataset to better identify the coupled processes leading to dense water formation. This study investigates the impacts of the fine scale ocean-atmosphere coupled processes on dense water formation during winter 2012-2013. We developed the coupling between the NEMO-WMED36 ocean model (1/36° resolution) and the AROME-WMED numerical weather prediction model (2.5 km resolution) and ran the high-resolution air-sea coupled system over SOP2. The coupled simulation is compared to an ocean-only simulation forced by AROME-WMED operational forecasts and to air-sea observations collected during the HyMeX SOP2. The results show small differences in term of surface fluxes. Dense water formation is slightly changed in the coupled simulation, whereas fine-scale ocean processes are significantly modified.

  7. Strong Optomechanical Interaction in Hybrid Plasmonic-Photonic Crystal Nanocavities with Surface Acoustic Waves

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Tzy-Rong; Lin, Chiang-Hsin; Hsu, Jin-Chen

    2015-01-01

    We propose dynamic modulation of a hybrid plasmonic-photonic crystal nanocavity using monochromatic coherent acoustic phonons formed by ultrahigh-frequency surface acoustic waves (SAWs) to achieve strong optomechanical interaction. The crystal nanocavity used in this study consisted of a defective photonic crystal beam coupled to a metal surface with a nanoscale air gap in between and provided hybridization of a highly confined plasmonic-photonic mode with a high quality factor and deep subwavelength mode volume. Efficient photon-phonon interaction occurs in the air gap through the SAW perturbation of the metal surface, strongly coupling the optical and acoustic frequencies. As a result, a large modulation bandwidth and optical resonance wavelength shift for the crystal nanocavity are demonstrated at telecommunication wavelengths. The proposed SAW-based modulation within the hybrid plasmonic-photonic crystal nanocavities beyond the diffraction limit provides opportunities for various applications in enhanced sound-light interaction and fast coherent acoustic control of optomechanical devices. PMID:26346448

  8. Understanding the Potential of Aeroelastic Couplings to Stabilize Ground and Air Resonance in a Soft-Inplane Tiltrotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Anna K. T.

    1999-01-01

    The tiltrotor offers the best mix of hovering and cruise flight of any of the current V/STOL configurations. One possible improvement on the tiltrotors of today designs would be using a soft-inplane hingeless hub. The advantages to a soft-inplane hingeless hub range from reduced weight and maintenance to reduced vibration and loads. However, soft-inplane rotor systems are inherently in danger of the aeromechanical instabilities of ground and air resonance. Furthermore tiltrotors can be subject to whirl flutter. At least in part because of the potential for air and ground resonance in a soft-inplane rotor, the Bell XV-15, the Bell-Boeing V-22 Osprey, and the new Bell Augusta 609 have stiff-inplane, gimballed rotors which do not experience these instabilities. In order to design soft-inplane V/STOL aircraft that do not experience ground or air resonance, it is important to be able to predict these instabilities accurately. Much of the research studying the stability of tiltrotors has been focused on the understanding and prediction of whirl flutter. As this instability is increasingly well understood, air and ground resonance for a tiltrotor need to be investigated. Once we understand the problems of air and ground resonance in a tiltrotor, we must look for solutions to these instabilities. Other researchers have found composite or kinematic couplings in the blades of a helicopter helpful for ground and air resonance stability. Tiltrotor research has shown composite couplings in the wing to be helpful for whirl flutter. Therefore, this project will undertake to model ground and air resonance of a soft-inplane hingeless tiltrotor to understand the mechanisms involved and to evaluate whether aeroelastic couplings in the wing or kinematic couplings in the blades would aid in stabilizing these instabilities in a tiltrotor.

  9. Imaging of Acoustically Coupled Oscillations Due to Flow Past a Shallow Cavity: Effect of Cavity Length Scale

    SciTech Connect

    P Oshkai; M Geveci; D Rockwell; M Pollack

    2004-05-24

    Flow-acoustic interactions due to fully turbulent inflow past a shallow axisymmetric cavity mounted in a pipe, which give rise to flow tones, are investigated using a technique of high-image-density particle image velocimetry in conjunction with unsteady pressure measurements. This imaging leads to patterns of velocity, vorticity, streamline topology, and hydrodynamic contributions to the acoustic power integral. Global instantaneous images, as well as time-averaged images, are evaluated to provide insight into the flow physics during tone generation. Emphasis is on the manner in which the streamwise length scale of the cavity alters the major features of the flow structure. These image-based approaches allow identification of regions of the unsteady shear layer that contribute to the instantaneous hydrodynamic component of the acoustic power, which is necessary to maintain a flow tone. In addition, combined image analysis and pressure measurements allow categorization of the instantaneous flow patterns that are associated with types of time traces and spectra of the fluctuating pressure. In contrast to consideration based solely on pressure spectra, it is demonstrated that locked-on tones may actually exhibit intermittent, non-phase-locked images, apparently due to low damping of the acoustic resonator. Locked-on flow tones (without modulation or intermittency), locked-on flow tones with modulation, and non-locked-on oscillations with short-term, highly coherent fluctuations are defined and represented by selected cases. Depending on which of these regimes occur, the time-averaged Q (quality)-factor and the dimensionless peak pressure are substantially altered.

  10. Electromagnetic wave attenuation measurements in a ring-shaped inductively coupled air plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Xiaolong, Wei; Haojun, Xu; Min, Lin; Chen, Su; Jianhai, Li

    2015-05-28

    An aerocraft with the surface, inlet and radome covered large-area inductive coupled plasma (ICP) can attenuate its radar echo effectively. The shape, thickness, and electron density (N{sub e}) distribution of ICP are critical to electromagnetic wave attenuation. In the paper, an air all-quartz ICP generator in size of 20 × 20 × 7 cm{sup 3} without magnetic confinement is designed. The discharge results show that the ICP is amorphous in E-mode and ring-shaped in H-mode. The structure of ICP stratifies into core region and edge halo in H-mode, and its width and thickness changes from power and pressure. Such phenomena are explained by the distribution of RF magnetic field, the diffusion of negative ions plasma and the variation of skin depth. In addition, the theoretical analysis shows that the N{sub e} achieves nearly uniform within the electronegative core and sharply steepens in the edge. The N{sub e} of core region is diagnosed by microwave interferometer under varied conditions (pressure in range of 10–50 Pa, power in 300–700 W). Furthermore, the electromagnetic wave attenuation measurements were carried out with the air ICP in the frequencies of 4–5 GHz. The results show that the interspaced ICP is still effective to wave attenuation, and the wave attenuation increases with the power and pressure. The measured attenuation is approximately in accordance with the calculation data of finite-different time-domain simulations.

  11. New efficient ligand for sub-mol % copper-catalyzed C-N cross-coupling reactions running under air.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Per-Fredrik; Astvik, Peter; Norrby, Per-Ola

    2012-01-01

    A new efficient ligand, N,N''-dimethyldiethylene triamine (DMDETA), has been synthesized and evaluated for sub-mol % copper-catalyzed C-N cross-coupling reactions. The efficiency of the ligand was determined by kinetic methods. DMDETA proved to display efficiency similar to DMEDA and, in addition, the resulting catalyst was tolerant to air. PMID:23209530

  12. New efficient ligand for sub-mol % copper-catalyzed C–N cross-coupling reactions running under air

    PubMed Central

    Larsson, Per-Fredrik; Astvik, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Summary A new efficient ligand, N,N’’-dimethyldiethylene triamine (DMDETA), has been synthesized and evaluated for sub-mol % copper-catalyzed C–N cross-coupling reactions. The efficiency of the ligand was determined by kinetic methods. DMDETA proved to display efficiency similar to DMEDA and, in addition, the resulting catalyst was tolerant to air. PMID:23209530

  13. Acoustically Induced Vibration of Structures: Reverberant Vs. Direct Acoustic Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolaini, Ali R.; O'Connell, Michael R.; Tsoi, Wan B.

    2009-01-01

    Large reverberant chambers have been used for several decades in the aerospace industry to test larger structures such as solar arrays and reflectors to qualify and to detect faults in the design and fabrication of spacecraft and satellites. In the past decade some companies have begun using direct near field acoustic testing, employing speakers, for qualifying larger structures. A limited test data set obtained from recent acoustic tests of the same hardware exposed to both direct and reverberant acoustic field testing has indicated some differences in the resulting structural responses. In reverberant acoustic testing, higher vibration responses were observed at lower frequencies when compared with the direct acoustic testing. In the case of direct near field acoustic testing higher vibration responses appeared to occur at higher frequencies as well. In reverberant chamber testing and direct acoustic testing, standing acoustic modes of the reverberant chamber or the speakers and spacecraft parallel surfaces can strongly couple with the fundamental structural modes of the test hardware. In this paper data from recent acoustic testing of flight hardware, that yielded evidence of acoustic standing wave coupling with structural responses, are discussed in some detail. Convincing evidence of the acoustic standing wave/structural coupling phenomenon will be discussed, citing observations from acoustic testing of a simple aluminum plate. The implications of such acoustic coupling to testing of sensitive flight hardware will be discussed. The results discussed in this paper reveal issues with over or under testing of flight hardware that could pose unanticipated structural and flight qualification issues. Therefore, it is of paramount importance to understand the structural modal coupling with standing acoustic waves that has been observed in both methods of acoustic testing. This study will assist the community to choose an appropriate testing method and test setup in

  14. Using air-coupled sensors to determine the depth of a surface-breaking crack in concrete.

    PubMed

    Kee, Seong-Hoon; Zhu, Jinying

    2010-03-01

    Previous studies showed that the surface wave transmission coefficient across a surface-breaking crack in concrete can be used to estimate the crack depth. However, inconsistencies in the surface wave transmission measurements limit the test accuracy and application of this technique. The inconsistencies come from near-field scattering by the crack tip and inconsistent sensor coupling conditions on rough concrete surfaces. This study first investigates the near-field size based on numerical analyses, and then suggests that reliable surface wave transmission should be measured in the far field. Based on the far-field measurement, the relationship between the surface wave transmission ratio and the normalized crack depth (crack depth/wavelength) is obtained. In the experimental study, the air-coupled sensing method is proposed as a solution to the sensor coupling problem. Owing to the non-contact feature, the air-coupled sensing method not only improves testing speed but also enables more consistent signal measurement. The experimental study using air-coupled sensors shows good agreement with the results of numerical simulation and analytic solution. PMID:20329827

  15. A two-way coupled mode formalism that satisfies energy conservation for impedance boundaries in underwater acoustics.

    PubMed

    Stotts, Steven A; Koch, Robert A

    2015-11-01

    This paper shows that energy conservation and the derivation of the two-way coupled mode range equations can be extended in three dimensions to complex mode functions and eigenvalues. Furthermore, the energy in the coupled mode formulation is conserved for finite thickness fluid ocean waveguides with a penetrable bottom boundary beneath any range dependence. The derivations rely on completeness and a modified orthonormality statement. The mode coupling coefficients are specified solely and explicitly by the waveguide range dependence. The statement of energy conservation is applied to a numerical coupled mode calculation. PMID:26627810

  16. ELECTROMAGNETISM, OPTICS, ACOUSTICS, HEAT TRANSFER, CLASSICAL MECHANICS, AND FLUID DYNAMICS: Quantum Information Processing in An Array of Fiber Coupled Cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jian; Zou, Jian; Shao, Bin

    2010-04-01

    We consider a fiber coupled cavity array. Each cavity is doped with a single two-level atom. By treating the atom-cavity systems as combined polaritonic qubits, we can transform it into a polaritonic qubit-qubit array in the dispersive regime. We show that the four fiber coupled cavity open chain and ring can both generate the four qubit W state and cluster state, and can both transfer one and two qubit arbitrary states. We also discuss the dynamical behaviors of the four fiber coupled cavity array with unequal couplings.

  17. COUPLING

    DOEpatents

    Hawke, B.C.

    1963-02-26

    This patent relates to a releasable coupling connecting a control rod to a control rod drive. This remotely operable coupling mechanism can connect two elements which are laterally and angviarly misaligned, and provides a means for sensing the locked condition of the elements. The coupling utilizes a spherical bayonet joint which is locked against rotation by a ball detent lock. (AEC)

  18. Non-contact evaluation of milk-based products using air-coupled ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, S.; Hindle, S. A.; Sandoz, J.-P.; Gan, T. H.; Hutchins, D. A.

    2006-07-01

    An air-coupled ultrasonic technique has been developed and used to detect physicochemical changes of liquid beverages within a glass container. This made use of two wide-bandwidth capacitive transducers, combined with pulse-compression techniques. The use of a glass container to house samples enabled visual inspection, helping to verify the results of some of the ultrasonic measurements. The non-contact pulse-compression system was used to evaluate agglomeration processes in milk-based products. It is shown that the amplitude of the signal varied with time after the samples had been treated with lactic acid, thus promoting sample destabilization. Non-contact imaging was also performed to follow destabilization of samples by scanning in various directions across the container. The obtained ultrasonic images were also compared to those from a digital camera. Coagulation with glucono-delta-lactone of skim milk poured into this container could be monitored within a precision of a pH of 0.15. This rapid, non-contact and non-destructive technique has shown itself to be a feasible method for investigating the quality of milk-based beverages, and possibly other food products.

  19. Air-coupled detection of nonlinear Rayleigh surface waves to assess material nonlinearity.

    PubMed

    Thiele, Sebastian; Kim, Jin-Yeon; Qu, Jianmin; Jacobs, Laurence J

    2014-08-01

    This research presents a new technique for nonlinear Rayleigh surface wave measurements that uses a non-contact, air-coupled ultrasonic transducer; this receiver is less dependent on surface conditions than laser-based detection, and is much more accurate and efficient than detection with a contact wedge transducer. A viable experimental setup is presented that enables the robust, non-contact measurement of nonlinear Rayleigh surface waves over a range of propagation distances. The relative nonlinearity parameter is obtained as the slope of the normalized second harmonic amplitudes plotted versus propagation distance. This experimental setup is then used to assess the relative nonlinearity parameters of two aluminum alloy specimens (Al 2024-T351 and Al 7075-T651). These results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed technique - the average standard deviation of the normalized second harmonic amplitudes, measured at locations along the propagation path, is below 2%. Experimental validation is provided by a comparison of the ratio of the measured nonlinearity parameters of these specimens with ratios from the absolute nonlinearity parameters for the same materials measured by capacitive detection of nonlinear longitudinal waves. PMID:24836962

  20. Detection of fatigue crack on a rotating steel shaft using air-coupled nonlinear ultrasonic modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Byeongju; Park, Byeongjin; Sohn, Hoon; Lim, Cheol-Woo; Park, Jae-Roung

    2015-04-01

    Rotating shafts in drop lifts of manufacturing facilities are susceptible to fatigue cracks as they are under repetitive heavy loading and high speed spins. However, it is challenging to use conventional contact transducers to monitor these shafts as they are continuously spinning with a high speed. In this study, a noncontact crack detection technique for a rotating shaft is proposed using air-coupled transducers (ACTs). (1) Low frequency (LF) and high frequency (HF) sinusoidal inputs are simultaneously applied to a shaft using two ACTs, respectively. A fatigue crack can provide a mechanism for nonlinear ultrasonic modulation and create spectral sidebands at the modulation frequencies, which are the sum and difference of the two input frequencies Then LF and HF inputs are independently applied to the shaft using each ACT. These three ultrasonic responses are measured using another ACT. (2) The damage index (DI) is defined as the energy of the first sideband components, which corresponding to the frequency sum and difference between HF and LF inputs. (3) Steps 1 and 2 are repeated with various combinations of HF and LF inputs. Crack existence is detected through an outlier analysis of the DIs. The effectiveness of the proposed technique is investigated using a steel shaft with a real fatigue crack.

  1. Acoustic metasurface-based perfect absorber with deep subwavelength thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yong; Assouar, Badreddine M.

    2016-02-01

    Conventional acoustic absorbers are used to have a structure with a thickness comparable to the working wavelength, resulting in major obstacles in real applications in low frequency range. We present a metasurface-based perfect absorber capable of achieving the total absorption of acoustic wave in an extremely low frequency region. The metasurface possessing a deep subwavelength thickness down to a feature size of ˜ λ / 223 is composed of a perforated plate and a coiled coplanar air chamber. Simulations based on fully coupled acoustic with thermodynamic equations and theoretical impedance analysis are utilized to reveal the underlying physics and the acoustic performances, showing an excellent agreement. Our realization should have an high impact on amount of applications due to the extremely thin thickness, easy fabrication, and high efficiency of the proposed structure.

  2. Acoustic velocity sensor for the NRL ABC research platform

    SciTech Connect

    Corsaro, R.D.; Houston, B.

    1996-04-01

    A new research platform has been constructed for general underwater structural-acoustics studies of sensor/actuator coupling mechanisms, and in particular for active acoustic boundary control (ABC) studies. It consists of an array of 15 {open_quote}{open_quote}ABC{close_quote}{close_quote} tiles arranged in a 5{times}3 pattern on a backing structure (an air-backed steel plate). Tiles are 10 inches square, and each tile contains a large area actuator, pressure sensor, and (acoustic particle) velocity sensor. While the actuator and pressure sensor could be constructed of commercially available transducer material, the selection of a suitable acoustic velocity sensor proved more difficult. This paper describes the velocity sensor system selected and its impact on the resulting performance and characteristics of the ABC Platform. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  3. Modeling of Air Pollutant Removal by Urban Trees Using a WRF/CMAQ/i-Tree Coupled System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroll, C.; Isla-Cabaraban, M.; Nowak, D.; Hirabayashi, S.; Endreny, T. A.

    2011-12-01

    The quantification of the effects of changes in land cover on the concentrations and depositions of air pollutants is crucial in the assessment of the potential impacts of urban tree planting schemes on air quality. Planting trees in urban areas can assist in the reduction of air pollutant concentrations and exposure risks. Techniques to calculate dry deposition to vegetation include the use transport and deposition models. A coupled modeling system that integrates the capabilities of meteorological, air quality, and urban dry deposition models to calculate dry deposition fluxes of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) has been developed and applied to Baltimore, MD. The system couples outputs from NOAA's mesoscale Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) meteorological model, the EPA's Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model, and a grid-based version of the dry deposition module of the USDA Forest Service's Urban Forest Effects model (i-Tree Landscape), which is being implemented in the new online i-Tree suite of tools. In this coupled system, WRF is used to create meteorological fields, CMAQ is used to estimate ambient air pollutant concentrations, and i-Tree Landscape is used to estimate dry deposition fluxes across an urban grid with a 500 m horizontal resolution. Tradeoffs between model complexity and model performance are examined to quantify the impact of employing simplified models to determine the impact of trees on urban air pollutants. Initial outputs from the modeling system for a period in July 2005 are compared with air temperatures and NO2 measurements at monitoring stations in downtown Baltimore. Although cold temperature biases were found, WRF simulation results show good agreement with air temperature observations during this period. CMAQ underestimates hourly NO2 concentrations but captures temporal variations. The normalized mean bias for hourly NO2 falls within the generally accepted range of -20% to -50%. Initial results show the benefits of utilizing

  4. Coupling field observations, soil modeling, and air dispersion algorithms to estimate 1,3-dichloropropene and chloropicrin flux and exposure.

    PubMed

    Cryer, S A; van Wesenbeeck, I J

    2011-01-01

    Soil fumigants are volatile compounds applied to agricultural land to control nematode populations, weeds, and crop diseases. Field trials used for measuring fumigant loss from soil to the atmosphere encompass only a small proportion of the near semi-infinite parameter combinations of environmental, agronomic, and meteorological conditions. One approach to supplement field observations uses a soil physics model for fumigant emission predictions. A model is first validated against existing field study observations and then used to extrapolate results to a wider range of edaphic and climatic conditions. This work compares field observations of 1,3-dichloropropene and chloropicrin emissions to predictions from the USDA soil model CHAIN_2D. Comparison between model predictions and field observations for a Florida and California study had values between 0.62 to 0.81 and 0.99 to 1.0 for discrete and cumulative emission flux, respectively. CHAIN_2D emission rates were then coupled to several USEPA air dispersion models (ISCST3, CALPUFF6) to extend emission estimates to near field air concentrations. CALPUFF6 predicted slightly higher 1-h maximum air concentrations than ISCST3 for the same source strength (26.2-36.0% for setbacks between 1 and 250 m from the field edge, respectively). A sensitivity analysis for the CHAIN_2D/ISCST3 coupled numerical system is provided, with several soil and irrigation parameters consistently the most sensitive. Changes in the depth of incorporation, tarp material, and initial soil water content illustrate the predicted impact to emission strength and resulting near-field air concentrations with reductions of cumulative emission loss from 8.1 to 71% and average 1-h maximum air concentration reductions between 6.2 and 41% depending on the mitigation strategy chosen. Additionally, a stochastic framework based on the published SOFEA system that couples variability in experiment, model sensitivity, and site specific attributes is outlined should

  5. Tuneable polaritonics at room temperature with strongly coupled Tamm plasmon polaritons in metal/air-gap microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossmann, C.; Coulson, C.; Christmann, G.; Farrer, I.; Beere, H. E.; Ritchie, D. A.; Baumberg, J. J.

    2011-06-01

    We report strong coupling between Tamm plasmons and excitons in III-V quantum wells at room temperature in ultracompact sample designs. A high refractive index contrast air-gap mirror together with optical Tamm states at a metal/semiconductor interface tightly confines the intracavity field leading to substantial local field enhancements. Angular-resolved reflectivity spectra give clear evidence for anticrossing in the dispersion relation. Room temperature Rabi splittings of 10 meV are found in excellent agreement with simulations. Electrical control of the polariton modes is realized without need for doped mirror layers. Such air-gap microcavities open innovative possibilites for electrically tunable microcavities and polaritonic microelectromechanics.

  6. Air- coupled ultrasonic testing of CFRP rods by means of guided waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kažys, Rymantas; Raišutis, Renaldas; Žukauskas, Egidijus; Mažeika, Liudas; Vladišauskas, Alfonsas

    2010-01-01

    One of the most important parts of the gliders is a lightweight longeron reinforcement made of carbon fibre reinforced plastics (CFRP) rods. These small diameter (a few millimetres) rods during manufacturing are glued together in epoxy filled matrix in order to build the arbitrary spar profile. However, the defects presenting in the rods such as brake of fibres, lack of bonding, reduction of density affect essentially the strength of the construction and are very complicated in repairing. Therefore, appropriate non-destructive testing techniques of carbon fibber rods should be applied before gluing them together. The objective of the presented work was development of NDT technique of CFRP rods used for aerospace applications, which is based on air- coupled excitation/reception of guided waves. The regularities of ultrasonic guided waves propagating in both circular and rectangular cross-section CFRP rods immersed into water were investigated and it was shown that the guided waves propagating along sample of the rod create leaky waves which are radiated into a surrounding medium. The ultrasonic receiver scanned over the rod enables to pick-up the leaky waves and to determine the non-uniformities of propagation caused by the defects. Theoretical investigations were carried out by means of numerical simulations based on a 2D and 3D finite differences method. By modelling and experimental investigations it was demonstrated that presence of any type of the defect disturbs the leaky wave and enables to detect them. So, the spatial position of defects can be determined also. It was shown that such important defects as a disbond of the plies essentially reduce or even completely suppress the leaky wave, so they can be detected quit easily.

  7. An assessment of air-sea heat fluxes from ocean and coupled reanalyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdivieso, Maria; Haines, Keith; Balmaseda, Magdalena; Chang, You-Soon; Drevillon, Marie; Ferry, Nicolas; Fujii, Yosuke; Köhl, Armin; Storto, Andrea; Toyoda, Takahiro; Wang, Xiaochun; Waters, Jennifer; Xue, Yan; Yin, Yonghong; Barnier, Bernard; Hernandez, Fabrice; Kumar, Arun; Lee, Tong; Masina, Simona; Andrew Peterson, K.

    2015-10-01

    Sixteen monthly air-sea heat flux products from global ocean/coupled reanalyses are compared over 1993-2009 as part of the Ocean Reanalysis Intercomparison Project (ORA-IP). Objectives include assessing the global heat closure, the consistency of temporal variability, comparison with other flux products, and documenting errors against in situ flux measurements at a number of OceanSITES moorings. The ensemble of 16 ORA-IP flux estimates has a global positive bias over 1993-2009 of 4.2 ± 1.1 W m-2. Residual heat gain (i.e., surface flux + assimilation increments) is reduced to a small positive imbalance (typically, +1-2 W m-2). This compensation between surface fluxes and assimilation increments is concentrated in the upper 100 m. Implied steady meridional heat transports also improve by including assimilation sources, except near the equator. The ensemble spread in surface heat fluxes is dominated by turbulent fluxes (>40 W m-2 over the western boundary currents). The mean seasonal cycle is highly consistent, with variability between products mostly <10 W m-2. The interannual variability has consistent signal-to-noise ratio (~2) throughout the equatorial Pacific, reflecting ENSO variability. Comparisons at tropical buoy sites (10°S-15°N) over 2007-2009 showed too little ocean heat gain (i.e., flux into the ocean) in ORA-IP (up to 1/3 smaller than buoy measurements) primarily due to latent heat flux errors in ORA-IP. Comparisons with the Stratus buoy (20°S, 85°W) over a longer period, 2001-2009, also show the ORA-IP ensemble has 16 W m-2 smaller net heat gain, nearly all of which is due to too much latent cooling caused by differences in surface winds imposed in ORA-IP.

  8. A parallel-architecture parametric equalizer for air-coupled capacitive ultrasonic transducers.

    PubMed

    McSweeney, Sean G; Wright, William M D

    2012-01-01

    Parametric equalization is rarely applied to ultrasonic transducer systems, for which it could be used on either the transmitter or the receiver to achieve a desired response. An optimized equalizer with both bump and cut capabilities would be advantageous for ultrasonic systems in applications in which variations in the transducer performance or the properties of the propagating medium produce a less-than-desirable signal. Compensation for non-ideal transducer response could be achieved using equalization on a device-by-device basis. Additionally, calibration of ultrasonic systems in the field could be obtained by offline optimization of equalization coefficients. In this work, a parametric equalizer for ultrasonic applications has been developed using multiple bi-quadratic filter elements arranged in a novel parallel arrangement to increase the flexibility of the equalization. The equalizer was implemented on a programmable system-on-chip (PSOC) using a small number of parallel 4th-order infinite impulse response switchedcapacitor band-pass filters. Because of the interdependency of the required coefficients for the switched capacitors, particle swarm optimization (PSO) was used to determine the optimum values. The response of a through-transmission system using air-coupled capacitive ultrasonic transducers was then equalized to idealized Hamming function or brick-wall frequencydomain responses. In each case, there was excellent agreement between the equalized signals and the theoretical model, and the fidelity of the time-domain response was maintained. The bandwidth and center frequency response of the system were significantly improved. It was also shown that the equalizer could be used on either the transmitter or the receiver, and the system could compensate for the effects of transmitterreceiver misalignment. PMID:22293739

  9. Geo-Acoustic Doppler Spectroscopy: A Novel Acoustic Technique For Surveying The Seabed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckingham, Michael J.

    2010-09-01

    An acoustic inversion technique, known as Geo-Acoustic Doppler Spectroscopy, has recently been developed for estimating the geo-acoustic parameters of the seabed in shallow water. The technique is unusual in that it utilizes a low-flying, propeller-driven light aircraft as an acoustic source. Both the engine and propeller produce sound and, since they are rotating sources, the acoustic signature of each takes the form of a sequence of narrow-band harmonics. Although the coupling of the harmonics across the air-sea interface is inefficient, due to the large impedance mismatch between air and water, sufficient energy penetrates the sea surface to provide a useable underwater signal at sensors either in the water column or buried in the sediment. The received signals, which are significantly Doppler shifted due to the motion of the aircraft, will have experienced a number of reflections from the seabed and thus they contain information about the sediment. A geo-acoustic inversion of the Doppler-shifted modes associated with each harmonic yields an estimate of the sound speed in the sediment; and, once the sound speed has been determined, the known correlations between it and the remaining geo-acoustic parameters allow all of the latter to be computed. This inversion technique has been applied to aircraft data collected in the shallow water north of Scripps pier, returning values of the sound speed, shear speed, porosity, density and grain size that are consistent with the known properties of the sandy sediment in the channel.

  10. Modeling of coupled thermodynamic and geomechanical performance of underground compressed air energy storage (CAES) in lined rock caverns

    SciTech Connect

    Rutqvist, J.; Kim, H. -M.; Ryu, D. -W.; Synn, J. -H.; Song, W. -K.

    2012-02-01

    We applied coupled nonisothermal, multiphase fluid flow and geomechanical numerical modeling to study the coupled thermodynamic and geomechanical performance of underground compressed air energy storage (CAES) in concrete-lined rock caverns. The paper focuses on CAES in lined caverns at relatively shallow depth (e.g., 100 m depth) in which a typical CAES operational pressure of 5 to 8 MPa is significantly higher than both ambient fluid pressure and in situ stress. We simulated a storage operation that included cyclic compression and decompression of air in the cavern, and investigated how pressure, temperature and stress evolve over several months of operation. We analyzed two different lining options, both with a 50 cm thick low permeability concrete lining, but in one case with an internal synthetic seal such as steel or rubber. For our simulated CAES system, the thermodynamic analysis showed that 96.7% of the energy injected during compression could be recovered during subsequent decompression, while 3.3% of the energy was lost by heat conduction to the surrounding media. Our geomechanical analysis showed that tensile effective stresses as high as 8 MPa could develop in the lining as a result of the air pressure exerted on the inner surface of the lining, whereas thermal stresses were relatively smaller and compressive. With the option of an internal synthetic seal, the maximum effective tensile stress was reduced from 8 to 5 MPa, but was still in substantial tension. We performed one simulation in which the tensile tangential stresses resulted in radial cracks and air leakage though the lining. This air leakage, however, was minor (about 0.16% of the air mass loss from one daily compression) in terms of CAES operational efficiency, and did not significantly impact the overall energy balance of the system. However, despite being minor in terms of energy balance, the air leakage resulted in a distinct pressure increase in the surrounding rock that could be

  11. High-Resolution Analysis of Seismic Air Gun Impulses and Their Reverberant Field as Contributors to an Acoustic Environment.

    PubMed

    Guerra, Melania; Dugan, Peter J; Ponirakis, Dimitri W; Popescu, Marian; Shiu, Yu; Rice, Aaron N; Clark, Christopher W

    2016-01-01

    In September and October 2011, a seismic survey took place in Baffin Bay, Western Greenland, in close proximity to a marine protected area (MPA). As part of the mitigation effort, five bottom-mounted marine acoustic recording units (MARUs) collected data that were used for the purpose of measuring temporal and spectral features from each impulsive event, providing a high-resolution record of seismic reverberation persistent after the direct impulse. Results were compared with ambient-noise levels as computed after the seismic survey to evidence that as a consequence of a series of repeating seismic impulses, sustained elevated levels create the potential for masking. PMID:26610981

  12. In-die ultrasonic and off-line air-coupled monitoring and characterization techniques for drug tablets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, J. D.; Kowalczyk, B. R.; Hancock, B. C.; Kaul, G.; Akseli, I.; Cetinkaya, C.

    2012-05-01

    Mechanical integrity and properties of drug tablets may adversely affect their therapeutic and structural functions. An embedded ultrasound monitoring system for tablet mechanical property monitoring during compaction and a non-contact/non-destructive off-line air-coupled technique for determining the mechanical properties of coated drug tablets are presented. In the compaction monitoring system, the change of ToF and the reflection coefficient for the upper-punch surface interface as a function of compaction pressure has been studied. In the air-coupled measurement approach, air-coupled excitation and laser interferometric detection are utilized and their effectiveness in characterizing the mechanical properties of a drug tablet by examining its vibrational resonance frequencies is demonstrated. An iterative computational procedure based on the finite element method and Newton's method is developed to extract the mechanical properties of the coated tablet from a subset of its measured resonance frequencies. The mechanical properties characterized by this technique are compared to those obtained by a contact ultrasonic method.

  13. Defect detection performance of the UCSD non-contact air-coupled ultrasonic guided wave inspection of rails prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariani, Stefano; Nguyen, Thompson V.; Sternini, Simone; Lanza di Scalea, Francesco; Fateh, Mahmood; Wilson, Robert

    2016-04-01

    The University of California at San Diego (UCSD), under a Federal Railroad Administration (FRA) Office of Research and Development (R&D) grant, is developing a system for high-speed and non-contact rail defect detection. A prototype using an ultrasonic air-coupled guided wave signal generation and air-coupled signal detection, paired with a real-time statistical analysis algorithm, has been realized. This system requires a specialized filtering approach based on electrical impedance matching due to the inherently poor signal-to-noise ratio of air-coupled ultrasonic measurements in rail steel. Various aspects of the prototype have been designed with the aid of numerical analyses. In particular, simulations of ultrasonic guided wave propagation in rails have been performed using a Local Interaction Simulation Approach (LISA) algorithm. The system's operating parameters were selected based on Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curves, which provide a quantitative manner to evaluate different detection performances based on the trade-off between detection rate and false positive rate. The prototype based on this technology was tested in October 2014 at the Transportation Technology Center (TTC) in Pueblo, Colorado, and again in November 2015 after incorporating changes based on lessons learned. Results from the 2015 field test are discussed in this paper.

  14. An approach for defect visualization and identification in composite plate structures using air-coupled guided ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panda, Rabi Sankar; Rajagopal, Prabhu; Balasubramaniam, Krishnan

    2015-03-01

    Composite materials are today widely used in engineering applications because of superior strength-weight ratios offered by them as well as high structural performance and corrosion resistance. However defects such as fibre breakage, matrix cracking, de-bonding and delaminations in composites impact their structural integrity and reliability negatively and NDE techniques to rapidly identify such defects are valuable. Ultrasonic guided waves have over the years emerged as attractive tools for scanning of large structures and recently they have been considered for rapid inspection of plate and pipe installations. Air-coupled ultrasound for generation of Lamb waves is particularly attractive for composite applications in view of the non-contact inspection offered, as well as the possibilities for rapid mechanized scanning. In this paper we present damage identification and visualisation approaches for quasi-isotropic composite plate structures, based on air-coupled plate guided ultrasonic (Lamb) waves. In the implementation demonstrated, an 8-layered quasi-isotropic [0/+45/-45/90]s glass fibre reinforced plastics (GFRP) composite plate is interrogated using air-coupled pitch-catch guided ultrasound. Propagation of Lamb waves in the laminates and their interaction with delaminations of different sizes at various locations along the structure are studied using 3D finite element (FE) analysis. The visualization approach is validated using experiments, leading to quantitative predictions of defect parameters such as sizing, location and depth. The approach is also extended for the inspection of complex composite structural features such as I- and T-sections.

  15. Evaluation of a regional air-quality model with bidirectional NH3 exchange coupled to an agroecosystem model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bash, J. O.; Cooter, E. J.; Dennis, R. L.; Walker, J. T.; Pleim, J. E.

    2013-03-01

    Atmospheric ammonia (NH3) is the primary atmospheric base and an important precursor for inorganic particulate matter and when deposited NH3 contributes to surface water eutrophication, soil acidification and decline in species biodiversity. Flux measurements indicate that the air-surface exchange of NH3 is bidirectional. However, the effects of bidirectional exchange, soil biogeochemistry and human activity are not parameterized in air quality models. The US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Community Multiscale Air-Quality (CMAQ) model with bidirectional NH3 exchange has been coupled with the United States Department of Agriculture's (USDA) Environmental Policy Integrated Climate (EPIC) agroecosystem model. The coupled CMAQ-EPIC model relies on EPIC fertilization timing, rate and composition while CMAQ models the soil ammonium (NH4+) pool by conserving the ammonium mass due to fertilization, evasion, deposition, and nitrification processes. This mechanistically coupled modeling system reduced the biases and error in NHx (NH3 + NH4+) wet deposition and in ambient aerosol concentrations in an annual 2002 Continental US (CONUS) domain simulation when compared to a 2002 annual simulation of CMAQ without bidirectional exchange. Fertilizer emissions estimated in CMAQ 5.0 with bidirectional exchange exhibits markedly different seasonal dynamics than the US EPA's National Emissions Inventory (NEI), with lower emissions in the spring and fall and higher emissions in July.

  16. COUPLING

    DOEpatents

    Frisch, E.; Johnson, C.G.

    1962-05-15

    A detachable coupling arrangement is described which provides for varying the length of the handle of a tool used in relatively narrow channels. The arrangement consists of mating the key and keyhole formations in the cooperating handle sections. (AEC)

  17. Highly enantioselective oxidative couplings of 2-naphthols catalyzed by chiral bimetallic oxovanadium complexes with either oxygen or air as oxidant.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qi-Xiang; Wu, Zhi-Jun; Luo, Zhi-Bin; Liu, Quan-Zhong; Ye, Jian-Liang; Luo, Shi-Wei; Cun, Lin-Feng; Gong, Liu-Zhu

    2007-11-14

    The chiral bimetallic oxovanadium complexes have been designed for the enantioselective oxidative coupling of 2-naphthols bearing various substituents at C6 and/or C7. The chirality transferring from the amino acid to the axis of the biphenyl in oxovanadium complexes 2 was found to occur with the use of UV and CD spectra and DFT calculation. The homo-coupling reaction with oxygen as the oxidant was promoted by 5 mol % of an oxovanadium complex derived from L-isoleucine and achiral biphenol to afford binaphthols in nearly quantitative yields with high enantioselectivities of up to 98% ee. An oxovanadium complex derived from L-isoleucine and H8-binaphthol is highly efficient at catalyzing the air-oxidized coupling of 2-naphthols with excellent enantioselectivities of up to 97% ee. 51V NMR study shows that the oxovanadium complexes have two vanadium(V) species. Kinetic studies, the cross-coupling reaction, and HRMS spectral studies on the reaction have been carried out and illustrate that two vanadium(V) species are both involved in catalysis and that the coupling reaction undergoes a radical-radical mechanism in an intramolecular manner. Quantum mechanical calculations rationalize the importance of the cooperative effects of the axial chirality matching S-amino acids on the stereocontrol of the oxidative coupling reaction. The application of the transformation in the preparation of chiral ligands and conjugated polymers confirms the importance of the current process in organic synthesis. PMID:17956093

  18. Simulation of unsteady state performance of a secondary air system by the 1D-3D-Structure coupled method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hong; Li, Peng; Li, Yulong

    2016-02-01

    This paper describes the calculation method for unsteady state conditions in the secondary air systems in gas turbines. The 1D-3D-Structure coupled method was applied. A 1D code was used to model the standard components that have typical geometric characteristics. Their flow and heat transfer were described by empirical correlations based on experimental data or CFD calculations. A 3D code was used to model the non-standard components that cannot be described by typical geometric languages, while a finite element analysis was carried out to compute the structural deformation and heat conduction at certain important positions. These codes were coupled through their interfaces. Thus, the changes in heat transfer and structure and their interactions caused by exterior disturbances can be reflected. The results of the coupling method in an unsteady state showed an apparent deviation from the existing data, while the results in the steady state were highly consistent with the existing data. The difference in the results in the unsteady state was caused primarily by structural deformation that cannot be predicted by the 1D method. Thus, in order to obtain the unsteady state performance of a secondary air system more accurately and efficiently, the 1D-3D-Structure coupled method should be used.

  19. A simple solution of sound transmission through an elastic wall to a rectangular enclosure, including wall damping and air viscosity effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nahavandi, A. N.; Sun, B. C.; Ball, W. H. W.

    1976-01-01

    A simple solution to the problem of the acoustical coupling between a rectangular structure, its air content, and an external noise source is presented. This solution is a mathematical expression for the normalized acoustic pressure inside the structure. Numerical results for the sound-pressure response for a specified set of parameters are also presented.

  20. Complex Coupling of Air Quality and Climate-Relevant Aerosols in a Chemistry-Aerosol Microphysics Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshioka, M.; Carslaw, K. S.; Reddington, C.; Mann, G.

    2013-12-01

    Controlling emissions of aerosols and their precursors to improve air quality will impact the climate through direct and indirect radiative forcing. We have investigated the impacts of changes in a range of aerosol and gas-phase emission fluxes and changes in temperature on air quality and climate change metrics using a global aerosol microphysics and chemistry model, GLOMAP. We investigate how the responses of PM2.5 and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) are coupled, and how attempts to improve air quality could have inadvertent effects on CCN, clouds and climate. The parameter perturbations considered are a 5°C increase in global temperature, increased or decreased precursor emissions of anthropogenic SO2, NH3, and NOx, and biogenic monoterpenes, and increased or decreased primary emissions of organic and black carbon aerosols from wildfire, fossil fuel, and biofuel. To quantify the interactions, we define a new sensitivity metric in terms of the response of CCN divided by the response of PM in different regions. .Our results show that the coupled chemistry and aerosol processes cause complex responses that will make any co-benefit policy decision problematic. In particular, we show that reducing SO2 emissions effectively reduces surface-level PM2.5 over continental regions in summer when background PM2.5 is high, with a relatively small reduction in marine CCN (and hence indirect radiative cooling over ocean), which is beneficial for near-term climate. Reducing NOx emissions does not improve summertime air quality very effectively but leads to a relatively high reduction of marine CCN. Reducing NH3 emissions has moderate effects on both PM2.5 and CCN. These three species are strongly coupled chemically and microphysically and the effects of changing emissions of one species on mass and size distributions of aerosols are very complex and spatially and temporally variable. For example, reducing SO2 emissions leads to reductions in sulphate and ammonium mass

  1. Air quality influenced by urban heat island coupled with synoptic weather patterns.

    PubMed

    Lai, Li-Wei; Cheng, Wan-Li

    2009-04-01

    Few studies have discussed the association between the urban heat island (UHI) phenomenon and air quality under synoptic weather patterns conducive to UHI. In this study, the authors used statistical analyses to study this association in the Taichung metropolis region. The air quality data obtained from government-owned observation stations and wind field profiles obtained from tethersonde monitoring (performed during 21-29 October 2004) were combined with the simulations of the horizontal wind fields at different heights by the air pollution model (TAPM). The results show that certain specific synoptic weather patterns worsen the air quality and induce the UHI phenomenon: Taichung's UHI appears clearly under the synoptic weather patterns featuring light air or breezes (0.56 m/s < or =wind speed <2.2 m/s) mainly from the north and west. Furthermore, under these weather patterns, the concentrations of air pollutants (NO2, CO2 and CO) increase significantly (P<0.05) with the UHI intensity. The convergence usually associated with nocturnal UHI causes the accumulation of O3 precursors, as well as other air pollutants, thereby worsening the air quality at that time and also during the following daytime period. PMID:19200584

  2. Coupling creep and damage in concrete under high sustained loading: Experimental investigation on bending beams and application of Acoustic Emission technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saliba, J.; Loukili, A.; Grondin, F.

    2010-06-01

    Creep and damage in concrete govern the long-term deformability of concrete. Thus, it is important to understand the interaction between creep and damage in order to design reliable civil engineering structures subjected to high level loading during a long time. Many investigations have been performed on the influence of concrete mixture, the effect of the bond between the matrix and the aggregates, temperature, aging and the size effect on the cracking mechanism and fracture parameters of concrete. But there is a lack of results on the influence of the creep loading history. In the present paper, an experimental investigation on the fracture properties of concrete beams submitted to three point bending tests with high levels of sustained load that deals with creep is reported. The results aim first to investigate the ranges of variation of the time response due to creep damage coupled effects under constant load and secondly to evaluate the residual capacity after creep. For this purpose a series of tests were carried out on geometrically similar specimens of size 100x200x800mm with notch to depth ratio of 0.2 in all the test specimens. The exchange of moisture was prevented and beams were subjected to a constant load of 70% and 90% of the maximum capacity. Three point bending test were realized on specimen at the age of 28 days to determine the characteristics of concrete and the maximum load so we could load the specimens in creep. Threepoint bend creep tests were performed on frames placed in a climate controlled chamber [1]. Then after four months of loading, the beams subjected to creep were removed from the creep frames and then immediately subjected to three-point bending test loading up to failure with a constant loading rate as per RILEM-FMC 50 recommendations. The residual capacity on the notched beams and the evolution of the characteristics of concrete due to the basic creep was considered. The results show that sustained loading had a strengthening

  3. Acoustic, piezoelectric, and dielectric nonlinearities of AlN in coupled resonator filters for high RF power levels.

    PubMed

    Sahyoun, Walaa; Duchamp, Jean-Marc; Benech, Philippe

    2011-10-01

    Coupled resonator filters (CRFs) are the new generation of BAW filters recently designed for the front-end modules of mobile transmission systems. Looking for designers' requirements, CRF devices have been characterized and modeled. The model based on equivalent circuits relies on material constants such as stiffness and electro-coupling coefficients, and works only for linear-mode propagation. Because of their positions between antennas and power amplifiers, they often work under high RF power, inducing nonlinear response in the AlN piezoelectric layer. In this work, we analyze for the first time the nonlinear behavior of AlN material particularly for coupled BAW resonators. To characterize the nonlinear effects in CRFs, we measure the 1-dB gain compression point (P1dB) and the intercept point (IP(3)). Then, we develop a nonlinear model of CRFs using harmonic balance (HB) simulation in commercially available software. The HB environment allows fitting simulations to measurements in terms of P(1dB) and IP(3). We find that a high RF power induces nonlinear changes in the material constants' real parts: elastic stiffness c(33) (4.9%), piezoelectric e(33) (17.4%), and permittivity ϵ(33) (5.2%). These nonlinear variations of material constants describe the nonlinear behavior of CRF devices using the same deposit process for AlN material. PMID:21989879

  4. Numerical study of innovative scramjet inlets coupled to combustors using hydrocarbon-air mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malo-Molina, Faure Joel

    The research objective is to use high-fidelity multi-physics Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis to characterize 3-D scramjet flowfields in two novel streamline traced circular configurations without axisymmetric profiles. This work builds on a body of research conducted over the past several years. In addition, this research provides the modeling and simulation support, prior to ground (wind tunnel) and flight experiment programs. Two innovative inlets, Jaws and Scoop, are analyzed and compared to a Baseline inlet, a current state of the art rectangular inlet used as a baseline for on/off-design conditions. The flight trajectory conditions selected were Mach 6 and a dynamic pressure of 1,500 psf (71.82 kPa), corresponding to a static pressure of 43.7 psf (2.09 kPa) and temperature of 400.8 R° (222.67 C°). All inlets are designed for equal flight conditions, equal contraction ratios and exit cross-sectional areas, thus facilitating their comparison and integration to a common combustor design. Analysis of these hypersonic inlets was performed to investigate distortion effects downstream in common generic combustors. These combustors include a single cavity acting as flame holder and strategically positioned fuel injection ports. This research not only seeks to identify the most successful integrated scramjet inlet/combustor design, but also investigates the flow physics and quantifies the integrated performance impact of the two novel scramjet inlet designs. It contributes to the hypersonic air-breathing community by providing analysis and predictions on directly-coupled combustor numerical experiments for developing pioneering inlets or nozzles for scramjets. Several validations and verifications of General Propulsion Analysis Chemical-kinetic and Two-phase (GPACT), the CFD tool, were conducted throughout the research. In addition, this study uses 13 gaseous species and 20 reactions for an Ethylene/air finite-rate chemical model. The key conclusions of

  5. An acoustic dual filter in the audio frequencies with two local resonant systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhao-qun; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Shu-yi; Fan, Li

    2014-08-01

    We report an acoustic dual filter to realize the sound regulation in the audio frequency range, in which resonant vibrations of two membrane-air and metal-elastomer systems generate two sound transmission peaks and a sound blocking below 3000 Hz. The local vibrational profiles manifest that the transmission peak at lower frequency is mainly dependent on the resonant vibration of the membrane-air system, and the coupling vibrations of two systems generate the blocking frequency and transmission peak at higher frequency. Importantly, two transmission peaks can be controlled independently. It is feasible to realize the acoustic device in sound shield and dual filters.

  6. Tropical air-sea coupling accelerates the recovery of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation after glacial meltwater event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krebs-Kanzow, U.; Timmermann, A.

    2009-04-01

    During "Heinrich events" brief and exceptionally large discharges of icebergs from the Laurentide and European ice sheets coincide with cold periods followed abrupt warmings. Climate reconstructions suggest that the freshwater pulses caused a temporary collapse of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) by stabilizing the stratification in the regions of North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) formation. Using a coupled ocean sea-ice atmosphere model of intermediate complexity we trigger a complete shut-down of the AMOC by injection of a freshwater pulse to the northern North Atlantic. (Analyzing)The analysis of fully and partially coupled freshwater perturbation experiments under glacial conditions reveals that the reduction of northward heat transport in the North Atlantic leads to a cooling north of the thermal equator. Due to advection of cold air and an intensification of the tradewinds the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) is shifted southward. Changes of the accumulated precipitation lead to generation of a positive salinity anomaly in the northern tropical Atlantic and a negative anomaly in the southern tropical Atlantic. During the shut-down phase of the AMOC, the cross-equatorial oceanic surface flow is halted, preventing a dilution of the positive salinity anomaly in the North Atlantic. Advected northward by the wind driven ocean circulation the positive salinity anomaly increases the upper ocean density in the deep water formation regions, thereby accelerating the recovery of the AMOC considerably. Partially coupled experiments which neglect tropical air-sea coupling reveal that the recovery time of the AMOC is almost twice as long as in the fully coupled case.

  7. Monte Carlo and discrete-ordinate simulations of spectral radiances in a coupled air-tissue system.

    PubMed

    Hestenes, Kjersti; Nielsen, Kristian P; Zhao, Lu; Stamnes, Jakob J; Stamnes, Knut

    2007-04-20

    We perform a detailed comparison study of Monte Carlo (MC) simulations and discrete-ordinate radiative-transfer (DISORT) calculations of spectral radiances in a 1D coupled air-tissue (CAT) system consisting of horizontal plane-parallel layers. The MC and DISORT models have the same physical basis, including coupling between the air and the tissue, and we use the same air and tissue input parameters for both codes. We find excellent agreement between radiances obtained with the two codes, both above and in the tissue. Our tests cover typical optical properties of skin tissue at the 280, 540, and 650 nm wavelengths. The normalized volume scattering function for internal structures in the skin is represented by the one-parameter Henyey-Greenstein function for large particles and the Rayleigh scattering function for small particles. The CAT-DISORT code is found to be approximately 1000 times faster than the CAT-MC code. We also show that the spectral radiance field is strongly dependent on the inherent optical properties of the skin tissue. PMID:17415404

  8. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: Air plasma coupled with antibody-conjugated nanoparticles: a new weapon against cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, G. C.; Kim, G. J.; Park, S. R.; Jeon, S. M.; Seo, H. J.; Iza, F.; Lee, J. K.

    2009-02-01

    Ambient air plasmas have been known to kill cancer cells. To enhance selectivity we have used antibody-conjugated nanoparticles. We achieved five times enhancement of melanoma cell death over the case of the plasma alone by using an air plasma with gold nanoparticles bound to anti-FAK antibodies. Our results show that this new interdisciplinary technique has enormous potential for use as a complement to conventional therapies.

  9. Air-coupled ultrasonic spectroscopy applied to the study of the properties of paper produced from mineral powder (mineral paper).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soto, D. A.; Salas, R. A.; Alvarez-Arenas, T. E. Gómez

    2012-05-01

    A recent technology has been introduced into the paper industry that makes possible to produce paper materials by replacing the cellulose fibres by a mineral powder, achieving a more environmentally friendly product compared with conventional paper. The purpose of this work is to determine the possibilities of an air-coupled ultrasonic technique to study this kind of new materials in order to develop an ultrasonic system useful for quality control for this industry. In particular, air-coupled ultrasonic spectroscopy is specially well suited to this kind of materials because of the fact that no coupling liquid and no direct contact with the sample is employed. A through transmission technique is employed and Fourier analysis is performed to obtain both magnitude and phase spectra of the transmission coefficient. Properties in the thickness direction as well as in the paper plane are investigated. Different paper grades (from 120 to 400 g/m2) provided by Terraskin have been studied. Very high attenuation coeficientes and very low propagation velocities (and hence elastic constant) are obtained, this can be explained by considering the large porosity of this material (about 50%) and the microstrucutre: solid grains in contact with a variable amount of polymeric resin partially filling the pore space.

  10. Initial Aerodynamic and Acoustic Study of an Active Twist Rotor Using a Loosely Coupled CFD/CSD Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, David D. Jr.

    2009-01-01

    Preliminary aerodynamic and performance predictions for an active twist rotor for a HART-II type of configuration are performed using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code, OVERFLOW2, and a computational structural dynamics (CSD) code, CAMRAD -II. These codes are loosely coupled to compute a consistent set of aerodynamics and elastic blade motions. Resultant aerodynamic and blade motion data are then used in the Ffowcs-Williams Hawkins solver, PSU-WOPWOP, to compute noise on an observer plane under the rotor. Active twist of the rotor blade is achieved in CAMRAD-II by application of a periodic torsional moment couple (of equal and opposite sign) at the blade root and tip at a specified frequency and amplitude. To provide confidence in these particular active twist predictions for which no measured data is available, the rotor system geometry and computational set up examined here are identical to that used in a previous successful Higher Harmonic Control (HHC) computational study. For a single frequency equal to three times the blade passage frequency (3P), active twist is applied across a range of control phase angles at two different amplitudes. Predicted results indicate that there are control phase angles where the maximum mid-frequency noise level and the 4P non -rotating hub vibrations can be reduced, potentially, both at the same time. However, these calculated reductions are predicted to come with a performance penalty in the form of a reduction in rotor lift-to-drag ratio due to an increase in rotor profile power.

  11. Characterization of acoustic black hole effect using a one-dimensional fully-coupled and wavelet-decomposed semi-analytical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Liling; Cheng, Li; Ji, Hongli; Qiu, Jinhao

    2016-07-01

    Acoustics Black Hole (ABH) effect shows promising features for potential vibration control and energy harvesting applications. The phenomenon occurs in a structure with diminishing thickness which gradually reduces the phase velocity of flexural waves. The coupling between the tailored ABH structure and the damping layer used to compensate for the adverse effect of the unavoidable truncation is critical and has not been well apprehended by the existing models. This paper presents a semi-analytical model to analyze an Euler-Bernoulli beam with embedded ABH feature and its full coupling with the damping layers coated over its surface. By decomposing the transverse displacement field of the beam over the basis of a set of Mexican hat wavelets, the extremalization of the Hamiltonian via Lagrange's equation yields a set of linear equations, which can be solved for structural responses. Highly consistent with the FEM and experimental results, numerical simulations demonstrate that the proposed wavelet-based model is particularly suitable to characterize the ABH-induced drastic wavelength fluctuation phenomenon. The ABH feature as well as the effect of the wedge truncation and that of the damping layers on the vibration response of the beam is analyzed. It is shown that the mass of the damping layers needs particular attention when their thickness is comparable to that of the ABH wedge around the tip area. Due to its modular and energy-based feature, the proposed framework offers a general platform allowing embodiment of other control or energy harvesting elements into the model to guide ABH structural design for various applications.

  12. Air-sea fluxes in a climate model using hourly coupling between the atmospheric and the oceanic components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Fangxing; von Storch, Jin-Song; Hertwig, Eileen

    2016-06-01

    We analyse the changes in the air-sea fluxes of momentum, heat and fresh water flux caused by increasing the ocean-atmosphere coupling frequency from once per day to once per hour in the Max Planck Institute Earth System Model. We diagnose the relative influences of daily averaging and high-frequency feedbacks on the basic statistics of the air-sea fluxes at grid point level and quantify feedback modes responsible for large scale changes in fluxes over the Southern Ocean and the Equatorial Pacific. Coupling once per hour instead of once per day reduces the mean of the momentum-flux magnitude by up to 7 % in the tropics and increases it by up to 10 % in the Southern Ocean. These changes result solely from feedbacks between atmosphere and ocean occurring on time scales shorter than 1 day . The variance and extremes of all the fluxes are increased in most parts of the oceans. Exceptions are found for the momentum and fresh water fluxes in the tropics. The increases result mainly from the daily averaging, while the decreases in the tropics are caused by the high-frequency feedbacks. The variance increases are substantial, reaching up to 50 % for the momentum flux, 100 % for the fresh water flux, and a factor of 15 for the net heat flux. These diurnal and intra-diurnal variations account for up to 50-90 % of the total variances and exhibit distinct seasonality. The high-frequency coupling can influence the large-scale feedback modes that lead to large-scale changes in the magnitude of wind stress over the Southern Ocean and Equatorial Pacific. In the Southern Ocean, the dependence of the SST-wind-stress feedback on the mean state of SST, which is colder in the experiment with hourly coupling than in the experiment with daily coupling, leads to an increase of westerlies. In the Equatorial Pacific, Bjerknes feedback in the hourly coupled experiment reveals a diurnal cycle during the El Niño events, with the feedback being stronger in the nighttime than in the daytime and

  13. Visualization studies of Lamb wave propagation and interactions with anomalies in composite laminates using air-coupled ultrasonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasanka Durvasula, V. S.; Madhavan, Vivek; Padiyar M, Janardhan; Giridharan, N. V.; Balasubramaniam, Krishnan

    2014-02-01

    An experimental method to visualize the propagation of ultrasonic Lamb waves in composite plates with delaminations, using air coupled ultrasonic transducers, is described here. Using this method experiments are done, on glass fiber reinforced plastic(GFRP) laminates, to study the Lamb wave interactions with delamination type defects. The S0 and A0 modes are chosen for experiments at an excitation frequency of 200 kHz. Defect dimensions are calculated from the visualization images and compared with actual values. A method for detecting depth of defects using deviation of wave-fronts, at the defect contours, is presented.

  14. Experimental Study of the Momentum Coupling Coefficient with the Pulse Frequency and Ambient Pressure for Air-Breathing Laser Propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Zhiping; Cai, Jian; Gong, Ping; Hu, Xiaojun; Tan, Rongqin; Zheng, Zhijun; Wu, Jin; Lu, Yan

    2006-05-01

    The air-breathing laser propulsion tests are conducted for parabolic models by using a high power TEA-CO2 pulsed laser. It is found the momentum coupling coefficient Cm varies with the pulse repeatable frequency and reaches the maximum near 50Hz. With a multi-use pendulum chamber, the change of Cm at different ambient pressure is measured. The experimental results show that the propulsion efficiency Cm does not decrease below the altitude of 10km, even increases a little bit. The calculated Cm fits the experimental result up to altitude 3km, then, they are separated. One possible reason is the temperature which is constant in the experiments.

  15. Development of a 3D finite element model evaluating air-coupled ultrasonic measurements of nonlinear Rayleigh waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhrig, Matthias P.; Kim, Jin-Yeon; Jacobs, Laurence J.

    2016-02-01

    This research presents a 3D numerical finite element (FE) model which, previously developed, precisely simulates non-contact, air-coupled measurements of nonlinear Rayleigh wave propagation. The commercial FE-solver ABAQUS is used to perform the simulations. First, frequency dependent pressure wave attenuation is investigated numerically to reconstruct the sound pressure distribution along the active surface of the non-contact receiver. Second, constitutive law and excitation source properties are optimized to match nonlinear ultrasonic experimental data. Finally, the FE-model data are fit with analytical solutions showing a good agreement and thus, indicating the significance of the study performed.

  16. Prediction of fire smoke exposure and air quality degradation: toward a high resolution coupled fire-atmosphere model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mari, Céline; Strada, Susanna; Filippi, Jean-Baptiste; Bosseur, Frederic; Pialat, Xavier; Humberto Amorin, Jorge; Borrego, Carlos; Freitas, Saulo; Longo, Karla; Martins, Vera; Miranda, Ana Isabel; Monteiro, Alexandra; Paugam, Ronan

    2013-04-01

    Wildfires release significant amounts of trace gas and aerosols into the atmosphere. Firefighters are exposed to wildland fire smoke with adverse health effects. At larger scale, depending on meteorological conditions and fire characteristics, fire emissions can efficiently reduce air quality and visibility, even far away from emission sources. Uncertainties in fire emissions and fire plume dynamics are two important factors which substantially limit the capability of current models to predict smoke exposure and air quality degradation. A collaborative effort recently started in France to develop a coupled fire-atmosphere model based on the fire propagation model ForeFire, developed at the University of Corsica, and the mesoscale non-hydrostatic meteorological model Meso-NH, developed by the University of Toulouse and Meteo-France. ForeFire is a semi-physical model based on an analytical estimation of the rate of spread and an integration with a front tracking method. The fire model is used to provide gridded heating, water vapor and chemical fluxes at high temporal and spatial resolutions to Meso-NH. The coupled model was used in two configurations depending on the spatial resolution: with or without the feedback of the atmosphere on the fire propagation. At kilometric resolution, the model is used off-line to simulate two Mediterranean fires: an arson wildfire that burned in 2005 near Lancon-de-Provence, south-eastern France, and a well documented episode of the Lisbon 2003 fires (in collaboration with the University of Aveiro, Portugal). The question of the injection height is treated with an adaptation of the eddy-diffusivity/mass flux approach for convective boundary layer and compared to the 1D Plume Rise Model (developed at INPE) in contrasted meteorological scenarios. At higher resolution, the two-way coupled model is tested on idealized and real fire cases including ozone chemistry. Future required developments on surface emissions and combustion chemistry

  17. Evaluation of operational online-coupled regional air quality models over Europe and North America in the context of AQMEII phase 2. Part II: Particulate Matter

    EPA Science Inventory

    The second phase of the Air Quality Model Evaluation International Initiative (AQMEII) brought together seventeen modeling groups from Europe and North America, running eight operational online-coupled air quality models over Europe and North America on common emissions and bound...

  18. Evaluation of operational online-coupled regional air quality models over Europe and North America in the context of AQMEII phase 2. Part 1: Ozone”

    EPA Science Inventory

    The second phase of the Air Quality Model Evaluation International Initiative (AQMEII) brought together sixteen modeling groups from Europe and North America, running eight operational online-coupled air quality models over Europe and North America on common emissions and boundar...

  19. Acoustic communication by ants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickling, Robert

    2002-05-01

    Many ant species communicate acoustically by stridulating, i.e., running a scraper over a washboard-like set of ridges. Ants appear to be insensitive to airborne sound. Consequently, myrmecologists have concluded that the stridulatory signals are transmitted through the substrate. This has tended to diminish the importance of acoustic communication, and it is currently believed that ant communication is based almost exclusively on pheromones, with acoustic communication assigned an almost nonexistent role. However, it can be shown that acoustic communication between ants is effective only if the medium is air and not the substrate. How, then, is it possible for ants to appear deaf to airborne sound and yet communicate through the air? An explanation is provided in a paper [R. Hickling and R. L. Brown, ``Analysis of acoustic communication by ants,'' J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 108, 1920-1929 (2000)]. Ants are small relative to the wavelengths they generate. Hence, they create a near field, which is characterized by a major increase in sound velocity (particle velocity of sound) in the vicinity of the source. Hair sensilla on the ants' antennae respond to sound velocity. Thus, ants are able to detect near-field sound from other ants and to exclude extraneous airborne sound.

  20. Coupled acoustic response of two-dimensional bounded and unbounded domains using doubly-asymptotic open boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birk, C.; Liu, L.; Song, Ch.

    2016-04-01

    A high-order doubly-asymptotic open boundary for modelling scalar wave propagation in two-dimensional unbounded media is presented. The proposed method is capable of handling domains with arbitrary geometry by using a circular boundary to divide these into near field and far field. The original doubly-asymptotic continued-fraction approach for the far field is improved by introducing additional factor coefficients. Additionally, low-order modes are approximated by singly-asymptotic expansions only to increase the robustness of the formulation. The scaled boundary finite element method is employed to model wave propagation in the near field. Here, the frequency-dependent impedance of bounded subdomains is also expanded into a series of continued fractions. Only three to four terms per wavelength are required to obtain accurate results. The continued-fraction solutions for the bounded domain and the proposed high-order doubly-asymptotic open boundary are expressed in the time-domain as coupled ordinary differential equations, which can be solved by standard time-stepping schemes. Numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the accuracy and robustness of the proposed method, as well as its advantage over existing singly-asymptotic open boundaries.

  1. Acoustics and precondensation phenomena in gas-vapor saturated mixtures.

    PubMed

    Guianvarc'h, C; Bruneau, M; Gavioso, R M

    2014-02-01

    Starting from fundamental hydrodynamics and thermodynamics equations for thermoviscous fluids, a new modeling procedure, which is suitable to describe acoustic propagation in gas mixtures, is presented. The model revises the boundary conditions which are appropriate to describe the condensation-evaporation processes taking place on a solid wall when one component of the mixture approaches saturation conditions. The general analytical solutions of these basic equations now give a unified description of acoustic propagation in an infinite, semi-infinite, or finite medium, throughout and beyond the boundary layers. The solutions account for the coupling between acoustic propagation and heat and concentration diffusion processes, including precondensation on the walls. The validity of the model and its predictive capability have been tested by a comparison with the description available in the literature of two particular systems (precondensation of propane and acoustic attenuation in a duct filled with an air-water vapor saturated mixture). The results of this comparison are discussed to clarify the relevance of the various physical phenomena that are involved in these processes. The model proposed here might be useful to develop methods for the acoustic determination of the thermodynamic and transport properties of gas mixtures as well as for practical applications involving gas and gas-vapor mixtures like thermoacoustics and acoustics in wet granular or porous media. PMID:25353596

  2. Acoustics and precondensation phenomena in gas-vapor saturated mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guianvarc'h, C.; Bruneau, M.; Gavioso, R. M.

    2014-02-01

    Starting from fundamental hydrodynamics and thermodynamics equations for thermoviscous fluids, a new modeling procedure, which is suitable to describe acoustic propagation in gas mixtures, is presented. The model revises the boundary conditions which are appropriate to describe the condensation-evaporation processes taking place on a solid wall when one component of the mixture approaches saturation conditions. The general analytical solutions of these basic equations now give a unified description of acoustic propagation in an infinite, semi-infinite, or finite medium, throughout and beyond the boundary layers. The solutions account for the coupling between acoustic propagation and heat and concentration diffusion processes, including precondensation on the walls. The validity of the model and its predictive capability have been tested by a comparison with the description available in the literature of two particular systems (precondensation of propane and acoustic attenuation in a duct filled with an air-water vapor saturated mixture). The results of this comparison are discussed to clarify the relevance of the various physical phenomena that are involved in these processes. The model proposed here might be useful to develop methods for the acoustic determination of the thermodynamic and transport properties of gas mixtures as well as for practical applications involving gas and gas-vapor mixtures like thermoacoustics and acoustics in wet granular or porous media.

  3. Comment on "Optimum absorption and aperture parameters for realistic coupled volume spaces determined from computational analysis and subjective testing results" [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 127, 223-232 (2010)].

    PubMed

    Xiang, Ning; Robinson, Philip; Botts, Jonathan

    2010-11-01

    A recent paper [D. T. Bradley and L. M. Wang, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 127, 223-232 (2010)] has reported inconsistencies between the results of two different approaches for characterizing non-exponential decays in coupled-volume systems. This letter aims to expose the origin of these inconsistencies, which are due to a limitation in the methodology utilized for the analysis presented in the paper referenced above. PMID:21110551

  4. Coupled Monitoring and Modeling of Air Quality and Regional Climate during the 2008 Beijing Olympic Games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Smith, J. A.; Michel, A. P.; Baeck, M. L.; Wang, Z.; Fast, J. D.; Gmachl, C.

    2009-12-01

    The 2008 Summer Olympic Games focused attention on the air quality of Beijing, China, especially through emission reduction measures designed to improve air quality for the 2008 Games. The Quantum Cascade Laser Open-Path System (QCLOPS) is a mid-infrared laser absorption spectrometer that uses a tunable, thermoelectrically cooled, and pulsed quantum cascade laser for continuous measurement of multiple trace gases. QCLOPS was used in a field campaign from July to September 2008 in Beijing to study trace gas concentrations before, during, and after the Olympic Games to examine changes induced by emissions reduction methods. Jointly, numerical simulation experiments were carried out with the Weather Research and Forecasting Model with chemistry module (WRF-Chem) for the same time period to examine the air quality, regional climate, and aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions in the Beijing metropolitan region, by taking advantage of high-resolution emission inventories developed by the Institute of Atmospheric Physics - Chinese Academy of Sciences to represent the effects of emission reduction policies for the Olympic period. Intercomparisons between QCLOPS observations and WRF-Chem simulations were performed, and results are presented. Furthermore we present detailed analyses on the atmospheric environment and air quality variables during the first week of August in 2008 followed by the opening ceremony of the 2008 Summer Olympics.

  5. "Advances in Coupled Air Quality, Farm Management and Biogeochemistry to address bidirectional ammonia flux"

    EPA Science Inventory

    A cropland farm management modeling system for regional air quality and field-scale applications of bi-directional ammonia exchange was presented at ITM XXI. The goal of this research is to improve estimates of nitrogen deposition to terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems and ambien...

  6. Analytical modeling, finite-difference simulation and experimental validation of air-coupled ultrasound beam refraction and damping through timber laminates, with application to non-destructive testing.

    PubMed

    Sanabria, Sergio J; Furrer, Roman; Neuenschwander, Jürg; Niemz, Peter; Schütz, Philipp

    2015-12-01

    Reliable non-destructive testing (NDT) ultrasound systems for timber composite structures require quantitative understanding of the propagation of ultrasound beams in wood. A finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) model is described, which incorporates local anisotropy variations of stiffness, damping and density in timber elements. The propagation of pulsed air-coupled ultrasound (ACU) beams in normal and slanted incidence configurations is reproduced by direct definition of material properties (gas, solid) at each model pixel. First, the model was quantitatively validated against analytical derivations. Time-varying wavefronts in unbounded timber with curved growth rings were accurately reproduced, as well as the acoustic properties (velocity, attenuation, beam skewing) of ACU beams transmitted through timber lamellas. An experimental sound field imaging (SFI) setup was implemented at NDT frequencies (120 kHz), which for specific beam incidence positions allows spatially resolved ACU field characterization at the receiver side. The good agreement of experimental and modeled beam shifts across timber laminates allowed extrapolation of the inner propagation paths. The modeling base is an orthotropic stiffness dataset for the desired wood species. In cross-grain planes, beam skewing leads to position-dependent wave paths. They are well-described in terms of the growth ring curvature, which is obtained by visual observation of the laminate. Extraordinary refraction phenomena were observed, which lead to well-collimated quasi-shear wave coupling at grazing beam incidence angles. The anisotropic damping in cross-grain planes is satisfactorily explained in terms of the known anisotropic stiffness dataset and a constant loss tangent. The incorporation of high-resolution density maps (X-ray computed tomography) provided insight into ultrasound scattering effects in the layered growth ring structure. Finally, the combined potential of the FDTD model and the SFI setup for

  7. Acoustic cooling engine

    DOEpatents

    Hofler, Thomas J.; Wheatley, John C.; Swift, Gregory W.; Migliori, Albert

    1988-01-01

    An acoustic cooling engine with improved thermal performance and reduced internal losses comprises a compressible fluid contained in a resonant pressure vessel. The fluid has a substantial thermal expansion coefficient and is capable of supporting an acoustic standing wave. A thermodynamic element has first and second ends and is located in the resonant pressure vessel in thermal communication with the fluid. The thermal response of the thermodynamic element to the acoustic standing wave pumps heat from the second end to the first end. The thermodynamic element permits substantial flow of the fluid through the thermodynamic element. An acoustic driver cyclically drives the fluid with an acoustic standing wave. The driver is at a location of maximum acoustic impedance in the resonant pressure vessel and proximate the first end of the thermodynamic element. A hot heat exchanger is adjacent to and in thermal communication with the first end of the thermodynamic element. The hot heat exchanger conducts heat from the first end to portions of the resonant pressure vessel proximate the hot heat exchanger. The hot heat exchanger permits substantial flow of the fluid through the hot heat exchanger. The resonant pressure vessel can include a housing less than one quarter wavelength in length coupled to a reservoir. The housing can include a reduced diameter portion communicating with the reservoir. The frequency of the acoustic driver can be continuously controlled so as to maintain resonance.

  8. Energy conversion and momentum coupling of the sub-kJ laser ablation of aluminum in air atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Mori, Koichi; Maruyama, Ryo; Shimamura, Kohei

    2015-08-21

    Energy conversion and momentum coupling using nano-second 1-μm-wavelength pulse laser irradiation on an aluminum target were measured in air and nitrogen gas atmospheres over a wide range of laser pulse energies from sub-J to sub-kJ. From the expansion rate of the shock wave, the blast-wave energy conversion efficiency, η{sub bw}, was deduced as 0.59 ± 0.02 in the air atmosphere at an ambient pressure from 30 to 101 kPa for a constant laser fluence at 115 J/cm{sup 2}. Moreover, the momentum coupling of a circular disk target was formulated uniquely as a function of the dimensionless shock-wave radius and the ratio of the laser spot radius to the disk radius, while η{sub bw} could be approximated as constant for the laser fluence from 4.7 to 4.1 kJ/cm{sup 2}, and the ambient pressure from 0.1 to 101 kPa.

  9. Dynamic considerations for composite metal-rubber laminate acoustic power coupling bellows with application to thermoacoustic refrigeration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Robert William

    Many electrically driven thermoacoustic refrigerators have employed corrugated metal bellows to couple work from an electro-mechanical transducer to the working fluid typically. An alternative bellows structure to mediate this power transfer is proposed: a laminated hollow cylinder comprised of alternating layers of rubber and metal 'hoop-stack'. Fatigue and visoelastic power dissipation in the rubber are critical considerations; strain energy density plays a role in both. Optimal aspect ratios for a rectangle corss-section in the rubber, for given values of bellows axial strain and oscillatory pressure loads are discussed. Comparisons of tearing energies estimated from known load cases and those obtained by finite element analysis for candidate dimensions are presented. The metal layers of bellows are subject to an out-of-plane buckling instability for the case of external pressure loading; failure of this type was experimentally observed. The proposed structure also exhibits column instability when subject to internal pressure, as do metal bellows. For hoop-stack bellows, shear deflection cannot be ignored and this leads to column instability for both internal and external pressures, the latter being analogous to the case of tension buckling of a beam. During prototype bellows testing, transverse modes of vibration are believed to have been excited parametrically as a consequence of the oscillatory pressures. Some operating frequencies of interest in this study lie above the cut-on frequency at which Timoshenko beam theory (TBT) predicts multiple phase speeds; it is shown that TBT fails to accurately predict both mode shapes and resonance frequencies in this regime. TBT is also shown to predict multiple phase speeds in the presence of axial tension, or external pressures, at magnitudes of interest in this study, over the entire frequency spectrum. For modes below cut-on absent a pressure differential (or equivalently, axial load) TBT predicts decreasing resonance

  10. CLIVAR-GSOP/GODAE Ocean Synthesis Inter-Comparison of Global Air-Sea Fluxes From Ocean and Coupled Reanalyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdivieso, Maria

    2014-05-01

    The GODAE OceanView and CLIVAR-GSOP ocean synthesis program has been assessing the degree of consistency between global air-sea flux data sets obtained from ocean or coupled reanalyses (Valdivieso et al., 2014). So far, fifteen global air-sea heat flux products obtained from ocean or coupled reanalyses have been examined: seven are from low-resolution ocean reanalyses (BOM PEODAS, ECMWF ORAS4, JMA/MRI MOVEG2, JMA/MRI MOVECORE, Hamburg Univ. GECCO2, JPL ECCOv4, and NCEP GODAS), five are from eddy-permitting ocean reanalyses developed as part of the EU GMES MyOcean program (Mercator GLORYS2v1, Reading Univ. UR025.3, UR025.4, UKMO GloSea5, and CMCC C-GLORS), and the remaining three are couple reanalyses based on coupled climate models (JMA/MRI MOVE-C, GFDL ECDA and NCEP CFSR). The global heat closure in the products over the period 1993-2009 spanned by all data sets is presented in comparison with observational and atmospheric reanalysis estimates. Then, global maps of ensemble spread in the seasonal cycle, and of the Signal to Noise Ratio of interannual flux variability over the 17-yr common period are shown to illustrate the consistency between the products. We have also studied regional variability in the products, particularly at the OceanSITES project locations (such as, for instance, the TAO/TRITON and PIRATA arrays in the Tropical Pacific and Atlantic, respectively). Comparisons are being made with other products such as OAFlux latent and sensible heat fluxes (Yu et al., 2008) combined with ISCCP satellite-based radiation (Zhang et al., 2004), the ship-based NOC2.0 product (Berry and Kent, 2009), the Large and Yeager (2009) hybrid flux dataset CORE.2, and two atmospheric reanalysis products, the ECMWF ERA-Interim reanalysis (referred to as ERAi, Dee et al., 2011) and the NCEP/DOE reanalysis R2 (referred to as NCEP-R2, Kanamitsu et al., 2002). Preliminary comparisons with the observational flux products from OceanSITES are also underway. References Berry, D

  11. Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    An acoustic neuroma is a benign tumor that develops on the nerve that connects the ear to the brain. ... can press against the brain, becoming life-threatening. Acoustic neuroma can be difficult to diagnose, because the ...

  12. Reflector for efficient coupling of a laser beam to air or other fluids

    DOEpatents

    Kare, J.T.

    1992-10-06

    A reflector array is disclosed herein that provides a controlled region or regions of plasma breakdowns from a laser beam produced at a remotely-based laser source. The plasma may be applied to produce thrust to propel a spacecraft, or to diagnose a laser beam, or to produce shock waves. The spacecraft propulsion system comprises a reflector array attached to the vehicle. The reflector array comprises a plurality of reflectors spaced apart on a reflective surface, with each reflector acting as an independent focusing mirror. The reflectors are spaced closely together to form a continuous or partially-continuous surface. The reflector array may be formed from a sheet of reflective material, such as copper or aluminum. In operation, a beam of electromagnetic energy, such as a laser beam, is directed at the reflectors which focus the reflected electromagnetic energy at a plurality of regions off the surface. The energy concentrated in the focal region causes a breakdown of the air or other fluid in the focal region, creating a plasma. Electromagnetic energy is absorbed in the plasma and it grows in volume, compressing and heating the adjacent fluid thereby providing thrust. Laser pulses may be applied repetitively. After each such thrust pulse, fresh air can be introduced next to the surface either laterally, or through a perforated surface. If air or some other gas or vapor is supplied, for example from a tank carried on board a vehicle, this invention may also be used to provide thrust in a vacuum environment. 10 figs.

  13. Reflector for efficient coupling of a laser beam to air or other fluids

    DOEpatents

    Kare, Jordin T.

    1992-01-01

    A reflector array is disclosed herein that provides a controlled region or regions of plasma breakdowns from a laser beam produced at a remotely-based laser source. The plasma may be applied to produce thrust to propel a spacecraft, or to diagnose a laser beam, or to produce shockwaves. The spacecraft propulsion system comprises a reflector array attached to the vehicle. The reflector array comprises a plurality of reflectors spaced apart on a reflective surface, with each reflector acting as an independent focusing mirror. The reflectors are spaced closely together to form a continuous or partially-continuous surface. The reflector array may be formed from a sheet of reflective material, such as copper or aluminum. In operation, a beam of electromagnetic energy, such as a laser beam, is directed at the reflectors which focus the reflected electromagnetic energy at a plurality of regions off the surface. The energy concentrated in the focal region causes a breakdown of the air or other fluid in the focal region, creating a plasma. Electromagnetic energy is absorbed in the plasma and it grows in volume, compressing and heating the adjacent fluid thereby providing thrust. Laser pulses may be applied repetitively. After each such thrust pulse, fresh air can be introduced next to the surface either laterally, or through a perforated surface. If air or some other gas or vapor is supplied, for example from a tank carried on board a vehicle, this invention may also be used to provide thrust in a vacuum environment.

  14. Analysis and Optimization of Spiral Circular Inductive Coupling Link for Bio-Implanted Applications on Air and within Human Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Mutashar, Saad; Hannan, Mahammad A.; Samad, Salina A.; Hussain, Aini

    2014-01-01

    The use of wireless communication using inductive links to transfer data and power to implantable microsystems to stimulate and monitor nerves and muscles is increasing. This paper deals with the development of the theoretical analysis and optimization of an inductive link based on coupling and on spiral circular coil geometry. The coil dimensions offer 22 mm of mutual distance in air. However, at 6 mm of distance, the coils offer a power transmission efficiency of 80% in the optimum case and 73% in the worst case via low input impedance, whereas, transmission efficiency is 45% and 32%, respectively, via high input impedance. The simulations were performed in air and with two types of simulated human biological tissues such as dry and wet-skin using a depth of 6 mm. The performance results expound that the combined magnitude of the electric field components surrounding the external coil is approximately 98% of that in air, and for an internal coil, it is approximately 50%, respectively. It can be seen that the gain surrounding coils is almost constant and confirms the omnidirectional pattern associated with such loop antennas which reduces the effect of non-alignment between the two coils. The results also show that the specific absorption rate (SAR) and power loss within the tissue are lower than that of the standard level. Thus, the tissue will not be damaged anymore. PMID:24984057

  15. Analysis and optimization of spiral circular inductive coupling link for bio-implanted applications on air and within human tissue.

    PubMed

    Mutashar, Saad; Hannan, Mahammad A; Samad, Salina A; Hussain, Aini

    2014-01-01

    The use of wireless communication using inductive links to transfer data and power to implantable microsystems to stimulate and monitor nerves and muscles is increasing. This paper deals with the development of the theoretical analysis and optimization of an inductive link based on coupling and on spiral circular coil geometry. The coil dimensions offer 22 mm of mutual distance in air. However, at 6 mm of distance, the coils offer a power transmission efficiency of 80% in the optimum case and 73% in the worst case via low input impedance, whereas, transmission efficiency is 45% and 32%, respectively, via high input impedance. The simulations were performed in air and with two types of simulated human biological tissues such as dry and wet-skin using a depth of 6 mm. The performance results expound that the combined magnitude of the electric field components surrounding the external coil is approximately 98% of that in air, and for an internal coil, it is approximately 50%, respectively. It can be seen that the gain surrounding coils is almost constant and confirms the omnidirectional pattern associated with such loop antennas which reduces the effect of non-alignment between the two coils. The results also show that the specific absorption rate (SAR) and power loss within the tissue are lower than that of the standard level. Thus, the tissue will not be damaged anymore. PMID:24984057

  16. Retrospective screening of pesticide metabolites in ambient air using liquid chromatography coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    López, Antonio; Yusà, Vicent; Millet, Maurice; Coscollà, Clara

    2016-04-01

    A new methodology for the retrospective screening of pesticide metabolites in ambient air was developed, using liquid chromatography coupled to Orbitrap high-resolution mass spectrometry (UHPLC-HRMS), including two systematic workflows (i) post-run target screening (suspect screening) and (ii) non-target screening. An accurate-mass database was built and used for the post-run screening analysis. The database contained 240 pesticide metabolites found in different matrixes such as air, soil, water, plants, animals and humans. For non-target analysis, a "fragmentation-degradation" relationship strategy was selected. The proposed methodology was applied to 31 air samples (PM10) collected in the Valencian Region (Spain). In the post-target analysis 34 metabolites were identified, of which 11 (3-ketocarburan, carbofuran-7-phenol, carbendazim, desmethylisoproturon, ethiofencarb-sulfoxide, malaoxon, methiocarb-sulfoxide, N-(2-ethyl-6-methylphenyl)-L-alanine, omethoate, 2-hydroxy-terbuthylazine, and THPAM) were confirmed using analytical standards. The semiquantitative estimated concentration ranged between 6.78 and 198.31 pg m(-3). Likewise, two unknown degradation products of malaoxon and fenhexamid were elucidated in the non-target screening. PMID:26838378

  17. Acoustic Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention relates to a sealing device having an acoustic resonator. The acoustic resonator is adapted to create acoustic waveforms to generate a sealing pressure barrier blocking fluid flow from a high pressure area to a lower pressure area. The sealing device permits noncontacting sealing operation. The sealing device may include a resonant-macrosonic-synthesis (RMS) resonator.

  18. Acoustic seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention relates to a sealing device having an acoustic resonator. The acoustic resonator is adapted to create acoustic waveforms to generate a sealing pressure barrier blocking fluid flow from a high pressure area to a lower pressure area. The sealing device permits noncontacting sealing operation. The sealing device may include a resonant-macrosonic-synthesis (RMS) resonator.

  19. 3D Finite-Difference Modeling of Acoustic Radiation from Seismic Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chael, E. P.; Aldridge, D. F.; Jensen, R. P.

    2013-12-01

    Shallow seismic events, earthquakes as well as explosions, often generate acoustic waves in the atmosphere observable at local or even regional distances. Recording both the seismic and acoustic signals can provide additional constraints on source parameters such as epicenter coordinates, depth, origin time, moment, and mechanism. Recent advances in finite-difference (FD) modeling methods enable accurate numerical treatment of wave propagation across the ground surface between the (solid) elastic and (fluid) acoustic domains. Using a fourth-order, staggered-grid, velocity-stress FD algorithm, we are investigating the effects of various source parameters on the acoustic (or infrasound) signals transmitted from the solid earth into the atmosphere. Compressional (P), shear (S), and Rayleigh waves all radiate some acoustic energy into the air at the ground surface. These acoustic wavefronts are typically conical in shape, since their phase velocities along the surface exceed the sound speed in air. Another acoustic arrival with a spherical wavefront can be generated from the vicinity of the epicenter of a shallow event, due to the strong vertical ground motions directly above the buried source. Images of acoustic wavefields just above the surface reveal the radiation patterns and relative amplitudes of the various arrivals. In addition, we compare the relative effectiveness of different seismic source mechanisms for generating acoustic energy. For point sources at a fixed depth, double-couples with almost any orientation produce stronger acoustic signals than isotropic explosions, due to higher-amplitude S and Rayleigh waves. Of course, explosions tend to be shallower than most earthquakes, which can offset the differences due to mechanism. Low-velocity material in the shallow subsurface acts to increase vertical seismic motions there, enhancing the coupling to acoustic waves in air. If either type of source breaks the surface (e.g., an earthquake with surface rupture

  20. Applications of the Zero-Group-Velocity Lamb Mode for Air-Coupled Ultrasonic Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holland, Stephen D.; Song, Jun-Ho; Evan, Victoria L.; Chimenti, D. E.

    2005-04-01

    Airborne ultrasound couples particularly well into plates at the zero-group-velocity point of the first order symmetric (S1) Lamb mode. Applications of this mode to ultrasonic imaging of plate-like structures are discussed. The sensitivity and high Q of this mode makes it ideal for imaging. Images from a wide variety of materials and samples, including composites and honeycomb structures are presented. Transmission at the zero-group-velocity frequency is shown to be particularly sensitive to nearby flaws and discontinuities, and is therefore suitable for wide-area scanning for cracks or manufacturing flaws.

  1. An air-tolerant approach to the carbonylative Suzuki-Miyaura coupling: applications in isotope labeling.

    PubMed

    Ahlburg, Andreas; Lindhardt, Anders T; Taaning, Rolf H; Modvig, Amalie E; Skrydstrup, Troels

    2013-10-18

    Carbonylative Suzuki-Miyaura coupling conditions have been developed that proceed without the exclusion of oxygen and in the presence of nondegassed and nondried solvents. By adapting the method to a two-chamber setup, the direct handling of carbon monoxide, produced from stable CO precursors, is avoided. The protocol afforded the desired benzophenones with excellent functional group tolerance and in good yields. Substituting the CO precursor, in the CO-producing chamber, with its carbon-13 labeled version generated the corresponding carbon-13 labeled benzophenones. Finally, the developed system was applied in the synthesis and isotope labeling of two pharmaceuticals, nordazepam and Tricor. PMID:24004340

  2. Urban impact on air quality in RegCM/CAMx couple for MEGAPOLI project - high resolution sensitivity study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halenka, T.; Huszar, P.; Belda, M.

    2010-09-01

    Recent studies show considerable effect of atmospheric chemistry and aerosols on climate on regional and local scale. For the purpose of qualifying and quantifying the magnitude of climate forcing due to atmospheric chemistry/aerosols on regional scale, the development of coupling of regional climate model and chemistry/aerosol model was started on the Department of Meteorology and Environmental Protection, Charles University, Prague, for the EC FP6 Project QUANTIFY and EC FP6 Project CECILIA. For this coupling, existing regional climate model and chemistry transport model have been used at very high resolution of 10km grid. Climate is calculated using RegCM while chemistry is solved by CAMx. The experiments with the couple have been prepared for EC FP7 project MEGAPOLI assessing the impact of the megacities and industrialized areas on climate. Meteorological fields generated by RCM drive CAMx transport, chemistry and a dry/wet deposition. A preprocessor utility was developed for transforming RegCM provided fields to CAMx input fields and format. New domain have been settled for MEGAPOLI purpose in 10km resolution including all the European "megacities" regions, i.e. London metropolitan area, Paris region, industrialized Ruhr area, Po valley etc. There is critical issue of the emission inventories available for 10km resolution including the urban hot-spots, TNO emissions are adopted for this sensitivity study in 10km resolution for comparison of the results with the simulation based on merged TNO emissions, i.e. basically original EMEP emissions at 50 km grid. The sensitivity test to switch on/off Paris area emissions is analysed as well. Preliminary results for year 2005 are presented and discussed to reveal whether the concept of effective emission indices could help to parameterize the urban plume effects in lower resolution models. Interactive coupling is compared to study the potential of possible impact of urban air-pollution to the urban area climate.

  3. Polariton Condensation in Dynamic Acoustic Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerda-Méndez, E. A.; Krizhanovskii, D. N.; Wouters, M.; Bradley, R.; Biermann, K.; Guda, K.; Hey, R.; Santos, P. V.; Sarkar, D.; Skolnick, M. S.

    2010-09-01

    We demonstrate that the tunable potential introduced by a surface acoustic wave on a homogeneous polariton condensate leads to fragmentation of the condensate into an array of wires which move with the acoustic velocity. Reduction of the spatial coherence of the condensate emission along the surface acoustic wave direction is attributed to the suppression of coupling between the spatially modulated condensates. Interparticle interactions observed at high polariton densities screen the acoustic potential, partially reversing its effect on spatial coherence.

  4. Coupled Physical/Chemical and Biofiltration Technologies to Reduce Air Emissions from Forest Products Industries

    SciTech Connect

    Gary D. McGinnis

    2001-12-31

    The research is a laboratory and bench-scale investigation of a system to concentrate and destroy volatile organic compounds (VOCs), including hazardous air pollutants, formed from the drying of wood and the manufacture of wood board products (e.g., particle board and oriented strandboard). The approach that was investigated involved concentrating the dilute VOCs (<500 ppmv) with a physical/chemical adsorption unit, followed by the treatment of the concentrated voc stream (2,000 to 2,500 ppmv) with a biofiltration unit. The research program lasted three years, and involved three research organizations. Michigan Technological University was the primary recipient of the financial assistance, the USDA Forest Products Laboratory (FPL) and Mississippi State University (MSU) were subcontractors to MTU. The ultimate objective of this research was to develop a pilot-scale demonstration of the technology with sufficient data to provide for the design of an industrial system. No commercialization activities were included in this project.

  5. Troposphere-Stratosphere Coupled Chemistry-Climate Interactions: From Global Warming Projections to Air Quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowack, P. J.; Abraham, N. L.; Maycock, A. C.; Braesicke, P.; Pyle, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    Changes in stratospheric composition can affect tropospheric composition and vice versa. Of particular interest are trace gas concentrations at the interface between these two atmospheric layers in the tropical upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS). This is due to the crucial importance of composition changes in the UTLS for the global energy budget. In a recent study (Nowack et al., 2015), we provided further evidence that composition changes in the tropical UTLS can significantly affect global warming projections. Using a state-of-the-art atmosphere-ocean chemistry-climate model, we found a ~20% smaller global warming in response to an abrupt 4xCO2 forcing if composition feedbacks were included in the calculations as compared to simulations in which composition feedbacks were not considered. We attributed this large difference in surface warming mainly to circulation-driven decreases in tropical UTLS ozone and related changes in stratospheric water vapor, partly counteracted by simultaneous changes in ice clouds. Here, we explain why this result is expected to differ between models and how, inter alia, tropospheric chemical mechanisms can contribute to this uncertainty. We highlight that improving our understanding of processes in the tropical UTLS and their representation in Earth system models remains a key challenge in climate research.Finally, taking geoengineering as a new example, we show that changes in the stratosphere can have an impact on air quality in the troposphere. In particular, we explain for a simple solar radiation management scenario how changes in surface ozone can be linked to changes in meteorology and composition in the troposphere and stratosphere. In conclusion, we highlight the importance of considering air quality impacts when evaluating a variety of geoengineering scenarios. Reference: Nowack, P.J., Abraham, N.L., Maycock, A.C., Braesicke, P., Gregory, J.M., Joshi, M.M., Osprey, A., and Pyle, J.A. Nature Climate Change 5, 41

  6. Air-coupled detection of the S1-ZGV lamb mode in a concrete plate based on backward wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjurström, H.; Ryden, N.

    2013-01-01

    Impact Echo is commonly used to determine thickness of concrete plate like structures. The method is based on the generation and detection of the plate thickness resonance frequency, where the group velocity of the first higher symmetric Lamb mode goes to zero (S1-ZGV). When using air-coupled microphones as receivers it is hard to determine the correct resonance frequency due to low signal to noise ratio. In this study multichannel signal processing is used to identify the S1-ZGV frequency, based on backward wave propagation instead of the conventional amplitude spectrum approach. The original PDF file of this article, as supplied to AIP Publishing, contained some minor font problems within Figures 1, 4, 7, 8, and 9. An updated PDF file using the correct font within those figures was issued on June 3, 2013. There are no other changes to the scientific content.

  7. Experimental Non-Contact Evaluation of Delamination in CFRP Composite Plates by Laser Air-Coupled Detection Ultrasonic System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seung-Joon; Lee, Joon-Hyun; Byun, Joon-Hyung

    The objective of this research is to develop non-contact and real time inspection technique based on laser generated ultrasound for evaluating near-surface delamination in Carbon/Epoxy composite fabricated from automated fiber placement system. In this study, A hybrid laser generation/air-coupled detection ultrasonic system for detection and visualization of delamination in composite plates with simulated delamination of the area of 20 mm × 20 mm between the first and the second layer. Optical fiberized Nd:YAG pulse laser (532 nm, 32 mJ) with linear slit array is used to generate ultrasonic guided wave in unidirectional CFRP specimen (24 plies, 2.85 mm thickness). The characteristic of time domain waveform and frequency spectrum of guided wave is discussed. Two- dimensional images are obtained from these characteristics. The convergence of received signal using the pitch-catch and the scattering-reflection technique is discussed.

  8. Thermo-mechanically coupled subduction using AMR together with a true free surface and sticky air in ASPECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraters, Menno; Glerum, Anne; Thieulot, Cedric; Spakman, Wim

    2015-04-01

    ASPECT (Kronbichler et al., 2012), short for Advanced Solver for Problems in Earth's ConvecTion, is a new Finite Element code which was originally designed for thermally driven (mantle) convection and is built on state of the art numerical methods (adaptive mesh refinement, linear and non-linear solver, stabilization of transport dominated processes and a high scalability on multiple processors). Here we present an application of ASPECT to the modelling of fully thermo-mechanically coupled subduction. Our model contains in the case of a true free surface three different compositions: two different crustal compositions, one on top of the subducting plate and one on top of the overriding plate, and a mantle composition. In the case of a free surface through a sticky air layer, a fourth composition representing this sticky air is added. We implemented a viscoplastic rheology using frictional plasticity and a composite viscosity defined by diffusion and dislocation creep. The lithospheric part of the mantle has the same composition as the rest of the mantle but has a higher viscosity because of a lower temperature. The temperature field is implemented in ASPECT as follows: a linear temperature gradient for the lithosphere and an adiabatic geotherm for the sublithospheric mantle. The Initial slab temperature is defined using the analytical solution of McKenzie (1970). The plates can be pushed from the sides of the model, and correspondingly it is possible to define an additional independent mantle in/out flow through the boundaries. We will show a preliminary set of models, highlighting the current codes capabilities, such as the fine tuned use of Adaptive Mesh Refinement in combination with topography development both through a true free surface and sticky air and solving for strongly non-linear rheologies.

  9. Air-sea Energy Transfer at Mesoscale in a Coupled High-resolution Model: Impact of Resolution and Current Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jullien, S.; Colas, F.; Masson, S. G.; Oerder, V.; Echevin, V.; Samson, G.; Crétat, J.; Berthet, S.; Hourdin, C.

    2015-12-01

    Winds are usually considered to force the ocean but recent studies suggested that oceanic mesoscale activity, characterized by eddies, filaments and fronts, could also affect the wind field. These structures feature abrupt changes in sea surface temperature (SST), surface pressure and surface currents that could impact the atmosphere by enhancing/reducing air-sea fluxes, accelerating/decelerating winds, modifying the wind-pressure balance… At this time, the detailed processes associated to such coupling, its intensity and significance remain a matter of research. Here, a state-of-the-art WRF-OASIS-NEMO coupled model is set up over a wide tropical channel (45°S-45°N) at various resolutions: 3/4°, 1/4° and 1/12° in both the ocean and the atmosphere. Several experiments are conducted in forced, partially or fully coupled modes, to highlight the effect of resolution and the role of SST vs. current feedback to energy injection into the ocean and the atmosphere. In strong mesoscale activity regions, a negative wind power input from the atmosphere to the ocean is seen at scales ranging from 100km to more than 1000km. Nonexistent at 3/4°, this negative forcing, acting against oceanic mesoscale activity, is almost twice more important at 1/12° than at 1/4°. In addition, partially coupled simulations, i.e. without current feedback, show that the impact of thermal coupling on this process is very limited. Energy injection to the marine atmospheric boundary layer also features imprints from oceanic mesoscale. Energy injection by scales shorter than 300km represents up to 20% of the total. Finally we show that increasing oceanic resolution, and therefore mesoscale activity, is necessary to resolve the full wind stress spectrum and has an upscaling effect by enhancing atmospheric mesoscale, which is larger scale than in the ocean. Using 1/4°oceanic resolution instead of 1/12° leads to a 50% loss of energy in the atmospheric mesoscale.

  10. Three-phase Coupling of Air, Droplets and Fibers for the Spray Molding Manufacturing Process of Polyurethane-Fiber-Reinforced Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diffo, P.; Wulf, P.; Breuer, M.

    2011-09-01

    In the present paper the authors present a multiphase flow simulation model of the interaction of a droplet-laden air flow with flexible fibers. This highly complex flow is occurring during a manufacturing process of fiber reinforced polyurethane based composites, where the liquid plastic polyurethane (PUR) is sprayed with air assistance in a tool form or on a substrate. Simultaneously chopped fibers are laterally inserted in the polyurethane-air spray cone for wetting before the entire mixture deposits on the substrate, where it starts curing. This investigation aims to compute the statistical fiber orientation and density distribution in the final composite, which will help modeling its anisotropic material properties. It is presumed that the final position and orientation of a fiber on a substrate results from its dynamics and coupled interactions with air, PUR-droplets and other fibers within the spray cone. Therefore, we present a new approach simplifying the multiply coupled interaction of the three phases. In this paper a model of the process is built, that computes the transient, 4-way-coupled behavior of the air-liquid droplets mixture with the CFD code ANSYS Fluent and the 1-way-air- and 1-way-droplet-coupled dynamics of the fibers with an extra code called FIDYST. Two approaches for the coupling of fibers with the air-droplets-mixture are presented: One considers the mixture as a pseudo-fluid ("homogenization"), the other computes a force for each of the phases separately, wherein the average momentum transfer for the fiber-droplet collision is estimated based on the probability of local collision events.

  11. Structural Acoustics and Vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaigne, Antoine

    This chapter is devoted to vibrations of structures and to their coupling with the acoustic field. Depending on the context, the radiated sound can be judged as desirable, as is mostly the case for musical instruments, or undesirable, like noise generated by machinery. In architectural acoustics, one main goal is to limit the transmission of sound through walls. In the automobile industry, the engineers have to control the noise generated inside and outside the passenger compartment. This can be achieved by means of passive or active damping. In general, there is a strong need for quieter products and better sound quality generated by the structures in our daily environment.

  12. Electromechanical acoustic liner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheplak, Mark (Inventor); Cattafesta, III, Louis N. (Inventor); Nishida, Toshikazu (Inventor); Horowitz, Stephen Brian (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A multi-resonator-based system responsive to acoustic waves includes at least two resonators, each including a bottom plate, side walls secured to the bottom plate, and a top plate disposed on top of the side walls. The top plate includes an orifice so that a portion of an incident acoustical wave compresses gas in the resonators. The bottom plate or the side walls include at least one compliant portion. A reciprocal electromechanical transducer coupled to the compliant portion of each of the resonators forms a first and second transducer/compliant composite. An electrical network is disposed between the reciprocal electromechanical transducer of the first and second resonator.

  13. Dual-Mode Combined Infra Red and Air-Coupled Ultrasonic Technique for Real-Time Industrial Process Control with Special Reference to the Food Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pallav, P.; Hutchins, D. A.; Diamond, G. G.; Gan, T. H.; Hellyer, J. E.

    2008-02-01

    This paper describes the use of air-coupled ultrasound and Near Infra red (NIR) as complimentary techniques for food quality assessment. A major study has been performed, in collaboration with four industrial food companies, to investigate the use of air-coupled ultrasound and NIR to both detect foreign bodies, and to measure certain parameters of interest, such as the amount of a certain additive. The research has demonstrated that air-coupled ultrasound can be used in on-line situations, measuring food materials such as chocolate and cheese. It is also capable of performing measurements on moving sealed metal cans containing food, and is able to detect foreign bodies with the top removed, as encountered just before sealing. NIR has been used as a complimentary technique to test food materials where propagation of air-coupled ultrasound was found to be difficult. This could be due to the presence of air pockets within the food material, as in the case of bread dough.

  14. Comparison of air-launched and ground-coupled configurations of SFCW GPR in time, frequency and wavelet domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van De Vijver, Ellen; De Pue, Jan; Cornelis, Wim; Van Meirvenne, Marc

    2015-04-01

    A stepped frequency continuous wave (SFCW) ground penetrating radar (GPR) system produces waveforms consisting of a sequence of sine waves with linearly increasing frequency. By adopting a wide frequency bandwidth, SFCW GPR systems offer an optimal resolution at each achievable measurement depth. Furthermore, these systems anticipate an improved penetration depth and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) as compared to time-domain impulse GPRs, because energy is focused in one single frequency at a time and the phase and amplitude of the reflected signal is recorded for each discrete frequency step. However, the search for the optimal practical implementation of SFCW GPR technology to fulfil these theoretical advantages is still ongoing. In this study we compare the performance of a SFCW GPR system for air-launched and ground-coupled antenna configurations. The first is represented by a 3d-Radar Geoscope GS3F system operated with a V1213 antenna array. This array contains 7 transmitting and 7 receiving antennae resulting in 13 measurement channels at a spacing of 0.075 m and providing a total scan width of 0.975 m. The ground-coupled configuration is represented by 3d-Radar's latest-generation SFCW system, GeoScope Mk IV, operated with a DXG1212 antenna array. With 6 transmitting and 5 receiving antennae this array provides 12 measurement channels and an effective scan width of 0.9 m. Both systems were tested on several sites representative of various application environments, including a test site with different road specimens (Belgian Road Research Centre) and two test areas in different agricultural fields in Flanders, Belgium. For each test, data acquisition was performed using the full available frequency bandwidth of the systems (50 to 3000 MHz). Other acquisition parameters such as the frequency step and dwell time were varied in different tests. Analyzing the data of the different tests in time, frequency and wavelet domain allows to evaluate different performance

  15. Topological Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhaoju; Gao, Fei; Shi, Xihang; Lin, Xiao; Gao, Zhen; Chong, Yidong; Zhang, Baile

    2015-03-01

    The manipulation of acoustic wave propagation in fluids has numerous applications, including some in everyday life. Acoustic technologies frequently develop in tandem with optics, using shared concepts such as waveguiding and metamedia. It is thus noteworthy that an entirely novel class of electromagnetic waves, known as "topological edge states," has recently been demonstrated. These are inspired by the electronic edge states occurring in topological insulators, and possess a striking and technologically promising property: the ability to travel in a single direction along a surface without backscattering, regardless of the existence of defects or disorder. Here, we develop an analogous theory of topological fluid acoustics, and propose a scheme for realizing topological edge states in an acoustic structure containing circulating fluids. The phenomenon of disorder-free one-way sound propagation, which does not occur in ordinary acoustic devices, may have novel applications for acoustic isolators, modulators, and transducers.

  16. Topological acoustics.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhaoju; Gao, Fei; Shi, Xihang; Lin, Xiao; Gao, Zhen; Chong, Yidong; Zhang, Baile

    2015-03-20

    The manipulation of acoustic wave propagation in fluids has numerous applications, including some in everyday life. Acoustic technologies frequently develop in tandem with optics, using shared concepts such as waveguiding and metamedia. It is thus noteworthy that an entirely novel class of electromagnetic waves, known as "topological edge states," has recently been demonstrated. These are inspired by the electronic edge states occurring in topological insulators, and possess a striking and technologically promising property: the ability to travel in a single direction along a surface without backscattering, regardless of the existence of defects or disorder. Here, we develop an analogous theory of topological fluid acoustics, and propose a scheme for realizing topological edge states in an acoustic structure containing circulating fluids. The phenomenon of disorder-free one-way sound propagation, which does not occur in ordinary acoustic devices, may have novel applications for acoustic isolators, modulators, and transducers. PMID:25839273

  17. Infrasound and Seismic Observation of the Hayabusa Reentry: Burst Signals and Air-to-Ground Coupling Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishihara, Y.; Hiramatsu, Y.; Yamamoto, M.; Furumoto, M.; Fujita, K.

    2012-12-01

    The Hayabusa, the world's first sample-return minor body explorer, reentered the Earth's atmosphere on June 13, 2010. This was the third direct reentry event from the interplanetary transfer orbit to the Earth at a velocity of over 11.2 km/s, and was the world's first case of a direct reentry of the spacecraft itself from the interplanetary transfer orbit. This was the very good and rare opportunity to study bolide class meteor phenomena by various aspects. Multi-site ground observations of the Hayabusa reentry were carried out in the Woomera Prohibited Area, Australia (Fujita et al., 2011). The observations were configured with optical imaging, spectroscopies, and shockwave detection with infrasound and seismic sensors. At three main stations (GOS2, GOS2A, and GOS2B), we installed small aperture infrasound/seismic arrays, as well as three single component seismic sub stations (GOS2B-sub1, to GOS2B-sub3) (Yamamoto et al., 2011; Ishihara et al., 2012). The infrasound and seismic sensors clearly recorded sonic-boom-type shockwaves from the Hayabusa sample return capsule (Ishihara et al., 2012). In addition, following capsule signal, lots of signals that probably correspond shockwave from disrupted fragments of spacecraft and energetic bursts of the spacecraft were also recorded (Yamamoto et al., 2011). In this study, we analyze signals generated by hypersonic motion of the disrupted fragments and energetic burst of the spacecraft. In addition, we examine the air-to-ground coupling process by comparing the waveforms computed by finite difference scheme with the actual ones. At all three arrayed main stations, after the capsule's shockwave arrival, we detect multiple shockwave signals by both infrasound and seismic sensors. For some of these signals arrive within 10 seconds after capsule's signal, we can identify one to one correspondence with optically tracked disrupted fragments of the spacecraft. Far after the capsule's signal, we also detect some arrivals of wave

  18. Nitrogen potential recovery and concentration of ammonia from swine manure using electrodialysis coupled with air stripping.

    PubMed

    Ippersiel, D; Mondor, M; Lamarche, F; Tremblay, F; Dubreuil, J; Masse, L

    2012-03-01

    The practice of intensive animal production in certain areas has resulted in excessive manure production for the available regional land base. Consequently, there is a need to develop treatment technologies to recover the valuable nutrients that manure contains so that the resulting product can be transported and used as fertilizer on agricultural land. The project presented here used electrodialysis in a dilution/concentration configuration to transfer the manure ammonia in the diluate solution by electromigration to an adjacent solution separated by an ion-exchange membrane under the driving force of an electrical potential. Then, air stripping from the electrodialysis-obtained concentrate solution without pH modification was used to isolate the ammonia in an acidic solution. An optimal process operating voltage of 17.5 V was first determined on the basis of current efficiency and total energy consumption. During the process, the swine manure pH varied from 8.5 to 8.2, values favourable for NH(4)(+) electromigration. Total ammonia nitrogen reached 21,352 mg/L in the concentrate solution, representing approximately seven times the concentration in the swine manure. Further increases in concentration were limited by water transfer from the diluate solution due to electroosmosis and osmosis. Applying vacuum to the concentrate reservoir was found to be more efficient than direct concentrate solution aeration for NH(3) recuperation in the acid trap, given that the ammonia recuperated under vacuum represented 14.5% of the theoretical value of the NH(3) present in the concentrate solution as compared to 6.2% for aeration. However, an excessively low concentrate solution pH (8.6-8.3) limited NH(3)volatilization toward the acid trap. These results suggest that the concentrate solution pH needs to be raised to promote the volatile NH(3) form of total ammonia nitrogen. PMID:21658837

  19. Air - Ground - Bedrock Temperature Coupling, Its Monitoring at Borehole Climate Observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cermák, V.

    2012-04-01

    Reconstructing ground surface temperature (GST) histories from present-day temperature-depth logs is now generally accepted as one of the independent and physically justified method to obtain information about the past climate history on the time scale of hundreds to thousands years. Any temperature change at the Earth`s surface slowly propagates downward and deeper we go farther back in time the measured temperature carries certain memory on what has happened on the surface in the past. Due to diffusive character of the process, however, the resolution quickly decreases for the remote events and the reconstructed GST at a given moment is a weighted average of temperature over a certain period of time. For better understanding of the temperature state in the subsurface T(z) logs can be suitably completed with long-run temperature-time monitoring at selected depth intervals, namely within the near-surface active layer affected by seasonal temperature variations (usually uppermost 30-40 m). In addition to GST inversions applied on deep T(z) profiles existing all over the world, several permanent borehole climate observatories were actually established in the last two decades to test the validity of the assumption that GST variations track the SAT (surface air temperature) changes as well as to study various environmental/local effects, such as the vegetation cover type/change, rain/snow precipitation, thawing/melting/freezing, etc. which controls the whole heat transfer process. Long-term monitoring of the shallow subsurface temperature field in suitably geographically located sites may additionally also help to understand the different conditions in e.g. urban vs. countryside environments and to assess the potential anthropogenic contribution to the present-day warming rate within the natural climate variability. This presentation summarizes main results obtained at the Czech borehole sites since 1992 completed with brief comparison of similar results collected

  20. Origin of negative density and modulus in acoustic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sam H.; Wright, Oliver B.

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides a review and fundamental physical interpretation for the effective densities and moduli of acoustic metamaterials. We introduce the terminology of hidden force and hidden source of volume: the effective density or modulus is negative when the hidden force or source of volume is larger than, and operates in antiphase to, respectively, the force or volume change that would be obtained in their absence. We demonstrate this ansatz for some established acoustic metamaterials with elements based on membranes, Helmholtz resonators, springs, and masses. The hidden force for membrane-based acoustic metamaterials, for instance, is the force from the membrane tension. The hidden source for a Helmholtz-resonator-based metamaterial is the extra air volume injected from the resonator cavity. We also explain the analogous concepts for pure mass-and-spring systems, in which case, hidden forces can arise from masses and springs fixed inside other masses, whereas hidden sources—more aptly termed hidden expanders of displacement in this case—can arise from light rigid trusses coupled to extra degrees of freedom for mechanical motion such as the case of coupling to masses that move at right angles to the wave-propagation direction. This overall picture provides a powerful tool for conceptual understanding and design of new acoustic metamaterials, and avoids common pitfalls involved in determining the effective parameters of such materials.

  1. Acoustic neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    Vestibular schwannoma; Tumor - acoustic; Cerebellopontine angle tumor; Angle tumor ... 177. Battista RA. Gamma knife radiosurgery for vestibular schwannoma. Otolaryngol Clin North Am . 2009;42:635-654. ...

  2. Seismo-Acoustic Observations of Explosive Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chael, E. P.; Hart, D. M.; Jones, K. R.

    2011-12-01

    Since January 2011, the Sandia National Laboratories Facility for Acceptance, Calibration and Testing (FACT) has operated a seismo-acoustic station with the purpose of recording local explosions on Kirtland Air Force Base (KAFB). Our immediate goals are to develop a catalog of events and a database of seismo-acoustic waveforms from ordnance disposal and Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) events. The catalog of events will include metadata such as shot time, size, type and location. The waveform archive includes a three-channel GS-13 seismometer and a single infrasound sensor (Chaparral 25 with 50' porous hose wind reduction system). In June of 2011 a weather station was added to complement the monitoring system by providing accurate wind conditions at the times of the explosive events. Monthly internal reports compiled by KAFB provided us with the metadata for the ordnance disposal explosions, and an agreement with DTRA has enabled us to obtain metadata on their events. To date 157 explosions have been identified, including 153 ordnance disposal events and 4 DTRA tests. Along with the catalog of events we have developed automated processing routines to extract both seismic and infrasound arrivals and measure basic waveform characteristics. These include amplitudes of pre-event noise, the direct seismic arrival, air-coupled seismic arrival, infrasound arrival, and wind speed/direction. Using the waveform measurements from the pre-event noise and air-coupled seismic arrival we calculate the SNR for the seismic component of the event. We also calculate the SNR for the infrasonic component of the event using pre-event noise and the direct infrasound arrival. Using the metadata and seismic and infrasonic SNR values we are able to calculate an air-to-ground coupling ratio for each event. For local (<10 km) explosion monitoring, the wind speed and direction can influence all of the analysis parameters. It will affect the pre-event noise level as well as the infrasound

  3. Coupled Air-ocean Nested Modeling Studies Of The Adriatic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pullen, J.; Doyle, J.; Hodur, R.; Cummings, J.

    We have conducted simulations of the Adriatic Sea using the Navy Coastal Ocean Model (NCOM), with surface forcing provided by the atmospheric component of the Coupled Ocean/Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPS). Our aim is to document and investigate the response pattern of the Adriatic to the complex combined forcing of the bora winds and strong Po River run-off. Separate three- dimensional multivariate optimum interpolation (MVOI) analysis techniques are used to generate the initial conditions for both COAMPS and NCOM. First, we used a 6-km NCOM grid over the entire Mediterranean Sea, with forcing supplied by sur- face stresses from a 27-km COAMPS grid, also covering the entire Mediterranean Sea area. Both the atmospheric and ocean fields produced were part of independent 12-hour incremental data assimilation cycles over the time period of interest. The re- sulting NCOM forecasts were then used as lateral boundary conditions for a series of higher resolution (2 km) NCOM forecasts of the Adriatic Sea. In these forecasts, a set of surface stress fields from COAMPS, using a nested 4 km grid centered over the Adriatic Sea, were used to force the NCOM high-resolution ocean nest. In addition, the 2 km Adriatic Sea model is forced by observed daily river discharge values from the Po River. We have focused on the time period of winter and spring 2001 when there were several bora wind events documented by the pilot program observations taken in preparation for the fall and winter 2002-2003 Adriatic Current Experiment (ACE). In addition, we analyze results from a multi-month simulation in fall/winter 1999 to establish circu- lation patterns that may appear during the upcoming observational season. The ACE observations will include ADCP's, moored buoys, CTD sections, and radar sites. The observational programs will generate much data about the circulation of this shallow sea subjected to river floods and strong bora wind events. The main goals of our work are to

  4. Effects of cloudy/clear air mixing and droplet pH on sulfate aerosol formation in a coupled chemistry/climate global model

    SciTech Connect

    Molenkamp, C.R.; Atherton, C.A.; Penner, J.E.; Walton, J.J.

    1996-10-01

    In this paper we will briefly describe our coupled ECHAM/GRANTOUR model, provide a detailed description of our atmospheric chemistry parameterizations, and discuss a couple of numerical experiments in which we explore the influence of assumed pH and rate of mixing between cloudy and clear air on aqueous sulfate formation and concentration. We have used our tropospheric chemistry and transport model, GRANTOUR, to estimate the life cycle and global distributions of many trace species. Recently, we have coupled GRANTOUR with the ECHAM global climate model, which provides several enhanced capabilities in the representation of aerosol interactions.

  5. Robust acoustic wave manipulation of bubbly liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gumerov, N. A.; Akhatov, I. S.; Ohl, C.-D.; Sametov, S. P.; Khazimullin, M. V.; Gonzalez-Avila, S. R.

    2016-03-01

    Experiments with water-air bubbly liquids when exposed to acoustic fields of frequency ˜100 kHz and intensity below the cavitation threshold demonstrate that bubbles ˜30 μm in diameter can be "pushed" away from acoustic sources by acoustic radiation independently from the direction of gravity. This manifests formation and propagation of acoustically induced transparency waves (waves of the bubble volume fraction). In fact, this is a collective effect of bubbles, which can be described by a mathematical model of bubble self-organization in acoustic fields that matches well with our experiments.

  6. Local probing of propagating acoustic waves in a gigahertz echo chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustafsson, Martin V.; Santos, Paulo V.; Johansson, Göran; Delsing, Per

    2012-04-01

    In the same way that micro-mechanical resonators resemble guitar strings and drums, surface acoustic waves resemble the sound these instruments produce, but moving over a solid surface rather than through air. In contrast with oscillations in suspended resonators, such propagating mechanical waves have not before been studied near the quantum mechanical limits. Here, we demonstrate local probing of surface acoustic waves with a displacement sensitivity of 30amRMSHz-1/2 and detection sensitivity on the single-phonon level after averaging, at a frequency of 932MHz. Our probe is a piezoelectrically coupled single-electron transistor, which is sufficiently fast, non-destructive and localized to enable us to track pulses echoing back and forth in a long acoustic cavity, self-interfering and ringing the cavity up and down. We project that strong coupling to quantum circuits will enable new experiments, and hybrids using the unique features of surface acoustic waves. Prospects include quantum investigations of phonon-phonon interactions, and acoustic coupling to superconducting qubits for which we present favourable estimates.

  7. Acoustic radar investigations of boundary layer phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marks, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    A comparison is made between acoustic radar echoes and conventional meteorological data obtained from the WKY tower, for the purpose of better understanding the relationships between acoustic radar echoes and boundary layer processes. Two thunderstorm outflow cases are presented and compared to both acoustic radar data and Charba's gust front model. The acoustic radar echoes reveal the boundary between warm and cold air and other areas of mixing and strong thermal gradient quite well. The thunderstorm outflow of 27 June 1972 is found to compare with in most respects to Charba's gust front model. The major difference is the complete separation of the head from the main body of cold air, probably caused by erosion of the area behind the head by mixing with the ambient air. Two cases of nocturnal inversions caused by advection of warmer air aloft are presented. It is found that areas of turbulent mixing or strong thermal gradient can be identified quite easily in the acoustic radar record.

  8. Musical Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gough, Colin

    This chapter provides an introduction to the physical and psycho-acoustic principles underlying the production and perception of the sounds of musical instruments. The first section introduces generic aspects of musical acoustics and the perception of musical sounds, followed by separate sections on string, wind and percussion instruments.

  9. Lamb wave dispersion and anisotropy profiling of composite plates via non-contact air-coupled and laser ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harb, M. S.; Yuan, F. G.

    2015-03-01

    Conventional ultrasound inspection has been a standard non-destructive testing method for providing an in-service evaluation and noninvasive means of probing the interior of a structure. In particular, measurement of the propagation characteristics of Lamb waves allows inspection of plates that are typical components in aerospace industry. A rapid, complete non-contact hybrid approach for excitation and detection of Lamb waves is presented and applied for non-destructive evaluation of composites. An air-coupled transducer (ACT) excites ultrasonic waves on the surface of a composite plate, generating different propagating Lamb wave modes and a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) is used to measure the out-of-plane velocity of the plate. This technology, based on direct waveform imaging, focuses on measuring dispersive curves for A0 mode in a composite laminate and its anisotropy. A two-dimensional fast Fourier transform (2D-FFT) is applied to out-of-plane velocity data captured experimentally using LDV to go from the time-spatial domain to frequency-wavenumber domain. The result is a 2D array of amplitudes at discrete frequencies and wavenumbers for A0 mode in a given propagation direction along the composite. The peak values of the curve are then used to construct frequency wavenumber and phase velocity dispersion curves, which are also obtained directly using Snell's law and the incident angle of the excited ultrasonic waves. A high resolution and strong correlation between numerical and experimental results are observed for dispersive curves with Snell's law method in comparison to 2D-FFT method. Dispersion curves as well as velocity curves for the composite plate along different directions of wave propagation are measured. The visual read-out of the dispersion curves at different propagation directions as well as the phase velocity curves provide profiling and measurements of the composite anisotropy. The results proved a high sensitivity of the air-coupled and laser

  10. A comparison of surface air temperature variability in three 1000-Yr. coupled ocean-atmosphere model integrations

    SciTech Connect

    Stouffer, R.J.; Hegerl, G.; Tett, S.

    2000-02-01

    This study compares the variability of surface air temperature in three long coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation model integrations. It is shown that the annual mean climatology of the surface air temperatures (SAT) in all three models is realistic and the linear trends over the 1,000-yr integrations are small over most areas of the globe. Second, although there are notable differences among the models, the models' SAT variability is fairly realistic on annual to decadal timescales, both in terms of the geographical distribution and of the global mean values. A notable exception is the poor simulation of observed tropical Pacific variability. In the HadCM2 model, the tropical variability is overestimated, while in the GFDL and HAM3L models, it is underestimated. Also, the ENSO-related spectral peak in the globally averaged observed SAT differs from that in any of the models. The relatively low resolution required to integrate models for long time periods inhibits the successful simulation of the variability in this region. On timescales longer than a few decades, the largest variance in the models is generally located near sea ice margins in high latitudes, which are also regions of deep oceanic convection and variability related to variations in the thermohaline circulation. However, the exact geographical location of these maxima varies from model to model. The preferred patterns of interdecadal variability that are common to all three coupled models can be isolated by computing empirical orthogonal functions (EOFs) of all model data simultaneously using the common EOF technique. A comparison of the variance each model associated with these common EOF patterns shows that the models generally agree on the most prominent patterns of variability. However, the amplitudes of the dominant models of variability differ to some extent between the models and between the models and observations. For example, two of the models have a mode with relatively large

  11. Coupling lead isotopes and element concentrations in epiphytic lichens to track sources of air emissions in the Alberta Oil Sands Region

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study was conducted that coupled use of element concentrations and lead (Pb) isotope ratios in the lichen Hypogymnia physodes collected during 2002 and 2008, to assess the impacts of air emissions from the Alberta Oil Sands Region (AOSR, Canada) mining and processing operations...

  12. Acoustic emission monitoring system

    DOEpatents

    Romrell, Delwin M.

    1977-07-05

    Methods and apparatus for identifying the source location of acoustic emissions generated within an acoustically conductive medium. A plurality of acoustic receivers are communicably coupled to the surface of the medium at a corresponding number of spaced locations. The differences in the reception time of the respective sensors in response to a given acoustic event are measured among various sensor combinations prescribed by the monitoring mode employed. Acoustic reception response encountered subsequent to the reception by a predetermined number of the prescribed sensor combinations are inhibited from being communicated to the processing circuitry, while the time measurements obtained from the prescribed sensor combinations are translated into a position measurement representative of the location on the surface most proximate the source of the emission. The apparatus is programmable to function in six separate and five distinct operating modes employing either two, three or four sensory locations. In its preferred arrangement the apparatus of this invention will re-initiate a monitoring interval if the predetermined number of sensors do not respond to a particular emission within a given time period.

  13. Strong coupling in non-polar GaN/AlGaN microcavities with air-gap/III-nitride distributed Bragg reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Renchun; Arita, Munetaka; Kako, Satoshi; Kamide, Kenji; Arakawa, Yasuhiko

    2015-09-01

    Strong coupling between excitons and photons is experimentally demonstrated in m-plane GaN/AlGaN microcavities (MCs) with air/AlGaN distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs) at room temperature. Strong coupling is confirmed by momentum space spectroscopy, and a Rabi splitting (Ω) of 84 meV is estimated. A Rabi splitting of 84 meV is the largest value reported in a III-nitride DBR MC to date and is mainly attributed to the shortened effective cavity length resulting from the high index contrast in the air-gap DBRs used here. These results show that III-nitride air-gap DBR MCs have a high potential for realizing high Ω / κ systems (where κ is the cavity loss).

  14. New high-order, semi-implicit Hybridized Discontinuous Galerkin - Spectral Element Method (HDG-SEM) for simulation of complex wave propagation involving coupling between seismic, hydro-acoustic and infrasonic waves: numerical analysis and case studies.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrana, S.; Vilotte, J. P.; Guillot, L.

    2015-12-01

    New seismological monitoring networks combine broadband seismic receivers, hydrophones and micro-barometers antenna, providing complementary observation of source-radiated waves. Exploiting these observations requires accurate and multi-media - elastic, hydro-acoustic, infrasound - wave simulation methods, in order to improve our physical understanding of energy exchanges at material interfaces.We present here a new development of a high-order Hybridized Discontinuous Galerkin (HDG) method, for the simulation of coupled seismic and acoustic wave propagation, within a unified framework ([1],[2]) allowing for continuous and discontinuous Spectral Element Methods (SEM) to be used in the same simulation, with conforming and non-conforming meshes. The HDG-SEM approximation leads to differential - algebraic equations, which can be solved implicitly using energy-preserving time-schemes.The proposed HDG-SEM is computationally attractive, when compared with classical Discontinuous Galerkin methods, involving only the approximation of the single-valued traces of the velocity field along the element interfaces as globally coupled unknowns. The formulation is based on a variational approximation of the physical fluxes, which are shown to be the explicit solution of an exact Riemann problem at each element boundaries. This leads to a highly parallel and efficient unstructured and high-order accurate method, which can be space-and-time adaptive.A numerical study of the accuracy and convergence of the HDG-SEM is performed through a number of case studies involving elastic-acoustic (infrasound) coupling with geometries of increasing complexity. Finally, the performance of the method is illustrated through realistic case studies involving ground wave propagation associated to topography effects.In conclusion, we outline some on-going extensions of the method.References:[1] Cockburn, B., Gopalakrishnan, J., Lazarov, R., Unified hybridization of discontinuous Galerkin, mixed and

  15. Acoustical studies on corrugated tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaguru, Rajavel

    Corrugated tubes and pipes offer greater global flexibility combined with local rigidity. They are used in numerous engineering applications such as vacuum cleaner hosing, air conditioning systems of aircraft and automobiles, HVAC control systems of heating ducts in buildings, compact heat exchangers, medical equipment and offshore gas and oil transportation flexible riser pipelines. Recently there has been a renewed research interest in analyzing the flow through a corrugated tube to understand the underlying mechanism of so called whistling, although the whistling in such a tube was identified in early twentieth century. The phenomenon of whistling in a corrugated tube is interesting because an airflow through a smooth walled tube of similar dimensions will not generate any whistling tones. Study of whistling in corrugated tubes is important because, it not only causes an undesirable noise problem but also results in flow-acoustic coupling. Such a coupling can cause significant structural vibrations due to flow-acoustic-structure interaction. This interaction would cause flow-induced vibrations that could result in severe damage to mechanical systems having corrugated tubes. In this research work, sound generation (whistling) in corrugated tubes due to airflow is analyzed using experimental as well as Computational Fluid Dynamics-Large Eddy Simulation (CFD-LES) techniques. Sound generation mechanisms resulting in whistling have been investigated. The whistling in terms of frequencies and sound pressure levels for different flow velocities are studied. The analytical and experimental studies are carried out to understand the influence of various parameters of corrugated tubes such as cavity length, cavity width, cavity depth, pitch, Reynolds numbers and number of corrugations. The results indicate that there is a good agreement between theoretically calculated, computationally predicted and experimentally measured whistling frequencies and sound pressure levels

  16. Air-sea interactions over Terra Nova Bay during winter: Simulation with a coupled atmosphere-polynya model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallée, Hubert

    A preliminary simulation of the Terra Nova Bay polynya has been performed with a coupled atmosphere-polynya model. The atmospheric model is a hydrostatic primitive equations model that has been validated previously by a simulation of the strong katabatic winds observed in that area. The polynya model includes a representation of the free drift of frazil ice and simple sea-ice dynamics and thermodynamics. Two and three-dimensional experiments have been performed under polar night conditions. Two-dimensional experiments show that an open (warm) water area influences significantly the atmospheric circulation in the antarctic coastal zone: an additional ice-breeze effect is simulated and is responsible for the strengthening of the katabatic winds near the coast. Because of the important temperature difference between the continental air and the ice-free ocean (up to 40°C), strong surface heat fluxes are simulated over the polynya. Finally, a three-dimensional experiment has been performed. The integration domain includes Terra Nova Bay. The polynya observed in that region is well simulated. It is found that heat losses from the polynya surface are stronger than previously thought but are probably constrained by the idealized representation of frazil ice, which is assumed to be uniform in each grid box. This stresses the need for having a better knowledge of frazil ice evolution in large polynyas.

  17. A fully-coupled implicit method for thermo-chemical nonequilibrium air at sub-orbital flight speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Chul; Yoon, Seokkwan

    1989-01-01

    A CFD technique is described in which the finite-rate chemistry in thermal and chemical nonequilibrium air is fully and implicitly coupled with the fluid motion. Developed for use in the suborbital hypersonic flight speed range, the method accounts for nonequilibrium vibrational and electronic excitation and dissociation, but not ionization. The steady-state solution to the resulting system of equations is obtained by using a lower-upper factorization and symmetric Gauss-Seidel sweeping technique through Newton iteration. Inversion of the left-hand-side matrices is replaced by scalar multiplications through the use of the diagonal dominance algorithm. The code, named CENS2H (Compressible-Euler-Navier-Stokes Two-Dimensional Hypersonic), is fully vectorized and requires about 8.8 x 10 to the -5th sec per node point per iteration using a Cray X-MP computer. Converged solutions are obtained after about 2400 iterations. Sample calculations are made for a circular cylinder and a 10 percent airfoil at 5 deg angle of attack. The calculated cylinder flow field agrees with that obtained experimentally. The code predicts a 10 percent change in lift, drag, and pitching moment for the airfoil due to the thermochemical phenomena.

  18. The Coupled Boundary Layers and Air-Sea Transfer (CBLAST) Experiments at the Martha's Vineyard Coastal Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edson, J. B.

    2001-12-01

    The Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) completed the initial phase of the Martha's Vineyard Coastal Observatory (MVCO) in July of 2001. The MVCO is being using to monitor coastal atmospheric and oceanic processes. Specifically, the observatory is expected to: - Provide continuous long-term observations for climate studies. - Provide a reliable system and rugged sensors that allow opportunistic sampling of extreme events. - Provide a local climatology for intensive, short duration field campaigns. - Further facilitate regional studies of coastal processes by providing infrastructure that supports easy access to power and data. This talk provides an example of the last two objectives using the low wind component of the Office of Naval Research's (ONR) Coupled Boundary Layers and Air-Sea Transfer (CBLAST) program. CBLAST-LOW has been designed to investigate air-sea interaction and coupled atmospheric and oceanic boundary layer dynamics at low wind speeds where the dynamic processes are driven and/or strongly modulated by thermal forcing. This effort is being carried out by scientists at WHOI, NPS, NOAA, NRL, Rutgers, UW/APL, JH/APL, OSU, NCAR, and other institutions, and includes observational and modeling components. The MVCO is providing observations and infrastructure in support of several intensive operating periods in the summers of 2001, 2002, and possibly 2003. During these periods, the observational network around the observatory was and will be greatly expanded using traditional oceanographic moorings and bottom mounted instrumentation, innovative 2- and 3-D moored and drifting arrays, survey ships, AUVs, satellite remote sensing, and heavily instrumented aircraft. In addition, the MVCO cabled components will be extended out to the 20-m isobath where we plan to deploy a 35-m tower. The tower will be instrumented from 15-m above the ocean surface to the ocean bottom with instruments capable of directly measuring the momentum, heat, and radiative

  19. Comparison of acoustic and seismic excitation, propagation, and scattering at an air-ground interface containing a mine-like inclusion.

    PubMed

    Muir, Thomas G; Costley, R Daniel; Sabatier, James M

    2014-01-01

    Finite element methods are utilized to model and compare the use of both a remote loudspeaker and a vertical shaker in the generation of sound and shear and interface waves in an elastic solid containing an imbedded elastic scatterer, which is resonant. Results for steady state and transient insonification are presented to illustrate excitation, propagation, and scattering mechanisms and effects. Comparisons of acoustic and vibratory excitation of the solid interface are made, with a view towards remote sensing of induced vibratory motion through optical measurement of the ground interface motion above the imbedded inclusion. Some advantages of the acoustic excitation method for exciting plate mode resonances in the target are observed. PMID:24437744

  20. Vibro-acoustics of a pressurized optical membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarazaga, Pablo A.; Johnson, Marty E.; Inman, Daniel J.

    2012-07-01

    Optical membranes are currently pursued for their ability to replace the conventional rigid mirrors that are used in space-based telescopes. Among some of the many benefits of using optical membranes is their ability to considerably reduce the weight of the structure. Given the low density of these thin-film membranes, the lower end dynamics play a more significant role than in their rigid plate-like counterparts. Space-based mirrors are subjected to a series of disturbances. Among those encountered are thermal radiation, debris impact, and slewing maneuvers. Thus, being able to model the dynamics appropriately is essential for the adequate performance of thin-film membrane mirrors. With this in mind, the work presented herein uses an impedance based modeling approach to describe the coupled dynamics of a pressurized optical membrane mirror with the end goal of performing vibration suppression of a membrane through acoustic excitation. First the effects of mass loading due to air surrounding a membrane and energy loss due to sound radiation to the far field are modeled in the case of a single membrane. These results are compared to the case of a membrane in vacuum. Second, the membrane is then coupled to a cylindrical cavity where the modeling takes into account the structural acoustic coupling between a cylindrical membrane and a rigid cylindrical cavity, similar to a drum. The coupled model also takes into account the energy loss by sound radiation to the far field due to the membrane's vibration. Third, this paper also looks at using a positive position feedback controller for vibration suppression of the membrane. This is done using a centralized acoustic source at the base of the cavity as the method of actuation. The acoustic actuation is of great interest since it does not mass load the membrane in the conventional way, as most methods of actuation would.

  1. Evaluation of a regional air-quality model with bi-directional NH3 exchange coupled to an agro-ecosystem model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bash, J. O.; Cooter, E. J.; Dennis, R. L.; Walker, J. T.; Pleim, J. E.

    2012-08-01

    Atmospheric ammonia (NH3) is the primary atmospheric base and an important precursor for inorganic particulate matter and when deposited NH3 contributes to surface water eutrophication, soil acidification and decline in species biodiversity. Flux measurements indicate that the air-surface exchange of NH3 is bi-directional. However, the effects of bi-directional exchange, soil biogeochemistry and human activity are not parameterized in air quality models. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)'s Community Multiscale Air-Quality (CMAQ) model with bi-directional NH3 exchange has been coupled with the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA)'s Environmental Policy Integrated Climate (EPIC) agro-ecosystem model's nitrogen geochemistry algorithms. CMAQ with bi-directional NH3 exchange coupled to EPIC connects agricultural cropping management practices to emissions and atmospheric concentrations of reduced nitrogen and models the biogeochemical feedback on NH3 air-surface exchange. This coupled modeling system reduced the biases and error in NHx (NH3 + NH4+) wet deposition and in ambient aerosol concentrations in an annual 2002 Continental US (CONUS) domain simulation when compared to a 2002 annual simulation of CMAQ without bi-directional exchange. Fertilizer emissions estimated in CMAQ 5.0 with bi-directional exchange exhibits markedly different seasonal dynamics than the US EPA's National Emissions Inventory (NEI), with lower emissions in the spring and fall and higher emissions in July.

  2. Room Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuttruff, Heinrich; Mommertz, Eckard

    The traditional task of room acoustics is to create or formulate conditions which ensure the best possible propagation of sound in a room from a sound source to a listener. Thus, objects of room acoustics are in particular assembly halls of all kinds, such as auditoria and lecture halls, conference rooms, theaters, concert halls or churches. Already at this point, it has to be pointed out that these conditions essentially depend on the question if speech or music should be transmitted; in the first case, the criterion for transmission quality is good speech intelligibility, in the other case, however, the success of room-acoustical efforts depends on other factors that cannot be quantified that easily, not least it also depends on the hearing habits of the listeners. In any case, absolutely "good acoustics" of a room do not exist.

  3. Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    ... slow growing tumor which arise primarily from the vestibular portion of the VIII cranial nerve and lie ... you have a "brain tumor" called acoustic neuroma (vestibular schwannoma). You think you are the only one ...

  4. Acoustic superlens using Helmholtz-resonator-based metamaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xishan; Yin, Jing; Yu, Gaokun Peng, Linhui; Wang, Ning

    2015-11-09

    Acoustic superlens provides a way to overcome the diffraction limit with respect to the wavelength of the bulk wave in air. However, the operating frequency range of subwavelength imaging is quite narrow. Here, an acoustic superlens is designed using Helmholtz-resonator-based metamaterials to broaden the bandwidth of super-resolution. An experiment is carried out to verify subwavelength imaging of double slits, the imaging of which can be well resolved in the frequency range from 570 to 650 Hz. Different from previous works based on the Fabry-Pérot resonance, the corresponding mechanism of subwavelength imaging is the Fano resonance, and the strong coupling between the neighbouring Helmholtz resonators separated at the subwavelength interval leads to the enhanced sound transmission over a relatively wide frequency range.

  5. One way coupling of CMAQ and a road source dispersion model for fine scale air pollution predictions

    PubMed Central

    Beevers, Sean D.; Kitwiroon, Nutthida; Williams, Martin L.; Carslaw, David C.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we have coupled the CMAQ and ADMS air quality models to predict hourly concentrations of NOX, NO2 and O3 for London at a spatial scale of 20 m × 20 m. Model evaluation has demonstrated reasonable agreement with measurements from 80 monitoring sites in London. For NO2 the model evaluation statistics gave 73% of the hourly concentrations within a factor of two of observations, a mean bias of −4.7 ppb and normalised mean bias of −0.17, a RMSE value of 17.7 and an r value of 0.58. The equivalent results for O3 were 61% (FAC2), 2.8 ppb (MB), 0.15 (NMB), 12.1 (RMSE) and 0.64 (r). Analysis of the errors in the model predictions by hour of the week showed the need for improvements in predicting the magnitude of road transport related NOX emissions as well as the hourly emissions scaling in the model. These findings are consistent with recent evidence of UK road transport NOX emissions, reported elsewhere. The predictions of wind speed using the WRF model also influenced the model results and contributed to the daytime over prediction of NOX concentrations at the central London background site at Kensington and Chelsea. An investigation of the use of a simple NO–NO2–O3 chemistry scheme showed good performance close to road sources, and this is also consistent with previous studies. The coupling of the two models raises an issue of emissions double counting. Here, we have put forward a pragmatic solution to this problem with the result that a median double counting error of 0.42% exists across 39 roadside sites in London. Finally, whilst the model can be improved, the current results show promise and demonstrate that the use of a combination of regional scale and local scale models can provide a practical modelling tool for policy development at intergovernmental, national and local authority level, as well as for use in epidemiological studies. PMID:23471172

  6. One way coupling of CMAQ and a road source dispersion model for fine scale air pollution predictions.

    PubMed

    Beevers, Sean D; Kitwiroon, Nutthida; Williams, Martin L; Carslaw, David C

    2012-11-01

    In this paper we have coupled the CMAQ and ADMS air quality models to predict hourly concentrations of NO X , NO2 and O3 for London at a spatial scale of 20 m × 20 m. Model evaluation has demonstrated reasonable agreement with measurements from 80 monitoring sites in London. For NO2 the model evaluation statistics gave 73% of the hourly concentrations within a factor of two of observations, a mean bias of -4.7 ppb and normalised mean bias of -0.17, a RMSE value of 17.7 and an r value of 0.58. The equivalent results for O3 were 61% (FAC2), 2.8 ppb (MB), 0.15 (NMB), 12.1 (RMSE) and 0.64 (r). Analysis of the errors in the model predictions by hour of the week showed the need for improvements in predicting the magnitude of road transport related NO X emissions as well as the hourly emissions scaling in the model. These findings are consistent with recent evidence of UK road transport NO X emissions, reported elsewhere. The predictions of wind speed using the WRF model also influenced the model results and contributed to the daytime over prediction of NO X concentrations at the central London background site at Kensington and Chelsea. An investigation of the use of a simple NO-NO2-O3 chemistry scheme showed good performance close to road sources, and this is also consistent with previous studies. The coupling of the two models raises an issue of emissions double counting. Here, we have put forward a pragmatic solution to this problem with the result that a median double counting error of 0.42% exists across 39 roadside sites in London. Finally, whilst the model can be improved, the current results show promise and demonstrate that the use of a combination of regional scale and local scale models can provide a practical modelling tool for policy development at intergovernmental, national and local authority level, as well as for use in epidemiological studies. PMID:23471172

  7. Optimization of Sensing and Feedback Control for Vibration/Flutter of Rotating Disk by PZT Actuators via Air Coupled Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Tianhong; Xu, Xinsheng; Han, Jianqiang; Lin, Rongming; Ju, Bingfeng; Li, Qing

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a feedback control mechanism and its optimization for rotating disk vibration/flutter via changes of air-coupled pressure generated using piezoelectric patch actuators are studied. A thin disk rotates in an enclosure, which is equipped with a feedback control loop consisting of a micro-sensor, a signal processor, a power amplifier, and several piezoelectric (PZT) actuator patches distributed on the cover of the enclosure. The actuator patches are mounted on the inner or the outer surfaces of the enclosure to produce necessary control force required through the airflow around the disk. The control mechanism for rotating disk flutter using enclosure surfaces bonded with sensors and piezoelectric actuators is thoroughly studied through analytical simulations. The sensor output is used to determine the amount of input to the actuator for controlling the response of the disk in a closed loop configuration. The dynamic stability of the disk-enclosure system, together with the feedback control loop, is analyzed as a complex eigenvalue problem, which is solved using Galerkin’s discretization procedure. The results show that the disk flutter can be reduced effectively with proper configurations of the control gain and the phase shift through the actuations of PZT patches. The effectiveness of different feedback control methods in altering system characteristics and system response has been investigated. The control capability, in terms of control gain, phase shift, and especially the physical configuration of actuator patches, are also evaluated by calculating the complex eigenvalues and the maximum displacement produced by the actuators. To achieve a optimal control performance, sizes, positions and shapes of PZT patches used need to be optimized and such optimization has been achieved through numerical simulations. PMID:22163788

  8. Effects of sensor locations on air-coupled surface wave transmission measurements across a surface-breaking crack.

    PubMed

    Kee, Seong-Hoon; Zhu, Jinying

    2011-02-01

    Previous studies show that the surface wave transmission (SWT) method is effective to determine the depth of a surface-breaking crack in solid materials. However, nearfield wave scattering caused by the crack affects the reliability and consistency of surface wave transmission measurements. Prior studies on near-field scattering have focused on the case where crack depth h is greater than wavelength λ of surface waves (i.e., h/λ > 1). Near-field scattering of surface waves remains not completely understood in the range of h/λ for the SWT method (i.e., 0 ≤ h/λ ≤ 1/3), where the transmission coefficient is sensitive to crack depth change and monotonically decreases with increasing h/λ. In this study, the authors thoroughly investigated the near-field scattering of surface waves caused by a surface-breaking crack using experimental tests and numerical simulations for 0 ≤ h/λ ≤ 1/3. First, the effects of sensor locations on surface wave transmission coefficients across a surface-breaking crack are studied experimentally. Data are collected from Plexiglas and concrete specimens using air-coupled sensors. As a result, the variation of transmission coefficients is expressed in terms of the normalized crack depth (h/λ) as well as the normalized sensor location (x/λ). The validity of finite element models is also verified by comparing experimental results with numerical simulations (finite element method). Second, a series of parametric studies is performed using the verified finite element model to obtain more complete understanding of near-field scattering of surface waves propagating in various solid materials with different mechanical properties and geometric conditions. Finally, a guideline for selecting appropriate sensor arrangements to reliably obtain the crack depth using the SWT method is suggested. PMID:21342828

  9. Acoustic asymmetric transmission based on time-dependent dynamical scattering

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qing; Yang, Yang; Ni, Xu; Xu, Ye-Long; Sun, Xiao-Chen; Chen, Ze-Guo; Feng, Liang; Liu, Xiao-ping; Lu, Ming-Hui; Chen, Yan-Feng

    2015-01-01

    An acoustic asymmetric transmission device exhibiting unidirectional transmission property for acoustic waves is extremely desirable in many practical scenarios. Such a unique property may be realized in various configurations utilizing acoustic Zeeman effects in moving media as well as frequency-conversion in passive nonlinear acoustic systems and in active acoustic systems. Here we demonstrate a new acoustic frequency conversion process in a time-varying system, consisting of a rotating blade and the surrounding air. The scattered acoustic waves from this time-varying system experience frequency shifts, which are linearly dependent on the blade’s rotating frequency. Such scattering mechanism can be well described theoretically by an acoustic linear time-varying perturbation theory. Combining such time-varying scattering effects with highly efficient acoustic filtering, we successfully develop a tunable acoustic unidirectional device with 20 dB power transmission contrast ratio between two counter propagation directions at audible frequencies. PMID:26038886

  10. ELECTROMAGNETISM, OPTICS, ACOUSTICS, HEAT TRANSFER, CLASSICAL MECHANICS, AND FLUID DYNAMICS: Phase Effect on Mode Coupling in Kelvin-Helmholtz Instability for Two-Dimensional Incompressible Fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Li-Feng; Teng, Ai-Ping; Ye, Wen-Hua; Xue, Chuang; Fan, Zheng-Feng; Li, Ying-Jun

    2009-10-01

    This paper studies the phase effect in mode coupling of Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in two-dimensional incompressible fluid. It is found that there is an important growth phenomenon of every mode in the mode coupling process. The growth changes periodically with phase difference and in the condition of our simulation the period is about 0.7π. The period characteristic is apparent in all stage of the mode coupling process, especially in the relatively later stage.

  11. Loose-coupling an air dispersion model and a geographic information system (GIS) for studying air pollution and asthma in the Bronx, New York City.

    PubMed

    Maantay, Juliana A; Tu, Jun; Maroko, Andrew R

    2009-02-01

    This study developed new procedures to loosely integrate an air dispersion model, AERMOD, and a geographic information system (GIS) package, ArcGIS, to simulate air dispersion from stationary sources in the Bronx, New York City, for five pollutants: PM(10), PM(2.5), NO(x), CO, and SO(2). Plume buffers created from the model results were used as proxies of human exposure to the pollution from the sources and they modified the commonly used fixed-distance proximity buffers by considering the realities of air dispersion. The application of the plume buffers confirmed that the higher asthma hospitalization rates were associated with the higher potential exposure to local air pollution. The air dispersion modeling exhibited advantages over proximity analysis and geostatistical methods for environmental health research. The loose integration provides a relatively simple and feasible method for health scientists to take advantage of both air dispersion modeling and GIS by avoiding the need for intensive programming and substantial GIS expertise. PMID:19241247

  12. Acoustic scattering response of hierarchic honeycomb structures for cylindrical and spherical structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mor, Arun

    Sandwich panels with honeycomb core are often employed in structures for improved mechanical properties with lightweight. Honeycombs are defined by non-overlapping and periodic unit cells. Most research conducted on these sandwich panels focuses on stiffness and strength properties. The acoustic aspect of these panels has been focused on sound transmission loss. For acoustics, previous studies used effective honeycomb orthotropic elastic moduli based on Cartesian unit cell geometry to model the core as a homogeneous structure. While efficient, this modeling approach loses accuracy at higher frequencies. Furthermore, when used for curved panels, the effective moduli are only approximate. In this work, mechanical and acoustic characteristics of cylindrical and spherical honeycomb panels are studied using finite element analysis. The unit cell geometry core is oriented both radially and in the transverse direction. The models are analyzed for sound scattering measured by target strength with interactions between structure and the acoustic medium through coupling between the domains. Both air and water are compared for the acoustic region. Different honeycomb core geometries varying in the hexagon arrangement, number of unit cells and level of hierarchy are studied. The structures developed are constrained to have the same total mass allowing for comparisons based on only changes in stiffness properties. The effect of face sheet thickness on the mechanical and acoustic properties of the curved sandwich structures is also studied. The vibration and acoustic scattering behavior of these structures have been investigated for natural frequencies between 1-1000 Hz to predict and understand the different responses near and at resonances. The target strength response of the structures has been studied in the near field at both front and back of the structures. The effect of acoustic coupling is observed clearly on varying the outer domains properties between air and water. It

  13. Design, construction, activation, and operation of a high intensity acoustic test chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamel, L. T.

    1986-01-01

    The design philosophy, construction, integration, and activation of the high intensity acoustic test chamber for production acceptance testing of satellites are discussed. The 32,000 cubic-foot acoustic test cell consists of a steel reinforced concrete chamber with six electropneumatic noise generators. One of the innovative features of the chamber is a unique quarter horn assembly that acoustically couples the noise generators to the chamber. Design concepts, model testing, and evaluation results are presented. Considerations such as nitrogen versus compressed air source, digital closed loop spectrum control versus manual equalizers, and microprocessor based interlock systems are included. Construction difficulties, anomalies encountered, and their resolution are also discussed. Results of the readiness testing are highlighted.

  14. Acoustically enhanced heat transport.

    PubMed

    Ang, Kar M; Yeo, Leslie Y; Friend, James R; Hung, Yew Mun; Tan, Ming K

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the enhancement of heat transfer in the nucleate boiling regime by inducing high frequency acoustic waves (f ∼ 10(6) Hz) on the heated surface. In the experiments, liquid droplets (deionized water) are dispensed directly onto a heated, vibrating substrate. At lower vibration amplitudes (ξs ∼ 10(-9) m), the improved heat transfer is mainly due to the detachment of vapor bubbles from the heated surface and the induced thermal mixing. Upon increasing the vibration amplitude (ξs ∼ 10(-8) m), the heat transfer becomes more substantial due to the rapid bursting of vapor bubbles happening at the liquid-air interface as a consequence of capillary waves travelling in the thin liquid film between the vapor bubble and the air. Further increases then lead to rapid atomization that continues to enhance the heat transfer. An acoustic wave displacement amplitude on the order of 10(-8) m with 10(6) Hz order frequencies is observed to produce an improvement of up to 50% reduction in the surface temperature over the case without acoustic excitation. PMID:26827343

  15. Acoustically enhanced heat transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ang, Kar M.; Yeo, Leslie Y.; Friend, James R.; Hung, Yew Mun; Tan, Ming K.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the enhancement of heat transfer in the nucleate boiling regime by inducing high frequency acoustic waves (f ˜ 106 Hz) on the heated surface. In the experiments, liquid droplets (deionized water) are dispensed directly onto a heated, vibrating substrate. At lower vibration amplitudes (ξs ˜ 10-9 m), the improved heat transfer is mainly due to the detachment of vapor bubbles from the heated surface and the induced thermal mixing. Upon increasing the vibration amplitude (ξs ˜ 10-8 m), the heat transfer becomes more substantial due to the rapid bursting of vapor bubbles happening at the liquid-air interface as a consequence of capillary waves travelling in the thin liquid film between the vapor bubble and the air. Further increases then lead to rapid atomization that continues to enhance the heat transfer. An acoustic wave displacement amplitude on the order of 10-8 m with 106 Hz order frequencies is observed to produce an improvement of up to 50% reduction in the surface temperature over the case without acoustic excitation.

  16. Regional coupled ocean-atmosphere downscaling in the Southeast Pacific: impacts on upwelling, mesoscale air-sea fluxes, and ocean eddies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putrasahan, Dian A.; Miller, Arthur J.; Seo, Hyodae

    2013-05-01

    Ocean-atmosphere coupling in the Humboldt Current System (HCS) of the Southeast Pacific is studied using the Scripps Coupled Ocean-atmosphere Regional (SCOAR) model, which is used to downscale the National Center for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Reanalysis-2 (RA2) product for the period 2000-2007 at 20-km resolution. An interactive 2-D spatial smoother within the sea-surface temperature (SST)-flux coupler is invoked in a separate run to isolate the impact of the mesoscale (˜50-200 km, in the oceanic sense) SST field felt by the atmosphere in the fully coupled run. For the HCS, SCOAR produces seasonal wind stress and wind stress curl patterns that agree better with QuikSCAT winds than those from RA2. The SCOAR downscaled wind stress distribution has substantially different impacts on the magnitude and structure of wind-driven upwelling processes along the coast compared to RA2. Along coastal locations such as Arica and Taltal, SCOAR and RA2 produce seasonally opposite signs in the total wind-driven upwelling transport. At San Juan, SCOAR shows that upwelling is mainly due to coastal Ekman upwelling transport, while in RA2 upwelling is mostly attributed to Ekman pumping. Fully coupled SCOAR shows significant SST-wind stress coupling during fall and winter, while smoothed SCOAR shows insignificant coupling throughout, indicating the important role of ocean mesoscale eddies on air-sea coupling in HCS. Coupling between SST, wind speed, and latent heat flux is incoherent in large-scale coupling and full coupling mode. In contrast, coupling between these three variables is clearly identified for oceanic mesoscales, which suggests that mesoscale SST affects latent heat directly through the bulk formulation, as well as indirectly through stability changes on the overlying atmosphere, which affects surface wind speeds. The SST-wind stress and SST-heat-flux couplings, however, fail to produce a strong change in the ocean eddy statistics. No rectified effects of ocean

  17. Method and means for measuring acoustic emissions

    DOEpatents

    Renken, Jr., Claus J.

    1976-01-06

    The detection of acoustic emissions emanating from an object is achieved with a capacitive transducer coupled to the object. The capacitive transducer is charged and then allowed to discharge with the rate of discharge being monitored. Oscillations in the rate of discharge about the normally exponential discharge curve for the capacitive transducer indicate the presence of acoustic emissions.

  18. Dust-Acoustic Waves: Visible Sound Waves

    SciTech Connect

    Merlino, Robert L.

    2009-11-10

    A historical overview of some of the early theoretical and experimental work on dust acoustic waves is given. The basic physics of the dust acoustic wave and some of the theoretical refinements that have been made, including the effects of collisions, plasma absorption, dust charge fluctuations, particle drifts and strong coupling effects are discussed. Some recent experimental findings and outstanding problems are also presented.

  19. Acoustic detection of electron spin resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coufal, H.

    1981-07-01

    The ESR-signal of DPPH was recorded by detecting the modulation of the absorbed microwave power with a gas-coupled microphone. This photo-acoustic detection scheme is compared with conventional ESR-detection. Applications of the acoustical detection method to other modulation spectroscopic techniques, particularly NMR, are discussed.

  20. Acoustic metamaterials for sound mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assouar, Badreddine; Oudich, Mourad; Zhou, Xiaoming

    2016-05-01

    We provide theoretical and numerical analyses of the behavior of a plate-type acoustic metamaterial considered in an air-borne sound environment in view of sound mitigation application. Two configurations of plate are studied, a spring-mass one and a pillar system-based one. The acoustic performances of the considered systems are investigated with different approaches and show that a high sound transmission loss (STL) up to 82 dB is reached with a metamaterial plate with a thickness of 0.5 mm. The physical understanding of the acoustic behavior of the metamaterial partition is discussed based on both air-borne and structure-borne approaches. Confrontation between the STL, the band structure, the displacement fields and the effective mass density of the plate metamaterial is made to have a complete physical understanding of the different mechanisms involved. xml:lang="fr"

  1. Vibro-acoustic analysis of the acoustic-structure interaction of flexible structure due to acoustic excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djojodihardjo, Harijono

    2015-03-01

    The application of BE-FE acoustic-structure interaction on a structure subject to acoustic load is elaborated using the boundary element-finite element acoustic structural coupling and the utilization of the computational scheme developed earlier. The plausibility of the numerical treatment is investigated and validated through application to generic cases. The analysis carried out in the work is intended to serve as a baseline in the analysis of acoustic structure interaction for lightweight structures. Results obtained thus far exhibit the robustness of the method developed.

  2. Longitudinal bulk acoustic mass sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Hales, J. H.; Teva, J.; Boisen, A.; Davis, Z. J.

    2009-07-20

    A polycrystalline silicon longitudinal bulk acoustic cantilever is fabricated and operated in air at 51 MHz. A mass sensitivity of 100 Hz/fg (1 fg=10{sup -15} g) is obtained from the preliminary experiments where a minute mass is deposited on the device by means of focused ion beam. The total noise in the currently applied measurement system allows for a minimum detectable mass of 0.5 fg in air.

  3. Structural Acoustics and Vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaigne, Antoine

    This structural chapter is devoted to vibrations of structures and to their coupling with the acoustic field. Depending on the context, the radiated sound can be judged as desirable, as is mostly the case for musical instruments, or undesirable, like noise generated by machinery. In architectural acoustics, one main goal is to limit the transmission of sound through walls. In the automobile industry, the engineers have to control the noise generated inside and outside the passenger compartment. This can be achieved by means of passive or active damping. In general, there is a strong need for quieter products and better sound quality generated by the structures in our daily environment.

  4. Evanescent Wave Coupling in a Geophysical System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evers, L. G.

    2014-12-01

    Earthquakes and explosions generate elastic waves in the solid earth, oceans and atmosphere. Underwater earthquakes are one of the dominant sources of hydro-acoustic waves in the oceans. However, atmospheric low frequency sound, i.e., infrasound, from underwater events has not been considered thus far, due to the high impedance contrast of the water-air interface making it almost fully reflective. Here, we report for the first time on atmospheric infrasound from a large underwater earthquake (Mw 8.1). Seismic waves coupled to hydro-acoustic waves at the ocean floor, after which the energy entered the SOund Fixing And Ranging (SOFAR) channel. The energy was diffracted by a sea mount and an oceanic ridge, which acted as a secondary source, into the water column followed by coupling into the atmosphere. The latter results from evanescent wave coupling and the attendant anomalous transparency of the sea surface for very low frequent acoustic waves. Current research focuses on the contribution of underwater sources to ambient atmospheric noise field of infrasonic waves. Such infrasonic energy is expected to be partly absorbed in the upper atmosphere, i.e., mesosphere and thermosphere.

  5. SES and Acoustics at GSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hogue, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents air and surface cleanliness characterization of the acoustics test facility and large (SES) thermal vacuum chamber at Goddard Space flight Center in Greenbelt, MD during the New Horizons Pluto probe program. It is shown that slow back-fill of the SES chamber is necessary to prevent excessive particle redistribution.

  6. Acoustical Modifications for the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crandell, Carl C.; Smaldino, Joseph J.

    1999-01-01

    This article reviews procedures for evaluating, measuring, and modifying noise and reverberation levels in the classroom environment. Recommendations include: relocating children away from high noise sources, such as fans, air conditioners, heating ducts, and faulty lighting fixtures, using sound-absorbing materials, using acoustical ceiling tile…

  7. Acoustic fault injection tool (AFIT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoess, Jeffrey N.

    1999-05-01

    On September 18, 1997, Honeywell Technology Center (HTC) successfully completed a three-week flight test of its rotor acoustic monitoring system (RAMS) at Patuxent River Flight Test Center. This flight test was the culmination of an ambitious 38-month proof-of-concept effort directed at demonstrating the feasibility of detecting crack propagation in helicopter rotor components. The program was funded as part of the U.S. Navy's Air Vehicle Diagnostic Systems (AVDS) program. Reductions in Navy maintenance budgets and available personnel have dictated the need to transition from time-based to 'condition-based' maintenance. Achieving this will require new enabling diagnostic technologies. The application of acoustic emission for the early detection of helicopter rotor head dynamic component faults has proven the feasibility of the technology. The flight-test results demonstrated that stress-wave acoustic emission technology can detect signals equivalent to small fatigue cracks in rotor head components and can do so across the rotating articulated rotor head joints and in the presence of other background acoustic noise generated during flight operation. During the RAMS flight test, 12 test flights were flown from which 25 Gbyte of digital acoustic data and about 15 hours of analog flight data recorder (FDR) data were collected from the eight on-rotor acoustic sensors. The focus of this paper is to describe the CH-46 flight-test configuration and present design details about a new innovative machinery diagnostic technology called acoustic fault injection. This technology involves the injection of acoustic sound into machinery to assess health and characterize operational status. The paper will also address the development of the Acoustic Fault Injection Tool (AFIT), which was successfully demonstrated during the CH-46 flight tests.

  8. Impacts of air-sea interactions on regional air quality predictions using WRF/Chem v3.6.1 coupled with ROMS v3.7: southeastern US example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, J.; He, R.; Zhang, Y.

    2015-11-01

    Air-sea interactions have significant impacts on coastal convection and surface fluxes exchange, which are important for the spatial and vertical distributions of air pollutants that affect public health, particularly in densely populated coastal areas. To understand the impacts of air-sea interactions on coastal air quality predictions, sensitivity simulations with different cumulus parameterization schemes and atmosphere-ocean coupling are conducted in this work over southeastern US in July 2010 using the Weather Research and Forecasting Model with Chemistry (WRF/Chem). The results show that different cumulus parameterization schemes can result in an 85 m difference in the domain averaged planetary boundary layer height (PBLH), and 4.8 mm difference in the domain averaged daily precipitation. Comparing to WRF/Chem without air-sea interactions, WRF/Chem with a 1-D ocean mixed layer model (WRF/Chem-OML) and WRF/Chem coupled with a 3-D Regional Ocean Modeling System (WRF/Chem-ROMS) predict the domain averaged changes in the sea surface temperature of 0.1 and 1.0 °C, respectively. The simulated differences in the surface concentrations of ozone (O3) and PM2.5 between WRF/Chem-ROMS and WRF/Chem can be as large as 17.3 ppb and 7.9 μg m-3, respectively. The largest changes simulated from WRF/Chem-ROMS in surface concentrations of O3 and particulate matter with diameter less than and equal to 2.5 μm (PM2.5) occur not only along coast and remote ocean, but also over some inland areas. Extensive validations against observations, show that WRF/Chem-ROMS improves the predictions of most cloud and radiative variables, and surface concentrations of some chemical species such as sulfur dioxide, nitric acid, maximum 1 h and 8 h O3, sulfate, ammonium, nitrate, and particulate matter with diameter less than and equal to 10 μm (PM10). This illustrates the benefits and needs of using coupled atmospheric-ocean model with advanced model representations of air-sea interactions for

  9. Microfluidic device for acoustic cell lysis

    DOEpatents

    Branch, Darren W.; Cooley, Erika Jane; Smith, Gennifer Tanabe; James, Conrad D.; McClain, Jaime L.

    2015-08-04

    A microfluidic acoustic-based cell lysing device that can be integrated with on-chip nucleic acid extraction. Using a bulk acoustic wave (BAW) transducer array, acoustic waves can be coupled into microfluidic cartridges resulting in the lysis of cells contained therein by localized acoustic pressure. Cellular materials can then be extracted from the lysed cells. For example, nucleic acids can be extracted from the lysate using silica-based sol-gel filled microchannels, nucleic acid binding magnetic beads, or Nafion-coated electrodes. Integration of cell lysis and nucleic acid extraction on-chip enables a small, portable system that allows for rapid analysis in the field.

  10. Mining Information form a Coupled Air Quality Model to Examine the Impacts of Agricultural Management Practices on Air and Groundwater Quality

    EPA Science Inventory

    Attributing nitrogen (N) in the environment to emissions from agricultural management practices is difficult because of the complex and inter-related chemical and biological reactions associated with N and its cascading effects across land, air and water. Such analyses are criti...

  11. Mining Environmental Data from a Coupled Modelling System to Examine the Impact of Agricultural Management Practices on Groundwater and Air Quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, V.; Cooter, E. J.; Hayes, B.; Murphy, M. S.; Bash, J. O.

    2014-12-01

    Excess nitrogen (N) resulting from current agricultural management practices can leach into sources of drinking water as nitrate, increasing human health risks of 'blue baby syndrome', hypertension, and some cancers and birth defects. Nitrogen also enters the atmosphere from land surfaces forming air pollution increasing human health risks of pulmonary and cardio-vascular disease. Characterizing and attributing nitrogen from agricultural management practices is difficult due to the complex and inter-related chemical and biological reactions associated with the nitrogen cascade. Coupled physical process-based models, however, present new opportunities to investigate relationships among environmental variables on new scales; particularly because they link emission sources with meteorology and the pollutant concentration ultimately found in the environment. In this study, we applied a coupled meteorology (NOAA-WRF), agricultural (USDA-EPIC) and air quality modelling system (EPA-CMAQ) to examine the impact of nitrogen inputs from corn production on ecosystem and human health and wellbeing. The coupled system accounts for the nitrogen flux between the land surface and air, and the soil surface and groundwater, providing a unique opportunity to examine the effect of management practices such as type and timing of fertilization, tilling and irrigation on both groundwater and air quality across the conterminous US. In conducting the study, we first determined expected relationships based on literature searches and then identified model variables as direct or surrogate variables. We performed extensive and methodical multi-variate regression modelling and variable selection to examine associations between agricultural management practices and environmental condition. We then applied the regression model to predict and contrast pollution levels between two corn production scenarios (Figure 1). Finally, we applied published health functions (e.g., spina bifida and cardio

  12. Acoustic levitation of a large solid sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade, Marco A. B.; Bernassau, Anne L.; Adamowski, Julio C.

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate that acoustic levitation can levitate spherical objects much larger than the acoustic wavelength in air. The acoustic levitation of an expanded polystyrene sphere of 50 mm in diameter, corresponding to 3.6 times the wavelength, is achieved by using three 25 kHz ultrasonic transducers arranged in a tripod fashion. In this configuration, a standing wave is created between the transducers and the sphere. The axial acoustic radiation force generated by each transducer on the sphere was modeled numerically as a function of the distance between the sphere and the transducer. The theoretical acoustic radiation force was verified experimentally in a setup consisting of an electronic scale and an ultrasonic transducer mounted on a motorized linear stage. The comparison between the numerical and experimental acoustic radiation forces presents a good agreement.

  13. Design and Characterization of a High-power Laser-induced Acoustic Desorption (LIAD) Probe Coupled with a Fourier-transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometer

    PubMed Central

    Shea, Ryan C.; Habicht, Steven C.; Vaughn, Weldon E.; Kenttämaa, Hilkka I.

    2008-01-01

    We report here the construction and characterization of a high-power laser-induced acoustic desorption (LIAD) probe designed for Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometers to facilitate analysis of non-volatile, thermally labile compounds. This “next generation” LIAD probe offers significant improvements in sensitivity and desorption efficiency for analytes with larger molecular weights via the use of higher laser irradiances. Unlike the previous probes which utilized a power limiting optical fiber to transmit the laser pulses through the probe, this probe employs a set of mirrors and a focusing lens. At the end of the probe, the energy from the laser pulses propagates through a thin metal foil as an acoustic wave, resulting in desorption of neutral molecules from the opposite side of the foil. Following desorption, the molecules can be ionized by electron impact or chemical ionization. Almost an order of magnitude greater power density (up to 5.0 × 109 W/cm2) is achievable on the backside of the foil with the high-power LIAD probe compared to the earlier LIAD probes (maximum power density ~9.0 × 108 W/cm2). The use of higher laser irradiances is demonstrated not to cause fragmentation of the analyte. The use of higher laser irradiances increases sensitivity since it results in the evaporation of a greater number of molecules per laser pulse. Measurement of the average velocities of LIAD evaporated molecules demonstrates that higher laser irradiances do not correlate with higher velocities of the gaseous analyte molecules. PMID:17319645

  14. Acoustically-tuned optical spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sklar, E.

    1981-01-01

    Lens arrangement corrects for aberrations and gives resolution of 0.7 seconds of arc. In spectrometer, light from telescope is relayed by doublet lens to acoustically tuned optical filter. Selected wavelengths are relayed by triplet lens to charge coupled device camera. Intervening cylindrical lens, tilted at 12 degree angle, corrects for astigmatism and coma introduced by two element birefringent crystal in filter.

  15. Mars Acoustic Anemometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banfield, D. J.

    2012-12-01

    is far less susceptible to contaminating influences as other techniques (e.g., hot wire/hot film) that have been used for anemometry at Mars. Our instrument is conceptually derived from the commercial terrestrial sonic anemometers, but uses specialized acoustic transducers to optimally couple with the low density martian air as well as survive the extreme temperature swings on Mars. Additionally, we use sophisticated signal processing to extract as much information as possible in the low S/N environment that is achievable at Mars. We have developed our instrument through to TRL 5, proving it in a martian wind tunnel in Denmark. We found wind speed sensitivities and precision to be of order 3 cm/s, and with appropriate calibration, accuracy can be similar, even when operating at 20-100 Hz. We will also test this instrument at 120,000' altitude (i.e., equivalent to Mars atmospheric density) as an autonomous package on a stratospheric balloon. We are currently developing a TRL 6 version of the instrument that will be tested once again in the Denmark Mars Wind Tunnel. We expect our flight configuration instrument to be about 1 kg, including a 1.5m mast. It will also draw about 2-3W of power. This instrument is now ready to be proposed for future Mars missions, where we believe it will make a significant contribution and a step forward in Mars atmospheric science.

  16. The evolution of air resonance power efficiency in the violin and its ancestors

    PubMed Central

    Nia, Hadi T.; Jain, Ankita D.; Liu, Yuming; Alam, Mohammad-Reza; Barnas, Roman; Makris, Nicholas C.

    2015-01-01

    The fact that acoustic radiation from a violin at air-cavity resonance is monopolar and can be determined by pure volume change is used to help explain related aspects of violin design evolution. By determining the acoustic conductance of arbitrarily shaped sound holes, it is found that air flow at the perimeter rather than the broader sound-hole area dominates acoustic conductance, and coupling between compressible air within the violin and its elastic structure lowers the Helmholtz resonance frequency from that found for a corresponding rigid instrument by roughly a semitone. As a result of the former, it is found that as sound-hole geometry of the violin's ancestors slowly evolved over centuries from simple circles to complex f-holes, the ratio of inefficient, acoustically inactive to total sound-hole area was decimated, roughly doubling air-resonance power efficiency. F-hole length then slowly increased by roughly 30% across two centuries in the renowned workshops of Amati, Stradivari and Guarneri, favouring instruments with higher air-resonance power, through a corresponding power increase of roughly 60%. By evolution-rate analysis, these changes are found to be consistent with mutations arising within the range of accidental replication fluctuations from craftsmanship limitations with subsequent selection favouring instruments with higher air-resonance power. PMID:25792964

  17. Effects of air resistance on AT-cut quartz thickness-shear resonators.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yangyang; Wang, Ji; Du, Jianke; Zhang, Weiping; Yang, Jiashi

    2013-02-01

    We study theoretically the effects of air resistance on an AT-cut quartz plate thickness-shear mode resonator. Mindlin's two-dimensional equations for coupled thickness-shear and flexural motions of piezoelectric plates are employed for the crystal resonator. The equations of a Newtonian fluid and the equations of linear acoustics are used for the shear and compressive waves in the air surrounding the resonator, respectively. Solutions for free and electrically forced vibrations are obtained. The impedance of the resonator is calculated. The effects of air resistance are examined. It is found that air viscosity causes a relative frequency shift of the order of ppm. When the material quality factor of quartz Q = 10(5), the air viscosity and compressibility both have significant effects on resonator impedance. For resonators with larger aspect ratios the effects of air resistance are weaker, and the effect of air compressibility is weaker than air viscosity. PMID:23357914

  18. Arctic acoustics ultrasonic modeling studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamuel, Jacques R.

    1990-03-01

    A unique collection of laboratory ultrasonic modeling results are presented revealing and characterizing hidden pulsed seismoacoustic wave phenomena from 3-D range dependent liquid/solid boundaries. The research succeeded in isolating and identifying low frequency (10 to 500 Hz) transmission loss mechanisms and provided physical insight into Arctic acoustic problems generally beyond the state-of-the-art of theoretical and numerical analysis. The ultrasonic modeling studies dealt with controversial issues and existing discrepancies on seismo-acoustic waves at water/ice interface, sea ice thickness determination, low frequency transmission loss, and bottom leaky Rayleigh waves. The areas investigated include leaky Rayleigh waves at water/ice interface, leaky flexural waves in floating ice plates, effects of dry/wet cracks in sea ice on plate waves and near grazing acoustic waves, edge waves in floating plates, low frequency backscatter from ice keel width resonances, conversion of underwater acoustic waves into plate waves by keels, nondispersive flexural wave along apex of small angle solid wedge, Scholte and leaky Rayleigh waves along apex of immersed 90 ice wedge, backscatter from trailing edge of floes, floating plate resonances associated with near-grazing underwater acoustic waves, acoustic coupling between adjacent floes, and multiple bottom leaky Rayleigh wave components in water layer over solid bottom.

  19. Vibro-acoustic analysis of composite plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarigül, A. S.; Karagözlü, E.

    2014-03-01

    Vibro-acoustic analysis plays a vital role on the design of aircrafts, spacecrafts, land vehicles and ships produced from thin plates backed by closed cavities, with regard to human health and living comfort. For this type of structures, it is required a coupled solution that takes into account structural-acoustic interaction which is crucial for sensitive solutions. In this study, coupled vibro-acoustic analyses of plates produced from composite materials have been performed by using finite element analysis software. The study has been carried out for E-glass/Epoxy, Kevlar/Epoxy and Carbon/Epoxy plates with different ply angles and numbers of ply. The effects of composite material, ply orientation and number of layer on coupled vibro-acoustic characteristics of plates have been analysed for various combinations. The analysis results have been statistically examined and assessed.

  20. Coupling Between Air and Ground Temperatures in PMIP3/CMIP5 Last Millennium Simulations and the Implications for Climate Reconstructions from Borehole Temperature Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beltrami, H.; García-García, A.; Cuesta-Valero, F. J.; Smerdon, J. E.

    2015-12-01

    The continental energy storage for the second half of the 20th20^{th} century has been estimated from geothermal data to be about 7±1×1021J7 ± 1 × 10^{21} J under the assumption that there exists a long-term coupling between the lower atmosphere and the continental subsurface. For General Circulation Models (GCMs) to simulate the continental energy storage of the Earth's energy budget, however, it is crucial that they correctly capture the processes that partition energy across the land-atmosphere boundary. We evaluate herein the characteristics of these processes as simulated by models in the third phase of the Paleoclimate Modelling Intercomparison Project and the fifth phase of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (PMIP33/CMIP55). We examine the seasonal differences between air and ground temperatures within PMIP3 last-millennium simulations concatenated with historical simulations from the CMIP5 archive. We find a strong air-ground coupling during the summer from 850850 to 20002000 CE. During the winter, the insulating effect of snow and latent heat exchanges produce a decoupling between air and ground temperatures in the northern high latitudes. These seasonal differences decrease with depth, supporting the central assumption of climate reconstructions from borehole temperature profiles. Additionally, we use the simulated temperature trends as an upper boundary condition to force a one-dimensional conductive model to derive synthetic temperature-depth profiles for each PMIP3/CMIP5 simulation. The inversions of these subsurface profiles yield temperature trends that retain the surface temperature variations of the last millennium for all the PMIP3/CMIP5 simulations. These results support the use of underground temperatures to reconstruct past changes in ground surface temperature and to estimate the continental energy storage. Results also provide guidance for improving the land-surface components of GCMs.