Science.gov

Sample records for air duct geometry

  1. The influence of air duct geometry on air jet direction in aircraft cabin ventilated by mixing ventilation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fišer, J.; Jícha, M.

    2013-04-01

    The paper deals with instigation of influence of air duct geometry on air jet direction in aircraft cabin ventilated by mixing ventilation. CFD approach was used for investigation and model geometry was based on small aircraft cabin mock-up geometry. Model was also equipped by nine seats and five manikins that represent passengers. The air jet direction was observed for selected ambient environment parameters and several types of air duct geometry and influence of main air duct geometry on jets direction is discussed. The model was created in StarCCM+ ver. 6.04.014 software and polyhedral mesh was used.

  2. 14 CFR 29.1103 - Induction systems ducts and air duct systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Induction systems ducts and air duct... TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Induction System § 29.1103 Induction systems ducts and air duct systems. (a) Each induction system duct upstream of the...

  3. 14 CFR 29.1103 - Induction systems ducts and air duct systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Induction systems ducts and air duct systems. 29.1103 Section 29.1103 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Induction System § 29.1103 Induction systems ducts and air...

  4. 14 CFR 25.1103 - Induction system ducts and air duct systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... between the air duct source and the airplane unit served by the air. (e) Each auxiliary power unit... other compartment or area of the airplane in which a hazard would be created resulting from the entry...

  5. 14 CFR 25.1103 - Induction system ducts and air duct systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... between the air duct source and the airplane unit served by the air. (e) Each auxiliary power unit... other compartment or area of the airplane in which a hazard would be created resulting from the entry...

  6. Advanced Strategy Guideline: Air Distribution Basics and Duct Design

    SciTech Connect

    Burdick, A.

    2011-12-01

    This report discusses considerations for designing an air distribution system for an energy efficient house that requires less air volume to condition the space. Considering the HVAC system early in the design process will allow adequate space for equipment and ductwork and can result in cost savings. Principles discussed that will maximize occupant comfort include delivery of the proper amount of conditioned air for appropriate temperature mixing and uniformity without drafts, minimization of system noise, the impacts of pressure loss, efficient return air duct design, and supply air outlet placement, as well as duct layout, materials, and sizing.

  7. AIR DUCTS STAND NEXT TO (AND OUTSIDE OF) REACTOR CABINET ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    AIR DUCTS STAND NEXT TO (AND OUTSIDE OF) REACTOR CABINET AT THE SOUTHWEST AND NORTHEAST CORNERS OF THE REACTOR'S THERMAL SHIELD. THEY WILL BE ENVELOPED IN BIOLOGICAL CONCRETE SHIELD. IN THE SUB-BASEMENT, THE TWO DUCTS WILL JOIN TOGETHER AND EXIT THE BUILDING TO THE FAN HOUSE. CAMERA FACING NORTH. INL NEGATIVE NO. 1625. Unknown Photographer, 3/6/1951 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  8. Low-noise flow valve for air ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallo, E. A.

    1970-01-01

    Valve assembly controls air flow from feeder into main duct, with minimum of turbulence, friction, pressure differential, and noise. Valve consists of damper, deflector, and spring. Streamlining of damper and deflector merges flow smoothly, while spring keeps damper and deflector in contact and eliminates valve chatter and damping vibrations.

  9. Vortex Shedding Inside a Baffled Air Duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Philip; Kenny, R. Jeremy

    2010-01-01

    Common in the operation of both segmented and un-segmented large solid rocket motors is the occurrence of vortex shedding within the motor chamber. A portion of the energy within a shed vortex is converted to acoustic energy, potentially driving the longitudinal acoustic modes of the motor in a quasi-discrete fashion. This vortex shedding-acoustic mode excitation event occurs for every Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) operation, giving rise to subsequent axial thrust oscillations. In order to better understand this vortex shedding/acoustic mode excitation phenomena, unsteady CFD simulations were run for both a test geometry and the full scale RSRM geometry. This paper covers the results from the subscale geometry runs, which were based on work focusing on the RSRM hydrodynamics. Unsteady CFD simulation parameters, including boundary conditions and post-processing returns, are reviewed. The results were further post-processed to identify active acoustic modes and vortex shedding characteristics. Probable locations for acoustic energy generation, and subsequent acoustic mode excitation, are discussed.

  10. Evaluation of mixing downstream of tees in duct systems with respect to single point representative air sampling.

    PubMed

    Kim, Taehong; O'Neal, Dennis L; Ortiz, Carlos

    2006-09-01

    Air duct systems in nuclear facilities must be monitored with continuous sampling in case of an accidental release of airborne radionuclides. The purpose of this work is to identify the air sampling locations where the velocity and contaminant concentrations fall below the 20% coefficient of variation required by the American National Standards Institute/Health Physics Society N13.1-1999. Experiments of velocity and tracer gas concentration were conducted on a generic "T" mixing system which included combinations of three sub ducts, one main duct, and air velocities from 0.5 to 2 m s (100 to 400 fpm). The experimental results suggest that turbulent mixing provides the accepted velocity coefficients of variation after 6 hydraulic diameters downstream of the T-junction. About 95% of the cases achieved coefficients of variation below 10% by 6 hydraulic diameters. However, above a velocity ratio (velocity in the sub duct/velocity in the main duct) of 2, velocity profiles were uniform in a shorter distance downstream of the T-junction as the velocity ratio went up. For the tracer gas concentration, the distance needed for the coefficients of variation to drop 20% decreased with increasing velocity ratio due to the sub duct airflow momentum. The results may apply to other duct systems with similar geometries and, ultimately, be a basis for selecting a proper sampling location under the requirements of single point representative sampling. PMID:16891896

  11. Cooling air recycling for gas turbine transition duct end frame and related method

    DOEpatents

    Cromer, Robert Harold; Bechtel, William Theodore; Sutcu, Maz

    2002-01-01

    A method of cooling a transition duct end frame in a gas turbine includes the steps of a) directing cooling air into the end frame from a region external of the transition duct and the impingement cooling sleeve; and b) redirecting the cooling air from the end frame into the annulus between the transition duct and the impingement cooling sleeve.

  12. Effect of discharge duct geometry on centrifugal fan performance and noise emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, David A.; Butrymowicz, William; Thomas, Christopher

    2005-09-01

    Non-ideal inlet and discharge duct geometries can cause significant changes to both the aerodynamic performance (``fan curve'') and specific sound power emission of a fan. A proper understanding of actual installed performance, as well as a good estimate of the system backpressure curve, is critical to achieving flow and acoustic goals as well as other criteria such as power consumption, mass and volume. To this end a battery of ISO 10302 tests was performed on a blower assembly which supports the Advanced Animal Habitat, being developed by ORBITEC for deployment on the International Space Station. The blower assembly consists of (4) identical centrifugal fans that, amongst themselves and across two prototypes, incorporated several discharge geometries. The inlet geometries were identical in all cases. Thus by comparing the dimensionless pressure-flow and noise emission characteristics across the cases, significant insight into the nature and potential magnitude of these effects is gained.

  13. Simulation Analysis of Air Flow and Turbulence Statistics in a Rib Grit Roughened Duct

    PubMed Central

    Vogiatzis, I. I.; Denizopoulou, A. C.; Ntinas, G. K.; Fragos, V. P.

    2014-01-01

    The implementation of variable artificial roughness patterns on a surface is an effective technique to enhance the rate of heat transfer to fluid flow in the ducts of solar air heaters. Different geometries of roughness elements investigated have demonstrated the pivotal role that vortices and associated turbulence have on the heat transfer characteristics of solar air heater ducts by increasing the convective heat transfer coefficient. In this paper we investigate the two-dimensional, turbulent, unsteady flow around rectangular ribs of variable aspect ratios by directly solving the transient Navier-Stokes and continuity equations using the finite elements method. Flow characteristics and several aspects of turbulent flow are presented and discussed including velocity components and statistics of turbulence. The results reveal the impact that different rib lengths have on the computed mean quantities and turbulence statistics of the flow. The computed turbulence parameters show a clear tendency to diminish downstream with increasing rib length. Furthermore, the applied numerical method is capable of capturing small-scale flow structures resulting from the direct solution of Navier-Stokes and continuity equations. PMID:25057511

  14. 14 CFR 25.1103 - Induction system ducts and air duct systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... the auxiliary power unit must be capable of resisting the maximum heat conditions likely to occur. (f) Each auxiliary power unit induction system duct must be constructed of materials that will not...

  15. 14 CFR 25.1103 - Induction system ducts and air duct systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... the auxiliary power unit must be capable of resisting the maximum heat conditions likely to occur. (f) Each auxiliary power unit induction system duct must be constructed of materials that will not...

  16. 14 CFR 29.1103 - Induction systems ducts and air duct systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... resisting the maximum heat conditions likely to occur. (f) Each auxiliary power unit induction system duct must be constructed of materials that will not absorb or trap hazardous quantities of flammable...

  17. 14 CFR 29.1103 - Induction systems ducts and air duct systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... resisting the maximum heat conditions likely to occur. (f) Each auxiliary power unit induction system duct must be constructed of materials that will not absorb or trap hazardous quantities of flammable...

  18. 14 CFR 25.1103 - Induction system ducts and air duct systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... the auxiliary power unit must be capable of resisting the maximum heat conditions likely to occur. (f) Each auxiliary power unit induction system duct must be constructed of materials that will not...

  19. 14 CFR 29.1103 - Induction systems ducts and air duct systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... resisting the maximum heat conditions likely to occur. (f) Each auxiliary power unit induction system duct must be constructed of materials that will not absorb or trap hazardous quantities of flammable...

  20. Experimental study on the flame behaviors of premixed methane/air mixture in horizontal rectangular ducts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dongliang; Sun, Jinhua; Chen, Sining; Liu, Yi; Chu, Guanquan

    2007-01-01

    In order to explore the flame propagation characteristics and tulip flame formation mechanism of premixed methane/air mixture in horizontal rectangular ducts, the techniques of Schlieren and high-speed video camera are used to study the flame behaviors of the premixed gases in a closed duct and opened one respectively, and the propagation characteristics in both cases and the formation mechanism of the tulip flame are analyzed. The results show that, the propagation flame in a closed duct is prior to form a tulip flame structure than that in an opened duct, and the tulip flame structure formation in a closed duct is related to the flame propagation velocity decrease. The sharp decrease of the flame propagation velocity is one of the reasons to the tulip flame formation, and the decrease of the flame propagation velocity is due to the decrease of the burned product flow velocity mainly.

  1. Should You Have the Air Ducts in Your Home Cleaned?

    MedlinePlus

    ... heat exchangers) may improve the efficiency of your system, resulting in a longer operating life, as well as some energy and maintenance ... spraying or otherwise introducing these materials into the operating duct system may cause much of the material to be ...

  2. Air-sea interaction and spatial variability of the surface evaporation duct in a coastal environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, Ian M.

    Aircraft observations are presented of the horizontal variability in the depth of the surface evaporation duct and the relationship with the mesoscale structure of air-sea interaction processes. The 2-dimensional fields of near-surface wind, stress, wind-stress curl, air and sea-surface temperature are measured directly for flow around a headland. The sea surface temperature field indicates cold upwelling driven by the wind-stress curl. Boundary-layer stability responds rapidly to the spatial changes in surface temperature. These changes result in modification of the evaporation duct, which decreases significantly in depth over the cooler upwelling water.

  3. Development of an ultrasonic airflow measurement device for ducted air.

    PubMed

    Raine, Andrew B; Aslam, Nauman; Underwood, Christopher P; Danaher, Sean

    2015-01-01

    In this study, an in-duct ultrasonic airflow measurement device has been designed, developed and tested. The airflow measurement results for a small range of airflow velocities and temperatures show that the accuracy was better than 3.5% root mean square (RMS) when it was tested within a round or square duct compared to the in-line Venturi tube airflow meter used for reference. This proof of concept device has provided evidence that with further development it could be a low-cost alternative to pressure differential devices such as the orifice plate airflow meter for monitoring energy efficiency performance and reliability of ventilation systems. The design uses a number of techniques and design choices to provide solutions to lower the implementation cost of the device compared to traditional airflow meters. The design choices that were found to work well are the single sided transducer arrangement for a "V" shaped reflective path and the use of square wave transmitter pulses ending with the necessary 180° phase changed pulse train to suppress transducer ringing. The device is also designed so that it does not have to rely on high-speed analogue to digital converters (ADC) and intensive digital signal processing, so could be implemented using voltage comparators and low-cost microcontrollers. PMID:25954952

  4. Development of an Ultrasonic Airflow Measurement Device for Ducted Air

    PubMed Central

    Raine, Andrew B.; Aslam, Nauman; Underwood, Christopher P.; Danaher, Sean

    2015-01-01

    In this study, an in-duct ultrasonic airflow measurement device has been designed, developed and tested. The airflow measurement results for a small range of airflow velocities and temperatures show that the accuracy was better than 3.5% root mean square (RMS) when it was tested within a round or square duct compared to the in-line Venturi tube airflow meter used for reference. This proof of concept device has provided evidence that with further development it could be a low-cost alternative to pressure differential devices such as the orifice plate airflow meter for monitoring energy efficiency performance and reliability of ventilation systems. The design uses a number of techniques and design choices to provide solutions to lower the implementation cost of the device compared to traditional airflow meters. The design choices that were found to work well are the single sided transducer arrangement for a “V” shaped reflective path and the use of square wave transmitter pulses ending with the necessary 180° phase changed pulse train to suppress transducer ringing. The device is also designed so that it does not have to rely on high-speed analogue to digital converters (ADC) and intensive digital signal processing, so could be implemented using voltage comparators and low-cost microcontrollers. PMID:25954952

  5. Duct System Flammability and Air Sealing Fire Separation Assemblies in the International Residential Code

    SciTech Connect

    Rudd, A.; Prahl, D.

    2014-12-01

    IBACOS identified two barriers that limit the ability of builders to cost-effectively achieve higher energy efficiency levels in housing. These are (1) the use of duct system materials that inherently achieve airtightness and are appropriately sized for low-load houses and (2) the ability to air seal fire separation assemblies. The issues identified fall into a gray area of the codes.

  6. Duct System Flammability and Air Sealing Fire Separation Assemblies in the International Residential Code

    SciTech Connect

    Rudd, A.; Prahl, D.

    2014-12-01

    IBACOS identified two barriers that limit the ability of builders to cost-effectively achieve higher energy efficiency levels in housing. These are the use of duct system materials that inherently achieve airtightness and are appropriately sized for low-load houses and the ability to air seal fire separation assemblies. The issues identified fall into a gray area of the codes.

  7. Advanced Strategy Guideline. Air Distribution Basics and Duct Design

    SciTech Connect

    Burdick, Arlan

    2011-12-01

    This report discusses considerations for designing an air distribution system for an energy efficient house that requires less air volume to condition the space. Considering the HVAC system early in the design process will allow adequate space for equipment and ductwork and can result in cost savings.

  8. ANALYSIS OF MEASUREMENT UNCERTAINTIES IN THE NULLING TEST FOR AIR LEAKAGE FROM RESIDENTIAL DUCTS.

    SciTech Connect

    ANDREWS,J.W.

    2001-04-01

    An analysis of measurement uncertainties in a recently proposed method of measuring air leakage in residential duct systems has been carried out. The uncertainties in supply and return leakage rates are expressed in terms of the value of the envelope leakage flow coefficient and the uncertainties in measured pressures and air flow rates. Results of the analysis are compared with data published by two research groups.

  9. Retrofitting Air Conditioning and Duct Systems in Hot, Dry Climates

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, Carl; Aldrich, Robb; Arena, Lois

    2012-07-01

    This technical report describes CARB's work with Clark County Community Resources Division in Las Vegas, Nevada, to optimize procedures for upgrading cooling systems on existing homes in the area to implement health, safety, and energy improvements. Detailed monitoring of five AC systems showed that three of the five systems met or exceeded air flow rate goals.

  10. Dual fan, dual-duct system meets air quality, energy-efficiency needs

    SciTech Connect

    Schuler, M.

    1996-03-01

    Canada`s Space Centre in Saint-Hubert Quebec is a 300,000 ft{sup 2} (27,871 m{sup 2}) complex that houses the headquarters of the Canadian Space Agency, the Canadian Astronaut Training Centre, mission ground control installations, research facilities, offices and the required support facilities. A comfortable, pleasant research environment was a primary concern for the Space Centre, given its elite clientele. The objectives were high indoor-air quality, design flexibility, energy efficiency and low capital costs. Dual duct systems which are the heart of the mechanical concept allowed the designers to meet these objectives. The Space Centre`s offices, laboratories and conference center are all served by dual-duct systems. All operate using an air economizer cycle. Gas boilers provide them with hot water for heating and steam for humidification while centrifugal chillers provide chilled water for cooling. This article describes the design.

  11. Numerical simulation of flow in a circular duct fitted with air-jet vortex generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Küpper, Christoph; Henry, Frank S.

    2002-04-01

    Most of the fundamental studies of the use of air-jet vortex generators (AJVGs) have concentrated on their potential ability to inhibit boundary layer separation on aerofoils. However, AJVGs may be of use in controlling or enhancing certain features of internal duct flows. For example, they may be of use in controlling the boundary layer at the entrance to engine air intakes, or as a means of increasing mixing and heat transfer. The objective of this paper is to analyse the flow field in the proximity of an air-jet vortex generator array in a duct by using two local numerical models, i.e. a simple flat plate model and a more geometrically faithful sector model. The sector model mirrors the circular nature of the duct's cross-section and the centre line conditions on the upper boundary. The flow was assumed fully turbulent and was solved using the finite volume, Navier-Stokes Code CFX 4 (CFDS, AEA Technology, Harwell) on a non-orthogonal, body-fitted, grid using the k- turbulence model and standard wall functions. Streamwise, vertical and cross-stream velocity profiles, circulation and peak vorticity decay, peak vorticity paths in cross-stream and streamwise direction, cross-stream vorticity profiles and cross-stream wall shear stress distributions were predicted. Negligible difference in results was observed between the flat plate and the sector model, since the produced vortices were small relative to the duct diameter and close to the surface. The flow field was most enhanced, i.e. maximum thinning of the boundary layer, with a configuration of 30° pitch and 75° skew angle. No significant difference in results could be observed between co- and counter-rotating vortex arrays. Copyright

  12. Whole house particle removal and clean air delivery rates for in-duct and portable ventilation systems.

    PubMed

    Macintosh, David L; Myatt, Theodore A; Ludwig, Jerry F; Baker, Brian J; Suh, Helen H; Spengler, John D

    2008-11-01

    A novel method for determining whole house particle removal and clean air delivery rates attributable to central and portable ventilation/air cleaning systems is described. The method is used to characterize total and air-cleaner-specific particle removal rates during operation of four in-duct air cleaners and two portable air-cleaning devices in a fully instrumented test home. Operation of in-duct and portable air cleaners typically increased particle removal rates over the baseline rates determined in the absence of operating a central fan or an indoor air cleaner. Removal rates of 0.3- to 0.5-microm particles ranged from 1.5 hr(-1) during operation of an in-duct, 5-in. pleated media filter to 7.2 hr(-1) for an in-duct electrostatic air cleaner in comparison to a baseline rate of 0 hr(-1) when the air handler was operating without a filter. Removal rates for total particulate matter less than 2.5 microm in aerodynamic diameter (PM2.5) mass concentrations were 0.5 hr(-1) under baseline conditions, 0.5 hr(-1) during operation of three portable ionic air cleaners, 1 hr(-1) for an in-duct 1-in. media filter, 2.4 hr(-1) for a single high-efficiency particle arrestance (HEPA) portable air cleaner, 4.6 hr(-1) for an in-duct 5-in. media filter, 4.7 hr(-1) during operation of five portable HEPA filters, 6.1 hr(-1) for a conventional in-duct electronic air cleaner, and 7.5 hr(-1) for a high efficiency in-duct electrostatic air cleaner. Corresponding whole house clean air delivery rates for PM2.5 attributable to the air cleaner independent of losses within the central ventilation system ranged from 2 m3/min for the conventional media filter to 32 m3/min for the high efficiency in-duct electrostatic device. Except for the portable ionic air cleaner, the devices considered here increased particle removal indoors over baseline deposition rates. PMID:19044163

  13. High-speed Tests of a Ducted Body with Various Air-outlet Openings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, John V.; Baals, Donald D.

    1942-01-01

    Test of a ducted body with Internal flow were made in the 8-foot high-speed wind tunnel for the purpose of studying the effects on external drag and an critical speed of the addition of efficient inlet and outlet openings to a basic streamline shape. Drag tests of a 13.6- inch-diameter streamline body of fineness ratio 6.14 were made at Mach numbers ranging from 0.20 to 0.75. The model was centrally mounted on a 9-percent-thick airfoil and was designed to have an efficient airfoil-body juncture and a high critical speed. An air inlet at the nose and various outlets at the tail were added: drag and internal-flow data were obtained over the given speed range. The critical speed of the ducted bodies was found to be as high as that of the streamline body. The external - drag with air flow through the body did not exceed the drag of the basic streamline shape. No appreciable variation in the efficiency of the diffuser section of the internal duct occurred throughout the Mach number range of the tests.

  14. Pan Air Geometry Management System (PAGMS): A data-base management system for PAN AIR geometry data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, J. F.

    1981-01-01

    A data-base management system called PAGMS was developed to facilitate the data transfer in applications computer programs that create, modify, plot or otherwise manipulate PAN AIR type geometry data in preparation for input to the PAN AIR system of computer programs. PAGMS is composed of a series of FORTRAN callable subroutines which can be accessed directly from applications programs. Currently only a NOS version of PAGMS has been developed.

  15. Optimization of Orifice Geometry for Cross-Flow Mixing in a Cylindrical Duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kroll, J. T.; Sowa, W. A.; Samuelsen, G. S.

    1996-01-01

    Mixing of gaseous jets in a cross-flow has significant applications in engineering, one example of which is the dilution zone of a gas turbine combustor. Despite years of study, the design of the jet injection in combustors is largely based on practical experience. The emergence of NO(x) regulations for stationary gas turbines and the anticipation of aero-engine regulations requires an improved understanding of jet mixing as new combustor concepts are introduced. For example, the success of the staged combustor to reduce the emission of NO(x) is almost entirely dependent upon the rapid and complete dilution of the rich zone products within the mixing section. It is these mixing challenges to which the present study is directed. A series of experiments was undertaken to delineate the optimal mixer orifice geometry. A cross-flow to core-flow momentum-flux ratio of 40 and a mass flow ratio of 2.5 were selected as representative of a conventional design. An experimental test matrix was designed around three variables: the number of orifices, the orifice length-to- width ratio, and the orifice angle. A regression analysis was performed on the data to arrive at an interpolating equation that predicted the mixing performance of orifice geometry combinations within the range of the test matrix parameters. Results indicate that the best mixing orifice geometry tested involves eight orifices with a long-to-short side aspect ratio of 3.5 at a twenty-three degree inclination from the center-line of the mixing section.

  16. Optimization of orifice geometry for cross-flow mixing in a cylindrical duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sowa, W. A.; Kroll, J. T.; Samuelsen, G. S.; Holdeman, J. D.

    1994-01-01

    Mixing of gaseous jets in a cross-flow has significant applications in engineering, one example of which is the dilution zone of a gas turbine combustor. Despite years of study, the design of jet injection in combustors is largely based on practical experience. A series of experiments was undertaken to delineate the optimal mixer orifice geometry. A cross-flow to core-flow momentum-flux ratio of 40 and a mass flow ratio of 2.5 were selected as representative of an advanced design. An experimental test matrix was designed around three variables: the number of orifices, the orifice aspect ratio (long-to-short dimension), and the orifice angle. A regression analysis was performed on the data to arrive at an interpolating equation that predicted the mixing performance of orifice geometry combinations within the range of the test matrix parameters. Results indicate that mixture uniformity is a non-linear function of the number of orifices, the orifice aspect ratio, and the orifice angle. Optimum mixing occurs when the asymptotic mean jet trajectories are in the range of 0.35 less than r/R less than 0.5 (where r = 0 is at the mixer wall) at z/R = 1.0. At the optimum number of orifices, the difference between shallow-angled slots with large aspect ratios and round holes is minimal and either approach will lead to good mixing performance. At the optimum number of orifices, it appears possible to have two local optimums where one corresponds to an aspect ratio of 1.0 and the other to a high aspect ratio.

  17. LG-ANALYST: linguistic geometry for master air attack planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stilman, Boris; Yakhnis, Vladimir; Umanskiy, Oleg

    2003-09-01

    We investigate the technical feasibility of implementing LG-ANALYST, a new software tool based on the Linguistic Geometry (LG) approach. The tool will be capable of modeling and providing solutions to Air Force related battlefield problems and of conducting multiple experiments to verify the quality of the solutions it generates. LG-ANALYST will support generation of the Fast Master Air Attack Plan (MAAP) with subsequent conversion into Air Tasking Order (ATO). An Air Force mission is modeled employing abstract board games (ABG). Such a mission may include, for example, an aircraft strike package moving to a target area with the opposing side having ground-to-air missiles, anti-aircraft batteries, fighter wings, and radars. The corresponding abstract board captures 3D air space, terrain, the aircraft trajectories, positions of the batteries, strategic features of the terrain, such as bridges, and their status, radars and illuminated space, etc. Various animated views are provided by LG-ANALYST including a 3D view for realistic representation of the battlespace and a 2D view for ease of analysis and control. LG-ANALYST will allow a user to model full scale intelligent enemy, plan in advance, re-plan and control in real time Blue and Red forces by generating optimal (or near-optimal) strategies for all sides of a conflict.

  18. Room-temperature thermal-resistance measurements of new and existing materials for shipboard air-duct systems

    SciTech Connect

    Zarr, R.R.; Somers, T.A.

    1988-10-01

    Thermal resistance measurements of conventional and composite-material insulation for shipboard air duct systems are described. Conventional shipboard air ducts are constructed of metal walls insulated externally with fibrous-glass board. Composite materials are being considered as replacements for these duct walls. Thermal measurements were conducted using the National Bureau of Standards 1-meter Guarded Hot Plate at a mean temperature of 23.9/sup 0/C (75/sup 0/F). Measurements of the fibrous-glass board specimens were within 3% of certified values of NBS SRM 1450a, fibrous-glass board. Measurements of two aramid-fiber honeycomb specimens were approximately one-half the thermal resistance of the fibrous-glass board specimens.

  19. Duct joining system

    DOEpatents

    Proctor, John P.; deKieffer, Robert C.

    2001-01-01

    A duct joining system for providing an air-tight seal and mechanical connection for ducts and fittings is disclosed. The duct joining system includes a flexible gasket affixed to a male end of a duct or fitting. The flexible gasket is affixed at an angle relative to normal of the male end of the duct. The female end of the other duct includes a raised bead in which the flexible gasket is seated when the ducts are properly joined. The angled flexible gasket seated in the raised bead forms an air-tight seal as well as fastens or locks the male end to the female end. Alternatively, when a flexible duct is used, a band clamp with a raised bead is clamped over the female end of the flexible duct and over the male end of a fitting to provide an air tight seal and fastened connection.

  20. Duct Joining System

    DOEpatents

    Proctor, John P.

    2001-02-27

    A duct joining system for providing an air-tight seal and mechanical connection for ducts and fittings is disclosed. The duct joining system includes a flexible gasket affixed to a male end of a duct or fitting. The flexible gasket is affixed at an angle relative to normal of the male end of the duct. The female end of the other duct includes a raised bead in which the flexible gasket is seated when the ducts are properly joined. The angled flexible gasket seated in the raised bead forms an air-tight seal as well as fastens or locks the male end to the female end. Alternatively, when a flexible duct is used, a band clamp with a raised bead is clamped over the female end of the flexible duct and over the male end of a fitting to provide an air tight seal and fastened connection.

  1. High accuracy acoustic relative humidity measurement in duct flow with air.

    PubMed

    van Schaik, Wilhelm; Grooten, Mart; Wernaart, Twan; van der Geld, Cees

    2010-01-01

    An acoustic relative humidity sensor for air-steam mixtures in duct flow is designed and tested. Theory, construction, calibration, considerations on dynamic response and results are presented. The measurement device is capable of measuring line averaged values of gas velocity, temperature and relative humidity (RH) instantaneously, by applying two ultrasonic transducers and an array of four temperature sensors. Measurement ranges are: gas velocity of 0-12 m/s with an error of ± 0.13 m/s, temperature 0-100 °C with an error of ± 0.07 °C and relative humidity 0-100% with accuracy better than 2 % RH above 50 °C. Main advantage over conventional humidity sensors is the high sensitivity at high RH at temperatures exceeding 50 °C, with accuracy increasing with increasing temperature. The sensors are non-intrusive and resist highly humid environments. PMID:22163610

  2. High Accuracy Acoustic Relative Humidity Measurement in Duct Flow with Air

    PubMed Central

    van Schaik, Wilhelm; Grooten, Mart; Wernaart, Twan; van der Geld, Cees

    2010-01-01

    An acoustic relative humidity sensor for air-steam mixtures in duct flow is designed and tested. Theory, construction, calibration, considerations on dynamic response and results are presented. The measurement device is capable of measuring line averaged values of gas velocity, temperature and relative humidity (RH) instantaneously, by applying two ultrasonic transducers and an array of four temperature sensors. Measurement ranges are: gas velocity of 0–12 m/s with an error of ±0.13 m/s, temperature 0–100 °C with an error of ±0.07 °C and relative humidity 0–100% with accuracy better than 2 % RH above 50 °C. Main advantage over conventional humidity sensors is the high sensitivity at high RH at temperatures exceeding 50 °C, with accuracy increasing with increasing temperature. The sensors are non-intrusive and resist highly humid environments. PMID:22163610

  3. STS-56 inflight maintenance (IFM) air duct routing on OV-103's middeck

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    STS-56 inflight maintenance (IFM) repair on Discovery's, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103's, middeck was required to offset overheating problems with one of the onboard experiments -- Detailed Supplementary Objective (DSO) 322, Human lymphocyte locomotion in microgravity. This 'elephant's trunk' fix was rigged from the airlock's air recirculation duct to DSO 322's forward locker location by Commander Kenneth Cameron. The 'elephant's trunk' was fashioned from trash bags and other plastic items to extend an airline to the troubled area. DSO 322 is collecting data on the locomotion and migration of human lymphocytes through intercellular matrix and is testing the rotating wall vessel and the specimen temperature controller. In the background is the port side wall with the side hatch, middeck accomodations rack (MAR), and shuttle orbiter repackaged galley (SORG) visible.

  4. Sound transmission loss of double plates with an air cavity between them in a rigid duct.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun-Sil; Kim, Sang-Ryul; Lee, Seong-Hyun; Seo, Yun-Ho; Ma, Pyung-Sik

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, the sound transmission loss (STL) of thin double plates with an air cavity between them in a rigid duct is considered using an analytical approach. The vibration motion of the plate and sound pressure field are expanded in terms of an infinite series of the modal functions. Under the plane wave condition, a low frequency solution is derived by including the first few symmetric modes. It is determined that the peak frequencies of the double plates coincide with those of each single plate. When the two plates are identical, the STL becomes zero at the natural frequencies of the single plate. However, when the two plates are not identical, the STL is always greater than zero. The location and amplitude of the dips are investigated using an approximate solution when the cavity depth is very small. It is observed that dividing the single plate into two plates with an air cavity in between degrades the STL in the low frequency range, while the equivalent surface mass density is preserved. However, when the cavity depth is not small, the STL of the single plate can be smaller than that of the double plates. PMID:27250128

  5. Study of Air Ingress Across the Duct During the Accident Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Hassan, Yassin

    2013-05-06

    The goal of this project is to study the fundamental physical phenomena associated with air ingress in very high temperature reactors (VHTRs). Air ingress may occur due to a rupture of primary piping and a subsequent breach in the primary pressure boundary in helium-cooled and graphite-moderated VHTRs. Significant air ingress is a concern because it introduces potential to expose the fuel, graphite support rods, and core to a risk of severe graphite oxidation. Two of the most probable air ingress scenarios involve rupture of a control rod or fuel access standpipe, and rupture in the main coolant pipe on the lower part of the reactor pressure vessel. Therefore, establishing a fundamental understanding of air ingress phenomena is critical in order to rationally evaluate safety of existing VHTRs and develop new designs that minimize these risks. But despite this importance, progress toward development these predictive capabilities has been slowed by the complex nature of the underlying phenomena. The combination of inter-diffusion among multiple species, molecular diffusion, natural convection, and complex geometries, as well as the multiple chemical reactions involved, impose significant roadblocks to both modeling and experiment design. The project team will employ a coordinated experimental and computational effort that will help gain a deeper understanding of multiphased air ingress phenomena. This project will enhance advanced modeling and simulation methods, enabling calculation of nuclear power plant transients and accident scenarios with a high degree of confidence. The following are the project tasks: Perform particle image velocimetry measurement of multiphase air ingresses; and, Perform computational fluid dynamics analysis of air ingress phenomena.

  6. FIELD EVALUATION OF IMPROVED METHODS FOR MEASURING THE AIR LEAKAGE OF DUCT SYSTEMS UNDER NORMAL OPERATING CONDITIONS IN 51 HOMES

    SciTech Connect

    Paul W. Francisco; Larry Palmiter; Erin Kruse; Bob Davis

    2003-10-18

    Duct leakage in forced-air distribution systems has been recognized for years as a major source of energy losses in residential buildings. Unfortunately, the distribution of leakage across homes is far from uniform, and measuring duct leakage under normal operating conditions has proven to be difficult. Recently, two new methods for estimating duct leakage at normal operating conditions have been devised. These are called the nulling test and the Delta-Q test. Small exploratory studies have been done to evaluate these tests, but previously no large-scale study on a broad variety of homes has been performed to determine the accuracy of these new methods in the field against an independent benchmark of leakage. This sort of study is important because it is difficult in a laboratory setting to replicate the range of leakage types found in real homes. This report presents the results of a study on 51 homes to evaluate these new methods relative to an independent benchmark and a method that is currently used. An evaluation of the benchmark procedure found that it worked very well for supply-side leakage measurements, but not as well on the return side. The nulling test was found to perform well, as long as wind effects were minimal. Unfortunately, the time and difficulty of setup can be prohibitive, and it is likely that this method will not be practical for general use by contractors except in homes with no return ducts. The Delta-Q test was found to have a bias resulting in overprediction of the leakage, which qualitatively confirms the results of previous laboratory, simulation, and small-scale field studies. On average the bias was only a few percent of the air handler flow, but in about 20% of the homes the bias was large. A primary flaw with the Delta-Q test is the assumption that the pressure between the ducts and the house remain constant during the test, as this assumption does not hold true. Various modifications to the Delta-Q method were evaluated as

  7. Stabilization of buoyancy-driven unstable vortex flow in mixed convection of air in a rectangular duct by tapering its top plate

    SciTech Connect

    Tseng, W.S.; Lin, W.L.; Yin, C.P.; Lin, C.L.; Lin, T.F.

    2000-02-01

    At high buoyancy-to-inertia ratio frequently encountered in various heat transfer equipment, the buoyancy-driven secondary vortex flow in a forced laminar flow through a bottom heated rectangular duct is rather unstable. Heat transfer augmentation associated with the buoyancy-driven vortex flow is desirable and welcome in many technological applications in which the efficient energy transport is of major concern. Here, stabilization of the buoyancy-driven unstable mixed convective vortex air flow in a bottom heated rectangular duct by tapering its top plate is investigated experimentally. Specifically, the duct is tapered so that its aspect ratio at the duct inlet is 4 and gradually raised to 12 at the exit of the duct. In the study the secondary flow in the duct is visualized and the steady and transient thermal characteristics of the flow are examined by measuring the spanwise distributions of the time-average temperature. The effects of the Reynolds and Grashof numbers on the vortex flow structure are studied in detail. Moreover, the spanwise-averaged Nusselt numbers for the horizontal rectangular and tapering ducts are also measured and compared. Furthermore, the time records of the air temperature are obtained to further detect the temporal stability of the flow. Over the ranges of the Re and Gr investigated for 5 {le} Re {le} 102 and 1.0 x 10{sup 4} {le} Gr {le} 1.7 x 10{sup 5}, the vortex flow induced in the rectangular duct exhibits temporal transition from a steady laminar to time periodic and then to chaotic state at increasing buoyancy-to-inertia ratio. Substantial change in the spatial structure of the vortex flow is also noted to accompany this temporal transition. The results for the tapering duct indicate that more vortex rolls can be induced due to the increase in the aspect ratio of the duct with the axial distance. But the vortex rolls are weaker and are completely stabilized by the tapering of the top plate.

  8. Ignition of lean fuel-air mixtures in a premixing-prevaporizing duct at temperatures up to 1000 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tacina, R. R.

    1980-01-01

    Conditions were determined in a premixing prevaporizing fuel preparation duct at which ignition occurred. An air blast type fuel injector with nineteen fuel injection points was used to provide a uniform spatial fuel air mixture. The range of inlet conditions where ignition occurred were: inlet air temperatures of 600 to 1000 K air pressures of 180 to 660 kPa, equivalence ratios (fuel air ratio divided by stoichiometric fuel air ratio) from 0.12 to 1.05, and velocities from 3.5 to 30 m/s. The duct was insulated and the diameter was 12 cm. Mixing lengths were varied from 16.5 to 47.6 and residence times ranged from 4.6 to 107 ms. The fuel was no. 2 diesel. Results show a strong effect of equivalence ratio, pressure and temperature on the conditions where ignition occurred. The data did not fit the most commonly used model of auto-ignition. A correlation of the conditions where ignition would occur which apply to this test apparatus over the conditions tested is (p/V) phi to the 1.3 power = 0.62 e to the 2804/T power where p is the pressure in kPa, V is the velocity in m/e, phi is the equivalence ratio, and T is the temperature in K. The data scatter was considerable, varying by a maximum value of 5 at a given temperature and equivalence ratio. There was wide spread in the autoignition data contained in the references.

  9. Laboratory evaluation of welder's exposure and efficiency of air duct ventilation for welding work in a confined space.

    PubMed

    Ojima, J; Shibata, N; Iwasaki, T

    2000-01-01

    CO2 arc welding in a confined space was simulated in a laboratory by manipulating a welding robot which worked in a small chamber to experimentally evaluate the welder's exposure to welding fumes, ozone and carbon monoxide (CO). The effects of the welding arc on the air temperature rise and oxygen (O2) concentration in the chamber were also investigated. The measuring points for these items were located in the presumed breathing zone of a welder in a confined space. The time averaged concentrations of welding fumes, ozone and CO during the arcing time were 83.55 mg/m3, 0.203 ppm and 0.006%, respectively, at a welding current of 120A-200A. These results suggest serious exposure of a welder who operates in a confined space. Air temperature in the chamber rose remarkably due to the arc heat and the increase in the welding current. No clear decrease in the O2 concentration in the chamber was recognized during this welding operation. A model of air duct ventilation was constructed in the small chamber to investigate the strategy of effective ventilation for hazardous welding contaminants in a confined space. With this model we examined ventilation efficiency with a flow rate of 1.08-1.80 m3/min (ventilation rate for 0.40-0.67 air exchanges per minute) in the chamber, and proved that the exposure level was not drastically reduced during arcing time by this air duct ventilation, but the residual contaminants were rapidly exhausted after the welding operation. PMID:10680307

  10. Flame behaviors of propane/air premixed flame propagation in a closed rectangular duct with a 90-deg bend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xuechao; Sun, Jinhua; Yuen, K. K.; Ding, Yibin; Chen, Sining

    2008-11-01

    Experiments of flame propagation in a small, closed rectangular duct with a 90° bend were performed for a propane-air mixture. The high speed camera and Schlieren techniques were used to record images of flame propagation process in the combustion pipe. Meanwhile, the fine thermocouples and ion current probes were applied to measure the temperature distribution and reaction intensity of combustion. The characteristics of propane-air flame and its microstructure were analyzed in detail by the experimental results. In the test, the special tulip flame formation was observed. Around the bend, the flame tip proceeded more quickly at the lower side with the flame front elongated toward the axial direction. And transition to turbulent flame occurred. It was suggested that fluctuations of velocity, ion current and temperature were mainly due to the comprehensive effects of multi-wave and the intense of turbulent combustion.

  11. Loft duct project report

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, J.R.

    1993-06-01

    On October 16, 1992, during a routine examination of the loft of Building 332, the Building Coordinator observed cracks in the welds of the duct work that services the fume hoods for Rooms 1313, 1321, and 1329. Further examination revealed cracks in the weld of the duct work that services the gloveboxes in Rooms 1321 and 1329. Upon discovery of the cracked welds, facility management immediately took the following two actions: Because one crack in the fume hood exhaust extended 70% around the duct circumference, a 1-ton chain fall was used to secure the duct to the roof support structure to prevent the duct from falling if the duct completely fractured. The Facility Manager suspended plutonium handling operations in the gloveboxes and work in the fume hoods in the affected rooms until the situation could be thoroughly investigated. Building 332 is ventilated by drawing conditioned air from the building hallways into the laboratories, hoods, and gloveboxes. This air is filtered through two sets of high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters before being exhausted from the facility. Figure 1 is a schematic of the typical air flow pattern for the facility. All affected duct work is located in the loft of the facility or pressure zone 4. This ducting is fabricated from 12-, 14- and 16-gauge, 304 stainless-steel sheet stock and joined by the Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) process.

  12. Vortex generator induced heat transfer augmentation past a rib in a heated duct air flow

    SciTech Connect

    Myrum, T.A.; Acharya, S.; Inamdar, S.; Mehrotra, A. )

    1992-02-01

    The present investigation represents the initial phase of a comprehensive experimental program designed to study the potential for increasing the heat transfer per unit pressure drop in a ribbed duct by positioning vortex generators at key locations in the flow. In particular, the present investigation consists of a rib positioned at the inlet to a rectangular test section with uniform heating at its bottom wall. Local and average Nusselt number results are obtained for a circular rod positioned either immediately above or just downstream of the rib.

  13. Format and basic geometry of a perspective display of air traffic for the cockpit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgreevy, Michael Wallace; Ellis, Stephen R.

    1991-01-01

    The design and implementation of a perspective display of air traffic for the cockpit is discussed. Parameters of the perspective are variable and interactive so that the appearance of the projected image can be widely varied. This approach makes allowances for exploration of perspective parameters and their interactions. The display was initially used to study the cases of horizontal maneuver biases found in experiments involving a plan view air traffic display format. Experiments to determine the effect of perspective geometry on spatial judgements have evolved from the display program. Several scaling techniques and other adjustments to the perspective are used to tailor the geometry for effective presentation of 3-D traffic situations.

  14. Particle deposition in ventilation ducts

    SciTech Connect

    Sippola, Mark R.

    2002-09-01

    Exposure to airborne particles is detrimental to human health and indoor exposures dominate total exposures for most people. The accidental or intentional release of aerosolized chemical and biological agents within or near a building can lead to exposures of building occupants to hazardous agents and costly building remediation. Particle deposition in heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems may significantly influence exposures to particles indoors, diminish HVAC performance and lead to secondary pollutant release within buildings. This dissertation advances the understanding of particle behavior in HVAC systems and the fates of indoor particles by means of experiments and modeling. Laboratory experiments were conducted to quantify particle deposition rates in horizontal ventilation ducts using real HVAC materials. Particle deposition experiments were conducted in steel and internally insulated ducts at air speeds typically found in ventilation ducts, 2-9 m/s. Behaviors of monodisperse particles with diameters in the size range 1-16 {micro}m were investigated. Deposition rates were measured in straight ducts with a fully developed turbulent flow profile, straight ducts with a developing turbulent flow profile, in duct bends and at S-connector pieces located at duct junctions. In straight ducts with fully developed turbulence, experiments showed deposition rates to be highest at duct floors, intermediate at duct walls, and lowest at duct ceilings. Deposition rates to a given surface increased with an increase in particle size or air speed. Deposition was much higher in internally insulated ducts than in uninsulated steel ducts. In most cases, deposition in straight ducts with developing turbulence, in duct bends and at S-connectors at duct junctions was higher than in straight ducts with fully developed turbulence. Measured deposition rates were generally higher than predicted by published models. A model incorporating empirical equations based on

  15. Viscous flow computations for elliptical two-duct version of the SSME hot gas manifold

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roger, R. P.

    1986-01-01

    The objective of the effort was to numerically simulate viscous subsonic flow in a proposed elliptical two-duct version of the fuel side Hot Gas Manifold (HGM) for the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME). The numerical results were to complement both water flow and air flow experiments in the two-duct geometry performed at NASA-MSFC and Rocketdyne. The three-dimensional character of the HGM consists of two essentially different geometries. The first part of the construction is a concentric shell duct structure which channels the gases from a turbine exit into the second part comprised of two cylindrically shaped transfer ducts. The initial concentric shell portion can be further subdivided into a turnaround section and a bowl section. The turnaround duct (TAD) changes the direction of the mean flow by 180 degress from a smaller radius to a larger radius duct which discharges into the bowl. The cylindrical transfer ducts are attached to the bowl on one side thus providing a plane of symmetry midway between the two. Centerline flow distance from the TAD inlet to the transfer duct exit is approximately two feet. Details of the approach used to numerically simulate laminar or turbulent flow in the HGM geometry are presented. Computational results are presented and discussed.

  16. FRACTIONAL AEROSOL FILTRATION EFFICIENCY OF IN-DUCT VENTILATION AIR CLEANERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The filtration efficiency of ventilation air cleaners is highly particle-size dependent over the 0.01 to 3 μm diameter size range. Current standardized test methods, which determine only overall efficiencies for ambient aerosol or other test aerosols, provide data of limited util...

  17. Advanced Duct Sealing Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, Max H.; Walker, Iain S.

    2003-08-01

    Duct leakage has been identified as a major source of energy loss in residential buildings. Most duct leakage occurs at the connections to registers, plenums or branches in the duct system. At each of these connections a method of sealing the duct system is required. Typical sealing methods include tapes or mastics applied around the joints in the system. Field examinations of duct systems have typically shown that these seals tend to fail over extended periods of time. The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has been testing sealant durability for several years. Typical duct tape (i.e. fabric backed tapes with natural rubber adhesives) was found to fail more rapidly than all other duct sealants. This report summarizes the results of duct sealant durability testing of five UL 181B-FX listed duct tapes (three cloth tapes, a foil tape and an Oriented Polypropylene (OPP) tape). One of the cloth tapes was specifically developed in collaboration with a tape manufacturer to perform better in our durability testing. The first test involved the aging of common ''core-to-collar joints'' of flexible duct to sheet metal collars, and sheet metal ''collar-to-plenum joints'' pressurized with 200 F (93 C) air. The second test consisted of baking duct tape specimens in a constant 212 F (100 C) oven following the UL 181B-FX ''Temperature Test'' requirements. Additional tests were also performed on only two tapes using sheet metal collar-to-plenum joints. Since an unsealed flexible duct joint can have a variable leakage depending on the positioning of the flexible duct core, the durability of the flexible duct joints could not be based on the 10% of unsealed leakage criteria. Nevertheless, the leakage of the sealed specimens prior to testing could be considered as a basis for a failure criteria. Visual inspection was also documented throughout the tests. The flexible duct core-to-collar joints were inspected monthly, while the sheet metal collar-to-plenum joints were inspected

  18. Lensing duct

    DOEpatents

    Beach, R.J.; Benett, W.J.

    1994-04-26

    A lensing duct to condense (intensify) light using a combination of front surface lensing and reflective waveguiding is described. The duct tapers down from a wide input side to a narrow output side, with the input side being lens-shaped and coated with an antireflective coating for more efficient transmission into the duct. The four side surfaces are uncoated, preventing light from escaping by total internal reflection as it travels along the duct (reflective waveguiding). The duct has various applications for intensifying light, such as in the coupling of diode array pump light to solid state lasing materials, and can be fabricated from inexpensive glass and plastic. 3 figures.

  19. Lensing duct

    DOEpatents

    Beach, Raymond J. , Benett

    1994-01-01

    A lensing duct to condense (intensify) light using a combination of front surface lensing and reflective waveguiding. The duct tapers down from a wide input side to a narrow output side, with the input side being lens-shaped and coated with an antireflective coating for more efficient transmission into the duct. The four side surfaces are uncoated, preventing light from escaping by total internal reflection as it travels along the duct (reflective waveguiding). The duct has various applications for intensifying light, such as in the coupling of diode array pump light to solid state lasing materials, and can be fabricated from inexpensive glass and plastic.

  20. Longevity of duct tape in residential air distribution systems: 1-D, 2-D, and 3-D joints

    SciTech Connect

    Abushakra, Bass

    2002-05-30

    The aging tests conducted so far showed that duct tape tends to degrade in its performance as the joint it is applied to requires a geometrical description of a higher number of space dimensions (1-D, 2-D, 3-D). One-dimensional joints are the easiest to seal with duct tape, and thus the least to experience failure. Two-dimensional joints, such as the flexible duct core-to-collar joints tested in this study, are less likely to fail than three-dimensional collar-to-plenum joints, as the shrinkage could have a positive effect in tightening the joint. Three-dimensional joints are the toughest to seal and the most likely to experience failure. The 2-D flexible duct core-to-collar joints passed the six-month period of the aging test in terms of leakage, but with the exception of the foil-butyl tape, showed degradation in terms hardening, brittleness, partial peeling, shrinkage, wrinkling, delamination of the tape layers, flaking, cracking, bubbling, oozing and discoloration. The baking test results showed that the failure in the duct tape joints could be attributed to the type of combination of the duct tape and the material it is applied to, as the duct tape behaves differently with different substrates. Overall, the foil-butyl tape (Tape 4) had the best results, while the film tape (Tape 3) showed the most deterioration. The conventional duct tapes tested (Tape 1 and Tape 2) were between these two extremes, with Tape 2 performing better than Tape 1. Lastly, we found that plastic straps became discolored and brittle during the tests, and a couple of straps broke completely. Therefore, we recommend that clamping the duct-taped flexible core-to-collar joints should be done with metallic adjustable straps.

  1. SENSITIVITY OF THE HOUSE PRESSURE TEST FOR DUCT LEAKAGE TO VARIATIONS IN THE DISTRIBUTION OF AIR LEAKAGE IN THE HOUSE ENVELOPE

    SciTech Connect

    ANDREWS,J.W.

    1998-12-01

    The house pressure test for air leakage in ducts calculates the signed difference between the supply and return leakage from the response of the air pressure in the house to operation of the system fan. The currently accepted version of this calculation was based on particular assumptions about how the house envelope leakage is distributed between the walls, ceiling, and floor. This report generalizes the equation to account for an arbitrary distribution of envelope leakage. It concludes that the currently accepted equation is usually accurate to within {+-}5%, but in a small proportion of cases the results may diverge by 50% or more.

  2. Sensitivity of the house pressure test for duct leakage to variations in the distribution of air leakage in the house envelope

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, J.W.

    1998-12-01

    The house pressure test for air leakage in ducts calculates the signed difference between the supply and return leakage from the response of the air pressure in the house to operation of the system fan. The currently accepted version of this calculation was based on particular assumptions about how the house envelope leakage is distributed between the walls, ceiling, and floor. This report generalizes the equation to account for an arbitrary distribution of envelope leakage. It concludes that the currently accepted equation is usually accurate to within {+-}5%, but in a small proportion of cases the results may diverge by 50% or more.

  3. Heat Transfer in a Superelliptic Transition Duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poinsatte, Philip; Thurman, Douglas; Hippensteele, Steven

    2008-01-01

    Local heat transfer measurements were experimentally mapped using a transient liquid-crystal heat transfer technique on the surface of a circular-to-rectangular transition duct. The transition duct had a length-to-diameter ratio of 1.5 and an exit-plane aspect ratio of 3. The crosssectional geometry was defined by the equation of a superellipse. The cross-sectional area was the same at the inlet and exit but varied up to 15 percent higher through the transition. The duct was preheated to a uniform temperature (nominally 64 C) before allowing room temperature air to be suddenly drawn through it. As the surface cooled, the resulting isothermal contours on the duct surface were revealed using a surface coating of thermochromic liquid crystals that display distinctive colors at particular temperatures. A video record was made of the surface temperature and time data for all points on the duct surfaces during each test. Using this surface temperature-time data together with the temperature of the air flowing through the model and the initial temperature of the model wall, the heat transfer coefficient was calculated by employing the classic one-dimensional, semi-infinite wall heat transfer conduction model. Test results are reported for inlet diameter-based Reynolds numbers ranging from 0.4x106 to 2.4x106 and two grid-generated freestream turbulence intensities of about 1 percent, which is typical of wind tunnels, and up to 16 percent, which may be more typical of real engine conditions.

  4. Study of effects of injector geometry on fuel-air mixing and combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bangert, L. H.; Roach, R. L.

    1977-01-01

    An implicit finite-difference method has been developed for computing the flow in the near field of a fuel injector as part of a broader study of the effects of fuel injector geometry on fuel-air mixing and combustion. Detailed numerical results have been obtained for cases of laminar and turbulent flow without base injection, corresponding to the supersonic base flow problem. These numerical results indicated that the method is stable and convergent, and that significant savings in computer time can be achieved, compared with explicit methods.

  5. Autoignition in a premixing-prevaporizing fuel duct using 3 different fuel injection systems at inlet air temperatures to 1250 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tacina, R. R.

    1983-01-01

    Conditions were determined in a continuous-flow, premixing-prevaporizing duct at which autoignition occurred. Test conditions were representative of an advanced, regenerative-cycle, automotive gas turbine. The test conditions inlet air temperatures from 600 to 1250 K (a vitiated preheater was used), pressures from 170 to 600 kPa, air velocities of 10 to 30 m/sec, equivalence ratios from 0.3 to 1.0, mixing lengths from 10 to 60 cm, and residence times of 2 to 100 ms. The fuel was diesel number 2. The duct was insulated and had an inside diameter of 12 cm. Three different fuel injection systems were used: One was a single simplex pressure atomizer, and the other two were multiple-source injectors. The data obtained with the simplex and one of the multiple-source injectors agreed satisfactorily with the references and correlated with an Arrenhius expression. The data obtained with the other multiple source injector, which used multiple cones to improve the fuel-air distribution, did not correlate well with residence time.

  6. Subsonic Flows through S-Ducts with Flow Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yi

    An inlet duct of an aircraft connects the air intake mounted on the fuselage to the engine within the aircraft body. The ideal outflow quality of the duct is steady, uniform and of high total pressure. Recently compact S-shaped inlet ducts are drawing more attention in the design of UAVs with short propulsion system. Compact ducts usually involve strong streamwise adverse pressure gradient and transverse secondary flow, leading to large-scale harmful vortical structures in the outflow. To improve the outflow quality modern flow control techniques have to be applied. Before designing successful flow control methods a solid understanding of the baseline flow field with the duct is crucial. In this work the fundamental mechanism of how the three dimensional flow topology evolves when the relevant parameters such as the duct geometry and boundary layer thickness are varied, is studied carefully. Two distinct secondary-flow patterns are identified. For the first time the sensitivity of the flow topology to the inflow boundary layer thickness in long ducts is clearly addressed. The interaction between the transverse motion induced by the transverse pressure gradient and the streamwise separation is revealed as the crucial reason for the various flow patterns existing in short ducts. A non-symmetric flow pattern is identified for the first time in both experiments and simulations in short ducts in which the intensity of the streamwise separation and the transverse invasion are in the same order of magnitude. A theory of energy accumulation and solution bifurcation is used to give a reasonable explanation for this non-symmetry. After gaining the knowledge of where and how the harmful vortical structures are generated several flow control techniques are tested to achieve a better outflow quality. The analysis of the flow control cases also provides a deeper insight into the behavior of the three-dimensional flow within the ducts. The conventional separation control method

  7. Method and apparatus for duct sealing using a clog-resistant insertable injector

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Duo; Modera, Mark P.

    2010-12-14

    A method for forming a duct access region through one side of a previously installed air duct, wherein the air duct has an air flow with an air flow direction by inserting an aerosol injector into a previously installed air duct through the access region. The aerosol injector includes a liquid tube having a liquid tube orifice for ejecting a liquid to be atomized; and a propellant cap. The method is accomplished by aligning the aerosol injector with the direction of air flow in the duct; activating an air flow within the duct; and spraying a sealant through the aerosol injector to seal the duct in the direction of the air flow.

  8. Duct closure

    DOEpatents

    Vowell, Kennison L.

    1987-01-01

    A closure for an inclined duct having an open upper end and defining downwardly extending passageway. The closure includes a cap for sealing engagement with the open upper end of the duct. Associated with the cap are an array of vertically aligned plug members, each of which has a cross-sectional area substantially conforming to the cross-sectional area of the passageway at least adjacent the upper end of the passageway. The plug members are interconnected in a manner to provide for free movement only in the plane in which the duct is inclined. The uppermost plug member is attached to the cap means and the cap means is in turn connected to a hoist means which is located directly over the open end of the duct.

  9. Multi-Group Reductions of LTE Air Plasma Radiative Transfer in Cylindrical Geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scoggins, James; Magin, Thierry Edouard Bertran; Wray, Alan; Mansour, Nagi N.

    2013-01-01

    Air plasma radiation in Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (LTE) within cylindrical geometries is studied with an application towards modeling the radiative transfer inside arc-constrictors, a central component of constricted-arc arc jets. A detailed database of spectral absorption coefficients for LTE air is formulated using the NEQAIR code developed at NASA Ames Research Center. The database stores calculated absorption coefficients for 1,051,755 wavelengths between 0.04 µm and 200 µm over a wide temperature (500K to 15 000K) and pressure (0.1 atm to 10.0 atm) range. The multi-group method for spectral reduction is studied by generating a range of reductions including pure binning and banding reductions from the detailed absorption coefficient database. The accuracy of each reduction is compared to line-by-line calculations for cylindrical temperature profiles resembling typical profiles found in arc-constrictors. It is found that a reduction of only 1000 groups is sufficient to accurately model the LTE air radiation over a large temperature and pressure range. In addition to the reduction comparison, the cylindrical-slab formulation is compared with the finite-volume method for the numerical integration of the radiative flux inside cylinders with varying length. It is determined that cylindrical-slabs can be used to accurately model most arc-constrictors due to their high length to radius ratios.

  10. Cornice Duct System

    SciTech Connect

    Wayne Place; Chuck Ladd

    2004-10-29

    SYNERGETICS, INC., has designed, developed, and tested an air handling duct system that integrates the air duct with the cornice trim of interior spaces. The device has the advantage that the normal thermal losses from ducts into unconditioned attics and crawl spaces can be totally eliminated by bringing the ducts internal to the conditioned space. The following report details work conducted in the second budget period to develop the Cornice Duct System into a viable product for use in a variety of residential or small commercial building settings. A full-scale prototype has been fabricated and tested in a laboratory test building at the Daylighting Facility at North Carolina State University., Based on the results of that testing, the prototype design as been refined, fabricated, installed, and extensively tested in a residential laboratory house. The testing indicates that the device gives substantially superior performance to a standard air distribution system in terms of energy performance and thermal comfort. Patent Number US 6,511,373 B2 has been granted on the version of the device installed and tested in the laboratory house. (A copy of that patent is attached.) Refinements to the device have been carried through two additional design iterations, with a particular focus on reducing installation time and cost and refining the air control system. These new designs have been fabricated and tested and show substantial promise. Based on these design and testing iterations, a final design is proposed as part of this document. That final design is the basis for a continuation in part currently being filed with the U.5, Patent office.

  11. Capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers based on annular cell geometry for air-coupled applications.

    PubMed

    Na, Shuai; Chen, Albert I H; Wong, Lawrence L P; Li, Zhenhao; Macecek, Mirek; Yeow, John T W

    2016-09-01

    A novel design of an air-coupled capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (CMUT) with annular cell geometry (annular CMUT) is proposed. Finite element analysis shows that an annular cell has a ratio of average-to-maximum displacement (RAMD) of 0.52-0.58 which is 58-76% higher than that of a conventional circular cell. The increased RAMD leads to a larger volume displacement which results in a 48.4% improved transmit sensitivity and 127.3% improved power intensity. Single-cell annular CMUTs were fabricated with 20-μm silicon plates on 13.7-μm deep and 1.35-mm wide annular cavities using the wafer bonding technique. The measured RAMD of the fabricated CMUTs is 0.54. The resonance frequency was measured to be 94.5kHz at 170-V DC bias. The transmit sensitivity was measured to be 33.83Pa/V and 25.85Pa/V when the CMUT was excited by a continuous wave and a 20-cycle burst, respectively. The receive sensitivity at 170-V DC bias was measured to be 7.7mV/Pa for a 20-cycle burst, and 15.0mV/Pa for a continuous incident wave. The proposed annular CMUT design demonstrates a significant improvement in transmit efficiency, which is an important parameter for air-coupled ultrasonic transducers. PMID:27352025

  12. Ramjet bypass duct and preburner configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orlando, Robert J. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A combined turbofan and ramjet aircraft engine includes a forward bypass duct which allows the engine to operate more efficiently during the turbofan mode of operation. By mounting a ramjet preburner in the forward duct and isolating this duct from the turbofan bypass air, a transition from turbofan operation to ramjet operation can take place at lower flight Mach numbers without incurring pressure losses or blockage in the turbofan bypass air.

  13. Geometry Modeling and Adaptive Control of Air-Breathing Hypersonic Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vick, Tyler Joseph

    Air-breathing hypersonic vehicles have the potential to provide global reach and affordable access to space. Recent technological advancements have made scramjet-powered flight achievable, as evidenced by the successes of the X-43A and X-51A flight test programs over the last decade. Air-breathing hypersonic vehicles present unique modeling and control challenges in large part due to the fact that scramjet propulsion systems are highly integrated into the airframe, resulting in strongly coupled and often unstable dynamics. Additionally, the extreme flight conditions and inability to test fully integrated vehicle systems larger than X-51 before flight leads to inherent uncertainty in hypersonic flight. This thesis presents a means to design vehicle geometries, simulate vehicle dynamics, and develop and analyze control systems for hypersonic vehicles. First, a software tool for generating three-dimensional watertight vehicle surface meshes from simple design parameters is developed. These surface meshes are compatible with existing vehicle analysis tools, with which databases of aerodynamic and propulsive forces and moments can be constructed. A six-degree-of-freedom nonlinear dynamics simulation model which incorporates this data is presented. Inner-loop longitudinal and lateral control systems are designed and analyzed utilizing the simulation model. The first is an output feedback proportional-integral linear controller designed using linear quadratic regulator techniques. The second is a model reference adaptive controller (MRAC) which augments this baseline linear controller with an adaptive element. The performance and robustness of each controller are analyzed through simulated time responses to angle-of-attack and bank angle commands, while various uncertainties are introduced. The MRAC architecture enables the controller to adapt in a nonlinear fashion to deviations from the desired response, allowing for improved tracking performance, stability, and

  14. Optimization of air-ejected rocket/missile geometries under validated supersonic flow field simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, D.; Domínguez, D.; Gonzalo, J.

    2014-12-01

    This paper defines a methodology to carry out optimizations of rocket/missile geometries by means of krigingbased algorithms applied to simulations made with computational fluid dynamic (CFD) codes. The first part of the paper is focused on the validation of the open source CFD code against a well-studied 3-dimmensional test case in supersonic conditions. The impact of several turbulence models, different numerical schemes to discretize the equations and different mesh resolution levels have been analyzed demonstrating the performance of using wall functions for supersonic flow. Good agreements between numerical, theoretical and experimental results are obtained and some general guidelines are extracted. The best accuracy is obtained with SST k-omega turbulence model with meshes suitable for the use of wall functions in the boundary cells. Then, with this configuration for the simulations, an air-ejected rocket fairing is selected to apply a geometrical optimization. The selected method is kriging-based, where a statistical model is generated by means of several numerical experiments dependent on a certain number of design parameters; the final objective is to find the minimum drag coefficient for the model, keeping enough room inside the fairing to install the requested payload. This kriging-based method allows obtaining the samples in a parallel manner, looking for the optimum design at the generated metamodel and hence improving its accuracy adding new samples if needed.

  15. Low-cost orbiting grinder for cutting ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, E. J.

    1970-01-01

    Low-cost, portable machine cuts ducts made from heat-treated alloys. An abrasive wheel, powered by a high-speed air motor mounted on an expandible plug against the inner wall of the duct, gives precise cutting.

  16. Coupled parametric design of flow control and duct shape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Florea, Razvan (Inventor); Bertuccioli, Luca (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A method for designing gas turbine engine components using a coupled parametric analysis of part geometry and flow control is disclosed. Included are the steps of parametrically defining the geometry of the duct wall shape, parametrically defining one or more flow control actuators in the duct wall, measuring a plurality of performance parameters or metrics (e.g., flow characteristics) of the duct and comparing the results of the measurement with desired or target parameters, and selecting the optimal duct geometry and flow control for at least a portion of the duct, the selection process including evaluating the plurality of performance metrics in a pareto analysis. The use of this method in the design of inter-turbine transition ducts, serpentine ducts, inlets, diffusers, and similar components provides a design which reduces pressure losses and flow profile distortions.

  17. Heat Transfer Enhancement in a Solar Air Heater with Roughened Duct Having Arc-Shaped Elements as Roughness Element on the Absorber Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Anil Prakash; Goel, Varun; Vashishtha, Siddhartha; Kumar, Amit

    2016-07-01

    An experimental study has been carried out for the heat transfer and friction characteristics for arc shaped roughness element used in solar air heaters. Duct has an aspect ratio (W/H) of 11, relative roughness pitch (p/e) range of 4-16, relative roughness height (e/D) range of 0.027-0.045, Reynolds number ( Re) range of 2200-22,000 and arc angle (α) was kept constant at 60°. The effects of Re, relative roughness pitch (p/e) and relative roughness height (e/D) on heat transfer and friction factor have been discussed. The results obtained for Nusselt number and friction factor has been compared with smooth solar air heater to see the enhancement in heat transfer and friction factor and it is found out that considerable enhancement takes place in case of heat transfer as well as in friction factor. Correlations were also developed for Nusselt number and friction factor. Thermo-hydraulic performance parameter is also calculated for the same.

  18. Heat Transfer Enhancement in a Solar Air Heater with Roughened Duct Having Arc-Shaped Elements as Roughness Element on the Absorber Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Anil Prakash; Goel, Varun; Vashishtha, Siddhartha; Kumar, Amit

    2016-05-01

    An experimental study has been carried out for the heat transfer and friction characteristics for arc shaped roughness element used in solar air heaters. Duct has an aspect ratio (W/H) of 11, relative roughness pitch (p/e) range of 4-16, relative roughness height (e/D) range of 0.027-0.045, Reynolds number (Re) range of 2200-22,000 and arc angle (α) was kept constant at 60°. The effects of Re, relative roughness pitch (p/e) and relative roughness height (e/D) on heat transfer and friction factor have been discussed. The results obtained for Nusselt number and friction factor has been compared with smooth solar air heater to see the enhancement in heat transfer and friction factor and it is found out that considerable enhancement takes place in case of heat transfer as well as in friction factor. Correlations were also developed for Nusselt number and friction factor. Thermo-hydraulic performance parameter is also calculated for the same.

  19. Effects of nozzle exit geometry and pressure ratio on plume shape for nozzles exhausting into quiescent air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scallion, William I.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of varying the exit geometry on the plume shapes of supersonic nozzles exhausting into quiescent air at several exit-to-ambient pressure ratios are given. Four nozzles having circular throat sections and circular, elliptical and oval exit cross sections were tested and the exit plume shapes are compared at the same exit-to-ambient pressure ratios. The resulting mass flows were calculated and are also presented.

  20. Reducing Uncertainty for the DeltaQ Duct Leakage Test

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max H.; Dickerhoff, Darryl J.

    2004-05-01

    The thermal distribution system couples the HVAC components to the building envelope, and shares many properties of the buildings envelope including moisture, conduction and most especially air leakage performance. Duct leakage has a strong influence on air flow rates through building envelopes (usually resulting in much greater flows than those due to natural infiltration) because unbalanced duct air flows and leaks result in building pressurization and depressurization. As a tool to estimate this effect, the DeltaQ duct leakage test has been developed over the past several years as an improvement to existing duct pressurization tests. It focuses on measuring the air leakage flows to outside at operating conditions that are required for envelope infiltration impacts and energy loss calculations for duct systems. The DeltaQ test builds on the standard envelope tightness blower door measurement techniques by repeating the tests with the system air handler off and on. The DeltaQ test requires several assumptions to be made about duct leakage and its interaction with the duct system and building envelope in order to convert the blower door results into duct leakage at system operating conditions. This study examined improvements to the DeltaQ test that account for some of these assumptions using a duct system and building envelope in a test laboratory. The laboratory measurements used a purpose-built test chamber coupled to a duct system typical of forced air systems in US homes. Special duct leaks with controlled air-flow were designed and installed into an airtight duct system. This test apparatus allowed the systematic variation of the duct and envelope leakage and accurate measurement of the duct leakage flows for comparison to DeltaQ test results. This paper will discuss the laboratory test apparatus design, construction and operation, the various analysis techniques applied to the calculation procedure and present estimates of uncertainty in measured duct

  1. Modeling particle loss in ventilation ducts

    SciTech Connect

    Sippola, Mark R.; Nazaroff, William W.

    2003-04-01

    Empirical equations were developed and applied to predict losses of 0.01-100 {micro}m airborne particles making a single pass through 120 different ventilation duct runs typical of those found in mid-sized office buildings. For all duct runs, losses were negligible for submicron particles and nearly complete for particles larger than 50 {micro}m. The 50th percentile cut-point diameters were 15 {micro}m in supply runs and 25 {micro}m in return runs. Losses in supply duct runs were higher than in return duct runs, mostly because internal insulation was present in portions of supply duct runs, but absent from return duct runs. Single-pass equations for particle loss in duct runs were combined with models for predicting ventilation system filtration efficiency and particle deposition to indoor surfaces to evaluate the fates of particles of indoor and outdoor origin in an archetypal mechanically ventilated building. Results suggest that duct losses are a minor influence for determining indoor concentrations for most particle sizes. Losses in ducts were of a comparable magnitude to indoor surface losses for most particle sizes. For outdoor air drawn into an unfiltered ventilation system, most particles smaller than 1 {micro}m are exhausted from the building. Large particles deposit within the building, mostly in supply ducts or on indoor surfaces. When filters are present, most particles are either filtered or exhausted. The fates of particles generated indoors follow similar trends as outdoor particles drawn into the building.

  2. Effects of Tube Diameter and Tubeside Fin Geometry on the Heat Transfer Performance of Air-Cooled Condensers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H. S.; Honda, Hiroshi

    A theoretical study has been made on the effects of tube diameter and tubeside fin geometry on the heat transfer performance of air-cooled condensers. Extensive numerical calculations of overall heat transfer from refrigerant R410A flowing inside a horizontal microfin tube to ambient air were conducted for a typical operating condition of the air-cooled condenser. The tubeside heat transfer coefficient was calculated by applying a modified stratified flow model developed by Wang et al.8). The numerical results show that the effects of tube diameter, fin height, fin number and helix angle of groove are significant, whereas those of the width of flat portion at the fin tip, the radius of round corner at the fin tip and the fin half tip angle are small.

  3. Investigation of the use of fly-ash based autoclaved cellular concrete blocks in coal mines for air duct work. Final report, January 25, 1993--December 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Horvath, M.L.

    1995-06-19

    Coal mines are required to provide ventilation to occupied portions of underground mines. Concrete block is used in this process to construct air duct walls. However, normal concrete block is heavy and not easy to work with and eventually fails dramatically after being loaded due to mine ceiling convergence and/or floor heave. Autoclaved cellular concrete block made from (70{plus_minus}%) coal fly ash is lightweight and less rigid when loaded. It is lighter and easier to use than regular concrete block for underground mine applications. It has also been used in surface construction around the world for over 40 years. Ohio Edison along with eight other electric utility companies, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), and North American Cellular Concrete constructed a mobile demonstration plant to produce autoclaved cellular concrete block from utility fly ash. To apply this research in Ohio, Ohio Edison also worked with the Ohio Coal Development Office and CONSOL Inc. to produce autoclaved cellular concrete block not only from coal ash but also from LIMB ash, SNRB ash, and PFBC ash from various clean coal technology projects sponsored by the Ohio Coal Development Office. The purpose of this project was to demonstrate the potential for beneficial use of fly ash and clean coal technology by-products in the production of lightweight block.

  4. Turbofan aft duct suppressor study program listing and user's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joshi, M. C.; Kraft, R. E.

    1983-01-01

    A description of the structure of the Annular Flow Duct Program (AFDP) for the calculation of acoustic suppression due to treatment in a finite length annular duct carrying sheared flow is presented. Although most appropriate for engine exhaust ducts, this program can be used to study sound propagation in any duct that maintains annular geometry over a considerable length of the duct. The program is based on the modal analysis of sound propagation in ducts with axial segments of different wall impedances. For specified duct geometry, wall impedance, flow and acoustic conditions in the duct (including mode amplitude distribution of the source) and duct termination reflection characteristics, the program calculates the suppression due to the treatment in the duct. The presence of forward and backward traveling modes in the duct due to the reflection and redistribution of modes at segment interfaces and duct end terminations are taken into account in the calculations. The effects of thin wall boundary layers (with a linear or mean flow velocity profile) on the acoustic propagation are also included in the program. A functional description of the major subroutines is included and a sample run is provided with an explanation of the output.

  5. BTS Fact Sheet: Improving the efficiency of your duct system

    SciTech Connect

    BNL

    1999-12-28

    The duct system, used in air heating and air cooling your home, is a collection of tubes that distributes the heated or cooled air to the various rooms. The duct system can have an important effect on health of the occupants through the distribution of indoor air pollution. Changes and repairs to a duct system should always be performed by a qualified professional. This brochure is meant to help you understand the problems that can affect the duct system and how you can save money, improve comfort, and protect against potential health hazards.

  6. Main rotor free wake geometry effects on blade air loads and response for helicopters in steady maneuvers. Volume 1: Theoretical formulation and analysis of results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadler, S. G.

    1972-01-01

    A mathematical model and computer program were implemented to study the main rotor free wake geometry effects on helicopter rotor blade air loads and response in steady maneuvers. The theoretical formulation and analysis of results are presented.

  7. Performance Study and CFD Predictions of a Ducted Fan System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abrego, Anita I.; Chang, I-Chung; Bulaga, Robert W.; Rutkowski, Michael (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    An experimental investigation was completed in the NASA Ames 7 by 10-Foot Wind Tunnel to study the performance characteristics of a ducted fan. The goal of this effort is to study the effect of ducted fan geometry and utilize Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis to provide a baseline for correlation. A 38-inch diameter, 10-inch chord duct with a five-bladed fixed-pitch fan was tested. Duct performance data were obtained in hover, vertical climb, and forward flight test conditions. This paper will present a description of the test, duct performance results and correlation with CFD predictions.

  8. INTERIOR DUCT SYSTEM DESIGN, CONSTRUCTION, AND PERFORMANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Janet E.R. Mcllvaine; David Beal; Philip Fairey

    2001-10-10

    By removing air distribution and conditioning equipment from unconditioned spaces, homeowners stand to benefit substantially with respect to both energy savings and indoor air quality. Duct leakage introduces: Greater heating and cooling loads from air at extreme temperatures and humidity levels; Outside air and air from unconditioned spaces that may contain air borne contaminants, combustion gases, pollen, mold spores, and/or particles of building materials; and Higher whole-house infiltration/exfiltration rates. Exemplary studies conducted since 1990 have demonstrated the prevalence of duct leakage throughout the United States and measured energy savings of approximately 20% during both heating and cooling seasons from leakage reduction. These all dealt with duct leakage to and/or from unconditioned spaces. In the building science community, leakage within the conditioned space is generally presumed to eliminate the negative consequences of duct leakage with the exception of possibly creating pressure imbalances in the house which relates to higher infiltration and/or exfiltration. The practical challenges of isolating ducts and air handlers from unconditioned spaces require builders to construct an air-tight environment for the ducts. Florida Solar Energy Center researchers worked with four builders in Texas, North Carolina, and Florida who build a furred-down chase located either in a central hallway or at the edges of rooms as an architectural detail. Some comparison homes with duct systems in attics and crawl spaces were included in the test group of more than 20 homes. Test data reveals that all of the duct/AHU systems built inside the conditioned space had lower duct leakage to unconditioned spaces than their conventional counterparts; however, none of the homes was completely free of duct leakage to unconditioned spaces. Common problems included wiring and plumbing penetrations of the chase, failure to treat the chase as an air tight space, and misguided

  9. Flue gas duct assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Montana, F.J.

    1984-08-28

    A length of longitudinally extending duct assembly for heated corrosive gases includes an outer support duct and a substantially gas-tight liner. The liner is spaced from the outer support duct by a relatively yielding spacer material that accommodates expansion of the liner in directions parallel to the inner surface of the outer support duct and in directions normal to the inner surface of the outer support duct without imposing any substantial resistance to such thermal expansion.

  10. Authentic Assessment in the Geometry Classroom: Calculating the Classroom Air-Exchange Rate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erich, David J.

    2002-01-01

    Introduces a room air-exchange activity designed to assess student understanding of the concept of volume. Lists materials for the activity and its procedures. Includes the lesson plan and a student worksheet. (KHR)

  11. Peripheral temperature variation in the wall of a noncircular duct - An experimental investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrow, H.; Hassan, A. K. A.; Avgerinos, C.

    1984-07-01

    This paper is concerned with the peripheral variation of the temperature in the wall of a straight noncircular duct, with special reference to the prediction of the temperature in the cladding of the fuel rods of a pressurized water reactor, in the event of a loss of coolant. A simple model of the conjugate heat transfers in the wall and the fluid is used to predict the temperature variation around the wall. To test the theory, experiments have been made to determine wall temperatures in a cusped duct using air as the working fluid for a range of fluid flow rates. Overall pressure drop and heat transfer measurements for friction factor and average heat transfer coefficient indicate the inadequacy of the hydraulic radius concept in the case of the very noncircular geometry used in the experiments, and the effect of asymmetry in heat transfer. It is thought that these heat transfer experiments are the first for this particular geometry.

  12. Surface determination of the air-earth electrical current density using co-located sensors of different geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, A. J.; Harrison, R. G.

    2006-06-01

    A vertical conduction current flows in the atmosphere as a result of the global atmospheric electric circuit. The current at the surface consists of the conduction current and a locally generated displacement current, which are often approximately equal in magnitude. A method of separating the two currents using two collectors of different geometry is investigated. The picoammeters connected to the collectors have a RC time constant of approximately 3s, permitting the investigation of higher frequency air-earth current changes than previously achieved. The displacement current component of the air-earth current derived from the instrument agrees with calculations using simultaneous data from a co-located fast response electric field mill. The mean value of the nondisplacement current measured over 9h was 1.76±0.002pAm-2.

  13. Design and analysis of air acoustic vector-sensor configurations for two-dimensional geometry.

    PubMed

    Wajid, Mohd; Kumar, Arun; Bahl, Rajendar

    2016-05-01

    Acoustic vector-sensors (AVS) have been designed using the P-P method for different microphone configurations. These configurations have been used to project the acoustic intensity on the orthogonal axes through which the direction of arrival (DoA) of a sound source has been estimated. The analytical expressions for the DoA for different microphone configurations have been derived for two-dimensional geometry. Finite element method simulation using COMSOL-Multiphysics has been performed, where the microphone signals for AVS configurations have been recorded in free field conditions. The performance of all the configurations has been evaluated with respect to angular error and root-mean-square angular error. The simulation results obtained with ideal geometry for different configurations have been corroborated experimentally with prototype AVS realizations and also compared with microphone-array method, viz., Multiple Signal Classification and Generalized Cross Correlation. Experiments have been performed in an anechoic room using different prototype AVS configurations made from small size microphones. The DoA performance using analytical expressions, simulation studies, and experiments with prototype AVS in anechoic chamber are presented in the paper. The square and delta configurations are found to perform better in the absence and presence of noise, respectively. PMID:27250174

  14. Design and evaluation of a low nitrogen oxides natural gas-fired conical wire-mesh duct burner for a micro-cogeneration unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramadan, Omar Barka Ab

    A novel low NOx conical wire-mesh duct burner was designed, built and tested in the present research. This thesis documents the design process and the in-depth evaluation of this novel duct burner for the development of a more efficient micro-cogeneration unit. This duct burner provides the thermal energy necessary to raise the microturbine exhaust gases temperature to increase the heat recovery capability. The duct burner implements both lean-premixed and surface combustion techniques to achieve low NOx and CO emissions. The design of the duct burner was supported by a qualitative flow visualization study for the duct burner premixer to provide insight into the premixer flow field (mixing process). Different premixer geometries were used to control the homogeneity of the fuel-oxidant mixture at the exit of the duct burner premixer. Laser sheet illumination (LSI) technique was used to capture images of the mixing process, for each configuration studied. A quasi-quantitative analysis technique was developed to rank the different premixer geometries in terms of mixing effectiveness. The premixer geometries that provided better mixing were selected and used for the combustion tests. The full-scale gas-fired duct burner was installed in the exhaust duct of a micro-cogeneration unit for the evaluation. Three wire-mesh burners with different pressure drops were used. Each burner has a conical shape made from FeCrAL alloy mat and was designed based on a heat release per unit area of 2500 kW/m2 and a total heat release of 240kW at 100 percent excess air. The local momentum of the gaseous mixture introduced through the wire-mesh was adjusted so that the flame stabilized outside the burner mesh (surface combustion). Cold flow tests (i.e., the duct burner was off, but the microturbine was running) were conducted to measure the effect of different duct burner geometrical parameters on flow split between the combustion zone and the bypass channel, and on pressure drop across

  15. Particle deposition in ventilation ducts: Connectors, bends anddeveloping flow

    SciTech Connect

    Sippola, Mark R.; Nazaroff, William W.

    2004-03-01

    In ventilation duct flow the turbulent flow profile is commonly disturbed or not fully developed and these conditions are likely to influence particle deposition to duct surfaces. Particle deposition rates at eight S-connectors, in two 90{sup o} duct bends and in two ducts where the turbulent flow profile was not fully developed were measured in a laboratory duct system with both galvanized steel and internally insulated ducts with hydraulic diameters of 15.2 cm. In the steel duct system, experiments with nominal particle diameters of 1, 3, 5, 9 and 16 {micro}m were conducted at each of three nominal air speeds: 2.2, 5.3 and 9.0 m/s. In the insulated duct system, deposition of particles with nominal diameters of 1, 3, 5, 8 and 13 {micro}m was measured at nominal air speeds of 2.2, 5.3 and 8.8 m/s. Fluorescent techniques were used to directly measure the deposition velocities of monodisperse fluorescent particles to duct surfaces. Deposition at S-connectors, in bends and in straight ducts with developing turbulence was often greater than deposition in straight ducts with fully developed turbulence for equal particle sizes, air speeds and duct surface orientations. Deposition rates at all locations were found to increase with an increase in particle size or air speed. High deposition rates at S-connectors resulted from impaction and these rates were nearly independent of the orientation of the S-connector. Deposition rates in the two 90{sup o} bends differed by more than an order of magnitude in some cases, probably because of the difference in turbulence conditions at the bend inlets. In straight steel ducts where the turbulent flow profile was developing, the deposition enhancement relative to fully developed turbulence generally increased with air speed and decreased with downstream distance from the duct inlet. This enhancement was greater at the duct ceiling and wall than at the duct floor. In insulated ducts, deposition enhancement was less pronounced overall

  16. 91. VIEW OF OBSOLETE AIRCONDITIONING DUCTS LOCATED IN NORTHWEST CORNER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    91. VIEW OF OBSOLETE AIR-CONDITIONING DUCTS LOCATED IN NORTHWEST CORNER OF ROOM, ABOVE SLC-3E AUTOPILOT EQUIPMENT. DIGITAL COUNTDOWN AND HOLD CLOCKS ON WALL LEFT OF DUCTS - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Operations Building, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  17. Air core notch-coil magnet with variable geometry for fast-field-cycling NMR.

    PubMed

    Kruber, S; Farrher, G D; Anoardo, E

    2015-10-01

    In this manuscript we present details on the optimization, construction and performance of a wide-bore (71 mm) α-helical-cut notch-coil magnet with variable geometry for fast-field-cycling NMR. In addition to the usual requirements for this kind of magnets (high field-to-power ratio, good magnetic field homogeneity, low inductance and resistance values) a tunable homogeneity and a more uniform heat dissipation along the magnet body are considered. The presented magnet consists of only one machined metallic cylinder combined with two external movable pieces. The optimal configuration is calculated through an evaluation of the magnetic flux density within the entire volume of interest. The magnet has a field-to-current constant of 0.728 mT/A, allowing to switch from zero to 0.125 T in less than 3 ms without energy storage assistance. For a cylindrical sample volume of 35 cm(3) the effective magnet homogeneity is lower than 130 ppm. PMID:26367321

  18. Effect of electrode geometry on high energy spark discharges in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belmouss, Mounia

    The government, aerospace, and transportation industries are deeply invested in developing new technologies to improve the performance and maneuverability of current and future aircraft while reducing aerodynamic noise and environmental impact. One of the key pathways to meet these goals is through aerodynamic flow control, which can involve suppressing or inducing separation, transition and management of turbulence in boundary layers, increasing the lift and reducing the drag of airfoils, and gas mixing to control fluctuating forces and aerodynamic noise [1]. In this dissertation, the complex flow field following a spark discharge is studied for a range of geometries and discharge characteristics, and the possibilities for using the induced flow for aerodynamic control are assessed. This work shows the influence of the electrode configuration on the fluid dynamics following the spark discharge and how the hot gas evolution gives rise to various physical phenomena (i.e. generation of turbulence, inducing vorticity, and gas mixing) that can be used to modify the flow-field structure near the boundary layer on an aerodynamic surface.

  19. 54. DETAIL OF AIRCONDITIONING EXHAUST DUCTS ON NORTH FACE OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    54. DETAIL OF AIR-CONDITIONING EXHAUST DUCTS ON NORTH FACE OF ERECT UMBILICAL MAST - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 West, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  20. Propagation Of Sound In Curved Ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rostafinski, Wojciech

    1992-01-01

    Monograph presents concise, comprehensive summary of knowledge of propagation of acoustic waves in ducts and pipes including bends. Pulls together information from Lord Rayleigh's book Theory Of Sound, published in 1878, and from 33 papers scattered throughout various scientific journals published between 1945 and 1989. Monograph useful to scientists and engineers interested in such diverse topics as musical instruments, air-conditioning ducts, and jet engines. Material not available in current texts.

  1. Normal Mastoid Air Cell System Geometry: Has Surface Area Been Overestimated?

    PubMed Central

    Byun, Sung Wan; Lee, Seung-Sin; Park, Jin Young; Yoo, Jeong Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to emphasize the necessity of a standard in segmentation threshold and algorithm for measuring volume and surface area of mastoid air cell system (MACS). Methods First, we obtained axial computed tomography scans of 54 normal temporal bones from 27 subjects. Then, we manipulated Hounsfield units (HU) image data in DICOM (digital imaging and communications in medicine) files directly using our program. The volume and surface area of MACS were computed and compared at segmentation thresholds (HU) from –700 to 0 at intervals of 50 using 2 algorithms; square pixel based (SP) algorithm and marching square (MS) algorithm. Results No significant difference was found between the volumes computed by SP and MS algorithms at each segmentation threshold. The surface area computed by SP algorithm, however, was significantly larger than that by MS algorithm. We could minimize this significant difference through a modification of the SP algorithm. As the lower HU threshold value was set, the smaller volume was measured. The surface area showed a plateau at a threshold of approximately –200 HU. The segmentation threshold had greater influence on the measured volume of MACS than the algorithm did. Conclusion A standard method for measuring volume and surface area of MACS is thought to be necessary. We suggest that the MS algorithm and –200 HU of the threshold could be a standard in the measurement of volume and surface area of MACS. PMID:26976023

  2. Optimization of the mechanical performance of a two-duct semicircular duct system--part 2: excitation of endolymph movements.

    PubMed

    Muller, M; Verhagen, J H G

    2002-06-21

    The endolymph flow inside the semicircular ducts is analytically investigated by considering a system of two hydrodynamically interconnected ducts. Rotation of this system adds an amount of motion (momentum) to parts of it. This results in an endolymph flow in generally all vestibular parts. The "external impulses" are the impulses which emerge by rotation of exclusively a particular vestibular part. The real impulses can be calculated from a set of equations which contain the external impulses. Analytical expressions are derived for the initial velocities in the ducts and for the maximum endolymph displacements. These formulae contain the external impulses and the ratios of: (1) the radii of crus commune and ducts (gamma), (2) the lengths of crus commune and ducts (lambda). It was proven that an interconnected system composed of two ducts, and also a system composed of two such semicircular duct systems, behaves as a pure rotation transducer (like a single duct does), also when it is rotated excentrically. Duct systems with polygonal and circular geometries were used to evaluate whether an optimal value of lambda would exist (gamma was already considered elsewhere). Optimum values of lambda in a range of about 0.10-0.52 were found. This rather wide range of values agrees with values from measurements. Optimization of an interconnected duct system appeared to be equal to optimization of a system composed of separate ducts. PMID:12151259

  3. A Comparison of Simulation Capabilities for Ducts

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, William A.; Smith, Matt K.; Gu, Lixing; New, Joshua Ryan

    2014-11-01

    Typically, the cheapest way to install a central air conditioning system in residential buildings is to place the ductwork in the attic. Energy losses due to duct-attic interactions can be great, but current whole-house models are unable to capture the dynamic multi-mode physics of the interactions. The building industry is notoriously fragmented and unable to devote adequate research resources to solve this problem. Builders are going to continue to put ducts in the attic because floor space is too expensive to closet them within living space, and there are both construction and aesthetic issues with other approaches such as dropped ceilings. Thus, there is a substantial need to publicly document duct losses and the cost of energy used by ducts in attics so that practitioners, builders, homeowners and state and federal code officials can make informed decisions leading to changes in new construction and additional retrofit actions. Thus, the goal of this study is to conduct a comparison of AtticSim and EnergyPlus simulation algorithms to identify specific features for potential inclusion in EnergyPlus that would allow higher-fidelity modeling of HVAC operation and duct transport of conditioned air. It is anticipated that the resulting analysis from these simulation tools will inform energy decisions relating to the role of ducts in future building energy codes and standards.

  4. Evaluation of DNA damage in exfoliated tear duct epithelial cells from individuals exposed to air pollution assessed by single cell gel electrophoresis assay.

    PubMed

    Rojas, E; Valverde, M; Lopez, M C; Naufal, I; Sanchez, I; Bizarro, P; Lopez, I; Fortoul, T I; Ostrosky-Wegman, P

    2000-06-22

    The search for relevant target cells for human monitoring purposes has increased during the last few years. Cells such as sperm, buccal or nasal and gastric epithelium are being used. In this study, we report the use of exfoliated tear duct epithelial cells as a potential material for human biomonitoring studies, since these cells are a target for environmental pollutants. We employed the alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) assay to evaluate for differences in the basal level of DNA damage between young adults from the south (exposed mainly to high levels of ozone) and from the north (exposed principally to hydrocarbons) regions of Mexico City. We found an increase in DNA migration in tear duct epithelial cells from individuals who live in the southern part of the city compared to those living in the northern part. Moreover, young people who live in the southwest part of the city with the highest values of ozone presented the highest values of DNA damage. These results show the feasibility of using exfoliated tear duct epithelial cells in human biomonitoring studies. PMID:10863153

  5. Investigation of the Rocket Induced Flow Field in a Rectangular Duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landrum, D. Brian; Lambert, James; Thames, Mignon; Hawk, Clark

    1999-01-01

    Rocket-Based Combined Cycle (RBCC) concepts attempt to improve the performance of launch vehicles at all points in the launch trajectory and make highly reusable launch vehicles a reality. The Aerojet Strutjet RBCC concept consists of a variable geometry duct with internal, vertical struts that functions in ducted rocket, ramjet, scramjet, and pure rocket modes. These struts have rocket and turbine exhaust nozzles imbedded within them. The rocket flows create an ejector effect with the ingested air at subsonic flight velocities. In ramjet and scramjet modes, the fuel rich nozzle flows react with the ingested air producing an afterburner effect. Under a NASA Marshall Space Flight Center contract, the UAH Propulsion Research Center (PRC) has designed and built a Strutjet simulation facility. A scale model of a single strut has been built and is undergoing cold-flow testing to investigate the mixing of the rocket and turbine exhausts with the ingested air. A complementary experimental program is also underway to examine the induced flow-field generated by rocket nozzles confined in a rectangular duct. Characterizing the induced flow behavior is critical to understanding and optimizing the performance of future Strutjet-based RBCC propulsion systems. The proposed paper will present results from the rocket induced flow investigation.

  6. Numerical simulation of duct flow with fog droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suryan, Abhilash; Lee, J. K.; Kim, D. S.; Kim, H. D.

    2010-12-01

    Evaporative cooling is a widely used air cooling technique. In this method, evaporation of a liquid in the surrounding air cools the air in contact with it. In the current investigation, numerical simulations are carried out to visualize the evaporation and dynamics of tiny water droplets of different diameters in a long air duct. The effect of initial droplet size on the temperature and relative humidity distribution of the air stream in the duct is investigated. Three different initial conditions of air are considered to verify the influence of ambient conditions. Droplet spray patterns are also analyzed to identify the suitable locations for the spray nozzles within the duct. The results obtained are displayed in a series of plots to provide a clear understanding of the evaporative cooling process as well as the droplet dynamics within the ducts.

  7. Main rotor free wake geometry effects on blade air loads and response for helicopters in steady maneuvers. Volume 2: Program listings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadler, S. G.

    1972-01-01

    A mathematical model and computer program was implemented to study the main rotor free wake geometry effects on helicopter rotor blade air loads and response in steady maneuvers. Volume 1 (NASA CR-2110) contains the theoretical formulation and analysis of results. Volume 2 contains the computer program listing.

  8. Lightweight Valve Closes Duct Quickly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fournier, Walter L.; Burgy, N. Frank

    1991-01-01

    Expanding balloon serves as lightweight emergency valve to close wide duct. Uninflated balloon stored in housing of duct. Pad resting on burst diaphragm protects balloon from hot gases in duct. Once control system triggers valve, balloon inflates rapidly to block duct. Weighs much less than does conventional butterfly, hot-gas, or poppet valve capable of closing duct of equal diameter.

  9. Effect of flow on the acoustic performance of extended reaction lined ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hersh, A. S.; Walker, B.

    1983-01-01

    A model is developed for the effects of uniform and boundary-layer mean flow on the attenuation and propagation of harmonically excited sound waves in an extended reaction lined cylindrical duct. A duct geometry consisting of an annular outer region of bulk material surrounding an inner cylinder of air is utilized. A numerical solution is obtained for the coupled wave equations governing the motion of the sound in both the inner and annular regions. It is found that the numerically predicted attenuation and propagations constants are in excellent agreement with measured values using Kevlar as the liner material for plane-wave mode (O,O) excitation over a wide range of mean flows and sound frequency. The boundary-layer effects are determined to be unimportant, at least for plane-wave sound. In addition, numerical studies indicate small differences between the use of either the radial velocity or the radial displacement boundary conditions.

  10. Distribution of air-water mixtures in parallel vertical channels as an effect of the header geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Marchitto, Annalisa; Fossa, Marco; Guglielmini, Giovanni

    2009-07-15

    Uneven phase distribution in heat exchangers is a cause of severe reductions in thermal performances of refrigeration equipment. To date, no general design rules are available to avoid phase separation in manifolds with several outlet channels, and even predicting the phase and mass distribution in parallel channels is a demanding task. In the present paper, measurements of two-phase air-water distributions are reported with reference to a horizontal header supplying 16 vertical upward channels. The effects of the operating conditions, the header geometry and the inlet port nozzle were investigated in the ranges of liquid and gas superficial velocities of 0.2-1.2 and 1.5-16.5 m/s, respectively. Among the fitting devices used, the insertion of a co-axial, multi-hole distributor inside the header confirmed the possibility of greatly improving the liquid and gas flow distribution by the proper selection of position, diameter and number of the flow openings between the supplying distributor and the system of parallel channels connected to the header. (author)

  11. Experiments measuring particle deposition from fully developed turbulent flow in ventilation ducts

    SciTech Connect

    Sippola, Mark R.; Nazaroff, William W.

    2003-08-01

    Particle deposition in ventilation ducts influences particle exposures of building occupants and may lead to a variety of indoor air quality concerns. Experiments have been performed in a laboratory to study the effects of particle size and air speed on deposition rates of particles from turbulent air flows in galvanized steel and internally insulated ducts with hydraulic diameters of 15.2 cm. The duct systems were constructed of materials typically found in commercial heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC) systems. In the steel duct system, experiments with nominal particle sizes of 1, 3, 5, 9 and 16 {micro}m were conducted at each of three nominal air speeds: 2.2, 5.3 and 9.0 m/s. In the insulated duct system, deposition rates of particles with nominal sizes of 1, 3, 5, 8 and 13 {micro}m were measured at nominal air speeds of 2.2, 5.3 and 8.8 m/s. Fluorescent techniques were used to directly measure the deposition velocities of monodisperse fluorescent particles to duct surfaces (floor, wall and ceiling) at two straight duct sections where the turbulent flow profile was fully developed. In steel ducts, deposition rates were higher to the duct floor than to the wall, which were, in turn, greater than to the ceiling. In insulated ducts, deposition was nearly the same to the duct floor, wall and ceiling for a given particle size and air speed. Deposition to duct walls and ceilings was greatly enhanced in insulated ducts compared to steel ducts. Deposition velocities to each of the three duct surface orientations in both systems were found to increase with increasing particle size or air velocity over the ranges studied. Deposition rates measured in the current experiments were in general agreement with the limited observations of similar systems by previous researchers.

  12. SNM holdup assessment of Los Alamos exhaust ducts. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, R.S.

    1994-02-01

    Fissile material holdup in glovebox and fume hood exhaust ducting has been quantified for all Los Alamos duct systems. Gamma-based, nondestructive measurements were used to quantify holdup. The measurements were performed during three measurement campaigns. The first campaign, Phase I, provided foot-by-foot, semiquantitative measurement data on all ducting. These data were used to identify ducting that required more accurate (quantitative) measurement. Of the 280 duct systems receiving Phase I measurements, 262 indicated less than 50 g of fissile holdup and 19 indicated fissile holdup of 50 or more grams. Seven duct systems were measured in a second campaign, called Series 1, Phase II. Holdup estimates on these ducts ranged from 421 g of {sup 235}U in a duct servicing a shut-down uranium-machining facility to 39 g of {sup 239}Pu in a duct servicing an active plutonium-processing facility. Measurements performed in the second campaign proved excessively laborious, so a third campaign was initiated that used more efficient instrumentation at some sacrifice in measurement quality. Holdup estimates for the 12 duct systems measured during this third campaign ranged from 70 g of {sup 235}U in a duct servicing analytical laboratories to 1 g of {sup 235}U and 1 g of {sup 239}Pu in a duct carrying exhaust air to a remote filter building. These quantitative holdup estimates support the conclusion made at the completion of the Phase I measurements that only ducts servicing shut-down uranium operations contain about 400 g of fissile holdup. No ventilation ducts at Los Alamos contain sufficient fissile material holdup to present a criticality safety concern.

  13. Ducted auroral kilometric radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calvert, W.

    1982-01-01

    Certain discrete, intense wave signals attributed to auroral kilometric radiation (AKR) were observed with ISEE-l while it was within the plasmaspheric shadow zone for direct propagation. It is believed that wave ducting by thin depletions of the plasma density aligned with the magnetic field accounts for such signals, and that their discrete nature is caused by the satellite intercepting individual ducts. These ducts, which were also observed as coincident decreases of the upper hybrid resonance frequency, appeared to be twenty-percent depletions roughly one hundred kilometers across. The AKR, which is emitted approximately perpendicular to the magnetic field, apparently entered these ducts equatorward of the source after the waves had been refracted parallel to the duct axis. A diffuse background was also observed which is consistent with the leakage from similar ducts at lower L-values. These observations establish the existence of ducted AKR, its signature on the satellite wave spectrograms, and new evidence for depletion ducts within the plasmasphere.

  14. Duct Leakage Repeatability Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Iain; Sherman, Max

    2014-01-01

    Duct leakage often needs to be measured to demonstrate compliance with requirements or to determine energy or Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) impacts. Testing is often done using standards such as ASTM E1554 (ASTM 2013) or California Title 24 (California Energy Commission 2013 & 2013b), but there are several choices of methods available within the accepted standards. Determining which method to use or not use requires an evaluation of those methods in the context of the particular needs. Three factors that are important considerations are the cost of the measurement, the accuracy of the measurement and the repeatability of the measurement. The purpose of this report is to evaluate the repeatability of the three most significant measurement techniques using data from the literature and recently obtained field data. We will also briefly discuss the first two factors. The main question to be answered by this study is to determine if differences in the repeatability of these tests methods is sufficient to indicate that any of these methods is so poor that it should be excluded from consideration as an allowed procedure in codes and standards.

  15. Modeling of three-dimensional mixing and reacting ducted flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zelazny, S. W.; Baker, A. J.; Rushmore, W. L.

    1976-01-01

    A computer code, based upon a finite element solution algorithm, was developed to solve the governing equations for three-dimensional, reacting boundary region, and constant area ducted flow fields. Effective diffusion coefficients are employed to allow analyses of turbulent, transitional or laminar flows. The code was used to investigate mixing and reacting hydrogen jets injected from multiple orifices, transverse and parallel to a supersonic air stream. Computational results provide a three-dimensional description of velocity, temperature, and species-concentration fields downstream of injection. Experimental data for eight cases covering different injection conditions and geometries were modeled using mixing length theory (MLT). These results were used as a baseline for examining the relative merits of other mixing models. Calculations were made using a two-equation turbulence model (k+d) and comparisons were made between experiment and mixing length theory predictions. The k+d model shows only a slight improvement in predictive capability over MLT. Results of an examination of the effect of tensorial transport coefficients on mass and momentum field distribution are also presented. Solutions demonstrating the ability of the code to model ducted flows and parallel strut injection are presented and discussed.

  16. Investigation of the tone-burst tube for duct lining attenuation measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soffel, A. R.; Morrow, P. F.

    1972-01-01

    The tone burst technique makes practical the laboratory evaluation of potential inlet and discharge duct treatments. Tone burst apparatus requires only simple machined parts and standard components. Small, simply made, lining samples are quickly and easily installed in the system. Two small electromagnetric loudspeaker drivers produce peak sound pressure level of over 166 db in the 3-square-inch sample duct. Air pump available in most laboratories can produce air flows of over plus and minus Mach 0.3 in the sample duct. The technique uses short shaped pulses of sound propagated down a progressive wave tube containing the sample duct. The peak pressure level output of the treated duct is compared with the peak pressure level output of a substituted reference duct. The difference between the levels is the attenuation or insertion loss of the treated duct. Evaluations of resonant absorber linings by the tone burst technique check attenuation values predicted by empirical formulas based on full scale ducts.

  17. Scale Model Experiments on Sound Propagation From a Mach 2.5 Cold Nitrogen Jet Flowing Through a Rigid-Walled Duct With a J-Deflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandula, Max; Vu, Bruce

    2003-01-01

    The Launch Systems Testbed (LST) represents the evolution of vibroacoustics research and development work performed at NASA John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) over the last 15 years. The LST is located at the Launch Equipment Test Facility (LETF) in the KSC industrial complex. The LETF is operated by Sierra Lobo, Inc., as a member of University-Affiliated Technology Development Contract (USTDC) to KSC Spaceport and Engineering and Technology Directorate (YA), with ASRC Aerospace Corporation as a the prime contractor. Trajectory Simulation Mechanism (TSM) is a major component of the LST, developed specifically to simulate nonstationary acoustic loads on launch pad structures, vehicles, and payloads. TSM enhances the capabilities within LST for simulating launch environments of future vehicles. The scaled launch environments will be used to predict the full-scale launch environment via an appropriate scaling procedure. Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) has tasked NASA KSC to perform a basic technology test program in support of developing a low-cost clean pad (incorporating passive mitigation techniques) for future launch vehicles. The overall goal of the program is to develop innovative launch exhaust management systems, which effectively reduce launch acoustic environment with innovative duct designs, while eliminating traditional sound suppression water systems. Passive techniques, such as nontraditional duct geometries, resonators, and diffusers, etc., will be investigated. The overall goals are to advance innovative concepts for a clean pad while developing ideas to reduce transmitted sound via investigation and modeling of jet exhaust acoustic and flow field characteristics. The series of tests outlined in this report represent baseline tests and are geared towards defining the acoustic load environment on the TSM pad for open and closed duct configurations. This report summarizes the cold jet acoustic testing for Mach 2.5 supersonic nitrogen jet issuing

  18. HVAC pipe/duct sizing using artificial neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, S.J.D.; Wong, K.F.V.

    1995-12-31

    The main objective of this study is to demonstrate that artificial neural networks (ANN`s) serve as useful aids to Heating, Ventilating and Air-Conditioning (HVAC) system design. In the present work, the design process for sizing fluid systems in HVAC is simulated by using ANN`S. Four ANN`s have been constructed in a personal computer, one for air duct sizing and three for pipe sizing. The air duct network was trained to output the friction rate and duct size. The three pipe sizing neural networks product pressure drops and pipe diameters. By using the trained artificial neural networks, data can be obtained instantly with errors less than 3%. Thus, ANN`s have been shown to simplify traditional methods and procedures in HVAC pipe and air duct sizing.

  19. Primary zone air proportioner

    DOEpatents

    Cleary, Edward N. G.

    1982-10-12

    An air proportioner is provided for a liquid hydrocarbon fueled gas turbine of the type which is convertible to oil gas fuel and to coal gas fuel. The turbine includes a shell for enclosing the turbine, an air duct for venting air in said shell to a gasifier, and a fuel injector for injecting gasified fuel into the turbine. The air proportioner comprises a second air duct for venting air from the air duct for mixing with fuel from the gasifier. The air can be directly injected into the gas combustion basket along with the fuel from the injector or premixed with fuel from the gasifier prior to injection by the fuel injector.

  20. Better Duct Systems for Home Heating and Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2004-11-01

    Duct systems used in forced-air space-conditioning systems are a vital element in home energy efficiency. How well a system works makes a big difference in the cost and the effectiveness of heating and cooling a home. At the same time, a duct system that is poorly designed or maintained can have a detrimental effect on the health of the people who live in the house, through the unintended distribution of indoor air pollution.

  1. Salivary duct stones

    MedlinePlus

    ... glands. Salivary duct stones are a type of salivary gland disorder. ... 83. Jackson NM, Mitchell JL, Walvekar RR. Inflammatory disorders of the salivary glands. In: Flint PW, Haughey BH, Lund LJ, et ...

  2. Determination of the evaporation duct height from standard meteorological data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, V. K.; Shalyapin, V. N.; Levadnyi, Yu. V.

    2007-02-01

    Four models used for evaluating the height of the evaporation duct from measured atmospheric pressure, water and air temperatures, and air humidity are considered.The calculated results are compared with the duct heights measured during two oceanographic expeditions in the tropical zone of the Atlantic Ocean and the equatorial zone of the Indian Ocean. The sensitivity of models to the errors in the meteorological parameters is investigated. It is shown that, in the case of unstable stratification, the heights of ducts in the 5 20-m range can be evaluated with an error of about 2.5 m. Recommendations for selection of optimal models are given.

  3. Radiative interactions in laminar duct flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trivedi, P. A.; Tiwari, S. N.

    1990-01-01

    Analyses and numerical procedures are presented for infrared radiative energy transfer in gases when other modes of energy transfer occur simultaneously. Two types of geometries are considered, a parallel plate duct and a circular duct. Fully developed laminar incompressible flows of absorbing-emitting species in black surfaced ducts are considered under the conditions of uniform wall heat flux. The participating species considered are OH, CO, CO2, and H2O. Nongray as well as gray formulations are developed for both geometries. Appropriate limiting solutions of the governing equations are obtained and conduction-radiation interaction parameters are evaluated. Tien and Lowder's wide band model correlation was used in nongray formulation. Numerical procedures are presented to solve the integro-differential equations for both geometries. The range of physical variables considered are 300 to 2000 K for temperature, 0.1 to 100.0 atm for pressure, and 0.1 to 100 cm spacings between plates/radius of the tube. An extensive parametric study based on nongray formulation is presented. Results obtained for different flow conditions indicate that the radiative interactions can be quite significant in fully developed incompressible flows.

  4. Film condensation in a horizontal rectangular duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Qing; Suryanarayana, N. V.

    1993-01-01

    Condensation heat transfer in a horizontal rectangular duct was experimentally and analytically investigated. To prevent the dripping of condensate on the film, the experiment was conducted inside a horizontal rectangular duct with vapor condensing only on the bottom cooled plate of the duct. R-113 and FC-72 (Fluorinert Electronic Fluid developed by the 3M Company) were used as the condensing fluids. The experimental program included measurements of film thickness, local and average heat transfer coefficients, wave length, wave speed, and a study of wave initiation. The measured film thickness was used to obtain the local heat transfer coefficient. The wave initiation was studied both with condensation and with an adiabatic air-liquid flow. The test sections used in both experiments were identical.

  5. Environmental Technology Verification: Supplement to Test/QA Plan for Biological and Aerosol Testing of General Ventilation Air Cleaners; Bioaerosol Inactivation Efficiency by HVAC In-Duct Ultraviolet Light Air Cleaners

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Air Pollution Control Technology Verification Center has selected general ventilation air cleaners as a technology area. The Generic Verification Protocol for Biological and Aerosol Testing of General Ventilation Air Cleaners is on the Environmental Technology Verification we...

  6. Patent arterial duct

    PubMed Central

    Forsey, Jonathan T; Elmasry, Ola A; Martin, Robin P

    2009-01-01

    Patent arterial duct (PAD) is a congenital heart abnormality defined as persistent patency in term infants older than three months. Isolated PAD is found in around 1 in 2000 full term infants. A higher prevalence is found in preterm infants, especially those with low birth weight. The female to male ratio is 2:1. Most patients are asymptomatic when the duct is small. With a moderate-to-large duct, a characteristic continuous heart murmur (loudest in the left upper chest or infraclavicular area) is typical. The precordium may be hyperactive and peripheral pulses are bounding with a wide pulse pressure. Tachycardia, exertional dyspnoea, laboured breathing, fatigue or poor growth are common. Large shunts may lead to failure to thrive, recurrent infection of the upper respiratory tract and congestive heart failure. In the majority of cases of PAD there is no identifiable cause. Persistence of the duct is associated with chromosomal aberrations, asphyxia at birth, birth at high altitude and congenital rubella. Occasional cases are associated with specific genetic defects (trisomy 21 and 18, and the Rubinstein-Taybi and CHARGE syndromes). Familial occurrence of PAD is uncommon and the usual mechanism of inheritance is considered to be polygenic with a recurrence risk of 3%. Rare families with isolated PAD have been described in which the mode of inheritance appears to be dominant or recessive. Familial incidence of PAD has also been linked to Char syndrome, familial thoracic aortic aneurysm/dissection associated with patent arterial duct, and familial patent arterial duct and bicuspid aortic valve associated with hand abnormalities. Diagnosis is based on clinical examination and confirmed with transthoracic echocardiography. Assessment of ductal blood flow can be made using colour flow mapping and pulsed wave Doppler. Antenatal diagnosis is not possible, as PAD is a normal structure during antenatal life. Conditions with signs and symptoms of pulmonary overcirculation

  7. Patent arterial duct.

    PubMed

    Forsey, Jonathan T; Elmasry, Ola A; Martin, Robin P

    2009-01-01

    Patent arterial duct (PAD) is a congenital heart abnormality defined as persistent patency in term infants older than three months. Isolated PAD is found in around 1 in 2000 full term infants. A higher prevalence is found in preterm infants, especially those with low birth weight. The female to male ratio is 2:1. Most patients are asymptomatic when the duct is small. With a moderate-to-large duct, a characteristic continuous heart murmur (loudest in the left upper chest or infraclavicular area) is typical. The precordium may be hyperactive and peripheral pulses are bounding with a wide pulse pressure. Tachycardia, exertional dyspnoea, laboured breathing, fatigue or poor growth are common. Large shunts may lead to failure to thrive, recurrent infection of the upper respiratory tract and congestive heart failure. In the majority of cases of PAD there is no identifiable cause. Persistence of the duct is associated with chromosomal aberrations, asphyxia at birth, birth at high altitude and congenital rubella. Occasional cases are associated with specific genetic defects (trisomy 21 and 18, and the Rubinstein-Taybi and CHARGE syndromes). Familial occurrence of PAD is uncommon and the usual mechanism of inheritance is considered to be polygenic with a recurrence risk of 3%. Rare families with isolated PAD have been described in which the mode of inheritance appears to be dominant or recessive. Familial incidence of PAD has also been linked to Char syndrome, familial thoracic aortic aneurysm/dissection associated with patent arterial duct, and familial patent arterial duct and bicuspid aortic valve associated with hand abnormalities. Diagnosis is based on clinical examination and confirmed with transthoracic echocardiography. Assessment of ductal blood flow can be made using colour flow mapping and pulsed wave Doppler. Antenatal diagnosis is not possible, as PAD is a normal structure during antenatal life. Conditions with signs and symptoms of pulmonary overcirculation

  8. Converting dual-duct constant-volume systems to variable-volume systems without retrofitting the terminal boxes

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, M.; Claridge, D.E.

    1999-07-01

    Dual-duct constant-air-volume systems can be converted to variable-air-volume systems by installing hot air dampers in the main hot air ducts. No terminal box retrofit is needed. The detailed retrofit procedures and control sequences are described in this paper. Results from a case study building are also presented.

  9. Detonation duct gas generator demonstration program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wortman, Andrew; Brinlee, Gayl A.; Othmer, Peter; Whelan, Michael A.

    1991-01-01

    The feasibility of the generation of detonation waves moving periodically across high speed channel flow is experimentally demonstrated. Such waves are essential to the concept of compressing requirements and increasing the engine pressure compressor with the objective of reducing conventional compressor requirements and increasing the engine thermodynamic efficiency through isochoric energy addition. By generating transient transverse waves, rather than standing waves, shock wave losses are reduced by an order of magnitude. The ultimate objective is to use such detonation ducts downstream of a low pressure gas turbine compressor to produce a high overall pressure ratio thermodynamic cycle. A 4 foot long, 1 inch x 12 inch cross-section, detonation duct was operated in a blow-down mode using compressed air reservoirs. Liquid or vapor propane was injected through injectors or solenoid valves located in the plenum or the duct itself. Detonation waves were generated when the mixture was ignited by a row of spark plugs in the duct wall. Problems with fuel injection and mixing limited the air speeds to about Mach 0.5, frequencies to below 10 Hz, and measured pressure ratios of about 5 to 6. The feasibility of the gas dynamic compression was demonstrated and the critical problem areas were identified.

  10. Turbofan Duct Propagation Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lan, Justin H.; Posey, Joe W. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The CDUCT code utilizes a parabolic approximation to the convected Helmholtz equation in order to efficiently model acoustic propagation in acoustically treated, complex shaped ducts. The parabolic approximation solves one-way wave propagation with a marching method which neglects backwards reflected waves. The derivation of the parabolic approximation is presented. Several code validation cases are given. An acoustic lining design process for an example aft fan duct is discussed. It is noted that the method can efficiently model realistic three-dimension effects, acoustic lining, and flow within the computational capabilities of a typical computer workstation.

  11. Air

    MedlinePlus

    ... do to protect yourself from dirty air . Indoor air pollution and outdoor air pollution Air can be polluted indoors and it can ... this chart to see what things cause indoor air pollution and what things cause outdoor air pollution! Indoor ...

  12. Gas turbine engine and its associated air intake system

    SciTech Connect

    Ballard, J.R.; Bennett, G.H.; Lee, L.A.

    1984-01-17

    A gas turbine engine and its associated air intake system are disclosed in which the air intake system comprises a generally horizontally extending duct through which an airflow is induced by an ejector pump powered by the engine. A portion of the air passing through the duct is directed through a second duct to the air inlet of the engine. The second duct is connected to the first duct in such a manner that the air directed to the engine air inlet is derived from a vertically upper region of the first duct. The arrangement is intended to reduce the amount of airborne particulate material ingested by the gas turbine engine.

  13. Seasonal variations of surface duct conditions in Ngaoundere, North Cameroon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaissassou, Samuel; Lenouo, André; Nzeukou, Armand; Tchawoua, Clément; Vondou, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    The seasonal variations of refractivity gradients from 104 to 3000 m above ground level in the troposphere layer are presented based on observations from the radiosonde station located in Ngaoundere (13.5°E, 7.3°N), a middle belt savannah region of Cameroon. Six years (2006-2011) of data from in situ measurements made by Agency for the Safety of Air Navigation in Africa and Madagascar (ASECNA) of the temperature, moisture, and pressure are used to determine the surface duct conditions over Ngaoundere region. Each time that a negative gradient from the Abel-retrieved refractivity profiles is seen, it implies the presence of a duct in this study. The occurrence of ducts strongly depends on the local climate and synoptic weather conditions which have an appreciable influence on the refractivity vertical profile, especially the seasonal north-south movement of the Inter Tropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) which provides wet and dry seasons to the region. Monthly and seasonal variations of ducts were also determined from the measured data. The highest and the lowest occurrence rate of surface ducts were observed during the wet and the dry seasons, respectively. September appears as the month when most of the ducts occur at the rate of at least one duct per day. The median duct thickness and duct strength are high and strong during the wet season, whereas they are low and weak during the dry season. When the data are separated into stable and unstable atmospheric conditions, we noticed that surface duct characteristics show some seasonal differences. Surface ducts are found to be more frequent in a stable atmosphere than in an unstable atmosphere. Statistical results are discussed alongside with local meteorological conditions and weather systems affecting the town of Ngaoundere. Besides, comments are made on their prospective significance in the region.

  14. Models for gamma-ray holdup measurements at duct contact

    SciTech Connect

    Sheppard, G.A.; Russo, P.A.; Wenz, T.R.; Miller, M.C.; Piquette, E.C. ); Haas, F.X.; Glick, J.B.; Garrett, A.G. )

    1991-01-01

    The use of gamma-ray measurements to nondestructively assay special nuclear material holdup in DOE processing facilities has increased recently. A measurement approach that is relatively insensitive to deposit geometry involves withdrawing the detector from the holdup-bearing equipment far enough to validate an assumed point-, line-, or area-source deposit geometry. Because of facility constraints, these generalized geometry procedures are not always followed, and some ducts are measured at contact. Quantitative interpretation of contact measurements requires knowledge of the width of the deposit transverse to the duct axis. Rocky Flats personnel have introduced a method to obtain data from which this width can be deduced. It involves taking measurements in pairs, with the detector viewing the holdup deposit at contact from above and below the duct. The interpretation of the top and bottom measurements to give the deposit width at each location requires a model for the detector's response to radial source position and a model for the deposit geometry. We have derived a relationship between the top-to-bottom count rate ratio and the deposit width that approximates the detector response and models the deposit geometry as a uniform strip. The model was validated in controlled experiments that used thin foils of high-enriched uranium metal to simulate duct deposits. 4 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  15. What Is Bile Duct Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... of bile duct cancer. The rest of this document refers only to cholangiocarcinomas. Benign bile duct tumors ... tumors, which aren’t discussed further in this document. Other cancers in the liver The most common ...

  16. Dynamic instability of ducts conveying fluid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Y. Y.

    1975-01-01

    A finite element analysis was used to study dynamic instability in ducts conveying high speed fluids. Ducts examined include cantilevered curved, flexibly supported, arbitrarily shaped, and composite duct systems. Partial differential equations were used to study the duct systems.

  17. Ducted fan type gas turbine engine power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Balzer, R.L.

    1992-02-25

    This patent describes a ducted fan type power plant which is cable of generating reverse thrust. It comprises: a gas turbine engine; a fan driven by the engine; an elongated bypass duct which is open at its front and rear ends and surrounds the fan, the bypass duct having a fixed forward section and a rear section which can be translated away from the fixed section as the pitch of the fan blades is reversed to reverse the flow of air through the bypass duct and generate a thrust directed from the front toward the rear of the power plant, thereby allowing air to be induced into the bypass duct through the downstream end thereof and also through the annular gap between the fixed and translated, rear sections of the bypass duct; means for generating a supply of high velocity fluid; means for injecting the high velocity fluid into the bypass duct from a locus to the rear means for delivering the high velocity fluid from the generating means to the injecting means.

  18. Duct Leakage Repeatability Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Iain; Sherman, Max

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this report is to evaluate the repeatability of the three most significant measurement techniques for duct leakage using data from the literature and recently obtained field data. We will also briefly discuss the first two factors. The main question to be answered by this study is to determine if differences in the repeatability of these tests methods is sufficient to indicate that any of these methods is so poor that it should be excluded from consideration as an allowed procedure in codes and standards. The three duct leak measurement methods assessed in this report are the two duct pressurization methods that are commonly used by many practitioners and the DeltaQ technique. These are methods B, C and A, respectively of the ASTM E1554 standard. Although it would be useful to evaluate other duct leak test methods, this study focused on those test methods that are commonly used and are required in various test standards, such as BPI (2010), RESNET (2014), ASHRAE 62.2 (2013), California Title 24 (CEC 2012), DOE Weatherization and many other energy efficiency programs.

  19. EFFECT OF AIRFLOW AND HEAT INPUT RATES ON DUCT EFFICIENCY.

    SciTech Connect

    ANDREWS,J.W.

    2003-05-28

    Reducing the airflow and heat input rates of a furnace that is connected to a duct system in thermal contact with unconditioned spaces can significantly reduce thermal distribution efficiency. This is a straightforward theoretical calculation based on the increased residence time of the air in the duct at the lower flow rate, which results in greater conduction losses. Experimental tests in an instrumented residential-size duct system have confirmed this prediction. Results are compared with the heat-loss algorithm in ASHRAE Standid 152P. The paper concludes with a discussion of possible remedies for this loss of efficiency in existing systems and optional design strategies in new construction.

  20. Compact Buried Ducts in a Hot-Humid Climate House

    SciTech Connect

    Mallay, D.

    2016-01-01

    A system of compact, buried ducts provides a high-performance and cost-effective solution for delivering conditioned air throughout the building. This report outlines research activities that are expected to facilitate adoption of compact buried duct systems by builders. The results of this research would be scalable to many new house designs in most climates and markets, leading to wider industry acceptance and building code and energy program approval.

  1. Efficiency of shock wave attenuation in ducts by various methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frolov, S. M.

    1993-02-01

    Different methods of shock wave attenuation in ducts are compared in terms of efficiency. The methods investigated include expansion of the duct cross section, the use of perforated side walls, and the use of porous screens and screen cascades. The attentuation of air shock waves is estimated by using a unified approach which provides satisfactory agreement with experimental data. Based on the results of the study, a nomogram is plotted which can be used for practical calculations.

  2. Measure Guideline: Summary of Interior Ducts in New Construction, Including an Efficient, Affordable Method to Install Fur-Down Interior Ducts

    SciTech Connect

    Beal, D.; McIlvaine , J.; Fonorow, K.; Martin, E.

    2011-11-01

    This document illustrates guidelines for the efficient installation of interior duct systems in new housing, including the fur-up chase method, the fur-down chase method, and interior ducts positioned in sealed attics or sealed crawl spaces. This document illustrates guidelines for the efficient installation of interior duct systems in new housing. Interior ducts result from bringing the duct work inside a home's thermal and air barrier. Architects, designers, builders, and new home buyers should thoroughly investigate any opportunity for energy savings that is as easy to implement during construction, such as the opportunity to construct interior duct work. In addition to enhanced energy efficiency, interior ductwork results in other important advantages, such as improved indoor air quality, increased system durability and increased homeowner comfort. While the advantages of well-designed and constructed interior duct systems are recognized, the implementation of this approach has not gained a significant market acceptance. This guideline describes a variety of methods to create interior ducts including the fur-up chase method, the fur-down chase method, and interior ducts positioned in sealed attics or sealed crawl spaces. As communication of the intent of an interior duct system, and collaboration on its construction are paramount to success, this guideline details the critical design, planning, construction, inspection, and verification steps that must be taken. Involved in this process are individuals from the design team; sales/marketing team; and mechanical, insulation, plumbing, electrical, framing, drywall and solar contractors.

  3. 29. DETAIL OF OUTLET DUCTS FOR MST AIRCONDITIONING SYSTEM IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. DETAIL OF OUTLET DUCTS FOR MST AIR-CONDITIONING SYSTEM IN NORTHWEST CORNER OF SLC-3W MST STATION 70.5 (LOWEST PAYLOAD SERVICE STATION). NOTE RING ATTACHMENT FOR PERSONNEL SAFETY HARNESS IN LEFT FOREGROUND. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 West, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  4. The flow field of an underexpanded H2 jet coaxially injected into a hot free or ducted supersonic jet of air or nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, R. V.

    1977-01-01

    Experimental data obtained in an investigation of the mixing of an underexpanded hydrogen jet in a supersonic flow both with and without combustion are presented. Tests were conducted in a Mach 2 test stream with both air and nitrogen as test media. Total temperature of the test stream was 2170 K, and static exit pressure was about one atmosphere. The static pressure at the exit of the hydrogen injector's Mach 2 nozzle was about two atmospheres. Primary measurements included shadowgraphs and pitot pressure surveys of the flow field. Pitot surveys and wall static pressures were measured for the case where the entire flow was shrouded. The results are compared to similar experimental data and theoretical predictions for the matched pressure case.

  5. Strategic guidelines for street canyon geometry to achieve sustainable street air quality—part II: multiple canopies and canyons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Andy T.; Au, William T. W.; So, Ellen S. P.

    The flow field and pollutant dispersion characteristics in a three-dimensional urban street canyon are investigated for various building array geometries. The street canyon in consideration is located in a multi-canopy building array that is similar to realistic estate situations. The pollutant dispersion characteristics are studied for various canopy aspect ratios, namely: the canyon height to width ratio, canyon length to height ratio, canyon breadth ratio and crossroad locations are studied. A three-dimensional field-size canyon has been analysed through numerical simulations using k- ɛ turbulence model. As expected, the wind flow and mode of pollutant dispersion is strongly dependent on the various flow geometric configurations and that the results can be different from that of a single canyon system. For example, it is found that the pollutant retention value is minimum when the canyon height-to-width ratio is approximately 0.8, or that the building height ratio is 0.5. Various rules of thumbs on urban canyon geometry have been established for good pollutant dispersion.

  6. Simulation of acoustic wave behavior in ducts and a plenum using finite elements package ANSYS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villalobos-Luna, Jose de Jesus; Lopez-Cruz, Pedro; Ramirez-Valencia, Ricardo; Elizondo-Garza, Fernando J.

    2002-11-01

    This paper shows and discusses the use of the finite element software ANSYS for simulation of the behavior of sound waves in a ducts-plenum system. The modeling is intended for didactic purposes, beginning with simple three-dimensional geometries of ducts and plenum. Two conditions can be included: (1) with and without acoustical absorbent materials on the inside walls of the ducts and (2) including or not labyrinths. The analysis allows students to see the behavior of the waves inside the duct-plenum system and they can manipulate the parameters of the model to improve the attenuation characteristics of the system.

  7. Complicated bile duct stones.

    PubMed

    Roy, Ashwin; Martin, Derrick

    2013-01-01

    Common bile duct stones (CBDSs) are solid deposits that can either form within the gallbladder or migrate to the common bile duct (CBD), or form de novo in the biliary tree. In the USA around 15% of the population have gallstones and of these, 3% present with symptoms annually. Because of this, there have been major advancements in the management of gallstones and related conditions. Management is based on the patient's risk profile; young and healthy patients are likely to be recommended for surgery and elderly patients with comorbidities are usually recommended for endoscopic procedures. Imaging of gallstones has advanced in the last 30 years with endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography evolving from a diagnostic to a therapeutic procedure in removing CBDSs. We present a complicated case of a patient with a CBDS and periampullary diverticulum and discuss the techniques used to diagnose and remove the stone from the biliary system. PMID:23946532

  8. Complicated bile duct stones

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Ashwin; Martin, Derrick

    2013-01-01

    Common bile duct stones (CBDSs) are solid deposits that can either form within the gallbladder or migrate to the common bile duct (CBD), or form de novo in the biliary tree. In the USA around 15% of the population have gallstones and of these, 3% present with symptoms annually. Because of this, there have been major advancements in the management of gallstones and related conditions. Management is based on the patient's risk profile; young and healthy patients are likely to be recommended for surgery and elderly patients with comorbidities are usually recommended for endoscopic procedures. Imaging of gallstones has advanced in the last 30 years with endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography evolving from a diagnostic to a therapeutic procedure in removing CBDSs. We present a complicated case of a patient with a CBDS and periampullary diverticulum and discuss the techniques used to diagnose and remove the stone from the biliary system. PMID:23946532

  9. The impact of traffic volume, composition, and road geometry on personal air pollution exposures among cyclists in Montreal, Canada.

    PubMed

    Hatzopoulou, Marianne; Weichenthal, Scott; Dugum, Hussam; Pickett, Graeme; Miranda-Moreno, Luis; Kulka, Ryan; Andersen, Ross; Goldberg, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Cyclists may experience increased exposure to traffic-related air pollution owing to increased minute ventilation and close proximity to vehicle emissions. The aims of this study were to characterize personal exposures to air pollution among urban cyclists and to identify potential determinants of exposure including the type of cycling lane (separated vs on-road), traffic counts, and meteorological factors. In total, personal air pollution exposure data were collected over 64 cycling routes during morning and evening commutes in Montreal, Canada, over 32 days during the summer of 2011. Measured pollutants included ultrafine particles (UFPs), fine particles (PM(2.5)), black carbon (BC), and carbon monoxide (CO). Counts of diesel vehicles were important predictors of personal exposures to BC, with each 10 vehicle/h increase associated with a 15.0% (95% confidence interval (CI): 5.7%, 24.0%) increase in exposure. Use of separated cycling lanes had less impact on personal exposures with a 12% (95% CI: -43%, 14%) decrease observed for BC and smaller decreases observed for UFPs (mean: -1.3%, 95% CI: -20%, 17%) and CO (mean: -5.6%, 95% CI: -17%, 4%) after adjusting for meteorological factors and traffic counts. On average, PM(2.5) exposure increased 7.8% (95% CI: -17%, 35%) with separate cycling lane use, but this estimate was imprecise and not statistically significant. In general, our findings suggest that diesel vehicle traffic is an important contributor to personal BC exposures and that separate cycling lanes may have a modest impact on personal exposure to some air pollutants. Further evaluation is required, however, as the impact of separate cycling lanes and/or traffic counts on personal exposures may vary between regions. PMID:22910003

  10. Lacrimal duct cyst abscess.

    PubMed

    Dharmasena, Aruna; Sobajo, Cassandra; Irion, Luciane; Ataullah, Sajid

    2014-12-01

    Cystic dilatation within the lacrimal gland is thought to be related to chronic inflammation and scarring of the lacrimal gland ductules. We review the literature and discuss a case and of lacrimal duct cyst suppuration presenting with visual loss, external ophthalmoplegia, proptosis and ptosis. To our knowledge, only one other report of a lacrimal ductal cyst abscess has been reported in the literature so far. PMID:25208223

  11. Laminar heat transfer in annular sector ducts

    SciTech Connect

    Soliman, H.M. )

    1987-02-01

    The continuing interest in compact heat exchangeers has created the need for friction factor and Nusselt number data for different passage shapes. It has long been recognized that circular tube results are generally not applicable to noncircular passages even when the hydraulic diameter is used as the characteristic dimension. Hence, design data should be generated for each passage individually, and a good source of such information is Shah and London. One duct geometry for which complete design information does not appear to be available in the open literature is that of annular sector ducts. Such configuration is encountered in multipassage internally finned tubes and many other compact het exchanger applications. The fluid flow problem for this configuration has been solved by Sparrow et al., and more recently by Niida. However, to the beest of the author's knowledge, the heat transfer results are not available yet. The purpose of this note is to summarize the analysis and results of fluid flow and heat transfer in annular sector ducts.

  12. Quadrupole lamp furnace for high temperature (up to 2050 K) synchrotron powder x-ray diffraction studies in air in reflection geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Sarin, P.; Yoon, W.; Jurkschat, K.; Zschack, P.; Kriven, W. M.

    2006-09-15

    A four-lamp thermal image furnace has been developed to conduct high temperature x-ray diffraction in reflection geometry on oxide ceramic powder samples in air at temperatures {<=}2050 K using synchrotron radiation. A refractory crucible made of Pt20%Rh alloy was used as a specimen holder. A material with well characterized lattice expansion properties was used as an internal crystallographic thermometer to determine the specimen temperature and displacement. The performance of the apparatus was verified by measurement of the thermal expansion properties of CeO{sub 2}, MgO, and Pt which were found to be within {+-}3% of the acceptable values. The advantages, limitations, and important considerations of the instrument developed are discussed.

  13. Quadrupole lamp furnace for high temperature (up to 2050 K) synchrotron powder x-ray diffraction studies in air in reflection geometry.

    SciTech Connect

    Sarin, P.; Yoon, W.; Jurkschat, K.; Zschack, P.; Kriven, W. M.; Univ. of Illinois; Frederick-Seitz Materials Research Lab.

    2006-09-01

    A four-lamp thermal image furnace has been developed to conduct high temperature x-ray diffraction in reflection geometry on oxide ceramic powder samples in air at temperatures {le} 2050 K using synchrotron radiation. A refractory crucible made of Pt20%Rh alloy was used as a specimen holder. A material with well characterized lattice expansion properties was used as an internal crystallographic thermometer to determine the specimen temperature and displacement. The performance of the apparatus was verified by measurement of the thermal expansion properties of CeO{sub 2}, MgO, and Pt which were found to be within {+-} 3% of the acceptable values. The advantages, limitations, and important considerations of the instrument developed are discussed.

  14. Energy efficient engine: Turbine transition duct model technology report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leach, K.; Thurlin, R.

    1982-01-01

    The Low-Pressure Turbine Transition Duct Model Technology Program was directed toward substantiating the aerodynamic definition of a turbine transition duct for the Energy Efficient Engine. This effort was successful in demonstrating an aerodynamically viable compact duct geometry and the performance benefits associated with a low camber low-pressure turbine inlet guide vane. The transition duct design for the flight propulsion system was tested and the pressure loss goal of 0.7 percent was verified. Also, strut fairing pressure distributions, as well as wall pressure coefficients, were in close agreement with analytical predictions. Duct modifications for the integrated core/low spool were also evaluated. The total pressure loss was 1.59 percent. Although the increase in exit area in this design produced higher wall loadings, reflecting a more aggressive aerodynamic design, pressure profiles showed no evidence of flow separation. Overall, the results acquired have provided pertinent design and diagnostic information for the design of a turbine transition duct for both the flight propulsion system and the integrated core/low spool.

  15. Bile duct malignancies.

    PubMed

    Tucek, S; Tomasek, J; Halámkova, J; Kiss, I; Andrasina, T; Hemmelová, B; Adámková-Krákorová, D; Vyzula, R

    2010-01-01

    Bile duct malignancies include intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC), extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ECC), gall bladder carcinoma (GC) and carcinoma of Vater's ampulla (ampulloma). Bile duct neoplasms are rare tumours with overall poor prognosis. The overall incidence affects up to 12.5 per 100,000 persons in the Czech Republic. The mortality rate has risen recently to 9.5 per 100,000 persons. The incidence and mortality have been remarkably stable over the past 3 decades. The survival rate of patients with these tumours is poor, usually not exceeding 12 months. The diagnostic process is complex, uneasy and usually late. Most cases are diagnosed when unresectable, and palliative treatment is the main approach of medical care for these tumours. The treatment remains very challenging. New approaches have not brought much improvement in this field. Standards of palliative care are lacking and quality of life assessments are surprisingly not common. From the scarce data it seems, however, that multimodal individually tailored treatment can prolong patients'survival and improve the health-related quality of life. The care in specialized centres offers methods of surgery, interventional radiology, clinical oncology and high quality supportive care. These methods are discussed in the article in greater detail. Improvements in this field can be sought in new diagnostic methods and new procedures in surgery and interventional radiology. Understanding the tumour biology on the molecular level could shift the strategy to a more successful one, resulting in more cured patients. Further improvements in palliative care can be sought by defining new targets and new drug development. The lack of patients with bile duct neoplasms has been the limiting factor for any improvements. A new design of larger randomized international multicentric clinical trials with prompt data sharing could help to overcome this major problem. Defining standards of palliative care is a necessity

  16. Bundle duct interaction studies for fuel assemblies. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Hsia, H.T.S.; Kaplan, S.

    1981-06-01

    It is known that the wire-wrapped rods and duct in an LMFBR are undergoing a gradual structural distortion from the initially uniform geometry under the combined effects of thermal expansion and irradiation induced swelling and creep. These deformations have a significant effect on flow characteristics, thus causing changes in thermal behavior such as cladding temperature and temperature distribution within a bundle. The temperature distribution may further enhance or retard irradiation induced deformation of the bundle. This report summarizes the results of the continuing effort in investigating the bundle-duct interaction, focusing on the need for the large development plant.

  17. Measure Guideline: Optimizing the Configuration of Flexible Duct Junction Boxes

    SciTech Connect

    Beach, R.; Burdick, A.

    2014-03-01

    This measure guideline offers additional recommendations to heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system designers for optimizing flexible duct, constant-volume HVAC systems using junction boxes within Air Conditioning Contractors of America (ACCA) Manual D guidance (Rutkowski, H. Manual D -- Residential Duct Systems, 3rd edition, Version 1.00. Arlington, VA: Air Conditioning Contractors of America, 2009.). IBACOS used computational fluid dynamics software to explore and develop guidance to better control the airflow effects of factors that may impact pressure losses within junction boxes among various design configurations (Beach, R., Prahl, D., and Lange, R. CFD Analysis of Flexible Duct Junction Box Design. Golden, CO: National Renewable Energy Laboratory, submitted for publication 2013). These recommendations can help to ensure that a system aligns more closely with the design and the occupants' comfort expectations. Specifically, the recommendations described herein show how to configure a rectangular box with four outlets, a triangular box with three outlets, metal wyes with two outlets, and multiple configurations for more than four outlets. Designers of HVAC systems, contractors who are fabricating junction boxes on site, and anyone using the ACCA Manual D process for sizing duct runs will find this measure guideline invaluable for more accurately minimizing pressure losses when using junction boxes with flexible ducts.

  18. Numerical and experimental analysis of a ducted propeller designed by a fully automated optimization process under open water condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Long; Druckenbrod, Markus; Greve, Martin; Wang, Ke-qi; Abdel-Maksoud, Moustafa

    2015-10-01

    A fully automated optimization process is provided for the design of ducted propellers under open water conditions, including 3D geometry modeling, meshing, optimization algorithm and CFD analysis techniques. The developed process allows the direct integration of a RANSE solver in the design stage. A practical ducted propeller design case study is carried out for validation. Numerical simulations and open water tests are fulfilled and proved that the optimum ducted propeller improves hydrodynamic performance as predicted.

  19. Intrahepatic Transposition of Bile Ducts

    PubMed Central

    Delić, Jasmin; Savković, Admedina; Isaković, Eldar; Marković, Sergije; Bajtarevic, Alma; Denjalić, Amir

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To describe the intrahepatic bile duct transposition (anatomical variation occurring in intrahepatic ducts) and to determine the frequency of this variation. Material and Methods. The researches were performed randomly on 100 livers of adults, both sexes. Main research methods were anatomical macrodissection. As a criterion for determination of variations in some parts of bile tree, we used the classification of Segmentatio hepatis according to Couinaud (1957) according to Terminologia Anatomica, Thieme Stuugart: Federative Committee on Anatomical Terminology, 1988. Results. Intrahepatic transposition of bile ducts was found in two cases (2%), out of total examined cases (100): right-left transposition (right segmental bile duct, originating from the segment VIII, joins the left liver duct-ductus hepaticus sinister) and left-right intrahepatic transposition (left segmental bile duct originating from the segment IV ends in right liver duct-ductus hepaticus dexter). Conclusion. Safety and success in liver transplantation to great extent depends on knowledge of anatomy and some common embryological anomalies in bile tree. Variations in bile tree were found in 24–43% of cases, out of which 1–22% are the variations of intrahepatic bile ducts. Therefore, good knowledge on ductal anatomy enables good planning, safe performance of therapeutic and operative procedures, and decreases the risk of intraoperative and postoperative complications. PMID:22550601

  20. Effectiveness of duct sealing and duct insulation in multi-family buildings. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Karins, N.H.; Tuluca, A.; Modera, M.

    1997-07-01

    This research investigated the cost-effectiveness of sealing and insulating the accessible portions of duct systems exposed to unconditioned areas in multifamily housing. Airflow and temperature measurements were performed in 25 apartments served by 10 systems a 9 multi-family properties. The measurements were performed before and after each retrofit, and included apartment airflow (supply and return), duct system temperatures, system fan flow and duct leakage area. The costs for each retrofit were recorded. The data were analyzed and used to develop a prototypical multifamily house. This prototype was used in energy simulations (DOE-2.1E) and air infiltration simulations (COMIS 2.1). The simulations were performed for two climates: New York City and Albany. In each climate, one simulation was performed assuming the basement was tight, and another assuming the basement was leaky. Simulation results and average retrofit costs were used to calculate cost-effectiveness. The results of the analysis indicate that sealing leaks of the accessible ductwork is cost-effective under all conditions simulated (simple payback was between 3 and 4 years). Insulating the accessible ductwork, however, is only cost-effective for buildings with leaky basement, in both climates (simple paybacks were less than 5 years). The simple payback period for insulating the ducts in buildings with tight basements was greater than 10 years, the threshold of cost-effectiveness for this research. 13 refs., 5 figs., 27 tabs.

  1. Ascariasis of the pancreatic duct.

    PubMed

    Klimovskij, Michail; Dulskas, Audrius; Kraulyte, Zita; Mikalauskas, Saulius

    2015-01-01

    Ascariasis is a common helminthic disease worldwide, although Lithuania and other European countries are not considered endemic areas. The presence of the Ascaris worm in the biliary tree causes choledocholithiasis-like symptoms. We report a case of pancreatic duct ascariasis causing such symptoms. A 73-year-old Lithuanian woman underwent endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) suspecting choledocholithiasis. Contrast injection into the common bile duct demonstrated a slightly dilated biliary tree without any filling defects, and the tail of an Ascaris worm protruding from the opening of the papilla Vater. The worm was captured by a snare but escaped deep into the duct. After a small wirsungotomy the worm was retrieved from the pancreatic duct. The patient received a 150 mg dose of levamisole orally repeated 7 days later and was discharged after complete resolution of symptoms. This first reported sporadic case of pancreatic duct ascariasis in Lithuania was successfully treated with ERCP and Levamisole. PMID:26374772

  2. Measure Guideline: Buried and/or Encapsulated Ducts

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, C.; Zoeller, W.; Mantha, P.

    2013-08-01

    Buried and/or encapsulated ducts (BEDs) are a class of advanced, energy-efficiency strategies intended to address the significant ductwork thermal losses associated with ducts installed in unconditioned attics. BEDs are ducts installed in unconditioned attics that are covered in loose-fill insulation and/or encapsulated in closed cell polyurethane spray foam insulation. This Measure Guideline covers the technical aspects of BEDs as well as the advantages, disadvantages, and risks of BEDs compared to other alternative strategies. This guideline also provides detailed guidance on installation of BEDs strategies in new and existing homes through step-by-step installation procedures. This Building America Measure Guideline synthesizes previously published research on BEDs and provides practical information to builders, contractors, homeowners, policy analysts, building professions, and building scientists. Some of the procedures presented here, however, require specialized equipment or expertise. In addition, some alterations to duct systems may require a specialized license. Persons implementing duct system improvements should not go beyond their expertise or qualifications. This guideline provides valuable information for a building industry that has struggled to address ductwork thermal losses in new and existing homes. As building codes strengthen requirements for duct air sealing and insulation, flexibility is needed to address energy efficiency goals. While ductwork in conditioned spaces has been promoted as the panacea for addressing ductwork thermal losses, BEDs installations approach - and sometimes exceed - the performance of ductwork in conditioned spaces.

  3. The impact of duct-to-duct interaction on the hex duct dilation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, M.J.; Chang, L.K.; Lahm, C.E.; Porter, D.L.

    1992-07-01

    Dilation of the hex duct is an important factor in the operational lifetime of fuel subassemblies in liquid metal fast reactors. It is caused primarily by the irradiation-enhanced creep and void swelling of the hex duct material. Excessive dilation may jeopardize subassembly removal from the core or cause a subassembly storage problem where the grid size of the storage basket is limited. Dilation of the hex duct in Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) limits useful lifetime because of these storage basket limitations. It is, therefore, important to understand the hex duct dilation behavior to guide the design and in-core management of fuel subassemblies in a way that excessive duct deformation can be avoided. To investigate the dilation phenomena, finite-element models of the hex duct have been developed. The inelastic analyses were performed using the structural analysis code, ANSYS. Both Type 316 and D9 austenitic stainless steel ducts are considered. The calculated dilations are in good agreement with profilometry measurements made after irradiation. The analysis indicates that subassembly interaction is an important parameter in addition to neutron fluence and temperature in determining hex duct dilation. 5 refs.

  4. Observations of Strong Surface Radar Ducts over the Persian Gulf.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, Ian M.; Goroch, Andreas K.; Rogers, David P.

    1999-09-01

    Ducting of microwave radiation is a common phenomenon over the oceans. The height and strength of the duct are controlling factors for radar propagation and must be determined accurately to assess propagation ranges. A surface evaporation duct commonly forms due to the large gradient in specific humidity just above the sea surface; a deeper surface-based or elevated duct frequently is associated with the sudden change in temperature and humidity across the boundary layer inversion.In April 1996 the U.K. Meteorological Office C-130 Hercules research aircraft took part in the U.S. Navy Ship Antisubmarine Warfare Readiness/Effectiveness Measuring exercise (SHAREM-115) in the Persian Gulf by providing meteorological support and making measurements for the study of electromagnetic and electro-optical propagation. The boundary layer structure over the Gulf is influenced strongly by the surrounding desert landmass. Warm dry air flows from the desert over the cooler waters of the Gulf. Heat loss to the surface results in the formation of a stable internal boundary layer. The layer evolves continuously along wind, eventually forming a new marine atmospheric boundary layer. The stable stratification suppresses vertical mixing, trapping moisture within the layer and leading to an increase in refractive index and the formation of a strong boundary layer duct. A surface evaporation duct coexists with the boundary layer duct.In this paper the authors present aircraft- and ship-based observations of both the surface evaporation and boundary layer ducts. A series of sawtooth aircraft profiles map the boundary layer structure and provide spatially distributed estimates of the duct depth. The boundary layer duct is found to have considerable spatial variability in both depth and strength, and to evolve along wind over distances significant to naval operations (100 km). The depth of the evaporation duct is derived from a bulk parameterization based on Monin-Obukhov similarity theory

  5. Apparatus for supplying conditioned air at a substantially constant temperature and humidity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obler, H. D. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    The apparatus includes a supply duct coupled to a source of supply air for carrying the supply air therethrough. A return duct is coupled to the supply duct for carrying return conditioned air therethrough. A temperature reducing device is coupled to the supply duct for decreasing the temperature of the supply and return conditioned air. A by-pass duct is coupled to the supply duct for selectively directing portions of the supply and return conditioned air around the temperature reducing device. Another by-pass duct is coupled to the return duct for selectively directing portions of the return conditioned air around the supply duct and the temperature reduction device. Controller devices selectively control the flow and amount of mixing of the supply and return conditioned air.

  6. Building America Case Study: Duct in Conditioned Space in a Dropped Ceiling or Fur-down, Gainesville, Florida (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2014-09-01

    Forced air distribution systems (duct systems) typically are installed out of sight for aesthetic reasons, most often in unconditioned areas such as an attic or crawlspace. Any leakage of air to or from the duct system (duct leakage) in unconditioned space not only loses energy, but impacts home and equipment durability and indoor air quality. An obvious solution to this problem is to bring the duct system into the interior of the house, either by sealing the area where the ducts are installed (sealed attic or crawlspace) or by building an interior cavity or chase above the ceiling plane (raised ceiling or fur-up chase) or below the ceiling plane (dropped ceiling or fur-down) for the duct system. This case study examines one Building America builder partner's implementation of an inexpensive, quick and effective method of building a fur-down or dropped ceiling chase.

  7. High-Performance Ducts in Hot-Dry Climates

    SciTech Connect

    Hoeschele, Marc; Chitwood, Rick; German, Alea; Weitzel, Elizabeth

    2015-07-30

    Duct thermal losses and air leakage have long been recognized as prime culprits in the degradation of heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) system efficiency. Both the U.S. Department of Energy’s Zero Energy Ready Home program and California’s proposed 2016 Title 24 Residential Energy Efficiency Standards require that ducts be installed within conditioned space or that other measures be taken to provide similar improvements in delivery effectiveness (DE). Pacific Gas & Electric Company commissioned a study to evaluate ducts in conditioned space and high-performance attics (HPAs) in support of the proposed codes and standards enhancements included in California’s 2016 Title 24 Residential Energy Efficiency Standards. The goal was to work with a select group of builders to design and install high-performance duct (HPD) systems, such as ducts in conditioned space (DCS), in one or more of their homes and to obtain test data to verify the improvement in DE compared to standard practice. Davis Energy Group (DEG) helped select the builders and led a team that provided information about HPD strategies to them. DEG also observed the construction process, completed testing, and collected cost data.

  8. DUCT RETROFIT STRATEGY TO COMPLEMENT A MODULATING FURNACE.

    SciTech Connect

    ANDREWS,J.W.

    2002-10-02

    Some recent work (Walker 2001, Andrews 2002) has indicated that installing a modulating furnace in a conventional duct system may, in many cases, result in a significant degradation in thermal distribution efficiency. The fundamental mechanism was pointed out nearly two decades ago (Andrews and Krajewski 1985). The problem occurs in duct systems that are less-than-perfectly insulated (e.g., R-4 duct wrap) and are located outside the conditioned space. It stems from the fact that when the airflow rate is reduced, as it will be when the modulating furnace reduces its heat output rate, the supply air will have a longer residence time in the ducts and will therefore lose a greater percentage of its heat by conduction than it did at the higher airflow rate. The impact of duct leakage, on the other hand, is not expected to change very much under furnace modulation. The pressures in the duct system will be reduced when the airflow rate is reduced, thus reducing the leakage per unit time. This is balanced by the fact that the operating time will increase in order to meet the same heating load as with the conventional furnace operating at higher output and airflow rates. The balance would be exact if the exponent in the pressure vs. airflow equation were the same as that in the pressure vs. duct leakage equation. Since the pressure-airflow exponent is usually {approx}0.5 and the pressure-leakage exponent is usually {approx}0.6, the leakage loss as a fraction of the load should be slightly lower for the modulating furnace. The difference, however, is expected to be small, determined as it is by a function with an exponent equal to the difference between the above two exponents, or {approx}0.1. The negative impact of increased thermal conduction losses from the duct system may be partially offset by improved efficiency of the modulating furnace itself. Also, the modulating furnace will cycle on and off less often than a single-capacity model, and this may add a small amount

  9. PMR Graphite Engine Duct Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stotler, C. L.; Yokel, S. A.

    1989-01-01

    The objective was to demonstrate the cost and weight advantages that could be obtained by utilizing the graphite/PMR15 material system to replace titanium in selected turbofan engine applications. The first component to be selected as a basis for evaluation was the outer bypass duct of the General Electric F404 engine. The operating environment of this duct was defined and then an extensive mechanical and physical property test program was conducted using material made by processing techniques which were also established by this program. Based on these properties, design concepts to fabricate a composite version of the duct were established and two complete ducts fabricated. One of these ducts was proof pressure tested and then run successfully on a factory test engine for over 1900 hours. The second duct was static tested to 210 percent design limit load without failure. An improved design was then developed which utilized integral composite end flanges. A complete duct was fabricated and successfully proof pressure tested. The net results of this effort showed that a composite version of the outer duct would be 14 percent lighter and 30 percent less expensive that the titanium duct. The other type of structure chosen for investigation was the F404 fan stator assembly, including the fan stator vanes. It was concluded that it was feasible to utilize composite materials for this type structure but that the requirements imposed by replacing an existing metal design resulted in an inefficient composite design. It was concluded that if composites were to be effectively used in this type structure, the design must be tailored for composite application from the outset.

  10. Verification of internal flow analyses in complex 3-D geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, S. K.; Buggeln, R. C.

    1992-11-01

    Analysis of internal flow in advanced rocket propulsion systems is complicated by hardware geometry, high Reynolds numbers, rotation, high frequency phenomena, and near incompressibility. Typical of such a problem is the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) hot gas manifold (HGM). Previous analyses of flow in the SSME HGM have been compared to air flow data and found to be inaccurate with respect to system losses, outer wall static pressures, and transfer duct environments. Such discrepancies could arise from flow measurement methodology, low order algorithms, turbulence modeling, and/or inadequate grid resolution. The objective of this work is to compare internal flow computational analyses to LDV flow measurements for the MSFC HGM pilot model configuration using two grids of different node density in the near wall region. Grids were generated with the EAGLE grid generator and calculations were made with the SRA MINT code. The calculated results were compared with HGM experimental data obtained in the MSFC water flow facility.

  11. Better Duct Systems for Home Heating and Cooling; Building Technologies Program (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    2004-11-01

    Duct systems used in forced-air space-conditioning systems are a vital element in home energy efficiency. How well a system works makes a big difference in the cost and the effectiveness of heating and cooling a home.

  12. Nondestructive Evaluation of the J-2X Direct Metal Laser Sintered Gas Generator Discharge Duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esther, Elizabeth A.; Beshears, Ronald D.; Lash, Rhonda K.

    2012-01-01

    The J-2X program at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) procured a direct metal laser sintered (DMLS) gas generator discharge duct from Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne and Morris Technologies for a test program that would evaluate the material properties and durability of the duct in an engine-like environment. DMLS technology was pursued as a manufacturing alternative to traditional techniques, which used off nominal practices to manufacture the gas generator duct's 180 degree turn geometry. MSFC's Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) Team performed radiographic, ultrasonic, computed tomographic, and fluorescent penetrant examinations of the duct. Results from the NDE examinations reveal some shallow porosity but no major defects in the as-manufactured material. NDE examinations were also performed after hot-fire testing the gas generator duct and yielded similar results pre and post-test and showed no flaw growth or development.

  13. Impacts of traffic composition and street-canyon geometry on on-road air quality in a high-rise building area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Kyung-Hwan; Kim, Kyung Hwan; Lee, Seung-Bok; Woo, Sung Ho; Bae, Gwi-Nam; Sunwoo, Young; Baik, Jong-Jin

    2016-04-01

    the building geometries around an intersection for better air quality in a high-rise building area.

  14. Calculation of turbulence-driven secondary motion in ducts with arbitrary cross section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demuren, A. O.

    1989-01-01

    Calculation methods for turbulent duct flows are generalized for ducts with arbitrary cross-sections. The irregular physical geometry is transformed into a regular one in computational space, and the flow equations are solved with a finite-volume numerical procedure. The turbulent stresses are calculated with an algebraic stress model derived by simplifying model transport equations for the individual Reynolds stresses. Two variants of such a model are considered. These procedures enable the prediction of both the turbulence-driven secondary flow and the anisotropy of the Reynolds stresses, in contrast to some of the earlier calculation methods. Model predictions are compared to experimental data for developed flow in triangular duct, trapezoidal duct and a rod-bundle geometry. The correct trends are predicted, and the quantitative agreement is mostly fair. The simpler variant of the algebraic stress model procured better agreement with the measured data.

  15. Calculation of turbulence-driven secondary motion in ducts with arbitrary cross-section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demuren, A. O.

    1990-01-01

    Calculation methods for turbulent duct flows are generalized for ducts with arbitrary cross-sections. The irregular physical geometry is transformed into a regular one in computational space, and the flow equations are solved with a finite-volume numerical procedure. The turbulent stresses are calculated with an algebraic stress model derived by simplifying model transport equations for the individual Reynolds stresses. Two variants of such a model are considered. These procedures enable the prediction of both the turbulence-driven secondary flow and the anisotropy of the Reynolds stresses, in contrast to some of the earlier calculation methods. Model predictions are compared to experimental data for developed flow in triangular duct, trapezoidal duct and a rod-bundle geometry. The correct trends are predicted, and the quantitative agreement is mostly fair. The simpler variant of the algebraic stress model procured better agreement with the measured data.

  16. Introduction to Indoor Air Quality

    MedlinePlus

    ... as conditions caused by outdoor impacts (such as climate change). Many reports and studies indicate that the following ... Air Duct Cleaning Asthma Health, Energy Efficiency and Climate Change Flood Cleanup Home Remodel Indoor airPLUS Mold Radon ...

  17. Articulated transition duct in turbomachine

    DOEpatents

    Flanagan, James Scott; McMahan, Kevin Weston; LeBegue, Jeffrey Scott; Pentecost, Ronnie Ray

    2014-04-29

    Turbine systems are provided. A turbine system includes a transition duct comprising an inlet, an outlet, and a duct passage extending between the inlet and the outlet and defining a longitudinal axis, a radial axis, and a tangential axis. The outlet of the transition duct is offset from the inlet along the longitudinal axis and the tangential axis. The duct passage includes an upstream portion and a downstream portion. The upstream portion extends from the inlet between an inlet end and an aft end. The downstream portion extends from the outlet between an outlet end and a head end. The turbine system further includes a joint coupling the aft end of the upstream portion and the head end of the downstream portion together. The joint is configured to allow movement of the upstream portion and the downstream portion relative to each other about or along at least one axis.

  18. Wave reflections from duct terminations.

    PubMed

    Selamet, A; Ji, Z L; Kach, R A

    2001-04-01

    The reflection coefficients and inertial end corrections of several duct terminations, including finite length duct extensions perpendicular to an infinite wall, as well as at a number of angles, curved interface surfaces, and annular cavities, are determined and analyzed in the absence of flow by employing the boundary element method. Predictions for the classical unflanged and flanged circular ducts show good agreement with analytical and computational results available in the literature. The predictions for curved interface surfaces (bellmouth or horn) are also consistent with the available experimental data. In view of its high reflection coefficient, the duct termination with an annular cavity may be suggested for the suppression of noise radiation in a specific frequency band or for an effective wave reflection from the termination. PMID:11325101

  19. Sound propagation in choked ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hersh, A. S.; Liu, C. Y.

    1976-01-01

    The linearized equations describing the propagation of sound in variable area ducts containing flow are shown to be singular when the duct mean flow is sonic. The singularity is removed when previously ignored nonlinear terms are retained. The results of a numerical study, for the case of plane waves propagating in a one-dimensional converging-diverging duct, show that the sound field is adequately described by the linearized equations only when the axial mean flow Mach number at the duct throat M sub th 0.6. For M sub th 0.6, the numerical results showed that acoustic energy flux was not conserved. An attempt was made to extend the study to include the nonlinear behavior of the sound field. Meaningful results were not obtained due, primarily, to numerical difficulties.

  20. CFD-based Design of LOX Pump Inlet Duct for Reduced Dynamic Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothermel, Jeffry; Dorney, Daniel J.; Dorney, Suzanne M.

    2003-01-01

    Numerical simulations have been completed for a variety of designs for a 90 deg elbow duct. The objective is to identify a design that minimizes the dynamic load entering a LOX turbopump located at the elbow exit. Designs simulated to date indicate that simpler duct geometries result in lower losses. Benchmark simulations have verified that the compressible flow code used in this study is applicable to these incompressible flow simulations.

  1. CFD-Based Design of Turbopump Inlet Duct for Reduced Dynamic Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothermel, Jeffry; Dorney, Suzanne M.; Dorney, Daniel J.

    2003-01-01

    Numerical simulations have been completed for a variety of designs for a 90 deg elbow duct. The objective is to identify a design that minimizes the dynamic load entering a LOX turbopump located at the elbow exit. Designs simulated to date indicate that simpler duct geometries result in lower losses. Benchmark simulations have verified that the compressible flow codes used in this study are applicable to these incompressible flow simulations.

  2. Reverse Flow Engine Core Having a Ducted Fan with Integrated Secondary Flow Blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kisska, Michael K. (Inventor); Princen, Norman H. (Inventor); Kuehn, Mark S. (Inventor); Cosentino, Gary B. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Secondary air flow is provided for a ducted fan having a reverse flow turbine engine core driving a fan blisk. The fan blisk incorporates a set of thrust fan blades extending from an outer hub and a set of integral secondary flow blades extending intermediate an inner hub and the outer hub. A nacelle provides an outer flow duct for the thrust fan blades and a secondary flow duct carries flow from the integral secondary flow blades as cooling air for components of the reverse flow turbine engine.

  3. Flow duct for nuclear reactors

    DOEpatents

    Straalsund, Jerry L.

    1978-01-01

    Improved liquid sodium flow ducts for nuclear reactors are described wherein the improvement comprises varying the wall thickness of each of the walls of a polygonal tubular duct structure so that each of the walls is of reduced cross-section along the longitudinal center line and of a greater cross-section along wall junctions with the other walls to form the polygonal tubular configuration.

  4. TWO NEW DUCT LEAKAGE TESTS

    SciTech Connect

    ANDREWS,J.W.

    1998-12-01

    Two variations on the tests for duct leakage currently embodied in ASHRAE Standard 152P (Method of Test for Determining the Design and Seasonal Efficiencies of Residential Thermal Distribution Systems) are presented. Procedures are derived for calculating supply and return duct leakage to/from outside using these new variations. Results of these tests are compared with the original ones in Standard 152P on the basis of data collected in three New York State homes.

  5. Two New Duct Leakage Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, J.W.

    1998-12-01

    Two variations on the tests for duct leakage currently embodied in ASHRAE Standard 152P (Method of Test for Determining the Design and Seasonal Efficiencies of Residential Thermal Distribution Systems) are presented. Procedures are derived for calculating supply and return duct leakage to/from outside using these new variations. Results of these tests are compared with the original ones in Standard 152P on the basis of data collected in three New York State homes.

  6. Guide to Air Cleaners in the Home

    MedlinePlus

    ... Air Duct Cleaning Asthma Health, Energy Efficiency and Climate Change Flood Cleanup Home Remodel Indoor airPLUS Mold Radon ... menu Learn the Issues Air Chemicals and Toxics Climate Change Emergencies Greener Living Health and Safety Land and ...

  7. Turbofan aft duct suppressor study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Syed, A. A.; Motsinger, R. E.; Fiske, G. H.; Joshi, M. C.; Kraft, R. E.

    1983-01-01

    Suppressions due to acoustic treatment in the annular exhaust duct of a model fan were theoretically predicted and compared with measured suppressions. The predictions are based on the modal analysis of sound propagation in a straight annular flow duct with segmented treatment. Modal distributions of the fan noise source (fan-stator interaction only) were measured using in-duct modal probes. The flow profiles were also measured in the vicinity of the modal probes. The acoustic impedance of the single degree of freedom treatment was measured in the presence of grazing flow. The measured values of mode distribution of the fan noise source, the flow velocity profile and the acoustic impedance of the treatment in the duct were used as input to the prediction program. The predicted suppressions, under the assumption of uniform flow in the duct, compared well with the suppressions measured in the duct for all test conditions. The interaction modes generated by the rotor-stator interaction spanned a cut-off ratio range from nearly 1 to 7.

  8. Aeroacoustic interaction in a corrugated duct

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kop'ev, V. F.; Mironov, M. A.; Solntseva, V. S.

    2008-03-01

    The sound generation by an air flow in a corrugated tube is studied experimentally for different values of the corrugation pitch and different tube lengths. The Strouhal numbers of sound generated in different tubes with different flow velocities lie within 0.4-0.6. As the flow velocity increases, the Strouhal number decreases. The effect of sound absorption by an air flow in a corrugated duct is described: in a corrugated tube with a flow, at frequencies below the generation frequency, the absorption of sound produced by an external source is observed. A semiempirical model of aeroacoustic interaction in a corrugated tube is proposed. The model provides a qualitative agreement with the experiment.

  9. The Development of the Ducted Fan Noise Propagation and Radiation Code CDUCT-LaRC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nark, Douglas M.; Farassat, F.; Pope, D. Stuart; Vatsa, Veer

    2003-01-01

    The development of the ducted fan noise propagation and radiation code CDUCT-LaRC at NASA Langley Research Center is described. This code calculates the propagation and radiation of given acoustic modes ahead of the fan face or aft of the exhaust guide vanes in the inlet or exhaust ducts, respectively. This paper gives a description of the modules comprising CDUCT-LaRC. The grid generation module provides automatic creation of numerical grids for complex (non-axisymmetric) geometries that include single or multiple pylons. Files for performing automatic inviscid mean flow calculations are also generated within this module. The duct propagation is based on the parabolic approximation theory of R. P. Dougherty. This theory allows the handling of complex internal geometries and the ability to study the effect of non-uniform (i.e. circumferentially and axially segmented) liners. Finally, the duct radiation module is based on the Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings (FW-H) equation with a penetrable data surface. Refraction of sound through the shear layer between the external flow and bypass duct flow is included. Results for benchmark annular ducts, as well as other geometries with pylons, are presented and compared with available analytical data.

  10. Estimating evaporation duct heights from radar sea echo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, L. Ted; Hattan, Claude P.; Stapleton, Janet K.

    2000-07-01

    The evaporation duct is a downward refracting layer that results from the rapid decrease in humidity with respect to altitude occurring in the atmospheric surface layer above bodies of water. The evaporation duct affects radar detection ranges at frequencies of approximately 1 GHz and above. Models based on Monin-Obukhov similarity theory are usually used to calculate evaporation duct refractivity profiles from bulk measurements of air temperature, humidity, wind speed, and the sea surface temperature. Modeling results by Pappert et al. [1992] indicated that the falloff of radar sea echo as a function of range was an increasing function of the evaporation duct height. On the basis of those results, the authors proposed inferring the evaporation duct height by a slope fit to modeled clutter power, a nonlinear least squares inversion procedure. Data for testing the inversion procedure were obtained using the S band Space Range Radar at Wallops Island, Virginia. Evaporation duct heights were inferred from the radar data on the basis of the assumption of a range-independent evaporation duct height and sea clutter radar cross section (σ°). Validation data consist of buoy and boat in situ bulk measurements. The result of comparing the radar-inferred evaporation duct heights and those calculated from bulk measurements indicates that the radar-inferred duct heights are strongly correlated with those from the in situ measurements, but there is some uncertainty as to whether they are biased or unbiased. That uncertainty arises from the assumed dependence of σ° on the grazing angle ψ. That dependence is currently a matter of debate in the open literature, with the lower and upper ends of modeling results being σ° ∝ ψ0; and σ° ∝ ψ4, respectively. We show results for both dependencies and note that the σ° ∝ ψ0; provides the best agreement with our measurements. It should be noted that inferring the evaporation duct height from radar sea echo is a problem

  11. Analysis of an advanced ducted propeller subsonic inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iek, Chanthy; Boldman, Donald R.; Ibrahim, Mounir

    1992-01-01

    A time marching Navier-Stokes code called PARC (PARC2D for 2-D/axisymmetric and PARC3D for 3-D flow simulations) was validated for an advanced ducted propeller (ADP) subsonic inlet. The code validation for an advanced ducted propeller (ADP) subsonic inlet. The code validation was implemented for a non-separated flow condition associated with the inlet operating at angles-of-attack of 0 and 25 degrees. The inlet test data were obtained in the 9 x 15 ft Low Speed Wind Tunnel at NASA Lewis Research Center as part of a cooperative study with Pratt and Whitney. The experimental study focused on the ADP inlet performance for take-off and approach conditions. The inlet was tested at a free stream Mach number of 0.2, at angles-of-attack between O and 35 degrees, and at a maximum propeller speed of 12,000 RPM which induced a corrected air flow rate of about 46 lb/sec based on standard day conditions. The computational grid and flow boundary conditions (BC) were based on the actual inlet geometry and the funnel flow conditions. At the propeller face, two types of BC's were applied: a mass flow BC and a fixed flow properties BC. The fixed flow properties BC was based on a combination of data obtained from the experiment and calculations using a potential flow code. Comparison of the computational results with the test data indicates that the PARC code with the propeller face fixed flow properties BC provided a better prediction of the inlet surface static pressures than the predictions when the mass flow BC was used. For an angle-of-attack of 0 degrees, the PARC2D code with the propeller face mass flow BC provided a good prediction of inlet static pressures except in the region of high pressure gradient. With the propeller face fixed flow properties BC, the PARC2D code provided a good prediction of the inlet static pressures. For an angle-of-attack of 25 degrees with the mass flow BC, the PARC3D code predicted statis pressures which deviated significantly from the test data

  12. Extension to an analysis of turbulent swirling compressible flow for application to axisymmetric small gas turbine ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, O. L.; Hankins, G. B.; Edwards, D. E.

    1981-01-01

    An existing computer program, the Axisymmetric Diffuser Duct Code (ADD code), which calculates compressible turbulent swirling flow through axisymmetric ducts was modified to permit calculation of flows through small gas turbine ducts with struts, guide vanes and large degrees of turning. The improvements include a coordinate generator, an end-wall loss model, and a generalized geometry capability to describe struts and guide vanes in ducts which turn more than 90 degrees. An improved output format was developed to provide the solution on any arbitrary plane in the duct and an extensive literature survey of calculation procedures used in gas turbine technology was completed which suggests improvements in the computer code. Calculations are presented for the flow through the AGT101 small gas turbine inlet duct and turbine exhaust diffuser which demonstrate the ADD code modifications implemented in the investigation. The computed results compare favorably with experimental results.

  13. CASE STUDY OF DUCT RETROFIT OF A 1985 HOME AND GUIDELINES FOR ATTIC AND CRAWL SPACE DUCT SEALING

    SciTech Connect

    Boudreaux, Philip R; Christian, Jeffrey E; Jackson, Roderick K

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is fully committed to research for developing the information and capabilities necessary to provide cost-effective residential retrofits yielding 50% energy savings within the next several years. Heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) is the biggest energy end use in the residential sector, and a significant amount of energy can be wasted through leaky ductwork in unconditioned spaces such as attics and crawl spaces. A detailed duct sealing case study is presented for one house along with nine brief descriptions of other duct retrofits completed in the mixed-humid climate. Costs and estimated energy savings are reported for most of the ten houses. Costs for the retrofits ranged from $0.92/ft2 to $1.80/ft2 of living space and estimated yearly energy cost savings due to the duct retrofits range from 1.8% to 18.5%. Lessons learned and duct sealing guidelines based on these ten houses, as well as close work with the HVAC industry in the mixed-humid climate of East Tennessee, northern Georgia, and south-central Kentucky are presented. It is hoped that the lessons learned and guidelines will influence local HVAC contractors, energy auditors, and homeowners when diagnosing or repairing HVAC duct leakage and will be useful for steering DOE s future research in this area.

  14. Laparoscopic common bile duct exploration.

    PubMed

    Vecchio, Rosario; MacFadyen, Bruce V

    2002-04-01

    In recent years, laparoscopic common bile duct exploration has become the procedure of choice in the management of choledocholithiasis in several laparoscopic centers. The increasing interest for this laparoscopic approach is due to the development of instrumentation and technique, allowing the procedure to be performed safely, and it is also the result of the revised role of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, which has been questioned because of its cost, risk of complications and effectiveness. Many surgeons, however, are still not familiar with this technique. In this article we discuss the technique and results of laparoscopic common bile duct exploration. Both the laparoscopic transcystic approach and choledochotomy are discussed, together with the results given in the literature. When one considers the costs, morbidity, mortality and the time required before the patient can return to work, it would appear that laparoscopic cholecystectomy with common bile duct exploration is more favorable than open surgery or laparoscopic cholecystectomy with preoperative or postoperative endoscopic sphincterotomy. However, the technique requires advanced laparoscopic skills, including suturing, knot tying, the use of a choledochoscope, guidewire, dilators and balloon stone extractor. Although laparoscopic common bile duct exploration appears to be the most cost-effective method to treat common bile duct stones, it should be emphasized that this procedure is very challenging, and it should be performed by well-trained laparoscopic surgeons with experience in biliary surgery. PMID:11981684

  15. Duct leakage impacts on VAV system performance in California large commercial buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Wray, Craig P.; Matson, Nance E.

    2003-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the variability of duct leakage impacts on air distribution system performance for typical large commercial buildings in California. Specifically, a hybrid DOE-2/TRNSYS sequential simulation approach was used to model the energy use of a low-pressure terminal-reheat variable-air-volume (VAV) HVAC system with six duct leakage configurations (tight to leaky) in nine prototypical large office buildings (representing three construction eras in three California climates where these types of buildings are common). Combined fan power for the variable-speed-controlled supply and return fans at design conditions was assumed to be 0.8 W/cfm. Based on our analyses of the 54 simulation cases, the increase in annual fan energy is estimated to be 40 to 50% for a system with a total leakage of 19% at design conditions compared to a tight system with 5% leakage. Annual cooling plant energy also increases by about 7 to 10%, but reheat energy decreases (about 3 to 10%). In combination, the increase in total annual HVAC site energy is 2 to 14%. The total HVAC site energy use includes supply and return fan electricity consumption, chiller and cooling tower electricity consumption, boiler electricity consumption, and boiler natural gas consumption. Using year 2000 average commercial sector energy prices for California ($0.0986/kWh and $7.71/Million Btu), the energy increases result in 9 to 18% ($7,400 to $9,500) increases in HVAC system annual operating costs. Normalized by duct surface area, the increases in annual operating costs are 0.14 to 0.18 $/ft{sup 2}. Using a suggested one-time duct sealing cost of $0.20 per square foot of duct surface area, these results indicate that sealing leaky ducts in VAV systems has a simple payback period of about 1.3 years. Even with total leakage rates as low as 10%, duct sealing is still cost effective. This suggests that duct sealing should be considered at least for VAV systems with 10% or more total duct

  16. Evaporation duct refractivity profile from satellite meteorological data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levadnyi, Iu.; Ivanov, V.; Shalyapin, V.

    The refractivity profile is initial data for the microwave propagation prediction models Evaporation duct height is usually used to characterize refractivity profile in the surface layer over sea The evaporation duct height is calculated using bulk measurement of air temperature wind speed humidity pressure at some level and sea surface temperature Four prevailing models LKB Liu-Katsaros-Businger RSHMU Russian State Hydro-Meteorological University optimized by us ECMWF European Center for Medium range Weather Forecast and COARE Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Response Experiment were examined The results of computation using above mentioned models were compared with the direct refractometric measurements All measurements meteorological and refractometric were made by us during two marine expeditions First expedition was in the Atlantic ocean from March to May in latitude 22 circ-32° North and longitude 52 circ-65° West 29 measurements Second one was in the Indian ocean from December to February in latitude 0 circ-15° North and longitude 55 circ-80° East 94 measurements The approximation by least square-root method was carried out to compare the direct measurements of evaporation duct height with the results of computations The minimum square-root error is obtained for LKB model 2 59m for negative air-sea temperature difference 2 42m maximum - for ECMWF model 2 72m All models overestimate low evaporation duct heights and underestimate - high values This effect is least of all define in RSHMU

  17. Technology Solutions Case Study: Duct in Conditioned Space in a Dropped Ceiling or Fur-down, Gainesville, Florida

    SciTech Connect

    2014-09-01

    Forced-air distribution systems (duct systems) typically are installed out of sight for aesthetic reasons, most often in unconditioned areas such as attics or crawlspaces. Any leakage of air to or from the duct system in unconditioned space not only loses energy, but impacts home and equipment durability and indoor air quality. An obvious solution is to bring the duct system into the interior of the house, either by sealing the area where the ducts are installed (attic or crawlspace) or by building an interior cavity or chase above the ceiling plane (raised ceiling or fur-up chase) or below the ceiling plane (dropped ceiling or fur-down) for the duct system. In this project, Building America Partnership for Improved Residential Construction team partnered with Tommy Williams Homes to implement an inexpensive, quick, and effective method of building a fur-down chase.

  18. Evaporation duct communication: Test Plan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, K. D.

    1991-02-01

    The Evaporation Duct Communication (EDCOM) project is an effort to provide an alternative ship-to-ship communications channel using the natural environment. A microwave communication link can be used on an over-the-water, over-the-horizon path through the evaporation duct. This report shows how a microwave communication link, operating at a range separation of more than twice the line-of-sight range, can be constructed. This link can achieve about 80-percent availability at a transmission frequency of 14.5 GHz and can be constructed using off-the-shelf RF equipment. Operation of this link will provide the first set of measurements of channel capacity that can be critically dependent on the existence of an oceanic evaporation duct. Construction of this link presents a unique opportunity to study and evaluate an alternative communications channel that can be used to alleviate naval battlegroup communications load.

  19. Congenital Atresia of Wharton's Duct.

    PubMed

    Hseu, Anne; Anne, Premchand; Anne, Samantha

    2016-02-01

    This is a case report of a three-month-old male who presented to clinic with a cystic lesion under the tongue. On clinical examination, a cystic lesion was observed in the, floor-of-mouth. The patient was referred to Paediatric Otorhinolaryngology service for further management. The differential diagnoses for floor-of-mouth lesions should be reviewed with primary focus on the Wharton's duct atresia and its management. It is crucial to recognize submandibular duct atresia in the primary Paediatric clinic in order to expedite management of lesion before complications arise including infection, enlargement of cyst, and feeding and breathing difficulties. PMID:27042492

  20. General Information about Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bile Duct Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Bile Duct Cancer Go to Health Professional ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  1. What Are the Key Statistics about Bile Duct Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... for bile duct cancer? What are the key statistics about bile duct cancer? Bile duct cancer is ... it is when it is found. For survival statistics, see the section “ Survival statistics for bile duct ...

  2. Moulded calculus of common bile duct mimicking a stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Brocki, Marian; Śmigielski, Jacek

    2014-01-01

    Bile duct stenosis, in most cases, appears to be the consequence of pancreatic head, ampulla of Vater and bile duct tumours, cholangitis sclerosans, as well as iatrogenic damages, which may all be diagnosed during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). In very rare cases the restriction may result from an atypically shaped wedged stone. This situation creates many diagnostic problems, which in the majority of cases can be solved using imaging studies. However, in some patients even a significant extension of diagnostic procedures may not lead to a correct diagnosis. We present a diagnostically difficult case of a deposit imitating restriction. We present a 70-year-old woman with common bile duct restriction undiagnosed despite several ultrasound examinations (USG), computed tomography (CT), double magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). Only after the third ERCP examination a fragmented, by formerly introduced prosthesis, deposit, imitating narrowing, was revealed. Identification of bile duct deposits depends on their composition, localisation and the imaging techniques used. Pigment calculi with atypical shape, bile density, air density or surrounding tissue density are very difficult to diagnose. Thus, the sensitivity of common bile duct stone detection in USG, CT, MRCP and endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is 5–88%; 6–88%; 73–97%; and 84–98%, respectively. Moreover, ERCP may not diagnose the character of the restriction even in 5.2% up to 30% of the patients. Consequently, assessment of diagnosis in a number of patients is difficult. A deposit imitating common bile duct (CBD) restriction is a rare, difficult to diagnose phenomenon, which should be taken into account during differential diagnosis of CBD restrictions. PMID:25061493

  3. Wind Turbine With Concentric Ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muhonen, A. J.

    1983-01-01

    Wind Turbine device is relatively compact and efficient. Converging inner and outer ducts increase pressure difference across blades of wind turbine. Turbine shaft drives alternator housed inside exit cone. Suitable for installation on such existing structures as water towers, barns, houses, and commercial buildings.

  4. Vitellointestinal Duct Anomalies in Infancy

    PubMed Central

    Kadian, Yogender Singh; Verma, Anjali; Rattan, Kamal Nain; Kajal, Pardeep

    2016-01-01

    Background: Vitellointestinal duct (VID) or omphalomesenteric duct anomalies are secondary to the persistence of the embryonic vitelline duct, which normally obliterates by weeks 5–9 of intrauterine life. Methods: This is a retrospective analysis of a total of 16 patients of symptomatic remnants of vitellointestinal duct from period of Jan 2009 to May 2013. Results: Male to female ratio (M:F) was 4.3:1 and mean age of presentation was 2 months and their mode of presentation was: patent VID in 9 (56.25%) patients, umbilical cyst in 2(12.25%), umbilical granuloma in 2 (12.25%), and Meckel diverticulum as content of hernia sac in obstructed umbilical hernia in 1 (6.25%) patient. Two patients with umbilical fistula had severe electrolyte disturbance and died without surgical intervention. Conclusion: Persistent VID may have varied presentations in infancy. High output umbilical fistula and excessive bowel prolapse demand urgent surgical intervention to avoid morbidity and mortality. PMID:27433448

  5. Design and performance of duct acoustic treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Motsinger, R. E.; Kraft, R. E.

    1991-01-01

    The procedure for designing acoustic treatment panels used to line the walls of aircraft engine ducts and for estimating the resulting suppression of turbofan engine duct noise is discussed. This procedure is intended to be used for estimating noise suppression of existing designs or for designing new acoustic treatment panels and duct configurations to achieve desired suppression levels.

  6. 46 CFR 116.610 - Ventilation ducts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... requirements relative to the passage of smoke and flame as the fire control boundary penetrated; (2) A steel duct penetrating an A-Class fire control boundary must be of at least 11 USSG, and a steel duct... duct penetrating an A-Class fire control boundary and opening into a space formed by that boundary...

  7. 46 CFR 116.610 - Ventilation ducts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... requirements relative to the passage of smoke and flame as the fire control boundary penetrated; (2) A steel duct penetrating an A-Class fire control boundary must be of at least 11 USSG, and a steel duct... duct penetrating an A-Class fire control boundary and opening into a space formed by that boundary...

  8. Molecular Geometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Desseyn, H. O.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Compares linear-nonlinear and planar-nonplanar geometry through the valence-shell electron pairs repulsion (V.S.E.P.R.), Mulliken-Walsh, and electrostatic force theories. Indicates that although the V.S.E.P.R. theory has more advantages for elementary courses, an explanation of the best features of the different theories offers students a better…

  9. Effects of the geometry of the exit of a tube in an oscillating flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echeverría, Elia; Málaga, Carlos; Czitrom, Steven; Olvera, Arturo; Stern, Catalina

    2014-11-01

    The problem of optimizing the performance of a wave-driven seawater pump - comprising a resonant duct and an exhaust duct joined by a variable volume air-compression chamber - it is explored by studying oscillating flows at the exit of a tube. It is known that the performance of this pump depends on the geometry of the mouth of its intake tube. An inspection of the integral expression of the Navier-Stokes equation along a central streamline of this flow shows that changing the shape of the tube's mouth modifies only the inertia and energy losses terms because both depend on the flow field at the chosen streamline. These changes must be such that the integral relation is preserved. Therefore, by measuring the inertial term (known as added mass), the term for losses can be measured indirectly. We developed a method to measure the added mass for oscillating flows in tubes with different mouth shapes and compared these measurements with those obtained for a model of the flow through the pump. Our results suggest a way to find a criterion for choosing the geometry of the mouth of the tubes in order to minimize dissipation and improve efficiency of the pump. This work was supported by funds provided by DGAPA-UNAM (Project PAPITT-IN1188608).

  10. Improved Duct Systems Task Report with StageGate 2 Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Moyer, Neil; Stroer, Dennis

    2007-12-31

    This report is about Building America Industrialized Housing Partnership's work with two industry partners, Davalier Homes and Southern Energy Homes, in constructing and evaluating prototype interior duct systems. Issues of energy performance, comfort, DAPIA approval, manufacturability and cost is addressed. A stage gate 2 analysis addresses the current status of project showing that there are still refinements needed to the process of incorporating all of the ducts within the air and thermal boundaries of the envelope.

  11. Pressure losses across multiple fittings in ventilation ducts.

    PubMed

    Ai, Z T; Mak, C M

    2013-01-01

    The accurate prediction of pressure losses across in-duct fittings is of significance in relation to the accurate sizing and good energy efficiency of air-delivery systems. Current design guides provide design methods and data for the prediction of pressure losses only for a single and isolated fitting. This study presents an investigation of pressure losses across multiple interactive in-duct fittings in a ventilation duct. A laboratory measurement of pressure losses across one fitting and multiple fittings in a ventilation duct is carried out. The pressure loss across multiple interactive fittings is lower than that across multiple similar individual fittings, while the percentage decrease is dependent on the configuration and combination of the fittings. This implies that the pressure loss across multiple closely mounted fittings calculated by summing the pressure losses across individual fittings, as provided in the ASHRAE handbook and the CIBSE guide, is overpredicted. The numerical prediction of the pressure losses across multiple fittings using the large-eddy simulation (LES) model shows good agreement with the measured data, suggesting that this model is a useful tool in ductwork design and can help to save experimental resources and improve experimental accuracy and reliability. PMID:24385871

  12. Pressure Losses across Multiple Fittings in Ventilation Ducts

    PubMed Central

    Ai, Z. T.; Mak, C. M.

    2013-01-01

    The accurate prediction of pressure losses across in-duct fittings is of significance in relation to the accurate sizing and good energy efficiency of air-delivery systems. Current design guides provide design methods and data for the prediction of pressure losses only for a single and isolated fitting. This study presents an investigation of pressure losses across multiple interactive in-duct fittings in a ventilation duct. A laboratory measurement of pressure losses across one fitting and multiple fittings in a ventilation duct is carried out. The pressure loss across multiple interactive fittings is lower than that across multiple similar individual fittings, while the percentage decrease is dependent on the configuration and combination of the fittings. This implies that the pressure loss across multiple closely mounted fittings calculated by summing the pressure losses across individual fittings, as provided in the ASHRAE handbook and the CIBSE guide, is overpredicted. The numerical prediction of the pressure losses across multiple fittings using the large-eddy simulation (LES) model shows good agreement with the measured data, suggesting that this model is a useful tool in ductwork design and can help to save experimental resources and improve experimental accuracy and reliability. PMID:24385871

  13. 21. STATION 70.5 OF MST, WEST SIDE. AIRCONDITIONING DUCT AT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. STATION 70.5 OF MST, WEST SIDE. AIR-CONDITIONING DUCT AT TOP; POWER BOX ON RIGHT; WINCH ON LEFT. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 East, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  14. Dark Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cembranos, J. A. R.; Dobado, A.; Maroto, A. L.

    Extra-dimensional theories contain additional degrees of freedom related to the geometry of the extra space which can be interpreted as new particles. Such theories allow to reformulate most of the fundamental problems of physics from a completely different point of view. In this essay, we concentrate on the brane fluctuations which are present in brane-worlds, and how such oscillations of the own space-time geometry along curved extra dimensions can help to resolve the Universe missing mass problem. The energy scales involved in these models are low compared to the Planck scale, and this means that some of the brane fluctuations distinctive signals could be detected in future colliders and in direct or indirect dark matter searches.

  15. Squaring the Circle: Geometric Skewness and Symmetry Breaking for Passive Scalar Transport in Ducts and Pipes.

    PubMed

    Aminian, Manuchehr; Bernardi, Francesca; Camassa, Roberto; McLaughlin, Richard M

    2015-10-01

    We study the role geometry plays in the emergence of asymmetries in diffusing passive scalars advected by pressure-driven flows in ducts and pipes of different aspect ratios. We uncover nonintuitive, multi-time-scale behavior gauged by a new statistic, which we term "geometric skewness" S^{G}, which measures instantaneously forming asymmetries at short times due to flow geometry. This signature distinguishes elliptical pipes of any aspect ratio, for which S^{G}=0, from rectangular ducts whose S^{G} is generically nonzero, and, interestingly, shows that a special duct of aspect ratio ≈0.53335 behaves like a circular pipe as its geometric skewness vanishes. Using a combination of exact solutions, novel short-time asymptotics, and Monte Carlo simulations, we establish the relevant time scales for plateaus and extrema in the evolution of the skewness and kurtosis for our class of geometries. For ducts limiting to channel geometries, we present new exact, single-series formulas for the first four moments on slices used to benchmark Monte Carlo simulations. PMID:26550727

  16. Squaring the Circle: Geometric Skewness and Symmetry Breaking for Passive Scalar Transport in Ducts and Pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aminian, Manuchehr; Bernardi, Francesca; Camassa, Roberto; McLaughlin, Richard M.

    2015-10-01

    We study the role geometry plays in the emergence of asymmetries in diffusing passive scalars advected by pressure-driven flows in ducts and pipes of different aspect ratios. We uncover nonintuitive, multi-time-scale behavior gauged by a new statistic, which we term "geometric skewness" SG, which measures instantaneously forming asymmetries at short times due to flow geometry. This signature distinguishes elliptical pipes of any aspect ratio, for which SG=0 , from rectangular ducts whose SG is generically nonzero, and, interestingly, shows that a special duct of aspect ratio ≈0.533 35 behaves like a circular pipe as its geometric skewness vanishes. Using a combination of exact solutions, novel short-time asymptotics, and Monte Carlo simulations, we establish the relevant time scales for plateaus and extrema in the evolution of the skewness and kurtosis for our class of geometries. For ducts limiting to channel geometries, we present new exact, single-series formulas for the first four moments on slices used to benchmark Monte Carlo simulations.

  17. Designing insulation for cryogenic ducts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Love, C. C.

    1984-03-01

    It is pointed out that the great temperature difference between the outside of a cryogenic duct and the liquified gas it carries can cause a high heat input unless blocked by a high thermal resistance. High thermal resistance for lines needing maximum insulation is provided by metal vacuum jackets. Low-density foam is satisfactory in cases in which higher heat input can be tolerated. Attention is given to the heat transfer through a duct vacuum jacket, the calculation of heat input and the exterior surface's steady-state temperature for various thicknesses of insulation, the calculation of the heat transfer through gimbal jackets, and design specifications regarding the allowable pressure rise in the jacket's annular space.

  18. Tear-ducts in wine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, John W. M.

    1999-11-01

    We examine the radial spoke pattern evident in the meniscus region in glasses of strong alcoholic beverages exhibiting the `tears-in-wine' phenomenon. We demonstrate that the pattern results from ridge-like elevations of the free surface which are supported by evaporatively-driven Marangoni convection in the meniscus region. Vortices associated with the convective motions are aligned in the radial direction by the surface tension gradient responsible for the generation of tears. The radial flow is focussed into the ridges, which thus serve as the principal conduits of fluid for the tears; consequently, we refer to the ridges as `tear-ducts'. The phenomenon is examined experimentally, and a numerical model of evaporatively-driven Marangoni convection is developed which reproduces the salient features of the tear-duct phenomenon.

  19. HAARP-Induced Ionospheric Ducts

    SciTech Connect

    Milikh, Gennady; Vartanyan, Aram

    2011-01-04

    It is well known that strong electron heating by a powerful HF-facility can lead to the formation of electron and ion density perturbations that stretch along the magnetic field line. Those density perturbations can serve as ducts for ELF waves, both of natural and artificial origin. This paper presents observations of the plasma density perturbations caused by the HF-heating of the ionosphere by the HAARP facility. The low orbit satellite DEMETER was used as a diagnostic tool to measure the electron and ion temperature and density along the satellite orbit overflying close to the magnetic zenith of the HF-heater. Those observations will be then checked against the theoretical model of duct formation due to HF-heating of the ionosphere. The model is based on the modified SAMI2 code, and is validated by comparison with well documented experiments.

  20. Small duct primary sclerosing cholangitis without inflammatory bowel disease is genetically different from large duct disease

    PubMed Central

    Næss, Sigrid; Björnsson, Einar; Anmarkrud, Jarl A.; Al Mamari, Said; Juran, Brian D.; Lazaridis, Konstantinos N.; Chapman, Roger; Bergquist, Annika; Melum, Espen; Marsh, Steven G. E.; Schrumpf, Erik; Lie, Benedicte A.; Boberg, Kirsten Muri; Karlsen, Tom H.; Hov, Johannes R.

    2014-01-01

    Background & aims Small duct primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is phenotypically a mild version of large duct PSC, but it is unknown whether these phenotypes share aetiology. We aimed to characterize their relationship by investigating genetic associations in the HLA complex, which represent the strongest genetic risk factors in large duct PSC. Methods Four classical HLA loci (HLA-A, HLA-B, HLA-C, HLA-DRB1) were genotyped in 87 small duct PSC patients, 485 large duct PSC patients and 1117 controls across three geographical regions. Results HLA-DRB1*13:01 (OR=2.0, 95% CI 1.2–3.4, P=0.01) and HLA-B*08 (OR=1.6, 95% CI 1.1–2.4, P=0.02) were significantly associated with small duct PSC compared with healthy controls. Based on the observed frequency of HLA-B*08 in small duct PSC, the strongest risk factor in large duct PSC, an estimated 32% (95% CI 4%–65%) of this population can be hypothesized to represent early stages or mild variants of large duct PSC. This subgroup may be constituted by small duct PSC patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), which greatly resembled large duct PSC in its HLA association. In contrast, small duct PSC without IBD was only associated with HLA-DRB1*13:01(P=0.03) and was otherwise distinctly dissimilar from large duct PSC. Conclusions Small duct PSC with IBD resembles large duct PSC in its HLA association and may represent early stages or mild variants of large duct disease. Different HLA associations in small duct PSC without IBD could indicate that this subgroup is a different entity. HLA-DRB1*13:01 may represent a specific risk factor for inflammatory bile duct disease. PMID:24517468

  1. SpaceX Dragon Air Circulation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hernandez, Brenda; Piatrovich, Siarhei; Prina, Mauro

    2011-01-01

    The Dragon capsule is a reusable vehicle being developed by Space Exploration Technologies (SpaceX) that will provide commercial cargo transportation to the International Space Station (ISS). Dragon is designed to be a habitable module while it is berthed to ISS. As such, the Dragon Environmental Control System (ECS) consists of pressure control and pressure equalization, air sampling, fire detection, illumination, and an air circulation system. The air circulation system prevents pockets of stagnant air in Dragon that can be hazardous to the ISS crew. In addition, through the inter-module duct, the air circulation system provides fresh air from ISS into Dragon. To utilize the maximum volume of Dragon for cargo packaging, the Dragon ECS air circulation system is designed around cargo rack optimization. At the same time, the air circulation system is designed to meet the National Aeronautics Space Administration (NASA) inter-module and intra-module ventilation requirements and acoustic requirements. A flight like configuration of the Dragon capsule including the air circulation system was recently assembled for testing to assess the design for inter-module and intra-module ventilation and acoustics. The testing included the Dragon capsule, and flight configuration in the pressure section with cargo racks, lockers, all of the air circulation components, and acoustic treatment. The air circulation test was also used to verify the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model of the Dragon capsule. The CFD model included the same Dragon internal geometry that was assembled for the test. This paper will describe the Dragon air circulation system design which has been verified by testing the system and with CFD analysis.

  2. Laser Microdissection of the Alveolar Duct Enables Single-Cell Genomic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Robert D.; Ysasi, Alexandra B.; Belle, Janeil M.; Wagner, Willi L.; Konerding, Moritz A.; Blainey, Paul C.; Pyne, Saumyadipta; Mentzer, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    Complex tissues such as the lung are composed of structural hierarchies such as alveoli, alveolar ducts, and lobules. Some structural units, such as the alveolar duct, appear to participate in tissue repair as well as the development of bronchioalveolar carcinoma. Here, we demonstrate an approach to conduct laser microdissection of the lung alveolar duct for single-cell PCR analysis. Our approach involved three steps. (1) The initial preparation used mechanical sectioning of the lung tissue with sufficient thickness to encompass the structure of interest. In the case of the alveolar duct, the precision-cut lung slices were 200 μm thick; the slices were processed using near-physiologic conditions to preserve the state of viable cells. (2) The lung slices were examined by transmission light microscopy to target the alveolar duct. The air-filled lung was sufficiently accessible by light microscopy that counterstains or fluorescent labels were unnecessary to identify the alveolar duct. (3) The enzymatic and microfluidic isolation of single cells allowed for the harvest of as few as several thousand cells for PCR analysis. Microfluidics based arrays were used to measure the expression of selected marker genes in individual cells to characterize different cell populations. Preliminary work suggests the unique value of this approach to understand the intra- and intercellular interactions within the regenerating alveolar duct. PMID:25309876

  3. Experimental Aeroheating Study of Mid-L/D Entry Vehicle Geometries: NASA LaRC 20-Inch Mach 6 Air Tunnel Test 6966

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollis, Brian R.; Hollingsworth, Kevin E.

    2014-01-01

    Aeroheating data on mid lift-to-drag ratio entry vehicle configurations has been obtained through hypersonic wind tunnel testing. Vehicles of this class have been proposed for high-mass Mars missions, such as sample return and crewed exploration, for which the conventional sphere-cone entry vehicle geometries of previous Mars missions are insufficient. Several configurations were investigated, including elliptically-blunted cylinders with both circular and elliptical cross sections, biconic geometries based on launch vehicle dual-use shrouds, and parametrically-optimized analytic geometries. Testing was conducted at Mach 6 over a range of Reynolds numbers sufficient to generate laminar, transitional, and turbulent flow. Global aeroheating data were obtained using phosphor thermography. Both stream-wise and cross-flow transition occured on different configurations. Comparisons were made with laminar and turbulent computational predictions generated with an algebraic turbulence model. Predictions were generally in good agreement in regions of laminar or fully-turbulent flow; however for transitional cases, the lack of a transition onset prediction capability produced less accurate comparisons. The data obtained in this study are intended to be used for prelimary mission design studies and the development and validation of computational methods.

  4. Measure Guideline: Optimizing the Configuration of Flexible Duct Junction Boxes

    SciTech Connect

    Beach, R.; Burdick, A.

    2014-03-01

    This measure guideline offers additional recommendations to heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system designers for optimizing flexible duct, constant-volume HVAC systems using junction boxes within Air Conditioning Contractors of America (ACCA) Manual D guidance. IBACOS used computational fluid dynamics software to explore and develop guidance to better control the airflow effects of factors that may impact pressure losses within junction boxes among various design configurations. These recommendations can help to ensure that a system aligns more closely with the design and the occupants' comfort expectations. Specifically, the recommendations described herein show how to configure a rectangular box with four outlets, a triangular box with three outlets, metal wyes with two outlets, and multiple configurations for more than four outlets. Designers of HVAC systems, contractors who are fabricating junction boxes on site, and anyone using the ACCA Manual D process for sizing duct runs will find this measure guideline invaluable for more accurately minimizing pressure losses when using junction boxes with flexible ducts.

  5. Theoretical models for duct acoustic propagation and radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eversman, Walter

    1991-01-01

    The development of computational methods in acoustics has led to the introduction of analysis and design procedures which model the turbofan inlet as a coupled system, simultaneously modeling propagation and radiation in the presence of realistic internal and external flows. Such models are generally large, require substantial computer speed and capacity, and can be expected to be used in the final design stages, with the simpler models being used in the early design iterations. Emphasis is given to practical modeling methods that have been applied to the acoustical design problem in turbofan engines. The mathematical model is established and the simplest case of propagation in a duct with hard walls is solved to introduce concepts and terminologies. An extensive overview is given of methods for the calculation of attenuation in uniform ducts with uniform flow and with shear flow. Subsequent sections deal with numerical techniques which provide an integrated representation of duct propagation and near- and far-field radiation for realistic geometries and flight conditions.

  6. Instability waves in supersonic jets confined in non-circular ducts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viswanathan, Krishnamurthy; Morris, Philip J.; Chen, G.

    1992-01-01

    The instability of supersonic jets confined in circular and non-circular ducts is investigated both analytically and numerically. A technique based on the boundary element method is developed to study jets confined in ducts of non-circular geometry. It is shown that the presence of an outer wall introduces additional instability modes for the circular outer duct case. A highly supersonic unconfined jet possesses many modes of instability. These include the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability and supersonic instabilities. The modifications of these instabilities by a coflowing stream and an outer wall are examined. It is shown that the presence of an outer wall alters the instability modes of the jet. For the case of a circular jet in a circular duct, both the vortex sheet model and a model that includes the effect of finite shear layer thickness are considered. The results of these calculations are compared with those for unconfined supersonic jets with external flow. Finally, the effects of changes in the duct geometry on the instability modes are examined.

  7. Refraction of acoustic duct waveguide modes by exhaust jets.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mani, R.

    1973-01-01

    The refraction of acoustic duct waveguide modes emitted from the open end of a semiinfinite rectangular duct by a jet-like exhaust flow is studied theoretically. The problem is formulated as a Wiener-Hopf problem and is ultimately solved by an approximate method due to Carrier and Koiter. Continuity of transverse acoustic particle displacement and of acoustic pressure is assumed at the jet/still-air interface. The solution exhibits several features of the acoustics of moving media such as a source convection effect, zones of relative silence, and simple refraction. Plots of far-field directivity patterns are presented for several cases and show refraction effects to be important even at modest exhaust Mach numbers of order 0.3. Only subsonic exhaust Mach numbers are considered.

  8. LABORATORY EVALUATION OF THE DELTA Q TEST FOR DUCT LEAKAGE

    SciTech Connect

    ANDREWS,J.W.

    2003-05-01

    Using a residential-size duct system in a controlled laboratory setting, the repeatability and accuracy of the Delta Q test for air leakage in residential duct systems have been measured. More than 100 Delta Q tests were performed. These were compared with results using fan pressurization and also with results of a procedure (Delta Q Plus) that uses leakage hole-size information to select the leakage pressures to be used in the Delta Q algorithm. The average error in supply or return leakage for the fan-pressurization test was 6.4% of system fan flow. For the Delta Q test it was 3.4% of fan flow, while for Delta Q Plus it was 1.9% of fan flow.

  9. Duct wall impedance control as an advanced concept for acoustic impression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, P. D.; Tester, B. J.

    1975-01-01

    Models and tests on an acoustic duct liner system which has the property of controlled-variable acoustic impedance are described. This is achieved by a novel concept which uses the effect of steady air flow through a multi-layer, locally reacting, resonant-cavity absorber. The scope of this work was limited to a 'proof of concept.' The test of the concept was implemented by means of a small-scale, square-section flow duct facility designed specifically for acoustic measurements, with one side of the duct acoustically lined. The test liners were designed with the aid of previously established duct acoustic theory and a semi-empirical impedance model of the liner system. Over the limited range tested, the liner behaved primarily as predicted, exhibiting significant changes in resistance and reactance, thus providing the necessary concept validation.

  10. Configuration Effects on Acoustic Performance of a Duct Liner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerhold, Carl H.; Brown, Martha C.; Jones, Michael G.; Nark, Douglas; Howerton, Brian M.

    2008-01-01

    Continued success in aircraft engine noise reduction necessitates ever more complete understanding of the effect that flow path geometry has on sound propagation in the engine. The Curved Duct Test Rig (CDTR) has been developed at NASA Langley Research Center to investigate sound propagation through a duct of comparable size (approximately the gap of GE90) and physical characteristics to the aft bypass duct of typical aircraft engines. The liner test section is designed to mimic the outer/inner walls of an engine exhaust bypass duct that has been unrolled circumferentially. Experiments to investigate the effect of curvature along the flow path on the acoustic performance of a test liner are performed in the CDTR and reported in this paper. Flow paths investigated include both straight and curved with offsets from the inlet to the discharge plane of and 1 duct width, respectively. The test liners are installed on the side walls of the liner test section. The liner samples are perforate over honeycomb core, which design is typical of liners installed in aircraft nacelles. In addition to fully treated side walls, combinations of treated and acoustically rigid walls are investigated. While curvature in the hard wall duct is found not to reduce the incident sound significantly, it does cause mode scattering. It is found that asymmetry of liner treatment causes scattering of the incident mode into less attenuated modes, which degrades the overall liner attenuation. It is also found that symmetry of liner treatment enhances liner performance by eliminating scattering into less attenuated modes. Comparisons of measured liner attenuation with numerical results predicted by an analytic model based on the parabolic approximation (CDUCT-LaRC) have also been made and are reported in this paper. The effect of curvature in the rigid wall configuration estimated by CDUCT-LaRC is similar to the observed results, and the mode scattering seen in the measurements also occurs in the

  11. Parotid salivary duct stenosis following caudal maxillectomy.

    PubMed

    Mestrinho, Lisa A; Faísca, Pedro B; Niza, Maria M R E

    2014-01-01

    Parotid salivary duct dilation was diagnosed in a 9-year-old male dog. The dog had undergone caudal maxillectomy on the ipsilateral side 2-years prior to presentation. Treatment consisted of parotid salivary duct excision and superficial parotidectomy that lead to the resolution of clinical signs. Transient facial neuropraxia was observed immediately after surgery and resolved spontaneously after 2-weeks. Parotid salivary duct dilation should be considered as a chronic postoperative complication following caudal maxillectomy. PMID:24902412

  12. Cold-air study of the effect on turbine stator blade aerodynamic performance of coolant ejection from various trailing-edge slot geometries. 1: Experimental results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prust, H. W., Jr.; Bartlett, W. M.

    1974-01-01

    Trailing-edge slot configurations were investigated in a two-dimensional cascade of turbine stator blades. The trailing-edge slots were incorporated into blades with round trailing edges. The five blade configurations investigated included blades with two different trailing-edge thicknesses and four different slot widths. The results of the investigation showed that there was, in general, a significant increase in primary-air efficiency due to the coolant flow, the increase varying with slot configuration. For the five configurations tested, the average percent change in primary-air efficiency per percent coolant flow varied almost linearly from zero to about 1.4 percent over a range of coolant- to primary-air exit-velocity ratios between 0 and 1.2. However, for different configurations there was considerable deviation from the average values in the lower range of exit velocity ratios.

  13. The aerodynamic characteristics of vortex ingestion for the F/A-18 inlet duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Bernhard H.

    1991-01-01

    A Reduced Navier-Stokes (RNS) solution technique was successfully combined with the concept of partitioned geometry and mesh generation to form a very efficient 3D RNS code aimed at the analysis-design engineering environment. Partitioned geometry and mesh generation is a pre-processor to augment existing geometry and grid generation programs which allows the solver to (1) recluster an existing gridlife mesh lattice, and (2) perturb an existing gridfile definition to alter the cross-sectional shape and inlet duct centerline distribution without returning to the external geometry and grid generator. The present results provide a quantitative validation of the initial value space marching 3D RNS procedure and demonstrates accurate predictions of the engine face flow field, with a separation present in the inlet duct as well as when vortex generators are installed to supress flow separation. The present results also demonstrate the ability of the 3D RNS procedure to analyze the flow physics associated with vortex ingestion in general geometry ducts such as the F/A-18 inlet. At the conditions investigated, these interactions are basically inviscid like, i.e., the dominant aerodynamic characteristics have their origin in inviscid flow theory.

  14. Lightweight Forms for Epoxy/Aramid Ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mix, E. W.; Anderson, A. N.; Bedford, Donald L., Sr.

    1986-01-01

    Aluminum mandrels easy to remove. Lightweight aluminum mandrel for shaping epoxy/aramid ducts simplifies and speeds production. In new process, glass-reinforced epoxy/aramid cloth wrapped on aluminum mandrel. Stainless-steel flanges and other hardware fitted on duct and held by simple tooling. Entire assembly placed in oven to cure epoxy. After curing, assembly placed in alkaline bath dissolves aluminum mandrel in about 4 hours. Epoxy/aramid shell ready for use as duct. Aluminum mandrel used to make ducts of various inside diameters up to 6 in. Standard aluminum forms used. Conventional tube-bending equipment produces requisite curves in mandrels.

  15. Traumatic injury of the thoracic duct.

    PubMed

    Guzman, A E; Rossi, L; Witte, C L; Smyth, S

    2002-03-01

    Injuries to the thoracic duct are infrequent but may become life-threatening when chylous leakage persists. This report describes 6 patients with such injuries in whom the leakage resolved spontaneously in one, was corrected using microsurgical lymphatic repair or lymphatic-venous anastomosis in two, successfully treated either by ligation of the thoracic duct or insertion of a peritoneovenous shunt in two, and was eventually controlled after bilateral pleurodesis and thoracic duct ligation by insertion of a peritoneo-venous shunt in one. Conventional lymphography is superior to lymphoscintigraphy and is usually required to document disruption of the thoracic duct. PMID:11939572

  16. Generator stator core vent duct spacer posts

    DOEpatents

    Griffith, John Wesley; Tong, Wei

    2003-06-24

    Generator stator cores are constructed by stacking many layers of magnetic laminations. Ventilation ducts may be inserted between these layers by inserting spacers into the core stack. The ventilation ducts allow for the passage of cooling gas through the core during operation. The spacers or spacer posts are positioned between groups of the magnetic laminations to define the ventilation ducts. The spacer posts are secured with longitudinal axes thereof substantially parallel to the core axis. With this structure, core tightness can be assured while maximizing ventilation duct cross section for gas flow and minimizing magnetic loss in the spacers.

  17. Extent of fungal growth on fiberglass duct liners with and without biocides under challenging environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Samimi, Behzad S; Ross, Kristen

    2003-03-01

    Eight brands of fiberglass duct liners, including three that contained biocides, were exposed to challenging environmental conditions that would promote fungal growth. Twenty-four rectangular sheet metal ducts in three groups of eight ducts per group were lined with the eight selected liners. Each group of ducts was exposed to one of the three test conditions within an environmental chamber for a period of 15 days. These conditions were a) 75 percent RH, b) 75 percent RH plus water spray, c) 75 percent RH plus dry nutrient, and d) 75 percent RH plus water plus nutrient. Viable spores of Aspergillus niger were aerosolized into each duct as seed. On the 16th day, air and surface samples for fungal spores were collected from inside ducts. The results of air sampling using N6 sampler and visual inspection indicated that two out of three biocide-containing liners, Permacote and Toughgard, inhibited fungal growth but only under condition A. The third biocide-containing liner, Aeroflex Plus, was effective even when it was wet (conditions A and B). All three biocide-containing liners failed to inhibit fungal growth under conditions C and D. Among the five other types of liners that did not contain biocides, ATCO Flex with a smooth Mylar coating was more preferable, exhibiting lower fungal activity during conditions A, B, and C. All liners failed under condition D when nutrient and water were added together. Surface sampling using adhesive tape failed to produce representative results, apparently due to rough/porous surface of duct liners. It was concluded that duct liners with biocide treatment could be less promoting to microbial growth under high humidity as long as their surfaces remain clean and water-free. A liner with an impermeable and smooth surface seems to be less subject to microbial growth under most conditions than biocide-containing liners having porous and/or rough surfaces. PMID:12573965

  18. Wastefree in-duct FGD

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, S. Jr.

    1995-12-31

    The first generation of easily-retrofitable duct-injection technologies experienced problems with modest performance, particulate non-compliance, and difficult waste disposal. A new sorbent concept, called Fluesorbent, has been developed specifically to address these problems. Based on a new lime sorbent material, the technology results in 80+% SO{sub 2} removal, net particulate reductions, and a valuable agricultural by-product instead of wastes. A 6,500 acfm, 2-MWe Fluesorbent pilot plant was recently constructed at Ohio Edison`s R.E. Burger station. This paper describes the technology and the Burger demonstration project.

  19. Three-dimensional compressible turbulent computations for a diffusing S-duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, C. F.; Bruns, J. E.; Harloff, G. J.; Debonis, J. R.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the capability of the computational fluid dynamics computer program PARC3D to model flow in a typical diffusing subsonic S-duct, with strong secondary flows. This evaluation is needed to provide confidence in the analysis of aircraft inlets, which have similar geometries. The performance predictions include total pressure profiles, static pressures, velocity profiles, boundary layer data, and skin friction data. Flow in the S-duct is subsonic, and the boundary layers are assumed to be turbulent. The results for both H and O grid solutions, are compared with existing test data.

  20. Numerical characterization of the hydrodynamics and thermal behavior of air flow in flexible air distribution system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharehdaghi, Samad; Moujaes, Samir

    2013-10-01

    Flexible duct air distribution systems are used in a large percentage of residential and small commercial buildings in the United States . Very few empirical or predictive data are available though to help provide the HVAC design engineer with reliable information . Moreover, because of the ducts flexibility, the shapes of these ducts offer a different set of operating fluid flow and thermal conditions from traditional smooth metal ducts. Hence, both the flow field and heat transfer through this kind of ducts are much more complex and merit to be analyzed from a numerical predictive approach. The aim of this research paper is to compute some of the hydrodynamic and heat transfer characteristics of the air flow inside these ducts over a range of Re numbers commonly used in the flow conditions of these air distribution systems. The information resulting from this CFD simulation, where a κ-ɛ turbulent model is used to predict the flow conditions, provide pressure drop and average convective heat transfer coefficients that exist in these ducts and was compared to previously found data. Circulation zones in the depressions of these ducts are found to exist which are suspected of influencing the pressured drop and heat transfer coefficients as compared to smooth ducts. The results show that fully developed conditions exist much earlier with regard to the inlet for both hydrodynamic and thermal entrance regions than what would be expected in smooth ducts under the same turbulent conditions.

  1. Optimization of the mechanical performance of a two-duct semicircular duct system--part 1: dynamics and duct dimensions.

    PubMed

    Muller, M; Verhagen, J H G

    2002-06-21

    The classical representation of the semicircular duct system consists of three separate duct circuits. The ducts are, however, in reality, hydrodynamically interconnected. Muller & Verhagen (1988a,b) derived equations for the mechanical behaviour of an interconnected system with three ducts (anterior, posterior and horizontal). An analytical solution of these equations would, however, be too complex to provide surveyable formulae. A system of two interconnected ducts avoids this complexity whilst keeping the essentials of the coupling of ducts intact. The solution of the equation of motion leads to expressions for time constants and maximal endolymph excursions which are functions of morphological parameters, viz. the ratios of radii (gamma) and lengths (lambda) of the common vestibular part (crus commune or utriculus) and the ducts. The system possesses two short time constants which are shown to have similar values. The maximum endolymph displacements in the two ducts after a steplike stimulus are the products of the respective initial velocities and combinations of time constants. The initial velocities depend strongly on the position of the labyrinth with respect to the excitating rotation vector. Measured data of gamma and lambda are compared with the theoretical results. For gamma, excellent agreement was found. lambda is treated elsewhere. PMID:12151258

  2. Air Cooling for High Temperature Power Electronics (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Waye, S.; Musselman, M.; King, C.

    2014-09-01

    Current emphasis on developing high-temperature power electronics, including wide-bandgap materials such as silicon carbide and gallium nitride, increases the opportunity for a completely air-cooled inverter at higher powers. This removes the liquid cooling system for the inverter, saving weight and volume on the liquid-to-air heat exchanger, coolant lines, pumps, and coolant, replacing them with just a fan and air supply ducting. We investigate the potential for an air-cooled heat exchanger from a component and systems-level approach to meet specific power and power density targets. A proposed baseline air-cooled heat exchanger design that does not meet those targets was optimized using a parametric computational fluid dynamics analysis, examining the effects of heat exchanger geometry and device location, fixing the device heat dissipation and maximum junction temperature. The CFD results were extrapolated to a full inverter, including casing, capacitor, bus bar, gate driver, and control board component weights and volumes. Surrogate ducting was tested to understand the pressure drop and subsequent system parasitic load. Geometries that met targets with acceptable loads on the system were down-selected for experimentation. Nine baseline configuration modules dissipated the target heat dissipation, but fell below specific power and power density targets. Six optimized configuration modules dissipated the target heat load, exceeding the specific power and power density targets. By maintaining the same 175 degrees C maximum junction temperature, an optimized heat exchanger design and higher device heat fluxes allowed a reduction in the number of modules required, increasing specific power and power density while still maintaining the inverter power.

  3. Measure Guideline: Sealing and Insulating of Ducts in Existing Homes

    SciTech Connect

    Aldrich, R.; Puttagunta, S.

    2011-12-01

    This document begins with a discussion on potential cost and performance benefits of duct sealing and insulating. It continues with a review of typical duct materials and components and the overall procedures for assessing and improving the duct system.

  4. What's New in Bile Duct Cancer Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topic Additional resources for bile duct cancer What’s new in bile duct cancer research and treatment? Bile ... is tumor blood vessels. Bile duct tumors need new blood vessels to grow beyond a certain size. ...

  5. Measure Guideline. Sealing and Insulating Ducts in Existing Homes

    SciTech Connect

    Aldrich, R.; Puttagunta, S.

    2011-12-01

    This document begins with a discussion on potential cost and performance benefits of duct sealing and insulating. It continues with a review of typical duct materials and components and the overall procedures for assessing and improving the duct system.

  6. Do We Know What Causes Bile Duct Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... duct cancer be prevented? Do we know what causes bile duct cancer? We don’t know the exact cause of ... to top » Guide Topics What Is Bile Duct Cancer? Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention Early Detection, Diagnosis, and ...

  7. Navier-Stokes analysis and experimental data comparison of compressible flow within ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harloff, G. J.; Reichert, B. A.; Sirbaugh, J. R.; Wellborn, S. R.

    1992-01-01

    Many aircraft employ ducts with centerline curvature or changing cross-sectional shape to join the engine with inlet and exhaust components. S-ducts convey air to the engine compressor from the intake and often decelerate the flow to achieve an acceptable Mach number at the engine compressor by increasing the cross-sectional area downstream. Circular-to-rectangular transition ducts are used on aircraft with rectangular exhaust nozzles to connect the engine and nozzle. To achieve maximum engine performance, the ducts should minimize flow total pressure loss and total pressure distortion at the duct exit. Changes in the curvature of the duct centerline or the duct cross-sectional shape give rise to streamline curvature which causes cross stream pressure gradients. Secondary flows can be caused by deflection of the transverse vorticity component of the boundary layer. This vortex tilting results in counter-rotating vortices. Additionally, the adverse streamwise pressure gradient caused by increasing cross-sectional area can lead to flow separation. Vortex pairs have been observed in the exit planes of both duct types. These vortices are due to secondary flows induced by pressure gradients resulting from streamline curvature. Regions of low total pressure are produced when the vortices convect boundary layer fluid into the main flow. The purpose of the present study is to predict the measured flow field in a diffusing S-duct and a circular-to-rectangular transition duct with a full Navier-Stokes computer program, PARC3D, and to compare the numerical predictions with new detailed experimental measurements. The work was undertaken to extend previous studies and to provide additional CFD validation data needed to help model flows with strong secondary flow and boundary layer separation. The S-duct computation extends the study of Smith et al, and Harloff et al, which concluded that the computation might be improved by using a finer grid and more advanced turbulence models

  8. Investigation in the 7-By-10 Foot Wind Tunnel of Ducts for Cooling Radiators Within an Airplane Wing, Special Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Thomas A.; Recant, Isidore G.

    1938-01-01

    An investigation was made in the NACA 7- by 10-foot wind tunnel of a large-chord wing model with a duct to house a simulated radiator suitable for a liquid-cooled engine. The duct was expanded to reduce the radiator losses, and the installation of the duct and radiator was made entirely within the wing to reduce form and interference drag. The tests were made using a two-dimensional flow set-up with a full-span duct and radiator. Section aerodynamic characteristics of the basic airfoil are given and also curves showing the characteristics of the various duct-radiator combinations. An expression for efficiency, the primary criterion of merit of any duct, and the effect of the several design parameters of the duct-radiator arrangement are discussed. The problem of throttling is considered and a discussion of the power required for cooling is included. It was found that radiators could be mounted in the wing and efficiently pass enough air for cooling with duct outlets located at any point from 0.25c to 0.70c from the wing leading edge on the upper surface. The duct-inlet position was found to be critical and, for maximum efficiency, had to be at the stagnation point of the airfoil and to change with flight attitude. The flow could be efficiently throttled only by a simultaneous variation of duct inlet and outlet sizes and of inlet position. It was desirable to round both inlet and outlet lips. With certain arrangements of duct, the power required for cooling at high speed was a very low percentage of the engine power.

  9. Salivary duct carcinoma of parotid gland.

    PubMed

    Kinnera, Vijay Sreedhar Babu; Mandyam, Kumaraswamy Reddy; Chowhan, Amit Kumar; Nandyala, Rukmangadha; Bobbidi, Venkata Phaneendra; Vutukuru, Venkatarami Reddy

    2009-07-01

    A 40-year old male presented with rapidly growing swelling in the right parotid region. Based on the fine needle aspiration cytology report of adenocarcinoma not otherwise specified, superficial parotidectomy was performed, which showed the features of salivary duct carcinoma by histopathological examination. The smears were reviewed to identify the potential pitfalls in the cytological diagnosis of salivary duct carcinoma. PMID:21887008

  10. Salivary duct carcinoma of parotid gland

    PubMed Central

    Kinnera, Vijay Sreedhar Babu; Mandyam, Kumaraswamy Reddy; Chowhan, Amit Kumar; Nandyala, Rukmangadha; Bobbidi, Venkata Phaneendra; Vutukuru, Venkatarami Reddy

    2009-01-01

    A 40-year old male presented with rapidly growing swelling in the right parotid region. Based on the fine needle aspiration cytology report of adenocarcinoma not otherwise specified, superficial parotidectomy was performed, which showed the features of salivary duct carcinoma by histopathological examination. The smears were reviewed to identify the potential pitfalls in the cytological diagnosis of salivary duct carcinoma. PMID:21887008

  11. Double-duct liquid metal magnetohydrodynamic engine

    DOEpatents

    Haaland, Carsten M.

    1995-01-01

    An internal combustion, liquid metal (LM) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) engine and an alternating current (AC) magnetohydrodynamic generator, are used in combination to provide useful AC electric energy output. The engine design has-four pistons and a double duct configuration, with each duct containing sodium potassium liquid metal confined between free pistons located at either end of the duct. The liquid metal is forced to flow back and forth in the duct by the movement of the pistons, which are alternatively driven by an internal combustion process. In the MHD generator, the two LM-MHD ducts pass in close proximity through a Hartmann duct with output transformer. AC power is produced by operating the engine with the liquid metal in the two generator ducts always flowing in counter directions. The amount of liquid metal maintained in the ducts may be varied. This provides a variable stroke length for the pistons. The engine/generator provides variable AC power at variable frequencies that correspond to the power demands of the vehicular propulsion. Also the engine should maintain nearly constant efficiency throughout the range of power usage. Automobiles and trucks could be powered by the invention, with no transmission or power converter devices being required.

  12. Double-duct liquid metal magnetohydrodynamic engine

    DOEpatents

    Haaland, Carsten M.

    1997-01-01

    An internal combustion, liquid metal (LM) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) engine and an alternating current (AC) magnetohydrodynamic generator, are used in combination to provide useful AC electric energy output. The engine design has four pistons and a double duct configuration, with each duct containing sodium potassium liquid metal confined between free pistons located at either end of the duct. The liquid metal is forced to flow back and forth in the duct by the movement of the pistons, which are alternatively driven by an internal combustion process. In the MHD generator, the two LM-MHD ducts pass in close proximity through a Hartmann duct with output transformer. AC power is produced by operating the engine with the liquid metal in the two generator ducts always flowing in counter directions. The amount of liquid metal maintained in the ducts may be varied. This provides a variable stroke length for the pistons. The engine/generator provides variable AC power at variable frequencies that correspond to the power demands of the vehicular propulsion. Also the engine should maintain nearly constant efficiency throughout the range of power usage. Automobiles and trucks could be powered by the invention, with no transmission or power converter devices being required.

  13. Tear-Duct Obstruction and Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... could block a duct, but reconstructive surgery right after the accident or injury may prevent this. Signs of Blocked Tear Ducts ... kids. It may take up to a week after surgery before symptoms improve. Your doctor will give you antibiotic ointment or drops along with ... Injuries Pinkeye (Conjunctivitis) Retinopathy of Prematurity Preparing Your Child ...

  14. Predicting vibrational failure of flexible ducting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, R. H.

    1971-01-01

    Technique applies to liquid or gas transfer through flexible ducting and proves valuable in high velocity fluid flow cases. Fluid mechanism responsible for free bellows vibrational excitation also causes flexible hose oscillation. Static pressure stress influences flexible ducting fatigue life and is considered separately.

  15. Rocket-in-a-Duct Performance Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Steven J.; Reed, Brian D.

    1999-01-01

    An axisymmetric, 110 N class, rocket configured with a free expansion between the rocket nozzle and a surrounding duct was tested in an altitude simulation facility. The propellants were gaseous hydrogen and gaseous oxygen and the hardware consisted of a heat sink type copper rocket firing through copper ducts of various diameters and lengths. A secondary flow of nitrogen was introduced at the blind end of the duct to mix with the primary rocket mass flow in the duct. This flow was in the range of 0 to 10% of the primary massflow and its effect on nozzle performance was measured. The random measurement errors on thrust and massflow were within +/-1%. One dimensional equilibrium calculations were used to establish the possible theoretical performance of these rocket-in-a-duct nozzles. Although the scale of these tests was small, they simulated the relevant flow expansion physics at a modest experimental cost. Test results indicated that lower performance was obtained at higher free expansion area ratios and longer ducts, while, higher performance was obtained with the addition of secondary flow. There was a discernable peak in specific impulse efficiency at 4% secondary flow. The small scale of these tests resulted in low performance efficiencies, but prior numerical modeling of larger rocket-in-a-duct engines predicted performance that was comparable to that of optimized rocket nozzles. This remains to be proven in large-scale, rocket-in-a-duct tests.

  16. Fabrication process of a high temperature polymer matrix engine duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pratt, R. D.; Wilson, A. J.

    1985-01-01

    The process that was used in the molding of an advanced composite outer by-pass duct planned for the F404 engine is discussed. This duct was developed as a potential replacement for the existing titanium duct in order to reduce both the weight and cost of the duct. The composite duct is now going into the manufacturing technology portion of the program. The duct is fabricated using graphite cloth impregnated with the PMR-15 matrix system.

  17. Film condensation in a horizontal rectangular duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Qing; Suryanarayana, N. V.

    1992-01-01

    Condensation heat transfer in an annular flow regime with and without interfacial waves was experimentally investigated. The study included measurements of heat transfer rate with condensation of vapor flowing inside a horizontal rectangular duct and experiments on the initiation of interfacial waves in condensation, and adiabatic air-liquid flow. An analytical model for the condensation was developed to predict condensate film thickness and heat transfer coefficients. Some conclusions drawn from the study are that the condensate film thickness was very thin (less than 0.6 mm). The average heat transfer coefficient increased with increasing the inlet vapor velocity. The local heat transfer coefficient decreased with the axial distance of the condensing surface, with the largest change at the leading edge of the test section. The interfacial shear stress, which consisted of the momentum shear stress and the adiabatic shear stress, appeared to have a significant effect on the heat transfer coefficients. In the experiment, the condensate flow along the condensing surface experienced a smooth flow, a two-dimensional wavy flow, and a three-dimensional wavy flow. In the condensation experiment, the local wave length decreased with the axial distance of the condensing surface and the average wave length decreased with increasing inlet vapor velocity, while the wave speed increased with increasing vapor velocity. The heat transfer measurements are reliable. And, the ultrasonic technique was effective for measuring the condensate film thickness when the surface was smooth or had waves of small amplitude.

  18. Salivary Duct Cyst: Histo-pathologic Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Vinayachandran, Divya; Sankarapandian, Sathasivasubramanian

    2013-01-01

    Non-neoplastic cysts of the salivary glands are uncommon and represent 2-5% of all salivary gland lesions. They are mainly mucoceles or salivary duct cysts. Unlike a mucocele, which is surrounded by granulation tissue, the salivary duct cyst is lined by epithelium. Salivary duct cysts are more common in the oral minor salivary glands and rarely occur in the major salivary glands, show a marked predilection for the superficial lobe of the parotid, and represent 10% of all salivary gland cysts. Neoplastic differentiation of the lining of the salivary duct cyst has been reported. We report a case of a salivary duct cyst of the left parotid gland, with a review of radiographic and histopathologic features. PMID:23878772

  19. Salivary Duct Cyst: Histo-pathologic Correlation.

    PubMed

    Vinayachandran, Divya; Sankarapandian, Sathasivasubramanian

    2013-01-01

    Non-neoplastic cysts of the salivary glands are uncommon and represent 2-5% of all salivary gland lesions. They are mainly mucoceles or salivary duct cysts. Unlike a mucocele, which is surrounded by granulation tissue, the salivary duct cyst is lined by epithelium. Salivary duct cysts are more common in the oral minor salivary glands and rarely occur in the major salivary glands, show a marked predilection for the superficial lobe of the parotid, and represent 10% of all salivary gland cysts. Neoplastic differentiation of the lining of the salivary duct cyst has been reported. We report a case of a salivary duct cyst of the left parotid gland, with a review of radiographic and histopathologic features. PMID:23878772

  20. Laparoscopic Anatomical Left Hepatectomy for Intrahepatic Bile Duct Papillary Mucinous Cystadenoma With Intraoperative Vascular Repair: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongyu; Peng, Bing

    2016-02-01

    Laparoscopic hepatectomy has been widely performed for patients with benign liver tumors such as hepatic hemangioma, focal nodular hyperplasia, and hepatic adenoma.We here present a case of a 78-year-old female patient who was initially admitted to our department due to fever and jaundice for 2 days. Abdominal enhanced computed tomography scan showed intrahepatic and extrahepatic bile duct dilatation with liver atrophy of left lobe. Unenhanced nodules were seen within the left intrahepatic bile duct. Ultrasonography revealed intrahepatic and extrahepatic bile duct dilatation with viscous fluid, tubular adenoma? Tumor markers including alpha fetoprotein, carcinoembryonic antigen, and CA19-9 were normal. Preoperative total bilirubin was 64.4 mmol/L.Laparoscopic anatomical left hepatectomy and common bile duct exploration were performed. In this procedure, a lot of mucus was seen within the common bile duct and left intrahepatic bile duct. No bile duct stones were found after the exploration. During parenchymal transection, intraoperative hemorrhage from middle hepatic vein was met, and we repaired middle hepatic vein by laparoscopic suture (5-0 Prolene). No air embolism and hypotension were met. This operation took 232 minutes and estimated blood loss was 300 mL. Postoperative ultrasonography indicated a normal outflow of middle hepatic vein and there was no stricture. The patient's postoperative course was uneventful and was discharged on the 6th day after surgery. Postoperative pathological diagnosis was intrahepatic bile duct papillary mucinous cystadenoma. PMID:26871845

  1. Acoustic transmission matrix of a variable area duct or nozzle carrying a compressible subsonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, J. H.

    1980-01-01

    The differential equations governing the propagation of sound in a variable area duct or nozzle carrying a one-dimensional subsonic compressible fluid flow are derived and put in state variable form using acoustic pressure and particle velocity as the state variables. The duct or nozzle is divided into a number of regions. The region size is selected so that in each region the Mach number can be assumed constant and the area variation can be approximated by an exponential area variation. Consequently, the state variable equation in each region has constant coefficients. The transmission matrix for each region is obtained by solving the constant coefficient acoustic state variable differential equation. The transmission matrix for the duct or nozzle is the product of the individual transmission matrices of each region. Solutions are presented for several geometries with and without mean flow.

  2. Neutron streaming through shield ducts using a discrete ordinates/Monte Carlo method

    SciTech Connect

    Urban, W.T.; Baker, R.S.

    1993-08-18

    A common problem in shield design is determining the neutron flux that streams through ducts in shields and also that penetrates the shield after having traveled partway down the duct. Obviously the determination of the neutrons that stream down the duct can be computed in a straightforward manner using Monte Carlo techniques. On the other hand those neutrons that must penetrate a significant portion of the shield are more easily handled using discrete ordinates methods. A hybrid discrete ordinates/Monte Carlo cods, TWODANT/MC, which is an extension of the existing discrete ordinates code TWODANT, has been developed at Los Alamos to allow the efficient, accurate treatment of both streaming and deep penetration problems in a single calculation. In this paper we provide examples of the application of TWODANT/MC to typical geometries that are encountered in shield design and compare the results with those obtained using the Los Alamos Monte Carlo code MCNP{sup 3}.

  3. Accretion onto Compact Objects Viewed as a Flow in Converging-Diverging Ducts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarti, K.; Majumdar, M. M.; Chakrabarti, Sandip K.

    Black hole accretion is necessarily transonic and the number of physical sonic points depends on the angular momentum of the flow. We study the properties of such a flow by recasting this idea into an engineering problem in which a flow has a subsonic to supersonic transition when it passes through a de Laval nozzle, i.e. a converging and diverging duct in a flat geometry in the presence of sufficient end pressure difference. Particularly interesting is the case of the centrifugal pressure supported standing shock formation inside an accretion flow, because the flow passes through at least two saddle type sonic points, one before and one after the shock. In this case, the duct itself has two minima and a maximum. We study the properties of such a duct as a function of the inflow parameters and classify all possible types of the flow through this composite nozzle.

  4. Acoustic transmission matrix of a variable area duct or nozzle carrying a compressible subsonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, J. H.

    1980-01-01

    The differential equations governing the propagation of sound in a variable area duct or nozzle carrying a one dimensional subsonic compressible fluid flow are derived and put in state variable form using acoustic pressure and particle velocity as the state variables. The duct or nozzle is divided into a number of regions. The region size is selected so that in each region the Mach number can be assumed constant and the area variation can be approximated by an exponential area variation. Consequently, the state variable equation in each region has constant coefficients. The transmission matrix for each region is obtained by solving the constant coefficient acoustic state variable differential equation. The transmission matrix for the duct or nozzle is the product of the individual transmission matrices of each region. Solutions are presented for several geometries with and without mean flow.

  5. Electromagnetic propagation in PEC and absorbing curved S-ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, Kenneth J.

    1988-01-01

    A finite-element Galerkin formulation has been developed to study transverse magnetic (TM) wave propagation in 2-D S-curved ducts with both perfectly conducting and absorbing walls. The reflection and transmission at the entrances and the exits of the curved ducts are determined by coupling the finite-element solutions in the curved ducts to the eigenfunctions of an infinite, uniform, perfectly conducting duct. Example solutions are presented for a double mitred and S-ducts of various lengths. The length of the S-duct is found to significantly effect the reflective characteristics of the duct. Also, the effect of curvature on an absorbing duct is illustrated.

  6. MINIMIZING DECOMPOSITION OF VAPORIZED HYDROGEN PEROXIDE IN CLEAN GALVANIZED STEEL DUCTING: IMPLICATIONS FOR BIOLOGICAL DECONTAMINATION

    SciTech Connect

    Verce, M F; Jayaraman, B; Ford, T D; Fisher, S E; Gadgil, A J; Carlsen, T M

    2007-09-07

    This work examined the behavior of vaporous hydrogen peroxide (VHP) in clean, room-scale galvanized steel (GS) and polyvinylchloride-coated steel air ducts, to understand how it might be used to decontaminate larger ventilation systems. VHP injected into the GS duct decreased in concentration along the length of the duct, whereas VHP concentrations in the polyvinylchloride coated duct remained essentially constant, suggesting that VHP decomposed at the GS surface. However, decomposition was reduced at lower temperatures ({approx} 22 C) and higher flow rates ({approx} 80 actual cubic meter per hour). A computational fluid dynamics model incorporating reactive transport was used to estimate surface VHP concentrations where contamination is likely to reside, and also showed how bends encourage VHP decomposition. Use of G. stearothermophilus indicators, in conjunction with model estimates, indicated that a concentration-contact time of {approx} 100 mg/L H{sub 2}O{sub 2}(g){center_dot}min was required to achieve a 6 log reduction of indicator spores in clean GS duct, at 30 C. When VHP is selected for building decontamination, this work suggests the most efficacious strategy may be to decontaminate GS ducting separately from the rest of the building, as opposed to a single decontamination event in which the ventilation system is used to distribute VHP throughout the entire building.

  7. Mixed convection heat and mass transfer in radially rotating rectangular ducts

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K.T.; Yan, W.M.

    1998-11-27

    Heat transfer in rotating ducts is encountered in many engineering applications, such as cooling of turbomachinery, gas turbines, and other rotating systems. The present work investigates mixed convection heat and mass transfer in the entrance region of radially rotating rectangular ducts with water film evaporation along the porous duct walls. Mechanisms of secondary vortex development in the ducts under various conditions are examined by a vorticity-velocity numerical method. Emphasis is placed on the rotation effects, including both Coriolis and centrifugal buoyancy forces, and the mass diffusion effect on the flow structure and heat transfer characteristics. Results are presented in particular for an air-water vapor system under various conditions. Predicted results show that the effects of liquid film evaporation along the porous duct walls on the mixed convection heat transfer are rather substantial. The magnitude of the evaporative latent heat transfer may be 10 times greater than that of sensible heat transfer. The predictions also demonstrate that the distributions of Nu, Sh{sub z}, and fRe are closely related to the emergence, disappearance, growth, and decay of the rotating-induced secondary vortices. Additionally, a higher Nu{sub z} is found for a rectangular duct with a larger aspect ratio ({gamma} = 2) due to the relatively stronger secondary flows.

  8. Field investigation of duct system performance in California light commercial buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Delp, W.W.; Matson, N.E.; Tschudy, E.

    1997-12-09

    This paper discusses field measurements of duct system performance in fifteen systems located in eight northern California buildings. Light commercial buildings, one- and two-story with package roof-top HVAC units, make up approximately 50% of the non-residential building stock in the U.S. Despite this fact little is known about the performance of these package roof-top units and their associated ductwork. These simple systems use similar duct materials and construction techniques as residential systems (which are known to be quite leaky). This paper discusses a study to characterize the buildings, quantify the duct leakage, and analyze the performance of the ductwork in these types of buildings. The study tested fifteen systems in eight different buildings located in northern California. All of these buildings had the ducts located in the cavity between the drop ceiling and the roof deck. In 50% of these buildings, this cavity was functionally outside the building`s air and thermal barriers. The effective leakage area of the ducts in this study was approximately 2.6 times that in residential buildings. This paper looks at the thermal analysis of the ducts, from the viewpoint of efficiency and thermal comfort. This includes the length of a cycle, and whether the fan is always on or if it cycles with the cooling equipment. 66% of the systems had frequent on cycles of less than 10 minutes, resulting in non-steady-state operation.

  9. An inlet/sampling duct for airborne OH and sulfuric acid measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisele, F. L.; Mauldin, R. L.; Tanner, D. J.; Fox, J. R.; Mouch, T.; Scully, T.

    1997-12-01

    An inlet assembly has been designed, tested, and used for the airborne measurements of OH and sulfuric acid. The inlet sampling duct, which incorporates a shroud connected to two nested, restricted flow ducts, slows air velocity by approximately a factor of 16 while maintaining a uniform and well-defined flow. Qualitative wind tunnel tests showed that an inlet shroud that incorporates a 3:1 inner surface and 4.5:1 outer elliptical front surface can straighten the airflow at angles of attack of up to 18°-20° with no visible signs of turbulence. Tests using a Pitot tube to scan the flow velocity profile of the restricted flow ducts showed that the shroud, coupled to inlet ducts, could slow the flow and provide a relatively flat average velocity profile across the central portion of the ducts at angles of attack up to 17°. Tests performed using a chemical tracer showed that at angles of attack where the Pitot tube measurements began to indicate slight flow instabilities (17°-24°), there was no mixing from the walls into the center of the inlet. The inlet assembly also possesses the ability to produce a fairly uniform concentration of OH in the relatively constant velocity portion of the inner duct for instrument calibration. Actual measurements of rapidly changing OH and H2SO4 provide both additional evidence of proper inlet operation and new insight into H2SO4 production and loss in and around clouds.

  10. Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis of Flexible Duct Junction Box Design

    SciTech Connect

    Beach, Robert; Prahl, Duncan; Lange, Rich

    2013-12-01

    IBACOS explored the relationships between pressure and physical configurations of flexible duct junction boxes by using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations to predict individual box parameters and total system pressure, thereby ensuring improved HVAC performance. Current Air Conditioning Contractors of America (ACCA) guidance (Group 11, Appendix 3, ACCA Manual D, Rutkowski 2009) allows for unconstrained variation in the number of takeoffs, box sizes, and takeoff locations. The only variables currently used in selecting an equivalent length (EL) are velocity of air in the duct and friction rate, given the first takeoff is located at least twice its diameter away from the inlet. This condition does not account for other factors impacting pressure loss across these types of fittings. For each simulation, the IBACOS team converted pressure loss within a box to an EL to compare variation in ACCA Manual D guidance to the simulated variation. IBACOS chose cases to represent flows reasonably correlating to flows typically encountered in the field and analyzed differences in total pressure due to increases in number and location of takeoffs, box dimensions, and velocity of air, and whether an entrance fitting is included. The team also calculated additional balancing losses for all cases due to discrepancies between intended outlet flows and natural flow splits created by the fitting. In certain asymmetrical cases, the balancing losses were significantly higher than symmetrical cases where the natural splits were close to the targets. Thus, IBACOS has shown additional design constraints that can ensure better system performance.

  11. CHARACTERIZATION OF LEAK PATHWAYS IN THE BELOW GRADE DUCTS OF THE BROOKHAVEN GRAPHITE RESEARCH REACTOR USING PERFLUOROCARBON TRACERS.

    SciTech Connect

    HEISER,J.; SULLIVAN,T.; KALB,P.; MILIAN,L.; WILKE,R.; NEWSON,C.; LILIMPAKIS,M.

    2001-04-01

    The focus of this program was the characterization of the soils beneath the main air ducts connecting the exhaust plenums with the Fan House. The air plenums experienced water intrusion during BGRR operations and after shutdown. The water intrusions were attributed to rainwater leaks into degraded parts of the system and to internal cooling water system leaks. As part of the overall characterization efforts, a state-of-the-art gaseous perfluorocarbon tracer technology was utilized to characterize leak pathways from the ducts. This in turn suggests what soil regions under or adjacent to the ductwork should be emphasized in the characterization process. Knowledge of where gaseous tracers leak from the ducts yields a conservative picture of where water transport, out of or into, the ducts might have occurred.

  12. Turbofan engine with a low pressure turbine driven supercharger in a bypass duct operated by a fuel rich combustor and an afterburner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartos, James W. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A multiple bypass turbofan engine includes a core Brayton Cycle gas generator with a fuel rich burning combustor and is provided with a variable supercharged bypass duct around the gas generator with a supercharging means in the supercharged bypass duct powered by a turbine not mechanically connected to the gas generator. The engine further includes a low pressure turbine driven forward fan upstream and forward of an aft fan and drivingly connected to a low pressure turbine by a low pressure shaft, the low pressure turbine being aft of and in serial flow communication with the core gas generator. A fan bypass duct is disposed radially outward of the core engine assembly and has first and second inlets disposed between the forward and aft fans. An inlet duct having an annular duct wall is disposed radially inward of the bypass duct and connects the second inlet to the bypass duct. A supercharger means for compressing air is drivingly connected to the low pressure turbine and is disposed in the inlet duct. A secondary combustor or augmentor is disposed in an exhaust duct downstream of and in fluid flow communication with the bypass duct and the gas generator.

  13. A preliminary study on the application of remotely sensed SST in locating evaporation duct height

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baig, Muhammad Hasan Ali; Wang, Zhenhui; Zhang, Lifu; Yang, Lu

    2012-10-01

    Refractivity happens due to stratification in the lower boundary layer over oceans due to variability of moisture, temperature, wind and sea surface temperature which collectively may lead to generate evaporation duct. The evaporation duct has a significant impact on the spread of electromagnetic waves in the atmosphere over oceans both from the meteorological and military point of view. This ducting sometimes supports normal propagation of radar signals and sometimes may cause distortion and attenuation of signals depending on the height of evaporation duct. This leads to over-estimation and under-estimation of rainfall by weather radar meteorologically and for other targets militarily. The aim of this study was not only to locate evaporation duct height but also to check the efficiency of Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF) and Babin's model so that results may be used in applying correction measures for precise identification of targets by radar. In this study by utilizing the high vertical resolution of WRF for the simulation of different meteorological parameters, the Babin's method was used for calculating the evaporation duct height over South China Sea for the two months, April and July. Very clear duct heights were calculated at different areas over sea in different time domains. Study reveals that maximum height existed in the month of April although July was rich with different EDHs in different regions in contrast to April. It was found that in most of the cases EDH was higher or maximum when relative humidity was comparatively lower and air temperature and wind speed were comparatively higher. This study paves a way for futuristic study of evaporation duct monitoring and forecasting by assimilation of remote sensing data especially through that of Geostationary satellites by incorporating verification measures from radar.

  14. Advanced Turbofan Duct Liner Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bielak, Gerald W.; Premo, John W.; Hersh, Alan S.

    1999-01-01

    The Advanced Subsonic Technology Noise Reduction Program goal is to reduce aircraft noise by 10 EPNdB by the year 2000 relative, to 1992 technology. The improvement goal for nacelle attenuation is 25% relative to 1992 technology by 1997 and 50% by 2000. The Advanced Turbofan Duct Liner Concepts Task work by Boeing presented in this document was in support of these goals. The basis for the technical approach was a Boeing study conducted in 1993-94 under NASA/FAA contract NAS1-19349, Task 6, investigating broadband acoustic liner concepts. As a result of this work, it was recommended that linear double layer, linear and perforate triple layer, parallel element, and bulk absorber liners be further investigated to improve nacelle attenuations. NASA LaRC also suggested that "adaptive" liner concepts that would allow "in-situ" acoustic impedance control also be considered. As a result, bias flow and high-temperature liner concepts were also added to the investigation. The major conclusion from the above studies is that improvements in nacelle liner average acoustic impedance characteristics alone will not result in 25% increased nacelle noise reduction relative to 1992 technology. Nacelle design advancements currently being developed by Boeing are expected to add 20-40% more acoustic lining to hardwall regions in current inlets, which is predicted to result in and additional 40-80% attenuation improvement. Similar advancements are expected to allow 10-30% more acoustic lining in current fan ducts with 10-30% more attenuation expected. In addition, Boeing is currently developing a scarf inlet concept which is expected to give an additional 40-80% attenuation improvement for equivalent lining areas.

  15. ASU nitrogen sweep gas in hydrogen separation membrane for production of HRSG duct burner fuel

    DOEpatents

    Panuccio, Gregory J.; Raybold, Troy M.; Jamal, Agil; Drnevich, Raymond Francis

    2013-04-02

    The present invention relates to the use of low pressure N2 from an air separation unit (ASU) for use as a sweep gas in a hydrogen transport membrane (HTM) to increase syngas H2 recovery and make a near-atmospheric pressure (less than or equal to about 25 psia) fuel for supplemental firing in the heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) duct burner.

  16. EVALUATING THE POTENTIAL EFFICACY OF AN ANTIMICROBIAL-CONTAINING SEALANT ON DUCT LINER AND GALVANIZED STEEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The article gives results of an evaluation of the potential efficacy of an antimicrobial-containing sealant on fibrous-glass duct liner (FGDL) and galvanized steel (GS) as used in heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems. HVAC systems become dirty to various degr...

  17. Development of an Experimental Rig for Investigation of Higher Order Modes in Ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerhold, Carl H.; Cabell, Randolph H.; Brown, Martha C.

    2006-01-01

    Continued progress to reduce fan noise emission from high bypass ratio engine ducts in aircraft increasingly relies on accurate description of the sound propagation in the duct. A project has been undertaken at NASA Langley Research Center to investigate the propagation of higher order modes in ducts with flow. This is a two-pronged approach, including development of analytic models (the subject of a separate paper) and installation of a laboratory-quality test rig. The purposes of the rig are to validate the analytical models and to evaluate novel duct acoustic liner concepts, both passive and active. The dimensions of the experimental rig test section scale to between 25% and 50% of the aft bypass ducts of most modern engines. The duct is of rectangular cross section so as to provide flexibility to design and fabricate test duct liner samples. The test section can accommodate flow paths that are straight through or offset from inlet to discharge, the latter design allowing investigation of the effect of curvature on sound propagation and duct liner performance. The maximum air flow rate through the duct is Mach 0.3. Sound in the duct is generated by an array of 16 high-intensity acoustic drivers. The signals to the loudspeaker array are generated by a multi-input/multi-output feedforward control system that has been developed for this project. The sound is sampled by arrays of flush-mounted microphones and a modal decomposition is performed at the frequency of sound generation. The data acquisition system consists of two arrays of flush-mounted microphones, one upstream of the test section and one downstream. The data are used to determine parameters such as the overall insertion loss of the test section treatment as well as the effect of the treatment on a modal basis such as mode scattering. The methodology used for modal decomposition is described, as is a description of the mode generation control system. Data are presented which demonstrate the performance

  18. Duct Remediation Program: Remediation operations and implementation

    SciTech Connect

    Beckman, T.d.; Davis, M.M.; Karas, T.M.

    1992-11-01

    Plutonium holdup material has accumulated in the process ventilation duct systems at Rocky Flats. Non-Destructive Assay (NDA) measurements identified ducts containing this material. The Defense Nuclear Facility Safety Board and the Department of Energy established the criteria for remediation of these ducts. A remediation team was assembled and a program plan created. This program plan included activities such as fissile material accumulation identification, criticality safety assessments, radiation dose determinations, facility safety evaluations, prevention of future accumulation, and removal of holdup material. Several operational considerations had to be evaluated in determining completion of remediation.

  19. Magnetospheric whistler ducts observed by ISIS satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ondoh, T.

    1976-01-01

    The latitudinal width of the magnetospheric whistler duct has been estimated by the first and final invariant latitudes of whistler echoes and the conservation of the magnetic flux for the centered dipole field, using 105 whistler echoes in ISIS VLF data received at Kashima, Japan for 1972-1973. The latitudinal distribution of whistler duct occurrence shows a maximum at invariant latitudes of 40-45 degrees near the maximum occurrence latitude of ground whistlers. The radial width of magnetospheric whistler duct in the geomagnetically equatorial plane increases with invariant latitude of the geomagnetic flux tube in which whistlers propagate.

  20. 40 CFR 63.6092 - Are duct burners and waste heat recovery units covered by subpart YYYY?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Are duct burners and waste heat recovery units covered by subpart YYYY? 63.6092 Section 63.6092 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES...

  1. 40 CFR 63.6092 - Are duct burners and waste heat recovery units covered by subpart YYYY?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Are duct burners and waste heat recovery units covered by subpart YYYY? 63.6092 Section 63.6092 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES...

  2. Natural Flow Air Cooled Photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanagnostopoulos, Y.; Themelis, P.

    2010-01-01

    Our experimental study aims to investigate the improvement in the electrical performance of a photovoltaic installation on buildings through cooling of the photovoltaic panels with natural air flow. Our experimental study aims to investigate the improvement in the electrical performance of a photovoltaic installation on buildings through cooling of the photovoltaic panels with natural air flow. We performed experiments using a prototype based on three silicon photovoltaic modules placed in series to simulate a typical sloping building roof with photovoltaic installation. In this system the air flows through a channel on the rear side of PV panels. The potential for increasing the heat exchange from the photovoltaic panel to the circulating air by the addition of a thin metal sheet (TMS) in the middle of air channel or metal fins (FIN) along the air duct was examined. The operation of the device was studied with the air duct closed tightly to avoid air circulation (CLOSED) and the air duct open (REF), with the thin metal sheet (TMS) and with metal fins (FIN). In each case the experiments were performed under sunlight and the operating parameters of the experimental device determining the electrical and thermal performance of the system were observed and recorded during a whole day and for several days. We collected the data and form PV panels from the comparative diagrams of the experimental results regarding the temperature of solar cells, the electrical efficiency of the installation, the temperature of the back wall of the air duct and the temperature difference in the entrance and exit of the air duct. The comparative results from the measurements determine the improvement in electrical performance of the photovoltaic cells because of the reduction of their temperature, which is achieved by the naturally circulating air.

  3. Error analysis for duct leakage tests in ASHRAE standard 152P

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, J.W.

    1997-06-01

    This report presents an analysis of random uncertainties in the two methods of testing for duct leakage in Standard 152P of the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE). The test method is titled Standard Method of Test for Determining Steady-State and Seasonal Efficiency of Residential Thermal Distribution Systems. Equations have been derived for the uncertainties in duct leakage for given levels of uncertainty in the measured quantities used as inputs to the calculations. Tables of allowed errors in each of these independent variables, consistent with fixed criteria of overall allowed error, have been developed.

  4. Transmission of wave energy in curved ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rostafinski, W.

    1973-01-01

    A formation of wave energy flow was developed for motion in curved ducts. A parametric study over a range of frequencies determined the ability of circular bends to transmit energy for the case of perfectly rigid walls.

  5. How Is Bile Duct Cancer Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... line through which a different kind of contrast dye (IV contrast) is injected. This helps better outline ... common bile duct. A small amount of contrast dye is injected through the tube to help outline ...

  6. Treatment Options for Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... checked to measure the amounts of bilirubin and alkaline phosphatase released into the blood by the liver. ... which a stent (a thin, flexible tube or metal tube) is placed in the bile duct to ...

  7. Treatment Option Overview (Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... checked to measure the amounts of bilirubin and alkaline phosphatase released into the blood by the liver. ... which a stent (a thin, flexible tube or metal tube) is placed in the bile duct to ...

  8. Stages of Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... checked to measure the amounts of bilirubin and alkaline phosphatase released into the blood by the liver. ... which a stent (a thin, flexible tube or metal tube) is placed in the bile duct to ...

  9. Bile Duct (Cholangiocarcinoma) Cancer: Radiation Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... form of radiation for bile duct cancer. External beam radiation therapy (EBRT) This type of radiation therapy ... determine the correct angles for aiming the radiation beams and the proper dose of radiation. The treatment ...

  10. Intraoperative cholangiography and bile duct injury.

    PubMed

    Sarli, L; Costi, R; Roncoroni, L

    2006-01-01

    We are not in agreement with the opinion that the credit for excellent results after laparoscopic cholecystectomy is to be attributed to the routine performing of intraoperative cholangiography. We performed 2538 laparoscopic cholecystectomies without routine intraoperative cholangiography and we obtained very low rate and severity of common bile duct injuries: there was a total of four common bile duct injuries (0.16%), in no case was the injury a major transaction, and injuries were detected intraoperatively and easily repaired with a T-tube. Cholangiography could prevent bile duct transaction, but that it is not necessary for intraoperative cholangiography to be routinely performed for this purpose. It is sufficient for intraoperative cholangiography to be performed whenever the surgeon is in doubt as to the biliary anatomy or common bile duct clearance, and that when dissection of the cholecystic peduncle proves difficult he does not hesitate to convert to open access. PMID:16333543

  11. Investigation of heat transfer in porous duct

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Athani, Abdulgaphur; Khan, T. M. Yunus

    2016-05-01

    Investigation of heat transfer in a square porous duct is carried out. The porous medium is sandwiched between inner and outer surface of a square duct. The flow is assumed to follow the Darcy law. The governing momentum and energy equations are non-dimensionalised and then converted to algebraic form of equations using finite element method. Galerkin method is used to transform the partial differential equations into simpler algebraic equations then solved in a iterative manner to arrive at the solution. The results are presented with respect to various geometric and physical parameters such as depth of porous medium, Rayleigh number etc. It is found that the isotherms and the streamlines take symmetrical position along the vertical central line of square duct. The isotherms are penetrated into deeper area at upper half of duct as compared to lower half.

  12. Model for coal dust duct explosions

    SciTech Connect

    Pickles, J.H.

    1982-01-01

    A theoretical discussion is given of the propagation of a dust explosion in a linear duct or pipeline. The particular aim is to investigate the experimental observation that propagating explosions are much harder to initiate in small laboratory scale ducts than in, say, coal mine galleries. A model is proposed in which a turbulent mixing phenomenon first identified by G.I. Taylor gives, for large ducts, very high flame velocities, which in turn lead to large fluid velocities and further increases in flame velocity. In small ducts, the time scale of the turbulent mixing is less than the time needed for the burning of individual coal particles. The particle burning time becomes an additional constraint on the rate of flame propagation and the development of explosions is inhibited.

  13. Rotating Rake Turbofan Duct Mode Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutliff, Daniel L.

    2005-01-01

    An experimental measurement system was developed and implemented by the NASA Glenn Research Center in the 1990s to measure turbofan duct acoustic modes. The system is a continuously rotating radial microphone rake that is inserted into the duct. This Rotating Rake provides a complete map of the acoustic duct modes present in a ducted fan and has been used on a variety of test articles: from a low-speed, concept test rig, to a full-scale production turbofan engine. The Rotating Rake has been critical in developing and evaluating a number of noise reduction concepts as well as providing experimental databases for verification of several aero-acoustic codes. More detailed derivation of the unique Rotating Rake equations are presented in the appendix.

  14. [Isolated neurofibroma of the common bile duct].

    PubMed

    Carbia, S; Pagola, J; Flaster, N; Guida, A; Jufe, L; González, B; Caniparoli, A

    1995-01-01

    The neurogenic tumors in the biliary tract are rare and usually are amputation neuroma that occur after cholecystectomy. We describe a case of isolated neurofibroma of the common bile duct in a young man not cholecystectomized. The patient suffered recurrent episodes of abdominal pain, vomiting and weight loss without clinical signs of Von Recklinghausen's disease or jaundice. The hepatogram was normal. The echography indicated a solid formation with obstruction of the proximal common bile duct. In the ERCP the stenosis was found. Surgical excision of the tumor and anastomosis of bilateral hepatic ducts and jejunum were carried out. At microscopic examination intraparietal neurofibroma of the common bile duct was found. As isolated entity, we know of only one reported case. PMID:8731581

  15. Device for Measuring Low Flow Speed in a Duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, Frank; Magee, Kevin

    2009-01-01

    A multiple-throat venturi system has been invented for measuring laminar flow of air or other gas at low speed (1 to 30 cm/s) in a duct while preserving the laminar nature of the flow and keeping the velocity profile across the duct as nearly flat as possible. While means for measuring flows at higher speeds are well established, heretofore, there have been no reliable means for making consistent, accurate measurements in this speed range. In the original application for which this system was invented, the duct leads into the test section of a low-speed wind tunnel wherein uniform, low-speed, laminar flow is required for scientific experiments. The system could also be used to monitor a slow flow of gas in an industrial process like chemical vapor deposition. In the original application, the multiple- throat venturi system is mounted at the inlet end of the duct having a rectangular cross section of 19 by 14 cm, just upstream of an assembly of inlet screens and flow straighteners that help to suppress undesired flow fluctuations (see Figure 1). The basic venturi measurement principle is well established: One measures the difference in pressure between (1) a point just outside the inlet, where the pressure is highest and the kinetic energy lowest; and (2) the narrowest part (the throat) of the venturi passage, where the kinetic energy is highest and the pressure is lowest. Then by use of Bernoulli s equation for the relationship between pressure and kinetic energy, the volumetric flow speed in the duct can be calculated from the pressure difference and the inlet and throat widths. The design of this system represents a compromise among length, pressure recovery, uniformity of flow, and complexity of assembly. Traditionally, venturis are used to measure faster flows in narrower cross sections, with longer upstream and downstream passages to maintain accuracy. The dimensions of the passages of the present venturi system are sized to provide a readily measurable

  16. Evaporation duct communication: Test plan, part 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, K. D.; Rogers, L. T.

    1991-11-01

    This document is a continuation and expansion of an earlier study that examines the feasibility of using the evaporation duct to support an alternative high-speed communication system for Navy applications. This Evaporation Duct Communication (EDCOM) experiment is a unique opportunity to evaluate another communication channel that can alleviate Navy ship-to-ship communication problems. Therefore, it is strongly recommended to proceed with this measurement program.

  17. Flow Simulation of Supersonic Inlet with Bypass Annular Duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, HyoungJin; Kumano, Takayasu; Liou, Meng-Sing; Povinelli, Louis A.; Conners, Timothy R.

    2011-01-01

    A relaxed isentropic compression supersonic inlet is a new concept that produces smaller cowl drag than a conventional inlet, but incurs lower total pressure recovery and increased flow distortion in the (radially) outer flowpath. A supersonic inlet comprising a bypass annulus to the relaxed isentropic compression inlet dumps out airflow of low quality through the bypass duct. A reliable computational fluid dynamics solution can provide considerable useful information to ascertain quantitatively relative merits of the concept, and further provide a basis for optimizing the design. For a fast and reliable performance evaluation of the inlet performance, an equivalent axisymmetric model whose area changes accounts for geometric and physical (blockage) effects resulting from the original complex three-dimensional configuration is proposed. In addition, full three-dimensional calculations are conducted for studying flow phenomena and verifying the validity of the equivalent model. The inlet-engine coupling is carried out by embedding numerical propulsion system simulation engine data into the flow solver for interactive boundary conditions at the engine fan face and exhaust plane. It was found that the blockage resulting from complex three-dimensional geometries in the bypass duct causes significant degradation of inlet performance by pushing the terminal normal shock upstream.

  18. Mucoepidermoid carcinoma in a thyroglossal duct remnant

    PubMed Central

    Warner, E.; Ofo, E.; Connor, S.; Odell, E.; Jeannon, J.P.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Thyroglossal duct cysts (TDC) are common midline neck swellings resulting from embryological remnants of the thyroglossal duct. They often contain ectopic thyroid tissue and malignant transformation has been reported, most commonly to papillary thyroid carcinoma. Mucoepidermoid carcinoma (MEC) usually occurs in the salivary glands and only rarely in the thyroid. This is the first case of a MEC occurring within a thyroglossal duct remnant. Presentation of a case A 73 year old lady presented with a thyroglossal duct cyst. She declined surgical excision, as she was adamant she wanted to avoid surgery. The neck mass rapidly enlarged at two years following initial diagnosis. Fine needle aspiration cytology was suspicious for carcinoma. She underwent total thyroidectomy and selective central compartment neck dissection with adjuvant radiotherapy. She remains alive and well two years post treatment. Discussion Mucoepidermoid carcinoma is the most common malignant neoplasm of salivary glands, although it has rarely been reported in diverse locations including the thyroid, lung and pancreas. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of mucoepidermoid carcinoma arising from a thyroglossal duct remnant. Conclusion This case adds weight to the literature favouring surgical excision of thyroglossal duct remnants due to the risk of malignant transformation. PMID:26101054

  19. Field comparison of design and diagnostic pathways for duct efficiency evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, J.W.

    1996-08-01

    A new method of test for residential thermal distribution efficiency is currently being developed under the auspices of the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE). This test method will have three main approaches, or ``pathways``, designated Design, Diagnostic, and Research. The Design Pathway uses builder`s information to predict thermal distribution efficiency in new construction. The Diagnostic Pathway uses air-flow, temperature, and pressure-difference tests--intended to take one to four hours--to evaluate thermal distribution efficiency in a completed house. For forced-air systems, three distinct techniques are being considered, one based on thermal inputs and outputs in the duct system, the second based on pressure and leakage-area measurements, and the third based on pressure differentials induced in the house by partial blockage of the return duct. This paper presents and discusses the results of Design Pathway calculations based on measured duct-system and floor-plan layouts and surface areas (in lieu of building plans) for fifteen residential duct systems in Long Island, New York. These are compared with measured Diagnostic Pathway efficiencies in eight of these homes.

  20. Fundamental investigation of duct/ESP phenomena: Flow visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, C. T.; Sowa, W. A.; Samuelsen, G. S.

    1990-11-01

    The objective is to characterize the performance and behavior of twin-fluid atomizers used for in-duct sulfur capture. Such atomizers characteristically produce dense sprays featuring very narrow dispersion angles and high droplet velocities. To meet the objective, several tasks were identified (1) demonstrate the usefulness of phase Doppler interferometry to characterize humidification atomizers, (2) screen several commercially available atomizers to guide in the selection of nozzles used of field testing, and (3) develop a data base useful for computational code development and validation. The approach taken is to characterize the liquid phase produced by practical, full scale, twin-fluid humidification atomizers. Eight such twin-fluid atomizers are considered. Several of these atomizers were used in field tests. Only water sprays are considered. Atomizer responses to changes in air pressure (air flow rate) and water pressure (water flow rate) are examined. Measurements of droplet size and corresponding mean axial velocity are obtained.

  1. Development of a three-dimensional turbulent duct flow analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eiseman, P. R.; Levy, R.; Mcdonald, H.; Briley, W. R.

    1978-01-01

    A method for computing three-dimensional turbulent subsonic flow in curved ducts is described. An approximate set of governing equations is given for viscous flows which have a primary flow direction. The derivation is coordinate invariant, and the resulting equations are expressed in terms of tensors. General tube-like coordinates were developed for a general class of geometries applicable to many internal flow problems. The coordinates are then particularized to pipes having superelliptic cross sections whose shape can vary continuously between a circle and a near rectangle. The analysis is applied to a series of relevant aerodynamic problems including transition from nearly square to round pipes and flow through a pipe with an S-shaped bend.

  2. Positive direct current corona discharges in single wire-duct electrostatic precipitators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yehia, Ashraf; Abdel-Fattah, E.; Mizuno, Akira

    2016-05-01

    This paper is aimed to study the characteristics of the positive dc corona discharges in single wire-duct electrostatic precipitators. Therefore, the corona discharges were formed inside dry air fed single wire-duct reactor under positive dc voltage at the normal atmospheric conditions. The corona current-voltage characteristics curves have been measured in parallel with the ozone concentration generated inside the reactor under different discharge conditions. The corona current-voltage characteristics curves have agreed with a semi empirical equation derived from the previous studies. The experimental results of the ozone concentration generated inside the reactor were formulated in the form of an empirical equation included the different parameters that were studied experimentally. The obtained equations are valid to expect both the current-voltage characteristics curves and the corresponding ozone concentration that generates with the positive dc corona discharges inside single wire-duct electrostatic precipitators under any operating conditions in the same range of the present study.

  3. Analysis and consequences of fire inside the ventilation ducts of a nuclear facility

    SciTech Connect

    Briand, A.R.; Laborde, J.C. ); Savornin, J.H.; Tessier, J.L. )

    1989-01-01

    Accident events involving fire are rather frequent and could have a severe effect on the safety of nuclear facilities. Among the fires that have broken out in nuclear plants, several have resulted from ignition of dust deposited inside the ventilation ducts and on the high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters. The BEATRICE test facility has been designed and built at a French nuclear studies center to enable the analysis and consequences of these types of fires to be evaluated. The associated experimental program is aimed at characterizing the fire (fire spread, aerosols formed), determining and simulating the temperature profiles along the duct (thermal losses evaluation by the pipette code), and evaluating the challenge and behavior of the associated HEPA filters (efficiency, contamination release, etc.). The tests performed in this study contributed to improvements in the basic knowledge about fires inside ventilation ducts and define the associated strategies (ventilation control, filters protection, etc.).

  4. Numerical modeling of simultaneous heat and moisture transfer under complex geometry for refrigeration purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Xiaofei; Joaquim, Rigola; Oriol, Lehmkuhl; Carles, Oliet; D, Pérez-Segarra Carlos

    2012-11-01

    The aim of the paper is to gain a better insight into heat and moisture transfer in refrigerator and to do fundamental study for water evaporation and condensation in refrigeration application. The governing transport equations (continuity, momentum, energy and concentration equations) in 3D Cartesian coordinates are firstly introduced. As the mixed convection is simulated in the paper, buoyancy forces caused by both temperature and concentration gradient are considered and are also included in momentum equation. Numerical results are carried out by using Termofluids code. The pressure-velocity linkage is solved by means of an explicit finite volume fractional step procedure. In order to validate the code, a humid air flowing in a horizontal 3D rectangular duct case is carried out and compared with the published numerical and experimental results. The contour of temperature and vapor density of air at a cross section is provided and analyzed. Finally, the heat and mass transfer process during the moist air flow through complicated geometry is simulated and temperature and humidity distributions are obtained.

  5. Technology Solutions Case Study: Sealed Air-Return Plenum Retrofit

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2012-08-01

    In this project, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researchers greatly improved indoor air quality and HVAC performance by replacing an old, leaky air handler with a new air handler with an air-sealed return plenum with filter; they also sealed the ducts, and added a fresh air intake.

  6. Geometry in Medias Res

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cukier, Mimi; Asdourian, Tony; Thakker, Anand

    2012-01-01

    Geometry provides a natural window into what it is like to do mathematics. In the world of geometry, playful experimentation is often more fruitful than following a procedure, and logic plus a few axioms can open new worlds. Nonetheless, teaching a geometry course in a way that combines both rigor and play can be difficult. Many geometry courses…

  7. Dynamic Geometry on WWW.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuntz, Gilles

    The first section of this paper on World Wide Web applications related to dynamic geometry addresses dynamic geometry and teaching, including the relationship between dynamic geometry and direct manipulation, key features of dynamic geometry environments, the importance of direct engagement of the learner using construction software for…

  8. Effect of radiant barriers and attic ventilation on residential attics and attic duct systems: New tools for measuring and modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Petrie, T.W.; Childs, P.W.; Christian, J.E.; Wilkes, K.E.

    1998-07-01

    A simple duct system was installed in an attic test module for a large scale climate simulator at a US national laboratory. The goal of the tests and subsequent modeling was to develop an accurate method of assessing duct system performance in the laboratory, enabling limiting conditions to be imposed at will and results to be applied to residential attics with attic duct systems. Steady-state tests were done at a severe summer and a mild winter condition. In all tests the roof surface was heated above ambient air temperatures by infrared lights. The attic test module first included then did not include the duct system. Attic ventilation from eave vents to a ridge vent was varied from none to values achievable by a high level of power ventilation. A radiant barrier was attached to the underside of the roof deck, both with and without the duct system in place. Tests were also done without the radiant barrier, both with and without the duct system. When installed, the insulated ducts ran along the floor of the attic, just above the attic insulation and along the edge of the attic near the eaves and one gable. These tests in a climate simulator achieved careful control and reproducibility of conditions. This elucidated dependencies that would otherwise be hidden by variations in uncontrolled variables. Based on the comparisons with the results of the tests at the mild winter condition and the severe summer condition, model predictions for attic air and insulation temperatures should be accurate within {+-} 10 F ({+-} 6 C). This is judged adequate for design purposes and could be better when exploring the effect of changes in attic and duct parameters at fixed climatic conditions.

  9. Propagation of premixed laminar flames in 3D narrow open ducts using RBF-generated finite differences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayona, Victor; Kindelan, Manuel

    2013-10-01

    Laminar flame propagation is an important problem in combustion modelling for which great advances have been achieved both in its theoretical understanding and in the numerical solution of the governing equations in 2D and 3D. Most of these numerical simulations use finite difference techniques on simple geometries (channels, ducts, ...) with equispaced nodes. The objective of this work is to explore the applicability of the radial basis function generated finite difference (RBF-FD) method to laminar flame propagation modelling. This method is specially well suited for the solution of problems with complex geometries and irregular boundaries. Another important advantage is that the method is independent of the dimension of the problem and, therefore, it is very easy to apply in 3D problems with complex geometries. In this work we use the RBF-FD method to compute 2D and 3D numerical results that simulate premixed laminar flames with different Lewis numbers propagating in open ducts.

  10. Size limitations in semicircular duct systems

    PubMed

    Muller

    1999-06-01

    The present article discusses mechanical requirements and limitations which are applicable to the construction of the system of semicircular ducts, especially to its size. The simplified case of a single, uniform duct system has been considered which can be described by a second order equation of motion. The principal functional quantities for this rotation-sensor are: (1) response speed; (2) sensitivity; and (3) regular flow. The response speed of a single, uniform semicircular duct is characterized by the short time constant (T2) which is dependent on the duct radius (r). Its estimated range is from 0.04 ms in the smallest to 140 ms in the largest known labyrinth. The sensitivity is characterized by the maximal endolymph displacement after a step stimulus (xmax). Its estimated range is from 0.0016 &mgr;m to 5.97 mm (6.56 decades!), assuming an input angular velocity of omega=1 rad s-1. The Reynolds number is a measure for an undisturbed laminar flow. Its estimated range varies from 7.38.10(-4)to 45.1 for omega=1 rad s-1. The above data follow from graphs in which, for a single uniform duct, circuit radius (R) is plotted against duct radius (r) for labyrinths of 233 species belonging to different vertebrate-groups. A relation R =38.9. r1.60was determined. The smallest labyrinth was found in a carp larva (Cyprinus), the largest in a whale shark (Rhincodon). Large whales possess labyrinths of average mammalian size. It is revealed that semicircular duct size is bound by requirements concerning regular flow and by a too low response speed for large labyrinths, and by a too low sensitivity for small labyrinths. Other important quantities are mechanical amplification factors which are a consequence of more complex vestibular constructions than a single uniform duct circuit. Allometric relationships are interpreted as compromises between the quantities mentioned. A hypothesis for the relatively large semicircular duct sizes of fishes, especially Elasmobranchii, compared

  11. Remodeling of the Fetal Collecting Duct Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Hiatt, Michael J.; Ivanova, Larissa; Toran, Nuria; Tarantal, Alice F.; Matsell, Douglas G.

    2010-01-01

    Congenital urinary tract obstruction induces changes to the renal collecting duct epithelium, including alteration and depletion of intercalated cells. To study the effects of obstruction on the ontogeny of intercalated cell development, we examined normal and obstructed human fetal and postnatal kidneys. In the normal human fetal kidney, intercalated cells originated in the medullary collecting duct at 8 weeks gestation and remained most abundant in the inner medulla throughout gestation. In the cortex, intercalated cells were rare at 18 and 26 weeks gestation and observed at low abundance at 36 weeks gestation. Although early intercalated cells exhibit an immature phenotype, Type A intercalated cells predominated in the inner and outer medullae at 26 and 36 weeks gestation with other intercalated cell subtypes observed rarely. Postnatally, the collecting duct epithelium underwent a remodeling whereby intercalated cells become abundant in the cortex yet absent from the inner medulla. In 18-week obstructed kidneys with mild to moderate injury, the intercalated cells became more abundant and differentiated than the equivalent age-matched normal kidney. In contrast, more severely injured ducts of the late obstructed kidney exhibited a significant reduction in intercalated cells. These studies characterize the normal ontogeny of human intercalated cell development and suggest that obstruction induces premature remodeling and differentiation of the fetal collecting duct epithelium. PMID:20035053

  12. Learning Geometry through Dynamic Geometry Software

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forsythe, Sue

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author investigates effective teaching and learning of geometrical concepts using dynamic geometry software (DGS). Based from her students' reactions to her project, the author found that her students' understanding of the concepts was better than if they had learned geometry through paper-based tasks. However, mixing computer…

  13. Convolution seal for transition duct in turbine system

    SciTech Connect

    Flanagan, James Scott; LeBegue, Jeffrey Scott; McMahan, Kevin Weston; Dillard, Daniel Jackson; Pentecost, Ronnie Ray

    2015-05-26

    A turbine system is disclosed. In one embodiment, the turbine system includes a transition duct. The transition duct includes an inlet, an outlet, and a passage extending between the inlet and the outlet and defining a longitudinal axis, a radial axis, and a tangential axis. The outlet of the transition duct is offset from the inlet along the longitudinal axis and the tangential axis. The transition duct further includes an interface feature for interfacing with an adjacent transition duct. The turbine system further includes a convolution seal contacting the interface feature to provide a seal between the interface feature and the adjacent transition duct.

  14. Investigation of Pneumatic Inlet and Diffuser Blowing on a Ducted Fan Propulsor in Static Thrust Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kondor, Shayne; Englar, Robert J.; Lee, Warren J.

    2003-01-01

    Tilting ducted fans present a solution for the lifting and forward flight propulsion requirements of VTOL aircraft. However, the geometry of the duct enshrouding the propeller has great a effect on the efficiency of the fan in various flight modes. Shroud geometry controls the velocity and pressure at the face of the fan, while maintaining a finite loading out at the tips of the fan blades. A duct tailored for most efficient generation of static lifting thrust will generally suffer from performance deficiencies in forward flight. The converse is true as well, leaving the designer with a difficult trade affecting the overall performance and sizing of the aircraft. Ideally, the shroud of a vertical lifting fan features a generous bell mouth inlet promoting acceleration of flow into the face of the fan, and terminating in a converging nozzle at the exit. Flow entering the inlet is accelerated into the fan by the circulation about the shroud, resulting in an overall increase in thrust compared to an open propeller operating under the same conditions . The accelerating shroud design is often employed in lifting ducted fans to benefit from the thrust augmentation; however, such shroud designs produce significant drag penalties in axial flight, thus are unsuitable for efficient forward flight applications. Decelerating, or diffusing, duct designs are employed for higher speed forward flight configurations. The lower circulation on the shroud tends to decelerate the flow into the face of the fan, which is detrimental to static thrust development; however, net thrust is developed on the shroud while the benefits of finite blade loading are retained. With judicious shroud design for intended flight speeds, a net increase in efficiency can be obtained over an open propeller. In this experiment, conducted under contract to NASA LaRC (contract NAG-1-02093) circulation control is being applied to a mildly diffusing shroud design, intended for improved forward flight performance

  15. Energy effectiveness of duct sealing and insulation in two multifamily buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, I.S.; Modera, M.P.; Tuluca, A.; Graham, I. |

    1996-08-01

    Energy losses from forced air distribution systems have a significant impact on the energy efficiency of buildings. Little work has been done to quantify these losses in apartment buildings. In this paper the authors will discuss field measurements made on four forced air heating systems to evaluate the duct system energy losses to unconditioned basements. The apartments were heated by natural gas furnaces located in the basements. The systems had bare sheet metal ductwork exposed to the basement conditions. The pre-retrofit measurements were made on the systems after sealing large easily visible leaks. The post-retrofit measurements were made after wrapping the ducts in foil backed glass fiber insulation and additional leak sealing. Only the sections of duct exposed to the basement were retrofitted because only these sections were accessible. This study examines the potential energy savings for this type of limited retrofit. The energy losses were separated into leakage and conduction terms. Leakage measurements were made using register flowhood techniques. Conduction losses were estimated by measuring temperatures in the plenums and at the registers. Analysis of the measurements has shown typical reduction in leakage flow due to duct sealing of about 40%. The reduction in leakage translated into a reduction in energy consumption of about 10%.

  16. User's Manual for DuctE3D: A Program for 3D Euler Unsteady Aerodynamic and Aeroelastic Analysis of Ducted Fans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, R.; Reddy, T. S. R.

    1997-01-01

    The program DuctE3D is used for steady or unsteady aerodynamic and aeroelastic analysis of ducted fans. This guide describes the input data required and the output files generated, in using DuctE3D. The analysis solves three dimensional unsteady, compressible Euler equations to obtain the aerodynamic forces. A normal mode structural analysis is used to obtain the aeroelastic equations, which are solved using either the time domain or the frequency domain solution method. Sample input and output files are included in this guide for steady aerodynamic analysis and aeroelastic analysis of an isolated fan row.

  17. MHD (magnetohydrodynamic) thermal hydraulic analysis of three-dimensional liquid metal flows in fusion blanket ducts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, T. A.; Picologlou, B. F.; Reed, C. B.; Walker, J. S.

    1988-02-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic flows of liquid metals in thin conducting ducts of various geometries in the presence of strong nonuniform transverse magnetic fields are examined. The interaction parameter and Hartmann number are assumed to be large, whereas the magnetic Reynolds number is assumed to be small. Under these assumptions, viscous and inertial effects are confined in very thin boundary layers adjacent to the walls. At walls parallel to the magnetic field lines, as at the side walls of a rectangular duct, the boundary layers (side layers) carry a significant fraction of the volumetric flow rate in the form of high velocity jets. The presence of these jets strongly enhances heat transfer performance. In addition, heat transfer can be further improved by guiding the flow toward a heated wall by proper variation of wall thicknesses, duct cross sectional dimensions and/or shape. Flows in nonconducting circular ducts are also examined. Experimental results obtained from the ALEX experiments at the Argonne National Laboratory are used to validate the numerical predictions.

  18. Numerical simulation of a shock wave/turbulent boundary layer interaction in a duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Wei-Li; Greber, Isaac

    1993-01-01

    A numerical investigation of the interaction of an incident oblique shock wave with a turbulent duct flow is presented. The investigation consists of solving the three-dimensional, unsteady, compressible, mass averaged Navier-Stokes equations, using an implicit finite volume, lower-upper time marching code and incorporates the three-dimensional Baldwin-Lomax turbulence model. Computed results are obtained Mach number 2.9 for a turning angle of 13 degrees and Reynolds number based on duct width of 1.36 x 10 exp 7. Under various inlet conditions, the results clearly depict the flow characteristics, including the shock geometry, the separated flow region, the wall pressure distribution, and the skin friction distribution. The findings provide a physical understanding of the three-dimensional vortex structure of the flow in a duct in which a shock wave interacts with a turbulent boundary layer. The results show that the ratio of the boundary layer thickness to the duct width is the critical parameter in determining the separation structure.

  19. MHD (magnetohydrodynamic) thermal hydraulic analysis of three-dimensional liquid metal flows in fusion blanket ducts

    SciTech Connect

    Hua, T.A.; Picologlou, B.F.; Reed, C.B.; Walker, J.S.

    1988-02-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic flows of liquid metals in thin conducting ducts of various geometries in the presence of strong nonuniform transverse magnetic fields are examined. The interaction parameter and Hartmann number are assumed to be large, whereas the magnetic Reynolds number is assumed to be small. Under these assumptions, viscous and inertial effects are confined in very thin boundary layers adjacent to the walls. At walls parallel to the magnetic field lines, as at the side walls of a rectangular duct, the boundary layers (side layers) carry a significant fraction of the volumetric flow rate in the form of high velocity jets. The presence of these jets strongly enhances heat transfer performance. In addition, heat transfer can be further improved by guiding the flow toward a heated wall by proper variation of wall thicknesses, duct cross sectional dimensions and/or shape. Flows in nonconducting circular ducts are also examined. Experimental results obtained from the ALEX experiments at the Argonne National Laboratory are used to validate the numerical predictions. 6 refs., 7 figs.

  20. A wave-envelope of sound propagation in nonuniform circular ducts with compressible mean flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nayfeh, A. H.; Kaiser, J. E.; Shaker, B. S.

    1979-01-01

    An acoustic theory is developed to determine the sound transmission and attenuation through an infinite, hard-walled or lined circular duct carrying compressible, sheared, mean flows and having a variable cross section. The theory is applicable to large as well as small axial variations, as long as the mean flow does not separate. The technique is based on solving for the envelopes of the quasi-parallel acoustic modes that exist in the duct instead of solving for the actual wave, thereby reducing the computation time and the round-off error encountered in purely numerical techniques. The solution recovers the solution based on the method of multiple scales for slowly varying duct geometry. A computer program was developed based on the wave-envelope analysis for general mean flows. Results are presented for the reflection and transmission coefficients as well as the acoustic pressure distributions for a number of conditions: both straight and variable area ducts with and without liners and mean flows from very low to high subsonic speeds are considered.

  1. "Mustache sign" due to Stensen duct dilation.

    PubMed

    Yoruk, O; Kılıc, K; Kantarcı, M

    2013-12-01

    An 80-year-old woman presented with a 5-year history of painless swellings of the left and right cheeks. The degree of swelling did not change with mastication. On palpation, the cheeks were soft, well defined, and movable. Compression and massage of the swollen areas caused increased salivary discharge from the orifices of the Stensen ducts. Three-dimensional computed tomography showed well-bordered, 15- to 20-mm wide, bilateral, tube-like dilatations of the ducts. The ductal origin of the swellings was explained to the patient, but she refused invasive procedures, thus no sialogram or surgical procedure was performed. We describe the clinical and radiographic features of a case of bilateral, congenital Stensen duct dilatation with bilateral swelling of the cheeks. PMID:24209996

  2. Acoustic energy in ducts - Further observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eversman, W.

    1979-01-01

    The transmission of acoustic energy in uniform ducts carrying uniform flow is investigated with the purpose of clarifying two points of interest. The two commonly used definitions of acoustic 'energy' flux are shown to be related by a Legendre transformation of the Lagrangian density exactly as in deriving the Hamiltonian density in mechanics. In the acoustic case the total energy density and the Hamiltonian density are not the same which accounts for two different 'energy' fluxes. When the duct has acoustically absorptive walls neither of the two flux expressions gives correct results. A reevaluation of the basis of derivation of the energy density and energy flux provides forms which yield consistent results for soft walled ducts.

  3. Computing Propagation Of Sound In Engine Ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saylor, Silvia

    1995-01-01

    Frequency Domain Propagation Model (FREDOM) computer program accounts for acoustic loads applied to components of engines. Models propagation of noise through fluids in ducts between components and through passages within components. Used not only to analyze hardware problems, but also for design purposes. Updated version of FREQPL program easier to use. Devised specifically for use in analyzing acoustic loads in rocket engines. Underlying physical and mathematical concepts implemented also applicable to acoustic propagation in other enclosed spaces; analyzing process plumbing and ducts in industrial buildings with view toward reducing noise in work areas.

  4. Modern management of common bile duct stones.

    PubMed

    Buxbaum, James

    2013-04-01

    It is imperative for gastroenterologists to understand the different formations of bile duct stones and the various medical treatments available. To minimize the complications of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), it is critical to appropriately assess the risk of bile duct stones before intervention. Biliary endoscopists should be comfortable with the basic techniques of stone removal, including sphincterotomy, mechanical lithotripsy, and stent placement. It is important to be aware of advanced options, including laser and electrohydraulic stone fragmentation, and papillary dilatation for problematic cases. The timing and need for ERCP in those who require a cholecystectomy is also a consideration. PMID:23540960

  5. Fundamental investigation of duct/ESP phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, C.A. ); Durham, M.D. ); Sowa, W.A. . Combustion Lab.); Himes, R.M. ); Mahaffey, W.A. )

    1991-10-21

    Radian Corporation was contracted to investigate duct injection and ESP phenomena in a 1.7 MW pilot plant constructed for this test program. This study was an attempt to resolve problems found in previous studies and answer remaining questions for the technology using an approach which concentrates on the fundamental mechanisms of the process. The goal of the study was to obtain a better understanding of the basic physical and chemical phenomena that control: (1) the desulfurization of flue gas by calcium-based reagent, and (2) the coupling of an existing ESP particulate collection device to the duct injection process. Process economics are being studied by others. (VC)

  6. Preconditioning the Helmholtz Equation for Rigid Ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, Kenneth J.; Kreider, Kevin L.

    1998-01-01

    An innovative hyperbolic preconditioning technique is developed for the numerical solution of the Helmholtz equation which governs acoustic propagation in ducts. Two pseudo-time parameters are used to produce an explicit iterative finite difference scheme. This scheme eliminates the large matrix storage requirements normally associated with numerical solutions to the Helmholtz equation. The solution procedure is very fast when compared to other transient and steady methods. Optimization and an error analysis of the preconditioning factors are present. For validation, the method is applied to sound propagation in a 2D semi-infinite hard wall duct.

  7. Congenital Atresia of Wharton’s Duct

    PubMed Central

    Hseu, Anne; Anne, Premchand

    2016-01-01

    This is a case report of a three-month-old male who presented to clinic with a cystic lesion under the tongue. On clinical examination, a cystic lesion was observed in the, floor-of-mouth. The patient was referred to Paediatric Otorhinolaryngology service for further management. The differential diagnoses for floor-of-mouth lesions should be reviewed with primary focus on the Wharton’s duct atresia and its management. It is crucial to recognize submandibular duct atresia in the primary Paediatric clinic in order to expedite management of lesion before complications arise including infection, enlargement of cyst, and feeding and breathing difficulties. PMID:27042492

  8. What Should You Ask Your Doctor about Bile Duct Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... treatment for bile duct cancer? What should you ask your doctor about bile duct cancer? It is ... your own. For instance, you might want to ask about clinical trials for which you may qualify. ...

  9. Experimental evaluation of a pilot multinozzle-duct apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Puster, R. L.

    1979-01-01

    A pilot multinozzle and duct were tested at ambient enthalpy to evaluate the suitability of such apparatus for testing thermal protection system panels mounted in the sidewalls of the duct downstream of the nozzle array. The flow field in the duct was complex: effects of wakes and shock waves from the nozzle dominated the flow field; the wakes continually mixed with the surrounding fluid; the boundary layer on the sidewalls of the duct was nonuniform; and near the exit of the duct the sidewall pressure variation was as much as 8.5 percent about the mean wall pressure. Starting loads on the duct walls were higher than those of a similar conventional nozzle and duct. It was concluded that the multinozzle-duct apparatus was not suitable for testing TPS panels, although the design and flow-field information should be of interest to designers of high-energy gasdynamic lasers.

  10. Combinatorial Geometry Printer Plotting.

    1987-01-05

    Picture generates plots of two-dimensional slices through the three-dimensional geometry described by the combinatorial geometry (CG) package used in such codes as MORSE and QAD-CG. These plots are printed on a standard line printer.

  11. In-duct identification of fluid-borne source with high spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heo, Yong-Ho; Ih, Jeong-Guon; Bodén, Hans

    2014-11-01

    Source identification of acoustic characteristics of in-duct fluid machinery is required for coping with the fluid-borne noise. By knowing the acoustic pressure and particle velocity field at the source plane in detail, the sound generation mechanism of a fluid machine can be understood. The identified spatial distribution of the strength of major radiators would be useful for the low noise design. Conventional methods for measuring the source in a wide duct have not been very helpful in investigating the source properties in detail because their spatial resolution is improper for the design purpose. In this work, an inverse method to estimate the source parameters with a high spatial resolution is studied. The theoretical formulation including the evanescent modes and near-field measurement data is given for a wide duct. After validating the proposed method to a duct excited by an acoustic driver, an experiment on a duct system driven by an air blower is conducted in the presence of flow. A convergence test for the evanescent modes is performed to find the necessary number of modes to regenerate the measured pressure field precisely. By using the converged modal amplitudes, very-close near-field pressure to the source is regenerated and compared with the measured pressure, and the maximum error was -16.3 dB. The source parameters are restored from the converged modal amplitudes. Then, the distribution of source parameters on the driver and the blower is clearly revealed with a high spatial resolution for kR<1.84 in which range only plane waves can propagate to far field in a duct. Measurement using a flush mounted sensor array is discussed, and the removal of pure radial modes in the modeling is suggested.

  12. General 2 charge geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Marika

    2006-03-01

    Two charge BPS horizon free supergravity geometries are important in proposals for understanding black hole microstates. In this paper we construct a new class of geometries in the NS1-P system, corresponding to solitonic strings carrying fermionic as well as bosonic condensates. Such geometries are required to account for the full microscopic entropy of the NS1-P system. We then briefly discuss the properties of the corresponding geometries in the dual D1-D5 system.

  13. Cold air systems: Sleeping giant

    SciTech Connect

    MacCracken, C.D. )

    1994-04-01

    This article describes how cold air systems help owners increase the profits from their buildings by reducing electric costs and improving indoor air quality through lower relative humidity levels. Cold air distribution involves energy savings, cost savings, space savings, greater comfort, cleaner air, thermal storage, tighter ducting, coil redesign, lower relative humidities, retrofitting, and improved indoor air quality (IAQ). It opens a door for architects, engineers, owners, builders, environmentalists, retrofitters, designers, occupants, and manufacturers. Three things have held up cold air's usage: multiple fan-powered boxes that ate up the energy savings of primary fans. Cold air room diffusers that provided inadequate comfort. Condensation from ducts, boxes, and diffusers. Such problems have been largely eliminated through research and development by utilities and manufacturers. New cold air diffusers no longer need fan powered boxes. It has also been found that condensation is not a concern so long as the ducts are located in air conditioned space, such as drop ceilings or central risers, where relative humidity falls quickly during morning startup.

  14. The refractive propagation factor and the rough evaporation duct experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doss-Hammel, Stephen M.; Tsintikidis, Dimitris; Davidson, Kenneth L.; Frederickson, Paul A.

    2003-03-01

    The Rough Evaporation Duct Experiment (RED) assessed the effects of the air-sea boundary layer on microwave and infrared (IR) signal propagation near the sea surface. The experiment was designed around the Floating Instrument Platform (FLIP) research platform, which was moored 10 kilometers off the northeast shore of Oahu, Hawaii. A 10-kilometer infrared propagation path was created from FLIP to a shore-based receiver and both scintillation and transmission measurements were made around the clock for a two-week period. An accurate model for the propagation of infrared signals in the marine atmospheric surface layer remains an elusive goal. Within the first tens of meters of elevation above the sea surface there are substantial vertical gradients of mass and temperature, and this has a strong effect on the prediction of extinction of the infrared signal. The effectiveness of the propagation models will be investigated and the results from the infrared signal propagation study during RED will be shown.

  15. Ducted Fan Designs Lead to Potential New Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    In 1994, aerospace engineers Rob Bulaga and Mike Moshier formed Trek Aerospace Inc., based in Folsom, California, to develop personal air vehicles using a novel ducted fan design. The company relied on Ames Research Center for a great deal of testing, the results of which have provided greater lift, lowered weight, more power, and improved maneuverability. The technology has been applied to three models: the Dragonfly UMR-1, the Springtail EFV, and the OVIWUN, a small-scale version that is for sale through the company's Web site. It is safer than a manned vehicle, and its size makes it relatively difficult for it to damage itself during test flights the way a larger mass, faster craft could.

  16. Geometry and Erdkinder.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Nathaniel J.

    2001-01-01

    Chronicles a teacher's first year teaching geometry at the Hershey Montessori Farm School in Huntsburg, Ohio. Instructional methods relied on Euclid primary readings and combined pure abstract logic with practical applications of geometry on the land. The course included geometry background imparted by Montessori elementary materials as well as…

  17. Minimum airflow reset of single-duct VAV terminal boxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Young-Hum

    Single duct Variable Air Volume (VAV) systems are currently the most widely used type of HVAC system in the United States. When installing such a system, it is critical to determine the minimum airflow set point of the terminal box, as an optimally selected set point will improve the level of thermal comfort and indoor air quality (IAQ) while at the same time lower overall energy costs. In principle, this minimum rate should be calculated according to the minimum ventilation requirement based on ASHRAE standard 62.1 and maximum heating load of the zone. Several factors must be carefully considered when calculating this minimum rate. Terminal boxes with conventional control sequences may result in occupant discomfort and energy waste. If the minimum rate of airflow is set too high, the AHUs will consume excess fan power, and the terminal boxes may cause significant simultaneous room heating and cooling. At the same time, a rate that is too low will result in poor air circulation and indoor air quality in the air-conditioned space. Currently, many scholars are investigating how to change the algorithm of the advanced VAV terminal box controller without retrofitting. Some of these controllers have been found to effectively improve thermal comfort, indoor air quality, and energy efficiency. However, minimum airflow set points have not yet been identified, nor has controller performance been verified in confirmed studies. In this study, control algorithms were developed that automatically identify and reset terminal box minimum airflow set points, thereby improving indoor air quality and thermal comfort levels, and reducing the overall rate of energy consumption. A theoretical analysis of the optimal minimum airflow and discharge air temperature was performed to identify the potential energy benefits of resetting the terminal box minimum airflow set points. Applicable control algorithms for calculating the ideal values for the minimum airflow reset were developed and

  18. Numerical Simulation of Noise from Supersonic Jets Passing Through a Rigid Duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandula, Max

    2012-01-01

    The generation, propagation and radiation of sound from a perfectly expanded Mach 2.5 cold supersonic jet flowing through an enclosed rigid-walled duct with an upstream J-deflector have been numerically simulated with the aid of OVERFLOW Navier-Stokes CFD code. A one-equation turbulence model is considered. While the near-field sound sources are computed by the CFD code, the far-field sound is evaluated by Kirchhoff surface integral formulation. Predictions of the farfield directivity of the OASPL (Overall Sound Pressure Level) agree satisfactorily with the experimental data previously reported by the author. Calculations also suggest that there is significant entrainment of air into the duct, with the mass flow rate of entrained air being about three times the jet exit mass flow rate.

  19. Will Duct Tape and Plastic Really Work? Issues Related to Expedient Shelter-In-Place

    SciTech Connect

    Sorensen, J.H.

    2002-08-30

    Expedient sheltering involves the use of common materials to enhance the safety of a room inside a building against the impacts of a chemical plume. The central premise behind taping and sealing with duct tape and plastic is to reduce airflow into a room. This paper reviews issues associated with the use of expedient sheltering materials and the effectiveness of this strategy. Expedient sheltering provides additional protection to people sheltering in place beyond that provided by the house and by a safe room without expedient measures. The materials chosen for taping and sealing--duct tape and plastic--are appropriate because they effectively reduce infiltration and the materials should withstand a vapor challenge. Taping is essential to reduce air infiltration. Plastic sheeting is not a critical element for reducing air infiltration, but it makes sealing off large windows easier.

  20. Thyroglossal Duct Carcinoma in a Cat.

    PubMed

    Moorer, Jeremiah D; Breshears, Melanie A; Dugat, Danielle R

    2016-01-01

    A 14 yr old castrated domestic shorthair cat presented for a fluid-filled structure in the ventral cervical region that had been present for 1 yr and had not resolved after repeated aspiration and drainage. Cervical computed tomography showed an approximately 10 cm, fluid-filled, multilobulated mass located on the ventrolateral right side of the cervical region extending into the thoracic inlet. Cytologic examination of the fluid revealed cystic fluid with evidence of chronic hemorrhage. The mass was surgically removed, and histopathologic examination revealed a thyroglossal duct carcinoma. Thyroid and parathyroid gland origin were ruled out by negative immunohistochemical staining for thyroglobulin, parathyroid hormone, calcitonin, and synaptophysin. No adjunctive treatment was performed and no recurrence was noted at 14 mo. Thyroglossal duct carcinoma has not been previously reported in a cat. There are two previous reports of squamous cell carcinoma of the thyroglossal duct in dogs. In humans, with complete removal and no evidence of metastasis, carcinoma of the thyroglossal duct has a good prognosis for recovery. PMID:27259027

  1. Idea Bank: Duct Tape Note Twister

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McHenry, Molly

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author relates how she observed a middle school math teacher deliver a miserable class. She realized that she did the same thing to her music students. To engage her students, she developed "Note Twister," a music reading game using duct tape to form musical notes and the basic premise behind the game, "Twister." She finds…

  2. Starting flow in regular polygonal ducts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C. Y.

    2016-06-01

    The starting flows in regular polygonal ducts of S = 3, 4, 5, 6, 8 sides are determined by the method of eigenfunction superposition. The necessary S-fold symmetric eigenfunctions and eigenvalues of the Helmholtz equation are found either exactly or by boundary point match. The results show the starting time is governed by the first eigenvalue.

  3. Thoracoscopic Ligation of the Thoracic Duct

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Julio A.

    2000-01-01

    Objective: When nonoperative treatment of chylothorax fails, thoracic duct ligation is usually performed through a thoracotomy. We describe two cases of persistent chylothorax, in a child and an adult, successfully treated with thoracoscopic ligation of the thoracic duct. Methods: A 4-year-old girl developed a right chylothorax following a Fontan procedure. Aggressive nonoperative management failed to eliminate the persistent chyle loss. A 72-year-old insulin-dependent diabetic man was involved in a motor vehicle accident, in which he sustained multiple fractured ribs, a right hemopneumothorax, a right femoral shaft fracture, and a T-11 thoracic vertebral fracture. Subsequently, he developed a right chylothorax, which did not respond to nonoperative management. Both patients were successfully treated with thoracoscopic ligation of the thoracic duct. Results: The child had significant decrease of chyle drainage following surgery. Increased drainage that appeared after the introduction of full feedings five days postoperatively was controlled with the somatostatin analog octreotide. The chest tube was removed two weeks after surgery. After two years' follow-up, she has had no recurrence of chylothorax. The adult had no chyle drainage following surgery. He was maintained on a medium-chain triglyceride diet postoperatively for two weeks. The chest tube was removed four days after surgery. After six months' follow-up, he has had no recurrence of chylothorax. Conclusions: Thoracoscopic ligation of the thoracic duct provides a safe and effective treatment of chylothorax and may avoid thoracotomy and its associated morbidity. PMID:10987402

  4. 46 CFR 116.610 - Ventilation ducts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... prevent corrosion; (4) Fire dampers must be capable of manual operation from outside the space served, be... damper, automatic damper, or vent cover, must be provided in an accessible location outside the space... duct penetrating an A-Class fire control boundary and opening into a space formed by that boundary...

  5. 46 CFR 116.610 - Ventilation ducts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... prevent corrosion; (4) Fire dampers must be capable of manual operation from outside the space served, be... damper, automatic damper, or vent cover, must be provided in an accessible location outside the space... duct penetrating an A-Class fire control boundary and opening into a space formed by that boundary...

  6. Sound attenuation of fiberglass lined ventilation ducts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albright, Jacob

    Sound attenuation is a crucial part of designing any HVAC system. Most ventilation systems are designed to be in areas occupied by one or more persons. If these systems do not adequately attenuate the sound of the supply fan, compressor, or any other source of sound, the affected area could be subject to an array of problems ranging from an annoying hum to a deafening howl. The goals of this project are to quantify the sound attenuation properties of fiberglass duct liner and to perform a regression analysis to develop equations to predict insertion loss values for both rectangular and round duct liners. The first goal was accomplished via insertion loss testing. The tests performed conformed to the ASTM E477 standard. Using the insertion loss test data, regression equations were developed to predict insertion loss values for rectangular ducts ranging in size from 12-in x 18-in to 48-in x 48-in in lengths ranging from 3ft to 30ft. Regression equations were also developed to predict insertion loss values for round ducts ranging in diameters from 12-in to 48-in in lengths ranging from 3ft to 30ft.

  7. Comparison of conversion coefficients for equivalent dose in terms of air kerma using a sitting and standing female adult voxel simulators exposure to photons in antero-posterior irradiation geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavalcante, F. R.; Galeano, D. C.; Carvalho Júnior, A. B.; Hunt, J.

    2014-02-01

    Due to the difficulty in implementing invasive techniques for calculations of dose for some exposure scenarios, computational simulators have been created to represent as realistically as possible the structures of the human body and through radiation transport simulations to obtain conversion coefficients (CCs) to estimate dose. In most published papers simulators are implemented in the standing posture and this may not describe a real scenario of exposure. In this work we developed exposure scenarios in the Visual Monte Carlo (VMC) code using a female simulator in standing and sitting postures. The simulator was irradiated in the antero-posterior (AP) geometry by a plane source of monoenergetic photons with energy from 10 keV to 2 MeV. The conversion coefficients for equivalent dose in terms of air kerma (HT/Kair) were calculated for both scenarios and compared. The results show that the percentage difference of CCs for the organs of the head and thorax was not significant (less than 5%) since the anatomic position of the organs is the same in both postures. The percentage difference is more significant to the ovaries (71% for photon energy of 20 keV), to the bladder (39% at 60 keV) and to the uterus (37% at 100 keV) due to different processes of radiation interactions in the legs of the simulator when its posture is changed. For organs and tissues that are distributed throughout the entire body, such as bone (21% at 100 keV) and muscle (30% at 80 keV) the percentage difference of CCs reflects a reduction of interaction of photons with the legs of the simulator. Therefore, the calculation of conversion coefficients using simulators in the sitting posture is relevant for a more accurate dose estimation in real exposures to radiation.

  8. Comparison of conversion coefficients for equivalent dose in terms of air kerma for photons using a male adult voxel simulator in sitting and standing posture with geometry of irradiation antero-posterior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galeano, D. C.; Cavalcante, F. R.; Carvalho, A. B.; Hunt, J.

    2014-02-01

    The dose conversion coefficient (DCC) is important to quantify and assess effective doses associated with medical, professional and public exposures. The calculation of DCCs using anthropomorphic simulators and radiation transport codes is justified since in-vivo measurement of effective dose is extremely difficult and not practical for occupational dosimetry. DCCs have been published by the ICRP using simulators in a standing posture, which is not always applicable to all exposure scenarios, providing an inaccurate dose estimation. The aim of this work was to calculate DCCs for equivalent dose in terms of air kerma (H/Kair) using the Visual Monte Carlo (VMC) code and the VOXTISS8 adult male voxel simulator in sitting and standing postures. In both postures, the simulator was irradiated by a plane source of monoenergetic photons in antero-posterior (AP) geometry. The photon energy ranged from 15 keV to 2 MeV. The DCCs for both postures were compared and the DCCs for the standing simulator were higher. For certain organs, the difference of DCCs were more significant, as in gonads (48% higher), bladder (16% higher) and colon (11% higher). As these organs are positioned in the abdominal region, the posture of the anthropomorphic simulator modifies the form in which the radiation is transported and how the energy is deposited. It was also noted that the average percentage difference of conversion coefficients was 33% for the bone marrow, 11% for the skin, 13% for the bone surface and 31% for the muscle. For other organs, the percentage difference of the DCCs for both postures was not relevant (less than 5%) due to no anatomical changes in the organs of the head, chest and upper abdomen. We can conclude that is important to obtain DCCs using different postures from those present in the scientific literature.

  9. The Energy Implications of Air-Side Fouling in Constant Air Volume HVAC Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Eric J. H.

    2011-12-01

    This thesis examines the effect of air-side fouling on the energy consumption of constant air volume (CAV) heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems in residential and small commercial buildings. There is a particular focus on evaluating the potential energy savings that may result from the remediation of such fouling from coils, filters, and other air system components. A computer model was constructed to simulate the behavior of a building and its duct system under various levels of fouling. The model was verified through laboratory and field testing and then used to run parametric simulations to examine the range of energy impacts for various climates and duct system characteristics. A sensitivity analysis was conducted to determine the impact of parameters like duct insulation, duct leakage, duct location, and duct design on savings potential. Duct system pressures, temperatures, and energy consumption for two houses were monitored for one month. The houses' duct systems, which were both in conditioned space, were given a full cleaning, and were then monitored for another month. The flow rates at the houses improved by 10% and 6%. The improvements were primarily due to installing a new filter, as both houses had only light coil fouling. The results indicate that there was negligible change in heating energy efficiency due to the system cleaning. The parametric simulation results are in agreement with the field experiment: for systems in all eight climates, with flowrates degraded by 20% or less, if ducts are located within the thermal zone, HVAC source energy savings from cleaning are negligible or even slightly negative. However, if ducts are outside the thermal zone, savings are in the 1 to 5% range. For systems with flowrates degraded by 40%, if ducts are within the thermal zone, savings from cleaning occurs only for air conditioning energy, up to 8% in climates like Miami, FL. If ducts are outside the thermal zone, savings occurs with both

  10. A bidirectional microphone for the measurement of duct noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Fontaine, R. F.; Shepherd, I. C.; Cabelli, A.

    1985-08-01

    A bidirectional microphone which resolves acoustic plane waves in ducts into forward and backward propagating components is described. The microphone has a flat frequency response and finds applications in the analysis of duct noise and in the determination of reflection coefficients for various duct configurations. It can also be employed as a unidirectional microphone in active noise attenuators.

  11. The effect of inlet boundary layer thickness on the flow within an annular S-shaped duct

    SciTech Connect

    Sonoda, T.; Arima, T.; Oana, M.

    1999-07-01

    Experimental and numerical investigations were carried out to gain a better understanding of the flow characteristics within an annular S-shaped duct, including the effect of the inlet boundary layer (IBL) on the flow. A duct with six struts and the geometry as that used to connect compressor spools on the experimental small two-spool turbofan engine was investigated. A curved downstream annular passage with similar meridional flow path geometry to that of the centrifugal compressor has been fitted at the exit of S-shaped duct. Two types of the IBL (i.e., thin and thick IBL) were used. Results showed that large differences of flow patterns were observed at the S-shaped duct exit between two types of IBL, though the value of net total pressure loss has not been remarkably changed. According to overall total pressure loss, which includes the IBL loss, the total pressure loss was greatly increased near the hub as compared to that for a thin one. For the thick IBL, a vortex pair related to the hub-side horseshoe vortex and the separated flow found at the strut trailing edge has been clearly captured in the form of the total pressure loss contours and secondary flow vectors, experimentally and numerically. The high-pressure loss regions on either side of the strut wake near the hub may act on a downstream compressor performance. There is a much-distorted three-dimensional flow patterns at the exit of S-shaped duct. This means that the aerodynamic sensitivity of S-shaped duct to the IBL thickness is very high. Therefore, sufficient care is needed to design not only downstream aerodynamic components (for example, centrifugal impeller) but also upstream aerodynamic components (LPC OGV).

  12. Development of cooling strategy for an air cooled lithium-ion battery pack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hongguang; Dixon, Regan

    2014-12-01

    This paper describes a cooling strategy development method for an air cooled battery pack with lithium-ion pouch cells used in a hybrid electric vehicle (HEV). The challenges associated with the temperature uniformity across the battery pack, the temperature uniformity within each individual lithium-ion pouch cell, and the cooling efficiency of the battery pack are addressed. Initially, a three-dimensional battery pack thermal model developed based on simplified electrode theory is correlated to physical test data. An analytical design of experiments (DOE) approach using Optimal Latin-hypercube technique is then developed by incorporating a DOE design model, the correlated battery pack thermal model, and a morphing model. Analytical DOE studies are performed to examine the effects of cooling strategies including geometries of the cooling duct, cooling channel, cooling plate, and corrugation on battery pack thermal behavior and to identify the design concept of an air cooled battery pack to maximize its durability and its driving range.

  13. Numerical Predictions of Mode Reflections in an Open Circular Duct: Comparison with Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahl, Milo D.; Hixon, Ray

    2015-01-01

    The NASA Broadband Aeroacoustic Stator Simulation code was used to compute the acoustic field for higher-order modes in a circular duct geometry. To test the accuracy of the results computed by the code, the duct was terminated by an open end with an infinite flange or no flange. Both open end conditions have a theoretical solution that was used to compare with the computed results. Excellent comparison for reflection matrix values was achieved after suitable refinement of the grid at the open end. The study also revealed issues with the level of the mode amplitude introduced into the acoustic held from the source boundary and the amount of reflection that occurred at the source boundary when a general nonreflecting boundary condition was applied.

  14. Active Control of Fan Noise: Feasibility Study. Volume 6; Theoretical Analysis for Coupling of Active Noise Control Actuator Ring Sources to an Annular Duct with Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraft, R. E.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this effort is to develop an analytical model for the coupling of active noise control (ANC) piston-type actuators that are mounted flush to the inner and outer walls of an annular duct to the modes in the duct generated by the actuator motion. The analysis will be used to couple the ANC actuators to the modal analysis propagation computer program for the annular duct, to predict the effects of active suppression of fan-generated engine noise sources. This combined program will then be available to assist in the design or evaluation of ANC systems in fan engine annular exhaust ducts. An analysis has been developed to predict the modes generated in an annular duct due to the coupling of flush-mounted ring actuators on the inner and outer walls of the duct. The analysis has been combined with a previous analysis for the coupling of modes to a cylindrical duct in a FORTRAN computer program to perform the computations. The method includes the effects of uniform mean flow in the duct. The program can be used for design or evaluation purposes for active noise control hardware for turbofan engines. Predictions for some sample cases modeled after the geometry of the NASA Lewis ANC Fan indicate very efficient coupling in both the inlet and exhaust ducts for the m = 6 spinning mode at frequencies where only a single radial mode is cut-on. Radial mode content in higher order cut-off modes at the source plane and the required actuator displacement amplitude to achieve 110 dB SPL levels in the desired mode were predicted. Equivalent cases with and without flow were examined for the cylindrical and annular geometry, and little difference was found for a duct flow Mach number of 0.1. The actuator ring coupling program will be adapted as a subroutine to the cylindrical duct modal analysis and the exhaust duct modal analysis. This will allow the fan source to be defined in terms of characteristic modes at the fan source plane and predict the propagation to the

  15. Air ejector augmented compressed air energy storage system

    DOEpatents

    Ahrens, Frederick W.; Kartsounes, George T.

    1980-01-01

    Energy is stored in slack demand periods by charging a plurality of underground reservoirs with air to the same peak storage pressure, during peak demand periods throttling the air from one storage reservoir into a gas turbine system at a constant inlet pressure until the air pressure in the reservoir falls to said constant inlet pressure, thereupon permitting air in a second reservoir to flow into said gas turbine system while drawing air from the first reservoir through a variable geometry air ejector and adjusting said variable geometry air ejector, said air flow being essentially at the constant inlet pressure of the gas turbine system.

  16. Air ejector augmented compressed air energy storage system

    DOEpatents

    Ahrens, F.W.; Kartsounes, G.T.

    Energy is stored in slack demand periods by charging a plurality of underground reservoirs with air to the same peak storage pressure, during peak demand periods throttling the air from one storage reservoir into a gas turbine system at a constant inlet pressure until the air presure in the reservoir falls to said constant inlet pressure, thereupon permitting air in a second reservoir to flow into said gas turbine system while drawing air from the first reservoir through a variable geometry air ejector and adjusting said variable geometry air ejector, said air flow being essentially at the constant inlet pressure of the gas turbine system.

  17. Aerosol sampling from stacks and ducts at the Rocky Flats Plant

    SciTech Connect

    McFarlane, A.R.; Anand, N.K.; Ortiz, C.A.

    1995-12-31

    While the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) in Golden, CO is being decommissioned; there is air flow through the ventilation systems in the buildings. Although the air is HEPA filtered, under the requirements of both the U.S. EPA and the U.S. DOE, several of the stacks and ducts must be continuously monitored for radionuclide aerosol particles, where plutonium is the principal radionuclide of concern. The air sampling effort for compliance with EPA requirements is focussed on the acquisition of representative aerosol samples, which are collected on filters and subsequently analyzed in a laboratory. The goal of the DOE sampling is to acquire representative samples that can be analyzed with near-real-time monitors for alarming purposes, where the alarms are used to warn workers that may be affected by elevated concentrations of radionuclides. The air sampling at RFP is based on single point representative sampling with a shrouded probe. For stacks and ducts that are under the cognizance of EPA, the approach is embodied in a set of Alternate Reference Methodologies that EPA has approved for use at DOE facilities. Shrouded probes were designed based on numerical predictions of performance and the efficacy of the probes was verified by wind tunnel tests. Aerosol transport lines were designed using a code, DEPOSITION that provides optimization of aerosol penetration. Adequacy of a location for single point sampling was based on numerical criteria for mixing of both contaminant mass and fluid momentum as manifested by the uniformity of the velocity profile and the profiles of tracer gas and aerosol particles. Scale models were constructed of key ducts and these were tested in the laboratory to determine the proper locations. For ducts and stacks that fall under DOE, but not EPA requirements, similar methodology was used; however, the single point sampling location is based on alarming considerations.

  18. Basement utility room (room 24; air handling room), near the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Basement utility room (room 24; air handling room), near the west end of the combat operations center, looking southwest towards fan system one, air ducts, and walk-in filter rooms. The exterior equipment well is visible at the left - March Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command, Combat Operations Center, 5220 Riverside Drive, Moreno Valley, Riverside County, CA

  19. Duct injection for SO{sub 2} control, Design Handbook, Volume 1, Process design and engineering guidelines

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    PETC developed a comprehensive program of coal-related, acid-rain research and development with a major activity area centering on flue gas cleanup and control of SO{sub 2} emissions. Particular emphasis was placed on the retrofit measures for older coal-fired power plants which predate the 1971 New Source Performance Standards. Candidate emission control technologies fall into three categories, depending upon their point of application along the fuel path (i.e., pre, during, or post combustion). The post-combustion, in-duct injection of a calcium-based chemical reagent seemed promising. Preliminary studies showed that reagent injection between the existing air heater and electrostatic precipitator (ESP) could remove between 50-60% of the SO{sub 2} and produce an environmentally safe, dry, solid waste that is easily disposed. Although SO{sub 2} removal efficiencies were less, the estimated capital costs for duct injection technology were low making the economics of duct injection systems seem favorable when compared to conventional wet slurry scrubbers under certain circumstances. With the promulgation of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 came more incentive for the development of low capital cost flue gas desulfurization (FGD) processes. A number of technical problems had to be resolved, however, before duct injection technology could be brought to a state of commercial readiness. The Duct Injection Technology Development Program was launched as a comprehensive, four-year research effort undertaken by PETC to develop this new technology. Completed in 1992, this Duct Injection Design Handbook and the three-dimensional predictive mathematical model constitute two primary end products from this development program. The aim of this design handbook and the accompanying math model is to provide utility personnel with sufficient information to evaluate duct injection technology against competing SO{sub 2} emissions reduction strategies for an existing plant.

  20. The influence of downstream passage on the flow within an annular S-shaped duct

    SciTech Connect

    Sonoda, T.; Arima, T.; Oana, M.

    1998-10-01

    Experimental and numerical investigations were carried out to gain a better understanding of the flow characteristics within an annular S-shaped duct, including the influence of the shape of the downstream passage located at the exit of the duct on the flow. A duct with six struts and the same geometry as that used to connect the compressor spools on the new experimental small two-spool turbofan engine was investigated. Two types of downstream passage were used. One type had a straight annular passage and the other a curved annular passage with a meridional flow path geometry similar to that of the centrifugal compressor. Results showed that the total pressure loss near the hub is large due to instability of the flow, as compared with that near the casing. Also, a vortex related to the horseshoe vortex was observed near the casing. In the case of the curved annular passage, the total pressure loss near the hub was greatly increased compared with the case of the straight annular passage, and the spatial position of this vortex depends on the passage core pressure gradient. Furthermore, results of calculation using an in-house-developed three-dimensional Navier-Stokes code with a low-Reynolds-number {kappa}-{epsilon} turbulence model were in good qualitative agreement with experimental results. According to the simulation results, a region of very high pressure loss is observed near the hub at the duct exit with the increase of inlet boundary layer thickness. Such regions of high pressure loss may act on the downstream compressor as a large inlet distortion, and strongly affect downstream compressor performance.

  1. Experimental testing and computational modeling of flat oval duct deflection

    SciTech Connect

    Smolinski, P.J.; Palmer, G.S.

    1998-10-01

    The deflection characteristics of spiral seam flat oval HVAC duct are examined in this study, and the effects of duct size, wall thickness, and the size spacing, and type of external reinforcement on the duct deformation are investigated. A duct test setup and a deflection measurement frame were developed for measuring the deformation of flat oval duct, and experimental testing was performed on a variety of duct configurations to measure the duct deflections at various positive and negative internal pressures. Finite element computer models of the ducts were developed to predict the deflections. The correlation between the predictions of the computer model and the data from the experimental testing is highly variable with differences ranging from a few percent to several hundred percent. In general, it was found that there was closer agreement between the finite element results and the experimental measurements for smaller duct and at locations of type 2 external reinforcements. This may be due to the fact that the finite element model assumed the idealized flat oval shape and this shape was better matched by smaller ducts and near the external reinforcement. It was also found that in some cases, unreinforced duct could achieve higher pressures than type 1 reinforced duct before exceeding the deflection limits. Sources of error include the uneven surface of the mastic in the measurement of the duct joint deflection and the variance of the actual duct shape from the idealized shape used in the finite element model. This study did not examine the variability of the experimental results due to differences in duct shape or manufacture.

  2. PLUTONIUM FINISHING PLANT (PFP) GENERALIZED GEOMETRY HOLDUP CALCULATIONS & TOTAL MEASUREMENT UNCERTAINTY

    SciTech Connect

    KEELE BD

    2005-02-01

    A collimated portable gamma-ray detector will be used to quantify the plutonium content of items that can be approximated as a point, line, or area geometry with respect to the detector. These items can include ducts, piping, glove boxes, isolated equipment inside of gloveboxes, and HEPA filters. The Generalized Geometry Holdup (GGH) model is used for the reduction of counting data. This document specifies the calculations to reduce counting data into contained plutonium and the associated total measurement uncertainty.

  3. Transition duct with divided upstream and downstream portions

    SciTech Connect

    McMahan, Kevin Weston; LeBegue, Jeffrey Scott; Maldonado, Jaime Javier; Dillard, Daniel Jackson; Flanagan, James Scott

    2015-07-14

    Turbine systems are provided. In one embodiment, a turbine system includes a transition duct comprising an inlet, an outlet, and a duct passage extending between the inlet and the outlet and defining a longitudinal axis, a radial axis, and a tangential axis. The outlet of the transition duct is offset from the inlet along the longitudinal axis and the tangential axis. The duct passage includes an upstream portion extending from the inlet and a downstream portion extending from the outlet. The turbine system further includes a rib extending from an outer surface of the duct passage, the rib dividing the upstream portion and the downstream portion.

  4. Acoustic radiation from lined, unflanged ducts: Acoustic source distribution program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckemeyer, R. J.; Sawdy, D. T.

    1971-01-01

    An acoustic radiation analysis was developed to predict the far-field characteristics of fan noise radiated from an acoustically lined unflanged duct. This analysis is comprised of three modular digital computer programs which together provide a capability of accounting for the impedance mismatch at the duct exit plane. Admissible duct configurations include circular or annular, with or without an extended centerbody. This variation in duct configurations provides a capability of modeling inlet and fan duct noise radiation. The computer programs are described in detail.

  5. An analysis of the acoustic energy in a flow duct with a vortex sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boij, Susann

    2009-03-01

    Modelling the acoustic scattering and absorption at an area expansion in a flow duct requires the incorporation of the flow-acoustic interaction. One way to quantify the interaction is to study the energy in the incident and the scattered field respectively. If the interaction is strong, energy may be transferred between the acoustic and the main flow field. In particular, shear layers, that may be the result of the flow separation, are unstable to low frequency perturbations such as acoustic waves. The vortex sheet model is an analytical linear acoustic model, developed to study scattering of acoustic waves in duct with sharp edges including the interaction with primarily the separated flows that arise at sharp edges and corners. In the model the flow field at an area expansion in a duct is described as a jet issuing into the larger part of the duct. In this paper, the flow-acoustic interaction is described in terms of energy flow. The linear convective wave equation is solved for a two-dimensional, rectangular flow duct geometry. The resulting modes are classified as "hydrodynamic" and "acoustic" when separating the acoustic energy from the part of the energy arising from the steady flow field. In the downstream duct, the set of modes for this complex flow field are not orthogonal. For small Strouhal numbers, the plane wave and the two hydrodynamic waves are all plane, although propagating with different wave speeds. As the Strouhal numbers increases, the hydrodynamic modes changes to get a shape where the amplitude is concentrated near the vortex sheet. In an intermediate Strouhal number region, the mode shape of the first higher order mode is very similar to the damped hydrodynamic mode. A physical interpretation of this is that we have a strong coupling between the flow field and the acoustic field when the modes are non-orthogonal. Energy concepts for this duct configuration and mean flow profile are introduced. The energy is formulated such that the vortex

  6. Investigation Flow Uniformity in a Supersonic Duct with High Enthalpy Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balboni, John; Atler, Doug; Gokcen, Tahir; Hartman, G. Joseph (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Flow uniformity in a high enthalpy facility is investigated. The scramjet research facility is composed of a rectangular combustor duct connected to a 100 MW electric arc air heater. The Mach 3.3 flow is accelerated through a two-dimensional contoured nozzle. Instream measurements were made with water-cooled Pitot probes and stagnation point heat flux gages at stream enthalpy levels ranging from 4 to 7 Mj/kg. Flow surveys were made on the flow centerline and off centerline in order to measure the three dimensional uniformity of the flow in the rectangular duct. Measurements indicated that although the flow in the aspect ratio 6:1 duct was relatively uniform on the centerline, three dimensional viscous effects were apparent near the corners. Flow through the nozzle and constant area duct was modeled computationally using a two dimensional, Navier-Stokes, reacting gas code. The computations predict that the flow in the test section is in vibrational equilibrium. The computed and measured Pitot pressure and heat flux profiles are in reasonable agreement with the experimental data.

  7. Curved Duct Noise Prediction Using the Fast Scattering Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, M. H.; Tinetti, Ana F.; Farassat, F.

    2007-01-01

    Results of a study to validate the Fast Scattering Code (FSC) as a duct noise predictor, including the effects of curvature, finite impedance on the walls, and uniform background flow, are presented in this paper. Infinite duct theory was used to generate the modal content of the sound propagating within the duct. Liner effects were incorporated via a sound absorbing boundary condition on the scattering surfaces. Simulations for a rectangular duct of constant cross-sectional area have been compared to analytical solutions and experimental data. Comparisons with analytical results indicate that the code can properly calculate a given dominant mode for hardwall surfaces. Simulated acoustic behavior in the presence of lined walls (using hardwall duct modes as incident sound) is consistent with expected trends. Duct curvature was found to enhance weaker modes and reduce pressure amplitude. Agreement between simulated and experimental results for a straight duct with hard walls (no flow) was excellent.

  8. Liquid-metal MHD flow in a duct whose cross section changes from a rectangle to a trapezoid, with applications in fusion blanket designs

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, J.S.

    1986-04-01

    This paper treats the liquid-metal MHD flow in a semi-infinite rectangular duct and a semi-infinite trapezoidal duct, which are connected by a finite-length transition duct. There is a strong, transverse, uniform magnetic field. The walls parallel to the magnetic field (sides) remain parallel, while the walls intersecting the magnetic field are twisted in the transition duct to provide the change in cross sectional shape. The left side has a constant height, while the height of the right side increases or decreases in the transition duct. This geometry gives a skewed velocity profile with a high velocity near the left side, provided the right side is relatively thick. All walls are thin and electrically conducting, but the sides are considerably thicker than the other walls. The application is to fusion-reactor blankets in which a high velocity near the first wall (separating the plasma chamber from the coolant) improves the thermal performance. Junctions of different ducts with walls parallel to the magnetic field are treated for the first time. In expansions, contractions and other geometric transition ducts, as well as in straight ducts with axially varying magnetic fields, the fluid flow and electric currents are concentrated in boundary layers adjacent to the sides and in the side. At a junction with a straight duct with a uniform magnetic field, the flow and current must transfer from the boundary layers adn sides to the core regions. These transfers at junctions play a key role in any three-dimensional flow.

  9. Study on numerical simulation of flowfield in afterburner for ducted rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Xiaoyu; Jin, Xing; Zhang, Peng

    2015-03-01

    Ducted rocket has been widely concerned on account of its high specific impulse, combustion stability and convenient maintenance which mixes the exhaust from a fuel gas generator with air from air inlet, and burns to produce thrust. It is necessary to establish two-dimensional or three-dimensional numerical models based on computational fluid dynamics to study on the flowfield in afterburner which is the key of ducted rocket because of expensive experiments, which is aimed at providing theoretical foundation for ducted rocket's development. In this paper, the gas-phase turbulent combustion process in afterburner with dual inlet three-dimensional mode was simulated numerically by solving Favre-averaged compressible turbulent N-S equations, the renormalization group (RNG) k-ɛ turbulence model was applied to simulate the turbulent flow, and Eddy-Dissipation Model (EDM) was applied to simulate gas combustion. Through simulation, situation analysis of flowfield in afterburner was done, and the influence of mixing combustion on afterburner was studied by taking air inlet angles and air-fuel ratio into account respectively. The results indicate that the distribution of temperature in afterburner is nonuniform, the backflow and axial swirl produced by gas mixing have an important influence on afterburner combustion. As air inlet angle is increased, the intensity of gas mixing is enhanced which is beneficial for afterburner combustion. That increasing air-fuel ratio is able to strength contact of oxygen with fuel gas, so that more fuel gas is consumed in the same location which is more beneficial for afterburner combustion.

  10. Hydrogen-air ignition torch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Repas, G. A.

    1986-01-01

    The design and operation of a hydrogen-air ignition torch presently being used to burn off excess hydrogen that accumulates in the scrubber exhaust ducts of two rocket engine test facilities at the NASA Lewis Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio, is described.

  11. Contrasting the efficiency of radiation belt losses caused by ducted and non-ducted whistler mode waves from manmade transmitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodger, C. J.; Carson, Bonar; Cummer, Steven A.; Gamble, R. J.; Clilverd, Mark; Sauvaud, Jean-Andre; Parrot, Michel; Green, Janet

    Electromagnetic waves in the VLF range generated at or near the Earth's surface can penetrate the ionosphere and propagate through the plasmasphere. It has long been recognized that whistler-mode waves can be trapped in localized field-aligned enhancements in plasmaspheric ionization density termed "whistler ducts", which guide the waves from one hemisphere to the other. For the non-guided cases, the whistler mode waves are said to be "nonducted". The nature of wave-particle interactions are affected by the wave being ducted or non-ducted through influence on the wave-normal angles. In the field-aligned ducted case, the dominant resonance possible is first-order cyclotron, whereas non-ducted interactions open up a much wider range of energies through equatorial and off-equatorial gyro-resonance. Thus the significance of these VLF waves as drivers of radiation belt losses is strongly influenced by whether these waves are dominantly ducted or non-ducted. At this point there is conflicting information in the literature as to whether the most significant loss processes are driven by ducted or non-ducted waves. In this study we use loss cone observations from instruments onboard the DEMETER and POES low-altitude satellites to focus on losses driven by powerful VLF communications transmitters. We wish to better characterise the losses previously reported and explained through interactions with ducted VLF transmissions. We also plan to examine losses into the atmosphere driven by non-ducted transmissions.

  12. Theoretical analysis of HVAC duct hanger systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. D.

    1987-01-01

    Several methods are presented which, together, may be used in the analysis of duct hanger systems over a wide range of frequencies. The finite element method (FEM) and component mode synthesis (CMS) method are used for low- to mid-frequency range computations and have been shown to yield reasonably close results. The statistical energy analysis (SEA) method yields predictions which agree with the CMS results for the 800 to 1000 Hz range provided that a sufficient number of modes participate. The CMS approach has been shown to yield valuable insight into the mid-frequency range of the analysis. It has been demonstrated that it is possible to conduct an analysis of a duct/hanger system in a cost-effective way for a wide frequency range, using several methods which overlap for several frequency bands.

  13. Porokeratotic Eccrine Ostial and Dermal Duct Nevus

    PubMed Central

    Naraghi, Mona Masoumeh; Goodarzi, Azadeh

    2013-01-01

    PEODDN is a rare benign cutaneous disorder that clinically resembles comedo nevus but favors the palms and soles, where pilosebaceous follicles are absent. Widespread involvement along Blaschko's lines can also occur. It is a disorder of keratinization involving the intraepidermal eccrine duct (acrosyringium) and is characterized by eccrine hamartoma and cornoid lamellation in pathology. The patient is a 29-year-old man with an 8-year history of pruritic skin lesions on his right lateral ankle. In the pathologic examination, multiple small epidermal invagination with overlying parakeratotic cornoid lamellation, loss of granular layer, and few dyskeratotic cells at the base of epidermal invagination are revealed. After clinic-pathologic correlation, the diagnosis of porokeratotic eccrine ostial and dermal duct nevus (PEODDN) was made. Late-onset and rare clinical presentation as pruritic lesion are the characteristic features that make this patient an extraordinary presentation of PEODDN. PMID:24307955

  14. Sea echo in tropospheric ducting environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappert, R. A.; Paulus, R. A.; Tappert, F. D.

    1992-04-01

    Path loss formulas for sea surface backscatter are developed for horizontally stratified tropospheric ducting environments. First-order Bragg backscatter results coupled with ray and waveguide formalism serve as the basis for the development. Two features of composite model formalism, namely shadowing and tilting of the surface normal in the plane of incidence, are included in the development. Though developed for hh polarization, conventional composite model modifications for vertical polarization and depolarization can be incorporated into the echo models. Comparisons are made with previously generated parabolic equation results and with empirical model results generated by Engineers Refractive Effects Prediction System. These comparisons are for a frequency of 9.6 GHz for the standard atmosphere and for 14- and 28-m evaporation ducts. Results apply to wind speeds of 10, 20, 30, and 40 knots (about 5, 10, 15, and 20 m/s).

  15. Evaporation duct assessment from meteorological buoys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hitney, Herbert V.

    2002-07-01

    The evaporation duct over the sea is usually assessed using bulk meteorological measurements. This paper investigates the utility of meteorological buoys as a source for these bulk measurements and compares evaporation duct assessments using two buoys in southern California waters separated by 128 km. A simple radio propagation experiment at 2.4 GHz between one of the buoys and the coast on an 18.2 km path is described. Observed propagation loss from this experiment is compared to modeled loss based on the meteorological measurements at each buoy. The purpose of this paper is to investigate radio propagation effects using established and accepted methods already described in the literature. Accordingly, no discussion of atmospheric surface layer meteorology affecting radio propagation is given.

  16. Low frequency sound attenuation in a flow duct using a thin slow sound material.

    PubMed

    Aurégan, Yves; Farooqui, Maaz; Groby, Jean-Philippe

    2016-05-01

    A thin subwavelength material that can be flush mounted in a duct and that gives an attenuation band at low frequencies in air flow channels is presented. To decrease the material thickness, the sound is slowed in the material using folded side branch tubes. The impedance of the material is compared to the optimal value given by the Cremer condition, which can differ greatly from the air characteristic impedance. Grazing flow on this material increases the losses at the interface between the flow and the material. PMID:27250200

  17. Ontogeny of the nasopalatine duct in primates.

    PubMed

    Shimp, Kristin L; Bhatnagar, Kunwar P; Bonar, Christopher J; Smith, Timothy D

    2003-09-01

    Ecological explanations have been put forward to account for the precocious or delayed development of patency in ducts leading to the vomeronasal organ (VNO) in certain mammals. Perinatal function may be related, in part, to the patency or fusion of the vomeronasal and nasopalatine (NPD) ducts. However, few studies have focused on NPD development in primates, which generally have a prolonged period of dependence during infancy. In this study we examined 24 prenatal primates and 13 neonatal primates, and a comparative sample of fetal mice and insectivores. In embryonic and early fetal Microcebus murinus, the NPD was completely fused, whereas in fetuses of later stages the duct was partially fused or completely patent. M. myoxinus of all stages demonstrated some degree of NPD fusion. In all other prenatal primates, the NPD was fused to some extent. Four prenatal insectivores (Tenrec ecaudatus) showed some degree of NPD fusion. In Mus musculus at 19 days gestation, the NPD was patent, although the anatomically separate VNO duct was fused. T. ecaudatus and most of the neonatal primates revealed complete NPD patency. An exception was Saguinus geoffroyi, which exhibited fusion of the NPD near the VNO opening. These observations may relate to differences in perinatal VNO function. The differences noted in our study suggest that M. murinus and M. myoxinus may differ in perinatal VNO functionality and perhaps in related behavior. Observations of neonatal primates suggest that NPD patency may be relatively common at birth and could serve other purposes in addition to being an access route for VNO stimuli. PMID:12923897

  18. Acoustic-Liner Admittance in a Duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, W. R.

    1986-01-01

    Method calculates admittance from easily obtainable values. New method for calculating acoustic-liner admittance in rectangular duct with grazing flow based on finite-element discretization of acoustic field and reposing of unknown admittance value as linear eigenvalue problem on admittance value. Problem solved by Gaussian elimination. Unlike existing methods, present method extendable to mean flows with two-dimensional boundary layers as well. In presence of shear, results of method compared well with results of Runge-Kutta integration technique.

  19. Zero leakage separable and semipermanent ducting joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mischel, H. T.

    1973-01-01

    A study program has been conducted to explore new methods of achieving zero leakage, separable and semipermanent, ducting joints for space flight vehicles. The study consisted of a search of literature of existing zero leakage methods, the generation of concepts of new methods of achieving the desired zero leakage criteria and the development of detailed analysis and design of a selected concept. Other techniques of leak detection were explored with a view toward improving this area.

  20. Autoignitions and detonations in engines and ducts.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Derek

    2012-02-13

    The origins of autoignition at hot spots are analysed and the pressure pulses that arise from them are related to knock in gasoline engines and to developing detonations in ducts. In controlled autoignition engines, autoignition is benign with little knock. There are several modes of autoignition and the existence of an operational peninsula, within which detonations can develop at a hot spot, helps to explain the performance of various engines. Earlier studies by Urtiew and Oppenheim of the development of autoignitions and detonations ahead of a deflagration in ducts are interpreted further, using a simple one-dimensional theory of the generation of shock waves ahead of a turbulent flame. The theory is able to indicate entry into the domain of autoignition in an 'explosion in the explosion'. Importantly, it shows the influence of the turbulent burning velocity, and particularly its maximum attainable value, upon autoignition. This value is governed by localized flame extinctions for both turbulent and laminar flames. The theory cannot show any details of the transition to a detonation, but regimes of eventually stable or unstable detonations can be identified on the operational peninsula. Both regimes exhibit transverse waves, triple points and a cellular structure. In the case of unstable detonations, transverse waves are essential to the continuing propagation. For hazard assessment, more needs to be known about the survival, or otherwise, of detonations that emerge from a duct into the same mixture at atmospheric pressure. PMID:22213665

  1. The transient response above an evaporation duct

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abo-Seliem, Adel A. S.

    1998-11-01

    The transient electromagnetic field generated by a vertical electric dipole above an evaporation duct is investigated theoretically. The evaporation duct model used is that previously described by Kahan and Eckart. A vertical electric dipole, above the surface layer, is taken as the source of the electromagnetic field. We determine the electrical field strength exactly at some fixed point above the duct layer, having chosen a certain polarization of the primary source whose moment is allowed to vary arbitrarily with time. A series expansion with respect to the images of the primary source permits us to apply the method first reported by Cagniard and later extended by de Hoop and Frankena to the case where the source is positioned in a medium of lesser permittivity. Hence, we can give a physically intuitive description of the polarization dependence of the time history of the electrical field strength. The distinction of different cases where the distances between the receiving and transmitting ends are greater or lesser than the total reflection distance is studied. The electrical field strength is evaluated for different excitation functions at some fixed but arbitrary positions of the point of observation in the half-space.

  2. Description of 0.186-scale model of high-speed duct of national transonic facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gentry, C. L., Jr.; Igoe, W. B.; Fuller, D. E.

    1981-01-01

    The National Transonic Facility (NTF) is a pressurized cryogenic wind tunnel with a 2.5 m square test section. A 0.186-scale model of the NTF was used to simulate the aerodynamic performance of the components of the high-speed duct of the NTF. These components consist of a wide-angle diffuser, settling chamber, contraction section, test section, model support section, and high-speed diffuser. The geometry of the model tunnel, referred to as the diffuser flow apparatus is described, and some of its operating characteristics are presented.

  3. Pronephric duct extension in amphibian embryos: migration and other mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Drawbridge, Julie; Meighan, Christopher M; Lumpkins, Rebecca; Kite, Mary E

    2003-01-01

    Initiation of excretory system development in all vertebrates requires (1) delamination of the pronephric and pronephric duct rudiments from intermediate mesoderm at the ventral border of anterior somites, and (2) extension of the pronephric duct to the cloaca. Pronephric duct extension is the central event in nephric system development; the pronephric duct differentiates into the tubule that carries nephric filtrate out of the body and induces terminal differentiation of adult kidneys. Early studies concluded that pronephric ducts formed by means of in situ segregation of pronephric duct tissue from lateral mesoderm ventral to the forming somites; more recent studies highlight caudal migration of the pronephric duct as the major morphogenetic mechanism. The purpose of this review is to provide the historical background on studies of the mechanisms of amphibian pronephric duct extension, to review evidence showing that different amphibians perform pronephric duct morphogenesis in different ways, and to suggest future studies that may help illuminate the molecular basis of the mechanisms that have evolved in amphibians to extend the pronephric duct to the cloaca. PMID:12508219

  4. Accessory Pancreatic Duct Patterns and Their Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Prasanna, Lokadolalu Chandracharya; Rajagopal, KV; Thomas, Huban R

    2015-01-01

    Context and Objective: Accessory pancreatic duct (APD) designed to reduce the pressure of major pancreatic duct by forming a secondary drainage channel. Few studies have mentioned the variant types of accessory ducts and their mode of formation, some of these have a clear clinical significance. Present study is aimed to evaluate the possible variations in the APD and its terminations. Materials and Methods: Forty formalin fixed adult human pancreas with duodenum in situ specimens were studied by injecting 1% aqueous eosin, followed by piece meal dissection of the head of the pancreas from posterior surface. Formation, tributaries, relations, and the termination of the accessory pancreatic duct were noted and photographed. Results: Accessory ducts revealed 50% belonged to long type, 22.5% were of short and ansa pancreatica type each, and embryonic type of duct pattern was seen in 5% specimens. 75% of long type ducts showed positive patency with eosin dye, followed by ansa type (44.4%), and least patency was found in short type (22.2%). With regard to the patency of the accessory pancreatic ducts towards their termination, we found 52.5% of the accessory ducts and 5% of the embryonic type pancreatic ducts were patent and in 42.5% of the specimen the ducts were obliterated. In 85% of specimens the minor duodenal papillae was anterosuperior to the major papilla and superior to the major papillae in 10% of the cases, and in 5% minor papillae was absent. The average distance between the two papillae was 2.35 cm. Conclusion: The knowledge of the complex anatomical relations of the gland with its duct, duodenum and bile ducts are essential for the surgeons and sinologists to plan and perform both the diagnostic as well as therapeutic procedures effectively. PMID:25954609

  5. The Beauty of Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Barbara H.

    2004-01-01

    This article describes a geometry project that used the beauty of stained-glass-window designs to teach middle school students about geometric figures and concepts. Three honors prealgebra teachers and a middle school mathematics gifted intervention specialist created a geometry project that covered the curriculum and also assessed students'…

  6. Geometry of multihadron production

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorken, J.D.

    1994-10-01

    This summary talk only reviews a small sample of topics featured at this symposium: Introduction; The Geometry and Geography of Phase space; Space-Time Geometry and HBT; Multiplicities, Intermittency, Correlations; Disoriented Chiral Condensate; Deep Inelastic Scattering at HERA; and Other Contributions.

  7. Want to Play Geometry?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufmann, Matthew L.; Bomer, Megan A.; Powell, Nancy Norem

    2009-01-01

    Students enter the geometry classroom with a strong concept of fairness and a sense of what it means to "play by the rules," yet many students have difficulty understanding the postulates, or rules, of geometry and their implications. Although they may never have articulated the properties of an axiomatic system, they have gained a practical…

  8. Euclidean Geometry via Programming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Filimonov, Rossen; Kreith, Kurt

    1992-01-01

    Describes the Plane Geometry System computer software developed at the Educational Computer Systems laboratory in Sofia, Bulgaria. The system enables students to use the concept of "algorithm" to correspond to the process of "deductive proof" in the development of plane geometry. Provides an example of the software's capability and compares it to…

  9. Geometry + Technology = Proof

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyublinskaya, Irina; Funsch, Dan

    2012-01-01

    Several interactive geometry software packages are available today to secondary school teachers. An example is The Geometer's Sketchpad[R] (GSP), also known as Dynamic Geometry[R] software, developed by Key Curriculum Press. This numeric based technology has been widely adopted in the last twenty years, and a vast amount of creativity has been…

  10. Optimizing Electrospray Interfaces Using Slowly Diverging Conical Duct (ConDuct) Electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Krutchinsky, Andrew N.; Padovan, Júlio C.; Cohen, Herbert; Chait, Brian T.

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate that the efficiency of ion transmission from atmosphere to vacuum through stainless steel electrodes that contain slowly divergent conical duct (ConDuct) channels can be close to 100%. Here, we explore the properties of 2.5 cm long electrodes with angles of divergence of 0°, 1°, 2°, 3°, 5°, 8°, 13°, and 21°, respectively. The ion transmission efficiency was observed to jump from 10–20% for the 0° (straight) channels to 90–95% for channels with an angle of divergence as small as 1°. Furthermore, the 2–3° ConDuct electrodes produced extraordinarily low divergence ion beams that propagated in a laser-like fashion over long distances in vacuum. To take advantage of these newly discovered properties, we constructed a novel atmosphere-to-vacuum ion interface utilizing a 2° ConDuct as an inlet electrode and compared its ion transmission efficiency with that of the interface used in the commercial (Thermo) Velos Orbitrap and Q Exactive mass spectrometers. We observed that the ConDuct interface transmitted up to 17 times more ions than the commercial reference interface and also yielded improved signal-to-noise mass spectra of peptides. We infer from these results that the performance of many current atmosphere-tovacuum interfaces utilizing metal capillaries can be substantially improved by replacing them with 1° or 2° metal ConDuct electrodes, which should preserve the convenience of supplying ion desolvation energy by heating the electrode while greatly increasing the efficiency of ion transmission into the mass spectrometer. PMID:25667060

  11. Duct flow nonuniformities for Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    A three-duct Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) Hot Gas Manifold geometry code was developed for use. The methodology of the program is described, recommendations on its implementation made, and an input guide, input deck listing, and a source code listing provided. The code listing is strewn with an abundance of comments to assist the user in following its development and logic. A working source deck will be provided. A thorough analysis was made of the proper boundary conditions and chemistry kinetics necessary for an accurate computational analysis of the flow environment in the SSME fuel side preburner chamber during the initial startup transient. Pertinent results were presented to facilitate incorporation of these findings into an appropriate CFD code. The computation must be a turbulent computation, since the flow field turbulent mixing will have a profound effect on the chemistry. Because of the additional equations demanded by the chemistry model it is recommended that for expediency a simple algebraic mixing length model be adopted. Performing this computation for all or selected time intervals of the startup time will require an abundance of computer CPU time regardless of the specific CFD code selected.

  12. The effect of riblets in rectangular duct flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dean, Brian; Bhushan, Bharat

    2012-02-01

    Much is known about the benefits of surface structures which mimic the riblets found on the skin of fast swimming sharks. Structures have been fabricated for study and application which replicate and improve upon the natural shape of the shark skin riblets, providing a maximum drag reduction of nearly 10% in external turbulent fluid flow. Mechanisms of fluid drag in turbulent flow and riblet-drag reduction theories from experiment and simulation are discussed. A brief review of riblet performance studies is given, and optimal riblet geometries are defined for external flow. A discussion of the structure of internal turbulent fluid flow is provided, and existing data for riblet drag reduction benefit is presented. A flow cell for studying riblet effects in internal rectangular duct flow is discussed, and data collected using several riblet surfaces fabricated for the flow cell is presented and analyzed. A discussion of the effects of the riblets on fluid flow is given, and conclusions are drawn about the possible benefits of riblets in internal fluid flow.

  13. Duct flow nonuniformities: Effect of struts in SSME HGM II(+)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, Roger

    1988-01-01

    A numerical study, using the INS3D flow solver, of laminar and turbulent flow around a two dimensional strut, and three dimensional flow around a strut in an annulus is presented. A multi-block procedure was used to calculate two dimensional laminar flow around two struts in parallel, with each strut represented by one computational block. Single block calculations were performed for turbulent flow around a two dimensional strut, using a Baldwin-Lomax turbulence model to parameterize the turbulent shear stresses. A modified Baldwin-Lomax model was applied to the case of a three dimensional strut in an annulus. The results displayed the essential features of wing-body flows, including the presence of a horseshoe vortex system at the junction of the strut and the lower annulus surface. A similar system was observed at the upper annulus surface. The test geometries discussed were useful in developing the capability to perform multiblock calculations, and to simulate turbulent flow around obstructions located between curved walls. Both of these skills will be necessary to model the three dimensional flow in the strut assembly of the SSME. Work is now in progress on performing a three dimensional two block turbulent calculation of the flow in the turnaround duct (TAD) and strut/fuel bowl juncture region.

  14. Static Thrust and Vectoring Performance of a Spherical Convergent Flap Nozzle with a Nonrectangular Divergent Duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wing, David J.

    1998-01-01

    The static internal performance of a multiaxis-thrust-vectoring, spherical convergent flap (SCF) nozzle with a non-rectangular divergent duct was obtained in the model preparation area of the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel. Duct cross sections of hexagonal and bowtie shapes were tested. Additional geometric parameters included throat area (power setting), pitch flap deflection angle, and yaw gimbal angle. Nozzle pressure ratio was varied from 2 to 12 for dry power configurations and from 2 to 6 for afterburning power configurations. Approximately a 1-percent loss in thrust efficiency from SCF nozzles with a rectangular divergent duct was incurred as a result of internal oblique shocks in the flow field. The internal oblique shocks were the result of cross flow generated by the vee-shaped geometric throat. The hexagonal and bowtie nozzles had mirror-imaged flow fields and therefore similar thrust performance. Thrust vectoring was not hampered by the three-dimensional internal geometry of the nozzles. Flow visualization indicates pitch thrust-vector angles larger than 10' may be achievable with minimal adverse effect on or a possible gain in resultant thrust efficiency as compared with the performance at a pitch thrust-vector angle of 10 deg.

  15. Duct wall impedance control as an advanced concept for acoustic suppression enhancement. [engine noise reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, P. D.

    1978-01-01

    A systems concept procedure is described for the optimization of acoustic duct liner design for both uniform and multisegment types. The concept was implemented by the use of a double reverberant chamber flow duct facility coupled with sophisticated computer control and acoustic analysis systems. The optimization procedure for liner insertion loss was based on the concept of variable liner impedance produced by bias air flow through a multilayer, resonant cavity liner. A multiple microphone technique for in situ wall impedance measurements was used and successfully adapted to produce automated measurements for all liner configurations tested. The complete validation of the systems concept was prevented by the inability to optimize the insertion loss using bias flow induced wall impedance changes. This inability appeared to be a direct function of the presence of a higher order energy carrying modes which were not influenced significantly by the wall impedance changes.

  16. Method and apparatus for duct sealing using a clog-resistant insertable injector

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Duo; Modera, Mark P.

    2007-01-02

    A clog-resistant injector spray nozzle allows relatively unobtrusive insertion through a small access aperture into existing ductwork in occupied buildings for atomized particulate sealing of a ductwork. The spray nozzle comprises an easily cleaned and easily replaced straight liquid tube whose liquid contents are principally propelled by a heated propellant gas, such as heated air. Heat transfer is minimized from the heated propellant gas to the liquid tube until they both exit the injector, thereby greatly reducing the likelihood of nozzle clogging. A method of duct sealing using particles driven by heated propellant gas is described, whereby duct-sealing operations become both faster, and commercially practicable in inhabited commercial and residential buildings.

  17. Experimental validation of a ducted propeller analysis method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, M. J.; Kinnas, S. A.; Kerwin, J. E.

    1992-06-01

    A ducted propeller model was tested in the MIT water tunnel. A hub apparatus was designed which allowed for the duct and propeller forces to be measured separately. The forces on the duct and propeller were measured over a range of advance coefficients. Velocities were measured upstream and downstream from the duct using a Laser Doppler Velocimetry system. Using these velocities the exprimental values for the spanwise distribution of circulation on the propeller blades were then calculated. The experimental results were compared to the results from a propeller lifting surface/duct and hub surface panel analysis code over the same range of advance coefficients showing very good agreement for the duct and propeller forces and the circulation in the region of attached flow.

  18. Optimization of the mechanical performance of a two-duct semicircular duct system--part 3: the positioning of the ducts in the head.

    PubMed

    Muller, M; Verhagen, J H G

    2002-06-21

    In the majority of vertebrates, the horizontal duct of the vestibular system lies approximately in the yawing plane of the head. The positioning of the vertical ducts, however, is not in the pitch- and roll planes but the vertical ducts generally lie under an angle of about 30-45 degrees relative to the medial plane. Using the equations for a hydrodynamically interconnected two-duct system, optimal positions of the vertical and horizontal ducts in different vertebrate groups can be derived. It was stated that the mean response of the vertical ducts should be optimized. This leads to a symmetrical positioning of the vertical ducts with respect to the medial plane. In all observed vertebrate groups, a solution of mu =(pi-alpha)/2 is found (mu is the angle of the vertical ducts relative to the medial plane, alpha is the angle between the vertical duct planes). For alpha=90 degrees, this provides an equal sensitivity for pitch- and roll- movements. For alpha>90 degrees, a larger sensitivity for pitch movements is obtained, at the expense of a lower sensitivity for roll movements. It is argued that the angle alpha between the vertical ducts may vary from 90 to 120 degrees. In most vertebrates, the centre of mass is stabilized by e.g. fins, tri- or quadrupedal stability, a crawling body or upside-down resting positions (e.g. bats). Birds are generally biped, so in walking they are also rather sensitive to roll. These features are related to labyrinth positioning in the head. PMID:12151260

  19. Technique for measuring air flow and carbon dioxide flux in large, open-top chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Ham, J.M.; Owensby, C.E.; Coyne, P.I.

    1993-10-01

    Open-Top Chambers (OTCs) are commonly used to evaluate the effect of CO{sub 2},O{sub 3}, and other trace gases on vegetation. This study developed and tested a new technique for measuring forced air flow and net CO{sub 2} flux from OTCs. Experiments were performed with a 4.5-m diam. OTC with a sealed floor and a specialized air delivery system. Air flow through the chamber was computed with the Bernoulli equation using measurements of the pressure differential between the air delivery ducts and the chamber interior. An independent measurement of air flow was made simultaneously to calibrate and verify the accuracy of the Bernoulli relationship. The CO{sub 2} flux density was calculated as the product of chamber air flow and the difference in CO{sub 2} concentration between the air entering and exhausting from the OTC (C{sub in}-C{sub out}). Accuracy was evaluated by releasing CO{sub 2} within the OTC at known rates. Data were collected with OTCs at ambient and elevated CO{sub 2} ({approx}700 {mu}mol{sup -1}). Results showed the Bernoulli equation, with a flow coefficient of 0.7, accurately measured air flow in the OTC within {+-}5% regardless of flow rate and air duct geometry. Experiments in ambient OTCs showed CO{sub 2} flux density ({mu}mol m{sup -2} s{sup -1}), computed from 2-min averages of air flow and C{sub in} - C{sub out,} was typically within {+-} 10% of actual flux, provided that the exit air velocity at the top of the OTC was greater than 0.6 m s{sup -1}. Obtaining the same accuracy in CO{sub 2}-enriched OTCs required a critical exit velocity near 1.2 m s{sup -1} to minimize the incursion of ambient air and prevent contamination of exit gas sample. When flux data were integrated over time to estimate daily CO{sub 2} flux ({mu}mol m{sup -2} d{sup -1}), actual and measured values agreed to within {+-}2% for both ambient and CO{sub 2}-enriched chambers, suggesting that accurate measurements of daily net C exchange are possible with this technique.

  20. Patent vitellointestinal duct as paraumblical abcess: A rare presentation

    PubMed Central

    Rekhi, Harnam Singh; Mittal, Sushil; Singh, Gurtej; Rekhi, Balwinder Kaur; Dugg, Pankaj

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Umbilical and paraumblical abscess can occur in children with presenting complaint of discharge from umbilical region. However, patent vitello intestinal duct presenting as paraumblical abscess is rare phenomenon. Presentation of case One year old male child presented with complain of discharge from umbilical region since birth. Incision & drainage done twice thinking it to be paraumblical abscess. Discussion Vitellointestinal duct as abscess is rare presentation but it should be considered as a differential diagnosis of discharging umbilicus as management of abscess and patent duct are different. Conclusion Patent vitellointestinal duct can present as paraumbilical abscess, and it should be kept in differential diagnosis specifically in children. PMID:26301682

  1. Duct injection technology prototype development: Evaluation of engineering data

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-07-01

    The objective of the Duct Injection Technology Prototype Development Project is to develop a sound design basis for applying duct injection technology as a post-combustion SO{sub 2}emissions control method to existing coal-fired power plants. The necessary engineering design and scale-up criteria will be developed for the commercialization of duct injection technology for the control of SO{sub 2} emissions from coal-fired boilers in the utility industry. The primary focus of the analyses summarized in this Topical Report is the review of the known technical and economic information associated with duct injection technology. (VC)

  2. Duct Remediation Program: Engineered access research and construction

    SciTech Connect

    Beckman, T.D.; Davis, M.M.; Karas, T.M.

    1992-11-01

    The Rocky Flats Plant, Duct Remediation mission concentrated on removing Plutonium Oxide from the process ductwork in the primary Plutonium processing facility. When possible, remediation took place from existing process gloveboxes. Fifteen locations were identified, however, that required accessing duct runs where no process gloveboxes existed. The building`s second floor utility areas had many locations where long, inaccessible duct runs were prevalent. Consequently, an extensive program for design, procurement and construction was initiated to contain and isolate ducts for penetration when existing glovebox sites were not present.

  3. Leaf seal for transition duct in turbine system

    SciTech Connect

    Flanagan, James Scott; LeBegue, Jeffrey Scott; McMahan, Kevin Weston; Dillard, Daniel Jackson; Pentecost, Ronnie Ray

    2013-06-11

    A turbine system is disclosed. In one embodiment, the turbine system includes a transition duct. The transition duct includes an inlet, an outlet, and a passage extending between the inlet and the outlet and defining a longitudinal axis, a radial axis, and a tangential axis. The outlet of the transition duct is offset from the inlet along the longitudinal axis and the tangential axis. The transition duct further includes an interface member for interfacing with a turbine section. The turbine system further includes a leaf seal contacting the interface member to provide a seal between the interface member and the turbine section.

  4. Convolution seal for transition duct in turbine system

    SciTech Connect

    Flanagan, James Scott; LeBegue, Jeffrey Scott; McMahan, Kevin Weston; Dillard, Daniel Jackson; Pentecost, Ronnie Ray

    2015-03-10

    A turbine system is disclosed. In one embodiment, the turbine system includes a transition duct. The transition duct includes an inlet, an outlet, and a passage extending between the inlet and the outlet and defining a longitudinal axis, a radial axis, and a tangential axis. The outlet of the transition duct is offset from the inlet along the longitudinal axis and the tangential axis. The transition duct further includes an interface member for interfacing with a turbine section. The turbine system further includes a convolution seal contacting the interface member to provide a seal between the interface member and the turbine section.

  5. Flexible metallic seal for transition duct in turbine system

    SciTech Connect

    Flanagan, James Scott; LeBegue, Jeffrey Scott; McMahan, Kevin Weston; Dillard, Daniel Jackson; Pentecost, Ronnie Ray

    2014-04-22

    A turbine system is disclosed. In one embodiment, the turbine system includes a transition duct. The transition duct includes an inlet, an outlet, and a passage extending between the inlet and the outlet and defining a longitudinal axis, a radial axis, and a tangential axis. The outlet of the transition duct is offset from the inlet along the longitudinal axis and the tangential axis. The transition duct further includes an interface member for interfacing with a turbine section. The turbine system further includes a flexible metallic seal contacting the interface member to provide a seal between the interface member and the turbine section.

  6. Buried and Encapsulated Ducts, Jacksonville, Florida (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2013-11-01

    Ductwork installed in unconditioned attics can significantly increase the overall heating and cooling costs of residential buildings. In fact, estimated duct thermal losses for single-family residential buildings with ductwork installed in unconditioned attics range from 10% to 45%. In a study of three single-story houses in Florida, the Building America research team Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) investigated the strategy of using buried and/or encapsulated ducts (BED) to reduce duct thermal losses in existing homes. The BED strategy consists of burying ducts in loose-fill insulation and/or encapsulating them in closed cell polyurethane spray foam (ccSPF) insulation. There are three possible combinations of BED strategies: (1) buried ducts; (2) encapsulated ducts (with ccSPF); and (3) buried and encapsulated ducts. The best solution for each situation depends on the climate, age of the house, and the configuration of the HVAC system and attic. For new construction projects, the team recommends that ducts be both encapsulated and buried as the minimal planning and costs required for this will yield optimal energy savings. The encapsulated/buried duct strategy, which utilizes ccSPF to address condensation concerns, is an approach that was developed specifically for humid climates.

  7. Analysis of nephric duct specification in the avian embryo

    PubMed Central

    Attia, Lital; Yelin, Ronit; Schultheiss, Thomas M.

    2012-01-01

    Vertebrate kidney tissue exhibits variable morphology that in general increases in complexity when moving from anterior to posterior along the body axis. The nephric duct, a simple unbranched epithelial tube, is derived in the avian embryo from a rudiment located in the anterior intermediate mesoderm (IM) adjacent to somites 8 to 10. Using quail-chick chimeric embryos, the current study finds that competence to form nephric duct is fixed when IM precursor cells are still located in the primitive streak, significantly before the onset of duct differentiation. In the primitive streak, expression of the gene HoxB4 is associated with prospective duct IM, whereas expression of the more posterior Hox gene HoxA6 is associated with more posterior, non-duct-forming IM. Misexpression of HoxA6, but not of HoxB4, in prospective duct-forming regions of the IM resulted in repression of duct formation, suggesting a mechanism for the restriction of duct formation to the anterior-most IM. The results are discussed with respect to their implications for anterior-posterior patterning of kidney tissue and of mesoderm in general, and for the loss of duct-forming ability in more posterior regions of the IM that has occurred during vertebrate evolution. PMID:23034630

  8. Computer code for analysing three-dimensional viscous flows in impeller passages and other duct geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tatchell, D. G.

    1979-01-01

    A code, CATHY3/M, was prepared and demonstrated by application to a sample case. The preparation is reviewed, a summary of the capabilities and main features of the code is given, and the sample case results are discussed. Recommendations for future use and development of the code are provided.

  9. 24 CFR 3280.715 - Circulating air systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Circulating air systems. 3280.715... Systems § 3280.715 Circulating air systems. Link to an amendment published at 78 FR 73989, Dec. 9, 2013... steel, tin-plated steel, or aluminum, or shall be listed Class 0, Class 1, or Class 2 air ducts. Class...

  10. Computation of transonic potential flow about 3 dimensional inlets, ducts, and bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reyhner, T. A.

    1982-01-01

    An analysis was developed and a computer code, P465 Version A, written for the prediction of transonic potential flow about three dimensional objects including inlet, duct, and body geometries. Finite differences and line relaxation are used to solve the complete potential flow equation. The coordinate system used for the calculations is independent of body geometry. Cylindrical coordinates are used for the computer code. The analysis is programmed in extended FORTRAN 4 for the CYBER 203 vector computer. The programming of the analysis is oriented toward taking advantage of the vector processing capabilities of this computer. Comparisons of computed results with experimental measurements are presented to verify the analysis. Descriptions of program input and output formats are also presented.

  11. Postoperative Chemoradiotherapy for Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jin-hong; Choi, Eun Kyung; Ahn, Seung Do; Lee, Sang-wook; Song, Si Yeol; Yoon, Sang Min; Kim, Young Seok; Lee, Yu Sun; Lee, Sung-Gyu; Hwang, Shin; Lee, Young-Joo; Park, Kwang-Min; Kim, Tae Won; Chang, Heung Moon; Lee, Jae-Lyun; Kim, Jong Hoon

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of postoperative concurrent chemoradiotherapy using three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and to identify the prognostic factors that influence survival in patients with extrahepatic bile duct cancer. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively analyzed the data from 101 patients with extrahepatic bile duct cancer who had undergone postoperative concurrent chemoradiotherapy using three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy. Of the 101 patients, 52 (51%) had undergone complete resection (R0 resection) and 49 (49%) had microscopic or macroscopic residual tumors (R1 or R2 resection). The median radiation dose was 50 Gy. Also, 85 patients (84%) underwent concurrent chemotherapy with 5-fluorouracil. Results: The median follow-up period was 47 months for the surviving patients. The 5-year overall survival rate was 34% for all patients. A comparison between patients with R0 and R1 resection indicated no significant difference in the 5-year overall survival (44% vs. 33%, p = .2779), progression-free survival (35% vs. 22%, p = .3107), or locoregional progression-free survival (75% vs. 63%, p = .2784) rates. An analysis of the first failure site in the 89 patients with R0 or R1 resection indicated isolated locoregional recurrence in 7 patients. Elevated postoperative carbohydrate antigen 19-9 level was an independent prognostic factor for overall survival (p = .001) and progression-free survival (p = .033). A total of 3 patients developed Grade 3 or greater late toxicity. Conclusion: Adjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy using three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy appears to improve locoregional control and survival in extrahepatic bile duct cancer patients with R1 resection. The postoperative carbohydrate antigen 19-9 level might be a useful prognostic marker to select patients for more intensified adjuvant therapy.

  12. Radiation of sound from unflanged cylindrical ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartharan, S. L.; Bayliss, A.

    1983-01-01

    Calculations of sound radiated from unflanged cylindrical ducts are presented. The numerical simulation models the problem of an aero-engine inlet. The time dependent linearized Euler equations are solved from a state of rest until a harmonic solution is attained. A fourth order accurate finite difference scheme is used and solutions are obtained from a fully vectorized Cyber-203 computer program. Cases of both plane waves and spin modes are treated. Spin modes model the sound generated by a turbofan engine. Boundary conditions for both plane waves and spin modes are treated. Solutions obtained are compared with experiments conducted at NASA Langley Research Center.

  13. Levitated Duct Fan (LDF) Aircraft Auxiliary Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichenberg, Dennis J.; Emerson, Dawn C.; Gallo, Christopher A.; Thompson, William K.

    2011-01-01

    This generator concept includes a novel stator and rotor architecture made from composite material with blades attached to the outer rotating shell of a ducted fan drum rotor, a non-contact support system between the stator and rotor using magnetic fields to provide levitation, and an integrated electromagnetic generation system. The magnetic suspension between the rotor and the stator suspends and supports the rotor within the stator housing using permanent magnets attached to the outer circumference of the drum rotor and passive levitation coils in the stator shell. The magnets are arranged in a Halbach array configuration.

  14. Anatomy of the nipple and breast ducts.

    PubMed

    Zucca-Matthes, Gustavo; Urban, Cícero; Vallejo, André

    2016-02-01

    Over time, variations of mastectomy came up and started allowing the oncological safety and the possibility of an immediate breast reconstruction. Nipple sparing mastectomy (NSM) procedures have strongly increased in frequency and have become one of the best alternatives to treat breast cancer, also improving overall aesthetic outcomes and the achievement of contralateral breast symmetry. The nipple areola-complex (NAC) must be considered the identity of the breast concerning self-esteem of patients. This paper will remind the main anatomical topics around the nipple and breast ducts. PMID:26855906

  15. [Carcinoma of the extrahepatic bile ducts].

    PubMed

    Cappelletti, F; Marzano, P F; Giacinti, I; Di Bello, M G; Maturo, A; Di Matteo, F M; Micacchi, M; Zaccagnino, P; Morucci, R; Petrassi, P; Ascenzi, P; Di Curzio, B

    1996-01-01

    In the last 5 years 25 patients (11 men, 14 women) with carcinoma of the extrahepatic biliary duct were studied. The most frequent localization of the carcinoma was the hepatic hilum. D.C.P. according to Whipple was possible only in one patient, while in 20 patients a palliative approach with external and internal biliary derivations was the choice. In the remaining 4 patients an explorative laparotomy with biopsy was performed. It is concluded that palliative resection allows for a better quality of life. PMID:9162182

  16. Porokeratotic eccrine ostial and dermal duct nevus

    PubMed Central

    Bandyopadhyay, Debabrata; Saha, Abanti; Das, Dipti; Das, Anupam

    2015-01-01

    Porokeratotic eccrine ostial and dermal duct nevus (PEODDN) is a rare nevoid condition characterized by asymptomatic grouped keratotic papules and plaques with a linear pattern on the extremities, having distinct porokeratotic histopathological features. The lesions usually present at birth or in childhood. We present here a case of late-onset PEODDN in a 23-year-old man who had lesions on the palm, forearm, arm and the chest along the lines of Blaschko, strictly localized to the left side of the body. PMID:25821735

  17. Anatomy of the nipple and breast ducts

    PubMed Central

    Urban, Cícero; Vallejo, André

    2016-01-01

    Over time, variations of mastectomy came up and started allowing the oncological safety and the possibility of an immediate breast reconstruction. Nipple sparing mastectomy (NSM) procedures have strongly increased in frequency and have become one of the best alternatives to treat breast cancer, also improving overall aesthetic outcomes and the achievement of contralateral breast symmetry. The nipple areola-complex (NAC) must be considered the identity of the breast concerning self-esteem of patients. This paper will remind the main anatomical topics around the nipple and breast ducts. PMID:26855906

  18. [Liver, bile ducts and pancreatic diseases].

    PubMed

    Kanno, T

    1995-06-01

    A fundamental guideline for the use of test results concerning liver, bile duct and pancreatic diseases was proposed in 1991 from the Japan Society of Clinical Pathology (JSCP). This guideline was principally based on the document of 1988 from the Committee on liver function tests of the Japanese Society of Gastroenterology (JSG). The document from the JSG was revised in May, 1994. Also a guideline for selection of markers of hepatitis virus in hepatic disorders, was proposed in January, 1994 from the same Committee of JSG. Here, we reevaluated and discussed the JSCP guideline as taking into consideration the two 1994 JSG documents. PMID:7602802

  19. Detonation duct gas generator demonstration program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wortman, A.; Othmer, P.; Rostafinski, W.

    1992-01-01

    An experimental demonstration is presented for the generation of detonation waves that move periodically across high speed channel flow; these waves can compress the outflow from a low pressure compressor, and thereby both reduce the compressor requirements associated with conventional gas turbines and enhance thermodynamic efficiency through isochoric energy addition. By generating transient transverse waves, rather than standing waves, shock-wave losses are reduced by an order of magnitude; the result is a Humphrey cycle augmenting the basic Brayton-cycle gas turbine. Attention is presently given to results from an experimental detonation duct.

  20. Gingerbread-House Geometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emenaker, Charles E.

    1999-01-01

    Describes a sixth-grade interdisciplinary geometry unit based on Charles Dickens's "A Christmas Carol". Focuses on finding area, volume, and perimeter, and working with estimation, decimals, and fractions in the context of making gingerbread houses. (ASK)

  1. What Is Geometry?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chern, Shiing-Shen

    1990-01-01

    Discussed are the major historical developments of geometry. Euclid, Descartes, Klein's Erlanger Program, Gaus and Riemann, globalization, topology, Elie Cartan, and an application to molecular biology are included as topics. (KR)

  2. Noncommutative Geometry and Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connes, Alain

    2006-11-01

    In this very short essay we shall describe a "spectral" point of view on geometry which allows to start taking into account the lessons from both renormalization and of general relativity. We shall first do that for renormalization and explain in rough outline the content of our recent collaborations with Dirk Kreimer and Matilde Marcolli leading to the universal Galois symmetry of renormalizable quantum field theories provided by the renormalization group in its cosmic Galois group incarnation. As far as general relativity is concerned, since the functional integral cannot be treated in the traditional perturbative manner, it relies heavily as a "sum over geometries" on the chosen paradigm of geometric space. This will give us the occasion to discuss, in the light of noncommutative geometry, the issue of "observables" in gravity and our joint work with Ali Chamseddine on the spectral action, with a first attempt to write down a functional integral on the space of noncommutative geometries.

  3. Proof in Transformation Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, A. W.

    1971-01-01

    The first of three articles showing how inductively-obtained results in transformation geometry may be organized into a deductive system. This article discusses two approaches to enlargement (dilatation), one using coordinates and the other using synthetic methods. (MM)

  4. Turbulent flame speeds in ducts and the deflagration/detonation transition

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, D.; Lawes, M.; Liu, Kexin

    2008-07-15

    A methodology is proposed for determining whether a deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) might occur for flame propagation along a duct with baffles, closed at the ignition end. A flammable mixture can attain a maximum turbulent burning velocity. If this is sufficiently high, a strong shock is formed ahead of the flame. It is assumed that this maximum burning velocity is soon attained and on the basis of previous studies, this value can be obtained for the given conditions. The increase in temperature and pressure of the reactants, due to the shock, further increases the maximum turbulent burning velocity. The gas velocity ahead of the flame is linked to one-dimensional shock wave equations in a numerical analysis. The predicted duct flame speeds with the appropriate maximum turbulent burning velocities are in good agreement with those measured in the slow and fast flame regimes of a range of CH{sub 4}-air and H{sub 2}-air mixtures. DDTs are possible if autoignition of the reactants occurs in the time available, and if the projected flame speed approaches the Chapman-Jouguet velocity at the same temperature and pressure. Prediction of the first condition requires values of the autoignition delay time of the mixture at the shocked temperatures and pressures. Prediction of the second requires values of the laminar burning velocity and Markstein number. With the appropriate values of these parameters, it is shown numerically that there is no DDT with CH{sub 4}-air. With H{sub 2}-air, the onset of DDT occurs close to the values of equivalence ratio at which it has been observed experimentally. The effects of different duct sizes also are predicted, although details of the DDT cannot be predicted. Extension of the study to a wider range of fuels requires more data on their laminar burning velocities and Markstein numbers at higher temperatures and pressures and on autoignition delay times at lower temperatures and pressures. (author)

  5. Distribution and Room Air Mixing Risks to Retrofitted Homes

    SciTech Connect

    Burdick, A.

    2014-12-01

    ​Energy efficiency upgrades reduce heating and cooling loads on a house. With enough load reduction and if the HVAC system warrants replacement, the HVAC system is often upgraded with a more efficient, lower capacity system that meets the loads of the upgraded house. For a single-story house with ceiling supply air diffusers, ducts are often removed and upgraded. For houses with ducts that are embedded in walls, the cost of demolition precludes the replacement of ducts. The challenge with the use of existing ducts is that the reduced airflow creates a decreased throw at the supply registers, and the supply air and room air do not mix well, leading to potential thermal comfort complaints. This project investigates this retrofit scenario. The issues and solutions discussed here are relevant to all climate zones, with emphasis on climates that require cooling.

  6. Distribution and Room Air Mixing Risks to Retrofitted Homes

    SciTech Connect

    Burdick, A.

    2014-12-01

    Energy efficiency upgrades reduce heating and cooling loads on a house. With enough load reduction and if the HVAC system warrants replacement, the HVAC system is often upgraded with a more efficient, lower capacity system that meets the loads of the upgraded house. For a single-story house with ceiling supply air diffusers, ducts are often removed and upgraded. For houses with ducts that are embedded in walls, the cost of demolition precludes the replacement of ducts. The challenge with the use of existing ducts is that the reduced airflow creates a decreased throw at the supply registers, and the supply air and room air do not mix well, leading to potential thermal comfort complaints. This project investigates this retrofit scenario. The issues and solutions discussed here are relevant to all climate zones, with emphasis on climates that require cooling.

  7. NF85: A three-dimensional, air-dynamics computer code for analyzing explosions in structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinke, R. G.

    1987-12-01

    The NF85 (Near-Field 85) computer program analyzes the effect of explosions on the dynamic behavior of air in structures. The explosion is modeled as a time- and spallese-dependent source of equivalent air mass and energy. Chemical reactions can be modeled directly with a combustion-model option, and tracer particles may be used to monitor combustion-products convection by the air. The near-field region of the explosion is modeled in three-dimensional Cartesian or cylindrical geometry. Internal structures can be defined in the region to reflect shock waves and obstruct airflow. A convenient dump/restart capability allows the movement or removal of internal structures during the transient solution. The effects of the surrounding far-field region are modeled at the three-dimensional region's external boundary by a wall surface, time- and space-dependent pressure or velocity boundary conditions, and/or one-dimensional Cartesian-geometry regions attached to openings in the external boundary. Ventilation ducts, passageways, and adjacent rooms can be modeled directly with one-dimensional regions, and the presence of blowers and filters can be modeled as well.

  8. Common Geometry Module

    2005-01-01

    The Common Geometry Module (CGM) is a code library which provides geometry functionality used for mesh generation and other applications. This functionality includes that commonly found in solid modeling engines, like geometry creation, query and modification; CGM also includes capabilities not commonly found in solid modeling engines, like geometry decomposition tools and support for shared material interfaces. CGM is built upon the ACIS solid modeling engine, but also includes geometry capability developed beside and onmore » top of ACIS. CGM can be used as-is to provide geometry functionality for codes needing this capability. However, CGM can also be extended using derived classes in C++, allowing the geometric model to serve as the basis for other applications, for example mesh generation. CGM is supported on Sun Solaris, SGI, HP, IBM, DEC, Linux and Windows NT platforms. CGM also indudes support for loading ACIS models on parallel computers, using MPI-based communication. Future plans for CGM are to port it to different solid modeling engines, including Pro/Engineer or SolidWorks. CGM is being released into the public domain under an LGPL license; the ACIS-based engine is available to ACIS licensees on request.« less

  9. CMS Geometry Through 2020

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborne, I.; Brownson, E.; Eulisse, G.; Jones, C. D.; Lange, D. J.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.

    2014-06-01

    CMS faces real challenges with upgrade of the CMS detector through 2020 and beyond. One of the challenges, from the software point of view, is managing upgrade simulations with the same software release as the 2013 scenario. We present the CMS geometry description software model, its integration with the CMS event setup and core software. The CMS geometry configuration and selection is implemented in Python. The tools collect the Python configuration fragments into a script used in CMS workflow. This flexible and automated geometry configuration allows choosing either transient or persistent version of the same scenario and specific version of the same scenario. We describe how the geometries are integrated and validated, and how we define and handle different geometry scenarios in simulation and reconstruction. We discuss how to transparently manage multiple incompatible geometries in the same software release. Several examples are shown based on current implementation assuring consistent choice of scenario conditions. The consequences and implications for multiple/different code algorithms are discussed.

  10. Improving air handler efficiency in houses

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Iain S.

    2004-05-01

    Although furnaces, air conditioners and heat pumps have become significantly more efficient over the last couple of decades, residential air handlers have typical efficiencies of only 10% to 15% due to poor electric motor performance and aerodynamically poor fans and fan housings. Substantial increases in performance could be obtained through improved air handler design and construction. A prototype residential air handler intended to address these issues has recently been developed. The prototype and a standard production fan were tested in a full-scale duct system and test chamber at LBNL specifically designed for testing heating, ventilation, and air conditioning systems. The laboratory tests compared efficiency, total airflow, sensitivity to duct system flow resistance, and the effects of installation in a smaller cabinet. The test results showed that the prototype air handler had about twice the efficiency of the standard air handler (averaged over a wide range of operating conditions) and was less sensitive to duct system flow resistance changes. The performance of both air handlers was significantly reduced by reducing the clearance between the air handler and cabinet it was placed in. These test results showed that in addition to the large scope for performance improvement, air handler fans need to be tested in the cabinets they operate in.

  11. Long-term statistics related to evaporation duct propagation of 2 GHz radio waves in the English Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunashekar, S. D.; Warrington, E. M.; Siddle, D. R.

    2010-12-01

    This paper presents long-term statistics additional to those previously published pertaining to evaporation duct propagation of UHF radio waves in the British Channel Islands, with particular focus on a completely over-sea 50 km transhorizon path. The importance of the evaporation duct as an anomalous propagation mechanism in marine and coastal regions is highlighted. In particular, the influence of various atmospheric parameters on the performance of a popular operational evaporation duct model is examined. The strengths and weaknesses of this model are evaluated under specific atmospheric conditions. The relationship between the continually varying evaporation duct height and transmitter-receiver antenna geometries is analyzed, and a range of statistics related to the implications of this relationship on the received signal strength is presented. The various issues under investigation are of direct relevance in the planning of long-range, over-sea radio systems operating in the UHF band, and have implications for the radio regulatory work carried out by organizations such as the International Telecommunication Union.

  12. Experimental investigation of the radiation of sound from an unflanged duct and a bellmouth, including the flow effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ville, J. M.; Silcox, R. J.

    1980-08-01

    The radiation of sound from an inlet as a function of flow velocity, frequency, duct mode structure, and inlet geometry was examined by using a spinning mode synthesizer to insure a given space-time structure inside the duct. Measurements of the radiation pattern (amplitude and phase) and of the pressure reflection coefficient were obtained over an azimuthal wave number range of 0 to 6 and a frequency range up to 5000 Hz for an unflanged duct and a bellmouth. The measured radiated field and pressure reflection coefficient without flow for the unflanged duct agree reasonably well with theory. The influence of the inlet contour appears to be very drastic near the cut-on frequency of a mode and reasonable agreement is found between the bellmouth pressure reflection coefficient and a infinite hyperboloidal inlet theory. It is also shown that the flow has a weak effect on the amplitude of the directivity factor but significantly shifts the directivity factor phase. The influence of the flow on the modulus of the pressure reflection coefficient is found to be well described by a theoretical prediction.

  13. Experimental investigation of the radiation of sound from an unflanged duct and a bellmouth, including the flow effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ville, J. M.; Silcox, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    The radiation of sound from an inlet as a function of flow velocity, frequency, duct mode structure, and inlet geometry was examined by using a spinning mode synthesizer to insure a given space-time structure inside the duct. Measurements of the radiation pattern (amplitude and phase) and of the pressure reflection coefficient were obtained over an azimuthal wave number range of 0 to 6 and a frequency range up to 5000 Hz for an unflanged duct and a bellmouth. The measured radiated field and pressure reflection coefficient without flow for the unflanged duct agree reasonably well with theory. The influence of the inlet contour appears to be very drastic near the cut-on frequency of a mode and reasonable agreement is found between the bellmouth pressure reflection coefficient and a infinite hyperboloidal inlet theory. It is also shown that the flow has a weak effect on the amplitude of the directivity factor but significantly shifts the directivity factor phase. The influence of the flow on the modulus of the pressure reflection coefficient is found to be well described by a theoretical prediction.

  14. Ultrasound imaging of the mouse pancreatic duct using lipid microbubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, B.; McKeown, K. R.; Skovan, B.; Ogram, E.; Ingram, P.; Ignatenko, N.; Paine-Murrieta, G.; Witte, R.; Matsunaga, T. O.

    2012-03-01

    Research requiring the murine pancreatic duct to be imaged is often challenging due to the difficulty in selectively cannulating the pancreatic duct. We have successfully catheterized the pancreatic duct through the common bile duct in severe combined immune deficient (SCID) mice and imaged the pancreatic duct with gas filled lipid microbubbles that increase ultrasound imaging sensitivity due to exquisite scattering at the gas/liquid interface. A SCID mouse was euthanized by CO2, a midline abdominal incision made, the common bile duct cut at its midpoint, a 2 cm, 32 gauge tip catheter was inserted about 1 mm into the duct and tied with suture. The duodenum and pancreas were excised, removed in toto, embedded in agar and an infusion pump was used to instill normal saline or lipid-coated microbubbles (10 million / ml) into the duct. B-mode images before and after infusion of the duct with microbubbles imaged the entire pancreatic duct (~ 1 cm) with high contrast. The microbubbles were cavitated by high mechanical index (HMI) ultrasound for imaging to be repeated. Our technique of catheterization and using lipid microbubbles as a contrast agent may provide an effective, affordable technique of imaging the murine pancreatic duct; cavitation with HMI ultrasound would enable repeated imaging to be performed and clustering of targeted microbubbles to receptors on ductal cells would allow pathology to be localized accurately. This research was supported by the Experimental Mouse Shared Service of the AZ Cancer Center (Grant Number P30CA023074, NIH/NCI and the GI SPORE (NIH/NCI P50 CA95060).

  15. Collecting duct intercalated cell function and regulation.

    PubMed

    Roy, Ankita; Al-bataineh, Mohammad M; Pastor-Soler, Núria M

    2015-02-01

    Intercalated cells are kidney tubule epithelial cells with important roles in the regulation of acid-base homeostasis. However, in recent years the understanding of the function of the intercalated cell has become greatly enhanced and has shaped a new model for how the distal segments of the kidney tubule integrate salt and water reabsorption, potassium homeostasis, and acid-base status. These cells appear in the late distal convoluted tubule or in the connecting segment, depending on the species. They are most abundant in the collecting duct, where they can be detected all the way from the cortex to the initial part of the inner medulla. Intercalated cells are interspersed among the more numerous segment-specific principal cells. There are three types of intercalated cells, each having distinct structures and expressing different ensembles of transport proteins that translate into very different functions in the processing of the urine. This review includes recent findings on how intercalated cells regulate their intracellular milieu and contribute to acid-base regulation and sodium, chloride, and potassium homeostasis, thus highlighting their potential role as targets for the treatment of hypertension. Their novel regulation by paracrine signals in the collecting duct is also discussed. Finally, this article addresses their role as part of the innate immune system of the kidney tubule. PMID:25632105

  16. Evaporation duct effects at millimeter wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, K. D.

    1992-03-01

    The evaporation duct strongly influences low-altitude over-the-horizon propagation at millimeter wavelengths. Results from more than 2000 hours of propagation and meteorological measurements made at 94 GHz on a 40.6 km over-horizon, over-water path along the southern California coast show that the average received power was 63 dB greater than d for propagation in a nonducting, or standard, atmosphere; 90 percent of the measurements were at least 55 dB greater than diffraction. A numerical model of transmission loss based on the observed surface meteorology is discussed and results are compared to measured transmission loss. On average, modeling results underestimate observations by only 10 dB. In addition, results from modeling based on an independent climatology of evaporation duct heights for the area are shown to be adequate for most propagation assessment purposes. The reliability and reasonable accuracy of the numerical model provides a strong justification for utilizing the technique to assess millimeter wave communication and radar systems operating in many, if not all, ocean regions.

  17. Evaporation duct effects at millimeter wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, K. D.

    1990-03-01

    The evaporation duct strongly influences low-altitude over-the horizon propagation at millimeter wavelengths. Results from more than 2000 hours of propagation and meteorological measurements were made at 94 GHz on a 40.6 km over-horizon, over-water path along the southern California coast show that the average received power was 63 dB greater than expected for propagation in a nonconducting, or normal, atmosphere; 90 percent of the measurements were at least 55 dB greater than the normal atmosphere. A numerical model of transmission loss based on observed surface meteorology is discussed and results are compared to measured transmission loss. On average, modeling results underestimate the transmission loss by 10 dB. In addition, results from modeling based on an independent climatology of evaporation duct heights for the area are shown to be adequate for most propagation assessment purposes. The reliability and reasonable accuracy of the model provide a strong justification for utilizing the technique to assess millimeter wave communication and radar systems operating in many, if not all, ocean regions.

  18. On the fundamental unsteady fluid dynamics of shock-induced flows through ducts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza, Nicole Renee

    Unsteady shock wave propagation through ducts has many applications, ranging from blast wave shelter design to advanced high-speed propulsion systems. The research objective of this study was improved fundamental understanding of the transient flow structures during unsteady shock wave propagation through rectangular ducts with varying cross-sectional area. This research focused on the fluid dynamics of the unsteady shock-induced flow fields, with an emphasis placed on understanding and characterizing the mechanisms behind flow compression (wave structures), flow induction (via shock waves), and enhanced mixing (via shock-induced viscous shear layers). A theoretical and numerical (CFD) parametric study was performed, in which the effects of these parameters on the unsteady flow fields were examined: incident shock strength, area ratio, and viscous mode (inviscid, laminar, and turbulent). Two geometries were considered: the backward-facing step (BFS) geometry, which provided a benchmark and conceptual framework, and the splitter plate (SP) geometry, which was a canonical representation of the engine flow path. The theoretical analysis was inviscid, quasi-1 D and quasi-steady; and the computational analysis was fully 2D, time-accurate, and VISCOUS. The theory provided the wave patterns and primary wave strengths for the BFS geometry, and the simulations verified the wave pattems and quantified the effects of geometry and viscosity. It was shown that the theoretical wave patterns on the BFS geometry can be used to systematically analyze the transient, 20, viscous flows on the SP geometry. This work also highlighted the importance and the role of oscillating shock and expansion waves in the development of these unsteady flows. The potential for both upstream and downstream flow induction was addressed. Positive upstream flow induction was not found in this study due to the persistent formation of an upstream-moving shock wave. Enhanced mixing was addressed by examining

  19. 14 CFR 23.1103 - Induction system ducts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Induction system ducts. 23.1103 Section 23.1103 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Induction System § 23.1103 Induction system ducts....

  20. 14 CFR 23.1103 - Induction system ducts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Induction system ducts. 23.1103 Section 23.1103 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Induction System § 23.1103 Induction system ducts....

  1. Sound waves in two-dimensional ducts with sinusoidal walls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nayfeh, A. H.

    1974-01-01

    The method of multiple scales is used to analyze the wave propagation in two-dimensional hard-walled ducts with sinusoidal walls. For traveling waves, resonance occurs whenever the wall wavenumber is equal to the difference of the wavenumbers of any two duct acoustic modes. The results show that neither of these resonating modes could occur without strongly generating the other.

  2. 11. VIEW OF A HEATING DUCT SITUATED SOUTHWEST OF THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. VIEW OF A HEATING DUCT SITUATED SOUTHWEST OF THE FAN HOUSE, ALONG THE MINE ROAD. THE BURNED RUINS OF THE MINE OFFICE ARE LOCATED ON THE FAR SIDE OF THE HEATING DUCT, TO THE NORTHWEST. - Tower Hill No. 2 Mine, Approximately 0.47 mile Southwest of intersection of Stone Church Road & Township Route 561, Hibbs, Fayette County, PA

  3. Duct thermal performance models for large commercial buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Wray, Craig P.

    2003-10-01

    Despite the potential for significant energy savings by reducing duct leakage or other thermal losses from duct systems in large commercial buildings, California Title 24 has no provisions to credit energy-efficient duct systems in these buildings. A substantial reason is the lack of readily available simulation tools to demonstrate the energy-saving benefits associated with efficient duct systems in large commercial buildings. The overall goal of the Efficient Distribution Systems (EDS) project within the PIER High Performance Commercial Building Systems Program is to bridge the gaps in current duct thermal performance modeling capabilities, and to expand our understanding of duct thermal performance in California large commercial buildings. As steps toward this goal, our strategy in the EDS project involves two parts: (1) developing a whole-building energy simulation approach for analyzing duct thermal performance in large commercial buildings, and (2) using the tool to identify the energy impacts of duct leakage in California large commercial buildings, in support of future recommendations to address duct performance in the Title 24 Energy Efficiency Standards for Nonresidential Buildings. The specific technical objectives for the EDS project were to: (1) Identify a near-term whole-building energy simulation approach that can be used in the impacts analysis task of this project (see Objective 3), with little or no modification. A secondary objective is to recommend how to proceed with long-term development of an improved compliance tool for Title 24 that addresses duct thermal performance. (2) Develop an Alternative Calculation Method (ACM) change proposal to include a new metric for thermal distribution system efficiency in the reporting requirements for the 2005 Title 24 Standards. The metric will facilitate future comparisons of different system types using a common ''yardstick''. (3) Using the selected near-term simulation approach, assess the impacts of

  4. Reactive control of subsonic axial fan noise in a duct.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Choy, Y S; Huang, L; Cheng, L

    2014-10-01

    Suppressing the ducted fan noise at low frequencies without varying the flow capacity is still a technical challenge. This study examines a conceived device consisting of two tensioned membranes backed with cavities housing the axial fan for suppression of the sound radiation from the axial fan directly. The noise suppression is achieved by destructive interference between the sound fields from the axial fan of a dipole nature and sound radiation from the membrane via vibroacoustics coupling. A two-dimensional model with the flow effect is presented which allows the performance of the device to be explored analytically. The air flow influences the symmetrical behavior and excites the odd in vacuo mode response of the membrane due to kinematic coupling. Such an asymmetrical effect can be compromised with off-center alignment of the axial fan. Tension plays an important role to sustain the performance to revoke the deformation of the membrane during the axial fan operation. With the design of four appropriately tensioned membranes covered by a cylindrical cavity, the first and second blade passage frequencies of the axial fan can be reduced by at least 20 dB. The satisfactory agreement between experiment and theory demonstrates that its feasibility is practical. PMID:25324066

  5. An electronically tunable duct silencer using dielectric elastomer actuators.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhenbo; Godaba, Hareesh; Cui, Yongdong; Foo, Choon Chiang; Debiasi, Marco; Zhu, Jian

    2015-09-01

    A duct silencer with tunable acoustic characteristics is presented in this paper. Dielectric elastomer, a smart material with lightweight, high elastic energy density and large deformation under high direct current/alternating current voltages, was used to fabricate this duct silencer. The acoustic performances and tunable mechanisms of this duct silencer were experimentally investigated. It was found that all the resonance peaks of this duct silencer could be adjusted using external control signals without any additional mechanical part. The physics of the tunable mechanism is further discussed based on the electro-mechanical interactions using finite element analysis. The present promising results also provide insight into the appropriateness of the duct silencer for possible use as next generation acoustic treatment device to replace the traditional acoustic treatment. PMID:26428819

  6. Heat Transfer in Conical Corner and Short Superelliptical Transition Ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poinsatte, Philip; Thurman, Douglas; Hippensteele, Steven

    2008-01-01

    Local surface heat transfer measurements were experimentally mapped using a transient liquid-crystal heat-transfer technique on the surface of two circular-to-rectangular transition ducts. One has a transition cross section defined by conical corners (Duct 1) and the other by an elliptical equation with changing coefficients (Duct 2). Duct 1 has a length-to-diameter ratio of 0.75 and an exit plane aspect ratio of 1.5. Duct 2 has a length-to-diameter ratio of 1.0 and an exit plane aspect ratio of 2.9. Test results are reported for various inlet-diameter-based Reynolds numbers ranging from 0.45 106 to 2.39 106 and two freestream turbulence intensities of about 1 percent, which is typical of wind tunnels, and up to 16 percent, which may be more typical of real engine conditions.

  7. Anicteric early bile duct carcinoma detection with magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography.

    PubMed

    Oshikiri, Taro; Morita, Takayuki; Fujita, Miyoshi; Miyasaka, Yuji; Senmaru, Naoto; Yamada, Hidehisa; Kondo, Satoshi; Katoh, Hiroyuki

    2005-01-01

    The poor prognosis of extrahepatic bile duct carcinoma makes early detection and diagnosis essential for positive patient outcomes. We describe 2 cases of jaundice-free early extrahepatic bile duct carcinoma detected by magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography. Extrahepatic bile duct carcinoma was discovered incidentally in patient 1 by magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography during evaluation of a gallbladder stone. In patient 2, extrahepatic bile duct carcinoma was found during a routine health maintenance exam. Both patients underwent radical surgical intervention. Both patient 1 and 2 have remained in good health for over one year, 3.5 and one year, respectively, and have not exhibited any signs or symptoms of relapse or cancer recurrence. Based on these cases, it appears that magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography can play a significant role in the early detection of extrahepatic bile duct carcinoma and improve disease prognosis. PMID:15816438

  8. Extravasation Mucocele Arising from a Lingual Thyroglossal Duct Remnant

    PubMed Central

    Nakahira, Mitsuhiko; Nakatani, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    Although a thyroglossal duct cyst is a congenital anomaly, it can also appear in adults. Despite the presence of embryological remnants, it is still unclear why the cyst should suddenly develop later in life. We report a case of a 46-year-old male with an extravasation mucocele arising from a long-standing lingual thyroglossal duct remnant. MRI demonstrated a lingual cystic lesion near the hyoid bone associated with a suprahyoid tract-like structure masquerading as a thyroglossal duct cyst. However, histopathological examination demonstrated a mucocele secondary to a rupture of a thyroglossal duct remnant with numerous intramural heterotopic salivary glands. We propose a new mechanism of an acquired cystic formation of this congenital disease that excessive production of mucus from heterotopic salivary glands and a physical trauma such as swallowing may lead to extravasation of mucus from the thyroglossal duct. PMID:25861502

  9. Extravasation mucocele arising from a lingual thyroglossal duct remnant.

    PubMed

    Nakahira, Mitsuhiko; Nakatani, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    Although a thyroglossal duct cyst is a congenital anomaly, it can also appear in adults. Despite the presence of embryological remnants, it is still unclear why the cyst should suddenly develop later in life. We report a case of a 46-year-old male with an extravasation mucocele arising from a long-standing lingual thyroglossal duct remnant. MRI demonstrated a lingual cystic lesion near the hyoid bone associated with a suprahyoid tract-like structure masquerading as a thyroglossal duct cyst. However, histopathological examination demonstrated a mucocele secondary to a rupture of a thyroglossal duct remnant with numerous intramural heterotopic salivary glands. We propose a new mechanism of an acquired cystic formation of this congenital disease that excessive production of mucus from heterotopic salivary glands and a physical trauma such as swallowing may lead to extravasation of mucus from the thyroglossal duct. PMID:25861502

  10. The surface evaporative duct height product: An evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, William T.

    1987-12-01

    The existence of a surface evaporative duct has many serious operational implications. One of the most serious and obvious implications is that the extended range of the radar will allow distant hostile units to detect the radar (and to be detected by the radar). Thus, the existence of a surface evaporative duct is an important component of the decision on whether or not to radiate. Another consequence of the duct is that a radar hole will exist between the top of the duct and the base of the lobes unaffected by the duct (see figure 1). Hostile aircraft or missiles will thus be able to approach the radar undetected. Conversely, knowledge of the refractivity profile in the vicinity of enemy radars can be turned to tactical advantage.

  11. A new evaporation duct climatology over the South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yang; Yang, Kunde; Yang, Yixin; Ma, Yuanliang

    2015-10-01

    The climatology of evaporation ducts is important for shipborne electromagnetic system design and application. The evaporation duct climatology that is currently used for such applications was developed in the mid 1980s; this study presents efforts to improve it over the South China Sea (SCS) by using a state-of-the-art evaporation duct model and an improved meteorology dataset. This new climatology provides better evaporation duct height (EDH) data over the SCS, at a higher resolution of 0.312°×0.313°. A comparison between the new climatology and the old one is performed. The monthly average EDH in the new climatology is between 10 and 12 m over the SCS, higher than that in the old climatology. The spatiotemporal characteristics of the evaporation duct over the SCS in different months are analyzed in detail, based on the new climatology.

  12. Regeneratively cooled transition duct with transversely buffered impingement nozzles

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, Jay A; Lee, Ching-Pang; Crawford, Michael E

    2015-04-21

    A cooling arrangement (56) having: a duct (30) configured to receive hot gases (16) from a combustor; and a flow sleeve (50) surrounding the duct and defining a cooling plenum (52) there between, wherein the flow sleeve is configured to form impingement cooling jets (70) emanating from dimples (82) in the flow sleeve effective to predominately cool the duct in an impingement cooling zone (60), and wherein the flow sleeve defines a convection cooling zone (64) effective to cool the duct solely via a cross-flow (76), the cross-flow comprising cooling fluid (72) exhausting from the impingement cooling zone. In the impingement cooling zone an undimpled portion (84) of the flow sleeve tapers away from the duct as the undimpled portion nears the convection cooling zone. The flow sleeve is configured to effect a greater velocity of the cross-flow in the convection cooling zone than in the impingement cooling zone.

  13. Rhinosporidiosis in the parotid duct: a rare case report.

    PubMed

    Panda, Swagatika; Lenka, Sthitaprajna; Padhiary, Subrat K; Sahoo, Sujit R; Srivastava, Gunjan

    2013-11-01

    Endemic to South India and Sri Lanka, Rhinosporidiosis is a chronic granulomatous infection caused by an agent of uncertain taxonomy: Rhinosporidium seeberi. Although it commonly manifests as a proliferative nasal lesion, many cases of Rhinosporidiosis have been reported where it has appeared as an extranasal lesion. The reported extranasal sites include the eye, ear, trachea, and parotid duct. However, the involvement of the parotid duct is quite rare, even among extranasal sites. The case presented is an adult female from the non-endemic zone of East India with a proliferative mass in the parotid duct. Although Rhinosporidiosis was not taken into consideration in the clinical differential diagnosis, eventual histopathological diagnosis confirmed Rhinosporidiosis. As this appears to be the second case of Rhinosporidiosis in the parotid duct in East India in 4 years, we encourage clinicians to be flexible in the differential diagnosis of proliferative growth in the parotid duct, even in those from non-endemic areas. PMID:23371913

  14. Analysis of pressure spectra measurements in a ducted combustion system. Ph.D. Thesis - Toledo Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, J. H.

    1980-01-01

    Combustion noise propagation in an operating ducted liquid fuel combustion system is studied in relation to the development of combustion noise prediction and suppression techniques. The presence of combustor emissions in the duct is proposed as the primary mechanism producing the attenuation and dispersion of combustion noise propagating in an operating liquid fuel combustion system. First, a complex mathematical model for calculating attenuation and dispersion taking into account mass transfer, heat transfer, and viscosity effects due to the presence of liquid fuel droplets or solid soot particles is discussed. Next, a simpler single parameter model for calculating pressure auto-spectra and cross-spectra which takes into account dispersion and attenuation due to heat transfer between solid soot particles and air is developed. Then, auto-spectra and cross-spectra obtained from internal pressure measurements in a combustion system consisting of a J-47 combustor can, a spool piece, and a long duct are presented. Last, analytical results obtained with the single parameter model are compared with the experimental measurements. The single parameter model results are shown to be in excellent agreement with the measurements.

  15. Ducts Sealing Using Injected Spray Sealant, Raleigh, North Carolina (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2014-03-01

    In multifamily and attached buildings, traditional duct sealing methods are often impractical or costly and disruptive because of the difficulty in accessing leakage sites. In this project, two retrofit duct sealing techniques - manually-applied sealants and injecting a spray sealant, were implemented in several low-rise multi-unit buildings. An analysis on the cost and performance of the two methods are presented. Each method was used in twenty housing units: approximately half of each group of units are single story and the remainder two-story. Results show that duct leakage to the outside was reduced by an average of 59% through the use of manual methods, and by 90% in the units where the injected spray sealant was used. It was found that 73% of the leakage reduction in homes that were treated with injected spray sealant was attributable to the manual sealing done at boots, returns and the air handler. The cost of manually-applying sealant ranged from $275 to $511 per unit and for the injected spray sealant the cost was $700 per unit. Modeling suggests a simple payback of 2.2 years for manual sealing and 4.7 years for the injected spray sealant system. Utility bills were collected for one year before and after the retrofits. Utility bill analysis shows 14% and 16% energy savings using injected spray sealant system and hand sealing procedure respectively in heating season whereas in cooling season, energy savings using injected spray sealant system and hand sealing were both 16%.

  16. MSFC hot air collectors. Phase 1: Test report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Losey, R.

    1977-01-01

    A development test program of 3 hot air flat plate solar collectors is described in detail. The pressure drop versus flow rate performance characteristics for these collectors, mounted in series, was determined under 14 different test conditions each of which was characterized by a unique combination of inlet air temperature and air flow rate. Characteristics of inlet, exit and transfer ducts of these collectors were also determined during this testing. The test results indicate that significant pressure drop occurs at air flow rates greater than 150 standard cubic feet per minute and this drop is not heavily dependent upon inlet air temperature; and inlet, exit and transfer duct characteristics differ sufficiently to suggest that system performance may be enhanced through careful design of each type of duct individually.

  17. Geometry and Cloaking Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochiai, T.; Nacher, J. C.

    2011-09-01

    Recently, the application of geometry and conformal mappings to artificial materials (metamaterials) has attracted the attention in various research communities. These materials, characterized by a unique man-made structure, have unusual optical properties, which materials found in nature do not exhibit. By applying the geometry and conformal mappings theory to metamaterial science, it may be possible to realize so-called "Harry Potter cloaking device". Although such a device is still in the science fiction realm, several works have shown that by using such metamaterials it may be possible to control the direction of the electromagnetic field at will. We could then make an object hidden inside of a cloaking device. Here, we will explain how to design invisibility device using differential geometry and conformal mappings.

  18. Students Discovering Spherical Geometry Using Dynamic Geometry Software

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guven, Bulent; Karatas, Ilhan

    2009-01-01

    Dynamic geometry software (DGS) such as Cabri and Geometers' Sketchpad has been regularly used worldwide for teaching and learning Euclidean geometry for a long time. The DGS with its inductive nature allows students to learn Euclidean geometry via explorations. However, with respect to non-Euclidean geometries, do we need to introduce them to…

  19. New Insights for Improving the Designs of Flexible Duct Junction Boxes (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2014-01-01

    IBACOS explored the relationships between pressure and physical configurations of flexible duct junction boxes by using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations to predict individual box parameters and total system pressure, thereby ensuring improved HVAC performance. Current Air Conditioning Contractors of America (ACCA) guidance (Group 11, Appendix 3, ACCA Manual D, Rutkowski 2009) allows for unconstrained variation in the number of takeoffs, box sizes, and takeoff locations. The only variables currently used in selecting an equivalent length (EL) are velocity of air in the duct and friction rate, given the first takeoff is located at least twice its diameter away from the inlet. This condition does not account for other factors impacting pressure loss across these types of fittings. For each simulation, the IBACOS team converted pressure loss within a box to an EL to compare variation in ACCA Manual D guidance to the simulated variation. IBACOS chose cases to represent flows reasonably correlating to flows typically encountered in the field and analyzed differences in total pressure due to increases in number and location of takeoffs, box dimensions, and velocity of air, and whether an entrance fitting is included. The team also calculated additional balancing losses for all cases due to discrepancies between intended outlet flows and natural flow splits created by the fitting. In certain asymmetrical cases, the balancing losses were significantly higher than symmetrical cases where the natural splits were close to the targets. Thus, IBACOS has shown additional design constraints that can ensure better system performance.

  20. Low frequency sound attenuation in a flow duct using a thin slow sound material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aurégan, Yves; Farooqui, Maaz; Groby, Jean-Philippe

    2016-05-01

    We present a thin subwavelength material that can be flush mounted to a duct and which gives a large wide band attenuation at remarkably low frequencies in air flow channels. To decrease the material thickness, the sound is slowed in the material using folded side branch tubes. The impedance of the material is compared to the optimal value, which differs greatly from the characteristic impedance. In particular, the viscous and thermal effects have to be very small to have high transmission losses. Grazing flow on this material increases the losses at the interface between the flow and the material.

  1. Acoustic propagation in rigid ducts with blockage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Raheb, M.; Wagner, P.

    1982-01-01

    Acoustic levitation has been suggested for moving nonmagnetic material in furnaces for heat processing in space experiments. Basically, acoustic standing waves under resonant conditions are excited in the cavity of the furnace while the material blockage is located at a pressure node and thus at a maximum gradient. The position of the blockage is controlled by displacing the node as a result of frequency change. The present investigation is concerned with the effect of blockage on the longitudinal and transverse resonances of a cylindrical cavity, taking into account the results of a one-dimensional and three-dimensional (3-D) analysis. Based on a Green's function surface element method, 3-D analysis is tested experimentally and proved to be accurate over a wide range of geometric parameters and boundary shapes. The shift in resonance depends on the change in pressure gradient and duct shortening caused by the blockage.

  2. Technology readiness for advanced ducted engines

    SciTech Connect

    Eckardt, D.; Brines, G.L.

    1989-01-01

    The Advanced Ducted Engines (ADEs) currently undergoing development for next-generation passenger aircraft typically possess bypass ratios of the order of 12-25 and specific fuel consumption figures 12-17 percent lower than current advanced turbofans. An extensive technology-readiness program has been mounted on behalf of ADE design definition over the last two years, encompassing among its concerns aircraft/engine-installation interference, low pressure-ratio fan aerodynamics, fan/nacelle interactions (including windmilling and thrust-reversal), acoustic characteristics, transonic-drive turbines, and slender nacelle aerodynamic and mechanical design. Both turbine-driven and geared ADE fans, which may be of single-rotating or contrarotating type, are discussed. 5 refs.

  3. ADAM: An Axisymmetric Duct Aeroacoustic Modeling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrahamson, A. L.

    1983-01-01

    An interconnected system of computer programs for analyzing the propagation and attenuation of sound in aeroengine ducts containing realistic compressible subsonic mean flows, ADAM was developed primarily for research directed towards the reduction of noise emitted from turbofan aircraft engines. The two basic components are a streamtube curvature program for determination of the mean flow, and a finite element code for solution of the acoustic propagation problem. The system, which has been specifically tailored for ease of use, is presently installed at NASA Langley Reseach Center on a Control Data Cyber 175 Computer under the NOS Operating system employing a Tektronix terminal for interactive graphics. The scope and organization of the ADAM system is described. A users guide, examples of input data, and results for selected cases are included.

  4. Live 3D image overlay for arterial duct closure with Amplatzer Duct Occluder II additional size.

    PubMed

    Goreczny, Sebstian; Morgan, Gareth J; Dryzek, Pawel

    2016-03-01

    Despite several reports describing echocardiography for the guidance of ductal closure, two-dimensional angiography remains the mainstay imaging tool; three-dimensional rotational angiography has the potential to overcome some of the drawbacks of standard angiography, and reconstructed image overlay provides reliable guidance for device placement. We describe arterial duct closure solely from venous approach guided by live three-dimensional image overlay. PMID:26358032

  5. Experimental Investigation of Water Droplet Impingement on Airfoils, Finite Wings, and an S-duct Engine Inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papadakis, Michael; Hung, Kuohsing E.; Vu, Giao T.; Yeong, Hsiung Wei; Bidwell, Colin S.; Breer, Martin D.; Bencic, Timothy J.

    2002-01-01

    Validation of trajectory computer codes, for icing analysis, requires experimental water droplet impingement data for a wide range of aircraft geometries as well as flow and icing conditions. This report presents improved experimental and data reduction methods for obtaining water droplet impingement data and provides a comprehensive water droplet impingement database for a range of test geometries including an MS(1)-0317 airfoil, a GLC-305 airfoil, an NACA 65(sub 2)-415 airfoil, a commercial transport tail section, a 36-inch chord natural laminar flow NLF(1)-0414 airfoil, a 48-inch NLF(1)-0414 section with a 25 percent chord simple flap, a state-of-the-art three-element high lift system, a NACA 64A008 finite span swept business jet tail, a full-scale business jet horizontal tail section, a 25 percent-scale business jet empennage, and an S-duct turboprop engine inlet. The experimental results were obtained at the NASA Glenn Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) for spray clouds with median volumetric diameter (MVD) of 11, 11.5, 21, 92, and 94 microns and for a range of angles of attack. The majority of the impingement experiments were conducted at an air speed of 175 mph corresponding to a Reynolds number of approximately 1.6 million per foot. The maximum difference of repeated tests from the average ranged from 0.24 to 12 percent for most of the experimental results presented. This represents a significant improvement in test repeatability compared to previous experimental studies. The increase in test repeatability was attributed to improvements made to the experimental and data reduction methods. Computations performed with the LEWICE-2D and LEWICE-3D computer codes for all test configurations are presented in this report. For the test cases involving median volumetric diameters of 11 and 21 microns, the correlation between the analytical and experimental impingement efficiency distributions was good. For the median volumetric diameters of 92 and 94-micron cases, however

  6. Experimental and analytical methods for the determination of connected-pipe ramjet and ducted rocket internal performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1994-07-01

    Connected-pipe, subsonic combustion ramjet and ducted rocket performance determination procedures used by the NATO countries have been reviewed and evaluated. A working document has been produced which provides recommended methods for reporting test results and delineates the parameters that are required to be measured. Explanations and detailed numerical examples are presented covering the determination of both theoretical and experimental performances, the use of air heaters and uncertainty and error analysis.

  7. Experimental Investigation of Oscillatory Flow Pressure and Pressure Drop Through Complex Geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ibrahim, Mounir B.; Wang, Meng; Gedeon, David

    2005-01-01

    A series of experiments have been performed to investigate the oscillatory flow pressure and pressure drop through complex geometries. These experiments were conducted at the CSU-SLRE facility which is a horizontally opposed, two-piston, single-acting engine with a split crankshaft driving mechanism. Flow through a rectangular duct, with no insert (obstruction), was studied first. Then four different inserts were examined: Abrupt, Manifold, Diverging Short and Diverging Long. The inserts were mounted in the center of the rectangular duct to represent different type of geometries that could be encountered in Stirling machines. The pressure and pressure drop of the oscillating flow was studied for: 1) different inserts, 2) different phase angle between the two pistons of the engine (zero, 90 lead, 180, and 90 lag), and 3) for different piston frequencies (5, 10, 15, and 20 Hz). It was found that the pressure drop of the oscillatory flow increases with increasing Reynolds number. The pressure drop was shown to be mainly due to the gas inertia for the case of oscillatory flow through a rectangular duct with no insert. On the other hand, for the cases with different inserts into the rectangular duct, the pressure drop has three sources: inertia, friction, and local losses. The friction pressure drop is only a small fraction of the total pressure drop. It was also shown that the dimensionless pressure drop decreases with increasing kinetic Reynolds number.

  8. The Helen of Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, John

    2010-01-01

    The cycloid has been called the Helen of Geometry, not only because of its beautiful properties but also because of the quarrels it provoked between famous mathematicians of the 17th century. This article surveys the history of the cycloid and its importance in the development of the calculus.

  9. The Geometry of Viruses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Case, Christine L.

    1991-01-01

    Presented is an activity in which students make models of viruses, which allows them to visualize the shape of these microorganisms. Included are some background on viruses, the biology and geometry of viruses, directions for building viruses, a comparison of cells and viruses, and questions for students. (KR)

  10. Gravity is Geometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacKeown, P. K.

    1984-01-01

    Clarifies two concepts of gravity--those of a fictitious force and those of how space and time may have geometry. Reviews the position of Newton's theory of gravity in the context of special relativity and considers why gravity (as distinct from electromagnetics) lends itself to Einstein's revolutionary interpretation. (JN)

  11. Sliding vane geometry turbines

    DOEpatents

    Sun, Harold Huimin; Zhang, Jizhong; Hu, Liangjun; Hanna, Dave R

    2014-12-30

    Various systems and methods are described for a variable geometry turbine. In one example, a turbine nozzle comprises a central axis and a nozzle vane. The nozzle vane includes a stationary vane and a sliding vane. The sliding vane is positioned to slide in a direction substantially tangent to an inner circumference of the turbine nozzle and in contact with the stationary vane.

  12. Making Solid Geometry Solid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartz, Viggo

    1981-01-01

    Allowing students to use a polystyrene cutter to fashion their own three-dimensional models is suggested as a means of allowing individuals to experience problems and develop ideas related to solid geometry. A list of ideas that can lead to mathematical discovery is provided. (MP)

  13. Fractal geometry of music.

    PubMed Central

    Hsü, K J; Hsü, A J

    1990-01-01

    Music critics have compared Bach's music to the precision of mathematics. What "mathematics" and what "precision" are the questions for a curious scientist. The purpose of this short note is to suggest that the mathematics is, at least in part, Mandelbrot's fractal geometry and the precision is the deviation from a log-log linear plot. PMID:11607061

  14. Geometry and physics

    PubMed Central

    Atiyah, Michael; Dijkgraaf, Robbert; Hitchin, Nigel

    2010-01-01

    We review the remarkably fruitful interactions between mathematics and quantum physics in the past decades, pointing out some general trends and highlighting several examples, such as the counting of curves in algebraic geometry, invariants of knots and four-dimensional topology. PMID:20123740

  15. GEOMETRY, TENTATIVE GUIDES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    KLIER, KATHERINE M.

    PRESENTED IS A FUSED COURSE IN PLANE, SOLID, AND COORDINATE GEOMETRY. ELEMENTARY SET THEORY, LOGIC, AND THE PRINCIPLE OF SEPARATION PROVIDE UNIFYING THREADS THROUGHOUT THE TEXT. THE TWO CURRICULUM GUIDES HAVE BEEN PREPARED FOR USE WITH TWO DIFFERENT TEXTS. EITHER CURRICULUM GUIDE MAY BE USED DEPENDING UPON THE CHOICE OF THE TEACHER AND THE NEEDS…

  16. Geometry of spinor regularization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hestenes, D.; Lounesto, P.

    1983-01-01

    The Kustaanheimo theory of spinor regularization is given a new formulation in terms of geometric algebra. The Kustaanheimo-Stiefel matrix and its subsidiary condition are put in a spinor form directly related to the geometry of the orbit in physical space. A physically significant alternative to the KS subsidiary condition is discussed. Derivations are carried out without using coordinates.

  17. Listening to Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Brett D.; Barger, Rita

    2009-01-01

    The many connections between music and mathematics are well known. The length of a plucked string determines its tone, the time signature of a piece of music is a ratio, and note durations are measured in fractions. One connection commonly overlooked is that between music and geometry--specifically, geometric transformations, including…

  18. Geometry of PDE's. IV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prástaro, Agostino

    2008-02-01

    Following our previous results on this subject [R.P. Agarwal, A. Prástaro, Geometry of PDE's. III(I): Webs on PDE's and integral bordism groups. The general theory, Adv. Math. Sci. Appl. 17 (2007) 239-266; R.P. Agarwal, A. Prástaro, Geometry of PDE's. III(II): Webs on PDE's and integral bordism groups. Applications to Riemannian geometry PDE's, Adv. Math. Sci. Appl. 17 (2007) 267-285; A. Prástaro, Geometry of PDE's and Mechanics, World Scientific, Singapore, 1996; A. Prástaro, Quantum and integral (co)bordism in partial differential equations, Acta Appl. Math. (5) (3) (1998) 243-302; A. Prástaro, (Co)bordism groups in PDE's, Acta Appl. Math. 59 (2) (1999) 111-201; A. Prástaro, Quantized Partial Differential Equations, World Scientific Publishing Co, Singapore, 2004, 500 pp.; A. Prástaro, Geometry of PDE's. I: Integral bordism groups in PDE's, J. Math. Anal. Appl. 319 (2006) 547-566; A. Prástaro, Geometry of PDE's. II: Variational PDE's and integral bordism groups, J. Math. Anal. Appl. 321 (2006) 930-948; A. Prástaro, Th.M. Rassias, Ulam stability in geometry of PDE's, Nonlinear Funct. Anal. Appl. 8 (2) (2003) 259-278; I. Stakgold, Boundary Value Problems of Mathematical Physics, I, The MacMillan Company, New York, 1967; I. Stakgold, Boundary Value Problems of Mathematical Physics, II, Collier-MacMillan, Canada, Ltd, Toronto, Ontario, 1968], integral bordism groups of the Navier-Stokes equation are calculated for smooth, singular and weak solutions, respectively. Then a characterization of global solutions is made on this ground. Enough conditions to assure existence of global smooth solutions are given and related to nullity of integral characteristic numbers of the boundaries. Stability of global solutions are related to some characteristic numbers of the space-like Cauchy dataE Global solutions of variational problems constrained by (NS) are classified by means of suitable integral bordism groups too.

  19. EFFECT OF CENTRAL FANS AND IN-DUCT FILTERS ON DEPOSITION RATES OF ULTRAFINE AND FINE PARTICLES IN AN OCCUPIED TOWNHOUSE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Airborne particles are implicated in morbidity and mortality of certain high-risk subpopulations. Exposure to particles occurs mostly indoors, where a main removal mechanism is deposition to surfaces. Deposition can be affected by the use of forced- air circulation through duct...

  20. Negative space filling and 3D reconstruction of histological sections demonstrates differences in volumes of vessels and ducts within portal tracts of canine livers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Visualizing areas of tissue that are occupied by air or liquid can provide a unique perspective on the relationships between various spaces within the tissue. The portal tracts of liver tissue are an example of such a space since the liver contains several vessels and ducts in various patterns of i...

  1. Register Closing Effects on Forced Air Heating System Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Iain S.

    2003-11-01

    Closing registers in forced air heating systems and leaving some rooms in a house unconditioned has been suggested as a method of quickly saving energy for California consumers. This study combined laboratory measurements of the changes in duct leakage as registers are closed together with modeling techniques to estimate the changes in energy use attributed to closing registers. The results of this study showed that register closing led to increased energy use for a typical California house over a wide combination of climate, duct leakage and number of closed registers. The reduction in building thermal loads due to conditioning only a part of the house was offset by increased duct system losses; mostly due to increased duct leakage. Therefore, the register closing technique is not recommended as a viable energy saving strategy for California houses with ducts located outside conditioned space. The energy penalty associated with the register closing technique was found to be minimized if registers furthest from the air handler are closed first because this tends to only affect the pressures and air leakage for the closed off branch. Closing registers nearer the air handler tends to increase the pressures and air leakage for the whole system. Closing too many registers (more than 60%) is not recommended because the added flow resistance severely restricts the air flow though the system leading to safety concerns. For example, furnaces may operate on the high-limit switch and cooling systems may suffer from frozen coils.

  2. Duct Leakage Modeling in EnergyPlus and Analysis of Energy Savings from Implementing SAV with InCITeTM

    SciTech Connect

    Wray, Craig; Sherman, Max

    2010-03-01

    This project addressed two significant deficiencies in air-handling systems for large commercial building: duct leakage and duct static pressure reset. Both constitute significant energy reduction opportunities for these buildings. The overall project goal is to bridge the gaps in current duct performance modeling capabilities, and to expand our understanding of air-handling system performance in California large commercial buildings. The purpose of this project is to provide technical support for the implementation of a duct leakage modeling capability in EnergyPlus, to demonstrate the capabilities of the new model, and to carry out analyses of field measurements intended to demonstrate the energy saving potential of the SAV with InCITeTM duct static pressure reset (SPR) technology. A new duct leakage model has been successfully implemented in EnergyPlus, which will enable simulation users to assess the impacts of leakage on whole-building energy use and operation in a coupled manner. This feature also provides a foundation to support code change proposals and compliance analyses related to Title 24 where duct leakage is an issue. Our example simulations continue to show that leaky ducts substantially increase fan power: 10percent upstream and 10percent downstream leakage increases supply fan power 30percent on average compared to a tight duct system (2.5percent upstream and 2.5percent downstream leakage). Much of this increase is related to the upstream leakage rather than to the downstream leakage. This does not mean, however, that downstream leakage is unimportant. Our simulations also demonstrate that ceiling heat transfer is a significant effect that needs to be included when assessing the impacts of duct leakage in large commercial buildings. This is not particularly surprising, given that ?ceiling regain? issues have already been included in residential analyses as long as a decade ago (e.g., ASHRAE Standard 152); mainstream simulation programs that are

  3. Generation of Higher Order Modes in a Rectangular Duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerhold, Carl H.; Cabell, Randolph H.; Brown, Donald E.

    2004-01-01

    Advanced noise control methodologies to reduce sound emission from aircraft engines take advantage of the modal structure of the noise in the duct. This noise is caused by the interaction of rotor wakes with downstream obstructions such as exit guide vanes. Mode synthesis has been accomplished in circular ducts and current active noise control work has made use of this capability to cancel fan noise. The goal of the current effort is to examine the fundamental process of higher order mode propagation through an acoustically treated, curved duct. The duct cross-section is rectangular to permit greater flexibility in representation of a range of duct curvatures. The work presented is the development of a feedforward control system to generate a user-specified modal pattern in the duct. The multiple-error, filtered-x LMS algorithm is used to determine the magnitude and phase of signal input to the loudspeakers to produce a desired modal pattern at a set of error microphones. Implementation issues, including loudspeaker placement and error microphone placement, are discussed. Preliminary results from a 9-3/8 inch by 21 inch duct, using 12 loudspeakers and 24 microphones, are presented. These results demonstrate the ability of the control system to generate a user-specified mode while suppressing undesired modes.

  4. Modeling low elevation GPS signal propagation in maritime atmospheric ducts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jinpeng; Wu, Zhensen; Wang, Bo; Wang, Hongguang; Zhu, Qinglin

    2012-05-01

    Using the parabolic wave equation (PWE) method, we model low elevation GPS L1 signal propagation in maritime atmospheric ducts. To consider sea surface impedance, roughness, and the effects of earth's curvature, we propose a new initial field model for the GPS PWE split-step solution. On the basis of the comparison between the proposed model and the conventional initial field model for a smooth, perfectly conducting sea surface on a planar earth, we conclude that both the amplitude and phase of the initial field are influenced by surface impedance and roughness, and that the interference behavior between direct and reflected GPS rays is affected by earth's curvature. The performance of the proposed model is illustrated with examples of low elevation GPS L1 signal propagation in three types of ducts: an evaporation duct, a surface-based duct, and an elevated duct. The GPS PWE is numerically implemented using the split-step discrete mixed Fourier transform algorithm to enforce impedance-type boundary conditions at the rough sea surface. Because the GPS signal is right hand circularly polarized, we calculate its power strength by combining the propagation predictions of the horizontally and the vertically polarized components. The effects of the maritime atmospheric ducts on low elevation GPS signal propagation are demonstrated according to the presented examples, and the potential applications of the GPS signals affected by ducts are discussed.

  5. An introduction to Minkowski geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farnsworth, David L.

    2016-07-01

    The fundamental ideas of Minkowski geometries are presented. Learning about Minkowski geometries can sharpen our students' understanding of concepts such as distance measurement. Many of its ideas are important and accessible to undergraduate students. Following a brief overview, distance and orthogonality in Minkowski geometries are thoroughly discussed and many illustrative examples and applications are supplied. Suggestions for further study of these geometries are given. Indeed, Minkowski geometries are an excellent source of topics for undergraduate research and independent study.

  6. Strategy Guideline. Compact Air Distribution Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Burdick, Arlan

    2013-06-01

    This guideline discusses the benefits and challenges of using a compact air distribution system to handle the reduced loads and reduced air volume needed to condition the space within an energy efficient home. The decision criteria for a compact air distribution system must be determined early in the whole-house design process, considering both supply and return air design. However, careful installation of a compact air distribution system can result in lower material costs from smaller equipment, shorter duct runs, and fewer outlets; increased installation efficiencies, including ease of fitting the system into conditioned space; lower loads on a better balanced HVAC system, and overall improved energy efficiency of the home.

  7. Remnant cystic duct adenocarcinoma presenting as gastric outlet obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Samuel Tsoon Wuan; Cheng, Yue; Cheung, Frances; Tang, Chung Ngai

    2016-01-01

    Only a few case reports of remnant cystic duct carcinoma exist. The presented case of remnant cystic duct carcinoma with invasion to pylorus and bulbus of duodenum leading to gastric outlet obstruction was the first of its kind. We reviewed all cases of remnant cystic duct carcinoma that we found in the literature and summarized its definition, presentation, extent of invasion and clinical outcome after operation. The diagnosis can be difficult due to the rarity of disease, locally advanced nature of disease and distorted postoperative anatomy. A high index of suspicion can increase the likelihood of a preoperative diagnosis. PMID:27154747

  8. Finite-amplitude waves in cylindrical lined ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nayfeh, A. H.; Tsai, M.-S.

    1974-01-01

    A second-order uniformly valid expansion is obtained for nonlinear waves propagating in a cylindrical duct lined with a point-reacting acoustic material that consists of a porous sheet followed by honey-comb cavities and backed by the impervious walls of the duct. The effect of the liner is taken into account by coupling the waves in the duct with those in the liner. As in the two-dimensional case, the nonlinearity increases the attenuation rate at all frequencies except in narrow bandwidths around the resonant frequencies, irrespective of the geometrical dimensions of the liner or the acoustic properties of the porous sheet.

  9. Modal density function and number of propagating modes in ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, E. J.

    1976-01-01

    Often raised questions in duct sound propagation studies involve the total number of propagating modes, the number of propagating radial modes for a particular spinning lobe number, and the number of modes possible between two given values of cutoff ratio or eigenvalue. These questions can be answered approximately by using the modal distribution function which is the integral of the modal density function for ducts in a manner similar to that previously published for architectural acoustics. The modal density functions are derived for rectangular and circular ducts with a uniform steady flow. Results from this continuous theory are compared to the actual (discrete) modal distributions.

  10. Millimetre-wave propagation in the evaporation duct

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, M. F.; Craig, K. H.

    1990-03-01

    Recent developments in propagation modeling based on the Parabolic Equation Method allow the forecasting of two-dimensional antenna coverage diagrams at millimeter wavelengths, in a dispersive atmosphere with arbitrary two-dimensional variation of the refractive index. The model was applied successfully to mm-wave propagation in the evaporation duct. The evaporation duct height is not sufficient to characterize mm-wave propagation, and information on the water vapor content is essential for the correct modeling of atmospheric absorption. Turbulence simulations were carried out, showing marked scintillation, effects in the evaporation duct. The method can be applied to arbitrary refractivity spectra, and gives a complete numerical description of the field statistics.

  11. Influence of evaporation ducts on radar sea return

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reilly, J. P.; Dockery, G. D.

    1990-04-01

    Modeling of radar sea return is discussed with consideration of propagation conditions. Both the intensity and propagation direction of energy incident at the sea surface can be significantly affected by the refractive condition of the atmosphere. The paper describes and evaluates a model that incorporates both of these effects for the situation where the propagation conditions are characterized as evaporation ducts. Such ducts are the most persistent marine propagation environment on a worldwide basis for low-altitude propagation. It is shown that commonly encountered evaporation ducts can profoundly affect sea returns.

  12. Duplicated extrahepatic bile duct identified following cholecystectomy injury

    PubMed Central

    Hoepfner, Lauren; Sweeney, Mary Katherine; White, Jared A.

    2016-01-01

    Though variations of intrahepatic biliary anatomy are quite common, duplication of the extrahepatic biliary system is extremely rare and reported infrequently in the literature. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy is one of the most common general surgery procedures performed. Unfortunately, iatrogenic bile duct injuries can contribute to significant morbidity including hospital readmissions, infectious complications and death. Anomalous extrahepatic biliary anatomy may be one of the factors, which increases the likelihood of bile duct injury during laparoscopic cholecystectomy. We present a case of an iatrogenic bile duct injury that occurred during a laparoscopic cholecystectomy, in which a duplicated extrahepatic biliary system was identified intraoperatively during the definitive operative repair. PMID:27141049

  13. Transition duct with late injection in turbine system

    SciTech Connect

    LeBegue, Jeffrey Scott; Pentecost, Ronnie Ray; Flanagan, James Scott; Kim, Won -Wook; McMahan, Kevin Weston

    2015-09-15

    A system for supplying an injection fluid to a combustor is disclosed. The system includes a transition duct comprising an inlet, an outlet, and a passage extending between the inlet and the outlet and defining a longitudinal axis, a radial axis, and a tangential axis. The outlet of the transition duct is offset from the inlet along the longitudinal axis and the tangential axis. The passage defines a combustion chamber. The system further includes a tube providing fluid communication for the injection fluid to flow through the transition duct and into the combustion chamber.

  14. A study on vortex flow control on inlet distortion in the re-engined 727-100 center inlet duct using computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Bernhard H.; Huang, Pao S.; Paschal, William A.; Cavatorta, Enrico

    1992-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics was used to investigate the management of inlet distortion by the introduction of discrete vorticity sources at selected locations in the inlet for the purpose of controlling secondary flow. These sources of vorticity were introduced by means of vortex generators. A series of design observations were made concerning the importance of various vortex generator design parameters in minimizing engine face circumferential distortion. The study showed that vortex strength, generator scale, and secondary flow field structure have a complicated and interrelated influence on the engine face distortion, over and above the initial geometry and arrangement of the generators. The installed vortex generator performance was found to be a function of three categories of variables: the inflow conditions, the aerodynamic characteristics associated with the inlet duct, and the design parameters related to the geometry, arrangement, and placement of the vortex generators within the outlet duct itself.

  15. Physics and geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souriau, Jean-Marie

    1983-01-01

    Differential geometry, the contemporary heir of the infinitesimal calculus of the 17th century, appears today as the most appropriate language for the description of physical reality. This holds at every level: The concept of “connexion,” for instance, is used in the construction of models of the universe as well as in the description of the interior of the proton. Nothing is apparently more contrary to the wisdom of physicists; all the same, “it works.” The pages that follow show the conceptual role played by this geometry in some examples—without entering into technical details. In order to achieve this, we shall often have to abandon the complete mathematical rigor and even full definitions; however, we shall be able to give a precise description of the connection of ideas thanks to some elements of group theory.

  16. Puzzle geometry and rigidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smania, Daniel

    2007-07-01

    We describe a new and robust method to prove rigidity results in complex dynamics. The new ingredient is the geometry of the critical puzzle pieces: under control of geometry and ``complex bounds'', two generalized polynomial-like maps which admit a topological conjugacy, quasiconformal outside the filled-in Julia set, are indeed quasiconformally conjugate. The proof uses a new abstract removability-type result for quasiconformal maps, following ideas of Heinonen and Koskela and of Kallunki and Koskela, optimized for applications in complex dynamics. We prove, as the first application of this new method, that, for even criticalities distinct from two, the period two cycle of the Fibonacci renormalization operator is hyperbolic with 1 -dimensional unstable manifold.

  17. Failures of information geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skilling, John

    2015-01-01

    Information H is a unique relationship between probabilities, based on the property of independence which is central to scientific methodology. Information Geometry makes the tempting but fallacious assumption that a local metric (conventionally based on information) can be used to endow the space of probability distributions with a preferred global Riemannian metric. No such global metric can conform to H, which is "from-to" asymmetric whereas geometrical length is by definition symmetric. Accordingly, any Riemannian metric will contradict the required structure of the very distributions which are supposedly being triangulated. It follows that probabilities do not form a metric space. We give counter-examples in which alternative formulations of information, and the use of information geometry, lead to unacceptable results.

  18. Cylindrical geometry hall thruster

    DOEpatents

    Raitses, Yevgeny; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus and method for thrusting plasma, utilizing a Hall thruster with a cylindrical geometry, wherein ions are accelerated in substantially the axial direction. The apparatus is suitable for operation at low power. It employs small size thruster components, including a ceramic channel, with the center pole piece of the conventional annular design thruster eliminated or greatly reduced. Efficient operation is accomplished through magnetic fields with a substantial radial component. The propellant gas is ionized at an optimal location in the thruster. A further improvement is accomplished by segmented electrodes, which produce localized voltage drops within the thruster at optimally prescribed locations. The apparatus differs from a conventional Hall thruster, which has an annular geometry, not well suited to scaling to small size, because the small size for an annular design has a great deal of surface area relative to the volume.

  19. Freezing in confined geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokol, P. E.; Ma, W. J.; Herwig, K. W.; Snow, W. M.; Wang, Y.; Koplik, Joel; Banavar, Jayanth R.

    1992-01-01

    Results of detailed structural studies, using elastic neutron scattering, of the freezing of liquid O2 and D2 in porous vycor glass, are presented. The experimental studies have been complemented by computer simulations of the dynamics of freezing of a Lennard-Jones liquid in narrow channels bounded by molecular walls. Results point to a new simple physical interpretation of freezing in confined geometries.

  20. Air Conditioning and Refrigeration Book III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckes, William; Fulkerson, Dan

    Designed to present theory as a functional aspect, this air conditioning and refrigeration curriculum guide is comprised of nine units of instruction. Unit titles include (1) Job Orientation, (2) Applying for a Job, (3) Customer Relations, (4) Business Management, (5) Psychometrics, (6) Residential Heat Loss and Heat Gain, (7) Duct Design and…