Science.gov

Sample records for air exchange measurements

  1. Air exchange effectiveness in office buildings: Measurement techniques and results

    SciTech Connect

    Fisk, W.J.; Faulkner, D.

    1992-07-01

    We define two air exchange effectiveness parameters which indicate the extent of short circuiting, mixing, or displacement air flow in an entire building, the air diffusion effectiveness which indicates the air flow pattern locally, and the normalized local age of air. After describing two tracer gas procedures for measuring these parameters, we discuss assumptions inherent in the data analysis that are often violated in large office buildings. To obtain valuable data, careful selection of buildings for measurements and assessments to determine if operating conditions are reasonably consistent with the assumptions are necessary. Multiple factors, in addition to the air flow pattern in the occupied space, can affect measurement results, consequently, the interpretation of measurements is not straightforward. We summarize the results of measurements in several office buildings and in a research laboratory. Almost all measurements indicate that the extent of both short circuiting and displacement flow is small. A moderate amount of short circuiting is evident from a few measurements in rooms with heated supply air. Ages of air and their reciprocals (local ventilation rates) often vary substantially between rooms, probably because of room-to-room variation in the rate of air supply. For future research, we suggest assessments of measurement accuracy, development of measurement approaches that may be practically applied for a broader range of buildings, and a greater focus on pollutant removal efficiencies.

  2. Direct measurements of air-sea CO2 exchange over a coral reef

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGowan, Hamish A.; MacKellar, Mellissa C.; Gray, Michael A.

    2016-05-01

    Quantification of CO2 exchange with the atmosphere over coral reefs has relied on microscale measurements of pCO2 gradients across the air-sea interfacial boundary; shipboard measurements of air-sea CO2 exchange over adjacent ocean inferred to represent over reef processes or ecosystem productivity modeling. Here we present by way of case study the first direct measurements of air-sea CO2 exchange over a coral reef made using the eddy covariance method. Research was conducted during the summer monsoon over a lagoonal platform reef in the southern Great Barrier Reef, Australia. Results show the reef flat to be a net source of CO2 to the atmosphere of similar magnitude as coastal lakes, while adjacent shallow and deep lagoons were net sinks as was the surrounding ocean. This heterogeneity in CO2 exchange with the atmosphere confirms need for spatially representative direct measurements of CO2 over coral reefs to accurately quantify their role in atmospheric carbon budgets.

  3. Measuring and modeling air exchange rates inside taxi cabs in Los Angeles, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Shi; Yu, Nu; Wang, Yueyan; Zhu, Yifang

    2015-12-01

    Air exchange rates (AERs) have a direct impact on traffic-related air pollutant (TRAP) levels inside vehicles. Taxi drivers are occupationally exposed to TRAP on a daily basis, yet there is limited measurement of AERs in taxi cabs. To fill this gap, AERs were quantified in 22 representative Los Angeles taxi cabs including 10 Prius, 5 Crown Victoria, 3 Camry, 3 Caravan, and 1 Uplander under realistic driving (RD) conditions. To further study the impacts of window position and ventilation settings on taxi AERs, additional tests were conducted on 14 taxis with windows closed (WC) and on the other 8 taxis with not only windows closed but also medium fan speed (WC-MFS) under outdoor air mode. Under RD conditions, the AERs in all 22 cabs had a mean of 63 h-1 with a median of 38 h-1. Similar AERs were observed under WC condition when compared to those measured under RD condition. Under WC-MFS condition, AERs were significantly increased in all taxi cabs, when compared with those measured under RD condition. A General Estimating Equation (GEE) model was developed and the modeling results showed that vehicle model was a significant factor in determining the AERs in taxi cabs under RD condition. Driving speed and car age were positively associated with AERs but not statistically significant. Overall, AERs measured in taxi cabs were much higher than typical AERs people usually encounter in indoor environments such as homes, offices, and even regular passenger vehicles.

  4. Measurement of air exchange rates in different indoor environments using continuous CO2 sensors.

    PubMed

    You, Yan; Niu, Can; Zhou, Jian; Liu, Yating; Bai, Zhipeng; Zhang, Jiefeng; He, Fei; Zhang, Nan

    2012-01-01

    A new air exchange rate (AER) monitoring method using continuous CO2 sensors was developed and validated through both laboratory experiments and field studies. Controlled laboratory simulation tests were conducted in a 1-m3 environmental chamber at different AERs (0.1-10.0 hr(-1)). AERs were determined using the decay method based on box model assumptions. Field tests were conducted in classrooms, dormitories, meeting rooms and apartments during 2-5 weekdays using CO2 sensors coupled with data loggers. Indoor temperature, relative humidity (RH), and CO2 concentrations were continuously monitored while outdoor parameters combined with on-site climate conditions were recorded. Statistical results indicated that good laboratory performance was achieved: duplicate precision was within 10%, and the measured AERs were 90%-120% of the real AERs. Average AERs were 1.22, 1.37, 1.10, 1.91 and 0.73 hr(-1) in dormitories, air-conditioned classrooms, classrooms with an air circulation cooling system, reading rooms, and meeting rooms, respectively. In an elderly particulate matter exposure study, all the homes had AER values ranging from 0.29 to 3.46 hr(-1) in fall, and 0.12 to 1.39 hr(-1) in winter with a median AER of 1.15.

  5. Measurement of air exchange rate of stationary vehicles and estimation of in-vehicle exposure.

    PubMed

    Park, J H; Spengler, J D; Yoon, D W; Dumyahn, T; Lee, K; Ozkaynak, H

    1998-01-01

    The air exchange rates or air changes per hour (ACH) were measured under 4 conditions in 3 stationary automobiles. The ACH ranged between 1.0 and 3.0 h-1 with windows closed and no mechanical ventilation, between 1.8 and 3.7 h-1 for windows closed with fan set on recirculation, between 13.3 and 26.1 h-1 for window open with no mechanical ventilation, and between 36.2 and 47.5 h-1 for window closed with the fan set on fresh air. ACHs for windows closed with no ventilation were higher for the older automobile than for the newer automobiles. With the windows closed and fan turned off, ACH was not influenced by wind speed (p > 0.05). When the window was open, ACH appeared to be greatly affected by wind speed (R2 = 0.86). These measurements are relevant to understanding exposures inside automobiles to sources such as dry-cleaned clothes, cigarettes and airbags. Therefore, to understand the in-vehicle exposure to these internal sources, perchloroethylene (PCE) emitted from dry-cleaned clothes and environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) inside a vehicle were modeled for simulated driving cycles. Airbag deployment was also modeled for estimating exposure level to alkaline particulate and carbon monoxide (CO). Average exposure to PCE inside a vehicle for 30 minutes period was high (approximately 780 micrograms/m3); however, this is only 6% of the two-week exposure that is influenced by the storage of dry cleaned clothing at home. On the other hand, the exposure levels of respirable suspended particulate (RSP) and formaldehyde due to ETS could reach 2.1 mg/m3 and 0.11 ppm, respectively, when a person smokes inside a driving car even with the window open. In modeling the in-vehicle concentrations following airbag deployment, the average CO level over 20 minutes would not appear to present problem (less than 28 ppm). The peak concentration of respirable particulate would have exceeded 140 mg/m3. Since most of the particle mass is composed of alkaline material, these high levels

  6. Measured performance of the heat exchanger in the NASA icing research tunnel under severe icing and dry-air conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, W.; Vanfossen, J.; Nussle, R.

    1987-01-01

    Measurements were made of the pressure drop and thermal perfomance of the unique refrigeration heat exchanger in the NASA Lewis Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) under severe icing and frosting conditions and also with dry air. This data will be useful to those planning to use or extend the capability of the IRT and other icing facilities (e.g., the Altitude Wind Tunnel-AWT). The IRT heat exchanger and refrigeration system is able to cool air passing through the test section down to at least a total temperature of -30 C (well below icing requirements), and usually up to -2 C. The system maintains a uniform temperature across the test section at all airspeeds, which is more difficult and time consuming at low airspeeds, at high temperatures, and on hot, humid days when the cooling towers are less efficient. The very small surfaces of the heat exchanger prevent any icing cloud droplets from passing through it and going through the tests section again. The IRT heat exchanger was originally designed not to be adversely affected by severe icing. During a worst-case icing test the heat exchanger iced up enough so that the temperature uniformaity was no worse than about +/- 1 deg C. The conclusion is that the heat exchanger design performs well.

  7. Towards constraining the stratosphere-troposphere exchange of radiocarbon: strategies of stratospheric 14CO2 measurements using AirCore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Huilin; Paul, Dipayan; Meijer, Harro; Miller, John; Kivi, Rigel; Krol, Maarten

    2016-04-01

    Radiocarbon (14C) plays an important role in the carbon cycle studies to understand both natural and anthropogenic carbon fluxes, but also in atmospheric chemistry to constrain hydroxyl radical (OH) concentrations in the atmosphere. Apart from the enormous 14C emissions from nuclear bomb testing in the 1950s and 1960s, radiocarbon is primarily produced in the stratosphere due to the cosmogenic production. To this end, better understanding the stratospheric radiocarbon source is very useful to advance the use of radiocarbon for these applications. However, stratospheric 14C observations have been very limited so that there are large uncertainties on the magnitude and the location of the 14C production as well as the transport of radiocarbon from the stratosphere to the troposphere. Recently we have successfully made stratospheric 14C measurements using AirCore samples from Sodankylä, Northern Finland. AirCore is an innovative atmospheric sampling system, which passively collects atmospheric air samples into a long piece of coiled stainless steel tubing during the descent of a balloon flight. Due to the relatively low cost of the consumables, there is a potential to make such AirCore profiling in other parts of the world on a regular basis. In this study, we simulate the 14C in the atmosphere and assess the stratosphere-troposphere exchange of radiocarbon using the TM5 model. The Sodankylä radiocarbon measurements will be used to verify the performance of the model at high latitude. Besides this, we will also evaluate the influence of different cosmogenic 14C production scenarios and the uncertainties in the OH field on the seasonal cycles of radiocarbon and on the stratosphere-troposphere exchange, and based on the results design a strategy to set up a 14C measurement program using AirCore.

  8. A mass balance method for non-intrusive measurements of surface-air trace gas exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denmead, O. T.; Harper, L. A.; Freney, J. R.; Griffith, D. W. T.; Leuning, R.; Sharpe, R. R.

    A mass balance method is described for calculating gas production from a surface or volume source in a small test plot from measurements of differences in the horizontal fluxes of the gas across upwind and downwind boundaries. It employs a square plot, 24 m×24 m, with measurements of gas concentration at four heights (up to 3.5 m) along each of the four boundaries. Gas concentrations are multiplied by the appropriate vector winds to yield the horizontal fluxes at each height on each boundary. The difference between these fluxes integrated over downwind and upwind boundaries represents production. Illustrations of the method, which involve exchanges of methane and carbon dioxide, are drawn from experiments with landfills, pastures and grazing animals. Tests included calculation of recovery rates from known gas releases and comparisons with a conventional micrometeorological approach and a backward dispersion model. The method performed satisfactorily in all cases. Its sensitivity for measuring exchanges of CO 2, CH 4 and N 2O in various scenarios was examined. As employed by us, the mass balance method can suffer from errors arising from the large number of gas analyses required for a flux determination, and becomes unreliable when there are light winds and variable wind directions. On the other hand, it is non-disturbing, has a simple theoretical basis, is independent of atmospheric stability or the shape of the wind profile, and is appropriate for flux measurement in situations where conventional micrometeorological methods can not be used, e.g. for small plots, elevated point sources, and heterogeneous surface sources.

  9. Indicator dilution measurements of lung volumes and alveolar air exchange during breathing.

    PubMed

    Hechtman, H B; Reid, M H; Dorn, B C; Weisel, R D

    1973-05-01

    A new triple tracer indicator dilution technique has been used to measure alveolar ventilation as well as air and tissue volumes in the lungs of experimental animals and man. The tracers indocyanine green, [(121)I]antipyrine and xenon-133 were rapidly injected into the right atrium, while sampling was carried out from a peripheral artery. Blood flow and tissue volumes were obtained by classical analysis of the indocyanine green and antipyrine concentration-time curves. A double exit-port, constant air flow model was used to analyze the xenon curves, because ventilatory loss led to incomplete recovery of the gas tracer in effluent blood. Uniform ventilation and perfusion were assumed. This analysis permitted calculation of alveolar ventilation (VA(Xe)) and functional residual capacity (FRC(Xe)) during normal breathing. In control studies, VA(Xe) was similar to VA(co2), obtained with the steady-state CO(2) method (r = 0.87), while in critically ill patients the xenon measurement was significantly lower, averaging 54% of VA(co2). In theory, underestimates in VA(Xe) and decrease in the ratio VA(Xe)/VA(co2) relate to nonuniformity in regional ventilation and perfusion. The effect is greatest for the slightly soluble gas, xenon. The significant inverse correlation between VA(Xe)/VA(co2) and the physiologic shunt is consistent with this postulate.FRC(Xe) was similar to the predicted FRC in animals but was 76% of the helium measured FRC in patients. FRC(Xe) was significantly lower than the xenon measured air volumes during breath-holding when nonuniformity of ventilation was not operative. Lung tissue volumes in animals were 83% of gravimetric lung weights, while in patients the volumes were much lower than predicted. Nonhomogeneous lung function, including failure to perfuse the entire capillary bed, with resultant incomplete penetration of tracers into all segments of lung air and tissue, may explain these findings. The resultant errors can be significant in sick

  10. Earth-air heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Kammel, D.W.

    1985-01-01

    Optimizing the thermal environment of a livestock building is beneficial to the growth and production of the animal. Minimizing temperature extremes of inlet ventilation air to the livestock building by passing the air through underground ducts would accomplish this goal. Providing this optimum environment by reducing heating and cooling loads would reduce energy costs and increase profits for the producer. The heat transfer in an earth-air heat exchanger was studied in two phases to develop design criteria for these systems. The experimental phase consisted of an earth-air exchanger installation from which data were collected during hot weather (cooling effect), cold weather (heating effect), and mild weather performances. The analytical phase developed a finite element program for simulating the earth-air heat exchanger and studying the effects of important parameters on the heat transfer rate and the air temperature. Results of the first phase were used to verify the computer model. Design criteria for the earth-air heat exchanger were determined based on the information obtained in the two phases of this study.

  11. Heat transfer and pressure drop measurements in an air/molten salt direct-contact heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Bohn, M.S.

    1988-11-01

    This paper presents a comparison of experimental data with a recently published model of heat exchange in irrigated packed beds. Heat transfer and pressure drop were measured in a 150 mm (ID) column with a 610-mm bed of metal Pall rings. Molten nitrate salt and preheated air were the working fluids with a salt inlet temperature of approximately 440{degree}C and air inlet temperatures of approximately 230{degree}C. A comparison between the experimental data and the heat transfer model is made on the basis of heat transfer from the salt. For the range of air and salt flow rates tested, 0.3 to 1.2 kg/m{sup 2} s air flow and 6 to 18 kg/m{sup 2} s salt flow, the data agree with the model within 22% standard deviation. In addition, a model for the column pressure drop was validated, agreeing with the experimental data within 18% standard deviation over the range of column pressure drop from 40 to 1250 Pa/m. 25 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Measurement and scaling of air-surface mercury exchange from substrates in the vicinity of two Nevada gold mines.

    PubMed

    Miller, Matthieu B; Gustin, Mae S; Eckley, Chris S

    2011-09-01

    The state of Nevada has extensive mineral resources, and is the largest producer of gold in the USA as well as fourth in world gold production. Mercury (Hg) is often present in the hydrothermal systems that produce gold deposits, and can be found in elevated concentrations in gold ore. As a result, mining of gold ore in Nevada has been shown to release Hg to the atmosphere from point and non-point sources. This project focused on measurement of air-soil Hg exchange associated with undisturbed soils and bedrock outcrops in the vicinity of two large gold mines. Field and laboratory data collected were used to identify the important variables controlling Hg flux from these surfaces, and to estimate a net flux from the areas adjacent to the active mines as well as that occurring from the mined area pre-disturbance. Mean daily flux by substrate type ranged from 9 ng m(-2) day(-1) to 140 ng m(-2) day(-1). Periods of net deposition of elemental Hg were observed when air masses originating from a mine site moved over sampling locations. Based on these observations and measured soil Hg concentrations we suggest that emissions from point and non-point sources at the mines are a source of Hg to the surrounding substrates with the amount deposited not being of an environmental concern but of interest mainly with respect to the cycling of atmospheric elemental Hg. Observations indicate that while some component of the deposited Hg is sequestered in the soil, this Hg is gradually released back to the atmosphere over time. Estimated pre-disturbance emissions from the current mine footprints based on field data were 0.1 and 1.7 kg yr(-1), compared to that estimated for the current non-point mining sources of 19 and 109 kg yr(-1), respectively.

  13. Mercury vapor air-surface exchange measured by collocated micrometeorological and enclosure methods - Part II: Bias and uncertainty analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, W.; Sommar, J.; Lin, C.-J.; Feng, X.

    2015-05-01

    Dynamic flux chambers (DFCs) and micrometeorological (MM) methods are extensively deployed for gauging air-surface Hg0 gas exchange. However, a systematic evaluation of the precision of the contemporary Hg0 flux quantification methods is not available. In this study, the uncertainty in Hg0 flux measured by the relaxed eddy accumulation (REA) method, the aerodynamic gradient method (AGM), the modified Bowen ratio (MBR) method, as well as DFC of traditional (TDFC) and novel (NDFC) designs, are assessed using a robust data set from two field intercomparison campaigns. The absolute precision in Hg0 concentration difference (ΔC) measurements is estimated at 0.064 ng m-3 for the gradient-based MBR and AGM systems. For the REA system, the parameter is Hg0 concentration (C) dependent at 0.069 + 0.022C. During the campaigns, 57 and 62 % of the individual vertical gradient measurements are found to be significantly different from 0, while for the REA technique, the percentage of significant observations is lower. For the chambers, non-significant fluxes are confined to a few night-time periods with varying ambient Hg0 concentrations. Relative bias for DFC-derived fluxes is estimated to be ~ ±10, and ~ 85% of the flux bias is within ±2 ng m-2 h-1 in absolute terms. The DFC flux bias follows a diurnal cycle, which is largely affected by the forced temperature and irradiation bias in the chambers. Due to contrasting prevailing micrometeorological conditions, the relative uncertainty (median) in turbulent exchange parameters differs by nearly a factor of 2 between the campaigns, while that in ΔC measurement is fairly consistent. The estimated flux uncertainties for the triad of MM techniques are 16-27, 12-23 and 19-31% (interquartile range) for the AGM, MBR and REA methods, respectively. This study indicates that flux-gradient-based techniques (MBR and AGM) are preferable to REA in quantifying Hg0 flux over ecosystems with low vegetation height. A limitation of all Hg0 flux

  14. Mercury vapor air-surface exchange measured by collocated micrometeorological and enclosure methods - Part II: Bias and uncertainty analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, W.; Sommar, J.; Lin, C.-J.; Feng, X.

    2015-02-01

    Dynamic flux chambers (DFCs) and micrometeorological (MM) methods are extensively deployed for gauging air-surface Hg0 gas exchange. However, a systematic evaluation of the precision of the contemporary Hg0 flux quantification methods is not available. In this study, the uncertainty in Hg0 flux measured by relaxed eddy accumulation (REA) method, aerodynamic gradient method (AGM), modified Bowen-ratio (MBR) method, as well as DFC of traditional (TDFC) and novel (NDFC) designs is assessed using a robust data-set from two field intercomparison campaigns. The absolute precision in Hg0 concentration difference (Δ C) measurements is estimated at 0.064 ng m-3 for the gradient-based MBR and AGM system. For the REA system, the parameter is Hg0 concentration (C) dependent at 0.069+0.022C. 57 and 62% of the individual vertical gradient measurements were found to be significantly different from zero during the campaigns, while for the REA-technique the percentage of significant observations was lower. For the chambers, non-significant fluxes are confined to a few nighttime periods with varying ambient Hg0 concentration. Relative bias for DFC-derived fluxes is estimated to be ~ ±10%, and ~ 85% of the flux bias are within ±2 ng m-2 h-1 in absolute term. The DFC flux bias follows a diurnal cycle, which is largely dictated by temperature controls on the enclosed volume. Due to contrasting prevailing micrometeorological conditions, the relative uncertainty (median) in turbulent exchange parameters differs by nearly a factor of two between the campaigns, while that in Δ C measurements is fairly stable. The estimated flux uncertainties for the triad of MM-techniques are 16-27, 12-23 and 19-31% (interquartile range) for the AGM, MBR and REA method, respectively. This study indicates that flux-gradient based techniques (MBR and AGM) are preferable to REA in quantifying Hg0 flux over ecosystems with low vegetation height. A limitation of all Hg0 flux measurement systems investigated

  15. On eddy accumulation with limited conditional sampling to measure air-surface exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Wesely, M.L.; Hart, R.L.

    1994-01-01

    An analysis of turbulence data collected at a height of 12.3 m above grasslands was carried out to illustrate some of the limitations and possible improvements in methods to compute vertical fluxes of trace substances by the eddy accumulation technique with conditional sampling. The empirical coefficient used in the technique has a slight dependence on atmospheric stability, which can be minimized by using a threshold vertical velocity equal to approximately 0.75{sigma}{sub w}, below which chemical sampling is suspended. This protocol results in a smaller chemical sample but increases the differences in concentrations by approximately 70%. For effective conditional sampling when mass is being accumulated in a trap or reservoir, the time of sampling during updrafts versus downdrafts should be measured and used to adjust estimates of the mean concentrations.

  16. Mercury vapor air-surface exchange measured by collocated micrometeorological and enclosure methods - Part I: Data comparability and method characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, W.; Sommar, J.; Lin, C.-J.; Feng, X.

    2015-01-01

    Reliable quantification of air-biosphere exchange flux of elemental mercury vapor (Hg0) is crucial for understanding the global biogeochemical cycle of mercury. However, there has not been a standard analytical protocol for flux quantification, and little attention has been devoted to characterize the temporal variability and comparability of fluxes measured by different methods. In this study, we deployed a collocated set of micrometeorological (MM) and dynamic flux chamber (DFC) measurement systems to quantify Hg0 flux over bare soil and low standing crop in an agricultural field. The techniques include relaxed eddy accumulation (REA), modified Bowen ratio (MBR), aerodynamic gradient (AGM) as well as dynamic flux chambers of traditional (TDFC) and novel (NDFC) designs. The five systems and their measured fluxes were cross-examined with respect to magnitude, temporal trend and correlation with environmental variables. Fluxes measured by the MM and DFC methods showed distinct temporal trends. The former exhibited a highly dynamic temporal variability while the latter had much more gradual temporal features. The diurnal characteristics reflected the difference in the fundamental processes driving the measurements. The correlations between NDFC and TDFC fluxes and between MBR and AGM fluxes were significant (R>0.8, p<0.05), but the correlation between DFC and MM fluxes were from weak to moderate (R=0.1-0.5). Statistical analysis indicated that the median of turbulent fluxes estimated by the three independent MM techniques were not significantly different. Cumulative flux measured by TDFC is considerably lower (42% of AGM and 31% of MBR fluxes) while those measured by NDFC, AGM and MBR were similar (<10% difference). This suggests that incorporating an atmospheric turbulence property such as friction velocity for correcting the DFC-measured flux effectively bridged the gap between the Hg0 fluxes measured by enclosure and MM techniques. Cumulated flux measured by REA

  17. Using Riverboat-Mounted Eddy Covariance for Direct Measurements of Air-water Gas Exchange in Amazonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, S. D.; Freitas, H.; Read, E.; Goulden, M. L.; Rocha, H.

    2007-12-01

    Gas evasion from Amazonian rivers and lakes to the atmosphere has been estimated to play an important role in the regional budget of carbon dioxide (Richey et al., 2002) and the global budget of methane (Melack et al., 2004). These flux estimates were calculated by combining remote sensing estimates of inundation area with water-side concentration gradients and gas transfer rates (piston velocities) estimated primarily from floating chamber measurements (footprint ~1 m2). The uncertainty in these fluxes was large, attributed primarily to uncertainty in the gas exchange parameterization. Direct measurements of the gas exchange coefficient are needed to improve the parameterizations in these environments, and therefore reduce the uncertainty in fluxes. The micrometeorological technique of eddy covariance is attractive since it is a direct measurement of gas exchange that samples over a much larger area than floating chambers, and is amenable to use from a moving platform. We present eddy covariance carbon dioxide exchange measurements made using a small riverboat in rivers and lakes in the central Amazon near Santarem, Para, Brazil. Water-side carbon dioxide concentration was measured in situ, and the gas exchange coefficient was calculated. We found the piston velocity at a site on the Amazon River to be similar to existing ocean-based parameterizations, whereas the piston velocity at a site on the Tapajos River was roughly a factor 5 higher. We hypothesize that the enhanced gas exchange at the Tapajos site was due to a shallow upwind fetch. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of boat-based eddy covariance on these rivers, and also the utility of a mobile platform to investigate spatial variability of gas exchange.

  18. Estimation of bias with the single-zone assumption in measurement of residential air exchange using the perfluorocarbon tracer gas method

    PubMed Central

    Van Ryswyk, K; Wallace, L; Fugler, D; MacNeill, M; Héroux, M È; Gibson, M D; Guernsey, J R; Kindzierski, W; Wheeler, A J

    2015-01-01

    Residential air exchange rates (AERs) are vital in understanding the temporal and spatial drivers of indoor air quality (IAQ). Several methods to quantify AERs have been used in IAQ research, often with the assumption that the home is a single, well-mixed air zone. Since 2005, Health Canada has conducted IAQ studies across Canada in which AERs were measured using the perfluorocarbon tracer (PFT) gas method. Emitters and detectors of a single PFT gas were placed on the main floor to estimate a single-zone AER (AER1z). In three of these studies, a second set of emitters and detectors were deployed in the basement or second floor in approximately 10% of homes for a two-zone AER estimate (AER2z). In total, 287 daily pairs of AER2z and AER1z estimates were made from 35 homes across three cities. In 87% of the cases, AER2z was higher than AER1z. Overall, the AER1z estimates underestimated AER2z by approximately 16% (IQR: 5–32%). This underestimate occurred in all cities and seasons and varied in magnitude seasonally, between homes, and daily, indicating that when measuring residential air exchange using a single PFT gas, the assumption of a single well-mixed air zone very likely results in an under prediction of the AER. PMID:25399878

  19. FACTORS AFFECTING AIR EXCHANGE IN TWO HOUSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Air exchange rate is critical to determining the relationship between indoor and outdoor concentrations of hazardous pollutants. Approximately 150 air exchange experiments were completed in two residences: a two-story detached house located in Redwood City, CA and a three-story...

  20. Effects of air exchange property of passive-type radon-thoron discriminative detectors on performance of radon and thoron measurements.

    PubMed

    Omori, Y; Janik, M; Sorimachi, A; Ishikawa, T; Tokonami, S

    2012-11-01

    Pairs of diffusion chambers with different air exchange rates are used in a large-scale survey to determine radon and thoron, separately. When they are enclosed in radon-proof bags for keeping after the exposure, since radon does not escape out immediately from the low-diffusion chamber, it leads to further exposure in the bags and disturbs the estimation of radon and thoron concentrations. In this study, the effects of the different air exchange properties of the radon-thoron discriminative detectors with CR-39 chips on the estimations of radon and thoron concentrations were investigated. The commercially available and frequently used detectors, Raduet, are examined in this study. The result shows that radon escapes out in 10 h. When degassing is not enough after the exposure in a calibration experiment or high-background radiation area, the residual radon causes the overestimation of the radon concentration and increase in the uncertainty in the thoron concentration, i.e. a low-performance quality of radon and thoron measurements.

  1. Wind variability and sheltering effects on measurements and modeling of air-water exchange for a small lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markfort, Corey D.; Resseger, Emily; Porté-Agel, Fernando; Stefan, Heinz

    2014-05-01

    Lakes with a surface area of less than 10 km2 account for over 50% of the global cumulative lake surface water area, and make up more than 99% of the total number of global lakes, ponds, and wetlands. Within the boreal regions as well as some temperate and tropical areas, a significant proportion of land cover is characterized by lakes or wetlands, which can have a dramatic effect on land-atmosphere fluxes as well as the local and regional energy budget. Many of these small water bodies are surrounded by complex terrain and forest, which cause the wind blowing over a small lake or wetland to be highly variable. Wind mixing of the lake surface layer affects thermal stratification, surface temperature and air-water gas transfer, e.g. O2, CO2, and CH4. As the wind blows from the land to the lake, wake turbulence behind trees and other shoreline obstacles leads to a recirculation zone and enhanced turbulence. This wake flow results in the delay of the development of wind shear stress on the lake surface, and the fetch required for surface shear stress to fully develop may be ~O(1 km). Interpretation of wind measurements made on the lake is hampered by the unknown effect of wake turbulence. We present field measurements designed to quantify wind variability over a sheltered lake. The wind data and water column temperature profiles are used to evaluate a new method to quantify wind sheltering of lakes that takes into account lake size, shape and the surrounding landscape features. The model is validated against field data for 36 Minnesota lakes. Effects of non-uniform sheltering and lake shape are also demonstrated. The effects of wind sheltering must be included in lake models to determine the effect of wind-derived energy inputs on lake stratification, surface gas transfer, lake water quality, and fish habitat. These effects are also important for correctly modeling momentum, heat, moisture and trace gas flux to the atmosphere.

  2. Air-sea exchange of dimethylsulfide in the Southern Ocean: Measurements from SO GasEx compared to temperate and tropical regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, M.; Blomquist, B. W.; Fairall, C. W.; Archer, S. D.; Huebert, B. J.

    2011-04-01

    In the Southern Ocean Gas Exchange Experiment (SO GasEx), we measured an atmospheric dimethylsulfide (DMS) concentration of 118 ± 54 pptv (1σ), a DMS sea-to-air flux of 2.9 ± 2.1 μmol m-2 d-1 by eddy covariance, and a seawater DMS concentration of 1.6 ± 0.7 nM. Dividing flux by the concurrent air-sea concentration difference yields the transfer velocity of DMS (kDMS). The kDMS in the Southern Ocean was significantly lower than previous measurements in the equatorial east Pacific, Sargasso Sea, northeast Atlantic, and southeast Pacific. Normalizing kDMS for the temperature dependence in waterside diffusivity and solubility results in better agreement among various field studies and suggests that the low kDMS in the Southern Ocean is primarily due to colder temperatures. The higher solubility of DMS at a lower temperature results in greater airside control and less transfer of the gas by bubbles formed from breaking waves. The final normalized DMS transfer velocity is similar to k of less soluble gases such as carbon dioxide in low-to-moderate winds; in high winds, DMS transfer velocity is significantly lower because of the reduced bubble-mediated transfer.

  3. Air-sea energy exchanges measured by eddy covariance during a localised coral bleaching event, Heron Reef, Great Barrier Reef, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacKellar, Mellissa C.; McGowan, Hamish A.

    2010-12-01

    Despite the widely claimed association between climate change and coral bleaching, a paucity of data exists relating to exchanges of heat, moisture and momentum between the atmosphere and the reef-water surface. We present in situ measurements of reef-water-air energy exchanges made using the eddy covariance method during a summer coral bleaching event at Heron Reef, Australia. Under settled, cloud-free conditions and light winds, daily net radiation exceeded 800 W m-2, with up to 95% of the net radiation during the morning partitioned into heating the water column, substrate and benthic cover including corals. Heating was exacerbated by a mid-afternoon low tide when shallow reef flat water reached 34°C and near-bottom temperatures 33°C, exceeding the thermal tolerance of corals, causing bleaching. Results suggest that local to synoptic scale meteorology, particularly clear skies, solar heating, light winds and the timing of low tide were the primary controls on coral bleaching.

  4. Passive bioventing driven by natural air exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Foor, D.C.; Zwick, T.C.; Hinchee, R.E.; Hoeppel, R.E.; Kyburg, C.; Bowling, L.

    1995-12-31

    Bioventing wells installed in the vadose zone of petroleum-contaminated sites at the Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center (MCAGCC) in Twentynine Palms, California, naturally inhale and exhale air. This natural air exchange appears to be driven primarily by barometric pressure changes. The natural air exchange was utilized to engineer a passive bioventing system in which a valve allows only air injection and prevents soil gas extraction. The system is effective in aerating petroleum-contaminated, oxygen-limited subsurface soils. This aeration resulted in enhanced biological activity and site remediation. The bioventing wells (vent wells) were fitted with a passive valve mechanism that opens when the atmospheric pressure overcomes the internal vent well pressure. When the valve is open it permits atmospheric air to enter the vent well and infiltrate into the soil, thereby stimulating bioremediation. When the vent well pressure overcomes atmospheric pressure, the valve is closed and inhibits soil gas extraction. The vent wells are installed in a coarse sand where the depth to groundwater is approximately 220 ft (67 m). Generally, deeper vent wells produce greater flowrates. Passive airflow rates of up to 7 cfm (12 m{sup 3}/h) have been achieved at the bioventing wells.

  5. Air-surface exchange of Hg0 measured by collocated micrometeorological and enclosure methods - Part 1: Data comparability and method characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, W.; Sommar, J.; Lin, C.-J.; Feng, X.

    2014-09-01

    Reliable quantification of air-biosphere exchange flux of elemental mercury vapor (Hg0) is crucial for understanding global biogeochemical cycle of mercury. However, there has not been a standard analytical protocol for flux quantification, and little attention has been devoted to characterize the temporal variability and comparability of fluxes measured by different methods. In this study, we deployed a collocated set of micro-meteorological (MM) and enclosure measurement systems to quantify Hg0 flux over bare soil and low standing crop in an agricultural field. The techniques include relaxed eddy accumulation (REA), modified Bowen-ratio (MBR), aerodynamic gradient (AGM) as well as dynamic flux chambers of traditional (TDFC) and novel (NDFC) designs. The five systems and their measured fluxes were cross-examined with respect to magnitude, temporal trend and sensitivity to environmental variables. Fluxes measured by the MM and DFC methods showed distinct temporal trends. The former exhibited a highly dynamic temporal variability while the latter had much gradual temporal features. The diurnal characteristics reflected the difference in the fundamental processes driving the measurements. The correlations between NDFC and TDFC fluxes and between MBR and AGM fluxes were significant (R > 0.8, p < 0.05), but the correlation between DFC and MM instantaneous fluxes were from weak to moderate (R = 0.1-0.5). Statistical analysis indicated that the median of turbulent fluxes estimated by the three independent MM-techniques were not significantly different. Cumulative flux measured by TDFC is considerably lower (42% of AGM and 31% of MBR fluxes) while those measured by NDFC, AGM and MBR were similar (< 10% difference). This implicates that the NDFC technique, which accounts for internal friction velocity, effectively bridged the gap in measured Hg0 flux compared to MM techniques. Cumulated flux measured by REA was ~60% higher than the gradient-based fluxes. Environmental

  6. The role of bubbles during air-sea gas exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emerson, Steven; Bushinsky, Seth

    2016-06-01

    The potential for using the air-sea exchange rate of oxygen as a tracer for net community biological production in the ocean is greatly enhanced by recent accuracy improvements for in situ measurements of oxygen on unmanned platforms. A limiting factor for determining the exchange process is evaluating the air-sea flux contributed by bubble processes produced by breaking waves, particularly during winter months under high winds. Highly accurate measurements of noble gases (Ne, Ar & Kr) and nitrogen, N2, in seawater are tracers of the importance of bubble process in the surface mixed layer. We use measured distributions of these gases in the ventilated thermocline of the North Pacific and an annual time series of N2 in the surface ocean of the NE Subarctic Pacific to evaluate four different air-water exchange models chosen to represent the range of model interpretation of bubble processes. We find that models must have an explicit bubble mechanism to reproduce concentrations of insoluble atmospheric gases, but there are periods when they all depart from observations. The recent model of Liang et al. (2013) stems from a highly resolved model of bubble plumes and categorizes bubble mechanisms into those that are small enough to collapse and larger ones that exchange gases before they resurface, both of which are necessary to explain the data.

  7. Simulation model air-to-air plate heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Wetter, Michael

    1999-01-01

    A simple simulation model of an air-to-air plate heat exchanger is presented. The model belongs to a collection of simulation models that allows the eflcient computer simulation of heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems. The main emphasis of the models is to shorten computation time and to use only input data that are known in the design process of an HVAC system. The target of the models is to describe the behavior of HVAC components in the part-load operation mode, which is becoming increasingly important in energy eficient HVAC systems. The models are intended to be used for yearly energy calculations or load calculations with time steps of about 10 minutes or larger. Short- time dynamic effects, which are of interest for different aspects of control theory, are neglected. The part-load behavior is expressed in terms of the nominal condition and the dimensionless variation of the heat transfer with change of mass flow and temperature. The effectiveness- NTU relations are used to parametrize the convective heat transfer at nominal conditions and to compute the part-load condition. If the heat transfer coefficients on the two exchanger sides are not equal (i. e. due to partial bypassing of air), their ratio can be easily calculated and set as a parameter. The model is static and uses explicit equations only. The explicit model formulation ensures short computation time and numerical stability, which allows using the model with sophisticated engineering methods like automatic system optimization. This paper fully outlines the algorithm description and its simplifications. It is not tailored for any particular simulation program to ensure easy implementation in any simulation program.

  8. Heat Recovery Ventilation for Housing: Air-to-Air Heat Exchangers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corbett, Robert J.; Miller, Barbara

    The air-to-air heat exchanger (a fan powered ventilation device that recovers heat from stale outgoing air) is explained in this six-part publication. Topic areas addressed are: (1) the nature of air-to-air heat exchangers and how they work; (2) choosing and sizing the system; (3) installation, control, and maintenance of the system; (4) heat…

  9. Review of Air Exchange Rate Models for Air Pollution Exposure Assessments

    EPA Science Inventory

    A critical aspect of air pollution exposure assessments is estimation of the air exchange rate (AER) for various buildings, where people spend their time. The AER, which is rate the exchange of indoor air with outdoor air, is an important determinant for entry of outdoor air pol...

  10. Remote air pollution measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byer, R. L.

    1975-01-01

    This paper presents a discussion and comparison of the Raman method, the resonance and fluorescence backscatter method, long path absorption methods and the differential absorption method for remote air pollution measurement. A comparison of the above remote detection methods shows that the absorption methods offer the most sensitivity at the least required transmitted energy. Topographical absorption provides the advantage of a single ended measurement, and differential absorption offers the additional advantage of a fully depth resolved absorption measurement. Recent experimental results confirming the range and sensitivity of the methods are presented.

  11. Measurements of VOC/SVOC emission factors from burning incenses in an environmental test chamber: influence of temperature, relative humidity, and air exchange rate.

    PubMed

    Manoukian, A; Buiron, D; Temime-Roussel, B; Wortham, H; Quivet, E

    2016-04-01

    This study investigates the influence of three environmental indoor parameters (i.e., temperature, relative humidity, and air exchange rate) on the emission of 13 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) during incense burning. Experiments have been carried out using an environmental test chamber. Statistical results from a classical two-level full factorial design highlight the predominant effect of ventilation on emission factors. The higher the ventilation, the higher the emission factor. Moreover, thanks to these results, an estimation of the concentration range for the compounds under study can be calculated and allows a quick look of indoor pollution induced by incense combustion. Carcinogenic substances (i.e., benzene, benzo(a)pyrene, and formaldehyde) produced from the incense combustion would be predicted in typical living indoors conditions to reach instantaneous concentration levels close to or higher than air quality exposure threshold values.

  12. 78 FR 49484 - Exchange of Air Force Real Property for Non-Air Force Real Property

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-14

    ... Department of Air Force Exchange of Air Force Real Property for Non-Air Force Real Property SUMMARY: Notice identifies excess Federal real property under administrative jurisdiction of the United States Air Force it... under the administrative jurisdiction of the Air Force. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Mr....

  13. Observational Studies of Parameters Influencing Air-sea Gas Exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schimpf, U.; Frew, N. M.; Bock, E. J.; Hara, T.; Garbe, C. S.; Jaehne, B.

    A physically-based modeling of the air-sea gas transfer that can be used to predict the gas transfer rates with sufficient accuracy as a function of micrometeorological parameters is still lacking. State of the art are still simple gas transfer rate/wind speed relationships. Previous measurements from Coastal Ocean Experiment in the Atlantic revealed positive correlations between mean square slope, near surface turbulent dis- sipation, and wind stress. It also demonstrated a strong negative correlation between mean square slope and the fluorescence of surface-enriched colored dissolved organic matter. Using heat as a proxy tracer for gases the exchange process at the air/water interface and the micro turbulence at the water surface can be investigated. The anal- ysis of infrared image sequences allow the determination of the net heat flux at the ocean surface, the temperature gradient across the air/sea interface and thus the heat transfer velocity and gas transfer velocity respectively. Laboratory studies were carried out in the new Heidelberg wind-wave facility AELOTRON. Direct measurements of the Schmidt number exponent were done in conjunction with classical mass balance methods to estimate the transfer velocity. The laboratory results allowed to validate the basic assumptions of the so called controlled flux technique by applying differ- ent tracers for the gas exchange in a large Schmidt number regime. Thus a modeling of the Schmidt number exponent is able to fill the gap between laboratory and field measurements field. Both, the results from the laboratory and the field measurements should be able to give a further understanding of the mechanisms controlling the trans- port processes across the aqueous boundary layer and to relate the forcing functions to parameters measured by remote sensing.

  14. Metal-air cell with ion exchange material

    SciTech Connect

    Friesen, Cody A.; Wolfe, Derek; Johnson, Paul Bryan

    2015-08-25

    Embodiments of the invention are related to anion exchange membranes used in electrochemical metal-air cells in which the membranes function as the electrolyte material, or are used in conjunction with electrolytes such as ionic liquid electrolytes.

  15. Self-defrosting recuperative air-to-air heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Drake, Richard L.

    1993-01-01

    A heat exchanger includes a stationary spirally or concentrically wound heat exchanger core with rotating baffles on upper and lower ends thereof. The rotating baffles include rotating inlets and outlets which are in communication with respective fixed inlets and outlets via annuli. The rotation of the baffles causes a concurrent rotation of the temperature distribution within the stationary exchanger core, thereby preventing frost build-up in some applications and preventing the formation of hot spots in other applications.

  16. Direct Measurement of Air-Sea Exchange of N2O5 and ClNO2 at a Polluted Coastal Site (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertram, T. H.; Kim, M.; Ryder, O. S.; Farmer, D.

    2013-12-01

    The reactive uptake of N2O5 at aqueous interfaces can serve as both an efficient NOx removal mechanism and regionally significant halogen activation process through the production of photo-labile ClNO2 molecules. Both the reaction rate and ClNO2 product yield are a complex function of the chemical composition and chloride molarity of the reactive surface. To date, analysis of the impact of N2O5 chemistry on oxidant loadings in the marine boundary layer has been limited to reactions occurring on aerosol particles, with little attention paid to reactions occurring at the air-sea interface. Here, we report the first direct measurements of the air-sea flux of N2O5 and ClNO2 made via eddy covariance in the polluted marine boundary layer in La Jolla, CA. We observe rapid N2O5 deposition to the ocean surface, while ClNO2 deposition rates were significantly lower and fastest during the first three hours following sunset. The results are interpreted using a time-dependent box-model, suggesting that under conditions characterized by shallow marine boundary layer heights (< 100 m) and representative aerosol reactive uptake coefficients (< 0.01), N2O5 deposition to the ocean surface can account for over 50% of the total N2O5 loss rate.

  17. The contrast model method for the thermodynamical calculation of air-air wet heat exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Xiugan; Mei, Fang

    1989-02-01

    The 'contrast model' method thermodynamic calculation of air-air crossflow wet heat exchangers with initial air condensation is presented. Contrast-model equations are derived from the actual heat exchanger equations as well as imaginary ones; it is then possible to proceed to a proof that the enthalpy efficiency of the contrast model equations is similar to the temperature efficiency of the dry heat exchanger. Conditions are noted under which it becomes possible to unify thermodynamic calculations for wet and dry heat exchangers.

  18. Self-defrosting recuperative air-to-air heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Drake, R.L.

    1993-12-28

    A heat exchanger is described which includes a stationary spirally or concentrically wound heat exchanger core with rotating baffles on upper and lower ends thereof. The rotating baffles include rotating inlets and outlets which are in communication with respective fixed inlets and outlets via annuli. The rotation of the baffles causes a concurrent rotation of the temperature distribution within the stationary exchanger core, thereby preventing frost build-up in some applications and preventing the formation of hot spots in other applications. 3 figures.

  19. Quantifying air-sea gas exchange using noble gases in a coastal upwelling zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, C. C.; Stanley, R. H. R.; Nicholson, D. P.; Squibb, M. E.

    2016-05-01

    The diffusive and bubble-mediated components of air-sea gas exchange can be quantified separately using time-series measurements of a suite of dissolved inert gases. We have evaluated the performance of four published air-sea gas exchange parameterizations using a five-day time-series of dissolved He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe concentration in Monterey Bay, CA. We constructed a vertical model including surface air-sea gas exchange and vertical diffusion. Diffusivity was measured throughout the cruise from profiles of turbulent microstructure. We corrected the mixed layer gas concentrations for an upwelling event that occurred partway through the cruise. All tested parameterizations gave similar results for Ar, Kr, and Xe; their air-sea fluxes were dominated by diffusive gas exchange during our study. For He and Ne, which are less soluble, and therefore more sensitive to differences in the treatment of bubble-mediated exchange, the parameterizations gave widely different results with respect to the net gas exchange flux and the bubble flux. This study demonstrates the value of using a suite of inert gases, especially the lower solubility ones, to parameterize air-sea gas exchange.

  20. Air-water oxygen exchange in a large whitewater river

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hall, Robert O.; Kennedy, Theodore A.; Rosi-Marshall, Emma J.

    2012-01-01

    Air-water gas exchange governs fluxes of gas into and out of aquatic ecosystems. Knowing this flux is necessary to calculate gas budgets (i.e., O2) to estimate whole-ecosystem metabolism and basin-scale carbon budgets. Empirical data on rates of gas exchange for streams, estuaries, and oceans are readily available. However, there are few data from large rivers and no data from whitewater rapids. We measured gas transfer velocity in the Colorado River, Grand Canyon, as decline in O2 saturation deficit, 7 times in a 28-km segment spanning 7 rapids. The O2 saturation deficit exists because of hypolimnetic discharge from Glen Canyon Dam, located 25 km upriver from Lees Ferry. Gas transfer velocity (k600) increased with slope of the immediate reach. k600 was -1 in flat reaches, while k600 for the steepest rapid ranged 3600-7700 cm h-1, an extremely high value of k600. Using the rate of gas exchange per unit length of water surface elevation (Kdrop, m-1), segment-integrated k600 varied between 74 and 101 cm h-1. Using Kdrop we scaled k600 to the remainder of the Colorado River in Grand Canyon. At the scale corresponding to the segment length where 80% of the O2 exchanged with the atmosphere (mean length = 26.1 km), k600 varied 4.5-fold between 56 and 272 cm h-1 with a mean of 113 cm h-1. Gas transfer velocity for the Colorado River was higher than those from other aquatic ecosystems because of large rapids. Our approach of scaling k600 based on Kdrop allows comparing gas transfer velocity across rivers with spatially heterogeneous morphology.

  1. Air exchange rates from atmospheric CO2 daily cycle

    PubMed Central

    Carrilho, João Dias; Mateus, Mário; Batterman, Stuart; da Silva, Manuel Gameiro

    2015-01-01

    We propose a new approach for measuring ventilation air exchange rates (AERs). The method belongs to the class of tracer gas techniques, but is formulated in the light of systems theory and signal processing. Unlike conventional CO2 based methods that assume the outdoor ambient CO2 concentration is constant, the proposed method recognizes that photosynthesis and respiration cycle of plants and processes associated with fuel combustion produce daily, quasi-periodic, variations in the ambient CO2 concentrations. These daily variations, which are within the detection range of existing monitoring equipment, are utilized for estimating ventilation rates without the need of a source of CO2 in the building. Using a naturally-ventilated residential apartment, AERs obtained using the new method compared favorably (within 10%) to those obtained using the conventional CO2 decay fitting technique. The new method has the advantages that no tracer gas injection is needed, and high time resolution results are obtained. PMID:26236090

  2. Dry air-surface exchange in hilly terrain

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, W.; Wesely, M.L.; Cook, D.R.; Hart, R.L.

    1991-01-01

    Surface fluxes of sensible heat, water vapor, carbon dioxide, ozone, and momentum were measured by using the eddy correlation method near the top of a small hill within the Konza Prairie in Kansas during the four 1987 Intensive Field Campaigns of the First ISLSCP Field Experiment (FIFE). Parameterizations of dry air-surface exchange in nonuniform terrain were examined. Larger drag coefficients, larger surface roughness lengths, and smaller aerodynamic resistances appeared to be associated with the deeper, rolling terrain upwind. Surface resistances were less affected by terrain inhomogeneities but were closely related to levels of photosynthetically active radiation. Normalized standard deviations of temperature, humidity, and vertical velocity are slightly different from values predicted by similarity relationships for uniform surfaces. The influences of these differences on fluxes estimated by use of a variance technique are relatively small as compared to the data scatter; computed variance fluxes are statistically in good agreement with eddy correlation fluxes. 11 refs., 7 figs.

  3. Measuring Heat-Exchanger Water Leakage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zampiceni, J.

    1986-01-01

    Water leakage in heat exchanger measured directly with help of electroytic hygrometer. In new technique, flow of nitrogen gas set up in one loop of heat exchanger. Other loop filled with water under pressure. Water concentration produced by leakage of water into nitrogen flow measured by hygrometer. New measurement method determines water concentrations up to 2,000 parts per million with accuracy of +/- 5 percent.

  4. Air-water gas exchange by waving vegetation stems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster-Martinez, M. R.; Variano, E. A.

    2016-07-01

    Exchange between wetland surface water and the atmosphere is driven by a variety of motions, ranging from rainfall impact to thermal convection and animal locomotion. Here we examine the effect of wind-driven vegetation movement. Wind causes the stems of emergent vegetation to wave back and forth, stirring the water column and facilitating air-water exchange. To understand the magnitude of this effect, a gas transfer velocity (k600 value) was measured via laboratory experiments. Vegetation waving was studied in isolation by mechanically forcing a model canopy to oscillate at a range of frequencies and amplitudes matching those found in the field. The results show that stirring due to vegetation waving produces k600 values from 0.55 cm/h to 1.60 cm/h. The dependence of k600 on waving amplitude and frequency are evident from the laboratory data. These results indicate that vegetation waving has a nonnegligible effect on gas transport; thus, it can contribute to a mechanistic understanding of the fluxes underpinning biogeochemical processes.

  5. A fundamentally new approach to air-cooled heat exchangers.

    SciTech Connect

    Koplow, Jeffrey P.

    2010-01-01

    We describe breakthrough results obtained in a feasibility study of a fundamentally new architecture for air-cooled heat exchangers. A longstanding but largely unrealized opportunity in energy efficiency concerns the performance of air-cooled heat exchangers used in air conditioners, heat pumps, and refrigeration equipment. In the case of residential air conditioners, for example, the typical performance of the air cooled heat exchangers used for condensers and evaporators is at best marginal from the standpoint the of achieving maximum the possible coefficient of performance (COP). If by some means it were possible to reduce the thermal resistance of these heat exchangers to a negligible level, a typical energy savings of order 30% could be immediately realized. It has long been known that a several-fold increase in heat exchanger size, in conjunction with the use of much higher volumetric flow rates, provides a straight-forward path to this goal but is not practical from the standpoint of real world applications. The tension in the market place between the need for energy efficiency and logistical considerations such as equipment size, cost and operating noise has resulted in a compromise that is far from ideal. This is the reason that a typical residential air conditioner exhibits significant sensitivity to reductions in fan speed and/or fouling of the heat exchanger surface. The prevailing wisdom is that little can be done to improve this situation; the 'fan-plus-finned-heat-sink' heat exchanger architecture used throughout the energy sector represents an extremely mature technology for which there is little opportunity for further optimization. But the fact remains that conventional fan-plus-finned-heat-sink technology simply doesn't work that well. Their primary physical limitation to performance (i.e. low thermal resistance) is the boundary layer of motionless air that adheres to and envelops all surfaces of the heat exchanger. Within this boundary layer

  6. Technology Candidates for Air-to-Air and Air-to-Ground Data Exchange

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haynes, Brian D.

    2015-01-01

    Technology Candidates for Air-to-Air and Air-to-Ground Data Exchange is a two-year research effort to visualize the U. S. aviation industry at a point 50 years in the future, and to define potential communication solutions to meet those future data exchange needs. The research team, led by XCELAR, was tasked with identifying future National Airspace System (NAS) scenarios, determining requirements and functions (including gaps), investigating technical and business issues for air, ground, & air-to-ground interactions, and reporting on the results. The project was conducted under technical direction from NASA and in collaboration with XCELAR's partner, National Institute of Aerospace, and NASA technical representatives. Parallel efforts were initiated to define the information exchange functional needs of the future NAS, and specific communication link technologies to potentially serve those needs. Those efforts converged with the mapping of each identified future NAS function to potential enabling communication solutions; those solutions were then compared with, and ranked relative to, each other on a technical basis in a structured analysis process. The technical solutions emerging from that process were then assessed from a business case perspective to determine their viability from a real-world adoption and deployment standpoint. The results of that analysis produced a proposed set of future solutions and most promising candidate technologies. Gap analyses were conducted at two points in the process, the first examining technical factors, and the second as part of the business case analysis. In each case, no gaps or unmet needs were identified in applying the solutions evaluated to the requirements identified. The future communication solutions identified in the research comprise both specific link technologies and two enabling technologies that apply to most or all specific links. As a result, the research resulted in a new analysis approach, viewing the

  7. Exposure Modeling of Residential Air Exchange Rates for NEXUS Participants

    EPA Science Inventory

    Due to cost and participant burden of personal measurements, air pollution health studies often estimate exposures using local ambient air monitors. Since outdoor levels do not necessarily reflect personal exposures, we developed the Exposure Model for Individuals (EMI) to improv...

  8. Exposure Modeling of Residential Air Exchange Rates for NEXUS Participants.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Due to cost and participant burden of personal measurements, air pollution health studies often estimate exposures using local ambient air monitors. Since outdoor levels do not necessarily reflect personal exposures, we developed the Exposure Model for Individuals (EMI) to improv...

  9. Air pressure measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballard, H. N.

    1978-01-01

    The pressure measurement was made by a Model 830J Rosemont sensor which utilized the principle of a changing pressure to change correspondingly the capacitance of the pressure sensitive element. The sensor's range was stated to be from zero to 100 Torr (14 km); however, the sensor was not activated until an altitude of 20 km (41 Torr) was reached during the balloon ascent. The resolution of the sensor was specified by the manufacturer as infinitesimal; however, associated electronic and pressure readout systems limit the resolution to .044 Torr. Thus in the vicinity of an altitude of 30 km the pressure resolution corresponded to an altitude resolution of approximately 33 meters.

  10. National Air Space (NAS) Data Exchange Environment Through 2060

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roy, Aloke

    2015-01-01

    NASA's NextGen Concepts and Technology Development (CTD) Project focuses on capabilities to improve safety, capacity and efficiency of the National Air Space (NAS). In order to achieve those objectives, NASA sought industry-Government partnerships to research and identify solutions for traffic flow management, dynamic airspace configuration, separation assurance, super density operations, airport surface operations and similar forward-looking air-traffic modernization (ATM) concepts. Data exchanges over NAS being the key enabler for most of these ATM concepts, the Sub-Topic area 3 of the CTD project sought to identify technology candidates that can satisfy air-to-air and air/ground communications needs of the NAS in the year 2060 timeframe. Honeywell, under a two-year contract with NASA, is working on this communications technology research initiative. This report summarizes Honeywell's research conducted during the second year of the study task.

  11. Measurement of air-surface exchange of speciated nitrogen and sulfur compounds using a modified MARGA 2S: ? Concentrations and fluxes above a grass field

    EPA Science Inventory

    Improved measurement methods are needed to characterize dry deposition of sulfur and nitrogen compounds to assess ecosystem exposure to nutrients and acidifying compounds and to develop atmospheric deposition budgets in support of critical loads assessments. The purpose of this s...

  12. Measurement of air-surface exchange of speciated nitrogen and sulfur compounds using a modified MARGA 2S: Assessment and control of data quality

    EPA Science Inventory

    Improved measurement methods are needed to characterize dry deposition of sulfur and nitrogen compounds to assess ecosystem exposure to nutrients and acidifying compounds and to develop atmospheric deposition budgets in support of critical loads assessments. The purpose of this ...

  13. Performance evaluation on an air-cooled heat exchanger for alumina nanofluid under laminar flow

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    This study analyzes the characteristics of alumina (Al2O3)/water nanofluid to determine the feasibility of its application in an air-cooled heat exchanger for heat dissipation for PEMFC or electronic chip cooling. The experimental sample was Al2O3/water nanofluid produced by the direct synthesis method at three different concentrations (0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 wt.%). The experiments in this study measured the thermal conductivity and viscosity of nanofluid with weight fractions and sample temperatures (20-60°C), and then used the nanofluid in an actual air-cooled heat exchanger to assess its heat exchange capacity and pressure drop under laminar flow. Experimental results show that the nanofluid has a higher heat exchange capacity than water, and a higher concentration of nanoparticles provides an even better ratio of the heat exchange. The maximum enhanced ratio of heat exchange and pressure drop for all the experimental parameters in this study was about 39% and 5.6%, respectively. In addition to nanoparticle concentration, the temperature and mass flow rates of the working fluid can affect the enhanced ratio of heat exchange and pressure drop of nanofluid. The cross-section aspect ratio of tube in the heat exchanger is another important factor to be taken into consideration. PMID:21827644

  14. The Effect of Rain on Air-Water Gas Exchange

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, David T.; Bliven, Larry F.; Wanninkhof, Rik; Schlosser, Peter

    1997-01-01

    The relationship between gas transfer velocity and rain rate was investigated at NASA's Rain-Sea Interaction Facility (RSIF) using several SF, evasion experiments. During each experiment, a water tank below the rain simulator was supersaturated with SF6, a synthetic gas, and the gas transfer velocities were calculated from the measured decrease in SF6 concentration with time. The results from experiments with IS different rain rates (7 to 10 mm/h) and 1 of 2 drop sizes (2.8 or 4.2 mm diameter) confirm a significant and systematic enhancement of air-water gas exchange by rainfall. The gas transfer velocities derived from our experiment were related to the kinetic energy flux calculated from the rain rate and drop size. The relationship obtained for mono-dropsize rain at the RSIF was extrapolated to natural rain using the kinetic energy flux of natural rain calculated from the Marshall-Palmer raindrop size distribution. Results of laboratory experiments at RSIF were compared to field observations made during a tropical rainstorm in Miami, Florida and show good agreement between laboratory and field data.

  15. Selection and costing of heat exchangers. Air-cooled type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1994-12-01

    ESDU 94043 extends the information in ESDU 92013 which, when an air-cooled exchanger is found appropriate and is costed, provides the results for a datum design 40 ft (12.2 m) long with G-fins and 1 in (25 mm) diameter tube operating at a noise level of 85 dBa. It provides factors derived from an analysis of manufacturer's data to be applied to the cost results from ESDU 92013 to account for variations in those parameters and features. Additional guidance on the configuration and use of air-cooled exchangers is given. The data are incorporated in ESDUpac A9213 which is a Fortran program that implements the selection and costing method of ESDU 92013. It is provided on disc in the software volume compiled to run under DOS with a user-friendly interface that prompts on screen for input data.

  16. Measurements of CO2 exchanges at the air-sediment interface during emersion: an annual budget of primary production in the Bay of Somme (Eastern English Channel, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spilmont, N.; Migné, A.; Davoult, D.

    2003-04-01

    A survey of benthic primary production during periods of emersion was performed in a muddy-sand station of the Bay of Somme (Eastern English Channel, France), a megatidal estuary. Primary production and respiration were estimated by in situ measurements of carbon dioxide fluxes using infra-red analysis. Using photosynthesis versus irradiance (P-I) curves (construted in February, April, July, August and October) and an estimation for P-I parameters variations along the year, two annual budgets of gross primary production were calculated. The first one was calculated using a theoretical irradiance varying only with the period of the year and the second one using irradiance measured along the year (every minute), including natural variations due to cloudiness. For each calculation, daily potential primary production was calculated as a function of irradiance (theoretical or measured) for the period of superimposition of day and emersion The budget under natural irradiance is a quarter lower (9.58 mol.C.m-2.yr-1 vs 12.83 mol.C.m-2.yr-1 with theoretical irradiance). The fornightly variability due to the superimposition of the tidal and day/night cycles is most of the time overshadowed by the effect of variability in light intensity under natural conditions. The annual community respiration being estimated to 13.42 mol.C.m-2.yr-1, the calculation of net community production led to an heterotrophic or a balanced annual budget (-3.84 mol.C.m-2.yr-1 with measured irradiance and -0.59 mol.C.m-2.yr-1 with theoretical irradiance).

  17. Probe Measures Fouling As In Heat Exchangers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marner, Wilbur J.; Macdavid, Kenton S.

    1990-01-01

    Combustion deposits reduce transfer of heat. Instrument measures fouling like that on gas side of heat exchanger in direct-fired boiler or heat-recovery system. Heat-flux probe includes tube with embedded meter in outer shell. Combustion gases flow over probe, and fouling accumulates on it, just as fouling would on heat exchanger. Embedded heat-flow meter is sandwich structure in which thin Chromel layers and middle alloy form thermopile. Users determine when fouling approaches unacceptable levels so they schedule cleaning and avoid decreased transfer of heat and increased drop in pressure fouling causes. Avoids cost of premature, unnecessary maintenance.

  18. Air pollution measurements from satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ludwig, C. B.; Griggs, M.; Malkmus, W.; Bartle, E. R.

    1973-01-01

    A study is presented on the remote sensing of gaseous and particulate air pollutants which is an extension of a previous report. Pollutants can be observed by either active or passive remote sensing systems. Calculations discussed herein indicate that tropospheric CO, CO2, SO2, NO2, NH3, HCHO, and CH4 can be measured by means of nadir looking passive systems. Additional species such as NO, HNO3, O3, and H2O may be measured in the stratosphere through a horizon experiment. A brief theoretical overview of resonance Raman scattering and resonance fluorescence is given. It is found that radiance measurements are most promising for general global applications, and that stratospheric aerosols may be measured using a sun occultation technique. The instrumentation requirements for both active and passive systems are examined and various instruments now under development are described.

  19. Experimental comparison of exchange bias measurement methodologies

    SciTech Connect

    Hovorka, Ondrej; Berger, Andreas; Friedman, Gary

    2007-05-01

    Measurements performed on all-ferromagnetic bilayer systems and supported by model calculation results are used to compare different exchange bias characterization methods. We demonstrate that the accuracy of the conventional two-point technique based on measuring the sum of the coercive fields depends on the symmetry properties of hysteresis loops. On the other hand, the recently proposed center of mass method yields results independent of the hysteresis loop type and coincides with the two-point measurement only if the loops are symmetric. Our experimental and simulation results clearly demonstrate a strong correlation between loop asymmetry and the difference between these methods.

  20. In calm seas, precipitation drives air-sea gas exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Colin

    2012-05-01

    In a series of experiments run in what resembles a heavily instrumented fish tank, Harrison et al. investigated the interwoven roles of wind and rain on air-sea gas exchange rates. Working with a 42-meterlong, 1-meter-wide, and 1.25-meter-tall experimental pool, the authors were able to control the wind speed, rainfall rate, water circulation speed, and other parameters, which they used to assess the effect of 24 different wind speed-rainfall rate combinations on the gas exchange rate of sulfur hexafuoride, a greenhouse gas. In trials that lasted up to 3 hours, the authors collected water samples from the tank at regular intervals, tracking the concentration of the dissolved gas.

  1. ASGAMAGE, the Air-Sea Gas Exchange/MAGE experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oost, Wiebe; Jacobs, Cor; Kohsiek, Wim; Goossens, Guus; van der Horn, Jaap; Sprung, Detlev; Rapsomanikis, Spyros; Kenntner, Thomas; Reiner, Thomas; Bowyer, Peter; Larsen, Søren; de Leeuw, Gerrit; Kunz, Gerard; Hall, Alan; Liss, Peter; Malin, Gill; Upstill-Goddard, Rob; Woolf, David; Graham, Angus; Nightingale, Phil; Fairall, Chris; Hare, Jeff; Dissly, Richard; Tans, Pieter; Anderson, Bob; Smith, Stu

    The ASGAMAGE project addressed the problem of the large discrepancy between the chemistry based and micrometeorological methods and aimed to determine any geophysical parameters apart from the wind speed that affect air-sea gas exchange in an effort to reduce the uncertainty in the global carbon balance. Experiments were performed in the spring and fall of 1996 at and near a research platform off the Dutch coast and two surface layer models were developed for the gas exchange process. The results gave a reduction of the difference between the two types of methods from an order of magnitude to a factor of two as well as indications for the causes of the remaining difference.

  2. Methods for measuring exchangeable protons in glycosaminoglycans.

    PubMed

    Beecher, Consuelo N; Larive, Cynthia K

    2015-01-01

    Recent NMR studies of the exchangeable protons of GAGs in aqueous solution, including those of the amide, sulfamate, and hydroxyl moieties, have demonstrated potential for the detection of intramolecular hydrogen bonds, providing insights into secondary structure preferences. GAG amide protons are observable by NMR over wide pH and temperature ranges; however, specific solution conditions are required to reduce the exchange rate of the sulfamate and hydroxyl protons and allow their detection by NMR. Building on the vast body of knowledge on detection of hydrogen bonds in peptides and proteins, a variety of methods can be used to identify hydrogen bonds in GAGs including temperature coefficient measurements, evaluation of chemical shift differences between oligo- and monosaccharides, and relative exchange rates measured through line shape analysis and EXSY spectra. Emerging strategies to allow direct detection of hydrogen bonds through heteronuclear couplings offer promise for the future. Molecular dynamic simulations are important in this effort both to predict and confirm hydrogen bond donors and acceptors.

  3. BOREAS TE-11 Leaf Gas Exchange Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Papagno, Andrea (Editor); Saugier, Bernard; Pontailler, J. Y.

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmospheric Study (BOREAS) TE-11 (Terrestrial Ecology) team collected several data sets in support of its efforts to characterize and interpret information on the sap flow, gas exchange, and lichen photosynthesis of boreal vegetation and meteorological data of the area studied. This data set contains measurements of assimilation and transpiration conducted at the Old Jack Pine (OJP) site during the growing seasons of 1993 and 1994. The data are stored in ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  4. Time variations of 222Rn concentration and air exchange rates in a Hungarian cave.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Hedvig Éva; Szabó, Zsuzsanna; Jordán, Gyozo; Szabó, Csaba; Horváth, Akos; Kiss, Attila

    2012-09-01

    A long-term radon concentration monitoring was carried out in the Pál-völgy cave, Budapest, Hungary, for 1.5 years. Our major goal was to determine the time dependence of the radon concentration in the cave to characterise the air exchange and define the most important environmental parameters that influence the radon concentration inside the cave. The radon concentration in the cave air was measured continuously by an AlphaGuard radon monitor, and meteorological parameters outside the cave were collected simultaneously. The air's radon concentration in the cave varied between 104 and 7776 Bq m(-3), the annual average value was 1884±85 Bq m(-3). The summer to winter radon concentration ratio was as high as 21.8. The outside air temperature showed the strongest correlation with the radon concentration in the cave, the correlation coefficient (R) was 0.76. PMID:22462600

  5. Air-Seawater Exchange of Organochlorine Pesticides along the Sediment Plume of a Large Contaminated River.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tian; Guo, Zhigang; Li, Yuanyuan; Nizzetto, Luca; Ma, Chuanliang; Chen, Yingjun

    2015-05-01

    Gaseous exchange fluxes of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) across the air-water interface of the coastal East China Sea were determined in order to assess whether the contaminated plume of the Yangtze River could be an important regional source of OCPs to the atmosphere. Hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs), chlordane compounds (CHLs), and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethanes (DDTs) were the most frequently detected OCPs in air and water. Air-water exchange was mainly characterized by net volatilization for all measured OCPs. The net gaseous exchange flux ranged 10-240 ng/(m2·day) for γ-HCH, 60-370 ng/(m2·day) for trans-CHL, 97-410 ng/(m2·day) for cis-CHL, and ∼0 (e.g., equilibrium) to 490 ng/(m2·day) for p,p'-DDE. We found that the plume of the large contaminated river can serve as a significant regional secondary atmospheric source of legacy contaminants released in the catchment. In particular, the sediment plume represented the relevant source of DDT compounds (especially p,p'-DDE) sustaining net degassing when clean air masses from the open ocean reached the plume area. In contrast, a mass balance showed that, for HCHs, contaminated river discharge (water and sediment) plumes were capable of sustaining volatilization throughout the year. These results demonstrate the inconsistencies in the fate of HCHs and DDTs in this large estuarine system with declining primary sources.

  6. ISSUES IN SIMULATING ELEMENTAL MERCURY AIR/WATER EXCHANGE AND AQUEOUS MONOMETHYLMERCURY SPECIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation focuses on two areas relevant to assessing the global fate and bioavailability of mercury: elemental mercury air/water exchange and aqueous environmental monomethylmercury speciation.

  7. Air infiltration and building tightness measurements in passive solar residences

    SciTech Connect

    Persily, A.K.; Grot, R.A.

    1984-05-01

    The airtightness of about fifty passive solar homes located throughout the United States was studied using low-cost measurement techniques. These homes are part of the DOE-sponsored Class B monitoring program conducted at the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) to evaluate the thermal performance of passive solar residential buildings. These tests provide the first set of building tightness measurements on a large group of passive solar buildings. The measurements include pressurization tests to measure airtightness and tracer gas measurements to determine air infiltration rates. The pressure tests show a variation in the airtightness of these homes from 3 to 30 exchanges/hr at 50 Pascal, with a median of 9.5 exchanges/hr. The air infiltration measurements cover a wider range from 0.05 to 3.0 exchanges/hr, with a median of 0.5 exchanges/hr. In comparing the tightness of these homes to other U.S. homes, one finds that these passive solar homes are not significantly tighter than homes built with less of an emphasis on energy use.

  8. Spatial Distribution and Air-Water Exchange of Organic Flame Retardants in the Lower Great Lakes.

    PubMed

    McDonough, Carrie A; Puggioni, Gavino; Helm, Paul A; Muir, Derek; Lohmann, Rainer

    2016-09-01

    Organic flame retardants (OFRs) such as polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and novel halogenated flame retardants (NHFRs) are ubiquitous, persistent, and bioaccumulative contaminants that have been used in consumer goods to slow combustion. In this study, polyethylene passive samplers (PEs) were deployed throughout the lower Great Lakes (Lake Erie and Lake Ontario) to measure OFRs in air and water, calculate air-water exchange fluxes, and investigate spatial trends. Dissolved Σ12BDE was greatest in Lake Ontario near Toronto (18 pg/L), whereas gaseous Σ12BDE was greatest on the southern shoreline of Lake Erie (11 pg/m(3)). NHFRs were generally below detection limits. Air-water exchange was dominated by absorption of BDEs 47 and 99, ranging from -964 pg/m(2)/day to -30 pg/m(2)/day. Σ12BDE in air and water was significantly correlated with surrounding population density, suggesting that phased-out PBDEs continued to be emitted from population centers along the Great Lakes shoreline in 2012. Correlation with dissolved Σ12BDE was strongest when considering population within 25 km while correlation with gaseous Σ12BDE was strongest when using population within 3 km to the south of each site. Bayesian kriging was used to predict dissolved Σ12BDE over the lakes, illustrating the utility of relatively highly spatially resolved measurements in identifying potential hot spots for future study.

  9. Spatial Distribution and Air-Water Exchange of Organic Flame Retardants in the Lower Great Lakes.

    PubMed

    McDonough, Carrie A; Puggioni, Gavino; Helm, Paul A; Muir, Derek; Lohmann, Rainer

    2016-09-01

    Organic flame retardants (OFRs) such as polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and novel halogenated flame retardants (NHFRs) are ubiquitous, persistent, and bioaccumulative contaminants that have been used in consumer goods to slow combustion. In this study, polyethylene passive samplers (PEs) were deployed throughout the lower Great Lakes (Lake Erie and Lake Ontario) to measure OFRs in air and water, calculate air-water exchange fluxes, and investigate spatial trends. Dissolved Σ12BDE was greatest in Lake Ontario near Toronto (18 pg/L), whereas gaseous Σ12BDE was greatest on the southern shoreline of Lake Erie (11 pg/m(3)). NHFRs were generally below detection limits. Air-water exchange was dominated by absorption of BDEs 47 and 99, ranging from -964 pg/m(2)/day to -30 pg/m(2)/day. Σ12BDE in air and water was significantly correlated with surrounding population density, suggesting that phased-out PBDEs continued to be emitted from population centers along the Great Lakes shoreline in 2012. Correlation with dissolved Σ12BDE was strongest when considering population within 25 km while correlation with gaseous Σ12BDE was strongest when using population within 3 km to the south of each site. Bayesian kriging was used to predict dissolved Σ12BDE over the lakes, illustrating the utility of relatively highly spatially resolved measurements in identifying potential hot spots for future study. PMID:27458653

  10. Measuring Air-Ionizer Output

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lonborg, J. O.

    1985-01-01

    Test apparatus checks ion content of airstream from commercial air ionizer. Apparatus ensures ion output is sufficient to neutralize static charges in electronic assembly areas and concentrations of positive and negative ions are balanced.

  11. Temporal variability of air-sea CO2 exchange in a low-emission estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mørk, Eva Thorborg; Sejr, Mikael Kristian; Stæhr, Peter Anton; Sørensen, Lise Lotte

    2016-07-01

    There is the need for further study of whether global estimates of air-sea CO2 exchange in estuarine systems capture the relevant temporal variability and, as such, the temporal variability of bulk parameterized and directly measured CO2 fluxes was investigated in the Danish estuary, Roskilde Fjord. The air-sea CO2 fluxes showed large temporal variability across seasons and between days and that more than 30% of the net CO2 emission in 2013 was a result of two large fall and winter storms. The diurnal variability of ΔpCO2 was up to 400 during summer changing the estuary from a source to a sink of CO2 within the day. Across seasons the system was suggested to change from a sink of atmospheric CO2 during spring to near neutral during summer and later to a source of atmospheric CO2 during fall. Results indicated that Roskilde Fjord was an annual low-emission estuary, with an estimated bulk parameterized release of 3.9 ± 8.7 mol CO2 m-2 y-1 during 2012-2013. It was suggested that the production-respiration balance leading to the low annual emission in Roskilde Fjord, was caused by the shallow depth, long residence time and high water quality in the estuary. In the data analysis the eddy covariance CO2 flux samples were filtered according to the H2Osbnd CO2 cross-sensitivity assessment suggested by Landwehr et al. (2014). This filtering reduced episodes of contradicting directions between measured and bulk parameterized air-sea CO2 exchanges and changed the net air-sea CO2 exchange from an uptake to a release. The CO2 gas transfer velocity was calculated from directly measured CO2 fluxes and ΔpCO2 and agreed to previous observations and parameterizations.

  12. Fluidized bed heat exchanger with water cooled air distributor and dust hopper

    DOEpatents

    Jukkola, Walfred W.; Leon, Albert M.; Van Dyk, Jr., Garritt C.; McCoy, Daniel E.; Fisher, Barry L.; Saiers, Timothy L.; Karstetter, Marlin E.

    1981-11-24

    A fluidized bed heat exchanger is provided in which air is passed through a bed of particulate material containing fuel. A steam-water natural circulation system is provided for heat exchange and the housing of the heat exchanger has a water-wall type construction. Vertical in-bed heat exchange tubes are provided and the air distributor is water-cooled. A water-cooled dust hopper is provided in the housing to collect particulates from the combustion gases and separate the combustion zone from a volume within said housing in which convection heat exchange tubes are provided to extract heat from the exiting combustion gases.

  13. Dynamics of compressible air flow in ducts with heat exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdulhadi, M.

    1986-12-01

    An investigation into the effect of heat addition on subsonic flow of an air stream in a constant-area duct preceded by a convergent nozzle is carried out. A nozzle flow apparatus with a heat exchanger encasing the constant-area duct has been built for this purpose. Hot water is provided from an electric boiler where the flow rate and the in-flow hot water temperature could be controlled. It is confirmed experimentally, as predicted analytically, that heat transfer to the gas decreases its local static pressure along the duct axis, and that this decrease is associated with an increase in Mach number toward M = 1 at the exit (thermal choking). In the case of subsonic flow, the additional entropy generated by the heat interaction exceeding the amount that produces thermal choking can only be accommodated by moving to a new Rayleigh line, at a decreased flow rate which lowers the inlet Mach number. The good correlation between the experimental results and the analytical derivations illustrates that the experimental arrangement has potential for further experiments and investigations.

  14. A novel technique for highly accurate gas exchange measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalkenings, R. K.; Jähne, B. J.

    2003-04-01

    The Heidelberg Aeolotron is a circular wind-wave facility for investigating air-sea gas exchange. In this contribution a novel technique for measuring highly accurate transfer velocities k of mass transfer will be presented. Traditionally, in mass balance techniques the constant of decay for gas concentrations over time is measured. The major drawback of this concept is the long time constant. At low wind speeds and a water height greater than 1 m the period of observation has to be several days. In a gas-tight facility such as the Aeolotron, the transfer velocity k can be computed from the concentration in the water body and the change of concentration in the gas space. Owing to this fact, transfer velocities are gained while greatly reducing the measuring times to less than one hour. The transfer velocity k of a tracer can be parameterized as k=1/β \\cdot u_* \\cdot Sc^n, with the Schmidt Number Sc, shear velocity u_* and the dimensionless transfer resistance β. The Schmidt Number exponent n can be derived from simultaneous measurements of different tracers. Since these tracers are of different Schmidt number, the shear velocity is not needed. To allow for Schmidt numbers spanning a hole decade, in our experiments He, H_2, N_2O and F12 are used. The relative accuracy of measuring the transfer velocity was improved to less than 2%. In 9 consecutive experiments conducted at a wind speed of 6.2 m/s, the deviation of the Schmidt number exponent was found to be just under 0.02. This high accuracy will allow precisely determining the transition of the Schmidt number exponent from n=2/3 to n=0.5 from a flat to wavy water surface. In order to quantify gas exchange not only the wind speed is important. Surfactants have a pronounced effect on the wave field and lead to a drastic reduction in the transfer velocity. In the Aeolotron measurements were conducted with a variety of measuring devices, ranging from an imaging slope gauge (ISG) to thermal techniques with IR

  15. Mathematical modeling of heat exchange between mine air and rock mass during fire

    SciTech Connect

    A.E. Krasnoshtein; B.P. Kazakov; A.V. Shalimov

    2006-05-15

    Solution of problems on heat exchange between ventilating air and rock mass and on gas admixture propagation in mine workings serve as a base for considering changes in heat-gas-air state at a mine after inflammation. The presented mathematical relations allow calculation of a varied velocity and movement direction of air flows, their temperatures and smoking conditions during fire.

  16. Air-surface exchange of polybrominated diphenyl ethers and polychlorinated biphenyls.

    PubMed

    Gouin, T; Thomas, G O; Cousins, I; Barber, J; Mackay, D; Jones, K C

    2002-04-01

    Air and leaf-litter samples were collected from a rural site in southern Ontario under meteorologically stable conditions in the early spring, prior to bud burst, over a three-day period to measure the simultaneous diurnal variations in polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). PBDEs are used in a wide range of commercial products as flame retardants and are being assessed internationally as potential persistent organic pollutants. Total PBDE concentrations in the air ranged between 88 and 1250 pg m(-3), and were dominated primarily by the lighter congeners PBDEs 17, 28, and 47, and concentrations of total PCBs ranged between 96 and 950 pg m(-3), and were dominated by the lower chlorinated (tri- to tetra-) congeners. Slopes of Clausius-Clapeyron plots indicate that both PCBs and PBDEs are experiencing active air-surface exchange. Fugacities were estimated from concentrations in the air and leaf-litter and suggest near equilibrium conditions. Following the three-day intensive sampling period, 40 air samples were collected at 24-hour intervals in an attempt to evaluate the effect of bud burst on atmospheric concentrations. Total PBDE concentrations in the daily air samples ranged between 10 and 230 pg m(-3), and were dominated by the lighter congeners PBDE 17, 28, and 47, whereas concentrations of total PCBs ranged between 30 and 450 pg m(-3) during this period. It is hypothesized thatthe high PBDE concentrations observed at the beginning of the sampling period are the result of an "early spring pulse" in which PBDEs deposited in the snowpack over the winter are released with snowmelt, resulting in elevated concentrations in the surface and air. Later in the sampling period, following bud burst, PBDE concentrations in air fell to 10 to 20 pg m(-3), possibly due to the high sorption capacity of this freshly emerging foliage compartment.

  17. Air Quality Measurements for Science and Policy

    EPA Science Inventory

    Air quality measurements and the methods used to conduct them are vital to advancing our knowledge of the source-to-receptor-to-health effects continuum1-3. This information then forms the basis for evaluating and managing air quality to protect human health and welfa...

  18. Measurement of Air Pollutants in the Troposphere

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clemitshaw, Kevin C.

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the principles, applications and performances of methods to measure gas-phase air pollutants that either utilise passive or active sampling with subsequent laboratory analysis or involve automated "in situ" sampling and analysis. It focuses on air pollutants that have adverse impacts on human health (nitrogen dioxide, carbon…

  19. Study of Ram-air Heat Exchangers for Reducing Turbine Cooling-air Temperature of a Supersonic Aircraft Turbojet Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diaguila, Anthony J; Livingood, John N B; Eckert, Ernst R G

    1956-01-01

    The sizes and weights of the cores of heat exchangers were determined analytically for possible application for reducing turbine cooling-air temperatures of an engine designed for a Mach number of 2.5 and an altitude The sizes and weights of the cores of heat exchangers were determined analytically for possible application for reducing turbine cooling-air temperatures of an engine designed for a Mach number of 2.5 and an altitude of 70,000 feet. A compressor-bleed-air weight flow of 2.7 pounds per second was assumed for the coolant; ram air was considered as the other fluid. Pressure drops and inlet states of both fluids were prescribed, and ranges of compressor-bleed-air temperature reductions and of the ratio of compressor-bleed to ram-air weight flows were considered.

  20. Air-Sea Exchange Of CO2: A Multi-Technology Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tengberg, A.; Almroth, E.; Anderson, L.; Hall, P.; Hjalmarsson, S.; Lefevre, D.; Omstedt, A.; Rutgersson, A.; Sahlee, E.; Smedman, A.; Wesslander, K.

    2006-12-01

    We report on experiences and results from a multidisciplinary project in which we try to elucidate the complex processes involved in air-sea exchange of CO2. This study was performed in the Baltic Sea (off the Swedish island Gotland) and combined the following technologies: - Meteorological measurements of wind, turbulence, temperature, humidity, humidity flux, CO2 and CO2 flux at several levels from a fixed observation tower - Hourly PCO2 measurements with a moored automatic instrument - Collection of dissolved oxygen, temperature, salinity and turbidity data at different levels in the water column at 1-minute intervals - Daily light (PAR) and primary production measurements obtained with a moored automatic incubator - Daily primary production measurements using manual methods - Use of an acoustic current profiler to collect water column information on currents, turbulence, water level and waves - Repetitive water column profiles, from a ship, of dissolved inorganic carbon, oxygen, nutrients, alkalinity, pH, PAR, Chlorophyll A, salinity and temperature

  1. Predicting residential air exchange rates from questionnaires and meteorology: model evaluation in central North Carolina.

    PubMed

    Breen, Michael S; Breen, Miyuki; Williams, Ronald W; Schultz, Bradley D

    2010-12-15

    A critical aspect of air pollution exposure models is the estimation of the air exchange rate (AER) of individual homes, where people spend most of their time. The AER, which is the airflow into and out of a building, is a primary mechanism for entry of outdoor air pollutants and removal of indoor source emissions. The mechanistic Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) AER model was linked to a leakage area model to predict AER from questionnaires and meteorology. The LBL model was also extended to include natural ventilation (LBLX). Using literature-reported parameter values, AER predictions from LBL and LBLX models were compared to data from 642 daily AER measurements across 31 detached homes in central North Carolina, with corresponding questionnaires and meteorological observations. Data was collected on seven consecutive days during each of four consecutive seasons. For the individual model-predicted and measured AER, the median absolute difference was 43% (0.17 h(-1)) and 40% (0.17 h(-1)) for the LBL and LBLX models, respectively. Additionally, a literature-reported empirical scale factor (SF) AER model was evaluated, which showed a median absolute difference of 50% (0.25 h(-1)). The capability of the LBL, LBLX, and SF models could help reduce the AER uncertainty in air pollution exposure models used to develop exposure metrics for health studies.

  2. Air Circulation and Heat Exchange Under Reduced Pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rygalov, V.; Wheeler, R.; Dixon, M.; Fowler, P.; Hillhouse, L.

    2010-01-01

    Heat exchange rates decrease non-linearly with reductions in atmospheric pressure. This decrease creates risk of thermal stress (elevated leaf temperatures) for plants under reduced pressures. Forced convection (fans) significantly increases heat exchange rate under almost all pressures except below 10 kPa. Plant cultivation techniques under reduced pressures will require forced convection. The cooling curve technique is a reliable means of assessing the influence of environmental variables like pressure and gravity on gas exchange of plant. These results represent the extremes of gas exchange conditions for simple systems under variable pressures. In reality, dense plant canopies will exhibit responses in between these extremes. More research is needed to understand the dependence of forced convection on atmospheric pressure. The overall thermal balance model should include latent and radiative exchange components.

  3. Spatiotemporally‐Resolved Air Exchange Rate as a Modifier of Acute Air Pollution‐Related Morbidity in AtlantaMorbidity in Atlanta

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiological studies frequently use central site concentrations as surrogates of exposure to air pollutants. Variability in air pollutant infiltration due to differential air exchange rates (AERs) is potentially a major factor affecting the relationship between central site c...

  4. Measuring Air Density in the Introductory Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calzà, G.; Gratton, L. M.; López-Arias, T.; Oss, S.

    2010-03-01

    The measurement of the mass, or the density, of air can easily be done with very simple materials and offers many interesting phenomena for discussion—buoyancy and its effects being the most obvious but not the only one. Many interesting considerations can be done regarding the behavior of gases, the effect of the external conditions in the measurement, and the reason for the choice of the procedure, among others. One of the most widespread approaches makes use of rubber balloons. Such an approach can be misleading if attention is not paid to the effect of the buoyant force on the balloon, exerted by the surrounding air. Air is weightless in an environment full of it. While this fact can usually be neglected in daily, nontechnical weight measurements, it is not the case when we are interested in the weight of air itself. A sketch such as the one depicted in Fig. 1 is often presented in elementary science textbooks, as a demonstration that air has weight. A search of the Internet will reveal that this misleading approach is often presented as the simplest one for this kind of measurement at an elementary level and represents one among other common misconceptions that can be found in K-6 science textbooks as discussed, for instance, in Ref. 2. For a more detailed description of the flaws inherent to the measurement of air's weight with a rubber balloon, see Ref. 3. In this paper we will describe two procedures to measure the density of air: weighing a PET bottle and a vacuum rigid container. There are other interesting ways to estimate the weight of air; see, for instance, the experiment of Zhu and Se-yuen using carbon dioxide and Archimedes' principle.4 We emphasize the experimental implications and the physical reasons for the accuracy and conceptual correctness of each method. It is important not to undervalue the importance of both simplicity and reliability for any experimental measurement made in a didactic context.

  5. Air-water gas exchange and CO2 flux in a mangrove-dominated estuary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ho, David T.; Ferrón, Sara; Engel, Victor C.; Larsen, Laurel G.; Barr, Jordan G.

    2014-01-01

    Mangrove forests are highly productive ecosystems, but the fate of mangrove-derived carbon remains uncertain. Part of that uncertainty stems from the fact that gas transfer velocities in mangrove-surrounded waters are not well determined, leading to uncertainty in air-water CO2 fluxes. Two SF6 tracer release experiments were conducted to determine gas transfer velocities (k(600) = 8.3 ± 0.4 and 8.1 ± 0.6 cm h−1), along with simultaneous measurements of pCO2 to determine the air-water CO2 fluxes from Shark River, Florida (232.11 ± 23.69 and 171.13 ± 20.28 mmol C m−2 d−1), an estuary within the largest contiguous mangrove forest in North America. The gas transfer velocity results are consistent with turbulent kinetic energy dissipation measurements, indicating a higher rate of turbulence and gas exchange than predicted by commonly used wind speed/gas exchange parameterizations. The results have important implications for carbon fluxes in mangrove ecosystems.

  6. Low GWP Refrigerants Modelling Study for a Room Air Conditioner Having Microchannel Heat Exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Bo; Bhandari, Mahabir S

    2016-01-01

    Microchannel heat exchangers (MHX) have found great successes in residential and commercial air conditioning applications, being compact heat exchangers, to reduce refrigerant charge and material cost. This investigation aims to extend the application of MHXs in split, room air conditioners (RAC), per fundamental heat exchanger and system modelling. For this paper, microchannel condenser and evaporator models were developed, using a segment-to-segment modelling approach. The microchannel heat exchanger models were integrated to a system design model. The system model is able to predict the performance indices, such as cooling capacity, efficiency, sensible heat ratio, etc. Using the calibrated system and heat exchanger models, we evaluated numerous low GWP (global warming potential) refrigerants. The predicted system performance indices, e.g. cooling efficiency, compressor discharge temperature, and required compressor displacement volume etc., are compared. Suitable replacements for R22 and R-410A for the room air conditioner application are recommended.

  7. Measurement of toxic and related air pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Jayanty, R.K.M.; Gay, B.W. Jr.

    1990-12-01

    A joint conference for the fifth straight year cosponsored by the Air and Waste Management Association's EM-3, EM-4, and ITF-2 technical committees, and the Atmospheric Research and Exposure Assessment Laboratory (AREAL) of the US Environmental Protection Agency, was held in Raleigh, North Carolina, May 1-4, 1990. The technical program consisted of 187 presentations, held in 20 technical sessions, on recent advances in the measurement and monitoring of toxic and related pollutants found in ambient and source atmospheres. Covering a wide range of measurement topics and supported by 66 exhibitors of instrumentation and consulting services, the symposium was attended by more than 850 professionals from the US and other countries. This overview highlights a selection of the technical presentations. A synopsis of the keynote address to the symposium is also included. Presentations include: (1) radon, (2) atmospheric chemistry and fate of toxic pollutants, (3) supercritical fluid extraction, (4) acidic deposition, (5) determination of polar and volatile organic pollutants in ambient air, (6) Delaware Superfund innovative technology evaluation (SITE) study, (7) mobile sources emissions characterization, (8) Superfund site air monitoring, (9) exposure assessment, (10) chemometrics and environmental data analysis, (11) nicotine in environmental tobacco smoke, (12) source monitoring, (13) effects of air toxics on plants, (14) measurement of volatile organic pollutants, (15) general, (16) air pollution dispersion modeling, (17) measurement of hazardous waste emissions, (18) measurement of indoor toxic air contaminants, and (19) environmental quality assurance.

  8. A CRITICAL ASSESSMENT OF ELEMENTAL MERCURY AIR/WATER EXCHANGE PARTNERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although evasion of elemental mercury from aquatic systems can significantly deplete net mercury accumulation resulting from atmospheric deposition, the current ability to model elemental mercury air/water exchange is limited by uncertainties in our understanding of all gaseous a...

  9. Air volume measurement of 'Braeburn' apple fruit.

    PubMed

    Drazeta, Lazar; Lang, Alexander; Hall, Alistair J; Volz, Richard K; Jameson, Paula E

    2004-05-01

    The radial disposition of air in the flesh of fruit of Malus domestica Borkh., cv 'Braeburn' was investigated using a gravimetric technique based on Archimedes' principle. Intercellular air volume was measured by weighing a small tissue sample under water before and after vacuum infiltration to remove the air. In a separate procedure, the volume of the same sample was measured by recording the buoyant upthrust experienced by it when fully immersed in water. The method underestimates tissue air volume due to a slight invasion of the intercellular air spaces around the edges of the sample when it is immersed in water. To correct for this error, an adjustment factor was made based upon an analysis of a series of measurements of air volume in samples of different dimensions. In 'Braeburn' there is a gradient of declining air content from just beneath the skin to the centre of the fruit with a sharp discontinuity at the core line. Cell shape and cell packing were observed in the surface layers of freshly excised and stained flesh samples using a dissecting microscope coupled to a video camera and a PC running proprietary software. Tissue organization changed with distance below the skin. It is speculated that reduced internal gas movement, due to the tightly packed tissue of 'Braeburn' and to the potential diffusion barrier at the core line between the cortex and the pith, may increase susceptibility of the flesh to disorders associated with tissue browning and breakdown. PMID:15047764

  10. Dry/wet performance of a plate-fin air-cooled heat exchanger with continuous corrugated fins

    SciTech Connect

    Hauser, S.G.; Kreid, D.K.; Johnson, B.M.

    1981-01-01

    The performance and operating characteristics of a plate-fin heat exchanger in dry/wet or deluge operations was experimentally determined. Development of the deluge heat/mass transfer model continued. The experiments were conducted in a specially-designed wind tunnel at the PNL. Air that was first heated and humidified to specified conditions was circulated at a controlled rate through a 2 ft x 6 ft heat exchanger module. The heat exchanger used in the tests was a wavy surface, plate fin on tube configuration. Hot water was circulated through the tubes at high flow rates to maintain an essentially isothermal condition on the tube side. Deionized water sprayed on the top of the vertically oriented plate fins was collected at the bottom of the core and recirculated. Instrumentation was provided for measurement of flow rates and thermodynamic conditions in the air, in the core circulation water, and in the deluge water. Measurements of the air side pressure drop and heat rejection rate were made as a function of air flow rate, air inlet temperature and humidity, deluge water flow rate, and the core inclination from the vertical. An overall heat transfer coefficient and an effective deluge film convective coefficient was determined. The deluge model, for predicting heat transfer from a wet finned heat exchanger was further developed and refined, and a major extension of the model was formulated that permits simultaneous calculation of both the heat transfer and evaporation rates from the wetted surface. The experiments showed an increase in the heat rejection rate due to wetting, accompanied by a proportional increase in the air side pressure drop. For operation at the same air side pressure drop, the enhancement ratio Q/sub w//Q/sub d/ varied between 2 and 5 for the conditions tested. Thus, the potential enhancement of heat transfer due to wetting can be substantial.

  11. Air-sea exchange fluxes of synthetic polycyclic musks in the North Sea and the Arctic.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zhiyong; Ebinghaus, Ralf; Temme, Christian; Heemken, Olaf; Ruck, Wolfgang

    2007-08-15

    Synthetic polycyclic musk fragrances Galaxolide (HHCB) and Tonalide (AHTN) were measured simultaneously in air and seawater in the Arctic and the North Sea and in the rural air of northern Germany. Median concentrations of gas-phase HHCB and AHTN were 4 and 18 pg m(-3) in the Arctic, 28 and 18 pg m(-3) in the North Sea, and 71 and 21 pg m(-3) in northern Germany, respectively. Various ratios of HHCB/AHTN implied that HHCB is quickly removed by atmospheric degradation, while AHTN is relatively persistent in the atmosphere. Dissolved concentrations ranged from 12 to 2030 pg L(-1) for HHCB and from below the method detection limit (3 pg L(-1)) to 965 pg L(-1) for AHTN with median values of 59 and 23 pg L(-1), respectively. The medians of volatilization fluxes for HHCB and AHTN were 27.2 and 14.2 ng m(-2) day(-1) and the depositional fluxes were 5.9 and 3.3 ng m(-2) day(-1), respectively, indicating water-to-air volatilization is a significant process to eliminate HHCB and AHTN from the North Sea. In the Arctic, deposition fluxes dominated the air-sea gas exchange of HHCB and AHTN, suggesting atmospheric input controls the levels of HHCB and AHTN in the polar region.

  12. THE EFFECT OF SALINITY ON RATES OF ELEMENTAL MERCURY AIR/WATER EXCHANGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. EPA laboratory in Athens, Georgia i spursuing the goal of developing a model for describing toxicant vapor phase air/water exchange under all relevant environmental conditions. To date, the two-layer exchange model (suitable for low wind speed conditions) has been modif...

  13. Pine needle holders for use in gas exchange measurements.

    PubMed

    Edwards, N T

    1989-12-01

    Simple holders for positioning pine needles in a gas exchange cuvette are described. The holders make it easy to enclose a standard length of needles in the cuvette in a single plane without mutual shading. The holders also make it possible, following gas exchange measurements, to harvest for further analysis just those needle portions that were enclosed in the leaf chamber. Field observations, which were made with a gas exchange cuvette incorporating the needle holders, on the relationship between carbon exchange rate and photon flux density in loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) needles are reported.

  14. Surfactant control of air-sea gas exchange across contrasting biogeochemical regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Ryan; Schneider-Zapp, Klaus; Upstill-Goddard, Robert

    2014-05-01

    Air-sea gas exchange is important to the global partitioning of CO2.Exchange fluxes are products of an air-sea gas concentration difference, ΔC, and a gas transfer velocity, kw. The latter is controlled by the rate of turbulent diffusion at the air-sea interface but it cannot be directly measured and has a high uncertainty that is now considered one of the greatest challenges to quantifying net global air-sea CO2 exchange ...(Takahashi et al., 2009). One important control on kw is exerted by sea surface surfactants that arise both naturally from biological processes and through anthropogenic activity. They influence gas exchange in two fundamental ways: as a monolayer physical barrier and through modifying sea surface hydrodynamics and hence turbulent energy transfer. These effects have been demonstrated in the laboratory with artificial surfactants ...(Bock et al., 1999; Goldman et al., 1988) and through purposeful surfactant releases in coastal waters .(.).........().(Brockmann et al., 1982) and in the open ocean (Salter et al., 2011). Suppression of kwin these field experiments was ~5-55%. While changes in both total surfactant concentration and the composition of the natural surfactant pool might be expected to impact kw, the required in-situ studies are lacking. New data collected from the coastal North Sea in 2012-2013 shows significant spatio-temporal variability in the surfactant activity of organic matter within the sea surface microlayer that ranges from 0.07-0.94 mg/L T-X-100 (AC voltammetry). The surfactant activities show a strong winter/summer seasonal bias and general decrease in concentration with increasing distance from the coastline possibly associated with changing terrestrial vs. phytoplankton sources. Gas exchange experiments of this seawater using a novel laboratory tank and gas tracers (CH4 and SF6) demonstrate a 12-45% reduction in kw compared to surfactant-free water. Seasonally there is higher gas exchange suppression in the summer

  15. Evaluation of a regional air-quality model with bidirectional NH3 exchange coupled to an agroecosystem model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bash, J. O.; Cooter, E. J.; Dennis, R. L.; Walker, J. T.; Pleim, J. E.

    2013-03-01

    Atmospheric ammonia (NH3) is the primary atmospheric base and an important precursor for inorganic particulate matter and when deposited NH3 contributes to surface water eutrophication, soil acidification and decline in species biodiversity. Flux measurements indicate that the air-surface exchange of NH3 is bidirectional. However, the effects of bidirectional exchange, soil biogeochemistry and human activity are not parameterized in air quality models. The US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Community Multiscale Air-Quality (CMAQ) model with bidirectional NH3 exchange has been coupled with the United States Department of Agriculture's (USDA) Environmental Policy Integrated Climate (EPIC) agroecosystem model. The coupled CMAQ-EPIC model relies on EPIC fertilization timing, rate and composition while CMAQ models the soil ammonium (NH4+) pool by conserving the ammonium mass due to fertilization, evasion, deposition, and nitrification processes. This mechanistically coupled modeling system reduced the biases and error in NHx (NH3 + NH4+) wet deposition and in ambient aerosol concentrations in an annual 2002 Continental US (CONUS) domain simulation when compared to a 2002 annual simulation of CMAQ without bidirectional exchange. Fertilizer emissions estimated in CMAQ 5.0 with bidirectional exchange exhibits markedly different seasonal dynamics than the US EPA's National Emissions Inventory (NEI), with lower emissions in the spring and fall and higher emissions in July.

  16. Impacts of air-sea exchange coefficients on snowfall events over the Korean Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Jung-Yoon; Kwon, Young Cheol

    2016-08-01

    Snowfall over the Korean Peninsula is mainly associated with air mass transformation by the fluxes across the air-sea interface during cold-air outbreaks over the warm Yellow Sea. The heat and momentum exchange coefficients in the surface flux parameterization are key parameters of flux calculations across the air-sea interface. This study investigates the effects of the air-sea exchange coefficients on the simulations of snowfall events over the Korean Peninsula using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. Two snowfall cases are selected for this study. One is a heavy snowfall event that took place on January 4, 2010, and the other is a light snowfall event that occurred on December 23-24, 2011. Several sensitivity tests are carried out with increased and decreased heat and momentum exchange coefficients. The domain-averaged precipitation is increased (decreased) with increased (decreased) heat exchange coefficient because the increased (decreased) surface heat flux leads to more (less) moist conditions in the low level of the atmosphere. On the other hand, the domain-averaged precipitation is decreased (increased) with increased (decreased) momentum exchange coefficient because the increased (decreased) momentum coefficient causes reduction (increase) of wind speed and heat flux. The variation of precipitation in the heat exchange coefficient experiments is much larger than that in the momentum exchange coefficient experiments because the change of heat flux has a more direct impact on moisture flux and snowfall amount, while the change of momentum flux has a rather indirect impact via wind speed changes. The low-pressure system is intensified and moves toward North when the heat exchange coefficient is increased because warming and moistening of the lower atmosphere contributes to destabilize the air mass, resulting in the change of precipitation pattern over the Korean Peninsula in the heat exchange coefficient experiments.

  17. 1991 EPA/AWMA international symposium on measurement of toxic and related air pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Gay, B.W. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this symposium was to provide a forum for exchange of information on the measurement of toxic and related air pollutants. The conference included presentations on the following: ozone precursors; atmospheric chemistry and fate of toxic pollutants; measurement of particulates and acidic aerosols; cloud water chemistry; asbestos exposure assessment; Staten Island/NJ Urban Air Toxics Assessment Project; personal exposure monitors; mobile sources emissions characterization; VOC monitoring for Clean Air Act Amendment requirement; product emission measurement in test chambers; USA/USSR joint air pollution study; VOC monitoring techniques; measurement of VOCs; measurement of polar volatile organics; exposure assessment; remote sensing for emissions monitoring; measurement methods development; measurement of hazardous waste emissions; chemometrics and environmental data analysis; source monitoring; air pollution dispersion modeling; measurement and data analysis of indoor toxic air contaminants; and environmental quality assurance. Two hundred seventeen papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the appropriate data bases.

  18. Scaling leaf measurements to estimate cotton canopy gas exchange

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diurnal leaf and canopy gas exchange of well watered field grown cotton were measured. Leaf measurements were made with a portable photosynthesis system and canopy measurements with open Canopy Evapo-Transpiration and Assimilation (CETA) systems. Leaf level measurements were arithmetically scaled to...

  19. Processes of Ammonia Air-Surface Exchange in a Fertilized Zea Mays Canopy

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent incorporation of coupled soil biogeochemical and bi-directional NH3 air-surface exchange algorithms into regional air quality models holds promise for further reducing uncertainty in estimates of NH3 emissions from fertilized soils. While this advancement represents a sig...

  20. Measurement of formaldehyde in clean air

    SciTech Connect

    Neitzert, V.; Seiler, W.

    1981-01-01

    A method for the measurement of small amounts of formaldehyde in air has been developed. The method is based on the derivatization of HCHO with 2.4-Denetrophenylhydragine, forming 2.4-Dentrophylhydragine, measured with GC-ECD-technique. HCHO is preconcentrated using a cryogenic sampling technique. The detection limit is 0.05 ppbv for a sampling volume of 200 liter. The method has been applied for measurements in continental and marine air masses showing HCHO mixing ratios of 0.4--5.0 ppbv and 0.2--1.0 ppbv, respectively. HCHO mixing ratios show diurnal variations with maximum values during the early afternoon and minimum values during the early morning. In continental air, HCHO mixing ratios are positively correlated with CO and SO/sub 2/, indicating anthropogenic HCHO sources which are estimated to be 6--11 x 10/sup 12/g/year/sup -1/ on a global scale.

  1. Balloons and Bottles: Activities on Air-Sea Heat Exchange.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphree, Tom

    1998-01-01

    Presents an activity designed to demonstrate how heating and cooling an air mass affects its temperature, volume, density, and pressure. Illustrates how thermal energy can cause atmospheric motion such as expansion, contraction, and winds. (Author/WRM)

  2. Measuring Air Density in the Introductory Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calza, G.; Gratton, L. M.; Lopez-Arias, T.; Oss, S.

    2010-01-01

    The measurement of the mass, or the density, of air can easily be done with very simple materials and offers many interesting phenomena for discussion--buoyancy and its effects being the most obvious but not the only one. Many interesting considerations can be done regarding the behavior of gases, the effect of the external conditions in the…

  3. Measure Guideline: Guide to Attic Air Sealing

    SciTech Connect

    Lstiburek, J.

    2014-09-01

    The Guide to Attic Air Sealing was completed in 2010 and although not in the standard Measure Guideline format, is intended to be a Measure Guideline on Attic Air Sealing. The guide was reviewed during two industry stakeholders meetings held on December 18th, 2009 and January 15th, 2010, and modified based on the comments received. Please do not make comments on the Building America format of this document. The purpose of the Guide to Attic Air Sealing is to provide information and recommendations for the preparation work necessary prior to adding attic insulation. Even though the purpose of this guide is to save energy - health, safety and durability should not be compromised by energy efficiency. Accordingly, combustion safety and ventilation for indoor air quality are addressed first. Durability and attic ventilation then follow. Finally, to maximize energy savings, air sealing is completed prior to insulating. The guide is intended for home remodelers, builders, insulation contractors, mechanical contractors, general contractors who have previously done remodeling and homeowners as a guide to the work that needs to be done.

  4. Review of air flow measurement techniques

    SciTech Connect

    McWilliams, Jennifer

    2002-12-01

    Airflow measurement techniques are necessary to determine the most basic of indoor air quality questions: ''Is there enough fresh air to provide a healthy environment for the occupants of the building?'' This paper outlines airflow measurement techniques, but it does not make recommendations for techniques that should be used. The airflows that will be discussed are those within a room or zone, those between rooms or zones, such as through doorways (open or closed) or passive vents, those between the building and outdoors, and those through mechanical air distribution systems. Techniques that are highlighted include particle streak velocimetry, hot wire anemometry, fan pressurization (measuring flow at a given pressure), tracer gas, acoustic methods for leak size determination, the Delta Q test to determine duct leakage flows, and flow hood measurements. Because tracer gas techniques are widely used to measure airflow, this topic is broken down into sections as follows: decay, pulse injection, constant injection, constant concentration, passive sampling, and single and multiple gas measurements for multiple zones.

  5. MONITORING CYCLICAL AIR-WATER ELEMENTAL MERCURY EXCHANGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previous experimental work has demonstrated that elemental mercury evasion from natural water displays a diel cycle; evasion rates during the day can be two to three times evasion rates observed at night. A study with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBS) found that diurnal PCB air/wa...

  6. Measure Guideline: Guide to Attic Air Sealing

    SciTech Connect

    Lstiburek, Joseph

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this measure guideline is to provide information and recommendations for the preparation work necessary prior to adding attic insulation. Even though the purpose of this guide is to save energy, health, safety, and durability should not be compromised by energy efficiency. Accordingly, combustion safety and ventilation for indoor air quality are addressed first. Durability and attic ventilation then follow. Finally, to maximize energy savings, air sealing is completed prior to insulating. The guide is intended for home remodelers, builders, insulation contractors, mechanical contractors, general contractors who have previously done remodeling and homeowners as a guide to the work that needs to be done.

  7. 40 CFR 91.310 - Engine intake air humidity measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... with intake air other than the ambient air in the test cell (i.e., air which has been pumbed directly to the engine air intake system). For engines which use ambient test cell air for the engine intake... the humidity conditioning has taken place. (b) Unconditioned air supply. Humidity measurements...

  8. 40 CFR 90.310 - Engine intake air humidity measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... engines which are supplied with intake air other than the ambient air in the test cell (i.e., air which has been pumped directly to the engine air intake system). For engines which use ambient test cell air for the engine intake air, the ambient test cell humidity measurement may be used. (a)...

  9. 40 CFR 91.310 - Engine intake air humidity measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... with intake air other than the ambient air in the test cell (i.e., air which has been pumbed directly to the engine air intake system). For engines which use ambient test cell air for the engine intake... the humidity conditioning has taken place. (b) Unconditioned air supply. Humidity measurements...

  10. 40 CFR 90.310 - Engine intake air humidity measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... engines which are supplied with intake air other than the ambient air in the test cell (i.e., air which has been pumped directly to the engine air intake system). For engines which use ambient test cell air for the engine intake air, the ambient test cell humidity measurement may be used. (a)...

  11. 40 CFR 91.416 - Intake air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Intake air flow measurement... Procedures § 91.416 Intake air flow measurement specifications. (a) If used, the engine intake air flow measurement method used must have a range large enough to accurately measure the air flow over the...

  12. 40 CFR 89.414 - Air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Air flow measurement specifications... Emission Test Procedures § 89.414 Air flow measurement specifications. (a) The air flow measurement method used must have a range large enough to accurately measure the air flow over the engine operating...

  13. 40 CFR 89.414 - Air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Air flow measurement specifications. 89... Test Procedures § 89.414 Air flow measurement specifications. (a) The air flow measurement method used must have a range large enough to accurately measure the air flow over the engine operating...

  14. 40 CFR 91.416 - Intake air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Intake air flow measurement... Procedures § 91.416 Intake air flow measurement specifications. (a) If used, the engine intake air flow measurement method used must have a range large enough to accurately measure the air flow over the...

  15. 40 CFR 89.414 - Air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Air flow measurement specifications... Emission Test Procedures § 89.414 Air flow measurement specifications. (a) The air flow measurement method used must have a range large enough to accurately measure the air flow over the engine operating...

  16. 40 CFR 91.416 - Intake air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Intake air flow measurement... Procedures § 91.416 Intake air flow measurement specifications. (a) If used, the engine intake air flow measurement method used must have a range large enough to accurately measure the air flow over the...

  17. 40 CFR 91.416 - Intake air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Intake air flow measurement... Procedures § 91.416 Intake air flow measurement specifications. (a) If used, the engine intake air flow measurement method used must have a range large enough to accurately measure the air flow over the...

  18. Air-sea exchange of carbon dioxide in the Southern Ocean and Antarctic marginal ice zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butterworth, Brian J.; Miller, Scott D.

    2016-07-01

    Direct carbon dioxide flux measurements using eddy covariance from an icebreaker in the high-latitude Southern Ocean and Antarctic marginal ice zone are reported. Fluxes were combined with the measured water-air carbon dioxide partial pressure difference (ΔpCO2) to compute the air-sea gas transfer velocity (k, normalized to Schmidt number 660). The open water data showed a quadratic relationship between k (cm h-1) and the neutral 10 m wind speed (U10n, m s-1), kopen = 0.245 U10n2 + 1.3, in close agreement with decades old tracer-based results and much lower than cubic relationships inferred from previous open ocean eddy covariance studies. In the marginal ice zone, the effective gas transfer velocity decreased in proportion to sea ice cover, in contrast with predictions of enhanced gas exchange in the presence of sea ice. The combined open water and marginal ice zone results affect the calculated magnitude and spatial distribution of Southern Ocean carbon flux.

  19. [Transfer of organisms during exchange of heat and moisture in air conditioning installations (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Beckert, J; Sinner, G

    1975-07-01

    With the exhaust air from ventilation and air conditioning installations escaping into the open, the heat content is also lost which fresh air from outside obtains at considerable expense of energy and technical equipment. The heat content, on the other hand, consists of about equal proportions of sensible heat and latent heat which is associated with the moisture content of the air. In order to regain the heat content of the escaping air so as to be able to use it again - and this is becoming increasingly important with rising energy costs - heat exchangers are necessary which remove the heat content from the exhaust air and transfer it to the fresh air from outside. With the high proportion of latent heat, this energy exchange is only effective if the latent heat can also be regained. For this purpose it is essential to have exchange surfaces which store and transfer both heat and moisture. To achieve this they must come into contact with the exhaust air stream and the fresh air stream alternately. Technically, this is done in a simple way by resolving rotor-like storage material. But a rigid separation of the air streams is no longer possible. Even if it is known that there are very highly developed sealing elements between the fixed and moving parts, the question whether particles from the exhaust air can get into the newly introduced outside air through the rotating storage material still gains in importance in certain types of usuage. For example, this is of importance for hospitals, especially in the operation areas in which air conditioning is desirable for 24 hours daily on hygienic grounds, but also in schools and offices where the present normal practice, for economic reasons, of recirculating air is to be avoided to stop the transference of infections pathogens and odours. In various places, experiments have been carried out earlier with heat exchangers consisting of asbestos board and with rotating storage material coated with lithium chloride and a

  20. Amine Measurements in Boreal Forest Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemmilä, Marja; Hellén, Heidi; Makkonen, Ulla; Hakola, Hannele

    2015-04-01

    Amines are reactive, volatile bases in the air with a general formula of RNH2, R2NH or R3N. Especially small amines can stabilize sulphuric acid clusters and hence affect nucleation. Amines react rapidly with hydroxyl radical (OH˙) thus affecting oxidative capacity of the atmosphere. The amine concentrations are higher in forest air than in urban air (Hellén et al., 2014), but the sources are not known. In order to get more information concerning amine sources, we conducted a measurement campaign in a boreal forest. At SMEAR II station at Hyytiälä, Southern Finland (61°510'N, 24°170'E, 180 m a.s.l.) The measurements cover seven months, from June to December 2014. For sampling and measuring we used MARGA (The instrument for Measuring AeRosols and Gases in Ambient air) which is an on-line ion chromatograph (IC) connected to a sampling system. The IC component of the MARGA system was coupled to an electrospray ionization quadrupole mass spectrometer (MS) to improve sensitivity of amine measurements. This new set-up enabled amine concentration measurements in ambient air both in aerosol and gas phases with a time resolution of only 1 hour. With MARGA-MS we analysed 7 different amines: monomethylamine (MMA), dimethylamine (DMA), trimethylamine (TMA), ethylamine (EA), diethylamine (DEA), propylamine (PA) and butylamine (BA). In preliminary data-analysis we found out, that in June and July most of the measured amines were in gas phase, and particle phase amine concentrations were mostly under detection limits (<1.7 pptv). In June the gaseous amine concentrations were higher than in July. The measured concentrations of gaseous amines followed temperature variation, which could indicate that amines are produced and emitted from the environment or re-emitted from the surfaces as temperature rises after deposition during night-time. All measured amines had similar diurnal variation with maxima during afternoon and minima during night. Results from other months will also

  1. Experiments probing the influence of air exchange rates on secondary organic aerosols derived from indoor chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weschler, Charles J.; Shields, Helen C.

    Reactions between ozone and terpenes have been shown to increase the concentrations of submicron particles in indoor settings. The present study was designed to examine the influence of air exchange rates on the concentrations of these secondary organic aerosols as well as on the evolution of their particle size distributions. The experiments were performed in a manipulated office setting containing a constant source of d-limonene and an ozone generator that was remotely turned "on" or "off" at 6 h intervals. The particle number concentrations were monitored using an optical particle counter with eight-channels ranging from 0.1-0.2 to>2.0 μm diameter. The air exchange rates during the experiments were either high (working hours) or low (non-working hours) and ranged from 1.6 to>12 h -1, with intermediate exchange rates. Given the emission rates of ozone and d-limonene used in these studies, at an air exchange rate of 1.6 h -1 particle number concentration in the 0.1-0.2 μm size-range peaked 1.2 h after the ozone generator was switched on. In the ensuing 4.8 h particle counts increased in successive size-ranges up to the 0.5-0.7 μm diameter range. At higher air exchange rates, the resulting concentrations of total particles and particle mass (calculated from particle counts) were smaller, and at exchange rates exceeding 12 h -1, no excess particle formation was detectable with the instrument used in this study. Particle size evolved through accretion and, in some cases, coagulation. There was evidence for coagulation among particles in the smallest size-range at low air exchange rates (high particle concentrations) but no evidence of coagulation was apparent at higher air exchange rates (lower particle concentrations). At higher air exchange rates the particle count or size distributions were shifted towards smaller particle diameters and less time was required to achieve the maximum concentration in each of the size-ranges where discernable particle growth

  2. Direct Measurements of the Surface-Atmosphere Exchange of Ammonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tevlin, A.; Murphy, J. G.; Wentworth, G.; Gregoire, P.

    2012-12-01

    As the dominant atmospheric base, ammonia plays an important role in the formation and growth of inorganic aerosols. Surface-atmosphere exchange of ammonia has been observed to occur as a bidirectional flux governed by the relative magnitudes of atmospheric gas phase concentration and a temperature-dependent surface compensation point. In order to better characterise the links between gas-particle and surface-atmosphere exchanges, more direct measurements of these exchanges are necessary. Eddy Covariance (EC) can provide the most direct surface-atmosphere flux measurements, but its requirement for high frequency data combined with the reactive nature of ammonia have limited its application for this species. In order to address this lack, an investigation into the instrumental sensitivity and time response requirements for EC ammonia flux measurements was carried out using a Quantum Cascade-Tunable Infrared Laser Differential Absorption Spectrometer (QC-TILDAS) capable of measuring ammonia concentration at 10 Hz. Time response was additionally improved through the use of a heated sample line and custom glass inlet, and the system was deployed over a short grass field in rural Ontario. The ammonia measurements were used along with three dimensional sonic anemometer wind speed data to calculate EC ammonia fluxes. When combined with simultaneous measurements of the inorganic composition of gas and particle phases made by Ambient Ion Monitor - Ion Chromatography (AIM-IC), these flux measurements can provide insight into the links between gas-particle and surface-atmosphere exchange.

  3. Use of cooling air heat exchangers as replacements for hot section strategic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gauntner, J. W.

    1983-01-01

    Because of financial and political constraints, strategic aerospace materials required for the hot section of future engines might be in short supply. As an alternative to these strategic materials, this study examines the use of a cooling air heat exchanger in combination with less advanced hot section materials. Cycle calculations are presented for future turbofan systems with overall pressure ratios to 65, bypass ratios near 13, and combustor exit temperatures to 3260 R. These calculations quantify the effect on TSFC of using a decreased materials technology in a turbofan system. The calculations show that the cooling air heat exchanger enables the feasibility of these engines.

  4. Subterranean heat exchanger for refrigeration air conditioning equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Rothwell, H.

    1980-09-30

    Heat exchanger apparatus for use with refrigeration cycle heating and cooling equipment is disclosed. In the preferred embodiment, it cooperates with and modifies refrigeration equipment including a compressor, an expansion valve, an evaporator coil and a closed loop for cycling refrigerant. This apparatus is a sealed container adapted to be placed in a well extending into artesian (Relatively heated or chilled) formations whereby the water of the formation stabilizes the temperature around the unit and enables heating and cooling. The sealed unit receives refrigerant from the top which flows along the sidewall at a reduced temperature, thereby condensing on the sidewall and trickling down the sidewall to collect in a sump at the bottom where the compressor pump picks up condensed refrigerant as a liquid and pumps it out of the artesian well to the connected refrigeration equipment.

  5. Exposure measurement for air-pollution epidemiology

    SciTech Connect

    Ferris, B.G.; Ware, J.H.; Spengler, J.D.

    1988-08-01

    The chapter describes the evolution of air-pollution epidemiology over a period when changes in pollution technologies have both lowered total exposures and dispersed them over vastly greater areas. Since personal exposure and microenvironmental measurements are expensive, studies oriented toward measurements of total exposure will be smaller and more intensive. The shift in emphasis to total human exposure also will affect health risk assessment and raise difficult issues in the regulatory domain. Considering that outdoor exposures (for which EPA has a regulatory mandate) occur in the context of exposures from other sources, the potential effect of regulatory action would probably be small. The regulatory issues are even more difficult for particulate air pollution since cigarette smoking is the strongest determinant of indoor levels but the EPA lacks regulatory responsibility for cigarette smoke.

  6. Experimental evaluation of dry/wet air-cooled heat exchangers. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Hauser, S.G.; Gruel, R.L.; Huenefeld, J.C.; Eschbach, E.J.; Johnson, B.M.; Kreid, D.K.

    1982-08-01

    The ultimate goal of this project was to contribute to the development of improved cooling facilities for power plants. Specifically, the objective during FY-81 was to experimentally determine the thermal performance and operating characteristics of an air-cooled heat exchanger surface manufactured by the Unifin Company. The performance of the spiral-wound finned tube surface (Unifin) was compared with two inherently different platefin surfaces (one developed by the Trane Co. and the other developed by the HOETERV Institute) which were previously tested as a part of the same continuing program. Under dry operation the heat transfer per unit frontal area per unit inlet temperature difference (ITD) of the Unifin surface was 10% to 20% below that of the other two surfaces at low fan power levels. At high fan power levels, the performances of the Unifin and Trane surfaces were essentially the same, and 25% higher than the HOETERV surface. The design of the Unifin surface caused a significantly larger air-side pressure drop through the heat exchanger both in dry and deluge operation. Generally higher overall heat transfer coefficients were calculated for the Unifin surface under deluged operation. They ranged from 2.0 to 3.5 Btu/hr-ft/sup 2/-/sup 0/F as compared to less than 2.0 Btu hr-ft/sup 2/-/sup 0/F for the Trane and HOETERV surfaces under similar conditions. The heat transfer enhancement due to the evaporative cooling effect was also measureably higher with the Unifin surface as compared to the Trane surface. This can be primarily attributed to the better wetting characteristics of the Unifin surface. If the thermal performance of the surfaces are compared at equal face velocities, the Unifin surface is as much as 35% better. This method of comparison accounts for the wetting characteristics while neglecting the effect of pressure drop. Alternatively the surfaces when compared at equal pressure drop essentially the same thermal performance.

  7. 40 CFR 91.309 - Engine intake air temperature measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Engine intake air temperature... Provisions § 91.309 Engine intake air temperature measurement. (a) Engine intake air temperature measurement... the supply system or in the air stream entering the engine. (b) The temperature measurements must...

  8. 40 CFR 91.309 - Engine intake air temperature measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Engine intake air temperature... Provisions § 91.309 Engine intake air temperature measurement. (a) Engine intake air temperature measurement... the supply system or in the air stream entering the engine. (b) The temperature measurements must...

  9. 40 CFR 91.309 - Engine intake air temperature measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Engine intake air temperature... Provisions § 91.309 Engine intake air temperature measurement. (a) Engine intake air temperature measurement... the supply system or in the air stream entering the engine. (b) The temperature measurements must...

  10. 40 CFR 91.309 - Engine intake air temperature measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Engine intake air temperature... Provisions § 91.309 Engine intake air temperature measurement. (a) Engine intake air temperature measurement... the supply system or in the air stream entering the engine. (b) The temperature measurements must...

  11. 40 CFR 91.309 - Engine intake air temperature measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Engine intake air temperature... Provisions § 91.309 Engine intake air temperature measurement. (a) Engine intake air temperature measurement... the supply system or in the air stream entering the engine. (b) The temperature measurements must...

  12. 40 CFR 89.414 - Air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Air flow measurement specifications. 89.414 Section 89.414 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Emission Test Procedures § 89.414 Air flow measurement specifications. (a) The air flow measurement...

  13. 40 CFR 91.310 - Engine intake air humidity measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Engine intake air humidity measurement... Provisions § 91.310 Engine intake air humidity measurement. This section refers to engines which are supplied... air, the ambient testcell humidity measurement may be used. (a) Humidity conditioned air supply....

  14. 40 CFR 91.310 - Engine intake air humidity measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Engine intake air humidity measurement... Provisions § 91.310 Engine intake air humidity measurement. This section refers to engines which are supplied... air, the ambient testcell humidity measurement may be used. (a) Humidity conditioned air supply....

  15. 40 CFR 91.310 - Engine intake air humidity measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Engine intake air humidity measurement... Provisions § 91.310 Engine intake air humidity measurement. This section refers to engines which are supplied... air, the ambient testcell humidity measurement may be used. (a) Humidity conditioned air supply....

  16. Measurement of frost characteristics on heat exchanger fins. Part 1: Test facility and instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, L.; Chen, H.; Besant, R.W.

    1999-07-01

    A special test facility was developed to characterize frost growing on heat exchanger fins where the cold surfaces and the air supply conditions were similar to those experienced in freezers, i.e., cold surface temperatures ranging from {minus}35 C to {minus}40 C, air supply temperatures from {minus}10 C to {minus}20 C, and 80% to 100% relative humidity (RH). This test facility included a test section with removable fins to measure the frost height and mass concentration. Frost height on heat exchanger fins was measured using a new automated laser scanning system to measure the height of frost and its distribution on selected fins. The increase in air pressure loss resulting from frost growth on the fins was measured directly in the test loop. The frost mass accumulation distribution was measured for each test using special pre-etched fins that could be easily subdivided and weighed. The total heat rate was measured using a heat flux meter. These frost-measuring instruments were calibrated and the uncertainty of each is stated.

  17. Gas exchange rates across the sediment-water and air-water interfaces in south San Francisco Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hartman, Blayne; Hammond, Douglas E.

    1984-01-01

    Radon 222 concentrations in the water and sedimentary columns and radon exchange rates across the sediment-water and air-water interfaces have been measured in a section of south San Francisco Bay. Two independent methods have been used to determine sediment-water exchange rates, and the annual averages of these methods agree within the uncertainty of the determinations, about 20%. The annual average of benthic fluxes from shoal areas is nearly a factor of 2 greater than fluxes from the channel areas. Fluxes from the shoal and channel areas exceed those expected from simple molecular diffusion by factors of 4 and 2, respectively, apparently due to macrofaunal irrigation. Values of the gas transfer coefficient for radon exchange across the air-water interface were determined by constructing a radon mass balance for the water column and by direct measurement using floating chambers. The chamber method appears to yield results which are too high. Transfer coefficients computed using the mass balance method range from 0.4 m/day to 1.8 m/day, with a 6-year average of 1.0 m/day. Gas exchange is linearly dependent upon wind speed over a wind speed range of 3.2–6.4 m/s, but shows no dependence upon current velocity. Gas transfer coefficients predicted from an empirical relationship between gas exchange rates and wind speed observed in lakes and the oceans are within 30% of the coefficients determined from the radon mass balance and are considerably more accurate than coefficients predicted from theoretical gas exchange models.

  18. Radon exchange dynamics in a karst system investigated by radon continuous measurements in water: first results.

    PubMed

    Peano, G; Vigna, B; Villavecchia, E; Agnesod, G

    2011-05-01

    In 2008 the underground Karst Laboratory of Bossea Cave started research on radon exchange dynamics between bedrock, cave waters (main collector and percolations) and indoor underground atmosphere. Radon air concentrations, normally high, increase more and more during the collector's floods. An explanation of this is a radon-water solubilisation process more effective in flood events, because of a greater rock-water contact surface. Radon is then carried by water into the cave and released into the air. To verify this, continuous measurements of radon concentration are needed not only in the air, but also in the waters of the cave. So a new device for continuous radon monitoring in water was tested, connected to the AlphaGuard radon monitor. For the first 6 months of 2010, for different sections of the cave, the correlations between radon in the air, radon in the waters and the collector's stream flow fluctuations were presented and discussed. PMID:21586541

  19. DOGEE-SOLAS: The Role of Surfactants in Air-Sea Gas Exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salter, M. E.; Upstill-Goddard, R. C.; Nightingale, P.

    2008-12-01

    One of the major aims of DOGEE-SOLAS was to improve our understanding of the role of surfactants in air- sea gas exchange. With this in mind we carried out a number of artificial surfactant releases on a research cruise in the North Atlantic (D320), during June-July of 2007. We used oleyl alcohol, a surrogate for natural surfactants which is relatively cheap and easy to obtain (it is used in the manufacture of cosmetics). The main release overlaid a dual tracer "patch" of SF6 and 3He; our aim was to directly compare values of the gas transfer velocity, kw, estimated within the surfactant covered patch with those estimated quasi- simultaneously in a second, surfactant-free patch about 20km away. A second release in conjunction with colleagues from the University of Hawaii had the aim of measuring DMS fluxes by eddy correlation both inside and outside a surfactant slick, and a third was undertaken in the path of one of two 14m ASIS (Air-Sea Interaction Spar) buoys operated by the University of Miami for direct comparison of surfactant effects on the fluxes of CO2, H2O, heat and momentum (eddy correlation) etc. We present here some preliminary findings from the work.

  20. Wind driven vertical transport in a vegetated, wetland water column with air-water gas exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poindexter, C.; Variano, E. A.

    2010-12-01

    Flow around arrays of cylinders at low and intermediate Reynolds numbers has been studied numerically, analytically and experimentally. Early results demonstrated that at flow around randomly oriented cylinders exhibits reduced turbulent length scales and reduced diffusivity when compared to similarly forced, unimpeded flows (Nepf 1999). While horizontal dispersion in flows through cylinder arrays has received considerable research attention, the case of vertical dispersion of reactive constituents has not. This case is relevant to the vertical transfer of dissolved gases in wetlands with emergent vegetation. We present results showing that the presence of vegetation can significantly enhance vertical transport, including gas transfer across the air-water interface. Specifically, we study a wind-sheared air-water interface in which randomly arrayed cylinders represent emergent vegetation. Wind is one of several processes that may govern physical dispersion of dissolved gases in wetlands. Wind represents the dominant force for gas transfer across the air-water interface in the ocean. Empirical relationships between wind and the gas transfer coefficient, k, have been used to estimate spatial variability of CO2 exchange across the worlds’ oceans. Because wetlands with emergent vegetation are different from oceans, different model of wind effects is needed. We investigated the vertical transport of dissolved oxygen in a scaled wetland model built inside a laboratory tank equipped with an open-ended wind tunnel. Plastic tubing immersed in water to a depth of approximately 40 cm represented emergent vegetation of cylindrical form such as hard-stem bulrush (Schoenoplectus acutus). After partially removing the oxygen from the tank water via reaction with sodium sulfite, we used an optical probe to measure dissolved oxygen at mid-depth as the tank water re-equilibrated with the air above. We used dissolved oxygen time-series for a range of mean wind speeds to estimate the

  1. Measurement of air entrainment in plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fincke, J. R.; Rodriquez, R.; Pentecost, C. G.

    The concentration and temperature of air entrained into argon and helium plasma jets has been measured using coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS). The argon plasma flow field is characterized by a short region of well behaved laminar flow near the nozzle exit followed by an abrupt transition to turbulence. Once the transition of turbulence occurs, air is rapidly mixed into the jet core. The location of the transition region is determined by the rapid cooling of the jet and the resulting increase in Reynolds number. In contrast, the helium plasma flow field never exceeds a Reynolds number of 200 and remains laminar. The entrainment process in this case is controlled by molecular diffusion rather than turbulent mixing.

  2. Measurement of air entrainment in plasma jets

    SciTech Connect

    Fincke, J.R.; Rodriquez, R.; Pentecost, C.G.

    1990-01-01

    The concentration and temperature of air entrained into argon and helium plasma jets has been measured using coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS). The argon plasma flow field is characterized by a short region of well behaved laminar flow near the nozzle exit followed by an abrupt transition to turbulence. Once the transition of turbulence occurs, air is rapidly mixed into the jet core. The location of the transition region is determined by the rapid cooling of the jet and the resulting increase in Reynolds number. In contrast, the helium plasma flow field never exceeds a Reynolds number of 200 and remains laminar. The entrainment process in this case is controlled by molecular diffusion rather than turbulent mixing. 9 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Carbon cycle: A hump in ocean-air exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, Christopher M.

    2016-06-01

    Semivolatile organic compounds from fossil fuels or incomplete combustion are ubiquitous. A suite of circumglobal measurements of their oceanic and atmospheric concentrations reveals large carbon fluxes through the deposition of these compounds.

  4. Effects of Climate Change on residential indoor-outdoor Air Exchange

    EPA Science Inventory

    INTRODUCTION: Climate change is expected to increase the mean and peak ambient temperatures, and perhaps wind patterns and intensity, while indoor environments will remain within the range of human thermal comfort. As passive air exchange through infiltration is partly driven by ...

  5. Gaseous exchange of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons across the air-water interface of lower Chesapeake Bay

    SciTech Connect

    Gustafson, K.E.; Dickhut, R.M.

    1995-12-31

    The gaseous exchange fluxes of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) across the air-water interface of lower Chesapeake Bay were determined using a modified two-film exchange model. Sampling covered the period January 1994 to June 1995 for five sites on lower Chesapeake Bay ranging from rural to urban and highly industrialized. Simultaneous air and water samples were collected and the atmospheric gas phase and water column dissolved phase analyzed via GC/MS for 17 PAHs. The direction and magnitude of flux for each PAH was calculated using Henry`s law constants, hydrological and meteorological parameters, Temperature was observed to be an important environmental factor in determining both the direction and magnitude of PAH gas exchange. Nonetheless, wind speed significantly impacts mass transfer coefficients, and therefore was found to control the magnitude of flux. Spatial and temporal variation of PAH gaseous exchange fluxes were examined. Fluxes were determined to be both into and out of Chesapeake Bay. The range of gas exchange fluxes ({minus}560 to 600{micro}g/M{sup 2}*Mo) is of the same order to 10X greater than atmospheric wet and dry depositional fluxes to lower Chesapeake Bay. The results of this study support the hypothesis that gas exchange is a major transport process affecting the net loadings of PAHs in lower Chesapeake Bay.

  6. 40 CFR 92.108 - Intake and cooling air measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... recommended practice J244 (incorporated by reference at § 92.5) are allowed. (b) Humidity and temperature measurements. (1) Air that has had its absolute humidity altered is considered humidity-conditioned air. For this type of intake air supply, the humidity measurements must be made within the intake air...

  7. 40 CFR 92.108 - Intake and cooling air measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... practice J244 (incorporated by reference at § 92.5) are allowed. (b) Humidity and temperature measurements. (1) Air that has had its absolute humidity altered is considered humidity-conditioned air. For this type of intake air supply, the humidity measurements must be made within the intake air supply...

  8. 40 CFR 92.108 - Intake and cooling air measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... recommended practice J244 (incorporated by reference at § 92.5) are allowed. (b) Humidity and temperature measurements. (1) Air that has had its absolute humidity altered is considered humidity-conditioned air. For this type of intake air supply, the humidity measurements must be made within the intake air...

  9. 40 CFR 92.108 - Intake and cooling air measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... recommended practice J244 (incorporated by reference at § 92.5) are allowed. (b) Humidity and temperature measurements. (1) Air that has had its absolute humidity altered is considered humidity-conditioned air. For this type of intake air supply, the humidity measurements must be made within the intake air...

  10. Effects of air current speed on gas exchange in plant leaves and plant canopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitaya, Y.; Tsuruyama, J.; Shibuya, T.; Yoshida, M.; Kiyota, M.

    To obtain basic data on adequate air circulation to enhance plant growth in a closed plant culture system in a controlled ecological life support system (CELSS), an investigation was made of the effects of the air current speed ranging from 0.01 to 1.0 m s-1 on photosynthesis and transpiration in sweetpotato leaves and photosynthesis in tomato seedlings canopies. The gas exchange rates in leaves and canopies were determined by using a chamber method with an infrared gas analyzer. The net photosynthetic rate and the transpiration rate increased significantly as the air current speeds increased from 0.01 to 0.2 m s-1. The transpiration rate increased gradually at air current speeds ranging from 0.2 to 1.0 m s-1 while the net photosynthetic rate was almost constant at air current speeds ranging from 0.5 to 1.0 m s-1. The increase in the net photosynthetic and transpiration rates were strongly dependent on decreased boundary-layer resistances against gas diffusion. The net photosynthetic rate of the plant canopy was doubled by an increased air current speed from 0.1 to 1.0 m s-1 above the plant canopy. The results demonstrate the importance of air movement around plants for enhancing the gas exchange in the leaf, especially in plant canopies in the CELSS.

  11. 40 CFR 90.416 - Intake air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Intake air flow measurement... Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 90.416 Intake air flow measurement specifications. (a) If used, the engine intake air flow measurement method used must have a range large enough to accurately measure...

  12. 40 CFR 90.416 - Intake air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Intake air flow measurement... Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 90.416 Intake air flow measurement specifications. (a) If used, the engine intake air flow measurement method used must have a range large enough to accurately measure...

  13. 40 CFR 90.416 - Intake air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Intake air flow measurement... Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 90.416 Intake air flow measurement specifications. (a) If used, the engine intake air flow measurement method used must have a range large enough to accurately measure...

  14. 40 CFR 90.416 - Intake air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Intake air flow measurement... Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 90.416 Intake air flow measurement specifications. (a) If used, the engine intake air flow measurement method used must have a range large enough to accurately measure...

  15. Waking the sleeping giant: Introducing new heat exchanger technology into the residential air-conditioning marketplace

    SciTech Connect

    Chapp, T.; Voss, M.; Stephens, C.

    1998-07-01

    The Air Conditioning Industry has made tremendous strides in improvements to the energy efficiency and reliability of its product offerings over the past 40 years. These improvement can be attributed to enhancements of components, optimization of the energy cycle, and modernized and refined manufacturing techniques. During this same period, energy consumption for space cooling has grown significantly. In January of 1992, the minimum efficiency requirement for central air conditioning equipment was raised to 10 SEER. This efficiency level is likely to increase further under the auspices of the National Appliance Energy Conservation Act (NAECA). A new type of heat exchanger was developed for air conditioning equipment by Modine Manufacturing Company in the early 1990's. Despite significant advantages in terms of energy efficiency, dehumidification, durability, and refrigerant charge there has been little interest expressed by the air conditioning industry. A cooperative effort between Modine, various utilities, and several state energy offices has been organized to test and demonstrate the viability of this heat exchanger design throughout the nation. This paper will review the fundamentals of heat exchanger design and document this simple, yet novel technology. These experiences involving equipment retrofits have been documented with respect to the performance potential of air conditioning system constructed with PF{trademark} Heat Exchangers (generically referred to as microchannel heat exchangers) from both an energy efficiency as well as a comfort perspective. The paper will also detail the current plan to introduce 16 to 24 systems into an extended field test throughout the US which commenced in the Fall of 1997.

  16. Experimental study on corrugated cross-flow air-cooled plate heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Minsung; Baik, Young-Jin; Park, Seong-Ryong; Ra, Ho-Sang; Lim, Hyug

    2010-11-15

    Experimental study on cross-flow air-cooled plate heat exchangers (PHEs) was performed. The two prototype PHEs were manufactured in a stack of single-wave plates and double-wave plates in parallel. Cooling air flows through the PHEs in a crosswise direction against internal cooling water. The heat exchanger aims to substitute open-loop cooling towers with closed-loop water circulation, which guarantees cleanliness and compactness. In this study, the prototype PHEs were tested in a laboratory scale experiments. From the tests, double-wave PHE shows approximately 50% enhanced heat transfer performance compared to single-wave PHE. However, double-wave PHE costs 30% additional pressure drop. For commercialization, a wide channel design for air flow would be essential for reliable performance. (author)

  17. 20 Years of Air-Water Gas Exchange Observations for Pesticides in the Western Arctic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Jantunen, Liisa M; Wong, Fiona; Gawor, Anya; Kylin, Henrik; Helm, Paul A; Stern, Gary A; Strachan, William M J; Burniston, Deborah A; Bidleman, Terry F

    2015-12-01

    The Arctic has been contaminated by legacy organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and currently used pesticides (CUPs) through atmospheric transport and oceanic currents. Here we report the time trends and air-water exchange of OCPs and CUPs from research expeditions conducted between 1993 and 2013. Compounds determined in both air and water were trans- and cis-chlordanes (TC, CC), trans- and cis-nonachlors (TN, CN), heptachlor exo-epoxide (HEPX), dieldrin (DIEL), chlorobornanes (ΣCHBs and toxaphene), dacthal (DAC), endosulfans and metabolite endosulfan sulfate (ENDO-I, ENDO-II, and ENDO SUL), chlorothalonil (CHT), chlorpyrifos (CPF), and trifluralin (TFN). Pentachloronitrobenzene (PCNB and quintozene) and its soil metabolite pentachlorothianisole (PCTA) were also found in air. Concentrations of most OCPs declined in surface water, whereas some CUPs increased (ENDO-I, CHT, and TFN) or showed no significant change (CPF and DAC), and most compounds declined in air. Chlordane compound fractions TC/(TC + CC) and TC/(TC + CC + TN) decreased in water and air, while CC/(TC + CC + TN) increased. TN/(TC + CC + TN) also increased in air and slightly, but not significantly, in water. These changes suggest selective removal of more labile TC and/or a shift in chlordane sources. Water-air fugacity ratios indicated net volatilization (FR > 1.0) or near equilibrium (FR not significantly different from 1.0) for most OCPs but net deposition (FR < 1.0) for ΣCHBs. Net deposition was shown for ENDO-I on all expeditions, while the net exchange direction of other CUPs varied. Understanding the processes and current state of air-surface exchange helps to interpret environmental exposure and evaluate the effectiveness of international protocols and provides insights for the environmental fate of new and emerging chemicals. PMID:26196214

  18. 20 Years of Air-Water Gas Exchange Observations for Pesticides in the Western Arctic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Jantunen, Liisa M; Wong, Fiona; Gawor, Anya; Kylin, Henrik; Helm, Paul A; Stern, Gary A; Strachan, William M J; Burniston, Deborah A; Bidleman, Terry F

    2015-12-01

    The Arctic has been contaminated by legacy organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and currently used pesticides (CUPs) through atmospheric transport and oceanic currents. Here we report the time trends and air-water exchange of OCPs and CUPs from research expeditions conducted between 1993 and 2013. Compounds determined in both air and water were trans- and cis-chlordanes (TC, CC), trans- and cis-nonachlors (TN, CN), heptachlor exo-epoxide (HEPX), dieldrin (DIEL), chlorobornanes (ΣCHBs and toxaphene), dacthal (DAC), endosulfans and metabolite endosulfan sulfate (ENDO-I, ENDO-II, and ENDO SUL), chlorothalonil (CHT), chlorpyrifos (CPF), and trifluralin (TFN). Pentachloronitrobenzene (PCNB and quintozene) and its soil metabolite pentachlorothianisole (PCTA) were also found in air. Concentrations of most OCPs declined in surface water, whereas some CUPs increased (ENDO-I, CHT, and TFN) or showed no significant change (CPF and DAC), and most compounds declined in air. Chlordane compound fractions TC/(TC + CC) and TC/(TC + CC + TN) decreased in water and air, while CC/(TC + CC + TN) increased. TN/(TC + CC + TN) also increased in air and slightly, but not significantly, in water. These changes suggest selective removal of more labile TC and/or a shift in chlordane sources. Water-air fugacity ratios indicated net volatilization (FR > 1.0) or near equilibrium (FR not significantly different from 1.0) for most OCPs but net deposition (FR < 1.0) for ΣCHBs. Net deposition was shown for ENDO-I on all expeditions, while the net exchange direction of other CUPs varied. Understanding the processes and current state of air-surface exchange helps to interpret environmental exposure and evaluate the effectiveness of international protocols and provides insights for the environmental fate of new and emerging chemicals.

  19. Advances in Air-Sea Flux Measurement by Eddy Correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blomquist, Byron W.; Huebert, Barry J.; Fairall, Christopher W.; Bariteau, Ludovic; Edson, James B.; Hare, Jeffrey E.; McGillis, Wade R.

    2014-09-01

    Eddy-correlation measurements of the oceanic flux are useful for the development and validation of air-sea gas exchange models and for analysis of the marine carbon cycle. Results from more than a decade of published work and from two recent field programs illustrate the principal interferences from water vapour and motion, demonstrating experimental approaches for improving measurement precision and accuracy. Water vapour cross-sensitivity is the greatest source of error for flux measurements using infrared gas analyzers, often leading to a ten-fold bias in the measured flux. Much of this error is not related to optical contamination, as previously supposed. While various correction schemes have been demonstrated, the use of an air dryer and closed-path analyzer is the most effective way to eliminate this interference. This approach also obviates density corrections described by Webb et al. (Q J R Meteorol 106:85-100, 1980). Signal lag and frequency response are a concern with closed-path systems, but periodic gas pulses at the inlet tip provide for precise determination of lag time and frequency attenuation. Flux attenuation corrections are shown to be 5 % for a cavity ring-down analyzer (CRDS) and dryer with a 60-m inlet line. The estimated flux detection limit for the CRDS analyzer and dryer is a factor of ten better than for IRGAs sampling moist air. While ship-motion interference is apparent with all analyzers tested in this study, decorrelation or regression methods are effective in removing most of this bias from IRGA measurements and may also be applicable to the CRDS.

  20. Air pollution measurements in traffic tunnels.

    PubMed

    De Fré, R; Bruynseraede, P; Kretzschmar, J G

    1994-10-01

    Air pollution measurements during April 1991 are reported from the Craeybeckx highway tunnel in Antwerp, Belgium. The tunnel was used daily by an average of 45,000 vehicles, of which 60% were gasoline fueled passenger cars, 20% diesel cars, and 20% trucks. Of the gasoline cars, only 3% had three-way catalysts. Tunnel air concentrations of nitrogen oxides, sulphur dioxide, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, nonmethane hydrocarbons, volatile organic compounds, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and lead are presented. The traffic emissions in the tunnel are calculated by the carbon balance method, which uses the increase of the total carbon concentration in the tunnel air as the reference quantity. Division of the concentration of any pollutant by the total carbon concentration gives emission factors per kilogram of carbon. These emission factors can be converted directly to emissions relative to fuel consumption or per kilometer. The fraction of diesel used in the tunnel was derived from sulphur to carbon ratios in tunnel air. A calculation procedure with breakdown of emission factors according to vehicle categories was used to estimate countrywide emissions. The estimated emissions were compared to results from the Flanders Emissions Inventory [Emissie Inventaris Vlaamse Regio (EIVR)] and calculated emissions according to the emission factors proposed by the European Commissions CORINAIR Working Group. For NOx there is excellent agreement. For carbon monoxide and hydrocarbons, the tunnel data produced higher emissions than the CORINAIR model would predict but lower than the official EIVR statistics. The estimated lead emissions from traffic are found to be 22 to 29% of the lead in gasoline.

  1. Estimating Riverine Air-Water Gas Exchange and Metabolism from Long Oxygen Time Series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, R. O., Jr.; Appling, A.; Yackulic, C. B.; Arroita, M.

    2015-12-01

    To accurately depict the role of streams and rivers in carbon cycling requires estimating air- water gas exchange, productivity, and respiration. It is possible to estimate gas exchange and metabolism (gross primary production and ecosystem respiration) simultaneously from oxygen data themselves, but estimates from any single day often contain a substantial (and unknown) amount of parameter error. Here we developed a statistical method to leverage the extra information in a long time series to better estimate daily rates of gas exchange and metabolism. Such time series are ubiquitous in water quality monitoring programs, and these data are readily available over broad spatial scales. We developed a hierarchical model that estimates gas exchange as a function of discharge for a year-long time series of dissolved oxygen data. Gas exchange, and therefore metabolism, had much lower temporal variability than if we estimated parameters on separate days. Rates of gas exchange were positively related with discharge, but the relationship was river specific and often nonlinear. Our approach provides a robust means to estimate gas exchange and metabolism from the many rivers that have oxygen time series collected as part of water quality monitoring.

  2. Decline of hexachlorocyclohexane in the Arctic atmosphere and reversal of air-sea gas exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bidleman, T. F.; Jantunen, L. M.; Falconer, R. L.; Barrie, L. A.; Fellin, P.

    1995-02-01

    Hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs) are the most abundant organochlorine pesticides in the arctic atmosphere and ocean surface water. A compilation of measurements made between 1979-93 from stations in the Canadian and Norwegian Arctic and from cruises in the Bering and Chukchi seas indicates that atmospheric concentrations of α-HCH have declined significantly (p < 0.01), with a time for 50% decrease of about 4 y in summer-fall and 6 y in winter-spring. The 1992-93 levels of about 100 pg m-3 are 2-4 fold lower than values in the mid-1980s. The trend in γ-HCH is less pronounced, but a decrease is also suggested from measurements in the Canadian Arctic and the Bering-Chukchi seas. HCHs in ocean surface water have remained relatively constant since the early 1980s. The decline in atmospheric α-HCH has reversed the net direction of air-sea gas exchange to the point where some northern waters are now sources of the pesticide to the atmosphere instead of sinks.

  3. Uncertainties in Air Exchange using Continuous-Injection, Long-Term Sampling Tracer-Gas Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, Max H.; Walker, Iain S.; Lunden, Melissa M.

    2013-12-01

    The PerFluorocarbon Tracer (PFT) method is a low-cost approach commonly used for measuring air exchange in buildings using tracer gases. It is a specific application of the more general Continuous-Injection, Long-Term Sampling (CILTS) method. The technique is widely used but there has been little work on understanding the uncertainties (both precision and bias) associated with its use, particularly given that it is typically deployed by untrained or lightly trained people to minimize experimental costs. In this article we will conduct a first-principles error analysis to estimate the uncertainties and then compare that analysis to CILTS measurements that were over-sampled, through the use of multiple tracers and emitter and sampler distribution patterns, in three houses. We find that the CILTS method can have an overall uncertainty of 10-15percent in ideal circumstances, but that even in highly controlled field experiments done by trained experimenters expected uncertainties are about 20percent. In addition, there are many field conditions (such as open windows) where CILTS is not likely to provide any quantitative data. Even avoiding the worst situations of assumption violations CILTS should be considered as having a something like a ?factor of two? uncertainty for the broad field trials that it is typically used in. We provide guidance on how to deploy CILTS and design the experiment to minimize uncertainties.

  4. Measuring and Modeling Component and Whole-System Carbon Exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Bolstad

    2006-11-01

    We measured ecosystem/atmospheric carbon exchange through a range of methods covering a range of scales. We measured carbon (C) pool and flux for a number of previously poorly quantified ecosystems, developed measurement and modeling methods, and applied these to substantially increase the accuracy and reduce uncertainty in ecosystem/atmospheric C exchange at a range of scales. It appears most upland forests are weak to strong carbon sinks, and status depends largely on disturbance history and age. Net flux from wetland ecosystems appears to be from weak sinks to moderate sources of C to the atmosphere. We found limited evidence for a positive feedback of warming/drying to increased ecosystem C emissions. We further developed multi-source integration and modeling methods, including multiple towers, to scale estimates to landscapes and larger regions.

  5. Modeling spatial and temporal variability of residential air exchange rates for the Near-Road Exposures and Effects of Urban Air Pollutants Study (NEXUS).

    PubMed

    Breen, Michael S; Burke, Janet M; Batterman, Stuart A; Vette, Alan F; Godwin, Christopher; Croghan, Carry W; Schultz, Bradley D; Long, Thomas C

    2014-11-07

    Air pollution health studies often use outdoor concentrations as exposure surrogates. Failure to account for variability of residential infiltration of outdoor pollutants can induce exposure errors and lead to bias and incorrect confidence intervals in health effect estimates. The residential air exchange rate (AER), which is the rate of exchange of indoor air with outdoor air, is an important determinant for house-to-house (spatial) and temporal variations of air pollution infiltration. Our goal was to evaluate and apply mechanistic models to predict AERs for 213 homes in the Near-Road Exposures and Effects of Urban Air Pollutants Study (NEXUS), a cohort study of traffic-related air pollution exposures and respiratory effects in asthmatic children living near major roads in Detroit, Michigan. We used a previously developed model (LBL), which predicts AER from meteorology and questionnaire data on building characteristics related to air leakage, and an extended version of this model (LBLX) that includes natural ventilation from open windows. As a critical and novel aspect of our AER modeling approach, we performed a cross validation, which included both parameter estimation (i.e., model calibration) and model evaluation, based on daily AER measurements from a subset of 24 study homes on five consecutive days during two seasons. The measured AER varied between 0.09 and 3.48 h(-1) with a median of 0.64 h(-1). For the individual model-predicted and measured AER, the median absolute difference was 29% (0.19 h‑1) for both the LBL and LBLX models. The LBL and LBLX models predicted 59% and 61% of the variance in the AER, respectively. Daily AER predictions for all 213 homes during the three year study (2010-2012) showed considerable house-to-house variations from building leakage differences, and temporal variations from outdoor temperature and wind speed fluctuations. Using this novel approach, NEXUS will be one of the first epidemiology studies to apply calibrated and

  6. 40 CFR 89.325 - Engine intake air temperature measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Engine intake air temperature... Test Equipment Provisions § 89.325 Engine intake air temperature measurement. (a) Engine intake air temperature measurement must be made within 122 cm of the engine. The measurement location must be made...

  7. 40 CFR 89.325 - Engine intake air temperature measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Engine intake air temperature... Test Equipment Provisions § 89.325 Engine intake air temperature measurement. (a) Engine intake air temperature measurement must be made within 122 cm of the engine. The measurement location must be made...

  8. 40 CFR 89.325 - Engine intake air temperature measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Engine intake air temperature... Test Equipment Provisions § 89.325 Engine intake air temperature measurement. (a) Engine intake air temperature measurement must be made within 122 cm of the engine. The measurement location must be made...

  9. 40 CFR 89.325 - Engine intake air temperature measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Engine intake air temperature... Test Equipment Provisions § 89.325 Engine intake air temperature measurement. (a) Engine intake air temperature measurement must be made within 122 cm of the engine. The measurement location must be made...

  10. 40 CFR 89.325 - Engine intake air temperature measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Engine intake air temperature... Test Equipment Provisions § 89.325 Engine intake air temperature measurement. (a) Engine intake air temperature measurement must be made within 122 cm of the engine. The measurement location must be made...

  11. 40 CFR 90.310 - Engine intake air humidity measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Engine intake air humidity measurement... Emission Test Equipment Provisions § 90.310 Engine intake air humidity measurement. This section refers to... for the engine intake air, the ambient test cell humidity measurement may be used. (a)...

  12. 40 CFR 90.310 - Engine intake air humidity measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Engine intake air humidity measurement... Emission Test Equipment Provisions § 90.310 Engine intake air humidity measurement. This section refers to... for the engine intake air, the ambient test cell humidity measurement may be used. (a)...

  13. 40 CFR 90.310 - Engine intake air humidity measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Engine intake air humidity measurement... Emission Test Equipment Provisions § 90.310 Engine intake air humidity measurement. This section refers to... for the engine intake air, the ambient test cell humidity measurement may be used. (a)...

  14. Plasma ion temperature measurements via charge exchange recombination radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonck, R. J.; Goldston, R. J.; Kaita, R.; Post, D. E.

    1983-02-01

    Spatially and temporally resolved plasma ion temperatures can be determined by measuring the Doppler-broadened line profiles of transitions excited by charge-exchange recombination reactions between fast hydrogen atoms and fully ionized low-Z ions. Plasma rotation velocity profiles can also be obtained. A sample result from the PDX tokamak using He+ radiation is presented, and expected line intensities for model cases for PDX and TFTR are calculated.

  15. Plasma ion temperature measurements via charge-exchange recombination radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Fonck, R.J.; Goldston, R.J.; Kaita, R.; Post, D.E.

    1982-11-01

    Spatially and temporally resolved plasma ion temperatures can be determined by measuring the Doppler-broadened line profiles of transitions excited by charge-exchange recombination reactions between fast hydrogen atoms and fully ionized low-Z ions. Plasma rotation velocity profiles can also be obtained. A sample result from the PDX tokamak using He/sup +/ radiation is presented, and expected line intensities for model cases for PDX and TFTR are calculated.

  16. Plasma ion temperature measurements via charge exchange recombination radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Fonck, R.J.; Goldston, R.J.; Kaita, R.; Post, D.E.

    1983-02-01

    Spatially and temporally resolved plasma ion temperatures can be determined by measuring the Doppler-broadened line profiles of transitions excited by charge-exchange recombination reactions between fast hydrogen atoms and fully ionized low-Z ions. Plasma rotation velocity profiles can also be obtained. A sample result from the PDX tokamak using He/sup +/ radiation is presented, and expected line intensities for model cases for PDX and TFTR are calculated.

  17. Development of an air ground data exchange concept: Flight deck perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flathers, G. W., II

    1987-01-01

    The planned modernization of the U.S. National Airspace System (NAS) includes the development and use of a digital data link as a means to exchange information between aircraft and ground-based facilities. This report presents an operationally-oriented concept on how data link could be used for applications related directly to air traffic control. The specific goal is to establish the role that data link could play in the air-ground communications. Due regard is given to the unique characteristics of data link and voice communications, current principles of air traffic control, operational procedures, human factors/man-machine interfaces, and the integration of data link with other air and ground systems. The resulting concept is illustrated in the form of a paper-and-pencil simulation in which data link and voice communications during the course of a hypothetical flight are described.

  18. DIFFUSIVE EXCHANGE OF GASEOUS POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS AND POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYLS ACROSS THE AIR-WATER INTERFACE OF THE CHESAPEAKE BAY. (R825245)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dissolved and gas-phase concentrations of nine polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and 46 polychlorinated biphenyl congeners were measured at eight sites on the Chesapeake Bay at four different times of the year to estimate net diffusive air-water gas exchange rates. Gaseous PAHs ar...

  19. Comparative assessment of the methods for exchangeable acidity measuring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanchikova, E. V.; Shamrikova, E. V.; Bespyatykh, N. V.; Zaboeva, G. A.; Bobrova, Yu. I.; Kyz"yurova, E. V.; Grishchenko, N. V.

    2016-05-01

    A comparative assessment of the results of measuring the exchangeable acidity and its components by different methods was performed for the main mineral genetic horizons of texturally-differentiated gleyed and nongleyed soddy-podzolic and gley-podzolic soils of the Komi Republic. It was shown that the contents of all the components of exchangeable soil acidity determined by the Russian method (with potassium chloride solution as extractant, c(KCl) = 1 mol/dm3) were significantly higher than those obtained by the international method (with barium chloride solution as extractant, c(BaCl2) = 0.1 mol/dm3). The error of the estimate of the concentration of H+ ions extracted with barium chloride solution equaled 100%, and this allowed only qualitative description of this component of the soil acidity. In the case of the extraction with potassium chloride, the error of measurements was 50%. It was also shown that the use of potentiometric titration suggested by the Russian method overestimates the results of soil acidity measurement caused by the exchangeable metal ions (Al(III), Fe(III), and Mn(II)) in comparison with the atomic emission method.

  20. Gas exchange in wetlands with emergent vegetation: The effects of wind and thermal convection at the air-water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poindexter, Cristina M.; Variano, Evan A.

    2013-07-01

    Methane, carbon dioxide, and oxygen are exchanged between wetlands and the atmosphere through multiple pathways. One of these pathways, the hydrodynamic transport of dissolved gas through the surface water, is often underestimated in importance. We constructed a model wetland in the laboratory with artificial emergent plants to investigate the mechanisms and magnitude of this transport. We measured gas transfer velocities, which characterize the near-surface stirring driving air-water gas transfer, while varying two stirring processes important to gas exchange in other aquatic environments: wind and thermal convection. To isolate the effects of thermal convection, we identified a semiempirical model for the gas transfer velocity as a function of surface heat loss. The laboratory results indicate that thermal convection will be the dominant mechanism of air-water gas exchange in marshes with emergent vegetation. Thermal convection yielded peak gas transfer velocities of 1 cm h-1. Because of the sheltering of the water surface by emergent vegetation, gas transfer velocities for wind-driven stirring alone are likely to exceed this value only in extreme cases.

  1. Exchange of organohalogen compounds between air and tree bark in the Yellow River region.

    PubMed

    He, Chang; Jin, Jun; Li, Guangyao; Wang, Ying

    2016-06-01

    Organohalogen compound concentrations in paired air and bark samples from the Yellow River region were determined. Overall, the organohalogen compound concentrations were higher in the samples from the lower than from the upper Yellow River region. The polybrominated diphenyl ether, polychlorinated biphenyl, and organochlorine pesticide concentrations were 310-5200, 0.92-3.8, and 120-6700 pg m(-3), respectively, in the air samples and 29,000-190,0000, 220-1400, and 49,000-220,0000 pg g(-1) lipid weight, respectively, in the bark samples. The concentrations in the air samples were significantly positively correlated with the concentrations in the bark samples. Constant B, related to the partitioning of a contaminant between the gas and particle phases in the air, was calculated for each compound. This was the first time constant B was simultaneously been determined for a range of different organohalogen compounds. An air-tree bark exchange model was calibrated and verified. The exchange coefficients (K(BA)) that were determined were compared with the model results, and the optimum K(OA) values for use in the model were found to be 10(9)-10(16). The compound of interest needed to be detected in more than 50% of the samples for the model results to be valid. PMID:27035385

  2. Spatiotemporally-Resolved Air Exchange Rate as a Modifier of Acute Air Pollution-Related Morbidity

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL) Human Exposure and Atmospheric Sciences Division (HEASD) conducts research in support of EPA mission to protect human health and the environment. HEASD research program supports Goal 1 (Clean Air) and Goal 4 (Healthy People) of EP...

  3. Use of cooling air heat exchangers as replacements for hot section strategic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gauntner, J. W.

    1983-01-01

    Because of financial and political constraints, strategic aerospace materials required for the hot section of future engines might be in short supply. As an alternative to these strategic materials, this study examines the use of a cooling air heat exchanger in combination with less advanced hot section materials. Cycle calculations are presented for future turbofan systems with overall pressure ratios to 65, bypass ratios near 13, and combustor exit temperatures to 3260 R. These calculations quantify the effect on TSFC of using a decreased materials technology in a turbofan system. The calculations show that the cooling air heat exchanger enables the feasibility of these engines. Previously announced in STAR as N83-34946

  4. Diurnal variation of NOx and ozone exchange between a street canyon and the overlying air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Kyung-Hwan; Baik, Jong-Jin

    2014-04-01

    The diurnal variation of NOx and O3 exchange between a street canyon and the overlying air in two dimensions is investigated to understand reactive pollutant removal and entrainment across the roof level of the street canyon. The computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model used in this study is a Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations (RANS) model and includes the urban surface and radiation processes and the comprehensive chemical processes. The CFD model is used for the one-day simulation in which the easterly ambient wind blows perpendicular to the north-south oriented street canyon with a canyon aspect ratio of 1. In the morning when the surface temperature of the downwind building wall is higher than that of the upwind building wall, two counter-rotating vortices appear in the street canyon (flow regime II). In the afternoon when the surface temperature of the upwind building wall is higher than that of the downwind building wall, an intensified primary vortex appears in the street canyon (flow regime I). The NOx and O3 exchange is generally active in the region close to the building wall with the higher temperature regardless of flow regime. The NOx and O3 exchange by turbulent flow is dominant in flow regime II, whereas the NOx and O3 exchange by mean flow becomes comparable to that by turbulent flow in a certain period of flow regime I. The NOx and O3 exchange velocities are similar to each other in the early morning, whereas these are significantly different from each other around noon and in the afternoon. This behavior indicates that the exchange velocity is dependent on flow regime. In addition, the diurnal variability of O3 exchange velocity is found to be dependent on photochemistry rather than dry deposition in the street canyon. This study suggests that photochemistry as well as flow in a street canyon is needed to be taken into account when exchange velocities for reactive pollutants are estimated.

  5. 40 CFR 89.326 - Engine intake air humidity measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Engine intake air humidity measurement. 89.326 Section 89.326 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Test Equipment Provisions § 89.326 Engine intake air humidity measurement. (a) Humidity conditioned...

  6. 40 CFR 89.326 - Engine intake air humidity measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Engine intake air humidity measurement. 89.326 Section 89.326 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Test Equipment Provisions § 89.326 Engine intake air humidity measurement. (a) Humidity conditioned...

  7. 40 CFR 89.326 - Engine intake air humidity measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Engine intake air humidity measurement. 89.326 Section 89.326 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Test Equipment Provisions § 89.326 Engine intake air humidity measurement. (a) Humidity conditioned...

  8. 40 CFR 89.326 - Engine intake air humidity measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Engine intake air humidity measurement. 89.326 Section 89.326 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Test Equipment Provisions § 89.326 Engine intake air humidity measurement. (a) Humidity conditioned...

  9. 40 CFR 89.326 - Engine intake air humidity measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Engine intake air humidity measurement. 89.326 Section 89.326 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Test Equipment Provisions § 89.326 Engine intake air humidity measurement. (a) Humidity conditioned...

  10. Continuous In-situ Measurements of Carbonyl Sulfide to Constrain Ecosystem Carbon and Water Exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastogi, B.; Kim, Y.; Berkelhammer, M. B.; Noone, D. C.; Lai, C. T.; Hollinger, D. Y.; Bible, K.; Leen, J. B.; Gupta, M.; Still, C. J.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the processes that control the terrestrial exchange of carbon and water are critical for examining the role of forested ecosystems in changing climates. A small but increasing number of studies have identified Carbonyl Sulfide (OCS) as a potential tracer for photosynthesis. OCS is hydrolyzed by an irreversible reaction in leaf mesophyll cells that is catalyzed by the enzyme, carbonic anhydrase. Leaf-level field and greenhouse studies indicate that OCS uptake is controlled by stomatal activity and that the ratio of OCS and CO2 uptake is reasonably constant. Existing studies on ecosystem OCS exchange have been based on laboratory measurements or short field campaigns and therefore little information on OCS exchange in a natural ecosystem over longer timescales is available. The objective of this study is to further assess the stability of OCS as a tracer for canopy photosynthesis in an active forested ecosystem and also to assess its utility for constraining transpiration, since both fluxes are mediated by canopy stomatal conductance. An off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy analyzer (Los Gatos Research Inc.) was deployed at the Wind River Experimental Forest in Washington (45.8205°N, 121.9519°W). Canopy air was sampled from three heights to measure vertical gradients of OCS within the canopy, and OCS exchange between the forest and the atmosphere. Here we take advantage of simultaneous measurements of the stable isotopologues of H2O and CO2 at corresponding heights as well as NEE (Net Ecosystem Exchange) from eddy covariance measurements to compare GPP (Gross Primary Production) and transpiration estimates from a variety of independent techniques. Our findings seek to allow assessment of the environmental and ecophysicological controls on evapotranspiration rates, which are projected to change in coming decades, and are otherwise poorly constrained.

  11. Air density measurement with a falling A4 sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oladyshkin, Ivan V.; Oladyshkina, Anastasia A.

    2016-09-01

    We propose a simple experiment on the air density measurement which does not require any special equipment: just an A4 sheet of paper, a stopwatch and a ruler. The discussed method uses the most basic air resistance model.

  12. Non-fouling heat exchanger preheats plant make-up air: saves $13,000 in first year

    SciTech Connect

    Goss, J.

    1980-08-01

    Air exchanges to maintain a comfortable working environment at Gates Rubber Company in Denver, Colorado, involves general exhaust from V-belt vulcanization lines. A ventilation system without heat recovery or make-up air heaters had been in use, but the goal of the company was to install a sytem that could handle normal plant exhaust air without filtration and involve little or no mechanization. A counter-flow, air-to-air heat exchanger having no moving parts has been used successfully to recover heat from many dirty industrial process exhausts. Heat recovery efficiencies range from 50 to 80%. Four heat exchangers, arranged in parallel, were installed in one of the 30,000 scfm exhaust/make-up air systems at the Denver plant and savings amounted to $13,000 the first year.

  13. Extraction of Poloidal Velocity from Charge Exchange Recombination Spectroscopy Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    W.M. Solomon; K.H. Burrell; P. Gohil; R.J. Groebner; L.R. Baylor

    2004-07-16

    A novel approach has been implemented on DIII-D to allow the correct determination of the plasma poloidal velocity from charge exchange spectroscopy measurements. Unlike usual techniques, the need for detailed atomic physics calculations to properly interpret the results is alleviated. Instead, the needed atomic physics corrections are self-consistently determined directly from the measurements, by making use of specially chosen viewing chords. Modeling results are presented that were used to determine a set of views capable of measuring the correction terms. We present the analysis of a quiescent H-mode discharge, illustrating that significant modifications to the velocity profiles are required in these high ion temperature conditions. We also present preliminary measurements providing the first direct comparison of the standard cross-section correction to the atomic physics calculations.

  14. Air-sea heat exchange, an element of the water cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chahine, M. T.

    1984-01-01

    The distribution and variation of water vapor, clouds and precipitation are examined. Principal driving forces for these distributions are energy exchange and evaporation at the air-sea interface, which are also important elements of air-sea interaction studies. The overall aim of air-sea interaction studies is to quantitatively determine mass, momentum and energy fluxes, with the goal of understanding the mechanisms controlling them. The results of general circulation simulations indicate that the atmosphere in mid-latitudes responds to changes in the oceanic surface conditions in the tropics. This correlation reflects the strong interaction between tropical and mid-latitude conditions caused by the transport of heat and momentum from the tropics. Studies of air-sea exchanges involve a large number of physica, chemical and dynamical processes including heat flux, radiation, sea-surface temperature, precipitation, winds and ocean currents. The fluxes of latent heat are studied and the potential use of satellite data in determining them evaluated. Alternative ways of inferring heat fluxes will be considered.

  15. The effects of rice canopy on the air-soil exchange of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and organochlorine pesticides using paired passive air samplers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Wang, Shaorui; Luo, Chunling; Li, Jun; Ming, Lili; Zhang, Gan; Li, Xiangdong

    2015-05-01

    The rice canopy in paddy fields can influence the air-soil exchange of organic chemicals. We used paired passive air samplers to assess the exchange of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) in a paddy field, South China. Levels of OCPs and light PAHs were generally higher under the canopy than above it. We found that the rice canopy can physically obstruct the evaporation of most OCPs and light PAHs, and can also act as a barrier to the gaseous deposition of p,p'-DDT and heavy PAHs. Paddy fields can behave as a secondary source of OCPs and light PAHs. The homolog patterns of these two types of chemical varied slightly between the air below and above the rice canopy, implying contributions of different sources. Paired passive air samplers can be used effectively to assess the in situ air-soil exchange of PAHs and OCPs in subtropical paddy fields.

  16. Air-Water Exchange of Legacy and Emerging Organic Pollutants across the Great Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohmann, R.; Ruge, Z.; Khairy, M.; Muir, D.; Helm, P.

    2014-12-01

    Organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are transported to great water bodies via long-range atmospheric transport and released from the surface water as air concentrations continue to diminish. As the largest fresh water bodies in North America, the Great Lakes have both the potential to accumulate and serve as a secondary source of persistent bioaccumulative toxins. OCP and PCB concentrations were sampled at 30+ sites across Lake Superior, Ontario and Erie in the summer of 2011. Polyethylene passive samplers (PEs) were simultaneously deployed in surface water and near surface atmosphere to determine air-water gaseous exchange of OCPs and PCBs. In Lake Superior, surface water and atmospheric concentrations were dominated by α-HCH (average 250 pg/L and 4.2 pg/m3, respectively), followed by HCB (average 17 pg/L and 89 pg/m3, respectively). Air-water exchange varied greatly between sites and individual OCPs, however α-endosulfan was consistently deposited into the surface water (average 19 pg/m2/day). PCBs in the air and water were characterized by penta- and hexachlorobiphenyls with distribution along the coast correlated with proximity to developed areas. Air-water exchange gradients generally yielded net volatilization of PCBs out of Lake Superior. Gaseous concentrations of hexachlorobenzene, dieldrin and chlordanes were significantly higher (p < 0.05) at Lake Erie than Lake Ontario. A multiple linear regression that incorporated meteorological, landuse and population data was used to explain variability in the atmospheric concentrations. Results indicated that landuse (urban and/or cropland) greatly explained the variability in the data. Freely dissolved concentrations of OCPs (

  17. The effect of internal air bleed on CO poisoning in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wentao

    It is found that carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning could be mitigated by increasing only cathode backpressure for a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) with ultra-thin membranes (≤25 μm). This mitigation can be explained by a heterogeneous oxidation of CO on a Pt-Ru/C anode by the permeated O 2 which is known as "internal air bleed" in his paper. A steady-state model which accounts for this internal air bleed has been developed to model the Pt-Ru/C anode polarization data when 50 ppm CO in H 2 is used as anode feed gas. The modeling results show that the mitigation of CO poisoning by the internal air bleed even exists at ambient conditions for a PEMFC with an ultra-thin membrane. Therefore, the effect of internal air bleed must be considered for modeling fuel cell performance or anode polarization data if an ultra-thin membrane and a low level of CO concentration are used for a Pt-Ru/C anode. An empirical relationship between the amount of internal air bleed used for the mitigation of CO poisoning and the fraction of free Pt sites is provided to facilitate the inclusion of an internal air bleed term in the modeling of anode polarization and the fuel cell performance.

  18. Measurement of a metastability-exchange cross section in krypton

    SciTech Connect

    Brechignac, C.; Vetter, R.

    1980-08-01

    The metastability-exchange cross section between (/sup 3/P/sub 2/)Kr atoms and (/sup 1/S/sub 0/)Kr atoms is measured by means of a two-laser saturated-absorption experiment performed on the lambda=557-nm transition. A study of velocity changes occurring in pure /sup 86/Kr and in (/sup 86/Kr--/sup 78/Kr) discharges leads to a value for the cross section Q75=(plus-or-minus10) A/sup 2/.

  19. A method for measuring exchange stiffness in ferromagnetic films

    SciTech Connect

    Girt, Erol; Huttema, W.; Montoya, E.; Kardasz, B.; Eyrich, C.; Heinrich, B.; Mryasov, O. N.; Dobin, A. Yu.; Karis, O.

    2011-04-01

    An exchange stiffness, A{sub ex}, in ferromagnetic films is obtained by fitting the M(H) dependence of two ferromagnetic layers antiferromagnetically coupled across a nonmagnetic spacer layer with a simple micromagnetic model. In epitaxial and textured structures this method allows measuring A{sub ex} between the crystallographic planes perpendicular to the growth direction of ferromagnetic films. Our results show that A{sub ex} between [0001] planes in textured Co grains is 1.54 {+-} 0.12 x 10{sup -11} J/m.

  20. [Effect of air temperature and rainfall on wetland ecosystem CO2 exchange in China].

    PubMed

    Chu, Xiao-jing; Han, Guang-xuan

    2015-10-01

    Wetland can be a potential efficient sink to reduce global warming due to its higher primary productivity and lower carbon decomposition rate. While there has been a series progress on the influence mechanism of ecosystem CO2 exchange over China' s wetlands, a systematic metaanalysis of data still needs to be improved. We compiled data of ecosystem CO2 exchange of 21 typical wetland vegetation types in China from 29 papers and carried out an integrated analysis of air temperature and precipitation effects on net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE), ecosystem respiration (Reco), gross primary productivity (GPP), the response of NEE to PAR, and the response of Reco to temperature. The results showed that there were significant responses (P<0.05) of NEE (R2 = 50%, R2=57%), GPP (R2 = 60%, R2 = 50%) Reco (R2 = 44%, R2=50%) with increasing air temperature and enhanced precipitation on the annual scale. On the growing season scale, air temperature accounted for 50% of the spatial variation of NEE, 36% of GPP and 19% of Reco, respectively. Both NEE (R2 = 33%) and GPP (R2 =25%) were correlated positively with precipitation (P<0.05). However, the relationship between Reco and precipitation was not significant (P>0.05). Across different Chinese wetlands, both precipitation and temperature had no significant effect on apparent quantum yield (α) or ecosystem respiration in the daytime (Reco,day, P>0.05). The maximum photosynthesis rate (Amax) was remarkably correlated with precipitation (P <0.01), but not with air temperature. Besides, there was no significant correlation between basal respiration (Rref) and precipitation (P>0.05). Precipitation was negatively correlated with temperature sensitivity of Reco (Q10, P<0.05). Furthermore, temperature accounted for 35% and 46% of the variations in temperature sensitivity of Reco (Q10) and basal respiration (Rref P<0.05), respectively. PMID:26995905

  1. What should we measure? Conceptualizing usage in health information exchange.

    PubMed

    Vest, Joshua R; Jasperson, Jon

    2010-01-01

    Under the provisions of the Health Information Technology for Economic & Clinical Health act providers need to demonstrate their 'meaningful use' of electronic health record systems' health information exchange (HIE) capability. HIE usage is not a simple construct, but the choice of its measurement must attend to the users, context, and objectives of the system being examined. This review examined how usage is reported in the existing literature and also what conceptualizations of usage might best reflect the nature and objectives of HIE. While existing literature on HIE usage included a diverse set of measures, most were theoretically weak, did not attend to the interplay of measure, level of analysis and architectural strategy, and did not reflect how HIE usage affected the actual process of care. Attention to these issues will provide greater insight into the effects of previously inaccessible information on medical decision-making and the process of care. PMID:20442148

  2. Influence of eutrophication on air-water exchange, vertical fluxes, and phytoplankton concentrations of persistent organic pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Dachs, J.; Eisenreich, S.J.; Hoff, R.M.

    2000-03-15

    The influence of eutrophication on the biogeochemical cycles of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) is largely unknown. In this paper, the application of a dynamic air-water-phytoplankton exchange model to Lake Ontario is used as a framework to study the influence of eutrophication on air-water exchange, vertical fluxes, and phytoplankton concentrations of POPs. The results of these simulations demonstrate that air-water exchange controls phytoplankton concentrations in remote aquatic environments with little influence from land-based sources of pollutants and supports levels in even historically contaminated systems. Furthermore, eutrophication or high biomass leads to a disequilibrium between the gas and dissolved phase, enhanced air-water exchange, and vertical sinking fluxes of PCBs. Increasing biomass also depletes the water concentrations leading to lower than equilibrium PCB concentrations in phytoplankton. Implications to future trends in PCB pollution in Lake Ontario are also discussed.

  3. Comparison of CO2 Dynamics and Air-Sea Exchange in Contrasting Tropical Reef Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drupp, P. S.; De Carlo, E. H.; Mackenzie, F. T.; Shamberger, K. E.; Musielewicz, S. B.; Maenner-Jones, S.; Sabine, C. L.; Feely, R. A.

    2011-12-01

    Multiyear high temporal resolution CO2 records in three differing coral reef settings were obtained using buoys deployed in coastal waters of Oahu since June 2008. The buoys are located on the barrier reef of Kaneohe Bay and offshore of Honolulu, on the south shore of Oahu. Annualized CO2 air-sea fluxes at the three buoys ranged from +0.05 mol C/m2/yr offshore Honolulu on a fringing reef well mixed with the open ocean to -1.12 mol C/m2/yr on a barrier reef flat in Kaneohe Bay (positive values represent CO2 sinks from the atmosphere and negative values represent sources). These fluxes compare well to those estimated from previous studies in Kaneohe Bay as well as in other tropical reef environments. pCO2 measurements, made every 3 hours, at each location show strong temporal cycles on multiple time scales ranging from diel to seasonal at each buoy and an anticorrelation with pO2. These records, when combined with those of a prior buoy deployment in southern Kaneohe Bay and several synoptic studies, allow us to examine how the principal biological cycles of productivity/respiration and calcification/carbonate dissolution are influenced by changing water column properties, physical processes (e.g. residence time) and atmospheric conditions and how these processes ultimately impact the exchange of CO2 between the ocean and atmosphere on hourly to interannual cycles. The data clearly demonstrate the need for high frequency pCO2 data to characterize completely and accurately short-term local changes in the CO2-carbonic acid system parameters and how these changes overprint the longer scale process of ocean acidification as a result of invasion of CO2 into the ocean due to emissions of anthropogenic CO2 to the atmosphere. Since many coral reef ecosystems are still sources of CO2 to the atmosphere because of positive net ecosystem calcification, and in some instances net heterotrophy, such data are even more critical in terms of assessing future changes in the direction

  4. Thermal control of a lidar laser system using a non-conventional ram air heat exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Killough, Brian D.; Alexander, William, Jr.; Swofford, Doyle P.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes the analysis and performance testing of a uniquely designed external heat exchanger. The heat exchanger is attached externally to an aircraft and is used to cool a laser system within the fuselage. Estimates showed insufficient cooling capacity with a conventional staggered tube array in the limited space available. Thus, a non-conventional design wes developed with larger tube and fin area exposed to the ram air to increase the heat transfer performance. The basic design consists of 28 circular finned aluminum tubes arranged in two parallel banks. Wind tunnel tests were performed to simulate air and liquid flight conditions for the non-conventional parallel bank arrangement and the conventional staggered tube arrangement. Performance comparisons of each of the two designs are presented. Test results are used in a computer model of the heat exchanger to predict the operating performance for the entire flight profile. These analyses predict significantly improved performance over the conventional design and show adequate thermal control margins.

  5. Thermal control of a lidar laser system using a non-conventional ram air heat exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Killough, Brian D.; Alexander, William, Jr.; Swofford, Doyle P.

    1990-10-01

    This paper describes the analysis and performance testing of a uniquely designed external heat exchanger. The heat exchanger is attached externally to an aircraft and is used to cool a laser system within the fuselage. Estimates showed insufficient cooling capacity with a conventional staggered tube array in the limited space available. Thus, a non-conventional design wes developed with larger tube and fin area exposed to the ram air to increase the heat transfer performance. The basic design consists of 28 circular finned aluminum tubes arranged in two parallel banks. Wind tunnel tests were performed to simulate air and liquid flight conditions for the non-conventional parallel bank arrangement and the conventional staggered tube arrangement. Performance comparisons of each of the two designs are presented. Test results are used in a computer model of the heat exchanger to predict the operating performance for the entire flight profile. These analyses predict significantly improved performance over the conventional design and show adequate thermal control margins.

  6. Distribution of organochlorine pesticides in the northern South China Sea: implications for land outflow and air-sea exchange.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Gan; Li, Jun; Cheng, Hairong; Li, Xiangdong; Xu, Weihai; Jones, Kevin C

    2007-06-01

    The South China Sea (SCS) is surrounded by developing countries in Southeast Asia, where persistent organic pollutants (POPs), such as organochlorine pesticides (OCPs), are still used legally or illegally, and are of concern. Yet little is known about the distribution of OCPs in the water and atmosphere over SCS, as well as their air-sea equilibrium status and time trends. In this study, ship-board air samples and surface seawater collected in the northern SCS between September 6 and 22, 2005 were analyzed for selected OCPs. The measured OCP concentrations in the atmosphere over the northern SCS were influenced by proximity to source regions and air mass origins. The highest atmospheric OCP concentrations were found at sampling sites adjacent to continental South China. OCPs in surface seawater showed significant spatial variations, with the highest concentration observed in a water sample from off Vietnam. The coastal currents were suggested to play a key role in the delivery of waterborne OCPs in the northern SCS. Time trend, land outflow, and air-sea exchange of selected OCPs in the SCS were investigated, by comparison of this dataset with historical data.

  7. The exchange of acetaldehyde between plants and the atmosphere: Stable carbon isotope and flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jardine, Kolby Jeremiah

    The exchange of acetaldehyde between plant canopies and the atmosphere may significantly influence regional atmospheric chemistry and plant metabolism. While plants are known to both produce and consume acetaldehyde, the exchange of this compound with forested ecosystems is complicated by physical, biological, and chemical processes that range from being poorly understood to completely unknown. This precludes a quantitative understanding of acetaldehyde exchange rates between the atmosphere and the biosphere. In this study, the processes controlling the exchange of acetaldehyde with plant canopies was investigated using concentration, flux, and natural abundance 13C measurements of gas phase acetaldehyde from individual plants, soils, and entire ecosystems. Although previously only considered important in anoxic tissues, it was discovered that acetaldehyde is produced and consumed in leaves through ethanolic fermentation coupled to the pyruvate dehydrogenase bypass system under normal aerobic conditions. These coupled pathways determine the acetaldehyde compensation point, a major factor controlling its exchange with the atmosphere. Carbon isotope analysis suggests a new pathway for acetaldehyde production from plants under stress involving the peroxidation of membrane fatty acids. This pathway may be a major source of acetaldehyde to the atmosphere from plants under biotic and abiotic stresses. Plant stomata were found to be the dominant pathway for the exchange of acetaldehyde with the atmosphere with stomatal conductance influencing both emission and uptake fluxes. In addition, increasing temperature and solar radiation was found to increase the compensation point by increasing the rates of acetaldehyde production relative to consumption. Under ambient conditions, bare soil was neutral to the exchange of acetaldehyde while senescing and decaying leaves were found to be strong source of acetaldehyde to the atmosphere due to increased decomposition processes and

  8. 40 CFR 91.416 - Intake air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Intake air flow measurement specifications. 91.416 Section 91.416 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM MARINE SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 91.416 Intake air flow...

  9. 40 CFR 89.414 - Air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Air flow measurement specifications. 89.414 Section 89.414 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE NONROAD COMPRESSION-IGNITION ENGINES Exhaust Emission Test Procedures § 89.414 Air...

  10. An Experimental Investigation of an Exhaust-gas-to-air Heat Exchanger for Use on Jet-stack-equipped Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stalder, Jackson R; Spies, Ray J , Jr

    1948-01-01

    Tests were made to determine the loss in exhaust-jet thrust and engine power resulting from the insertion of an exhaust-gas-to-air heat exchanger in a jet-type exhaust stack of an aircraft engine. The thermal performance of the heat exchanger was also determined.

  11. 40 CFR 90.309 - Engine intake air temperature measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Engine intake air temperature... Emission Test Equipment Provisions § 90.309 Engine intake air temperature measurement. (a) The measurement...) The temperature measurements must be accurate to within ±2 °C....

  12. 40 CFR 90.309 - Engine intake air temperature measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Engine intake air temperature... Emission Test Equipment Provisions § 90.309 Engine intake air temperature measurement. (a) The measurement...) The temperature measurements must be accurate to within ±2 °C....

  13. 40 CFR 90.309 - Engine intake air temperature measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Engine intake air temperature... Emission Test Equipment Provisions § 90.309 Engine intake air temperature measurement. (a) The measurement...) The temperature measurements must be accurate to within ±2 °C....

  14. 40 CFR 90.309 - Engine intake air temperature measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Engine intake air temperature... Emission Test Equipment Provisions § 90.309 Engine intake air temperature measurement. (a) The measurement...) The temperature measurements must be accurate to within ±2 °C....

  15. 40 CFR 90.309 - Engine intake air temperature measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Engine intake air temperature... Emission Test Equipment Provisions § 90.309 Engine intake air temperature measurement. (a) The measurement...) The temperature measurements must be accurate to within ±2 °C....

  16. Dry deposition and soil-air gas exchange of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in an industrial area.

    PubMed

    Bozlaker, Ayse; Odabasi, Mustafa; Muezzinoglu, Aysen

    2008-12-01

    Ambient air and dry deposition, and soil samples were collected at the Aliaga industrial site in Izmir, Turkey. Atmospheric total (particle+gas) Sigma(41)-PCB concentrations were higher in summer (3370+/-1617 pg m(-3), average+SD) than in winter (1164+/-618 pg m(-3)), probably due to increased volatilization with temperature. Average particulate Sigma(41)-PCBs dry deposition fluxes were 349+/-183 and 469+/-328 ng m(-2) day(-1) in summer and winter, respectively. Overall average particulate deposition velocity was 5.5+/-3.5 cm s(-1). The spatial distribution of Sigma(41)-PCB soil concentrations (n=48) showed that the iron-steel plants, ship dismantling facilities, refinery and petrochemicals complex are the major sources in the area. Calculated air-soil exchange fluxes indicated that the contaminated soil is a secondary source to the atmosphere for lighter PCBs and as a sink for heavier ones. Comparable magnitude of gas exchange and dry particle deposition fluxes indicated that both mechanisms are equally important for PCB movement between air and soil in Aliaga.

  17. Occurrence and air-sea exchange of phthalates in the Arctic.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zhiyong; Ebinghaus, Ralf; Temme, Christian; Lohmann, Rainer; Caba, Armando; Ruck, Wolfgang

    2007-07-01

    Air and seawater samples were taken simultaneously to investigate the distribution and air-sea gas exchange of phthalates in the Arctic onboard the German Research Ship FS Polarstern. Samples were collected on expeditions ARK XX1&2 from the North Sea to the high Arctic (60 degrees N-85 degrees N) in the summer of 2004. The concentration of sigma6 phthalates (dimethyl phthalate (DMP), diethyl phthalate (DEP), di-i-butyl phthalate (DiBP), di-n-butyl phthalate (DnBP), butylbenzyl phthalate (BBP), and diethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP)) ranged from 30 to 5030 pg L(-1) in the aqueous dissolved phase and from 1110 to 3090 pg m(-3) in the atmospheric gas phase. A decreasing latitudinal trend was present in the seawater and to a lesser degree in the atmosphere from the Norwegian coast to the high Arctic. Overall, deposition dominated the air-sea gas exchange for DEHP, while volatilization from seawater took place in the near-coast environment. The estimated net gas deposition of DEHP was 5, 30, and 190 t year(-1) for the Norwegian Sea, the Greenland Sea, and the Arctic, respectively. This suggests that atmospheric transport and deposition of phthalates is a significant process for their occurrence in the remote Atlantic and Arctic Ocean.

  18. Equipment for Measuring Air Flow, Air Temperature, Relative Humidity, and Carbon Dioxide in Schools. Technical Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Bruce W.

    Information on equipment and techniques that school facility personnel may use to evaluate IAQ conditions are discussed. Focus is placed on the IAQ parameters of air flow, air temperature, relative humidity, as well as carbon dioxide and the equipment used to measure these factors. Reasons for measurement and for when the measurement of these…

  19. Measurement of Radon in Indoor Air.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downey, Daniel M.; Simolunas, Glenn

    1988-01-01

    Describes a laboratory experiment to teach the principles of air sampling, gamma ray spectroscopy, nuclear decay, and radioactive equilibrium. Analyzes radon by carbon adsorption and gamma ray counting. Provides methodology and rate of decay equations. (MVL)

  20. Flight tests with a data link used for air traffic control information exchange

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knox, Charles E.; Scanlon, Charles H.

    1991-01-01

    Previous studies showed that air traffic control (ATC) message exchange with a data link offers the potential benefits of increased airspace system safety and efficiency. To accomplish these benefits, data link can be used to reduce communication errors and relieve overloaded ATC voice radio frequencies, which hamper efficient message exchange during peak traffic periods. Flight tests with commercial airline pilots as test subjects were conducted in the NASA Transport Systems Research Vehicle Boeing 737 airplane to contrast flight operations that used current voice communications with flight operations that used data link to transmit both strategic and tactical ATC clearances during a typical commercial airflight from takeoff to landing. The results of these tests that used data link as the primary communication source with ATC showed flight crew acceptance, a perceived reduction in crew work load, and a reduction in crew communication errors.

  1. Transient secondary organic aerosol formation from limonene ozonolysis in indoor environments: impacts of air exchange rates and initial concentration ratios.

    PubMed

    Youssefi, Somayeh; Waring, Michael S

    2014-07-15

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) results from the oxidation of reactive organic gases (ROGs) and is an indoor particle source. The aerosol mass fraction (AMF), a.k.a. SOA yield, quantifies the SOA forming potential of ROGs and is the ratio of generated SOA to oxidized ROG. The AMF depends on the organic aerosol concentration, as well as the prevalence of later generation reactions. AMFs have been measured in unventilated chambers or steady-state flow through chambers. However, indoor settings have outdoor air exchange, and indoor SOA formation often occurs when ROGs are transiently emitted, for instance from emissions of cleaning products. Herein, we quantify "transient AMFs" from ozonolysis of pulse-emitted limonene in a ventilated chamber, for 18 experiments at low (0.28 h(-1)), moderate (0.53 h(-1)), and high (0.96 h(-1)) air exchange rates (AER) with varying initial ozone-limonene ratios. Transient AMFs increased with the amount of ROG reacted; AMFs also increased with decreasing AERs and increasing initial ozone-limonene ratios, which together likely promoted more ozone reactions with the remaining exocyclic bond of oxidized limonene products in the SOA phase. Knowing the AER and initial ozone-limonene ratio is crucial to predict indoor transient SOA behavior accurately.

  2. Investigation into the importance of the stomatal pathway in the exchange of PCBs between air and plants.

    PubMed

    Barber, Jonathan L; Kurt, Perihan B; Thomas, Gareth O; Kerstiens, Gerhard; Jones, Kevin C

    2002-10-15

    The transfer of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) from air to vegetation is an important air-surface exchange process that affects global cycling and can result in human and wildlife exposure via the terrestrial food chain. To improve understanding of this process, the role of stomata in uptake of gas-phase polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) was investigated using Hemerocallis x hybrida "Black Eyed Stella", a plant with a high stomatal density. Uptake of PCBs was monitored over a 72-h period in the presence and absence of light. Uptake rates were significantly greater in illuminated (stomata open) plants than unilluminated (stomata closed) plants for 18 of the 28 measured PCB congeners (p < 0.05). Depuration of PCBs was monitored in a subsequent experiment over a period of 3 weeks. Levels after 3 weeks of depuration time were still much higher than the concentration prior to contamination. Tri- and tetrachlorinated PCBs showed the greatest depuration, with less than 20% and 50% of accumulated PCBs respectively remaining, while approximately 70% of higher chlorinated PCB congeners remained in the plants at the end of the experiment. Treatments with/without light (to control stomatal opening during uptake) and with/without abscisic acid (ABA) application (to control stomatal opening during depuration) were compared. After contamination indoors for 3 days, there was a significantly higher concentration of PCBs (p < 0.05) in the light contaminated plants than the dark-contaminated plants for 13 of the 28 measured PCB congeners. The ABA treatment affected depuration of PCB-18 only. "Light/ABA-treated" plants had a significantly slower depuration rate for PCB-18 than "light/untreated", "dark/ABA-treated", and "dark/untreated" plants (p < 0.05). The results of the study indicate that there is a stomatal effect on the rate of exchange of PCBs between Hemerocallis leaves and air. PMID:12387399

  3. Observations on long-term air-soil exchange of organic contaminants.

    PubMed

    Jones, K C

    1994-09-01

    Evidence for long-term changes in the soil composition of selected organic compounds, brought about by exchanges with the atmosphere, is briefly reviewed. In the case of some compounds - such as benzo(a)pyrene and octachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, soils may be significant long-term environmental sinks for atmospherically-derived material. In other cases - such as phenanthrene and some of the lighter PCBs, de-gassing or volatilisation from soil back to the air can occur under certain conditions. Hence the soil may act as a "short-term" sink, and a potential source to atmosphere. Indeed, for some 'semi-volatile' compounds used in large quantities in the past - such as PCBs, soil outgassing may actually be an extremely important source to contemporary air. Furthermore, soil outgassing from areas of former high use may provide an important driving mechanism for continued "global cycling" of a range of semi-volatile organochlorine compounds.

  4. EXCHANGE

    SciTech Connect

    Boltz, J.C.

    1992-09-01

    EXCHANGE is published monthly by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), a multidisciplinary facility operated for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The purpose of EXCHANGE is to inform computer users about about recent changes and innovations in both the mainframe and personal computer environments and how these changes can affect work being performed at DOE facilities.

  5. Air-sea Exchange of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs), Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs), Organochlorine Pesticides (OCPs) and Polybrominated Diphenyl Ethers (PBDEs) in the Mediterranean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lammel, G. P.; Heil, A.; Kukucka, P.; Meixner, F. X.; Mulder, M. D.; Prybilova, P.; Prokes, R.; Rusina, T. S.; Song, G. Z.; Vrana, B.

    2015-12-01

    The marine atmospheric environment is a receptor for persistent organic pollutants (POPs) which are advected from sources on land, primary, such as biomass burning by-products (PAHs, dioxins), and secondary, such as volatilization from contaminated soils (PCBs, pesticides). Primary sources do not exist in the marine environment, except for PAHs (ship engines) but following previous atmospheric deposition, the sea surface may turn to a secondary source by reversal of diffusive air-sea mass exchange. No monitoring is in place. We studied the vertical fluxes of a wide range of primary and secondary emitted POPs based on measurements in air and surface seawater at a remote coastal site in the eastern Mediterranean (2012). To this end, silicon rubbers were used as passive water samplers, vertical concentration gradients were determined in air and fluxes were quantified based on Eddy covariance. Diffusive air-sea exchange fluxes of hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs) and semivolatile PAHs were found close to phase equilibrium, except one PAH, retene, a wood burning tracer, was found seasonally net-volatilisational. Some PCBs, p,p'-DDE, penta- and hexachlorobenzene (PeCB, HCB) were mostly net-depositional, while PBDEs were net-volatilizational. Fluxes determined at a a remote coastal site ranged -33 - +2.4 µg m-2 d-1 for PAHs and -4.0 - +0.3 µg m-2 d-1for halogenated compounds (< 0 means net-deposition, > 0 means net-volatilization). It is concluded that nowadays in open seas more pollutants are undergoing reversal of the direction of air-sea exchange. Recgional fire activity records in combination with box model simulations suggest that deposition of retene during summer is followed by a reversal of air-sea exchange. The seawater surface as secondary source of pollution should be assessed based on flux measurements across seasons and over longer time periods.

  6. Free air breathing proton exchange membrane fuel cell: Thermal behavior characterization near freezing temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higuita Cano, Mauricio; Kelouwani, Sousso; Agbossou, Kodjo; Dubé, Yves

    2014-01-01

    A free air breathing fuel cell thermal model is developed. This proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) has been selected as the basis for the study due to its use in automotive applications. The blowers integrated to the stack provide the required air flow for hydrogen oxidation as well as the fluid for the stack thermal regulation. Hence, their controls are a key point for keeping the system to maximum efficiency. Using well-known fuel cell electrochemistry, a dynamic thermal model near freezing temperature, which includes the stack physical parameters, is developed and validated. In addition to these parameters, only the inlet and outlet air temperatures are used to derive the model. Experimental validation with a real 1 kW free air breathing PEMFC has demonstrated that the model can reasonably track the stack internal temperature with a maximum deviation between the observed and the estimated temperatures of 5%. Therefore, the proposed method will allow the development of efficient blower management systems for PEMFC efficiency improvement.

  7. Measuring gas temperature during spin-exchange optical pumping process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Normand, E.; Jiang, C. Y.; Brown, D. R.; Robertson, L.; Crow, L.; Tong, X.

    2016-04-01

    The gas temperature inside a Spin-Exchange Optical Pumping (SEOP) laser-pumping polarized 3He cell has long been a mystery. Different experimental methods were employed to measure this temperature but all were based on either modelling or indirect measurement. To date there has not been any direct experimental measurement of this quantity. Here we present the first direct measurement using neutron transmission to accurately determine the number density of 3He, the temperature is obtained using the ideal gas law. Our result showed a surprisingly high gas temperature of 380°C, compared to the 245°C of the 3He cell wall temperature and 178°C of the optical pumping oven temperature. This experiment result may be used to further investigate the unsolved puzzle of the "X-factor" in the SEOP process which places an upper bound to the 3He polarization that can be achieved. Additional spin relaxation mechanisms might exist due to the high gas temperature, which could explain the origin of the X-factor.

  8. Perfluorocarbon tracer method for air-infiltration measurements

    DOEpatents

    Dietz, R.N.

    1982-09-23

    A method of measuring air infiltration rates suitable for use in rooms of homes and buildings comprises the steps of emitting perfluorocarbons in the room to be measured, sampling the air containing the emitted perfluorocarbons over a period of time, and analyzing the samples at a laboratory or other facility.

  9. Atmospheric organochlorine pollutants and air-sea exchange of hexachlorocyclohexane in the Bering and Chukchi Seas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hinckley, D.A.; Bidleman, T.F.; Rice, C.P.

    1991-01-01

    Organochlorine pesticides have been found in Arctic fish, marine mammals, birds, and plankton for some time. The lack of local sources and remoteness of the region imply long-range transport and deposition of contaminants into the Arctic from sources to the south. While on the third Soviet-American Joint Ecological Expedition to the Bering and Chukchi Seas (August 1988), high-volume air samples were taken and analyzed for organochlorine pesticides. Hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH), hexachlorobenzene, polychlorinated camphenes, and chlordane (listed in order of abundance, highest to lowest) were quantified. The air-sea gas exchange of HCH was estimated at 18 stations during the cruise. Average alpha-HCH concentrations in concurrent atmosphere and surface water samples were 250 pg m-3 and 2.4 ng L-1, respectively, and average gamma-HCH concentrations were 68 pg m-3 in the atmosphere and 0.6 ng L-1 in surface water. Calculations based on experimentally derived Henry's law constants showed that the surface water was undersaturated with respect to the atmosphere at most stations (alpha-HCH, average 79% saturation; gamma-HCH, average 28% saturation). The flux for alpha-HCH ranged from -47 ng m-2 day-1 (sea to air) to 122 ng m-2 d-1 (air to sea) and averaged 25 ng m-2 d-1 air to sea. All fluxes of gamma-HCH were from air to sea, ranged from 17 to 54 ng m-2 d-1, and averaged 31 ng m-2 d-1.

  10. Atmospheric organochlorine pollutants and air-sea exchange of hexachlorocyclohexane in the Bering and Chukchi seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinckley, Daniel A.; Bidleman, Terry F.; Rice, Clifford P.

    1991-04-01

    Organochlorine pesticides have been found in Arctic fish, marine mammals, birds, and plankton for some time. The lack of local sources and remoteness of the region imply long-range transport and deposition of contaminants into the Arctic from sources to the south. While on the third Soviet-American Joint Ecological Expedition to the Bering and Chukchi Seas (August 1988), high-volume air samples were taken and analyzed for Organochlorine pesticides. Hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH), hexachlorobenzene, polychlorinated camphenes, and chlordane (listed in order of abundance, highest to lowest) were quantified. The air-sea gas exchange of HCH was estimated at 18 stations during the cruise. Average α-HCH concentrations in concurrent atmosphere and surface water samples were 250 pg m-3 and 2.4 ng L-1, respectively, and average γ-HCH concentrations were 68 pg m-3 in the atmosphere and 0.6 ng L-1 in surface water. Calculations based on experimentally derived Henry's law constants showed that the surface water was undersaturated with respect to the atmosphere at most stations (α-HCH, average 79% saturation; γ-HCH, average 28% saturation). The flux for α-HCH ranged from -47 ng m-2 day-1 (sea to air) to 122 ng m-2 d-1 (air to sea) and averaged 25 ng m-2 d-1 air to sea. All fluxes of γ-HCH were from air to sea, ranged from 17 to 54 ng m-2 d-1, and averaged 31 ng m-2 d-1.

  11. GAS CHROMATOGRAPHIC TECHNIQUES FOR THE MEASUREMENT OF ISOPRENE IN AIR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The chapter discusses gas chromatographic techniques for measuring isoprene in air. Such measurement basically consists of three parts: (1) collection of sufficient sample volume for representative and accurate quantitation, (2) separation (if necessary) of isoprene from interfer...

  12. Indoor air quality, air exchange rates, and radioactivity in new built temporary houses following the Great East Japan Earthquake in Minamisoma, Fukushima.

    PubMed

    Shinohara, N; Tokumura, M; Kazama, M; Yoshino, H; Ochiai, S; Mizukoshi, A

    2013-08-01

    This study measured air exchange rates, indoor concentrations of aldehydes and volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and radioactivity levels at 19 temporary houses in different temporary housing estate constructed in Minamisoma City following the Great East Japan Earthquake. The 19 surveyed houses represented all of the companies assigned to construct temporary houses in that Minamisoma City. Data were collected shortly after construction and before occupation, from August 2011 to January 2012. Mean air exchange rates in the temporary houses were 0.28/h, with no variation according to housing types and construction date. Mean indoor concentrations of formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, toluene, ethylbenzene, m/p-xylene, o-xylene, styrene, p-dichlorobenzene, tetradecane, and total VOCs (TVOCs) were 29.2, 72.7, 14.6, 6.35, 3.05, 1.81, 7.29, 14.3, 8.32, and 901 μg/m(3), respectively. The levels of acetaldehyde and TVOCs exceeded the indoor guideline (48 μg/m(3)) and interim target (400 μg/m(3)) in more than half of the 31 rooms tested. In addition to guideline chemicals, terpenes (α-pinene and d-limonene) and acetic esters (butyl acetate and ethyl acetate) were often detected in these houses. The indoor radiation levels measured by a Geiger-Müller tube (Mean: 0.22 μSv/h) were lower than those recorded outdoors (Mean: 0.42 μSv/h), although the shielding effect of the houses was less than for other types of buildings.

  13. Indoor air quality, air exchange rates, and radioactivity in new built temporary houses following the Great East Japan Earthquake in Minamisoma, Fukushima.

    PubMed

    Shinohara, N; Tokumura, M; Kazama, M; Yoshino, H; Ochiai, S; Mizukoshi, A

    2013-08-01

    This study measured air exchange rates, indoor concentrations of aldehydes and volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and radioactivity levels at 19 temporary houses in different temporary housing estate constructed in Minamisoma City following the Great East Japan Earthquake. The 19 surveyed houses represented all of the companies assigned to construct temporary houses in that Minamisoma City. Data were collected shortly after construction and before occupation, from August 2011 to January 2012. Mean air exchange rates in the temporary houses were 0.28/h, with no variation according to housing types and construction date. Mean indoor concentrations of formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, toluene, ethylbenzene, m/p-xylene, o-xylene, styrene, p-dichlorobenzene, tetradecane, and total VOCs (TVOCs) were 29.2, 72.7, 14.6, 6.35, 3.05, 1.81, 7.29, 14.3, 8.32, and 901 μg/m(3), respectively. The levels of acetaldehyde and TVOCs exceeded the indoor guideline (48 μg/m(3)) and interim target (400 μg/m(3)) in more than half of the 31 rooms tested. In addition to guideline chemicals, terpenes (α-pinene and d-limonene) and acetic esters (butyl acetate and ethyl acetate) were often detected in these houses. The indoor radiation levels measured by a Geiger-Müller tube (Mean: 0.22 μSv/h) were lower than those recorded outdoors (Mean: 0.42 μSv/h), although the shielding effect of the houses was less than for other types of buildings. PMID:23336325

  14. Measuring Air Resistance in a Computerized Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Takahashi, Ken; Thompson, D.

    1999-01-01

    Presents an activity that involves dropping spherical party balloons onto a sonic motion sensor to show that the force associated with the air resistance is proportional to both the square of the velocity and the cross-sectional area of the balloon. (Author/WRM)

  15. Next-generation air measurement technologies

    EPA Science Inventory

    This is a presentation at a workshop in Chicago on emerging air monitoring technologies, hosted by a local nonprofit. The audience is composed of a mixture of technical backgrounds. This presentation will be part of an opening panel and the goal is to give an overview of the st...

  16. The simultaneous measurement of low rates of CO2 and O2 exchange in biological systems.

    PubMed

    Willms, J R; Dowling, A N; Dong, Z M; Hunt, S; Shelp, B J; Layzell, D B

    1997-12-15

    An instrument for measuring low rates of biological O2 exchange using an open-flow gas analysis system is described. A novel differential O2 sensor that is capable of measuring as little as 0.4 Pa O2 against a back-ground of ambient air (20,900 Pa O2), yet has a dynamic range of +/- 2000 Pa O2 (i.e., +/- ca. 2% O2) is described. Baseline drift was typically less than 0.025 Pa min-1. The differential O2 sensor was incorporated into a respiratory quotient/photosynthetic quotient analyzer that contained other environmental sensors for atmospheric pressure, absolute O2 and CO2 concentration, temperature of the differential O2 sensor block, and differential pressure between reference and sample streams. Protocols for how these sensors can be used to calibrate the differential O2 sensor and to improve its stability with time are described. Together, the differential O2 sensor, the environmental sensors, and the simple calibration techniques allow for simultaneous, noninvasive, and accurate measurements of O2 and CO2 exchange in tissues with metabolic rates as low as about 0.1 mumol O2 or CO2 h-1. Example data are provided in which O2 differentials of 3 to 41 Pa O2 were measured in an open-flow system. PMID:9417789

  17. Measurements of soil and canopy exchange rates in the Amazon rain forest using Rn-222

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trumbore, S. E.; Keller, M.; Wofsy, S. C.; Da Costa, J. M.

    1990-01-01

    Measurements were taken of the emission of Rn-222 from Amazon forest rocks and soils and used as a tracer of ventilation of the forest canopy layer at night. It was determined that the greatest resistance to transfer of trace gases from the soil to the atmosphere lies in the soil air space. Profiles of Rn-222 and CO2 showed steepest concentration gradients in the layer between 0 and 3 m above soil surface. Aerodynamic resistances calculated for this layer from Rn-222 and CO2 varied from 1.6 to 18 s/cm, with greater resistance during the afternoon than at night. The resistance to exchange with air from the entire 41 m layer below the canopy averaged 4.8 s/cm during 13 nights of CO2 profiles. The calculated average time to flush the layer below 41 m is 5.5 hr, and it is concluded that this indicates that significant exchange occurs despite nocturnal stratification.

  18. Seasonality of diffusive exchange of polychlorinated biphenyls and hexachlorobenzene across the air-sea interface of Kaohsiung Harbor, Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Fang, Meng-Der; Ko, Fung-Chi; Baker, Joel E; Lee, Chon-Lin

    2008-12-15

    Gaseous and dissolved concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and hexachlorobenzene (HCB) were measured in the ambient air and water of Kaohsiung Harbor lagoon, Taiwan, from December 2003 to January 2005. During the rainy season (April to September), gaseous PCB and HCB concentrations were low due to both scavenging by precipitation and dilution by prevailing southwesterly winds blown from the atmosphere of the South China Sea. In contrast, trace precipitation and prevailing northeasterly winds during the dry season (October to March) resulted in higher gaseous PCB and HCB concentrations. Instantaneous air-water exchange fluxes of PCB homologues and HCB were calculated from 22 pairs of air and water samples from Kaohsiung Harbor lagoon. All net fluxes of PCB homologues and HCB in this study are from water to air (net volatilization). The highest net volatile flux observed was +172 ng m(-)(2) day(-1) (dichlorobiphenyls) in December, 2003 due to the high wind speed and high dissolved concentration. The PCB homologues and HCB fluxes were significantly governed by dissolved concentrations in Kaohsiung Harbor lagoon. For low molecular weight PCBs (LMW PCBs), their fluxes were also significantly correlated with wind speed. The net PCB and HCB fluxes suggest that the annual sums of 69 PCBs and HCB measured in this study were mainly volatile (57.4 x 10(3) and 28.3 x 10(3) ng m(-2) yr(-1), respectively) and estimated yearly, 1.5 kg and 0.76 kg of PCBs and HCB were emitted from the harbor lagoon surface waters to the ambient atmosphere. The average tPCB flux in this study was about one-tenth of tPCB fluxes seen in New York Harbor and in the Delaware River, which are reported to be greatly impacted by PCBs.

  19. Air-water gas exchange of chlorinated pesticides in four lakes spanning a 1,205 meter elevation range in the Canadian Rocky Mountains.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Andrew C; Kimpe, Lynda E; Blais, Jules M

    2005-01-01

    Concentrations of selected persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in air and water were measured from four lakes that transect the Canadian Rocky Mountains. These data were used in combination with wind velocity and temperature-adjusted Henry's law constants to estimate the direction and magnitude of chemical exchange across the air-water interface of these lakes. Bow Lake (1,975 m above sea level [masl]) was studied during the summers of 1998 through 2000; Donald (770 masl) was studied during the summer of 1999; Dixon Dam Lake (946 masl) and Kananaskis Lake (1,667 masl) were studied during the summer of 2000. Hexachlorobenzene (HCB) and dieldrin volatilized from Bow Lake in spring and summer of 1998 to 2000 at a rate of 0.92 +/-1.1 and 0.55+/-0.37 ng m(-2) d(-1), respectively. The alpha-endosulfan deposited to Bow Lake at a rate of 3.4+/-2.2 ng m(-2) d(-1). Direction of gas exchange for gamma-hexachlorocyclohexane (gamma-HCH) changed from net deposition in 1998 to net volatilization in 1999, partly because of a surge in y-HCH concentrations in the water at Bow Lake in 1999. Average gamma-HCH concentrations in air declined steadily over the three-year period, from 0.021 ng m(-3) in 1998, to 0.0023 ng m(-3) in 2000, and to volatilization in 1999 and 2000. Neither the concentrations of organochlorine compounds (OCs) in air and water, nor the direction and rate of air-water gas exchange correlate with temperature or elevation. In general, losses of pesticides by outflow were greater than the amount exchanged across the air-water interface in these lakes. PMID:15683168

  20. Indoor air-quality measurements in energy-efficient residential buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Berk, J.V.; Hollowell, C.D.; Pepper, J.H.; Young, R.

    1980-05-01

    The potential impact on indoor air quality of energy-conserving measures that reduce ventilation is being assessed in a field-monitoring program conducted by the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Using a mobile laboratory, on-site monitoring of infiltration rate, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, nitric oxide, ozone, sulfur dioxide, formaldehyde, total aldehydes, and particulates was conducted in three houses designed to be energy-efficient. Preliminary results show that energy-conserving design features that reduce air-exchange rates compromise indoor air quality; specifically, indoor levels of several pollutants were found to exceed levels detected outdoors. Although the indoor levels of most pollutants are within limits established by present outdoor air-quality standards, considerable work remains to be accomplished before health-risk effects can be accurately assessed and broad-scale regulatory guidelines revised to comply with energy-conservation goals.

  1. Distribution and air-sea exchange of mercury (Hg) in polluted marine environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagnato, E.; Sprovieri, M.; Bitetto, M.; Bonsignore, M.; Calabrese, S.; Di Stefano, V.; Oliveri, E.; Parello, F.; Mazzola, S.

    2012-04-01

    Mercury (Hg) is emitted in the atmosphere by anthropogenic and natural sources, these last accounting for one third of the total emissions. Since the pre-industrial age, the atmospheric deposition of mercury have increased notably, while ocean emissions have doubled owing to the re-emission of anthropogenic mercury. Exchange between the atmosphere and ocean plays an important role in cycling and transport of mercury. We present the preliminary results from a study on the distribution and evasion flux of mercury at the atmosphere/sea interface in the Augusta basin (SE Sicily, southern Italy), a semi-enclosed marine area affected by a high degree of contamination (heavy metals and PHA) due to the oil refineries placed inside its commercial harbor. It seems that the intense industrial activity of the past have lead to an high Hg pollution in the bottom sediments of the basin, whose concentrations are far from the background mercury value found in most of the Sicily Strait sediments. The release of mercury into the harbor seawater and its dispersion by diffusion from sediments to the surface, make the Augusta basin a potential supplier of mercury both to the Mediterranean Sea and the atmosphere. Based on these considerations, mercury concentration and flux at the air-sea interface of the Bay have been estimated using a real-time atomic adsorption spectrometer (LUMEX - RA915+) and an home-made accumulation chamber, respectively. Estimated Total Atmospheric Mercury (TGM) concentrations during the cruise on the bay were in the range of 1-3 ng · m-3, with a mean value of about 1.4 ng · m-3. These data well fit with the background Hgatm concentration values detected on the land (1-2 ng · m-3, this work), and, more in general, with the background atmospheric TGM levels found in the North Hemisphere (1.5-1.7 ng · m-3)a. Besides, our measurements are in the range of those reported for other important polluted marine areas. The mercury evasion flux at the air-sea interface

  2. Effect of sea sprays on air-sea momentum exchange at severe wind conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troitskaya, Yu.; Ezhova, E.; Semenova, A.; Soustova, I.

    2012-04-01

    Wind-wave interaction at extreme wind speed is of special interest now in connection with the problem of explanation of the sea surface drag saturation at the wind speed exceeding 30 m/s. The idea on saturation (and even reduction) of the coefficient of aerodynamic resistance of the sea surface at hurricane wind speed was first suggested in [1] on the basis of theoretical analysis of sensitivity of maximum wind speed in a hurricane to the ratio of the enthalpy and momentum exchange coefficients. Both field [2-4] and laboratory [5] experiments confirmed that at hurricane wind speed the sea surface drag coefficient is significantly reduced in comparison with the parameterization obtained at moderate to strong wind conditions. Two groups of possible theoretical mechanisms for explanation of the effect of the sea surface drag reduction can be specified. In the first group of models developed in [6,7], the sea surface drag reduction is explained by peculiarities of the air flow over breaking waves. Another approach more appropriate for the conditions of developed sea exploits the effect of sea drops and sprays on the wind-wave momentum exchange. Papers[8,9] focused on the effect of the sea drops on stratification of the air-sea boundary layer similar to the model of turbulent boundary layer with the suspended particles [10], while papers [11-13] estimated the momentum exchange of sea drops and air-flow. A mandatory element of the spray induced momentum flux is a parameterization of the momentum exchange between droplets and air flow, which determines the "source function" in the momentum balance equation. In this paper a model describing the motion of a spume droplet, the wind tear away from the crest of a steep surface wave, and then falling into the water. We consider two models for the injection of droplets into the air flow. The first one assumes that the drop starts from the surface at the orbital velocity of the wave. In the second model we consider droplets from

  3. International Space Station Common Cabin Air Assembly Condensing Heat Exchanger Hydrophilic Coating Failures and Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balistreri, Steven F.; Shaw, Laura A.; Laliberte, Yvon

    2010-01-01

    The ability to control the temperature and humidity of an environment or habitat is critical for human survival. These factors are important to maintaining human health and comfort, as well as maintaining mechanical and electrical equipment in good working order to support the human and to accomplish mission objectives. The temperature and humidity of the International Space Station (ISS) United States On-orbit Segment (USOS) cabin air is controlled by the Common Cabin Air Assembly (CCAA). The CCAA consists of a fan, a condensing heat exchanger (CHX), an air/water separator, temperature and liquid sensors, and electrical controlling hardware and software. The CHX is the primary component responsible for control of temperature and humidity. The CCAA CHX contains a chemical coating that was developed to be hydrophilic and thus attract water from the humid influent air. This attraction forms the basis for water removal and therefore cabin humidity control. However, there have been several instances of CHX coatings becoming hydrophobic and repelling water. When this behavior is observed in an operational CHX, the unit s ability to remove moisture from the air is compromised and the result is liquid water carryover into downstream ducting and systems. This water carryover can have detrimental effects on the cabin atmosphere quality and on the health of downstream hardware. If the water carryover is severe and widespread, this behavior can result in an inability to maintain humidity levels in the USOS. This paper will describe the operation of the five CCAAs within in the USOS, the potential causes of the hydrophobic condition, and the impacts of the resulting water carryover to downstream systems. It will describe the history of this behavior and the actual observed impacts to the ISS USOS. Information on mitigation steps to protect the health of future CHX hydrophilic coatings and potential remediation techniques will also be discussed.

  4. The air-water exchange of C{sub 15}-C{sub 31} n-alkanes in a precipitation-dominated seepage lake.

    SciTech Connect

    Doskey, P. V.; Environmental Research

    2000-01-01

    The air-water exchange of semivolatile n-alkanes in Crystal Lake, a small precipitation-dominated seepage lake in northern Wisconsin, was investigated with modeling and mass balance approaches. The results suggest that atmospheric deposition contributes approximately 80% of the allochthonous input of n-alkanes to Crystal Lake. Atmospheric deposition accounts for about 50% of the total annual input of n-alkanes to Crystal Lake, and an additional 30% is contributed by in situ production of planktonic n-alkanes ({Sigma}C{sub 15}, C{sub 17}, C{sub 19}). Contributions to the particle dry flux of terrestrial n-alkanes ({Sigma}C{sub 25}, C{sub 27}, C{sub 29}, C{sub 31}) by pine pollen dispersal and by dry deposition of particles containing leaf waxes are similar in magnitude and constitute about 60% of the atmospheric input, with particle wet deposition being responsible for the remainder. Approximately 30% of the atmospheric input of the n-alkanes occurs during a two-week episode of pine pollen dispersal in spring. Concentration gradients between gaseous n-alkanes in the atmosphere and dissolved n-alkanes in the water column of Crystal Lake favor volatilization of n-alkanes from the lake surface; however, distributions of dissolved n-alkanes are characteristic of bacteria, and therefore are contained in organic matter and not available for air-water exchange. The estimated net atmospheric input of terrestrial n-alkanes is about 20% less than the settling sediment flux. Additional allochthonous sources of the terrestrial n-alkanes might include diffuse surface runoff or episodes of coarse-particle deposition. The discrepancies in the results from the modeling and mass balance approaches indicate that direct measurements of air-water exchange rates and measurements of the seasonal variations of particle size distributions in air and rain would greatly improve our ability to quantify air-water exchange rates of n-alkanes.

  5. Measure Guideline: Air Sealing Attics in Multifamily Buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Otis, C.; Maxwell, S.

    2012-06-01

    This Building America Measure Guideline is intended for owners, builders, contractors, homeowners, and other stakeholders in the multifamily building industry, and focuses on challenges found in existing buildings for a variety of housing types. It explains why air sealing is desirable, explores related health and safety issues, and identifies common air leakage points in multifamily building attics. In addition, it also gives an overview of materials and techniques typically used to perform air sealing work.

  6. Measure Guideline. Air Sealing Attics in Multifamily Buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Otis, Casey; Maxwell, Sean

    2012-06-01

    This Building America Measure Guideline is intended for owners, builders, contractors, homeowners, and other stakeholders in the multifamily building industry, and focuses on challenges found in existing buildings for a variety of housing types. It explains why air sealing is desirable, explores related health and safety issues, and identifies common air leakage points in multifamily building attics. In addition, it also gives an overview of materials and techniques typically used to perform air sealing work.

  7. Proton dose calculation based on in-air fluence measurements.

    PubMed

    Schaffner, Barbara

    2008-03-21

    Proton dose calculation algorithms--as well as photon and electron algorithms--are usually based on configuration measurements taken in a water phantom. The exceptions to this are proton dose calculation algorithms for modulated scanning beams. There, it is usual to measure the spot profiles in air. We use the concept of in-air configuration measurements also for scattering and uniform scanning (wobbling) proton delivery techniques. The dose calculation includes a separate step for the calculation of the in-air fluence distribution per energy layer. The in-air fluence calculation is specific to the technique and-to a lesser extent-design of the treatment machine. The actual dose calculation uses the in-air fluence as input and is generic for all proton machine designs and techniques. PMID:18367787

  8. 40 CFR 90.416 - Intake air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Intake air flow measurement specifications. 90.416 Section 90.416 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NONROAD SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES AT OR BELOW 19 KILOWATTS Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures §...

  9. Optical Air Flow Measurements in Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogue, Rodney K.; Jentink, Henk W.

    2004-01-01

    This document has been written to assist the flight-test engineer and researcher in using optical flow measurements in flight applications. The emphasis is on describing tradeoffs in system design to provide desired measurement performance as currently understood. Optical system components are discussed with examples that illustrate the issues. The document concludes with descriptions of optical measurement systems designed for a variety of applications including aeronautics research, airspeed measurement, and turbulence hazard detection. Theoretical discussion is minimized, but numerous references are provided to supply ample opportunity for the reader to understand the theoretical underpinning of optical concepts.

  10. Are BVOC exchanges in agricultural ecosystems overestimated? Insights from fluxes measured in a maize field over a whole growing season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachy, Aurélie; Aubinet, Marc; Schoon, Niels; Amelynck, Crist; Bodson, Bernard; Moureaux, Christine; Heinesch, Bernard

    2016-04-01

    Maize is the most important C4 crop worldwide. It is also the second most important crop worldwide (C3 and C4 mixed), and is a dominant crop in some world regions. Therefore, it can potentially influence local climate and air quality through its exchanges of gases with the atmosphere. Among others, biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) are known to influence the atmospheric composition and thereby modify greenhouse gases lifetime and pollutant formation in the atmosphere. However, so far, only two studies have dealt with BVOC exchanges from maize. Moreover, these studies were conducted on a limited range of meteorological and phenological conditions, so that the knowledge of BVOC exchanges by this crop remains poor. Here, we present the first BVOC measurement campaign performed at ecosystem-scale on a maize field during a whole growing season. It was carried out in the Lonzée Terrestrial Observatory (LTO), an ICOS site. BVOC fluxes were measured by the disjunct by mass-scanning eddy covariance technique with a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer for BVOC mixing ratios measurements. Outstanding results are (i) BVOC exchanges from soil were as important as BVOC exchanges from maize itself; (ii) BVOC exchanges observed on our site were much lower than exchanges observed by other maize studies, even under normalized temperature and light conditions, (iii) they were also lower than those observed on other crops grown in Europe. Lastly (iv), BVOC exchanges observed on our site under standard environmental conditions, i.e., standard emission factors SEF, were much lower than those currently considered by BVOC exchange up-scaling models. From those observations, we deduced that (i) soil BVOC exchanges should be better understood and should be incorporated in terrestrial BVOC exchanges models, and that (ii) SEF for the C4 crop plant functional type cannot be evaluated at global scale but should be determined for each important agronomic and pedo-climatic region

  11. Solid oxide fuel cell power plant having a fixed contact oxidation catalyzed section of a multi-section cathode air heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Saito, Kazuo; Lin, Yao

    2015-02-17

    The multi-section cathode air heat exchanger (102) includes at least a first heat exchanger section (104), and a fixed contact oxidation catalyzed section (126) secured adjacent each other in a stack association. Cool cathode inlet air flows through cool air channels (110) of the at least first (104) and oxidation catalyzed sections (126). Hot anode exhaust flows through hot air channels (124) of the oxidation catalyzed section (126) and is combusted therein. The combusted anode exhaust then flows through hot air channels (112) of the first section (104) of the cathode air heat exchanger (102). The cool and hot air channels (110, 112) are secured in direct heat exchange relationship with each other so that temperatures of the heat exchanger (102) do not exceed 800.degree. C. to minimize requirements for using expensive, high-temperature alloys.

  12. Air-Cooled Heat Exchanger for High-Temperature Power Electronics: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Waye, S. K.; Lustbader, J.; Musselman, M.; King, C.

    2015-05-06

    This work demonstrates a direct air-cooled heat exchanger strategy for high-temperature power electronic devices with an application specific to automotive traction drive inverters. We present experimental heat dissipation and system pressure curves versus flow rate for baseline and optimized sub-module assemblies containing two ceramic resistance heaters that provide device heat fluxes. The maximum allowable junction temperature was set to 175 deg.C. Results were extrapolated to the inverter scale and combined with balance-of-inverter components to estimate inverter power density and specific power. The results exceeded the goal of 12 kW/L and 12 kW/kg for power density and specific power, respectively.

  13. Oceanic Whitecaps and Their Role in Air-Sea Exchange Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glazman, R. E.

    The book is based on the proceedings of the 1983 Whitecap Workshop, held at University College, Galway, Ireland. The 22 full-length papers and 18 abstracts of poster presentations that it contains cover a wide range of topics. The small-scale air-sea exchange processes triggered by the breaking of wind-generated gravity waves serve as the common ground from which specialized excursions are made into the fields of acoustics and optics of bubbly water, statistics and hydrodynamics of water waves, remote sensing, atmospheric electricity, and physicochemical hydrodynamics of bubbles, droplets, and water surfaces coated with organic films. The book opens with “The Life and Science of Alfred H. Woodcock” by Duncan Blanchard (State University of New York, Albany).

  14. AIR INFILTRATION MEASUREMENTS USING TRACER GASES: A LITERATURE REVIEW

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a literature review of air filtration measurements using tracer gases, including sulfur hexafluoride, hydrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, and radioactive argon and krypton. Sulfur hexafluoride is the commonest tracer gas of choice...

  15. Measurement-based upscaling of Pan Arctic Net Ecosystem Exchange: the PANEEx project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Njuabe Mbufong, Herbert; Kusbach, Antonin; Lund, Magnus; Persson, Andreas; Christensen, Torben R.; Tamstorf, Mikkel P.; Connolly, John

    2016-04-01

    The high variability in Arctic tundra net ecosystem exchange (NEE) of carbon (C) can be attributed to the high spatial heterogeneity of Arctic tundra due to the complex topography. Current models of C exchange handle the Arctic as either a single or few ecosystems, responding to environmental change in the same manner. In this study, we developed and tested a simple pan Arctic NEE (PANEEx) model using the Misterlich light response curve (LRC) function with photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD) as the main driving variable. Model calibration was carried out with eddy covariance carbon dioxide (CO2) data from 12 Arctic tundra sites. The model input parameters (Fcsat, Rd and α) were estimated as a function of air temperature (AirT) and leaf area index (LAI) and represent specific characteristics of the NEE-PPFD relationship, including the saturation flux, dark respiration and initial light use efficiency, respectively. LAI and air temperature were respectively estimated from empirical relationships with remotely sensed normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and land surface temperature (LST). These are available as MODIS Terra product MOD13Q1 and MOD11A1 respectively. Therefore, no specific knowledge of the vegetation type is required. The PANEEx model captures the spatial heterogeneity of the Arctic tundra and was effective in simulating 77% of the measured fluxes (r2 = 0.72, p < 0.001) at the 12 sites used in the calibration of the model. Further, the model effectively estimates NEE in three disparate Alaskan ecosystems (heath, tussock and fen) with an estimation ranging between 10 - 36% of the measured fluxes. We suggest that the poor agreement between the measured and modeled NEE may result from the disparity between ground-based measured LAI (used in model calibration) and remotely sensed LAI (estimated from NDVI and used in NEE estimation). Moreover, our results suggests that using simple linear regressions may be inadequate as parameters estimated

  16. Air-snow exchange of nitrate: a modelling approach to investigate physicochemical processes in surface snow at Dome C, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bock, Josué; Savarino, Joël; Picard, Ghislain

    2016-04-01

    Snowpack is a multiphase (photo)chemical reactor that strongly influences the air composition in polar and snow-covered regions. Snowpack plays a special role in the nitrogen cycle, as it has been shown that nitrate undergoes numerous recycling stages (including photolysis) in the snow before being permanently buried in the firn. However, the current understanding of these physicochemical processes remains very poor. Several modelling studies have attempted to reproduce (photo)chemical reactions inside snow grains, but these required strong assumptions to characterise snow reactive properties, which are not well defined. Physical processes such as adsorption, solid state diffusion and co-condensation also affect snow chemical composition. We developed a model including a physically based parameterisation of these air-snow exchange processes for nitrate. This modelling study divides into two distinct parts: firstly, surface concentration of nitrate adsorbed onto snow is calculated using existing isotherm parametrisation. Secondly, bulk concentration of nitrate in solid solution into the ice matrix is modelled. In this second approach, solid state diffusion drives the evolution of nitrate concentration inside a layered spherical snow grain. A physically-based parameterisation defining the concentration at the air-snow interface was developed to account for the the co-condensation process. The model uses as input a one-year long time series of atmospheric nitrate concentration measured at Dome C, Antarctica. The modelled nitrate concentration in surface snow is compared to field measurements. We show that on the one hand, the adsorption of nitric acid on the surface of the snow grains fails to fit the observed variations. During winter and spring, the modelled adsorbed concentration of nitrate is 2.5 and 8.3-fold higher than the measured one, respectively. A strong diurnal variation driven by the temperature cycle and a peak occurring in early spring are two other

  17. Method and Apparatus for Measuring Surface Air Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Bing (Inventor); Hu, Yongxiang (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention is directed to an apparatus and method for remotely measuring surface air pressure. In one embodiment, the method of the present invention utilizes the steps of transmitting a signal having multiple frequencies into the atmosphere, measuring the transmitted/reflected signal to determine the relative received power level of each frequency and then determining the surface air pressure based upon the attenuation of the transmitted frequencies.

  18. Measuring In-Air and Underwater Hearing in Seabirds.

    PubMed

    Crowell, Sara C

    2016-01-01

    Electrophysiological methods were used to measure the in-air hearing of 10 species of seabirds. There are currently no measures of the underwater hearing abilities of diving birds. In preparation for constructing a behavioral audiogram both in-air and underwater hearing, several species of diving ducks were raised. Because there is a considerable amount of literature on bird hearing in air, the technical setup and training methods were modeled on similar studies, with modifications to address the nature of the underwater sound field and the difficulty of the task for the birds. PMID:26611081

  19. Measuring In-Air and Underwater Hearing in Seabirds.

    PubMed

    Crowell, Sara C

    2016-01-01

    Electrophysiological methods were used to measure the in-air hearing of 10 species of seabirds. There are currently no measures of the underwater hearing abilities of diving birds. In preparation for constructing a behavioral audiogram both in-air and underwater hearing, several species of diving ducks were raised. Because there is a considerable amount of literature on bird hearing in air, the technical setup and training methods were modeled on similar studies, with modifications to address the nature of the underwater sound field and the difficulty of the task for the birds.

  20. 40 CFR 92.108 - Intake and cooling air measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... device for all modes except idle. For idle, the measurement accuracy shall be ±5 percent or less of the...) Corrections to the measured air mass flowrate shall be made when an engine system incorporates devices that... from these devices shall be approved by the Administrator. (3) Measurements made in accordance with...

  1. [The functional and hygienic evaluation of a thermal exchange storage apparatus for recovering warmth from outgoing stable air].

    PubMed

    Paar, G; Bocklisch, H; Reinz, R; Hermanns, W

    1990-10-01

    By means of a thermo exchange apparatus it is possible to recover 70 to 80 percent of warmth of the stable air for heating. Thus much energy for climatizing can be saved. Alternating directions of to and from air streams may cause re-influx of germs, dependent on percentage of dust. This risk can be minimized by using an apparatus each for relatively small units separately.

  2. Technique for measuring air flow and carbon dioxide flux in large, open-top chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Ham, J.M.; Owensby, C.E.; Coyne, P.I.

    1993-10-01

    Open-Top Chambers (OTCs) are commonly used to evaluate the effect of CO{sub 2},O{sub 3}, and other trace gases on vegetation. This study developed and tested a new technique for measuring forced air flow and net CO{sub 2} flux from OTCs. Experiments were performed with a 4.5-m diam. OTC with a sealed floor and a specialized air delivery system. Air flow through the chamber was computed with the Bernoulli equation using measurements of the pressure differential between the air delivery ducts and the chamber interior. An independent measurement of air flow was made simultaneously to calibrate and verify the accuracy of the Bernoulli relationship. The CO{sub 2} flux density was calculated as the product of chamber air flow and the difference in CO{sub 2} concentration between the air entering and exhausting from the OTC (C{sub in}-C{sub out}). Accuracy was evaluated by releasing CO{sub 2} within the OTC at known rates. Data were collected with OTCs at ambient and elevated CO{sub 2} ({approx}700 {mu}mol{sup -1}). Results showed the Bernoulli equation, with a flow coefficient of 0.7, accurately measured air flow in the OTC within {+-}5% regardless of flow rate and air duct geometry. Experiments in ambient OTCs showed CO{sub 2} flux density ({mu}mol m{sup -2} s{sup -1}), computed from 2-min averages of air flow and C{sub in} - C{sub out,} was typically within {+-} 10% of actual flux, provided that the exit air velocity at the top of the OTC was greater than 0.6 m s{sup -1}. Obtaining the same accuracy in CO{sub 2}-enriched OTCs required a critical exit velocity near 1.2 m s{sup -1} to minimize the incursion of ambient air and prevent contamination of exit gas sample. When flux data were integrated over time to estimate daily CO{sub 2} flux ({mu}mol m{sup -2} d{sup -1}), actual and measured values agreed to within {+-}2% for both ambient and CO{sub 2}-enriched chambers, suggesting that accurate measurements of daily net C exchange are possible with this technique.

  3. Air-snow exchange of nitrate: a modelling approach to investigate physicochemical processes in surface snow at Dome C, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bock, Josué; Savarino, Joël; Picard, Ghislain

    2016-10-01

    Snowpack is a multiphase (photo)chemical reactor that strongly influences the air composition in polar and snow-covered regions. Snowpack plays a special role in the nitrogen cycle, as it has been shown that nitrate undergoes numerous recycling stages (including photolysis) in the snow before being permanently buried in the ice. However, the current understanding of these physicochemical processes remains very poor. Several modelling studies have attempted to reproduce (photo)chemical reactions inside snow grains, but these have relied on strong assumptions to characterise snow reactive properties, which are not well defined. Air-snow exchange processes such as adsorption, solid-state diffusion, or co-condensation also affect snow chemical composition. Here, we present a physically based model of these processes for nitrate. Using as input a 1-year-long time series of atmospheric nitrate concentration measured at Dome C, Antarctica, our model reproduces with good agreement the nitrate measurements in the surface snow. By investigating the relative importance of the main exchange processes, this study shows that, on the one hand, the combination of bulk diffusion and co-condensation allows a good reproduction of the measurements (correlation coefficient r = 0.95), with a correct amplitude and timing of summer peak concentration of nitrate in snow. During winter, nitrate concentration in surface snow is mainly driven by thermodynamic equilibrium, whilst the peak observed in summer is explained by the kinetic process of co-condensation. On the other hand, the adsorption of nitric acid on the surface of the snow grains, constrained by an already existing parameterisation for the isotherm, fails to fit the observed variations. During winter and spring, the modelled concentration of adsorbed nitrate is respectively 2.5 and 8.3-fold higher than the measured one. A strong diurnal variation driven by the temperature cycle and a peak occurring in early spring are two other

  4. Air-water exchange of anthropogenic and natural organohalogens on International Polar Year (IPY) expeditions in the Canadian Arctic.

    PubMed

    Wong, Fiona; Jantunen, Liisa M; Pućko, Monika; Papakyriakou, Tim; Staebler, Ralf M; Stern, Gary A; Bidleman, Terry F

    2011-02-01

    Shipboard measurements of organohalogen compounds in air and surface seawater were conducted in the Canadian Arctic in 2007-2008. Study areas included the Labrador Sea, Hudson Bay, and the southern Beaufort Sea. High volume air samples were collected at deck level (6 m), while low volume samples were taken at 1 and 15 m above the water or ice surface. Water samples were taken within 7 m. Water concentration ranges (pg L(-1)) were as follows: α-hexachlorocyclohexane (α-HCH) 465-1013, γ-HCH 150-254, hexachlorobenzene (HCB) 4.0-6.4, 2,4-dibromoanisole (DBA) 8.5-38, and 2,4,6-tribromoanisole (TBA) 4.7-163. Air concentration ranges (pg m(-3)) were as follows: α-HCH 7.5-48, γ-HCH 2.1-7.7, HCB 48-71, DBA 4.8-25, and TBA 6.4 - 39. Fugacity gradients predicted net deposition of HCB in all areas, while exchange directions varied for the other chemicals by season and locations. Net evasion of α-HCH from Hudson Bay and the Beaufort Sea during open water conditions was shown by air concentrations that averaged 14% higher at 1 m than 15 m. No significant difference between the two heights was found over ice cover. The α-HCH in air over the Beaufort Sea was racemic in winter (mean enantiomer fraction, EF = 0.504 ± 0.008) and nonracemic in late spring-early summer (mean EF = 0.476 ± 0.010). This decrease in EF was accompanied by a rise in air concentrations due to volatilization of nonracemic α-HCH from surface water (EF = 0.457 ± 0.019). Fluxes of chemicals during the southern Beaufort Sea open water season (i.e., Leg 9) were estimated using the Whitman two-film model, where volatilization fluxes are positive and deposition fluxes are negative. The means ± SD (and ranges) of net fluxes (ng m(-2) d(-1)) were as follows: α-HCH 6.8 ± 3.2 (2.7-13), γ-HCH 0.76 ± 0.40 (0.26-1.4), HCB -9.6 ± 2.7 (-6.1 to -15), DBA 1.2 ± 0.69 (0.04-2.0), and TBA 0.46 ± 1.1 ng m(-2) d(-1) (-1.6 to 2.0).

  5. Rural southeast Texas air quality measurements during the 2006 Texas Air Quality Study.

    PubMed

    Schade, Gunnar W; Khan, Siraj; Park, Changhyoun; Boedeker, Ian

    2011-10-01

    The authors conducted air quality measurements of the criteria pollutants carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, and ozone together with meteorological measurements at a park site southeast of College Station, TX, during the 2006 Texas Air Quality Study II (TexAQS). Ozone, a primary focus of the measurements, was above 80 ppb during 3 days and above 75 ppb during additional 8 days in summer 2006, suggestive of possible violations of the ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) in this area. In concordance with other air quality measurements during the TexAQS II, elevated ozone mixing ratios coincided with northerly flows during days after cold front passages. Ozone background during these days was as high as 80 ppb, whereas southerly air flows generally provided for an ozone background lower than 40 ppb. Back trajectory analysis shows that local ozone mixing ratios can also be strongly affected by the Houston urban pollution plume, leading to late afternoon ozone increases of as high as 50 ppb above background under favorable transport conditions. The trajectory analysis also shows that ozone background increases steadily the longer a southern air mass resides over Texas after entering from the Gulf of Mexico. In light of these and other TexAQS findings, it appears that ozone air quality is affected throughout east Texas by both long-range and regional ozone transport, and that improvements therefore will require at least a regionally oriented instead of the current locally oriented ozone precursor reduction policies.

  6. Optical Air Flow Measurements for Flight Tests and Flight Testing Optical Air Flow Meters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jentink, Henk W.; Bogue, Rodney K.

    2005-01-01

    Optical air flow measurements can support the testing of aircraft and can be instrumental to in-flight investigations of the atmosphere or atmospheric phenomena. Furthermore, optical air flow meters potentially contribute as avionics systems to flight safety and as air data systems. The qualification of these instruments for the flight environment is where we encounter the systems in flight testing. An overview is presented of different optical air flow measurement techniques applied in flight and what can be achieved with the techniques for flight test purposes is reviewed. All in-flight optical airflow velocity measurements use light scattering. Light is scattered on both air molecules and aerosols entrained in the air. Basic principles of making optical measurements in flight, some basic optical concepts, electronic concepts, optoelectronic interfaces, and some atmospheric processes associated with natural aerosols are reviewed. Safety aspects in applying the technique are shortly addressed. The different applications of the technique are listed and some typical examples are presented. Recently NASA acquired new data on mountain rotors, mountain induced turbulence, with the ACLAIM system. Rotor position was identified using the lidar system and the potentially hazardous air flow profile was monitored by the ACLAIM system.

  7. Bidirectional air-sea exchange and accumulation of POPs (PAHs, PCBs, OCPs and PBDEs) in the nocturnal marine boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lammel, Gerhard; Meixner, Franz X.; Vrana, Branislav; Efstathiou, Christos I.; Kohoutek, Jiři; Kukučka, Petr; Mulder, Marie D.; Přibylová, Petra; Prokeš, Roman; Rusina, Tatsiana P.; Song, Guo-Zheng; Tsapakis, Manolis

    2016-05-01

    As a consequence of long-range transported pollution, air-sea exchange can become a major source of persistent organic pollutants in remote marine environments. The vertical gradients in the air were quantified for 14 species, i.e. four parent polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), three polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), three organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and two polybrominated diphenylethers (PBDEs) in the gas-phase at a remote coastal site in the southern Aegean Sea in summer. Most vertical gradients were positive (Δc/Δz > 0), indicating downward (net depositional) flux. Significant upward (net volatilisational) fluxes were found for three PAHs, mostly during daytime, and for two OCPs, mostly during night-time, as well as for one PCB and one PBDE during part of the measurements. While phenanthrene was deposited, fluoranthene (FLT) and pyrene (PYR) seem to undergo flux oscillation, hereby not following a day-night cycle. Box modelling confirms that volatilisation from the sea surface has significantly contributed to the night-time maxima of OCPs. Fluxes were quantified based on eddy covariance. Deposition fluxes ranged from -28.5 to +1.8 µg m-2 day-1 for PAHs and -3.4 to +0.9 µg m-2 day-1 for halogenated compounds. Dry particle deposition of FLT and PYR did not contribute significantly to the vertical flux.

  8. Measurement of Moisture Transport in the Membrane-Based Enthalpy Exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novotný, P.; Nguyen, V.; Dvořák, V.

    2013-04-01

    Application of moisture membrane system can increase the efficiency of the HVAC system where the latent heat load is responsible for a large fraction of total energy. The moisture transfer mechanisms in membranes were studied on our experimental device, which supplied dry air and humid air in two regime.The dry air and humid air were delivered to membrane-based enthalpy exchanger with two contraflow cavities separated by the examined membrane. Nine types of hydrophilic membranes were compared by efficiency of moisture transport during isothermal humidity transport for flow velocity from 0.5 to 4 ms-1

  9. Air-water exchange of brominated anisoles in the northern Baltic Sea.

    PubMed

    Bidleman, Terry F; Agosta, Kathleen; Andersson, Agneta; Haglund, Peter; Nygren, Olle; Ripszam, Matyas; Tysklind, Mats

    2014-06-01

    Bromophenols produced by marine algae undergo O-methylation to form bromoanisoles (BAs), which are exchanged between water and air. BAs were determined in surface water of the northern Baltic Sea (Gulf of Bothnia, consisting of Bothnian Bay and Bothnian Sea) during 2011-2013 and on a transect of the entire Baltic in September 2013. The abundance decreased in the following order: 2,4,6-tribromoanisole (2,4,6-TBA)>2,4-dibromoanisole (2,4-DBA)≫2,6-dibromoanisole (2,6-DBA). Concentrations of 2,4-DBA and 2,4,6-TBA in September were higher in the southern than in the northern Baltic and correlated well with the higher salinity in the south. This suggests south-to-north advection and dilution with fresh riverine water enroute, and/or lower production in the north. The abundance in air over the northern Baltic also decreased in the following order: 2,4,6-TBA>2,4-DBA. However, 2,6-DBA was estimated as a lower limit due to breakthrough from polyurethane foam traps used for sampling. Water/air fugacity ratios ranged from 3.4 to 7.6 for 2,4-DBA and from 18 to 94 for 2,4,6-TBA, indicating net volatilization. Flux estimates using the two-film model suggested that volatilization removes 980-1360 kg of total BAs from Bothnian Bay (38000 km2) between May and September. The release of bromine from outgassing of BAs could be up to 4-6% of bromine fluxes from previously reported volatilization of bromomethanes and bromochloromethanes.

  10. Utilization of lasers for air data measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, J.

    1991-05-01

    The operating principles of the ALEV3 three axis laser Doppler anemometer, which was designed for flight tests with the A-320 and A-340 aircraft, are depicted. If mounted on the aircraft center of gravity, the ALEV-3 allows true flight velocity in three directions and angles of attack and sideslip to be directly measured with a very good accuracy, in particular flight areas such as limit buffeting, stall, high Mach numbers, or sideslip flights. Aircraft parameter estimation, calculation, and calibration results are presented. The accuracies of velocity, static pressure and aerodynamic angle measurements were compared with classical anemometers precisions. Flight tests results of the ALEV-1 one axis laser anemometer for A-320 are given as a reference.

  11. Study of air-soil exchange of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the north-central part of India--a semi arid region.

    PubMed

    Masih, Amit; Masih, Jamson; Taneja, Ajay

    2012-01-01

    Soil is the major environmental reservoir of organic compounds and soil-air exchange is a key process in governing the environmental fate of these compounds on a regional and global scale. Samples of air and soil were collected to study the levels of PAHs in the air and soil of the Agra region. Concentrations of PAH measured at four locations in the city of Agra, covers industrial, residential, roadside and agricultural areas. Samples were extracted with hexane by ultrasonic agitation. Extracts were then fractioned on a silica-gel column and the aromatic fraction was analysed by GC-MS. The mean concentration of the total PAH (T-PAH) in the air of Agra was 24.95, 17.95 and 14.25 ng m(-3), during winter, monsoon and summer respectively. The average concentration of T-PAH in the soil of Agra was 12.50, 8.25 and 6.44 μg g(-1) in winter, monsoon and summer seasons respectively. The aim of this study was to investigate the rate of approach to equilibrium partitioning of PAHs between air and soil compartments and to determine the direction of net flux of the studied PAH between air and soil. Calculated soil-air fugacity quotients indicate that the soil may now be a source of some lighter weight PAHs to the atmosphere, whereas it appears to be still acting as a long-term sink for the heavier weight PAHs to some extent in this region.

  12. Identification and influence of spatial outliers in air quality measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Leary, B. F.; Lemke, L. D.

    2015-12-01

    The heterogeneous nature of urban air complicates the analysis of spatial and temporal variability in air quality measurements. Evaluation of potentially inaccurate measurements (i.e., outliers) poses particularly difficult challenges in extensive air quality datasets with multiple measurements distributed in time and space. This study investigated the identification and impact of outliers in measurements of NO­2, BTEX, PM2.5, and PM10 in the contiguous Detroit, Michigan, USA and Windsor, Ontario, Canada international airshed. Measurements were taken at 100 locations during September 2008 and June 2009 and modeled at a 300m by 300m scale resolution. The objective was to determine if outliers were present and, if so, to quantify the magnitude of their impact on modeled spatial pollution distributions. The study built upon previous investigations by the Geospatial Determinants of Health Outcomes Consortium that examined relationships between air pollutant distributions and asthma exacerbations in the Detroit and Windsor airshed. Four independent approaches were initially employed to identify potential outliers: boxplots, variogram clouds, difference maps, and the Local Moran's I statistic. Potential outliers were subsequently reevaluated for consistency among methods and individually assessed to select a final set of outliers. The impact of excluding individual outliers was subsequently determined by revising the spatially variable air pollution models and recalculating associations between air contaminant concentrations and asthma exacerbations in Detroit and Windsor in 2008. For the pollutants examined, revised associations revealed weaker correlations with spatial outliers removed. Nevertheless, the approach employed improves the model integrity by increasing our understanding of the spatial variability of air pollution in the built environment and providing additional insights into the association between acute asthma exacerbations and air pollution.

  13. Development and Evaluation of a New Air Exchange Rate Algorithm for the Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation Model

    EPA Science Inventory

    between-home and between-city variability in residential pollutant infiltration. This is likely a result of differences in home ventilation, or air exchange rates (AER). The Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation (SHEDS) model is a population exposure model that uses a pro...

  14. Use of an air-fluid exchange system to promote graft adhesion during Descemet's stripping automated endothelial keratoplasty.

    PubMed

    Meisler, David M; Dupps, William J; Covert, Douglas J; Koenig, Steven B

    2007-05-01

    Dislocation of the graft is a well-recognized complication of Descemet's stripping automated endothelial keratoplasty (DSAEK). We describe a technique to promote adhesion of the graft during DSAEK using an anterior chamber air-fluid infusion and exchange for direct control of the pressure and medium used to tamponade the graft against the host stroma.

  15. Measuring a hidden coordinate: Rate-exchange kinetics from 3D correlation functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, Mark A.; Darvin, Jason R.

    2016-08-01

    Nonexponential kinetics imply the existence of at least one slow variable other than the observable, that is, the system has a "hidden" coordinate. We develop a simple, but general, model that allows multidimensional correlation functions to be calculated for these systems. Homogeneous and heterogeneous mechanisms are both included, and slow exchange of the rates is allowed. This model shows that 2D and 3D correlation functions of the observable measure the distribution and kinetics of the hidden coordinate controlling the rate exchange. Both the mean exchange time and the shape of the exchange relaxation are measurable. However, complications arise because higher correlation functions are sums of multiple "pathways," each of which measures different dynamics. Only one 3D pathway involves exchange dynamics. Care must be used to extract exchange dynamics without contamination from other processes.

  16. Measurement results obtained from air quality monitoring system

    SciTech Connect

    Turzanski, P.K.; Beres, R.

    1995-12-31

    An automatic system of air pollution monitoring operates in Cracow since 1991. The organization, assembling and start-up of the network is a result of joint efforts of the US Environmental Protection Agency and the Cracow environmental protection service. At present the automatic monitoring network is operated by the Provincial Inspection of Environmental Protection. There are in total seven stationary stations situated in Cracow to measure air pollution. These stations are supported continuously by one semi-mobile (transportable) station. It allows to modify periodically the area under investigation and therefore the 3-dimensional picture of creation and distribution of air pollutants within Cracow area could be more intelligible.

  17. MEASUREMENT OF LOW LEVEL AIR TOXICS WITH MODIFIED UV DOAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    To further understand near source impacts, EPA is working to develop open-path optical techniques for spatiotemporal-resolved measurement of air pollutants. Of particular interest is near real time quantification of mobile-source generated CO, Nox and hydrocarbons measured in cl...

  18. The Aeroflex: A Bicycle for Mobile Air Quality Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Elen, Bart; Peters, Jan; Van Poppel, Martine; Bleux, Nico; Theunis, Jan; Reggente, Matteo; Standaert, Arnout

    2013-01-01

    Fixed air quality stations have limitations when used to assess people's real life exposure to air pollutants. Their spatial coverage is too limited to capture the spatial variability in, e.g., an urban or industrial environment. Complementary mobile air quality measurements can be used as an additional tool to fill this void. In this publication we present the Aeroflex, a bicycle for mobile air quality monitoring. The Aeroflex is equipped with compact air quality measurement devices to monitor ultrafine particle number counts, particulate mass and black carbon concentrations at a high resolution (up to 1 second). Each measurement is automatically linked to its geographical location and time of acquisition using GPS and Internet time. Furthermore, the Aeroflex is equipped with automated data transmission, data pre-processing and data visualization. The Aeroflex is designed with adaptability, reliability and user friendliness in mind. Over the past years, the Aeroflex has been successfully used for high resolution air quality mapping, exposure assessment and hot spot identification. PMID:23262484

  19. The Aeroflex: a bicycle for mobile air quality measurements.

    PubMed

    Elen, Bart; Peters, Jan; Poppel, Martine Van; Bleux, Nico; Theunis, Jan; Reggente, Matteo; Standaert, Arnout

    2013-01-01

    Fixed air quality stations have limitations when used to assess people's real life exposure to air pollutants. Their spatial coverage is too limited to capture the spatial variability in, e.g., an urban or industrial environment. Complementary mobile air quality measurements can be used as an additional tool to fill this void. In this publication we present the Aeroflex, a bicycle for mobile air quality monitoring. The Aeroflex is equipped with compact air quality measurement devices to monitor ultrafine particle number counts, particulate mass and black carbon concentrations at a high resolution (up to 1 second). Each measurement is automatically linked to its geographical location and time of acquisition using GPS and Internet time. Furthermore, the Aeroflex is equipped with automated data transmission, data pre-processing and data visualization. The Aeroflex is designed with adaptability, reliability and user friendliness in mind. Over the past years, the Aeroflex has been successfully used for high resolution air quality mapping, exposure assessment and hot spot identification. 

  20. The influence of water vapor on atmospheric exchange measurements with an ICOS* based Laser absorption analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunk, Rüdiger; Quan, Zhi; Wandel, Matthias; Yi, Zhigang; Bozem, Heiko; Kesselmeier, Jürgen

    2014-05-01

    Carbonyl sulfide and carbon monoxide are both atmospheric trace gases of high interest. Recent advances in the field of spectroscopy have enabled instruments that measure the concentration of the above and other trace gases very fast and with good precision. Increasing the effective path length by reflecting the light between two mirrors in a cavity, these instruments reach impressive sensitivities. Often it is possible to measure the concentration of more than one trace gas at the same time. The OCS/CO2 Analyzer by LGR (Los Gatos Research, Inc.) measures the concentration of water vapor [H2O], carbonyl sulfide [COS], carbon dioxide [CO2] and carbon monoxide [CO] simultaneously. For that the cavity is saturated with light, than the attenuation of light is measured as in standard absorption spectroscopy. The instrument proved to be very fast with good precision and to be able to detect even very low concentrations, especially for COS (as low as 30ppt in the case of COS). However, we observed a rather strong cross sensitivity to water vapor. Altering the water vapor content of the sampled air with two different methods led to a change in the perceived concentration of COS, CO and CO2. This proved especially problematic for enclosure (cuvette) measurements, where the concentrations of one of the above species in an empty cuvette are compared to the concentration of another cuvette containing a plant whose exchange of trace gases with the atmosphere is of interest. There, the plants transpiration leads to a large difference in water vapor content between the cuvettes and that in turn produces artifacts in the concentration differences between the cuvettes for the other above mentioned trace gases. For CO, simultaneous measurement with a UV-Emission Analyzer (AL 5002, Aerolaser) and the COS/CO Analyzer showed good agreement of perceived concentrations as long as the sample gas was dry and an increasing difference in perceived concentration when the sample gas was

  1. THE ROLE OF AQUEOUS THIN FILM EVAPORATIVE COOLING ON RATES OF ELEMENTAL MERCURY AIR-WATER EXCHANGE UNDER TEMPERATURE DISEQUILIBRIUM CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The technical conununity has only recently addressed the role of atmospheric temperature variations on rates of air-water vapor phase toxicant exchange. The technical literature has documented that: 1) day time rates of elemental mercury vapor phase air-water exchange can exceed ...

  2. Advances in the Lightweight Air-Liquid Composite Heat Exchanger Development for Space Exploration Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shin, E. Eugene; Johnston, J. Chris; Haas, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    An advanced, lightweight composite modular Air/Liquid (A/L) Heat Exchanger (HX) Prototype for potential space exploration thermal management applications was successfully designed, manufactured, and tested. This full-scale Prototype consisting of 19 modules, based on recommendations from its predecessor Engineering Development unit (EDU) but with improved thermal characteristics and manufacturability, was 11.2 % lighter than the EDU and achieves potentially a 42.7% weight reduction from the existing state-of-the-art metallic HX demonstrator. However, its higher pressure drop (0.58 psid vs. 0.16 psid of the metal HX) has to be mitigated by foam material optimizations and design modifications including a more systematic air channel design. Scalability of the Prototype design was validated experimentally by comparing manufacturability and performance between the 2-module coupon and the 19-module Prototype. The Prototype utilized the thermally conductive open-cell carbon foam material but with lower density and adopted a novel high-efficiency cooling system with significantly increased heat transfer contact surface areas, improved fabricability and manufacturability compared to the EDU. Even though the Prototype was required to meet both the thermal and the structural specifications, accomplishing the thermal requirement was a higher priority goal for this first version. Overall, the Prototype outperformed both the EDU and the corresponding metal HX, particularly in terms of specific heat transfer, but achieved 93.4% of the target. The next generation Prototype to achieve the specification target, 3,450W would need 24 core modules based on the simple scaling factor. The scale-up Prototype will weigh about 14.7 Kg vs. 21.6 Kg for the metal counterpart. The advancement of this lightweight composite HX development from the original feasibility test coupons to EDU to Prototype is discussed in this paper.

  3. Foundation Heat Exchanger Final Report: Demonstration, Measured Performance, and Validated Model and Design Tool

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, Patrick; Im, Piljae

    2012-01-01

    Geothermal heat pumps, sometimes called ground-source heat pumps (GSHPs), have been proven capable of significantly reducing energy use and peak demand in buildings. Conventional equipment for controlling the temperature and humidity of a building, or supplying hot water and fresh outdoor air, must exchange energy (or heat) with the building's outdoor environment. Equipment using the ground as a heat source and heat sink consumes less non-renewable energy (electricity and fossil fuels) because the earth is cooler than outdoor air in summer and warmer in winter. The most important barrier to rapid growth of the GSHP industry is high first cost of GSHP systems to consumers. The most common GSHP system utilizes a closed-loop ground heat exchanger. This type of GSHP system can be used almost anywhere. There is reason to believe that reducing the cost of closed-loop systems is the strategy that would achieve the greatest energy savings with GSHP technology. The cost premium of closed-loop GSHP systems over conventional space conditioning and water heating systems is primarily associated with drilling boreholes or excavating trenches, installing vertical or horizontal ground heat exchangers, and backfilling the excavations. This project investigates reducing the cost of horizontal closed-loop ground heat exchangers by installing them in the construction excavations, augmented when necessary with additional trenches. This approach applies only to new construction of residential and light commercial buildings or additions to such buildings. In the business-as-usual scenario, construction excavations are not used for the horizontal ground heat exchanger (HGHX); instead the HGHX is installed entirely in trenches dug specifically for that purpose. The potential cost savings comes from using the construction excavations for the installation of ground heat exchangers, thereby minimizing the need and expense of digging additional trenches. The term foundation heat exchanger (FHX

  4. Foundation Heat Exchanger Final Report: Demonstration, Measured Performance, and Validated Model and Design Tool

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, Patrick; Im, Piljae

    2012-04-01

    Geothermal heat pumps, sometimes called ground-source heat pumps (GSHPs), have been proven capable of significantly reducing energy use and peak demand in buildings. Conventional equipment for controlling the temperature and humidity of a building, or supplying hot water and fresh outdoor air, must exchange energy (or heat) with the building's outdoor environment. Equipment using the ground as a heat source and heat sink consumes less non-renewable energy (electricity and fossil fuels) because the earth is cooler than outdoor air in summer and warmer in winter. The most important barrier to rapid growth of the GSHP industry is high first cost of GSHP systems to consumers. The most common GSHP system utilizes a closed-loop ground heat exchanger. This type of GSHP system can be used almost anywhere. There is reason to believe that reducing the cost of closed-loop systems is the strategy that would achieve the greatest energy savings with GSHP technology. The cost premium of closed-loop GSHP systems over conventional space conditioning and water heating systems is primarily associated with drilling boreholes or excavating trenches, installing vertical or horizontal ground heat exchangers, and backfilling the excavations. This project investigates reducing the cost of horizontal closed-loop ground heat exchangers by installing them in the construction excavations, augmented when necessary with additional trenches. This approach applies only to new construction of residential and light commercial buildings or additions to such buildings. In the business-as-usual scenario, construction excavations are not used for the horizontal ground heat exchanger (HGHX); instead the HGHX is installed entirely in trenches dug specifically for that purpose. The potential cost savings comes from using the construction excavations for the installation of ground heat exchangers, thereby minimizing the need and expense of digging additional trenches. The term foundation heat exchanger (FHX

  5. Short-term temperature-dependent air-surface exchange and atmospheric concentrations of polychlorinated naphthalenes and organochlorine pesticides

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, R.G.M.; Burnett, V.; Harner, T.; Jones, K.C.

    2000-02-01

    Atmospheric concentrations of five organochlorine (OC) pesticides, some of which have been banned for a number of years, and polychlorinated naphthalenes (PCNs) were measured at a U.K. site over periods of 6 h for 7 days resulting in 28 samples. Mean concentrations of the pesticides were {alpha}-HCH 90 pg m{sup {minus}3}, {gamma}-HCH 500, {rho},{rho}{prime}-DDE 8, dieldrin 63, endrin 22, and HCB 39. PCN mean homologue concentrations were {sub 3}CNs 67 pg m{sup {minus}3}, {sub 4}CNs 78, {sub 5}CNs 5, {sub 6}CNs 0.6, {sub 7}CNs 0.6, and {Sigma}PCNs 152. TEQ concentrations for those PCNs ascribed TEF values ranged between 0.36 and 3.6 fg m{sup {minus}3} which corresponds to {approximately}3.0--30% of the TEQ concentrations of PCDD/Fs at the same site. All the compounds measured, except HCB, exhibited a strong temperature-dependent diurnal cycling. Results from Clausius-Clapeyron plots show that pesticide concentrations were controlled by temperature-driven air-surface recycling throughout the first 5 days when stable atmospheric conditions were dominant, while during the last 2 days advection became more influential as more unstable and cooler weather started to influence the site. PCN concentrations were controlled primarily by a mixture of recycling and advection throughout the first 5 days and then by advection in the final 2 days, suggesting that there are ongoing emissions from diffuse point sources of PCNs into the U.K. atmosphere. This study provides further evidence of the rapid air-surface exchange of semivolatile organic compounds (SOCs) and shows how different factors alone or in combination can produce rapid changes in the atmospheric concentrations of past and present SOCs.

  6. Polarized radio emission from extensive air showers measured with LOFAR

    SciTech Connect

    Schellart, P.; Buitink, S.; Corstanje, A.; Enriquez, J.E.; Falcke, H.; Hörandel, J.R.; Krause, M.; Nelles, A.; Rachen, J.P.; Veen, S. ter; Thoudam, S.

    2014-10-01

    We present LOFAR measurements of radio emission from extensive air showers. We find that this emission is strongly polarized, with a median degree of polarization of nearly 99%, and that the angle between the polarization direction of the electric field and the Lorentz force acting on the particles, depends on the observer location in the shower plane. This can be understood as a superposition of the radially polarized charge-excess emission mechanism, first proposed by Askaryan and the geomagnetic emission mechanism proposed by Kahn and Lerche. We calculate the relative strengths of both contributions, as quantified by the charge-excess fraction, for 163 individual air showers. We find that the measured charge-excess fraction is higher for air showers arriving from closer to the zenith. Furthermore, the measured charge-excess fraction also increases with increasing observer distance from the air shower symmetry axis. The measured values range from (3.3± 1.0)% for very inclined air showers at 25 m to (20.3± 1.3)% for almost vertical showers at 225 m. Both dependencies are in qualitative agreement with theoretical predictions.

  7. Total gaseous mercury exchange between water and air during cloudy weather conditions over Hongfeng Reservoir, Guizhou, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xinbin; Wang, Shaofeng; Qiu, Guangle; He, Tianrong; Li, Guanghui; Li, Zhonggen; Shang, Lihai

    2008-08-01

    Total gaseous mercury (TGM) exchange fluxes between air and water surface were measured using a dynamic flux chamber (DFC) coupled with a gaseous mercury analyzer at two sampling sites of Hongfeng reservoir in cloudy and rainy weather conditions. The concentrations of dissolved gaseous mercury (DGM) in water were also measured and indicated that DGM was supersaturated at most time during the sampling periods, which implied that the water body acted primarily as a source of mercury to the atmosphere. In general, TGM fluxes displayed a consistent diurnal pattern with peak fluxes at noon and minimum levels at early morning or night. However, this diurnal pattern was not clear when the weather was heavily cloudy and rainy with the maximum solar radiation of less than 140 W m-2. At this specific weather condition, a significantly positive correlation between TGM flux and relative humidity was observed. The behaviors of TGM flux over Hongfeng reservoir observed at cloudy weather conditions were some what different from those observed during mostly sunny weather conditions in Northern America and Europe. The empirical model developed based on the correlation between TGM flux and solar radiation during sunny days in Northern America was not applicable for estimation of TGM flux at cloudy and rainy weather conditions.

  8. An international dosimetry exchange for boron neutron capture therapy. Part I: Absorbed dose measurements.

    PubMed

    Binns, P J; Riley, K J; Harling, O K; Kiger, W S; Munck af Rosenschöld, P M; Giusti, V; Capala, J; Sköld, K; Auterinen, I; Serén, T; Kotiluoto, P; Uusi-Simola, J; Marek, M; Viererbl, L; Spurny, F

    2005-12-01

    An international collaboration was organized to undertake a dosimetry exchange to enable the future combination of clinical data from different centers conducting neutron capture therapy trials. As a first step (Part I) the dosimetry group from the Americas, represented by MIT, visited the clinical centers at Studsvik (Sweden), VTT Espoo (Finland), and the Nuclear Research Institute (NRI) at Rez (Czech Republic). A combined VTT/NRI group reciprocated with a visit to MIT. Each participant performed a series of dosimetry measurements under equivalent irradiation conditions using methods appropriate to their clinical protocols. This entailed in-air measurements and dose versus depth measurements in a large water phantom. Thermal neutron flux as well as fast neutron and photon absorbed dose rates were measured. Satisfactory agreement in determining absorbed dose within the experimental uncertainties was obtained between the different groups although the measurement uncertainties are large, ranging between 3% and 30% depending upon the dose component and the depth of measurement. To improve the precision in the specification of absorbed dose amongst the participants, the individually measured dose components were normalized to the results from a single method. Assuming a boron concentration of 15 microg g(-1) that is typical of concentrations realized clinically with the boron delivery compound boronophenylalanine-fructose, systematic discrepancies in the specification of the total biologically weighted dose of up to 10% were apparent between the different groups. The results from these measurements will be used in future to normalize treatment plan calculations between the different clinical dosimetry protocols as Part II of this study.

  9. Measuring Outdoor Air Intake Rates into Existing Building

    SciTech Connect

    Fisk, William; Sullivan, Douglas; Cohen, Sebastian; Han, Hwataik

    2009-04-16

    Practical and accurate technologies are needed for continuously measuring and controlling outdoor air (OA) intake rates in commercial building heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems. This project evaluated two new measurement approaches. Laboratory experiments determined that OA flow rates were measurable with errors generally less than 10 percent using electronic air velocity probes installed between OA intake louver blades or at the outlet face of louvers. High accuracy was maintained with OA flow rates as low as 15 percent of the maximum for the louvers. Thus, with this measurement approach HVAC systems do not need separate OA intakes for minimum OA supply. System calibration parameters are required for each unique combination of louver type and velocity sensor location but calibrations are not necessary for each system installation. The research also determined that the accuracy of measuring OA flow rates with velocity probes located in the duct downstream of the intake louver was not improved by installing honeycomb airflow straighteners upstream of the probes. Errors varied with type of upstream louver, were as high as 100 percent, and were often greater than 25 percent. In conclusion, use of electronic air velocity probes between the blades of OA intake louvers or at the outlet face of louvers is a highly promising means of accurately measuring rates of OA flow into HVAC systems. The use of electronic velocity probes downstream of airflow straighteners is less promising, at least with the relatively small OA HVAC inlet systems employed in this research.

  10. Low-frequency sound absorption measurements in air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, A. J.; Meredith, R. W.

    1984-01-01

    Thirty sets of sound absorption measurements in air at a pressure of 1 atmosphere are presented at temperatures from 10 C to 50 C, relative humidities from 0 to 100 percent, and frequencies from 10 to 2500 Hz. The measurements were conducted by the method of free decay in a resonant tube having a length of 18.261 m and bore diameter of 0.152 m. Background measurements in a gas consisting of 89.5 percent N2 and 10.5 percent Ar, a mixture which has the same sound velocity as air, permitted the wall and structural losses of the tube to be separated from the constituent absorption, consisting of classical rotational and vibrational absorption, in the air samples. The data were used to evaluate the vibrational relaxation frequencies of N2 and/or O2 for each of the 30 sets of meteorological parameters. Over the full range of humidity, the measured relaxation frequencies of N2 in air lie between those specified by ANSI Standard S1.26-1978 and those measured earlier in binary N2H2O mixtures. The measured relaxation frequencies could be determined only at very low values of humidity, reveal a significant trend away from the ANSI standard, in agreement with a prior investigation.

  11. Measurement of oxygen transfer from air into organic solvents

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, Hemalata; Hobisch, Mathias; Borisov, Sergey; Klimant, Ingo; Krühne, Ulrich; Woodley, John M

    2015-01-01

    Abstract BACKGROUND The use of non‐aqueous organic media is becoming increasingly important in many biotechnological applications in order to achieve process intensification. Such media can be used, for example, to directly extract poorly water‐soluble toxic products from fermentations. Likewise many biological reactions require the supply of oxygen, most normally from air. However, reliable online measurements of oxygen concentration in organic solvents (and hence oxygen transfer rates from air to the solvent) has to date proven impossible due to limitations in the current analytical methods. RESULTS For the first time, online oxygen measurements in non‐aqueous media using a novel optical sensor are demonstrated. The sensor was used to measure oxygen concentration in various organic solvents including toluene, THF, isooctane, DMF, heptane and hexane (which have all been shown suitable for several biological applications). Subsequently, the oxygen transfer rates from air into these organic solvents were measured. CONCLUSION The measurement of oxygen transfer rates from air into organic solvents using the dynamic method was established using the solvent resistant optical sensor. The feasibility of online oxygen measurements in organic solvents has also been demonstrated, paving the way for new opportunities in process control. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Chemical Technology & Biotechnology published by JohnWiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society of Chemical Industry.

  12. Indoor air quality. [Health hazards due to energy conservation measures

    SciTech Connect

    Hollowell, C.D.

    1981-06-01

    Rising energy prices, among other factors, have generated an incentive to reduce ventilation rates and thereby reduce the cost of heating and cooling buildings. Reduced ventilation in buildings may significantly increase exposure to indoor air pollution and perhaps have adverse effects on occupant health and comfort. Preliminary findings suggest that reduced ventilation may adversely affect indoor air quality unless appropriate control strategies are undertaken. The strategies used to control indoor air pollution depend on the specific pollutant or class of pollutants encountered, and differ somewhat depending on whether the application is to an existing building or a new building under design and construction. Whenever possible, the first course of action is prevention or reduction of pollutant emissions at the source. In most buildings, control measures involve a combination of prevention, removal, and suppression. Common sources of indoor air pollution in buildings, the specific pollutants emitted by each source, the potential health effects, and possible control techniques are discussed.

  13. A SOLAS challenge: How can we test test feedback loops involving air-sea exchange?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huebert, B. J.

    2004-12-01

    It is now well accepted that the Earth System links biological and physical processes in the water, on land, and in the air, creating countless feedback loops and dependencies that are at best difficult to quantify. One example of interest to SOLAS scientists is the suspension and long-range transport of dust from Asia, which may or may not interact with acidic air pollutants, that may increase the biological availability of iron, thereby increasing primary productivity in parts of the Pacific. This could increase DMS emissions and modify the radiative impact of Pacific clouds, affecting the climate and the hydrological system that limits the amount of dust lofted each year. Air-sea exchange is central to many such feedbacks: Variations in productivity in upwelling waters off Peru probably change DMS emissions and modify the stratocumulus clouds that blanket that region, thereby feeding back to productivity. The disparate time and space scales of the controlling processes make it difficult to observationally constrain such systems without the use of multi-year time-series and intensive multiplatform process studies. Unfortunately, much of the infrastructure for funding Earth science is poorly suited for supporting multidisciplinary research. For example, NSF's program managers are organized into disciplines and sub-disciplines, and rely on disciplinary reviewer communities that are protective of their slices of the funding pie. It is easy to find authors of strong, innovative, cross-disciplinary (yet unsuccessful) proposals who say they'll never try it again, because there is so little institutional support for interfacial research. Facility issues also complicate multidisciplinary projects, since there are usually several allocating groups that don't want to commit their ships, airplanes, or towers until the other groups have done so. The result is that there are very few examples of major interdisciplinary projects, even though IGBP core programs have articulated

  14. Reprint of: A numerical modelling of gas exchange mechanisms between air and turbulent water with an aquarium chemical reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaosa, Ryuichi S.

    2014-08-01

    This paper proposes a new numerical modelling to examine environmental chemodynamics of a gaseous material exchanged between the air and turbulent water phases across a gas-liquid interface, followed by an aquarium chemical reaction. This study uses an extended concept of a two-compartment model, and assumes two physicochemical substeps to approximate the gas exchange processes. The first substep is the gas-liquid equilibrium between the air and water phases, A(g)⇌A(aq), with Henry's law constant H. The second is a first-order irreversible chemical reaction in turbulent water, A(aq)+H2O→B(aq)+H+ with a chemical reaction rate κA. A direct numerical simulation (DNS) technique has been employed to obtain details of the gas exchange mechanisms and the chemical reaction in the water compartment, while zero velocity and uniform concentration of A is considered in the air compartment. The study uses the different Schmidt numbers between 1 and 8, and six nondimensional chemical reaction rates between 10(≈0) to 101 at a fixed Reynolds number. It focuses on the effects of the Schmidt number and the chemical reaction rate on fundamental mechanisms of the gas exchange processes across the interface.

  15. A numerical modelling of gas exchange mechanisms between air and turbulent water with an aquarium chemical reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaosa, Ryuichi S.

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a new numerical modelling to examine environmental chemodynamics of a gaseous material exchanged between the air and turbulent water phases across a gas-liquid interface, followed by an aquarium chemical reaction. This study uses an extended concept of a two-compartment model, and assumes two physicochemical substeps to approximate the gas exchange processes. The first substep is the gas-liquid equilibrium between the air and water phases, A(g)⇌A(aq), with Henry's law constant H. The second is a first-order irreversible chemical reaction in turbulent water, A(aq)+H2O→B(aq)+H+ with a chemical reaction rate κA. A direct numerical simulation (DNS) technique has been employed to obtain details of the gas exchange mechanisms and the chemical reaction in the water compartment, while zero velocity and uniform concentration of A is considered in the air compartment. The study uses the different Schmidt numbers between 1 and 8, and six nondimensional chemical reaction rates between 10(≈0) to 101 at a fixed Reynolds number. It focuses on the effects of the Schmidt number and the chemical reaction rate on fundamental mechanisms of the gas exchange processes across the interface.

  16. Occurrence and air-seawater exchange of brominated flame retardants and Dechlorane Plus in the North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möller, Axel; Xie, Zhiyong; Caba, Armando; Sturm, Renate; Ebinghaus, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    The occurrence, spatial and seasonal concentration variations in air and seawater and the air-seawater exchange of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), alternate brominated flame retardants (BFRs) and Dechlorane Plus (DP) were studied in the German part of the North Sea in 2010. BDE-209 and DP were found to be the dominating compounds, both in the atmosphere and in seawater. Sum PBDEs (∑ 10PBDEs) ranged from 0.31 to 10.7 pg m -3 in the atmosphere and from not detected (n.d.) to 10.5 pg L -1 in seawater, respectively. DP ranged from 0.13 to 22.3 pg m -3 and from 0.10 to 17.7 pg L -1 in air and seawater, respectively. Besides, four other BFRs including hexabromobenzene (HBB) and pentabromobenzene (PBBz) were detected. Elevated atmospheric concentrations were observed in continentally influenced air masses while highest seawater concentrations were observed at sampling stations close to the coast influenced by riverine discharge. The ratio of the two DP stereoisomers both in air and water was found to be close to the technical mixture at high concentrations but changed at lower concentrations giving first evidence for the alteration within the aquatic environment. Both dry air-seawater gas exchange and dry deposition are input pathways of BFRs and DP in the North Sea besides riverine discharge.

  17. Hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs) in the Canadian Archipelago. 2. Air-water gas exchange of alpha- and gamma-HCH.

    PubMed

    Jantunen, Liisa M; Helm, Paul A; Kylin, Henrik; Bidleman, Terry F

    2008-01-15

    Air and water were sampled in the Canadian Archipelago during summer on the Tundra Northwest 1999 (TNW-99) expedition and air was sampled at Resolute Bay (RB), Nunavut, to determine the gas exchange of alpha- and gamma-hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs) and the enantiomers of alpha-HCH. Air concentrations of sigmaHCH during TNW-99 and at RB were similar, averaging 55 and 53 pg m(-3), respectively. The net gas exchange direction was volatilization for alpha-HCH and near equilibrium or deposition for gamma-HCH, whereas actual fluxes depended on the fraction of open water. Enantiomer fractions, EF = (+)/[(+) + (-)] of alpha-HCH in air sampled from shipboard were significantly correlated to those in surface water for events with >90% open water, but were closer to racemic and not correlated to EFs in water for events with 0-50% open water. Levels of alpha-HCH in air at RB averaged 37 +/- 9 pg m(-3) from June to early July, and EFs were close to racemic (0.496 +/- 0.004). In mid-July the ice pack broke up around RB. From this point through August, air concentrations increased significantly to 53 +/- 5 pg m(-3), and the mean EF decreased significantly to 0.483 +/- 0.009. Air concentrations of gamma-HCH at RB did not differ significantly before (8.0 +/- 3.7 pg m(-3)) and after (6.6 +/- 0.76 pg m(-3)) ice breakup. Results show that alpha-HCH enantiomers are sensitive tracers for following the impact of ice cover loss on gas exchange in the Arctic.

  18. Drop size distribution and air velocity measurements in air assist swirl atomizer sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mao, C.-P.; Oechsle, V.; Chigier, N.

    1987-01-01

    Detailed measurements of mean drop size (SMD) and size distribution parameters have been made using a Fraunhofer diffraction particle sizing instrument in a series of sprays generated by an air assist swirl atomizer. Thirty-six different combinations of fuel and air mass flow rates were examined with liquid flow rates up to 14 lbm/hr and atomizing air flow rates up to 10 lbm/hr. Linear relationships were found between SMD and liquid to air mass flow rate ratios. SMD increased with distance downstream along the center line and also with radial distance from the axis. Increase in obscuration with distance downstream was due to an increase in number density of particles as the result of deceleration of drops and an increase in the exposed path length of the laser beam. Velocity components of the atomizing air flow field measured by a laser anemometer show swirling jet air flow fields with solid body rotation in the core and free vortex flow in the outer regions.

  19. Air-substrate mercury exchange associated with landfill disposal of coal combustion products.

    PubMed

    Xin, Mei; Gustin, Mae S; Ladwig, Kenneth; Pflughoeft-Hassett, Debra F

    2006-08-01

    Previous laboratory studies have shown that lignite-derived fly ash emitted mercury (Hg) to the atmosphere, whereas bituminous- and subbituminous-derived fly ash samples adsorbed Hg from the air. In addition, wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) materials were found to have higher Hg emission rates than fly ash. This study investigated in situ Hg emissions at a blended bituminous-subbituminous ash landfill in the Great Lakes area and a lignite-derived ash and FGD solids landfill in the Midwestern United States using a dynamic field chamber. Fly ash and saturated FGD materials emitted Hg to atmosphere at low rates (-0.1 to 1.2 ng/ m2hr), whereas FGD material mixed with fly ash and pyrite exhibited higher emission rates (approximately 10 ng/m2hr) but were still comparable with natural background soils (-0.3 to 13 ng/ m2hr). Air temperature, solar radiation, and relative humidity were important factors correlated with measured Hg fluxes. Field study results were not consistent with corresponding laboratory observations in that fluxes measured in the latter were higher and more variable. This is hypothesized to be partially an artifact of the flux measurement methods.

  20. FMPS measurement of nanoparticle pollutant in office air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Zhaoqin; Lin, Jianzhong; Yu, Mingzhou

    2010-08-01

    Fast Mobility Particle Sizer (FMPS) is an electrical mobility instrument used to measure the nanoparticle number concentration and size distribution in an office environment. Actual measurements indicate the distributions of ultrafine particle number and size in office air are inhomogeneous in space. The nonaparticle size is bimodal and log-normally distribution in an office environment when only people activities are considered. The traffic pollutant in the outdoor including the automobile tail gas and the dust will change the particles size distribution and enhance the particle number concentration those of indoor air. It can also be seen from the results that the laser printer releases a large number of nanoparticles, especially around 80nm in diameter in the printing process. The laser printer may be the mainly ultrafine particle source in the office air.

  1. Measurement of air toxics using extractive FTIR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lacoss, J.P.; Ogle, L.D.; Shareef, G.S.

    1995-12-31

    In response to the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, the Gas Research Institute (GRI) is investigating air toxics emissions from natural gas industry sources. Included in this effort are measurements from internal combustion engines, one of the source categories targeted by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for development of maximum achievable control technology (MACT) based regulations by the year 2000. Formaldehyde and other aldehydes are the air toxics potentially present in engine exhaust. Since there are no EPA approved methods available for quantifying aldehydes in engine exhaust, GRI initiated a field test to validate an extractive Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) based method according to U.S. EPA Method 301 {open_quotes}Field Validation of Pollutant Measurement Methods for Various Media{close_quotes}. The extended paper presents the results of this validation testing for formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, and acrolein conducted to support this validation testing.

  2. Continuous In-situ Measurements of Carbonyl Sulfide (OCS) and Carbon Dioxide Isotopes to Constrain Ecosystem Carbon and Water Exchanges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastogi, B.; Still, C. J.; Noone, D. C.; Berkelhammer, M. B.; Whelan, M.; Lai, C. T.; Hollinger, D. Y.; Gupta, M.; Leen, J. B.; Huang, Y. W.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the processes that control the terrestrial exchange of carbon and water are critical for examining the role of forested ecosystems in changing climates. A small but increasing number of studies have identified Carbonyl Sulfide (OCS) as a potential tracer for photosynthesis. OCS is hydrolyzed by an irreversible reaction in leaf mesophyll cells that is catalyzed by the enzyme, carbonic anhydrase. Leaf- level field and greenhouse studies indicate that OCS uptake is controlled by stomatal activity and that the ratio of OCS and CO2 uptake is reasonably constant. Existing studies on ecosystem OCS exchange have been based on laboratory measurements or short field campaigns and therefore little information on OCS exchange in a natural ecosystem over longer timescales is available. The objective of this study is to further assess the stability of OCS as a tracer for canopy photosynthesis in an active forested ecosystem and also to assess its utility for constraining transpiration, since both fluxes are mediated by canopy stomatal conductance. An off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy analyzer (Los Gatos Research Inc.) was deployed at the Wind River Experimental Forest in Washington (45.8205°N, 121.9519°W). Canopy air was sampled from four heights as well as the soil to measure vertical gradients of OCS within the canopy, and OCS exchange between the forest and the atmosphere for the growing season. Here we take advantage of simultaneous measurements of the stable isotopologues of H2O and CO2 at corresponding heights as well as NEE (Net Ecosystem Exchange) from eddy covariance measurements to compare GPP (Gross Primary Production) and transpiration estimates from a variety of independent techniques. Our findings also seek to allow assessment of the environmental and ecophysicological controls on evapotranspiration rates, which are projected to change in coming decades, and are otherwise poorly constrained.

  3. Monte Carlo study of TLD measurements in air cavities.

    PubMed

    Haraldsson, Pia; Knöös, Tommy; Nyström, Håkan; Engström, Per

    2003-09-21

    Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) are used for verification of the delivered dose during IMRT treatment of head and neck carcinomas. The TLDs are put into a plastic tube, which is placed in the nasal cavities through the treated volume. In this study, the dose distribution to a phantom having a cylindrical air cavity containing a tube was calculated by Monte Carlo methods and the results were compared with data from a treatment planning system (TPS) to evaluate the accuracy of the TLD measurements. The phantom was defined in the DOSXYZnrc Monte Carlo code and calculations were performed with 6 MV fields, with the TLD tube placed at different positions within the cylindrical air cavity. A similar phantom was defined in the pencil beam based TPS. Differences between the Monte Carlo and the TPS calculations of the absorbed dose to the TLD tube were found to be small for an open symmetrical field. For a half-beam field through the air cavity, there was a larger discrepancy. Furthermore, dose profiles through the cylindrical air cavity show, as expected, that the treatment planning system overestimates the absorbed dose in the air cavity. This study shows that when using an open symmetrical field, Monte Carlo calculations of absorbed doses to a TLD tube in a cylindrical air cavity give results comparable to a pencil beam based treatment planning system.

  4. Disruptive Innovation in Air Measurement Technology: Reality or Hype?

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation is a big picture overview on the changing state of air measurement technology in the world, with a focus on the introduction of low-cost sensors into the market place. The presentation discusses how these new technologies may be a case study in disruptive innov...

  5. Measuring radon concentration in air using a diffusion cloud chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cases, R.; Ros, E.; Zúñiga, J.

    2011-09-01

    Radon concentration in air is a major concern in lung cancer studies. A traditional technique used to measure radon abundance is the charcoal canister method. We propose a novel technique using a diffusion cloud chamber. This technique is simpler and can easily be used for physics demonstrations for high school and university students.

  6. Continuous Quantitative Measurements on a Linear Air Track

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vogel, Eric

    1973-01-01

    Describes the construction and operational procedures of a spark-timing apparatus which is designed to record the back and forth motion of one or two carts on linear air tracks. Applications to measurements of velocity, acceleration, simple harmonic motion, and collision problems are illustrated. (CC)

  7. METHOD FOR MEASURING AIR-IMMISCIBLE LIQUID PARTITION COEFFICIENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The principal objective of this work was to measure nonaqueous phase liquid-air partition coefficients for various gas tracer compounds. Known amounts of trichloroethene (TCE) and tracer, as neat compounds, were introduced into glass vials and allowed to equilibrate. The TCE and ...

  8. Measured Air Distribution Effectiveness for Residential Mechanical Ventilation Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, Max; Sherman, Max H.; Walker, Iain S.

    2008-05-01

    The purpose of ventilation is dilute or remove indoor contaminants that an occupant is exposed to. In a multi-zone environment such as a house, there will be different dilution rates and different source strengths in every zone. Most US homes have central HVAC systems, which tend to mix the air thus the indoor conditions between zones. Different types of ventilation systems will provide different amounts of exposure depending on the effectiveness of their air distribution systems and the location of sources and occupants. This paper will report on field measurements using a unique multi-tracer measurement system that has the capacity to measure not only the flow of outdoor air to each zone, but zone-to-zone transport. The paper will derive seven different metrics for the evaluation of air distribution. Measured data from two homes with different levels of natural infiltration will be used to evaluate these metrics for three different ASHRAE Standard 62.2 compliant ventilation systems. Such information can be used to determine the effectiveness of different systems so that appropriate adjustments can be made in residential ventilation standards such as ASHRAE Standard 62.2.

  9. Temperature Measurement in Microhollow Cathode Discharges in Atmospheric Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Block, Rolf; Toedter, Olaf; Schoenbach, Karl H.

    1998-10-01

    By reducing the diameter of the cathode opening in hollow cathode discharge geometry to values on the order of one hundred micrometers we were able to operate the discharges in a direct current mode at atmospheric pressure in air. The possibility to operate microhollow cathode discharges (MHCD) in parallel [1] in atmospheric air opens a wide range of applications. At atmospheric pressures, the electric power of a single discharge was measured as 8W. The power density in the microhollow exceeds 1MW/cm^3. This leads to strong thermal loading of the electrodes. In order to study the thermal properties of the discharge we have used a method based on emission spectroscopy. The rotational structure of the emitted lines corresponding to the second positive system of nitrogen contains information on the neutral gas temperature. Taking the apparatus profile into account the temperature of the rotational excited molecules can be estimated by a comparison of simulated and measured data. Measurements on MHCD up to atmospheric pressure show an increase in the neutral gas temperature to values exceeding 1000K. In addition to the gas temperature the electrode temperatures were measured and the thermodynamic behavior of the electrode configuration was calculated. [1] W. Shi, K.H. Schoenbach Parallel Operation of Microhollow Cathode Discharges, ICOPS98, Raleigh, NC, USA, 1998 This work was funded by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR) in cooperation with the DDR&E Air Plasma Ramparts MURI program, and by the Department of Energy, Advanced Energy Division.

  10. Global Ammonia Concentrations Seen by the 13-years AIRS Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, Juying; Wei, Zigang; Larrabee Strow, L.; Dickerson, Russell; Nowak, John; Wang, Yuxuan

    2016-04-01

    Ammonia is an integral part of the nitrogen cycle and is projected to be the largest single contributor to each of acidification, eutrophication and secondary particulate matter in Europe by 2020 (Sutton et al., 2008). The impacts of NH3 also include: aerosol production affecting global radiative forcing, increases in emissions of the greenhouse gases nitrous oxide (N2O) and methane (CH4), and modification of the transport and deposition patterns of SO2 and NOx. Therefore, monitoring NH3 global distribution of sources is vitally important to human health with respect to both air and water quality and climate change. We have developed new daily and global ammonia (NH3) products from AIRS hyperspectral measurements. These products add value to AIRS's existing products that have made significant contributions to weather forecasts, climate studies, and air quality monitoring. With longer than 13 years of data records, these measurements have been used not only for daily monitoring purposes but also for inter-annual variability and short-term trend studies. We will discuss the global NH3 emission sources from biogenic and anthropogenic activities over many emission regions captured by AIRS. We will focus their variability in the last 13 years.

  11. Air-surface exchange of H2O, CO2, and O3 at a tallgrass prairie in relation to remotely sensed vegetation indices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, W.; Wesely, M. L.; Cook, D. R.; Hart, R. L.

    1992-01-01

    Parameters derived from eddy correlation measurements of the air-surface exchange rates of H2O, CO2, and O3 over a tallgrass prairie are examined in terms of their relationships with spectral reflectance data remotely sensed from aircraft and satellites during the four 1987 intensive field campaigns of the First ISLSCP Field Experiment (FIFE). The surface conductances were strongly modulated by photosynthetically active radiation received at the surface when the grass was green and well watered; mesophyll resistances were large for CO2 but negligible for H2O and O3.

  12. CARS Temperature and Species Measurements For Air Vehicle Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danehy, Paul M.; Gord, James R.; Grisch, Frederic; Klimenko, Dmitry; Clauss, Walter

    2005-01-01

    The coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) method has recently been used in the United States and Europe to probe several different types of propulsion systems for air vehicles. At NASA Langley Research Center in the United States, CARS has been used to simultaneously measure temperature and the mole fractions of N2, O2 and H2 in a supersonic combustor, representative of a scramjet engine. At Wright- Patterson Air Force Base in the United States, CARS has been used to simultaneously measure temperature and mole fractions of N2, O2 and CO2, in the exhaust stream of a liquid-fueled, gas-turbine combustor. At ONERA in France and the DLR in Germany researchers have used CARS to measure temperature and species concentrations in cryogenic LOX-H2 rocket combustion chambers. The primary aim of these measurements has been to provide detailed flowfield information for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code validation.

  13. Impacts of Atmospheric Modes of Variability on Air-Sea Heat Exchange in the Red Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abualnaja, Yasser O.; Papadopoulos, Vassilis P.; Josey, Simon A.; Hoteit, Ibrahim; Kontoyiannis, Harilaos; Raitsos, Dionissios E.

    2014-05-01

    The potential impacts on Red Sea surface heat exchange of various major modes of atmospheric variability are investigated using the NASA Modern Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) atmospheric reanalysis and the Objectively Analyzed Air-Sea Flux dataset (OAFlux) merged satellite+reanalysis dataset. The mode impacts on surface net heat flux are quantified by calculating the heat flux anomaly that corresponds to a unit positive value of each index for each grid point. The seasonal effects of the atmospheric forcing are investigated considering two and four typical seasons of a calendar year. Considering two seasons, the impacts are strongest during the winter-centered part of the year (October to March) mainly over the northern sub-basin. The North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), the East Atlantic - West Russia Pattern (EAWR), and the Indian Monsoon Index (IMI) have the greatest effects. They generate negative anomalies (by definition additional ocean heat loss) of 7-12 W/m2 in the northern Red Sea basin mean net heat flux for a unit positive value of the mode index. During the summer (April to September), the signal is smaller and the East Atlantic (EA) and Multivariate ENSO Index (MEI) modes have the strongest impact which is now located in the southern Red Sea (sub-basin anomalies of 4 W/m2 for unit positive mode index, negative for EA and positive for MEI). Results obtained by analysis carried out on the traditional four-season basis reveal that indices impact peaks during the typical boreal winter (DJF) with average anomalies of 12-18 W/m2 to be found in the northern part. It is noteworthy that during the winter, the EAWR generates negative anomalies around 30 W/m2 over the most of the central Red Sea. During the spring (MAM), summer (JJA) and autumn (SON) the anomalies are considerably lower, especially during the spring when the mode impacts are negligible. Atmospheric modes have a stronger effect on air-sea heat flux over the northern

  14. Definition of air quality measurements for monitoring space shuttle launches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorpe, R. D.

    1978-01-01

    A description of a recommended air quality monitoring network to characterize the impact on ambient air quality in the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) (area) of space shuttle launch operations is given. Analysis of ground cloud processes and prevalent meteorological conditions indicates that transient HCl depositions can be a cause for concern. The system designed to monitor HCl employs an extensive network of inexpensive detectors combined with a central analysis device. An acid rain network is also recommended. A quantitative measure of projected minimal long-term impact involves the limited monitoring of NOx and particulates. All recommended monitoring is confined ti KSC property.

  15. Occurrence and air/sea-exchange of novel organic pollutants in the marine environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebinghaus, R.; Xie, Z.

    2006-12-01

    A number of studies have demonstrated that several classes of chemicals act as biologically relevant signalling substances. Among these chemicals, many, including PCBs, DDT and dioxins, are semi-volatile, persistent, and are capable of long-range atmospheric transport via atmospheric circulation. Some of these compounds, e.g. phthalates and alkylphenols (APs) are still manufactured and consumed worldwide even though there is clear evidence that they are toxic to aquatic organisms and can act as endocrine disruptors. Concentrations of NP, t-OP and NP1EO, DMP, DEP, DBP, BBP, and DEHP have been simultaneously determined in the surface sea water and atmosphere of the North Sea. Atmospheric concentrations of NP and t-OP ranged from 7 to 110 pg m - 3, which were one to three orders of magnitude below coastal atmospheric concentrations already reported. NP1EO was detected in both vapor and particle phases, which ranged from 4 to 50 pg m - 3. The concentrations of the phthalates in the atmosphere ranged from below the method detection limit to 3.4 ng m - 3. The concentrations of t-OP, NP, and NP1EO in dissolved phase were 13-300, 90-1400, and 17-1660 pg L - 1. DBP, BBP, and DEHP were determined in the water phase with concentrations ranging from below the method detection limit to 6.6 ng L - 1. This study indicates that atmospheric deposition of APs and phthalates into the North Sea is an important input pathway. The net fluxes indicate that the air sea exchange is significant and, consequently the open ocean and polar areas will be an extensive sink for APs and phthalates.

  16. Airborne measurements of surface layer turbulence over the ocean during cold air outbreaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Shu-Shien; Yeh, Eueng-Nan

    1987-01-01

    The spectral characteristics of surface layer turbulence for the near-shore cloud street regions over the Atlantic Ocean were examined using 50-m level data of airborne measurements of atmospheric turbulence spectra above the western Atlantic Ocean during cold air outbreaks. The present study, performed for the Mesoscale Air-Sea Exchange (MASEX) experiment, extends and completes the preliminary analyses of Chou and Yeh (1987). In the inertial subrange, a near 4/3 ratio was observed between velocity spectra normal to and those along the aircraft heading. A comparison of the turbulent kinetic energy budgets with those of Wyngaard and Cote (1971) and Caughey and Wyngaard (1979) data indicates that the turbulent kinetic energy in the surface layer is dissipated less in the MASEX data than in data obtained by the previous groups.

  17. The measured energy impact of air leakage on frame wall systems. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharyya, S.

    1991-06-01

    Infiltration is customarily assumed to increase the heating and cooling load of a building by an amount equal to the mass flow rate of the infiltration times the enthalpy difference between the inside and outside air -- with the latent portion of the enthalpy difference sometimes neglected. An experimental and analytical investigation has been conducted on the actual energy impact of air leakage on frame wall systems. Calorimetric measurements conducted on a small test cell and on a well characterized stud-cavity wall specimen with measured amounts of air leakage introduced under a variety of controlled conditions and configurations show convincingly that infiltration can lead to a much smaller change in the energy load than is customarily calculated. The data also suggest that the phenomenon occurs in full-sized houses as well. Infiltration Heat Exchange Effectiveness (IHEE),{var_epsilon}, is introduced as a measure of the effectiveness of a building in ``recovering`` heat otherwise lost (or gained) because of infiltration. Measurements show that {var_epsilon} increases as: (a) flow rate decreases; (b) flow path length increases; and, (c) hole/crack size decreases.

  18. The measured energy impact of air leakage on frame wall systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharyya, S.

    1991-06-01

    Infiltration is customarily assumed to increase the heating and cooling load of a building by an amount equal to the mass flow rate of the infiltration times the enthalpy difference between the inside and outside air -- with the latent portion of the enthalpy difference sometimes neglected. An experimental and analytical investigation has been conducted on the actual energy impact of air leakage on frame wall systems. Calorimetric measurements conducted on a small test cell and on a well characterized stud-cavity wall specimen with measured amounts of air leakage introduced under a variety of controlled conditions and configurations show convincingly that infiltration can lead to a much smaller change in the energy load than is customarily calculated. The data also suggest that the phenomenon occurs in full-sized houses as well. Infiltration Heat Exchange Effectiveness (IHEE),{var epsilon}, is introduced as a measure of the effectiveness of a building in recovering'' heat otherwise lost (or gained) because of infiltration. Measurements show that {var epsilon} increases as: (a) flow rate decreases; (b) flow path length increases; and, (c) hole/crack size decreases.

  19. Influence of temperature changes on ambient air NOx chemiluminescence measurements.

    PubMed

    Miñarro, Marta Doval; Ferradás, Enrique González; Martínez, Francisco J Marzal

    2012-09-01

    Users of automatic air pollution monitors are largely unaware of how certain parameters, like temperature, can affect readings. The present work examines the influence of temperature changes on chemiluminescence NO(x) measurements made with a Thermo Scientific 42i analyzer, a model widely used in air monitoring networks and air pollution studies. These changes are grouped into two categories according to European Standard EN 14211: (1) changes in the air surrounding the analyzers and (2) changes in the sampled air. First, the sensitivity tests described in Standard EN 14211 were performed to determine whether the analyzer performance was adapted to the requirements of the standard. The analyzer met the performance criteria of both tests; however, some differences were detected in readings with temperature changes even though the temperature compensator was on. Sample temperature changes were studied more deeply as they were the most critical (they cannot be controlled and differences of several tens of degrees can be present in a single day). Significant differences in readings were obtained when changing sample temperature; however, maximum deviations were around 3% for temperature ranges of 15°C. If other possible uncertainty contributions are controlled and temperature variations with respect to the calibration temperature are not higher than 15°C, the effect of temperature changes could be acceptable and no data correction should have to be applied. PMID:21964932

  20. Air-snowpack exchange of bromine, ozone and mercury in the springtime Arctic simulated by the 1-D model PHANTAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyota, K.; Dastoor, A. P.; Staebler, R. M.; McConnell, J. C.

    2012-04-01

    A dynamic exchange of halogens between the ocean, sea ice, snowpack, and the atmosphere is a main driver for the occurrence of ozone depletion episodes (ODEs) and atmospheric mercury depletion episodes (AMDEs) in the polar boundary layer particularly during the spring. Oxidized mercury is deposited to the snow/ice surface efficiently concurrent with the AMDEs and can be transformed to methyl-mercury, which subsequently bio-magnifies and imposes various health threats to northern communities and wild life. However, some field measurements of mercury in the snowpack and overlying ambient air, including but not limited to those in the polar region, indicate the photochemical reduction of oxidized mercury back to gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) on timescales of days to weeks whereas other studies show no evidence of rapid reduction. Such differences could be attributed not only to meteorological factors like temperature but also to chemical/biological factors that control the abundance of halogens and organic compounds, with a link to the redox chemistry of mercury. In order to understand the role of each driving process in the overall behaviors of mercury in the polar region, we have developed a one-dimensional model, PHANTAS (a model of PHotochemistry ANd Transport in Air and Snowpack), which describes multiphase chemistry in the gas phase, aerosols and the brine layer assumed to exist on the grain surface of saline snowpack. Henry's law for Hg(II) gases and aqueous-phase stability constants for Hg(II)-halide complexes are re-evaluated including their temperature dependence. Photochemical reduction of Hg(II) to Hg(0) in the aqueous phase is handled simply by a prescribed first-order rate constant with diurnal variations. The model also handles the transport of gases and aerosols across the snowpack and the turbulent atmospheric boundary layer. The atmospheric profile of turbulent diffusivity down to the interfacial sublayer is diagnosed from an arbitrary chosen set

  1. Short-term 222Rn activity concentration changes in underground spaces with limited air exchange with the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fijałkowska-Lichwa, L.; Przylibski, T. A.

    2011-04-01

    The authors investigated short-time changes in 222Rn activity concentration occurring yearly in two underground tourist facilities with limited air exchange with the atmosphere. One of them is Niedźwiedzia (Bear) Cave in Kletno, Poland - a natural space equipped with locks ensuring isolation from the atmosphere. The other site is Fluorite Adit in Kletno, a section of a disused uranium mine. This adit is equipped with a mechanical ventilation system, operated periodically outside the opening times (at night). Both sites are situated within the same metamorphic rock complex, at similar altitudes, about 2 km apart. The measurements conducted revealed spring and autumn occurrence of convective air movements. In Bear Cave, this process causes a reduction in 222Rn activity concentration in the daytime, i.e. when tourists, guides and other staff are present in the cave. From the point of view of radiation protection, this is the best situation. For the rest of the year, daily concentrations of 222Rn activity in the cave are very stable. In Fluorite Adit, on the other hand, significant variations in daily 222Rn activity concentrations are recorded almost all year round. These changes are determined by the periods of activity and inactivity of mechanical ventilation. Unfortunately this is inactive in the daytime, which results in the highest values of 222Rn activity concentration at the times when tourists and staff are present in the adit. Slightly lower concentrations of radon in Fluorite Adit are recorded in the winter season, when convective air movements carry a substantial amount of radon out into the atmosphere. The incorrect usage of mechanical ventilation in Fluorite Adit results in the most unfavourable conditions in terms of radiation protection. The staff working in that facility are exposed practically throughout the year to the highest 222Rn activity concentrations, both at work (in the adit) and at home (outside their working hours). Therefore, not very well

  2. Study of a cave's air exchange pattern based on radon concentration and the time dependence of radon concentration in Pál-völgy Cave (Budapest, Hungary)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagy, H. E.; Horvath, A.; Jordan, Gy.; Szabo, Cs.; Kiss, A.

    2012-04-01

    A long-term (one year and a half), high resolution, with an integration time of one hour, radon concentration monitoring was carried out in Pál-völgy Cave (Budapest, Hungary). Our major goal was to determine the time dependence of radon concentration in the cave and to understand the exchange pattern of the cave air with the outdoor air based on radon concentrations, and to determine the factors that affect the radon concentration in the cave air. Pál-völgy Cave is situated in the Buda Hills, which is the NE part of the Transdanubian Central Range. The wall rock of the cave is dominantly Eocene Szépvölgy Limestone Formation. Above the limestone Eocene Buda Marl and Oligocene Tard Clay are deposited. A huge multiphase hydrothermal cave system developed in the Szépvölgy Limestone and partially in the Buda Marl resulted in a long-term complex paleokarstic evolution from the Late Eocene to the Quaternary. The radon concentration in the cave air was measured continuously by an AlphaGuard radon monitor, and meteorological parameters outside the cave were also collected simultaneously. The arithmetic mean of the annual radon concentration was 1.9 kBq/m3 and the radon concentration varied between 104-7,776 Bq/m3. In addition, the results indicate a clear seasonal variability of radon concentration in the cave air: in winter the radon concentration fluctuates around a low mean value of 253 Bq/m3, in summer it oscillates around a high mean value of 5,504 Bq/m3, whereas in spring and autumn the radon level varies between the winter and summer values. The summer to winter radon concentration ratio (radon concentration in summer/radon concentration in winter) was high, 21.8. The outside air temperature showed the strongest correlation with the radon concentration in the cave, Pierson's linear correlation coefficient is 0.76. If the outdoor air temperature is lower than the cave air temperature (12 °C), especially in autumn and winter the air flows from outside into the

  3. Net ecosystem CO2 exchange and evapotranspiration of a sphagnum mire: field measurements and model simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olchev, Alexander; Volkova, Elena; Karataeva, Tatiana; Zatsarinnaya, Dina; Novenko, Elena

    2014-05-01

    The spatial and temporal variability of net ecosystem exchange of CO2 (NEE) and evapotranspiration (ET) of a karst-hole sphagnum peat mire situated at the boundary between broad-leaved and forest-steppe zones in the central part of European Russia (54.06N, 37.59E, 260 m a.s.l.) was described using results of field measurements and simulations with Mixfor-3D model. The area of the mire is about 1.2 ha and it is surrounded by a broadleaved forest stand. It is a typical peat mire according to water and mineral supply as well as to vegetation composition. The vegetation of the peripheral parts of the mire is typical eutrophic whereas the vegetation in its central part is represented by meso-oligothrophic plant communities. To describe the spatial variability of NEE and ET within the mire a portable measuring system consisting of a transparent ventilated chamber combined with an infrared CO2 and H2O analyzer LI-840A (Li-Cor, USA) was used. The measurements were provided along a transect from the southern peripheral part of the mire to its center under sunny clear-sky weather conditions in the period from May to September of 2012 and from May 2013 to October 2013. The chamber method was used for measurements of NEE and ET fluxes because of small size of the mire, a very uniform surrounding forest stand and the mosaic mire vegetation. All these factors promote very heterogeneous exchange conditions within the mire and make it difficult to apply, for example, an eddy covariance method that is widely used for flux measurements in the field. The results of the field measurements showed a significant spatial and temporal variability of NEE and ET that was mainly influenced by incoming solar radiation, air temperature and ground water level. During the entire growing season the central part of the mire was a sink of CO2 for the atmosphere (up to 6.8±4.2 µmol m-2 s-1 in June) whereas its peripheral part, due to strong shading by the surrounding forest, was mainly a source of

  4. Assemblies of protective anion exchange membrane on air electrode for its efficient operation in aqueous alkaline electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertolotti, Bruno; Chikh, Linda; Vancaeyzeele, Cédric; Alfonsi, Séverine; Fichet, Odile

    2015-01-01

    Aqueous alkaline metal-air batteries represent promising energy storage devices when supplied with atmospheric air. However, under this condition, the air electrode shows a very short life time (i.e. 50 h of operation in 5 M LiOH at -10 mA cm-2), mainly due to the precipitation of carbonates inside the electrode porosity. The air electrode can then be protected by an anion exchange membrane on the electrolyte side. In this paper, we demonstrate that the efficiency of this protective membrane depends on the assembly method on the electrode. When a modified poly(epichlorohydrin) (PECH) network is synthesized directly on the electrode, the polymer seeps inside the electrode porosity, and a suitable interface inducing negligible additional polarization in comparison with classical pressure-assembled membranes is obtained. This protected electrode shows improved stability of up to 160 h of operation in 5 M LiOH. This performance is improved to 350 h by adjusting the conductivity and the ionic exchange capacity. Finally, the interest of interpenetrating polymer network (IPN) architecture compared to a single network is confirmed. Indeed, an electrode protected with a PECH/poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (PHEMA) IPN is stable for 650 h in 5 M LiOH. In addition, degradation process becomes reversible since the assembly can be regenerated, which is not possible for the bare electrode.

  5. Heat Storage Characteristics of Latent-Heat Microcapsule Slurry Using Hot Air Bubbles by Direct-Contact Heat Exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inaba, Hideo; Horibe, Akihiko; Kim, Myoung-Jun; Tsukamoto, Hirofumi

    This study deals with the heat storage characteristics of latent-heat microcapsule slurry consisting of a mixture of fine microcapsules packed with latent-heat storage material and water. The heat storage operation for the latent-heat microcapsules was carried out by the direct-contact heat exchange method using hot air bubbles. The latent-heat microcapsule consisted of n-paraffin as a core latent-heat storage material and melamine resin as a coating substance. The relationship between the completion time of latent-heat storage and some parameters was examined experimentally. The nondimensional correlation equations for temperature efficiency, the completion time period of the latent-heat storage process and variation in the enthalpy of air through the microcapsule slurry layer were derived in terms of the ratio of microcapsule slurry layer height to microcapsule diameter, Reynolds number for airflow, Stefan number and modified Stefan number for absolute humidity of flowing air.

  6. Measuring Infiltration Rates in Homes as a Basis for Understanding Indoor Air Quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jerz, G. G.; Lamb, B. K.; Pressley, S. N.; O'Keeffe, P.; Fuchs, M.; Kirk, M.

    2015-12-01

    Infiltration rates, or the rate of air exchange, of houses are important to understand because ventilation can be a dominate factor in determining indoor air quality. There are chemicals that are emitted from surfaces or point sources inside the home which are harmful to humans; these chemicals come from various objects including furniture, cleaning supplies, building materials, gas stoves, and the surrounding environment. The use of proper ventilation to cycle cleaner outdoor air into the house can be crucial for maintaining healthy living conditions in the home. At the same time, there can also be outdoor pollutants which infiltrate the house and contribute to poor indoor air quality. In either case, it is important to determine infiltration rates as a function of outdoor weather conditions, the house structure properties and indoor heating and cooling systems. In this work, the objective is to measure ventilation rates using periodic releases of a tracer gas and measuring how quickly the tracer concentration decays. CO2 will be used as the tracer gas because it is inert and harmless at low levels. An Arduino timer is connected to a release valve which controls the release of 9.00 SLPM of CO2 into the uptake vent within the test home. CO2 will be released until there is at least a 200 to 300 ppm increase above ambient indoor levels. Computers with CO2 sensors and temperature/pressure sensors attached will be used to record data from different locations within the home which will continuously record data up to a week. The results from these periodic ventilation measurements will be analyzed with respect to outdoor wind and temperature conditions and house structure properties. The data will be used to evaluate an established indoor air quality model.

  7. Hydrogen bond stabilities in membrane-reconstituted alamethicin from amide-resolved hydrogen-exchange measurements.

    PubMed Central

    Dempsey, C E; Handcock, L J

    1996-01-01

    Amide-resolved hydrogen-deuterium exchange-rate constants were measured for backbone amides of alamethicin reconstituted in dioleoylphosphatidylcholine vesicles by an exchange-trapping method combined with high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. In vesicles containing alamethicin at molar ratios between 1:20 and 1:100 relative to lipid, the exchange-rate constants increased with increasing volume of the D20 buffer in which the vesicles were suspended, indicating that exchange under these conditions is dominated by partitioning of the peptide into the aqueous phase. This was supported by observation of a linear relationship between the exchange-rate constants for amides in membrane-reconstituted alamethicin and those for amides in alamethicin dissolved directly into D2O buffer. Significant protection of amides from exchange with D2O buffer in membrane-reconstituted alamethicin is interpreted in terms of stabilization by helical hydrogen bonding. Under conditions in which amide exchange occurred by partitioning of the peptide into solution, only lower limits for hydrogen-bond stabilities in the membrane were determined; all the potentially hydrogen-bonded amides of alamethicin are at least 1000-fold exchange protected in the membrane-bound state. When partitioning of alamethicin into the aqueous phase was suppressed by hydration of reconstituted vesicles in a limiting volume of water [D2O:dioleoylphosphatidylcholine:alamethicin; 220:1:0.05; (M:M:M)], the exchange-protection factors exhibited helical periodicity with highly exchange-protected, and less well-protected, amides on the nonpolar and polar helix faces, respectively. The exchange data indicate that, under the conditions studied, alamethicin adopts a stable helical structure in DOPC bilayers in which all the potentially hydrogen-bonded amides are stabilized by helical hydrogen bonds. The protection factors define the orientation of the peptide helix with respect to an aqueous phase, which is

  8. Advances in Fast Response Acoustically Derived Air Temperature Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogoev, Ivan; Jacobsen, Larry; Horst, Thomas; Conrad, Benjamin

    2016-04-01

    Fast-response accurate air-temperature measurements are required when estimating turbulent fluxes of heat, water and carbon dioxide by open-path eddy-covariance technique. In comparison with contact thermometers like thermocouples, ultra-sonic thermometers do not suffer from solar radiation loading, water vapor condensation and evaporative cooling effects. Consequently they have the potential to provide more accurate true air temperature measurements. The absolute accuracy of the ultrasonic thermometer is limited by the following parameters: the distance between the transducer pairs, transducer delays associated with the electrical-acoustic signal conversion that vary with temperature, components of the wind vector that are normal to the ultrasonic paths, and humidity. The distance between the transducer pairs is commonly obtained by coordinate measuring machine. Improved accuracy demonstrated in this study results from increased stiffness in the anemometer head to better maintain the ultrasonic path-length distances. To further improve accuracy and account for changes in transducer delays and distance as a function of temperature, these parameters are characterized in a zero-wind chamber over the entire operating temperature range. When the sonic anemometer is combined with a co-located fast-response water vapor analyzer, like in the IRGASON instrument, speed of sound can be compensated for humidity effects on a point-by-point basis resulting in a true fast-response air temperature measurement. Laboratory test results show that when the above steps are implemented in the calibration of the ultrasonic thermometer air-temperature accuracy better than ±0.5 degrees Celsius can be achieved over the entire operating range. The approach is also validated in a field inter-comparison with an aspirated thermistor probe mounted in a radiation shield.

  9. Measuring Density Of Air By Ultraviolet Rayleigh Scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckenzie, Robert L.

    1992-01-01

    Report presents theoretical and experimental studies directed toward development of optoelectronic instrument to measure density of air at altitudes from 50 to 90 km and possibly beyond. Instrument mounted in Space Shuttle orbiter and operated during reentry into atmosphere. Data gathered by instrument needed because density of upper atmosphere highly variable in space and time and this variability affects aerodynamic behavior and trajectory of reentering Shuttle. Variations in density also meteorologically significant.

  10. Radio Emission in Atmospheric Air Showers Measured by LOPES-30

    SciTech Connect

    Isar, P. G.

    2008-01-24

    When Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays (UHECR) interact with particles in the Earth's atmosphere, they produce a shower of secondary particles propagating towards the ground. These relativistic particles emit synchrotron radiation in the radio frequency range when passing the Earth's magnetic field. The LOPES (LOFAR Prototype Station) experiment investigates the radio emission from these showers in detail and will pave the way to use this detection technique for large scale applications like in LOFAR (Low Frequency Array) and the Pierre Auger Observatory. The LOPES experiment is co-located and measures in coincidence with the air shower experiment KASCADE-Grande at Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Germany. LOPES has an absolute amplitude calibration array of 30 dipole antennas (LOPES-30). After one year of measurements of the single East-West polarization by all 30 antennas, recently, the LOPES-30 set-up was configured to perform dual-polarization measurements. Half of the antennas have been configured for measurements of the North-South polarization. Only by measuring at the same time both, the E-W and N-S polarization components of the radio emission, the geo-synchrotron effect as the dominant emission mechanism in air showers can be verified. The status of the measurements, including the absolute calibration procedure of the dual-polarized antennas as well as analysis of dual-polarized event examples are reported.

  11. Development and Evaluation of a New Air Exchange Rate Algorithm for the Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation Model (ISES Presentation)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previous exposure assessment panel studies have observed considerable seasonal, between-home and between-city variability in residential pollutant infiltration. This is likely a result of differences in home ventilation, or air exchange rates (AER). The Stochastic Human Exposure ...

  12. PAH Measurements in Air in the Athabasca Oil Sands Region.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Yu-Mei; Harner, Tom; Li, Henrik; Fellin, Phil

    2015-05-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) measurements were conducted by Wood Buffalo Environmental Association (WBEA) at four community ambient Air quality Monitoring Stations (AMS) in the Athabasca Oil Sands Region (AOSR) in Northeastern Alberta, Canada. The 2012 and 2013 mean concentrations of a subset of the 22 PAH species were 9.5, 8.4, 8.8, and 32 ng m(-3) at AMS 1 (Fort McKay), AMS 6 (residential Fort McMurray), AMS 7 (downtown Fort McMurray), and AMS 14 (Anzac), respectively. The average PAH concentrations in Fort McKay and Fort McMurray were in the range of rural and semirural areas, but peak values reflect an industrial emission influence. At these stations, PAHs were generally associated with NO, NO2, PM2.5, and SO2, indicating the emissions were from the combustion sources such as industrial stacks, vehicles, residential heating, and forest fires, whereas the PAH concentrations at AMS 14 (∼35 km south of Fort McMurray) were more characteristic of urban areas with a unique pattern: eight of the lower molecular weight PAHs exhibited strong seasonality with higher levels during the warmer months. Enthalpies calculated from Clausius-Clapeyron plots for these eight PAHs suggest that atmospheric emissions were dominated by temperature-dependent processes such as volatilization at warm temperatures. These findings point to the potential importance of localized water-air and/or surface-air transfer on observed PAH concentrations in air.

  13. PAH Measurements in Air in the Athabasca Oil Sands Region.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Yu-Mei; Harner, Tom; Li, Henrik; Fellin, Phil

    2015-05-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) measurements were conducted by Wood Buffalo Environmental Association (WBEA) at four community ambient Air quality Monitoring Stations (AMS) in the Athabasca Oil Sands Region (AOSR) in Northeastern Alberta, Canada. The 2012 and 2013 mean concentrations of a subset of the 22 PAH species were 9.5, 8.4, 8.8, and 32 ng m(-3) at AMS 1 (Fort McKay), AMS 6 (residential Fort McMurray), AMS 7 (downtown Fort McMurray), and AMS 14 (Anzac), respectively. The average PAH concentrations in Fort McKay and Fort McMurray were in the range of rural and semirural areas, but peak values reflect an industrial emission influence. At these stations, PAHs were generally associated with NO, NO2, PM2.5, and SO2, indicating the emissions were from the combustion sources such as industrial stacks, vehicles, residential heating, and forest fires, whereas the PAH concentrations at AMS 14 (∼35 km south of Fort McMurray) were more characteristic of urban areas with a unique pattern: eight of the lower molecular weight PAHs exhibited strong seasonality with higher levels during the warmer months. Enthalpies calculated from Clausius-Clapeyron plots for these eight PAHs suggest that atmospheric emissions were dominated by temperature-dependent processes such as volatilization at warm temperatures. These findings point to the potential importance of localized water-air and/or surface-air transfer on observed PAH concentrations in air. PMID:25844542

  14. A Comparison of Process-Scale Modeling and Measurements of Atmosphere-Snowpack Exchange of Nitrogen Oxides at Summit, Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, K. A.; Helmig, D.; Kramer, L. J.; Doskey, P. V.; Van Dam, B. A.; Seok, B.; Ganzeveld, L.

    2015-12-01

    Snowpack over glacial ice is a reservoir for reactive nitrogen gases. Previous studies indicate nitrogen oxides (NOx) are generated in snowpack interstitial air through photolysis of nitrate (NO3-). Gradients in NOx mixing ratios between snowpack interstitial air and the overlying atmosphere regulate NOx surface exchange, which affects the Arctic ozone budget and climate. To better understand the dynamics of cryosphere-atmosphere exchange of NOx in the Arctic, we use a 1-D process-scale model to evaluate measurements of NOxin and above the snowpack during March-May 2009 at Summit, Greenland. The model is based upon the processes previously presented in the snowpack chemistry and physics model, MISTRA-SNOW, which represents snow grains as spheres with surfaces uniformly coated by an aqueous phase. Modeled profiles of NO, NO2, and O3 up to ~ 2 meters deep into the snowpack for March-May 2009 have been compared to measured profiles and will be presented. During the March-May time period at Summit, low irradiances are observed during March, diurnal irradiance profiles are observed during April, and the sun never sets in May. The model results suggest a key chemical pathway for the formation of NO2 during "nighttime" that was previously unexplained. In addition, modeled 24-hour NOx fluxes are compared to measured NOx fluxes from a MET tower at Summit. Modeled fluxes of NOx in April 2009 are the same order of magnitude as the measurements; however, modeled fluxes of NOx deviate up to one order of magnitude from measurements in May 2009. A detailed analysis of the modeled/measured flux comparison will be presented.

  15. Bias in air sampling techniques used to measure inhalation exposure.

    PubMed

    Cohen, B S; Harley, N H; Lippmann, M

    1984-03-01

    Factors have been evaluated which contribute to the lack of agreement between inhalation exposure estimates obtained by time-weighted averaging of samples taken with mini hi-volume samplers, and those measured by time integrating, low-volume, lapel mounted, personal monitors. Measurements made with real-time aerosol monitors on workers at a Be-Cu production furnace show that part of the discrepancy results from variability of the aerosol concentration within the breathing zone. Field studies of sampler inlet bias, the influences of the electrostatic fields around polystyrene filter holders, and resuspension of dust from work clothing, were done in three areas of a Be plant. No significant differences were found in Be air concentrations measured simultaneously by open and closed face cassettes, and "mini hi-volume" samplers mounted on a test stand. No significant influence on Be collection was detected between either positively or negatively charged monitors and charge neutralized control monitors. The effect of contaminated work clothing on dust collection by lapel mounted monitors is most important. Beryllium release from the fabrics affected air concentrations measured by fabric mounted monitors more than it affected concentrations measured by monitors positioned above the fabrics. The latter were placed 16 cm from the vertically mounted fabrics, to simulate the position of the nose or mouth. We conclude that dust resuspended from work clothing is the major source of the observed discrepancy between exposures estimated from lapel mounted samplers and time-weighted averages.

  16. Bias in air sampling techniques used to measure inhalation exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, B.S.; Harley, N.H.; Lippmann, M.

    1984-03-01

    Factors have been evaluated which contribute to the lack of agreement between inhalation exposure estimates obtained by time-weighted averaging of samples taken with mini hi-volume samplers, and those measured by time integrating, low-volume, lapel mounted, personal monitors. Measurements made with real-time aerosol monitors on workers at a Be-Cu production furnace show that part of the discrepancy results from variability of the aerosol concentration within the breathing zone. Field studies of sampler inlet bias, the influences of the electrostatic fields around polystyrene filter holders, and resuspension of dust from work clothing, were done in three areas of a Be plant. No significant differences were found in Be air concentrations measured simultaneously by open and closed face cassettes, and mini hi-volume samplers mounted on a test stand. No significant influence on Be collection was detected between either positively or negatively charged monitors and charge neutralized control monitors. The effect of contaminated work clothing on dust collection by lapel mounted monitors is most important. Beryllium release from the fabrics affected air concentrations measured by fabric mounted monitors more than it affected concentrations measured by monitors positioned above the fabrics. The latter were placed 16 cm from the vertically mounted fabrics, to simulate the position of the nose or mouth. The authors conclude that dust resuspended from work clothing is the major source of the observed discrepancy between exposures estimated from lapel mounted samplers and time-weighted averages.

  17. Integrated Assessment of Air Pollution Control Measures for Megacities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrich, R.; Theloke, J.; Denier-van-der-Gon, H.; Kugler, U.; Kampffmeyer, T.; Roos, J.; Torras, S.

    2012-04-01

    Air pollution in large cities is still a matter of concern. Especially the concentration of fine particles (PM10 and PM2.5) is largest in large cities leading to severe health impacts. Furthermore the PM10 thresholds of the EU Air Quality Directive are frequently exceeded. Thus the question arises, whether the initiated policies and measures for mitigating air pollution are sufficient to meet the air quality targets and - if not - which efficient further pollution mitigation measures exist. These questions have been addressed in the EU research project MEGAPOLI for the four European megacities respectively agglomerations London, Paris, Rhine-Ruhr area and Po valley. Firstly, a reference scenario of future activities and emissions has been compiled for the megacities for the years 2020, 2030 and 2050 for all relevant air pollutants (CO, NH3, NMVOC, NOx, PM10, PM2.5 and SO2) and greenhouse gases (CO2, CH4 and N2O). The reference scenario takes into account as well population changes as technical progress and economic growth. As pollution flowing in from outside the city is about as important as pollution caused by emissions in the city, the analysis covers the whole of Europe and not only the city area. Emissions are then transformed into concentrations using atmospheric models. The higher concentrations in cities were estimated with a newly developed 'urban increment' model. Results show, that in the megacities the limits of the Air Quality Directive (2008/50/EC) will be exceeded. Thus additional efforts are necessary to reduce emissions further. Thus, a number of further measures (not implemented in current legislation) were selected and assessed. These included mitigation options for road transport, other mobile sources, large combustion plants, small and medium combustion plants and industry. For each measure and in addition for various bundles of measures a cost-benefit analysis has been carried out. Benefits (avoided health risks and climate change risks) have

  18. Biology and air-sea gas exchange controls on the distribution of carbon isotope ratios (δ13C) in the ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmittner, A.; Gruber, N.; Mix, A. C.; Key, R. M.; Tagliabue, A.; Westberry, T. K.

    2013-09-01

    Analysis of observations and sensitivity experiments with a new three-dimensional global model of stable carbon isotope cycling elucidate processes that control the distribution of δ13C of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in the contemporary and preindustrial ocean. Biological fractionation and the sinking of isotopically light δ13C organic matter from the surface into the interior ocean leads to low δ13CDIC values at depths and in high latitude surface waters and high values in the upper ocean at low latitudes with maxima in the subtropics. Air-sea gas exchange has two effects. First, it acts to reduce the spatial gradients created by biology. Second, the associated temperature-dependent fractionation tends to increase (decrease) δ13CDIC values of colder (warmer) water, which generates gradients that oppose those arising from biology. Our model results suggest that both effects are similarly important in influencing surface and interior δ13CDIC distributions. However, since air-sea gas exchange is slow in the modern ocean, the biological effect dominates spatial δ13CDIC gradients both in the interior and at the surface, in contrast to conclusions from some previous studies. Calcium carbonate cycling, pH dependency of fractionation during air-sea gas exchange, and kinetic fractionation have minor effects on δ13CDIC. Accumulation of isotopically light carbon from anthropogenic fossil fuel burning has decreased the spatial variability of surface and deep δ13CDIC since the industrial revolution in our model simulations. Analysis of a new synthesis of δ13CDIC measurements from years 1990 to 2005 is used to quantify preformed and remineralized contributions as well as the effects of biology and air-sea gas exchange. The model reproduces major features of the observed large-scale distribution of δ13CDIC as well as the individual contributions and effects. Residual misfits are documented and analyzed. Simulated surface and subsurface δ13CDIC are influenced by

  19. Prototype Systems for Measuring Outdoor Air Intake Rates in Rooftop Air Handlers

    SciTech Connect

    Fisk, William J.; Chan, Wanyu R.; Hotchi, Toshifumi

    2015-01-01

    The widespread absence of systems for real-time measurement and feedback control, of minimum outdoor air intake rates in HVAC systems contributes to the poor control of ventilation rates in commercial buildings. Ventilation rates affect building energy consumption and influence occupant health. The project designed fabricated and tested four prototypes of systems for measuring rates of outdoor air intake into roof top air handlers. All prototypes met the ±20% accuracy target at low wind speeds, with all prototypes accurate within approximately ±10% after application of calibration equations. One prototype met the accuracy target without a calibration. With two of four prototype measurement systems, there was no evidence that wind speed or direction affected accuracy; however, winds speeds were generally below usually 3.5 m s-1 (12.6 km h-1) and further testing is desirable. The airflow resistance of the prototypes was generally less than 35 Pa at maximum RTU air flow rates. A pressure drop of this magnitude will increase fan energy consumption by approximately 4%. The project did not have resources necessary to estimate costs of mass produced systems. The retail cost of components and materials used to construct prototypes ranged from approximately $1,200 to $1,700. The test data indicate that the basic designs developed in this project, particularly the designs of two of the prototypes, have considerable merit. Further design refinement, testing, and cost analysis would be necessary to fully assess commercial potential. The designs and test results will be communicated to the HVAC manufacturing community.

  20. Performance enhancement of an experimental air conditioning system by using TiO2/methanol nanofluid in heat pipe heat exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monirimanesh, Negin; Nowee, S. Mostafa; Khayyami, Shideh; Abrishamchi, Iman

    2016-05-01

    The effect of using nanofluid in thermosyphon-type heat pipe heat exchangers on energy conservation of an air-conditioning system was sought in this study. Innovatively, two heat exchangers in-series were deployed using TiO2/methanol nanofluids with 0-4 wt% concentrations as working fluids. The impacts of temperature and relative humidity on the effectiveness of 2 and 4-row heat exchangers were analyzed experimentally and more that 40 % energy saving was obtained.

  1. Low-Cost Sensor Units for Measuring Urban Air Quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popoola, O. A.; Mead, M.; Stewart, G.; Hodgson, T.; McLoed, M.; Baldovi, J.; Landshoff, P.; Hayes, M.; Calleja, M.; Jones, R.

    2010-12-01

    Measurements of selected key air quality gases (CO, NO & NO2) have been made with a range of miniature low-cost sensors based on electrochemical gas sensing technology incorporating GPS and GPRS for position and communication respectively. Two types of simple to operate sensors units have been designed to be deployed in relatively large numbers. Mobile handheld sensor units designed for operation by members of the public have been deployed on numerous occasions including in Cambridge, London and Valencia. Static sensor units have also been designed for long-term autonomous deployment on existing street furniture. A study was recently completed in which 45 sensor units were deployed in the Cambridge area for a period of 3 months. Results from these studies indicate that air quality varies widely both spatially and temporally. The widely varying concentrations found suggest that the urban environment cannot be fully understood using limited static site (AURN) networks and that a higher resolution, more dispersed network is required to better define air quality in the urban environment. The results also suggest that higher spatial and temporal resolution measurements could improve knowledge of the levels of individual exposure in the urban environment.

  2. Calibration of NASA Turbulent Air Motion Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrick, John D. W.; Ritter, John A.; Watson, Catherine E.; Wynkoop, Mark W.; Quinn, John K.; Norfolk, Daniel R.

    1996-01-01

    A turbulent air motion measurement system (TAMMS) was integrated onboard the Lockheed 188 Electra airplane (designated NASA 429) based at the Wallops Flight Facility in support of the NASA role in global tropospheric research. The system provides air motion and turbulence measurements from an airborne platform which is capable of sampling tropospheric and planetary boundary-layer conditions. TAMMS consists of a gust probe with free-rotating vanes mounted on a 3.7-m epoxy-graphite composite nose boom, a high-resolution inertial navigation system (INS), and data acquisition system. A variation of the tower flyby method augmented with radar tracking was implemented for the calibration of static pressure position error and air temperature probe. Additional flight calibration maneuvers were performed remote from the tower in homogeneous atmospheric conditions. System hardware and instrumentation are described and the calibration procedures discussed. Calibration and flight results are presented to illustrate the overall ability of the system to determine the three-component ambient wind fields during straight and level flight conditions.

  3. Air Quality Science and Regulatory Efforts Require Geostationary Satellite Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pickering, Kenneth E.; Allen, D. J.; Stehr, J. W.

    2006-01-01

    Air quality scientists and regulatory agencies would benefit from the high spatial and temporal resolution trace gas and aerosol data that could be provided by instruments on a geostationary platform. More detailed time-resolved data from a geostationary platform could be used in tracking regional transport and in evaluating mesoscale air quality model performance in terms of photochemical evolution throughout the day. The diurnal cycle of photochemical pollutants is currently missing from the data provided by the current generation of atmospheric chemistry satellites which provide only one measurement per day. Often peak surface ozone mixing ratios are reached much earlier in the day during major regional pollution episodes than during local episodes due to downward mixing of ozone that had been transported above the boundary layer overnight. The regional air quality models often do not simulate this downward mixing well enough and underestimate surface ozone in regional episodes. Having high time-resolution geostationary data will make it possible to determine the magnitude of this lower-and mid-tropospheric transport that contributes to peak eight-hour average ozone and 24-hour average PM2.5 concentrations. We will show ozone and PM(sub 2.5) episodes from the CMAQ model and suggest ways in which geostationary satellite data would improve air quality forecasting. Current regulatory modeling is typically being performed at 12 km horizontal resolution. State and regional air quality regulators in regions with complex topography and/or land-sea breezes are anxious to move to 4-km or finer resolution simulations. Geostationary data at these or finer resolutions will be useful in evaluating such models.

  4. Mercury emission from terrestrial background surfaces in the eastern USA. Part I: Air/surface exchange of mercury within a southeastern deciduous forest (Tennessee) over one year

    SciTech Connect

    Kuiken, Todd; Zhang, Hong; Gustin, Mae S.; Lindberg, Steven Eric

    2008-03-01

    This study focused on the development of a seasonal data set of the Hg air/surface exchange over soils associated with low Hg containing surfaces in a deciduous forest in the southern USA. Data were collected every month for 11 months in 2004 within Standing Stone State Forest in Tennessee using the dynamic flux chamber method. Mercury air/surface exchange associated with the litter covered forest floor was very low with the annual mean daytime flux being 0.4 0.5 ng m-2 h-1 (n = 301). The daytime Hg air/surface exchange over the year oscillated between emission (81% of samples with positive flux) and deposition (19% of samples with negative flux). A seasonal trend of lower emission in the spring and summer (closed canopy) relative to the fall and winter (open canopy) was observed. Correlations were found between the air/surface exchange and certain environmental factors on specific days sampled but not collectively over the entire year. The very low magnitude of Hg air/surface exchange as observed in this study suggests that an improved methodology for determining and reporting emission fluxes is needed when the values of fluxes and chamber blanks are both very low and comparable. This study raises questions and points to a need for more research regarding how to scale the Hg air/surface exchange for surfaces with very low emissions.

  5. SCANNING VOLTA POTENTIALS MEASUREMENTS OF METALS IN IRRADIATED AIR.

    SciTech Connect

    ISAACS, H.S.; ADZIC, G.; AND ENERGY SCIENCES AND TECHNOLOGY DEPARTMENT; JEFFCOATE, C.S.

    2000-10-22

    A method for direct dc measurement of the Volta potential is presented. High intensity synchrotron x-ray beams were used to locally irradiate the atmosphere adjacent to the metal surface and produce a conducting path between a sample and a reference probe. The direct measurements of potential in the ionized air could be made at probe heights of around 1 mm compared to less than 0.1 mm for the Kelvin probe. The measurements were similar to traditional Kelvin probe measurements, but had a poorer spatial resolution. In contrast to the Kelvin probe methods, the approach described allows observation of the current as a function of impressed voltage. Methods to improve the special resolution of the technique and applications to corrosion under coating will be presented.

  6. Automatable Measurement of Gas Exchange Rate in Streams: Oxygen-Carbon Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennington, R.; Haggerty, R.; Argerich, A.; Wondzell, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    Gas exchange rates between streams and the atmosphere are critically important to measurement of in-stream ecologic processes, as well as fate and transport of hazardous pollutants such as mercury and PCBs. Methods to estimate gas exchange rates include empirical relations to hydraulics, and direct injection of a tracer gas such as propane or SF6. Empirical relations are inconsistent and inaccurate, particularly for lower order, high-roughness streams. Gas injections are labor-intensive, and measured gas exchange rates are difficult to extrapolate in time since they change with discharge and stream geometry. We propose a novel method for calculation of gas exchange rates utilizing O2, pCO2, pH, and temperature data. Measurements, which can be automated using data loggers and probes, are made on the upstream and downstream end of the study reach. Gas exchange rates are then calculated from a solution to the transport equations for oxygen and dissolved inorganic carbon. Field tests in steep, low order, high roughness streams of the HJ Andrews Experimental Forest indicate the method to be viable along stream reaches with high downstream gas concentration gradients and high rates of gas transfer velocity. Automated and continuous collection of oxygen and carbonate chemistry data is increasingly common, thus the method may be used to estimate gas exchange rates through time, and is well suited for interactivity with databases.

  7. International Space Station Common Cabin Air Assembly Condensing Heat Exchanger Hydrophilic Coating Operation, Recovery, and Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balistreri, Steven F.; Steele, John W.; Caron, Mark E.; Laliberte, Yvon J.; Shaw, Laura A.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to control the temperature and humidity of an environment or habitat is critical for human survival. These factors are important to maintaining human health and comfort, as well as maintaining mechanical and electrical equipment in good working order to support the human and to accomplish mission objectives. The temperature and humidity of the International Space Station (ISS) United States On-orbit Segment (USOS) cabin air is controlled by the Common Cabin Air Assembly (CCAA). The CCAA consists of a fan, a condensing heat exchanger (CHX), an air/water separator, temperature and liquid sensors, and electrical controlling hardware and software. The CHX is the primary component responsible for control of temperature and humidity. The CCAA CHX contains a chemical coating that was developed to be hydrophilic and thus attract water from the humid influent air. This attraction forms the basis for water removal and therefore cabin humidity control. However, there have been several instances of CHX coatings becoming hydrophobic and repelling water. When this behavior is observed in an operational CHX in the ISS segments, the unit s ability to remove moisture from the air is compromised and the result is liquid water carryover into downstream ducting and systems. This water carryover can have detrimental effects on the ISS cabin atmosphere quality and on the health of downstream hardware. If the water carryover is severe and widespread, this behavior can result in an inability to maintain humidity levels in the USOS. This paper will describe the operation of the five CCAAs within the USOS, the potential causes of the hydrophobic condition, and the impacts of the resulting water carryover to downstream systems. It will describe the history of this behavior and the actual observed impacts to the ISS USOS. Information on mitigation steps to protect the health of future CHX hydrophilic coatings as well as remediation and recovery of the full heat exchanger will be

  8. Distribution and air-sea exchange of current-use pesticides (CUPs) from East Asia to the high Arctic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Guangcai; Xie, Zhiyong; Cai, Minghong; Möller, Axel; Sturm, Renate; Tang, Jianhui; Zhang, Gan; He, Jianfeng; Ebinghaus, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    Surface seawater and marine boundary layer air samples were collected on the ice-breaker R/V Xuelong (Snow Dragon) from the East China Sea to the high Arctic (33.23-84.5° N) in July to September 2010 and have been analyzed for six current-use pesticides (CUPs): trifluralin, endosulfan, chlorothalonil, chlorpyrifos, dacthal, and dicofol. In all oceanic air samples, the six CUPs were detected, showing highest level (>100 pg/m(3)) in the Sea of Japan. Gaseous CUPs basically decreased from East Asia (between 36.6 and 45.1° N) toward Bering and Chukchi Seas. The dissolved CUPs in ocean water ranged widely from air. Trifluralin in seawater was relatively high in the Sea of Japan (35.2° N) and evenly distributed between 36.9 and 72.5° N, but it remained below the detection limit at the highest northern latitudes in Chukchi Sea. In contrast with other CUPs, concentrations of chlorothalonil and dacthal were more abundant in Chukchi Sea and in East Asia. The air-sea gas exchange of CUPs was generally dominated by net deposition. Latitudinal trends of fugacity ratios of α-endosulfan, chlorothalonil, and dacthal showed stronger deposition of these compounds in East Asia than in Chukchi Sea, while trifluralin showed stronger deposition in Chukchi Sea (-455 ± 245 pg/m(2)/day) than in the North Pacific (-241 ± 158 pg/m(2)/day). Air-sea gas exchange of chlorpyrifos varied from net volatilizaiton in East Asia (<40° N) to equilibrium or net deposition in the North Pacific and the Arctic.

  9. Air

    MedlinePlus

    ... do to protect yourself from dirty air . Indoor air pollution and outdoor air pollution Air can be polluted indoors and it can ... this chart to see what things cause indoor air pollution and what things cause outdoor air pollution! Indoor ...

  10. Exchange of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons across the air-water interface in the Bohai and Yellow Seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yingjun; Lin, Tian; Tang, Jianhui; Xie, Zhiyong; Tian, Chongguo; Li, Jun; Zhang, Gan

    2016-09-01

    In this study, air and surface seawater samples collected from the Bohai (BS) and Yellow Seas (YS) in May 2012 were determined exchange of PAHs, especially of low-molecular-weight (LMW) PAHs (three- and four-ring PAHs) at the air-water interface. Net volatilization fluxes of LMW PAHs were 266-1454 ng/m2/d and decreased with distance from the coast, indicating that these PAHs transported from coastal runoff were potential contributors to the atmosphere in the BS and YS. Moreover, LMW PAHs were enriched in the dissolved phase compared with those in the particulate phase in the water column, possibly suggesting that the volatilized LMW PAHs were directly derived from wastewater discharge or petroleum pollution rather than released from contaminated sediments. The air-sea exchange fluxes of the three-ring PAHs were 2- to 20-fold higher than their atmospheric deposition fluxes in the BS and YS. The input to and output from the water reached equilibrium for four-ring PAHs. Differently, five- and six-ring PAHs were introduced into the marine environment primarily through dry and wet deposition, indicating that the water column was still a sink of these PAHs from the surrounding atmosphere.

  11. Exchange of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons across the air-water interface in the Bohai and Yellow Seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yingjun; Lin, Tian; Tang, Jianhui; Xie, Zhiyong; Tian, Chongguo; Li, Jun; Zhang, Gan

    2016-09-01

    In this study, air and surface seawater samples collected from the Bohai (BS) and Yellow Seas (YS) in May 2012 were determined exchange of PAHs, especially of low-molecular-weight (LMW) PAHs (three- and four-ring PAHs) at the air-water interface. Net volatilization fluxes of LMW PAHs were 266-1454 ng/m2/d and decreased with distance from the coast, indicating that these PAHs transported from coastal runoff were potential contributors to the atmosphere in the BS and YS. Moreover, LMW PAHs were enriched in the dissolved phase compared with those in the particulate phase in the water column, possibly suggesting that the volatilized LMW PAHs were directly derived from wastewater discharge or petroleum pollution rather than released from contaminated sediments. The air-sea exchange fluxes of the three-ring PAHs were 2- to 20-fold higher than their atmospheric deposition fluxes in the BS and YS. The input to and output from the water reached equilibrium for four-ring PAHs. Differently, five- and six-ring PAHs were introduced into the marine environment primarily through dry and wet deposition, indicating that the water column was still a sink of these PAHs from the surrounding atmosphere.

  12. Probing the radio emission from air showers with polarization measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aab, A.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahlers, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Alves Batista, R.; Ambrosio, M.; Aminaei, A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Antičić, T.; Aramo, C.; Arqueros, F.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avenier, M.; Avila, G.; Badescu, A. M.; Barber, K. B.; Bardenet, R.; Bäuml, J.; Baus, C.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. H.; Bellido, J. A.; BenZvi, S.; Berat, C.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanco, F.; Blanco, M.; Bleve, C.; Blümer, H.; Boháčová, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brancus, I.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Buscemi, M.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caccianiga, B.; Caccianiga, L.; Candusso, M.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Cheng, S. H.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chudoba, J.; Cilmo, M.; Clay, R. W.; Cocciolo, G.; Colalillo, R.; Collica, L.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceição, R.; Contreras, F.; Cooper, M. J.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Criss, A.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dallier, R.; Daniel, B.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; De Domenico, M.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Vega, G.; de Mello Junior, W. J. M.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Souza, V.; de Vries, K. D.; del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Dembinski, H.; Dhital, N.; Di Giulio, C.; Di Matteo, A.; Diaz, J. C.; Díaz Castro, M. L.; Diep, P. N.; Diogo, F.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Docters, W.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dong, P. N.; Dorofeev, A.; dos Anjos, J. C.; Dova, M. T.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; Facal San Luis, P.; Falcke, H.; Fang, K.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferguson, A. P.; Fick, B.; Figueira, J. M.; Filevich, A.; Filipčič, A.; Foerster, N.; Fox, B. D.; Fracchiolla, C. E.; Fraenkel, E. D.; Fratu, O.; Fröhlich, U.; Fuchs, B.; Gaior, R.; Gamarra, R. F.; Gambetta, S.; García, B.; Garcia Roca, S. T.; Garcia-Gamez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garilli, G.; Gascon Bravo, A.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giammarchi, M.; Giller, M.; Gitto, J.; Glaser, C.; Glass, H.; Gomez Albarracin, F.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Gómez Vitale, P. F.; Gonçalves, P.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Gookin, B.; Gorgi, A.; Gorham, P.; Gouffon, P.; Grebe, S.; Griffith, N.; Grillo, A. F.; Grubb, T. D.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harrison, T. A.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Herve, A. E.; Hill, G. C.; Hojvat, C.; Hollon, N.; Holt, E.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovský, M.; Huber, D.; Huege, T.; Insolia, A.; Isar, P. G.; Jansen, S.; Jarne, C.; Josebachuili, M.; Kadija, K.; Kambeitz, O.; Kampert, K. H.; Karhan, P.; Kasper, P.; Katkov, I.; Kégl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Keivani, A.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Knapp, J.; Krause, R.; Krohm, N.; Krömer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuempel, D.; Kunka, N.; La Rosa, G.; LaHurd, D.; Latronico, L.; Lauer, R.; Lauscher, M.; Lautridou, P.; Le Coz, S.; Leão, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; López, R.; Lopez Agüera, A.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lu, L.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Lyberis, H.; Maccarone, M. C.; Malacari, M.; Maldera, S.; Maller, J.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, V.; Mariş, I. C.; Marquez Falcon, H. R.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martin, L.; Martinez, H.; Martínez Bravo, O.; Martraire, D.; Masías Meza, J. J.; Mathes, H. J.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurel, D.; Maurizio, D.; Mayotte, E.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina, C.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menichetti, E.; Menshikov, A.; Messina, S.; Meyhandan, R.; Mićanović, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Middendorf, L.; Minaya, I. A.; Miramonti, L.; Mitrica, B.; Molina-Bueno, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Monnier Ragaigne, D.; Montanet, F.; Morales, B.; Morello, C.; Moreno, J. C.; Mostafá, M.; Moura, C. A.; Muller, M. A.; Müller, G.; Münchmeyer, M.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navarro, J. L.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nelles, A.; Neuser, J.; Nhung, P. T.; Niechciol, M.; Niemietz, L.; Niggemann, T.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Nožka, L.; Oehlschläger, J.; Olinto, A.; Oliveira, M.; Ortiz, M.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Parente, G.; Parra, A.; Pastor, S.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; PeÂķala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Pesce, R.; Petermann, E.; Petrera, S.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, Y.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Plum, M.; Pontz, M.; Porcelli, A.; Preda, T.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Quel, E. J.; Querchfeld, S.; Quinn, S.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Revenu, B.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rivera, H.; Rizi, V.; Roberts, J.; Rodrigues de Carvalho, W.; Rodriguez Cabo, I.; Rodriguez Fernandez, G.; Rodriguez Martino, J.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodríguez-Frías, M. D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Rossler, T.; Roth, M.; Rouillé-d'Orfeuil, B.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Rühle, C.; Saffi, S. J.; Saftoiu, A.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Salesa Greus, F.; Salina, G.; Sánchez, F.; Sanchez-Lucas, P.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, B.; Sarmento, R.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Schmidt, A.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovánek, P.; Schröder, F. G.; Schulz, A.; Schulz, J.; Sciutto, S. J.; Scuderi, M.; Segreto, A.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Sigl, G.; Sima, O.; Śmiałkowski, A.; Šmída, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Spinka, H.; Squartini, R.; Srivastava, Y. N.; Stanič, S.; Stapleton, J.; Stasielak, J.; Stephan, M.; Straub, M.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijärvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Šuša, T.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Szuba, M.; Tapia, A.; Tartare, M.; Taşcǎu, O.; Thao, N. T.; Tiffenberg, J.; Timmermans, C.; Tkaczyk, W.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Toma, G.; Tomankova, L.; Tomé, B.; Tonachini, A.; Torralba Elipe, G.; Torres Machado, D.; Travnicek, P.; Tridapalli, D. B.; Trovato, E.; Tueros, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Valdés Galicia, J. F.; Valiño, I.; Valore, L.; van Aar, G.; van den Berg, A. M.; van Velzen, S.; van Vliet, A.; Varela, E.; Vargas Cárdenas, B.; Varner, G.; Vázquez, J. R.; Vázquez, R. A.; Veberič, D.; Verzi, V.; Vicha, J.; Videla, M.; Villaseñor, L.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrlich, P.; Wainberg, O.; Walz, D.; Watson, A. A.; Weber, M.; Weidenhaupt, K.; Weindl, A.; Werner, F.; Westerhoff, S.; Whelan, B. J.; Widom, A.; Wieczorek, G.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczyńska, B.; Wilczyński, H.; Will, M.; Williams, C.; Winchen, T.; Wundheiler, B.; Wykes, S.; Yamamoto, T.; Yapici, T.; Younk, P.; Yuan, G.; Yushkov, A.; Zamorano, B.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zaw, I.; Zepeda, A.; Zhou, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zimbres Silva, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Pierre Auger Collaboration

    2014-03-01

    The emission of radio waves from air showers has been attributed to the so-called geomagnetic emission process. At frequencies around 50 MHz this process leads to coherent radiation which can be observed with rather simple setups. The direction of the electric field induced by this emission process depends only on the local magnetic field vector and on the incoming direction of the air shower. We report on measurements of the electric field vector where, in addition to this geomagnetic component, another component has been observed that cannot be described by the geomagnetic emission process. The data provide strong evidence that the other electric field component is polarized radially with respect to the shower axis, in agreement with predictions made by Askaryan who described radio emission from particle showers due to a negative charge excess in the front of the shower. Our results are compared to calculations which include the radiation mechanism induced by this charge-excess process.

  13. Size measurement of plutonium particles from internal sputtering into air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yung-Sung; Holmes, Thomas D.; George, Timothy G.; Marlow, William H.

    2005-06-01

    During the past century, the results of spontaneous translocation of radioactivity in air, biological media and groundwater have been reported. Here, we report the first measurements of the size characteristics in air of the particles participating in this translocation phenomenon. For the plutonium material powering radioisotope thermal generators, we find two narrow, well-separated fractions, one corresponding to particles below a nanometer and one at or below 10 nm. These results are interpreted as a gas-phase nucleation phenomenon arising from internal sputtering. They suggest fruitful directions for further research with immediate implications for accounting for the effects of radiological terrorism, for identifying new signatures for nuclear materials of possible use in antiterrorism and other covert nuclear materials operations, for radioactive and mixed materials storage handling, for reactor safety and source term modeling and for other materials processes.

  14. Experimental and numerical investigation on air-side performance of fin-and-tube heat exchangers with various fin patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, L.H.; Zeng, M.; Wang, Q.W.

    2009-07-15

    Air-side heat transfer and friction characteristics of five kinds of fin-and-tube heat exchangers, with the number of tube rows (N = 12) and the diameter of tubes (D{sub o} = 18 mm), have been experimentally investigated. The test samples consist of five types of fin configurations: crimped spiral fin, plain fin, slit fin, fin with delta-wing longitudinal vortex generators (VGs) and mixed fin with front 6-row vortex-generator fin and rear 6-row slit fin. The heat transfer and friction factor correlations for different types of heat exchangers were obtained with the Reynolds numbers ranging from 4000 to 10000. It was found that crimped spiral fin provides higher heat transfer and pressure drop than the other four fins. The air-side performance of heat exchangers with the above five fins has been evaluated under three sets of criteria and it was shown that the heat exchanger with mixed fin (front vortex-generator fin and rear slit fin) has better performance than that with fin with delta-wing vortex generators, and the slit fin offers best heat transfer performance at high Reynolds numbers. Based on the correlations of numerical data, Genetic Algorithm optimization was carried out, and the optimization results indicated that the increase of VG attack angle or length, or decrease of VG height may enhance the performance of vortex-generator fin. The heat transfer performances for optimized vortex-generator fin and slit fin at hand have been compared with numerical method. (author)

  15. Exchanges of Aggregate Air Nitrogen Emissions and Watershed Nitrogen Loads”

    EPA Science Inventory

    An approach has been developed to define transfer coefficients that can be used to convert changes in air emissions to changes in air deposition and subsequently to changes in loads delivered to the Bay. This approach uses a special CMAQ version that quantitatively attributes wa...

  16. Gas-exchange analysis of chloroplastic fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase antisense potatoes at different air humidities and at elevated CO(2).

    PubMed

    Muschak, M; Willmitzer, L; Fisahn, J

    1999-07-01

    Gas-exchange measurements were performed to analyze the leaf conductances and assimilation rates of potato (Solanum tuberosum L. cv. Desireé) plants expressing an antisense construct against chloroplastic fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (FBPase, EC 3.1.3.11) in response to increasing photon flux densities, different relative air humidities and elevated CO(2) concentrations. Assimilation rates (A) and transpiration rates (E) were observed during a stepwise increase of photon flux density. These experiments were carried out under atmospheric conditions and in air containing 500 micromol mol(-1) CO(2). In both gas atmospheres, two levels of relative air humidity (60-70% and 70-80%) were applied in different sets of measurements. Intercellular CO(2) concentration, leaf conductance, air-to-leaf vapour pressure deficit, and instantaneous water-use efficiency (A/E) were determined. As expected, assimilation rates of the FBPase antisense plants were significantly reduced as compared to the wild type. Saturation of assimilation rates in transgenic plants occurred at a photon flux density of 200 micromol m(-2) s(-1), whereas saturation in wild type plants was observed at 600 micromol m(-2) s(-1). Elevated ambient CO(2) levels did not effect assimilation rates of transgenic plants. At 70-80% relative humidity and atmospheric CO(2) concentration the FBPase antisense plants had significantly higher leaf conductances than wild-type plants while no difference emerged at 60-70%. These differences in leaf conductance vanished at elevated levels of ambient CO(2). Stomatal response to different relative air humidities was not affected by mesophyll photosynthetic activity. It is suggested that the regulation of stomatal opening upon changes in photon flux density is merely mediated by a signal transmitted from mesophyll cells, whereas the intercellular CO(2) concentration plays a minor role in this kind of stomatal response. The results are discussed with respect to stomatal control by

  17. Pressure measurements of a three wave journal air bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimofte, Florin; Addy, Harold E., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    In order to validate theoretical predictions of a wave journal bearing concept, a bench test rig was assembled at NASA Lewis Research Center to measure the steady-state performance of a journal air bearing. The tester can run up to 30,000 RPM and the spindle has a run out of less than 1 micron. A three wave journal bearing (50 mm diameter and 58 mm length) has been machined at NASA Lewis. The pressures at 16 ports along the bearing circumference at the middle of the bearing length were measured and compared to the theoretical prediction. The bearing ran at speeds up to 15,000 RPM and certain loads. Good agreement was found between the measured and calculated pressures.

  18. Air-Sea Interaction Measurements from R/P FLIP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friehe, C. A.

    2002-12-01

    Soon after its inception, R/P FLIP was used to study the interaction of the atmosphere and ocean due to its unique stability and low flow distortion. A number of campaigns have been conducted to measure the surface fluxes of heat, water vapor and horizontal momentum of the wind with instrumentation as used over land, supported by the Office of Naval Research and the National Science Foundation. The size of FLIP allows for simultaneous ocean wave and mixed-layer measurements as well. Air-sea interaction was a prime component of BOMEX in 1968, where FLIP transited the Panama Canal. The methods used were similar to the over-land "Kansas" experiment of AFCRL in 1968. BOMEX was followed by many experiments in the north Pacific off San Diego, northern California, and Hawaii. Diverse results from FLIP include identification of the mechanism that causes erroneous fluctuating temperature measurements in the salt-aerosol-laden marine atmosphere, the role of humidity on optical refractive index fluctuations, and identification of Miles' critical layer in the air flow over waves.

  19. Measuring the force of drag on air sheared sessile drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milne, Andrew J. B.; Fleck, Brian; Amirfazli, Alidad

    2012-11-01

    To blow a drop along or off of a surface (i.e. to shed the drop), the drag force on the drop (based on flow conditions, drop shape, and fluid properties) must overcome the adhesion force between the drop and the surface (based on surface tension, drop shape, and contact angle). While the shedding of sessile drops by shear flow has been studied [Milne, A. J. B. & Amirfazli, A. Langmuir 25, 14155 (2009).], no independent measurements of the drag or adhesion forces have been made. Likewise, analytic predictions are limited to hemispherical drops and low air velocities. We present, therefore, measurements of the drag force on sessile drops at air velocities up to the point of incipient motion. Measurements were made using a modified floating element shear sensor in a laminar low speed wind tunnel to record drag force over the surface with the drop absent, and over the combined system of the surface and drop partially immersed in the boundary layer. Surfaces of different wettabilities were used to study the effects of drop shape and contact angles, with drop volume ranged between approximately 10 and 100 microlitres. The drag force for incipient motion (which by definition equals the maximum of the adhesion force) is compared to simplified models for drop adhesion such as that of Furmidge

  20. Identifying Housing and Meteorological Conditions Influencing Residential Air Exchange Rates in the DEARS and RIOPA Studies: Development of Distributions for Human Exposure Modeling

    EPA Science Inventory

    Appropriate prediction of residential air exchange rate (AER) is important for estimating human exposures in the residential microenvironment, as AER drives the infiltration of outdoor-generated air pollutants indoors. AER differences among homes may result from a number of fact...

  1. Empowering smartphone users with sensor node for air quality measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oletic, Dinko; Bilas, Vedran

    2013-06-01

    We present an architecture of a sensor node developed for use with smartphones for participatory sensing of air quality in urban environments. Our solution features inexpensive metal-oxide semiconductor gas sensors (MOX) for measurement of CO, O3, NO2 and VOC, along with sensors for ambient temperature and humidity. We focus on our design of sensor interface consisting of power-regulated heater temperature control, and the design of resistance sensing circuit. Accuracy of the sensor interface is characterized. Power consumption of the sensor node is analysed. Preliminary data obtained from the CO gas sensors in laboratory conditions and during the outdoor field-test is shown.

  2. The impact of European measures to reduce air pollutants on air quality, human health and climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turnock, S.; Butt, E. W.; Richardson, T.; Mann, G.; Forster, P.; Haywood, J. M.; Crippa, M.; Janssens-Maenhout, G. G. A.; Johnson, C.; Bellouin, N.; Spracklen, D. V.; Carslaw, K. S.; Reddington, C.

    2015-12-01

    European air quality legislation has reduced emissions of air pollutants across Europe since the 1970s, resulting in improved air quality and benefits to human health but also an unintended impact on regional climate. Here we used a coupled chemistry-climate model and a new policy relevant emission scenario to determine the impact of air pollutant emission reductions over Europe. The emission scenario shows that a combination of technological improvements and end-of-pipe abatement measures in the energy, industrial and road transport sectors reduced European emissions of sulphur dioxide, black carbon and organic carbon by 53%, 59% and 32% respectively. We estimate that these emission reductions decreased European annual mean concentrations of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) by 35%, sulphate by 44%, black carbon (BC) by 56% and particulate organic matter (POM) by 23%. The reduction in PM2.5 concentrations is calculated to have prevented 107,000 (40,000-172,000, 5-95% confidence intervals) premature deaths annually from cardiopulmonary disease and lung cancer across the EU member states. The decrease in aerosol concentrations caused a positive all-sky aerosol radiative forcing at the top of atmosphere over Europe of 2.3±0.06 W m-2 and a positive clear-sky forcing of 1.7±0.05 W m-2. Additionally, the amount of solar radiation incident at the surface over Europe increased by 3.3±0.07 W m-2 under all-sky and by 2.7±0.05 W m-2 under clear-sky conditions. Reductions in BC concentrations caused a 1 Wm-2 reduction in atmospheric absorption. We use an energy budget approximation to show that the aerosol induced radiative changes caused both temperature and precipitation to increase globally and over Europe. Our results show that the implementation of European legislation to reduce the emission of air pollutants has improved air quality and human health over Europe, as well as altered the regional radiative balance and climate.

  3. Seasonal variation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in soil and air of Dalian areas, China: an assessment of soil-air exchange.

    PubMed

    Wang, Degao; Yang, Meng; Jia, Hongliang; Zhou, Lei; Li, Yifan

    2008-09-01

    The seasonal variations of concentrations of PAHs in the soil and the air were measured in urban and rural region of Dalian, China in 2007. In soil, mean concentrations of all PAHs in summer were larger than those in winter, whereas the concentrations of heavier weight PAHs in winter were larger than those in summer. Winter/summer concentration ratios for individual PAHs (R(W/S)) increased with the increase of molecular weight of PAHs in soil, indicating that PAHs with high molecular weight were more easily deposited to soil in winter than summer. In air, mean concentrations of all PAHs in winter were larger than those in summer. In comparison with the R(W/S) in soil, all the values of R(W/S) in air were larger than one indicating that the entire individual PAH concentrations in winter were larger than those in summer. The average concentration composition for each PAH compound in soil and air samples was determined and the seasonal change of PAH profile was very small. It was suggested that PAHs in soils and air had the same or similar sources both in winter and summer. The approach to the soil-air equilibrium was assessed by calculating fugacity quotients between soil and air using the soil and air concentrations. The calculated soil-air fugacity quotients indicated that soil acted as a secondary source to the atmosphere for all lighter weight PAHs (two-three rings) and it will continue to be a sink for heavier weight PAHs (five-six rings) in the Dalian environment, both in winter and summer. Medium weight PAHs (four-five rings) were close to the soil-air equilibrium and the tendency shifted between soil and air when season or function region changed. The fugacity quotients of PAHs in summer (mean temperature 298 K) were larger than those in winter (mean temperature 273 K), indicating a higher tendency in summer than winter for PAHs to move from soil to air. The variation of ambient conditions such as temperature, rainfall, etc. can influence the movement of PAHs

  4. Excitation and Charge Exchange Phenomena in Astronomical Objects: Measurement of Cross Sections and Lifetimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, Ara; Smith, S.; Lozano, J.; Cadez, I.; Greewnood, J.; Mawhovter, R.; Williams, I.; Niimura, M.

    2003-01-01

    This document addresses extreme ultraviolet radiation and X-ray emissions from comets, planets and heliospheric gases focusing on the measurement of charge-exchange cross sections and radiative lifetimes. Highly-charged heavy ions present in the solar wind, and their abundance relative to the total oxygen-ion abundance are detailed. The plan for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory high-charge ion facility is outlined detailing its ability to measure absolute collisional excitation cross sections, absolute charge-exchange cross sections, lifetimes of metastable ion levels, and X-ray emission spectra following charge changes.

  5. Automated measurement of respiratory gas exchange by an inert gas dilution technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawin, C. F.; Rummel, J. A.; Michel, E. L.

    1974-01-01

    A respiratory gas analyzer (RGA) has been developed wherein a mass spectrometer is the sole transducer required for measurement of respiratory gas exchange. The mass spectrometer maintains all signals in absolute phase relationships, precluding the need to synchronize flow and gas composition as required in other systems. The RGA system was evaluated by comparison with the Douglas bag technique. The RGA system established the feasibility of the inert gas dilution method for measuring breath-by-breath respiratory gas exchange. This breath-by-breath analytical capability permits detailed study of transient respiratory responses to exercise.

  6. Air-vegetation exchange of SOCs as a control of atmospheric concentrations and residence times

    SciTech Connect

    Hornbuckle, K.C.; Eisenreich, S.J.

    1994-12-31

    Semi-volatile organic compounds (SOCs) such as the polychlorinated biphenyls exhibit seasonal maxima in atmospheric concentrations with highest values in the warm summer. This generally believed to result from the effect of temperature on SOC vapor pressure with direct and important implications to global transport. The authors have conducted a series of field experiments whereby air samples were collected above an ombrotrophic, forested bog in northern MN at a frequency of 6 day{sup {minus}1} during the fall, winter, spring and summer. Samples of Sphagnum moss and other vegetation were also collected on each occasion. All samples were analyzed for PCBs, low MW PAHs, gaseous hydrocarbons and selected pesticides. Meteorological and soils data were collected during all experiments (air and soil temperature, wind direction and velocity, RH). Diurnal concentration data, air-plant and air-soil partition coefficients and probable mechanisms and kinetics of SOC-plant interactions will be presented.

  7. Air toxics being measured more accurately, controlled more effectively

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-01

    In response to the directives of the Clean Air Act Amendments, Argonne National Laboratory is developing new or improved pollutant control technologies for industries that burn fossil fuels. This research continues Argonne`s traditional support for the US DOE Flue Gas Cleanup Program. Research is underway to measure process emissions and identify new and improved control measures. Argonne`s emission control research has ranged from experiments in the basic chemistry of pollution-control systems, through laboratory-scale process development and testing to pilot-scale field tests of several technologies. Whenever appropriate, the work has emphasized integrated or combined control systems as the best approach to technologies that offer low cost and good operating characteristics.

  8. Projection Moire Interferometry Measurements of Micro Air Vehicle Wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, Gary A.; Bartram, Scott M.; Waszak, Martin R.; Jenkins, Luther N.

    2001-01-01

    Projection Moire Interferometry (PMI) has been used to measure the structural deformation of micro air vehicle (MAV) wings during a series of wind tunnel tests. The MAV wings had a highly flexible wing structure, generically reminiscent of a bat s wing, which resulted in significant changes in wing shape as a function of MAV angle-of-attack and simulated flight speed. This flow-adaptable wing deformation is thought to provide enhanced vehicle stability and wind gust alleviation compared to rigid wing designs. Investigation of the potential aerodynamic benefits of a flexible MAV wing required measurement of the wing shape under aerodynamic loads. PMI was used to quantify the aerodynamically induced changes in wing shape for three MAV wings having different structural designs and stiffness characteristics. This paper describes the PMI technique, its application to MAV testing, and presents a portion of the PMI data acquired for the three different MAV wings tested.

  9. The organic sea surface microlayer in the upwelling region off Peru and implications for air-sea exchange processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, A.; Galgani, L.

    2015-07-01

    The sea surface microlayer (SML) is at the very surface of the ocean, linking the hydrosphere with the atmosphere, and central to a range of global biogeochemical and climate-related processes. The presence and enrichment of organic compounds in the SML have been suggested to influence air-sea gas exchange processes as well as the emission of primary organic aerosols. Among these organic compounds, primarily of plankton origin, are dissolved exopolymers, specifically polysaccharides and proteins, and gel particles, such as Transparent Exopolymer Particles (TEP) and Coomassie Stainable Particles (CSP). These organic substances often accumulate in the surface ocean when plankton productivity is high. Here, we report results obtained in December 2012 during the SOPRAN Meteor 91 cruise to the highly productive, coastal upwelling regime off Peru. Samples were collected from the SML and from ~ 20 cm below, and were analyzed for polysaccharidic and proteinaceous compounds, gel particles, total and dissolved organic carbon, bacterial and phytoplankton abundance. Our study provides insight to the physical and biological control of organic matter enrichment in the SML, and discusses the potential role of organic matter in the SML for air-sea exchange processes.

  10. Exchange of Groundwater and Surface-Water Mediated by Permafrost Response to Seasonal and Long Term Air Temperature Variation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ge, Shemin; McKenzie, Jeffrey; Voss, Clifford; Wu, Qingbai

    2011-01-01

    Permafrost dynamics impact hydrologic cycle processes by promoting or impeding groundwater and surface water exchange. Under seasonal and decadal air temperature variations, permafrost temperature changes control the exchanges between groundwater and surface water. A coupled heat transport and groundwater flow model, SUTRA, was modified to simulate groundwater flow and heat transport in the subsurface containing permafrost. The northern central Tibet Plateau was used as an example of model application. Modeling results show that in a yearly cycle, groundwater flow occurs in the active layer from May to October. Maximum groundwater discharge to the surface lags the maximum subsurface temperature by two months. Under an increasing air temperature scenario of 3?C per 100 years, over the initial 40-year period, the active layer thickness can increase by three-fold. Annual groundwater discharge to the surface can experience a similar three-fold increase in the same period. An implication of these modeling results is that with increased warming there will be more groundwater flow in the active layer and therefore increased groundwater discharge to rivers. However, this finding only holds if sufficient upgradient water is available to replenish the increased discharge. Otherwise, there will be an overall lowering of the water table in the recharge portion of the catchment.

  11. Exchange of groundwater and surface-water mediated by permafrost response to seasonal and long term air temperature variation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ge, S.; McKenzie, J.; Voss, C.; Wu, Q.

    2011-01-01

    Permafrost dynamics impact hydrologic cycle processes by promoting or impeding groundwater and surface water exchange. Under seasonal and decadal air temperature variations, permafrost temperature changes control the exchanges between groundwater and surface water. A coupled heat transport and groundwater flow model, SUTRA, was modified to simulate groundwater flow and heat transport in the subsurface containing permafrost. The northern central Tibet Plateau was used as an example of model application. Modeling results show that in a yearly cycle, groundwater flow occurs in the active layer from May to October. Maximum groundwater discharge to the surface lags the maximum subsurface temperature by two months. Under an increasing air temperature scenario of 3C per 100 years, over the initial 40-year period, the active layer thickness can increase by three-fold. Annual groundwater discharge to the surface can experience a similar three-fold increase in the same period. An implication of these modeling results is that with increased warming there will be more groundwater flow in the active layer and therefore increased groundwater discharge to rivers. However, this finding only holds if sufficient upgradient water is available to replenish the increased discharge. Otherwise, there will be an overall lowering of the water table in the recharge portion of the catchment. Copyright 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  12. Ion exchange chromatography and radioimmunoassay procedure for measuring opioid peptides and substance P

    SciTech Connect

    Bergstroem, L.; Christensson, I.; Folkesson, R.; Stenstroem, B.; Terenius, L.

    1983-10-01

    The measurements of peptides of the enkephalin, dynorphin and substance P systems is complicated by the number of possible precursor fragments and degradation products that might cross-react with the antisera. By using an ion-exchanger step before radioimmunoassay one can reduce the possibility that observed peptide levels are due to precursors or metabolites. The ion-exchanger method runs with good recovery and its main advantage is that many samples can be run in parallel. The recovery from the ion-exchanger was similar using two different homogenizing media, whereas the measured endogenous levels of (Met) and (Leu)enkephalin were 3-4 fold higher with 1M acetic acid than when a 1:1 MeOH/HCl mixture was used for tissue extraction.

  13. Gas and liquid measurements in air-water bubbly flows

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, X.; Doup, B.; Sun, X.

    2012-07-01

    Local measurements of gas- and liquid-phase flow parameters are conducted in an air-water two-phase flow loop. The test section is a vertical pipe with an inner diameter of 50 mm and a height of 3.2 m. The measurements are performed at z/D = 10. The gas-phase measurements are performed using a four-sensor conductivity probe. The data taken from this probe are processed using a signal processing program to yield radial profiles of the void fraction, bubble velocity, and interfacial area concentration. The velocity measurements of the liquid-phase are performed using a state-of-the-art Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) system. The raw PIV images are acquired using fluorescent particles and an optical filtration device. Image processing is used to remove noise in the raw PIV images. The statistical cross correlation is introduced to determine the axial velocity field and turbulence intensity of the liquid-phase. Measurements are currently being performed at z/D = 32 to provide a more complete data set. These data can be used for computational fluid dynamic model development and validation. (authors)

  14. Concentrations, atmospheric partitioning, and air-water/soil surface exchange of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin and dibenzofuran along the upper reaches of the Haihe River basin, North China.

    PubMed

    Nie, Zhiqiang; Die, Qingqi; Yang, Yufei; Tang, Zhenwu; Wang, Qi; Huang, Qifei

    2014-01-01

    Polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin and dibenzofuran (PCDD/PCDF) were overall measured and compared in ambient air, water, soils, and sediments along the upper reaches of the Haihe River of North China, so as to evaluate their concentrations, profiles, and to understand the processes of gas-particle partitioning and air-water/soil exchange. The following results were obtained: (1) The average concentrations (toxic equivalents, TEQs) of 2,3,7,8-PCDD/PCDF in air, water, sediment, and soil samples were 4,855 fg/m(3), 9.5 pg/L, 99.2 pg/g dry weight (dw), and 56.4 pg/g (203 fg TEQ/m(3), 0.46 pg TEQ/L, 2.2 pg TEQ/g dw, and 1.3 pg TEQ/g, respectively), respectively. (2) Although OCDF, 1,2,3,4,6,7,8-HpCDF, OCDD, and 1,2,3,4,6,7,8-HpCDD were the dominant congeners among four environmental sinks, obvious discrepancies of these congener and homologue patterns of PCDD/PCDF were observed still. (3) Significant linear correlations for PCDD/PCDF were observed between the gas-particle partition coefficient (K p) and the subcooled liquid vapor pressure (P L (0)) and octanol-air partition coefficient (K oa). (4) Fugacity fraction values of air-water exchange indicated that most of PCDD/PCDF homologues were dominated by net volatilization from water into air. The low-chlorinated PCDD/PCDF (tetra- to hexa-) presented a strong net volatilization from the soil into air, while high-chlorinated PCDD/PCDF (hepta- to octa-) were mainly close to equilibrium for air-soil exchange. PMID:24643387

  15. Mobile Air Monitoring: Measuring Change in Air Quality in the City of Hamilton, 2005-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Matthew D.; DeLuca, Patrick F.; Corr, Denis; Kanaroglou, Pavlos S.

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the change in air pollutant concentrations between 2005 and 2010 occurring in the City of Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. After analysis of stationary air pollutant concentration data, we analyze mobile air pollutant concentration data. Air pollutants included in the analysis are CO, PM[subscript 2.5], SO[subscript 2], NO,…

  16. Mutagenicity, sister chromatid exchange inducibility and in vitro cell transforming ability of particulates from Athens air

    SciTech Connect

    Athanasiou, K.; Arzimanoglou, I.; Piccoli, C.; Yamasaki, H.

    1987-09-01

    Airborne particulates were collected over a period of twelve months by the use of Hi-Vol samplers in the basin of Athens, Greece. N-Hexane extracts were tested in a battery of in vitro tests for their ability to induce mutation in bacteria as well as mutations, sister chromatid exchange and morphological transformation in cultured mammalian cells. Positive results were found for mutagenicity with Salmonella strain TA98 in the Ames assay, for sister chromatid exchange induction in CHO cells and for transformation in BALB/c 3T3 cells in culture. They also showed weak non-dose-related induction of ouabain resistance in BALB/c 3T3 cells. The contribution of oxidizing and nitrating agents found in the Athens atmosphere, together with sunlight UV irradiation in the formation of direct acting mutagens and potential carcinogens from ambient polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, is suggested.

  17. Regenerable device for scrubbing breathable air of CO2 and moisture without special heat exchanger equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tepper, E. H. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    The device concerns the circulation of cabin air through canisters which absorb and adsorb carbon dioxide, together with excess moisture, and return the scrubbed air to the cabin for recirculation. A coating on an inert substrate in granular form absorbs and adsorbs the impurities at standard temperatures and pressures, but desorbs such impurities at low pressures (vacuum) and standard temperatures. This fact is exploited by making the device in a stack of cells consisting of layers or cells which are isolated from one another flow-wise and are connected to separate manifolds and valving systems into two separate subsets. A first subset may be connected for the flow breathable air therethrough until the polyethyleneimine of its cells is saturated with CO2 and H2O. During the same period the second subset of cells is manifolded to a vacuum source.

  18. Measurement of indoor air quality in two new test houses

    SciTech Connect

    Hodgson, A.T.

    1996-01-01

    This study assessed indoor air quality in two similar, new houses being evaluated for energy performance. One house (A) was built conventionally. The other (B) was an energy-efficient structure. Air samples for individual volatile organic compounds (VOCs), total VOCs (TVOC) and formaldehyde were collected following completion of the interiors of the houses and on several occasions during the following year. Ventilation rates were also determined so that source strengths of airborne contaminants could be estimated with a mass- balance model. There were no substantial differences in indoor air quality between the houses. The TVOC concentrations in House A ranged from 1,700 - 4,400 {mu}p m{sup -3}, with the highest value coinciding with the lowest ventilation rate. The TVOC concentrations in House B were 2,400 - 2,800 {mu}g m{sup -3}. These values are elevated compared to a median value of 700 {mu}g m{sup -3} measured for a large residential study. Formaldehyde concentrations ranged up to 74 {mu}g m{sup -3}. The dominant VOC in both houses was hexanal, an odorous chemical irritant. The concentrations of acetone, pentanal, toluene, alpha-pinene and other aldehydes were also relatively high in both houses. The source strengths of many of the analytes did not decline substantially over the course of the study. The OSB was estimated to contribute substantially to concentrations of formaldehyde and acetone in the houses. The results also suggested that OSB was not the dominant source of pentanal, hexanal and alpha-pinene, all of which had elevated emissions in the houses, possibly from a single source.

  19. Thickness and air gap measurement of assembled IR objectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lueerss, B.; Langehanenberg, P.

    2015-05-01

    A growing number of applications like surveillance, thermography, or automotive demand for infrared imaging systems. Their imaging performance is significantly influenced by the alignment of the individual lens elements. Besides the lateral orientation of lenses, the air spacing between the lenses is a crucial parameter. Because of restricted mechanical accessibility within an assembled objective, a non-contact technique is required for the testing of these parameters. So far commercial measurement systems were not available for testing of IR objectives since many materials used for infrared imaging are non-transparent at wavelengths below 2 μm. We herewith present a time-domain low coherent interferometer capable of measuring any kind of infrared material (e.g., Ge, Si, etc.) as well as VIS materials. The fiber-optic set-up is based on a Michelson-Interferometer in which the light from a broadband super-luminescent diode is split into a reference arm with a variable optical delay and a measurement arm where the sample is placed. On a photo detector, the reflected signals from both arms are superimposed and recorded as a function of the variable optical path. Whenever the group delay difference is zero, a coherence peak occurs and the relative lens' surface distances are derived from the optical delay. In order to penetrate IR materials, the instrument operates at 2.2 μm. The set-up allows the contactless determination of thicknesses and air gaps inside of assembled infrared objective lenses with accuracy in the micron range. It therefore is a tool for the precise manufacturing or quality control.

  20. Thickness and air gap measurement of assembled IR objectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lueerss, B.; Langehanenberg, P.

    2015-10-01

    A growing number of applications like surveillance, thermography, or automotive demand for infrared imaging systems. Their imaging performance is significantly influenced by the alignment of the individual lenses. Besides the lateral orientation of lenses, the air spacing between the lenses is a crucial parameter. Because of restricted mechanical accessibility within an assembled objective, a non-contact technique is required for the testing of these parameters. So far, commercial measurement systems were not available for testing of IR objectives since most materials used for infrared imaging are non-transparent at wavelengths below 2 μm. We herewith present a time-domain low coherent interferometer capable of measuring any kind of infrared material (e.g., Ge, Si, etc.) as well as VIS materials. The set-up is based on a Michelson interferometer in which the light from a broadband superluminescent diode is split into a reference arm with a variable optical delay and a measurement arm where the sample is placed. On a detector, the reflected signals from both arms are superimposed and recorded as a function of the variable optical path. Whenever the group delay difference is zero, a coherence peak occurs and the relative distances of the lens surfaces are derived from the optical delay. In order to penetrate IR materials, the instrument operates at 2.2 μm. Together with an LWIR autocollimator, this technique allows for the determination of centering errors, lens thicknesses and air spacings of assembled IR objective lenses with a micron accuracy. It is therefore a tool for precision manufacturing and quality control.

  1. Carbon dioxide control in an open system that measures canopy gas exchanges

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration ([CO2]) effects both C3 net assimilation (A) as well as crop water use. Methods for measuring whole canopy gas exchange responses under [CO2] enrichment are needed for breeding programs aiming to develop crop cultivars resistant to stresses like drought in a...

  2. Carbon dioxide control in an open system that measures canopy gas exchanges

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration affects both C3 carbon net assimilation as well as crop water use. Methods for measuring whole canopy gas exchange responses under carbon dioxide enrichment are needed for breeding programs aiming to develop crop cultivars resistant to stresses like drought i...

  3. Through-the-electrode model of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell with independently measured parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Weisbrod, K.R.; Grot, S.A.; Vanderborgh, N.E.

    1995-05-01

    A one dimensional model for a proton exchange membrane fuel cell was developed which makes use of independently measured parameters for predicting single cell performance. Optimization of catalyst layer formulation and properties are explored. Impact of temperature and cathode pressure upon system performance was investigated.

  4. Through-the-electrode model of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell with independently measured parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Weisbrod, K.R.; Grot, S.A.; Vandergborgh, N.E.

    1995-09-01

    A one dimensional model for a proton exchange membrane fuel cell was developed which makes use of independently measured parameters for predicting single cell performance. Optimization of catalyst layer formulation and properties are explored. Impact of temperature and cathode pressure upon system performance is investigated.

  5. Productivity and carbon dioxide exchange of the leguminous crops: Estimates from flux tower measurements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Net CO2 exchange data on legume crops at 17 flux tower sites in North America and 3 sites in Europe representing 29 site-years of measurements were partitioned into gross photosynthesis and ecosystem respiration using a light-response function method, resulting in new estimates of ecosystem-scale ec...

  6. Ecoregion Framework Facilitating Synthesis and Up-scaling of Tower CO2 Exchange Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmanov, T. G.; Wylie, B. K.; Howard, D. M.; Zhang, L.

    2015-12-01

    As the flux-tower studies of terrestrial CO2 exchange are currently approaching the stage of generalization and up-scaling, there is a growing need for an effective framework for these efforts facilitating comparative analysis and synthesis of flux tower data. Developed in the 1980s to denote a region with recurring patterns of ecosystems with similar climatic, vegetation, soil, and relief conditions, during the past decades the ecoregion concept was widely used as a tool combining modeling, GIS and remote sensing techniques in environmental and nature conservation project at the national and international scale. We describe application of the ecoregion approach to synthesis and up-scaling of the tower CO2 exchange measurements in the three major ecoregions of the Great Plains: Shortgrass steppe (SGS), Mixed prairie (MP), and Tallgrass prairie (TP). Original data of tower CO2 exchange (NEE) measurements during the 1996-2013 period covering 23 years at 6 sites in SGS, 86 years at 21 sites in MP, and 80 years at 24 sites in TP were partitioned into the gross photosynthesis (Pg) and ecosystem respiration (Re) components using the light-soil temperature-VPD response method. We present ecoregion-specific multivariate models relating gross photosynthesis, ecosystem respiration and major ecosystem-scale ecophysiological parameters (photosynthetic capacity, apparent quantum yield, light-use efficiency, daytime respiration intensity) to on-site (climatic, plant, soil) and remotely sensed (NDVI) drivers of CO2 exchange. Superposition of these models on GIS layers of appropriate drivers was used to describe geographic patterns (maps) of photosynthesis, respiration, net CO2 exchange and ecophysiological parameters across the Great Plains. The source-sink activity at the ecoregion-scale was quantified by calculating spatial integrals of CO2 exchange characteristic over GIS pixels represented by the tower measurements.

  7. Position-specific measurement of oxygen isotope ratios in cellulose: Isotopic exchange during heterotrophic cellulose synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waterhouse, John S.; Cheng, Shuying; Juchelka, Dieter; Loader, Neil J.; McCarroll, Danny; Switsur, V. Roy; Gautam, Lata

    2013-07-01

    We describe the first reported method for the measurement of oxygen isotope ratios at each position in the glucose units of the cellulose molecule. The overall process comprises a series of synthetic organic sequences, by which α-cellulose is hydrolysed to glucose, and oxygen atoms at specific positions in the glucose molecule are removed in samples of benzoic acid for measurement of δ18O. Values of δ18O at specific positions in cellulose are calculated from these δ18O values and the overall δ18O value of the cellulose. We apply the method to determine the degree to which oxygen atoms at each position undergo isotopic exchange with water during heterotrophic cellulose synthesis, such as occurs in the cambium of trees. To do this we extract α-cellulose from wheat seedlings germinated in the dark in aqueous media of differing oxygen isotope ratios. Results indicate that oxygen atoms at positions 5 and 6 (O-5 and O-6 respectively) undergo around 80% exchange with medium water, O-3 undergoes around 50% exchange, and O-2 and O-4 do not undergo isotopic exchange. The results have important implications for extracting palaeoclimatic records from oxygen isotope time series obtained from tree ring cellulose. As O-5 and O-6 undergo significant exchange with medium water during heterotrophic cellulose synthesis, oxygen isotopes at these positions in tree ring cellulose should carry a predominantly trunk (source) water signal. On the other hand, O-2 and O-4 should retain the isotopic signature of leaf water in tree ring cellulose. Our method therefore potentially enables the separate reconstruction of past temperature and humidity data from oxygen isotope ratios of tree ring cellulose - something that has hitherto not been possible. The measured degrees of isotopic exchange are to some extent unexpected and cannot be fully explained using current biochemical mechanisms, suggesting that knowledge of these processes is incomplete.

  8. Measurement of vertical velocity using clear-air Doppler radars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanzandt, T. E.; Green, J. L.; Nastrom, G. D.; Gage, K. S.; Clark, W. L.; Warnock, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    A new clear air Doppler radar was constructed, called the Flatland radar, in very flat terrain near Champaign-Urbana, Illinois. The radar wavelength is 6.02 m. The radar has been measuring vertical velocity every 153 s with a range resolution of 750 m almost continuously since March 2, 1987. The variance of vertical velocity at Flatland is usually quite small, comparable to the variance at radars located near rough terrain during periods of small background wind. The absence of orographic effects over very flat terrain suggests that clear air Doppler radars can be used to study vertical velocities due to other processes, including synoptic scale motions and propagating gravity waves. For example, near rough terrain the shape of frequency spectra changes drastically as the background wind increases. But at Flatland the shape at periods shorter than a few hours changes only slowly, consistent with the changes predicted by Doppler shifting of gravity wave spectra. Thus it appears that the short period fluctuations of vertical velocity at Flatland are alsmost entirely due to the propagating gravity waves.

  9. Indoor air quality measurements in 38 Pacific Northwest commercial buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Turk, B.H.; Brown, J.T.; Geisling-Sobotka, K.; Froehlich, D.A.; Grimsrud, D.T.; Harrison, J.; Revzan, K.L.

    1986-06-01

    A Bonneville Power Administration-funded study monitored ventilation rates and a variety of indoor air pollutants in 38 Pacific Northwest commercial buildings. The buildings ranged in age from 6 months to 90 years, in size from 864 to 34,280 m/sup 2/, and occupancy from 25 to 2500 people. Building average formaldehyde (HCHO) concentrations were below the 20 ppB detection limit in 48% of the buildings. Nitrogen dioxide (NO/sub 2/) concentration averages ranged from 5 ppB to 43 ppB and were lower than outdoor concentrations in 8 of 13 buildings. At only one site, an elementary school classroom, did carbon dioxide (CO/sub 2/) exceed 1000 ppM. Radon (Rn) levels were elevated in one building with an average concentration of 7.4 pCiL/sup -1/. Respirable particles (RSP) concentrations in smoking areas in 32 buildings had a geometric mean of 44 ..mu..g m/sup -3/ and ranged up to 308 ..mu..g m/sup -3/ at one site. In non-smoking areas the geometric mean RSP was 15 ..mu..g m/sup -3/. Outside air ventilation rates did not appear to be the single dominant parameter in determining indoor pollutant concentrations. Measured pollutant concentrations in 2 ''complaint'' buildings were below accepted guidelines. The cause of the complaints was not identified.

  10. A Method to Exchange Air Nitrogen Emission Reductions for Watershed Nitrogen Load Reductions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Presentation of the method developed for the Chesapeake Bay Program to estimate changes in nitrogen loading to Chesapeake due to changes in Bay State state-level nitrogen oxide emissions to support air-water trading by the Bay States. Type for SticsUnder AMAD Application QAPP, QA...

  11. The Sensitivity of Precooled Air-Breathing Engine Performance to Heat Exchanger Design Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webber, H.; Bond, A.; Hempsell, M.

    The issues relevant to propulsion design for Single Stage To Orbit (SSTO) vehicles are considered. In particular two air- breathing engine concepts involving precooling are compared; SABRE (Synergetic Air-Breathing and Rocket Engine) as designed for the Skylon SSTO launch vehicle, and a LACE (Liquid Air Cycle Engine) considered in the 1960's by the Americans for an early generation spaceplane. It is shown that through entropy minimisation the SABRE has made substantial gains in performance over the traditional LACE precooled engine concept, and has shown itself as the basis of a viable means of realising a SSTO vehicle. Further, it is demonstrated that the precooler is a major source of thermodynamic irreversibility within the engine cycle and that further reduction in entropy can be realised by increasing the heat transfer coefficient on the air side of the precooler. If this were to be achieved, it would improve the payload mass delivered to orbit by the Skylon launch vehicle by between 5 and 10%.

  12. Species measurements in a hypersonic, hydrogen-air, combustion wake

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, K.A.; Stalker, R.J.

    1996-09-01

    A continuously sampling, time-of-flight mass spectrometer has been used to measure relative species concentrations in a two-dimensional, hydrogen-air combustion wake at mainstream Mach numbers exceeding 5. The experiments, in a free piston shock tunnel, yielded distributions of hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, water, and nitric oxide at stagnation enthalpies ranging from 5.6 MJ/kg to 12.2 MJ/kg and at a distance of approximately 100s times the thickness of the initial hydrogen jet. The amount of hydrogen mixed in stoichiometric proportions was approximately independent of the stagnation enthalpy, despite the fact that the proportion of hydrogen in the wake was increased with stagnation enthalpy. Roughly 50% of the mixed hydrogen underwent combustion at the highest enthalpy. The proportion of hydrogen reacting to water could be approximately predicted using reaction rates based on mainstream temperatures.

  13. Species measurements in a hypersonic, hydrogen-air, combustion wake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skinner, K. A.; Stalker, R. J.

    1995-01-01

    A continuously sampling, time-of-flight mass spectrometer has been used to measure relative species concentrations in a two-dimensional, hydrogen-air combustion wake at mainstream Mach numbers exceeding 5. The experiments, which were conducted in a free piston shock tunnel, yielded distributions of hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, water and nitric oxide at stagnation enthalpies ranging from 5.6 MJ kg(exp -1) to 1.2 MJ kg(exp -1) and at a distance of approximately 100 times the thickness of the initial hydrogen jet. The amount of hydrogen that was mixed in stoichiometric proportions was approximately independent of the stagnation enthalpy, in spite of the fact that the proportion of hydrogen in the wake increased with stagnation enthalpy. Roughly 50 percent of the mixed hydrogen underwent combustion at the highest enthalpy. The proportion of hydrogen reacting to water could be approximately predicted using reaction rates based on mainstream temperatures.

  14. Factors influencing indoor air quality in an urban high rise apartment building (retitled as "Air Pollution and air exchange in an urban high rise apartment building")

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL) Human Exposure and Atmospheric Sciences Division (HEASD) conducts research in support of EPA mission to protect human health and the environment. HEASD research program supports Goal 1 (Clean Air) and Goal 4 (Healthy People) of EP...

  15. Sodium concentration measurement during hemodialysis through ion-exchange resin and conductivity measure approach: in vitro experiments.

    PubMed

    Tura, Andrea; Sbrignadello, Stefano; Mambelli, Emanuele; Ravazzani, Paolo; Santoro, Antonio; Pacini, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Sodium measurement during hemodialysis treatment is important to preserve the patient from clinical events related to hypo- or hyper-natremia Usually, sodium measurement is performed through laboratory equipment which is typically expensive, and requires manual intervention. We propose a new method, based on conductivity measurement after treatment of dialysate solution through ion-exchange resin. To test this method, we performed in vitro experiments. We prepared 40 ml sodium chloride (NaCl) samples at 280, 140, 70, 35, 17.5, 8.75, 4.375 mEq/l, and some "mixed samples", i.e., with added potassium chloride (KCl) at different concentrations (4.375-17.5 mEq/l), to simulate the confounding factors in a conductivity-based sodium measurement. We measured the conductivity of all samples. Afterwards, each sample was treated for 1 min with 1 g of Dowex G-26 resin, and conductivity was measured again. On average, the difference in the conductivity between mixed samples and corresponding pure NaCl samples (at the same NaCl concentration) was 20.9%. After treatment with the exchange resin, it was 14.7%, i.e., 42% lower. Similar experiments were performed with calcium chloride and magnesium chloride as confounding factors, with similar results. We also performed some experiments on actual dialysate solution during hemodialysis sessions in 15 patients, and found that the correlation between conductivity measures and sodium concentration improved after resin treatment (R=0.839 before treatment, R=0.924 after treatment, P<0.0001). We conclude that ion-exchange resin treatment coupled with conductivity measures may improve the measurement of sodium compared to conductivity measures alone, and may become a possible simple approach for continuous and automatic sodium measurement during hemodialysis.

  16. Measurement of total reduced sulfur compounds in ambient air

    SciTech Connect

    McQuaker, N.R.; Rajala, G.E.; Pengilly, D.

    1986-05-01

    Methods for the determination of total reduced sulfur (TRS) compounds in the ambient air based on coulometric detection (Philips Model PW 9700 analyzer) and thermal oxidation followed by detection using pulsed fluorescence (Teco Model 43 analyzer) have been evaluated. Analytical response factors, relative to H/sub 2/S, were determined for both the individual TRS compounds and compounds such as terpenes and carbonyl sulfide that may be a potential source of interference. The results for COS and terpenes indicate that in a typical monitoring situation normally encountered concentrations of these compounds are not expected to cause significant measurement bias. The results for the individual TRS compounds indicate that while variations in TRS composition are not a factor in assessing measurement bias for the thermal oxidation/pulsed fluorescence method, they are a factor for the Philips coulometric method; i.e., increasing positive measurement bias maybe introduced as the TRS composition shifts toward relatively less H/sub 2/S. Philips-Teco comparison data collected at a single site in the vicinity of three operating kraft pupil mills are compatible with these expectations. 8 references, 1 figure, 3 tables.

  17. Wash-out of ambient air contaminations for breath measurements.

    PubMed

    Maurer, F; Wolf, A; Fink, T; Rittershofer, B; Heim, N; Volk, T; Baumbach, J I; Kreuer, S

    2014-06-01

    In breath analysis, ambient air contaminations are ubiquitous and difficult to eliminate. This study was designed to investigate the reduction of ambient air background by a lung wash-out with synthetic air. The reduction of the initial ambient air volatile organic compound (VOC) intensity was investigated in the breath of 20 volunteers inhaling synthetic air via a sealed full face mask in comparison to inhaling ambient air. Over a period of 30 minutes, breath analysis was conducted using ion mobility spectrometry coupled to a multi-capillary column. A total of 68 VOCs were identified for inhaling ambient air or inhaling synthetic air. By treatment with synthetic air, 39 VOCs decreased in intensity, whereas 29 increased in comparison to inhaling ambient air. In total, seven VOCs were significantly reduced (P-value < 0.05). A complete wash-out of VOCs in this setting was not observed, whereby a statistically significant reduction up to 65% as for terpinolene was achieved. Our setting successfully demonstrated a reduction of ambient air contaminations from the airways by a lung wash-out with synthetic air.

  18. Air-Sea Interaction Measurements from the Controlled Towed Vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khelif, D.; Bluth, R. T.; Jonsson, H.; Barge, J.

    2014-12-01

    The Controlled Towed Vehicle (CTV) uses improved towed drone technology to actively maintain via a radar altimeter and controllable wing a user-set height that can be as low as the canonical reference height of 10 m above the sea surface. After take-off, the drone is released from the tow aircraft on a ~700-m stainless steel cable. We have instrumented the 0.23 m diameter and 2.13 m long drone with high fidelity instruments to measure the means and turbulent fluctuations of 3-D wind vector, temperature, humidity, pressure, CO2 and IR sea surface temperature. Data are recorded internally at 40 Hz and simultaneously transmitted to the tow aircraft via dedicated wireless Ethernet link. The CTV accommodates 40 kg of instrument payload and provides it with 250 W of continuous power through a ram air propeller-driven generator. Therefore its endurance is only limited by that of the tow aircraft.We will discuss the CTV development, the engineering challenges and solutions that have been successfully implemented to overcome them. We present results from recent flights as low as 9 m over the coastal ocean and comparisons of profiles and turbulent fluxes from the CTV and the tow aircraft. Manned aircraft operation at low-level boundary-layer flights is very limited. Dropsondes and UAS (Unmanned Aerial Systems) and UAS are alternates for measurements near the ocean surface. However, dropsondes have limited sensor capability and do not measure fluxes, and most present UAS vehicles do not have the payload and power capacity nor the low-flying ability in high winds over the oceans. The CTV therefore, fills a needed gap between the dropsondes, in situ aircraft, and UAS. The payload, capacity and power of the CTV makes it suitable for a variety of atmospheric research measurements. Other sensors to measure aerosol, chemistry, radiation, etc., could be readily accommodated in the CTV.

  19. Air-sea exchange of gaseous mercury in the tropical coast (Luhuitou fringing reef) of the South China Sea, the Hainan Island, China.

    PubMed

    Ci, Zhijia; Zhang, Xiaoshan; Wang, Zhangwei

    2016-06-01

    The air-sea exchange of gaseous mercury (mainly Hg(0)) in the tropical ocean is an important part of the global Hg biogeochemical cycle, but the related investigations are limited. In this study, we simultaneously measured Hg(0) concentrations in surface waters and overlaying air in the tropical coast (Luhuitou fringing reef) of the South China Sea (SCS), Hainan Island, China, for 13 days on January-February 2015. The purpose of this study was to explore the temporal variation of Hg(0) concentrations in air and surface waters, estimate the air-sea Hg(0) flux, and reveal their influencing factors in the tropical coastal environment. The mean concentrations (±SD) of Hg(0) in air and total Hg (THg) in waters were 2.34 ± 0.26 ng m(-3) and 1.40 ± 0.48 ng L(-1), respectively. Both Hg(0) concentrations in waters (53.7 ± 18.8 pg L(-1)) and Hg(0)/THg ratios (3.8 %) in this study were significantly higher than those of the open water of the SCS in winter. Hg(0) in waters usually exhibited a clear diurnal variation with increased concentrations in daytime and decreased concentrations in nighttime, especially in cloudless days with low wind speed. Linear regression analysis suggested that Hg(0) concentrations in waters were positively and significantly correlated to the photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) (R (2) = 0.42, p < 0.001). Surface waters were always supersaturated with Hg(0) compared to air (the degree of saturation, 2.46 to 13.87), indicating that the surface water was one of the atmospheric Hg(0) sources. The air-sea Hg(0) fluxes were estimated to be 1.73 ± 1.25 ng m(-2) h(-1) with a large range between 0.01 and 6.06 ng m(-2) h(-1). The high variation of Hg(0) fluxes was mainly attributed to the greatly temporal variation of wind speed.

  20. Biology and air-sea gas exchange controls on the distribution of carbon isotope ratios (δ13C) in the ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmittner, A.; Gruber, N.; Mix, A. C.; Key, R. M.; Tagliabue, A.; Westberry, T. K.

    2013-05-01

    Analysis of observations and sensitivity experiments with a new three-dimensional global model of stable carbon isotope cycling elucidate the processes that control the distribution of δ13C in the contemporary and preindustrial ocean. Biological fractionation dominates the distribution of δ13CDIC of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) due to the sinking of isotopically light δ13C organic matter from the surface into the interior ocean. This process leads to low δ13CDIC values at dephs and in high latitude surface waters and high values in the upper ocean at low latitudes with maxima in the subtropics. Air-sea gas exchange provides an important secondary influence due to two effects. First, it acts to reduce the spatial gradients created by biology. Second, the associated temperature dependent fractionation tends to increase (decrease) δ13CDIC values of colder (warmer) water, which generates gradients that oppose those arising from biology. Our model results suggest that both effects are similarly important in influencing surface and interior δ13CDIC distributions. However, air-sea gas exchange is slow, so biological effect dominate spatial δ13CDIC gradients both in the interior and at the surface, in constrast to conclusions from some previous studies. Analysis of a new synthesis of δ13CDIC measurements from years 1990 to 2005 is used to quantify preformed (δ13Cpre) and remineralized (δ13Crem) contributions as well as the effects of biology (Δδ13Cbio) and air-sea gas exchange (δ13C*). The model reproduces major features of the observed large-scale distribution of δ13CDIC, δ13Cpre, δ13Crem, δ13C*, and Δδ13Cbio. Residual misfits are documented and analyzed. Simulated surface and subsurface δ13CDIC are influenced by details of the ecosystem model formulation. For example, inclusion of a simple parameterization of iron limitation of phytoplankton growth rates and temperature-dependent zooplankton grazing rates improves the agreement with δ13CDIC

  1. Tolerance of non-platinum group metals cathodes proton exchange membrane fuel cells to air contaminants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reshetenko, Tatyana; Serov, Alexey; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Matanovic, Ivana; Sarah Stariha; Atanassov, Plamen

    2016-08-01

    The effects of major airborne contaminants (SO2, NO2 and CO) on the spatial performance of Fe/N/C cathode membrane electrode assemblies were studied using a segmented cell system. The injection of 2-10 ppm SO2 in air stream did not cause any performance decrease and redistribution of local currents due to the lack of stably adsorbed SO2 molecules on Fe-Nx sites, as confirmed by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The introduction of 5-20 ppm of CO into the air stream also did not affect fuel cell performance. The exposure of Fe/N/C cathodes to 2 and 10 ppm NO2 resulted in performance losses of 30 and 70-75 mV, respectively. DFT results showed that the adsorption energies of NO2 and NO were greater than that of O2, which accounted for the observed voltage decrease and slight current redistribution. The cell performance partially recovered when the NO2 injection was stopped. The long-term operation of the fuel cells resulted in cell performance degradation. XPS analyses of Fe/N/C electrodes revealed that the performance decrease was due to catalyst degradation and ionomer oxidation. The latter was accelerated in the presence of air contaminants. The details of the spatial performance and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy results are presented and discussed.

  2. Tolerance of non-platinum group metals cathodes proton exchange membrane fuel cells to air contaminants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reshetenko, Tatyana; Serov, Alexey; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Matanovic, Ivana; Sarah Stariha; Atanassov, Plamen

    2016-08-01

    The effects of major airborne contaminants (SO2, NO2 and CO) on the spatial performance of Fe/N/C cathode membrane electrode assemblies were studied using a segmented cell system. The injection of 2-10 ppm SO2 in air stream did not cause any performance decrease and redistribution of local currents due to the lack of stably adsorbed SO2 molecules on Fe-Nx sites, as confirmed by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The introduction of 5-20 ppm of CO into the air stream also did not affect fuel cell performance. The exposure of Fe/N/C cathodes to 2 and 10 ppm NO2 resulted in performance losses of 30 and 70-75 mV, respectively. DFT results showed that the adsorption energies of NO2 and NO were greater than that of O2, which accounted for the observed voltage decrease and slight current redistribution. The cell performance partially recovered when the NO2 injection was stopped. The long-term operation of the fuel cells resulted in cell performance degradation. XPS analyses of Fe/N/C electrodes revealed that the performance decrease was due to catalyst degradation and ionomer oxidation. The latter was accelerated in the presence of air contaminants. The details of the spatial performance and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy results are presented and discussed.

  3. Measurement-while-drilling (MWD) development for air drilling

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, L.A.; Harrison, W.H.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this program is to tool-harden and make commercially available an existing wireless MWD tool to reliably operate in an air, air-mist, or air-foam environment during Appalachian Basin oil and gas directional drilling operations in conjunction with downhole motors and/or (other) bottom-hole assemblies. The application of this technology is required for drilling high angle (holes) and horizontal well drilling in low-pressure, water sensitive, tight gas formations that require air, air-mist, and foam drilling fluids. The basic approach to accomplishing this objective was to modify GEC's existing electromagnetic (e-m) CABLELESS''{trademark} MWD tool to improve its reliability in air drilling by increasing its tolerance to higher vibration and shock levels (hardening). Another important aim of the program is to provide for continuing availability of the resultant tool for use on DOE-sponsored, and other, air-drilling programs.

  4. Measurement-while-drilling (MWD) development for air drilling

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, L.A.; Harrison, W.H.

    1992-06-01

    The objective of this program is to tool-harden and make commercially available an existing wireless MWD tool to reliably operate in an air, air-mist, or air-foam environment during Appalachian Basin oil and gas directional drilling operations in conjunction with downhole motors and/or (other) bottom-hole assemblies. The application of this technology is required for drilling high angle (holes) and horizontal well drilling in low-pressure, water sensitive, tight gas formations that require air, air-mist, and foam drilling fluids. The basic approach to accomplishing this objective was to modify GEC`s existing electromagnetic (e-m) ``CABLELESS``{trademark} MWD tool to improve its reliability in air drilling by increasing its tolerance to higher vibration and shock levels (hardening). Another important aim of the program is to provide for continuing availability of the resultant tool for use on DOE-sponsored, and other, air-drilling programs.

  5. Influence of current velocity and wind speed on air-water gas exchange in a mangrove estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, David T.; Coffineau, Nathalie; Hickman, Benjamin; Chow, Nicholas; Koffman, Tobias; Schlosser, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Knowledge of air-water gas transfer velocities and water residence times is necessary to study the fate of mangrove derived carbon exported into surrounding estuaries and ultimately to determine carbon balances in mangrove ecosystems. For the first time, the 3He/SF6 dual tracer technique, which has been proven to be a powerful tool to determine gas transfer velocities in the ocean, is applied to Shark River, an estuary situated in the largest contiguous mangrove forest in North America. The mean gas transfer velocity was 3.3 ± 0.2 cm h-1 during the experiment, with a water residence time of 16.5 ± 2.0 days. We propose a gas exchange parameterization that takes into account the major sources of turbulence in the estuary (i.e., bottom generated shear and wind stress).

  6. Uncertainties of Gaseous Oxidized Mercury Measurements Using KCl-Coated Denuders, Cation-Exchange Membranes, and Nylon Membranes: Humidity Influences.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jiaoyan; Gustin, Mae Sexauer

    2015-05-19

    Quantifying the concentration of gaseous oxidized mercury (GOM) and identifying the chemical compounds in the atmosphere are important for developing accurate local, regional, and global biogeochemical cycles. The major hypothesis driving this work was that relative humidity affects collection of GOM on KCl-coated denuders and nylon membranes, both currently being applied to measure GOM. Using a laboratory manifold system and ambient air, GOM capture efficiency on 3 different collection surfaces, including KCl-coated denuders, nylon membranes, and cation-exchange membranes, was investigated at relative humidity ranging from 25 to 75%. Recovery of permeated HgBr2 on KCl-coated denuders declined by 4-60% during spikes of relative humidity (25 to 75%). When spikes were turned off GOM recoveries returned to 60 ± 19% of permeated levels. In some cases, KCl-coated denuders were gradually passivated over time after additional humidity was applied. In this study, GOM recovery on nylon membranes decreased with high humidity and ozone concentrations. However, additional humidity enhanced GOM recovery on cation-exchange membranes. In addition, reduction and oxidation of elemental mercury during experiments was observed. The findings in this study can help to explain field observations in previous studies.

  7. Calculated and Measured Air and Soil Freeze-Thaw Frequencies.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Donald G.; Ruschy, David L.

    1995-10-01

    Freeze-thaw frequencies calculated by eight different counting methods were compared using daily maximum and minimum temperatures from eight north-central United States National Weather Service (NWS) stations. These frequencies were also compared to those obtained using hourly air temperature data from six of the same NWS stations. In addition, the calculated frequencies were compared to measured freeze-thaw frequencies at several depths in a bare soil and a sod-covered soil at the University of Minnesota St. Paul campus climatological observatory.The necessary acceptance of the idealized daily heating cycle when using daily maximum and minimum air temperature data resulted in a higher occurrence of calculated freeze-thaw events than those obtained with hourly data; one method gave 23% more freeze-thaw events with the daily maximum and minimum temperatures.With the freeze-thaw phenomenon centered upon those months in which the mean temperature hovers near O°C, a bimodal frequency occurs at the northern stations (October and April, as at International Falls, Minnesota, and November and March at Fargo, North Dakota), while in warmer climates the bimodal characteristic is replaced by a single-peak frequency in January as at Sedalia and West Plains, Missouri.In the comparison between the calculated freeze-thaw frequencies based on daily maximum and minimum values and the hourly temperature measurements at several heights between the surface and the temperature shelter at the climatological observatory, it was found that the annual total frequencies increased as the height above the surface decreased. For the shallowest height above the surface there was an approximate 13% increase over those measured in the shelter with hourly temperature data.The annual total frequencies of the calculated freeze-thaw events obtained with the daily maximum and minimum temperature measurements in the shelter approximated those actually occurring at the 1-cm depth in a bare soil at the

  8. Toward a cold hybrid-trap measurement of charge-exchange between Na and Ca+: Na excited state fraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, James E.; Goodman, Douglas S.; Kwolek, Jonathan M.; Blumel, Reinhold; Narducci, Frank A.; Smith, Winthrop W.

    2015-05-01

    We present progress towards the measurement of the charge-exchange collision rate coefficient between neutral sodium and ionic calcium. The rate constant for charge exchange between ground state sodium and calcium ion has been previously calculated and predicts a lifetime in our system of the order of days. Experiments by our group show a much larger charge exchange collision rate, probably from the excited 3P state of sodium. Therefore, an accurate measurement of the charge exchange collision rate constant will require an accurate value for the excited state fraction of the Na MOT. We have developed a technique for making a model-independent measurement of the excited state fraction of a MOT inside a hybrid trap. We compare the measured excited state fraction using this technique with measurements assuming a two-level model of the atom. In addition, we review our recent measurement of the total elastic and resonant charge exchange collision rate between Na and Na+.

  9. Flammability measurements of difluoromethane in air at 100 C

    SciTech Connect

    Grosshandler, W.L.; Donnelly, M.K.; Womeldorf, C.

    1999-07-01

    Difluoromethane (CH{sub 2}F{sub 2}, or R-32) is a candidate to replace currently used ozone-depleting chlorofluorocarbon refrigerants. Because CH{sub 2}F{sub 2} is flammable, it is necessary to assess the hazard posed by a leak in a refrigeration machine. The currently accepted method for determining flammability, ASTM E 681, has difficulty discerning the flammability boundary for weak fuels such as CH{sub 2}F{sub 2}. This paper describes an alternative approach to identify the limits of flammability, using a twin, premixed counter-flow flame. By using the extinction of an already established flame, the point dividing flammable from non-flammable becomes unambiguous. The limiting extinction mixture changes with stretch rate, so it is convenient to report the flammability limit as the value extrapolated to a zero stretch condition. In the burner, contoured nozzles with outlet diameters of 12 mm are aligned counter to each other and spaced 12 mm apart. The lean flammability limit of CH{sub 2}F{sub 2} in dry air at room temperature was previously reported by the authors to be a mole fraction of 0.14, using the twin counter-flow flame method. In the current study, relative humidity was not found to affect the lean limit. Increasing the temperature of the premixed fuel and air to 100 C is shown to extend the flammability limit in the lean direction to 0.13. The rich limit of CH{sub 2}F{sub 2} found using the counter-flow method is around 0.27. The uncertainties of the measurements are presented and the results compared to data in the literature.

  10. Next Generation Air Measurements for Fugitive, Area Source, and Fence Line Applications

    EPA Science Inventory

    Next generation air measurements (NGAM) is an EPA term for the advancing field of air pollutant sensor technologies, data integration concepts, and geospatial modeling strategies. Ranging from personal sensors to satellite remote sensing, NGAM systems may provide revolutionary n...

  11. Unrestricted release measurements with ambient air ionization monitors

    SciTech Connect

    MacArthur, D.; Gunn, R.; Dockray, T.; Luff, C.

    1999-03-01

    Radiation monitoring systems based on the long-range alpha detection (LRAD) technique, such as the BNFL Instruments IonSens{trademark}, provide a single contamination measurement for an entire object rather than the more familiar individual readings for smaller surface areas. The LRAD technique relies on the ionization of ambient air molecules by alpha particles, and the subsequent detection of these ions, rather than direct detection of the alpha particles themselves. A single monitor can detect all of the ions produced over a large object and report a total contamination level for the entire surface of that object. However, both the unrestricted release limits specified in USDOE Order 5400.5 (and similar documents in other countries), and the definitions of radioactive waste categories, are stated in terms of contamination per area. Thus, conversion is required between the total effective contamination as measured by the LRAD-based detector and the allowable release limits. In addition, since the release limits were not written assuming an averaging detector system, the method chosen to average the assumed contamination over the object can have a significant impact on the effective sensitivity of the detector.

  12. Air shower arrival directions measured at Buckland Park

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerhardy, P. R.; Clay, R. W.; Patterson, J. R.; Prescott, J. R.; Gregory, A. G.; Protheroe, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    The Buckland Park air shower array was operated for 3 years from 1979 to 1981 particularly for the study of anisotropies in the region of the knee of the size spectrum. The array which has been described in detail elsewhere was situated at a latitude of 35 S and had an effective size threshold of approx 3 x 10 to the 5th power particles (approx 3 x 10 to the 15th power Ev for vertical showers). A number of results from this experiment have already been published including anisotropy analyses (Gerhardy and Clay, 1983) and searches for very high energy gamma ray sources. The final distribution of measured shower arrival directions are presented here. These 1.3 x 10 to the 5th power events were selected as indicated in detail in Gerhardy and Clay (1983) and were essentially those events with well measured arrival directions. They are the same data set used in the above reference but no complete sky map has previously been presented.

  13. Hazard Assessment of Chemical Air Contaminants Measured in Residences

    SciTech Connect

    Logue, J.M.; McKone, T.E.; Sherman, M. H.; Singer, B.C.

    2010-05-10

    Identifying air pollutants that pose a potential hazard indoors can facilitate exposure mitigation. In this study, we compiled summary results from 77 published studies reporting measurements of chemical pollutants in residences in the United States and in countries with similar lifestyles. These data were used to calculate representative mid-range and upper bound concentrations relevant to chronic exposures for 267 pollutants and representative peak concentrations relevant to acute exposures for 5 activity-associated pollutants. Representative concentrations are compared to available chronic and acute health standards for 97 pollutants. Fifteen pollutants appear to exceed chronic health standards in a large fraction of homes. Nine other pollutants are identified as potential chronic health hazards in a substantial minority of homes and an additional nine are identified as potential hazards in a very small percentage of homes. Nine pollutants are identified as priority hazards based on the robustness of measured concentration data and the fraction of residences that appear to be impacted: acetaldehyde; acrolein; benzene; 1,3-butadiene; 1,4-dichlorobenzene; formaldehyde; naphthalene; nitrogen dioxide; and PM{sub 2.5}. Activity-based emissions are shown to pose potential acute health hazards for PM{sub 2.5}, formaldehyde, CO, chloroform, and NO{sub 2}.

  14. Soil-atmosphere exchange of ammonia in a non-fertilized grassland: measured emission potentials and inferred fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wentworth, G. R.; Murphy, J. G.; Gregoire, P. K.; Cheyne, C. A. L.; Tevlin, A. G.; Hems, R.

    2014-05-01

    A 50 day field study was carried out in a semi-natural, non-fertilized grassland in south-western Ontario, Canada during the late summer and early autumn of 2012. The purpose was to explore surface-atmosphere exchange processes of ammonia (NH3) with a focus on bi-directional fluxes between the soil and atmosphere. Measurements of soil pH and ammonium concentration ([NH4+]) yielded the first direct quantification of soil emission potential (Γsoil=[NH4+]/[H+]) for this land type, with values ranging from 35 to 1850 (an average of 290). The soil compensation point, the atmospheric NH3 mixing ratio below which net emission from the soil will occur, exhibited both a seasonal trend and diurnal trend. Higher daytime and August compensation points were attributed to higher soil temperature. Soil-atmosphere fluxes were estimated using NH3 measurements from the Ambient Ion Monitor Ion Chromatograph (AIM-IC) and a~simple resistance model. Vegetative effects were neglected due to the short canopy height and significant Γsoil. Inferred fluxes were, on average, 2.6 ± 4.5 ng m-2 s-1 in August (i.e. net emission) and -5.8 ± 3.0 ng m-2 s-1 in September (i.e. net deposition). These results are in good agreement with the only other bi-directional exchange study in a semi-natural, non-fertilized grassland. A Lagrangian dispersion model (HYSPLIT) was used to calculate air parcel back trajectories throughout the campaign and revealed that NH3 mixing ratios had no directional bias throughout the campaign, unlike the other atmospheric constituents measured. This implies that soil-atmosphere exchange over a non-fertilized grassland can significantly moderate near-surface NH3 concentrations. In addition, we provide indirect evidence that dew and fog evaporation can cause a morning increase of [NH3(g)]. Implications of our findings on current NH3 bi-directional exchange modelling efforts are also discussed.

  15. Soil-atmosphere exchange of ammonia in a non-fertilized grassland: measured emission potentials and inferred fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wentworth, G. R.; Murphy, J. G.; Gregoire, P. K.; Cheyne, C. A. L.; Tevlin, A. G.; Hems, R.

    2014-10-01

    A 50-day field study was carried out in a semi-natural, non-fertilized grassland in south-western Ontario, Canada during the late summer and early autumn of 2012. The purpose was to explore surface-atmosphere exchange processes of ammonia (NH3) with a focus on bi-directional fluxes between the soil and atmosphere. Measurements of soil pH and ammonium concentration ([NH4+]) yielded the first direct quantification of soil emission potential (Γsoil = [NH4+]/[H+]) for this land type, with values ranging from 35 to 1850 (an average of 290). The soil compensation point, the atmospheric NH3 mixing ratio below which net emission from the soil will occur, exhibited both a seasonal trend and diurnal trend. Higher daytime and August compensation points were attributed to higher soil temperature. Soil-atmosphere fluxes were estimated using NH3 measurements from the Ambient Ion Monitor Ion Chromatograph (AIM-IC) and a simple resistance model. Vegetative effects were ignored due to the short canopy height and significant Γsoil. Inferred fluxes were, on average, 2.6 ± 4.5 ng m-2 s-1 in August (i.e. net emission) and -5.8 ± 3.0 ng m-2 s-1 in September (i.e. net deposition). These results are in good agreement with the only other bi-directional exchange study in a semi-natural, non-fertilized grassland. A Lagrangian dispersion model (Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory - HYSPLIT) was used to calculate air parcel back-trajectories throughout the campaign and revealed that NH3 mixing ratios had no directional bias throughout the campaign, unlike the other atmospheric constituents measured. This implies that soil-atmosphere exchange over a non-fertilized grassland can significantly moderate near-surface NH3 concentrations. In addition, we provide indirect evidence that dew and fog evaporation can cause a morning increase of [NH3]g. Implications of our findings on current NH3 bi-directional exchange modelling efforts are also discussed.

  16. Quality site seasonal report: Army Air Force Exchange Service Headquarters Building, SFBP 1343, August 1984 through May 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Pollock, E.O. Jr.

    1987-10-15

    The active solar Domestic Hot Water (DHW) system at the HQ Army-Air Force Exchange Service (AAFES) Building was designed and constructed as part of the Solar in Federal Buildings Programs (SFBP). This retrofitted system is one of eight of the systems in the SFBP selected for quality monitoring. The purpose of this monitoring effort is to document the performance of quality state-of-the-art solar systems in large federal building applications. The six-story HQ AAFES Building houses a cafeteria, officer's mess and club and office space for 2400 employees. The siphon-return drainback system uses 1147 ft/sup 2/ of Aircraftsman flat-plate collectors to collect solar energy which is used to preheat domestic hot water. Solar energy is stored in a 1329-gallon tank and transferred to the hot water load through a heat exchanger located in the 356-gallon DHW preheat tank. Auxiliary energy is supplied by two gas fired boilers which boost the temperature to 130/sup 0/F before it is distributed to the load. Highlights of the performance of the HQ AAFES Building solar system during the monitoring period from August 1984 through May 1985 are presented in this report.

  17. Intense air-sea exchange and heavy rainfall: impact of the northern Adriatic SST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stocchi, P.; Davolio, S.

    2016-02-01

    Over the northern Adriatic basin, intense air-sea interactions are often associated with heavy precipitation over the mountainous areas surrounding the basin. In this study, a high-resolution mesoscale model is employed to simulate three severe weather events and to evaluate the effect of the sea surface temperature on the intensity and location of heavy rainfall. The sensitivity tests show that the impact of SST varies among the events and it mainly involves the modification of the PBL characteristics and thus the flow dynamics and its interaction with the orography.

  18. Laser interferometric measurement of ion electrode shape and charge exchange erosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macrae, Gregory S.; Mercer, Carolyn R.

    1991-01-01

    A projected fringe profilometry system was applied to surface contour measurements of an accelerator electrode from an ion thrustor. The system permitted noncontact, nondestructive evaluation of the fine and gross structure of the electrode. A 3-D surface map of a dished electrode was generated without altering the electrode surface. The same system was used to examine charge exchange erosion pits near the periphery of the electrode to determine the depth, location, and volume of material lost. This electro-optical measurement system allowed rapid, nondestructive, digital data acquisition coupled with automated computer data processing. In addition, variable sensitivity allowed both coarse and fine measurements of objects having various surface finishes.

  19. Laser interferometric measurement of ion electrode shape and charge exchange erosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macrae, Gregory S.; Mercer, Carolyn R.

    1991-01-01

    A novel projected fringe profilometry system was applied to surface contour measurements of an accelerator electrode from an ion thruster. The system permitted noncontact, nondestructive evaluation of the fine and gross structure of the electrode. A 3D surface map of a dished electrode was generated without altering the electrode surface. The same system was used to examine charge exchange erosion pits near the periphery of the electrode to determine the depth, location, and volume of material lost. This electro-optical measurement system allowed rapid nondestructive digital data acquisition coupled with automated computer data-processing. In addition, variable sensitivity allowed both coarse and fine measurements of objects having various surface finishes.

  20. MEASUREMENT OF HYDROPEROXIDES DURING THE TEXAS 2000 AIR QUALITY STUDY.

    SciTech Connect

    ZHENG,J.; ALAOUIE,A.; WEINSTEIN-LLOYD,J.B.; SPRINGSTON,S.R.; NUNNERMACKER,L.J.; LEE,Y.N.; BRECHTEL,F.; KLEINMAN,L.; DAUM,P.

    2002-01-17

    Hydroperoxides are important atmospheric oxidants. They are responsible for most of the oxidation of aqueous-phase SO{sub 2} to sulfate in the northeastern United States, resulting in the formation of acid precipitation and visibility-reducing sulfate aerosol (Penkett et al., 1979; Lind et al., 1987; Madronich and Calvert, 1990; Tanner and Schorran, 1995). Atmospheric hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2} or HP) is produced by the self-reaction of hydroperoxyl radicals (HO{sub 2}); higher organic peroxides are produced by reaction of HO{sub 2} with alkylperoxyl radicals (RO{sub 2}). Peroxyl radicals, along with OH, are chain carriers in the complex photochemical process that produces tropospheric ozone. Thus, concentrations of peroxides and their free radical precursors depend on solar intensity and ambient concentrations of water vapor, ozone, NO{sub x} (NO + NO{sub 2}), and VOCs (volatile organic compounds). Several investigators have demonstrated that HP and hydroxymethyl hydroperoxide (HOCH2 OOH or HMHP) also may be formed when ozone reacts with alkenes in moist air (Becker et al., 1990; Hewitt and Kok, 1991; Gaeb et al., 1995). Peroxides are the expected sink for peroxyl radicals when concentrations of NO are low. Otherwise, these radicals react with NO to form NO{sub 2}. Under high NO{sub x} conditions, NO{sub z} (oxidation products of NO and NO{sub 2}) becomes the principal radical sink. Therefore, formation rates of peroxides relative to NO{sub z} provide information about the history of an air mass and the expected sensitivity of ozone production to reduced emissions (Kleinman et al., 1997; Sillman, 1995; 1997). Through photolysis and reaction with OH, peroxides also act as a radical source; thus, reliable peroxide measurements are necessary for calculating ozone production rates. In this paper, we will summarize peroxide observations at the Williams Tower, and aboard the U.S. Department of Energy G-1 research aircraft in Houston, TX, during August and

  1. Laboratory Evaluation of Air Flow Measurement Methods for Residential HVAC Returns

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Iain; Stratton, Chris

    2015-07-01

    This project improved the accuracy of air flow measurements used in commissioning California heating and air conditioning systems in Title 24 (Building and Appliance Efficiency Standards), thereby improving system performance and efficiency of California residences. The research team at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory addressed the issue that typical tools used by contractors in the field to test air flows may not be accurate enough to measure return flows used in Title 24 applications. The team developed guidance on performance of current diagnostics as well as a draft test method for use in future evaluations. The series of tests performed measured air flow using a range of techniques and devices. The measured air flows were compared to reference air flow measurements using inline air flow meters built into the test apparatus. The experimental results showed that some devices had reasonable results (typical errors of 5 percent or less) but others had much bigger errors (up to 25 percent).

  2. Seasonal variations in concentrations, distributions, and air-soil exchange fluxes of dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls in Shanghai, China.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yajun; Nie, Zhiqiang; He, Jie; Die, Qingqi; Fang, Yanyan; Liu, Feng; Yang, Yufei; Gao, Xingbao; Huang, Qifei

    2016-02-01

    Dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyl (dl-PCB) concentrations in ambient air and soil in Shanghai, China, were measured to allow seasonal and spatial differences in the dl-PCB concentrations, profiles, distributions, fugacity fractions, and air-soil fluxes to be determined. The toxic equivalent (TEQ) DL-PCB concentrations in the air were higher in summer (mean 9.46 fg m(-3), range 1.32-26.3 fg m(-3)) than in winter (mean 4.57 fg m(-3), range 1.55-10.9 fg m(-3)). The DL-PCB concentrations in air were different in different areas, and the concentrations decreased in the order industrial areas > commercial and residential areas > suburban areas > rural area. The mean DL-PCB concentration in soil was 0.25 pg TEQ g(-1) dry weight (dw) and the range was 0.05-0.90 pg TEQ g(-1) dw. The highest DL-PCB concentration in soil was found in a sample from a commercial/residential area. The DL-PCB fluxes were negative (-216 pg m(-2) h(-1) in summer and -41.1 pg m(-2) h(-1) in winter), and the fugacity fractions were below 0.5, indicating that dl-PCBs in Shanghai are deposited from the air to the soil in all seasons. The net fluxes were higher in summer than in winter, and the deposition fluxes were higher in industrial areas than in other areas in both summer and winter.

  3. Measurements of exchange anisotropy in NiFe/NiO films with different techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fermin, J. R.; Lucena, M. A.; Azevedo, A.; de Aguiar, F. M.; Rezende, S. M.

    2000-05-01

    One of the puzzles of the recent investigations on the exchange anisotropy in ferromagnetic (FM)/antiferromagnetic (AF) bilayers is the fact that different techniques yield different values for the exchange field (HE) between the layers. We report an investigation on sputtered NiFe/NiO carried out with three different techniques, namely, magneto-optical Kerr effect magnetometry (MOKE), Brillouin light scattering (BLS), and ferromagnetic resonance (FMR). In an attempt to reconcile the measurements obtained with the various techniques, we interpret the data with a model that includes the formation of a planar domain wall in the AF layer, giving rise to a torque on the FM moment represented by an effective domain wall field (HW). We find out that while the same pair of values of HE and HW provide equally good fits to the reversible FMR and BLS measurements, different pairs are necessary to fit the irreversible magnetometry data.

  4. Measurement of CO2 exchange between Boreal forest and the atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Black, T Andrew; Gaumont-Guay, David; Jassal, Rachhpal S; Amiro, Brian D; Jarvis, Paul G; Gower, Stith T; Kelliher, Frank M; Dunn, Allison; Wofsy, Steven C

    2005-01-01

    The Boreal forest is the world's second largest forested biome occupying the circumpolar region between 50 degrees N and 70 degrees N. This heterogeneous biome stores about 25% of all terrestrial carbon. We have reviewed EC measurements of CO2 exchange between the atmosphere and Boreal forests, and assessed progress in understanding the controlling processes. We have assessed net ecosystem productivity, the net balance between net primary productivity and heterotrophic respiration, measured using the EC method, for 38 Boreal forest sites. Gross ecosystem productivity has been estimated by adding day-time EC-measured CO2 fluxes to respiration estimated from night-time relationships between respiration and temperature. Maximum midday values of gross ecosystem productivity vary from 33 pmol m(-2) s(-1) for aspen to 6 micromol m(-2) s(-1) for larch stands. Long-term EC flux measurements, ongoing at nine Boreal sites, have shown the strong impact of spring weather and growing season water balance on annual net ecosystem productivity. Estimation of net biome production, incorporating the effects of disturbance resulting from forest fires and logging, has progressed significantly in recent years. After disturbance, summer measurements in Boreal chronosequences suggest that it takes about 10 years before growing season carbon uptake offsets the decomposition emissions. Small-scale exchange rate measurements using chambers and manipulative experiments such as stem girdling and soil heating help to understand the processes and mechanisms playing major roles in the carbon balance of terrestrial ecosystems. Aircraft EC flux measurements, convective boundary layer carbon budgets, and (13)C/12C changes in the atmosphere play an important role in validating estimates of regional carbon exchange based on scaled up EC measurements. Atmospheric inverse models are an important approach to studying regional and global carbon balance but need further improvement to yield reliable

  5. Concentrations, Trends, and Air-Water Exchange of PAHs and PBDEs Derived from Passive Samplers in Lake Superior in 2011.

    PubMed

    Ruge, Zoe; Muir, Derek; Helm, Paul; Lohmann, Rainer

    2015-12-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and polybrominated diphenylethers (PBDEs) are both currently released into the environment from anthropogenic activity. Both are hence primarily associated with populated or industrial areas, although wildfires can be an important source of PAHs, as well. Polyethylene passive samplers (PEs) were simultaneously deployed in surface water and near surface atmosphere to determine spatial trends and air-water gaseous exchange of 21 PAHs and 11 PBDEs at 19 sites across Lake Superior in 2011. Surface water and atmospheric PAH concentrations were greatest at urban sites (up to 65 ng L(-1) and 140 ng m(-3), respectively, averaged from June to October). Near populated regions, PAHs displayed net air-to-water deposition, but were near equilibrium off-shore. Retene, probably depositing following major wildfires in the region, dominated dissolved PAH concentrations at most Lake Superior sites. Atmospheric and dissolved PBDEs were greatest near urban and populated sites (up to 6.8 pg L(-1) and 15 pg m(-3), respectively, averaged from June to October), dominated by BDE-47. At most coastal sites, there was net gaseous deposition of BDE-47, with less brominated congeners contributing to Sault Ste. Marie and eastern open lake fluxes. Conversely, the central open lake and Eagle Harbor sites generally displayed volatilization of PBDEs into the atmosphere, mainly BDE-47. PMID:26436513

  6. The Origins of Air Parcels Uplifted in a Two Dimensional Gravity Wave in the Tropical Upper Troposphere During the NASA Stratosphere Troposphere Exchange Project (STEP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selkirk, Henry B.; Pfister, Leonhard; Chan, K. Roland; Kritz, Mark; Kelly, Ken

    1989-01-01

    During January and February 1987, as part of the Stratosphere-Troposphere Exchange Project, the NASA ER-2 made 11 flights from Darwin, Australia to investigate dehydration mechanisms in the vicinity of the tropical tropopause. After the monsoon onset in the second week of January, steady easterly flow of 15-25 ms (exp -1) was established in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere over northern Australia and adjacent seas. Penetrating into this regime were elements of the monsoon convection such as overshooting convective turrets and extensive anvils including cyclone cloud shields. In cases of the latter, the resulting flow obstructions tended to produce mesoscale gravity waves. In several instances the ER- 2 meteorological and trace constituent measurements provide a detailed description of the structure of these gravity waves. Among these was STEP Flight 6, 22-23 January. It is of particular interest to STEP because of the close proximity of ice-laden and dehydrated air on the same isentropic surfaces. Convective events inject large amounts of ice into the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere which may not be completely removed by local precipitation processes. In the present instance, a gravity wave for removed from the source region appears to induce relativity rapid upward motion in the ice-laden air and subsequent dessication. Potential mechanisms for such a localized removal process are under investigation.

  7. Diffusive exchange of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons across the air-water interface of the Patapsco River, an urbanized subestuary of the Chesapeake Bay

    SciTech Connect

    Bamford, H.A.; Offenberg, J.H.; Larsen, R.K.; Ko, F.C.; Baker, J.E.

    1999-07-01

    Air-water exchange fluxes of 13 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were determined along a transect in the Patapsco River from the Inner Harbor of Baltimore, MD, to the mainstem of the northern Chesapeake Bay. Sampling took place at six sites during three sampling intensives (June 1996, February 1997, and July 1997) and at one site every ninth day between March 1997 and March 1998 to measure spatial, daily, and annual variability in the fluxes. The direction and magnitude of the daily fluxes of individual PAHs were strongly influenced by the wind speed and direction, by the air temperature, and by the highly variable PAH concentrations in the gas and dissolved phases. Individual fluxes ranged from 14,200 ng m{sup {minus}2} day{sup {minus}1} net volatilization of fluorene during high winds to 11,400 ng m{sup {minus}2} day{sup {minus}1} net absorption of phenanthrene when prevailing winds blowing from the northwest across the city of Baltimore elevated gaseous PAH concentrations over the water. The largest PAH volatilization fluxes occurred adjacent to the stormwater discharges, driven by elevated dissolved PAH concentrations in surface waters. Estimated annual volatilization fluxes ranged from 1.1 {micro}g m{sup {minus}2} yr{sup {minus}1} for chrysene to 800 {micro}g m{sup {minus}2} yr{sup {minus}1} for fluorene.

  8. A measurement of two-photon exchange in unpolarized elastic electron-proton scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurov, Mikhail

    2016-03-01

    Jefferson Lab experiment E05-017 was designed to study 2-photon exchange contributions to elastic electron-proton scattering over a wide kinematic range. By detecting the scattered proton instead of the electron these measurements will be very sensitive to the ɛ dependence of the cross section and consequently the ratio GE/GM. The goals of the experiment, the experimental technique and the kinematic range will be presented. The analysis sequence and results of the early steps will be outlined.

  9. Measurement of frost characteristics on heat exchanger fins. Part 2: Data and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H.; Thomas, L.; Besant, R.W.

    1999-07-01

    Part 1 of this paper described the frost growth test facility and instrumentation. In Part 2, results are presented for typical operating conditions with frost growth on heat exchanger fins. Typical data are presented for frost height distributions on fins, increase in pressure loss for airflow through a finned test section, frost mass accumulation on fins, and heat rate. Special attention is given to the uncertainty in each of these measurements and calculations.

  10. Tropical Intraseasonal Air-Sea Exchanges during the 1997 Pacific Warming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sui, C.-H.; Lau, K.-M.; Chou, S.-H.; Wang, Zihou

    1999-01-01

    The Madden Julian Oscillations (MJO) and associated westerly wind (WW) events account for much of the tropical intraseasonal variability (TISV). The TISV has been suggested as an important stochastic forcing that may be one of the underlying causes for the observed irregularities of the El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO). Recent observational studies and theories of interannual to interdecadal-scale variability suggest that ENSO may arise from different mechanisms depending on the basic states. The Pacific warming event of 1997, being associated with a period of strong MJO and WW events, serves as a natural experiment for studying the possible role of TISV in triggering an ENSO event. We have performed a combined statistical and composite analysis of surface WW events based on the assimilated surface wind and sea level pressure for the period of 1980-1993, the SSM/I wind for the period of 1988-1997, and OLR. Results indicates that extratropical forcing contribute significantly to the evolution of MJO and establishment of WW events over the Pacific warm pool. Following the major WW events, there appeared an eastward extension of equatorial warm SST anomalies from the western Pacific warm pool. Such tropical-extratropical interaction is particularly clear in the winter of 96-97 that leads to the recent warming event in 1997/98. From the above discussion, our current study on this subject is based on the hypothesis that 1) there is an enhanced air-sea interaction associated with TISV and the northerly surges from the extratropics in the initial phase of the 97/98 warming event, and 2) the relevant mechanisms are functions of the basic state of the coupled system (in terms of SST distribution and atmospheric mean circulation) that varies at the interannual and interdecadal time scale. We are analyzing the space-time structure of the northerly surges, their association with air-sea fluxes and upper ocean responses during the period of September 1996 to June 1997. The

  11. More than just CO2: Multiple trace gas exchange measurements at a temperate mountain grassland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohlfahrt, Georg; Hammerle, Albin; Hörtnagl, Lukas; Bamberger, Ines; Hansel, Armin

    2015-04-01

    Ecosystems exchange a large number of different trace gases to/from the atmosphere, however the vast majority of FLUXNET sites quantifies only the fluxes of carbon dioxide and when assessing the carbon or greenhouse gas balance neglect other carbon or greenhouse gas fluxes. This causes an overestimation of the role of carbon dioxid exchange for the ecosystem carbon and greenhouse gas balance, the magnitude of which is largely unconstrained Here we use the eddy covariance method (and variants thereof) with a large variety of analytical methods to quantify the exchange of multiple trace gases to/from a mountain grassland, partly for a time period of over a decade. The monitored trace gas fluxes cover: carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, carbon monoxide and several volatile organic compounds. The main result of our study is that carbon dioxide is the major contributor to the gaseous carbon and greenhouse gas budget at this temperate mountain grassland, which however may be significantly modulated by other trace gases may, at least during some years. Differences between source and sink periods for the different trace gases and the underlying drivers are discussed and annual budgets, for some compounds covering multiple years up to decades, are presented. We conclude that multiple trace gas flux measurements help to elucidate the importance of the exchange of carbon dioxide for the ecosystem carbon and greenhouse gas budget.

  12. Comparisons of Air Radiation Model with Shock Tube Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bose, Deepak; McCorkle, Evan; Bogdanoff, David W.; Allen, Gary A., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents an assessment of the predictive capability of shock layer radiation model appropriate for NASA s Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle lunar return entry. A detailed set of spectrally resolved radiation intensity comparisons are made with recently conducted tests in the Electric Arc Shock Tube (EAST) facility at NASA Ames Research Center. The spectral range spanned from vacuum ultraviolet wavelength of 115 nm to infrared wavelength of 1400 nm. The analysis is done for 9.5-10.5 km/s shock passing through room temperature synthetic air at 0.2, 0.3 and 0.7 Torr. The comparisons between model and measurements show discrepancies in the level of background continuum radiation and intensities of atomic lines. Impurities in the EAST facility in the form of carbon bearing species are also modeled to estimate the level of contaminants and their impact on the comparisons. The discrepancies, although large is some cases, exhibit order and consistency. A set of tests and analyses improvements are proposed as forward work plan in order to confirm or reject various proposed reasons for the observed discrepancies.

  13. Rechargeable Metal–Air Proton‐Exchange Membrane Batteries for Renewable Energy Storage

    PubMed Central

    Nagao, Masahiro; Kobayashi, Kazuyo; Yamamoto, Yuta; Yamaguchi, Togo; Oogushi, Akihide

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Rechargeable proton‐exchange membrane batteries that employ organic chemical hydrides as hydrogen‐storage media have the potential to serve as next‐generation power sources; however, significant challenges remain regarding the improvement of the reversible hydrogen‐storage capacity. Here, we address this challenge through the use of metal‐ion redox couples as energy carriers for battery operation. Carbon, with a suitable degree of crystallinity and surface oxygenation, was used as an effective anode material for the metal redox reactions. A Sn0.9In0.1P2O7‐based electrolyte membrane allowed no crossover of vanadium ions through the membrane. The V4+/V3+, V3+/V2+, and Sn4+/Sn2+ redox reactions took place at a more positive potential than that for hydrogen reduction, so that undesired hydrogen production could be avoided. The resulting electrical capacity reached 306 and 258 mAh g−1 for VOSO4 and SnSO4, respectively, and remained at 76 and 91 % of their respective initial values after 50 cycles. PMID:27525212

  14. Demonstrations of Magnetic Phenomena: Measuring the Air Permeability Using Tablets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lara, V. O. M.; Amaral, D. F.; Faria, D.; Vieira, L. P.

    2014-01-01

    We use a tablet to experimentally determine the dependencies of the magnetic field (B) on the electrical current and the axial distance from a coil (z). Our data shows good precision on the inverse cubic dependence of the magnetic field on the axial distance, B?z[superscript -3]. We obtain the value of air permeability µ[subscript air] with good…

  15. Gaseous and Freely-Dissolved PCBs in the Lower Great Lakes Based on Passive Sampling: Spatial Trends and Air-Water Exchange.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Wang, Siyao; McDonough, Carrie A; Khairy, Mohammed; Muir, Derek C G; Helm, Paul A; Lohmann, Rainer

    2016-05-17

    Polyethylene passive sampling was performed to quantify gaseous and freely dissolved polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in the air and water of Lakes Erie and Ontario during 2011-2012. In view of differing physical characteristics and the impacts of historical contamination by PCBs within these lakes, spatial variation of PCB concentrations and air-water exchange across these lakes may be expected. Both lakes displayed statistically similar aqueous and atmospheric PCB concentrations. Total aqueous concentrations of 29 PCBs ranged from 1.5 pg L(-1) in the open lake of Lake Erie (site E02) in 2011 spring to 105 pg L(-1) in Niagara (site On05) in 2012 summer, while total atmospheric concentrations were 7.7-634 pg m(-3) across both lakes. A west-to-east gradient was observed for aqueous PCBs in Lake Erie. River discharge and localized influences (e.g., sediment resuspension and regional alongshore transport) likely dominated spatial trends of aqueous PCBs in both lakes. Air-water exchange fluxes of Σ7PCBs ranged from -2.4 (±1.9) ng m(-2) day(-1) (deposition) in Sheffield (site E03) to 9.0 (±3.1) ng m(-2) day(-1) (volatilization) in Niagara (site On05). Net volatilization of PCBs was the primary trend across most sites and periods. Almost half of variation in air-water exchange fluxes was attributed to the difference in aqueous concentrations of PCBs. Uncertainty analysis in fugacity ratios and mass fluxes in air-water exchange of PCBs indicated that PCBs have reached or approached equilibrium only at the eastern Lake Erie and along the Canadian shore of Lake Ontario sites, where air-water exchange fluxes dominated atmospheric concentrations.

  16. Gaseous and Freely-Dissolved PCBs in the Lower Great Lakes Based on Passive Sampling: Spatial Trends and Air-Water Exchange.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Wang, Siyao; McDonough, Carrie A; Khairy, Mohammed; Muir, Derek C G; Helm, Paul A; Lohmann, Rainer

    2016-05-17

    Polyethylene passive sampling was performed to quantify gaseous and freely dissolved polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in the air and water of Lakes Erie and Ontario during 2011-2012. In view of differing physical characteristics and the impacts of historical contamination by PCBs within these lakes, spatial variation of PCB concentrations and air-water exchange across these lakes may be expected. Both lakes displayed statistically similar aqueous and atmospheric PCB concentrations. Total aqueous concentrations of 29 PCBs ranged from 1.5 pg L(-1) in the open lake of Lake Erie (site E02) in 2011 spring to 105 pg L(-1) in Niagara (site On05) in 2012 summer, while total atmospheric concentrations were 7.7-634 pg m(-3) across both lakes. A west-to-east gradient was observed for aqueous PCBs in Lake Erie. River discharge and localized influences (e.g., sediment resuspension and regional alongshore transport) likely dominated spatial trends of aqueous PCBs in both lakes. Air-water exchange fluxes of Σ7PCBs ranged from -2.4 (±1.9) ng m(-2) day(-1) (deposition) in Sheffield (site E03) to 9.0 (±3.1) ng m(-2) day(-1) (volatilization) in Niagara (site On05). Net volatilization of PCBs was the primary trend across most sites and periods. Almost half of variation in air-water exchange fluxes was attributed to the difference in aqueous concentrations of PCBs. Uncertainty analysis in fugacity ratios and mass fluxes in air-water exchange of PCBs indicated that PCBs have reached or approached equilibrium only at the eastern Lake Erie and along the Canadian shore of Lake Ontario sites, where air-water exchange fluxes dominated atmospheric concentrations. PMID:26642083

  17. Alpine lee cyclogenesis influence on air-sea heat exchanges and marine atmospheric boundary layer thermodynamics over the western Mediterranean during a Tramontane/Mistral event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flamant, Cyrille

    2003-02-01

    Data from a recent field campaign are used to analyze the nonstationary aspects of air-sea heat exchanges and marine atmospheric boundary layer (MABL) thermodynamics over the Gulf of Lion (GoL) in connection with synoptic forcing. The data set includes measurements made from a wide range of platforms (sea-borne, airborne, and space-borne) as well as three-dimensional atmospheric modeling. The analysis focuses on the 24 March 1998 Tramontane/Mistral event. It is shown that the nonstationary nature of the wind regime over the GoL was controlled by the multistage evolution of an Alpine lee cyclone over the Tyrrhenian Sea (between Sardinia and continental Italy). In the early stage (low at 1014 hPa) the Tramontane flow prevailed over the GoL. As the low deepened (1010 hPa), the prevailing wind regime shifted to a well-established Mistral that peaked around 1200 UTC. In the afternoon the Mistral was progressively disrupted by a strengthening outflow coming from the Ligurian Sea in response to the deepening low over the Tyrrhenian Sea (1008 hPa) and the channelling induced by the presence of the Apennine range (Italy) and the Alps. In the evening the Mistral was again well established over the GoL as the depression continued to deepen (1002 hPa) but moved to the southeast, reducing the influence of outflow from the Ligurian Sea on the flow over the GoL. The air-sea heat exchanges and the structure of the MABL over the GoL were observed to differ significantly between the established Mistral period and the disrupted Mistral period. In the latter period, surface latent and sensible heat fluxes were reduced by a factor of 2, on average. During that latter period, air-sea moisture exchanges were mainly driven by dynamics, whereas during the former period, both winds and vertical moisture gradients controlled moisture exchanges. The MABL was shallower during the latter period (0.7 km instead of 1.2 km) because of reduced surface turbulent heat fluxes and increased wind shear

  18. Canopy photosynthesis and transpiration in microgravity: gas exchange measurements aboard Mir.

    PubMed

    Monje, O; Bingham, G E; Carman, J G; Campbell, W F; Salisbury, F B; Eames, B K; Sytchev, V; Levinskikh, M A; Podolsky, I

    2000-01-01

    The SVET Greenhouse on-board the Orbital Station Mir was used to measure canopy photosynthesis and transpiration rates for the first time in space. During the Greenhouse IIB experiment on Mir (June-January 1997), carbon and water vapor fluxes from two wheat (cv. Superdwarf) canopies were measured using the US developed Gas Exchange Measurement System (GEMS). Gas analyzers capable of resolving CO2 concentration differences of 5 micromoles mol-1 against a background of 0.9% CO2, are necessary to measure photosynthetic and respiratory rates on Mir. The ability of the GEMS gas analyzers to measure these CO2 concentration differences was determined during extensive ground calibrations. Similarly, the sensitivity of the analyzers to water vapor was sufficient to accurately measure canopy evapotranspiration. Evapotranspiration, which accounted for over 90% of the water added to the root zone, was estimated using gas exchange and used to estimate substrate moisture content. This paper presents canopy photosynthesis and transpiration data during the peak vegetative phase of development in microgravity.

  19. The D/H Ratio in Atmospheric Water Vapour: Continuous in situ Measurements of Soil-Plant-Atmosphere Exchange by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, D. W.; Jamie, I. M.; Parkes, S. D.; Wilson, S. R.

    2003-12-01

    The D/H ratio in atmospheric water vapour provides a valuable tracer for exchange and transport processes. We present a novel method for real-time, continuous, in situ field measurements of the D/H ratio of atmospheric water vapour, and illustrate the method with measurements of vertical profiles of both water content and HDO/H2O ratio over an agricultural pasture in SE Australia. We measured 7-point vertical profiles (0.5-22m) every 30 minutes continuously over a three week period in spring. The observed variations in the vertical profiles on diurnal and weekly timescales provide valuable constraints on the exchanges of water between atmosphere, soil and plants. The measurement technique used is Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. Whole air was drawn via a buffer volume into a multi-pass optical absorption cell from inlet lines on a 22m tower in the pasture paddock. The FT-IR absorption spectrum of the air was recorded with a Bomem MB100 FTIR spectrometer at 1 cm-1 resolution, typically for 2 minutes per sample. Each of the 7 inlets was sampled twice per half hour to provide 30 minute average vertical profiles. Precision in δ D is around 1-2 per mil. The instrument can be fully automated, and is mobile and suitable for field measurements.

  20. High efficiency air cycle air conditioning system

    SciTech Connect

    Rannenberg, G. C.

    1985-11-19

    An air cycle air conditioning system is provided with regenerative heat exchangers upstream and downstream of an expansion turbine. A closedloop liquid circulatory system serially connects the two regenerative heat exchangers for regeneration without the bulk associated with air-to-air heat exchange. The liquid circulatory system may also provide heat transport to a remote sink heat exchanger and from a remote load as well as heat exchange within the sink heat exchanger and load for enhanced compactness and efficiency.

  1. Simulating the Vapour Phase Air/Water Exchange of p,p′-DDE, p,p′-DDT, Lindane, and 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzodioxin

    EPA Science Inventory

    Uncertainties in our understanding of gaseous air/water exchange have emerged as major sources of concern in efforts to construct global and regional mass balances of both the green house gas carbon dioxide and semi-volatile persistent, bioaccumulative and toxic chemicals. Hoff e...

  2. Fast time resolution charge-exchange measurements during the fishbone instability in the poloidal divertor experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Beiersdorfer, P.; Kaita, R.; Goldston, R.J.

    1984-01-01

    Measurements of fast ion losses due to the fishbone instability during high ..beta../sub T/q neutral beam heated discharges in the Poloidal Divertor Experiment have been made using two new vertical-viewing charge-exchange analyzers. The measurements show that the instability has an n=1 toroidal mode number, and that it ejects beam ions in a toroidally rotating beacon directed outward along a major radius. Observations of ejected ions with energies up to twice the beam injection energy at R approx. = R/sub 0/ + a indicate the presence of a non-..mu..-conserving acceleration mechanism.

  3. Chemical-Specific Representation of Air-Soil Exchange and Soil Penetration in Regional Multimedia Models

    SciTech Connect

    McKone, T.E.; Bennett, D.H.

    2002-08-01

    In multimedia mass-balance models, the soil compartment is an important sink as well as a conduit for transfers to vegetation and shallow groundwater. Here a novel approach for constructing soil transport algorithms for multimedia fate models is developed and evaluated. The resulting algorithms account for diffusion in gas and liquid components; advection in gas, liquid, or solid phases; and multiple transformation processes. They also provide an explicit quantification of the characteristic soil penetration depth. We construct a compartment model using three and four soil layers to replicate with high reliability the flux and mass distribution obtained from the exact analytical solution describing the transient dispersion, advection, and transformation of chemicals in soil with fixed properties and boundary conditions. Unlike the analytical solution, which requires fixed boundary conditions, the soil compartment algorithms can be dynamically linked to other compartments (air, vegetation, ground water, surface water) in multimedia fate models. We demonstrate and evaluate the performance of the algorithms in a model with applications to benzene, benzo(a)pyrene, MTBE, TCDD, and tritium.

  4. Air-Seawater Exchange of Organochlorine Pesticides in the Southern Ocean between Australia and Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Bigot, Marie; Muir, Derek C G; Hawker, Darryl W; Cropp, Roger; Dachs, Jordi; Teixeira, Camilla F; Bengtson Nash, Susan

    2016-08-01

    This study contributes new data on the spatial variability of persistent organic pollutants in the Indian-Pacific sector of the Southern Ocean and represents the first empirical data obtained from this region in 25 years. Paired high-volume atmospheric and seawater samples were collected along a transect between Australia and Antarctica to investigate the latitudinal dependence of the occurrence and distribution of legacy organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and the current use pesticide chlorpyrifos in the Southern Ocean. Dissolved ΣHCH and dieldrin concentrations decreased linearly with increasing latitude from 7.7 to 3.0 and from 1.0 to 0.6 pg·L(-1), respectively. There was no consistent trend observed in the latitudinal profile of atmospheric samples; however, some compounds (such as dieldrin) showed reduced concentrations from 7.5-3.4 to 2.7-0.65 pg·m(-3) at the highest latitudes south of the Polar Front. Chlorpyrifos was found in samples from this area for the first time. Estimated air-seawater fugacity ratios and fluxes indicate a current net deposition between -3600 and -900, -6400 and -400, and -1400 and -200 (pg·m(-2)·d(-1)) for γ-HCH, dieldrin, and chlorpyrifos, respectively. These findings suggest that, under current climatic conditions, the Southern Ocean reservoir in the Indian-Pacific sector serves as an environmental sink rather than a source of OCPs to the atmosphere. PMID:27348023

  5. The effects of oxygen induced pulmonary vasoconstriction on bedside measurement of pulmonary gas exchange.

    PubMed

    Weinreich, Ulla M; Thomsen, Lars P; Rees, Stephen E; Rasmussen, Bodil S

    2016-04-01

    In patients with respiratory failure measurements of pulmonary gas exchange are of importance. The bedside automatic lung parameter estimator (ALPE) of pulmonary gas exchange is based on changes in inspired oxygen (FiO2) assuming that these changes do not affect pulmonary circulation. This assumption is investigated in this study. Forty-two out of 65 patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) had measurements of mean pulmonary arterial pressure (MPAP), cardiac output and pulmonary capillary wedge pressure thus enabling the calculation of pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) at each FiO2 level. The research version of ALPE was used and FiO2 was step-wise reduced a median of 0.20 and ultimately returned towards baseline values, allowing 6-8 min' steady state period at each of 4-6 levels before recording the oxygen saturation (SpO2). FiO2 reduction led to median decrease in SpO2 from 99 to 92 %, an increase in MPAP of 4 mmHg and an increase in PVR of 36 dyn s cm(-5). Changes were immediately reversed on returning FiO2 towards baseline. In this study changes in MPAP and PVR are small and immediately reversible consistent with small changes in pulmonary gas exchange. This indicates that mild deoxygenation induced pulmonary vasoconstriction does not have significant influences on the ALPE parameters in patients after CABG.

  6. Demonstrations of magnetic phenomena: measuring the air permeability using tablets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lara, V. O. M.; Amaral, D. F.; Faria, D.; Vieira, L. P.

    2014-11-01

    We use a tablet to experimentally determine the dependencies of the magnetic field (B) on the electrical current and the axial distance from a coil (z). Our data shows good precision on the inverse cubic dependence of the magnetic field on the axial distance, B ∝ z-3. We obtain the value of air permeability μair with good accuracy. We also observe the same dependence of B on z when considering a magnet instead of a coil. Although our estimates are obtained through simple data fits, we also perform a more sophisticated error analysis, confirming the result for μair.

  7. Real-Time Aerodynamic Parameter Estimation without Air Flow Angle Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morelli, Eugene A.

    2010-01-01

    A technique for estimating aerodynamic parameters in real time from flight data without air flow angle measurements is described and demonstrated. The method is applied to simulated F-16 data, and to flight data from a subscale jet transport aircraft. Modeling results obtained with the new approach using flight data without air flow angle measurements were compared to modeling results computed conventionally using flight data that included air flow angle measurements. Comparisons demonstrated that the new technique can provide accurate aerodynamic modeling results without air flow angle measurements, which are often difficult and expensive to obtain. Implications for efficient flight testing and flight safety are discussed.

  8. Utilizing MRI to measure the transcytolemmal water exchange rate for the rat brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quirk, James D.; Bretthorst, G. Larry; Neil, Jeffrey J.

    2001-05-01

    Understanding the exchange of water between the intra- and extracellular compartments of the brain is important both for understanding basic physiology and for the interpretation of numerous MRI results. However, due to experimental difficulties, this basic property has proven difficult to measure in vivo. In our experiments, we will track overall changes in the relaxation rate constant of water in the rat brain following the administration of gadoteridol, a relaxation agent, to the extracellular compartment. From these changes, we will utilize probability theory and Markov Chain Monte Carlo simulations to infer the compartment specific water exchange and relaxation rate constants. Due to the correlated nature of these parameters and our inability to independently observe them, intelligent model selection is critical. Through analysis of simulated data sets, we refine our choice of model and method of data collection to optimize applicability to the in vivo situation.

  9. A Conductivity Device for Measuring Sulfur Dioxide in the Air

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craig, James C.

    1972-01-01

    Described is a general electroconductivity device enabling students to determine sulfur dioxide concentration in a particular location, hopefully leading to a deeper understanding of the problem of air pollution. (DF)

  10. Air Traffic Complexity Measurement Environment (ACME): Software User's Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    A user's guide for the Air Traffic Complexity Measurement Environment (ACME) software is presented. The ACME consists of two major components, a complexity analysis tool and user interface. The Complexity Analysis Tool (CAT) analyzes complexity off-line, producing data files which may be examined interactively via the Complexity Data Analysis Tool (CDAT). The Complexity Analysis Tool is composed of three independently executing processes that communicate via PVM (Parallel Virtual Machine) and Unix sockets. The Runtime Data Management and Control process (RUNDMC) extracts flight plan and track information from a SAR input file, and sends the information to GARP (Generate Aircraft Routes Process) and CAT (Complexity Analysis Task). GARP in turn generates aircraft trajectories, which are utilized by CAT to calculate sector complexity. CAT writes flight plan, track and complexity data to an output file, which can be examined interactively. The Complexity Data Analysis Tool (CDAT) provides an interactive graphic environment for examining the complexity data produced by the Complexity Analysis Tool (CAT). CDAT can also play back track data extracted from System Analysis Recording (SAR) tapes. The CDAT user interface consists of a primary window, a controls window, and miscellaneous pop-ups. Aircraft track and position data is displayed in the main viewing area of the primary window. The controls window contains miscellaneous control and display items. Complexity data is displayed in pop-up windows. CDAT plays back sector complexity and aircraft track and position data as a function of time. Controls are provided to start and stop playback, adjust the playback rate, and reposition the display to a specified time.

  11. Measurement of pion double charge exchange on carbon-13, carbon-14, magnesium-26, and iron-56

    SciTech Connect

    Seidl, P.A.

    1985-02-01

    Cross sections for the /sup 13,14/C,/sup 26/Mg,/sup 56/Fe(..pi../sup +/,..pi../sup -/)/sup 13,14/O,/sup 26/Si,/sup 56/Ni reactions were measured with the Energetic Pion Channel and Spectrometer at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility for 120 less than or equal to T/sub ..pi../ less than or equal to 292 MeV and 0 less than or equal to theta less than or equal to 50. The double isobaric analog states (DIAS) are of primary interest. In addition, cross sections for transitions to /sup 14/O(0/sup +/, 5.92 MeV), /sup 14/O(2/sup +/, 7.77 MeV), /sup 56/Ni(gs), /sup 13/O(gs), and /sup 13/O(4.21 MeV) are presented. The /sup 13/O(4.21 MeV) state is postulated to have J/sup ..pi../ = 1/2/sup -/. The data are compared to previously measured double-charge-exchange cross sections on other nuclei, and the systematics of double charge exchange on T greater than or equal to 1 target nuclei leading to the DIAS are studied. Near the ..delta../sub 33/ resonance, cross sections for the DIAS transitions are in disagreement with calculations in which the reaction is treated as sequential charge exchange through the free pion-nucleon amplitude, while for T/sub ..pi../ > 200 MeV the anomalous features of the 164 MeV data are not apparent. This is evidence for significant higher order contributions to the double-charge-exchange amplitude near the reasonable energy. Two theoretical approaches that include two nucleon processes are applied to the DIAS data. 64 references.

  12. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN HVAC SYSTEM OPERATION, AIR EXCHANGE RATE, AND INDOOR-OUTDOOR PARTICULATE MATTER RATIOS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Measurements of duty cycle , the fraction of time the heating and cooling (HVAC) system was operating, were made in each participant's home during the spring season of the RTP Particulate Matter Panel Study. A miniature temperature sensor/data logger combination placed on the ...

  13. Effect of air on energy and rise-time spectra measured by proportional gas counter

    SciTech Connect

    Kawano, T.; Tanaka, M.; Isozumi, S.; Isozumi, Y.; Tosaki, M.; Sugiyama, T.

    2015-03-15

    Air exerts a negative effect on radiation detection using a gas counter because oxygen contained in air has a high electron attachment coefficient and can trap electrons from electron-ion pairs created by ionization from incident radiation in counting gas. This reduces radiation counts. The present study examined the influence of air on energy and rise-time spectra measurements using a proportional gas counter. In addition, a decompression procedure method was proposed to reduce the influence of air and its effectiveness was investigated. For the decompression procedure, the counting gas inside the gas counter was decompressed below atmospheric pressure before radiation detection. For the spectrum measurement, methane as well as various methane and air mixtures were used as the counting gas to determine the effect of air on energy and rise-time spectra. Results showed that the decompression procedure was effective for reducing or eliminating the influence of air on spectra measurement using a proportional gas counter. (authors)

  14. Biofilm-like properties of the sea surface and predicted effects on air-sea CO2 exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wurl, Oliver; Stolle, Christian; Van Thuoc, Chu; The Thu, Pham; Mari, Xavier

    2016-05-01

    Because the sea surface controls various interactions between the ocean and the atmosphere, it has a profound function for marine biogeochemistry and climate regulation. The sea surface is the gateway for the exchange of climate-relevant gases, heat and particles. Thus, in order to determine how the ocean and the atmosphere interact and respond to environmental changes on a global scale, the characterization and understanding of the sea surface are essential. The uppermost part of the water column is defined as the sea-surface microlayer and experiences strong spatial and temporal dynamics, mainly due to meteorological forcing. Wave-damped areas at the sea surface are caused by the accumulation of surface-active organic material and are defined as slicks. Natural slicks are observed frequently but their biogeochemical properties are poorly understood. In the present study, we found up to 40 times more transparent exopolymer particles (TEP), the foundation of any biofilm, in slicks compared to the underlying bulk water at multiple stations in the North Pacific, South China Sea, and Baltic Sea. We found a significant lower enrichment of TEP (up to 6) in non-slick sea surfaces compared to its underlying bulk water. Moreover, slicks were characterized by a large microbial biomass, another shared feature with conventional biofilms on solid surfaces. Compared to non-slick samples (avg. pairwise similarity of 70%), the community composition of bacteria in slicks was increasingly (avg. pairwise similarity of 45%) different from bulk water communities, indicating that the TEP-matrix creates specific environments for its inhabitants. We, therefore, conclude that slicks can feature biofilm-like properties with the excessive accumulation of particles and microbes. We also assessed the potential distribution and frequency of slick-formation in coastal and oceanic regions, and their effect on air-sea CO2 exchange based on literature data. We estimate that slicks can reduce CO2

  15. New Insights Into the Surface / Atmosphere Exchange of Particles Based on Recent Advances in Measurement Technology (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemitz, E.; Phillips, G. J.; Thomas, R.; di Marco, C. F.; Fowler, D.

    2009-12-01

    Dry deposition velocities of particles govern the deposition and atmospheric lifetime of aerosols and their constituents and need to be parameterised in chemical transport models to predict air quality, climate change and ecosystem impacts. The same micrometeorological flux measurement approaches used to measure deposition rates can be used to quantify emissions from area sources such as urban emissions and resuspension. This paper reviews recent measurements of fluxes of particle number and, importantly, individual aerosol chemical compounds, made with wet-chemistry gradient systems and eddy-covariance using aerosol mass spectrometry. The results indicate that aerosol exchange tends to be bi-directional and is modulated by particle dynamics due to evaporation and condensation growth. Often, some aerosol components are emitted or chemically formed below the measurement height, while other components deposit or evaporate. This has important implications on the use of field measurements of number fluxes for the development of model parameterisations. For example, measurements over a range of surfaces show that ammonium nitrate volatilises during the deposition to semi-natural vegetation, forming associated gaseous precursors, which deposit faster than the aerosol species. This evaporation therefore enhances total nitrogen deposition, and models need to use enhanced effective deposition rates to account for the effect. Conversely, the effect of particle dynamics on fluxes can be used to study aerosol processing, such as the in-situ formation of inorganic and organic secondary aerosol and the volatilisation of primary combustion aerosol. Examples will be shown from agricultural, natural and urban environments. Finally, the paper will discuss future research priorities to help improve parameterisations of dry deposition velocities further.

  16. Validating Health Information Exchange (HIE) Data For Quality Measurement Across Four Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Nupur; Kuperman, Gil; Onyile, Arit; Lowry, Tina; Genes, Nicholas; DiMaggio, Charles; Richardson, Lynne; Husk, Gregg; Shapiro, Jason S

    2014-01-01

    Health information exchange (HIE) provides an essential enhancement to electronic health records (EHR), allowing information to follow patients across provider organizations. There is also an opportunity to improve public health surveillance, quality measurement, and research through secondary use of HIE data, but data quality presents potential barriers. Our objective was to validate the secondary use of HIE data for two emergency department (ED) quality measures: identification of frequent ED users and early (72-hour) ED returns. We compared concordance of various demographic and encounter data from an HIE for four hospitals to data provided by the hospitals from their EHRs over a two year period, and then compared measurement of our two quality measures using both HIE and EHR data. We found that, following data cleaning, there was no significant difference in the total counts for frequent ED users or early ED returns for any of the four hospitals (p<0.001). PMID:25954362

  17. Measurements of Physical and Gas Exchanges between the Atmosphere and Surface at the Tiksi Hydrometeorological Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uttal, T.; Grachev, A. A.; Makshtas, A. P.; Repina, I.; Persson, O. P.; Laurila, T. J.; Crepinsek, S.

    2013-12-01

    In recent years a number of Arctic stations have installed micro-meteorological towers in recognition of the need to explicitly quantify the detailed exchanges between the surface and the atmosphere. One of the newer installations is a 20 meter tower in Tiksi, Russia that is located at 71.58N, 128.92E in the Russian Far East. The Tiksi tower is equipped with temperature, humidity and wind sensors at several levels (allowing the calculation of turbulent heat fluxes and fine scale characterization of the near-surface boundary layer) and H2O/CO2 sensors, It is located in near proximity to measurements of incoming and outgoing solar radiation (allowing energy balance calculations), and CH4 sensors, surface O3 measurements (allowing detection of ozone depletion events), and ancillary measurements of snow depth and permafrost active layer temperature profiles. An integrated analysis will look at the variability of these physical and chemical exchanges and variations over one annual cycle with an emphasis on detecting connections and linkages. This network of measurements supports the International Arctic Systems for Observing the Atmosphere (www.iasoa.org) and Global Cryosphere Watch (http://globalcryospherewatch.org/)

  18. Development of gas exchange and ion regulation in two species of air-breathing fish, Betta splendens and Macropodus opercularis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chun-Yen; Lin, Cheng-Huang; Lin, Hui-Chen

    2015-07-01

    Aquatic air-breathing anabantoids, a group of fish species characterized by the presence of a labyrinth organ and some gills, exhibit morphological variations. This study aimed to examine whether unequal gill growth begins during the early stages and described the sequence of the early gill developmental events in Betta splendens and Macropodus opercularis. To determine when the ion regulatory and gas exchange abilities first appear in the gills, mitochondria-rich cells (MRCs) and neuroepithelial cells (NECs) were examined in young B. splendens. To evaluate the relative importance of the gills and the labyrinth organ under different levels of oxygen uptake stress, the levels of carbonic anhydrase II (CAII) and Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase (NKA) protein expressions in 2 gills and the labyrinth organ were examined in M. opercularis. We found that the first 3 gills developed earlier than the 4th gill in both species, an indication that the morphological variation begins early in life. In B. splendens, the MRCs and NECs clearly appeared in the first 3 gills at 4 dph and were first found in the 4th gill until 11 dph. The oxygen-sensing ability of the gills was concordant with the ionoregulatory function. In M. opercularis, the hypoxic group had a significantly higher air-breathing frequency. CAII protein expression was higher in the labyrinth organ in the hypoxic group. The gills exhibited increased NKA protein expression in the hypoxic and restricted groups, respectively. Functional plasticity in CAII and NKA protein expressions was found between the gills and the labyrinth organ in adult M. opercularis.

  19. Effects of proton exchange membrane on the performance and microbial community composition of air-cathode microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yun-Yeong; Kim, Tae Gwan; Cho, Kyung-Suk

    2015-10-10

    This study investigated the effects of proton exchange membranes (PEMs) on performance and microbial community of air-cathode microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Air-cathode MFCs with reactor volume of 1L were constructed in duplicate with or without PEM (designated as ACM-MFC and AC-MFC, respectively) and fed with a mixture of glucose and acetate (1:1, w:w). The maximum power density and coulombic efficiency did not differ between MFCs in the absence or presence of a PEM. However, PEM use adversely affected maximum voltage production and the rate of organic compound removal (p<0.05). Quantitative droplet digital PCR indicated that AC-MFCs had a greater bacterial population than ACM-MFCs (p<0.05). Likewise, ribosomal tag pyrosequencing revealed that the diversity index of bacterial communities was greater for AC-MFCs (p<0.05). Network analysis revealed that the most abundant genus was Enterococcus, which comprised ≥62% of the community and was positively associated with PEM and negatively associated with the rate of chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal (Pearson correlation>0.9 and p<0.05). Geobacter, which is known as an exoelectrogen, was positively associated with maximum power density and negatively associated with PEM. Thus, these results suggest that the absence of PEM favored the growth of Geobacter, a key player for electricity generation in MFC systems. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that MFC systems without PEM are more efficient with respect to power production and COD removal as well as exoelectrogen growth.

  20. Development of gas exchange and ion regulation in two species of air-breathing fish, Betta splendens and Macropodus opercularis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chun-Yen; Lin, Cheng-Huang; Lin, Hui-Chen

    2015-07-01

    Aquatic air-breathing anabantoids, a group of fish species characterized by the presence of a labyrinth organ and some gills, exhibit morphological variations. This study aimed to examine whether unequal gill growth begins during the early stages and described the sequence of the early gill developmental events in Betta splendens and Macropodus opercularis. To determine when the ion regulatory and gas exchange abilities first appear in the gills, mitochondria-rich cells (MRCs) and neuroepithelial cells (NECs) were examined in young B. splendens. To evaluate the relative importance of the gills and the labyrinth organ under different levels of oxygen uptake stress, the levels of carbonic anhydrase II (CAII) and Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase (NKA) protein expressions in 2 gills and the labyrinth organ were examined in M. opercularis. We found that the first 3 gills developed earlier than the 4th gill in both species, an indication that the morphological variation begins early in life. In B. splendens, the MRCs and NECs clearly appeared in the first 3 gills at 4 dph and were first found in the 4th gill until 11 dph. The oxygen-sensing ability of the gills was concordant with the ionoregulatory function. In M. opercularis, the hypoxic group had a significantly higher air-breathing frequency. CAII protein expression was higher in the labyrinth organ in the hypoxic group. The gills exhibited increased NKA protein expression in the hypoxic and restricted groups, respectively. Functional plasticity in CAII and NKA protein expressions was found between the gills and the labyrinth organ in adult M. opercularis. PMID:25783787

  1. Eddy covariance measurements of net C exchange in the CAM bioenergy crop, Agave tequiliana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, Nick A.; Choncubhair, Órlaith Ní; Males, Jamie; del Real Laborde, José Ignacio; Rubio-Cortés, Ramón; Griffiths, Howard; Lanigan, Gary

    2016-04-01

    Bioenergy crop cultivation may focus more on low grade and marginal lands in order to avoid competition with food production for land and water resources. However, in many regions, this would require improvements in plant water-use efficiency that are beyond the physiological capacity of most C3 and C4 bioenergy crop candidates. Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) plants, such as Agave tequiliana, can combine high above-ground productivity with as little as 20% of the water demand of C3 and C4 crops. This is achieved through temporal separation of carboxylase activities, with stomata opening at night to allow gas exchange and minimise transpirational losses. Previous studies have employed 'bottom-up' methodologies to investigate carbon (C) accumulation and productivity in Agave, by scaling leaf-level gas exchange and titratable acidity (TA) with leaf area index or maximum productivity. We used the eddy covariance (EC) technique to quantify ecosystem-scale gas exchange over an Agave plantation in Mexico ('top-down' approach). Measurements were made over 252 days, including the transition from wet to dry periods. Results were cross-validated against diel changes in titratable acidity, leaf-unfurling rates, energy exchange fluxes and reported biomass yields. Net ecosystem exchange of CO2 displayed a CAM rhythm that alternated from a net C sink at night to a net C source during the day and partitioned canopy fluxes (gross C assimilation, FA,EC) showed a characteristic four-phase CO2 exchange pattern. The projected ecosystem C balance indicated that the site was a net sink of -333 ± 24 g C m-2 y-1, comprising cumulative soil respiration of 692 ± 7 g C m-2 y-1 and FA,EC of -1025 ± 25 g C m-2 y-1. EC-estimated biomass yield was 20.1 Mg ha-1 y-1. Average integrated daily FA,EC was -234 ± 5 mmol CO2 m-2 d-1 and persisted almost unchanged after 70 days of drought conditions. Our results suggest that the carbon acquisition strategy of drought avoidance employed by Agave

  2. Eddy covariance measurements of net C exchange in the CAM bioenergy crop, Agave tequiliana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, Nick A.; Choncubhair, Órlaith Ní; Males, Jamie; del Real Laborde, José Ignacio; Rubio-Cortés, Ramón; Griffiths, Howard; Lanigan, Gary

    2016-04-01

    Bioenergy crop cultivation may focus more on low grade and marginal lands in order to avoid competition with food production for land and water resources. However, in many regions, this would require improvements in plant water-use efficiency that are beyond the physiological capacity of most C3 and C4 bioenergy crop candidates. Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) plants, such as Agave tequiliana, can combine high above-ground productivity with as little as 20% of the water demand of C3 and C4 crops. This is achieved through temporal separation of carboxylase activities, with stomata opening at night to allow gas exchange and minimise transpirational losses. Previous studies have employed 'bottom-up' methodologies to investigate carbon (C) accumulation and productivity in Agave, by scaling leaf-level gas exchange and titratable acidity (TA) with leaf area index or maximum productivity. We used the eddy covariance (EC) technique to quantify ecosystem-scale gas exchange over an Agave plantation in Mexico ('top-down' approach). Measurements were made over 252 days, including the transition from wet to dry periods. Results were cross-validated against diel changes in titratable acidity, leaf-unfurling rates, energy exchange fluxes and reported biomass yields. Net ecosystem exchange of CO2 displayed a CAM rhythm that alternated from a net C sink at night to a net C source during the day and partitioned canopy fluxes (gross C assimilation, FA,EC) showed a characteristic four-phase CO2 exchange pattern. The projected ecosystem C balance indicated that the site was a net sink of -333 ± 24 g C m‑2 y‑1, comprising cumulative soil respiration of 692 ± 7 g C m‑2 y‑1 and FA,EC of -1025 ± 25 g C m‑2 y‑1. EC-estimated biomass yield was 20.1 Mg ha‑1 y‑1. Average integrated daily FA,EC was -234 ± 5 mmol CO2 m‑2 d‑1 and persisted almost unchanged after 70 days of drought conditions. Our results suggest that the carbon acquisition strategy of drought avoidance

  3. Charge exchange spectroscopy system calibration for ion temperature measurement in KSTARa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Won-Ha; Lee, Hyungho; Seo, Dongcheol; Kwon, Myeun

    2010-10-01

    The charge exchange spectroscopy (CES) system including collection assemblies, lens design, and cassettes for the KSTAR experiment was installed to obtain profiles of the ion temperature and the toroidal rotation velocity from charge exchange emission between plasma ions and beam neutrals near the plasma axis by using a modulated neutral beam and a background system. We can measure the charge exchange spectra of an impurity line such as the 529 nm line of carbon VI to get ion temperature and rotation profiles in KSTAR. The CES and background systems will have absolute intensity and spectral calibrations using a calibrated source and various spectral lamps. The calibration was done inside the tokamak after all CES systems are installed and the optical systems are slid into the cassettes. This requires that the diagnostic systems are installed near the vacuum vessel inside the cryostat maintaining the superconducting state of the superconducting coils. Repeated spectral calibrations of the spectrometer and charge coupled device for CES will be made in the diagnostic room during the experimental campaign. We show a detailed description of the KSTAR CES system, how to calibrate, and the results of calibration.

  4. A gravimetric approach to providing SI traceability for concentration measurement results of mercury vapor at ambient air levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ent, Hugo; van Andel, Inge; Heemskerk, Maurice; van Otterloo, Peter; Bavius, Wijnand; Baldan, Annarita; Horvat, Milena; Brown, Richard J. C.; Quétel, Christophe R.

    2014-11-01

    Current measurement and calibration capabilities for mercury vapor in air are maintained at levels of 0.2-40 μg Hg m-3. In this work, a mercury vapor generator has been developed to establish metrological traceability to the international system of units (SI) for mercury vapor measurement results ≤15 ng Hg m-3, i.e. closer to realistic ambient air concentrations (1-2 ng Hg m-3) [1]. Innovations developed included a modified type of diffusion cell, a new measurement method to weigh the loss in (mercury) mass of these diffusion cells during use (ca. 6-8 μg mass difference between successive weighings), and a new housing for the diffusion cells to maximize flow characteristics and to minimize temperature variations and adsorption effects. The newly developed mercury vapor generator system was tested by using diffusion cells generating 0.8 and 16 ng Hg min-1. The results also show that the filter system, to produce mercury free air, is working properly. Furthermore, and most importantly, the system is producing a flow with a stable mercury vapor content. Some additional improvements are still required to allow the developed mercury vapor generator to produce SI traceable mercury vapor concentrations, based upon gravimetry, at much lower concentration levels and reduced measurement uncertainties than have been achieved previously. The challenges to be met are especially related to developing more robust diffusion cells and better mass measurement conditions. The developed mercury vapor generator will contribute to more reliable measurement results of mercury vapor at ambient and background air levels, and also to better safety standards and cost reductions in industrial processes, such as the liquefied natural gas field, where aluminum main cryogenic heat exchangers are used which are particularly prone to corrosion caused by mercury.

  5. High Resolution CH4 Emissions and Dissolved CH4 Measurements Elucidate Surface Gas Exchange Processes in Toolik Lake, Arctic Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Sontro, T.; Sollberger, S.; Kling, G. W.; Shaver, G. R.; Eugster, W.

    2013-12-01

    Approximately 14% of the Alaskan North Slope is covered in lakes of various sizes and depths. Diffusive carbon emissions (CH4 and CO2) from these lakes offset the tundra sink by ~20 %, but the offset would substantially increase if ebullitive CH4 emissions were also considered. Ultimately, arctic lake CH4 emissions are not insignificant in the global CH4 budget and their contribution is bound to increase due to impacts from climate change. Here we present high resolution CH4 emission data as measured via eddy covariance and a Los Gatos gas analyzer during the ice free period from Toolik Lake, a deep (20 m) Arctic lake located on the Alaskan North Slope, over the last few summers. Emissions are relatively low (< 25 mg CH4 m-2 d-1) with little variation over the summer. Diurnal variations regularly occur, however, with up to 3 times higher fluxes at night. Gas exchange is a relatively difficult process to estimate, but is normally done so as the product of the CH4 gradient across the air-water interface and the gas transfer velocity, k. Typically, k is determined based on the turbulence on the water side of the interface, which is most commonly approximated by wind speed; however, it has become increasingly apparent that this assumption does not remain valid across all water bodies. Dissolved CH4 profiles in Toolik revealed a subsurface peak in CH4 at the thermocline of up to 3 times as much CH4 as in the surface water. We hypothesize that convective mixing at night due to cooling surface waters brings the subsurface CH4 to the surface and causes the higher night fluxes. In addition to high resolution flux emission estimates, we also acquired high resolution data for dissolved CH4 in surface waters of Toolik Lake during the last two summers using a CH4 equilibrator system connected to a Los Gatos gas analyzer. Thus, having both the flux and the CH4 gradient across the air-water interface measured directly, we can calculate k and investigate the processes influencing

  6. The measured performance of an air thermosyphon system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, L. S.; Burns, P. J.; Winn, C. B.

    Results of performance tests of a solar thermosyphon test cell are reported. The test cell comprised a structure on a concrete slab with fiberglass insulated walls. The north wall consisted of a styrofoam-insulated gravel-filled box, while the south wall featured double glazing over metal solar collectors. The ceiling was ducted to provide air flow from the south collector to the rock storage, and an air channel was built into the floor. A numerical model was developed of the expected performance of the cell, using an Euler technique to solve the transient energy and momentum equations. The temperature was monitored at various points of the structure and flow visualization studies were made with titanium tetrachloride. Heat was found to be stored in the upper portion of the rock box, which because of its size also inhibited circulation. Thermal comfort was determined to be available due to warm surfaces, rather than warm air.

  7. Air-bearing spin facility for measuring energy dissipation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, R. L.

    1976-01-01

    The air-bearing spin facility was developed to determine experimentally the effect of energy dissipation upon the motion of spinning spacecraft. The facility consists of an air-bearing spin table, a telemetry system, a command system, and a ground control station. The air-bearing spin table was designed to operate in a vacuum chamber. Tests were run on spacecraft components such as fuel tanks, nutation dampers, reaction wheels, and active nutation damper systems. Each of these items affected the attitude of a spinning spacecraft. An experimental approach to determine these effects was required because the dissipation of these components could not be adequately analyzed. The results of these experiments have been used, with excellent results, to predict spacecraft motion.

  8. Partitioning net ecosystem carbon exchange into net assimilation and respiration using 13CO2 measurements: A cost-effective sampling strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    OgéE, J.; Peylin, P.; Ciais, P.; Bariac, T.; Brunet, Y.; Berbigier, P.; Roche, C.; Richard, P.; Bardoux, G.; Bonnefond, J.-M.

    2003-06-01

    The current emphasis on global climate studies has led the scientific community to set up a number of sites for measuring the long-term biosphere-atmosphere net CO2 exchange (net ecosystem exchange, NEE). Partitioning this flux into its elementary components, net assimilation (FA), and respiration (FR), remains necessary in order to get a better understanding of biosphere functioning and design better surface exchange models. Noting that FR and FA have different isotopic signatures, we evaluate the potential of isotopic 13CO2 measurements in the air (combined with CO2 flux and concentration measurements) to partition NEE into FR and FA on a routine basis. The study is conducted at a temperate coniferous forest where intensive isotopic measurements in air, soil, and biomass were performed in summer 1997. The multilayer soil-vegetation-atmosphere transfer model MuSICA is adapted to compute 13CO2 flux and concentration profiles. Using MuSICA as a "perfect" simulator and taking advantage of the very dense spatiotemporal resolution of the isotopic data set (341 flasks over a 24-hour period) enable us to test each hypothesis and estimate the performance of the method. The partitioning works better in midafternoon when isotopic disequilibrium is strong. With only 15 flasks, i.e., two 13CO2 nighttime profiles (to estimate the isotopic signature of FR) and five daytime measurements (to perform the partitioning) we get mean daily estimates of FR and FA that agree with the model within 15-20%. However, knowledge of the mesophyll conductance seems crucial and may be a limitation to the method.

  9. Low air exchange rate causes high indoor radon concentration in energy-efficient buildings.

    PubMed

    Vasilyev, A V; Yarmoshenko, I V; Zhukovsky, M V

    2015-06-01

    Since 1995, requirements on energy-efficient building construction were established in Russian Building Codes. In the course of time, utilisation of such technologies became prevailing, especially in multi-storey building construction. According to the results of radon survey in buildings constructed meeting new requirements on energy efficiency, radon concentration exceeds the average level in early-constructed buildings. Preponderance of the diffusion mechanism of radon entry in modern multi-storey buildings has been experimentally established. The experimental technique of the assessment of ventilation rate in dwellings under real conditions was developed. Based on estimates of average ventilation rate, it was approved that measures to increase energy efficiency lead to reduction in ventilation rate and accumulation of higher radon concentrations indoors. Obtained ventilation rate values have to be considered as extremely low.

  10. Beyond the born approximation: Measuring the two-photon exchange effect at CLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Robert Paul

    2012-09-01

    Recent results from experiments at Jefferson Laboratory, Newport News VA, which measured the ratio of the electric to magnetic form factors of the proton, GE/GM, have forced us to reexamine the single photon exchange approximation in lepton-proton elastic scattering. Discrepancies between the ratio obtained via the time-tested Rosenbluth separation method and newer polarization transfer measurements, which differ by as much as a factor of three, may be resolved by considering the effect of two photon exchange (TPE) processes. The CLAS TPE experiment at Jefferson Laboratory, will determine the effect of two-photon exchange in elastic lepton-proton scattering by precisely measuring the ratio of positron-proton to electron-proton elastic cross sections over a large kinematic range (0.1 < ɛ < 0.96,0.2 ≥ Q2 ≤ 2.0GeV2). We accomplish this by directing the 5.5 GeV primary electron beam, provided by the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF), onto a set of radiators and converters to produce simultaneous and identical beams of electron and positrons which collide with our proton target. Acceptance and efficiency concerns are minimized by only considering the ratios of the elastic cross sections and by switching polarity of magnets in the beamline and the spectrometer. Guided by the results of a short 2006 test run and extensive GEANT based modeling, new shielding and beamline components were designed to maximize luminosity. We took data from November 2010 - February 2011. The unique experimental design and challenges of the TPE experiment and the current analysis status will be presented.

  11. Soil concentrations, occurrence, sources and estimation of air-soil exchange of polychlorinated biphenyls in Indian cities.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Paromita; Zhang, Gan; Li, Jun; Selvaraj, Sakthivel; Breivik, Knut; Jones, Kevin C

    2016-08-15

    Past studies have shown potentially increasing levels of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in the Indian environment. This is the first attempt to investigate the occurrence of PCBs in surface soil and estimate diffusive air-soil exchange, both on a regional scale as well as at local level within the metropolitan environment of India. From the north, New Delhi and Agra, east, Kolkata, west, Mumbai and Goa and Chennai and Bangalore in the southern India were selected for this study. 33 PCB congeners were quantified in surface soil and possible sources were derived using positive matrix factorization model. Net flux directions of PCBs were estimated in seven major metropolitan cities of India along urban-suburban-rural transects. Mean Σ33PCBs concentration in soil (12ng/g dry weight) was nearly twice the concentration found in global background soil, but in line with findings from Pakistan and urban sites of China. Higher abundance of the heavier congeners (6CB-8CB) was prevalent mostly in the urban centers. Cities like Chennai, Mumbai and Kolkata with evidence of ongoing PCB sources did not show significant correlation with soil organic carbon (SOC). This study provides evidence that soil is acting as sink for heavy weight PCB congeners and source for lighter congeners. Atmospheric transport is presumably a controlling factor for occurrence of PCBs in less polluted sites of India.

  12. H/D exchange of a 15N labelled Tau fragment as measured by a simple Relax-EXSY experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Juan; Ahuja, Puneet; Landrieu, Isabelle; Cantrelle, François-Xavier; Huvent, Isabelle; Lippens, Guy

    2014-12-01

    We present an equilibrium H/D exchange experiment to measure the exchange rates of labile amide protons in intrinsically unfolded proteins. By measuring the contribution of the H/D exchange to the apparent T1 relaxation rates in solvents of different D2O content, we can easily derive the rates of exchange for rapidly exchanging amide protons. The method does not require double isotope labelling, is sensitive, and requires limited fitting of the data. We demonstrate it on a functional fragment of Tau, and provide evidence for the hydrogen bond formation of the phosphate moiety of Ser214 with its own amide proton in the same fragment phosphorylated by the PKA kinase.

  13. Measuring air layer volumes retained by submerged floating-ferns Salvinia and biomimetic superhydrophobic surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Reker, Meike; Barthlott, Wilhelm

    2014-01-01

    Summary Some plants and animals feature superhydrophobic surfaces capable of retaining a layer of air when submerged under water. Long-term air retaining surfaces (Salvinia-effect) are of high interest for biomimetic applications like drag reduction in ship coatings of up to 30%. Here we present a novel method for measuring air volumes and air loss under water. We recorded the buoyancy force of the air layer on leaf surfaces of four different Salvinia species and on one biomimetic surface using a highly sensitive custom made strain gauge force transducer setup. The volume of air held by a surface was quantified by comparing the buoyancy force of the specimen with and then without an air layer. Air volumes retained by the Salvinia-surfaces ranged between 0.15 and 1 L/m2 depending on differences in surface architecture. We verified the precision of the method by comparing the measured air volumes with theoretical volume calculations and could find a good agreement between both values. In this context we present techniques to calculate air volumes on surfaces with complex microstructures. The introduced method also allows to measure decrease or increase of air layers with high accuracy in real-time to understand dynamic processes. PMID:24991518

  14. Measuring air layer volumes retained by submerged floating-ferns Salvinia and biomimetic superhydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Mayser, Matthias J; Bohn, Holger F; Reker, Meike; Barthlott, Wilhelm

    2014-01-01

    Some plants and animals feature superhydrophobic surfaces capable of retaining a layer of air when submerged under water. Long-term air retaining surfaces (Salvinia-effect) are of high interest for biomimetic applications like drag reduction in ship coatings of up to 30%. Here we present a novel method for measuring air volumes and air loss under water. We recorded the buoyancy force of the air layer on leaf surfaces of four different Salvinia species and on one biomimetic surface using a highly sensitive custom made strain gauge force transducer setup. The volume of air held by a surface was quantified by comparing the buoyancy force of the specimen with and then without an air layer. Air volumes retained by the Salvinia-surfaces ranged between 0.15 and 1 L/m(2) depending on differences in surface architecture. We verified the precision of the method by comparing the measured air volumes with theoretical volume calculations and could find a good agreement between both values. In this context we present techniques to calculate air volumes on surfaces with complex microstructures. The introduced method also allows to measure decrease or increase of air layers with high accuracy in real-time to understand dynamic processes.

  15. Direct measurement of ordinary refractive index of proton exchanged LiNbO 3 waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivares, J.; Díaz-García, M. A.; Cabrera, J. M.

    1992-08-01

    A method for the direct measurement of ordinary refractive index no of proton-exchanged LiNbO 3 waveguides is proposed and demonstrated. Values of Δ no are given for a variety of guides ( X-cut, Y-cut, different lithium benzoate concentrations, annealed or unannealed). The relation Δ no=0.007-0.40Δ ne holds for all Δ no values, except for unannealed guides prepared in pure benzoic acid that show Δ no relatively higher. The usefulness of the method for the experimental study of anisotropic guides presenting hybrid leaky modes is shown.

  16. Helium measurements simulating alpha-particle diagnostics by the pellet charge exchange in Large Helical Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozaki, T.; Goncharov, P.; Veschev, E.; Sudo, S.; Tamura, N.; ,

    2008-03-01

    It is very important to investigate the confinement of α particle, which is produced by the nuclear reaction in ITER or fusion reactor. The pellet charge exchange measurement (PCX) is one of the most powerful methods because it can directly provide the profile of α particle energy spectra in plasma. In Large Helical Device (LHD), it is possible to confine the high energetic particle (helium) accelerated by using the ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICH). Therefore it is possible to perform the simulation experiment of α particle diagnostic in LHD.

  17. DXL: A sounding rocket mission measuring Solar Wind Charge eXchange properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galeazzi, Massimiliano

    2016-04-01

    Solar Wind interacts with the interstellar neutrals via charge exchange mechanism to produce spatially and temporally varying x-rays making it difficult to separate from other diffuse sources. The Diffuse X-rays from the Local Galaxy (DXL) mission measured the spatial signature of Solar Wind Charge eXchange (SWCX) emission due to the helium focusing cone. The mission used 2 large area proportional counters and was able to separate the SWCX contribution from Local Hot Bubble emission. The data from the mission provide a robust estimate of the SWCX contribution to the ROSAT maps, measuring the compound SWCX cross section with He in all ROSAT bands. The results showed that the total SWCX contribution in the ¼ keV band is, on average, ~27%. A new mission, DXL-2, was launched on December 4, 2015 with two new counters for a better understanding of the energy distribution of heliospheric SWCX photons, by using a multi-band approach. A dedicated scan to accurately measure the cone position and solve the IBEX controversy was also performed. The talk will discuss the DXL mission, the results from the first flight, and the preliminary results from the latest flight.Submitted for the DXL Collaboration

  18. 30 CFR 75.320 - Air quality detectors and measurement devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Air quality detectors and measurement devices... COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Ventilation § 75.320 Air quality detectors and measurement devices. (a) Tests for methane shall be made by a qualified person...

  19. A Simple Experiment To Measure the Content of Oxygen in the Air Using Heated Steel Wool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vera, Francisco; Rivera, Rodrigo; Nunez, Cesar

    2011-01-01

    The typical experiment to measure the oxygen content in the atmosphere uses the rusting of steel wool inside a closed volume of air. Two key aspects of this experiment that make possible a successful measurement of the content of oxygen in the air are the use of a closed atmosphere and the use of a chemical reaction that involves the oxidation of…

  20. Impact of calibration technique on measurement accuracy for the JET core charge-exchange system.

    PubMed

    Giroud, Carine; Meigs, A G; Negus, C R; Zastrow, K-D; Biewer, T M; Versloot, T W

    2008-10-01

    The core charge-exchange diagnostic at the Joint European Torus (JET) provides measurements of the impurity ion temperature T(i), toroidal velocity V(phi), and impurity ion densities n(imp), across the whole minor radius. A contribution to the uncertainty of the measured quantities is the error resulting from the multi-Gaussian fit and photon statistics, usually quoted for each measured data. Absolute intensity calibration and especially alignment of the viewing directions can introduce an important systematic error. The technique adopted at JET to reduce this systematic contribution to the error is presented in this paper. The error in T(i), V(phi), and n(imp) is then discussed depending on their use.

  1. Quantum Yields of CAM Plants Measured by Photosynthetic O(2) Exchange.

    PubMed

    Adams, W W; Nishida, K; Osmond, C B

    1986-05-01

    The quantum yield of photosynthetic O(2) exchange was measured in eight species of leaf succulents representative of both malic enzyme type and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase type CAM plants. Measurements were made at 25 degrees C and CO(2) saturation using a leaf disc O(2) electrode system, either during or after deacidification. The mean quantum yield was 0.095 +/- 0.012 (sd) moles O(2) per mole quanta, which compared with 0.094 +/- 0.006 (sd) moles O(2) per mole quanta for spinach leaf discs measured under the same conditions. There were no consistent differences in quantum yield between decarboxylation types or during different phases of CAM metabolism. On the basis of current notions of compartmentation of CAM biochemistry, our observations are interpreted to indicate that CO(2) refixation is energetically independent of gluconeogenesis during deacidification.

  2. Nitric oxide density measurements in air and air/fuel nanosecond pulse discharges by laser induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uddi, M.; Jiang, N.; Adamovich, I. V.; Lempert, W. R.

    2009-04-01

    Laser induced fluorescence is used to measure absolute nitric oxide concentrations in air, methane-air and ethylene-air non-equilibrium plasmas, as a function of time after initiation of a single pulse, 20 kV peak voltage, 25 ns pulse duration discharge. A mixture of NO and nitrogen with known composition (4.18 ppm NO) is used for calibration. Peak NO density in air at 60 Torr, after a single pulse, is ~8 × 1012 cm-3 (~4.14 ppm) occurring at ~250 µs after the pulse, with decay time of ~16.5 ms. Peak NO atom mole fraction in a methane-air mixture with equivalence ratio of phiv = 0.5 is found to be approximately equal to that in air, with approximately the same rise and decay rate. In an ethylene-air mixture (also with equivalence ratio of phiv = 0.5), the rise and decay times are comparable to air and methane-air, but the peak NO concentration is reduced by a factor of approximately 2.5. Spontaneous emission measurements show that excited electronic states N2(C 3Π) and NO(A 2Σ) in air at P = 60 Torr decay within ~20 ns and ~1 µs, respectively. Kinetic modelling calculations incorporating air plasma kinetics complemented with the GRI Mech 3.0 hydrocarbon oxidation mechanism are compared with the experimental data using three different NO production mechanisms. It is found that NO concentration rise after the discharge pulse is much faster than predicted by Zel'dovich mechanism reactions, by two orders of magnitude, but much slower compared with reactions of electronically excited nitrogen atoms and molecules, also by two orders of magnitude. It is concluded that processes involving long lifetime (~100 µs) metastable states, such as N2(X 1Σ,v) and O2(b 1Σ), formed by quenching of the metastable N2(A 3Σ) state by ground electronic state O2, may play a dominant role in NO formation. NO decay, in all cases, is found to be dominated by the reverse Zel'dovich reaction, NO + O → N + O2, as well as by conversion into NO2 in a reaction of NO with ozone.

  3. Water and Air Measures That Make 'PureSense'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Each day, we read about mounting global concerns regarding the ability to sustain supplies of clean water and to reduce air contamination. With water and air serving as life s most vital elements, it is important to know when these environmental necessities may be contaminated, in order to eliminate exposure immediately. The ability to respond requires an understanding of the conditions impacting safety and quality, from source to tap for water, and from outdoor to indoor environments for air. Unfortunately, the "time-to-know" is not immediate with many current technologies, which is a major problem, given the greater likelihood of risky situations in today s world. Accelerating alert and response times requires new tools, methods, and technologies. New solutions are needed to engage in more rapid detection, analysis, and response. This is the focus of a company called PureSense Environmental, Inc., which evolved out of a unique relationship with NASA. The need for real-time management and operations over the quality of water and air, and the urgency to provide new solutions, were reinforced by the events of September 11, 2001. This, and subsequent events, exposed many of the vulnerabilities facing the multiple agencies tasked with working in tandem to protect communities from harmful disaster. Much has been done since September 11 to accelerate responses to environmental contamination. Partnerships were forged across the public and private sectors to explore, test, and use new tools. Methods and technologies were adopted to move more astutely from proof-of-concept to working solutions.

  4. Air-Sea Exchange and Budget of Sulfur and Oxygen-Containing Volatile Organic Compounds in the Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanimoto, H.; Omori, Y.; Inomata, S.; Iwata, T.; Kameyama, S.

    2015-12-01

    By combining proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) and gradient flux (GF) technique, in situ measurement of air-sea fluxes of multiple volatile organic compounds (VOCs) was developed and deployed. Starting in 2008, we made in situ observations of air-sea fluxes at 15 locations as well as underway observations of marine air/surface seawater bulk concentrations in the Pacific Ocean, during eight research cruises by R/V Hakuho-Maru. The fluxes of biogenic trace gases, DMS and isoprene, were always positive, with the magnitudes being in accordance with previously reported. In contrast, the fluxes of oxygenated VOCs including acetone and acetaldehyde varied from negative to positive, suggesting that the tropical and subtropical Pacific are a source, while the North Pacific is a sink. A basin-scale budget of VOCs were determined for 4 biogeochemical provinces in the Pacific Ocean, and the role of oceans for VOCs were discussed with respect to physical and biogeochemical processes.

  5. High-precision diode-laser-based temperature measurement for air refractive index compensation

    SciTech Connect

    Hieta, Tuomas; Merimaa, Mikko; Vainio, Markku; Seppae, Jeremias; Lassila, Antti

    2011-11-01

    We present a laser-based system to measure the refractive index of air over a long path length. In optical distance measurements, it is essential to know the refractive index of air with high accuracy. Commonly, the refractive index of air is calculated from the properties of the ambient air using either Ciddor or Edlen equations, where the dominant uncertainty component is in most cases the air temperature. The method developed in this work utilizes direct absorption spectroscopy of oxygen to measure the average temperature of air and of water vapor to measure relative humidity. The method allows measurement of temperature and humidity over the same beam path as in optical distance measurement, providing spatially well-matching data. Indoor and outdoor measurements demonstrate the effectiveness of the method. In particular, we demonstrate an effective compensation of the refractive index of air in an interferometric length measurement at a time-variant and spatially nonhomogeneous temperature over a long time period. Further, we were able to demonstrate 7 mK RMS noise over a 67 m path length using a 120 s sample time. To our knowledge, this is the best temperature precision reported for a spectroscopic temperature measurement.

  6. Charge Exchange Contribution to the Decay of the Ring Current, Measured by Energetic Neutral Atoms (ENAs)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorgensen, A. M.; Henderson, M. G.; Roelof, E. C.; Reeves, G. D.; Spence, H. E.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we calculate the contribution of charge exchange to the decay of the ring current. Past works have suggested that charge exchange of ring current protons is primarily responsible for the decay of the ring current during the late recovery phase, but there is still much debate about the fast decay of the early recovery phase. We use energetic neutral atom (ENA) measurements from Polar to calculate the total ENA energy escape. To get the total ENA escape we apply a forward modeling technique, and to estimate the total ring current energy escape we use the Dessler-Parker-Sckopke relationship. We find that during the late recovery phase of the March 10, 1998 storm ENAs with energies greater than 17.5 keV can account for 75% of the estimated energy loss from the ring current. During the fast recovery the measured ENAs can only account for a small portion of the total energy loss. We also find that the lifetime of the trapped ions is significantly shorter during the fast recovery phase than during the late recovery phase, suggesting that different processes are operating during the two phases.

  7. Micrometeorological measurements of CH4 and CO2 exchange between the atmosphere and subarctic tundra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fan, S. M.; Wofsy, S. C.; Bakwin, P. S.; Jacob, D. J.; Anderson, S. M.; Kebabian, P. L.; Mcmanus, J. B.; Kolb, C. E.; Fitzjarrald, D. R.

    1992-01-01

    Eddy correlation flux measurements and concentration profiles of total hydrocarbons (THC) and CO2 were combined to provide a comprehensive record of atmosphere-biosphere exchange for these gases over a 30-day period in July-August 1988 in the Yukon-Kuskokwin River Delta of Alaska. Over 90 percent of net ecosystem exchanges of THC were due to methane. Lakes and wet meadow tundra provided the major sources of methane. The average fluxes from lake, dry tundra, and wet tundra were 11 +/- 3, 29 +/- 3, and 57 +/- 6 mg CH4/sq m/d, respectively. The mean remission rate for the site was 25 mg/sq m/d. Maximum uptake of CO2 by the tundra was 1.4 gC/sq m/d between 1000 and 1500 hrs, and nocturnal respiration averaged 0.73 gC/sq m/d. Net uptake of CO2 was 0.30 gC/sq m/d for the 30 days of measurement; methane flux accounted for 6 percent of CO2 net uptake.

  8. Treatment of Perchlorate-Contaminated Groundwater Using Highly-Selective, Regenerable Anion-Exchange Resins at Edwards Air Force Base

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, B.

    2003-05-30

    Selective ion exchange is one of the most effective treatment technologies for removing low levels of perchlorate (ClO{sub 4}{sup -}) from contaminated water because of its high efficiency without adverse impacts on the water quality caused by adding or removing any chemicals or nutrients. This report summarizes both the laboratory and a field pilot-scale studies to determine the ability and efficiency of the bifunctional synthetic resins to remove ClO{sub 4}{sup -} from the contaminated groundwater at the Edwards Air Force Base in California. Regeneration of the resins after groundwater treatment was also evaluated using the FeCl{sub 3}-HCl regeneration technique recently developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. On the basis of this study, the bifunctional resin, D-3696 was found to be highly selective toward ClO{sub 4}{sup -} and performed much better than one of the best commercial nitrate-selective resins (Purolite A-520E) and more than an order of magnitude better than the Purolite A-500 resin (with a relatively low selectivity). At an influent concentration of {approx} 450 {micro}g/L ClO{sub 4}{sup -} in groundwater, the bifunctional resin bed treated {approx} 40,000 empty bed volumes of groundwater before a significant breakthrough of ClO{sub 4}{sup -} occurred. The presence of relatively high concentrations of chloride and sulfate in site groundwater did not appear to affect the ability of the bifunctional resin to remove ClO{sub 4}{sup -}. However, the presence of high iron or iron oxyhydroxides and/or biomass in groundwater caused a significant fouling of the resin beds and greatly influenced the effectiveness in regenerating the resins sorbed with ClO{sub 4}{sup -}. Under such circumstances, a prefilter ({approx} 0.5-1 {micro}m) was found to be necessary to remove these particulates and to reduce the risk of fouling of the resin beds. Without significant fouling, the resin bed could be effectively regenerated by the FeCl{sub 3} displacement technique

  9. Measure Guideline. Air Conditioner Diagnostics, Maintenance, and Replacement

    SciTech Connect

    Springer, David; Dakin, Bill

    2013-03-01

    This guideline responds to the need for an efficient means of identifying, diagnosing, and repairing faults in air conditioning systems in existing homes that are undergoing energy upgrades. Inadequate airflow due to constricted ducts or undersized filters, improper refrigerant charge, and other system defects can be corrected at a fraction of the cost of equipment replacement and can yield significant savings. The guideline presents a two-step approach to diagnostics and repair.

  10. Measure Guideline: Air Conditioner Diagnostics, Maintenance, and Replacement

    SciTech Connect

    Springer, D.; Dakin, B.

    2013-03-01

    This guideline responds to the need for an efficient means of identifying, diagnosing, and repairing faults in air conditioning systems in existing homes that are undergoing energy upgrades. Inadequate airflow due to constricted ducts or undersized filters, improper refrigerant charge, and other system defects can be corrected at a fraction of the cost of equipment replacement and can yield significant savings. The guideline presents a two-step approach to diagnostics and repair.

  11. Air Flow and Pressure Drop Measurements Across Porous Oxides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Dennis S.; Cuy, Michael D.; Werner, Roger A.

    2008-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of air flow tests across eight porous, open cell ceramic oxide samples. During ceramic specimen processing, the porosity was formed using the sacrificial template technique, with two different sizes of polystyrene beads used for the template. The samples were initially supplied with thicknesses ranging from 0.14 to 0.20 in. (0.35 to 0.50 cm) and nonuniform backside morphology (some areas dense, some porous). Samples were therefore ground to a thickness of 0.12 to 0.14 in. (0.30 to 0.35 cm) using dry 120 grit SiC paper. Pressure drop versus air flow is reported. Comparisons of samples with thickness variations are made, as are pressure drop estimates. As the density of the ceramic material increases the maximum corrected flow decreases rapidly. Future sample sets should be supplied with samples of similar thickness and having uniform surface morphology. This would allow a more consistent determination of air flow versus processing parameters and the resulting porosity size and distribution.

  12. Laboratory Evaluation of Air Flow Measurement Methods for Residential HVAC Returns for New Instrument Standards

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Iain; Stratton, Chris

    2015-08-01

    This project improved the accuracy of air flow measurements used in commissioning California heating and air conditioning systems in Title 24 (Building and Appliance Efficiency Standards), thereby improving system performance and efficiency of California residences. The research team at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory addressed the issue that typical tools used by contractors in the field to test air flows may not be accurate enough to measure return flows used in Title 24 applications. The team developed guidance on performance of current diagnostics as well as a draft test method for use in future evaluations. The study team prepared a draft test method through ASTM International to determine the uncertainty of air flow measurements at residential heating ventilation and air conditioning returns and other terminals. This test method, when finalized, can be used by the Energy Commission and other entities to specify required accuracy of measurement devices used to show compliance with standards.

  13. Measurement of interference between W and Z exchange in electron-neutrino electron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, R.C.; Chen, H.H.; Doe, P.J.; Hausammann, R.; Lee, W.P.; Mahler, H.J.; Potter, M.E.; Lu, X.Q.; Wang, K.C. ); Bowles, T.J.; Burman, R.L.; Carlini, R.D.; Cochran, D.R.F.; Frank, J.S.; Piasetzky, E.; Sandberg, V.D. ); Krakauer, D.A.; Talaga, R.L. )

    1990-03-19

    A measurement of the reaction {nu}{sub {ital e}}+{ital e}{sup {minus}}{r arrow}{nu}{sub {ital e}}+{ital e}{sup {minus}} was performed using a beam-stop source of {nu}{sub {ital e}}. Based upon 234{plus minus}35 events, we obtain a cross section of {sigma}({nu}{sub {ital ee}})=(9.9{plus minus}1.5(stat){plus minus}1.0(syst)){times}10{sup {minus}42} cm{sup 2} {times}({ital E}{sub {nu}} (GeV)). This reaction is mediated by the exchange of {ital W} and {ital Z} bosons and is thus sensitive to the interference between them. This interference is measured to be {minus}1.07{plus minus}0.17(stat){plus minus}0.11(syst), consistent with the destructive interference ({minus}1.08) predicted by the standard model.

  14. What Controls the Net Forest-Atmosphere Exchange of Carbonyl Sulfide? Results from 2 Years of Eddy Flux Measurements and SiB Model Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehr, R. A.; Commane, R.; Baker, I. T.; Munger, J. W.; Saleska, S. R.; Wofsy, S. C.

    2015-12-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (OCS) is currently a focus of ground-, aircraft-, and satellite-based measurements as well as of model development, owing mainly to its potential use as a large-scale proxy for gross primary production (GPP). OCS is taken up by leaves and either taken up or emitted by soils, depending on the circumstances. Because OCS is destroyed by the enzyme carbonic anhydrase within the leaf rather than by any light-dependent reaction, the leaf uptake is expected to be related to the conductance of the diffusive pathway into the leaf (stomata + mesophyll + leaf boundary air layer) rather than to GPP directly, though GPP and the diffusive conductance are often strongly correlated. Here we use 2 years of eddy covariance measurements of the net ecosystem-atmosphere exchange of OCS, along with measurements of the vertical profile of OCS within the forest, to investigate the controls on ecosystem-scale OCS uptake and emission. We compare the OCS measurements, and simultaneous CO2 isotope flux and profile measurements, to predictions from the Simple Biosphere (SiB) model, which has been used to simulate OCS and 13CO2 fluxes for both vegetation and soils but has not yet been systematically tested against these relatively novel tracers. We thereby address the key question: How can measurements of the net ecosystem-atmosphere OCS exchange contribute to empirical quantification of stomatal conductance and GPP and to improving process-based ecosystem models?

  15. Validation of low-cost ozone measurement instruments suitable for use in an air-quality monitoring network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, David E.; Henshaw, Geoff S.; Bart, Mark; Laing, Greer; Wagner, John; Naisbitt, Simon; Salmond, Jennifer A.

    2013-06-01

    This paper presents a novel low-cost instrument that uses a sensor based on conductivity changes of heated tungstic oxide, which is capable of accurately measuring ambient concentrations of ozone. A combination of temperature steps and air flow-rate steps is used to continually reset and re-zero the sensor. A two-stage calibration procedure is presented, in which a nonlinear transformation converts sensor resistance to a signal linear in ozone concentration, then a linear correlation is used to align the calibration with a reference instrument. The required calibration functions specific for the sensor, and control system for air flow rate and sensor temperature, are housed with the sensor in a compact, simple-to-exchange assembly. The instrument can be operated on solar power and uses cell phone technology to enable monitoring in remote locations. Data from field trials are presented here to demonstrate that both the accuracy and the stability of the instrument over periods of months are within a few parts-per-billion by volume. We show that common failure modes can be detected through measurement of signals available from the instrument. The combination of long-term stability, self-diagnosis, and simple, inexpensive repair means that the cost of operation and calibration of the instruments is significantly reduced in comparison with traditional reference instrumentation. These instruments enable the economical construction and operation of ozone monitoring networks of accuracy, time resolution and spatial density sufficient to resolve the local gradients that are characteristic of urban air pollution.

  16. Indoor air quality in the Karns research houses: baseline measurements and impact of indoor environmental parameters on formaldehyde concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, T. G.; Fung, K. W.; Tromberg, B. J.; Hawthorne, A. R.

    1985-12-01

    Baseline indoor air quality measurements, a nine-month radon study, and an environmental parameters study examining the impact of indoor temperature (T) and relative humidity (RH) levels on formaldehyde (CH2O) concentrations have been performed in three unoccupied research homes located in Karns, Tennessee. Inter-house comparison measurements of (1) CH2O concentration, (2) CH20 emission rates from primary CH20 emission sources, (3) radon and radon daughter concentrations, and (4) air exchange rates indicate that the three homes are similar. The results of the nine-month radon study indicate indoor concentrations consistently below the EPA recommended level of 4 pCi/L. Evidence was found that crawl-space concentrations may be reduced using heat pump systems whose outdoor units circulate fresh air through the crawl-spaoe. The modeled results of the environmental parameters study indicate approximate fourfold increases in CH20 concentrations from 0.07 to 0.27 ppm for seasonal T and RH conditions of 20°C, 30% RH and 29°C, 80% RH, respectively. Evaluation of these environmental parameters study data with steady-state CH2O concentration models developed from laboratory studies of the environmental dependence of CH2O emissions from particleboard underlayment indicate good correlations between the laboratory and field studies.

  17. A modified photo- and magnetoacoustic multigas analyzer applied in gas exchange measurements.

    PubMed

    Clemensen, P; Christensen, P; Norsk, P; Grønlund, J

    1994-06-01

    The feasibility of replacing a conventional mass spectrometer (MS) with a specially modified multicomponent (O2, CO2, Freon 22, and SF6) acoustic infrared and paramagnetic (IR/PM) gas analyzer in inert gas-rebreathing and metabolic gas exchange measurements has been investigated. Rebreathing variables were determined simultaneously with the MS and IR/PM analyzers in duplicate measurements at rest and during submaximal exercise in 10 subjects. The differences (means +/- SD, IR/PM - MS) were 0.028 +/- 0.048 liters [functional residual capacity (FRC)], 0.18 +/- 0.38 l/min [cardiac output (Qc)], -0.006 +/- 0.030 l/min [O2 consumption (VO2)], and -33 +/- 108 ml [combined lung tissue and capillary blood volume (Vti,c)]. The coefficients of variation on repeated estimates were 5.8% (FRC), 5.4% (Qc), 6.2% (VO2), and 17% (Vti,c) with the IR/PM analyzer and 5.9% (FRC), 4.2% (Qc), 5.0% (VO2), and 9.8% (Vti,c) with the MS. The differences (IR/PM - MS) obtained in mixed-expirate measurements were -0.006 +/- 0.020 l/min (VO2) and 0.020 +/- 0.021 l/min (CO2 production). Breath-by-breath estimates of VO2 and CO2 production with the IR/PM analyzer were, on average, 2.4 and 4.4% higher than the MS estimates, respectively. Our results demonstrate that the IR/PM gas analyzer, when appropriately modified, can substitute for a complex MS in a variety of noninvasive pulmonary gas exchange measurements.

  18. Characterizing the lifetime and occurrence of stratospheric-tropospheric exchange events in the rocky mountain region using high-resolution ozone measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, John T.; McGee, Thomas J.; Thompson, Anne M.; Pierce, R. Bradley; Sumnicht, Grant K.; Twigg, Laurence W.; Eloranta, Edwin; Hoff, Raymond M.

    2015-12-01

    The evolution of a Stratospheric-Tropospheric Exchange (STE) event from 4 to 8 August 2014 at Fort Collins, Colorado, is described. The event is characterized with observations from the Goddard Space Flight Center TROPospheric OZone (TROPOZ) Differential Absorption Lidar, the University of Wisconsin High Spectral Resolution Lidar, and multiple ozonesondes during NASA's Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality and the Front Range Air Pollution and Photochemistry Experiment (FRAPPE) campaigns. Based on the extended TROPOZ observations throughout the entire campaign, it was found that STE events have largely contributed to an additional 10-30 ppbv of ozone at Fort Collins. Additional measurements of ozone and relative humidity from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder are characterize the transport of the intrusion. The Real-time Air Quality Modeling System simulated ozone agrees well with the TROPOZ ozone concentrations and altitude during the STE event. To extend the analysis into other seasons and years, the modeled ozone to potential vorticity ratio is used as a tracer for stratospheric air residing below the tropopause. It is found that at Fort Collins, CO, and depending on season from 2012 to 2014, between 18 and 31% of tropospheric ozone corresponds to stratospheric air. A relationship to determine the lifetime of stratospheric air below the tropopause is derived using the simulated ratio tracer. Results indicate that throughout summer 2014, 43% of stratospheric air resided below the tropopause for less than 12 h. However, nearly 39% persisted below the tropopause for 12-48 h and likely penetrated deeper in the troposphere.

  19. Emission characteristics and air-surface exchange of gaseous mercury at the largest active landfill in Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Wei; Li, Zhonggen; Chai, Xiaoli; Hao, Yongxia; Lin, Che-Jen; Sommar, Jonas; Feng, Xinbin

    2013-11-01

    The emission characteristics and air-surface exchange of gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) at Laogang landfill in Shanghai, China, the largest active landfill in Asia, has been investigated during two intensive field campaigns in 2011 and 2012. The mercury (Hg) content in municipal solid waste (MSW) varied widely from 0.19 to 1.68 mg kg-1. Over the closed cell in the landfill, the mean ambient air GEM concentration was virtually indistinguishable from the hemispherical background level (1.5-2.0 ng m-3) while the concentration downwind of ongoing landfill operation (e.g. dumping, burying and compacting of MSW) was clearly elevated. GEM emission through landfill gas (LFG) was identified as a significant source. GEM concentrations in LFGs collected from venting pipes installed in different landfill cells varied widely from 3.0 to 1127.8 ng m-3. The GEM concentrations were found negatively correlated to the age of LFG cells, suggesting GEM released through LFG declined readily with time. The GEM emission from this source alone was estimated to be 1.23-1.73 mg h-1. GEM emission from cover soil surfaces was considerably lower and at a scale comparable to that of background soil surfaces. This is in contrast to earlier reports showing enhanced GEM emissions from landfill surfaces in Southern China, probably due to the difference in soil Hg content and gas permeability characteristics of soils at different sites. Vertical concentration profiles of GEM in the interstitial gas of buried MSW were sampled, perhaps for the first time, which exhibited a wide spatial variability (4.9-713.1 ng m-3) in the 3-year-old landfill cell investigated. GEM emission from landfill operation was estimated to be 290-525 mg h-1 using a box model. This suggests that GEM degassing from Laogang landfill is quantitatively largely dominated by emissions from daily landfilling operations with a much smaller contribution from LFG venting and insignificant (bi-directional fluxes near zero) contribution

  20. First continuous measurements of δ18O-CO2 in air with a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vardag, S. N.; Hammer, S.; Sabasch, M.; Griffith, D. W. T.; Levin, I.

    2015-02-01

    The continuous in situ measurement of δ18O in atmospheric CO2 opens a new door to differentiating between CO2 source and sink components with high temporal resolution. Continuous 13C-CO2 measurement systems have already been commercially available for some time, but until now, only few instruments have been able to provide a continuous measurement of the oxygen isotope ratio in CO2. Besides precise 13C/12C observations, the Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer is also able to measure the 18O / 16O ratio in CO2, but the precision and accuracy of the measurements have not yet been evaluated. Here we present a first analysis of δ18O-CO2 (and δ13C-CO2) measurements with the FTIR analyser in Heidelberg. We used Allan deviation to determine the repeatability of δ18O-CO2 measurements and found that it decreases from 0.25‰ for 10 min averages to about 0.1‰ after 2 h and remains at that value up to 24 h. We evaluated the measurement precision over a 10-month period (intermediate measurement precision) using daily working gas measurements and found that our spectrometer measured δ18O-CO2 to better than 0.3‰ at a temporal resolution of less than 10 min. The compatibility of our FTIR-spectrometric measurements to isotope-ratio mass-spectrometric (IRMS) measurements was determined by comparing FTIR measurements of cylinder gases and ambient air with IRMS measurements of flask samples, filled with gases of the same cylinders or collected from the same ambient air intake. Two-sample t tests revealed that, at the 0.01 significance level, the FTIR and the IRMS measurements do not differ significantly from each other and are thus compatible. We describe two weekly episodes of ambient air measurements, one in winter and one in summer, and discuss what potential insights and new challenges combined highly resolved CO2, δ13C-CO2 and δ18O-CO2 records may provide in terms of better understanding regional scale continental carbon exchange processes.