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Sample records for air field ohio

  1. 75 FR 65594 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Ohio Ambient Air Quality...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-26

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Ohio Ambient Air Quality Standards AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY... consolidation of Ohio's Ambient Air Quality Standards (AAQS) into Ohio's State Implementation Plan (SIP)...

  2. 75 FR 65572 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Ohio Ambient Air Quality...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-26

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Ohio Ambient Air Quality Standards AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Direct final rule... of Ohio's Ambient Air Quality Standards (AAQS) into Ohio's State Implementation Plan (SIP) under...

  3. 78 FR 68377 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Ohio NOX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-14

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Ohio NOX SIP... November 15, 2010, Ohio EPA submitted to EPA revisions to Ohio OAC 3745-14. EPA is proposing to approve these revisions under the Clean Air Act, which allows for Ohio's Clean Air Interstate Rule (CAIR) NO...

  4. 78 FR 69337 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Ohio SO2

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-19

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Ohio SO2 Air... June 24, 2011, Ohio Environmental Protection Agency submitted for Clean Air Act State Implementation Plan (SIP) approval, revisions to Ohio Administrative Code (OAC) rules: 3745-18-01, 3745-18- 03 to...

  5. [Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio]. Volume 5, Field Investigation report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    An environmental investigation of ground water conditions has been undertaken at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB), Ohio to obtain data to assist in the evaluation of a potential removal action to prevent, to the extent practicable, migration of the contaminated ground water across Base boundaries. Field investigations were limited to the central section of the southwestern boundary of Area C and the Springfield Pike boundary of Area B. Further, the study was limited to a maximum depth of 150 feet below grade. Three primary activities of the field investigation were: (1) installation of 22 monitoring wells, (2) collection and analysis of ground water from 71 locations, (3) measurement of ground water elevations at 69 locations. Volatile organic compounds including trichloroethylene, perchloroethylene, and/or vinyl chloride were detected in concentrations exceeding Maximum Contaminant Levels (MCL) at three locations within the Area C investigation area. Ground water at the Springfield Pike boundary of Area B occurs in two primary units, separated by a thicker-than-expected clay layers. One well within Area B was determined to exceed the MCL for trichloroethylene.

  6. 78 FR 19990 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Ohio Ambient Air Quality...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-03

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Ohio Ambient Air Quality Standards; Correction AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Final rule... air quality standards in a new chapter of rules and adjusted the rule references accordingly...

  7. Evaluation of Gust and Draft Velocities from Flights of P-61C Airplanes within Thunderstorms September 10, 1947 to September 15, 1947 at Clinton County Army Air Field, Ohio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Funk, Jack

    1948-01-01

    The gust and draft velocities from records of NACA instruments installed in P-61C airplanes participating in thunderstorm flights at Clinton County Army Air Field, Ohio, from September 10, 1947 to September 15, 1947, are presented.

  8. Evaluation of Gust and Draft Velocities from Flights of P-61C Airplanes within Thunderstorms August 16, 1947 to August 20, 1947 at Clinton County Army Air Field, Ohio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Funk, Jack

    1948-01-01

    The gust and draft velocities from records of NACA instruments installed in P-61C airplanes participating in thunderstorm flights at Clinton County Army Air Field, Ohio, from August 16, 1947 to August 20, 1947 are presented.

  9. Evaluation of Gust and Draft Velocities from Flights of P-61C Airplanes within Thunderstorms August 13, 1947 to August 15, 1947 at Clinton County Army Air Field, Ohio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Funk, Jack

    1948-01-01

    The gust and draft velocities from records of NACA instruments installed in P-61C airplanes participating in thunderstorm flights at Clinton County Army Air Field, Ohio, from August 13, 1947 to August 15, 1947 are presented.

  10. [Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright- Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio]. Volume 4, Health and Safety Plan (HSP); Phase 1, Task 4 Field Investigation report: Draft

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-01

    This Health and Safety Plan (HSP) was developed for the Environmental Investigation of Ground-water Contamination Investigation at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base near Dayton, Ohio, based on the projected scope of work for the Phase 1, Task 4 Field Investigation. The HSP describes hazards that may be encountered during the investigation, assesses the hazards, and indicates what type of personal protective equipment is to be used for each task performed. The HSP also addresses the medical monitoring program, decontamination procedures, air monitoring, training, site control, accident prevention, and emergency response.

  11. 75 FR 73025 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Ohio Portion of the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-29

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Ohio Portion... plan for the Ohio portion of the Cincinnati-Hamilton, OH-KY-IN 8-hour ozone area. The Cincinnati-Hamilton area includes Butler, Clermont, Clinton, Hamilton, and Warren Counties in Ohio,...

  12. 75 FR 72954 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Ohio Portion of the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-29

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Ohio Portion... Ohio portion of the Cincinnati-Hamilton, OH-KY-IN 8-hour ozone area. The Cincinnati-Hamilton area includes Butler, Clermont, Clinton, Hamilton, and Warren Counties in Ohio, Lawrenceburg Township...

  13. [Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio]. Volume 2, Work plan: Phase 1, Task 4, Field Investigation: Draft

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-01

    In April 1990 Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB) initiated an investigation to evaluate a potential CERCLA removal action to prevent, to the extent practicable, the migration of ground-water contamination in the Mad River Valley Aquifer within and across WPAFB boundaries. The action will be based on a Focused Feasibility Study with an Action Memorandum serving as a decision document that is subject to approval by the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency. The first phase (Phase 1) of this effort involves an investigation of ground-water contamination migrating across the southwest boundary of Area C and across Springfield Pike adjacent to Area B. Task 4 of Phase 1 is a field investigation to collect sufficient additional information to evaluate removal alternatives. The field investigation will provide information in the following specific areas of study: water-level data which will be used to permit calibration of the ground-water flow model to a unique time in history; and ground-water quality data which will be used to characterize the current chemical conditions of ground water.

  14. 77 FR 71371 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Redesignation of the Ohio...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-30

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Parts 52 and 81 Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio... annual PM 2.5 standard, based on the most recent three years of certified air quality data. EPA is... maintaining the 1997 annual PM 2.5 National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) through 2022 in the...

  15. 77 FR 71383 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Redesignation of the Ohio...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-30

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Parts 52 and 81 Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio... attains the 1997 annual PM 2.5 standard, based on the most recent three years of certified air quality...'s plan for maintaining the 1997 annual PM 2.5 National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS)...

  16. Installation Restoration Program Field Investigation Report, Hazardous Waste Storage Area, Rickenbacker Air National Guard Base, Columbus, Ohio

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-10-01

    storage drums, or in the four 25,000 gallon underground storage tanks . The purpose of the investigation was to determine if the soil or ground water...investigations were recommended to define the lateral and vertical extent and magnitude of contamination Rickenbacker Air National Guard Base, Hazardous waste storage area, deicing fluid, underground storage tanks .

  17. 40 CFR 81.202 - Northwest Ohio Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Northwest Ohio Intrastate Air Quality... Quality Control Regions § 81.202 Northwest Ohio Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Northwest Ohio Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (Ohio) consists of the territorial area encompassed by the...

  18. 40 CFR 81.202 - Northwest Ohio Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Northwest Ohio Intrastate Air Quality... Quality Control Regions § 81.202 Northwest Ohio Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Northwest Ohio Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (Ohio) consists of the territorial area encompassed by the...

  19. 40 CFR 81.70 - Parkersburg (West Virginia)-Marietta (Ohio) Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (Ohio) Interstate Air Quality Control Region. 81.70 Section 81.70 Protection of Environment... (Ohio) Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Parkersburg (West Virginia)-Marietta (Ohio) Interstate... County, Tyler County, Wetzel County, Wood County. In the State of Ohio: Athens County, Meigs...

  20. 40 CFR 81.70 - Parkersburg (West Virginia)-Marietta (Ohio) Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (Ohio) Interstate Air Quality Control Region. 81.70 Section 81.70 Protection of Environment... (Ohio) Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Parkersburg (West Virginia)-Marietta (Ohio) Interstate... County, Tyler County, Wetzel County, Wood County. In the State of Ohio: Athens County, Meigs...

  1. 78 FR 6064 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio and Indiana; Cincinnati...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-29

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio and Indiana; Cincinnati-Hamilton, Ohio, Ohio and Indiana 1997 8- Hour Ozone Maintenance Plan Revisions to Approved Motor...: EPA is proposing to approve the request by Ohio and Indiana to revise the Cincinnati-Hamilton, 1997...

  2. [Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio]. Volume 5, Appendix A, Part 2, Field Investigation report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    This report contains information related to the sampling and chemical analysis of ground water at the Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. It is part of a field investigation of ground water contamination.

  3. URBAN SPRAWL MODELING, AIR QUALITY MONITORING AND RISK COMMUNICATION: THE NORTHEAST OHIO PROJECT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Northeast Ohio Urban Sprawl, Air Quality Monitoring, and Communications Project (hereafter called the Northeast Ohio Project) provides local environmental and health information useful to residents, local officials, community planners, and others in a 15 county region in the ...

  4. Investigation of air transportation technology at Ohio University, 1984

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcfarland, Richard H.

    1987-01-01

    The operational development of Loran-C for enroute navigation and nonprecision approaches was studied, and is only one of the many projects funded by the Joint University Program for Air Transportation at Ohio University. Other projects included work on the DATAC data bus monitor, global positioning system test bed receiver development, fiber optic data bus application in general aviation aircraft, and advanced remote monitoring techniques.

  5. 78 FR 19128 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Particulate Matter Standards

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-29

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Particulate... is taking direct final action to convert a conditional approval of specified provisions of the Ohio state implementation plan (SIP) to a full approval. Ohio submitted a request to approve...

  6. 78 FR 19164 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Particulate Matter Standards

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-29

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Particulate... proposing to convert a conditional approval of specified provisions of the Ohio state implementation plan (SIP) to a full approval. Ohio submitted a request to approve a section of its particulate matter...

  7. 77 FR 70121 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; PBR and PTIO

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-23

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; PBR and PTIO..., 2012 direct final rule approving a revision to the Ohio State Implementation Plan (SIP). EPA will... Install (PTI) requirement and a general permit program as additions to Ohio's SIP. After publication...

  8. 78 FR 34965 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; 1997 8-Hour Ozone...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-11

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; 1997 8-Hour Ozone Maintenance Plan Revision; Motor Vehicle Emissions Budgets for the Ohio Portion of the Wheeling... Act, EPA is proposing to approve the request by Ohio to revise the 1997 8-hour ozone maintenance...

  9. (Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright- Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-01

    This Health and Safety Plan (HSP) was developed for the Environmental Investigation of Ground-water Contamination Investigation at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base near Dayton, Ohio, based on the projected scope of work for the Phase 1, Task 4 Field Investigation. The HSP describes hazards that may be encountered during the investigation, assesses the hazards, and indicates what type of personal protective equipment is to be used for each task performed. The HSP also addresses the medical monitoring program, decontamination procedures, air monitoring, training, site control, accident prevention, and emergency response.

  10. 75 FR 65594 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Particulate Matter Standards

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-26

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Particulate... revise the Ohio State Implementation Plan under the Clean Air Act. The State has submitted revisions to... approving only a portion of Rule 7, while not acting on the portion providing a partial exemption...

  11. 76 FR 76048 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio and Indiana; Redesignation of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-06

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Parts 52 and 81 Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio and Indiana; Redesignation of the Ohio and Indiana Portions Cincinnati-Hamilton Area to Attainment of the 1997... annual National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS or standard) for fine particulate matter (PM...

  12. [Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio]. Volume 3, Sampling and analysis plan (SAP): Phase 1, Task 4, Field Investigation: Draft

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-01

    In April 1990, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB), initiated an investigation to evaluate a potential Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) removal action to prevent, to the extent practicable, the offsite migration of contaminated ground water from WPAFB. WPAFB retained the services of the Environmental Management Operations (EMO) and its principle subcontractor, International Technology Corporation (IT) to complete Phase 1 of the environmental investigation of ground-water contamination at WPAFB. Phase 1 of the investigation involves the short-term evaluation and potential design for a program to remove ground-water contamination that appears to be migrating across the western boundary of Area C, and across the northern boundary of Area B along Springfield Pike. Primarily, Task 4 of Phase 1 focuses on collection of information at the Area C and Springfield Pike boundaries of WPAFB. This Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) has been prepared to assist in completion of the Task 4 field investigation and is comprised of the Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPP) and the Field Sampling Plan (FSP).

  13. 40 CFR 81.64 - Huntington (West Virginia)-Ashland (Kentucky)-Portsmouth-Ironton (Ohio) Interstate Air Quality...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (Kentucky)-Portsmouth-Ironton (Ohio) Interstate Air Quality Control Region. 81.64 Section 81.64 Protection... (West Virginia)-Ashland (Kentucky)-Portsmouth-Ironton (Ohio) Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Huntington (West Virginia)-Ashland (Kentucky)-Portsmouth-Ironton (Ohio) Interstate Air Quality Control...

  14. 40 CFR 81.64 - Huntington (West Virginia)-Ashland (Kentucky)-Portsmouth-Ironton (Ohio) Interstate Air Quality...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (Kentucky)-Portsmouth-Ironton (Ohio) Interstate Air Quality Control Region. 81.64 Section 81.64 Protection... (West Virginia)-Ashland (Kentucky)-Portsmouth-Ironton (Ohio) Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Huntington (West Virginia)-Ashland (Kentucky)-Portsmouth-Ironton (Ohio) Interstate Air Quality Control...

  15. 78 FR 38247 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Redesignation of the Ohio...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-26

    ... submitted by Ohio. EPA is proposing that the inventories for ammonia and volatile organic compounds (VOC.... Maintenance Plan and Evaluation of Precursors B. Ammonia and VOC Comprehensive Emissions Inventories IV..., and Ohio's supplemental submission of comprehensive ammonia and VOC emissions inventories. On...

  16. [Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio]. Volume 5, Appendix A, Part 1, Field Investigation report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    This report presents information related to the sampling of ground water at the Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. It is part of an investigation into possible ground water contamination. Information concerns well drilling/construction; x-ray diffraction and sampling; soil boring logs; and chain-of-custody records.

  17. 78 FR 41752 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Redesignation of the Ohio...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-11

    ... proposing that the inventories for ammonia and volatile organic compounds (VOC), in conjunction with the... supplemental submission to EPA on April 29, 2013, Ohio submitted ammonia and VOC emissions inventories...

  18. 77 FR 28264 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; West Virginia; Ohio; Determination...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-14

    ...-Weirton Area. The resident perceives the air quality to be poor and thus questioned how this Area will be... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; West Virginia; Ohio... (PM 2.5 ) National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS). EPA is determining that the...

  19. 78 FR 66320 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio: Bellefontaine; Determination...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-05

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio: Bellefontaine... attained the 2008 lead (Pb) national ambient air quality standard (NAAQS). In this action, EPA is proposing... determination of attainment is based upon complete, quality-assured and certified ambient air monitoring...

  20. 76 FR 40246 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Control of Gasoline...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-08

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Control of... INFORMATION CONTACT: Carolyn Persoon, Environmental Engineer, Control Strategies Section, Air Programs Branch.... List of Subjects in 40 CFR Part 52 Air pollution control, Carbon monoxide, Intergovernmental...

  1. Sex Differences in Neuropsychological Function and Manganese in Air, Blood, Hair, and Toenails in Ohio Residents

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: This study compares manganese (Mn) in air, blood, hair, and toenails and neuropsychological function of 110 women and 76 men, environmentally exposed to Mn in air (Mn-air) in two Ohio towns from a ferromanganese smelter and a soil Mn-packaging facility.Method: Biomark...

  2. 78 FR 38256 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Redesignation of the Ohio...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-26

    ... ammonia and volatile organic compounds (VOC), in conjunction with the inventories for nitrogen oxides (NO... 2.5 Precursors d. Maintenance Plan and Evaluation of Precursors B. Ammonia and VOC Comprehensive... decision of the D.C. Circuit, and the State of Ohio's supplemental submission of comprehensive ammonia...

  3. 78 FR 16826 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Cleveland-Akron-Lorain and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-19

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Cleveland...-hour ozone maintenance air quality State Implementation Plans (SIPs) under the Clean Air Act to replace... Vehicle Emissions Simulator (MOVES) emissions model. Ohio submitted the SIP revision requests to EPA...

  4. 78 FR 63436 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Dayton-Springfield...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-24

    ...-2013-0378; FRL-9901-62-Region5] Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio... to revise the 1997 8-hour ozone maintenance air quality state implementation plan (SIP) for the... (MOVES) emissions model. The Dayton-Springfield area consists of Clark, Greene, Miami, and...

  5. Characterization of Air Manganese Exposure Estimates for Residents in Two Ohio Towns

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study was conducted to derive receptor-specific outdoor exposure concentrations of total suspended particulate (TSP) and respirable (dae ≤1O µm) air manganese (air-Mn) for East Liverpool and Marietta (Ohio) in the absence of facility emissions data, but where long-t...

  6. 75 FR 65567 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Particulate Matter Standards

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-26

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Particulate... requirements. The particulate matter (PM) standards contain the particulate emission control requirements that have been necessary to attain and maintain the 2006 National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS)...

  7. 76 FR 64880 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio and Indiana; Redesignation of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-19

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio and Indiana; Redesignation of the Cincinnati-Hamilton Area to Attainment of the 1997 Annual Standard for Fine Particulate...: a portion of ] Dearborn County) to attainment for the 1997 annual National Ambient Air...

  8. [Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio]. Volume 3, Appendix A, Draft standard operating procedures and elements: Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP): Phase 1, Task 4, Field Investigation, Draft

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-01

    This report presents information concerning field procedures employed during the monitoring, well construction, well purging, sampling, and well logging at the Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. Activities were conducted in an effort to evaluate ground water contamination.

  9. Heating, Ventilation, Air-conditioning, and Refrigeration. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    Developed through a modified DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) process involving business, industry, labor, and community agency representatives in Ohio, this document is a comprehensive and verified employer competency profile for heating, ventilation, air conditioning, and refrigeration occupations. The list contains units (with and without…

  10. Contributing recharge areas to water-supply wells at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sheets, R.A.

    1994-01-01

    Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, in southwestern Ohio, has operated three well fields--Area B, Skeel Road, and the East Well Fields--to supply potable water for consumption and use for base activities. To protect these well fields from contamination and to comply with the Ohio Wellhead Protection Plan, the Base is developing a wellhead-protection program for the well fields. A three-dimensional, steady-state ground-water-flow model was developed in 1993 to simulate heads in (1) the buried-valley aquifer system that is tapped by the two active well fields, and in (2) an upland bedrock aquifer that may supply water to the wells. An advective particle-tracking algorithm that requires estimated porosities and simulated heads was used to estimate ground-water-flow pathlines and traveltimes to the active well fields. Contributing recharge areas (CRA's)--areas on the water table that contribute water to a well or well field--were generated for 1-, 5-, and 10-year traveltimes. Results from the simulation and subsequent particle tracking indicate that the CRA's for the Skeel Road Well Fields are oval and extend north- ward, toward the Mad River, as pumping at the well field increases. The sizes of the 1-, 5-, and 10-year CRA's of Skeel Road Well Field, under maximum pumping conditions, are approximately 0.5, 1.5 and 3.2 square miles, respectively. The CRA's for the Area B Well Field extend to the north, up the Mad River Valley; as pumping increases at the well field, the CRA's extend up the Mad River Valley under Huffman Dam. The sizes of the 1-, 5-, and 10-year CRA's of Area B Well Field, under maximum pumping conditions, are approximately 0.1, 0.5, and 0.9 square miles, respectively. The CRA's for the East Well Field are affected by nearby streams under average pumping conditions. The sizes of the 1-, 5-, and 10-year CRA's of the East Well Field, under maximum pumping conditions, are approximately 0.2, 1.2, and 2.4 square miles, respectively. However, as pumping increases

  11. 78 FR 34965 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Lima 1997 8-Hour Ozone...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-11

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Lima 1997 8... Implementation Plan (SIP) to replace the previously approved motor vehicle emissions budgets with budgets developed using EPA's Motor Vehicle Emissions Simulator (MOVES) emissions model. Ohio submitted the...

  12. Installation Restoration Program. Ohio Air National Guard, Toledo Express Airport, Swanton, Ohio. Site Investigation Work Plan

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-09-01

    Protective boots, rubber, neophrene steel toe/shank 7. Hard hat 8. Face shield 9. Safety glasses 10. Air-purifying respirator 11. Respirator spectacle kit 12...ELSA Emergency Life Support Apparatus 3 EMT Emergency Medical Technician EPA Environmental Protection Agency ETG Environmental Technology Group FFS...Adverse-Effect Level 3vi I i LIST OF ACRONYMS (Continued) MCLs Maximum Contaminant Levels MCLGs Maximum Contaminant Level Goals 3 MPRSA Marine Protection

  13. (Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-01

    In April 1990 Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB) initiated an investigation to evaluate a potential CERCLA removal action to prevent, to the extent practicable, the migration of ground-water contamination in the Mad River Valley Aquifer within and across WPAFB boundaries. The action will be based on a Focused Feasibility Study with an Action Memorandum serving as a decision document that is subject to approval by the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency. The first phase (Phase 1) of this effort involves an investigation of ground-water contamination migrating across the southwest boundary of Area C and across Springfield Pike adjacent to Area B. Task 4 of Phase 1 is a field investigation to collect sufficient additional information to evaluate removal alternatives. The field investigation will provide information in the following specific areas of study: water-level data which will be used to permit calibration of the ground-water flow model to a unique time in history; and ground-water quality data which will be used to characterize the current chemical conditions of ground water.

  14. (Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    An environmental investigation of ground water conditions has been undertaken at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB), Ohio to obtain data to assist in the evaluation of a potential removal action to prevent, to the extent practicable, migration of the contaminated ground water across Base boundaries. Field investigations were limited to the central section of the southwestern boundary of Area C and the Springfield Pike boundary of Area B. Further, the study was limited to a maximum depth of 150 feet below grade. Three primary activities of the field investigation were: (1) installation of 22 monitoring wells, (2) collection and analysis of ground water from 71 locations, (3) measurement of ground water elevations at 69 locations. Volatile organic compounds including trichloroethylene, perchloroethylene, and/or vinyl chloride were detected in concentrations exceeding Maximum Contaminant Levels (MCL) at three locations within the Area C investigation area. Ground water at the Springfield Pike boundary of Area B occurs in two primary units, separated by a thicker-than-expected clay layers. One well within Area B was determined to exceed the MCL for trichloroethylene.

  15. Ohio EPA Teachers Kit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Environmental Protection Agency, Columbus.

    In an effort to provide teachers in Ohio with assistance in environmental education, the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has produced this teachers kit. It is designed to describe what the Ohio EPA is doing to protect Ohio's air, land, and water. The background information provides an historical account of some of the events that have…

  16. 40 CFR 81.64 - Huntington (West Virginia)-Ashland (Kentucky)-Portsmouth-Ironton (Ohio) Interstate Air Quality...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Huntington (West Virginia)-Ashland... AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.64 Huntington... Huntington (West Virginia)-Ashland (Kentucky)-Portsmouth-Ironton (Ohio) Interstate Air Quality Control...

  17. 40 CFR 81.64 - Huntington (West Virginia)-Ashland (Kentucky)-Portsmouth-Ironton (Ohio) Interstate Air Quality...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Huntington (West Virginia)-Ashland... AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.64 Huntington... Huntington (West Virginia)-Ashland (Kentucky)-Portsmouth-Ironton (Ohio) Interstate Air Quality Control...

  18. 40 CFR 81.64 - Huntington (West Virginia)-Ashland (Kentucky)-Portsmouth-Ironton (Ohio) Interstate Air Quality...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Huntington (West Virginia)-Ashland... AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.64 Huntington... Huntington (West Virginia)-Ashland (Kentucky)-Portsmouth-Ironton (Ohio) Interstate Air Quality Control...

  19. Investigation of air transportation technology at Ohio University, 1981. [loran

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcfarland, R. H.

    1982-01-01

    The increased availability of Loran signals in the United States encouraged consideration of Loran for airborne applications. High quality signal processing to obtain effective signal-to-noise ratios which permit good reliability in position determination consistent with airborne applications is considered. Techniques for deriving air navigation quality information from Loran-C were investigated.

  20. Estimating Air-Manganese Exposures in Two Ohio Towns

    EPA Science Inventory

    Manganese (Mn), a nutrient required for normal metabolic function, is also a persistent air pollutant and a known neurotoxin at high concentrations. Elevated exposures can result in a number of motor and cognitive deficits. Quantifying chronic personal exposures in residential po...

  1. Edge-of-field evaluation of the Ohio phosphorus risk index

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Phosphorus Index (PI) has been the cornerstone for phosphorus (P)-based management and planning over the past twenty years; yet, field-scale evaluation of many state PIs has been limited. In this study, measured P loads in surface runoff and tile discharge from 40 agricultural fields in Ohio wit...

  2. 78 FR 28551 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Canton-Massillon 1997 8-Hour...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-15

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Canton... Implementation Plan (SIP) under the Clean Air Act to replace the previously approved motor vehicle emissions budgets with budgets developed using EPA's Motor Vehicle Emissions Simulator (MOVES) emissions model....

  3. MULTIMEDIA CHEMICAL ANALYSIS PLAN FOR CHILDREN'S AGGREGATE EXPOSURE FIELD STUDIES IN NORTH CAROLINA AND OHIO

    EPA Science Inventory

    The samples collected in the CTEPP North Carolina and Ohio field campaigns were analyzed for a suite of organic chemicals in various compound classes, chosen because of their possible carcinogenicity, acute or chronic toxicity, or potential for endocrine system disruption. The...

  4. Statistical summary of air quality data for metropolitian Cleveland, Ohio, 1967 - 1972: Total suspended particulates, nitrogen dioxide, and sulfur dioxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, R. B.; Neustadter, H. E.; Fordyce, J. S.; Burr, J. C., Jr.; Cornett, C. L.

    1974-01-01

    Air-quality data for metropolitan Cleveland, Ohio, from 1967 through 1972 were collated and statistically analyzed. Total suspended particulates (TSP) departed from lognormal distribution in 1972. Nitrogen dioxide and sulfur dioxide, departed significantly from lognormal distributions in 1972. In Cleveland the Ohio standards were not met. However, the data indicate a general improvement in air quality. Unusually high precipitation (43% above the average in 1972) may be responsible in lowering these values from the 1971 levels. The mean values of TSP, NO2, and SO2 are 104, 191, and 83 microgram/cu m respectively.

  5. International Air Travel to Ohio, USA, and the Impact on Malaria, Influenza, and Hepatitis A

    PubMed Central

    Brannen, Donald E.; Alhammad, Ali; Branum, Melissa; Schmitt, Amy

    2016-01-01

    The State of Ohio led the United States in measles in 2014, ostensibly related to international air travel (IAT), and ranked lower than 43 other states in infectious disease outbreak preparedness. We conducted a retrospective cohort study using surveillance data of the total Ohio population of 11 million from 2010 through 2014 with a nested case control of air travelers to determine the risk of malaria, seasonal influenza hospitalizations (IH), and hepatitis A (HA) disease related to international travel and to estimate the association with domestic enplanement. IAT appeared protective for HA and IH with a risk of 0.031 (.02–.04) but for malaria was 2.7 (2.07–3.62). Enplanement increased the risk for nonendemic M 3.5 (2.5–4.9) and for HA and IH 1.39 (1.34–1.44). IAT's ratio of relative risk (RRR) of malaria to HA and IH was 87.1 (55.8–136) greater than 219 times versus domestic enplanement which was protective for malaria at 0.397 (0.282–0.559). Malaria is correlated with IAT with cases increasing by 6.9 for every 10,000 passports issued. PMID:27123365

  6. Ozone concentrations near roadways - results of a field study in Cincinnati, Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, T.; Weaver, M.; Mozier, J.

    1997-12-31

    In evaluating alternative versions of the National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) for ozone, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency uses the probabilistic NAAQS Exposure Model (pNEM/O3) to estimate the relative ozone exposures of urban populations. This model simulates the movement of susceptible population groups through various microenvironmental (ME) settings and uses ambient monitoring data and ME adjustments to estimate a sequence of exposures for each group. One ME is defined as {open_quotes}outdoors near roadway.{close_quotes} To obtain an improved modeling database for this ME, researchers conducted a two-phase field study in Cincinnati, Ohio during the summers of 1994 and 1995. Technicians measured ozone and nitric oxide from automobile exhaust at upwind and downwind locations near a variety of roadways in areas with historically high ozone levels. During the 1995 phase, measurements were taken at 2 and 10-meter elevations along a downwind pathway at right angles to each roadway. Statistical analyses of the ozone concentrations measured at these locations indicated that height above the ground was always a very significant predictor of ozone, with ozone levels at 10 m above the ground tending to be higher than those at 2 m. Ozone varied significantly as a quadratic function of distance from the road at 2 m, but not at 10 m. Downwind ozone decreased with increasing levels of downwind NO, consistent with the hypothesis that ozone is scavenged by NO from automobile exhaust. Downwind ozone levels increased with increasing temperature.

  7. 76 FR 60373 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio, Kentucky, and Indiana...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-29

    ... is comprised of Butler, Clermont, Hamilton, and Warren Counties in Ohio; Boone, Campbell and Kenton..., Hamilton, and Warren Counties in Ohio; Boone, Campbell and Kenton Counties in Kentucky; and a portion...

  8. 78 FR 62459 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Redesignation of the Canton...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-22

    ... ), volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and ammonia for the area. EPA, therefore, grants Ohio's request to...\\ NO X , SO 2 ,\\2\\ VOCs, and ammonia documented in Ohio's PM 2.5 redesignation request and supplemental... inventories for primary PM 2.5 , NO X , SO 2 , VOCs, and ammonia documented in Ohio's June 26, 2012, and...

  9. Environmental Assessment for the Hilltop Community Services District, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    characterized by a relatively large range of  seasonal   variability with  cold  winters and warm, humid summers. Climate data from a weather station in Greene...Research Laboratories (USACERL). 1991. Tri‐Services Cultural  Resources  Management  Center. Cultural Resource  Investigation  for Proposed Marker Pylons...88th Air Base Wing Environmental Management Division. we are requesting information on Ohio’s rare plant’S and animals, high quality plant communiUes

  10. CTEPP: RECRUITING AND FIELD SAMPLING IN NORTH CAROLINA AND OHIO

    EPA Science Inventory

    The research field study (CTEPP) of approximately 260 preschool children's exposures to persistent organic pollutants in their everyday environments began in early 2000. CTEPP is a multimedia study of the children's aggregate (total) exposures over a 48-hr period, both at thei...

  11. Correlation of LANDSAT lineaments with Devonian gas fields in Lawrence County, Ohio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, G. O.

    1981-01-01

    In an effort to locate sources of natural gas in Ohio, the fractures and lineaments in Black Devonian shale were measured by: (1) field mapping of joints, swarms, and fractures; (2) stereophotointerpretation of geomorphic lineaments with precise photoquads; and (3) by interpreting the linear features on LANDSAT images. All results were compiled and graphically represented on 1:250,000 scale maps. The geologic setting of Lawrence County was defined and a field fracture map was generated and plotted as rose patterns at the exposure site. All maps were compared, contrasted, and correlated by superimposing each over the other as a transparency. The LANDSAT lineaments had significant correlation with the limits of oil and gas producing fields. These limits included termination of field production as well as extensions to other fields. The lineaments represent real rock fractures with zones of increased permeability in the near surface bedrock.

  12. (Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-01

    This report presents information concerning field procedures employed during the monitoring, well construction, well purging, sampling, and well logging at the Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. Activities were conducted in an effort to evaluate ground water contamination.

  13. Field and laboratory study of cold-asphalt-mix recycling in Ohio. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Majidzadeh, K.; Ilves, G.J.; Abdulshafi, A.; Kaloush, K.

    1987-09-01

    The report presents a study initiated in 1984 to develop specification guidelines and mix-design recommendations and to obtain performance data on cold-mix recycling projects in Ohio. Two mainline, low-volume roads and one shoulder pavement were selected for the study. Documentation and evaluation of the projects are discussed generally in two parts. The first part includes the site-selection criteria, pre-construction evaluation, mix designs, construction specifications and construction monitoring. The second part discusses performance evaluation through field inspection, data collection, and laboratory evaluation of material properties.

  14. (Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    This Removal Action System Design has been prepared as a Phase I Volume for the implementation of the Phase II removal action at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB) near Dayton, Ohio. The objective of the removal action is to prevent, to the extent practicable, the migration of ground water contaminated with chlorinated volatile organic compounds (VOCS) across the southwest boundary of Area C. The Phase 1, Volume 9 Removal Action System Design compiles the design documents prepared for the Phase II Removal Action. These documents, which are presented in Appendices to Volume 9, include: Process Design, which presents the 30 percent design for the ground water treatment system (GWTS); Design Packages 1 and 2 for Earthwork and Road Construction, and the Discharge Pipeline, respectively; no drawings are included in the appendix; Design Package 3 for installation of the Ground Water Extraction Well(s); Design Package 4 for installation of the Monitoring Well Instrumentation; and Design Package 5 for installation of the Ground Water Treatment System; this Design Package is incorporated by reference because of its size.

  15. Reservoir management strategy for East Randolph Field, Randolph Township, Portage County, Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Safley, L.E.; Salamy, S.P.; Young, M.A.; Fowler, M.L.; Wing, J.L.; Thomas, J.B.; Mills, J.; Wood, D.

    1998-07-01

    The primary objective of the Reservoir Management Field Demonstration Program is to demonstrate that multidisciplinary reservoir management teams using appropriate software and methodologies with efforts scaled to the size of the resource are a cost-effective method for: Increasing current profitability of field operations; Forestalling abandonment of the reservoir; and Improving long-term economic recovery for the company. The primary objective of the Reservoir Management Demonstration Project with Belden and Blake Corporation is to develop a comprehensive reservoir management strategy to improve the operational economics and optimize oil production from East Randolph field, Randolph Township, Portage County, Ohio. This strategy identifies the viable improved recovery process options and defines related operational and facility requirements. In addition, strategies are addressed for field operation problems, such as paraffin buildup, hydraulic fracture stimulation, pumping system optimization, and production treatment requirements, with the goal of reducing operating costs and improving oil recovery.

  16. Statistical summary and trend evaluation of air quality data for Cleveland, Ohio in 1967 to 1971: Total suspended particulate, nitrogen dioxide, and sulfur dioxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neustadter, H. E.; Sidik, S. M.; Burr, J. C., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    Air quality data for Cleveland, Ohio, for the period of 1967 to 1971 were collated and subjected to statistical analysis. The total suspended particulate component is lognormally distributed; while sulfur dioxide and nitrogen dioxide are reasonably approximated by lognormal distributions. Only sulfur dioxide, in some residential neighborhoods, meets Ohio air quality standards. Air quality has definitely improved in the industrial valley, while in the rest of the city, only sulfur dioxide has shown consistent improvement. A pollution index is introduced which displays directly the degree to which the environmental air conforms to mandated standards.

  17. 75 FR 34939 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Final Approval and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-21

    ...), (NN)(5), (OO), (OO)(1), (OO)(2), (OO)(3), (OO)(4), (PP)(2), (UU)(3), (AAA), (DDD), and Appendix A. EPA... of Volatile Organic Compounds from Stationary Sources, Paragraph (AAA), as adopted by Ohio on...

  18. 77 FR 39177 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Regional Haze

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-02

    ....H. Glatfelter's alternative BART approach to include a process capable of 90 percent SO 2 removal... uncontrolled and other plants are controlled instead, EPA believes that the set of reductions in Ohio's...

  19. 78 FR 63388 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Dayton-Springfield...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Plan Revision to Approved Motor Vehicle Emissions Budgets AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA.... The Toledo area consists of Lucas and Wood Counties. The Ohio portion of the...

  20. 78 FR 45135 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Redesignation of the Dayton...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-26

    ... inventories for nitrogen oxides (NO X ), direct PM 2.5 , sulfur dioxide (SO 2 ), ammonia, and volatile organic... supplemental submission to EPA on April 30, 2013, Ohio submitted ammonia and VOC emissions inventories...

  1. 78 FR 34903 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; 1997 8-Hour Ozone...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-11

    ... Emissions Simulator (MOVES) emissions model. Ohio submitted the SIP revision request to EPA on December 7... modeling and participated in the consultation process. The Federal Highway Administration and the...

  2. 78 FR 34906 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Lima 1997 8-Hour Ozone...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-11

    ... Motor Vehicle Emissions Simulator (MOVES) emissions model. Ohio submitted the SIP revision request to... consultation process. The Federal Highway Administration and the Ohio Department of Transportation have taken...

  3. Wheat mosaic virus (WMoV), the causal agent of High Plains disease, is present in Ohio wheat fields

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat mosaic virus (WMoV), the causal agent of High Plains disease in wheat, was found in wheat fields in three western counties in Ohio: Auglaize, Miami, and Paulding. WMoV nucleoprotein sequence was identified from Illumina deep sequencing of RNA collected from symptomatic and asymptomatic wheat s...

  4. Edge-of-field research to quantify the impacts of agricultural practices on water quality in Ohio

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Drainage is needed to sustain agricultural production to meet the demands of a growing global population, but it also transports nutrients from fields to surface water bodies. The State of Ohio is facing the tremendous challenge of maintaining agricultural production while protecting the environment...

  5. Assessing UST corrective action technologies: Lessons learned about in situ air sparging at the Denison Avenue Site, Cleveland, Ohio. Project report

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, T.R.; Chaudet, R.E.; Johnson, R.L.

    1994-12-01

    In situ air sparging (IAS) has been used at an increasing number of sites to address groundwater contamination. Because of the lack of substantive performance data, however, the actual effectiveness of the system is not known. The EPA Office of Research and Development Risk reduction Engineering Laboratory (ORD RREL) with the EPA Region 5 Office of Underground Storage Tanks, the Ohio State Fire Marshal, and BP Exploration & Oil, Inc. (BP) participated in a field evaluation of an IAS system at a petroleum leaking UST site in Cleveland, Ohio. The purpose of the study was to provide performance data that will be independently evaluated by EPA to better understand IAS effectiveness. The report presents the site and monitoring data provided by BP over a 2-year period. The chemical data indicated an overall decrease of BTEX concentrations in groundwater to nondetectable levels shortly after startup of the IAS system. Variability in the chemical and process data also precludes making any definitive link between the decrease in contaminant concentrations and IAS performance at this site.

  6. 76 FR 20598 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Control of Emissions of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-13

    ... version of 3745-21-07, in Ohio's SIP, has inadequate compliance test methods and definitions. The most... compliance. (6)(a)--This paragraph specifies that the test methods and procedures of paragraphs (A) to (C) of... EPA. (6)(c)--This paragraph allows emission test data from similar sources or operations to be...

  7. 76 FR 11082 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Oxides of Nitrogen Budget...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-01

    ... Nitrogen Budget Trading Program; Technical Amendment AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION..., 2009. This relates to Ohio rule revisions concerning 240 allowances under the Nitrogen Oxides Budget... oxides of nitrogen (NO X ) allowances from the State's 2005 new source allowance set aside under the NO...

  8. 78 FR 59258 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Redesignation of the Dayton...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-26

    ...-Springfield (Dayton) nonattainment area (Clark, Greene, and Montgomery Counties) to attainment for the 1997...-Springfield, Ohio nonattainment area (Clark, Greene, and Montgomery Counties), as submitted on June 1, 2011... County Montgomery County * * * * * * * \\a\\ Includes Indian Country located in each county or area,...

  9. 76 FR 64825 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans, Ohio and Indiana; Redesignation of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-19

    ... ,\\1\\ NO X , and sulfur dioxide (SO 2 ),\\2\\ documented in Ohio and Indiana's PM 2.5 redesignation... measures include the following. Tier 2 Emission Standards for Vehicles and Gasoline Sulfur Standards. These... Tier 2 standards included the ] requirement to reduce the sulfur content of gasoline to 30 parts...

  10. 78 FR 57270 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Redesignation of the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-18

    ... compounds (VOC), and ammonia as meeting the requirements of the CAA. Finally, EPA finds adequate and is... 24-hour PM 2.5 standard. In a supplemental submission to EPA on April 30, 2013, Ohio provided ammonia.../2008 emission inventories for VOC and ammonia as satisfying the requirement in section 172(c)(3) of...

  11. Estimation of the recharge areas contributing water to the south well field, Columbus, Ohio

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schalk, C.W.; ,

    1996-01-01

    The city of Columbus, Ohio, operates four radial collector wells, designed to yield 42 Mgal/d (million gallons per day), in southern Franklin County, Ohio, as part of their municipal supply of water. The collector wells are adjacent to, and designed to induce infiltration from, Big Walnut Creek and Scioto River. A previously constructed, three-dimensional, steady-state and transient ground-water-flow model of this river-aquifer system was used to estimate contributing recharge areas (CRA's) and calculate particle flowpaths in southern Franklin County. The simulations were of two steady-state periods (October 1979 and March 1986) and one 5-year transient period (March 1986---June 1991). The first simulation (1979) was of conditions before construction of the collector wells. The second simulation (1986) was of conditions when the collector wells were producing 8 Mgal/d. During the 5 years covered in the transient simulation, production at the well field averaged 18.5 Mgal/d. Under the 1979 conditions, the largest ground-water contributing areas were of the quarries and Scioto River (41 and 47 percent of the study area, respectively). During 1986, when 8 Mgal/d was withdrawn, the primary contributing areas were of the quarries (40 percent), collector wells (34 percent), and rivers (8 percent). Travel times associated with simulated particles of water tracked from cells along Big Walnut Creek to their discharge points in cells along Scioto River were about 5 to 60 years in the 1979 simulation and about 7 to 41 years in the 1986 simulation. The endpoints of these particles varied as simulated pumping rates were increased to 22 Mgal/d. The 1986, 10-year CRA's of the collector wells under 8 Mgal/d-conditions totalled about 4.5 mi2. As the pumping rate was increased to 22 Mgal/d in a predictive simulation, 10-year CRA's of the collector wells increased to 6.7mi2. Because the transient simulation encompassed only 5 years, the 10-year CRA's could not be estimated from the

  12. Ground water levels in the vicinity of the Miami well field, Montgomery County, Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Schucker, J.M. ); Hallfrisch, M. )

    1992-01-01

    During the early stages of the drought of 1987-88 in Ohio, a number of diminished capacity complaints were received from domestic well owners in northwestern Montgomery County. Most home owners blamed the nearby Dayton-Miami Well Field (MWF). The MWF is situated in a preglacial, bedrock valley filled with outwash deposits. In this area, sand and gravel outwash deposits from a buried valley aquifer. Glacial outwash also covers that uplands to the west, where a large number of domestic water wells are located. Recharge to the uplands is primarily by infiltration of precipitation. The buried valley aquifer is recharged via infiltration from the Great Miami River and precipitation. Recharge into the valley aquifer is enhanced from man-made recharge lagoons near the well field. Additional recharge to the well field occurs from ground water inflow from north of the well field, and inflow from the adjacent uplands to the east. Temporal changes in the extent of the cone of depression surrounding the well field are shown on potentiometric surface maps. Furthermore, the cone of depression extends into the glacial outwash deposits underlying the upland area, clearly indicating a hydraulic connection between the buried valley aquifer and these glacial outwash deposits beneath the upland area. This expanding cone of depression indicates that increased pumping is exceeding recharge and ground water is being removed from aquifer storage. Ground water levels in the MWF reached their lowest point during the drought of 1987-88. This was the period during which most domestic well failures occurred. If production from the MWF continues to increase and/or this region experience another prolonged drought, dewatering of domestic wells east of the MWF will likely reoccur.

  13. Environmental Assessment for the Expansion and Renovation of Dog Kennels, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-01

    and Preserves Ohio Department of Natural Resources Fountain Square, Building F Cohunbus, Ohio 43224 Shaw Environmental, Inc. 5050 Section Avenue...INSTRUCTIONS: DATA REQUEST OHIO DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES DIVISION OF NATURAL AREAS AND PRESERVES HERITAGE DATA SERVICES 1889 FOUNTAIN ...selection of native plant seed mixes. ENDANGERED SPECIES COMMENTS: The proposed project lies within the range of the Indiana bat (Myotis soda /is), a

  14. 76 FR 43634 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; West Virginia and Ohio...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-21

    ... complete, quality-assured, and certified ambient air monitoring data for the 2007-2009 monitoring period... based upon air quality monitoring data from those monitors for calendar years 2001-2003. These...-assured, and certified PM 2.5 air quality monitoring data recorded in the EPA Air Quality System...

  15. 76 FR 32110 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio, Kentucky, and Indiana...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-03

    ... attainment is based upon complete, quality-assured and certified ambient air monitoring data for the 2007... the 1997 PM 2.5 NAAQS based upon air quality monitoring data from those monitors for calendar years.... Cincinnati Area Air Quality EPA has reviewed the ambient air monitoring data for the Cincinnati Area...

  16. Lag times of bank filtration at a well field, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sheets, R.A.; Darner, R.A.; Whitteberry, B.L.

    2002-01-01

    Wells placed next to surface-water bodies to induce infiltration have come under scrutiny because of the presence of the potential pathogens in surface water. Removal of pathogens and other contaminants by bank filtration is assumed, but regulatory agencies question the effectiveness of this process. To investigate transport processes of biological constituents, advective groundwater traveltimes to production wells under the influence of surface water need to be established first to determine appropriate water-quality sampling schedules. This paper presents the results of a study of bank filtration at a well field in southwestern Ohio. Field parameters such as water level, specific conductance, and water temperature were measured at least hourly at a streamflow gaging station and at five monitoring wells each at two separate sites, corresponding to two nearby production wells. Water-quality samples also were collected in all wells and the streamflow gaging station. Specific conductance is directly related to concentration of chloride, a chemically conservative constituent. Cross-correlation methods were used to determine the average traveltime from the river to the monitoring wells. Traveltimes based on specific conductance ranged from approximately 20 h to 10 days at one site and 5 days to 3 months at the other site. Calculated groundwater flow velocities ranged from 2.1 ?? 10-3 to 6.0 ?? 10-3 cm/s and 3.5 ?? 10-4 to 7.1 ?? 10-4 cm/s at the two sites. Data collected when a production well is continuously pumping reveal shorter and more consistent traveltimes than when the same well is pumped intermittently. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. (Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio)

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Bill

    1991-10-01

    In April 1990, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB), initiated an investigation to evaluate a potential Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) removal action to prevent, to the extent practicable, the offsite migration of contaminated ground water from WPAFB. WPAFB retained the services of the Environmental Management Operations (EMO) and its principle subcontractor, International Technology Corporation (IT) to complete Phase 1 of the environmental investigation of ground-water contamination at WPAFB. Phase 1 of the investigation involves the short-term evaluation and potential design for a program to remove ground-water contamination that appears to be migrating across the western boundary of Area C, and across the northern boundary of Area B along Springfield Pike. Primarily, Task 4 of Phase 1 focuses on collection of information at the Area C and Springfield Pike boundaries of WPAFB. This Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) has been prepared to assist in completion of the Task 4 field investigation and is comprised of the Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPP) and the Field Sampling Plan (FSP).

  18. 76 FR 61291 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; West Virginia; Ohio; Determination...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-04

    ... matter (PM 2.5 ) National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) has clean data for the 2006 24-hour PM 2.5... on the 2008-2010 data available in EPA's Air Quality System (AQS) database. If this proposed... for this action? IV. What is EPA's analysis of the relevant air quality data? V. What's EPA's...

  19. 76 FR 28393 - Proposed Approval of Air Quality Implementation Plan; Ohio and West Virginia; Determinations of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-17

    ... complete, quality-assured, and certified ambient air monitoring data for the 2007-2009 period showing that... designations and classifications for the 1997 PM 2.5 NAAQS based upon air quality monitoring data from those... adequate to evaluate the air quality of these areas, and so these twenty-one monitoring sites with...

  20. First report of soybean vein necrosis-associated virus in Ohio soybean fields

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean vein necrosis-associated virus (SVNaV), a newly discovered tospovirus that infects soybean, was first described as widespread in a number of southern and midwestern states, but so far has not been reported in Ohio. Here we describe its occurrence in six different soybean leaf samples collect...

  1. Field study for disposal of solid wastes from Advanced Coal Processes: Ohio LIMB Site Assessment. Final report, April 1986--November 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Weinberg, A.; Coel, B.J.; Butler, R.D.

    1994-10-01

    New air pollution regulations will require cleaner, more efficient processes for converting coal to electricity, producing solid byproducts or wastes that differ from conventional pulverized-coal combustion ash. Large scale landfill test cells containing byproducts were built at 3 sites and are to be monitored over at least 3 years. This report presents results of a 3-y field test at an ash disposal site in northern Ohio; the field test used ash from a combined lime injection-multistage burner (LIMB) retrofit at the Ohio Edison Edgewater plant. The landfill test cells used LIMB ash wetted only to control dusting in one cell, and LIMB ash wetted to optimize compaction density in the other cell. Both test cells had adequate load-bearing strength for landfill stability but had continuing dimensional instability. Heaving and expansion did not affect the landfill stability but probably contributed to greater permeability to infiltrating water. Leachate migration occurred from the base, but effects on downgradient groundwater were limited to increased chloride concentration in one well. Compressive strength of landfilled ash was adequate to support equipment, although permeability was higher and strength was lower than anticipated. Average moisture content has increased to about 90% (dry weight basis). Significant water infiltration has occurred; the model suggests that as much as 20% of the incident rainfall will pass through and exit as leachate. However, impacts on shallow ground water is minimal. Results of this field study suggest that LIMB ash from combustion of moderate to high sulfur coals will perform acceptably if engineering controls are used to condition and compact the materials, reduce water influx to the landfill, and minimize leachate production. Handling of the ash did not pose serious problems during cell construction; steaming and heat buildup were moderate.

  2. Evaluation of ground-water flow by particle tracking, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cunningham, W.L.; Sheets, R.A.; Schalk, C.W.

    1994-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB) began a Basewide Monitoring Program (BMP) in 1992. The purpose of the BMP was to establish a long-term ground-water and surface- water sampling network in order to (1) characterize current ground-water and surface-water quality; (2) describe water-quality changes as water enters, flows across, and exits Base boundaries; (3) conduct statistical analyses of water quality; and (4) estimate the effect of WPAFB on regional water quality. As part of the BMP, the USGS conducted ground-water particle-tracking analyses based on a ground-water-flow model produced during a previous USGS study. This report briefly describes the previous USGS study, the inherent assumptions of particle-tracking analyses, and information on the regional ground-water-flow field as inferred from particle pathlines. Pathlines for particles placed at the Base boundary and particles placed within identified Installation Restoration Program sites are described.

  3. (Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-01

    In April 1990, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB) initiated an effort for the evaluation of potential removal of ground water contamination at the Base. This report presents a current assessment of the nature and extent of the contamination believed to be migrating across the southwestern boundary of Area C and the northern boundary of Area B based upon analysis of existing environmental data obtained from several sources. The existing data base indicates widespread, low-level contamination moving across Base boundaries at levels that pose no immediate threat to the Mad River Valley well fields. An investigation by the City of Dayton in May and June 1990, however, implies that a more identifiable plume of PCE and TCE may be crossing the southwestern boundary of Area C immediately downgradient of Landfill 5. More data is needed to delineate ground water contamination and to design and implement a suitable control system. This report concludes that although an extensive study of the boundaries in question would be the preferred approach, a limited, focused investigation and subsequent feasibility study can be accomplished with a reasonable certainty of achieving the desired outcome of this project.

  4. Effects of energy-efficient ventilation rates on indoor air quality at an Ohio elementary school

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berk, J. V.; Young, R.; Hollowell, C. D.; Turiel, I.; Pepper, J.

    1980-04-01

    A mobile laboratory was used to monitor air outdoors and at three indoor sites (two classrooms and a large multipurpose room); tests were made at three different ventilation rates. The parameters measured were outside air flow rates, odor perception, microbial burden, particulate mass, total aldehydes, carbon dioxide, ozone, and nitrogen oxides. The results of these measurements are given and compared with the existing outdoor air quality standards. Carbon dioxide concentrations increased as the ventilation rate decreased, but still did not exceed current standards. Odor perceptibility increased slightly at the lowest ventilation rate. Other pollutants showed very low concentrations, which did not change with reductions in ventilation rate.

  5. 77 FR 59879 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; PBR and PTIO

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-01

    ... revisions to make its air pollution permit program more efficient. Approving these additions will make the... health and the environment, EPA is taking direct final action to approve the revisions. DATES:...

  6. 75 FR 25797 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; General Provisions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-10

    ...: Andy Chang, Environmental Engineer, Criteria Pollutant Section, Air Programs Branch (AR-18J), U.S..., chang.andy@epa.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: In the Rules section of this Federal Register, EPA...

  7. [Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio]. Volume 9, Removal action system design

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    This Removal Action System Design has been prepared as a Phase I Volume for the implementation of the Phase II removal action at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB) near Dayton, Ohio. The objective of the removal action is to prevent, to the extent practicable, the migration of ground water contaminated with chlorinated volatile organic compounds (VOCS) across the southwest boundary of Area C. The Phase 1, Volume 9 Removal Action System Design compiles the design documents prepared for the Phase II Removal Action. These documents, which are presented in Appendices to Volume 9, include: Process Design, which presents the 30 percent design for the ground water treatment system (GWTS); Design Packages 1 and 2 for Earthwork and Road Construction, and the Discharge Pipeline, respectively; no drawings are included in the appendix; Design Package 3 for installation of the Ground Water Extraction Well(s); Design Package 4 for installation of the Monitoring Well Instrumentation; and Design Package 5 for installation of the Ground Water Treatment System; this Design Package is incorporated by reference because of its size.

  8. Hydrogeology and simulation of ground-water flow at the South Well Field, Columbus, Ohio

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cunningham, W.L.; Bair, E.S.; Yost, W.P.

    1996-01-01

    The City of Columbus, Ohio, operates four radial collector wells in southern Franklin County. The 'South Well Field' is completed in permeable outwash and ice-contact deposits, upon which flow the Scioto River and Big Walnut Creek. The wells are designed to yield approximately 42 million gallons per day; part of that yield results from induced infiltration of surface water from the Scioto River and Big Walnut Creek. The well field supplied up to 30 percent of the water supply of southern Columbus and its suburbs in 1991. This report describes the hydrogeology of southern Franklin County and a tran sient three-dimensional, numerical ground-water- flow model of the South Well Field. The primary source of ground water in the study area is the glacial drift aquifer. The glacial drift is composed of sand, gravel, and clay depos ited during the Illinoian and Wisconsinan glaciations. In general, thick deposits of till containing lenses of sand and gravel dominate the drift in the area west of the Scioto River. The thickest and most productive parts of the glacial drift aquifer are in the buried valleys in the central and eastern parts of the study area underlying the Scioto River and Big Walnut Creek. Horizontal hydraulic conductivity of the glacial drift aquifer differs spa tially and ranges from 30 to 375 feet per day. The specific yield ranges from 0.12 to 0.30. The secondary source of ground water within the study area is the underlying carbonate bedrock aquifer, which consists of Silurian and Devonian limestones, dolomites, and shales. The horizontal hydraulic conductivity of the carbonate bedrock aquifer ranges from 10 to 15 feet per day. The storage coefficient is about 0.0002. The ground-water-flow system in the South Well Field area is recharged by precipitation, regional ground-water flow, and induced stream infiltration. Yearly recharge rates varied spatially and ranged from 4.0 to 12.0 inches. The three-dimensional, ground-water-flow model was constructed by

  9. 78 FR 66280 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio: Bellefontaine; Determination...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-05

    ... 2.5 (see 40 CFR 51.1004(c)). This action does not constitute a redesignation of the area to... nonattainment area has attained the 2008 lead (Pb) national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS or standard). In this action, EPA is determining that the Bellefontaine nonattainment area (hereafter also...

  10. 76 FR 43175 - Approval of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Indiana and Ohio; Disapproval of Interstate...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-20

    ...-available only in hard copy. Publicly-available docket materials are available either electronically in http://www.regulations.gov or in hard copy at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 5, Air and... pertains to interstate transport of certain emissions, also known as the CAA ``good neighbor''...

  11. 75 FR 25770 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; General Provisions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-10

    ...., Monday through Friday, excluding Federal holidays. We recommend that you telephone Andy Chang...: Andy Chang, Environmental Engineer, Criteria Pollutant Section, Air Programs Branch (AR-18J), U.S..., chang.andy@epa.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Throughout this document whenever ``we,'' ``us,''...

  12. 76 FR 27290 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; West Virginia; Kentucky; Ohio...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-11

    ... for 2010 in EPA's Air Quality System (AQS) database that show the area continues to attain. If EPA... for deliveries of boxed information. The Regional Office official hours of business are Monday through... information provided, unless the comment includes information claimed to be Confidential Business...

  13. (Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    This report presents information related to the sampling of ground water at the Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. It is part of an investigation into possible ground water contamination. Information concerns well drilling/construction; x-ray diffraction and sampling; soil boring logs; and chain-of-custody records.

  14. Final Environmental Assessment, Assured Aerospace Fuels Research Facility, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-01

    RAPCA Regional Air Pollution Control Agency RCRA Resource Conservation and Recovery Act RI Remedial Investigation RO reverse osmosis ROD Record of...compressor needed to provide high pressure compressed natural gas (CNG) feed. In addition, there would not be adequate space for ancillary support...include reverse osmosis (RO) water, CNG, N2 gas, H2 and CO gas, a catalyst, and cooling water. The Reformer requires 28 gallons per hour of RO water to

  15. MECHANIZATION STUDY OF THE AIR FORCE INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY LIBRARY, WRIGHT-PATTERSON AFB, OHIO

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The Air Force Institute of Technology (AFIT) Library uses an IBM 1401 computer to produce a list of journal holdings, alphabetically arranged and provided with an abbreviation glossary. One list was produced and circulated. Input to the system is EAM cards with journal data. Because of difficulties in obtaining use of the computer--which is not owned by the Library--within a reasonable time , the Library has decided to abandon computer mechanization and to use instead Library--owned Flexowriter equipments interfaced with supplemental EAM card punch, sorter, and reader.

  16. (Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    The Phase I, Task 5, Focused Feasibility Study (FFS) has been prepared as part of the Environmental Investigation of Ground Water Contamination Project being conducted by Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB). The primary objective of this FFS was to select a cost-effective method of preventing migration of contaminated ground water across the southwestern boundary of Area C of the Base. The FFS presented in this document is a portion of a much larger effort being conducted at WPAFB. The detailed analysis of alternatives for the extraction, treatment, and discharge of contaminated ground water migrating across the southwest boundary of Area C at WPAFB led to the selection of a preferred removal action alternative. Specifically, this alternative is that ground water be extracted utilizing a three well array pumping at a total of 400 to 800 gpm, removed water be treated via air stripping to achieve appropriate effluent concentrations, and treated water be discharged to the Mad River in accordance with a National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit and other relevant permits.

  17. Ohio Career Resource.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Dept. of Education, Columbus. Div. of Career-Technical and Adult Education.

    This resource is designed to provide Ohio labor market information for use with advisory committees to stimulate and inform dialogue about the current evaluation and future planning of programs. It provides reports for 23 career fields in 6 career clusters. Each report highlights careers and occupations in the field and answers these questions:…

  18. Results of the basewide monitoring program at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, 1993-1994

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schalk, C.W.; Cunningham, W.L.

    1996-01-01

    Geologic and hydrologic data were collected at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB), Ohio, as part of Basewide Monitoring Program (BMP) that began in 1992. The BMP was designed as a long-term project to character ground-water and surface-water quality (including streambed sediments), describe water-quality changes as water enters, flows across, and exits the Base, and investigate the effects of activities at WPAFB on regional water quality. Ground water, surface ware, and streambed sediment were sampled in four rounds between August 1993 and September 1994 to provide the analytical data needed to address the objectives of the BMP. Surface-water-sampling rounds were designed to include most of the seasonal hydrologic conditions encountered in southwestern Ohio, including baseflow conditions and spring runoff. Ground-water-sampling rounds were scheduled for times of recession and recharfe. Ground-water data were used to construct water-table, potentiometric, and vertical gradient maps of the WPAFB area. Water levels have not changed significantly since 1987, but the effects of pumping on and near the Base can have a marked effect on water levels in localized areas. Ground-ware gradients generally were downward throughout Area B (the southwestern third of the Base) and in the eastern third of Areas A and C (the northeastern two-thirds of the Base), and were upward in the vicinity of Mad River. Stream-discharge measurements verified these gradients. Many of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency maximum contaminant level (MCL) exceedances of inorganic constituents in ground water were associated with water from the bedrock. Exceedances of concentrations of chromium and nickel were found consistently in five wells completed in the glacial aquifer beneath the Base. Five organic compounds [trichloroethylene (TCE), tetrachloroethylene (PCE), vinyl chloride, benzene, and bis(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate] were detected at concentrations that exceeded MCLs; all of the TCE

  19. Rickenbacker Air National Guard Base, Columbus, Ohio. Pre-Closure Sampling Report. Hazardous Waste Storage Area. Volume 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-03-01

    Prepared br IU UUUI ENGINEERING-SCIENCE 19101 Viliaview Road - Suite 301 Cleveland, Ohio 44119 For the: U.S. Department of Enery Under Contract No. DE...Ohio 6-10 6.3 Standards for Metal Concentrations in Soil and Drinking Water - RANGB, OH 6-12 6.4 Detected Compounds in Soils (0-2’) at HWSA - RANGB...F degrees Fahrenheit FS Feasibility Study FFS Focused Feasibility Study GC Gas Chromatograph GC/MS Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry HAL Health

  20. Isolation and identification of pathogenic microorganisms at wastewater-irrigated fields: ratios in air and wastewater

    SciTech Connect

    Teltsch, B.; Kedmi, S.; Bonnet, L.; Borenzstajn-Rotem, Y.; Katzenelson, E.

    1980-06-01

    Samples of air and corresponding wastewater samples were taken at wastewater spray-irrigated fields. The concentrations of salmonellae and enteroviruses present in these samples were determined and compared with those of coliforms, and the ratios between them were calculated. The most common Salmonella serotype in the air was Salmonella ohio, whereas in the wastewater, Salmonella anatum was the most common. Enteroviruses isolated and identified were poliovirus, echovirus, and coxsackievirus type B. From the ratios of salmonellas to coliforms and enteroviruses to coliforms in the air, as compared to these ratios in the wastewater, it was concluded that the suitability of coliforms as an indication of airborne contamination caused by spray irrigation is questionable.

  1. 78 FR 16785 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Cleveland-Akron-Lorain and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-19

    ... factors or vehicle miles traveled) (Sec. 93.118(e)(4)(vi)). We find that Ohio has met all of the adequacy... provided the vehicle miles of travel and other necessary data from the travel demand network models. The...-Akron-Lorain and Columbus 1997 8-Hour Ozone Maintenance Plan Revisions to Approved Motor...

  2. Installation Restoration Program. Ohio Air National Guard, Toledo Express Airport, Swanton, Ohio. Quality Assurance Project Plan, Project Health and Safety Plan

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-04-01

    American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTH) Type II reagent water, and pesticide -grade methanol and hexane rinses, in that order. Specific...detergent (e.g., Liqui-Noxo, Alconoxe) and rinsed with potable water, ASTM Type II reagent water, and pesticide -grade methanol and hexane, in that order...water, rinsed with pesticide -grade methanol and hexane, and allowed to air dry. This procedure will minimize any potential cross-contamination

  3. Mutagenicity of indoor air particles in a residential pilot field study: application and evaluation of new methodologies

    SciTech Connect

    Lewtas, J.; Goto, S.; Williams, K.; Chuang, J.C.; Petersen, B.A.

    1987-01-01

    The mutagenicity of indoor air-particulate matter was measured in a pilot field study of homes in Columbus, Ohio, during the 1984 winter. The study was conducted in eight all-natural-gas homes and two all-electric homes. Particulate matter and semi-volatile organic compounds were collected indoors using a medium-volume sampler. A micro-forward mutation bioassay employing Salmonella typhimurium strain TM 677 was used to quantify the mutagenicity in solvent extracts of microgram quantities of indoor air particles. The mutagenicity was quantified in terms of both mutation frequency per mg of organic matter extracted and per cubic meter of air sampled. The combustion-source variables explored in this study included woodburning in fireplaces and cigarette smoking. Homes in which cigarette smoking occurred had the highest concentrations of mutagenicity per cubic meter of air.

  4. FIELD MEASUREMENT TECHNOLOGY FOR MERCURY IN SOIL AND SEDIMENT OHIO LUMEX'S RA-915+/RP-91C MERCURY ANALYZER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ohio Lumex's RA915+/91 C mercury analyzer was demonstrated under the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation Program in May 2003, at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The purpose of the Demonstration was to c...

  5. [Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio]. Volume 1, Site assessment report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-01

    In April 1990, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB) initiated an effort for the evaluation of potential removal of ground water contamination at the Base. This report presents a current assessment of the nature and extent of the contamination believed to be migrating across the southwestern boundary of Area C and the northern boundary of Area B based upon analysis of existing environmental data obtained from several sources. The existing data base indicates widespread, low-level contamination moving across Base boundaries at levels that pose no immediate threat to the Mad River Valley well fields. An investigation by the City of Dayton in May and June 1990, however, implies that a more identifiable plume of PCE and TCE may be crossing the southwestern boundary of Area C immediately downgradient of Landfill 5. More data is needed to delineate ground water contamination and to design and implement a suitable control system. This report concludes that although an extensive study of the boundaries in question would be the preferred approach, a limited, focused investigation and subsequent feasibility study can be accomplished with a reasonable certainty of achieving the desired outcome of this project.

  6. Water-quality data-collection activities in Colorado and Ohio; Phase II, Evaluation of 1984 field and laboratory quality-assurance practices

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Childress, Carolyn J. Oblinger; Chaney, Thomas H.; Myers, Donna; Norris, J. Michael; Hren, Janet

    1987-01-01

    Serious questions have been raised by Congress about the usefulness of water-quality data for addressing issues of regional and national scope and, especially, for characterizing the current quality of the Nation's streams and ground water. In response, the U.S. Geological Survey has undertaken a pilot study in Colorado and Ohio to (1) determine the characteristics of current (1984) water-quality data-collection activities of Federal, regional, State, and local agencies, and academic institutions; and (2) determine how well the data from these activities, collected for various purposes and using different procedures, can be used to improve our ability to answer major broad-scope questions, such as:A. What are (or were) natural or near-natural water-quality conditions?B. What are existing water-quality conditions?C. How has water quality changed, and how do the changes relate to human activities?Colorado and Ohio were chosen for the pilot study largely because they represent regions with different types of waterquality concerns and programs. The study has been divided into three phases, the objectives of which are: Phase I--Inventory water-quality data-collection programs, including costs, and identify those programs that met a set of broad criteria for producing data that are potentially appropriate for water-quality assessments of regional and national scope. Phase II--Evaluate the quality assurance of field and laboratory procedures used in producing the data from programs that met the broad criteria of Phase I. Phase III--Compile the qualifying data and evaluate the adequacy of this data base for addressing selected water-quality questions of regional and national scope.Water-quality data are collected by a large number of organizations for diverse purposes ranging from meeting statutory requirements to research on water chemistry. Combining these individual data bases is an appealing and potentially cost-effective way to attempt to develop a data base adequate

  7. Results of soil, ground-water, surface-water, and streambed-sediment sampling at Air Force Plane 85, Columbus, Ohio, 1996

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parnell, J.M.

    1997-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with Aeronautical Systems Center, Environmental Management Directorate, Restoration Division, prepared the Surface- and Ground- Water Monitoring Work Plan for Air Force Plant 85 (AFP 85 or Plant), Columbus, Ohio, under the Air Force Installation Restoration Program to characterize any ground-water, surface-water, and soil contamination that may exist at AFP 85. The USGS began the study in November 1996. The Plant was divided into nine sampling areas, which included some previously investi gated study sites. The investigation activities included the collection and presentation of data taken during drilling and water-quality sampling. Data collection focused on the saturated and unsatur ated zones and surface water. Twenty-three soil borings were completed. Ten monitoring wells (six existing wells and four newly constructed monitoring wells) were selected for water-quality sam pling. Surface-water and streambed-sediment sampling locations were chosen to monitor flow onto and off of the Plant. Seven sites were sampled for both surface-water and streambed-sediment quality. This report presents data on the selected inorganic and organic constituents in soil, ground water, surface water, and streambed sediments at AFP 85. The methods of data collection and anal ysis also are included. Knowledge of the geologic and hydrologic setting could aid Aeronautical Systems Center, Environmental Management Directorate, Restoration Division, and its governing regulatory agencies in future remediation studies.

  8. 78 FR 28497 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Canton-Massillon 1997 8-Hour...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-15

    ... Specialist, Control Strategies Section, Air Programs Branch (AR-18J), Environmental Protection Agency, Region... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION...: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Direct final rule. SUMMARY: Under the Clean Air Act (CAA), EPA...

  9. Air channel distribution during air sparging: A field experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Leeson, A.; Hinchee, R.E.; Headington, G.L.; Vogel, C.M.

    1995-12-31

    Air sparging may have the potential to improve upon conventional groundwater treatment technologies. However, judging from studies published to date and theoretical analyses, it is possible that air sparging may have a limited effect on aquifer contamination. The basic mechanisms controlling air sparging are not well understood, and current monitoring practice does not appear adequate to quantitatively evaluate the process. During this study, the effective zone of influence, defined as the areas in which air channels form, was studied as a function of flowrate and depth of injection points. This was accomplished by conducting the air sparging test in an area with shallow standing water. Air sparging points were installed at various depths, and the zone of influence was determined visually.

  10. U.S. Settles with Marathon Petroleum Corporation to Cut Harmful Air Emissions at Facilities in Indiana, Kentucky and Ohio

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    WASHINGTON - The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) announced a settlement with Marathon Petroleum Corporation today that resolves various alleged Clean Air Act violations at 10 Marathon facilities an

  11. Aerodynamic size distribution of suspended particulate matter in the ambient air in the city of Cleveland, Ohio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leibecki, H. F.; King, R. B.; Fordyce, J. S.

    1974-01-01

    The City of Cleveland Division of Air Pollution Control and NASA jointly investigated the chemical and physical characteristics of the suspended particulate matter in Cleveland, and as part of the program, measurements of the particle size distribution of ambient air samples at five urban locations during August and September 1972 were made using high-volume cascade impactions. The distributions were evaluated for lognormality, and the mass median diameters were compared between locations and as a function of resultant wind direction. Junge-type distributions were consistent with dirty continental aerosols. About two-thirds of the suspended particulate matter observed in Cleveland is less than 7 microns in diameter.

  12. Water, Ohio's Remarkable Resource.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groves, Carrie J.

    Information on water and water resources in Ohio is presented in seven sections. Water from Ohio streams, water storage, lakes in Ohio, and ground water are discussed in the first section ("Water, A Part of the Earth"). A brief discussion on the ecosystem is provided in the second section ("Water and Life"). Topics discussed in…

  13. Close Air Support for the Field Army

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1964-05-25

    90. 76 of the 12th Air Support C omand , for consideration.4 From D plus 4 to D plus 7, requests for attacks on tar,:ets of’ opportunity were not...ibid. 3 8 Ibid. 9o evolved into the "Rover Joe" svstem of close air suooort. Rover Joe was based to an extent on the "Rover David " orinciple used in...tentacles (air sunport oart-4, air sunoort control, and rear links (liaison officer at iir force airfields). Rover David vas intended to be located

  14. Silurian "Clinton" Sandstone Reservoir Characterization for Evaluation of CO2-EOR Potential in the East Canton Oil Field, Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Ronald Riley; John Wicks; Christopher Perry

    2009-12-30

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of using CO2-enhanced oil recovery (EOR) in the East Canton oil field (ECOF). Discovered in 1947, the ECOF in northeastern Ohio has produced approximately 95 million barrels (MMbbl) of oil from the Silurian 'Clinton' sandstone. The original oil-in-place (OOIP) for this field was approximately 1.5 billion bbl and this study estimates by modeling known reservoir parameters, that between 76 and 279 MMbbl of additional oil could be produced through secondary recovery in this field, depending on the fluid and formation response to CO2 injection. A CO2 cyclic test ('Huff-n-Puff') was conducted on a well in Stark County to test the injectivity in a 'Clinton'-producing oil well in the ECOF and estimate the dispersion or potential breakthrough of the CO2 to surrounding wells. Eighty-one tons of CO2 (1.39 MMCF) were injected over a 20-hour period, after which the well was shut in for a 32-day 'soak' period before production was resumed. Results demonstrated injection rates of 1.67 MMCF of gas per day, which was much higher than anticipated and no CO2 was detected in gas samples taken from eight immediately offsetting observation wells. All data collected during this test was analyzed, interpreted, and incorporated into the reservoir characterization study and used to develop the geologic model. The geologic model was used as input into a reservoir simulation performed by Fekete Associates, Inc., to estimate the behavior of reservoir fluids when large quantities of CO2 are injected into the 'Clinton' sandstone. Results strongly suggest that the majority of the injected CO2 entered the matrix porosity of the reservoir pay zones, where it diffused into the oil. Evidence includes: (A) the volume of injected CO2 greatly exceeded the estimated capacity of the hydraulic fracture and natural fractures; (B) there was a gradual injection and pressure rate build-up during the test; (C) there was a subsequent, gradual flashout of

  15. Silurian "Clinton" Sandstone Reservoir Characterization for Evaluation of CO2-EOR Potential in the East Canton Oil Field, Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, Ronald; Wicks, John; Perry, Christopher

    2009-12-30

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of using CO2-enhanced oil recovery (EOR) in the East Canton oil field (ECOF). Discovered in 1947, the ECOF in northeastern Ohio has produced approximately 95 million barrels (MMbbl) of oil from the Silurian “Clinton” sandstone. The original oil-in-place (OOIP) for this field was approximately 1.5 billion bbl and this study estimates by modeling known reservoir parameters, that between 76 and 279 MMbbl of additional oil could be produced through secondary recovery in this field, depending on the fluid and formation response to CO2 injection. A CO2 cyclic test (“Huff-n-Puff”) was conducted on a well in Stark County to test the injectivity in a “Clinton”-producing oil well in the ECOF and estimate the dispersion or potential breakthrough of the CO2 to surrounding wells. Eighty-one tons of CO2 (1.39 MMCF) were injected over a 20-hour period, after which the well was shut in for a 32-day “soak” period before production was resumed. Results demonstrated injection rates of 1.67 MMCF of gas per day, which was much higher than anticipated and no CO2 was detected in gas samples taken from eight immediately offsetting observation wells. All data collected during this test was analyzed, interpreted, and incorporated into the reservoir characterization study and used to develop the geologic model. The geologic model was used as input into a reservoir simulation performed by Fekete Associates, Inc., to estimate the behavior of reservoir fluids when large quantities of CO2 are injected into the “Clinton” sandstone. Results strongly suggest that the majority of the injected CO2 entered the matrix porosity of the reservoir pay zones, where it diffused into the oil. Evidence includes: (A) the volume of injected CO2 greatly exceeded the estimated capacity of the hydraulic fracture and natural fractures; (B) there was a gradual injection and pressure rate build-up during the test; (C) there was a subsequent

  16. Response to Clean Air Conservancy, Inc.'s March 9, 2001 Comments on Ohio's Title V Operating Permit Program

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document may be of assistance in applying the Title V air operating permit regulations. This document is part of the Title V Policy and Guidance Database available at www2.epa.gov/title-v-operating-permits/title-v-operating-permit-policy-and-guidance-document-index. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  17. Notes from the field: Botulism caused by consumption of commercially produced potato soups stored improperly--Ohio and Georgia, 2011.

    PubMed

    2011-07-08

    In January and April 2011, CDC provided antitoxin for treatment of two persons with toxin type A botulism associated with consumption of potato soup produced by two companies. On January 28, 2011, an Ohio resident, aged 29 years, was hospitalized after 5 days of progressive dizziness, blurred vision, dysphagia, and difficulty breathing. The patient required mechanical ventilation and botulism antitoxin. On January 18, he had tasted potato soup from a bulging plastic container, noted a bad taste, and discarded the remainder. The soup had been purchased on December 7, 2010, from the refrigerated section of a local grocer, but it had been kept unrefrigerated for 42 days. He was hospitalized for 57 days and then was transferred with residual weakness to a rehabilitation facility.

  18. Hydrogeology, simulated ground-water flow, and ground-water quality, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dumouchelle, D.H.; Schalk, C.W.; Rowe, G.L.; De Roche, J.T.

    1993-01-01

    Ground water is the primary source of water in the Wright-Patterson Air Force Base area. The aquifer consists of glacial sands and gravels that fill a buried bedrock-valley system. Consolidated rocks in the area consist of poorly permeable Ordovician shale of the Richmondian stage, in the upland areas, the Brassfield Limestone of Silurian age. The valleys are filled with glacial sediments of Wisconsinan age consisting of clay-rich tills and coarse-grained outwash deposits. Estimates of hydraulic conductivity of the shales based on results of displacement/recovery tests range from 0.0016 to 12 feet per day; estimates for the glacial sediments range from less than 1 foot per day to more than 1,000 feet per day. Ground water flow from the uplands towards the valleys and the major rivers in the region, the Great Miami and the Mad Rivers. Hydraulic-head data indicate that ground water flows between the bedrock and unconsolidated deposits. Data from a gain/loss study of the Mad River System and hydrographs from nearby wells reveal that the reach of the river next to Wright-Patterson Air Force Base is a ground-water discharge area. A steady-state, three-dimensional ground-water-flow model was developed to simulate ground-water flow in the region. The model contains three layers and encompasses about 100 square miles centered on Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. Ground water enters the modeled area primarily by river leakage and underflow at the model boundary. Ground water exits the modeled area primarily by flow through the valleys at the model boundaries and through production wells. A model sensitivity analysis involving systematic changes in values of hydrologic parameters in the model indicates that the model is most sensitive to decreases in riverbed conductance and vertical conductance between the upper two layers. The analysis also indicates that the contribution of water to the buried-valley aquifer from the bedrock that forms the valley walls is about 2 to 4

  19. Modeling the air-soil transport pathway of perfluorooctanoic acid in the mid-Ohio Valley using linked air dispersion and vadose zone models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Hyeong-Moo; Ryan, P. Barry; Vieira, Verónica M.; Bartell, Scott M.

    2012-05-01

    As part of an extensive modeling effort on the air-soil-groundwater transport pathway of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), this study was designed to compare the performance of different air dispersion modeling systems (AERMOD vs. ISCST3), and different approaches to handling incomplete meteorological data using a data set with substantial soil measurements and a well characterized point source for air emissions. Two of the most commonly used EPA air dispersion models, AERMOD and ISCST3, were linked with the EPA vadose zone model PRZM-3. Predicted deposition rates from the air dispersion model were used as input values for the vadose zone model to estimate soil concentrations of PFOA at different depths. We applied 34 years of meteorological data including hourly surface measurements from Parkersburg Airport and 5 years of onsite wind direction and speed to the air dispersion models. We compared offsite measured soil concentrations to predictions made for the corresponding sampling depths, focusing on soil rather than air measurements because the offsite soil samples were less likely to be influenced by short-term variability in emission rates and meteorological conditions. PFOA concentrations in surface soil (0-30 cm depth) were under-predicted and those in subsurface soil (>30 cm depth) were over-predicted compared to observed concentrations by both linked air and vadose zone model. Overall, the simulated values from the linked modeling system were positively correlated with those observed in surface soil (Spearman's rho, Rsp = 0.59-0.70) and subsurface soil (Rsp = 0.46-0.48). This approach provides a useful modeling scheme for similar exposure and risk analyses where the air-soil-groundwater transport is a primary contamination pathway.

  20. [Field investigations of the air pollution level of populated territories].

    PubMed

    Vinokurov, M V

    2014-01-01

    The assessment and management of air quality of settlements is one of the priorities in the field of environmental protection. In the management of air quality the backbone factor is the methodology of the organization, performance and interpretation of data of field investigations. The present article is devoted to the analysis of the existing methodological approaches and practical aspects of their application in the organization and performance of field investigations with the aim to confirm the adequacy of the boundaries of the sanitary protection zone in the old industrial regions, hygienic evaluation of the data of field investigations of the air pollution level.

  1. Environmental Assessment for the Consolidation of 88th Air Base Wing Civil Engineer Operations, Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    National Historical Park- National Park Service 1. Bartramia longicauda - Upland Sandpiper, threatened 2. Carex mesochorea- Midland Sedge ...its range in the eastern United States, Eastern Massasaugas are found in wet prairies, sedge meadows and early successional fields. Preferred...wetland habitats are marshes and fens. They avoid open water and seem to prefer the cover of broad-leafed plants, emergents, and sedges . Natural

  2. Office of Inspector General audit report on credit card usage at the Ohio Field Office and the Fernald and Miamisburg Environmental Management Projects

    SciTech Connect

    1999-03-01

    In 1994 the Department of Energy (Department) obtained the services of Rocky Mountain BankCard System, through the use of a General Services Administration contract, as a means for the Department and its contractors to make small purchases. The use of credit cards was expected to simplify small purchase procedures and improve cash management. The Ohio Field Office (Field Office) uses the credit card system and oversees usage by its area offices. Contractors under the Field Office also use the credit card system to make small purchases. The Office of Inspector General (OIG) has issued one audit report concerning the use of credit cards. In April 1996, the OIG issued Report WR-B-96-06, Audit of Bonneville Power Administration`s Management of Information Resources. The audit concluded that improvements could be made in implementing credit card and property procedures in Bonneville`s management of computer-related equipment. Specifically, many credit card purchases were made by employees whose authority to buy was not properly documented, and the purchasing files often lacked invoices that would show what was purchased. Additionally, some cardholders split purchases to avoid credit card limits. The objective of this audit was to determine whether the Field Office, Fernald and Miamisburg Environmental Management Projects, Fluor Daniel, and B and W were using credit cards for the appropriate purposes and within the limitations established by Federal and Departmental regulations.

  3. The mutagenicity of indoor air particles in a residential pilot field study: Application and evaluation of new methodologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewtas, Joellen; Goto, Sumio; Williams, Katherine; Chuang, Jane C.; Petersen, Bruce A.; Wilson, Nancy K.

    The mutagenicity of indoor air paniculate matter has been measured in a pilot field study of homes in Columbus, Ohio during the 1984 winter. The study was conducted in eight all natural-gas homes and two all electric homes. Paniculate matter and semi-volatile organic compounds were collected indoors using a medium volume sampler. A micro-forward mutation bioassay employing Salmonella typhimurium strain TM 677 was used to quantify the mutagenicity in solvent extracts of microgram quantities of indoor air particles. The mutagenicity was quantified in terms of both mutation frequency per mg of organic matter extracted and per cubic meter of air sampled. The combustion source variables explored in this study included woodburning in fireplaces and cigarette smoking. Homes in which cigarette smoking occurred had the highest concentrations of mutagenicity per cubic meter of air. The average indoor air mutagenicity per cubic meter was highly correlated with the number of cigarettes smoked. When the separate sampling periods in each room were compared, the mutagenicity in the kitchen samples was the most highly correlated with the number of cigarettes smoked.

  4. Geophysical Investigation Along the Great Miami River From New Miami to Charles M. Bolton Well Field, Cincinnati, Ohio

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sheets, R.A.; Dumouchelle, D.H.

    2009-01-01

    Three geophysical profiling methods were tested to help characterize subsurface materials at selected transects along the Great Miami River, in southwestern Ohio. The profiling methods used were continuous seismic profiling (CSP), continuous resistivity profiling (CRP), and continuous electromagnetic profiling (CEP). Data were collected with global positioning systems to spatially locate the data along the river. The depth and flow conditions of the Great Miami River limited the amount and quality of data that could be collected with the CSP and CRP methods. Data from the CSP were generally poor because shallow reflections (less than 5 meters) were mostly obscured by strong multiple reflections and deep reflections (greater than 5 meters) were sparse. However, modeling of CRP data indicated broad changes in subbottom geology, primarily below about 3 to 5 meters. Details for shallow electrical conductivity (resistivity) (less than 3 meters) were limited because of the 5-meter electrode spacing used for the surveys. For future studies of this type, a cable with 3-meter electrode spacing (or perhaps even 1-meter spacing) might best be used in similar environments to determine shallow electrical properties of the stream-bottom materials. CEP data were collected along the entire reach of the Great Miami River. The CRP and CEP data did not correlate well, but the CRP electrode spacing probably limited the correlation. Middle-frequency (3,510 hertz) and high-frequency (15,030 hertz) CEP data were correlated to water depth. Low-frequency (750 hertz) CEP data indicate shallow (less than 5-meter) changes in electrical conductivity. Given the variability in depth and flow conditions on a river such as the Great Miami, the CEP method worked better than either the CSP or CRP methods.

  5. Ohio News Nuggets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oguntoyinbo, Lekan

    2010-01-01

    This article presents a snapshot of major happenings at some colleges and universities in Ohio. Ohio universities build on a tradition of inclusion. The Buckeye State has a rich tradition of progressive higher education institutions, many of which were among the first in the nation to offer degrees to women and people of color. Antioch College,…

  6. VIEW ALONG OHIO AVENUE, LOOKING TOWARD 1905 BAND BARRACKS (BUILDING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW ALONG OHIO AVENUE, LOOKING TOWARD 1905 BAND BARRACKS (BUILDING 61 O)CENTER AND FORAGE HOUSE (BUILDING 476)LEFT. VIEW TO NORTHWEST - Plattsburgh Air Force Base, U.S. Route 9, Plattsburgh, Clinton County, NY

  7. A Study of the Linen and Laundry Control Procedures at the U.S. Air Force Medical Center, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-08-01

    Psychiatric Intensive Care Rectal Reconstruction Radiotherapy Super Voltage Rheumatology Therapeutic Abortions Thoracic Surgery Urology Endodontics Orthodontics...1976. Periodicals Anthony, M.F. Costly Materials Retrieved from Laundry. Hospitals; Journal of American Hospital Association; 16 May 1978. Berger, G...Costs. Hospitals, J.A.H.A. 1 April 1976. Fastow, K. Adopt Fitted Bed Sheets. American Journal of Occupational Therapy; July 1977. Field, Fritz

  8. Rodent sperm analysis in field-based ecological risk assessment: pilot study at Ravenna army ammunition plant, Ravenna, Ohio.

    PubMed

    Tannenbaum, Lawrence V; Bazar, Matthew; Hawkins, Melanie S; Cornaby, Barney W; Ferguson, Elizabeth A; Chantelle Carroll, L; Ryan, Patrick F

    2003-01-01

    Ecological risk assessment (ERA) guidance recommends that field-truthing efforts proceed when modeled hazard quotients (HQs) suggest that toxicological effects are occurring to site receptors. To date, no field methods have been proposed by the regulatory community that can lead to definitive determinations of acceptable or unacceptable risk for birds and mammals, the two terrestrial classes of receptors that are commonly assessed using the HQ method. This paper describes rodent sperm analysis (RSA) as a viable method to be applied in the field at sites with historical contamination. RSA is capable of detecting biological differences that bear on reproduction, a highly regarded toxicological endpoint of concern in USEPA Superfund-type ERAs. The results of RSA's first application at a study site are reported and discussed. The paper also provides the rationale for RSA's efficacy in the context of Superfund and other environmental cleanup programs, where limited time and money are available to determine and evaluate the field condition.

  9. Ohio Community College Portraits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio Board of Regents, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This paper provides information on student characteristics, success and progress rates, cost of attendance, degrees awarded, class size, faculty characteristics, and employment outcomes at each of Ohio's twenty-three community college.

  10. Bioventing Field Initiative at Keesler Air Force Base, Mississippi

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    This report describes the activities conducted at Keesler AFB, Mississippi, as part of the Bioventing Field initiative for the U.S. Air Force Center...and installation of bioventing systems. Each site at the base is discussed individually, followed by a description of site activities at the...background area. The purpose of this Bioventing Field initiative is to measure the soil gas permeability and microbial activity at a contaminated site in

  11. Presence of Fusarium graminearum in air associated with sorghum fields

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sorghum can be included in crop rotations with wheat. However, there are no known reports on the effects of sorghum grown in rotation with wheat on the epidemiology of head scab caused by Fusarium graminearum. Conidia in air samples within two sorghum fields were collected by passive spore trapping ...

  12. Bioventing Field Initiative at Robins Air Force Base, Georgia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    This report describes the activities conducted at three sites at Robins Air Force Base (AFB), Georgia, as part of the Bioventing Field initiative for...respiration test, and installation of a bioventing system. The specific objectives of this task are described in the following section. The test sites at the

  13. A Bicycle-Based Field Measurement System for the Study of Thermal Exposure in Cuyahoga County, Ohio, USA.

    PubMed

    Rajkovich, Nicholas B; Larsen, Larissa

    2016-01-25

    Collecting a fine scale of microclimate data can help to determine how physical characteristics (e.g., solar radiation, albedo, sky view factor, vegetation) contribute to human exposure to ground and air temperatures. These data also suggest how urban design strategies can reduce the negative impacts of the urban heat island effect. However, urban microclimate measurement poses substantial challenges. For example, data taken at local airports are not representative of the conditions at the neighborhood or district level because of variation in impervious surfaces, vegetation, and waste heat from vehicles and buildings. In addition, fixed weather stations cannot be deployed quickly to capture data from a heat wave. While remote sensing can provide data on land cover and ground surface temperatures, resolution and cost remain significant limitations. This paper describes the design and validation of a mobile measurement bicycle. This bicycle permits movement from space to space within a city to assess the physical and thermal properties of microclimates. The construction of the vehicle builds on investigations of the indoor thermal environment of buildings using thermal comfort carts.

  14. A Bicycle-Based Field Measurement System for the Study of Thermal Exposure in Cuyahoga County, Ohio, USA

    PubMed Central

    Rajkovich, Nicholas B.; Larsen, Larissa

    2016-01-01

    Collecting a fine scale of microclimate data can help to determine how physical characteristics (e.g., solar radiation, albedo, sky view factor, vegetation) contribute to human exposure to ground and air temperatures. These data also suggest how urban design strategies can reduce the negative impacts of the urban heat island effect. However, urban microclimate measurement poses substantial challenges. For example, data taken at local airports are not representative of the conditions at the neighborhood or district level because of variation in impervious surfaces, vegetation, and waste heat from vehicles and buildings. In addition, fixed weather stations cannot be deployed quickly to capture data from a heat wave. While remote sensing can provide data on land cover and ground surface temperatures, resolution and cost remain significant limitations. This paper describes the design and validation of a mobile measurement bicycle. This bicycle permits movement from space to space within a city to assess the physical and thermal properties of microclimates. The construction of the vehicle builds on investigations of the indoor thermal environment of buildings using thermal comfort carts. PMID:26821037

  15. Notes from the field: campylobacteriosis outbreak associated with consuming undercooked chicken liver pâté - Ohio and Oregon, December 2013-January 2014.

    PubMed

    Scott, Magdalena Kendall; Geissler, Aimee; Poissant, Tasha; DeBess, Emilio; Melius, Beth; Eckmann, Kaye; Salehi, Ellen; Cieslak, Paul R

    2015-04-17

    On January 8, 2014, the Ohio Department of Health notified the Oregon Public Health Division (OPHD) of campylobacteriosis in two Ohio residents recently returned from Oregon. The travelers reported consuming chicken liver pâté* at an Oregon restaurant. On January 10, OPHD received additional reports of campylobacteriosis in two persons who had consumed chicken liver pâté at another Oregon restaurant. Campylobacter jejuni was isolated in cultures of fecal specimens from three patients. OPHD investigated to determine the sources of the illnesses and to institute preventive measures.

  16. Electric field step in air gap streamer discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng Rong; Zhuang Chijie; Yu Zhanqing; Li Zhizhao; Geng Yinan

    2011-11-28

    Electric field (E-field) in air gap streamer discharges under positive lightning impulse was measured by specifically developed integrated electro-optic sensors. An E-field step phenomenon was observed. The E-field firstly agreed with the Laplace field, then suddenly increased with a rise time of {mu}s. The occurrence probability of this phenomenon increased as the applied voltage increased. The discharge current waveforms and photos taken by a fast camera prove the E-field step was caused by the space net charge. From the E-step rise time and the corona area range, the average electron drift speed under the experiment situation was estimated about 0.2 x 10{sup 6} - 0.6x 10{sup 6} m/s.

  17. Advanced Metallic Air Vehicle Structure Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-08-01

    Patterson Air Force Base , Ohio 45433. AIR FORCE FLIGHT DYNAMICS LABORATORY AIR FORCE WRIGHT AERONAUTICAL LABORATORIES AIR FORCE SYSTEMS COMMAND Best...Available Copy WRIGHT-PATTERSON AIR FORCE BASE , OHIO 45433 THIS DOCUMENT CONTAINED C) BLANK PAGES THAT HAVE 0 3 BEEN DELETED 9 NOTICES When Government...December 1975. Other requests for this document must be referred to Air Force Flight Dynamics Laboratory (FB-A), Wright-Patterson Air Force Base , Ohio

  18. Field evaluation of sampling and analysis for organic pollutants in indoor air

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, J.C.; Mack, G.A.; Stockrahm, J.W.; Hannan, S.W.; Bridges, C.

    1988-08-01

    The objectives of the study were to determine the feasibility of the use of newly developed indoor air samplers in residential indoor air sampling and to evaluate methodology for characterization of the concentrations of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), PAH derivatives, and nicotine in residential air. Residential air sampling was conducted in Columbus, Ohio during the winter of 1986/87. The PAH derivatives were found at much lower levels than their parent PAH. Higher average indoor levels of all but three target compounds were found compared to outdoor levels. The higher outdoor levels of these three compounds (naphthalene dicarboxylic acid anhydride, pyrene dicarboxylic acid anhydride, and 2-nitrofluoranthene) are probably due to atmospheric transformation. Cigarette smoking was identified as the most-significant contributor to indoor levels of PAH and PAH derivatives. Homes with gas-heating systems appeared to have higher pollutant levels compared to homes with electric-heating systems.

  19. Potential Overwintering Locations of Soybean Aphid (Hemiptera: Aphididae) Colonizing Soybean in Ohio and Wisconsin.

    PubMed

    Crossley, Michael S; Hogg, David B

    2015-04-01

    Soybean aphids, Aphis glycines Matsumura, depend on long-distance, wind-aided dispersal to complete their life cycle. Despite our general understanding of soybean aphid biology, little is explicitly known about dispersal of soybean aphids between winter and summer hosts in North America. This study compared genotypic diversity of soybean aphids sampled from several overwintering locations in the Midwest and soybean fields in Ohio and Wisconsin to test the hypothesis that these overwintering locations are sources of the soybean colonists. In addition, air parcel trajectory analyses were used to demonstrate the potential for long-distance dispersal events to occur to or from these overwintering locations. Results suggest that soybean aphids from overwintering locations along the Illinois-Iowa border and northern Indiana-Ohio are potential colonists of soybean in Ohio and Wisconsin, but that Ohio is also colonized by soybean aphids from other unknown overwintering locations. Soybean aphids in Ohio and Wisconsin exhibit a small degree of population structure that is not associated with the locations of soybean fields in which they occur, but that may be related to specific overwintering environments, multiple introductions to North America, or spatial variation in aphid phenology. There may be a limited range of suitable habitat for soybean aphid overwintering, in which case management of soybean aphids may be more effective at their overwintering sites. Further research efforts should focus on discovering more overwintering locations of soybean aphid in North America, and the relative impact of short- and long-distance dispersal events on soybean aphid population dynamics.

  20. Architectural Survey of Ohio Army National Guard Properties: Volume 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    OHARNG Armory (1959, acquired in 1996) ............................. 90 4.4 Rickenbacker Army Enclave ( RAE ) – Ohio Armory Architecture...Military Academy PWA Public Works Administration RAE Rickenbacker Army Enclave RPA Rickenbacker Port Authority SAC Strategic Air Command TAC...Armory (ERDC-CERL, 2014). ERDC/CERL TR-15-38, Vol. I 92 4.4 Rickenbacker Army Enclave ( RAE ) – Ohio Armory Architecture 4.4.1 Historic context of

  1. Communications; a Survey of Ohio Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Summers, F. William

    This study was conducted to determine means for more effective communication among librarians, professional organizations, public officials, and the general public in order to improve Ohio library service. The analysis of communications involved field interviews, an examination of newsclippings and publications, and use of information from a…

  2. The OhioView Project

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    1998-01-01

    The Ohio View Consortium is a group of universities, colleges, K-12 schools, libraries, and local and State government agencies in the State of Ohio working with the USGS and NASA to provide affordable, integrated access to and delivery of U.S. Government satellite and geospatial data. The Ohio View Project is a pilot project that combines the USGS activities in providing an integrated information access and delivery capability with the activities of the Ohio View Consortium 

  3. Final Environmental Assessment for National Air & Space Intelligence Center and US Air Force School of Aerospace Medicine Field Training Activities at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-14

    amphibians (4 frogs, a toad, and a salamander), 36 fishes, 14 mussels, 35 butterflies, 8 moths, 15 odonates ( dragonflies and damselflies), 6...environments. Most species of amphibians, reptiles, and dragonflies documented at WPAFB have been found in or near aquatic habitats. Habitat specialists

  4. Detection of underground voids in Ohio by use of geophysical methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Munk, Jens; Sheets, R.A.

    1997-01-01

    Geophysical methods are generally classified as electrical, potential field, and seismic methods. Each method type relies on contrasts of physical properties in the subsurface. Forward models based on the physical properties of air- and water-filled voids within common geologic materials indicate that several geophysical methods are technically feasible for detection of subsurface voids in Ohio, but ease of use and interpretation varies widely between the methods. Ground-penetrating radar is the most rapid and cost-effective method for collection of subsurface data in areas associated with voids under roadways. Electrical resistivity, gravity, or seismic reflection methods have applications for direct delineation of voids, but data-collection and analytical procedures are more time consuming. Electrical resistivity, electromagnetic, or magnetic methods may be useful in locating areas where conductive material, such as rail lines, are present in abandoned underground coal mines. Other electrical methods include spontaneous potential and very low frequency (VLF); these latter two methods are considered unlikely candidates for locating underground voids in Ohio. Results of ground-penetrating radar surveys at three highway sites indicate that subsurface penetration varies widely with geologic material type and amount of cultural interference. Two highway sites were chosen over abandoned underground coal mines in eastern Ohio. A third site in western Ohio was chosen in an area known to be underlain by naturally occurring voids in lime stone. Ground-penetrating radar surveys at Interstate 470, in Belmont County, Ohio, indicate subsurface penetration of less than 15 feet over a mined coal seam that was known to vary in depth from 0 to 40 feet. Although no direct observations of voids were made, anomalous areas that may be related to collapse structures above voids were indicated. Cultural interference dominated the radar records at Interstate 70, Guernsey County, Ohio

  5. Ohio incinerator battle continues

    SciTech Connect

    Melody, M.

    1993-05-01

    Waste Technologies Industries (WTI; East Liverpool, Ohio) is trying to wing what it hopes will be its final battle in a 13-year, $160 million war with the government, and community and environmental groups. The company since 1980 has sought EPA approval to operate a hazardous waste incinerator in East Liverpool, Ohio. WTI late last year conducted a pre-test burn, or shakedown, during which the incinerator burned certain types of hazardous waste. The test demonstrates the incinerator's performance under normal operating conditions, Regulatory authorities, including EPA and the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency (OEPA), monitored activity during the shakedown, which was limited to 720 hours of operation. In accordance with RCRA requirements, the company in March conducted a trial burn to demonstrate that the incinerator meets permit standards. WTI's permit specifies three performance parameters the incinerator must meet -- particulate and hydrogen chloride emissions limits, and destruction removal efficiencies (DREs).

  6. Tech Prep Ohio Progress Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio Board of Regents, Columbus.

    Tech prep programs integrate academic, occupational, and employability during the last 2 years of high school and the first 2 years of college, combining the best of college-prep academics with the best of vocational and technical education. The Ohio Tech Prep program, jointly administered by the Ohio Board of Regents and the Ohio Department of…

  7. Air drilling for gas sands: Marianne Field, Sweetwater County, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Wellborn, R.

    1983-08-01

    Marianne field is on the northeast flank of the Rock Springs uplift in Sweetwater County, Wyoming, just south of the town of Superior. The field is located where regional east dip averages 300 ft/mi (57 m/km). Numerous east-northeast-trending normal faults are present across the field with displacements ranging from 20 to 400 ft (6 to 120 m). Updip stratigraphic pinch-outs are responsible for gas accumulations in two separate Second Frontier sandstones with entrapment apparently not related to faulting. There are similar traps in various thin sandstone stringers in the Third Frontier and Muddy sandstones. In addition, a combination stratigraphic-fault trap for hydrocarbons appears to have been found in the Dakota and Lakota sandstones in one well; these horizons were abandoned for mechanical reasons before conclusive testing could be completed. All but one of the wells at Marianne field have been drilled either partially or completely with air. Consequently the potential to produce from various pay zones in nearly every well was determined prior to running production casing. This information generally cannot be obtained through drill stem testing in this area due to the formation damage from the drilling mud on the Cretaceous sandstone reservoirs. If an air-drilled gas reservoir was damaged later by drilling mud or cement, the potential was already known and it could be brought back through fracturing. The field consists of 6 gas wells and 5 dry holes.

  8. Development of a field-portable air monitor for Lewisite

    SciTech Connect

    Aldstadt, J.H.; Martin, A.F.; Olson, D.C. |

    1996-03-01

    The focus of this research is the development of a prototype field-portable ambient-air monitor for measuring trace levels of volatile organoarsenicals. Lewisite (dichloro[2-chlorovinyl]arsine) is a chemical warfare agent developed during World War I and stockpiled on a large scale by the former Soviet Union. A continuous air monitor for Lewisite at the eight-hour time-weighted-average concentration (3 {mu}g/m{sup 3}) is necessary to protect the safety and health of arms control treaty inspectors. Flow injection is used to integrate an air sampling device based on liquid-phase extraction with a flow-through detector based on potentiometric stripping analysis. We describe a method for the sampling and preconcentration of organoarsenicals from ambient air by using a gas permeation membrane sampler. The sampler is designed to selectively preconcentrate analyte that permeates a silicone rubber membrane into a caustic carrier stream. Instrument design is described for the sampling and detection methodologies.

  9. Deregulation Impact in Negotiating a New Electrical Contract Between NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field and FirstEnergy Corp., Cleveland, Ohio, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quach, Quyen T.; Zala, Laszlo F.

    2002-01-01

    The governor of the State of Ohio signed amended substitute Senate bill 3 on July 6, 1999, requiring Ohio's electric industry to change from a monopoly environment to a competitive electric environment for generation services. The start date for competitive retail generation services was set for January 1, 2001. This new deregulation law allowed all Ohioans to choose the supplier of generation service, but the transmission and distribution would remain regulated. It also required electric utilities to unbundle the three main components (generation, transmission, and distribution) and make other changes designed to produce a competitive electric generation market. While deregulation was taking shape, the NASA Glenn Research Center electrical contract with FirstEnergy Corp. of Cleveland, Ohio, was to expire on September 7, 1999. Glenn strategically evaluated and incorporated the impacts of electric deregulation in the negotiations. Glenn and FirstEnergy spent over a year in negotiations until the Glenn utility team and the FirstEnergy negotiating team came to an agreement in the fall of 2000, and a new contract became effective on January 1, 2001.

  10. Questioning Ohio's Loyalty Requirement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neil, Robert M.

    2006-01-01

    Beginning this past summer, all new employees at some Ohio public universities, including those accepting teaching positions, are being confronted with politically sensitive and intrusive questions. In addition to the "Have you solicited any individual for membership in an organization on the U.S. Department of State Terrorist…

  11. MIGRATORY LABOR IN OHIO.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BINGHAM, SALLY

    OHIO HAS BECOME A HIGHLY INDUSTRIALIZED STATE WITH INSUFFICIENT QUALIFIED LOCAL FARM WORKERS TO MEET HARVEST DEMANDS. MIGRANT WORKERS HAVE FILLED THAT NEED, DOING MOSTLY "STOOP WORK" AND WORKING IN FOOD PROCESSING PLANTS. THE ANNUAL WORKER PLAN HAS PROVIDED FOR MORE EFFICIENT SCHEDULING OF MIGRANTS. CONSTRUCTIVE PROGRAMS HAVE BEEN…

  12. 2014 Ohio Remediation Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio Board of Regents, 2014

    2014-01-01

    In fulfillment of Ohio Revised Code 3333.041 (A) (1) the Chancellor has published a listing by school district of the number of the 2013 high school graduates who attended a state institution of higher education in academic year 2013-2014 and the percentage of each district's graduates required by the institution to enroll in a remedial course in…

  13. Ohio Biotechnology Competency Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Lavonna; Bowermeister, Bob; Boudreau, Joyce

    This document, which lists the biotechnology competencies identified by representatives from biotechnology businesses and industries as well as secondary and post-secondary educators throughout Ohio, is intended to assist individuals and organizations in developing college tech prep programs that will prepare students from secondary through…

  14. Who Are Ohio's Migrants?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hintz, Joy; Mecartney, John

    Identifying and defining Ohio's migrant population, the document also seeks to destroy many of the myths that exist about migrant workers. The survey, made in September 1972, found that 90% of the state's 35,000 workers were Spanish speaking. The document also gives information on migrant recruitment, crew leaders, income, housing, crops,…

  15. Ohio School Design Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio School Facilities Commission, Columbus.

    This manual presents guidance to facility designers, school administrators, staff, and students for the development of school facilities being constructed under Ohio's Classroom Facilities Assistance Program. It provides critical analysis of individual spaces and material/system components necessary for the construction of elementary and secondary…

  16. Ohio Agriscience Lesson Plans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sommers, Robert D., II, Comp.; Waidelich, William D., Comp.

    This document, which is intended for Ohio agriculture teachers, contains lesson plans for an eight-unit competency-based course in agriscience. Each lesson plan contains some or all of the following items: (1) unit title; (2) competency/terminal performance objective; (3) competency builders/pupil performance objectives; (4) list of applied…

  17. Evaluation of membrane filter field monitors for microbiological air sampling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fields, N. D.; Oxborrow, G. S.; Puleo, J. R.; Herring, C. M.

    1974-01-01

    Due to area constraints encountered in assembly and testing areas of spacecraft, the membrane filter field monitor (MF) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration-accepted Reyniers slit air sampler were compared for recovery of airborne microbial contamination. The intramural air in a microbiological laboratory area and a clean room environment used for the assembly and testing of the Apollo spacecraft was studied. A significantly higher number of microorganisms was recovered by the Reyniers sampler. A high degree of consistency between the two sampling methods was shown by a regression analysis, with a correlation coefficient of 0.93. The MF samplers detected 79% of the concentration measured by the Reyniers slit samplers. The types of microorganisms identified from both sampling methods were similar.

  18. Encapsulated graphene field-effect transistors for air stable operation

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandrou, Konstantinos Kymissis, Ioannis; Petrone, Nicholas; Hone, James

    2015-03-16

    In this work, we report the fabrication of encapsulated graphene field effects transistors (GFETs) with excellent air stability operation in ambient environment. Graphene's 2D nature makes its electronics properties very sensitive to the surrounding environment, and thus, non-encapsulated graphene devices show extensive vulnerability due to unintentional hole doping from the presence of water molecules and oxygen limiting their performance and use in real world applications. Encapsulating GFETs with a thin layer of parylene-C and aluminum deposited on top of the exposed graphene channel area resulted in devices with excellent electrical performance stability for an extended period of time. Moisture penetration is reduced significantly and carrier mobility degraded substantially less when compared to non-encapsulated control devices. Our CMOS compatible encapsulation method minimizes the problems of environmental doping and lifetime performance degradation, enabling the operation of air stable devices for next generation graphene-based electronics.

  19. Geomagnetic Field Effects on the Imaging Air Shower Cherenkov Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Commichau, S.C.; Biland, A.; Kranich, D.; de los Reyes, R.; Moralejo, A.; Sobczyńska, D.

    Imaging Air Cherenkov Telescopes (IACTs) detect the Cherenkov light flashes of Extended Air Showers (EAS) triggered by VHE gamma-rays impinging on the Earth's atmosphere. Due to the overwhelming background from hadron induced EAS, the discrimination of the rare gamma-like events is rather difficult, in particular at energies below 100 GeV. The influence of the Geomagnetic Field (GF) on the EAS development can further complicate this discrimination and, in addition, also systematically affect the gamma-efficiency and energy resolution of an IACT. Here we present the results from dedicated Monte Carlo (MC) simulations for the MAGIC telescope site, show the GF effects on real data as well as possible corrections for these effects.

  20. Proceedings Papers of the AFSC (Air Force Systems Command) Avionics Standardization Conference (2nd) Held at Dayton, Ohio on 30 November-2 December 1982. Volume 1.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-11-01

    information is required before any intelligent comparisons can be made. Effects of the J73 Language on Optimization J73 is a relatively large language...manner will occur." further muddies the water . 3.1.1.2 Floating Type Descriptions (2.1.1.2) The definition of J73 floating point numerics have many of...include conventional general purpose bombs, guided bomb dispensers, missiles * (air-to-air and air-to-ground), nuclear weapons, sensor pods, dropped

  1. Proceedings Papers of the AFSC (Air Force Systems Command) Avionics Standardization Conference (2nd) Held at Dayton, Ohio on 30 November-2 December 1982. Volume 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-11-01

    rit.-rioi Servio., Medal with one oak leaf cluster, Air Medal with 15 oak Th :f chister.;-, and Air Force -crvir•dation Medal with tr oak . leaf ...DI9efus- Industry Attitudes About Air Force Interface Standards Report of an Electronics Industries - Association Survey. A D-P0)3 571 Digital Avionics...Lovelace joined NASA in 1974 as Associate Administrator for the * Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology. He was named Deputy Adminis- - trator in

  2. Simulation of the effects of nearby quarrying operations on ground-water flow at the South Well Field, Franklin County, Ohio

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nalley, Gregory M.; Haefner, Ralph J.

    1999-01-01

    The City of Columbus, Ohio, operates a municipal well field in southern Franklin County that is adjacent to a sand and gravel mining operation. Mining operations have the potential to alter ground-water flowpaths and change the sources of water to pumped wells. Previous ground-water-flow modeling of the area has shown that water pumped from the supply wells is derived from infiltration from nearby rivers and surrounding bedrock. Some of that water flows through existing quarries. Because water quality differs among these sources and is affected by the path along which water flows to the wells, five flow conditions were simulated to evaluate the influence of different mining scenarios on sources of water as related to the size and shape of contributing recharge areas (CRAs) to wells. The first simulation was based on a revision of an existing model by Schalk (1996). The second and third simulations included one in which a 20-foot layer of undisturbed aquifer material within the quarry above the bedrock is left intact, and another in which the 20-foot layer is removed. The fourth and fifth simulations included one in which the 20-foot layer of undisturbed aquifer material is left above the bedrock and the quarry is backfilled with fine- grained sand and silt (a byproduct of the mining operations), and another in which the 20-foot layer is removed before the quarry is backfilled with the fine-grained sand and silt. The results of the five model simulations indicate that the overall volumetric budgets among models change only slightly in response to changing conditions at the quarry. The most significant change is noted in the amount of water that the aquifers gained from constant head and river leakage. This change is due to the way the quarries were simulated and lower heads in the aquifers compared to those in simulations made with earlier models. Previously published model simulations showed that the 5-year CRAs did not extend into the area of the newest sand and

  3. Site 5 air sparging pilot test, Naval Air Station Cecil Field, Jacksonville, Florida.

    PubMed

    Murray, W A; Lunardini, R C; Ullo, F J; Davidson, M E

    2000-02-25

    A 72-h air sparging pilot test was conducted at Site 5 (Operable Unit 2), Naval Air Station Cecil Field, Jacksonville, FL, to determine performance parameters necessary for full-scale design. The sparge well was completed to a depth of 29 ft, several feet below the groundwater plume contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs), primarily benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX). Air flow rates supplied to the sparge well were 3 cubic feet/min (cfm) during the first day, 2 cfm during the second day, and 1 cfm during the third day. Water levels in monitoring wells initially rose approximately 2 ft during the first 4-5 h of the test, then receded back to pre-test equilibrium levels over the next 15 h, for a total duration of water mounding of about 20 h. A small (approximately 0.5 ft) water table drop, with subsequent recovery to equilibrium level, occurred each time the air sparging rate was decreased. Although there is considerable variation depending on direction from the sparge well, the average radius of influence varied from approximately 30 ft at 1 cfm to 50 ft at 3 cfm. The air sparge system was capable of increasing the dissolved oxygen from 0 to 6 or 7 mg/l within 12-15 h of air channels reaching a given location. A lag time of approximately 13 h was observed before air channels reached a radius of 30 ft and dissolved oxygen levels began to increase at that radius. CO(2) (stripped out of the groundwater by the sparging) decreased from a pre-test concentration of 150 to 20 mg/l at r=5 ft, and from 150 to 50 mg/l at r=30 ft, within a period of about 24 h. The rate of VOC mass removal during the pilot test was 0.06 lb/day at a sparge rate of 3 cfm, and it appears that air sparging will effect a rapid cleanup of the VOCs in the Site 5 groundwater plume.

  4. Vehicular air pollution, playgrounds, and youth athletic fields.

    PubMed

    Rundell, Kenneth W; Caviston, Renee; Hollenbach, Amanda M; Murphy, Kerri

    2006-07-01

    In spite of epidemiological evidence concerning vehicular air pollution and adverse respiratory/cardiovascular health, many athletic fields and school playgrounds are adjacent to high traffic roadways and could present long-term health risks for exercising children and young adults. Particulate matter (PM(1),0.02-1.0 microm diameter) number counts were taken serially at four elementary school athletic/playground fields and at one university soccer field. Elementary school PM1 measurements were taken over 17 days; measurements at the university soccer field were taken over 62 days. The high-traffic-location elementary school field demonstrated higher 17-day [PM1] than the moderate and 2 low traffic elementary school fields (48,890 +/- 34,260, 16,730 +/- 10,550, 11,960 +/- 6680, 10,030 +/- 6280, respective mean counts; p < .05). The 62-day mean PM1 values at the university soccer field ranged from 115,000 to 134,000 particles cm(-3). Lowest mean values were recorded at measurement sites furthest from the highway (approximately 34,000 particles cm(-3)) and followed a second-order logarithmic decay (R2 = .999) with distance away from the highway. Mean NO2 and SO2 levels were below 100 ppb, mean CO was 0.33 +/- 1.87 ppm, and mean O3 was 106 +/- 47 ppb. Ozone increased with rising temperature and was highest in the warmer afternoon hours (R = .61). Although the consequence of daily recess play and athletic activities by school children and young athletes in high ambient [PM1] conditions has not yet been clearly defined, this study is a critical component to evaluating functional effects of chronic combustion-derived PM exposure on these exercising schoolchildren and young adults. Future studies should examine threshold limits and mechanistic actions of real-world particle exposure.

  5. Ohio Coal Research Consortium fifth year final reports summary, September 1, 1994--February 29, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-01

    As part of its efforts to improve the use of high-sulfur Ohio coal within environmental limits, the Ohio Coal Development Office, an entity within the Ohio Department of Development (OCDO/ODOD), in late 1988 established a consortium of four Ohio universities. The purpose of the Ohio Coal Research Consortium is to conduct a multi-year fundamental research programs focused on: (1) the enhancement or development of dry sorption processes for the economical removal of high levels of SO{sub 2} and other pollutants, and (2) an increased understanding of methods for reduction in air toxics emissions from combustion gases produced by burning high-sulfur Ohio coal. This report contains summaries of eleven studies in these areas.

  6. Ohio Coal Research Consortium fourth year final summary report, September 1, 1993--August 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    As a part of its efforts to improve the use of high-sulfur Ohio coal within environmental limits, the Ohio Coal Development Office, an entity within the Ohio Department of Development (OCDO/ODOD), in late 1988 established a consortium of four Ohio universities. The purpose of the Ohio Coal Research Consortium is to conduct a multi-year fundamental research program focused on (1) the enhancement or development of dry sorption processes for the economical removal of high levels of SO{sub 2} and other pollutants and (2) an increased understanding of methods for reduction in air toxics emissions from combustion gases produced by burning high-sulfur Ohio coal. This report contains summaries of twelve studies in these areas.

  7. Notes from the Field: Increase in Neisseria meningitidis-Associated Urethritis Among Men at Two Sentinel Clinics - Columbus, Ohio, and Oakland County, Michigan, 2015.

    PubMed

    Bazan, Jose A; Peterson, Amy S; Kirkcaldy, Robert D; Briere, Elizabeth C; Maierhofer, Courtney; Turner, Abigail Norris; Licon, Denisse B; Parker, Nicole; Dennison, Amanda; Ervin, Melissa; Johnson, Laura; Weberman, Barbara; Hackert, Pamela; Wang, Xin; Kretz, Cecilia B; Abrams, A Jeanine; Trees, David L; Del Rio, Carlos; Stephens, David S; Tzeng, Yih-Ling; DiOrio, Mary; Roberts, Mysheika Williams

    2016-06-03

    Neisseria meningitidis (Nm) urogenital infections, although less common than infections caused by Neisseria gonorrhoeae (Ng), have been associated with urethritis, cervicitis, proctitis, and pelvic inflammatory disease. Nm can appear similar to Ng on Gram stain analysis (gram-negative intracellular diplococci) (1-5). Because Nm colonizes the nasopharynx, men who receive oral sex (fellatio) can acquire urethral Nm infections (1,3,5). This report describes an increase in Nm-associated urethritis in men attending sexual health clinics in Columbus, Ohio, and Oakland County, Michigan.

  8. State summaries: Ohio

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wolfe, M.E.

    2006-01-01

    In 2005, the value of coal and industrial minerals sold in Ohio amounted to $1.5 billion, an increase of 7% from 2004. Coal production for the year increased 4.7% from 2004, totalling 22.3 Mt. Aggregate production totalled 114 Mt, a 4% decrease from 2004. In 2005, the state's salt sales amounted to $132 million. Production of industrial sandstone and conglomerate as well as dimension stone and limestone also increased.

  9. Libraries in Ohio: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: https://medlineplus.gov/libraries/ohio.html Libraries in Ohio To use the sharing features on ... org/communityhealthlibrary/communityhealthlibrary.asp Athens Ohio University Alden Library 30 Park Place Athens, OH 45701-2978 740- ...

  10. Health hazard evaluation report HETA 93-0562-2464, Ohio University, Athens, Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, J.; Van Gilder, T.

    1994-10-01

    In response to a request for technical assistance from Ohio University, Athens, Ohio an investigation was performed into possible hazardous working conditions during asbestos removal by a contractor (SIC-1799). Personal breathing zone (PBZ) air samples were collected and analyzed quantitatively for 2-butoxyethanol (111762) (2-BE) and refined petroleum solvent (RPS). Urine samples were collected and analyzed for butoxyacetic-acid (2516930)(BAA). The PBZ readings were above the NIOSH recommended exposure limits of 24mg/m3 for 2-BE and 250mg/m3 for RPS. Dermal exposure may have significantly contributed to workers` overall exposures. The authors conclude that workers were exposed to potentially hazardous air concentrations of 2-BE and RPS. The authors recommend that efforts be made to control exposure, including the use of chemical protective clothing.

  11. Field Operations and Enforcement Manual for Air Pollution Control. Volume I: Organization and Basic Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weisburd, Melvin I.

    The Field Operations and Enforcement Manual for Air Pollution Control, Volume I, explains in detail the following: sources and classification of pollutants; meteorological influence on air quality; the air pollution control agency; the field enforcement officer; the enforcement process; prosecuting violation; and inspection techniques including…

  12. Better Buildings NW Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Moyer, Kevin

    2015-03-04

    When the Toledo Lucas County Port Authority (TLCPA) filed for the Department of Energy EECBG grant in late 2009, it was part of a strategic and Board backed objective to expand the organization’s economic development and financing programs into alternative energy and energy efficiency. This plan was filed with the knowledge and support of the areas key economic development agencies. The City of Toledo was also a key partner with the Mayor designating a committee to develop a Strategic Energy Policy for the City. This would later give rise to a Community Sustainability Strategic Plan for Toledo, Lucas County and the surrounding region with energy efficiency as a key pillar. When the TLCPA signed the grant documents with the DOE in June of 2010, the geographic area was severely distressed economically, in the early stages of a recovery from over a 30% drop in business activity and high unemployment. The TLCPA and its partners began identifying potential project areas well before the filing of the application, continuing to work diligently before the formal award and signing of the grant documents. Strong implementation and actions plans and business and financing models were developed and revised throughout the 3 year grant period with the long term goal of creating a sustainable program. The TLCPA and the City of Toledo demonstrated early leadership by forming the energy improvement district and evaluating buildings under their control including transportation infrastructure and logistics, government services buildings and buildings which housed several for profit and not for profit tenants while completing significant energy efficiency projects that created public awareness and confidence and solid examples of various technologies and energy savings. As was stated in the DOE Award Summary, the undertaking was focused as a commercial program delving into Alternative Energy Utility Districts; what are referred to in Ohio Statute as Energy Special Improvement

  13. Ohio River Environmental Assessment. Cultural Resources Reconnaissance Report, Ohio.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-01-01

    and Adams Counties. Region 9A. Miami Purchase Association, John Hauck House, 812 Dayton Street, Cincinnati, Ohio 45214. (513) 721-4506. Brown , Clermont...WITHIN ONE KILOMETER OF THE OHIO RIVER DETERMINED ELIGIBLE FOR OR PENDING NATIONAL REGISTER STATUS COUNTY SITE Adams John T. Wilson Homestead Brown ... Brown *........................................ 47 Clermont ....................................... 48 Columbiana .................................... 49

  14. Field Test of Room-to-Room Uniformity of Ventilation Air Distribution in Two New Houses

    SciTech Connect

    Hendron, Robert; Anderson, Ren; Barley, Dennis; Rudd, Armin; Townsend, Aaron; Hancock, Ed

    2006-12-01

    This report describes a field test to characterize the uniformity of room-to-room ventilation air distribution under various operating conditions by examining multi-zone tracer gas decay curves and calculating local age-of-air.

  15. Coastal Ohio Wind Project

    SciTech Connect

    Gorsevski, Peter; Afjeh, Abdollah; Jamali, Mohsin; Bingman, Verner

    2014-04-04

    The Coastal Ohio Wind Project intends to address problems that impede deployment of wind turbines in the coastal and offshore regions of Northern Ohio. The project evaluates different wind turbine designs and the potential impact of offshore turbines on migratory and resident birds by developing multidisciplinary research, which involves wildlife biology, electrical and mechanical engineering, and geospatial science. Firstly, the project conducts cost and performance studies of two- and three-blade wind turbines using a turbine design suited for the Great Lakes. The numerical studies comprised an analysis and evaluation of the annual energy production of two- and three-blade wind turbines to determine the levelized cost of energy. This task also involved wind tunnel studies of model wind turbines to quantify the wake flow field of upwind and downwind wind turbine-tower arrangements. The experimental work included a study of a scaled model of an offshore wind turbine platform in a water tunnel. The levelized cost of energy work consisted of the development and application of a cost model to predict the cost of energy produced by a wind turbine system placed offshore. The analysis found that a floating two-blade wind turbine presents the most cost effective alternative for the Great Lakes. The load effects studies showed that the two-blade wind turbine model experiences less torque under all IEC Standard design load cases considered. Other load effects did not show this trend and depending on the design load cases, the two-bladed wind turbine showed higher or lower load effects. The experimental studies of the wake were conducted using smoke flow visualization and hot wire anemometry. Flow visualization studies showed that in the downwind turbine configuration the wake flow was insensitive to the presence of the blade and was very similar to that of the tower alone. On the other hand, in the upwind turbine configuration, increasing the rotor blade angle of attack

  16. Using soil records with atmospheric dispersion modeling to investigate the effects of clean air regulations on 60 years of manganese deposition in Marietta, Ohio (USA).

    PubMed

    Carter, Megan R; Gaudet, Brian J; Stauffer, David R; White, Timothy S; Brantley, Susan L

    2015-05-15

    Atmospheric emissions of metals from anthropogenic activities have led to deposition and contamination of soils worldwide. We quantified addition of manganese (Mn) to soils around the largest emitter of Mn in the United States (U.S.) using chemical analyses and atmospheric dispersion modeling (Second-Order Closure Integrated Puff (SCIPUFF)). Concentrations of soil-surface Mn were enriched by 9-fold relative to that of the parent material within 1 km of the facility. Elevated concentrations of Mn and chromium (Cr), another potentially toxic element that was emitted, document contamination only within 1 m of the soil surface. Total mass of Mn added per unit land area integrated over 1 m, mMn, equals ~80 mg Mn cm(-2) near the facility. Values of mMn remained above background up to tens of kilometers from the source. Air concentrations of Mn particles of 7.5-micron diameter simulated with SCIPUFF using available data for the emission rate and local meteorological conditions for 2006 were consistent with measured air concentrations. However, the Mn deposition calculated for 2006 with SCIPUFF yielded a cumulative value over the lifetime of the refinery (60 years) that is a factor of 15 lower than the Mn observed to have been added to the soils. This discrepancy can be easily explained if Mn deposition rates before 1988 were more than an order of magnitude greater than today. Such higher emissions are probable, given the changes in metal production with time and the installation of emission controls after the Clean Air Act (1970). This work shows that atmospheric dispersion models can be used with soil profiles to understand the changes in metal emissions over decadal timescales. In addition, the calculations are consistent with the Clean Air Act accounting for a 15-fold decrease in the Mn deposition to soils around the refinery per metric ton of Mn alloy produced.

  17. Ohio Health Technology Competency Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boudreau, Joyce; Miller, Lavonna F.

    This document, which was jointly developed by representatives from a broad cross-section of Ohio's health care industries and educators representing Ohio's schools and colleges, is intended as a foundation for developing an integrated delivery system to prepare students for careers in health care. The document's introductory section presents…

  18. SOURCES OF MERCURY WET DEPOSITION IN EASTERN OHIO, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the fall of 2002, an enhanced air monitoring site was established in Steubenville, Ohio as part of a multi-year comprehensive mercury monitoring and source apportionment study to investigate the impact of local and regional coal combustion sources on atmospheric mercury deposi...

  19. National Environmental/Energy Workforce Assessment for Ohio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Field Research Center Inc., Iowa City, IA.

    This report presents existing workforce levels, training programs and career potentials and develops staffing level projections (1976-1982) based on available information for the State of Ohio. The study concerns itself with the environmental pollution control areas of air, noise, potable water, pesticides, radiation, solid waste, wastewater, and…

  20. Flight evaluation: Ohio University omega receiver base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlin, K. A.; Lilley, R. W.; Salter, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    A flight evaluation is presented of the Ohio University Omega Receiver Base, developed under the NASA Tri-University Program in Air Transportation, to provide a vehicle for the transfer of flight-test data to NASA and to other participants in the Tri-University program. Chart recordings of flight data are given, along with chronological listings of significant events which occurred during the flight. Digital data was prepared in data-processing card form for distribution. Data include phase measurements from all eight Omega time-slots for the duration of the flight, plus event marks which serve to correlate the phase data with flight-path documentation.

  1. Field calibration of two types of microphones in hyperbaric air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Paul F.; Carpenter, Susan; Green, John

    1990-01-01

    The response of two microphones, one a condenser microphone and the other a diaphragm-activated piezoelectric ceramic microphone, were measured in compressed air at pressures as great as 810 kilopascals (8 atmospheres). The response of each microphone was compared to that of a hydrophone operated in air as a microphone. The results show that the two types of microphone respond similarly to high ambient pressure. Both types are less sensitive to sound pressure in compressed air than in air at normal pressures, and the frequency responses of both microphones are altered. The results are useful in the analyses of ambient noise measurements done during experiments in compressed air.

  2. 21 CFR 808.85 - Ohio.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ohio. 808.85 Section 808.85 Food and Drugs FOOD... and Local Exemptions § 808.85 Ohio. (a) The following Ohio medical device requirement is enforceable... under section 521(b) of the act: Ohio Revised Code, section 4747.09, the first two sentences...

  3. Ohio Principal Evaluation System: Model Packet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio Department of Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The Ohio Principal Evaluation System (OPES) was collaboratively developed by Ohio superintendents, school administrators, higher education faculty, and representatives from Ohio's administrator associations. It was designed to be research-based, transparent, fair and adaptable to the specific contexts of Ohio's districts (rural, urban, suburban,…

  4. 21 CFR 808.85 - Ohio.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ohio. 808.85 Section 808.85 Food and Drugs FOOD... and Local Exemptions § 808.85 Ohio. (a) The following Ohio medical device requirement is enforceable... under section 521(b) of the act: Ohio Revised Code, section 4747.09, the first two sentences...

  5. 77 FR 8185 - Ohio Regulatory Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-14

    ...We are announcing receipt of a proposed amendment to the Ohio regulatory program (the ``Ohio program'') under the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 (SMCRA or the Act) and reopening the public comment period. The comment period is being reopened to incorporate changes that Ohio made to its initial amendment submission of 2007 regarding Ohio's alternative bonding system. We did......

  6. Indoor air quality in green-renovated vs. non-green low-income homes of children living in a temperate region of US (Ohio).

    PubMed

    Coombs, Kanistha C; Chew, Ginger L; Schaffer, Christopher; Ryan, Patrick H; Brokamp, Cole; Grinshpun, Sergey A; Adamkiewicz, Gary; Chillrud, Steve; Hedman, Curtis; Colton, Meryl; Ross, Jamie; Reponen, Tiina

    2016-06-01

    Green eco-friendly housing includes approaches to reduce indoor air pollutant sources and to increase energy efficiency. Although sealing/tightening buildings can save energy and reduce the penetration of outdoor pollutants, an adverse outcome can be increased buildup of pollutants with indoor sources. The objective of this study was to determine the differences in the indoor air quality (IAQ) between green and non-green homes in low-income housing complexes. In one housing complex, apartments were renovated using green principles (n=28). Home visits were conducted immediately after the renovation, and subsequently at 6 months and at 12 months following the renovation. Of these homes, eight homes had pre-renovation home visits; this allowed pre- and post-renovation comparisons within the same homes. Parallel visits were conducted in non-green (control) apartments (n=14) in a nearby low-income housing complex. The IAQ assessments included PM2.5, black carbon, ultrafine particles, sulfur, total volatile organic compounds (VOCs), formaldehyde, and air exchange rate. Data were analyzed using linear mixed-effects models. None of the indoor pollutant concentrations were significantly different between green and non-green homes. However, we found differences when comparing the concentrations before and after renovation. Measured immediately after renovation, indoor black carbon concentrations were significantly lower averaging 682 ng/m(3) in post-renovation vs. 2364 ng/m(3) in pre-renovation home visits (p=0.01). In contrast, formaldehyde concentrations were significantly higher in post-renovated (0.03 ppm) than in pre-renovated homes (0.01 ppm) (p=0.004). Questionnaire data showed that opening of windows occurred less frequently in homes immediately post-renovation compared to pre-renovation; this factor likely affected the levels of indoor black carbon (from outdoor sources) and formaldehyde (from indoor sources) more than the renovation status itself. To reduce IAQ

  7. Interim Report for Bioventing Field Initiative at Robins Air Force Base, Georgia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    This report describes the activities conducted at Robins Air Force Base (AFB), Georgia, as part of the Bioventing Field Initiative for the U.S. Air...soil gas survey, air permeability test, in situ respiration tests, and installation of bioventing systems. The specific objectives of this task are described in the following section.

  8. 75 FR 8871 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans and Designation of Areas for Air Quality...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-26

    ...EPA is proposing to approve the requests of Ohio and Indiana to redesignate the Ohio and Indiana portions of the Cincinnati- Hamilton, OH-KY-IN 8-hour ozone nonattainment area, ``the Cincinnati- Hamilton area,'' to attainment for that standard, because these requests meet the statutory requirements for redesignation under the Clean Air Act (CAA). The Ohio Environmental Protection Agency (Ohio......

  9. Performance of underfloor air distribution: Results of a field study

    SciTech Connect

    Fisk, William; Faulkner, David; Sullivan, Douglas

    2004-09-02

    Underfloor air distribution (UFAD) is a new method of supplying heated or cooled air throughout a building. Reported advantages of UFAD include easy relocation of air supply diffusers, energy savings, and improved indoor air quality (IAQ). We measured several aspects of the performance of an UFAD system installed in a medium-size office building. The measured air change effectiveness was very close to unity, which is comparable to that measured in buildings with typical overhead air distribution. The pollutant removal efficiency for carbon dioxide was 13 percent higher than expected in a space with well-mixed air, suggesting a 13 percent reduction in exposures to occupant generated pollutants. The increase in indoor air temperatures with height above the floor was only 1 to 2 C (2-4 F). This amount of thermal stratification could reduce the sensible energy requirements for cooling of outdoor air by approximately 10 percent. The occupants level of satisfaction with thermal conditions w as well above average and this high satisfaction rating could possibly be due, in all or part, to the use of a UFAD system. The results of this study provide some evidence of moderate energy and IAQ-related benefits of UFAD. Before general conclusions are drawn, the benefits need to be confirmed in other studies.

  10. Advancing STEM Learning across the Educational Pipeline: Statewide Efforts in Ohio. Issue Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Youth Policy Forum, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This issue brief is focused on state efforts to improve education in science, technology, engineering, and math--collectively known as the "STEM" disciplines. The brief is largely based on a March, 2009 American Youth Policy Forum (AYPF) field trip to Columbus and Dayton, Ohio, and describes Ohio's success in advancing STEM education…

  11. Bioventing Field Initiative at Galena and Campion Air Force Stations, Alaska

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    This report describes the activities conducted at Galena Air Force Station (AFS) and Campion AFS, Alaska, as part of the Bioventing Field Initiative...air permeability test, in situ respiration tests, and installation of bioventing systems. The specific objectives of this Bioventing Field Initiative

  12. Regulatory facility guide for Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, S.S.; Bock, R.E.; Francis, M.W.; Gove, R.M.; Johnson, P.E.; Kovac, F.M.; Mynatt, J.O.; Rymer, A.C.

    1994-02-28

    The Regulatory Facility Guide (RFG) has been developed for the DOE and contractor facilities located in the state of Ohio. It provides detailed compilations of international, federal, and state transportation-related regulations applicable to shipments originating at destined to Ohio facilities. This RFG was developed as an additional resource tool for use both by traffic managers who must ensure that transportation operations are in full compliance with all applicable regulatory requirements and by oversight personnel who must verify compliance activities.

  13. Far Noise Field of Air Jets and Jet Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callaghan, Edmund E; Coles, Willard D

    1957-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to study and compare the acoustic radiation of air jets and jet engines. A number of different nozzle-exit shapes were studied with air jets to determine the effect of exit shape on noise generation. Circular, square, rectangular, and elliptical convergent nozzles and convergent-divergent and plug nozzles were investigated. The spectral distributions of the sound power for the engine and the air jet were in good agreement for the case where the engine data were not greatly affected by reflection or jet interference effects. Such power spectra for a subsonic or slightly choked engine or air jet show that the peaks of the spectra occur at a Strouhal number of 0.3.

  14. Air

    MedlinePlus

    ... do to protect yourself from dirty air . Indoor air pollution and outdoor air pollution Air can be polluted indoors and it can ... this chart to see what things cause indoor air pollution and what things cause outdoor air pollution! Indoor ...

  15. Ohio EE 2000: A Strategic Plan for Environmental Education in Ohio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Environmental Protection Agency, Columbus.

    In 1996, the Environmental Education Council of Ohio (EECO) took the lead in developing a statewide plan to build Ohio's capacity--or Ohio's ability to provide leadership and resources--for environmental education. The goal for the project was to collaboratively develop and implement a statewide strategy for building Ohio's ability to promote…

  16. Field Studies for Secondary Organic Aerosol in the Transboundary Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irei, S.; Takami, A.; Sadanaga, Y.; Nozoe, S.; Hayashi, M.; Hara, K.; Arakaki, T.; Hatakeyama, S.; Miyoshi, T.; Yokouchi, Y.; Bandow, H.

    2014-12-01

    To study formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) in the air outflowed from the Chinese continent and its fraction in an urban city located in downwind, we have conducted field studies at two background sites and one urban site in the western Japan: the Cape Hedo Aerosol and Atmospheric Monitoring Station (26.9˚N, 128.3˚E), the Fukue Atmospheric Monitoring Station (32.8˚N, 128.7˚E), and Fukuoka University (33.6˚N, 130.4˚E), respectively. During the studies, stable carbon isotope ratio (δ13C) of low-volatile water-soluble organic carbon (LV-WSOC) was measured in 24 h collected filter samples of total suspended particulate matter. Concentration of fine organic aerosol and the proportion of the signal at m/z 44 (ions from the carboxyl group) in the organic mass spectra (f44) were also measured by Aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometers. Limited to the Fukue site only, mixing ratios of trace gas species, such as aromatic hydrocarbons, NOx, and NOy, were also measured using GC-FID and NOx and NOyanalyzers for estimation of photochemical age (t[OH]). A case study in December 2010 showed that plots of δ13C versus f44 showed systematic variations at Hedo and Fukue. However, their trends were opposite. At Fukue the trend was consistent in the plot of δ13C of LV-WSOC versus t[OH] estimated by the NOx/NOy or the hydrocarbon ratios, indicating influence of SOA. The systematic trends aforementioned qualitatively agreed with a binary mixture model of SOA with background LV-WSOC having the f44 of ~0.06 and the δ13C of -17‰ or higher, implication of some influence of primary emission associated with C4plants. Given that the LV-WSOC at the urban Fukuoka site was a binary mixture, a mass balance for δ13C was constructed below. In the equation, δ13CMix, δ13CLocal, δ13CTrans, and FLocal are δ13C of binary LV-WSOC mixture, δ13C of LV-WSOC from local emission origin, δ13C of LV-WSOC from transboundary pollution origin, and a fraction of LV-WSOC from local emission

  17. Management of Social Incentives in Air Force Technical Training: A Field Experiment. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hakel, Milton D.; And Others

    The report is a study of the utility of social reinforcement for improving Air Force training. It was conducted through a field evaluation of social incentive instructional systems which would serve to improve student motivation, classroom performance, and attitudes. The participants included a total of 300 trainees from two Air Force bases; 25…

  18. Interim Report for Bioventing Field Initiative at Site UST 173, Robins Air Force Base, Georgia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    This report describes the activities conducted at Robins Air Force Base (AFB), Georgia, Site UST 173 as part of the Bioventing Field Initiative for...which includes a soil gas survey, air permeability test, in situ respiration tests, and installation of bioventing systems. The specific objectives of this task are described in the following section.

  19. Transport properties of high-temperature air in a magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Bruno, D.; Capitelli, M.; Catalfamo, C.; Giordano, D.

    2011-01-15

    Transport properties of equilibrium air plasmas in a magnetic field are calculated with the Chapman-Enskog method. The range considered for the temperature is [50-50 000] K and for the magnetic induction is [0-300] T.

  20. 76 FR 18288 - Ohio Disaster #OH-00026

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION Ohio Disaster OH-00026 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 1. SUMMARY: This is an amendment of the Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Ohio dated 03/18...'s disaster declaration in the State of Ohio, dated 03/18/2011, is hereby amended to establish...

  1. 75 FR 61229 - Ohio Disaster #OH-00023

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-04

    ... ADMINISTRATION Ohio Disaster OH-00023 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of OHIO dated 09/27/2010... adversely affected by the disaster: Primary Counties: Athens. Contiguous Counties: Ohio: Hocking,...

  2. 76 FR 16846 - Ohio Disaster # OH-00026

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-25

    ... ADMINISTRATION Ohio Disaster OH-00026 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of OHIO dated 03/18/2011...: Ohio: Allen, Crawford, Darke, Delaware, Hardin, Logan, Mercer, Morrow, Shelby, Union, Van Wert,...

  3. Staying the Course: Racing for Ohio's Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Logan, Debra Kay

    2010-01-01

    With the change in Ohio's Operating Standards in July of 2002, students across Ohio began losing school library learning opportunities. District after district made financially based decisions to minimize, and in a few cases totally eliminate, school library programs. Across the state, many of Ohio's children lost precious learning opportunities.…

  4. 77 FR 16315 - Ohio Disaster #OH-00032

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-20

    ... ADMINISTRATION Ohio Disaster OH-00032 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Ohio dated 03/13/2012... adversely affected by the disaster: Primary Counties: Clermont. Contiguous Counties: Ohio: Brown,...

  5. 76 FR 33804 - Ohio Disaster #OH-00027

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-09

    ... ADMINISTRATION Ohio Disaster OH-00027 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Ohio dated 06/02/2011...: Ohio: Gallia, Pike, Ross, Scioto, Vinton. Kentucky: Boyd, Greenup. West Virginia: Cabell, Wayne....

  6. Music in Ohio Schools. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clay, Thomas

    To determine facts and opinions concerning the status of music in all Ohio schools (public and private), questionnaires were sent to the 4,389 K-12 teachers listed in the 1981 Ohio Music Education Association (OMEA) Directory and survey instruments were mailed to superintendents of each of Ohio's 614 school districts. Approximately 47.5% of the…

  7. Probing Atmospheric Electric Fields in Thunderstorms through Radio Emission from Cosmic-Ray-Induced Air Showers.

    PubMed

    Schellart, P; Trinh, T N G; Buitink, S; Corstanje, A; Enriquez, J E; Falcke, H; Hörandel, J R; Nelles, A; Rachen, J P; Rossetto, L; Scholten, O; Ter Veen, S; Thoudam, S; Ebert, U; Koehn, C; Rutjes, C; Alexov, A; Anderson, J M; Avruch, I M; Bentum, M J; Bernardi, G; Best, P; Bonafede, A; Breitling, F; Broderick, J W; Brüggen, M; Butcher, H R; Ciardi, B; de Geus, E; de Vos, M; Duscha, S; Eislöffel, J; Fallows, R A; Frieswijk, W; Garrett, M A; Grießmeier, J; Gunst, A W; Heald, G; Hessels, J W T; Hoeft, M; Holties, H A; Juette, E; Kondratiev, V I; Kuniyoshi, M; Kuper, G; Mann, G; McFadden, R; McKay-Bukowski, D; McKean, J P; Mevius, M; Moldon, J; Norden, M J; Orru, E; Paas, H; Pandey-Pommier, M; Pizzo, R; Polatidis, A G; Reich, W; Röttgering, H; Scaife, A M M; Schwarz, D J; Serylak, M; Smirnov, O; Steinmetz, M; Swinbank, J; Tagger, M; Tasse, C; Toribio, M C; van Weeren, R J; Vermeulen, R; Vocks, C; Wise, M W; Wucknitz, O; Zarka, P

    2015-04-24

    We present measurements of radio emission from cosmic ray air showers that took place during thunderstorms. The intensity and polarization patterns of these air showers are radically different from those measured during fair-weather conditions. With the use of a simple two-layer model for the atmospheric electric field, these patterns can be well reproduced by state-of-the-art simulation codes. This in turn provides a novel way to study atmospheric electric fields.

  8. Compressed-air energy storage: Pittsfield aquifer field test

    SciTech Connect

    Bui, H.V.; Herzog, R.A.; Jacewicz, D.M.; Lange, G.R.; Scarpace, E.R.; Thomas, H.H. )

    1990-02-01

    This report documents the results of a comprehensive investigation into the practical feasibility for Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) in Porous Media. Natural gas porous media storage technology developed from seventy years of experience by the natural gas storage industry is applied to the investigation of CAES in porous media. A major objective of this investigation is the geologic characterization, deliverability prediction, and operations analysis of the Pittsfield CAES aquifer experiment, conducted in Pike County, Illinois during 1981--85 under EPRI/DOE sponsorship. Emphasis has been placed on applying accepted petroleum engineering concepts to the study of deliverability and on the characterization and quantification of oxygen losses which reportedly occurred at Pittsfield. Other objectives are to apply the natural gas underground storage technology and approach to a general study of CAES feasibility in porous media reservoirs, with emphasis on the practical risks and constraints of air storage in aquifer and depleted natural gas reservoirs, the effects of water on CAES operation, corrosion effects, and a review of air dehydration options.

  9. Field Hydraulic and Air-Blast Sprayers for Row Crops.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Herbert, Jr., Comp.

    This agriculture extension service publication from Pennsylvania State University discusses techniques and equipment used in spraying field crops. In the discussion of field hydraulic sprayers, specific topics include types of sprayers, tanks, pumps, pressure regulators, hoses, boom spraying, directed spraying, and nozzle bodies. In the discussion…

  10. Ohio Veterans' Children's Home [and] Update: Ohio Veterans' Children's Home.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Legislative Office of Education Oversight, Columbus.

    The education and related services provided by the Ohio Veterans' Children's Home (OVCH) to its 211 residents (ages 6 to 19) were evaluated. Children in the home arrive either by placement through a public agency or by private placement, and the average length of stay is about a year. Approximately half of the children appear to have severe…

  11. Cloud Patterns and the Upper Air Wind Field,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-10-01

    34DZ" with respect to the other air. Or, if moisture, dust, or smoke is introduced into the flow upstrean from "DZ", then "DZ" acts as a southeastern...34DZ" results in matter such as dust, smoke , or moisture in the system to be vertically thickest in a band along the DZ axis. It may become thicker by...sunrise. Sometimes during summer or late spring when the low level enviroment is very moist, the outflow boundaries from the convection will continue to

  12. Field evaluation of a horizontal well recirculation system for groundwater treatment: Pilot test at the Clean Test Site Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Piketon, Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Muck, M.T.; Kearl, P.M.; Siegrist, R.L.

    1998-08-01

    This report presents the results of field testing a horizontal well recirculation system at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS). The recirculation system uses a pair of horizontal wells, one for groundwater extraction and treatment and the other for reinjection of treated groundwater, to set up a recirculation flow field. The induced flow field from the injection well to the extraction well establishes a sweeping action for the removal and treatment of groundwater contaminants. The overall purpose of this project is to study treatment of mixed groundwater contaminants that occur in a thin water-bearing zone not easily targeted by traditional vertical wells. The project involves several research elements, including treatment-process evaluation, hydrodynamic flow and transport modeling, pilot testing at an uncontaminated site, and pilot testing at a contaminated site. The results of the pilot test at an uncontaminated site, the Clean Test Site (CTS), are presented in this report.

  13. Limnology of selected lakes in Ohio, 1975

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tobin, Robert L.; Youger, John D.

    1977-01-01

    Water-quality reconnaissance by the U.S. Geological Survey and Ohio Environmental Protection Agency, to evaluate the status of Ohio's lakes and reservoirs was begun in 1975 with studies of 17 lakes. Spring and summer data collections for each lake included: profile measurements of temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH, and specific conductance; field and laboratory analyses of physical, biological, chemical organic characteristics; (nutrient), and concentrations of major and minor chemical constituents from composites of the water column; and physical and chemical data from major inflows.Light penetration (secchi disk) ranged from 9.4 feet (2.9 meters) in Lake Hope to 0.4 feet (0.1 meter) in Acton Lake. Seasonal thermal stratification or stability is shown for 10 lakes deeper than 15 feet (4.6 meters). Unstable or modified temperature profiles were observed in shallow lakes (depths less than 15 feet) or lakes controlled through subsurface release valves.Dissolved oxygen saturation ranged from 229 percent (20.8 milligrams per liter) in the epilimnion of Paint Creek Lake to zero in the bottom waters of all thermally stabilized lakes. Marked chemical and physical differences and nutrient uptake and recycling developed within different thermal strata. Anaerobic zones were frequently characterized by hydrogen sulfide and ammonia.Calcium was the dominant or codominant cation, and bicarbonate and(or) sulfate were the major anions in all lakes sampled. Only Hope and Vesuvius Lakes had soft water (hardness less than 61 milligrams per liter as CaCO3 ), and both lakes were further characterized by low pH (less than 7.0). Specific conductance ranged from 510 micromhos (Deer Creek and Salt Fork Lakes) to 128 micromhos (Lake Hope). Pesticide residues were detected in Acton Lake, and concentrations of one or more trace metals were at or above Ohio Environmental Protection Agency recommended limits in 11 lakes.Fecal coliform colony counts were below 400 colonies per 100 milliliters in

  14. Horticulture. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    This list consists of essential competencies from the following specialized Ohio Competency Analysis Profiles: Floriculutre and Greenhouse Worker; Nursery and Garden Center Worker; and Turf and Landscape Worker. Developed through a modified DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) process involving business, industry, labor, and community agency…

  15. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile. Index.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    This index contains the unit titles from all 60 Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile (OCAP) lists. It is intended to facilitate the combination of units from different OCAPs in order to develop curricula that meet specific program needs (e.g., learner differences, labor market demands, and technological developments). OCAP titles are as follows:…

  16. Postretirement Medical Coverage in Ohio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adelman, Saul W.; Cross, Mark L.

    2007-01-01

    The Ohio State Teacher Retirement System (STRS) provides retirement, survivor, and disability benefits to public school (K-12) teachers, college and university professors employed by state institutions, and the spouses and eligible dependents of these employees. In doing so, it operates much like other state retirement systems. The money to…

  17. Ohio Workplace Education Resource Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northwest ABLE Resource Center, Toledo, OH.

    This manual is designed for adult basic education programs to use as a resource for workplace education (WE). It begins with a section of introductory materials, including a WE definition, scope of work, and survey results. The next section contains a program profile; director/coordinator profile; instructor profiles; Ohio ABLE workplace site…

  18. Ohio Construction Technologies Competency Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Lavonna; Bowermeister, Bob

    This document, which lists construction technologies competencies as identified by representatives from government agencies and labor organizations as well as secondary and postsecondary educators throughout Ohio, is intended to assist individuals and organizations in developing both college tech prep programs and apprenticeship training/education…

  19. Ohio Guidelines for Educational Interpreters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Dept. of Education, Columbus. Div. of Special Education.

    This document presents Ohio's state guidelines to assist school districts in providing appropriate educational interpreting services for students who have hearing impairments. A section on the primary role of the educational interpreter considers: necessary knowledge and skills, modes of communication, interpreting environments, testing…

  20. HOW OHIO HELPS MIGRANT CHILDREN.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elizabeth S. Magee Education and Research Foundation, Inc., Cleveland, OH.

    PRESENTED WERE PROBLEMS OF OHIO MIGRANT WORKERS, MOSTLY TEXANS OF MEXICAN BACKGROUND, WHOSE CHILDREN WERE DEFICIENT IN EDUCATIONAL GROWTH. THE GROWTH OF THE SUMMER SCHOOL PROGRAM BEGAN IN 1957 WITH AN INVESTIGATION THAT POINTED OUT THE NEED OF SUCH SCHOOLS FOR MIGRANT CHILDREN. IN 1958, TWO SUMMER SCHOOL CLASSES WERE HELD, IN 1959, THE TWO CLASSES…

  1. Entrepreneurship. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    Developed through a modified DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) process involving business, industry, labor, and community agency representatives in Ohio, this document is a comprehensive and verified employer competency profile for entrepreneurship. The list contains units (with and without subunits), competencies, and competency builders that…

  2. Ohio's Middle Childhood Licensure Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Paula M.; Ross, Diane; Miller, Jennifer; Dever, Robin; Jones, Karen A.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to describe middle level prepared teachers' perceptions of their practices after completing an Ohio Middle Childhood: Grades 4-9 teacher education program. Using the National Middle School Association/National Council of Accreditation of Teacher Education Initial Level Teacher Preparation Standards (2001)…

  3. Carpentry. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    This comprehensive and verified employer competency list was developed from a modified DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) process involving business, industry, labor, and community agency representatives from Ohio. This competency list contains 14 units (with or without subunits), competencies, and competency builders that identify the occupational,…

  4. Welding. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    This Ohio Competency Analysis Profile (OCAP), derived from a modified Developing a Curriculum (DACUM) process, is a comprehensive and verified employer competency list for a welding program. It contains units (with or without subunits), competencies, and competency builders that identify the occupational, academic, and employability skills needed…

  5. Antidote: Civic Responsibility. Ohio Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phi Alpha Delta Law Fraternity International, Washington, DC.

    Designed for middle school through high school students, this unit contains eight lesson plans that focus on Ohio state law. The state lessons correspond to lessons in the volume, "Antidote: Civic Responsibility. Drug Avoidance Lessons for Middle School & High School Students." Developed to be presented by educators, law student, or…

  6. Masonry. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    Developed through a modified DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) process involving business, industry, labor, and community agency representatives in Ohio, this document is a comprehensive and verified employer competency profile for masonry occupations. The list contains units (with and without subunits), competencies, and competency builders that…

  7. Ohio Engineering Technologies Competency Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Lavonna; Draeger, Meg; Bowermeister, Bob; Wancho, Richard

    This document, which lists engineering technologies competencies as identified by representatives from business and industry as well as secondary and post-secondary educators throughout Ohio, is intended to assist individuals and organizations in developing college tech prep programs that will prepare students from secondary through post-secondary…

  8. Study of flow fields induced by surface dielectric barrier discharge actuator in low-pressure air

    SciTech Connect

    Che, Xueke E-mail: st@mail.iee.ac.cn; Nie, Wansheng; Tian, Xihui; Hou, Zhiyong; He, Haobo; Zhou, Penghui; Zhou, Siyin; Yang, Chao; Shao, Tao E-mail: st@mail.iee.ac.cn

    2014-04-15

    Surface dielectric barrier discharge (SDBD) is a promising method for a flow control. Flow fields induced by a SDBD actuator driven by the ac voltage in static air at low pressures varying from 1.0 to 27.7 kPa are measured by the particle image velocimetry method. The influence of the applied ac voltage frequency and magnitude on the induced flow fields is studied. The results show that three different classes of flow fields (wall jet flow field, complex flow field, and vortex-shape flow field) can be induced by the SDBD actuator in the low-pressure air. Among them, the wall jet flow field is the same as the tangential jet at atmospheric pressure, which is, together with the vertical jet, the complex flow field. The vortex-shape flow field is composed of one vertical jet which points towards the wall and two opposite tangential jets. The complex and the vortex-shape flow fields can be transformed to the wall jet flow field when the applied ac voltage frequency and magnitude are changed. It is found that the discharge power consumption increases initially, decreases, and then increases again at the same applied ac voltage magnitude when the air pressure decreases. The tangential velocity of the wall jet flow field increases when the air pressure decreases. It is however opposite for the complex flow field. The variation of the applied ac voltage frequency influences differently three different flow fields. When the applied ac voltage magnitude increases at the same applied ac voltage frequency, the maximal jet velocity increases, while the power efficiency increases only initially and then decreases again. The discharge power shows either linear or exponential dependences on the applied ac voltage magnitude.

  9. BIOREMEDIATION FIELD EVALUATION: EIELSON AIR FORCE BASE, ALASKA (EPA/540/R-95/533)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This publication, one of a series presenting the findings of the Bioremediation Field Initiatives bioremediation field evaluations, provides a detailed summary of the evaluation conducted at the Eielson Air Force Base (AFB) Superfund site in Fairbanks, Alaska. At this site, the ...

  10. Interim Report for Bioventing Field Initiative at Westover Air Force Base, Massachusetts

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    This report describes the activities conducted at Westover Air Force Base (AFB), Massachusetts, as part of the Bioventing Field Initiative for the...respiration test, and installation of bioventing systems. The specific objectives of this Bioventing Field Initiative are described in the following section

  11. BIOREMEDIATION FIELD EVALUATION - HILL AIR FORCE BASE, UTAH

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 1990, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) established the Bioremediation Field Initiative as part of its overall strategy to increase the use of bioremediation to treat hazardous wastes at Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liabil- ity Act (C...

  12. Understrength Air Force Officer Career Fields. A Force Management Approach

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    communications, and computers; intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance CFM career field manager CGO company-grade officer CMDB Consolidated Manpower...this report were drawn from two data sources. The first is the Consolidated Manpower Data Base ( CMDB ), which is the collection of Unit Manpower

  13. The temperature fields measurement of air in the car cabin by infrared camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pešek, M.

    2013-04-01

    The article deals with the temperature fields measurement of air using the Jenoptic Variocam infrared camera inside the car Škoda Octavia Combi II. The temperature fields with the use of auxiliary material with a high emissivity value were visualized. The measurements through the viewing window with a high transmissivity value were performed. The viewing windows on the side car door were placed. In the rear car area, the temperature fields of air on the spacious sheet of auxiliary material were visualized which is a suitable method for 2D airstreams. In the front car area, the temperature fields in the air were measured with the use of the measuring net which is suitable for 3D airstreams measuring.

  14. Design and construction of cage environments for air ion and electric field research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yost, M. G.; Kellogg, E. W.

    1987-06-01

    This report describes the design and construction of cage environments suitable for chronic exposures of large groups of mice to air ions and electric fields. These environments provide defined and reproducible ion densities, ion flux, DC electric fields, sound levels, air temperature and air quality. When used during a 2 year study, these cage environments served as a durable and reliable continuous exposure system. Three environmental chambers (cubicles) housed a total of 12 cages and provided control of air temperature, air purity and lighting. Exposure cages had grounded metal exterior walls, a plexiglass door and interior walls lined with formica. An internal isolated field plate supplemented with guard wires, energized with ca 1000 VDC, created about a 2 kV/m electric field at the grounded cage floor. Air ions resulted from the beta emission of sealed tritium foils mounted on the field plate. Cages provided high ion (1.3×105 ions/cc), low ion (1.6×103 ions/cc) and field only (ion depleted < 50 ions/cc) conditions for both polarities with similar electric fields in ionized and field only cages. Detailed mapping of the floor level ion flux using 100 cm2 flat probes gave average fluxes of 880 fA cm-2 in high ion cages and 10 fA cm-2 in low ion cages. Whole body currents measured using live anesthethized mice in high ion cages averaged 104±63 pA. Both ion flux and whole body currents remained constant over time, indicating no charge accumulation on body fur or cage wall surfaces in this exposure system.

  15. MODELING AIR TOXICS AND PM 2.5 CONCENTRATION FIELDS AS A MEANS FOR FACILITATING HUMAN EXPOSURE ASSESSMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The capability of the US EPA Models-3/Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system is extended to provide gridded ambient air quality concentration fields at fine scales. These fields will drive human exposure to air toxics and fine particulate matter (PM2.5) models...

  16. Losing Ohio's Future: Why College Graduates Flee the Buckeye State and What Might Be Done about It

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas B. Fordham Institute, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Thomas B. Fordham Institute became interested in Ohio's human-talent issues via its work to improve public education. Fordham wanted answers to two related questions: what would it take to excite, attract, and retain more top college students to work in Ohio, and what else would it take to draw them into the field of education? To seek…

  17. Assessment of common soybean-infecting viruses in Ohio, USA, through multisite sampling and high-throughput sequencing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To assess the scope of virus disease problems of soybean in Ohio, USA, a survey was conducted during 2011 and 2012 soybean growing seasons. A total of 259 samples were collected from 80 soybean fields distributed in 42 Ohio counties, accounting for more than 90% of major soybean-growing counties in ...

  18. The field performance of frontal air bags: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Kent, Richard; Viano, David C; Crandall, Jeff

    2005-03-01

    This article presents a broad review of the literature on frontal air bag field performance, starting with the initial government and industry projections of effectiveness and concluding with the most recent assessments of depowered systems. This review includes as many relevant metrics as practicable, interprets the findings, and provides references so the interested reader can further evaluate the limitations, confounders, and utility of each metric. The evaluations presented here range from the very specific (individual case studies) to the general (statistical analyses of large databases). The metrics used to evaluate air bag performance include fatality reduction or increase; serious, moderate, and minor injury reduction or increase; harm reduction or increase; and cost analyses, including insurance costs and the cost of life years saved for various air bag systems and design philosophies. The review begins with the benefits of air bags. Fatality and injury reductions attributable to the air bag are presented. Next, the negative consequences of air bag deployment are described. Injuries to adults and children and the current trends in air bag injury rates are discussed, as are the few documented instances of inadvertent deployments or non-deployment in severe crashes. In the third section, an attempt is made to quantify the influence of the many confounding factors that affect air bag performance. The negative and positive characteristics of air bags are then put into perspective within the context of societal costs and benefits. Finally, some special topics, including risk homeostasis and the performance of face bags, are discussed.

  19. Magnetic Fields Can Control Heat and Sound

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-23

    Joseph Heremans March 23 2015, 2.48pm EDT Magnetic fields can control heat and sound AUTHOR Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering...Physics, and Materials Science & Engineering at The Ohio State University Sound is carried by periodic vibrations of atoms in gases, liquids and... sound waves, which then propagate through the air until they hit a listener’s eardrums and make them vibrate as well. From these vibrations, the listener

  20. Bending and growth of entrained air filament under converging and asymmetric rotational fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Parmod; Das, Arup K.; Mitra, Sushanta K.

    2017-02-01

    Here we have proposed the increase of the entrainment rate by extruding an air filament under the action of convergent but asymmetric rotational field. By varying the source speed and the diameter of rotational fields, we showed the bending of an air filament towards the higher strength direction of the asymmetric inertia. Interfacial profiles like bubble ejection from the air filament and non-collapsible entrainment with air accumulation in a stagnant zone are obtained in finite volume based numerical simulations, on gradual increase of average rotational fields. Physical understanding of bent interface profile reveals the presence of multiple stages in filament growth depending upon the inertia of surrounding medium. Accumulation of air in the stagnant zone is found to be more prominent in case of rotational speed based asymmetry in contrast to its counterpart having diametric asymmetry of imposing sources. Relative comparison between these two methods of producing asymmetric field showed faster growth of filament upon varying the source diameter, while keeping the speed same. In case of extreme retardation and enhancement of rotational asymmetry, film pinch off and formation of bubble train have been reported. The shape of ejected bubbles is governed by the inertia of the surrounding medium, and bubbles have taken elliptical shapes with their major axis aligned parallel to the adjacent velocity field.

  1. Evaluation of the Emission, Transport, and Deposition of Mercury and Fine Particulate Matter from Coal-Based Power Plants in the Ohio River Valley Region

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin Crist

    2008-12-31

    As stated in the proposal: Ohio University, in collaboration with CONSOL Energy, Advanced Technology Systems, Inc (ATS) and Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. (AER) as subcontractors, evaluated the impact of emissions from coal-fired power plants in the Ohio River Valley region as they relate to the transport and deposition of mercury and associated fine particulate matter. This evaluation involved two interrelated areas of effort: ambient air monitoring and regional-scale modeling analysis. The scope of work for the ambient air monitoring included the deployment of a surface air monitoring (SAM) station in southeastern Ohio. The SAM station contains sampling equipment to collect and measure mercury (including speciated forms of mercury and wet and dry deposited mercury), particulate matter (PM) mass, PM composition, and gaseous criteria pollutants (CO, NOx, SO2, O3, etc.). Laboratory analyses of time-integrated samples were used to obtain chemical speciation of ambient PM composition and mercury in precipitation. Nearreal- time measurements were used to measure the ambient concentrations of PM mass and all gaseous species including Hg0 and RGM. Approximately 30 months of field data were collected at the SAM site to validate the proposed regional model simulations for episodic and seasonal model runs. The ambient air quality data provides mercury, and fine particulate matter data that can be used by Ohio Valley industries to assess performance on multi-pollutant control systems. The scope of work for the modeling analysis includes (1) development of updated inventories of mercury emissions from coal plants and other important sources in the modeled domain; (2) adapting an existing 3-D atmospheric chemical transport model to incorporate recent advancements in the understanding of mercury transformations in the atmosphere; (3) analyses of the flux of Hg0, RGM, and fine particulate matter in the different sectors of the study region to identify key transport

  2. EVALUATION OF THE EMISSION, TRANSPORT, AND DEPOSITION OF MERCURY, FINE PARTICULATE MATTER, AND ARSENIC FROM COAL-BASED POWER PLANTS IN THE OHIO RIVER VALLEY REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin Crist

    2004-10-02

    Ohio University, in collaboration with CONSOL Energy, Advanced Technology Systems, Inc (ATS) and Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. (AER) as subcontractors, is evaluating the impact of emissions from coal-fired power plants in the Ohio River Valley region as they relate to the transport and deposition of mercury, arsenic, and associated fine particulate matter. This evaluation will involve two interrelated areas of effort: ambient air monitoring and regional-scale modeling analysis. The scope of work for the ambient air monitoring will include the deployment of a surface air monitoring (SAM) station in southeastern Ohio. The SAM station will contain sampling equipment to collect and measure mercury (including speciated forms of mercury and wet and dry deposited mercury), arsenic, particulate matter (PM) mass, PM composition, and gaseous criteria pollutants (CO, NOx, SO{sub 2}, O{sub 3}, etc.). Laboratory analysis of time-integrated samples will be used to obtain chemical speciation of ambient PM composition and mercury in precipitation. Near-real-time measurements will be used to measure the ambient concentrations of PM mass and all gaseous species including Hg{sup 0} and RGM. Approximately of 18 months of field data will be collected at the SAM site to validate the proposed regional model simulations for episodic and seasonal model runs. The ambient air quality data will also provide mercury, arsenic, and fine particulate matter data that can be used by Ohio Valley industries to assess performance on multi-pollutant control systems. The scope of work for the modeling analysis will include (1) development of updated inventories of mercury and arsenic emissions from coal plants and other important sources in the modeled domain; (2) adapting an existing 3-D atmospheric chemical transport model to incorporate recent advancements in the understanding of mercury transformations in the atmosphere; (3) analyses of the flux of Hg{sup 0}, RGM, arsenic, and fine

  3. Experimental analysis of the velocity field of the air flowing through the swirl diffusers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaszczur, M.; Branny, M.; Karch, M.; Borowski, M.

    2016-09-01

    The article presents the results of experimental studies of flow of air through diffusers. Presented laboratory model is a simplification of the real system and was made in a geometric scale 1:10. Simplifying refer both to the geometry of the object and conditions of air flow. The aim of the study is to determine the actual velocity fields of air flowing out of the swirl diffuser. The results obtained for the diffuser various settings are presented. We have tested various flow rates of air. Stereo Particle Image Velocimetry (SPIV) method was used to measure all velocity vector components. The experimental results allow to determine the actual penetration depth of the supply air into the room. This will allow for better definition of the conditions of ventilation in buildings.

  4. Elemental composition and size distribution of particulates in Cleveland, Ohio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, R. B.; Fordyce, J. S.; Neustadter, H. E.; Leibecki, H. F.

    1975-01-01

    Measurements were made of the elemental particle size distribution at five contrasting urban environments with different source-type distributions in Cleveland, Ohio. Air quality conditions ranged from normal to air pollution alert levels. A parallel network of high-volume cascade impactors (5-state) were used for simultaneous sampling on glass fiber surfaces for mass determinations and on Whatman-41 surfaces for elemental analysis by neutron activation for 25 elements. The elemental data are assessed in terms of distribution functions and interrelationships and are compared between locations as a function of resultant wind direction in an attempt to relate the findings to sources.

  5. Simulation of radio emission from air showers in atmospheric electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Buitink, S.; Huege, T.; Falcke, H; Kuijpers, J.

    2010-02-25

    We study the effect of atmospheric electric fields on the radio pulse emitted by cos- mic ray air showers. Under fair weather conditions the dominant part of the radio emission is driven by the geomagnetic field. When the shower charges are accelerated and deflected in an electric field additional radiation is emitted. We simulate this effect with the Monte Carlo code REAS2, using CORSIKA-simulated showers as input. In both codes a routine has been implemented that treats the effect of the electric field on the shower particles. We find that the radio pulse is significantly altered in background fields of the order of ~100 V/cm and higher. Practically, this means that air showers passing through thunderstorms emit radio pulses that are not a reliable measure for the shower energy. Under other weather circumstances significant electric field effects are expected to occur rarely, but nimbostratus clouds can harbor fields that are large enough. In general, the contribution of the electric field to the radio pulse has polarization properties that are different from the geomagnetic pulse. In order to filter out radio pulses that have been affected by electric field effects, radio air shower experiments should keep weatherinformation and perform full polarization measurements of the radio signal.

  6. Avian survey and field guide for Osan Air Base, Korea.

    SciTech Connect

    Levenson, J.

    2006-12-05

    This report summarizes the results of the avian surveys conducted at Osan Air Base (AB). This ongoing survey is conducted to comply with requirements of the Environmental Governing Standards (EGS) for the Republic of Korea, the Integrated Natural Resources Management Plan (INRMP) for Osan AB, and the 51st Fighter Wing's Bird Aircraft Strike Hazard (BASH) Plan. One hundred ten bird species representing 35 families were identified and recorded. Seven species are designated as Natural Monuments, and their protection is accorded by the Korean Ministry of Culture and Tourism. Three species appear on the Korean Association for Conservation of Nature's (KACN's) list of Reserved Wild Species and are protected by the Korean Ministry of Environment. Combined, ten different species are Republic of Korea (ROK)-protected. The primary objective of the avian survey at Osan AB was to determine what species of birds are present on the airfield and their respective habitat requirements during the critical seasons of the year. This requirement is specified in Annex J.14.c of the 51st Fighter BASH Plan 91-212 (51 FW OPLAN 91-212). The second objective was to initiate surveys to determine what bird species are present on Osan AB throughout the year and from the survey results, determine if threatened, endangered, or other Korean-listed bird species are present on Osan AB. This overall census satisfies Criterion 13-3.e of the EGS for Korea. The final objective was to formulate management strategies within Osan AB's operational requirements to protect and enhance habitats of known threatened, endangered, and ROK-protected species in accordance with EGS Criterion 13-3.a that are also favorable for the reproduction of indigenous species in accordance with the EGS Criterion 13-3.h.

  7. Avian Field guide and checklist for Kunsan Air Base, Korea.

    SciTech Connect

    Levenson, J. B.; Environmental Assessment

    2005-11-15

    This report summarizes the results of the avian surveys conducted at Kunsan Air Base (AB). This on-going survey is conducted to comply with requirements of the Environmental Governing Standards (EGS) for the Republic of Korea, the Integrated Natural Resources Management Plan (INRMP) for Kunsan AB, and the 8th Fighter Wing's Bird Aircraft Strike Hazard (BASH) Plan. One hundred sixteen bird species representing 34 families were identified and recorded. Seven species are designated as Cultural Property Monuments, and their protection is accorded by the Korean Ministry of Culture and Tourism. Six species appear on the Korean Association for Conservation of Nature's(KACN's) list of Reserved Wild Species and are protected by the Korean Ministry of Environment. Combined, only ten different species are Republic of Korea (ROK)-protected because the Eurasian Spoonbill, Peregrine Falcon, and Eurasian Oystercatcher are listed by both agencies. The primary objective of the avian survey at Kunsan AB was to determine what species of birds are present on the airfield and their respective habitat requirements during the critical seasons of the year. This requirement is specified in Annex C.4.a.(1-4) of the 8th Fighter Wing BASH Plan(8FWOPLAN 91-202). The second objective was to initiate surveys to determine what bird species are present on Kunsan AB throughout the year, and from the survey results determine if threatened, endangered, or other Korean-listed bird species are present on Kunsan AB. This overall census satisfies Criterion 13-3.e of the EGS for Korea. The final objective was to formulate management strategies within Kunsan AB's operational requirements to protect and enhance habitats of known threatened, endangered, and ROK-protected species in accordance with EGS Criterion 13-3.a and also that are favorable for the reproduction of indigenous species in accordance with the EGS Criterion 13-3.h.

  8. Field Study of Exhaust Fans for Mitigating Indoor Air Quality Problems & Indoor Air Quality - Exhaust Fan Mitigation.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1987-07-01

    Overall, the findings show that exhaust fans basically provide small amounts of ventilation compensation. By monitoring the common indoor air pollutants (radon, formaldehyde, carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, and water vapor), it was found that the quality of the indoor air was not adversely affected by the use of exhaust fans. Nor did their use provide any measurable or significant benefits since no improvement in air quality was ascertained. While exhaust fans of this small size did not increase radon, which is the contaminant of most concern, the researchers caution that operation of a larger fan or installation in a very tight home could result in higher levels because depressurization is greater. The daily energy consumption for use of these appliances during the heating season was calculated to be 1.5 kilowatt hours or approximately 3% of the energy consumption in the study homes. The information collected in this collaborative field study indicates that the use of these particular ventilation systems has no significant effect on indoor air quality.

  9. Far-field dispersal modeling for fuel-air-explosive devices

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, M.W.

    1990-05-01

    A computer model for simulating the explosive dispersal of a fuel agent in the far-field regime is described and is applied to a wide variety of initial conditions to judge their effect upon the resulting fuel/air cloud. This work was directed toward modeling the dispersal process associated with Fuel-Air-Explosives devices. The far-field dispersal regime is taken to be that time after the initial burster charge detonation in which the shock forces no longer dominate the flow field and initial canister and fuel mass breakup has occurred. The model was applied to a low vapor pressure fuel, a high vapor pressure fuel and a solid fuel. A strong dependence of the final cloud characteristics upon the initial droplet size distribution was demonstrated. The predicted fuel-air clouds were highly non-uniform in concentration. 18 refs., 86 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. A Methods Comparison for Collecting Macroinvertebrates in the Ohio River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wooten, M. S.; Emery, E. B.; Johnson, B. R.; Blocksom, K.

    2005-05-01

    Collection of representative benthic macroinvertebrate samples from large rivers has been challenging researchers for many years. The objective of our study was to develop an appropriate method(s) for sampling macroinvertebrates from the Ohio River. Four existing sampling methods were compared in the Markland Pool of the Ohio River (ORM 436.2 - 531.5). Ten sites were sampled in triplicate using Hester-Dendy samplers (H-D), deep Hester-Dendy samplers, multihabitat sweeps (MH), and kick nets. All sites and methods combined produced 167 separate taxa, with H-Ds collecting the highest number of taxa for an individual method with 107 and the MH collecting the lowest with 65. Each method produced taxa unique to a particular sampling method, with only 33 taxa common across all four methods. Although the MH method collected the fewest taxa, it produced the largest amount of unique taxa with 15. Preliminary results indicate that multiple collection methods are necessary for more representative macroinvertebrate surveys in the Ohio River. These resulting field methods will ultimately be used to develop a macroinvertebrate bioassessment protocol for the Ohio River.

  11. Ohio Space Grant Funds for Scholarship/Fellowship Students

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The Ohio Aerospace Institute (OAT), a consortium of university, industry, and government, was formed to promote collaborative aerospace-related research, graduate education, and technology transfer among the nine Ohio universities with doctoral level engineering programs, NASA Lewis Research Center, Air Force Wright Laboratory, and industry. OAT provides enhanced opportunities for affiliates to utilize federal government research laboratories and facilities at Lewis Research Center (LeRC) and Wright Laboratory. As a component of the graduate education and research programs, students and faculty from the member universities, LeRC engineers and scientists, and visiting investigators from industry, government and non-member universities conduct collaborative research projects using the unique facilities at LeRC, and will participate in collaborative education programs. Faculty from the member universities who hold collateral appointments at OAT, and government and industry experts serving as adjunct faculty, can participate in the supervision of student research.

  12. Flow-field differences and electromagnetic-field properties of air and N2 inductively coupled plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Minghao; Yamada, Kazuhiko; Takahashi, Yusuke; Liu, Kai; Zhao, Tong

    2016-12-01

    A numerical model for simulating air and nitrogen inductively coupled plasmas (ICPs) was developed considering thermochemical nonequilibrium and the third-order electron transport properties. A modified far-field electromagnetic model was introduced and tightly coupled with the flow field equations to describe the Joule heating and inductive discharge phenomena. In total, 11 species and 49 chemical reactions of air, which include 5 species and 8 chemical reactions of nitrogen, were employed to model the chemical reaction process. The internal energy transfers among translational, vibrational, rotational, and electronic energy modes of chemical species were taken into account to study thermal nonequilibrium effects. The low-Reynolds number Abe-Kondoh-Nagano k-ɛ turbulence model was employed to consider the turbulent heat transfer. In this study, the fundamental characteristics of an ICP flow, such as the weak ionization, high temperature but low velocity in the torch, and wide area of the plasma plume, were reproduced by the developed numerical model. The flow field differences between the air and nitrogen ICP flows inside the 10-kW ICP wind tunnel were made clear. The interactions between the electromagnetic and flow fields were also revealed for an inductive discharge.

  13. Alcohol fuel from Ohio farms

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    Brief descriptions of on-farm ethanol production methods including feedstock preparation, cooking, fermentation, and distillation are presented. Safety conditions are described. Investment in on-farm ethanol production facilities and their potential returns are addressed. The market for ethanol and ethanol blends as well as for by-products is encouraging. Legal aspects for permitting and environmental regulations both for Ohio and federal agencies are discussed. (DMC)

  14. Field air permeability and hydraulic conductivity of landfilled municipal solid waste in China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Huayong; Chen, Tan; Wang, Hongtao; Lu, Wenjing

    2012-05-15

    The successful design and operation of in situ treatment systems using air and water additions for sustainable landfilling are constrained by a lack of knowledge of the key parameters, such as field air permeability and hydraulic conductivity of landfilled municipal solid waste (MSW). This work provides data on the field air permeability k(a) and hydraulic conductivity K(w) of MSW obtained by conducting short-term air and water injection tests at a landfill in Beijing, China. The k(a) and K(w) values are found to in the range of 1.2 × 10(-13)-1.9 × 10(-12) m(2) and 5.9 × 10(-7)-7.2 × 10(-6) m s(-1), respectively. Both k(a) and K(w) decreased significantly with landfill depth due to the increase in overburden pressure and the finer particles of the waste in deeper layers, leading to a lower porosity of waste. The higher moisture saturation in the deeper layers also contributed to the decrease in k(a). To compare the permeability with respect to air and water, the water permeability k(w) was calculated based on the estimated K(w) and was found to be approximately three orders of magnitude smaller than the corresponding k(a) for waste at the same layer. The differences in k(w) and k(a) may be due to the relative air permeability, the potential short-circuiting of air and active production of biogas, which undermine the relationship between k(w) and k(a). Therefore, to successfully design and operate air and water addition systems in a landfill, in situ measurements of the air permeability and hydraulic conductivity are essential.

  15. History Untold: Celebrating Ohio History Through ABLE Students. Ohio History Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kent State Univ., OH. Ohio Literacy Resource Center.

    This document is a compilation of 33 pieces of writing presenting Ohio adult basic and literacy education (ABLE) students' perspectives of community and personal history. The items included in the compilation were written by ABLE students across Ohio in celebration of Ohio History Day. The compilation is organized in five sections as follows: (1)…

  16. Air core poloidal magnetic field system for a toroidal plasma producing device

    DOEpatents

    Marcus, Frederick B.

    1978-01-01

    A poloidal magnetics system for a plasma producing device of toroidal configuration is provided that reduces both the total volt-seconds requirement and the magnitude of the field change at the toroidal field coils. The system utilizes an air core transformer wound between the toroidal field (TF) coils and the major axis outside the TF coils. Electric current in the primary windings of this transformer is distributed and the magnetic flux returned by air core windings wrapped outside the toroidal field coils. A shield winding that is closely coupled to the plasma carries a current equal and opposite to the plasma current. This winding provides the shielding function and in addition serves in a fashion similar to a driven conducting shell to provide the equilibrium vertical field for the plasma. The shield winding is in series with a power supply and a decoupling coil located outside the TF coil at the primary winding locations. The present invention requires much less energy than the usual air core transformer and is capable of substantially shielding the toroidal field coils from poloidal field flux.

  17. Analysis of the sensitivity of soils to the leaching of agricultural pesticides in Ohio

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schalk, C.W.

    1998-01-01

    Pesticides have not been found frequently in the ground waters of Ohio even though large amounts of agricultural pesticides are applied to fields in Ohio every year. State regulators, including representatives from Ohio Environmental Protection Agency and Departments of Agriculture, Health, and Natural Resources, are striving to limit the presence of pesticides in ground water at a minimum. A proposed pesticide management plan for the State aims at protecting Ohio's ground water by assessing pesticide-leaching potential using geographic information system (GIS) technology and invoking a monitoring plan that targets aquifers deemed most likely to be vulnerable to pesticide leaching. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with Ohio Department of Agriculture, assessed the sensitivity of mapped soil units in Ohio to pesticide leaching. A soils data base (STATSGO) compiled by U.S. Department of Agriculture was used iteratively to estimate soil units as being of high to low sensitivity on the basis of soil permeability, clay content, and organic-matter content. Although this analysis did not target aquifers directly, the results can be used as a first estimate of areas most likely to be subject to pesticide contamination from normal agricultural practices. High-sensitivity soil units were found in lakefront areas and former lakefront beach ridges, buried valleys in several river basins, and parts of central and south- central Ohio. Medium-high-sensitivity soil units were found in other river basins, along Lake Erie in north-central Ohio, and in many of the upland areas of the Muskingum River Basin. Low-sensitivity map units dominated the northwestern quadrant of Ohio.

  18. Geothermal investigations in Ohio and Pennsylvania

    SciTech Connect

    Eckstein, Y.; Heimlich, R.A.; Palmer, D.F.; Shannon, S.S. Jr.

    1982-04-01

    New values of heat flow were determined for the Appalachian Plateau in eastern Ohio and northwestern Pennsylvania. Corrected values for wells in Washington and Summit Counties, Ohio, are 1.36 and 1.37 heat-flow units (HFU), respectively. Those of 1.84 and 2.00 HFU define a previously unknown heat-flow high in Venango and Clarion counties, Pennsylvania. Thermal conductivity was measured for core samples from 12 wells in Ohio and 6 wells in Pennsylvania. Heat production was determined for 34 core and outcrop samples from Ohio, Pennsylvania, and New Jersey.

  19. A VLA Search for the Ohio State ``Wow''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Robert H.; Marvel, Kevin B.

    2001-01-01

    In 1977 a search for extraterrestrial intelligence at the Ohio State University Radio Observatory recorded a strong, narrowband, and apparently intermittent emission near the 21 cm hydrogen line. The detection displayed the antenna pattern signature of a transiting celestial radio source but was not repeated in subsequent transit observations. The event has been advanced by some as a candidate interstellar signal and dismissed by others as probable interference; no independent attempt to replicate the event with a spectral resolution comparable to Ohio State's has been reported. We used the Very Large Array to search for a possible underlying source-artificial or natural-which could account for the detection by occasionally brightening because of scintillation, intrinsic variability, or some other mechanism. With a sensitivity greater than 100 times the original observations, we found two continuum sources within the Ohio State coordinate error boxes, but they displayed no unusual spectral features, showed no sign of flux variability, yielded normal spectral indices based on additional observations at 6 cm, and were too weak to account for the Ohio State detection. No narrow-bandwidth point sources were detected over a band of 1.5 MHz to a flux limit of about 20 mJy at the nominal coordinates. We conclude that the ``Wow'' was not due to a continuous source usually below Ohio State's several jansky detection threshold but occasionally increasing in flux by a factor of less than ~100. Our search does not significantly constrain the possibility of intermittent sources because we dwelled for only 5-22 minutes per field.

  20. The impacts of magnetic field on repetitive nanosecond pulsed dielectric barrier discharge in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yidi; Qi, Haicheng; Fan, Zhihui; Yan, Huijie; Ren, ChunSheng

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, the impacts of the parallel magnetic field on the repetitive nanosecond pulsed dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) are experimentally investigated by optical and electrical measurements. The DBD is generated between two parallel-plate electrodes in the ambient air with the stationary magnetic field on the order of 1 T. The experimental results show that additional microdischarge channels are generated and the photocurrent intensity of the plasma is increased by the magnetic field. The microdischarge channels develop along the magnetic field lines and the diffuse background emission of the discharge is stronger in the DBD with the magnetic field. As the pulse repetition frequency decreases from 1200 Hz to 100 Hz, only the photocurrent intensity of the third discharge that occurred at about 500 ns is noticeably increased by the additional magnetic field. It is believed that the enhancement of the memory effect and the confinement of the magnetic field on electrons are the main reasons.

  1. The radiated fields of focussing air-coupled ultrasonic phased arrays.

    PubMed

    Neild, A; Hutchins, D A; Robertson, T J; Davis, L A J; Billson, D R

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents an investigation into the fields radiated into air by ultrasonic phased arrays under transient excitation. In particular, it includes a theoretical prediction of spatial variations in amplitude throughout the both the near-field and far-field of such arrays. The approach has been used to predict the result of phasing to produce a focus in air, which can be seen to be particularly effective in the near-field of the array. Interesting features are observed, which are then described in terms of the performance of both individual elements and the resulting array. It is shown how some elements of design can be used to improve performance in focussing. The predictions are compared to the results of experiments in air using electrostatic arrays, where good focussing could be achieved provided the appropriate design principles were followed. The approach has been developed specifically for use in air, but the results would also hold for modelling in certain medical arrays where a focussing requirement might be needed close to the array itself.

  2. Field Operations and Enforcement Manual for Air Pollution Control. Volume III: Inspection Procedures for Specific Industries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weisburd, Melvin I.

    The Field Operations and Enforcement Manual for Air Pollution Control, Volume III, explains in detail the following: inspection procedures for specific sources, kraft pulp mills, animal rendering, steel mill furnaces, coking operations, petroleum refineries, chemical plants, non-ferrous smelting and refining, foundries, cement plants, aluminum…

  3. Responses of atmospheric electric field and air-earth current to variations of conductivity profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makino, M.; Ogawa, T.

    1984-05-01

    A global circuit model is constructed to study responses of air-earth current and electric field to a variation of atmospheric electrical conductivity profile. The model includes the orography and the global distribution of thunderstorm generators. The conductivity varies with latitude and exponentially with altitude. The thunderstorm cloud is assumed to be a current generator with a positive source at the top and a negative one at the bottom. The UT diurnal variations of the global current and the ionospheric potential are evaluated considering the local-time dependence of thunderstorm activity. The global distribution of the electric field and the air-earth current are affected by the orography and latitudinal effects. Assuming a variation of conductivity profile, responses of atmospheric electrical parameters are investigated. The nonuniform decrement of the conductivity with altitude increases both the electric field and the air-earth current. The result suggests a possibility that the increment of the electric field and the air-earth current after a solar flare may be caused by this scheme, due to Forbush decrease.

  4. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 91-257-2184, Ohio Civil Rights Commission, 200 Goodall Complex, Cincinnati, Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Echt, A.; Wilcox, T.G.; Crandall, M.S.; Martinez, K.F.

    1992-03-01

    In response to an employer request, an investigation was undertaken of poor indoor air quality at the Ohio Civil Rights Commission (SIC-9441), Cincinnati, Ohio. The Commission occupied three floors of an office building which was newly renovated in 1985. Complaints began following water leaks from condensate pans in the air handling units on third floor east and third floor west beginning in August of 1990. Carbon-dioxide (124389) concentrations, temperature and relative humidity were measured during the study at six different locations inside the building. Carbon-dioxide levels rose from a mean of 366 parts per million (ppm) in the morning to a mean of 638ppm in the afternoon. Temperatures ranged from 69.9 to 75.3 degrees-F. Relative humidity ranged from 51.5 to 75.5%. Over half the employees had experienced symptoms such as nasal congestion, headaches, or eye irritation while in the building. The filters for the outside air supply fit poorly and allowed dust from the outside to go around the filters, permitting entrance of organic material into the air handling system. Significant moisture blowby of the cooling coils was also noted. According to the authors, there was no clear evidence that the employees' respiratory symptoms were caused by contaminants in the building; however, the presence of thermophilic actinomycetes within the building raises concern. The authors recommend specific measures to help reduce complaints related to the indoor climate of the building.

  5. Faculty Handbook: Ohio Program of Intensive English.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parsons, Adelaide H.; Perdreau, Cornelia

    Designed for faculty who are new to the Ohio Program of Intensive English (OPIE), this handbook is intended as an orientation and basic reference guide. The OPIE is described as a program established at Ohio University in 1967 to offer intensive or semi-intensive English language training for non-native speakers who need English for academic study…

  6. 33 CFR 117.417 - Ohio River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Ohio River. 117.417 Section 117.417 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Kentucky § 117.417 Ohio River. The draw of the Southern...

  7. 33 CFR 117.417 - Ohio River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Ohio River. 117.417 Section 117.417 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Kentucky § 117.417 Ohio River. The draw of the Southern...

  8. 33 CFR 117.417 - Ohio River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Ohio River. 117.417 Section 117.417 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Kentucky § 117.417 Ohio River. The draw of the Southern...

  9. Ohio Schools and Privatization: Opportunity or Risk?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, William

    Food service, transportation and building cleaning and maintenance are big business and are seen as candidates for privatization. In Ohio, a 30-item questionnaire was developed for the state's school district superintendents. Results were generated from the 143 questionnaires that were returned (70 percent response rate). Findings show that Ohio's…

  10. 21 CFR 808.85 - Ohio.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EXEMPTIONS FROM FEDERAL PREEMPTION OF STATE AND LOCAL MEDICAL DEVICE REQUIREMENTS Listing of Specific State and Local Exemptions § 808.85 Ohio. (a) The following Ohio medical device requirement is...

  11. 21 CFR 808.85 - Ohio.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EXEMPTIONS FROM FEDERAL PREEMPTION OF STATE AND LOCAL MEDICAL DEVICE REQUIREMENTS Listing of Specific State and Local Exemptions § 808.85 Ohio. (a) The following Ohio medical device requirement is...

  12. 78 FR 47816 - Ohio Disaster # OH-00040

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-06

    ... ADMINISTRATION Ohio Disaster OH-00040 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration . ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Ohio dated 07/29/2013... determined to be adversely affected by the disaster: Primary Counties: Perry. Contiguous Counties:...

  13. Sexual Assault Reporting Procedures at Ohio Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krivoshey, Mira S.; Adkins, Rachel; Hayes, Rebecca; Nemeth, Julianna M.; Klein, Elizabeth G.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To assess how Ohio colleges conform to recommendations that address barriers to reporting sexual assault. Participants: A study sample of Ohio 4-year colleges ("N" = 105). Methods: College Web sites were examined between March and November 2011 for their availability of sexual assault policies using 8 measures. Results: Of the…

  14. 33 CFR 117.417 - Ohio River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ohio River. 117.417 Section 117.417 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Kentucky § 117.417 Ohio River. The draw of the Southern...

  15. 75 FR 47859 - Ohio Disaster # OH-00022.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-09

    ... ADMINISTRATION Ohio Disaster OH-00022. AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Ohio dated 08/04/2010... determined to be adversely affected by the disaster: Primary Counties: Lawrence. Contiguous Counties:...

  16. 75 FR 47858 - Ohio Disaster #OH-00021

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-09

    ... ADMINISTRATION Ohio Disaster OH-00021 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Ohio dated 08/04/2010... determined to be adversely affected by the disaster: Primary Counties: Wood. Contiguous Counties:...

  17. 33 CFR 117.417 - Ohio River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Ohio River. 117.417 Section 117.417 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Kentucky § 117.417 Ohio River. The draw of the Southern...

  18. 76 FR 44647 - Ohio Disaster #OH-00029

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Ohio Disaster OH-00029 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This... State of Ohio (FEMA-4002- DR), dated 07/13/2011. Incident: Severe Storms and Flooding. Incident...

  19. 77 FR 46346 - Ohio Regulatory Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-03

    ... Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement 30 CFR Part 935 Ohio Regulatory Program AGENCY: Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement (OSM), Interior. ACTION: Proposed rule; public... amendment to the Ohio regulatory program under the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977...

  20. Selected Health Practices Among Ohio's Rural Residents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, G. Howard; Pugh, Albert

    Using a stratified random sample of 12 of Ohio's 88 counties, this 1967 study had as its objectives (1) to measure the level of participation in selected health practices by Ohio's rural residents, (2) to compare the level of participation in selected health practices of farm and rural nonfarm residents, and (3) to examine levels of participation…

  1. Ohio's School Finance System: Constitutional or Unconstitutional?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bulach, Clete

    Since June 1979, when the Ohio Supreme Court declared Ohio's finance system constitutional, that system has continued to deteriorate, as evidenced by the number of districts borrowing from the school loan fund. Moreover, the supreme courts of four other states have recently declared their state financing systems unconstitutional. This paper…

  2. Diversified Health Occupations. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    This list consists of essential competencies from the following specialized Ohio Competency Analysis Profile: Dental Assistant; Medical Assistant; and Nurse Aide. Developed through a modified DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) process involving business, industry, labor, and community agency representatives in Ohio, this document is a comprehensive…

  3. Ohio's Career Continuum Program Director's Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Dept. of Education, Columbus.

    Aimed at local program directors, the handbook provides fundamental information, procedures, and strategies regarding the implementation and development of career education programs, K-10, in Ohio. An overview provides information on the purposes, history, administration, and educational components of the Ohio Career Education Program. Chapters…

  4. Electric field and dewetting induced hierarchical structure formation in polymer/polymer/air trilayers.

    PubMed

    Leach, K Amanda; Gupta, Suresh; Dickey, Michael D; Willson, C Grant; Russell, Thomas P

    2005-12-01

    Electrohydrodynamics were studied in a trilayer thin film system consisting of two different polymeric layers and air. A polymer with a higher dielectric constant, poly(methyl methacrylate), was sandwiched between air and a lower dielectric constant polymer, polystyrene. An electric field was applied normal to the interfaces. Along with electrostatic forces, dewetting forces were significant at two of the interfaces, namely, the polystyrene/silicon wafer and the polystyrene/poly(methyl methacrylate) interfaces. These two combined forces produce novel closed-cell structures that are difficult to produce by other existing techniques.

  5. In-situ bioventing: Two US EPA and Air Force sponsored field studies

    SciTech Connect

    Sayles, G.D.; Hinchee, R.E.; Brenner, R.C.; Vogel, C.M.; Miller, R.N.

    1992-01-01

    Bioventing is the process of delivering oxygen by forced air movement through organically contaminated unsaturated soils in order to stimulate in situ biodegradation in an otherwise oxygen-limited environment. The paper is a report on progress of two ongoing bioventing field studies involving JP-4 jet fuel contamination. The first investigation, at Eielson AFB near Fairbanks, Alaska, is a study of bioventing in shallow soils and cold climates in conjunction with an evaluation of soil warming techniques. The second study, at Hill AFB near Salt Lake City, Utah, is examining bioventing of large volumes of soil and determining biodegradation and volatilization rates as a function of air injection rate.

  6. Ground-water resources of the Holloman Air Force Base well field area, 1967, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ballance, W.C.; Mattick, Robert E.

    1976-01-01

    Water consumption at Holloman Air Force Base (HAFB), N. Mex., reached an all time high in 1964 and 1965. Further increases in withdrawal without expansion of pumping facilities will hasten the chemical deterioration of the ground water pumped from the well fields. Saline water in the well-field area is present on the north and west sides of the potable-water area and in a thin shallow zone that overlies the potable-water sands in part of the potable-water area. The latter source is affecting quality of the water produced from most wells. The saturated thickness of material underlying the Boles well field ranges from about 3 ,500 feet in the western part of the field to about 1,200 feet in the eastern part of the field. In the Douglass and San Andres well fields, the saturated thickness ranges from 3,500 feet to about 300 feet. Expansion of the Boles and San Andres well fields to the east and southeast would move the center of pumping away from the highly saline water to the north and west. This would eliminate overpumping of the present wells that has resulted from the expanded facilities at Holloman Air Force Base. (Woodard-USGS)

  7. Porous media experience applicable to field evaluation for compressed air energy storage

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, R.D.; Gutknecht, P.J.

    1980-06-01

    A survey is presented of porous media field experience that may aid in the development of a compressed air energy storage field demonstration. Work done at PNL and experience of other groups and related industries is reviewed. An overall view of porous media experience in the underground storage of fluids is presented. CAES experience consists of site evaluation and selection processes used by groups in California, Kansas, and Indiana. Reservoir design and field evaluation of example sites are reported. The studies raised questions about compatibility with depleted oil and gas reservoirs, storage space rights, and compressed air regulations. Related experience embraces technologies of natural gas, thermal energy, and geothermal and hydrogen storage. Natural gas storage technology lends the most toward compressed air storage development, keeping in mind the respective differences between stored fluids, physical conditions, and cycling frequencies. Both fluids are injected under pressure into an aquifer to form a storage bubble confined between a suitable caprock structure and partially displaced ground water. State-of-the-art information is summarized as the necessary foundation material for field planning. Preliminary design criteria are given as recommendations for basic reservoir characteristics. These include geometric dimensions and storage matrix properties such as permeability. Suggested ranges are given for injection air temperature and reservoir pressure. The second step in developmental research is numerical modeling. Results have aided preliminary design by analyzing injection effects upon reservoir pressure, temperature and humidity profiles. Results are reported from laboratory experiments on candidate sandstones and caprocks. Conclusions are drawn, but further verification must be done in the field.

  8. The inception of pulsed discharges in air: simulations in background fields above and below breakdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Anbang; Teunissen, Jannis; Ebert, Ute

    2014-11-01

    We investigate discharge inception in air, in uniform background electric fields above and below the breakdown threshold. We perform 3D particle simulations that include a natural level of background ionization in the form of positive and \\text{O}2- ions. In background fields below breakdown, we use a strongly ionized seed of electrons and positive ions to enhance the field locally. In the region of enhanced field, we observe the growth of positive streamers, as in previous simulations with 2D plasma fluid models. The inclusion of background ionization has little effect in this case. When the background field is above the breakdown threshold, the situation is very different. Electrons can then detach from \\text{O}2- and start ionization avalanches in the whole volume. These avalanches together create one extended discharge, in contrast to the ‘double-headed’ streamers found in many fluid simulations.

  9. Geology and hydrogeology of Naval Air Station Chase Field and Naval Auxiliary Landing Field Goliad, Bee and Goliad counties, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Snyder, G.L.

    1995-01-01

    Large vertical hydraulic-head gradients are present between the unconfined Evangeline aquifer and confined Fleming aquifers at Naval Air Station Chase Field and Naval Auxiliary Landing Field Goliad. These gradients, together with the results of the aquifer test at Naval Air Station Chase Field and assumed characteristics of the confining units, indicate that downward flow of ground water probably occurs from the water-table aquifer to the underlying aquifers. The rate of downward flow between the two confined Fleming aquifers (from A-sand to B-sand) can be approximated using an estimate of vertical hydraulic conductivity of the intervening confining unit obtained from assumed storage characteristics and data from the aquifer test. Under the relatively high vertical hydraulic-head gradient induced by the aquifer test, ground-water movement from the A-sand aquifer to the B-sand aquifer could require about 490 years; and about 730 years under the natural gradient. Future increases in ground-water withdrawals from the B-sand aquifer might increase downward flow in the aquifer system of the study area.

  10. Pouring it on in Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Malloy, M.G.

    1996-03-01

    For IMCO Recycling, Inc. (Irving, Texas), scrap is anything but a dirty word. Sheet scrap, used beverage cans (UBCs), and other types of aluminum recovered from the waste stream are the major feedstock for the company`s 335-million-pound per-year (ppy) aluminum recycling facility in Uhrichsville, Ohio, about halfway between Akron, Ohio, and Wheeling, West Virginia. The facility is the largest for IMCO, which, in turn, claims to be the world`s largest aluminum recycling company. The company upgraded the facility to its current capacity in 1994, just two years after the plant went on line. IMCO had foreseen the need for expansion when it built the facility, leaving space for two more furnaces than the eight that it had originally. IMCO, whose name was derived from the company`s predecessor, International metals Co., was organized in its current form in 1988. It now has an annual total capacity of about 1.7 billion ppy, according to Paul Dufour, the company`s CEO.

  11. Emergence of Ixodes scapularis and Borrelia burgdorferi, the Lyme disease vector and agent, in Ohio.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Glowacki, Meaghan N; Hoet, Armando E; Needham, Glen R; Smith, Kathleen A; Gary, Richard E; Li, Xin

    2014-01-01

    Lyme disease, the most common vector-borne disease in the United States, is caused by a tick-borne infection with Borrelia burgdorferi. Currently, Ohio is considered by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to be non-endemic for Lyme disease. The low incidence of Lyme disease in this state was largely attributed to the absence of the transmitting vector, Ixodes scapularis, commonly known as the blacklegged tick. However, a tick surveillance program established by Ohio Department of Health indicated that the number of I. scapularis in Ohio had increased sharply in recent years, from 0 - 5 ticks per year during 1983-2008 to 15 in 2009, 40 in 2010, and 184 in 2011. During the fall deer hunting season, examination of deer heads submitted to Ohio Department of Agriculture found 29 I. scapularis from 7 counties in 2010 and 1,830 from 25 counties in 2011. As of 2012, the tick had been found in 57 of the 88 counties of Ohio. In addition, all three active stages (larva, nymph, and adult) of I. scapularis were found in Tiverton Township of Coshocton County, demonstrating the presence of established tick populations at this central Ohio location. Of 530 nymphal or adult I. scapularis analyzed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), 32 (6.1%) tested positive for the B. burgdorferi flaB gene, ranging from 36 to 390,000 copies per tick. Antibodies to B. burgdorferi antigens were detected in 2 of 10 (20%) field-captured Peromyscus leucopus from Tiverton Township, and in 41 of 355 (11.5%) dogs residing in Ohio. Collectively, these data suggest that the enzootic life cycle of B. burgdorferi has become established in Ohio, which poses risk of Lyme disease to people and animals in the area.

  12. A Rising Tide of Digitization--The Ohio Memory Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kupfer, Shannon

    2010-01-01

    In 2009, after a year of planning and preparation, the second generation of Ohio Memory was launched. A collaborative effort of the Ohio Historical Society (OHS) and the State Library of Ohio, Ohio Memory is a repository for more than 75,000 digital items, including photographs, journals, and other manuscript materials, as well as print documents…

  13. Using Field-Metered Data to Quantify Annual Energy Use of Portable Air Conditioners

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, Thomas; Willem, Henry; Ni, Chun Chun; Stratton, Hannah; Chen, Yuting; Ganeshalingam, Mohan; Iyer, Maithili; Price, Sarah; Dunham, Camilla

    2014-12-01

    As many regions of the United States experience rising temperatures, consumers have come to rely increasingly on cooling appliances (including portable air conditioners) to provide a comfortable indoor temperature. Home occupants sometimes use a portable air conditioner (PAC) to maintain a desired indoor temperature in a single room or enclosed space. Although PACs in residential use are few compared to centrally installed and room air conditioning (AC) units, the past few years have witnessed an increase of PACs use throughout the United States. There is, however, little information and few research projects focused on the energy consumption and performance of PACs, particularly studies that collect information from field applications of PACs. The operation and energy consumption of PACs may differ among geographic locations and households, because of variations in cooling load, frequency, duration of use, and other user-selected settings. In addition, the performance of building envelope (thermal mass and air leakage) as well as inter-zonal mixing within the building would substantially influence the ability to control and maintain desirable indoor thermal conditions. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) conducted an initial field-metering study aimed at increasing the knowledge and data related to PAC operation and energy consumption in the United States.

  14. Air Quality in Megacities: Lessons Learned from Mexico City Field Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molina, L. T.

    2014-12-01

    More than half of the world's population now lives in urban areas because of the opportunities for better jobs, access to city services, cultural and educational activities, and a desire for more stimulating human interaction. At the same time, many of these urban centers are expanding rapidly, giving rise to the phenomenon of megacities. In recent decades air pollution has become not only one of the most important environmental problems of megacities, but also presents serious consequences to human health and ecosystems and economic costs to society. Although the progress to date in combating air pollution problems in developed and some developing world megacities has been impressive, many challenges remain including the need to improve air quality while simultaneously mitigating climate change. This talk will present the results and the lessons learned from field measurements conducted in Mexico City Metropolitan Area - one of the world's largest megacities - over the past decade. While each city has its own unique circumstances, the need for an integrated assessment approach in addressing complex environmental problems is the same. There is no single strategy in solving air pollution problems in megacities; a mix of policy measures based on sound scientific findings will be necessary to improve air quality, protect public health, and mitigate climate change.

  15. Numerical Simulations of Blast Loads from Near-Field Ground Explosions in Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrociński, Stanisław; Flis, Leszek

    2015-12-01

    Numerical simulations of air blast loading in the near-field acting on the ground have been performed. A simplified blast model based on empirical blast loading data representing spherical and hemispherical explosive shapes has been simulated. Conwep is an implementation of the empirical blast models presented by Kingery and Bulmash, which is also implemented in the commercial code LS-DYNA based on work done by Rahnders-Pehrson and Bannister. This makes it possible to simulate blast loads acting on structures representing spherical and hemispherical explosive shapes of TNT with reasonable computational effort as an alternative to the SPH and Eulerian model. The CPU time for the simplified blast model is however considerably shorter and may still be useful in time consuming concept studies. Reasonable numerical results using reasonable model sizes can be achieved not only for modelling near-field explosions in air but most areas of geotechnical. Calculation was compared with blast SPH and Eulerian model.

  16. Observation of the Avalanche of Runaway Electrons in Air in a Strong Electric Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurevich, A. V.; Mesyats, G. A.; Zybin, K. P.; Yalandin, M. I.; Reutova, A. G.; Shpak, V. G.; Shunailov, S. A.

    2012-08-01

    The generation of an avalanche of runaway electrons is demonstrated for the first time in a laboratory experiment. Two flows of runaway electrons are formed sequentially in an extended air discharge gap at the stage of delay of a pulsed breakdown. The first, picosecond, runaway electron flow is emitted in the cathode region where the field is enhanced. Being accelerated in the gap, this beam generates electrons due to impact ionization. These secondary electrons form a delayed avalanche of runaway electrons if the field is strong enough. The properties of the avalanche correspond to the existing notions about the runaway breakdown in air. The measured current of the avalanche exceeds up to an order the current of the initiating electron beam.

  17. Observation of the avalanche of runaway electrons in air in a strong electric field.

    PubMed

    Gurevich, A V; Mesyats, G A; Zybin, K P; Yalandin, M I; Reutova, A G; Shpak, V G; Shunailov, S A

    2012-08-24

    The generation of an avalanche of runaway electrons is demonstrated for the first time in a laboratory experiment. Two flows of runaway electrons are formed sequentially in an extended air discharge gap at the stage of delay of a pulsed breakdown. The first, picosecond, runaway electron flow is emitted in the cathode region where the field is enhanced. Being accelerated in the gap, this beam generates electrons due to impact ionization. These secondary electrons form a delayed avalanche of runaway electrons if the field is strong enough. The properties of the avalanche correspond to the existing notions about the runaway breakdown in air. The measured current of the avalanche exceeds up to an order the current of the initiating electron beam.

  18. Flightdeck and air traffic control collaboration evaluation (FACE): evaluating aviation communication in the laboratory and field.

    PubMed

    Sharples, Sarah; Stedmon, Alex; Cox, Gemma; Nicholls, Alistair; Shuttleworth, Tracey; Wilson, John

    2007-07-01

    The challenge to anticipate the human factors impact of introducing new technologies into a safety critical environment can be addressed in a number of ways. This paper presents a research programme that utilised both laboratory- and field-based assessments to examine the way in which datalink and freeflight may affect the communication and collaboration between pilots, air traffic controllers, and other actors and artefacts in the flightdeck-air traffic control (ATC) joint cognitive system. An overview of the results from these studies is presented, and guidance is provided as to the likely situations in which this new technology is most likely to be successfully applied. In addition, the methodological approach of combining results from field and laboratory data is discussed.

  19. Variations of electric field and electric resistivity of air caused by dust motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seran, E.; Godefroy, M.; Renno, N.; Elliott, H.

    2013-08-01

    report results of a field campaign conducted in the Nevada desert with a suite of electric field instruments consisting of a field mill (FM) and a short dipole antenna (SDA). Furthermore, we show that a combination of the measurements of these two instruments allows the estimation of the electric resistivity of air, an important quantity that is extremely difficult to measure near the Earth's surface. The electric resistivity of air is found to vary between 1.5 · 1013 and 6 · 1013 Ω m and to correlate with changes in electric field. Vertical DC electric fields with amplitudes up to 6 kV m-1 were observed to correspond to clouds of dust blowing through the measurement site. Enhanced DC and AC electric fields are measured during periods when horizontal wind speed exceeds 7 m s-1, or around twice the background value. We suggest that low-frequency emissions, below ~200 Hz, are generated by the motion of electrically charged particles in the vicinity of the SDA electrode and propose a simple model to reproduce the observed spectra. According to this model, the spectral response is controlled by three parameters, (i) the speed of the charged particles, (ii) the charge concentration, and (iii) the minimum distance between the particle and the electrode. In order to explain the electric fields measured with the FM sensors at different heights, we developed a multilayer model that relates the electric field to the charge distribution. For example, a nonlinear variation of the electric field observed by the FM sensors below 50 cm is simulated by a near-surface layer of tens of centimeters that is filled with electrically charged particles that carry a predominantly negative charge in the vicinity of the soil. The charge concentration inside this layer is estimated to vary between 1012 and 5 · 1013 electrons m-3.

  20. Intensive probing of a clear air convective field by radar and instrumental drone aircraft.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowland, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    An instrumented drone aircraft was used in conjunction with ultrasensitive radar to study the development of a convective field in the clear air. Radar data are presented which show an initial constant growth rate in the height of the convective field of 3.8 m/min, followed by a short period marked by condensation and rapid growth at a rate in excess of 6.1 m/min. Drone aircraft soundings show general features of a convective field including progressive lifting of the inversion at the top of the convection and a cooling of the air at the top of the field. Calculations of vertical heat flux as a function of time and altitude during the early stages of convection show a linear decrease in heat flux with altitude to near the top of the convective field and a negative heat flux at the top. Evidence is presented which supports previous observations that convective cells overshoot their neutral buoyancy level into a region where they are cool and moist compared to their surroundings. Furthermore, only that portion of the convective cell that has overshot its neutral buoyancy level is generally visible to the radar.

  1. The influence of air content in water on ultrasonic cavitation field.

    PubMed

    Liu, Liyan; Yang, Yang; Liu, Penghong; Tan, Wei

    2014-03-01

    Cavitation is a complex physical phenomenon affected by many factors, one of which is the gas dissolved in the medium. Researchers have given some efforts to the influence of gas content on sonoluminescence or some specific chemical reactions in and around the bubble, but limited work has been reported about the influence on the ultrasonic cavitation field distribution. In this work, the intensity distribution of the ultrasound field in a cleaning tank has been measured with the hydrophone. After analysed and visualised by MATLAB software, it was found that the cavitation intensity distribution in degassed water was much better than that in tap water. And further study proved that degassing process can improve the cavitation effect dramatically both in intensity and scope. Finally, the cavitation fields in mediums with different gas content were measured and the specific influence of air content on cavitation field was discussed.

  2. The Passy-2015 field experiment: wintertime atmospheric dynamics and air quality in a narrow alpine valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paci, Alexandre; Staquet, Chantal

    2016-04-01

    Wintertime anticyclonic conditions lead to the formation of persistent stable boundary layers which may induce severe air pollution episodes in urban or industrialized area, particularly in mountain regions. The Arve river valley in the Northern Alps is very sensitive to this phenomenon, in particular close to the city of Passy (Haute-Savoie), 20 km down valley past Chamonix. This place is indeed one of the worst place in France regarding air quality, the concentration of fine particles and Benzo(a)pyrene (a carcinogenic organic compound) regularly exceeding the EU legal admissible level during winter. Besides air quality measurements, such as the ones presently carried in the area by the local air quality agency Air Rhône-Alpes or in the DECOMBIO project led by LGGE, it is crucial to improve our knowledge of the atmospheric boundary layer dynamics and processes at the valley scale under these persistent stable conditions in order to improve our understanding on how it drives pollutant dispersion. These issues motivated the Passy-2015 field experiment which took place during the winter 2014-2015. A relatively large set-up of instruments was deployed on a main measurement site in the valley center and on four other satellite sites. It includes several remote sensing instruments, a surface flux station, a 10 m instrumented tower, a large aperture scintillometer, a fog monitoring station among others. Most of the instruments were present from early January to the end of February. During two intensive observation periods, 6-14 February and 17-20 February, the instrumental set-up was completed on the main site with high frequency radio-soundings (up to one per 1h30), a tethered balloon, a remote controlled drone quadcopter and a sodar. The field campaign, the instruments, the meteorological situations observed and preliminary results will be presented. This field experiment is part of the Passy project funded by ADEME through the French national programme LEFE/INSU and

  3. Viruses in maize and Johnsongrass in southern Ohio.

    PubMed

    Stewart, L R; Teplier, R; Todd, J C; Jones, M W; Cassone, B J; Wijeratne, S; Wijeratne, A; Redinbaugh, M G

    2014-12-01

    The two major U.S. maize viruses, Maize dwarf mosaic virus (MDMV) and Maize chlorotic dwarf virus (MCDV), emerged in southern Ohio and surrounding regions in the 1960s and caused significant losses. Planting resistant varieties and changing cultural practices has dramatically reduced virus impact in subsequent decades. Current information on the distribution, diversity, and impact of known and potential U.S. maize disease-causing viruses is lacking. To assess the current reservoir of viruses present at the sites of past disease emergence, we used a combination of serological testing and next-generation RNA sequencing approaches. Here, we report enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and RNA-Seq data from samples collected over 2 years to assess the presence of viruses in cultivated maize and an important weedy reservoir, Johnsongrass (Sorghum halepense). Results revealed a persistent reservoir of MDMV and two strains of MCDV in Ohio Johnsongrass. We identified sequences of several other grass-infecting viruses and confirmed the presence of Wheat mosaic virus in Ohio maize. Together, these results provide important data for managing virus disease in field corn and sweet corn maize crops, and identifying potential future virus threats.

  4. [Negative air ions generated by plants upon pulsed electric field stimulation applied to soil].

    PubMed

    Wu, Ren-ye; Deng, Chuan-yuan; Yang, Zhi-jian; Weng, Hai-yong; Zhu, Tie-jun-rong; Zheng, Jin-gui

    2015-02-01

    This paper investigated the capacity of plants (Schlumbergera truncata, Aloe vera var. chinensis, Chlorophytum comosum, Schlumbergera bridgesii, Gymnocalycium mihanovichii var. friedrichii, Aspidistra elatior, Cymbidium kanran, Echinocactus grusonii, Agave americana var. marginata, Asparagus setaceus) to generate negative air ions (NAI) under pulsed electric field stimulation. The results showed that single plant generated low amounts of NAI in natural condition. The capacity of C. comosum and G. mihanovichii var. friedrichii generated most NAI among the above ten species, with a daily average of 43 ion · cm(-3). The least one was A. americana var. marginata with the value of 19 ion · cm(-3). When proper pulsed electric field stimulation was applied to soil, the NAI of ten plant species were greatly improved. The effect of pulsed electric field u3 (average voltage over the pulse period was 2.0 x 10(4) V, pulse frequency was 1 Hz, and pulse duration was 50 ms) was the greatest. The mean NAI concentration of C. kanran was the highest 1454967 ion · cm(-3), which was 48498.9 times as much as that in natural condition. The lowest one was S. truncata with the value of 34567 ion · cm(-3), which was 843.1 times as much as that in natural condition. The capacity of the same plants to generate negative air ion varied extremely under different intensity pulsed electric fields.

  5. Effect of a uniform electric field on soot in laminar premixed ethylene/air flames

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y.; Yao, Q.; Nathan, G.J.; Alwahabi, Z.T.; King, K.D.; Ho, K.

    2010-07-15

    The effect of a nominally uniform electric field on the initially uniform distribution of soot has been assessed for laminar premixed ethylene/air flames from a McKenna burner. An electrophoretic influence on charged soot particles was measured through changes to the deposition rate of soot on the McKenna plug, using laser extinction (LE). Soot volume fraction was measured in situ using laser-induced incandescence (LII). Particle size and morphologies were assessed through ex situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) using thermophoretic sampling particle diagnostics (TSPD). The results show that the majority of these soot particles are positively charged. The presence of a negatively charged plug was found to decrease the particle residence times in the flame and to influence the formation and oxidation progress. A positively charged plug has the opposite effect. The effect on soot volume fraction, particles size and morphology with electric field strength is also reported. Flame stability was also found to be affected by the presence of the electric field, with the balance of the electrophoretic force and drag force controlling the transition to unstable flame flicker. The presence of charged species generated by the flame was found to reduce the dielectric field strength to one seventh that of air. (author)

  6. TECNAIRE winter field campaign: turbulent characteristics and their influence on air quality conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagüe, Carlos; Román Cascón, Carlos; Maqueda, Gregorio; Sastre, Mariano; Arrillaga, Jon A.; Artíñano, Begoña; Diaz-Ramiro, Elías; Gómez-Moreno, Francisco J.; Borge, Rafael; Narros, Adolfo; Pérez, Javier

    2016-04-01

    An urban field campaign was conducted at an air pollution hot spot in Madrid city (Spain) during winter 2015 (from 16th February to 2nd March). The zone selected for the study is a square (Plaza Fernández Ladreda) located in the southern part of the city. This area is an important intersection of several principal routes, and therefore a significant impact in the air quality of the area is found due to the high traffic density. Meteorological data (wind speed and direction, air temperature, relative humidity, pressure, precipitation and global solar radiation) were daily recorded as well as micrometeorological measurements obtained from two sonic anemometers. To characterize this urban atmospheric boundary layer (uABL), micrometeorological parameters (turbulent kinetic energy -TKE-, friction velocity -u∗- and sensible heat flux -H-) are calculated, considering 5-minute average for variance and covariance evaluations. Furthermore, synoptic atmospheric features were analyzed. As a whole, a predominant influence of high pressure systems was found over the Atlantic Ocean and western Spain, affecting Madrid, but during a couple of days (17th and 21st February) some atmospheric instability played a role. The influence of the synoptic situation and specially the evolution of the micrometeorological conditions along the day on air quality characteristics (Particulate Matter concentrations: PM10, PM2.5 and PM1, and NOx concentrations) are analyzed and shown in detail. This work has been financed by Madrid Regional Research Plan through TECNAIRE (P2013/MAE-2972).

  7. Evolution of the air cavity during a depressurized wave impact. I. The kinematic flow field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugni, C.; Miozzi, M.; Brocchini, M.; Faltinsen, O. M.

    2010-05-01

    This paper describes a systematic experimental study of the role of the ambient pressure on wave impact events in depressurized environments. A wave impact event of "mode (b)" [see Lugni et al., "Wave impact loads: The role of the flip-through," Phys. Fluids 18, 122101 (2006)] causes entrapment of an air cavity. Here the topological and kinematic aspects of its oscillation and evolution toward collapse into a mixture of water and air bubbles are studied, while Part II [Lugni et al., "Evolution of the air cavity during a depressurized wave impact. II. The dynamic field," Phys. Fluids 22, 056102 (2010)] focuses on the dynamic features of the flow. Four distinct stages characterize the flow evolution: (1) the closure of the cavity onto the wall, (2) the isotropic compression/expansion of the cavity, (3) its anisotropic compression/expansion, and (4) the rise of the cavity up the wall. The first two stages are mainly governed by the air leakage, the last two by the surrounding hydrodynamic flow, which contributes to compressing the bubble horizontally and to convecting it up the wall. Ullage pressure affects the ratio between the minimum and maximum cavity areas. An ullage pressure of 2.5% of the atmospheric pressure leads to an area ratio of about 360% of the equivalent ratio at atmospheric conditions.

  8. Air compressor battery duration with mechanical ventilation in a field anesthesia machine.

    PubMed

    Szpisjak, Dale F; Giberman, Anthony A

    2015-05-01

    Compressed air to power field anesthesia machine ventilators may be supplied by air compressor with battery backup. This study determined the battery duration when the compPAC ventilator's air compressor was powered by NiCd battery to ventilate the Vent Aid Training Test Lung modeling high (HC = 0.100 L/cm H2O) and low (LC = 0.020 L/cm H2O) pulmonary compliance. Target tidal volumes (VT) were 500, 750, and 1,000 mL. Respiratory rate = 10 bpm, inspiratory-to-expiratory time ratio = 1:2, and fresh gas flow = 1 L/min air. N = 5 in each group. Control limits were determined from the first 150 minutes of battery power for each run and lower control limit = mean VT - 3SD. Battery depletion occurred when VT was below the lower control limit. Battery duration ranged from 185.8 (±3.2) minutes in the LC-1000 group to 233.3 (±3.6) minutes in the HC-750 group. Battery duration of the LC-1000 group was less than all others (p = 0.027). The differences among the non-LC-1000 groups were not clinically significant.

  9. Near-field dispersal modeling for liquid fuel-air explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, D.R.

    1990-07-01

    The near-field, explosive dispersal of a liquid into air has been explored using a combination of analytical and numerical models. The near-field flow regime is transient, existing only as long as the explosive forces produced by the detonation of the burster charge dominate or are approximately equal in magnitude to the aerodynamic drag forces on the liquid. The near-field model provides reasonable initial conditions for the far-field model, which is described in a separate report. The near-field model consists of the CTH hydrodynamics code and a film instability model. In particular, the CTH hydrodynamics code is used to provide initial temperature, pressure, and velocity fields, and bulk material distribution for the far-field model. The film instability model is a linear stability model for a radially expanding fluid film, and is used to provide a lower bound on the breakup time and an upper and lower bound on the initial average drop diameter for the liquid following breakup. Predictions of the liquid breakup time and the initial arithmetic average drop diameter from the model compare favorably with the sparse experimental data. 26 refs., 20 figs., 8 tabs.

  10. Measurement of temperature and velocity fields in a convective fluid flow in air using schlieren images.

    PubMed

    Martínez-González, A; Moreno-Hernández, D; Guerrero-Viramontes, J A

    2013-08-01

    A convective fluid flow in air could be regulated if the physical process were better understood. Temperature and velocity measurements are required in order to obtain a proper characterization of a convective fluid flow. In this study, we show that a classical schlieren system can be used for simultaneous measurements of temperature and velocity in a convective fluid flow in air. The schlieren technique allows measurement of the average fluid temperature and velocity integrated in the direction of the test beam. Therefore, in our experiments we considered surfaces with isothermal conditions. Temperature measurements are made by relating the intensity level of each pixel in a schlieren image to the corresponding knife-edge position measured at the exit focal plane of the schlieren system. The same schlieren images were also used to measure the velocity of the fluid flow by using optical flow techniques. The algorithm implemented analyzes motion between consecutive schlieren frames to obtain a tracked sequence and finally velocity fields. The proposed technique was applied to measure the temperature and velocity fields in natural convection of air due to unconfined and confined heated rectangular plates.

  11. NORTHERN OHIO AEROSOL STUDY: STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS EVALUATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A consortium of Universities, located in northwest Ohio have received funds to conduct a comprehensive evaluation of land applied biosolids in that state. This USDA funded study includes observing land application practices and evaluating biosolids, soils, runoff water and bioaer...

  12. Intensive probing of clear air convective fields by radar and instrumented drone aircraft.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowland, J. R.

    1972-01-01

    Clear air convective fields were probed in three summer experiments (1969, 1970, and 1971) on an S-band monopulse tracking radar at Wallops Island, Virginia, and a drone aircraft with a takeoff weight of 5.2 kg, wingspan of 2.5 m, and cruising glide speed of 10.3 m/sec. The drone was flown 23.2 km north of the radar and carried temperature, pressure/altitude, humidity, and vertical and airspeed velocity sensors. Extensive time-space convective field data were obtained by taking a large number of RHI and PPI pictures at short intervals of time. The rapidly changing overall convective field data obtained from the radar could be related to the meteorological information telemetered from the drone at a reasonably low cost by this combined technique.

  13. Electrical conductivity of a methane–air burning plasma under the action of weak electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colonna, G.; Pietanza, L. D.; D’Angola, A.; Laricchiuta, A.; Di Vita, A.

    2017-02-01

    This paper focuses on the calculation of the electrical conductivity of a methane–air flame in the presence of weak electric fields, solving the Boltzmann equation for free electrons self-consistently coupled with chemical kinetics. The chemical model GRI-Mech 3.0 has been completed with chemi-ionization reactions to model ionization in the absence of fields, and a database of cross sections for electron-impact-induced processes to account for reactions and transitions activated in the flame during discharge. The dependence of plasma properties on the frequency of an oscillating field has been studied under different pressure and gas temperature conditions. Fitting expressions of the electrical conductivity as a function of gas temperature and methane consumption are provided for different operational conditions in the Ansaldo Energia burner.

  14. Magnetic-field generation by pulsed irradiation of aluminium in air

    SciTech Connect

    Chumakov, A N; Chekan, P V

    2015-03-31

    Magnetic-field generation arising under irradiation of an aluminium barrier in the air by a series of laser pulses is studied experimentally. It is found that the magnetic field increases nonlinearly from 10{sup -5} to 10{sup -3} T with increasing laser power density from 10{sup 7} to 10{sup 9} W cm{sup -2}, the degree of nonlinearity being different for single nanosecond pulses, for a series of such pulses with a repetition rate of 100 – 150 μs and for a combination of a millisecond laser pulse and a series of nanosecond laser pulses. The dependences of the magnetic-field induction on the power density of laser radiation in the above-mentioned regimes are established. (interaction of laser radiation with matter)

  15. Air Force Research Laboratory Technology Milestones 2008

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    Air Force Research Laboratory ( AFRL ) is the only science and technology (S&T) organization for the Air Force . Accordingly, AFRL fulfills a mission to...Readership survey is sponsored by the Air Force Research Laboratory ( AFRL ), Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio. Thank you in advance for your...Base Defense AFRL researchers participated in the Robotic Physical Security Experiment, conducted at

  16. Impact of air traffic emissions on airport air quality. Multi-scale modeling, test bed and field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramaroson, R.; Vuillot, F.; Durand, Y.; Courbet, B.; Janin, F.; Copalle, A.; Guin, C.; Paux, E.; Vannier, F.; Talbaut, M.; Weill, M.

    2004-12-01

    Air traffic emissions are playing a significant role in airport air quality. Engine emissions contribute to the ozone and PM formation. There is an emergence of a need to develop advanced numerical tools and airport emission databases for air pollution studies. Field monitoring at airports necessary to support model assessment is still limited in time and space. The French ONERA AIRPUR project has focused on three objectives: emission inventories; dispersion models; field measurements. Results are presented and discussed in this paper. The ground spatial distribution of LTO emissions using realistic aircraft trajectories, aircraft-engine classification by ICAO, fuel flow methodology and diurnal variations of fleet number, is presented and discussed. Exhaust species time evolution is simulated using a chemical-dispersion model. Results show high emissions of NOx during LTO, and a maximum of CO and Hydrocarbons during taxi. Depending on seasons, the NOx lifetime is varying differently; lower concentration is calculated far away from LTO emissions. Longer-lived pollutants such as ozone are formed downstream and require the use of advanced dispersion models. For this reason, two interactive models coupling the micro and the regional scales are developed and used in this work. A 3D CFD model (CEDRE) simulates the flow characteristics around buildings and the dispersion of emissions. CEDRE boundary conditions are provided by the 3D nested dispersion model MEDIUM/MM5, which includes a surface boundary layer chemistry and calculates the concentration of pollutants from the local to the airport vicinities. The CFD results show a tracer accumulation calculated downstream beside terminals, consistent with observations at some mega-airports. Sensibility studies are conducted to highlight the impact of emissions on ozone formation with MEDIUM. Results show that longer-lived species are produced downstream, their concentration depending on NOx, aromatics and VOC released by

  17. Fine coal flotation in a centrifugal field with an air sparged hydrocyclone

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.D.; van Camp, M.C.

    1982-11-01

    Preliminary results are reported for the design and development of a pilot-scale air-sparged hydrocyclone for cleaning fine coal (590 ..mu..m, - 28 mesh) containing 24% ash and 1.6% sulphur. The principle of separation is the flotation of hydrophobic coal particles in the centrifugal field generated by the fluid flow in the air-sparged hydrocyclone. This 152 mm hydrocyclone has a nominal capacity of 0.9 ton/h, and experimental results suggest that separations vastly superior to a water-only cyclone are possible. In addition, the separation efficiency is as good, if not better, than that achieved with conventional flotation cells. Typical results indicate that 75% clean coal can be recovered at 15% ash leaving a tailing product of almost 50% ash.

  18. Large Field of View PIV Measurements of Air Entrainment by SLS SMAT Water Sound Suppression System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stegmeir, Matthew; Pothos, Stamatios; Bissell, Dan

    2015-11-01

    Water-based sound suppressions systems have been used to reduce the acoustic impact of space vehicle launches. Water flows at a high rate during launch in order to suppress Engine Generated Acoustics and other potentially damaging sources of noise. For the Space Shuttle, peak flow rates exceeded 900,000 gallons per minute. Such large water flow rates have the potential to induce substantial entrainment of the surrounding air, affecting the launch conditions and generating airflow around the launch vehicle. Validation testing is necessary to quantify this impact for future space launch systems. In this study, PIV measurements were performed to map the flow field above the SMAT sub-scale launch vehicle scaled launch stand. Air entrainment effects generated by a water-based sound suppression system were studied. Mean and fluctuating fluid velocities were mapped up to 1m above the test stand deck and compared to simulation results. Measurements performed with NASA MSFC.

  19. Analysis of indoor air quality data from East Tennessee field studies

    SciTech Connect

    Dudney, C.S.; Hawthorne, A.R.

    1985-08-01

    This report presents the results of follow-up experimental activities and data analyses of an indoor air quality study conducted in 40 East Tennessee homes during 1982-1983. Included are: (1) additional experimental data on radon levels in all homes, repeat measurements in house No. 7 with elevated formaldehyde levels, and energy audit information on the participants' homes; (2) further data analyses, especially of the large formaldehyde data base, to ascertain relationships of pollutant levels vs environmental factors and house characteristics; (3) indoor air quality data base considerations and development of the study data base for distribution on magnetic media for both mainframe and desktop computer use; and (4) identification of design and data collection considerations for future field studies. A bibliography of additional publications related to this effort is also presented.

  20. Flood of March 1997 in southern Ohio

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jackson, K.S.; Vivian, S.A.; Diam, F.J.; Crecelius, C.J.

    1997-01-01

    Rainfall amounts of up to 12 inches produced by thunderstorms during March 1-2, 1997 resulted in severe flooding throughout much of southern Ohio. Eighteen counties were declared Federal and State disaster areas. Cost estimates of damage in Ohio from the flooding are nearly $180 million. About 6,500 residences and more than 800 businesses were affected by flooding. Nearly 20,000 persons were evacuated, and 5 deaths were attributed to the flooding. Record peak stage and streamflow were recorded at U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) streamflow-gaging stations on Ohio Brush Creek near West Union and Shade River near Chester. The peak streamflow at these two locations exceeded the estimate of the 100-year-recurrence- interval peak streamflow. The recurrence intervals of peak stream flow at selected USGS streamflow gaging stations throughout southern Ohio ranged from less than 2 years to greater than 100 years. The most severe flooding in the State was generally confined to areas within 50 to 70 miles of the Ohio River. Many communities along the Ohio River experienced the worst flooding in more than 30 years.

  1. Artificial intelligence modeling to evaluate field performance of photocatalytic asphalt pavement for ambient air purification.

    PubMed

    Asadi, Somayeh; Hassan, Marwa; Nadiri, Ataallah; Dylla, Heather

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, the application of titanium dioxide (TiO₂) as a photocatalyst in asphalt pavement has received considerable attention for purifying ambient air from traffic-emitted pollutants via photocatalytic processes. In order to control the increasing deterioration of ambient air quality, urgent and proper risk assessment tools are deemed necessary. However, in practice, monitoring all process parameters for various operating conditions is difficult due to the complex and non-linear nature of air pollution-based problems. Therefore, the development of models to predict air pollutant concentrations is very useful because it can provide early warnings to the population and also reduce the number of measuring sites. This study used artificial neural network (ANN) and neuro-fuzzy (NF) models to predict NOx concentration in the air as a function of traffic count (Tr) and climatic conditions including humidity (H), temperature (T), solar radiation (S), and wind speed (W) before and after the application of TiO₂ on the pavement surface. These models are useful for modeling because of their ability to be trained using historical data and because of their capability for modeling highly non-linear relationships. To build these models, data were collected from a field study where an aqueous nano TiO₂ solution was sprayed on a 0.2-mile of asphalt pavement in Baton Rouge, LA. Results of this study showed that the NF model provided a better fitting to NOx measurements than the ANN model in the training, validation, and test steps. Results of a parametric study indicated that traffic level, relative humidity, and solar radiation had the most influence on photocatalytic efficiency.

  2. Quantitative Determination of the Breakdown Field of Air from Van de Graaff Generator Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beach, John; Chartrand, Bridget; Gallagher, Hugh

    2016-03-01

    The Van de Graaff generator (VG) is ubiquitous in electrostatic demonstrations because of the large static charge and dramatic sparks produced. We have developed a novel technique for determining the breakdown field of air using the VG. When a spark occurs, the force of attraction between the VG and a discharge sphere suspended above it is measured by a Pasco force sensor. At this time the charge is not symmetric but pulled towards the near side of the spheres by mutual attraction. In order to interpret the measured force in terms of the breakdown field, an accurate model of the charge distribution is needed. Using the method of images for a spherical conductor in an iterative fashion we can provide this model. The electric field in the vicinity of the spheres is then calculated from the charge distribution and its maximum value is the breakdown field. In preliminary work, we determined the breakdown field to be 3.1x106 N/C at 24.9 C and 18% relative humidity. We will report our most recent determination of the breakdown field using this method and discuss the validity of the results in terms of accepted values, experimental limitations and sensitivity to the charge distribution model.

  3. An Autosampler and Field Sample Carrier for Maximizing Throughput Using an Open-Air, Surface Sampling Ion Source for MS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A recently developed, commercially available, open-air, surface sampling ion source for mass spectrometers provides individual analyses in several seconds. To realize its full throughput potential, an autosampler and field sample carrier were designed and built. The autosampler ...

  4. Field calibration of polyurethane foam (PUF) disk passive air samplers for PCBs and OC pesticides.

    PubMed

    Chaemfa, Chakra; Barber, Jonathan L; Gocht, Tilman; Harner, Tom; Holoubek, Ivan; Klanova, Jana; Jones, Kevin C

    2008-12-01

    Different passive air sampler (PAS) strategies have been developed for sampling in remote areas and for cost-effective simultaneous spatial mapping of POPs (persistent organic pollutants) over differing geographical scales. The polyurethane foam (PUF) disk-based PAS is probably the most widely used. In a PUF-based PAS, the PUF disk is generally mounted inside two stainless steel bowls to buffer the air flow to the disk and to shield it from precipitation and light. The field study described in this manuscript was conducted to: compare performance of 3 different designs of sampler; to further calibrate the sampler against the conventional active sampler; to derive more information on field-based uptake rates and equilibrium times of the samplers. Samplers were also deployed at different locations across the field site, and at different heights up a meteorological tower, to investigate the possible influence of sampler location. Samplers deployed <5m above ground, and not directly sheltered from the wind gave similar uptake rates. Small differences in dimensions between the 3 designs of passive sampler chamber had no discernable effect on accumulation rates, allowing comparison with previously published data.

  5. Field estimates of polyurethane foam - air partition coefficients for hexachlorobenzene, alpha-hexachlorocyclohexane and bromoanisoles.

    PubMed

    Bidleman, Terry F; Nygren, Olle; Tysklind, Mats

    2016-09-01

    Partition coefficients of gaseous semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) between polyurethane foam (PUF) and air (KPA) are needed in the estimation of sampling rates for PUF disk passive air samplers. We determined KPA in field experiments by conducting long-term (24-48 h) air sampling to saturate PUF traps and shorter runs (2-4 h) to measure air concentrations. Sampling events were done at daily mean temperatures ranging from 1.9 to 17.5 °C. Target compounds were hexachlorobenzene (HCB), alpha-hexachlorocyclohexane (α-HCH), 2,4-dibromoanisole (2,4-DiBA) and 2,4,6-tribromoanisole (2,4,6-TriBA). KPA (mL g(-1)) was calculated from quantities on the PUF traps at saturation (ng g(-1)) divided by air concentrations (ng mL(-1)). Enthalpies of PUF-to-air transfer (ΔHPA, kJ mol(-1)) were determined from the slopes of log KPA/mL g(-1) versus 1/T(K) for HCB and the bromoanisoles, KPA of α-HCH was measured only at 14.3 to 17.5 °C and ΔHPA was not determined. Experimental log KPA/mL g(-1) at 15 °C were HCB = 7.37; α-HCH = 8.08; 2,4-DiBA = 7.26 and 2,4,6-TriBA = 7.26. Experimental log KPA/mL g(-1) were compared with predictions based on an octanol-air partition coefficient (log KOA) model (Shoeib and Harner, 2002a) and a polyparameter linear free relationship (pp-LFER) model (Kamprad and Goss, 2007) using different sets of solute parameters. Predicted KP values varied by factors of 3 to over 30, depending on the compound and the model. Such discrepancies provide incentive for experimental measurements of KPA for other SVOCs.

  6. Ohio Advanced Energy Manufacturing Center

    SciTech Connect

    Kimberly Gibson; Mark Norfolk

    2012-07-30

    The program goal of the Ohio Advanced Energy Manufacturing Center (OAEMC) is to support advanced energy manufacturing and to create responsive manufacturing clusters that will support the production of advanced energy and energy-efficient products to help ensure the nation's energy and environmental security. This goal cuts across a number of existing industry segments critical to the nation's future. Many of the advanced energy businesses are starting to make the transition from technology development to commercial production. Historically, this transition from laboratory prototypes through initial production for early adopters to full production for mass markets has taken several years. Developing and implementing manufacturing technology to enable production at a price point the market will accept is a key step. Since these start-up operations are configured to advance the technology readiness of the core energy technology, they have neither the expertise nor the resources to address manufacturing readiness issues they encounter as the technology advances toward market entry. Given the economic realities of today's business environment, finding ways to accelerate this transition can make the difference between success and failure for a new product or business. The advanced energy industry touches a wide range of industry segments that are not accustomed to working together in complex supply chains to serve large markets such as automotive and construction. During its first three years, the Center has catalyzed the communication between companies and industry groups that serve the wide range of advanced energy markets. The Center has also found areas of common concern, and worked to help companies address these concerns on a segment or industry basis rather than having each company work to solve common problems individually. EWI worked with three industries through public-private partnerships to sew together disparate segments helping to promote overall industry

  7. The Ohio Library Association and the Ohio Library Trustees Association; a Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altman, Ellen

    This study assesses the activities of the Ohio Library Association (OLA) an the Ohio Library Trustees Association (OLTA)--the formal and informal relationships with the State Library, promotion of libraries throughout the state by these organizations, and participation and attitudes of the organizations' members. Data for the study were collected…

  8. Water Resources Data. Ohio - Water Year 1992. Volume 1. Ohio River Basin excluding project data

    SciTech Connect

    H.L. Shindel; J.H. Klingler; J.P. Mangus; L.E. Trimble

    1993-03-01

    Water-resources data for the 1992 water year for Ohio consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of ground-water wells. This report, in two volumes, contains records for water discharge at 121 gaging stations, 336 wells, and 72 partial-record sites; and water levels at 312 observation wells. Also included are data from miscellaneous sites. Additional water data were collected at various sites not involved in the systematic data-collection program and are published as miscellaneous measurements and analyses. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System collected by the US Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in Ohio. Volume 1 covers the central and southern parts of Ohio, emphasizing the Ohio River Basin. (See Order Number DE95010451 for Volume 2 covering the northern part of Ohio.)

  9. Simultaneous measurement of temperature and velocity fields in convective air flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmeling, Daniel; Bosbach, Johannes; Wagner, Claus

    2014-03-01

    Thermal convective air flows are of great relevance in fundamental studies and technical applications such as heat exchangers or indoor ventilation. Since these kinds of flow are driven by temperature gradients, simultaneous measurements of instantaneous velocity and temperature fields are highly desirable. A possible solution is the combination of particle image velocimetry (PIV) and particle image thermography (PIT) using thermochromic liquid crystals (TLCs) as tracer particles. While combined PIV and PIT is already state of the art for measurements in liquids, this is not yet the case for gas flows. In this study we address the adaptation of the measuring technique to gaseous fluids with respect to the generation of the tracer particles, the particle illumination and the image filtering process. Results of the simultaneous PIV/PIT stemming from application to a fluid system with continuous air exchange are presented. The measurements were conducted in a cuboidal convection sample with air in- and outlet at a Rayleigh number Ra ≈ 9.0 × 107. They prove the feasibility of the method by providing absolute and relative temperature accuracies of σT = 0.19 K and σΔT = 0.06 K, respectively. Further open issues that have to be addressed in order to mature the technique are identified.

  10. Laser-guided energetic discharges over large air gaps by electric-field enhanced plasma filaments

    PubMed Central

    Théberge, Francis; Daigle, Jean-François; Kieffer, Jean-Claude; Vidal, François; Châteauneuf , Marc

    2017-01-01

    Recent works on plasma channels produced during the propagation of ultrashort and intense laser pulses in air demonstrated the guiding of electric discharges along the laser path. However, the short plasma lifetime limits the length of the laser-guided discharge. In this paper, the conductivity and lifetime of long plasma channels produced by ultrashort laser pulses is enhanced efficiently over many orders of magnitude by the electric field of a hybrid AC-DC high-voltage source. The AC electric pulse from a Tesla coil allowed to stimulate and maintain the highly conductive channel during few milliseconds in order to guide a subsequent 500 times more energetic discharge from a 30-kV DC source. This DC discharge was laser-guided over an air gap length of two metres, which is more than two orders of magnitude longer than the expected natural discharge length. Long plasma channel induced by laser pulses and stimulated by an external high-voltage source opens the way for wireless and efficient transportation of energetic current pulses over long air gaps and potentially for guiding lightning. PMID:28053312

  11. Field calibration of polyurethane foam disk passive air samplers for PBDEs.

    PubMed

    Chaemfa, Chakra; Barber, Jonathan L; Moeckel, Claudia; Gocht, Tilman; Harner, Tom; Holoubek, Ivan; Klanova, Jana; Jones, Kevin C

    2009-10-01

    A field study was performed to derive uptake rates of airborne polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) to polyurethane foam (PUF) disk passive air samplers (PAS) and to investigate the influence of deployment location and device design. Data are presented on the gas-particle partitioning of PBDEs, since atmospheric phase distribution was considered to be a variable which could affect sampler performance. Uptake rates for these compounds were similar to those derived previously for other classes of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) (approximately 2-6 m(3)/day), with rates higher for the higher brominated species. Whilst other compound classes (e.g. polychlorinated biphenyls) are predominantly present in the air in the gas phase, heavier PBDEs have an association with particulates in the atmosphere at ambient temperatures. In this study, the PUF disk PAS therefore sampled PBDEs present in the gas phase and on fine aerosols with a similar sampling efficiency to those which are predominantly gas phase compounds. Compounds which are exclusively on particles are sampled less efficiently. A comparison of the three most commonly used PUF deployment configurations, used by different research groups, indicated little difference in uptake rates. The ranges of derived air concentrations for BDE-47, -99, and -183 between three sampler designs were 7.5-9.8, 7.4-12.4, and 4.7-6.6 pg/m(3), respectively. This suggests the robustness of this sampler in comparisons between regional and global campaigns where these three designs are employed.

  12. Field measurements of efficiency and duct retrofit effectiveness in residential forced air distributions systems

    SciTech Connect

    Jump, D.A.; Walker, I.S.; Modera, M.P.

    1996-08-01

    Forced air distribution systems can have a significant impact on the energy consumed in residences. It is common practice in U.S. residential buildings to place such duct systems outside the conditioned space. This results in the loss of energy by leakage and conduction to the surroundings. In order to estimate the magnitudes of these losses, 24 houses in the Sacramento, California, area were tested before and after duct retrofitting. The systems in these houses included conventional air conditioning, gas furnaces, electric furnaces and heat pumps. The retrofits consisted of sealing and insulating the duct systems. The field testing consisted of the following measurements: leakage of the house envelopes and their ductwork, flow through individual registers, duct air temperatures, ambient temperatures, surface areas of ducts, and HVAC equipment energy consumption. These data were used to calculate distribution system delivery efficiency as well as the overall efficiency of the distribution system including all interactions with building load and HVAC equipment. Analysis of the test results indicate an average increase in delivery efficiency from 64% to 76% and a corresponding average decrease in HVAC energy use of 18%. This paper summarizes the pre- and post-retrofit efficiency measurements to evaluate the retrofit effectiveness, and includes cost estimates for the duct retrofits. The impacts of leak sealing and insulating will be examined separately. 8 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  13. Laser-guided energetic discharges over large air gaps by electric-field enhanced plasma filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Théberge, Francis; Daigle, Jean-François; Kieffer, Jean-Claude; Vidal, François; Châteauneuf, Marc

    2017-01-01

    Recent works on plasma channels produced during the propagation of ultrashort and intense laser pulses in air demonstrated the guiding of electric discharges along the laser path. However, the short plasma lifetime limits the length of the laser-guided discharge. In this paper, the conductivity and lifetime of long plasma channels produced by ultrashort laser pulses is enhanced efficiently over many orders of magnitude by the electric field of a hybrid AC-DC high-voltage source. The AC electric pulse from a Tesla coil allowed to stimulate and maintain the highly conductive channel during few milliseconds in order to guide a subsequent 500 times more energetic discharge from a 30-kV DC source. This DC discharge was laser-guided over an air gap length of two metres, which is more than two orders of magnitude longer than the expected natural discharge length. Long plasma channel induced by laser pulses and stimulated by an external high-voltage source opens the way for wireless and efficient transportation of energetic current pulses over long air gaps and potentially for guiding lightning.

  14. Formation of thermal flow fields and chemical transport in air and water by atmospheric plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Tetsuji; Iwafuchi, Yutaka; Morfill, Gregor E.; Sato, Takehiko

    2011-05-01

    Cold atmospheric plasma is a potential tool for medical purposes, e.g. disinfection/sterilization. In order for it to be effective and functional, it is crucial to understand the transport mechanism of chemically reactive species in air as well as in liquid. An atmospheric plasma discharge was produced between a platinum pin electrode and the surface of water. The thermal flow field of a cold atmospheric plasma as well as its chemical components was measured. A gas flow with a velocity of around 15 m s-1 to the water's surface was shown to be induced by the discharge. This air flow induced a circulating flow in the water from the discharge point at the water's surface because of friction. It was also demonstrated that the chemical components generated in air dissolved in water and the properties of the water changed. The reactive species were believed to be distributed mainly by convective transport in water, because the variation in the pH profile indicated by a methyl red solution resembled the induced flow pattern.

  15. From the Field to the Laboratory: Air Pollutant-Induced Genomic Effects in Lung Cells

    PubMed Central

    Vizuete, William; Sexton, Kenneth G.; Nguyen, Hang; Smeester, Lisa; Aagaard, Kjersti Marie; Shope, Cynthia; Lefer, Barry; Flynn, James H.; Alvarez, Sergio; Erickson, Mathew H.; Fry, Rebecca C.

    2015-01-01

    Current in vitro studies do not typically assess cellular impacts in relation to real-world atmospheric mixtures of gases. In this study, we set out to examine the feasibility of measuring biological responses at the level of gene expression in human lung cells upon direct exposures to air in the field. This study describes the successful deployment of lung cells in the heavily industrialized Houston Ship Channel. By examining messenger RNA (mRNA) levels from exposed lung cells, we identified changes in genes that play a role as inflammatory responders in the cell. The results show anticipated responses from negative and positive controls, confirming the integrity of the experimental protocol and the successful deployment of the in vitro instrument. Furthermore, exposures to ambient conditions displayed robust changes in gene expression. These results demonstrate a methodology that can produce gas-phase toxicity data in the field. PMID:26917966

  16. East Ohio gas 'bridges' service to reach new customers

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-12-01

    A lift bridge across the Cuyahoga River at the eastern end of Whiskey Island provided the most feasible route to five new industrial customers for East Ohio Gas Co. in Cleveland. Previously considered ''unpipeable'', the island was reached by building a line along the stationary bridgework 125 ft above the bridge. The 6-in pipe is protected by a heat-fused epoxy coating; welded joints were covered in the field with heat-shrink sleeves. The line is fully electrically insulated and protected from lightning.

  17. Water use in Ohio, 1980

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eberle, Michael; McClure, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    An estimated 13,389 million gallons of water per day were used in Ohio in 1980, in four major categories of water use. Of this total, 12,645 Mgal/d (million gallons per day) were taken from surface-water sources whereas 744 Mgal/d was ground water. Totals for each category (in Mgal/d) were: thermoelectric power generation, 10,417; self-supplied manufacturing, 1,399; public water supplies, 1,432; and rural domestic and livestock, 141. Additional miscellaneous uses (irrigation, rural commercial, and non-manufacturing industrial) probably totaled about 300 Mgal/d. The five counties that led the state in total water use were: Jefferson, 2,620 Mgal/d; Lucas, 1,150 Mgal/d; Gallia, 1.086 Mgal/d; Cuyahoga, 1,085 Mgal/d; and Lorain, 991 Mgal/d. These counties, in the same order, were the top five surface-water users. (USGS)

  18. Field investigation source area ST58 old Quartermaster service station, Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Liikala, T.L.; Evans, J.C.

    1995-01-01

    Source area ST58 is the site of the old Quartermaster service station at Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. The source area is one of several Source Evaluation Report sites being investigated by Pacific Northwest Laboratory for the US Air Force as candidates for no further remedial action, interim removal action, or a remedial investigation/feasibility study under a Federal Facilities Agreement. The purpose of this work was to characterize source area ST58 and excavate the most contaminated soils for use in composting treatability studies. A field investigation was conducted to determine the nature and extent of soil contamination. The field investigation entailed a records search; grid node location, surface geophysical, and soil gas surveys; and test pit soil sampling. Soil excavation followed based on the results of the field investigation. The site was backfilled with clean soil. Results from this work indicate close spatial correlation between screening instruments, used during the field investigation and soil excavation, and laboratory analyses. Gasoline was identified as the main subsurface contaminant based on the soil gas surveys and test pit soil sampling. A center of contamination was located near the northcentral portion of the source area, and a center was located in the northwestern comer. The contamination typically occurred near or below a former soil horizon probably as a result of surface spills and leaks from discontinuities and/or breaks in the underground piping. Piping locations were delineated during the surface geophysical surveys and corresponded very well to unscaled drawings of the site. The high subsurface concentrations of gasoline detected in the northwestern comer of the source area probably reflect ground-water contamination and/or possibly floating product.

  19. Fielded ATM network for the Air National Guard Global Yankee Fort Drum exercise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminski, Robert L.; Hague, Daniel; Maciag, Chester

    1996-06-01

    This paper will review the deployment, demonstration, and test of an Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) network to support the Air National Guard `Global Yankee' field exercise held at Fort Drum, New York. The network provided forty five (45) megabit per second (mbps) ATM connections between the Air Operations Center (AOC) and Forward Operating Location (FOL) located at Fort Drum, the State University of New York (SUNY) Health Science Center located in Syracuse, New York and Rome Laboratory located in Rome, New York. Connections were made with both fiber and free space equipment. The fiber connections used were part of the existing ATM New York Network (NYNet) between Rome Lab, SUNY Health Science Center and NYNEX Corporation. This network was extended to Watertown, New York by NYNEX to provide connectivity to Fort Drum. The free space links were provided by commercial DS-3 (45 mbps) radios, and 2 to 6 mbps Troposcatter Satellite Support Radios (TSSRs). This paper will also discuss significant digital Command, Control, Communications and Intelligence enhancements to the battlefield provided by the deployed ATM network. For example, videoconferencing and shared workspace capability was demonstrated over the AOC-to-FOL TSSR link, enabling remote intelligence briefings, pilot Battle Damage Assessment, and Search and Rescue coordination. Remote Medical Diagnostics videoconferencing with MRI high resolution digital imagery was demonstrated between the FOL, AOC, and SUNY Health Science Center. Finally, the network provided connectivity between the AOC and the Joint Surveillance System (JSS) radar's located at Griffiss Air Force BAse. The JSS data combined with the Rome Lab developed Radar Analysis Program provided AOC personnel with air picture areas of interest.

  20. AirSWOT: An Airborne Platform for Surface Water Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, E.; Moller, D.; Smith, L. C.; Pavelsky, T. M.; Alsdorf, D. E.

    2010-12-01

    The SWOT mission, expected to launch in 2020, will provide global measurements of surface water extent and elevation from which storage change and discharge can be derived. SWOT-like measurements are not routinely used by the hydrology community, and their optimal use and associated errors are areas of active research. The purpose of AirSWOT, a system that has been proposed to NASA’s Instrument Incubator Program, is to provide SWOT-like measurements to the hydrology and ocean community to be used to advance the understanding and use of SWOT data in the pre-launch phase. In the post-launch phase, AirSWOT will be used as the SWOT calibration/validation platform. The AirSWOT payload will consist of Kaspar, a multi-beam Ka-band radar interferometer able to produce elevations over a 5 km swath with centimetric precision. The absolute elevation accuracy of the AirSWOT system will be achieved with a combination of high precision Inertial Motion Units (IMUs), ground calibration points, and advanced calibration techniques utilizing a priori knowledge. It is expected that the accuracy of AirSWOT will exceed or match SWOT’s accuracy requirements. In addition to elevation measurements, the AirSWOT payload will include a near-infrared camera able to provide coincident high-resolution optical imagery of the water bodies imaged by the radar. In its initial hydrology deployments, AirSWOT will investigate four field sites: the Ohio-Mississippi confluence, the lower Atchafalaya River on the Mississippi River Delta, the Yukon River basin near Fairbanks, and the Sacramento River, California. The Ohio-Mississippi confluence is targeted for its large discharge, modest slope, and control structures that modulate Ohio but not Mississippi River slopes and elevations. The lower Atchafalaya River includes low slopes, wetlands with differing vegetation types, and some open lakes. Vegetation includes Cyprus forests, floating macrophytes, and grass marshes, all of which impact radar returns

  1. Coal reserves of the Pittsburgh (No.8) bed in Belmont County, Ohio

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berryhill, Henry L.

    1955-01-01

    Remaining coal reserves totaling 1,929 million tons have been appraised in the Pittsburgh (No. 8) coal bed in Belmont County, Ohio. Of these, 508 million tons are classified as measured and 1,421 million tons are classified as indicated. All the coal has less than 1,000 feet of overburden, and most of it is of high volatile A bituminous rank. This estimate is based on field work by the United States Geological Survey, supplemented by data from the fries of the Ohio Geological Survey and from mine and drill-hole records provided by mining companies.

  2. Effect of uniform magnetic and electric fields on microstructure and substructure characteristics of combustion products of aluminum nanopowder in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Il'in, A. P.; Mostovshchikov, A. V.; Pak, A. Ya.

    2016-12-01

    We have analyzed the effect of constant electric and magnetic fields on the micro- and substructure characteristics of the combustion products of aluminum nanopowder in air. It has been found that the combustion of aluminum nanopowder in a magnetic field leads to the formation of single crystals of the hexagonal habitus, while the combustion in an electric field results in the formation of faceted crystallites with layered morphology. The fields noticeably affect the crystal lattice parameters of aluminum oxide and nitride (reduce the coherent scattering regions in aluminum nitride and increase such regions in aluminum γ-oxide). At the same time, the displacement of atoms relative to the equilibrium position becomes noticeably smaller for all crystal phases under the action of the fields (except for aluminum nitride in a magnetic field). These results have been explained by the orienting and stabilizing actions of the fields on the combustion products of aluminum nanopowder in air.

  3. ZT-P: an advanced air core reversed field pinch prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenberg, K.F.; Buchenauer, C.J.; Burkhardt, L.C.; Caudill, L.D.; Dike, R.S.; Dominguez, T.; Downing, J.N.; Forman, P.R.; Garcia, J.A.; Giger, A.J.

    1986-01-01

    The ZT-P experiment, with a major radius of 0.45 m and a minor radius of 0.07 m, was designed to prototype the next generation of reversed field pinch (RFP) machines at Los Alamos. ZT-P utilizes an air-core poloidal field system, with precisely wound and positioned rigid copper coils, to drive the plasma current and provide plasma equilibrium with intrinsically low magnetic field errors. ZT-P's compact configuration is adaptable to test various first wall and limiter designs at reactor-relevant current densities in the range of 5 to 20 MA/m/sup 2/. In addition, the load assembly design allows for the installation of toroidal field divertors. Design of ZT-P began in October 1983, and assembly was completed in October 1984. This report describes the magnetic, electrical, mechanical, vacuum, diagnostic, data acquisition, and control aspects of the machine design. In addition, preliminary data from initial ZT-P operation are presented. Because of ZT-P's prototypical function, many of its design aspects and experimental results are directly applicable to the design of a next generation RFP. 17 refs., 47 figs.

  4. Test Data of Flow Field of Shuttle SRM Nozzle Joint with Bond Defects, Using Unheated Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hair, Leroy M.; McAnally, James V.; Hengel, John E.

    1989-01-01

    The nozzle-to-case joint on the Shuttle SRM (as redesigned after the Challenger accident) features an adhesive sealant filling and bonding the joint, with a wiper O-ring to prevent the adhesive from reaching and disabling the closure O-ring. Flawless implementation of that joint design would ensure that hot, corrosive propellant combustion gases never reach the closure O-ring. However, understanding the flow field related to bonding defects is prudent. A comprehensive test program was conducted to quantify such flow fields and associated heating environments. A two-dimensional, full-scale model represented 65 inches of the nozzle joint, using unheated air as the test medium, in a blowdown mode. Geometry variations modeled RSRM assembly tolerances, and two types of bonding defects: pullaways and blowholes. A range of the magnitude of each type defect was tested. Also a range of operational parameters was tested, representative of the RSRM flow environment, including duplication of RSRM Mach and Reynolds numbers. Extensive instrumentation was provided to quantify pressures, heat rates, and velocities. The resulting data established that larger geometric defects cause larger pressure and larger heating, at the closure O-ring region. Velocity trends were not so straight-forward. Variations in assembly tolerances did not generally affect flow fields or heating. Operational parameters affected flow fields and heating as might be expected, increasing density or velocity increased heating. Complete details of this test effort are presented.

  5. Chamber and field evaluations of air pollution tolerances of urban trees

    SciTech Connect

    Karnosky, D.F.

    1981-04-01

    Results are presented for a study of the relative air pollution tolerances of 32 urban-tree cultivars as determined by both chamber fumigations and field exposures. Tolerances to ozone and sulfur dioxide, alone and in combination, were determined using short-term, acute doses administered while the plants were inside a plastic fumigation chamber located inside the Cary Arboretum greenhouses. In a follow-up study still underway, representatives of the same cultivars were outplanted at four locations in the greater New York City area. To date, only oxidant-type injury has been observed on trees in the field plots. Cultivars tolerant to all chamber and field exposures were Acer platanoides Cleveland, Crimson King, Emerald Queen, Jade Glen, and Summershade; Acer rubrum Autumn Flame and Red Sunset; Acer saccharum Green Mountain and Temple's Upright; Fagus sylvatica Rotundifolia; Fraxinus pennsylvanica Summit; and Ginkgo biloba Fastigate and Sentry. Cultivars sensitive to ozone as determined by the chamber and field tests and that may serve as bioindicators of the presence of ozone were Gleditsia triacanthos inermis imperial and Platanus acerifolia Bloodgood.

  6. 1. Photocopied 1974 from Album of Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Photocopied 1974 from Album of Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, Witteman Brothers, Smithsonian Institution, 1882. WOODCUT ILLUSTRATION OF TRESTLE WORK, CHEAT RIVER GORGE. - Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, Tray Run Viaduct, Spanning Tray Run, Rowlesburg, Preston County, WV

  7. 26. Photocopy of drawing, Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, District Engineer's ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. Photocopy of drawing, Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, District Engineer's Office, 1942 PILE RECORD PLAN, RECONSTRUCTION OF FELLS STREET WHARF, TOBACCO WAREHOUSE - Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, Tobacco Warehouse, 1000-1001 Fell Street, Baltimore, Independent City, MD

  8. 3. Photocopied 1974 from The Baltimore and Ohio Railroad and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Photocopied 1974 from The Baltimore and Ohio Railroad and Its Branches, from the Lakes to the Sea, Baltimore, 1872. EARLY VIEW AT TRACK LEVEL. - Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, Tray Run Viaduct, Spanning Tray Run, Rowlesburg, Preston County, WV

  9. Using Field-Metered Data to Quantify Annual Energy Use of Portable Air Conditioners

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, Thomas; Willem, Henry; Ni, Chun Chun; Stratton, Hannah; Chen, Yuting; Ganeshalingam, Mohan; Iyer, Maithili; Price, Sarah; Dunham, Camilla

    2014-12-12

    As many regions of the United States experience rising temperatures, consumers have come to rely increasingly on cooling appliances (including portable air conditioners) to provide a comfortable indoor temperature. Home occupants sometimes use a portable air conditioner (PAC) to maintain a desired indoor temperature in a single room or enclosed space. Although PACs in residential use are few compared to centrally installed and room air conditioning (AC) units, the past few years have witnessed an increase of PACs use throughout the United States. There is, however, little information and few research projects focused on the energy consumption and performance of PACs, particularly studies that collect information from field applications of PACs. The operation and energy consumption of PACs may differ among geographic locations and households, because of variations in cooling load, frequency, duration of use, and other user-selected settings. In addition, the performance of building envelope (thermal mass and air leakage) as well as inter-zonal mixing within the building would substantially influence the ability to control and maintain desirable indoor thermal conditions. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) conducted an initial field-metering study aimed at increasing the knowledge and data related to PAC operation and energy consumption in the United States. LBNL performed its field-metering study from mid-April to late October 2014. The study, which monitored 19 sites in the Northeastern United States (4 in upstate New York and 15 near Philadelphia), collected real-time data on PAC energy consumption along with information regarding housing characteristics, consumer behavior, and environmental conditions that were expected to affect PAC performance. Given the limited number of test sites, this study was not intended to be statistically representative of PAC users in the United States but rather to understand the system response to the cooling demand and to

  10. Sources of mercury wet deposition in Eastern Ohio, USA.

    PubMed

    Keeler, Gerald J; Landis, Matthew S; Norris, Gary A; Christianson, Emily M; Dvonch, J Timothy

    2006-10-01

    In the fall of 2002, an enhanced air monitoring site was established in Steubenville, Ohio as part of a multi-year comprehensive mercury monitoring and source apportionment study to investigate the impact of local and regional coal combustion sources on atmospheric mercury deposition in the Ohio River Valley. This study deployed advanced monitoring instrumentation, utilized innovative analytical techniques, and applied state-of-the-art statistical receptor models. This paper presents wet deposition data and source apportionment modeling results from daily event precipitation samples collected during the calendar years 2003-2004. The volume-weighted mean mercury concentrations for 2003 and 2004 were 14.0 and 13.5 ng L(-1), respectively, and total annual mercury wet deposition was 13.5 and 19.7 microg m(-2), respectively. Two new EPA-implemented multivariate statistical models, positive matrix factorization (PMF) and Unmix, were applied to the data set and six sources were identified. The dominant contributor to the mercury wet deposition was found by both models to be coal combustion (approximately 70%). Meteorological analysis also indicated that a majority of the mercury deposition found at the Steubenville site was due to local and regional sources.

  11. An Analysis of Manufacturing Engineering Technology Programs throughout Indiana, Kentucky, and Ohio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, John T.

    A study examined the extent to which postsecondary institutions in Indiana, Kentucky, and Ohio were addressing the needs of industry for those individuals desiring to enter the field of manufacturing engineering technology. The population for the study included all those schools in the three target states that were identified by a directory…

  12. Trends and Issues Affecting Economic Development in Ohio, 2001-2005.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Jerold R.; Safrit, R. Dale

    Fourteen economic development practitioners were asked to participate in a modified Delphi study that attempted to provide a level of agreement about future trends and issues that affect economic development at the county level in Ohio. Literature from several fields was reviewed to find potential trends and issues and, using a Likert-type scale,…

  13. 33 CFR 334.845 - Wisconsin Air National Guard, Volk Field military exercise area located in Lake Michigan offshore...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., Volk Field military exercise area located in Lake Michigan offshore from Manitowoc and Sheboygan... Air National Guard, Volk Field military exercise area located in Lake Michigan offshore from Manitowoc.... (b) The regulation. (1) During specific, infrequent periods when Military exercises will be...

  14. Petroleum geology of southwestern Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Sitler, G.

    1987-09-01

    Approximately 250 wells have been drilled in the 22-county area comprising southwestern Ohio. Despite numerous shows from various zones, no sustained commercial production has been established. Live oil and gas shows have been reported from surface exposures of outcropping Silurian carbonates down to, and including, the Cambrian Mount Simon Sandstone. Several wells have been completed and actually produced hydrocarbons for a short period, but were subsequently abandoned. Despite the lack of established production, the area holds considerable promise as a potential oil and natural gas producing region. Gravity, magnetics, seismic, surface and source rock geochemistry, linear trace analysis, and subsurface computer mapping have all been used to study the structure, stratigraphy, and petroleum geology of the area. Basement geology is complex and has affected sedimentation patterns in the overlying Cambrian rocks. The Grenville-Central Province contact is present in the area and exhibits faulting, mineralization, and possibly plutonism. The Cambrian and Ordovician stratigraphy in the area is relatively simple, with clastics at the base, carbonates in the middle, and a thick shale capping the sequence. Several major facies changes are evident within the section. Structural geology is also fairly simple. However, local discontinuities are apparent and include Precambrian doming and faulting, reactivated faulting, and Knox unconformable surfaces. Potential reservoirs in the area include the Utica Shale, Trenton Limestone, St. Peter Sandstone, Rose Run sandstone, Knox dolomites, Kerbel sandstone, Eau Claire Sandstone, and Mount Simon Sandstone. Favorable source rock geochemistry and the abundance of hydrocarbon shows suggest favorable source rocks to be present. Many different types of traps have been observed.

  15. Ohio History: A Professional Development Manual. Using State History To Prepare Students for Ohio's 4th Grade Citizenship Proficiency Test. 3rd Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franks, Betty Barclay; Taylor, Nancy

    This booklet contains 12 lessons about the history of Ohio correlated to the proficiency outcomes of the "Grade 4 Proficiency Test Outcomes in Ohio." Lessons include: (1) "Emigrating to Ohio"; (2) "The Era of Expansion"; (3) "Finding Out about Ohio"; (4) "Emigrating to Ohio"; (5) "Settling in…

  16. E3 Success Story - Working Together: E3 Ohio and the Ohio By-Product Synergy Network

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Mid-Ohio Regional Planning Commission (MORPC) received funding to support the integration of the national E3 sustainability initiative with the Ohio By-Product Synergy (BPS) Network to create an efficient and replicable model for reducing GHGs.

  17. Preliminary survey report: evaluation of brake-drum-service controls at Ohio Department of Transportation, Maintenance Facility, Lebanon, Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Sheehy, J.W.

    1986-07-01

    The Ohio Department of Transportation, Maintenance Facility, Lebanon, Ohio, was visited as part of a study of asbestos control during the maintenance and repair of vehicular brakes. The effectiveness of various control technologies designed to reduce asbestos exposure were evaluated.

  18. Applying Systems Thinking to Improve Special Education in Ohio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levenson, Nathan

    2012-01-01

    This report was written at the request of the Thomas B. Fordham Institute and the Educational Service Center of Central Ohio, to inform the discussion of state-level policy makers and other stakeholders on how to improve the quality and cost-effectiveness of services provided to Ohio's students with special needs. It is critical for Ohio to find…

  19. Ohio Children: Together We Can Help Them Grow.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Children's Defense Fund-Ohio, Columbus.

    Ohio, like other states, will soon begin implementing parts of a sweeping new federal welfare reform law. These seven 1- and 2-page reports, issued under the general heading of "Ohio Children: Together We Can Help Them Grow," describe various Ohio welfare programs, providing statistics on their costs and usage rates, as well as changes…

  20. 78 FR 5476 - Ohio; Major Disaster and Related Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-25

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Ohio; Major Disaster and Related Determinations AGENCY... declaration of a major disaster for the State of Ohio (FEMA-4098-DR), dated January 3, 2013, and related... have determined that the damage in certain areas of the State of Ohio resulting from severe storms...

  1. 77 FR 60003 - Ohio Disaster Number OH-00030

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION Ohio Disaster Number OH-00030 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 1... Only for the State of Ohio (FEMA- 4077-DR), dated 08/20/2012. Incident: Severe Storms and Straight-line... private non-profit organizations in the State of Ohio, dated 08/20/2012, is hereby amended to include...

  2. 78 FR 9448 - Ohio Disaster Number OH-00039

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-08

    ... ADMINISTRATION Ohio Disaster Number OH-00039 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 1... Only for the State of Ohio (FEMA- 4098-DR), dated 01/03/2013. Incident: Severe storms and flooding due... major disaster declaration for Private Non-Profit organizations in the State of OHIO, dated...

  3. 77 FR 54600 - Ohio; Major Disaster and Related Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-05

    ... [Internal Agency Docket No. FEMA-4077-DR; Docket ID FEMA-2012-0002] Ohio; Major Disaster and Related... Presidential declaration of a major disaster for the State of Ohio (FEMA-4077-DR), dated August 20, 2012, and... follows: I have determined that the damage in certain areas of the State of Ohio resulting from...

  4. 78 FR 27853 - Asian Longhorned Beetle; Quarantined Areas in Ohio

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-13

    ... Inspection Service 7 CFR Part 301 Asian Longhorned Beetle; Quarantined Areas in Ohio AGENCY: Animal and Plant... prevent the artificial spread of ALB to noninfested areas of the United States. Surveys conducted in Ohio... Clermont County, OH. The State of Ohio has quarantined the infested areas to prevent the further spread...

  5. 76 FR 28895 - Safety Zone; Ohio River, Sewickley, PA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-19

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Ohio River, Sewickley, PA AGENCY: Coast... zone on specified waters of the Ohio River in Sewickley, Pennsylvania. The safety zone is needed to... safety zone on the Ohio River from mile marker 11.7 to mile marker 12.0, extending the entire width...

  6. 27 CFR 9.78 - Ohio River Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ohio River Valley. 9.78... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.78 Ohio River Valley. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Ohio...

  7. Exploring Ohio's Private Education Sector. School Survey Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Catt, Andrew D.

    2014-01-01

    Exploring Ohio's Private Education Sector is the second entry in the Friedman Foundation for Educational Choice's "School Survey Series." This report synthesizes information on Ohio's private schools collected by the U.S. Department of Education and the Ohio Department of Education (ODE). Two appendices provide supplementary tables and…

  8. 76 FR 47221 - Ohio; Major Disaster and Related Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-04

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Ohio; Major Disaster and Related Determinations AGENCY... declaration of a major disaster for the State of Ohio (FEMA-4002-DR), dated July 13, 2011, and related... determined that the damage in certain areas of the State of Ohio resulting from severe storms and...

  9. 77 FR 41193 - Ohio; Emergency and Related Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-12

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Ohio; Emergency and Related Determinations AGENCY: Federal... of an emergency for the State of Ohio (FEMA-3346-EM), dated June 30, 2012, and related determinations... emergency conditions in the State of Ohio resulting from severe storms beginning on June 29, 2012,...

  10. Review of "Yearning to Break Free: Ohio Superintendents Speak out"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horn, Catherine; Dworkin, Gary

    2011-01-01

    The report, Yearning to Break Free: Ohio Superintendents Speak Out, describes findings of a survey of 246 Ohio school superintendents about critical issues facing the state's educational system. In particular, the intent of the study was to examine how superintendents might do more with fewer resources. The authors conclude that Ohio districts…

  11. Directory of Ohio Environmental Education Sites and Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mourad, Teresa; Morrone, Michele

    This publication is the result of a collaboration between the Environmental Education Council of Ohio (EECO) and the Office of Environmental Education at the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency (OEPA). This directory of environmental education resources within the state of Ohio is intended to assist educators in finding information that can…

  12. The Oklahoma Field Test: Air-Conditioning Electricity Savings from Standard Energy Conservation Measures, Radiant Barriers, and High-Efficiency Window Air Conditioners

    SciTech Connect

    Ternes, M.P.

    1992-01-01

    A field test involving 104 houses was performed in Tulsa, Oklahoma, to measure the air-conditioning electricity consumption of low-income houses equipped with window air conditioners, the reduction in this electricity consumption attributed to the installation of energy conservation measures (ECMs) as typically installed under the Oklahoma Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP), and the reduction achieved by the replacement of low-efficiency window air conditioners with high-efficiency units and the installation of attic radiant barriers. Air-conditioning electricity consumption and indoor temperature were monitored weekly during the pre-weatherization period (June to September 1988) and post-weatherization period (May to September 1989). House energy consumption models and regression analyses were used to normalize the air-conditioning electricity savings to average outdoor temperature conditions and the pre-weatherization indoor temperature of each house. The average measured pre-weatherization air-conditioning electricity consumption was 1664 kWh/year ($119/year). Ten percent of the houses used less than 250 kWh/year, while another 10% used more than 3000 kWh/year. An average reduction in air-conditioning electricity consumption of 535 kWh/year ($38/year and 28% of pre-weatherization consumption) was obtained from replacement of one low-efficiency window air conditioner (EER less than 7.0) per house with a high-efficiency unit (EER greater than 9.0). For approximately the same cost, savings tripled to 1503 kWh/year ($107/year and 41% of pre-weatherization consumption) in those houses with initial air-conditioning electricity consumption greater than 2750 kWh/year. For these houses, replacement of a low-efficiency air conditioner with a high-efficiency unit was cost effective using the incremental cost of installing a new unit now rather than later; the average installation cost for these houses under a weatherization program was estimated to be $786. The

  13. Field Demonstration of Active Desiccant-Based Outdoor Air Preconditioning Systems, Final Report: Phase 3

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, J.

    2001-07-09

    This report summarizes an investigation of the performance of two active desiccant cooling systems that were installed as pilot systems in two locations--a college dormitory and a research laboratory--during the fall of 1999. The laboratory system was assembled in the field from commercially available Trane air-handling modules combined with a standard total energy recovery module and a customized active desiccant wheel, both produced by SEMCO. The dormitory system was a factory-built, integrated system produced by SEMCO that included both active desiccant and sensible-only recovery wheels, a direct-fired gas regeneration section, and a pre-piped Trane heat pump condensing section. Both systems were equipped with direct digital control systems, complete with full instrumentation and remote monitoring capabilities. This report includes detailed descriptions of these two systems, installation details, samples of actual performance, and estimations of the energy savings realized. These pilot sites represent a continuation of previous active desiccant product development research (Fischer, Hallstrom, and Sand 2000; Fischer 2000). Both systems performed as anticipated, were reliable, and required minimal maintenance. The dehumidification/total-energy-recovery hybrid approach was particularly effective in all respects. System performance showed remarkable improvement in latent load handling capability and operating efficiency compared with the original conventional cooling system and with the conventional system that remained in another, identical wing of the facility. The dehumidification capacity of the pilot systems was very high, the cost of operation was very low, and the system was cost-effective, offering a simple payback for these retrofit installations of approximately 5 to 6 years. Most important, the dormitory system resolved numerous indoor air quality problems in the dormitory by providing effective humidity control and increased, continuous ventilation air.

  14. Air flow and concentration fields at urban road intersections for improved understanding of personal exposure.

    PubMed

    Tiwary, Abhishek; Robins, Alan; Namdeo, Anil; Bell, Margaret

    2011-07-01

    This paper reviews the state of knowledge on modelling air flow and concentration fields at road intersections. The first part covers the available literature from the past two decades on experimental (both field and wind tunnel) and modelling activities in order to provide insight into the physical basis of flow behaviour at a typical cross-street intersection. This is followed by a review of associated investigations of the impact of traffic-generated localised turbulence on the concentration fields due to emissions from vehicles. There is a discussion on the role of adequate characterisation of vehicle-induced turbulence in making predictions using hybrid models, combining the merits of conventional approaches with information obtained from more detailed modelling. This concludes that, despite advancements in computational techniques, there are crucial knowledge gaps affecting the parameterisations used in current models for individual exposure. This is specifically relevant to the growing impetus on walking and cycling activities on urban roads in the context of current drives for sustainable transport and healthy living. Due to inherently longer travel times involved during such trips, compared to automotive transport, pedestrians and cyclists are subjected to higher levels of exposure to emissions. Current modelling tools seem to under-predict this exposure because of limitations in their design and in the empirical parameters employed.

  15. The Effect of Air Density on Atmospheric Electric Fields Required for Lightning Initiation from a Long Airborne Object

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bazelyan, E. M.; Aleksandrov, N. L.; Raizer, Yu. Pl.; Konchankov, A. M.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of the work was to determine minimum atmospheric electric fields required for lightning initiation from an airborne vehicle at various altitudes up to 10 km. The problem was reduced to the determination of a condition for initiation of a viable positive leader from a conductive object in an ambient electric field. It was shown that, depending on air density and shape and dimensions of the object, critical atmospheric fields are governed by the condition for leader viability or that for corona onset. To establish quantitative criteria for reduced air densities, available observations of spark discharges in long laboratory gaps were analyzed, the effect of air density on leader velocity was discussed and evolution in time of the properties of plasma in the leader channel was numerically simulated. The results obtained were used to evaluate the effect of pressure on the quantitative relationships between the potential difference near the leader tip, leader current and its velocity; based on these relationships, criteria for steady development of a leader were determined for various air pressures. Atmospheric electric fields required for lightning initiation from rods and ellipsoidal objects of various dimensions were calculated at different air densities. It was shown that there is no simple way to extend critical ambient fields obtained for some given objects and pressures to other objects and pressures.

  16. The Oklahoma Field Test: Air-conditioning electricity savings from standard energy conservation measures, radiant barriers, and high-efficiency window air conditioners

    SciTech Connect

    Ternes, M.P.; Levins, W.P.

    1992-08-01

    A field test Involving 104 houses was performed in Tulsa, Oklahoma, to measure the air-conditioning electricity consumption of low-income houses equipped with window air conditioners, the reduction in this electricity consumption attributed to the installation of energy conservation measures (ECMS) as typically installed under the Oklahoma Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP), and the reduction achieved by the replacement of low-efficiency window air conditioners with high-efficiency units and the installation of attic radiant barriers. Air-conditioning electricity consumption and indoor temperature were monitored weekly during the pre-weatherization period (June to September 1988) and post-weatherization period (May to September 1989). House energy consumption models and regression analyses were used to normalize the air-conditioning electricity savings to average outdoor temperature conditions and the pre-weatherization indoor temperature of each house. The following conclusions were drawn from the study: (1) programs directed at reducing air-conditioning electricity consumption should be targeted at clients with high consumption to improve cost effectiveness; (2) replacing low-efficiency air conditioners with high-efficiency units should be considered an option in a weatherization program directed at reducing air-conditioning electricity consumption; (3) ECMs currently being installed under the Oklahoma WAP (chosen based on effectiveness at reducing space-heating energy consumption) should continue to be justified based on their space-heating energy savings potential only; and (4) attic radiant barriers should not be included in the Oklahoma WAP if alternatives with verified savings are available or until further testing demonstrates energy savings or other benefits in this typo of housing.

  17. Atrazine Residues in Northern Ohio 1980.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-09-01

    AD-A09A 279 HEIDELBERG COLL TIFFIN OH WATER QUALITY LAS F/G 13/2 ATRAZINE RESIDUES IN NORTHERN OHIO 1980.(Ul SE P AG J V SETZLER DACW49-79-C0020 F...NUMBERS Water Quality Laboawtry Heidelberg College Tiff in, Ohio 44883 11. CONTROLLING OFFICE NAME AND ADDRESS Water Quality Section NCBED-HQ ebwwW U.S...are available from National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161 It. KEY WORDS (Continue On revere. side if necessren d identify by

  18. Field demonstration and commercialization of silent discharge plasma hazardous air pollutant control technology

    SciTech Connect

    Rosocha, L.A.; Coogan, J.J.; Korzekwa, R.A.; Secker, D.A.; Reimers, R.F.; Herrmann, P.G.; Chase, P.J.; Gross, M.P. |; Jones, M.R.

    1996-07-01

    Silent electrical discharge plasma (dielectric barrier) reactors can decompose gas-phase pollutants by free-radical attack or electron-induced fragmentation. The radicals or electrons are produced by the large average volume nonthermal plasmas generated in the reactor. In the past decade, the barrier configuration has attracted attention for destroying toxic chemical agents for the military, removing harmful greenhouse gases, and treating other environmentally- hazardous chemical compounds. At the Los Alamos National Laboratory, we have been studying the silent discharge plasma (SDP) for processing gaseous-based hazardous chemicals for approximately five years. The key objective is to convert hazardous or toxic chemicals into non-hazardous compounds or into materials which are more easily managed. The main applications have been for treating off-gases from thermal treatment units, and for abating hazardous air-pollutant emissions (e.g., industrial air emissions, vapors extracted from contaminated soil or groundwater). In this paper, we will summarize the basic principles of SDP processing, discuss illustrative applications of the technology, and present results from small-scale field tests that are relevant to our commercialization effort.

  19. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 3): Middletown Air Field, Pennsylvania (first remedial action), December 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-12-31

    The Middletown Air Field site covers what is now the Harrisburg International Airport (HIA), located between the town of Middletown and Nighspire, Dauphin County, Pennsylvania. The airport is owned and operated by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania Department of Transportation. The area surrounding the base is characterized as mixed residential/industrial. Between 1898 and 1962, the property was owned by the U.S. Government and used by the military. HIA and several other entities occupy what was referred to as the Olmsted Air Force Base. In March 1983, TCA contamination caused six of the ten onsite production wells supplying HIA to be taken out of service. Studies initiated under the Department of Defense Installation Restoration Program indicate that while ground-water contamination due to volatile organic compounds exists, the exact source(s) of contamination cannot be clearly defined. Ground water contamination may result from one or more, possibly current, sources in the 'industrial area'. To date, HIA has been able to temporarily meet the water requirements of the facility by taking the most contaminated well off-line as a potable water source, and by blending potable water from a number of wells.

  20. Field evaluation of advanced controls for the retrofit of packaged air conditioners and heat pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Weimin; Katipamula, Srinivas; Ngo, Hung; Underhill, Ronald M.; Taasevigen, Danny J.; Lutes, Robert G.

    2015-09-01

    This paper documents the magnitude of energy savings achievable in the field by retrofitting existing packaged rooftop units (RTUs) with advanced control strategies not ordinarily used for RTUs. A total of 66 RTUs on 8 different buildings were retrofitted with a commercially available advanced controller for improving RTU operational efficiency. The controller features enhanced air-side economizer control, multi-speed fan control, and demand controlled ventilation. Of the 66 RTUs, 18 are packaged heat pumps and the rest are packaged air conditioners with gas heat. The eight buildings cover four building types and four climate conditions. Based on the data collected for about a whole year, the advanced controller reduced the normalized annual RTU energy consumption between 22% and 90%, with an average of 57% for all RTUs. The average fractional savings uncertainty was 12% at 95% confidence level. Normalized annual electricity savings were in the range between 0.47 kWh/h (kWh per hour of RTU operation) and 7.21 kWh/h, with an average of 2.39 kWh/h. RTUs greater than 53 kW and runtime greater than 14 hours per day had payback periods less than 3 years even at $0.05/kWh.

  1. Health hazard evaluation report HETA 84-198-1560, Division of Public Health Laboratories, State of Ohio, Columbus, Ohio. [Ethylene oxide and organic-solvent vapors

    SciTech Connect

    Behrens, V.; Burroughs, G.E.

    1985-02-01

    Breathing-zone and environmental samples were analyzed for ethylene oxide and organic-solvent vapors at the Public Health Laboratory, State of Ohio, Columbus, Ohio, on March 26 and 27, 1984. The evaluation was requested because of employee complaints of mucous membrane and skin irritation while they poured gonorrhea culture media into petri dishes that had been sterilized with ethylene oxide. The authors conclude that the environmental cause of the health problems cannot be determined due to the lack of symptoms on the days of the survey. Without taking measurements on the exact day when conspicuous symptoms occur, it is difficult to determine the source of the problem. General recommendations include checking the general air circulation in the media laboratory and encouraging employees to wear gloves that protect hands and wrists while pouring culture media.

  2. Elemental composition of suspended particulates as functions of space and time in Cleveland, Ohio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neustadter, H. E.; King, R. B.; Fordyce, J. S.

    1975-01-01

    An approach to the analysis of a very large elemental concentration data set. The particular data considered was generated by instrumental neutron activation and emission spectroscopy analyses of over 750 24-hour ambient air particulate samples collected at 16 sites in Cleveland, Ohio, during the 15 months from August 1971 thru October 1972. Examples are presented that show the use of multiple approaches to interpreting the data, including pairwise correlation statistics, selective data plotting and cluster analysis.

  3. The use of total simulator training in transitioning air-carrier pilots: A field evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Randle, R. J., Jr.; Tanner, T. A.; Hamerman, J. A.; Showalter, T. H.

    1981-01-01

    A field study was conducted in which the performance of air carrier transitioning pilots who had landing training in a landing maneuver approved simulator was compared with the performance of pilots who had landing training in the aircraft. Forty-eight trainees transitioning to the B-727 aircraft and eighty-seven trainees transitioning to the DC-10 were included in the study. The study results in terms of both objectively measured performance indicants and observer and check-pilot ratings did not demonstrate a clear distinction between the two training groups. The results suggest that, for these highly skilled transitioning pilots, a separate training module in the aircraft may be of dubious value.

  4. Experimental study of near-field air entrainment by subsonic volcanic jets

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Solovitz, S.A.; Mastin, L.G.

    2009-01-01

    The flow structure in the developing region of a turbulent jet has been examined using particle image velocimetry methods, considering the flow at steady state conditions. The velocity fields were integrated to determine the ratio of the entrained air speed to the jet speed, which was approximately 0.03 for a range of Mach numbers up to 0.89 and. Reynolds numbers up to 217,000. This range of experimental Mach and Reynolds numbers is higher than previously considered for high-accuracy entrainment measures, particularly in the near-vent region. The entrainment values are below those commonly used for geophysical analyses of volcanic plumes, suggesting that existing 1-D models are likely to understate the tendency for column collapse. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  5. Field validation of sound mitigation models and air pollutant emission testing in support of missile motor disposal activities.

    PubMed

    McFarland, Michael J; Palmer, Glenn R; Kordich, Micheal M; Pollet, Dean A; Jensen, James A; Lindsay, Mitchell H

    2005-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Defense approved activities conducted at the Utah Test and Training Range (UTTR) include both operational readiness test firing of intercontinental ballistic missile motors as well as the destruction of obsolete or otherwise unusable intercontinental ballistic missile motors through open burn/open detonation (OB/ OD). Within the Utah Division of Air Quality, these activities have been identified as having the potential to generate unacceptable noise levels, as well as significant amounts of hazardous air pollutants. Hill Air Force Base, UT, has completed a series of field tests at the UTTR in which sound-monitoring surveillance of OB/OD activities was conducted to validate the Sound Intensity Prediction System (SIPS) model. Using results generated by the SIPS model to support the decision to detonate, the UTTR successfully disposed of missile motors having an aggregate net explosive weight (NEW) of 56,500 lbs without generating adverse noise levels within populated areas. These results suggest that, under appropriate conditions, missile motors of even larger NEW may be detonated without exceeding regulatory noise limits. In conjunction with collecting noise monitoring data, air quality data was collected to support the development of air emission factors for both static missile motor firings and OB/OD activities. Through the installation of 15 ground-based air samplers, the generation of combustion fixed gases, hazardous air pollutants, and chlorides were monitored during the 56,500-lb NEW detonation event. Comparison of field measurements to predictions generated from the U.S. Navy's energetic combustion pollutant formation model, POLU4WN, indicated that, as the detonation fireball expanded from ground zero, organic compounds as well as carbon monoxide continued to oxidize as the hot gases reacted with ambient air. Hazardous air pollutant analysis of air samplers confirmed the presence of chloromethane, benzene, toluene, 1,2-propadiene, and

  6. The relationship among air quality, mixing heights, and winds observed during the entire TexAQS-II field study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, C.; Knoderer, C. A.; Zahn, P.

    2007-12-01

    The Texas Air Quality Study II (TexAQS-II) was designed to provide support for State Implementation Plan (SIP) revisions. The SIP revisions outline strategies for improving air quality to meet the new federal 8-hr ozone standard and regional haze requirements. As part of TexAQS-II, a field study was conducted to collect air quality and meteorological data throughout eastern Texas from May 1, 2005, through October 15, 2006. As part of the field study, various organizations made upper-air meteorological measurements at several locations. These measurements were collected by twelve 915-MHz radar wind profilers (RWPs), three 404 MHz RWPs, nine Radio Acoustic Sounding Systems (RASS), two sodars, and one lidar. These instruments provide vertically, horizontally, and temporally resolved wind, virtual temperature (Tv), and mixing height information. This presentation will address the three-dimensional and temporal characteristics of these parameters throughout the study domain for the entire study period and how these characteristic vary by season, month, and synoptic weather pattern. The presentation will also address how these characteristics influence regional and local air quality conditions throughout the study domain, including the relationship among various transport statistics, mixing height characteristics (e.g., time of peak mixing, morning mixing height growth rate, peak mixing height, average morning mixing height, etc.) and air quality. In addition, case studies will illustrate the finer-scale details of the relationship among the evolution of mixing heights, diurnal variability of winds, and air quality.

  7. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 89-065-2119, One Government Center, Toledo, Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Burr, G.A.; Alderfer, R.J.

    1991-06-01

    In response to a request from the Ohio Department of Health, an investigation was undertaken of possible hazardous working conditions at One Government Center, a modern 22 story municipal office building located in downtown Toledo, Ohio. Employees reported fatigue, nausea, headache, and other effects perhaps linked to poor indoor air quality. The building housed offices for the city of Toledo, the county and the state of Ohio. Questionnaires were administered to workers, and air quality measurements were made on floors 15 through 22. For the most part the concentration of carbon-dioxide (124389) was below the acceptable limit (1000 parts per million) with two exceptions which probably reflected a higher occupancy level and more extensive use of office partitions. Temperature and humidity levels measured were all within the acceptable limits. Respirable particulate levels in a smoking lounge located on the seventeenth floor were 454 micrograms/cubic meter and exceeded the recommended limit of 150 micrograms/cubic meter. The authors conclude that the indoor air quality parameters were within acceptable limits in most of the areas. The authors recommend that the existing smoking policy should be modified, and that the number of employees in specific areas be reduced or the ventilation in these same areas should be increased.

  8. Measurement of volatile plant compounds in field ambient air by thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cai, Xiao-Ming; Xu, Xiu-Xiu; Bian, Lei; Luo, Zong-Xiu; Chen, Zong-Mao

    2015-12-01

    Determination of volatile plant compounds in field ambient air is important to understand chemical communication between plants and insects and will aid the development of semiochemicals from plants for pest control. In this study, a thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TD-GC-MS) method was developed to measure ultra-trace levels of volatile plant compounds in field ambient air. The desorption parameters of TD, including sorbent tube material, tube desorption temperature, desorption time, and cold trap temperature, were selected and optimized. In GC-MS analysis, the selected ion monitoring mode was used for enhanced sensitivity and selectivity. This method was sufficiently sensitive to detect part-per-trillion levels of volatile plant compounds in field ambient air. Laboratory and field evaluation revealed that the method presented high precision and accuracy. Field studies indicated that the background odor of tea plantations contained some common volatile plant compounds, such as (Z)-3-hexenol, methyl salicylate, and (E)-ocimene, at concentrations ranging from 1 to 3400 ng m(-3). In addition, the background odor in summer was more abundant in quality and quantity than in autumn. Relative to previous methods, the TD-GC-MS method is more sensitive, permitting accurate qualitative and quantitative measurements of volatile plant compounds in field ambient air.

  9. Calibration and validation of a two-dimensional hydrodynamic model of the Ohio River, Jefferson County, Kentucky

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wagner, C.R.; Mueller, D.S.

    2001-01-01

    The quantification of current patterns is an essential component of a Water Quality Analysis Simulation Program (WASP) application in a riverine environment. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) provided a field validated two-dimensional Resource Management Associates-2 (RMA-2) hydrodynamic model capable of quantifying the steady-flowpatterns in the Ohio River extending from river mile 590 to 630 for the Ohio River Valley Water Sanitation Commission (ORSANCO) water-quality modeling efforts on that reach. Because of the hydrodynamic complexities induced by McAlpine Locks and Dam (Ohio River mile 607), the model was split into two segments: an upstream reach, which extended from the dam upstream to the upper terminus of the study reach at Ohio River mile 590; and a downstream reach, which extended from the dam downstream to a lower terminus at Ohio River mile 636. The model was calibrated to a low-flow hydraulic survey (approximately 35,000 cubic feet per second (ft3/s)) and verified with data collected during a high-flow survey (approximately 390,000 ft3/s). The model calibration and validation process included matching water-surface elevations at 10 locations and velocity profiles at 30 cross sections throughout the study reach. Based on the calibration and validation results, the model is a representative simulation of the Ohio River steady-flow patterns below discharges of approximately 400,000 ft3/s.

  10. Determination of methyl isothiocyanate in air downwind of fields treated with metam-sodium by subsurface drip irrigation.

    PubMed

    Woodrow, James E; Seiber, James N; LeNoir, James S; Krieger, Robert I

    2008-08-27

    Air concentrations of methyl isothiocyanate (MITC) were determined near two fields treated with metam-sodium (MS) by subsurface drip irrigation. The two study fields showed measurable airborne MITC residues during application of MS and for periods up to 48 h postapplication. Using a Gaussian plume dispersion model, flux values were estimated for all of the sampling periods. On the basis of the flux estimates, the amount of MITC that volatilized within the 48 h period was about 1.4% of the applied material. Compared to other studies, MITC residues in air measured during application by subsurface drip irrigation were up to four orders-of-magnitude lower than those previously published for applications involving delivery through surface irrigation water. Our measured concentrations of MITC in field air were at levels below current regulatory guidance and thresholds for adverse human health effects.

  11. Assessment of the air-soil partitioning of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in a paddy field using a modified fugacity sampler.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Luo, Chunling; Wang, Shaorui; Liu, Junwen; Pan, Suhong; Li, Jun; Ming, Lili; Zhang, Gan; Li, Xiangdong

    2015-01-06

    Rice, one of the most widely cultivated crops, has received great attention in contaminant uptake from soil and air, especially for the special approaches used for its cultivation. The dry-wet alternation method can influence the air-soil partitioning of semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) in the paddy ecosystem. Here, we modified a fugacity sampler to investigate the air-surface in situ partitioning of ubiquitous polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) at different growth stages in a suburban paddy field in South China. The canopy of rice can form a closed space, which acts like a chamber that can force the air under the canopy to equilibrate with the field surface. When we compared the fugacities calculated using a fugacity model of the partition coefficients to the measured fugacities, we observed similar trends in the variation, but significantly different values between different growing stages, especially during the flooding stages. However, the measured and calculated fugacity fractions were comparable when uncertainties in our calculations were considered, with the exception of the high molecular weight (HMW) PAHs. The measured fugacity fractions suggested that the HMW PAHs were also closed to equilibrium between the paddy field and atmosphere. The modified fugacity sampler provided a novel way of accurately determining the in situ air-soil partitioning of SVOCs in a wet paddy field.

  12. Swine Producer. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    This Ohio Competency Analysis Profile (OCAP), derived from a modified Developing a Curriculum (DACUM) process, is a comprehensive and verified employer competency list for a swine producer program. It contains units (with or without subunits), competencies, and competency builders that identify the occupational, academic, and employability skills…

  13. Preliminary Findings on Rural Homelessness in Ohio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    First, Richard J.; And Others

    This report is designed to present preliminary findings from the first comprehensive study of rural homelessness in the United States. The study was conducted during the first 6 months of 1990, and data were collected from interviews with 921 homeless adults in 21 randomly selected rural counties in Ohio. The sample counties represent 26% of the…

  14. County by County in Ohio Genealogy. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khouw, Petta; And Others

    The State Library of Ohio's genealogy collection of over 8,000 items is listed by county. Within each county listing the sources are designated as atlases, cemetery and death records, census records (the majority from the 1800's), family-church-Bible records, marriage records, or county and township histories. Vital records consist of material…

  15. Diesel Mechanics. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    This Ohio Competency Analysis Profile (OCAP), derived from a modified Developing a Curriculum (DACUM) process, is a current comprehensive and verified employer competency program list for diesel mechanics. Each unit (with or without subunits) contains competencies and competency builders that identify the occupational, academic, and employability…

  16. Energy Drink Use Among Ohio Appalachian Smokers.

    PubMed

    Davison, Genevieve; Shoben, Abigail; Pasch, Keryn E; Klein, Elizabeth G

    2016-10-01

    Caffeine-containing energy drinks have emerged as a public health concern due to their association with caffeine toxicity and alcohol use. Despite the fact that previous research has linked caffeine use in the form of coffee drinking to smoking, there is little research examining the association between energy drinks and smoking. The present study examines demographic and behavioral factors associated with energy drink use among a sample of rural Ohio Appalachian smokers. It was hypothesized that male gender, young age (21-30 years.) and alcohol use would be associated with energy drink use. A sample of adult smokers (n = 298) from Ohio Appalachian counties were interviewed regarding demographic and behavioral factors. Logistic regression analysis was used to assess the association between these factors and energy drink use. Seventy percent of Ohio Appalachian smokers studied had ever used an energy drink and 40 % had used an energy drink in the past month. Young age, male gender, and single marital status were associated with higher odds of ever having used an energy drink. Young age, and binge drinking were associated with higher odds of past 30-day use while abstinence from drinking was associated with lower odds of past 30-day use. Ohio Appalachian adult smokers had higher rates of energy drink use compared to previous estimates of ever or past month use found in other studies. The combined use of caffeine, nicotine, and alcohol warrants attention due to potential for health risk.

  17. Practical Nursing. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    Developed through a modified DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) process involving business, industry, labor, and community agency representatives in Ohio, this document is a comprehensive and verified employer competency profile for practical nursing. The list contains units (with and without subunits), competencies, and competency builders that…

  18. Bilingual Education in Ohio: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Catheline, Michael

    This overview of bilingual education ih Ohio includes profiles of bilingual programs in Youngstown, Toledo, Cleveland, and Athens. Current practices in these programs are considered with regard to funding, identification and assessment of students, instructional models, materials, the cultural component of instruction, parental involvement, and…

  19. Machine Trades. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    This Ohio Competency Analysis Profile (OCAP), derived from a modified Developing a Curriculum (DACUM) process, is a current comprehensive and verified employer competency program list for machine trades. Each unit (with or without subunits) contains competencies and competency builders that identify the occupational, academic, and employability…

  20. Power Equipment Technology. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    Developed through a modified DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) process involving business, industry, labor, and community agency representatives in Ohio, this document is a comprehensive and verified employer competency profile for power equipment technology occupations. The list contains units (with and without subunits), competencies, and…

  1. Agricultural Production. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    This list consists of essential competencies from the following specialized Ohio Competency Analysis Profiles: Beef and Sheep Producers; Crop Producer; Dairy Producer; Poultry Producer; and Swine Producer. Developed through a modified DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) process involving business, industry, labor, and community agency representatives…

  2. Poultry Producer. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    This Ohio Competency Analysis Profile (OCAP), derived from a modified Developing a Curriculum (DACUM) process, is a comprehensive and verified employer competency list for a poultry producer program. It contains units (with or without subunits), competencies, and competency builders that identify the occupational, academic, and employability…

  3. General Marketing. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    Developed through a modified DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) process involving business, industry, labor, and community agency representatives in Ohio, this document is a comprehensive and verified employer competency profile for general marketing occupations. The list contains units (with and without subunits), competencies, and competency…

  4. Entertainment Marketing. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    This Ohio Competency Analysis Profile (OCAP), derived from a modified Developing a Curriculum (DACUM) process, is a current comprehensive and verified employer competency program list for entertainment marketing. Each unit (with or without subunits) contains competencies and competency builders that identify the occupational, academic, and…

  5. Improving Ohio's Education Management Information System (EMIS).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Legislative Office of Education Oversight, Columbus.

    Due to legislative mandate, the Ohio Department of Education (ODE) was required to develop a system (the Education Management Information System) that would increase the amount of information available to state-level policy makers and the public. Some recommendations for improving the function of EMIS are offered in this report. The text provides…

  6. Focus: Curriculum Profile. Ohio's Balancing Act.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tollifson, Jerry

    1990-01-01

    Describes how the Ohio Department of Education developed its art curriculum, the Balanced Comprehensive Art Curriculum (BCAC). Going beyond the traditional studio art approach, the program requires students to respond and express themselves in three areas: personal development, artistic heritage, and art in society. (KM)

  7. Dairy Producer. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    This Ohio Competency Analysis Profile (OCAP), derived from a modified Developing a Curriculum (DACUM) process, is a current comprehensive and verified employer competency program list for dairy producers. Each unit (with or without subunits) contains competencies and competency builders that identify the occupational, academic, and employability…

  8. Meat Processor. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    Developed through a modified DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) process involving business, industry, labor, and community agency representatives in Ohio, this document is a comprehensive and verified employer competency profile for meat processing occupations. The list contains units (with and without subunits), competencies, and competency builders…

  9. Animal Management Technician. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    Developed through a modified DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) process involving business, industry, labor, and community agency representatives in Ohio, this document is a comprehensive and verified employer competency profile for animal management technician occupations. The list contains units (with and without subunits), competencies, and…

  10. 75 FR 72947 - Ohio Regulatory Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-29

    ... Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement 30 CFR Part 935 Ohio Regulatory Program AGENCY: Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement (OSM), Interior. ACTION: Final rule; approval of...'') regulations under the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 (SMCRA or the Act). The...

  11. Migrant Programs in Wisconsin and Ohio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vega, Jaime I., Ed.; And Others

    Compiled for use by agencies working with migrant and seasonal farmworkers, this directory lists programs and services available to these farmworkers during their stay in Ohio and Wisconsin. Data were obtained from Federal, State, and local agencies in each State. Special emphasis was placed on information and data current as of summer 1973.…

  12. Resource Conservation. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    Developed through a modified DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) process involving business, industry, labor, and community agency representatives in Ohio, this document is a comprehensive and verified employer competency profile for resource conservation occupations. The list contains units (with and without subunits), competencies, and competency…

  13. Protecting Political Speech: "Brandenburg vs. Ohio" Updated.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegel, Paul

    1981-01-01

    Examines the interpretation and application of the Supreme Court's decision in "Brandenburg vs. Ohio" which prohibits states from limiting political speech unless it is directed at inciting imminent lawless action. Presents four patterns in interpretation characterized by immediacy, speaker's intention, advocacy of nonviolent victimless…

  14. Forest Industry Worker. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    Developed through a modified DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) process involving business, industry, labor, and community agency representatives in Ohio, this document is a comprehensive and verified employer competency profile for forest industry occupations. The list contains units (with and without subunits), competencies, and competency builders…

  15. Auto Mechanics. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    This comprehensive and verified employer competency list was developed from a modified DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) process involving business, industry, labor, and community agency representatives from Ohio. This competency list contains 11 units (with or without subunits), competencies, and competency builders that identify the occupational,…

  16. Ohio Sampler: Outdoor and Environmental Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballbach, Joann, Ed.

    This document provides practical suggestions and meaningful activities for implementing Ohio's model curriculum in science for instruction that emphasizes hands-on experience and diverse learning opportunities. It also includes a variety of nonscience activities that emphasize and utilize the outdoors. This Sampler lists activities by indoor or…

  17. 78 FR 2708 - Ohio Disaster # OH-00039

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Ohio Disaster OH-00039 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This...: 10/03/2013. ADDRESSES: Submit completed loan applications to: U.S. Small Business...

  18. Dental Assistant. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    Developed through a modified DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) process involving business, industry, labor, and community agency representatives in Ohio, this document is a comprehensive and verified employer competency profile for dental assistants. The list contains units (with and without subunits), competencies, and competency builders that…

  19. Microscopy & microanalysis 2016 in Columbus, Ohio

    DOE PAGES

    Michael, Joseph R.

    2016-01-08

    The article provides information about an upcoming conference from the program chair. The Microscopy Society of America (MSA), the Microanalysis Society (MAS), and the International Metallographic Society (IMS) invite participation in Microscopy & Microanalysis 2016 in Columbus, Ohio, July 24 through July 28, 2016.

  20. Nurse Aide. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    Developed through a modified DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) process involving business, industry, labor, and community agency representatives in Ohio, this document is a comprehensive and verified employer competency profile for nurses' aides. The list contains units (with and without subunits), competencies, and competency builders that identify…

  1. Industrial Maintenance. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    Developed through a modified DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) process involving business, industry, labor, and community agency representatives in Ohio, this document is a comprehensive and verified employer competency profile for industrial maintenance occupations. The list contains units (with and without subunits), competencies, and competency…

  2. Energy Drink Use Among Ohio Appalachian Smokers

    PubMed Central

    Shoben, Abigail; Pasch, Keryn E.; Klein, Elizabeth G.

    2017-01-01

    Caffeine-containing energy drinks have emerged as a public health concern due to their association with caffeine toxicity and alcohol use. Despite the fact that previous research has linked caffeine use in the form of coffee drinking to smoking, there is little research examining the association between energy drinks and smoking. The present study examines demographic and behavioral factors associated with energy drink use among a sample of rural Ohio Appalachian smokers. It was hypothesized that male gender, young age (21–30 years.) and alcohol use would be associated with energy drink use. A sample of adult smokers (n = 298) from Ohio Appalachian counties were interviewed regarding demographic and behavioral factors. Logistic regression analysis was used to assess the association between these factors and energy drink use. Seventy percent of Ohio Appalachian smokers studied had ever used an energy drink and 40 % had used an energy drink in the past month. Young age, male gender, and single marital status were associated with higher odds of ever having used an energy drink. Young age, and binge drinking were associated with higher odds of past 30-day use while abstinence from drinking was associated with lower odds of past 30-day use. Ohio Appalachian adult smokers had higher rates of energy drink use compared to previous estimates of ever or past month use found in other studies. The combined use of caffeine, nicotine, and alcohol warrants attention due to potential for health risk. PMID:26879965

  3. Ohio's Appalachian Children [with] County Factsheets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joyce, Erin; Stoneburner, Chris; Wachtel, Mary

    Noting that one of every eight Ohio children live in Appalachian counties and that preparing these children to become productive, contributing members of Appalachia's culture and economy hinges on making sure that all children are healthy, ready for school, and attend safe and effective public schools, this report is the first to examine health…

  4. Ohio Business Management. Technical Competency Profile (TCP).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ray, Gayl M.; Wilson, Nick; Mangini, Rick

    This document describes the essential competencies from secondary through post-secondary associate degree programs for a career in business management. Ohio College Tech Prep Program standards are described, and a key to profile codes is provided. Sample occupations in this career area, such as management trainee, product manager, and advertising…

  5. A Guide to Ohio Outdoor Education Areas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melvin, Ruth W.

    More than 700 areas in Ohio, useful as sites for environmental and outdoor studies, are catalogued in this guide. They include national forests; state parks; forest and wildlife areas; historic sites and memorials; metropolitan, country, and city parks; agency and private camps; conservation agency properties; conservancy district lands and…

  6. Columbus Saves: Saving Money in Ohio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shockey, Susan

    2004-01-01

    The "Columbus Saves" educational program is a broad-based community coalition made up of more than 40 local organizations from the education, nonprofit, government, faith-based, and private sectors. Common goals of partners in reaching Columbus, Ohio's 1.5 million residents are to: (a) promote increased savings through education and…

  7. [Effect of air-electric fields on driving and reaction patterns. Test subjects in the car driving simulator (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Anselm, D; Danner, M; Kirmaier, N; König, H L; Müller-Limmroth, W; Reis, A; Schauerte, W

    1977-06-10

    In the relevant frequency range of about 10 Hertz cars can be considered very largely as Faraday cages and consequently as screens against air-electric fields. This may have a negative influence on driving and reaction patterns as a result. In an extensive investigation 48 subjects in a driving simulator were exposed to definite artificially produced air-electric fields. The self-rating of the performance and concentration of the subjects, reaction times and driving errors were determined. While the reaction times remained practically constant, the driving behavior of the subjects improved.

  8. Streamer development in barrier discharge in air: spectral signatures and electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoder, Tomas; Simek, Milan; Bonaventura, Zdenek; Prukner, Vaclav

    2015-09-01

    Electrical breakdown in the upper atmosphere takes form of so called Transient Luminous Events (TLE). Down to the certain pressure limit, the first phases of the TLE-phenomena are controlled by the streamer mechanism. In order to understand the development of these events, streamers in 10 torr air were generated in volume barrier discharge. Stability and reproducibility of generated streamers were secured by proper electrode geometry and specific applied voltage waveform. In this work, spectrally resolved measurements of the streamer head emission with high spatial and temporal resolution are presented. Precise recordings of the emission of the second positive and first negative systems of molecular nitrogen allowed the determination of the spatio-temporal development of the reduced electric field in the streamer head. This unique experimental result reveals in more details the early stages of the streamer development and gives, besides values for streamer velocity and its diameter, quantitative information on the magnitude of the electric field. T.H. was financed through the ESF Programme TEA-IS (Grant No. 4219), M.S. and V.P. by the AVCR under collaborative project M100431201 and Z.B. acknowledges the support of grant of Czech Science Foundation GA15-04023S.

  9. Turbulent Combustion in Aluminum-air Clouds for Different Scale Explosion Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhl, Allen; Balakrishnan, Kaushik; Bell, John; Beckner, Vincent

    2015-06-01

    We have studied turbulent combustion effects in explosions, and proposed heterogeneous continuum models for the turbulent combustion fields. Also we have proposed an induction-time model for the ignition of Al particle clouds, based on Arrhenius fits to the shock tube data of Boiko. Here we explore scaling issues associated with Al particle combustion in such explosions. This is a non-premixed combustion system; the global burning rate is controlled by rate of turbulent mixing of fuel (Al particles) with air. For similitude reasons, the turbulent mixing rates should scale with the explosion length and time scales. However, the induction time for ignition of Al particles depends on an Arrhenius function, which is independent of such scales. To study this, we have performed numerical simulations of turbulent combustion in unconfined Al-SDF (shock-dispersed-fuel) explosion fields at different scales. Three different charge masses were assumed: 1-g, 1-kg and 1-T Al-powder charges. We found that there are two combustion regimes: an ignition regime--where the burning rate decays a power law function of time, and a turbulent combustion regime--where the burning rate decays exponentially with time.

  10. Cost effectiveness of the stream-gaging program in Ohio

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shindel, H.L.; Bartlett, W.P.

    1986-01-01

    This report documents the results of the cost effectiveness of the stream-gaging program in Ohio. Data uses and funding sources were identified for 107 continuous stream gages currently being operated by the U.S. Geological Survey in Ohio with a budget of $682,000; this budget includes field work for other projects and excludes stations jointly operated with the Miami Conservancy District. No stream gage were identified as having insufficient reason to continue their operation; nor were any station identified as having uses specifically only for short-term studies. All 107 station should be maintained in the program for the foreseeable future. The average standard error of estimation of stream flow records is 29.2 percent at its present level of funding. A minimum budget of $679,000 is required to operate the 107-gage program; a budget less than this does no permit proper service and maintenance of the gages and recorders. At the minimum budget, the average standard error is 31.1 percent The maximum budget analyzed was $1,282,000, which resulted in an average standard error of 11.1 percent. A need for additional gages has been identified by the other agencies that cooperate in the program. It is suggested that these gage be installed as funds can be made available.

  11. Field Assessment of the Village Green Project: An Autonomous Community Air Quality Monitoring System

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent findings on air pollution levels in communities motivate new technologies to assess air pollution at finer spatial scale. The Village Green Project (VGP) is a novel approach using commercially-available technology for long-term community environments air pollution measure...

  12. Commercial Air Carrier Vulnerabilities to Information Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    GMO /ENS/02E-11 DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE AIR UNIVERSITY AIR FORCE INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio...AFIT/ GMO /ENS/02E-11 COMMERCIAL AIR CARRIER VULNERABILITIES TO INFORMATION OPERATIONS...networks that without them, “there is no water coming out of your tap; there is no electricity lighting your room; there is no food being transported to

  13. Compensating for the impact of non-stationary spherical air cavities on IMRT dose delivery in transverse magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Bol, G H; Lagendijk, J J W; Raaymakers, B W

    2015-01-21

    With the development of the 1.5 T MRI linear accelerator and the clinical introduction of the 0.35 T ViewRay™ system, delivering intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in a transverse magnetic field becomes increasingly important. When delivering dose in the presence of a transverse magnetic field, one of the most prominent phenomena occurs around air cavities: the electron return effect (ERE). For stationary, spherical air cavities which are centrally located in the phantom, the ERE can be compensated by using opposing beams configurations in combination with IMRT. In this paper we investigate the effects of non-stationary spherical air cavities, centrally located within the target in a phantom containing no organs at risk, on IMRT dose delivery in 0.35 T and 1.5 T transverse magnetic fields by using Monte Carlo simulations. We show that IMRT can be used for compensating ERE around those air cavities, except for intrafraction appearing or disappearing air cavities. For these cases, gating or plan re-optimization should be used. We also analyzed the option of using IMRT plans optimized at 0 T to be delivered in the presence of 0.35 T and 1.5 T magnetic field. When delivering dose at 0.35 T, IMRT plans optimized at 0 T and 0.35 T perform equally well regarding ERE compensation. Within a 1.5 T environment, the 1.5 T optimized plans perform slightly better for the static and random intra- and interfraction air cavity movement cases than the 0 T optimized plans. For non-stationary spherical air cavities with a baseline shift (intra- and interfraction) the 0 T optimized plans perform better. These observations show the intrinsic ERE compensation by equidistant and opposing beam configurations for spherical air cavities within the target area. IMRT gives some additional compensation, but only in case of correct positioning of the air cavity according to the IMRT compensation. For intrafraction appearing or disappearing air cavities this correct positioning is absent

  14. 78 FR 68367 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Ohio NOX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-14

    ... other large industrial boilers, cement kilns, and internal combustion engines were the most cost... other large boilers and turbines (non-EGUs), along with controls on cement kilns and large internal combustion engines. Under the NO X SIP Call, states have flexibility in determining where NO X...

  15. 76 FR 79593 - Approval, and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Redesignation of the Ohio...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-22

    ... , nitrogen oxide and sulfur dioxide (SO 2 ) emissions inventories as satisfying the requirement in section... Emission Standards for Vehicles and Gasoline Sulfur Standards. These emission control requirements result... also reduced the sulfur content of gasoline to 30 parts per million (ppm) beginning in January...

  16. 78 FR 69299 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Ohio SO2

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-19

    ... that you telephone Sarah Arra, Environmental Scientist, at (312) ] 886-9401 before visiting the Region 5 office. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Sarah Arra, Environmental Scientist, Attainment Planning... facilities that have been shut down with their shutdown dates. For the last third of Table 1, EPA was...

  17. 78 FR 53275 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Redesignation of the Ohio...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-29

    ... dioxide (SO 2 ), ammonia and volatile organic compounds (VOC) in the Parkersburg-Marietta area (Washington... provided ammonia and VOC emissions inventories to EPA to supplement the February 29, 2012, and April 16... 2005 NO X , SO 2 , and PM 2.5 emission inventories and 2007/2008 ammonia and VOC emission...

  18. Evaluation of near surface ozone and particulate matter in air quality simulations driven by dynamically downscaled historical meteorological fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seltzer, Karl M.; Nolte, Christopher G.; Spero, Tanya L.; Appel, K. Wyat; Xing, Jia

    2016-08-01

    In this study, techniques typically used for future air quality projections are applied to a historical 11-year period to assess the performance of the modeling system when the driving meteorological conditions are obtained using dynamical downscaling of coarse-scale fields without correcting toward higher-resolution observations. The Weather Research and Forecasting model and the Community Multiscale Air Quality model are used to simulate regional climate and air quality over the contiguous United States for 2000-2010. The air quality simulations for that historical period are then compared to observations from four national networks. Comparisons are drawn between defined performance metrics and other published modeling results for predicted ozone, fine particulate matter, and speciated fine particulate matter. The results indicate that the historical air quality simulations driven by dynamically downscaled meteorology are typically within defined modeling performance benchmarks and are consistent with results from other published modeling studies using finer-resolution meteorology. This indicates that the regional climate and air quality modeling framework utilized here does not introduce substantial bias, which provides confidence in the method's use for future air quality projections.

  19. Evaluation of near surface ozone and particulate matter in air quality simulations driven by dynamically downscaled historical meteorological fields

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study, techniques typically used for future air quality projections are applied to a historical 11-year period to assess the performance of the modeling system when the driving meteorological conditions are obtained using dynamical downscaling of coarse-scale fields witho...

  20. Field Operations and Enforcement Manual for Air Pollution Control. Volume II: Control Technology and General Source Inspection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weisburd, Melvin I.

    The Field Operations and Enforcement Manual for Air Pollution Control, Volume II, explains in detail the following: technology of source control, modification of operations, particulate control equipment, sulfur dioxide removal systems for power plants, and control equipment for gases and vapors; inspection procedures for general sources, fuel…

  1. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 4): Naval Air Station Cecil Field, Operable Unit 6, Jacksonville, FL, September 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    The site name is the Golf Course Pesticide Disposal Area, Site 11, Operable Unit (OU) 6. The site is located in a wooded area between the 11th fairway and the 17th green at the Naval Air Station (NAS) Cecil Field golf course, Jacksonville, Florida. The purpose of the interim remedial action is to remove buried containers of pesticides and associated contaminated soil.

  2. 64. INTERIOR VIEW LOOKING DOWN LENGTH OF AIR CONDITIONING EQUIPMENT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    64. INTERIOR VIEW LOOKING DOWN LENGTH OF AIR CONDITIONING EQUIPMENT REPAIR SHOP. - Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, Mount Clare Shops, South side of Pratt Street between Carey & Poppleton Streets, Baltimore, Independent City, MD

  3. The Inquiry Process and Museum Field Trips: A Technique for the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiBella, Robert L.; Steele, George E.

    This paper suggests model lessons that elementary or secondary social studies teachers can use to integrate field-trip experiences directly into instruction, specifically, inquiry teaching. The Ohio Historical Center and the Ohio Village in Columbus, Ohio, are used as example museums. To illustrate the instructional activities, the authors…

  4. Field Observation of the Green Ocean Amazon. Neutral Cluster Air Ion Spectrometer (NAIS) Final Campaign Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Petaja, T.; Backman, J.; Manninen, H. E.; Wimmer, D.

    2016-03-01

    The neutral cluster and air ion spectrometer (NAIS) was deployed to the T3 site for Intensive Operations Periods 1 and 2 (IOP1 and IOP2). The NAIS is an instrument that measures aerosol particle and ion number size distributions in the mobility diameter range of 0.8 to 42 nm, corresponding to electrical mobility range between 3.2 and 0.0013 cm2 V-1 s-1. New particle formation (NPF) events were detected using the NAIS at the T3 field site during IOP1 and IOP2. Secondary NPF is a globally important source of aerosol number. To fully explain atmospheric NPF and subsequent growth, we need to directly measure the initial steps of the formation processes in different environments, including rain forest. Particle formation characteristics, such as formation and growth rates, were used as indicators of the relevant processes and participating compounds in the initial formation. In a case of parallel ion and neutral cluster measurements, we estimated the relative contribution of ion-induced and neutral nucleation to the total particle formation.

  5. Turbulent combustion in aluminum-air clouds for different scale explosion fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhl, Allen L.; Balakrishnan, Kaushik; Bell, John B.; Beckner, Vincent E.

    2017-01-01

    This paper explores "scaling issues" associated with Al particle combustion in explosions. The basic idea is the following: in this non-premixed combustion system, the global burning rate is controlled by rate of turbulent mixing of fuel (Al particles) with air. From similarity considerations, the turbulent mixing rates should scale with the explosion length and time scales. However, the induction time for ignition of Al particles depends on an Arrhenius function, which is independent of the explosion length and time. To study this, we have performed numerical simulations of turbulent combustion in unconfined Al-SDF (shock-dispersed-fuel) explosion fields at different scales. Three different charge masses were assumed: 1-g, 1-kg and 1-T Al-powder charges. We found that there are two combustion regimes: an ignition regime—where the burning rate decays as a power-law function of time, and a turbulent combustion regime—where the burning rate decays exponentially with time. This exponential dependence is typical of first order reactions and the more general concept of Life Functions that control the dynamics of evolutionary systems. Details of the combustion model are described. Results, including mean and rms profiles in combustion cloud and fuel consumption histories, are presented.

  6. Air mass characterization during the DAURE field campaign by PTR-TOF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, Axel; Schallhart, Simon; Müller, Markus; Hansel, Armin

    2010-05-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are emitted into the atmosphere from a wide variety of biogenic and anthropogenic sources. Although some of the sources are well characterized, many uncertainties remain about the fate of these compounds in the atmosphere and their role in organic aerosol formation. Here we present measurements using Proton Transfer Reaction Time-of-Flight (PTR-TOF) Mass Spectrometry during the DAURE field campaign ("Determination of the sources of atmospheric Aerosols in Urban and Rural Environments in the western Mediterranean") obtained during February and March 2009. Measurements were performed at a rural mountain site located in the Montseny Natural Park 40 km to the NNE of the city of Barcelona, and 25 km from the Mediterranean coast. Volatile organic compounds where identified and quantified using PTR-TOF with 1 minute time resolution. The instruments mass resolving power of 4000 - 5000 and a mass accuracy of 5 ppm allows for the unambiguous sum-formula identification of e.g. hydrocarbons (HCs) or oxygenated VOCs (OVOCs). The high time resolution allows separating out on site pollution events. Air masses impacted by biomass-burning, urban, marine and vegetation emissions are characterized using tracers like acetonitrile, aromatics, dimethyl sulfide or biogenic compounds (terpenoids) and the degree of photochemical processing is inferred from the data.

  7. June 3, 1996 Ohio Letter

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document may be of assistance in applying the Title V air operating permit regulations. This document is part of the Title V Policy and Guidance Database available at www2.epa.gov/title-v-operating-permits/title-v-operating-permit-policy-and-guidance-document-index. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  8. Geophysical Characterization for a CO2 Sequestration Potential in the Ohio River Valley Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, N.; Jagucki, P.; Meggyesy, D.; Janosy, R.; Sminchak, J.; Ramakrishan, T.; Boyd, A.

    2003-12-01

    A site at the American Electric Power's (AEP) Mountaineer Power Plant, WV in the Ohio River Valley in the Midwestern U.S., a region with the economy heavily dependent on fossil fuels, such as coal, oil, and gas, is being evaluated to determine the potential for geologic sequestration. The project is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Battelle, AEP, BP, The Ohio Air Quality Development Office, and Schlumberger. The major objective of the current phase is to characterize the reservoir at the plant site. Future decisions with regard to CO2 injection will be subject to the evaluated reservoir properties. The effort includes acquisition of 2-dimensional seismic data, assessment of regional geology, drilling to PreCambrian rocks and formation analysis and testing in a 2,800 meters deep well, reservoir simulations, risk assessment, and stakeholder outreach. The test well reached total depth in summer 2003. Wireline logging and reservoir testing was performed for each section of the borehole, including extensive tests in the lowermost 885 meters to estimate formation properties and pressure gradients. The logs included gamma-ray, neutron and density, and array resistivity, magnetic resonance relaxation for permeability information, elemental composition via capture spectroscopy, and resistivity based formation image. The seismic survey was conducted over approximately 11 miles along 2 lines: one along strike and one along dip. The results of the geophysical surveys combined with the field observations provide an integrated assessment of the major injection parameters for the two main injection reservoirs of interest, the Rose Run Formation and the Lower Maryville formation. In addition, the properties of the potential caprock formations overlying the candidate injection zones were also determined. The results of this characterization will be presented with emphasis on geophysical testing and seismic survey. These results are also being used to conduct reservoir

  9. Source evaluation report phase 2 investigation: Limited field investigation. Final report: United States Air Force Environmental Restoration Program, Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-10-01

    This report describes the limited field investigation work done to address issues and answer unresolved questions regarding a collection of potential contaminant sources at Eielson Air Force Base (AFB), near Fairbanks, Alaska. These sources were listed in the Eielson AFB Federal Facility Agreement supporting the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) cleanup of the base. The limited field investigation began in 1993 to resolve all remaining technical issues and provide the data and analysis required to evaluate the environmental hazard associated with these sites. The objective of the limited field investigation was to allow the remedial project managers to sort each site into one of three categories: requiring remedial investigation/feasibility study, requiring interim removal action, or requiring no further remedial action.

  10. Crop losses from air pollutants: A computer and field-based assessment program and crop and forest losses from air pollutants: An assessment program. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Mutters, R.; Guzy, M.; Thompson, C.R.

    1993-10-01

    The Air Resources Board-sponsored Crop Loss Assessment Program quantifies potential ozone-caused yield losses in 26 crops grown in California. Statewide yield loss estimates were made with aggregated county statistics, and at a subcounty level for the southern San Joaquin Valley. Interpolations of statewide 7-hr mean zone levels were made for selected air basins delimited by a 2000-ft altitudinal barrier. Estimated yield losses were calculated using 2.50 pphm as a background 12-hr average concentration. Regression analyses were performed in a detailed analysis of cotton yield responses in Kern County. Statistically significant regressions of yield vs. ozone concentration, soil characteristics and cotton variety were observed. A field survey to identify ozone injury in cotton, almond and grape was conducted at 11 sites in the Central Valley.

  11. Evaluation of CMAQ and CAMx Ensemble Air Quality Forecasts during the 2015 MAPS-Seoul Field Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, E.; Kim, S.; Bae, C.; Kim, H. C.; Kim, B. U.

    2015-12-01

    The performance of Air quality forecasts during the 2015 MAPS-Seoul Field Campaign was evaluated. An forecast system has been operated to support the campaign's daily aircraft route decisions for airborne measurements to observe long-range transporting plume. We utilized two real-time ensemble systems based on the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF)-Sparse Matrix Operator Kernel Emissions (SMOKE)-Comprehensive Air quality Model with extensions (CAMx) modeling framework and WRF-SMOKE- Community Multi_scale Air Quality (CMAQ) framework over northeastern Asia to simulate PM10 concentrations. Global Forecast System (GFS) from National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) was used to provide meteorological inputs for the forecasts. For an additional set of retrospective simulations, ERA Interim Reanalysis from European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) was also utilized to access forecast uncertainties from the meteorological data used. Model Inter-Comparison Study for Asia (MICS-Asia) and National Institute of Environment Research (NIER) Clean Air Policy Support System (CAPSS) emission inventories are used for foreign and domestic emissions, respectively. In the study, we evaluate the CMAQ and CAMx model performance during the campaign by comparing the results to the airborne and surface measurements. Contributions of foreign and domestic emissions are estimated using a brute force method. Analyses on model performance and emissions will be utilized to improve air quality forecasts for the upcoming KORUS-AQ field campaign planned in 2016.

  12. SNRB{trademark} air toxics monitoring. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) is currently conducting a project under the DOE`s Clean Coal Technology (CCT II) Program to demonstrate its SO{sub x}NO{sub x}-Rox Box{trademark} (SNRB{trademark}) process in a 5 MWe Field Demonstration Unit at Ohio Edison`s R. E. Burger Plant near Shadyside, Ohio. The objective of the SNRB{trademark} Air Toxics Monitoring Project was to provide data on SNRB{trademark} air toxics emissions control performance to B&W and to add to the DOE/EPRI/EPA data base by quantifying the flow rates of selected hazardous substances (or air toxics) in all of the major input and output streams of the SNRB{trademark} process as well as the power plant. Work under the project included the collection and analysis of representative samples of all major input and output streams of the SNRB{trademark} demonstration unit and the power plant, and the subsequent laboratory analysis of these samples to determine the partitioning of the hazardous substances between the various process streams. Material balances for selected air toxics were subsequently calculated around the SNRB{trademark} and host boiler systems, including the removal efficiencies across each of the major air pollution control devices. This report presents results of the SNRB{trademark} Air Toxics Monitoring Project. In addition to the Introduction, a brief description of the test site, including the Boiler No. 8 and the SNRB{trademark} process, is included in Section H. The concentrations of air toxic emissions are presented in Section II according to compound class. Material balances are included in Section IV for three major systems: boiler, electrostatic precipitator, and SNRB{trademark}. Emission factors and removal efficiencies are also presented according to compound class in Sections V and VI, respectively. A data evaluation is provided in Section VII.

  13. Field assessment of induction motor efficiency through air-gap torque

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, J.S.; Sorenson, P.L.

    1995-11-01

    Induction motors are the most popular motors used in industry. This paper further suggests the use of air-gap torque method to evaluate their efficiency and load changes. The fundamental difference between Method E and the air-gap torque method is discussed. Efficiency assessments conducted on induction motors under various conditions show the accuracy and potential of the air-gap torque method.

  14. Field verification of sound attenuation modeling and air emission testing in support of missile motor disposal activities.

    PubMed

    McFarland, Michael J; Palmer, Glenn R; Rasmussen, Steve L; Kordich, Micheal M; Pollet, Dean A; Jensen, James A; Lindsay, Mitchell H

    2006-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Defense-approved activities conducted at the Utah Test and Training Range (UTTR) include both operational readiness test firing of intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) motors, as well as the destruction of obsolete or otherwise unusable ICBM motors through open burn/open detonation (OB/OD). Within the Utah Division of Air Quality, these activities have been identified as having the potential to generate unacceptable noise levels, as well as significant amounts of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Hill Air Force Base, UT, has completed a series of field tests at the UTTR in which sound-monitoring surveillance of OB/OD activities was conducted to validate the Sound Intensity Prediction System (SIPS) model. Using results generated by the SIPS model to support the decision to detonate, the UTTR successfully disposed of missile motors having an aggregate net explosive weight (NEW) of 81,374 lb without generating adverse noise levels within populated areas. In conjunction with collecting noise-monitoring data, air emissions were collected to support the development of air emission factors for both static missile motor firings and OB/OD activities. Through the installation of 15 ground-based air samplers, the generation of combustion-fixed gases, VOCs, and chlorides was monitored during the 81,374-lb NEW detonation event. Comparison of field measurements to predictions generated from the US Navy energetic combustion pollutant formation model, POLU4WN, indicated that, as the detonation fire ball expanded, organic compounds, as well as CO, continued to oxidize as the combustion gases mixed with ambient air. VOC analysis of air samplers confirmed the presence of chloromethane, vinyl chloride, benzene, toluene, and 2-methyl-1-propene. Qualitative chloride analysis indicated that gaseous HCl was generated at low concentrations, if at all.

  15. Prevalence of permanent threshold shifts in the United States Air Force hearing conservation program by career field, 2005-2011.

    PubMed

    Lloyd Soderlund, Laurel; McKenna, Elizabeth A; Tastad, Katie; Paul, Marika

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe changes in hearing, using the permanent threshold shift metric, among United States Air Force servicemembers, including active duty, Reserve and Air National Guard components, for demographics, job categories, and career fields. In the United States Air Force, only servicemembers who are occupationally exposed routinely to hazardous noise are monitored. Audiogram records and demographic variables were analyzed for servicemembers from 2005-2011 using data from the Department of Defense system that captures occupational hearing tests worldwide. Results suggest that occupational hearing loss was larger in males than females, in officers than enlisted populations, and in Reserve and Air National Guard than in active duty. Compared to similar civilian career fields, active duty has lower prevalence rates for occupational hearing loss overall, although Reserve and Air National Guard prevalence rates were more similar to the civilian reported rates. The proportion of personnel with permanent threshold shifts varied between 4.6-16.7% within active duty career fields, which includes 76% of the population for study timeframe. Permanent threshold shift was larger in small job categories, and in jobs that are not considered exposed to hazardous noise routinely which is comparative with results from civilian data analysis of occupational hearing loss. Further investigation into testing practices for Air Force specific groups, use of the system for nonoccupational hearing testing, and challenges to follow-up compliance is warranted. Increased surveillance procedures for occupational hearing loss are needed to address concerns on the prevalence of servicemember hearing loss, the role of recreational and lifestyle factors to contribute the high reported hearing loss prevalence of veterans compared to nonveterans.

  16. Air quality perception of pedestrians in an urban outdoor Mediterranean environment: A field survey approach.

    PubMed

    Pantavou, Katerina; Lykoudis, Spyridon; Psiloglou, Basil

    2017-01-01

    Perception plays a significant role on people's response to preventive measures. In the view of public awareness, the aim of this study was to explore factors that affect air quality perception and to reveal its potential patterns. Air quality perception of individuals, in terms of dust and overall air quality, was examined in relation to air pollutants concentrations, meteorological variables, personal characteristics as well as their thermal sensation and health condition. The data used were obtained from environmental measurements, in situ and from stations, and questionnaire surveys conducted in an outdoor urban Mediterranean area, Athens, Greece. The participants were asked to report their air quality perception and thermal sensation based on predefined scales. A thermal index, Physiological Equivalent Temperature (PET), was estimated to obtain an objective measure of thermal sensation. Particulate matter (PM10) and nitrogen oxide (NO) were associated with dust perception. Nitrogen oxides (NOx) and carbon monoxide (CO) were associated to air quality perception. Age, area of residence, health symptoms and thermal sensation also affected the perception of air quality. Dusty or poor air quality conditions were more likely to be reported when pollutants' concentrations were increased. Younger people, participants residing in the city center, experiencing health symptoms or warm thermal sensation showed a trend towards reporting more unfavorable air quality conditions.

  17. Electric air filtration: theory, laboratory studies, hardware development, and field evaluations

    SciTech Connect

    Bergman, W.; Biermann, A.; Kuhl, W.; Lum, B.; Bogdanoff, A.; Hebard, H.; Hall, M.; Banks, D.; Mazumder, M.; Johnson, J.

    1983-09-01

    We summarize the results of a seven-year research project for the US Department of Energy (DOE) to develop electric air filters that extend the service life of high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters used in the nuclear industry. This project was unique to Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and it entailed comprehensive theory, laboratory studies, and hardware development. We present our work in three major areas: (1) theory of and instrumentation for filter test methods, (2) theoretical and laboratory studies of electric air filters, and (3) development and evaluation of eight experimental electric air filters.

  18. Designing a Campaign: Forbes’ March to the Ohio

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-14

    Distribution: A 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Brigadier General John Forbes’ march from Carlisle to the Ohio River in 1758 was the...Unclassified Brigadier General John Forbes’ march from Carlisle to the Ohio River in 1758 was the first successful campaign in North America...Duquesne, located at the headwaters of the Ohio River at what is now the city of Pittsburgh. This campaign, led by Brigadier General John Forbes, became

  19. Information Summary, Area of Concern: Ashtabula River, Ohio

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-12-01

    Buffalo; and Ms. Julie Letterhos, Ohio State Environmental Protection Agency. Mr. Larry Bird, ERSD, provided technical assistance in preparing tabulated ...River, Ashta- bula, Ohio, on November 30 and December 2, 1982. (RI) 8 Bulk Chemical Analyses (Inorganic Parameters) Conducted on Sediments from...Ashtabula Harbor. (R2) 9 Bulk Chemical Analyses (Organic Parameters) Conducted on Sediments from Ashtabula Harbor, Ashtabula, Ohio. (R2) 10 Bulk Analyses

  20. Toxic-substance control for the Ohio River

    SciTech Connect

    Tennant, P.; Vicory, A.; Norman, C. ); McConocha, P.

    1990-10-01

    Before the widespread application of pollution abatement technology, the Ohio River and its tributaries suffered severe water-quality degradation as a consequence of the basin's economic growth. In 1948, eight states in the Ohio Valley signed a compact pledging cooperation to restore and maintain the quality of the valley's waters. The authors outline the monitoring and control of toxic substances in the Ohio River.

  1. Assessment of the effects of potential control strategies on emissions sources in Ohio and downwind ozone levels

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, R.; Yocke, M.; Eisenger, D.; Spires, B.

    1996-12-31

    The 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) contained wide-range regional controls for improving air quality and air quality related values throughout the US. Evidence to date suggests that regional transport of ozone is a significant contributor to ozone exceedances in many ozone nonattainment areas in the eastern US. Thus, the Environmental Council of States (ECOS) has formed the Ozone Transport Assessment Group (OTAG) to analyze the regional ozone problem and assess the effectiveness of regional control strategies for reducing regional ozone concentrations. Many of the regional control strategies suggested by OTAG may significantly affect sources in the state of Ohio. Thus, the State of Ohio sponsored this study to perform a detailed review of the effect that regional control strategies proposed by OTAG and others will have on emission sources in Ohio. The effects of these proposed controls were reviewed and quantified to assess their effectiveness compared to other control measures. In addition, supplemental photochemical modeling was performed to complement the regional ozone modeling being performed by OTAG to provide quantitative estimates of the impacts of sources in the state of Ohio on downwind ozone concentrations. A version of the EPA UAM that incorporates the ability to perform ozone source apportionment of geographic regions and/or source categories was applied to the Cincinnati UAM SIP databases to determine the regions that contribute to high ozone in the Cincinnati area and identify the types of controls and locations that could potentially lead to adverse local effects. Using the OTAG modeling databases, the UAMX model was also applied using its source apportionment capability to provide a definitive estimate of the contribution Ohio sources have on regional ozone levels.

  2. Earthquakes Induced by Hydraulic Fracturing in Poland Township, Ohio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skoumal, R.; Brudzinski, M. R.; Currie, B. S.

    2014-12-01

    Felt seismicity induced by hydraulic fracturing is very rare with only a handful of reported cases worldwide. Using an optimized multi-station cross-correlation template matching routine, 77 earthquakes were identified in Poland Township, Mahoning County, Ohio that were closely related spatially and temporally to active hydraulic fracturing operations. We identified earthquakes as small as M ~1 up to M 3, one of the largest earthquakes induced by hydraulic fracturing in the United States. These events all occurred 4-12 March 2014 and the rate decayed once the Ohio Department of Natural Resources issued a shutdown of hydraulic fracturing at a nearby well on 10 March. Using a locally derived velocity model and double difference relocation, the earthquake epicenters occurred during six stimulation stages along two horizontal well legs that were located ~0.8 km away. Nearly 100 stages in nearby wells at greater distances from the earthquake source region did not coincide with detected seismicity. During the sequence, hypocenters migrated ~600 m along an azimuth of 083 degrees defining a vertically oriented plane of seismicity close to the top of the Precambrian basement. The focal mechanism determined for the M 3 event had a vertically oriented left-lateral fault plane consistent with the earthquake distribution and the regional stress field. The focal mechanism, orientation, and depth of hypocenters were similar to that of the 2011 Youngstown earthquake sequence that occurred ~20 km away, but was correlated with wastewater injection instead of hydraulic fracturing. Considering the relatively large magnitude of these events and the b-value of 0.85, it appears the hydraulic fracturing induced slip along a pre-existing fault/fracture zone optimally oriented in the regional stress field.

  3. Magnetic field-directed self-assembly of FePt-based nanoparticles at the liquid-air interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chokprasombat, K.; Sirisathitkul, Y.; Sirisathitkul, C.

    2016-10-01

    The self-assembly of nanoparticles is a prominent strategy for fabricating nanomaterials and nanodevices. Herein, FePt-based nanoparticles are self-assembled at a diethylene glycol-air interface, under an applied in-plane static magnetic field. The effect of the field on the self-assembly is apparent at a field strength of 60 mT, whereby nanoparticles arranged into randomly oriented nanoparticle chains. Increasing the field strength to 90-120 mT resulted in the nanoparticle chains becoming increasingly disintegrated, and large islands form at the expense of the uniform nanoparticle monolayer. The pattern arising from self-assembly is described based on the drag force and ligand-ligand interactions, which compete with van der Waals forces and magnetic dipole interactions induced by the applied magnetic field.

  4. Thermal comfort in the humid tropics: Field experiments in air conditioned and naturally ventilated buildings in Singapore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Dear, R. J.; Leow, K. G.; Foo, S. C.

    1991-12-01

    Thermal comfort field experiments were conducted in Singapore in both naturally ventilated highrise residential buildings and air conditioned office buildings. Each of the 818 questionnaire responses was made simultaneously with a detailed set of indoor climatic measurements, and estimates of clothing insulation and metabolic rate. Results for the air conditioned sample indicated that office buildings were overcooled, causing up to one-third of their occupants to experience cool thermal comfort sensations. These observations in air conditioned buildings were broadly consistent with the ISO, ASHRAE and Singapore indoor climatic standards. Indoor climates of the naturally ventilated apartments during the day and early evening were on average three degrees warmer than the ISO comfort standard prescriptions, but caused much less thermal discomfort than expected. Discrepancies between thermal comfort responses in apartment blocks and office buildings are discussed in terms of contemporary perceptual theory.

  5. Human contacts with oral rabies vaccine baits distributed for wildlife rabies management--Ohio, 2012.

    PubMed

    2013-04-12

    Baits laden with oral rabies vaccines are important for the management of wildlife rabies in the United States. In August 2012, the Wildlife Services program of the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service began a field trial involving limited distribution of a new oral rabies vaccine bait in five states, including Ohio. The vaccine consisted of live recombinant human adenovirus type 5 vector, expressing rabies virus glycoprotein (AdRG1.3) (Onrab). A previously used oral rabies vaccine consisting of a live recombinant vaccinia vector, expressing rabies virus glycoprotein (V-RG) (Raboral V-RG), was distributed in other areas of Ohio. To monitor human contacts and potential vaccine virus exposure, surveillance was conducted by the Ohio Department of Health, local Ohio health agencies, and CDC. During August 23-September 7, 2012, a total of 776,921 baits were distributed in Ohio over 4,379 square miles (11,341 square kilometers). During August 24-September 12, a total of 89 baits were reported found by the general public, with 55 human contacts with baits identified (some contacts involved more than one bait). In 27 of the 55 human contacts, the bait was not intact, and a barrier (e.g., gloves) had not been used to handle the bait, leaving persons at risk for vaccine exposure and vaccine virus infection. However, no adverse events were reported. Continued surveillance of human contacts with oral rabies vaccine baits and public warnings to avoid contact with baits are needed because of the potential for vaccine virus infection.

  6. Air transportation technology program at Ohio University, 1983

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcfarland, Richard H.; Nickum, James D.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose is to provide a research tool, a receiver, such that engineers interested in examining Loran-C performance, usefulness, and other properties will have a flexible, modifiable, and well-known piece of receiving hardware. The significant improvements to the Loran-C receiver are summarized.

  7. Airfield Pavement Evaluation: Springfield Air National Guard Base, Ohio

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-09-01

    68 + + 141 157 244 232 649 451 574 304 V 12 7 A A A A A A A A A A A VI 13 9 A A A A A A A A A A A + + 95 + + + 176 + 369 + + + 353 205 , 414 + + 425...seven miles to the east-southeast. The mean wind chill for January, the coldest month is 12 degrees Farenheit , however the mean chill temperature is

  8. Preliminary Assessment Springfield Air National Guard Base, Ohio Air National Guard, Springfield-Beckley Municipal Airport, Springfield, Ohio and Blue Ash Air National Guard Station, Ohio Air National Guard, Cincinnati, Ohio

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-01

    dolomite by a spring zone. The Springfield Limestone is a dolostone and contains a small percentage of silica and alumia. The composition is not...the mineral dolomite, or a variety of limestone or marble rich in magnesium carbonate. DOLOSTONE - A term proposed by Shrock in 1948 for the sedimentary

  9. Microbial contamination of indoor air due to leakages from crawl space: a field study.

    PubMed

    Airaksinen, M; Pasanen, P; Kurnitski, J; Seppänen, O

    2004-02-01

    Mechanical exhaust ventilation system is typical in apartment buildings in Finland. In most buildings the base floor between the first floor apartments and crawl space is not air tight. As the apartments have lower pressure than the crawl space due to ventilation, contaminated air may flow from the crawl space to the apartments. The object of this study was to find out whether a potential air flow from crawl space has an influence on the indoor air quality. The results show that in most cases the concentration of fungal spores was clearly higher in the crawl space than inside the building. The size distribution of fungal spores depended on the fungal species. Correlation between the fungal spores in the crawl space and indoors varied with microbial species. Some species have sources inside the building, which confounds the possible relation between crawl pace and indoor concentrations. Some species, such as Acremonium, do not normally have a source indoors, but its concentration in the crawl space was elevated; our measurements showed also elevated concentrations of Acremonium in the air of the apartments. This consistent finding shows a clear linkage between fungal spores in the indoor air and crawl space. We conclude that a building with a crawl space and pressure difference over the base floor could be a potential risk for indoor air quality in the first floor apartments.

  10. 40 CFR 81.20 - Metropolitan Cincinnati Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.20 Metropolitan Cincinnati Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Cincinnati Interstate Air Quality Control Region (Ohio-Kentucky-Indiana) is revised to consist...

  11. 40 CFR 81.20 - Metropolitan Cincinnati Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.20 Metropolitan Cincinnati Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Cincinnati Interstate Air Quality Control Region (Ohio-Kentucky-Indiana) is revised to consist...

  12. 40 CFR 81.43 - Metropolitan Toledo Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.43 Metropolitan Toledo Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Toledo Interstate Air Quality Control Region (Ohio-Michigan) consists of the territorial...

  13. 40 CFR 81.43 - Metropolitan Toledo Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.43 Metropolitan Toledo Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Toledo Interstate Air Quality Control Region (Ohio-Michigan) consists of the territorial...

  14. Field evaluation of nanofilm detectors for measuring acidic particles in indoor and outdoor air.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Beverly S; Heikkinen, Maire S A; Hazi, Yair; Gao, Hai; Peters, Paul; Lippmann, Morton

    2004-09-01

    This field evaluation study was conducted to assess new technology designed to measure number concentrations of strongly acidic ultrafine particles. Interest in these particles derives from their potential to cause adverse health effects. Current methods for counting and sizing airborne ultrafine particles cannot isolate those particles that are acidic. We hypothesized that the size-resolved number concentration of such particles to which people are exposed could be measured by newly developed iron nanofilm detectors on which sulfuric acid (H2SO4*) droplets produce distinctive ringed reaction sites visible by atomic force microscopy (AFM). We carried out field measurements using an array of samplers, with and without the iron nanofilm detectors, that allowed indirect comparison of particle number concentrations and size-resolved measures of acidity. The iron nanofilm detectors are silicon chips (5 mm x 5 mm x 0.6 mm) that are coated with iron by vapor deposition. The iron layer was 21.5 or 26 nm thick for the two batches used in these experiments. After exposure the detector surface was scanned topographically by AFM to view and enumerate the ringed acid reaction sites and deposited nonacidic particles. The number of reaction sites and particles per scan can be counted directly on the image displayed by AFM. Sizes can also be measured, but for this research we did not size particles collected in the field. The integrity of the surface of iron nanofilm detectors was monitored by laboratory analysis and by deploying blank detectors and detectors that had previously been exposed to H2SO4 calibration aerosols. The work established that the detectors could be used with confidence in temperate climates. Under extreme high humidity and high temperature, the surface film was liable to detach from the support, but remaining portions of the film still produced reliable data. Exposure to ambient gases in a filtered air canister during the field tests did not affect the film

  15. Electrical characteristics of single-component ambipolar organic field-effect transistors and effects of air exposure on them

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakanoue, Tomo; Yahiro, Masayuki; Adachi, Chihaya; Takimiya, Kazuo; Toshimitsu, Akio

    2008-05-01

    We investigated the electrical characteristics of single-component ambipolar organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) by controlling the device structure and preparation and the measurement conditions. Six organic semiconductor materials (copper-phthalocyanine, tris-(8-hydroxyquinoline)aluminum (Alq3), alpha-sexithiophene, 4-4'-bis-styrylphenyl, 2,7-diphenyl[1]benzothieno[3,2-b]benzothiophene, or a photopolymerized polydiacethylene derivative (PDA) were used as the active layer, and all were found to transport both holes and electrons. The PDA-based FETs had the highest hole and electron mobilities (0.12 and 0.025 cm2/V s, respectively). We also investigated the effect of air exposure on the OFETs. The hole mobility was barely affected by the exposure while the electron mobility was significantly affected. The threshold voltage for p-channel operation was shifted by the exposure while that for n-channel operation was not, indicating that the hole density in the active layer is increased by air exposure whereas the electron density is independent of air exposure. Furthermore, we prepared an Alq3-based p-channel OFET and investigated the effect of air exposure on it. While its operation was stable in vacuum, air exposure degraded its characteristics. These behaviors indicate that irreversible chemical reactions occur between cationic Alq3 species and oxygen or water molecules.

  16. A comparison of methods for the assessment of odor impacts on air quality: Field inspection (VDI 3940) and the air dispersion model CALPUFF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranzato, Laura; Barausse, Alberto; Mantovani, Alice; Pittarello, Alberto; Benzo, Maurizio; Palmeri, Luca

    2012-12-01

    Unpleasant odors are a major cause of public complaints concerning air quality and represent a growing social problem in industrialized countries. However, the assessment of odor pollution is still regarded as a difficult task, because olfactory nuisance can be caused by many different chemical compounds, often found in hard-to-detect concentrations, and the perception of odors is influenced by subjective thresholds; moreover, the impact of odor sources on air quality is mediated by complex atmospheric dispersion processes. The development of standardized assessment approaches to odor pollution and proper international regulatory tools are urgently needed. In particular, comparisons of the methodologies commonly used nowadays to assess odor impacts on air quality are required. Here, we assess the olfactory nuisance caused by an anaerobic treatment plant for municipal solid waste by means of two alternative techniques: the field inspection procedure and the atmospheric dispersion model CALPUFF. Our goal was to compare rigorously their estimates of odor nuisance, both qualitatively (spatial extent of odor impact) and quantitatively (intensity of odor nuisance). To define the impact of odors, we referred to the German standards, based on the frequency of odor episodes in terms of odor hours. We report a satisfying, although not perfect agreement between the estimates provided by the two techniques. For example, they assessed similar spatial extents of odor pollution, but different frequencies of odor episodes in locations where the odor nuisance was highest. The comparison highlights strengths and weaknesses for both approaches. CALPUFF is a cheaper methodology which can be used predictively, but fugitive emissions are difficult to model reliably, because of uncertainty regarding timing, location and emission rate. Field inspection takes into account the role of human perception, but unlike the model it does not always characterize precisely the extent of the odor

  17. Cloudy Sounding and Cloud-Top Height Retrieval From AIRS Alone Single Field-of-View Radiance Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisz, Elisabeth; Li, Jun; Li, Jinlong; Zhou, Daniel K.; Huang, Hung-Lung; Goldberg, Mitchell D.; Yang, Ping

    2007-01-01

    High-spectral resolution measurements from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) onboard the EOS (Earth Observing System) Aqua satellite provide unique information about atmospheric state, surface and cloud properties. This paper presents an AIRS alone single field-of-view (SFOV) retrieval algorithm to simultaneously retrieve temperature, humidity and ozone profiles under all weather conditions, as well as cloud top pressure (CTP) and cloud optical thickness (COT) under cloudy skies. For optically thick cloud conditions the above-cloud soundings are derived, whereas for clear skies and optically thin cloud conditions the profiles are retrieved from 0.005 hPa down to the earth's surface. Initial validation has been conducted by using the operational MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) product, ECMWF (European Center of Medium range Weather Forecasts) analysis fields and radiosonde observations (RAOBs). These inter-comparisons clearly demonstrate the potential of this algorithm to process data from 38 high-spectral infrared (IR) sounder instruments.

  18. Installation Restoration Program. Records Search 8204th Field Training Site, Wisconsin Air National Guard, Volk Field Air National Guard Base, Camp Douglas, Wisconsin.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-08-01

    with past hazardous .: _., material disposal sites on DOD facilities, control the migration of hazardous contamination from such facilities, and...consists of follow-on field work to determine the extent and magnitude of contaminant migration . Phase III (not part of this contract) consists of...increases the likelihood of off-base contaminant migration via the groundwater pathway. This is particularly true for the current landfill (Site No. 2

  19. The use of wind fields in a land use regression model to predict air pollution concentrations for health exposure studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arain, M. A.; Blair, R.; Finkelstein, N.; Brook, J. R.; Sahsuvaroglu, T.; Beckerman, B.; Zhang, L.; Jerrett, M.

    A methodology is developed to include wind flow effects in land use regression (LUR) models for predicting nitrogen dioxide (NO 2) concentrations for health exposure studies. NO 2 is widely used in health studies as an indicator of traffic-generated air pollution in urban areas. Incorporation of high-resolution interpolated observed wind direction from a network of 38 weather stations in a LUR model improved NO 2 concentration estimates in densely populated, high traffic and industrial/business areas in Toronto-Hamilton urban airshed (THUA) of Ontario, Canada. These small-area variations in air pollution concentrations that are probably more important for health exposure studies may not be detected by sparse continuous air pollution monitoring network or conventional interpolation methods. Observed wind fields were also compared with wind fields generated by Global Environmental Multiscale-High resolution Model Application Project (GEM-HiMAP) to explore the feasibility of using regional weather forecasting model simulated wind fields in LUR models when observed data are either sparse or not available. While GEM-HiMAP predicted wind fields well at large scales, it was unable to resolve wind flow patterns at smaller scales. These results suggest caution and careful evaluation of regional weather forecasting model simulated wind fields before incorporating into human exposure models for health studies. This study has demonstrated that wind fields may be integrated into the land use regression framework. Such integration has a discernable influence on both the overall model prediction and perhaps more importantly for health effects assessment on the relative spatial distribution of traffic pollution throughout the THUA. Methodology developed in this study may be applied in other large urban areas across the world.

  20. Development of Gridded Fields of Urban Canopy Parameters for Advanced Urban Meteorological and Air Quality Models

    EPA Science Inventory

    Urban dispersion and air quality simulation models applied at various horizontal scales require different levels of fidelity for specifying the characteristics of the underlying surfaces. As the modeling scales approach the neighborhood level (~1 km horizontal grid spacing), the...