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Sample records for air field ohio

  1. 75 FR 65594 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Ohio Ambient Air Quality...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-26

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Ohio Ambient Air Quality Standards AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY... consolidation of Ohio's Ambient Air Quality Standards (AAQS) into Ohio's State Implementation Plan (SIP)...

  2. [Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio]. Volume 5, Field Investigation report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    An environmental investigation of ground water conditions has been undertaken at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB), Ohio to obtain data to assist in the evaluation of a potential removal action to prevent, to the extent practicable, migration of the contaminated ground water across Base boundaries. Field investigations were limited to the central section of the southwestern boundary of Area C and the Springfield Pike boundary of Area B. Further, the study was limited to a maximum depth of 150 feet below grade. Three primary activities of the field investigation were: (1) installation of 22 monitoring wells, (2) collection and analysis of ground water from 71 locations, (3) measurement of ground water elevations at 69 locations. Volatile organic compounds including trichloroethylene, perchloroethylene, and/or vinyl chloride were detected in concentrations exceeding Maximum Contaminant Levels (MCL) at three locations within the Area C investigation area. Ground water at the Springfield Pike boundary of Area B occurs in two primary units, separated by a thicker-than-expected clay layers. One well within Area B was determined to exceed the MCL for trichloroethylene.

  3. [Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright- Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio]. Volume 4, Health and Safety Plan (HSP); Phase 1, Task 4 Field Investigation report: Draft

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-01

    This Health and Safety Plan (HSP) was developed for the Environmental Investigation of Ground-water Contamination Investigation at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base near Dayton, Ohio, based on the projected scope of work for the Phase 1, Task 4 Field Investigation. The HSP describes hazards that may be encountered during the investigation, assesses the hazards, and indicates what type of personal protective equipment is to be used for each task performed. The HSP also addresses the medical monitoring program, decontamination procedures, air monitoring, training, site control, accident prevention, and emergency response.

  4. Screening for volatile organic compounds in soil and groundwater by use of a portable gas chromatograph during field investigations at an Air Force installation in Ohio

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parnell, James M.

    1995-01-01

    The use of the portable gas chromatograph for screening of soil and water samples in the field was part of the drilling program for the installation of monitoring wells for a basewide ground-water monitoring program at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio. Selected soil and ground-water samples were screened in the field for volatile organic compounds to determine if contamination was present, to define the vertical and lateral extent of contamination, and to aid in the placement of the well screens for optimal interception of contaminants. This report describes the screening methods, sample-collection, quality-assurance/quality-control methods, and data-interpretation procedures necessary for screening of soil and ground-water samples in the field during the water resources investigations.

  5. 78 FR 68377 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Ohio NOX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-14

    ... these revisions under the Clean Air Act, which allows for Ohio's Clean Air Interstate Rule (CAIR) NO X Ozone Season Trading Program rules to supersede Ohio's nitrogen oxides (NO X ) State Implementation Plan (SIP) Call Budget Trading Program rules, but leave other requirements of the NO X SIP Call in place...

  6. [Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio]. Volume 2, Work plan: Phase 1, Task 4, Field Investigation: Draft

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-01

    In April 1990 Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB) initiated an investigation to evaluate a potential CERCLA removal action to prevent, to the extent practicable, the migration of ground-water contamination in the Mad River Valley Aquifer within and across WPAFB boundaries. The action will be based on a Focused Feasibility Study with an Action Memorandum serving as a decision document that is subject to approval by the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency. The first phase (Phase 1) of this effort involves an investigation of ground-water contamination migrating across the southwest boundary of Area C and across Springfield Pike adjacent to Area B. Task 4 of Phase 1 is a field investigation to collect sufficient additional information to evaluate removal alternatives. The field investigation will provide information in the following specific areas of study: water-level data which will be used to permit calibration of the ground-water flow model to a unique time in history; and ground-water quality data which will be used to characterize the current chemical conditions of ground water.

  7. [Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio]. Volume 5, Appendix A, Part 2, Field Investigation report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    This report contains information related to the sampling and chemical analysis of ground water at the Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. It is part of a field investigation of ground water contamination.

  8. 76 FR 64825 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans, Ohio and Indiana; Redesignation of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-19

    ...EPA is approving, under the Clean Air Act (CAA), Ohio's and Indiana's requests to redesignate their respective portions of the Cincinnati-Hamilton nonattainment area (for Ohio: Butler, Clermont, Hamilton, and Warren Counties, Ohio; for IN: a portion of Dearborn County) to attainment for the 1997 annual National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS or standard) for fine particulate matter......

  9. URBAN SPRAWL MODELING, AIR QUALITY MONITORING AND RISK COMMUNICATION: THE NORTHEAST OHIO PROJECT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Northeast Ohio Urban Sprawl, Air Quality Monitoring, and Communications Project (hereafter called the Northeast Ohio Project) provides local environmental and health information useful to residents, local officials, community planners, and others in a 15 county region in the ...

  10. 78 FR 63388 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Dayton-Springfield...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-24

    ...Under the Clean Air Act (CAA), EPA is approving requests by Ohio to revise the 1997 8-hour ozone maintenance air quality state implementation plan (SIP) for the Dayton-Springfield area, the Toledo area, and the Ohio portions of the Parkersburg-Marietta and Steubenville-Weirton, West Virginia-Ohio areas, to replace onroad emissions inventories and motor vehicle emissions budgets (budgets) with......

  11. [Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio]. Volume 3, Sampling and analysis plan (SAP): Phase 1, Task 4, Field Investigation: Draft

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-01

    In April 1990, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB), initiated an investigation to evaluate a potential Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) removal action to prevent, to the extent practicable, the offsite migration of contaminated ground water from WPAFB. WPAFB retained the services of the Environmental Management Operations (EMO) and its principle subcontractor, International Technology Corporation (IT) to complete Phase 1 of the environmental investigation of ground-water contamination at WPAFB. Phase 1 of the investigation involves the short-term evaluation and potential design for a program to remove ground-water contamination that appears to be migrating across the western boundary of Area C, and across the northern boundary of Area B along Springfield Pike. Primarily, Task 4 of Phase 1 focuses on collection of information at the Area C and Springfield Pike boundaries of WPAFB. This Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) has been prepared to assist in completion of the Task 4 field investigation and is comprised of the Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPP) and the Field Sampling Plan (FSP).

  12. (Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright- Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-01

    This Health and Safety Plan (HSP) was developed for the Environmental Investigation of Ground-water Contamination Investigation at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base near Dayton, Ohio, based on the projected scope of work for the Phase 1, Task 4 Field Investigation. The HSP describes hazards that may be encountered during the investigation, assesses the hazards, and indicates what type of personal protective equipment is to be used for each task performed. The HSP also addresses the medical monitoring program, decontamination procedures, air monitoring, training, site control, accident prevention, and emergency response.

  13. 40 CFR 81.70 - Parkersburg (West Virginia)-Marietta (Ohio) Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Parkersburg (West Virginia)-Marietta... PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.70 Parkersburg (West Virginia)-Marietta (Ohio) Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Parkersburg (West Virginia)-Marietta (Ohio)...

  14. 40 CFR 81.70 - Parkersburg (West Virginia)-Marietta (Ohio) Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Parkersburg (West Virginia)-Marietta... PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.70 Parkersburg (West Virginia)-Marietta (Ohio) Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Parkersburg (West Virginia)-Marietta (Ohio)...

  15. 40 CFR 81.70 - Parkersburg (West Virginia)-Marietta (Ohio) Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Parkersburg (West Virginia)-Marietta... PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.70 Parkersburg (West Virginia)-Marietta (Ohio) Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Parkersburg (West Virginia)-Marietta (Ohio)...

  16. 40 CFR 81.70 - Parkersburg (West Virginia)-Marietta (Ohio) Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Parkersburg (West Virginia)-Marietta... PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.70 Parkersburg (West Virginia)-Marietta (Ohio) Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Parkersburg (West Virginia)-Marietta (Ohio)...

  17. 40 CFR 81.70 - Parkersburg (West Virginia)-Marietta (Ohio) Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Parkersburg (West Virginia)-Marietta... PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.70 Parkersburg (West Virginia)-Marietta (Ohio) Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Parkersburg (West Virginia)-Marietta (Ohio)...

  18. 75 FR 73025 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Ohio Portion of the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-29

    ... of the Cincinnati-Hamilton Area; 8-Hour Ozone Maintenance Plan AGENCY: Environmental Protection... plan for the Ohio portion of the Cincinnati-Hamilton, OH-KY-IN 8-hour ozone area. The Cincinnati-Hamilton area includes Butler, Clermont, Clinton, Hamilton, and Warren Counties in Ohio,...

  19. 78 FR 19990 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Ohio Ambient Air Quality...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-03

    ... the relocated air quality standard rules. This action was published at 75 FR 65572 as a direct final... previously approved, most notably including revisions that EPA had proposed to disapprove (see 70 FR 36901... Register on October 26, 2010 (75 FR 65572), on page 65574 in the second column, the paragraph numbered...

  20. [Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio]. Volume 5, Appendix A, Part 1, Field Investigation report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    This report presents information related to the sampling of ground water at the Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. It is part of an investigation into possible ground water contamination. Information concerns well drilling/construction; x-ray diffraction and sampling; soil boring logs; and chain-of-custody records.

  1. 78 FR 6035 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio and Indiana; Cincinnati...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-29

    ...EPA is approving the request by Ohio and Indiana to revise the Cincinnati-Hamilton 1997 8-hour ozone maintenance air quality State Implementation Plans (SIPs) to replace the previously approved motor vehicle emissions budgets (budgets) with budgets developed using EPA's Motor Vehicle Emissions Simulator (MOVES) emissions model. The Ohio and Indiana portions of the Cincinnati-Hamilton area......

  2. 78 FR 34965 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Lima 1997 8-Hour Ozone...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Lima 1997 8... the request by Ohio to revise the Lima, Ohio 1997 8-hour ozone maintenance air quality...

  3. 78 FR 16785 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Cleveland-Akron-Lorain and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-19

    ...EPA is approving the request by Ohio to revise the Cleveland- Akron-Lorain and the Columbus, Ohio 1997 8-hour ozone maintenance air quality State Implementation Plans (SIPs) under the Clean Air Act (CAA) to replace the previously approved motor vehicle emissions budgets (budgets) with budgets developed using EPA's Motor Vehicle Emissions Simulator (MOVES) emissions model. Ohio submitted the......

  4. 78 FR 53275 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Redesignation of the Ohio...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-29

    ...? On December 2, 2011 (76 FR 75464), EPA issued a final determination that the Parkersburg-Marietta and... standard. On November 30, 2012 (77 FR 71383, 77 FR 71371), EPA published notices proposing to approve Ohio..., 2012, requests for redesignation. On June 26, 2013 (78 FR 38256, 78 FR 38247), EPA...

  5. 75 FR 72954 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Ohio Portion of the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-29

    ... remain below attainment levels. Table 1--Comparison of 2008, 2015 and 2020 VOC and NOX Emissions for the... background for this action? On May 11, 2010 (75 FR 26118), EPA redesignated the Ohio and Indiana portions of... review by the Office of Management and Budget under Executive Order 12866 (58 FR 51735, October 4,...

  6. 78 FR 69337 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Ohio SO2

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-19

    ... Plan (SIP) approval, revisions to Ohio Administrative Code (OAC) rules: 3745-18-01, 3745-18- 03 to 3745-18-52, 3745-18-54 to 3745-18-77, 3745-18-79, 3745-18-81 to 3745-18-89, and 3745-18-91 to 3745-18-94... specific paragraphs in OAC 3745-18-04. DATES: Comments must be received on or before December 19,...

  7. 75 FR 65594 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Particulate Matter Standards

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Particulate... have been necessary to attain and maintain the 2006 National Ambient Air Quality Standards for PM...

  8. Characterization of Air Manganese Exposure Estimates for Residents in Two Ohio Towns

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study was conducted to derive receptor-specific outdoor exposure concentrations of total suspended particulate (TSP) and respirable (dae ≤1O µm) air manganese (air-Mn) for East Liverpool and Marietta (Ohio) in the absence of facility emissions data, but where long-t...

  9. 40 CFR 81.64 - Huntington (West Virginia)-Ashland (Kentucky)-Portsmouth-Ironton (Ohio) Interstate Air Quality...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Huntington (West Virginia)-Ashland... (West Virginia)-Ashland (Kentucky)-Portsmouth-Ironton (Ohio) Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Huntington (West Virginia)-Ashland (Kentucky)-Portsmouth-Ironton (Ohio) Interstate Air Quality Control...

  10. 40 CFR 81.64 - Huntington (West Virginia)-Ashland (Kentucky)-Portsmouth-Ironton (Ohio) Interstate Air Quality...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Huntington (West Virginia)-Ashland... (West Virginia)-Ashland (Kentucky)-Portsmouth-Ironton (Ohio) Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Huntington (West Virginia)-Ashland (Kentucky)-Portsmouth-Ironton (Ohio) Interstate Air Quality Control...

  11. 40 CFR 81.64 - Huntington (West Virginia)-Ashland (Kentucky)-Portsmouth-Ironton (Ohio) Interstate Air Quality...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Huntington (West Virginia)-Ashland... (West Virginia)-Ashland (Kentucky)-Portsmouth-Ironton (Ohio) Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Huntington (West Virginia)-Ashland (Kentucky)-Portsmouth-Ironton (Ohio) Interstate Air Quality Control...

  12. 40 CFR 81.64 - Huntington (West Virginia)-Ashland (Kentucky)-Portsmouth-Ironton (Ohio) Interstate Air Quality...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Huntington (West Virginia)-Ashland... (West Virginia)-Ashland (Kentucky)-Portsmouth-Ironton (Ohio) Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Huntington (West Virginia)-Ashland (Kentucky)-Portsmouth-Ironton (Ohio) Interstate Air Quality Control...

  13. 40 CFR 81.64 - Huntington (West Virginia)-Ashland (Kentucky)-Portsmouth-Ironton (Ohio) Interstate Air Quality...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Huntington (West Virginia)-Ashland... (West Virginia)-Ashland (Kentucky)-Portsmouth-Ironton (Ohio) Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Huntington (West Virginia)-Ashland (Kentucky)-Portsmouth-Ironton (Ohio) Interstate Air Quality Control...

  14. 78 FR 41752 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Redesignation of the Ohio...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-11

    ...-2010 ambient air monitoring data (76 FR 56641), we are proposing to determine that the area continues... combustion sources. The first air quality standards for PM 2.5 were promulgated on July 18, 1997, at 62 FR... January 5, 2005, at 70 FR 944, EPA published air quality area designations for the 1997 annual PM...

  15. [Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio]. Volume 3, Appendix A, Draft standard operating procedures and elements: Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP): Phase 1, Task 4, Field Investigation, Draft

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-01

    This report presents information concerning field procedures employed during the monitoring, well construction, well purging, sampling, and well logging at the Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. Activities were conducted in an effort to evaluate ground water contamination.

  16. Heating, Ventilation, Air-conditioning, and Refrigeration. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    Developed through a modified DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) process involving business, industry, labor, and community agency representatives in Ohio, this document is a comprehensive and verified employer competency profile for heating, ventilation, air conditioning, and refrigeration occupations. The list contains units (with and without…

  17. 78 FR 45135 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Redesignation of the Dayton...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-26

    ...EPA is proposing to approve the State of Ohio's request to redesignate the Dayton-Springfield nonattainment area (Dayton) to attainment for the 1997 annual National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS or standard) for fine particulate matter (PM2.5). EPA is also proposing to approve the related elements including emissions inventories, maintenance plans, and the accompanying motor......

  18. AIR POLLUTION AND HEALTH EFFECTS IN CHILDREN RESIDING IN AKRON, OHIO

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of ambient air pollutants on respiratory function, incidence, and severity of acute respiratory illness, nature of pulmonary epidemiology, and trace element accumulation, in 4th, 5th, and 6th grade children in Akron, Ohio. Ai...

  19. 77 FR 59879 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; PBR and PTIO

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; PBR and PTIO AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: EPA is proposing...

  20. 77 FR 71383 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Redesignation of the Ohio...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-30

    ... attainment date based on quality- assured, certified 2007-2009 ambient air monitoring data (76 FR 75464), we... were promulgated on July 18, 1997, at 62 FR 38652. EPA promulgated an annual standard at a level of 15... at each monitoring site. On January 5, 2005, at 70 FR 944, EPA published air quality...

  1. 77 FR 71371 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Redesignation of the Ohio...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-30

    ... for PM 2.5 based on quality-assured, certified 2007-2009 ambient air monitoring data (76 FR 75464), we... 18, 1997, at 62 FR 38652. EPA promulgated an annual standard at a level of 15 micrograms per cubic... each monitoring site. On January 5, 2005, at 70 FR 944, EPA published air quality area designations...

  2. Contributing recharge areas to water-supply wells at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sheets, R.A.

    1994-01-01

    Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, in southwestern Ohio, has operated three well fields--Area B, Skeel Road, and the East Well Fields--to supply potable water for consumption and use for base activities. To protect these well fields from contamination and to comply with the Ohio Wellhead Protection Plan, the Base is developing a wellhead-protection program for the well fields. A three-dimensional, steady-state ground-water-flow model was developed in 1993 to simulate heads in (1) the buried-valley aquifer system that is tapped by the two active well fields, and in (2) an upland bedrock aquifer that may supply water to the wells. An advective particle-tracking algorithm that requires estimated porosities and simulated heads was used to estimate ground-water-flow pathlines and traveltimes to the active well fields. Contributing recharge areas (CRA's)--areas on the water table that contribute water to a well or well field--were generated for 1-, 5-, and 10-year traveltimes. Results from the simulation and subsequent particle tracking indicate that the CRA's for the Skeel Road Well Fields are oval and extend north- ward, toward the Mad River, as pumping at the well field increases. The sizes of the 1-, 5-, and 10-year CRA's of Skeel Road Well Field, under maximum pumping conditions, are approximately 0.5, 1.5 and 3.2 square miles, respectively. The CRA's for the Area B Well Field extend to the north, up the Mad River Valley; as pumping increases at the well field, the CRA's extend up the Mad River Valley under Huffman Dam. The sizes of the 1-, 5-, and 10-year CRA's of Area B Well Field, under maximum pumping conditions, are approximately 0.1, 0.5, and 0.9 square miles, respectively. The CRA's for the East Well Field are affected by nearby streams under average pumping conditions. The sizes of the 1-, 5-, and 10-year CRA's of the East Well Field, under maximum pumping conditions, are approximately 0.2, 1.2, and 2.4 square miles, respectively. However, as pumping increases

  3. 78 FR 38247 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Redesignation of the Ohio...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-26

    ... 1997 annual PM 2.5 standard (76 FR 75464). On November 30, 2012, EPA published a proposed rulemaking... 107(d)(3)(E) of the CAA (77 FR 71371). In that rulemaking EPA proposed several related actions. First... Clean Air Fine Particle Implementation Rule'' (72 FR 20586, April 25, 2007) and the ``Implementation...

  4. 78 FR 38256 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Redesignation of the Ohio...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-26

    ... standard (76 FR 75464). On November 30, 2012, EPA published a proposed rulemaking determining further that... the CAA (77 FR 71383). In that rulemaking EPA proposed several related actions. First, EPA proposed to.... Circuit remanded to EPA the ``Final Clean Air Fine Particle Implementation Rule'' (72 FR 20586, April...

  5. 76 FR 79593 - Approval, and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Redesignation of the Ohio...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-22

    ... for PM 2.5 were promulgated on July 18, 1997, at 62 FR 38652. EPA promulgated an annual standard at a...-hour PM 2.5 concentrations at each monitoring site. On January 5, 2005, at 70 FR 944, EPA published air... for the 1997 annual PM 2.5 standard. On October 17, 2006, at 71 FR 61144, EPA retained the annual PM...

  6. (Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    An environmental investigation of ground water conditions has been undertaken at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB), Ohio to obtain data to assist in the evaluation of a potential removal action to prevent, to the extent practicable, migration of the contaminated ground water across Base boundaries. Field investigations were limited to the central section of the southwestern boundary of Area C and the Springfield Pike boundary of Area B. Further, the study was limited to a maximum depth of 150 feet below grade. Three primary activities of the field investigation were: (1) installation of 22 monitoring wells, (2) collection and analysis of ground water from 71 locations, (3) measurement of ground water elevations at 69 locations. Volatile organic compounds including trichloroethylene, perchloroethylene, and/or vinyl chloride were detected in concentrations exceeding Maximum Contaminant Levels (MCL) at three locations within the Area C investigation area. Ground water at the Springfield Pike boundary of Area B occurs in two primary units, separated by a thicker-than-expected clay layers. One well within Area B was determined to exceed the MCL for trichloroethylene.

  7. (Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-01

    In April 1990 Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB) initiated an investigation to evaluate a potential CERCLA removal action to prevent, to the extent practicable, the migration of ground-water contamination in the Mad River Valley Aquifer within and across WPAFB boundaries. The action will be based on a Focused Feasibility Study with an Action Memorandum serving as a decision document that is subject to approval by the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency. The first phase (Phase 1) of this effort involves an investigation of ground-water contamination migrating across the southwest boundary of Area C and across Springfield Pike adjacent to Area B. Task 4 of Phase 1 is a field investigation to collect sufficient additional information to evaluate removal alternatives. The field investigation will provide information in the following specific areas of study: water-level data which will be used to permit calibration of the ground-water flow model to a unique time in history; and ground-water quality data which will be used to characterize the current chemical conditions of ground water.

  8. Estimating Air-Manganese Exposures in Two Ohio Towns

    EPA Science Inventory

    Manganese (Mn), a nutrient required for normal metabolic function, is also a persistent air pollutant and a known neurotoxin at high concentrations. Elevated exposures can result in a number of motor and cognitive deficits. Quantifying chronic personal exposures in residential po...

  9. Ohio EPA Teachers Kit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Environmental Protection Agency, Columbus.

    In an effort to provide teachers in Ohio with assistance in environmental education, the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has produced this teachers kit. It is designed to describe what the Ohio EPA is doing to protect Ohio's air, land, and water. The background information provides an historical account of some of the events that have…

  10. Characterization of air manganese exposure estimates for residents in two Ohio towns.

    PubMed

    Colledge, Michelle A; Julian, Jaime R; Gocheva, Vihra V; Beseler, Cheryl L; Roels, Harry A; Lobdell, Danelle T; Bowler, Rosemarie M

    2015-08-01

    This study was conducted to derive receptor-specific outdoor exposure concentrations of total suspended particulate (TSP) and respirable (dae ≤ 10 µm) air manganese (air-Mn) for East Liverpool and Marietta (Ohio) in the absence of facility emissions data, but where long-term air measurements were available. Our "site-surface area emissions method" used U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) AERMOD (AMS/EPA Regulatory Model) dispersion model and air measurement data to estimate concentrations for residential receptor sites in the two communities. Modeled concentrations were used to create ratios between receptor points and calibrated using measured data from local air monitoring stations. Estimated outdoor air-Mn concentrations were derived for individual study subjects in both towns. The mean estimated long-term air-Mn exposure levels for total suspended particulate were 0.35 μg/m³ (geometric mean [GM]) and 0.88 μg/m³ (arithmetic mean [AM]) in East Liverpool (range: 0.014-6.32 μg/m³) and 0.17 μg/m³ (GM) and 0.21 μg/m³ (AM) in Marietta (range: 0.03-1.61 μg/m³). Modeled results compared well with averaged ambient air measurements from local air monitoring stations. Exposure to respirable Mn particulate matter (PM10; PM <10 μm) was higher in Marietta residents. PMID:26211636

  11. Edge-of-field evaluation of the Ohio phosphorus risk index

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Phosphorus Index (PI) has been the cornerstone for phosphorus (P)-based management and planning over the past twenty years; yet, field-scale evaluation of many state PIs has been limited. In this study, measured P loads in surface runoff and tile discharge from 40 agricultural fields in Ohio wit...

  12. 78 FR 6064 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio and Indiana; Cincinnati...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-29

    ...; Cincinnati-Hamilton, Ohio, Ohio and Indiana 1997 8- Hour Ozone Maintenance Plan Revisions to Approved Motor...: EPA is proposing to approve the request by Ohio and Indiana to revise the Cincinnati-Hamilton, 1997 8... Simulator (MOVES) 2010a emissions model. The Ohio and Indiana portions of the Cincinnati- Hamilton...

  13. International Air Travel to Ohio, USA, and the Impact on Malaria, Influenza, and Hepatitis A

    PubMed Central

    Brannen, Donald E.; Alhammad, Ali; Branum, Melissa; Schmitt, Amy

    2016-01-01

    The State of Ohio led the United States in measles in 2014, ostensibly related to international air travel (IAT), and ranked lower than 43 other states in infectious disease outbreak preparedness. We conducted a retrospective cohort study using surveillance data of the total Ohio population of 11 million from 2010 through 2014 with a nested case control of air travelers to determine the risk of malaria, seasonal influenza hospitalizations (IH), and hepatitis A (HA) disease related to international travel and to estimate the association with domestic enplanement. IAT appeared protective for HA and IH with a risk of 0.031 (.02–.04) but for malaria was 2.7 (2.07–3.62). Enplanement increased the risk for nonendemic M 3.5 (2.5–4.9) and for HA and IH 1.39 (1.34–1.44). IAT's ratio of relative risk (RRR) of malaria to HA and IH was 87.1 (55.8–136) greater than 219 times versus domestic enplanement which was protective for malaria at 0.397 (0.282–0.559). Malaria is correlated with IAT with cases increasing by 6.9 for every 10,000 passports issued. PMID:27123365

  14. Characterization of air manganese exposure estimates for residents in two Ohio towns

    PubMed Central

    Colledge, Michelle A.; Julian, Jaime R.; Gocheva, Vihra V.; Beseler, Cheryl L.; Roels, Harry A.; Lobdell, Danelle T.; Bowler, Rosemarie M.

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to derive receptor-specific outdoor exposure concentrations of total suspended particulate (TSP) and respirable (dae ≤ 10 μm) air manganese (air-Mn) for East Liverpool and Marietta (Ohio) in the absence of facility emissions data, but where long-term air measurements were available. Our “site-surface area emissions method” used U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) AERMOD (AMS/EPA Regulatory Model) dispersion model and air measurement data to estimate concentrations for residential receptor sites in the two communities. Modeled concentrations were used to create ratios between receptor points and calibrated using measured data from local air monitoring stations. Estimated outdoor air-Mn concentrations were derived for individual study subjects in both towns. The mean estimated long-term air-Mn exposure levels for total suspended particulate were 0.35 μg/m3 (geometric mean [GM]) and 0.88 μg/m3 (arithmetic mean [AM]) in East Liverpool (range: 0.014–6.32 μg/m3) and 0.17 μg/m3 (GM) and 0.21 μg/m3 (AM) in Marietta (range: 0.03–1.61 μg/m3). Modeled results compared well with averaged ambient air measurements from local air monitoring stations. Exposure to respirable Mn particulate matter (PM10; PM <10 μm) was higher in Marietta residents. Implications Few available studies evaluate long-term health outcomes from inhalational manganese (Mn) exposure in residential populations, due in part to challenges in measuring individual exposures. Local long-term air measurements provide the means to calibrate models used in estimating long-term exposures. Furthermore, this combination of modeling and ambient air sampling can be used to derive receptor-specific exposure estimates even in the absence of source emissions data for use in human health outcome studies. PMID:26211636

  15. Investigation of Air Transportation Technology at Ohio University, 1989-1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lilley, Robert W.

    1990-01-01

    The activities of the participants in the Joint University Program (JUP) at Ohio University are briefly surveyed. During 1989 to 1990, five topics received emphasis. A spectrum-efficient weather data uplink system was designed, constructed, and flight tested. An integrated Global Positioning System/Inertial Navigation System (GPS/INS) study continued, utilizing the Redundant strapdown Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) on loan from NASA. The Ridge Regression theory was refined and applied to air navigation scenarios. System Identification theory was applied to GPS data to point the way to better understanding of the effects of Selective Availability on civilian users of this navigation system. An analysis of thought-related (electroencephalographic) signals for application to control of computer systems that could have significance in aiding paraplegics or for hands-off systems control in industrial or air traffic control areas was carried out.

  16. MULTIMEDIA CHEMICAL ANALYSIS PLAN FOR CHILDREN'S AGGREGATE EXPOSURE FIELD STUDIES IN NORTH CAROLINA AND OHIO

    EPA Science Inventory

    The samples collected in the CTEPP North Carolina and Ohio field campaigns were analyzed for a suite of organic chemicals in various compound classes, chosen because of their possible carcinogenicity, acute or chronic toxicity, or potential for endocrine system disruption. The...

  17. 76 FR 64880 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio and Indiana; Redesignation of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-19

    ...; Redesignation of the Cincinnati-Hamilton Area to Attainment of the 1997 Annual Standard for Fine Particulate... approve Ohio's and Indiana's requests to redesignate their respective portions of the Cincinnati-Hamilton OH-IN- KY nonattainment area (for Ohio: Butler, Clermont, Hamilton, and Warren Counties, Ohio; for...

  18. OHIO RIVER BASIN ENERGY STUDY: AIR QUALITY AND RELATED IMPACTS. VOLUME I. DOCUMENTATION IN SUPPORT OF KEY ORBES AIR QUALITY FINDINGS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report was prepared as part of the Ohio River Basin Energy Study (ORBES), a multi-disciplinary research program supported by the Environmental Protection Agency. The extensive air quality analysis undertaken for the ORBES included examination of pollutant emissions and resul...

  19. 78 FR 48087 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Redesignation of the Canton...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-07

    ...On June 26, 2012, the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency submitted a request for EPA to redesignate the Canton-Massillon area (Stark County), Ohio, nonattainment area to attainment of the 1997 annual and 2006 24-hour standards for fine particulate matter (PM2.5). EPA is proposing to grant Ohio's request. EPA is proposing to determine that the Canton-Massillon area attains the 1997......

  20. CTEPP: RECRUITING AND FIELD SAMPLING IN NORTH CAROLINA AND OHIO

    EPA Science Inventory

    The research field study (CTEPP) of approximately 260 preschool children's exposures to persistent organic pollutants in their everyday environments began in early 2000. CTEPP is a multimedia study of the children's aggregate (total) exposures over a 48-hr period, both at thei...

  1. 78 FR 19164 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Particulate Matter Standards

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-29

    ... Matter Standards AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: EPA is proposing to convert a conditional approval of specified provisions of the Ohio state implementation plan (SIP) to a full approval. Ohio submitted a request to approve a section of its particulate matter...

  2. 78 FR 34903 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; 1997 8-Hour Ozone...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-11

    ... Table 2--Total NOX Emissions With MOVES2010a Mobile Emissions in the Ohio portion of Wheeling West... effective June 15, 2007 (72 FR 27644). MOBILE6.2-based budgets for the Ohio portion of the area were... section 176(c) of the CAA. See the official release of the MOVES2010 emissions model (75 FR 9411-9414)...

  3. (Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    This report contains information related to the sampling and chemical analysis of ground water at the Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. It is part of a field investigation of ground water contamination.

  4. (Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-01

    This report presents information concerning field procedures employed during the monitoring, well construction, well purging, sampling, and well logging at the Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. Activities were conducted in an effort to evaluate ground water contamination.

  5. (Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    This Removal Action System Design has been prepared as a Phase I Volume for the implementation of the Phase II removal action at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB) near Dayton, Ohio. The objective of the removal action is to prevent, to the extent practicable, the migration of ground water contaminated with chlorinated volatile organic compounds (VOCS) across the southwest boundary of Area C. The Phase 1, Volume 9 Removal Action System Design compiles the design documents prepared for the Phase II Removal Action. These documents, which are presented in Appendices to Volume 9, include: Process Design, which presents the 30 percent design for the ground water treatment system (GWTS); Design Packages 1 and 2 for Earthwork and Road Construction, and the Discharge Pipeline, respectively; no drawings are included in the appendix; Design Package 3 for installation of the Ground Water Extraction Well(s); Design Package 4 for installation of the Monitoring Well Instrumentation; and Design Package 5 for installation of the Ground Water Treatment System; this Design Package is incorporated by reference because of its size.

  6. Correlation of LANDSAT lineaments with Devonian gas fields in Lawrence County, Ohio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, G. O.

    1981-01-01

    In an effort to locate sources of natural gas in Ohio, the fractures and lineaments in Black Devonian shale were measured by: (1) field mapping of joints, swarms, and fractures; (2) stereophotointerpretation of geomorphic lineaments with precise photoquads; and (3) by interpreting the linear features on LANDSAT images. All results were compiled and graphically represented on 1:250,000 scale maps. The geologic setting of Lawrence County was defined and a field fracture map was generated and plotted as rose patterns at the exposure site. All maps were compared, contrasted, and correlated by superimposing each over the other as a transparency. The LANDSAT lineaments had significant correlation with the limits of oil and gas producing fields. These limits included termination of field production as well as extensions to other fields. The lineaments represent real rock fractures with zones of increased permeability in the near surface bedrock.

  7. Statistical summary and trend evaluation of air quality data for Cleveland, Ohio in 1967 to 1971: Total suspended particulate, nitrogen dioxide, and sulfur dioxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neustadter, H. E.; Sidik, S. M.; Burr, J. C., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    Air quality data for Cleveland, Ohio, for the period of 1967 to 1971 were collated and subjected to statistical analysis. The total suspended particulate component is lognormally distributed; while sulfur dioxide and nitrogen dioxide are reasonably approximated by lognormal distributions. Only sulfur dioxide, in some residential neighborhoods, meets Ohio air quality standards. Air quality has definitely improved in the industrial valley, while in the rest of the city, only sulfur dioxide has shown consistent improvement. A pollution index is introduced which displays directly the degree to which the environmental air conforms to mandated standards.

  8. Reservoir management strategy for East Randolph Field, Randolph Township, Portage County, Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Safley, L.E.; Salamy, S.P.; Young, M.A.; Fowler, M.L.; Wing, J.L.; Thomas, J.B.; Mills, J.; Wood, D.

    1998-07-01

    The primary objective of the Reservoir Management Field Demonstration Program is to demonstrate that multidisciplinary reservoir management teams using appropriate software and methodologies with efforts scaled to the size of the resource are a cost-effective method for: Increasing current profitability of field operations; Forestalling abandonment of the reservoir; and Improving long-term economic recovery for the company. The primary objective of the Reservoir Management Demonstration Project with Belden and Blake Corporation is to develop a comprehensive reservoir management strategy to improve the operational economics and optimize oil production from East Randolph field, Randolph Township, Portage County, Ohio. This strategy identifies the viable improved recovery process options and defines related operational and facility requirements. In addition, strategies are addressed for field operation problems, such as paraffin buildup, hydraulic fracture stimulation, pumping system optimization, and production treatment requirements, with the goal of reducing operating costs and improving oil recovery.

  9. Assessing UST corrective action technologies: Lessons learned about in situ air sparging at the Denison Avenue Site, Cleveland, Ohio. Project report

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, T.R.; Chaudet, R.E.; Johnson, R.L.

    1994-12-01

    In situ air sparging (IAS) has been used at an increasing number of sites to address groundwater contamination. Because of the lack of substantive performance data, however, the actual effectiveness of the system is not known. The EPA Office of Research and Development Risk reduction Engineering Laboratory (ORD RREL) with the EPA Region 5 Office of Underground Storage Tanks, the Ohio State Fire Marshal, and BP Exploration & Oil, Inc. (BP) participated in a field evaluation of an IAS system at a petroleum leaking UST site in Cleveland, Ohio. The purpose of the study was to provide performance data that will be independently evaluated by EPA to better understand IAS effectiveness. The report presents the site and monitoring data provided by BP over a 2-year period. The chemical data indicated an overall decrease of BTEX concentrations in groundwater to nondetectable levels shortly after startup of the IAS system. Variability in the chemical and process data also precludes making any definitive link between the decrease in contaminant concentrations and IAS performance at this site.

  10. 76 FR 6376 - Approval of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Indiana and Ohio; Disapproval of Interstate...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-04

    ... micrograms per cubic meter ( g/m\\3\\) to 35 g/m\\3\\ (see, 71 FR 61144).\\1\\ On September 25, 2009, EPA issued... promulgated CAIR on May 12, 2005 (see, 70 FR 25162). CAIR required ] States to reduce emissions of sulfur... Ozone; Proposed Rule,'' 75 FR 45210 (August 2, 2010). IDEM and Ohio EPA made submittals on October...

  11. 75 FR 65567 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Particulate Matter Standards

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-26

    ... revisions are being evaluated in separate rulemaking; see the June 27, 2005 proposed rule at 70 FR 36901... requirements for major sources, found at OAC 3745-31 (approved by EPA on January 10, 2003, 68 FR 1366), to... to Rule 9 since it was approved by EPA on May 27, 1994, 59 FR 27464. Ohio requested approval of...

  12. 78 FR 19128 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Particulate Matter Standards

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-29

    ... source and fugitive source PM restrictions, and add a PM emission limitation exemption for jet engine..., direct final rule (75 FR 65567). EPA conditionally approved OAC 3745-17-11 in the October 26, 2010, rule... the Ohio SIP on November 8, 2006 (71 FR 65417). Section (A)(5) states that sources can be subject...

  13. 78 FR 57273 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Redesignation of the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-18

    ... attaining the 1997 annual and 2006 24-hour PM 2.5 standard (78 FR 41752) and that the Ohio portion of the... an emissions inventory and a maintenance plan for the area. On July 11, 2013, (78 FR 41752), EPA... basis for these actions was provided in the proposal on July 11, 2013 (78 FR 41752). III. What is...

  14. 76 FR 76048 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio and Indiana; Redesignation of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-06

    ... October 19, 2011 (76 FR 64825), direct final rule approving Ohio's and Indiana's requests to redesignate... October 19, 2011 (76 FR 64880). EPA will not institute a second comment period on this action. DATES: The direct final rule published at 76 FR 64825 on October 19, 2011, is withdrawn as of December 6, 2011....

  15. 78 FR 11748 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; PBR and PTIO

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-20

    ... October 10, 2001 (66 FR 51570) and fully approved on January 22, 2003 (68 FR 2909). For nonattainment areas, the program was fully approved on January 10, 2003 (68 FR 1366). Included in this program at OAC... exemption, PTIO, and General Permit program provisions (77 FR 59751) as a revision to Ohio's SIP....

  16. 77 FR 39177 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Regional Haze

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-02

    ... codified at 40 CFR 51.308. This rule was promulgated on July 1, 1999 (64 FR 35713). Further significant..., 2012 (77 FR 3712). The proposal notice described the nature of the regional haze problem and the... Directors Consortium (LADCO), Ohio identified one non-electric generating unit (non-EGU) source,...

  17. Ohio Environmental Education Areas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melvin, Ruth W.

    This is a guide to regional sites in Ohio which can be studied in regard to resource management; land use; the quality of air, water, soil; and reclamation. The first section of the guide includes brief descriptions of Ohio's natural features at the present time, accounts of past appearances and events, and predictions for the future. In the…

  18. Wheat mosaic virus (WMoV), the causal agent of High Plains disease, is present in Ohio wheat fields

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat mosaic virus (WMoV), the causal agent of High Plains disease in wheat, was found in wheat fields in three western counties in Ohio: Auglaize, Miami, and Paulding. WMoV nucleoprotein sequence was identified from Illumina deep sequencing of RNA collected from symptomatic and asymptomatic wheat s...

  19. Edge-of-field research to quantify the impacts of agricultural practices on water quality in Ohio

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Drainage is needed to sustain agricultural production to meet the demands of a growing global population, but it also transports nutrients from fields to surface water bodies. The State of Ohio is facing the tremendous challenge of maintaining agricultural production while protecting the environment...

  20. Use of passive alpha detectors to screen for uranium contamination in a field at Fernald, Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Dudney, C.S.; Meyer, K.E.; Gammage, R.B.; Wheeler, R.V.; Salasky, M.; Kotrappa, P.

    1995-06-01

    This paper reports the results from a field test of newly developed techniques for inexpensive, in situ screening of soil for alpha contamination. Passive alpha detectors that are commercially available for the detection indoor airborne alpha activity (i.e., {sup 222}Rn) have been modified so they can be applied to the detection of alpha contamination on surfaces or in soils. Results reported here are from an intercomparison involving several different techniques with all measurements being made at the same sites in a field near the formerly used uranium processing facility at Fernald, Ohio, during the summer of 1994. The results for two types of passive alpha detector show that the quality of calibration is improved if soils samples are milled to increase homogeneity within the soil matrices. The correlation between laboratory based radiochemical analyses and quick, field-based screening measurements is acceptable and can be improved if the passive devices are left for longer exposure times in the field. The total cost per measurement for either type of passive alpha detector is probably less than $25 and should provide a cost-effective means for site managers to develop the information needed to find areas with remaining alpha contamination so resources can be allocated efficiently.

  1. Lithologic, natural-gamma, grain-size, and well-construction data for Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dumouchelle, D.H.; De Roche, Jeffrey T.

    1991-01-01

    Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, in southwestern Ohio, overlies a buried-valley aquifer. The U.S. Geological Survey installed 35 observation wells at 13 sites on the base from fall 1988 through spring 1990. Fourteen of the wells were completed in bedrock; the remaining wells were completed in unconsolidated sediments. Split-spoon and bedrock cores were collected from all of the bedrock wells. Shelby-tube samples were collected from four wells. The wells were drilled by either the cable-tool or rotary method. Data presented in this report include lithologic and natural-gamma logs, and, for selected sediment samples, grain-size distributions of permeability. Final well-construction details, such as the total depth of well, screened interval, and grouting details, also are presented.

  2. 76 FR 27290 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; West Virginia; Kentucky; Ohio...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-11

    ...: (404) 562-9040. 4. Mail: EPA-R04-OAR-2010-0255, Regulatory Development Section, Air Planning Branch... Development Section, Air Planning Branch, Air, Pesticides and Toxics Management Division, U.S. Environmental... electronically in http://www.regulations.gov or in hard copy at the Regulatory Development Section, Air...

  3. (Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio)

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Bill

    1991-10-01

    In April 1990, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB), initiated an investigation to evaluate a potential Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) removal action to prevent, to the extent practicable, the offsite migration of contaminated ground water from WPAFB. WPAFB retained the services of the Environmental Management Operations (EMO) and its principle subcontractor, International Technology Corporation (IT) to complete Phase 1 of the environmental investigation of ground-water contamination at WPAFB. Phase 1 of the investigation involves the short-term evaluation and potential design for a program to remove ground-water contamination that appears to be migrating across the western boundary of Area C, and across the northern boundary of Area B along Springfield Pike. Primarily, Task 4 of Phase 1 focuses on collection of information at the Area C and Springfield Pike boundaries of WPAFB. This Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) has been prepared to assist in completion of the Task 4 field investigation and is comprised of the Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPP) and the Field Sampling Plan (FSP).

  4. Fungal fragments in moldy houses: A field study in homes in New Orleans and Southern Ohio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reponen, Tiina; Seo, Sung-Chul; Grimsley, Faye; Lee, Taekhee; Crawford, Carlos; Grinshpun, Sergey A.

    Smaller-sized fungal fragments (<1 μm) may contribute to mold-related health effects. Previous laboratory-based studies have shown that the number concentration of fungal fragments can be up to 500 times higher than that of fungal spores, but this has not yet been confirmed in a field study due to lack of suitable methodology. We have recently developed a field-compatible method for the sampling and analysis of airborne fungal fragments. The new methodology was utilized for characterizing fungal fragment exposures in mold-contaminated homes selected in New Orleans, Louisiana and Southern Ohio. Airborne fungal particles were separated into three distinct size fractions: (i) >2.25 μm (spores), (ii) 1.05-2.25 μm (mixture), and (iii) <1.0 μm (submicrometer-sized fragments). Samples were collected in five homes in summer and winter and analyzed for (1→3)- β- D-glucan. The total (1→3)- β- D-glucan varied from 0.2 to 16.0 ng m -3. The ratio of (1→3)- β- D-glucan mass in fragment size fraction to that in spore size fraction ( F/ S) varied from 0.011 to 2.163. The mass ratio was higher in winter (average=1.017) than in summer (0.227) coinciding with a lower relative humidity in the winter. Assuming a mass-based F/ S-ratio=1 and the spore size=3 μm, the corresponding number-based F/ S-ratio (fragment number/spore number) would be 10 3 and 10 6, for the fragment sizes of 0.3 and 0.03 μm, respectively. These results indicate that the actual (field) contribution of fungal fragments to the overall exposure may be very high, even much greater than that estimated in our earlier laboratory-based studies.

  5. Lag times of bank filtration at a well field, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sheets, R.A.; Darner, R.A.; Whitteberry, B.L.

    2002-01-01

    Wells placed next to surface-water bodies to induce infiltration have come under scrutiny because of the presence of the potential pathogens in surface water. Removal of pathogens and other contaminants by bank filtration is assumed, but regulatory agencies question the effectiveness of this process. To investigate transport processes of biological constituents, advective groundwater traveltimes to production wells under the influence of surface water need to be established first to determine appropriate water-quality sampling schedules. This paper presents the results of a study of bank filtration at a well field in southwestern Ohio. Field parameters such as water level, specific conductance, and water temperature were measured at least hourly at a streamflow gaging station and at five monitoring wells each at two separate sites, corresponding to two nearby production wells. Water-quality samples also were collected in all wells and the streamflow gaging station. Specific conductance is directly related to concentration of chloride, a chemically conservative constituent. Cross-correlation methods were used to determine the average traveltime from the river to the monitoring wells. Traveltimes based on specific conductance ranged from approximately 20 h to 10 days at one site and 5 days to 3 months at the other site. Calculated groundwater flow velocities ranged from 2.1 ?? 10-3 to 6.0 ?? 10-3 cm/s and 3.5 ?? 10-4 to 7.1 ?? 10-4 cm/s at the two sites. Data collected when a production well is continuously pumping reveal shorter and more consistent traveltimes than when the same well is pumped intermittently. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. (Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-01

    In April 1990, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB) initiated an effort for the evaluation of potential removal of ground water contamination at the Base. This report presents a current assessment of the nature and extent of the contamination believed to be migrating across the southwestern boundary of Area C and the northern boundary of Area B based upon analysis of existing environmental data obtained from several sources. The existing data base indicates widespread, low-level contamination moving across Base boundaries at levels that pose no immediate threat to the Mad River Valley well fields. An investigation by the City of Dayton in May and June 1990, however, implies that a more identifiable plume of PCE and TCE may be crossing the southwestern boundary of Area C immediately downgradient of Landfill 5. More data is needed to delineate ground water contamination and to design and implement a suitable control system. This report concludes that although an extensive study of the boundaries in question would be the preferred approach, a limited, focused investigation and subsequent feasibility study can be accomplished with a reasonable certainty of achieving the desired outcome of this project.

  7. Evaluation of ground-water flow by particle tracking, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cunningham, W.L.; Sheets, R.A.; Schalk, C.W.

    1994-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB) began a Basewide Monitoring Program (BMP) in 1992. The purpose of the BMP was to establish a long-term ground-water and surface- water sampling network in order to (1) characterize current ground-water and surface-water quality; (2) describe water-quality changes as water enters, flows across, and exits Base boundaries; (3) conduct statistical analyses of water quality; and (4) estimate the effect of WPAFB on regional water quality. As part of the BMP, the USGS conducted ground-water particle-tracking analyses based on a ground-water-flow model produced during a previous USGS study. This report briefly describes the previous USGS study, the inherent assumptions of particle-tracking analyses, and information on the regional ground-water-flow field as inferred from particle pathlines. Pathlines for particles placed at the Base boundary and particles placed within identified Installation Restoration Program sites are described.

  8. Effects of energy-efficient ventilation rates on indoor air quality at an Ohio elementary school

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berk, J. V.; Young, R.; Hollowell, C. D.; Turiel, I.; Pepper, J.

    1980-04-01

    A mobile laboratory was used to monitor air outdoors and at three indoor sites (two classrooms and a large multipurpose room); tests were made at three different ventilation rates. The parameters measured were outside air flow rates, odor perception, microbial burden, particulate mass, total aldehydes, carbon dioxide, ozone, and nitrogen oxides. The results of these measurements are given and compared with the existing outdoor air quality standards. Carbon dioxide concentrations increased as the ventilation rate decreased, but still did not exceed current standards. Odor perceptibility increased slightly at the lowest ventilation rate. Other pollutants showed very low concentrations, which did not change with reductions in ventilation rate.

  9. 78 FR 66320 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio: Bellefontaine; Determination...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-05

    ...; Determination of Attainment for the 2008 Lead Standard AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION... attained the 2008 lead (Pb) national ambient air quality standard (NAAQS). In this action, EPA is...

  10. First report of soybean vein necrosis-associated virus in Ohio soybean fields

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean vein necrosis-associated virus (SVNaV), a newly discovered tospovirus that infects soybean, was first described as widespread in a number of southern and midwestern states, but so far has not been reported in Ohio. Here we describe its occurrence in six different soybean leaf samples collect...

  11. Field study for disposal of solid wastes from Advanced Coal Processes: Ohio LIMB Site Assessment. Final report, April 1986--November 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Weinberg, A.; Coel, B.J.; Butler, R.D.

    1994-10-01

    New air pollution regulations will require cleaner, more efficient processes for converting coal to electricity, producing solid byproducts or wastes that differ from conventional pulverized-coal combustion ash. Large scale landfill test cells containing byproducts were built at 3 sites and are to be monitored over at least 3 years. This report presents results of a 3-y field test at an ash disposal site in northern Ohio; the field test used ash from a combined lime injection-multistage burner (LIMB) retrofit at the Ohio Edison Edgewater plant. The landfill test cells used LIMB ash wetted only to control dusting in one cell, and LIMB ash wetted to optimize compaction density in the other cell. Both test cells had adequate load-bearing strength for landfill stability but had continuing dimensional instability. Heaving and expansion did not affect the landfill stability but probably contributed to greater permeability to infiltrating water. Leachate migration occurred from the base, but effects on downgradient groundwater were limited to increased chloride concentration in one well. Compressive strength of landfilled ash was adequate to support equipment, although permeability was higher and strength was lower than anticipated. Average moisture content has increased to about 90% (dry weight basis). Significant water infiltration has occurred; the model suggests that as much as 20% of the incident rainfall will pass through and exit as leachate. However, impacts on shallow ground water is minimal. Results of this field study suggest that LIMB ash from combustion of moderate to high sulfur coals will perform acceptably if engineering controls are used to condition and compact the materials, reduce water influx to the landfill, and minimize leachate production. Handling of the ash did not pose serious problems during cell construction; steaming and heat buildup were moderate.

  12. An aerial radiological survey of the Wright-Patterson Air Force Base and surrounding area, Fairborn, Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    An aerial radiological survey was conducted over areas of Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB) and the immediate surrounding area, during the period July 7 through 20, 1994. The survey was conducted to measure and map the gamma radiation in the area. This mission was the first aerial radiation survey conducted at WPAFB. In the surveyed area, five small localized sources of gamma radiation were detected which were atypical of naturally-occurring radionuclides. On WPAFB property, these sources included a radiation storage facility in Area B (krypton-85) and an ash pile near the Area C flight line (low energy gamma activity). In the area covered outside WPAFB boundaries, sources included cesium-137 in excess of worldwide fallout over a landfill in a northern Dayton industrial area, an X-ray radiography source over a steel plant in the same industrial area, and a mixture of cesium-137 in excess of worldwide fallout and possibly iridium-192 in an area near Crystal Lakes, Ohio. The naturally-occurring gamma emitters (uranium-238 and progeny, thorium and progeny, and potassium-40) were detected in the remaining area with a total exposure rate range of 4 to 16 {mu}R/h; this range is typical of that found in the United States, 1 to 20 {mu}R/h.

  13. [Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio]. Volume 9, Removal action system design

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    This Removal Action System Design has been prepared as a Phase I Volume for the implementation of the Phase II removal action at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB) near Dayton, Ohio. The objective of the removal action is to prevent, to the extent practicable, the migration of ground water contaminated with chlorinated volatile organic compounds (VOCS) across the southwest boundary of Area C. The Phase 1, Volume 9 Removal Action System Design compiles the design documents prepared for the Phase II Removal Action. These documents, which are presented in Appendices to Volume 9, include: Process Design, which presents the 30 percent design for the ground water treatment system (GWTS); Design Packages 1 and 2 for Earthwork and Road Construction, and the Discharge Pipeline, respectively; no drawings are included in the appendix; Design Package 3 for installation of the Ground Water Extraction Well(s); Design Package 4 for installation of the Monitoring Well Instrumentation; and Design Package 5 for installation of the Ground Water Treatment System; this Design Package is incorporated by reference because of its size.

  14. 76 FR 40246 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Control of Gasoline...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-08

    ... rule under the Clean Air Act pertaining to a request for the use of low Reid Vapor Pressure (RVP) fuel... request use of low RVP fuel in the Cincinnati and Dayton areas on May 25, 2007 (72 FR 29269..., 2007 (72 FR 29269), on page 29273 in the second column, paragraph numbered (138): ``Areas...

  15. 76 FR 43634 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; West Virginia and Ohio...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-21

    ... 2.5 Implementation Rule of April 25, 2007 (72 FR 20664). II. What is the background of these actions? On July 18, 1997 (62 FR 36852), EPA established a health-based PM 2.5 NAAQS at 15.0 micrograms per... (70 FR 944), EPA published its air quality designations and classifications for the 1997 PM 2.5...

  16. 78 FR 52733 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Redesignation of the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-26

    ... standards for PM 2.5 were promulgated on July 18, 1997, at 62 FR 38652. EPA promulgated an annual standard... concentrations at each monitoring site. On January 5, 2005, at 70 FR 944, EPA published air quality area.... On October 17, 2006, at 71 FR 61144, the EPA retained the annual PM 2.5 standard at 15 g/m\\3\\...

  17. 78 FR 66280 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio: Bellefontaine; Determination...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-05

    ... of designations for the 2008 Lead NAAQS on November 22, 2011. See 76 FR 72097. No additional areas in..., 2008 (73 FR 66964), EPA established a 2008 primary and secondary Pb NAAQS at 0.15 micrograms per cubic... 50.16. On November 22, 2010 (75 FR 71033), EPA published its initial air quality designations...

  18. (Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    This report presents information related to the sampling of ground water at the Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. It is part of an investigation into possible ground water contamination. Information concerns well drilling/construction; x-ray diffraction and sampling; soil boring logs; and chain-of-custody records.

  19. 76 FR 32110 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio, Kentucky, and Indiana...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-03

    ... Implementation Rule of April 25, 2007 (72 FR 20664), that the Cincinnati Area has attained the 1997 annual PM 2.5... July 18, 1997 (62 FR 36852), EPA established an annual PM 2.5 NAAQS at 15.0 micrograms per cubic meter.... On January 5, 2005 (70 FR 944), EPA published its air quality designations and classifications...

  20. 76 FR 28393 - Proposed Approval of Air Quality Implementation Plan; Ohio and West Virginia; Determinations of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-17

    ... accordance with EPA's PM 2.5 Implementation Rule of April 25, 2007 (72 FR 20664), that these Areas have... background for these actions? On July 18, 1997 (62 FR 36852), EPA established an annual PM 2.5 NAAQS at 15.0... 24-hour standard.) See 40 CFR 50.7. On January 5, 2005 (70 FR 944), EPA published its air...

  1. 76 FR 48754 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Reasonably Available Control...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-09

    ... Rule To Implement the 8-Hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard--Phase 2'' (70 FR 71612... and Budget under Executive Order 12866 (58 FR 51735, October 4, 1993); Does not impose an information...); Does not have Federalism implications as specified in Executive Order 13132 (64 FR 43255, August...

  2. 76 FR 75464 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; West Virginia and Ohio...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-02

    ..., we mean EPA. On July 18, 1997 (62 FR 36852), EPA established a health-based PM 2.5 NAAQS at 15.0..., 2005 (70 FR 944), EPA published its air quality designations and classifications for the 1997 p.m. 2.5... Register on November 20, 2009 (74 FR 60199) and remain in effect. Under CAA section 179(c), EPA is...

  3. Hydrogeology and simulation of ground-water flow at the South Well Field, Columbus, Ohio

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cunningham, W.L.; Bair, E.S.; Yost, W.P.

    1996-01-01

    The City of Columbus, Ohio, operates four radial collector wells in southern Franklin County. The 'South Well Field' is completed in permeable outwash and ice-contact deposits, upon which flow the Scioto River and Big Walnut Creek. The wells are designed to yield approximately 42 million gallons per day; part of that yield results from induced infiltration of surface water from the Scioto River and Big Walnut Creek. The well field supplied up to 30 percent of the water supply of southern Columbus and its suburbs in 1991. This report describes the hydrogeology of southern Franklin County and a tran sient three-dimensional, numerical ground-water- flow model of the South Well Field. The primary source of ground water in the study area is the glacial drift aquifer. The glacial drift is composed of sand, gravel, and clay depos ited during the Illinoian and Wisconsinan glaciations. In general, thick deposits of till containing lenses of sand and gravel dominate the drift in the area west of the Scioto River. The thickest and most productive parts of the glacial drift aquifer are in the buried valleys in the central and eastern parts of the study area underlying the Scioto River and Big Walnut Creek. Horizontal hydraulic conductivity of the glacial drift aquifer differs spa tially and ranges from 30 to 375 feet per day. The specific yield ranges from 0.12 to 0.30. The secondary source of ground water within the study area is the underlying carbonate bedrock aquifer, which consists of Silurian and Devonian limestones, dolomites, and shales. The horizontal hydraulic conductivity of the carbonate bedrock aquifer ranges from 10 to 15 feet per day. The storage coefficient is about 0.0002. The ground-water-flow system in the South Well Field area is recharged by precipitation, regional ground-water flow, and induced stream infiltration. Yearly recharge rates varied spatially and ranged from 4.0 to 12.0 inches. The three-dimensional, ground-water-flow model was constructed by

  4. Isolation and identification of pathogenic microorganisms at wastewater-irrigated fields: ratios in air and wastewater

    SciTech Connect

    Teltsch, B.; Kedmi, S.; Bonnet, L.; Borenzstajn-Rotem, Y.; Katzenelson, E.

    1980-06-01

    Samples of air and corresponding wastewater samples were taken at wastewater spray-irrigated fields. The concentrations of salmonellae and enteroviruses present in these samples were determined and compared with those of coliforms, and the ratios between them were calculated. The most common Salmonella serotype in the air was Salmonella ohio, whereas in the wastewater, Salmonella anatum was the most common. Enteroviruses isolated and identified were poliovirus, echovirus, and coxsackievirus type B. From the ratios of salmonellas to coliforms and enteroviruses to coliforms in the air, as compared to these ratios in the wastewater, it was concluded that the suitability of coliforms as an indication of airborne contamination caused by spray irrigation is questionable.

  5. Results of the basewide monitoring program at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, 1993-1994

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schalk, C.W.; Cunningham, W.L.

    1996-01-01

    Geologic and hydrologic data were collected at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB), Ohio, as part of Basewide Monitoring Program (BMP) that began in 1992. The BMP was designed as a long-term project to character ground-water and surface-water quality (including streambed sediments), describe water-quality changes as water enters, flows across, and exits the Base, and investigate the effects of activities at WPAFB on regional water quality. Ground water, surface ware, and streambed sediment were sampled in four rounds between August 1993 and September 1994 to provide the analytical data needed to address the objectives of the BMP. Surface-water-sampling rounds were designed to include most of the seasonal hydrologic conditions encountered in southwestern Ohio, including baseflow conditions and spring runoff. Ground-water-sampling rounds were scheduled for times of recession and recharfe. Ground-water data were used to construct water-table, potentiometric, and vertical gradient maps of the WPAFB area. Water levels have not changed significantly since 1987, but the effects of pumping on and near the Base can have a marked effect on water levels in localized areas. Ground-ware gradients generally were downward throughout Area B (the southwestern third of the Base) and in the eastern third of Areas A and C (the northeastern two-thirds of the Base), and were upward in the vicinity of Mad River. Stream-discharge measurements verified these gradients. Many of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency maximum contaminant level (MCL) exceedances of inorganic constituents in ground water were associated with water from the bedrock. Exceedances of concentrations of chromium and nickel were found consistently in five wells completed in the glacial aquifer beneath the Base. Five organic compounds [trichloroethylene (TCE), tetrachloroethylene (PCE), vinyl chloride, benzene, and bis(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate] were detected at concentrations that exceeded MCLs; all of the TCE

  6. Field surveys of vegetation during a period of rising electric power generation in the Ohio River Valley

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, J.S.; Showman, R.E.

    1984-01-01

    The phytotoxicity of SO/sub 2/, a byproduct of smelting operations and generation of electricity from fossil fuels, has been known for over a century. Yet, there is disagreement over the potential risk to vegetation by SO/sub 2/ emissions in the U.S. and controversy over the environmental impact of increasing utilization of coal. Combustion of coal and generation of electricity were increasing rapidly in the 1970s, so a program of annual surveys of vegetation was initiated in an area where two new generating stations were to be constructed in addition to two existing ones. The objective was to determine whether increases in SO/sub 2/ emissions would be accompanied by the appearance of foliar symptoms on trees, weeds, crops, or ornamental plants and/or disappearance of SO/sub 2/ susceptible species of lichens. Vegetation surveys have been carried out around emission sources at many different locations to identify air pollutants, locate emission sources, delineate the area of exposure, determine compensation for injury to plants, and evaluate suitability of alternate sites for new emission sources. Observations of higher vegetation are useful because certain species develop characteristic foliar symptoms after exposure to individual episodes of elevated SO/sub 2/. Mapping of lichen populations is also useful because, over long periods of time, lichens respond to repeated or extended exposures to concentrations of SO/sub 2/ that do not necessarily produce characteristic symptoms on foliage of higher plants. The area of study was located in southeastern Ohio and northwestern West Virginia along both sides of the Ohio River. Results of the surveys are presented.

  7. Ohio Career Resource.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Dept. of Education, Columbus. Div. of Career-Technical and Adult Education.

    This resource is designed to provide Ohio labor market information for use with advisory committees to stimulate and inform dialogue about the current evaluation and future planning of programs. It provides reports for 23 career fields in 6 career clusters. Each report highlights careers and occupations in the field and answers these questions:…

  8. Population differentiation in Andropogon virginicus L. between abandoned coal strip mine spoil and old field habitats in Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Nellessen, J.E.

    1989-01-01

    Populations of Andropogon virginicus L. from abandoned coal mine spoils and old fields in southeastern Ohio were studied to determine whether ecotypic differentiation had occurred. Three mine spoil and three old field populations were paired for reciprocal transplant studies. A uniform garden was also established. Mine spoil and old field populations were compared for differences in demographic patterns, vegetative growth and phenology, reproductive output, and physiology. There were a greater number of seedlings and smaller individuals in the mine spoils, but seed production was similar between habitats. Seeds disperse farther in mine spoils and there was no or very little seedling establishment in 8 to 35 year old fields. Plants attained greater height in mine spoils. Population differentiation between one of the mine sites and one of the old fields was evident for seed weight, numbers of seeds per plant, and plant biomass. The three old field populations also differed from each other in reproductive characteristics. Mine spoil plants contained significantly more nitrogen within seeds despite the fact that mine soils had only half the available nitrogen as old field soils. Old field plants had a higher magnesium content in leaves. Chlorophyll content of leaves was higher for plants in old fields than for plants in mines. Undisturbed plants from both habitats had significantly higher photosynthetic rates than transplants. Old field plants had significantly greater photosynthetic rates than mine plants when grown in the uniform garden even though transpiration rates were similar. Differentiation between some coal mine spoil and old field populations of A. virginicus was evident for height growth, seed weight, photosynthesis, seed nitrogen content, magnesium content, and seed germination. Local population differentiation in plant height, seed weight, and in the timing of plant maturation was also observed.

  9. An Innovative Field Trip Experience for Ohio Middle School Students and Teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terndrup, D. M.; Wojton, M. A.; Sparks, L.; Dungan, R.

    2008-06-01

    As part of a new collaboration between astronomers and educators at a major science center, we have created a program which combines a field trip experience for middle school students with professional development opportunities for their teachers. The program consists of interactive lectures by astronomers, teacher workshops on space science ideas, and inquiry-based student workshops on fundamental (astro)physical concepts. We conducted a pilot program in 2007 consisting of four schools with different student demographics. Initial results show significant improvement between pre- and post-workshop testing in several areas. Several logistical problems remain to be worked out, especially in the operation of the teacher workshops.

  10. [Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio]. Volume 1, Site assessment report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-01

    In April 1990, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB) initiated an effort for the evaluation of potential removal of ground water contamination at the Base. This report presents a current assessment of the nature and extent of the contamination believed to be migrating across the southwestern boundary of Area C and the northern boundary of Area B based upon analysis of existing environmental data obtained from several sources. The existing data base indicates widespread, low-level contamination moving across Base boundaries at levels that pose no immediate threat to the Mad River Valley well fields. An investigation by the City of Dayton in May and June 1990, however, implies that a more identifiable plume of PCE and TCE may be crossing the southwestern boundary of Area C immediately downgradient of Landfill 5. More data is needed to delineate ground water contamination and to design and implement a suitable control system. This report concludes that although an extensive study of the boundaries in question would be the preferred approach, a limited, focused investigation and subsequent feasibility study can be accomplished with a reasonable certainty of achieving the desired outcome of this project.

  11. Results of soil, ground-water, surface-water, and streambed-sediment sampling at Air Force Plane 85, Columbus, Ohio, 1996

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parnell, J.M.

    1997-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with Aeronautical Systems Center, Environmental Management Directorate, Restoration Division, prepared the Surface- and Ground- Water Monitoring Work Plan for Air Force Plant 85 (AFP 85 or Plant), Columbus, Ohio, under the Air Force Installation Restoration Program to characterize any ground-water, surface-water, and soil contamination that may exist at AFP 85. The USGS began the study in November 1996. The Plant was divided into nine sampling areas, which included some previously investi gated study sites. The investigation activities included the collection and presentation of data taken during drilling and water-quality sampling. Data collection focused on the saturated and unsatur ated zones and surface water. Twenty-three soil borings were completed. Ten monitoring wells (six existing wells and four newly constructed monitoring wells) were selected for water-quality sam pling. Surface-water and streambed-sediment sampling locations were chosen to monitor flow onto and off of the Plant. Seven sites were sampled for both surface-water and streambed-sediment quality. This report presents data on the selected inorganic and organic constituents in soil, ground water, surface water, and streambed sediments at AFP 85. The methods of data collection and anal ysis also are included. Knowledge of the geologic and hydrologic setting could aid Aeronautical Systems Center, Environmental Management Directorate, Restoration Division, and its governing regulatory agencies in future remediation studies.

  12. FIELD MEASUREMENT TECHNOLOGY FOR MERCURY IN SOIL AND SEDIMENT OHIO LUMEX'S RA-915+/RP-91C MERCURY ANALYZER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ohio Lumex's RA915+/91 C mercury analyzer was demonstrated under the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation Program in May 2003, at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The purpose of the Demonstration was to c...

  13. Aerodynamic size distribution of suspended particulate matter in the ambient air in the city of Cleveland, Ohio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leibecki, H. F.; King, R. B.; Fordyce, J. S.

    1974-01-01

    The City of Cleveland Division of Air Pollution Control and NASA jointly investigated the chemical and physical characteristics of the suspended particulate matter in Cleveland, and as part of the program, measurements of the particle size distribution of ambient air samples at five urban locations during August and September 1972 were made using high-volume cascade impactions. The distributions were evaluated for lognormality, and the mass median diameters were compared between locations and as a function of resultant wind direction. Junge-type distributions were consistent with dirty continental aerosols. About two-thirds of the suspended particulate matter observed in Cleveland is less than 7 microns in diameter.

  14. Modeling the air-soil transport pathway of perfluorooctanoic acid in the mid-Ohio Valley using linked air dispersion and vadose zone models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Hyeong-Moo; Ryan, P. Barry; Vieira, Verónica M.; Bartell, Scott M.

    2012-05-01

    As part of an extensive modeling effort on the air-soil-groundwater transport pathway of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), this study was designed to compare the performance of different air dispersion modeling systems (AERMOD vs. ISCST3), and different approaches to handling incomplete meteorological data using a data set with substantial soil measurements and a well characterized point source for air emissions. Two of the most commonly used EPA air dispersion models, AERMOD and ISCST3, were linked with the EPA vadose zone model PRZM-3. Predicted deposition rates from the air dispersion model were used as input values for the vadose zone model to estimate soil concentrations of PFOA at different depths. We applied 34 years of meteorological data including hourly surface measurements from Parkersburg Airport and 5 years of onsite wind direction and speed to the air dispersion models. We compared offsite measured soil concentrations to predictions made for the corresponding sampling depths, focusing on soil rather than air measurements because the offsite soil samples were less likely to be influenced by short-term variability in emission rates and meteorological conditions. PFOA concentrations in surface soil (0-30 cm depth) were under-predicted and those in subsurface soil (>30 cm depth) were over-predicted compared to observed concentrations by both linked air and vadose zone model. Overall, the simulated values from the linked modeling system were positively correlated with those observed in surface soil (Spearman's rho, Rsp = 0.59-0.70) and subsurface soil (Rsp = 0.46-0.48). This approach provides a useful modeling scheme for similar exposure and risk analyses where the air-soil-groundwater transport is a primary contamination pathway.

  15. Hydrogeology, simulated ground-water flow, and ground-water quality, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dumouchelle, D.H.; Schalk, C.W.; Rowe, G.L.; De Roche, J.T.

    1993-01-01

    Ground water is the primary source of water in the Wright-Patterson Air Force Base area. The aquifer consists of glacial sands and gravels that fill a buried bedrock-valley system. Consolidated rocks in the area consist of poorly permeable Ordovician shale of the Richmondian stage, in the upland areas, the Brassfield Limestone of Silurian age. The valleys are filled with glacial sediments of Wisconsinan age consisting of clay-rich tills and coarse-grained outwash deposits. Estimates of hydraulic conductivity of the shales based on results of displacement/recovery tests range from 0.0016 to 12 feet per day; estimates for the glacial sediments range from less than 1 foot per day to more than 1,000 feet per day. Ground water flow from the uplands towards the valleys and the major rivers in the region, the Great Miami and the Mad Rivers. Hydraulic-head data indicate that ground water flows between the bedrock and unconsolidated deposits. Data from a gain/loss study of the Mad River System and hydrographs from nearby wells reveal that the reach of the river next to Wright-Patterson Air Force Base is a ground-water discharge area. A steady-state, three-dimensional ground-water-flow model was developed to simulate ground-water flow in the region. The model contains three layers and encompasses about 100 square miles centered on Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. Ground water enters the modeled area primarily by river leakage and underflow at the model boundary. Ground water exits the modeled area primarily by flow through the valleys at the model boundaries and through production wells. A model sensitivity analysis involving systematic changes in values of hydrologic parameters in the model indicates that the model is most sensitive to decreases in riverbed conductance and vertical conductance between the upper two layers. The analysis also indicates that the contribution of water to the buried-valley aquifer from the bedrock that forms the valley walls is about 2 to 4

  16. Silurian "Clinton" Sandstone Reservoir Characterization for Evaluation of CO2-EOR Potential in the East Canton Oil Field, Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, Ronald; Wicks, John; Perry, Christopher

    2009-12-30

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of using CO2-enhanced oil recovery (EOR) in the East Canton oil field (ECOF). Discovered in 1947, the ECOF in northeastern Ohio has produced approximately 95 million barrels (MMbbl) of oil from the Silurian “Clinton” sandstone. The original oil-in-place (OOIP) for this field was approximately 1.5 billion bbl and this study estimates by modeling known reservoir parameters, that between 76 and 279 MMbbl of additional oil could be produced through secondary recovery in this field, depending on the fluid and formation response to CO2 injection. A CO2 cyclic test (“Huff-n-Puff”) was conducted on a well in Stark County to test the injectivity in a “Clinton”-producing oil well in the ECOF and estimate the dispersion or potential breakthrough of the CO2 to surrounding wells. Eighty-one tons of CO2 (1.39 MMCF) were injected over a 20-hour period, after which the well was shut in for a 32-day “soak” period before production was resumed. Results demonstrated injection rates of 1.67 MMCF of gas per day, which was much higher than anticipated and no CO2 was detected in gas samples taken from eight immediately offsetting observation wells. All data collected during this test was analyzed, interpreted, and incorporated into the reservoir characterization study and used to develop the geologic model. The geologic model was used as input into a reservoir simulation performed by Fekete Associates, Inc., to estimate the behavior of reservoir fluids when large quantities of CO2 are injected into the “Clinton” sandstone. Results strongly suggest that the majority of the injected CO2 entered the matrix porosity of the reservoir pay zones, where it diffused into the oil. Evidence includes: (A) the volume of injected CO2 greatly exceeded the estimated capacity of the hydraulic fracture and natural fractures; (B) there was a gradual injection and pressure rate build-up during the test; (C) there was a subsequent

  17. Silurian "Clinton" Sandstone Reservoir Characterization for Evaluation of CO2-EOR Potential in the East Canton Oil Field, Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Ronald Riley; John Wicks; Christopher Perry

    2009-12-30

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of using CO2-enhanced oil recovery (EOR) in the East Canton oil field (ECOF). Discovered in 1947, the ECOF in northeastern Ohio has produced approximately 95 million barrels (MMbbl) of oil from the Silurian 'Clinton' sandstone. The original oil-in-place (OOIP) for this field was approximately 1.5 billion bbl and this study estimates by modeling known reservoir parameters, that between 76 and 279 MMbbl of additional oil could be produced through secondary recovery in this field, depending on the fluid and formation response to CO2 injection. A CO2 cyclic test ('Huff-n-Puff') was conducted on a well in Stark County to test the injectivity in a 'Clinton'-producing oil well in the ECOF and estimate the dispersion or potential breakthrough of the CO2 to surrounding wells. Eighty-one tons of CO2 (1.39 MMCF) were injected over a 20-hour period, after which the well was shut in for a 32-day 'soak' period before production was resumed. Results demonstrated injection rates of 1.67 MMCF of gas per day, which was much higher than anticipated and no CO2 was detected in gas samples taken from eight immediately offsetting observation wells. All data collected during this test was analyzed, interpreted, and incorporated into the reservoir characterization study and used to develop the geologic model. The geologic model was used as input into a reservoir simulation performed by Fekete Associates, Inc., to estimate the behavior of reservoir fluids when large quantities of CO2 are injected into the 'Clinton' sandstone. Results strongly suggest that the majority of the injected CO2 entered the matrix porosity of the reservoir pay zones, where it diffused into the oil. Evidence includes: (A) the volume of injected CO2 greatly exceeded the estimated capacity of the hydraulic fracture and natural fractures; (B) there was a gradual injection and pressure rate build-up during the test; (C) there was a subsequent, gradual flashout of

  18. Water, Ohio's Remarkable Resource.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groves, Carrie J.

    Information on water and water resources in Ohio is presented in seven sections. Water from Ohio streams, water storage, lakes in Ohio, and ground water are discussed in the first section ("Water, A Part of the Earth"). A brief discussion on the ecosystem is provided in the second section ("Water and Life"). Topics discussed in the third section…

  19. ARSENIC AND OHIO UTILITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presentation provides information on arsenic removal drinking water treatment systems that are likely to be used in Ohio for arsenic removal. Because most Ohio ground water contain significant amounts of iron, iron removal processes will play a major role in treating Ohio gro...

  20. The mutagenicity of indoor air particles in a residential pilot field study: Application and evaluation of new methodologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewtas, Joellen; Goto, Sumio; Williams, Katherine; Chuang, Jane C.; Petersen, Bruce A.; Wilson, Nancy K.

    The mutagenicity of indoor air paniculate matter has been measured in a pilot field study of homes in Columbus, Ohio during the 1984 winter. The study was conducted in eight all natural-gas homes and two all electric homes. Paniculate matter and semi-volatile organic compounds were collected indoors using a medium volume sampler. A micro-forward mutation bioassay employing Salmonella typhimurium strain TM 677 was used to quantify the mutagenicity in solvent extracts of microgram quantities of indoor air particles. The mutagenicity was quantified in terms of both mutation frequency per mg of organic matter extracted and per cubic meter of air sampled. The combustion source variables explored in this study included woodburning in fireplaces and cigarette smoking. Homes in which cigarette smoking occurred had the highest concentrations of mutagenicity per cubic meter of air. The average indoor air mutagenicity per cubic meter was highly correlated with the number of cigarettes smoked. When the separate sampling periods in each room were compared, the mutagenicity in the kitchen samples was the most highly correlated with the number of cigarettes smoked.

  1. Electrostatic air filters generated by electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Bergman, W.; Biermann, A.H.; Hebard, H.D.; Lum, B.Y.; Kuhl, W.D.

    1981-01-27

    This paper presents theoretical and experimental findings on fibrous filters converted to electrostatic operation by a nonionizing electric field. Compared to a conventional fibrous filter, the electrostatic filter has a higher efficiency and a longer, useful life. The increased efficiency is attributed to a time independent attraction between polarized fibers and charged, polarized particles and a time dependent attraction between charged fibers and charged, polarized particles. The charge on the fibers results from a dynamic process of charge accumulation due to the particle deposits and a charge dissipation due to the fiber conductivity.

  2. Water-quality data-collection activities in Colorado and Ohio; Phase II, Evaluation of 1984 field and laboratory quality-assurance practices

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Childress, C.J.; Chaney, T.M.; Myers, Donna; Norris, J.M.; Hren, Janet

    1987-01-01

    Serious questions have been raised by Congress about the usefulness of water quality data for addressing issues of regional and national scope and, especially, for characterizing the current quality of the Nation 's streams and groundwater. In response, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted a pilot study in Colorado and Ohio to: (1) determine the characteristics of current (1984) water quality data collection activities of Federal, regional, State, and local agencies, and academic institutions; and (2) determine how well the data from these activities, collected for various purposes and using different procedures, can be used to improve the ability to answer major broad scope questions, such as: what are (or were) natural or near-natural water quality conditions; what are existing water quality conditions; and, how water quality has changed and how the changes relate to human activities. Colorado and Ohio were chosen for the pilot study largely because they represent regions with different types of water quality concerns and programs. The study has been divided into three phases, the objectives of which are: Phase I - Inventory water quality data collection programs, including costs, and identify those programs that met a set of broad criteria for producing data that are potentially appropriate for water quality assessments of regional and national scope. Phase II - Evaluate the quality assurance of field and laboratory procedures used in producing the data from programs that met the broad criteria of Phase I. Phase III - Compile the qualifying data and evaluate the adequacy of this data base for addressing selected water quality questions of regional and national scope. (Author 's abstract)

  3. Office of Inspector General audit report on credit card usage at the Ohio Field Office and the Fernald and Miamisburg Environmental Management Projects

    SciTech Connect

    1999-03-01

    In 1994 the Department of Energy (Department) obtained the services of Rocky Mountain BankCard System, through the use of a General Services Administration contract, as a means for the Department and its contractors to make small purchases. The use of credit cards was expected to simplify small purchase procedures and improve cash management. The Ohio Field Office (Field Office) uses the credit card system and oversees usage by its area offices. Contractors under the Field Office also use the credit card system to make small purchases. The Office of Inspector General (OIG) has issued one audit report concerning the use of credit cards. In April 1996, the OIG issued Report WR-B-96-06, Audit of Bonneville Power Administration`s Management of Information Resources. The audit concluded that improvements could be made in implementing credit card and property procedures in Bonneville`s management of computer-related equipment. Specifically, many credit card purchases were made by employees whose authority to buy was not properly documented, and the purchasing files often lacked invoices that would show what was purchased. Additionally, some cardholders split purchases to avoid credit card limits. The objective of this audit was to determine whether the Field Office, Fernald and Miamisburg Environmental Management Projects, Fluor Daniel, and B and W were using credit cards for the appropriate purposes and within the limitations established by Federal and Departmental regulations.

  4. Field and laboratory assessment of a coal processing effluent in the Leading Creek Watershed, Meigs County, Ohio.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, A J; Cherry, D S; Currie, R J

    2003-04-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has not recommended water quality criteria (WQC) to protect aquatic life from elevated sodium and sulfate concentrations, such as those associated with the coal-processing effluent of Meigs County Mine #31. This discharge, received by a tributary of the Leading Creek Watershed (SE Ohio), had a mean specific conductivity (SC) of 8,109 (7,750-8,750) microS/cm and total metal concentrations below acute WQC. The mean 48-h LC(50) for Ceriodaphnia dubia in the effluent was 6,713 +/- 99 microS/cm; mean 48-h survival was 44% for study sites downstream of the effluent. The best indicators of impairment used in this study were Ceriodaphnia fecundity, in situ Corbicula fluminea growth, EPT minus Hydropsychidae (richness and relative abundance), and relative Ephemeroptera abundance. Mayflies, reduced by more than 99% below the effluent, were absent from all but the furthest downstream study site. SC was strongly correlated with Corbicula growth (r = -0.9755, p = 0.0009) and EPT minus Hydropsychidae richness (r = -0.8756, p < 0.0001), suggesting the effluent was primarily responsible for biotic impairment. Our results indicated that SC levels, a measure of dissolved solids, in the Leading Creek Watershed that exceeded approximately 3,700 microS/cm impaired sensitive aquatic fauna. PMID:12712291

  5. Characterizing Air Toxics from Oil Field Operations in Los Angeles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, M. C.; Brown, S. G.; DeWinter, J. L.; Bai, S.; O'Brien, T.; Vaughn, D.; Peltier, R.; Soltis, J.; Field, R. A.; Murphy, S. M.; Roberts, P. T.

    2014-12-01

    The Inglewood Oil Field in urban Los Angeles has been in operation for more than 70 years. Neighborhoods surrounding the oil field are concerned with the potential emissions of air toxics from oil field operations. The Baldwin Hills Air Quality Study focused on (1) quantifying air toxics concentrations originating from the Inglewood Oil Field operations, including drilling and well workovers, and (2) assessing the health risk of both acute and chronic exposure to air toxics emitted from oil field operations. Key pollutants identified for characterization included diesel particulate matter (DPM), cadmium, benzene, nickel, formaldehyde, mercury, manganese, acrolein, arsenic, and lead. The field study began in November 2012 and ended in November 2013. Four types of instruments were used to characterize oil field operations: (1) Aethalometers to measure black carbon (BC; as a proxy for DPM); (2) X-ray fluorescence spectrometer (XRF) for metals; (3) Proton-Transfer-Reaction Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (PTR-TOFMS) for volatile organic compounds; and (4) meteorological sensors to help assess the wind patterns, temperature, and humidity that influence pollutant concentrations. Overall concentrations of most of the species measured in the study were quite low for an urban area. We determined that there were statistically significant increases in concentrations of DPM associated with oil field operations when winds were from the west-southwest. BC concentrations increased by 0.036 to 0.056 μg/m3, on average, when winds originated from the west-southwest, compared to annual mean BC concentrations of approximately 0.67 μg/m3. West-southwest winds occurred 53% of the time during the study. No other pollutants showed strong statistical evidence of chronic or acute risk from oil field operations.

  6. FIELD TEST OF AIR SPARGING COUPLED WITH SOIL VAPOR EXTRACTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A controlled field study was designed and conducted to assess the performance of air sparging for remediation of petroleum fuel and solvent contamination in a shallow (3-m deep) groundwater aquifer. Sparging was performed in an insolation test cell (5 m by 3 m by 8-m deep). A soi...

  7. Presence of Fusarium graminearum in air associated with sorghum fields

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sorghum can be included in crop rotations with wheat. However, there are no known reports on the effects of sorghum grown in rotation with wheat on the epidemiology of head scab caused by Fusarium graminearum. Conidia in air samples within two sorghum fields were collected by passive spore trapping ...

  8. Geophysical Investigation Along the Great Miami River From New Miami to Charles M. Bolton Well Field, Cincinnati, Ohio

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sheets, R.A.; Dumouchelle, D.H.

    2009-01-01

    Three geophysical profiling methods were tested to help characterize subsurface materials at selected transects along the Great Miami River, in southwestern Ohio. The profiling methods used were continuous seismic profiling (CSP), continuous resistivity profiling (CRP), and continuous electromagnetic profiling (CEP). Data were collected with global positioning systems to spatially locate the data along the river. The depth and flow conditions of the Great Miami River limited the amount and quality of data that could be collected with the CSP and CRP methods. Data from the CSP were generally poor because shallow reflections (less than 5 meters) were mostly obscured by strong multiple reflections and deep reflections (greater than 5 meters) were sparse. However, modeling of CRP data indicated broad changes in subbottom geology, primarily below about 3 to 5 meters. Details for shallow electrical conductivity (resistivity) (less than 3 meters) were limited because of the 5-meter electrode spacing used for the surveys. For future studies of this type, a cable with 3-meter electrode spacing (or perhaps even 1-meter spacing) might best be used in similar environments to determine shallow electrical properties of the stream-bottom materials. CEP data were collected along the entire reach of the Great Miami River. The CRP and CEP data did not correlate well, but the CRP electrode spacing probably limited the correlation. Middle-frequency (3,510 hertz) and high-frequency (15,030 hertz) CEP data were correlated to water depth. Low-frequency (750 hertz) CEP data indicate shallow (less than 5-meter) changes in electrical conductivity. Given the variability in depth and flow conditions on a river such as the Great Miami, the CEP method worked better than either the CSP or CRP methods.

  9. Operational Information Science (Documentation) Activities at Wright Field, Ohio, before 1950, with Emphasis on Foreign-Language Technical Reports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Eugene B.

    1992-01-01

    Describes documentation activities by the Air Documents Division, a precursor of the Defense Technical Information Center, involving captured German technical reports related to aeronautical science and technology following World War II. Document publication, acquisition, processing, dissemination, and utilization are discussed; and selection of…

  10. Brass plasmoid in external magnetic field at different air pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, D. N.; Thareja, Raj K.; Pandey, Pramod K.

    2013-10-15

    The behavior of expanding brass plasmoid generated by 266 nm wavelength of Nd:YAG laser in nonuniform magnetic field at different air pressures has been examined using optical emission spectroscopy and fast imaging of plasma plumes. The splitting of the plasma plumes and enhancement of intensity of Cu I at 510.5 nm in the presence of magnetic field at lower pressures are discussed. The threading and expulsion of the magnetic field lines through the plasmoid are correlated with the ambient pressure. The stoichiometry of the plasma plume is not significantly influenced by the magnetic field; however, the abundance of neutral to ionic species of Cu and Zn is greatly influenced by the magnetic field.

  11. Ohio News Nuggets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oguntoyinbo, Lekan

    2010-01-01

    This article presents a snapshot of major happenings at some colleges and universities in Ohio. Ohio universities build on a tradition of inclusion. The Buckeye State has a rich tradition of progressive higher education institutions, many of which were among the first in the nation to offer degrees to women and people of color. Antioch College,…

  12. Ohio and the World.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuller, Michael J.

    The 28 lessons for use in secondary social studies courses will help increase student awareness and understanding of the growing ties between life in Ohio and in their hometowns and life in villages and cities around the world. Although written specifically for use in Ohio schools, the lessons can easily be adapted for use in other states. Most of…

  13. VIEW ALONG OHIO AVENUE, LOOKING TOWARD 1905 BAND BARRACKS (BUILDING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW ALONG OHIO AVENUE, LOOKING TOWARD 1905 BAND BARRACKS (BUILDING 61 O)CENTER AND FORAGE HOUSE (BUILDING 476)LEFT. VIEW TO NORTHWEST - Plattsburgh Air Force Base, U.S. Route 9, Plattsburgh, Clinton County, NY

  14. [Detection of trace uranium in air with field spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Yang, Ya-Xin; Xiao, Sai-Jin; Liu, Qing-Cheng; Huang, Long-Zhu; Peng, Dao-Feng; Zheng, Yong-Ming

    2012-07-01

    As a natural radioactive element, uranium and its compounds exist as aerosol and transfer in air. In gas phase, uranium can cause various kinds of radioactive damage to human body. The change in its concentration in a local area is related to the exploration and utilization of nuclear energy. Therefore, the development of field method for rapid uranium detection in air sample is very important. In this contribution, the air samples over uranium ores collected by a general pump was absorbed with 2.0 mol x L(-1) nitrate and then reacted with solid reagent kit. When the reaction between trace uranium and chromogenic reagent was finished, the homemade portable photometer was used to measure the absorbance. The results showed that the concentration of uranium in air samples over low grade uranium ores can be successfully determined by the present method and the values agree with that obtained by ICP-MS. The RSD measured by the new method was 1.72%. The application of the new field spectrometry in discriminating uranium ores from other ores has the potential advantages of easy operation, cost-saving and high accuracy. PMID:23016358

  15. Field evaluation of sampling and analysis for organic pollutants in indoor air

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, J.C.; Mack, G.A.; Stockrahm, J.W.; Hannan, S.W.; Bridges, C.

    1988-08-01

    The objectives of the study were to determine the feasibility of the use of newly developed indoor air samplers in residential indoor air sampling and to evaluate methodology for characterization of the concentrations of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), PAH derivatives, and nicotine in residential air. Residential air sampling was conducted in Columbus, Ohio during the winter of 1986/87. The PAH derivatives were found at much lower levels than their parent PAH. Higher average indoor levels of all but three target compounds were found compared to outdoor levels. The higher outdoor levels of these three compounds (naphthalene dicarboxylic acid anhydride, pyrene dicarboxylic acid anhydride, and 2-nitrofluoranthene) are probably due to atmospheric transformation. Cigarette smoking was identified as the most-significant contributor to indoor levels of PAH and PAH derivatives. Homes with gas-heating systems appeared to have higher pollutant levels compared to homes with electric-heating systems.

  16. 40 CFR 81.336 - Ohio.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... NAAQS for purposes of 40 CFR part 51 subpart X. Ohio—PM-10 Designated Area Designation Date Type... affecting § 81.336, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the... AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Section 107 Attainment Status Designations § 81.336 Ohio....

  17. 40 CFR 81.336 - Ohio.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... NAAQS for purposes of 40 CFR part 51 subpart X. Ohio—PM-10 Designated Area Designation Date Type..., see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the printed volume... AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Section 107 Attainment Status Designations § 81.336 Ohio....

  18. 40 CFR 81.336 - Ohio.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... NAAQS for purposes of 40 CFR part 51 subpart X. Ohio—PM-10 Designated Area Designation Date Type... affecting § 81.336, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the... AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Section 107 Attainment Status Designations § 81.336 Ohio....

  19. 40 CFR 81.336 - Ohio.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... NAAQS for purposes of 40 CFR part 51 subpart X. Ohio—PM-10 Designated Area Designation Date Type..., see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the printed volume... AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Section 107 Attainment Status Designations § 81.336 Ohio....

  20. 40 CFR 81.336 - Ohio.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... NAAQS for purposes of 40 CFR part 51 subpart X. Ohio—PM-10 Designated Area Designation Date Type..., see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the printed volume... AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Section 107 Attainment Status Designations § 81.336 Ohio....

  1. Airborne scientists begin Ohio acid rain study

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-08-01

    Atmospheric scientists spent June flying through storm clouds over Ohio to collect rain and air samples to better understand rain chemistry, the conditions that cause acid rain and methods for controlling it. The authors will be collecting samples in the Columbus, Ohio area because many of the materials suspected of causing acid rain, such as sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides and hydrogen peroxide, can be found in this vicinity. The study is part of the US Department of the Energy's Processing of Emissions by Clouds and Precipitation program (PRECP).

  2. Development of a field-portable air monitor for Lewisite

    SciTech Connect

    Aldstadt, J.H.; Martin, A.F.; Olson, D.C. |

    1996-03-01

    The focus of this research is the development of a prototype field-portable ambient-air monitor for measuring trace levels of volatile organoarsenicals. Lewisite (dichloro[2-chlorovinyl]arsine) is a chemical warfare agent developed during World War I and stockpiled on a large scale by the former Soviet Union. A continuous air monitor for Lewisite at the eight-hour time-weighted-average concentration (3 {mu}g/m{sup 3}) is necessary to protect the safety and health of arms control treaty inspectors. Flow injection is used to integrate an air sampling device based on liquid-phase extraction with a flow-through detector based on potentiometric stripping analysis. We describe a method for the sampling and preconcentration of organoarsenicals from ambient air by using a gas permeation membrane sampler. The sampler is designed to selectively preconcentrate analyte that permeates a silicone rubber membrane into a caustic carrier stream. Instrument design is described for the sampling and detection methodologies.

  3. Encapsulated graphene field-effect transistors for air stable operation

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandrou, Konstantinos Kymissis, Ioannis; Petrone, Nicholas; Hone, James

    2015-03-16

    In this work, we report the fabrication of encapsulated graphene field effects transistors (GFETs) with excellent air stability operation in ambient environment. Graphene's 2D nature makes its electronics properties very sensitive to the surrounding environment, and thus, non-encapsulated graphene devices show extensive vulnerability due to unintentional hole doping from the presence of water molecules and oxygen limiting their performance and use in real world applications. Encapsulating GFETs with a thin layer of parylene-C and aluminum deposited on top of the exposed graphene channel area resulted in devices with excellent electrical performance stability for an extended period of time. Moisture penetration is reduced significantly and carrier mobility degraded substantially less when compared to non-encapsulated control devices. Our CMOS compatible encapsulation method minimizes the problems of environmental doping and lifetime performance degradation, enabling the operation of air stable devices for next generation graphene-based electronics.

  4. Geomagnetic Field Effects on the Imaging Air Shower Cherenkov Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Commichau, S.C.; Biland, A.; Kranich, D.; de los Reyes, R.; Moralejo, A.; Sobczyńska, D.

    Imaging Air Cherenkov Telescopes (IACTs) detect the Cherenkov light flashes of Extended Air Showers (EAS) triggered by VHE gamma-rays impinging on the Earth's atmosphere. Due to the overwhelming background from hadron induced EAS, the discrimination of the rare gamma-like events is rather difficult, in particular at energies below 100 GeV. The influence of the Geomagnetic Field (GF) on the EAS development can further complicate this discrimination and, in addition, also systematically affect the gamma-efficiency and energy resolution of an IACT. Here we present the results from dedicated Monte Carlo (MC) simulations for the MAGIC telescope site, show the GF effects on real data as well as possible corrections for these effects.

  5. Evaluation of membrane filter field monitors for microbiological air sampling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fields, N. D.; Oxborrow, G. S.; Puleo, J. R.; Herring, C. M.

    1974-01-01

    Due to area constraints encountered in assembly and testing areas of spacecraft, the membrane filter field monitor (MF) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration-accepted Reyniers slit air sampler were compared for recovery of airborne microbial contamination. The intramural air in a microbiological laboratory area and a clean room environment used for the assembly and testing of the Apollo spacecraft was studied. A significantly higher number of microorganisms was recovered by the Reyniers sampler. A high degree of consistency between the two sampling methods was shown by a regression analysis, with a correlation coefficient of 0.93. The MF samplers detected 79% of the concentration measured by the Reyniers slit samplers. The types of microorganisms identified from both sampling methods were similar.

  6. A Bicycle-Based Field Measurement System for the Study of Thermal Exposure in Cuyahoga County, Ohio, USA.

    PubMed

    Rajkovich, Nicholas B; Larsen, Larissa

    2016-02-01

    Collecting a fine scale of microclimate data can help to determine how physical characteristics (e.g., solar radiation, albedo, sky view factor, vegetation) contribute to human exposure to ground and air temperatures. These data also suggest how urban design strategies can reduce the negative impacts of the urban heat island effect. However, urban microclimate measurement poses substantial challenges. For example, data taken at local airports are not representative of the conditions at the neighborhood or district level because of variation in impervious surfaces, vegetation, and waste heat from vehicles and buildings. In addition, fixed weather stations cannot be deployed quickly to capture data from a heat wave. While remote sensing can provide data on land cover and ground surface temperatures, resolution and cost remain significant limitations. This paper describes the design and validation of a mobile measurement bicycle. This bicycle permits movement from space to space within a city to assess the physical and thermal properties of microclimates. The construction of the vehicle builds on investigations of the indoor thermal environment of buildings using thermal comfort carts. PMID:26821037

  7. A Bicycle-Based Field Measurement System for the Study of Thermal Exposure in Cuyahoga County, Ohio, USA

    PubMed Central

    Rajkovich, Nicholas B.; Larsen, Larissa

    2016-01-01

    Collecting a fine scale of microclimate data can help to determine how physical characteristics (e.g., solar radiation, albedo, sky view factor, vegetation) contribute to human exposure to ground and air temperatures. These data also suggest how urban design strategies can reduce the negative impacts of the urban heat island effect. However, urban microclimate measurement poses substantial challenges. For example, data taken at local airports are not representative of the conditions at the neighborhood or district level because of variation in impervious surfaces, vegetation, and waste heat from vehicles and buildings. In addition, fixed weather stations cannot be deployed quickly to capture data from a heat wave. While remote sensing can provide data on land cover and ground surface temperatures, resolution and cost remain significant limitations. This paper describes the design and validation of a mobile measurement bicycle. This bicycle permits movement from space to space within a city to assess the physical and thermal properties of microclimates. The construction of the vehicle builds on investigations of the indoor thermal environment of buildings using thermal comfort carts. PMID:26821037

  8. Ohio Community College Portraits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio Board of Regents, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This paper provides information on student characteristics, success and progress rates, cost of attendance, degrees awarded, class size, faculty characteristics, and employment outcomes at each of Ohio's twenty-three community college.

  9. USDA-ARS, OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY COOPERATIVE RESEARCH ON BIOLOGICALLY CONTROLLING FUSARIUM HEAD BLIGHT: 2. 2002 FIELD TESTS OF ANTAGONIST AND ANTAGONIST/FUNGICIDE MIXTURES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Research on optimizing methods for selectively isolating, mass producing, and utilizing microbial antagonists effective against Fusarium head blight (FHB) on wheat was initiated in 1997 at NCAUR in Peoria, IL, in conjunction with the Ohio State University. Biological control agents discovered in th...

  10. Field Operations and Enforcement Manual for Air Pollution Control. Volume I: Organization and Basic Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weisburd, Melvin I.

    The Field Operations and Enforcement Manual for Air Pollution Control, Volume I, explains in detail the following: sources and classification of pollutants; meteorological influence on air quality; the air pollution control agency; the field enforcement officer; the enforcement process; prosecuting violation; and inspection techniques including…

  11. Detection of underground voids in Ohio by use of geophysical methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Munk, Jens; Sheets, R.A.

    1997-01-01

    Geophysical methods are generally classified as electrical, potential field, and seismic methods. Each method type relies on contrasts of physical properties in the subsurface. Forward models based on the physical properties of air- and water-filled voids within common geologic materials indicate that several geophysical methods are technically feasible for detection of subsurface voids in Ohio, but ease of use and interpretation varies widely between the methods. Ground-penetrating radar is the most rapid and cost-effective method for collection of subsurface data in areas associated with voids under roadways. Electrical resistivity, gravity, or seismic reflection methods have applications for direct delineation of voids, but data-collection and analytical procedures are more time consuming. Electrical resistivity, electromagnetic, or magnetic methods may be useful in locating areas where conductive material, such as rail lines, are present in abandoned underground coal mines. Other electrical methods include spontaneous potential and very low frequency (VLF); these latter two methods are considered unlikely candidates for locating underground voids in Ohio. Results of ground-penetrating radar surveys at three highway sites indicate that subsurface penetration varies widely with geologic material type and amount of cultural interference. Two highway sites were chosen over abandoned underground coal mines in eastern Ohio. A third site in western Ohio was chosen in an area known to be underlain by naturally occurring voids in lime stone. Ground-penetrating radar surveys at Interstate 470, in Belmont County, Ohio, indicate subsurface penetration of less than 15 feet over a mined coal seam that was known to vary in depth from 0 to 40 feet. Although no direct observations of voids were made, anomalous areas that may be related to collapse structures above voids were indicated. Cultural interference dominated the radar records at Interstate 70, Guernsey County, Ohio

  12. Tech Prep Ohio Progress Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio Board of Regents, Columbus.

    Tech prep programs integrate academic, occupational, and employability during the last 2 years of high school and the first 2 years of college, combining the best of college-prep academics with the best of vocational and technical education. The Ohio Tech Prep program, jointly administered by the Ohio Board of Regents and the Ohio Department of…

  13. Field Test of Room-to-Room Uniformity of Ventilation Air Distribution in Two New Houses

    SciTech Connect

    Hendron, Robert; Anderson, Ren; Barley, Dennis; Rudd, Armin; Townsend, Aaron; Hancock, Ed

    2006-12-01

    This report describes a field test to characterize the uniformity of room-to-room ventilation air distribution under various operating conditions by examining multi-zone tracer gas decay curves and calculating local age-of-air.

  14. Deregulation Impact in Negotiating a New Electrical Contract Between NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field and FirstEnergy Corp., Cleveland, Ohio, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quach, Quyen T.; Zala, Laszlo F.

    2002-01-01

    The governor of the State of Ohio signed amended substitute Senate bill 3 on July 6, 1999, requiring Ohio's electric industry to change from a monopoly environment to a competitive electric environment for generation services. The start date for competitive retail generation services was set for January 1, 2001. This new deregulation law allowed all Ohioans to choose the supplier of generation service, but the transmission and distribution would remain regulated. It also required electric utilities to unbundle the three main components (generation, transmission, and distribution) and make other changes designed to produce a competitive electric generation market. While deregulation was taking shape, the NASA Glenn Research Center electrical contract with FirstEnergy Corp. of Cleveland, Ohio, was to expire on September 7, 1999. Glenn strategically evaluated and incorporated the impacts of electric deregulation in the negotiations. Glenn and FirstEnergy spent over a year in negotiations until the Glenn utility team and the FirstEnergy negotiating team came to an agreement in the fall of 2000, and a new contract became effective on January 1, 2001.

  15. FIELD-DEPLOYABLE MONITORS FOR VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN AIR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Volatile organic compounds in ambient air are usually estimated by trapping them from air or collecting whole air samples and returning them to a laboratory for analysis by gas chromatography using selective detection. ata do not appear for several days, during which sample integ...

  16. FIELD DEPLOYABLE MONITORS FOR VOLATILE COMPOUNDS IN AIR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Volatile organic compounds in ambient air are usually estimated by trapping them from air or collecting whole air samples and returning them to a laboratory for analysis by gas chromatography using selective detection. ata do not appear for several days, during which sample integ...

  17. Assessing Natural Isothiocyanate Air Emissions after Field Incorporation of Mustard Cover Crop

    SciTech Connect

    Trott, Donna M.; LePage, Jane; Hebert, Vincent

    2012-01-01

    A regional air assessment was performed to characterize volatile natural isothiocyanate (NITC) compounds in air during soil incorporation of mustard cover crops in Washington State. Field air sampling and analytical methods were developed specific to three NITCs known to be present in air at appreciable concentrations during/after field incorporation. The maximum observed concentrations in air for the allyl, benzyl, and phenethyl isothiocyanates were respectively 188, 6.1, and 0.7 lg m-3 during mustard incorporation. Based on limited inhalation toxicity information, airborne NITC concentrations did not appear to pose an acute human inhalation exposure concern to field operators and bystanders.

  18. Ohio School Design Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio School Facilities Commission, Columbus.

    This manual presents guidance to facility designers, school administrators, staff, and students for the development of school facilities being constructed under Ohio's Classroom Facilities Assistance Program. It provides critical analysis of individual spaces and material/system components necessary for the construction of elementary and secondary…

  19. Ohio Biotechnology Competency Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Lavonna; Bowermeister, Bob; Boudreau, Joyce

    This document, which lists the biotechnology competencies identified by representatives from biotechnology businesses and industries as well as secondary and post-secondary educators throughout Ohio, is intended to assist individuals and organizations in developing college tech prep programs that will prepare students from secondary through…

  20. Ohio Agriscience Lesson Plans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sommers, Robert D., II, Comp.; Waidelich, William D., Comp.

    This document, which is intended for Ohio agriculture teachers, contains lesson plans for an eight-unit competency-based course in agriscience. Each lesson plan contains some or all of the following items: (1) unit title; (2) competency/terminal performance objective; (3) competency builders/pupil performance objectives; (4) list of applied…

  1. 2014 Ohio Remediation Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio Board of Regents, 2014

    2014-01-01

    In fulfillment of Ohio Revised Code 3333.041 (A) (1) the Chancellor has published a listing by school district of the number of the 2013 high school graduates who attended a state institution of higher education in academic year 2013-2014 and the percentage of each district's graduates required by the institution to enroll in a remedial course in…

  2. Ohio's Career Passport Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Dept. of Education, Columbus.

    This publication provides sample components of the Ohio Career Passport, including the rationale and purpose of each. Section 1 contains examples of the letter of verification, a letter from a school or district administrator, which confirms that the individual is a student at the school. Written on school letterhead, it sends the signal to the…

  3. Ohio Business Surveys.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baughin, Judith A.

    Results of four surveys of international businesses in the Toledo, Columbus, Cincinnati, and Akron, Ohio, areas regarding the language skills of employees and usefulness of second language skills in their domestic and international trade activities are reported in detail. In the Toledo survey it was found that of the 48 respondents, 72% responded…

  4. MIGRATORY LABOR IN OHIO.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BINGHAM, SALLY

    OHIO HAS BECOME A HIGHLY INDUSTRIALIZED STATE WITH INSUFFICIENT QUALIFIED LOCAL FARM WORKERS TO MEET HARVEST DEMANDS. MIGRANT WORKERS HAVE FILLED THAT NEED, DOING MOSTLY "STOOP WORK" AND WORKING IN FOOD PROCESSING PLANTS. THE ANNUAL WORKER PLAN HAS PROVIDED FOR MORE EFFICIENT SCHEDULING OF MIGRANTS. CONSTRUCTIVE PROGRAMS HAVE BEEN DEVELOPED FOR…

  5. Who Are Ohio's Migrants?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hintz, Joy; Mecartney, John

    Identifying and defining Ohio's migrant population, the document also seeks to destroy many of the myths that exist about migrant workers. The survey, made in September 1972, found that 90% of the state's 35,000 workers were Spanish speaking. The document also gives information on migrant recruitment, crew leaders, income, housing, crops,…

  6. Simulation of the effects of nearby quarrying operations on ground-water flow at the South Well Field, Franklin County, Ohio

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nalley, Gregory M.; Haefner, Ralph J.

    1999-01-01

    The City of Columbus, Ohio, operates a municipal well field in southern Franklin County that is adjacent to a sand and gravel mining operation. Mining operations have the potential to alter ground-water flowpaths and change the sources of water to pumped wells. Previous ground-water-flow modeling of the area has shown that water pumped from the supply wells is derived from infiltration from nearby rivers and surrounding bedrock. Some of that water flows through existing quarries. Because water quality differs among these sources and is affected by the path along which water flows to the wells, five flow conditions were simulated to evaluate the influence of different mining scenarios on sources of water as related to the size and shape of contributing recharge areas (CRAs) to wells. The first simulation was based on a revision of an existing model by Schalk (1996). The second and third simulations included one in which a 20-foot layer of undisturbed aquifer material within the quarry above the bedrock is left intact, and another in which the 20-foot layer is removed. The fourth and fifth simulations included one in which the 20-foot layer of undisturbed aquifer material is left above the bedrock and the quarry is backfilled with fine- grained sand and silt (a byproduct of the mining operations), and another in which the 20-foot layer is removed before the quarry is backfilled with the fine-grained sand and silt. The results of the five model simulations indicate that the overall volumetric budgets among models change only slightly in response to changing conditions at the quarry. The most significant change is noted in the amount of water that the aquifers gained from constant head and river leakage. This change is due to the way the quarries were simulated and lower heads in the aquifers compared to those in simulations made with earlier models. Previously published model simulations showed that the 5-year CRAs did not extend into the area of the newest sand and

  7. Performance of underfloor air distribution: Results of a field study

    SciTech Connect

    Fisk, William; Faulkner, David; Sullivan, Douglas

    2004-09-02

    Underfloor air distribution (UFAD) is a new method of supplying heated or cooled air throughout a building. Reported advantages of UFAD include easy relocation of air supply diffusers, energy savings, and improved indoor air quality (IAQ). We measured several aspects of the performance of an UFAD system installed in a medium-size office building. The measured air change effectiveness was very close to unity, which is comparable to that measured in buildings with typical overhead air distribution. The pollutant removal efficiency for carbon dioxide was 13 percent higher than expected in a space with well-mixed air, suggesting a 13 percent reduction in exposures to occupant generated pollutants. The increase in indoor air temperatures with height above the floor was only 1 to 2 C (2-4 F). This amount of thermal stratification could reduce the sensible energy requirements for cooling of outdoor air by approximately 10 percent. The occupants level of satisfaction with thermal conditions w as well above average and this high satisfaction rating could possibly be due, in all or part, to the use of a UFAD system. The results of this study provide some evidence of moderate energy and IAQ-related benefits of UFAD. Before general conclusions are drawn, the benefits need to be confirmed in other studies.

  8. Notes from the Field: Increase in Neisseria meningitidis-Associated Urethritis Among Men at Two Sentinel Clinics - Columbus, Ohio, and Oakland County, Michigan, 2015.

    PubMed

    Bazan, Jose A; Peterson, Amy S; Kirkcaldy, Robert D; Briere, Elizabeth C; Maierhofer, Courtney; Turner, Abigail Norris; Licon, Denisse B; Parker, Nicole; Dennison, Amanda; Ervin, Melissa; Johnson, Laura; Weberman, Barbara; Hackert, Pamela; Wang, Xin; Kretz, Cecilia B; Abrams, A Jeanine; Trees, David L; Del Rio, Carlos; Stephens, David S; Tzeng, Yih-Ling; DiOrio, Mary; Roberts, Mysheika Williams

    2016-01-01

    Neisseria meningitidis (Nm) urogenital infections, although less common than infections caused by Neisseria gonorrhoeae (Ng), have been associated with urethritis, cervicitis, proctitis, and pelvic inflammatory disease. Nm can appear similar to Ng on Gram stain analysis (gram-negative intracellular diplococci) (1-5). Because Nm colonizes the nasopharynx, men who receive oral sex (fellatio) can acquire urethral Nm infections (1,3,5). This report describes an increase in Nm-associated urethritis in men attending sexual health clinics in Columbus, Ohio, and Oakland County, Michigan. PMID:27254649

  9. Air

    MedlinePlus

    ... do to protect yourself from dirty air . Indoor air pollution and outdoor air pollution Air can be polluted indoors and it can ... this chart to see what things cause indoor air pollution and what things cause outdoor air pollution! Indoor ...

  10. Using soil records with atmospheric dispersion modeling to investigate the effects of clean air regulations on 60 years of manganese deposition in Marietta, Ohio (USA).

    PubMed

    Carter, Megan R; Gaudet, Brian J; Stauffer, David R; White, Timothy S; Brantley, Susan L

    2015-05-15

    Atmospheric emissions of metals from anthropogenic activities have led to deposition and contamination of soils worldwide. We quantified addition of manganese (Mn) to soils around the largest emitter of Mn in the United States (U.S.) using chemical analyses and atmospheric dispersion modeling (Second-Order Closure Integrated Puff (SCIPUFF)). Concentrations of soil-surface Mn were enriched by 9-fold relative to that of the parent material within 1 km of the facility. Elevated concentrations of Mn and chromium (Cr), another potentially toxic element that was emitted, document contamination only within 1 m of the soil surface. Total mass of Mn added per unit land area integrated over 1 m, mMn, equals ~80 mg Mn cm(-2) near the facility. Values of mMn remained above background up to tens of kilometers from the source. Air concentrations of Mn particles of 7.5-micron diameter simulated with SCIPUFF using available data for the emission rate and local meteorological conditions for 2006 were consistent with measured air concentrations. However, the Mn deposition calculated for 2006 with SCIPUFF yielded a cumulative value over the lifetime of the refinery (60 years) that is a factor of 15 lower than the Mn observed to have been added to the soils. This discrepancy can be easily explained if Mn deposition rates before 1988 were more than an order of magnitude greater than today. Such higher emissions are probable, given the changes in metal production with time and the installation of emission controls after the Clean Air Act (1970). This work shows that atmospheric dispersion models can be used with soil profiles to understand the changes in metal emissions over decadal timescales. In addition, the calculations are consistent with the Clean Air Act accounting for a 15-fold decrease in the Mn deposition to soils around the refinery per metric ton of Mn alloy produced. PMID:25698519

  11. Field Validation of ICF Residential Building Air-Tightness

    SciTech Connect

    Sacs, I.; Ternes, M.P.

    2001-01-01

    Recent advances in home construction methods have made considerable progress in addressing energy savings issues. Certain methods are potentially capable of tightening the building envelope, consequently reducing air leakage and minimizing heating and air conditioning related energy losses. Insulated concrete form (ICF) is an economically viable alternative to traditional woodframe construction. Two homes, one of wood-frame, the other of ICF construction, were studied. Standard air leakage testing procedures were used to compare air tightness characteristics achieved by the two construction types. The ICF home showed consistently lower values for air leakage in these tests. The buildings otherwise provided similar data during testing, suggesting that the difference in values is due to greater airtight integrity of the ICF construction method. Testing on more homes is necessary to be conclusive. However, ICF construction shows promise as a tighter building envelope construction method.

  12. Field evaluation of a horizontal well recirculation system for groundwater treatment: Field demonstration at X-701B Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Piketon, Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Korte, N.; Muck, M.; Kearl, P.; Siegrist, R.; Schlosser, R.; Zutman, J.; Houk, T.

    1998-08-01

    This report describes the field-scale demonstration performed as part of the project, In Situ Treatment of Mixed Contaminants in Groundwater. This project was a 3{1/2} year effort comprised of laboratory work performed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and fieldwork performed at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS). The overall goal of the project was to evaluate in situ treatment of groundwater using horizontal recirculation coupled with treatment modules. Specifically, horizontal recirculation was tested because of its application to thin, interbedded aquifer zones. Mixed contaminants were targeted because of their prominence at DOE sites and because they cannot be treated with conventional methods. The project involved several research elements, including treatment process evaluation, hydrodynamic flow and transport modeling, pilot testing at an uncontaminated site, and full-scale testing at a contaminated site. This report presents the results of the work at the contaminated site, X-701B at PORTS. Groundwater contamination at X-701B consists of trichloroethene (TCE) (concentrations up to 1800 mg/L) and technetium-998 (Tc{sup 99}) (activities up to 926 pCi/L).

  13. Ohio Coal Research Consortium fourth year final summary report, September 1, 1993--August 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    As a part of its efforts to improve the use of high-sulfur Ohio coal within environmental limits, the Ohio Coal Development Office, an entity within the Ohio Department of Development (OCDO/ODOD), in late 1988 established a consortium of four Ohio universities. The purpose of the Ohio Coal Research Consortium is to conduct a multi-year fundamental research program focused on (1) the enhancement or development of dry sorption processes for the economical removal of high levels of SO{sub 2} and other pollutants and (2) an increased understanding of methods for reduction in air toxics emissions from combustion gases produced by burning high-sulfur Ohio coal. This report contains summaries of twelve studies in these areas.

  14. Air injection project breathes fire into aging West Hackberry oil field

    SciTech Connect

    Duey, R.

    1996-02-01

    Amoco, the DOE and LSU seek more oil from Gulf Coast salt dome fields with air injection technique. The West Hackberry Field in Louisiana is a water-driven reservoir. By injecting air into the high-pressure, high-temperature reservoir rock, the water is backed down, allowing the oil to drain off the steeply dipped rock.

  15. Far Noise Field of Air Jets and Jet Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callaghan, Edmund E; Coles, Willard D

    1957-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to study and compare the acoustic radiation of air jets and jet engines. A number of different nozzle-exit shapes were studied with air jets to determine the effect of exit shape on noise generation. Circular, square, rectangular, and elliptical convergent nozzles and convergent-divergent and plug nozzles were investigated. The spectral distributions of the sound power for the engine and the air jet were in good agreement for the case where the engine data were not greatly affected by reflection or jet interference effects. Such power spectra for a subsonic or slightly choked engine or air jet show that the peaks of the spectra occur at a Strouhal number of 0.3.

  16. Northwest Ohio Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Moyer, Kevin

    2015-03-04

    EXECUTIVE SUMMARY When the Toledo Lucas County Port Authority (TLCPA) filed for the Department of Energy EECBG grant in late 2009, it was part of a strategic and Board backed objective to expand the organization’s economic development and financing programs into alternative energy and energy efficiency. This plan was filed with the knowledge and support of the areas key economic development agencies. The City of Toledo was also a key partner with the Mayor designating a committee to develop a Strategic Energy Policy for the City. This would later give rise to a Community Sustainability Strategic Plan for Toledo, Lucas County and the surrounding region with energy efficiency as a key pillar. When the TLCPA signed the grant documents with the DOE in June of 2010, the geographic area was severely distressed economically, in the early stages of a recovery from over a 30% drop in business activity and high unemployment. The TLCPA and its partners began identifying potential project areas well before the filing of the application, continuing to work diligently before the formal award and signing of the grant documents. Strong implementation and actions plans and business and financing models were developed and revised throughout the 3 year grant period with the long term goal of creating a sustainable program. The TLCPA and the City of Toledo demonstrated early leadership by forming the energy improvement district and evaluating buildings under their control including transportation infrastructure and logistics, government services buildings and buildings which housed several for profit and not for profit tenants while completing significant energy efficiency projects that created public awareness and confidence and solid examples of various technologies and energy savings. As was stated in the DOE Award Summary, the undertaking was focused as a commercial program delving into Alternative Energy Utility Districts; what are referred to in Ohio Statute as Energy Special

  17. Indoor air quality in green-renovated vs. non-green low-income homes of children living in a temperate region of US (Ohio).

    PubMed

    Coombs, Kanistha C; Chew, Ginger L; Schaffer, Christopher; Ryan, Patrick H; Brokamp, Cole; Grinshpun, Sergey A; Adamkiewicz, Gary; Chillrud, Steve; Hedman, Curtis; Colton, Meryl; Ross, Jamie; Reponen, Tiina

    2016-06-01

    Green eco-friendly housing includes approaches to reduce indoor air pollutant sources and to increase energy efficiency. Although sealing/tightening buildings can save energy and reduce the penetration of outdoor pollutants, an adverse outcome can be increased buildup of pollutants with indoor sources. The objective of this study was to determine the differences in the indoor air quality (IAQ) between green and non-green homes in low-income housing complexes. In one housing complex, apartments were renovated using green principles (n=28). Home visits were conducted immediately after the renovation, and subsequently at 6 months and at 12 months following the renovation. Of these homes, eight homes had pre-renovation home visits; this allowed pre- and post-renovation comparisons within the same homes. Parallel visits were conducted in non-green (control) apartments (n=14) in a nearby low-income housing complex. The IAQ assessments included PM2.5, black carbon, ultrafine particles, sulfur, total volatile organic compounds (VOCs), formaldehyde, and air exchange rate. Data were analyzed using linear mixed-effects models. None of the indoor pollutant concentrations were significantly different between green and non-green homes. However, we found differences when comparing the concentrations before and after renovation. Measured immediately after renovation, indoor black carbon concentrations were significantly lower averaging 682 ng/m(3) in post-renovation vs. 2364 ng/m(3) in pre-renovation home visits (p=0.01). In contrast, formaldehyde concentrations were significantly higher in post-renovated (0.03 ppm) than in pre-renovated homes (0.01 ppm) (p=0.004). Questionnaire data showed that opening of windows occurred less frequently in homes immediately post-renovation compared to pre-renovation; this factor likely affected the levels of indoor black carbon (from outdoor sources) and formaldehyde (from indoor sources) more than the renovation status itself. To reduce IAQ

  18. OhioLINK Electronic Journal Use at Ohio State University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connell, Tschera Harkness; Rogers, Sally A.; Diedrichs, Carol Pitts

    2005-01-01

    A five-question survey randomly presented to users at Ohio State University (OSU) as they viewed articles in OhioLINK's Electronic Journal Center (EJC) in fall 2002 probed the user's status, academic unit, reason for viewing, path to the article, and frequency of EJC use. Usage by faculty and graduate students, by frequent users, and by those in…

  19. Coastal Ohio Wind Project

    SciTech Connect

    Gorsevski, Peter; Afjeh, Abdollah; Jamali, Mohsin; Bingman, Verner

    2014-04-04

    The Coastal Ohio Wind Project intends to address problems that impede deployment of wind turbines in the coastal and offshore regions of Northern Ohio. The project evaluates different wind turbine designs and the potential impact of offshore turbines on migratory and resident birds by developing multidisciplinary research, which involves wildlife biology, electrical and mechanical engineering, and geospatial science. Firstly, the project conducts cost and performance studies of two- and three-blade wind turbines using a turbine design suited for the Great Lakes. The numerical studies comprised an analysis and evaluation of the annual energy production of two- and three-blade wind turbines to determine the levelized cost of energy. This task also involved wind tunnel studies of model wind turbines to quantify the wake flow field of upwind and downwind wind turbine-tower arrangements. The experimental work included a study of a scaled model of an offshore wind turbine platform in a water tunnel. The levelized cost of energy work consisted of the development and application of a cost model to predict the cost of energy produced by a wind turbine system placed offshore. The analysis found that a floating two-blade wind turbine presents the most cost effective alternative for the Great Lakes. The load effects studies showed that the two-blade wind turbine model experiences less torque under all IEC Standard design load cases considered. Other load effects did not show this trend and depending on the design load cases, the two-bladed wind turbine showed higher or lower load effects. The experimental studies of the wake were conducted using smoke flow visualization and hot wire anemometry. Flow visualization studies showed that in the downwind turbine configuration the wake flow was insensitive to the presence of the blade and was very similar to that of the tower alone. On the other hand, in the upwind turbine configuration, increasing the rotor blade angle of attack

  20. Climatological aspects of drought in Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, J.C. )

    1993-06-01

    Precipitation and Palmer hydrological drought index (PHDI) data have been used to identify past occurrences of Ohio drought, to illustrate the temporal variability occurring statewide within dry periods, and to compare some of the key dry spells to those of 1987-88 and 1991-92. Periods of hydrologic drought and low precipitation generally persist for 2 to 5 years and tend to cluster in time, such as occurred from 1930-1966. It is not uncommon for precipitation to return to normal or near normal conditions while short-term drought persists in terms of streamflow, ground water supply, and runoff, as measured by the PHDI. The period April 1930 to March 1931 is the driest on record in Ohio although longer periods of low precipitation have occurred from 1893-1896, 1952-1955, and 1963-1965. The temporal clusters of droughts are separated by prolonged wet periods, including those extending roughly from 1875-1893, 1905-1924, and 1966-1987. Correlations between Ohio monthly precipitation and mean air temperature suggest that drought is linked to unusually high summer temperatures through mechanisms such as increased evapotranspiration, leading to increased fluxes of sensible heat from dry soil surfaces. In winter, warm conditions tend to favor higher precipitation, soil recharge, and runoff. Variations in mean temperature and atmospheric circulation may also be linked to other observed climatic features such as long-term trends in soil-water recharge season (October-March) precipitation.

  1. Horizontal drilling opportunities in Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Noel, J.A. )

    1991-08-01

    Horizontal drilling has become commonplace in certain parts of Texas. The Austin Chalk is the favorite target, especially where fracture systems are present. The activity has become so intense that leases are now costly or nearly impossible to find. This type of activity was prevalent during the late oil boom, but with vertical wells. So, the same areas that were drilled then are being redone with horizontal drilling. In the past few months, carbonates with little or no evidence of fracture systems are being drilled with some success. Because of the difficulty in lease acquisition, operators are turning their attention elsewhere. Even though horizontal drilling has been conducted limitedly in the Devonian black shales, the Appalachian basin is an area that calls for attention. In Ohio, there have been instances of discoveries of one-well fields in both the Trenton and Trempealeau formations. The initial production from these wells ranges from a few to hundreds of barrels of oil per day. The lack of success in offset wells has been attributed to the interpretation that the producing wells were serendipitously drilled into a limited fractured reservoir. In most cases, the producer is surrounded by clusters of dry holes. These Ohio wells and wells in one other area are studied using well data, spectral and sonic logs, aerial photographs, side-looking radar surveys, and other data. The results are presented on structure contour and lineament maps, and quantitative log interpretations. The maps show the interpretations of those areas of fracture systems that might be viable targets for horizontal drilling.

  2. Financing Public Libraries in Ohio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stocker, Frederick D.

    This study is an outgrowth of the plans and programs set in motion by the study of professor Ralph Blasingame, Rutgers University Graduate School, in 1968, and the 1969 legislation setting up the Ohio Library Development Plan (OLDP). Its purposes are to describe the system of financing public libraries in Ohio, to identify problem areas, and to…

  3. Ohio Health Technology Competency Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boudreau, Joyce; Miller, Lavonna F.

    This document, which was jointly developed by representatives from a broad cross-section of Ohio's health care industries and educators representing Ohio's schools and colleges, is intended as a foundation for developing an integrated delivery system to prepare students for careers in health care. The document's introductory section presents…

  4. THE USDA/AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE RESEARCH WEATHER NETWORK IN LAKE COUNTY, OHIO - 2002 UPDATE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Permanent meteorological stations have been installed in Northeast Ohio production nurseries to archive weather data during horticultural experiments. Insect and disease management research require detailed knowledge of weather conditions. Data such as soil moisture and temperature, air temperature...

  5. Field Studies for Secondary Organic Aerosol in the Transboundary Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irei, S.; Takami, A.; Sadanaga, Y.; Nozoe, S.; Hayashi, M.; Hara, K.; Arakaki, T.; Hatakeyama, S.; Miyoshi, T.; Yokouchi, Y.; Bandow, H.

    2014-12-01

    To study formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) in the air outflowed from the Chinese continent and its fraction in an urban city located in downwind, we have conducted field studies at two background sites and one urban site in the western Japan: the Cape Hedo Aerosol and Atmospheric Monitoring Station (26.9˚N, 128.3˚E), the Fukue Atmospheric Monitoring Station (32.8˚N, 128.7˚E), and Fukuoka University (33.6˚N, 130.4˚E), respectively. During the studies, stable carbon isotope ratio (δ13C) of low-volatile water-soluble organic carbon (LV-WSOC) was measured in 24 h collected filter samples of total suspended particulate matter. Concentration of fine organic aerosol and the proportion of the signal at m/z 44 (ions from the carboxyl group) in the organic mass spectra (f44) were also measured by Aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometers. Limited to the Fukue site only, mixing ratios of trace gas species, such as aromatic hydrocarbons, NOx, and NOy, were also measured using GC-FID and NOx and NOyanalyzers for estimation of photochemical age (t[OH]). A case study in December 2010 showed that plots of δ13C versus f44 showed systematic variations at Hedo and Fukue. However, their trends were opposite. At Fukue the trend was consistent in the plot of δ13C of LV-WSOC versus t[OH] estimated by the NOx/NOy or the hydrocarbon ratios, indicating influence of SOA. The systematic trends aforementioned qualitatively agreed with a binary mixture model of SOA with background LV-WSOC having the f44 of ~0.06 and the δ13C of -17‰ or higher, implication of some influence of primary emission associated with C4plants. Given that the LV-WSOC at the urban Fukuoka site was a binary mixture, a mass balance for δ13C was constructed below. In the equation, δ13CMix, δ13CLocal, δ13CTrans, and FLocal are δ13C of binary LV-WSOC mixture, δ13C of LV-WSOC from local emission origin, δ13C of LV-WSOC from transboundary pollution origin, and a fraction of LV-WSOC from local emission

  6. National Environmental/Energy Workforce Assessment for Ohio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Field Research Center Inc., Iowa City, IA.

    This report presents existing workforce levels, training programs and career potentials and develops staffing level projections (1976-1982) based on available information for the State of Ohio. The study concerns itself with the environmental pollution control areas of air, noise, potable water, pesticides, radiation, solid waste, wastewater, and…

  7. SOURCES OF MERCURY WET DEPOSITION IN EASTERN OHIO, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the fall of 2002, an enhanced air monitoring site was established in Steubenville, Ohio as part of a multi-year comprehensive mercury monitoring and source apportionment study to investigate the impact of local and regional coal combustion sources on atmospheric mercury deposi...

  8. The simulation of far-field wavelets using frequency-domain air-gun array near-field wavelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Jian-Guo; Deng, Yong; Tong, Xin-Xin

    2013-12-01

    Air-gun arrays are used in marine-seismic exploration. Far-field wavelets in subsurface media represent the stacking of single air-gun ideal wavelets. We derived single air-gun ideal wavelets using near-field wavelets recorded from near-field geophones and then synthesized them into far-field wavelets. This is critical for processing wavelets in marineseismic exploration. For this purpose, several algorithms are currently used to decompose and synthesize wavelets in the time domain. If the traveltime of single air-gun wavelets is not an integral multiple of the sampling interval, the complex and error-prone resampling of the seismic signals using the time-domain method is necessary. Based on the relation between the frequency-domain phase and the time-domain time delay, we propose a method that first transforms the real near-field wavelet to the frequency domain via Fourier transforms; then, it decomposes it and composes the wavelet spectrum in the frequency domain, and then back transforms it to the time domain. Thus, the resampling problem is avoided and single air-gun wavelets and far-field wavelets can be reliably derived. The effect of ghost reflections is also considered, while decomposing the wavelet and removing the ghost reflections. Modeling and real data processing were used to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed method.

  9. Compressed-air energy storage: Pittsfield aquifer field test

    SciTech Connect

    Bui, H.V.; Herzog, R.A.; Jacewicz, D.M.; Lange, G.R.; Scarpace, E.R.; Thomas, H.H. )

    1990-02-01

    This report documents the results of a comprehensive investigation into the practical feasibility for Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) in Porous Media. Natural gas porous media storage technology developed from seventy years of experience by the natural gas storage industry is applied to the investigation of CAES in porous media. A major objective of this investigation is the geologic characterization, deliverability prediction, and operations analysis of the Pittsfield CAES aquifer experiment, conducted in Pike County, Illinois during 1981--85 under EPRI/DOE sponsorship. Emphasis has been placed on applying accepted petroleum engineering concepts to the study of deliverability and on the characterization and quantification of oxygen losses which reportedly occurred at Pittsfield. Other objectives are to apply the natural gas underground storage technology and approach to a general study of CAES feasibility in porous media reservoirs, with emphasis on the practical risks and constraints of air storage in aquifer and depleted natural gas reservoirs, the effects of water on CAES operation, corrosion effects, and a review of air dehydration options.

  10. Compressed-air energy storage field test using the aquifer at Pittsfield, Illinois

    SciTech Connect

    Istvan, J.A.; Pereira, J.C.; Roark, P.; Bakhtiari, H. )

    1990-02-01

    This report describes the design, construction, and operation of a field experiment to examine feasibility of full-scale compressed air energy storage (CAES) within aquifer reservoirs. A summary of data obtained and the conclusions from the field experiment are presented. Two injection/withdrawal wells, two instrument wells, and four logging/sampling wells were drilled and cored. Air was injected in the St. Peter Sandstone to create an air bubble which was cycled with ambient and elevated temperature air in the injection withdrawal pattern contemplated for CAES installations. At its peak content of 111.75 {times} 10{sup 6} scf, the air bubble was 30 ft thick at the I/W well area and reached 18 ft in thickness at a distance of 686 ft from the I/W well. Three post-test core wells were drilled and cored. The caprock, reservoir, and formation water were sampled and analyzed prior to and after exposure to compressed air and associated water. Samples of stored air were collected and analyzed. Items of interest were degree of liquid entrance into flowing well, effects in aquifer of increased air temperature, and changes in oxygen content of air. Prior to plugging and abandoning the well field, an additional well was drilled and cored, outside the air bubble. This work is part of the continuing research by EPRI to investigate the geochemical oxidation process. Reservoir engineering and utilization of geologic media for storing air has many complexities, but it has useable experience from successful natural gas storage. The design, construction, and testing at Pittsfield demonstrates that orientation toward useage of an aquifer air storage facility can be performed successfully. The disappearance of oxygen needs attention for seasonal storage of air but should not dampen enthusiasm for weekly or daily storage cycles.

  11. Field Hydraulic and Air-Blast Sprayers for Row Crops.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Herbert, Jr., Comp.

    This agriculture extension service publication from Pennsylvania State University discusses techniques and equipment used in spraying field crops. In the discussion of field hydraulic sprayers, specific topics include types of sprayers, tanks, pumps, pressure regulators, hoses, boom spraying, directed spraying, and nozzle bodies. In the discussion…

  12. On the measurement of stationary electric fields in air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirkham, H.

    2002-01-01

    Applications and measurement methods for field measurements are reviewed. Recent developments using optical technology are examined. The various methods are compared. It is concluded that the best general purpose instrument is the isolated cylindrical field mill, but MEMS technology could furnish better instruments in the future.

  13. Hydrogen cyanide in ambient air near a gold heap leach field: Measured vs. modeled concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orloff, Kenneth G.; Kaplan, Brian; Kowalski, Peter

    To extract gold from low-grade ores, a solution of sodium cyanide is trickled over pads of crushed ore. During this operation, small quantities of hydrogen cyanide gas may escape to the ambient air. To assess these emissions, we collected air samples at monitoring stations located on opposite sides of a gold heap leach field at distances ranging from 1100 to 1500 ft from the center of the field. Hydrogen cyanide was detected in 6 of 18 ambient air samples at concentrations ranging from 0.26 to 1.86 parts per billion (ppb). Ambient air samples collected at residential properties located within 2600 ft of the leach field did not contain detectable concentrations of cyanide (detection level of 0.2 ppb). We used site-specific data and two steady-state air dispersion models, ISCST3 and AERMOD, to predict ambient air concentrations of cyanide at the sampling points. The ISCST3 model over-predicted the measured 8-h concentrations of hydrogen cyanide by a factor of 2.4, on average, and the AERMOD model under-predicted the air concentrations of hydrogen cyanide by a factor of 0.76, on average. The major sources of uncertainty in the model predictions were the complex terrain of the area and the uncertainty in the emission rates of cyanide from the leach field. The measured and predicted concentrations of cyanide in the air samples were not at levels that would pose a human health hazard for acute or chronic exposures.

  14. Transport properties of high-temperature air in a magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Bruno, D.; Capitelli, M.; Catalfamo, C.; Giordano, D.

    2011-01-15

    Transport properties of equilibrium air plasmas in a magnetic field are calculated with the Chapman-Enskog method. The range considered for the temperature is [50-50 000] K and for the magnetic induction is [0-300] T.

  15. Probing Atmospheric Electric Fields in Thunderstorms through Radio Emission from Cosmic-Ray-Induced Air Showers.

    PubMed

    Schellart, P; Trinh, T N G; Buitink, S; Corstanje, A; Enriquez, J E; Falcke, H; Hörandel, J R; Nelles, A; Rachen, J P; Rossetto, L; Scholten, O; Ter Veen, S; Thoudam, S; Ebert, U; Koehn, C; Rutjes, C; Alexov, A; Anderson, J M; Avruch, I M; Bentum, M J; Bernardi, G; Best, P; Bonafede, A; Breitling, F; Broderick, J W; Brüggen, M; Butcher, H R; Ciardi, B; de Geus, E; de Vos, M; Duscha, S; Eislöffel, J; Fallows, R A; Frieswijk, W; Garrett, M A; Grießmeier, J; Gunst, A W; Heald, G; Hessels, J W T; Hoeft, M; Holties, H A; Juette, E; Kondratiev, V I; Kuniyoshi, M; Kuper, G; Mann, G; McFadden, R; McKay-Bukowski, D; McKean, J P; Mevius, M; Moldon, J; Norden, M J; Orru, E; Paas, H; Pandey-Pommier, M; Pizzo, R; Polatidis, A G; Reich, W; Röttgering, H; Scaife, A M M; Schwarz, D J; Serylak, M; Smirnov, O; Steinmetz, M; Swinbank, J; Tagger, M; Tasse, C; Toribio, M C; van Weeren, R J; Vermeulen, R; Vocks, C; Wise, M W; Wucknitz, O; Zarka, P

    2015-04-24

    We present measurements of radio emission from cosmic ray air showers that took place during thunderstorms. The intensity and polarization patterns of these air showers are radically different from those measured during fair-weather conditions. With the use of a simple two-layer model for the atmospheric electric field, these patterns can be well reproduced by state-of-the-art simulation codes. This in turn provides a novel way to study atmospheric electric fields. PMID:25955053

  16. Hydrology and water quality near the South Well Field, southern Franklin County, Ohio, with emphasis on the simulation of ground-water flow and transport of Scioto River. Water resources investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Childress, C.J.O.; Sheets, R.A.; Bair, E.S.

    1991-01-01

    At present (1990), about 15 percent of the total water supply for the City of Columbus, Ohio, is provided by ground water withdrawn from the South Well Field in southern Franklin County. Much of the flow of Scioto River at the South Well Field originates from the Jackson Pike Wastewater Treatment Facility (WTF), one of two municipal wastewater-treatment plants operated by the City of Columbus. The Jackson Pike WTF discharges effluent into Scioto River about 6 mi upstream from the South Well Field. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), undertook a study to evaluate the hydrologic consequences of changes in effluent discharge to Scioto River and to clarify the interaction of Scioto River and carbonate bedrock and glacial drift aquifers at the South Well Field. The report describes the hydrology and water quality of the South Well Field area by presenting the results of (1) surface-water-transport simulations of a conservative constituent during low flow of Scioto River from Frank Road to the South Well Field and (2) ground-water-flow simulations of the glacial drift and carbonate bedrock aquifers at the South Well Field. The simulations are examined along with surface-water and ground-water quality to describe the relation between the quantity and quality of flow in the Scioto River; the nature of the ground-water-flow system; and the quantity, quality, and sources of water pumped from the South Well Field. Data collection in the study area in August and September 1987 and 1988 included sampling for surface-water and ground-water quality and measurement of surface-water discharge, Scioto River travel-times, ground-water levels, and vertical riverbed hydraulic conductivity.

  17. 77 FR 14006 - Record of Decision for the Military Housing Privatization Initiative Hurlburt Field and Eglin Air...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-08

    ... Field and Eglin Air Force Base, Florida, Final Environmental Impact Statement ACTION: Notice of... signed the ROD for the Military Housing Privatization Initiative (MPHI) Hurlburt Field and Eglin...

  18. FISH-HABITAT RELATIONSHIPS IN DRAINAGE DITCHES WITHIN A PREDOMINANTLY AGRICULTURAL WATERSHED IN CENTRAL OHIO

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agricultural drainage ditches are a common landscape feature in Ohio, and constitute 25% of stream habitat in Ohio. Management of drainage ditches focuses on removing excess water from agricultural fields without considering the influence of these actions on the biota living within ditches. Informat...

  19. Advancing STEM Learning across the Educational Pipeline: Statewide Efforts in Ohio. Issue Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Youth Policy Forum, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This issue brief is focused on state efforts to improve education in science, technology, engineering, and math--collectively known as the "STEM" disciplines. The brief is largely based on a March, 2009 American Youth Policy Forum (AYPF) field trip to Columbus and Dayton, Ohio, and describes Ohio's success in advancing STEM education across the…

  20. BIOREMEDIATION FIELD EVALUATION - HILL AIR FORCE BASE, UTAH

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 1990, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) established the Bioremediation Field Initiative as part of its overall strategy to increase the use of bioremediation to treat hazardous wastes at Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liabil- ity Act (C...

  1. Factors affecting air sparging remediation systems using field data and numerical simulations.

    PubMed

    Benner, Michael L; Mohtar, Rabi H; Lee, Linda S

    2002-12-01

    Field data from five air sparging sites were used to assess the effect of several soil, contaminant, and air sparging system factors on the removal time and associated costs required to reach specified clean-up criteria. Numerical simulations were also performed to better assess the field data and to expand the data sets beyond the five field sites. Ten factors were selected and evaluated individually over a range of values based on information from practitioners and the literature. Trends in removal time and removal cost to reach a specified clean-up criterion were analyzed to ascertain the conditions controlling contaminant removal with variations in each factors' value. A linear sensitivity equation was used to quantify system dynamics controlling the observed contaminant removal trends for each factor. Factors found most critical across all field sites in terms of removal time and/or cost were contaminant type, sparge pulsing schedule, number of wells, maximum biodecay rate, total soil porosity, and aquifer organic carbon content. Factors showing moderate to low effect included the depth of the sparge point below the water table, air injection rate/pressure, horizontal air conductivity, and anisotropy ratio. At each field site, subsurface coverage of sparged air, sparged air residence time, contaminant equilibrium in the system, contaminant phase distribution, oxygen availability to microbes, and contaminant volatility seem to control the system responses and were affected by one or more of the 10 factors evaluated. PMID:12423944

  2. Regulatory facility guide for Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, S.S.; Bock, R.E.; Francis, M.W.; Gove, R.M.; Johnson, P.E.; Kovac, F.M.; Mynatt, J.O.; Rymer, A.C.

    1994-02-28

    The Regulatory Facility Guide (RFG) has been developed for the DOE and contractor facilities located in the state of Ohio. It provides detailed compilations of international, federal, and state transportation-related regulations applicable to shipments originating at destined to Ohio facilities. This RFG was developed as an additional resource tool for use both by traffic managers who must ensure that transportation operations are in full compliance with all applicable regulatory requirements and by oversight personnel who must verify compliance activities.

  3. Solar energy system performance evaluation: seasonal report for Solaron-Akron, Akron, Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-05-01

    The long-term field performance of the installed system and technical contributions to the definition of techniques and requirements for solar energy system design are reported. The Solar Energy System was designed by Solaron Corporation, Denver, Colorado, to provide an 1840 square foot floor area with space heating and domestic hot water (DHW) for a dual-level single family residence in Akron, Ohio. The Solar Energy System uses air as the heat transport medium, has a 546 square foot flat plate collector array subsystem, a 270 cubic foot rock thermal storage bin subsystem, a domestic hot water preheat tank, pumps, controls and transport lines. The auxiliary space heating subsystem is an air to liquid heat pump coupled with a 1000 gallon water storage tank. Electricity provides auxiliary energy for both space heating and DHW subsystems.

  4. Study of flow fields induced by surface dielectric barrier discharge actuator in low-pressure air

    SciTech Connect

    Che, Xueke E-mail: st@mail.iee.ac.cn; Nie, Wansheng; Tian, Xihui; Hou, Zhiyong; He, Haobo; Zhou, Penghui; Zhou, Siyin; Yang, Chao; Shao, Tao E-mail: st@mail.iee.ac.cn

    2014-04-15

    Surface dielectric barrier discharge (SDBD) is a promising method for a flow control. Flow fields induced by a SDBD actuator driven by the ac voltage in static air at low pressures varying from 1.0 to 27.7 kPa are measured by the particle image velocimetry method. The influence of the applied ac voltage frequency and magnitude on the induced flow fields is studied. The results show that three different classes of flow fields (wall jet flow field, complex flow field, and vortex-shape flow field) can be induced by the SDBD actuator in the low-pressure air. Among them, the wall jet flow field is the same as the tangential jet at atmospheric pressure, which is, together with the vertical jet, the complex flow field. The vortex-shape flow field is composed of one vertical jet which points towards the wall and two opposite tangential jets. The complex and the vortex-shape flow fields can be transformed to the wall jet flow field when the applied ac voltage frequency and magnitude are changed. It is found that the discharge power consumption increases initially, decreases, and then increases again at the same applied ac voltage magnitude when the air pressure decreases. The tangential velocity of the wall jet flow field increases when the air pressure decreases. It is however opposite for the complex flow field. The variation of the applied ac voltage frequency influences differently three different flow fields. When the applied ac voltage magnitude increases at the same applied ac voltage frequency, the maximal jet velocity increases, while the power efficiency increases only initially and then decreases again. The discharge power shows either linear or exponential dependences on the applied ac voltage magnitude.

  5. BIOREMEDIATION FIELD EVALUATION: EIELSON AIR FORCE BASE, ALASKA (EPA/540/R-95/533)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This publication, one of a series presenting the findings of the Bioremediation Field Initiatives bioremediation field evaluations, provides a detailed summary of the evaluation conducted at the Eielson Air Force Base (AFB) Superfund site in Fairbanks, Alaska. At this site, the ...

  6. Influence of atmospheric electric fields on the radio emission from extensive air showers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trinh, T. N. G.; Scholten, O.; Buitink, S.; van den Berg, A. M.; Corstanje, A.; Ebert, U.; Enriquez, J. E.; Falcke, H.; Hörandel, J. R.; Köhn, C.; Nelles, A.; Rachen, J. P.; Rossetto, L.; Rutjes, C.; Schellart, P.; Thoudam, S.; ter Veen, S.; de Vries, K. D.

    2016-01-01

    The atmospheric electric fields in thunderclouds have been shown to significantly modify the intensity and polarization patterns of the radio footprint of cosmic-ray-induced extensive air showers. Simulations indicated a very nonlinear dependence of the signal strength in the frequency window of 30-80 MHz on the magnitude of the atmospheric electric field. In this work we present an explanation of this dependence based on Monte Carlo simulations, supported by arguments based on electron dynamics in air showers and expressed in terms of a simplified model. We show that by extending the frequency window to lower frequencies, additional sensitivity to the atmospheric electric field is obtained.

  7. The temperature fields measurement of air in the car cabin by infrared camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pešek, M.

    2013-04-01

    The article deals with the temperature fields measurement of air using the Jenoptic Variocam infrared camera inside the car Škoda Octavia Combi II. The temperature fields with the use of auxiliary material with a high emissivity value were visualized. The measurements through the viewing window with a high transmissivity value were performed. The viewing windows on the side car door were placed. In the rear car area, the temperature fields of air on the spacious sheet of auxiliary material were visualized which is a suitable method for 2D airstreams. In the front car area, the temperature fields in the air were measured with the use of the measuring net which is suitable for 3D airstreams measuring.

  8. Avian survey and field guide for Osan Air Base, Korea.

    SciTech Connect

    Levenson, J.

    2006-12-05

    This report summarizes the results of the avian surveys conducted at Osan Air Base (AB). This ongoing survey is conducted to comply with requirements of the Environmental Governing Standards (EGS) for the Republic of Korea, the Integrated Natural Resources Management Plan (INRMP) for Osan AB, and the 51st Fighter Wing's Bird Aircraft Strike Hazard (BASH) Plan. One hundred ten bird species representing 35 families were identified and recorded. Seven species are designated as Natural Monuments, and their protection is accorded by the Korean Ministry of Culture and Tourism. Three species appear on the Korean Association for Conservation of Nature's (KACN's) list of Reserved Wild Species and are protected by the Korean Ministry of Environment. Combined, ten different species are Republic of Korea (ROK)-protected. The primary objective of the avian survey at Osan AB was to determine what species of birds are present on the airfield and their respective habitat requirements during the critical seasons of the year. This requirement is specified in Annex J.14.c of the 51st Fighter BASH Plan 91-212 (51 FW OPLAN 91-212). The second objective was to initiate surveys to determine what bird species are present on Osan AB throughout the year and from the survey results, determine if threatened, endangered, or other Korean-listed bird species are present on Osan AB. This overall census satisfies Criterion 13-3.e of the EGS for Korea. The final objective was to formulate management strategies within Osan AB's operational requirements to protect and enhance habitats of known threatened, endangered, and ROK-protected species in accordance with EGS Criterion 13-3.a that are also favorable for the reproduction of indigenous species in accordance with the EGS Criterion 13-3.h.

  9. Avian Field guide and checklist for Kunsan Air Base, Korea.

    SciTech Connect

    Levenson, J. B.; Environmental Assessment

    2005-11-15

    This report summarizes the results of the avian surveys conducted at Kunsan Air Base (AB). This on-going survey is conducted to comply with requirements of the Environmental Governing Standards (EGS) for the Republic of Korea, the Integrated Natural Resources Management Plan (INRMP) for Kunsan AB, and the 8th Fighter Wing's Bird Aircraft Strike Hazard (BASH) Plan. One hundred sixteen bird species representing 34 families were identified and recorded. Seven species are designated as Cultural Property Monuments, and their protection is accorded by the Korean Ministry of Culture and Tourism. Six species appear on the Korean Association for Conservation of Nature's(KACN's) list of Reserved Wild Species and are protected by the Korean Ministry of Environment. Combined, only ten different species are Republic of Korea (ROK)-protected because the Eurasian Spoonbill, Peregrine Falcon, and Eurasian Oystercatcher are listed by both agencies. The primary objective of the avian survey at Kunsan AB was to determine what species of birds are present on the airfield and their respective habitat requirements during the critical seasons of the year. This requirement is specified in Annex C.4.a.(1-4) of the 8th Fighter Wing BASH Plan(8FWOPLAN 91-202). The second objective was to initiate surveys to determine what bird species are present on Kunsan AB throughout the year, and from the survey results determine if threatened, endangered, or other Korean-listed bird species are present on Kunsan AB. This overall census satisfies Criterion 13-3.e of the EGS for Korea. The final objective was to formulate management strategies within Kunsan AB's operational requirements to protect and enhance habitats of known threatened, endangered, and ROK-protected species in accordance with EGS Criterion 13-3.a and also that are favorable for the reproduction of indigenous species in accordance with the EGS Criterion 13-3.h.

  10. Design and construction of cage environments for air ion and electric field research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yost, M. G.; Kellogg, E. W.

    1987-06-01

    This report describes the design and construction of cage environments suitable for chronic exposures of large groups of mice to air ions and electric fields. These environments provide defined and reproducible ion densities, ion flux, DC electric fields, sound levels, air temperature and air quality. When used during a 2 year study, these cage environments served as a durable and reliable continuous exposure system. Three environmental chambers (cubicles) housed a total of 12 cages and provided control of air temperature, air purity and lighting. Exposure cages had grounded metal exterior walls, a plexiglass door and interior walls lined with formica. An internal isolated field plate supplemented with guard wires, energized with ca 1000 VDC, created about a 2 kV/m electric field at the grounded cage floor. Air ions resulted from the beta emission of sealed tritium foils mounted on the field plate. Cages provided high ion (1.3×105 ions/cc), low ion (1.6×103 ions/cc) and field only (ion depleted < 50 ions/cc) conditions for both polarities with similar electric fields in ionized and field only cages. Detailed mapping of the floor level ion flux using 100 cm2 flat probes gave average fluxes of 880 fA cm-2 in high ion cages and 10 fA cm-2 in low ion cages. Whole body currents measured using live anesthethized mice in high ion cages averaged 104±63 pA. Both ion flux and whole body currents remained constant over time, indicating no charge accumulation on body fur or cage wall surfaces in this exposure system.

  11. Field Study of Exhaust Fans for Mitigating Indoor Air Quality Problems & Indoor Air Quality - Exhaust Fan Mitigation.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1987-07-01

    Overall, the findings show that exhaust fans basically provide small amounts of ventilation compensation. By monitoring the common indoor air pollutants (radon, formaldehyde, carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, and water vapor), it was found that the quality of the indoor air was not adversely affected by the use of exhaust fans. Nor did their use provide any measurable or significant benefits since no improvement in air quality was ascertained. While exhaust fans of this small size did not increase radon, which is the contaminant of most concern, the researchers caution that operation of a larger fan or installation in a very tight home could result in higher levels because depressurization is greater. The daily energy consumption for use of these appliances during the heating season was calculated to be 1.5 kilowatt hours or approximately 3% of the energy consumption in the study homes. The information collected in this collaborative field study indicates that the use of these particular ventilation systems has no significant effect on indoor air quality.

  12. POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS AND THEIR DERIVATIVES IN INDOOR AND OUTDOOR AIR IN AND EIGHT-HOME STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A pilot field study was performed in Columbus, Ohio during the winter of 1986/1987. he objectives were to determine the feasibility of the use of a newly developed quiet sampler in indoor air sampling for particles and semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs), and to estimate the r...

  13. MODELING AIR TOXICS AND PM 2.5 CONCENTRATION FIELDS AS A MEANS FOR FACILITATING HUMAN EXPOSURE ASSESSMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The capability of the US EPA Models-3/Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system is extended to provide gridded ambient air quality concentration fields at fine scales. These fields will drive human exposure to air toxics and fine particulate matter (PM2.5) models...

  14. Validation of a prototype DiodeAir for small field dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Underwood, T. S. A.; Thompson, J.; Bird, L.; Scott, A. J. D.; Patmore, P.; Winter, H. C.; Hill, M. A.; Fenwick, J. D.

    2015-04-01

    Standard commercial diode detectors over-respond within small radiation fields, an effect largely attributable to the relatively high mass-density of silicon. However, Monte Carlo studies can be used to optimise dosimeter designs and have demonstrated that ‘mass-density compensation’—for example, introducing a low-density air-gap upstream of a diode’s high-density silicon volume—can substantially improve instrument response. In this work we used egs_chamber Monte Carlo simulations to predict the ideal air-gap thickness for a PTW 60017 unshielded diode detector. We then developed a prototype instrument incorporating that air-gap and, for a 6 MV linac, tested it experimentally against EBT3 film. We also tested a further three prototypes with different air-gap thicknesses. Our results demonstrate that for a 10 × 10 cm2 reference field the DiodeAir, a PTW 60017 diode with a built-in air-gap of 1 mm, has on-axis correction factors near unity. Laterally the DiodeAir performs very well off-axis and reports FWHM and penumbra values consistent with those measured using EBT3. For PDD measurement, the performance of the DiodeAir matches that of the original PTW 60017. The experimental focus of this work was 6 MV but we also simulated the on-axis response of the DiodeAir within 15 MV beams and found that our modification proved robust to this substantial increase in beam energy. However, the original diode 60017 does exhibit low energy scatter dependencies and may over-respond to high linac dose-rates such that applying the mass-density compensation method to an alternative instrument (particularly a diamond detector) could ultimately take us even closer to the small-field ideal.

  15. Validation of a prototype DiodeAir for small field dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Underwood, T S A; Thompson, J; Bird, L; Scott, A J D; Patmore, P; Winter, H C; Hill, M A; Fenwick, J D

    2015-04-01

    Standard commercial diode detectors over-respond within small radiation fields, an effect largely attributable to the relatively high mass-density of silicon. However, Monte Carlo studies can be used to optimise dosimeter designs and have demonstrated that 'mass-density compensation'-for example, introducing a low-density air-gap upstream of a diode's high-density silicon volume-can substantially improve instrument response. In this work we used egs_chamber Monte Carlo simulations to predict the ideal air-gap thickness for a PTW 60017 unshielded diode detector. We then developed a prototype instrument incorporating that air-gap and, for a 6 MV linac, tested it experimentally against EBT3 film. We also tested a further three prototypes with different air-gap thicknesses. Our results demonstrate that for a 10 × 10 cm(2) reference field the DiodeAir, a PTW 60017 diode with a built-in air-gap of 1 mm, has on-axis correction factors near unity. Laterally the DiodeAir performs very well off-axis and reports FWHM and penumbra values consistent with those measured using EBT3. For PDD measurement, the performance of the DiodeAir matches that of the original PTW 60017. The experimental focus of this work was 6 MV but we also simulated the on-axis response of the DiodeAir within 15 MV beams and found that our modification proved robust to this substantial increase in beam energy. However, the original diode 60017 does exhibit low energy scatter dependencies and may over-respond to high linac dose-rates such that applying the mass-density compensation method to an alternative instrument (particularly a diamond detector) could ultimately take us even closer to the small-field ideal. PMID:25789823

  16. Simulation of radio emission from air showers in atmospheric electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Buitink, S.; Huege, T.; Falcke, H; Kuijpers, J.

    2010-02-25

    We study the effect of atmospheric electric fields on the radio pulse emitted by cos- mic ray air showers. Under fair weather conditions the dominant part of the radio emission is driven by the geomagnetic field. When the shower charges are accelerated and deflected in an electric field additional radiation is emitted. We simulate this effect with the Monte Carlo code REAS2, using CORSIKA-simulated showers as input. In both codes a routine has been implemented that treats the effect of the electric field on the shower particles. We find that the radio pulse is significantly altered in background fields of the order of ~100 V/cm and higher. Practically, this means that air showers passing through thunderstorms emit radio pulses that are not a reliable measure for the shower energy. Under other weather circumstances significant electric field effects are expected to occur rarely, but nimbostratus clouds can harbor fields that are large enough. In general, the contribution of the electric field to the radio pulse has polarization properties that are different from the geomagnetic pulse. In order to filter out radio pulses that have been affected by electric field effects, radio air shower experiments should keep weatherinformation and perform full polarization measurements of the radio signal.

  17. Far-field dispersal modeling for fuel-air-explosive devices

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, M.W.

    1990-05-01

    A computer model for simulating the explosive dispersal of a fuel agent in the far-field regime is described and is applied to a wide variety of initial conditions to judge their effect upon the resulting fuel/air cloud. This work was directed toward modeling the dispersal process associated with Fuel-Air-Explosives devices. The far-field dispersal regime is taken to be that time after the initial burster charge detonation in which the shock forces no longer dominate the flow field and initial canister and fuel mass breakup has occurred. The model was applied to a low vapor pressure fuel, a high vapor pressure fuel and a solid fuel. A strong dependence of the final cloud characteristics upon the initial droplet size distribution was demonstrated. The predicted fuel-air clouds were highly non-uniform in concentration. 18 refs., 86 figs., 4 tabs.

  18. Field experiments yield new insights into gas exchange and excess air formation in natural porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klump, Stephan; Tomonaga, Yama; Kienzler, Peter; Kinzelbach, Wolfgang; Baumann, Thomas; Imboden, Dieter M.; Kipfer, Rolf

    2007-03-01

    Gas exchange between seepage water and soil air within the unsaturated and quasi-saturated zones is fundamentally different from gas exchange between water and gas across a free boundary layer, e.g., in lakes or rivers. In addition to the atmospheric equilibrium fraction, most groundwater samples contain an excess of dissolved atmospheric gases which is called "excess air". Excess air in groundwater is not only of crucial importance for the interpretation of gaseous environmental tracer data, but also for other aspects of groundwater hydrology, e.g., for oxygen availability in bio-remediation and in connection with changes in transport dynamics caused by the presence of entrapped air bubbles. Whereas atmospheric solubility equilibrium is controlled mainly by local soil temperature, the excess air component is characterized by the (hydrostatic) pressure acting on entrapped air bubbles within the quasi-saturated zone. Here we present the results of preliminary field experiments in which we investigated gas exchange and excess air formation in natural porous media. The experimental data suggest that the formation of excess air depends significantly on soil properties and on infiltration mechanisms. Excess air was produced by the partial dissolution of entrapped air bubbles during a sprinkling experiment in fine-grained sediments, whereas similar experiments conducted in coarse sand and gravel did not lead to the formation of excess air in the infiltrating water. Furthermore, the experiments revealed that the noble gas temperatures determined from noble gases dissolved in seepage water at different depths are identical to the corresponding in situ soil temperatures. This finding is important for all applications of noble gases as a paleotemperature indicator in groundwater since these applications are always based on the assumption that the noble gas temperature is identical to the (past) soil temperature.

  19. Determination of needed parameters for measuring temperature fields in air by thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pešek, Martin; Pavelek, Milan

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this article is the parameters determination of equipment for measuring temperature fields in air using an infrared camera. This method is based on the visualization of temperature fields in an auxiliary material, which is inserted into the non-isothermal air flow. The accuracy of air temperature measurement (or of surface temperature of supplies) by this method depends especially on (except for parameters of infrared camera) the determination of the static and the dynamic qualities of auxiliary material. The emissivity of support material is the static quality and the dynamic quality is time constant. Support materials with a high emissivity and a low time constant are suitable for the measurement. The high value of emissivity results in a higher measurement sensitivity and the radiation temperature independence. In this article the emissivity of examined kinds of auxiliary materials (papers and textiles) is determined by temperature measuring of heated samples by a calibrated thermocouple and by thermography, with the emissivity setting on the camera to 1 and with the homogeneous radiation temperature. Time constants are determined by a step change of air temperature in the surrounding of auxiliary material. The time constant depends mainly on heat transfer by the convection from the air into the auxiliary material. That is why the effect of air temperature is examined in this article (or a temperature difference towards the environmental temperature) and the flow velocity on the time constant with various types of auxiliary materials. The obtained results allow to define the conditions for using the method of measurement of temperature fields in air during various heating and air conditioning applications.

  20. Air core poloidal magnetic field system for a toroidal plasma producing device

    DOEpatents

    Marcus, Frederick B.

    1978-01-01

    A poloidal magnetics system for a plasma producing device of toroidal configuration is provided that reduces both the total volt-seconds requirement and the magnitude of the field change at the toroidal field coils. The system utilizes an air core transformer wound between the toroidal field (TF) coils and the major axis outside the TF coils. Electric current in the primary windings of this transformer is distributed and the magnetic flux returned by air core windings wrapped outside the toroidal field coils. A shield winding that is closely coupled to the plasma carries a current equal and opposite to the plasma current. This winding provides the shielding function and in addition serves in a fashion similar to a driven conducting shell to provide the equilibrium vertical field for the plasma. The shield winding is in series with a power supply and a decoupling coil located outside the TF coil at the primary winding locations. The present invention requires much less energy than the usual air core transformer and is capable of substantially shielding the toroidal field coils from poloidal field flux.

  1. Field testing soybeans for residual effects of air pollution and seed size on crop yield

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, R.K.; Rose, L.P. Jr.; Leffel, R.C.

    1980-01-01

    Mean seed weights (g/100 seeds) for four soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.), cultivars grown in 1973 and 1974 in cylindrical open-top field chambers that provided carbon-filtered air were significantly greater (17.2) than from plants grown in nonfiltered air in chambers (15.1), or in conventional plots without chambers (15.7). Using this seed, as experiment was designed to answer three questions: (i) does air quality influence seed yields from subsequent plants; (ii) do seed size differences, possibly induced by air pollutants, influence subsequent seed yields; (iii) is there a yield advantage from planting large seed vs an original lot of seed. This experiment was designed as a split-split plot with six replications. The whole plot treatments were the four cultivars; the split-plot treatments consisted of the nine factorial combinations of three seed sizes and three environments. The split-split plot treatment was a comparison between the specified seed size and an original lot of the seed from which the specific seed size was obtained. Six seeds per 30 cm of row were planted and evaluated in a field experiment near Queenstown, Maryland, in 1975. We found no residual air quality effects on subsequent seed yields. Differences in seed size observed for different air qualities did not significantly affect yields. In general, there was no significant yield advantage for plants grown from a selected seed size as compared with the original lot seed.

  2. The Right to Read Effort in Ohio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nemeth, Joseph S., Ed.

    1973-01-01

    The federal Right to Read program is funding five school-based reading programs for the third consecutive year in Ohio. In addition to money, Right to Read provides technical assistance and materials to each site. Ball State University coordinates Ohio's team. Dr. Joseph Nemeth is the federally appointed technical assistant for Ohio's five…

  3. Staying the Course: Racing for Ohio's Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Logan, Debra Kay

    2010-01-01

    With the change in Ohio's Operating Standards in July of 2002, students across Ohio began losing school library learning opportunities. District after district made financially based decisions to minimize, and in a few cases totally eliminate, school library programs. Across the state, many of Ohio's children lost precious learning opportunities.…

  4. Analysis of heat pumps installed in family housing at Hunter Army Air Field

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, S.A.

    1994-08-01

    The US Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) tasked Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in support of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) to conduct a postconstruction evaluation of the air-source heat pumps installed in family housing at Hunter Army Air Field (AAF). The objective of this project was to investigate and resolve concerns about an increase in energy costs at Hunter AAF following the installation of heat pumps in November 1992. After completing several analyses and a field inspection of the heat pumps in family housing at Hunter AAF, the following conclusions were made: the installation of air-source heat pumps reduced the annual energy cost in family housing by $46,672 in 1993; the heat pump thermostat controls in Hunter AAF family housing appear to be incorrectly installed; and the Hunter AAF electric utility bill increased 10% during the first 6 months of 1993 compared to the first 6 months of 1992.

  5. Field evaluation of a horizontal well recirculation system for groundwater treatment: Pilot test at the Clean Test Site Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Piketon, Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Muck, M.T.; Kearl, P.M.; Siegrist, R.L.

    1998-08-01

    This report presents the results of field testing a horizontal well recirculation system at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS). The recirculation system uses a pair of horizontal wells, one for groundwater extraction and treatment and the other for reinjection of treated groundwater, to set up a recirculation flow field. The induced flow field from the injection well to the extraction well establishes a sweeping action for the removal and treatment of groundwater contaminants. The overall purpose of this project is to study treatment of mixed groundwater contaminants that occur in a thin water-bearing zone not easily targeted by traditional vertical wells. The project involves several research elements, including treatment-process evaluation, hydrodynamic flow and transport modeling, pilot testing at an uncontaminated site, and pilot testing at a contaminated site. The results of the pilot test at an uncontaminated site, the Clean Test Site (CTS), are presented in this report.

  6. VERTICAL FLUXES AND EXCHANGE COEFFICIENTS IN THE AIR OVER ST. LOUIS. FIELD PROGRAM 1975

    EPA Science Inventory

    A field program was carried out in the greater metropolitan area of St. Louis, MO during February and July of 1975 as part of the Regional Air Pollution Study (RAPS). The purpose of the program was to collect atmospheric measurements needed for future studies of the planetary bou...

  7. Field Operations and Enforcement Manual for Air Pollution Control. Volume III: Inspection Procedures for Specific Industries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weisburd, Melvin I.

    The Field Operations and Enforcement Manual for Air Pollution Control, Volume III, explains in detail the following: inspection procedures for specific sources, kraft pulp mills, animal rendering, steel mill furnaces, coking operations, petroleum refineries, chemical plants, non-ferrous smelting and refining, foundries, cement plants, aluminum…

  8. Air-propelled abrasive grit for postemergence in-row weed control in field corn

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Organic growers need additional tools for weed control. A new technique involving abrasive grit propelled by compressed air was tested in field plots. Grit derived from corn cobs was directed at seedlings of summer annual weeds growing at the bases of corn plants when the corn was at differing early...

  9. Broadband field-resolved terahertz detection via laser induced air plasma with controlled optical bias.

    PubMed

    Li, Chia-Yeh; Seletskiy, Denis V; Yang, Zhou; Sheik-Bahae, Mansoor

    2015-05-01

    We report a robust method of coherent detection of broadband THz pulses using terahertz induced second-harmonic (TISH) generation in a laser induced air plasma together with a controlled second harmonic optical bias. We discuss a role of the bias field and its phase in the process of coherent detection. Phase-matching considerations subject to plasma dispersion are also examined. PMID:25969238

  10. Ohio Veterans' Children's Home [and] Update: Ohio Veterans' Children's Home.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Legislative Office of Education Oversight, Columbus.

    The education and related services provided by the Ohio Veterans' Children's Home (OVCH) to its 211 residents (ages 6 to 19) were evaluated. Children in the home arrive either by placement through a public agency or by private placement, and the average length of stay is about a year. Approximately half of the children appear to have severe…

  11. OH State Profile. Ohio: Ohio Graduation Tests (OGT)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides information about Ohio Graduation Test, a comprehensive standards-based exam. The purpose of the test is to: (1) Measure the level of reading, writing, mathematics, science, and social studies skill expected at the end of 10th grade; (2) Ensure that students achieve a passing score as a condition of granting a diploma; (3)…

  12. USDA-ARS and The Ohio State University cooperative research: Use of fractional factorial field designs to assess the integration of diverse treatments against FHB

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In previous work, we discovered and patented microbial strains that reduce Fusarium head blight (FHB) of wheat in the greenhouse and field and also demonstrated reduction of FHB via a variety of approaches including the use of UV protectants, fungicide, chemical inducers of systemic acquired disease...

  13. Horticulture. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    This list consists of essential competencies from the following specialized Ohio Competency Analysis Profiles: Floriculutre and Greenhouse Worker; Nursery and Garden Center Worker; and Turf and Landscape Worker. Developed through a modified DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) process involving business, industry, labor, and community agency…

  14. Ohio Engineering Technologies Competency Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Lavonna; Draeger, Meg; Bowermeister, Bob; Wancho, Richard

    This document, which lists engineering technologies competencies as identified by representatives from business and industry as well as secondary and post-secondary educators throughout Ohio, is intended to assist individuals and organizations in developing college tech prep programs that will prepare students from secondary through post-secondary…

  15. Ohio Workplace Education Resource Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northwest ABLE Resource Center, Toledo, OH.

    This manual is designed for adult basic education programs to use as a resource for workplace education (WE). It begins with a section of introductory materials, including a WE definition, scope of work, and survey results. The next section contains a program profile; director/coordinator profile; instructor profiles; Ohio ABLE workplace site…

  16. Ohio's Career Enhancement Pilot Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Legislative Office of Education Oversight, Columbus.

    This report on an evaluation of Ohio state-funded career enhancement pilot programs cover six school districts. Four kinds of programs are covered: (1) career ladder--teachers are promoted through a series of steps based on different levels of competence and responsibility; (2) career option--teachers take on and are compensated for defined…

  17. Ohio Construction Technologies Competency Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Lavonna; Bowermeister, Bob

    This document, which lists construction technologies competencies as identified by representatives from government agencies and labor organizations as well as secondary and postsecondary educators throughout Ohio, is intended to assist individuals and organizations in developing both college tech prep programs and apprenticeship training/education…

  18. Welding. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    This Ohio Competency Analysis Profile (OCAP), derived from a modified Developing a Curriculum (DACUM) process, is a comprehensive and verified employer competency list for a welding program. It contains units (with or without subunits), competencies, and competency builders that identify the occupational, academic, and employability skills needed…

  19. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile. Index.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    This index contains the unit titles from all 60 Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile (OCAP) lists. It is intended to facilitate the combination of units from different OCAPs in order to develop curricula that meet specific program needs (e.g., learner differences, labor market demands, and technological developments). OCAP titles are as follows:…

  20. Masonry. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    Developed through a modified DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) process involving business, industry, labor, and community agency representatives in Ohio, this document is a comprehensive and verified employer competency profile for masonry occupations. The list contains units (with and without subunits), competencies, and competency builders that…

  1. Ohio Special Education Profile, 2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio Coalition for the Education of Children with Disabilities, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This report provides a brief, but substantive, profile of the special needs student population in Ohio, including academic performance and graduation trends and an overview of special education funding and related policy issues. The report's central message is that investments in students with special educational needs produce substantial results…

  2. Cosmetology. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    This comprehensive and verified employer competency list was developed from a modified DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) process involving business, industry, labor, and community agency representatives from Ohio. This competency list contains 17 units (with or without subunits), competencies, and competency builders that identify the occupational,…

  3. Accounting. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    Developed through a modified DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) process involving business, industry, labor, and community agency representatives in Ohio, this document is a comprehensive and verified employer competency profile for accounting occupations. The list contains units (with and without subunits), competencies, and competency builders that…

  4. Entrepreneurship. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    Developed through a modified DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) process involving business, industry, labor, and community agency representatives in Ohio, this document is a comprehensive and verified employer competency profile for entrepreneurship. The list contains units (with and without subunits), competencies, and competency builders that…

  5. Postretirement Medical Coverage in Ohio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adelman, Saul W.; Cross, Mark L.

    2007-01-01

    The Ohio State Teacher Retirement System (STRS) provides retirement, survivor, and disability benefits to public school (K-12) teachers, college and university professors employed by state institutions, and the spouses and eligible dependents of these employees. In doing so, it operates much like other state retirement systems. The money to…

  6. Numerical analysis of air-flow and temperature field in a passenger car compartment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamar, Haslinda Mohamed; Kamsah, Nazri; Mohammad Nor, Ahmad Miski

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents a numerical study on the temperature field inside a passenger's compartment of a Proton Wira saloon car using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) method. The main goal is to investigate the effects of different glazing types applied onto the front and rear windscreens of the car on the distribution of air-temperature inside the passenger compartment in the steady-state conditions. The air-flow condition in the passenger's compartment is also investigated. Fluent CFD software was used to develop a three-dimensional symmetrical model of the passenger's compartment. Simplified representations of the driver and one rear passenger were incorporated into the CFD model of the passenger's compartment. Two types of glazing were considered namely clear insulated laminated tint (CIL) with a shading coefficient of 0.78 and green insulated laminate tint (GIL) with a shading coefficient of 0.5. Results of the CFD analysis were compared with those obtained when the windscreens are made up of clear glass having a shading coefficient of 0.86. Results of the CFD analysis show that for a given glazing material, the temperature of the air around the driver is slightly lower than the air around the rear passenger. Also, the use of GIL glazing material on both the front and rear windscreens significantly reduces the air temperature inside the passenger's compartment of the car. This contributes to a better thermal comfort condition to the occupants. Swirling air flow condition occurs in the passenger compartment. The air-flow intensity and velocity are higher along the side wall of the passenger's compartment compared to that along the middle section of the compartment. It was also found that the use of glazing materials on both the front and rear windscreen has no significant effects on the air-flow condition inside the passenger's compartment of the car.

  7. Influence of a Static Magnetic Field on Laser Induced Tungsten Plasma in Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ding; Liu, Ping; Sun, Liying; Hai, Ran; Ding, Hongbin

    2016-04-01

    In this work, laser induced tungsten plasma has been investigated in the absence and presence of 0.6 T static transverse magnetic field at atmospheric pressure in air. The spectroscopic characterization of laser induced tungsten plasma was experimentally studied using space-resolved emission spectroscopy. The atomic emission lines of tungsten showed a significant enhancement in the presence of a magnetic field, while the ionic emission lines of tungsten presented little change. Temporal variation of the optical emission lines of tungsten indicated that the atomic emission time in the presence of a magnetic field was longer than that in the absence of a magnetic field, while no significant changes occurred for the ionic emission time. The spatial resolution of optical emission lines of tungsten demonstrated that the spatial distribution of atoms and ions were separated. The influence of a magnetic field on the spatial distribution of atoms was remarkable, whereas the spatial distribution of ions was little influenced by the magnetic field. The different behaviors between ions and atoms with and without magnetic field in air were related to the various atomic processes especially the electrons and ions recombination process during the plasma expansion and cooling process.

  8. Creating power, technology and products: the role of coal gasification in Ohio's economy and energy future

    SciTech Connect

    2007-12-15

    The study examines how coal gasification (CG) combined with Carbon Capture and Sequestration (CCS) technology could play a role in Ohio's economy and energy future - particularly in Northeast Ohio, a major center of manufacturing in the U.S. This working paper focuses primarily on opportunities for gasification projects to augment Ohio's economy. It examines economic activity factors related to coal gasification and how the location of a number of key support industries in Ohio could provide the state with a competitive advantage in this area. The study focuses on a polygeneration facility that would supply electricity and some other products as an example of the type of gasification facility that could, if a sufficient number of similar facilities were located in the area, serve as the stimulus for a new or expanded industry cluster. Although not further discussed in this paper, any Ohio gasification facility would be in close proximity to oil and gas fields that can serve as sites for sequestering the carbon dioxide separated out from the coal-gasification process. The potential economic impact of locating a polygeneration gasifier in Northeast Ohio is large. A significant portion of the inputs required for one $1.1+ billion facility can be supplied either within northeastern Ohio or from elsewhere in the state. Operation of the facility is estimated to increase annual statewide personal income by $39 million and Ohio output by $161 million. The Northeast Ohio region will account for 98 percent of the operational benefits. The report suggests several possible steps to convert this research to an action plan to build support for, and interest in, a coal-gasification industry cluster in Northeast Ohio. Outreach should focus on engaging industry leaders, foundations, and state and regional economic development leaders. 16 tabs., 3 apps.

  9. Porous media experience applicable to field evaluation for compressed air energy storage

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, R.D.; Gutknecht, P.J.

    1980-06-01

    A survey is presented of porous media field experience that may aid in the development of a compressed air energy storage field demonstration. Work done at PNL and experience of other groups and related industries is reviewed. An overall view of porous media experience in the underground storage of fluids is presented. CAES experience consists of site evaluation and selection processes used by groups in California, Kansas, and Indiana. Reservoir design and field evaluation of example sites are reported. The studies raised questions about compatibility with depleted oil and gas reservoirs, storage space rights, and compressed air regulations. Related experience embraces technologies of natural gas, thermal energy, and geothermal and hydrogen storage. Natural gas storage technology lends the most toward compressed air storage development, keeping in mind the respective differences between stored fluids, physical conditions, and cycling frequencies. Both fluids are injected under pressure into an aquifer to form a storage bubble confined between a suitable caprock structure and partially displaced ground water. State-of-the-art information is summarized as the necessary foundation material for field planning. Preliminary design criteria are given as recommendations for basic reservoir characteristics. These include geometric dimensions and storage matrix properties such as permeability. Suggested ranges are given for injection air temperature and reservoir pressure. The second step in developmental research is numerical modeling. Results have aided preliminary design by analyzing injection effects upon reservoir pressure, temperature and humidity profiles. Results are reported from laboratory experiments on candidate sandstones and caprocks. Conclusions are drawn, but further verification must be done in the field.

  10. 33 CFR 334.845 - Wisconsin Air National Guard, Volk Field military exercise area located in Lake Michigan offshore...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Wisconsin Air National Guard, Volk Field military exercise area located in Lake Michigan offshore from Manitowoc and Sheboygan... Air National Guard, Volk Field military exercise area located in Lake Michigan offshore from...

  11. 33 CFR 334.845 - Wisconsin Air National Guard, Volk Field military exercise area located in Lake Michigan offshore...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Wisconsin Air National Guard, Volk Field military exercise area located in Lake Michigan offshore from Manitowoc and Sheboygan... Air National Guard, Volk Field military exercise area located in Lake Michigan offshore from...

  12. 33 CFR 334.845 - Wisconsin Air National Guard, Volk Field military exercise area located in Lake Michigan offshore...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Wisconsin Air National Guard, Volk Field military exercise area located in Lake Michigan offshore from Manitowoc and Sheboygan... Air National Guard, Volk Field military exercise area located in Lake Michigan offshore from...

  13. 33 CFR 334.845 - Wisconsin Air National Guard, Volk Field military exercise area located in Lake Michigan offshore...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Wisconsin Air National Guard, Volk Field military exercise area located in Lake Michigan offshore from Manitowoc and Sheboygan... Air National Guard, Volk Field military exercise area located in Lake Michigan offshore from...

  14. The inception of pulsed discharges in air: simulations in background fields above and below breakdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Anbang; Teunissen, Jannis; Ebert, Ute

    2014-11-01

    We investigate discharge inception in air, in uniform background electric fields above and below the breakdown threshold. We perform 3D particle simulations that include a natural level of background ionization in the form of positive and \\text{O}2- ions. In background fields below breakdown, we use a strongly ionized seed of electrons and positive ions to enhance the field locally. In the region of enhanced field, we observe the growth of positive streamers, as in previous simulations with 2D plasma fluid models. The inclusion of background ionization has little effect in this case. When the background field is above the breakdown threshold, the situation is very different. Electrons can then detach from \\text{O}2- and start ionization avalanches in the whole volume. These avalanches together create one extended discharge, in contrast to the ‘double-headed’ streamers found in many fluid simulations.

  15. Evaluation of the Emission, Transport, and Deposition of Mercury, Fine Particulate Matter, and Arsenic from Coal-Based Power Plants in the Ohio River Valley Region

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin Crist

    2006-04-02

    As stated in the proposal: Ohio University, in collaboration with CONSOL Energy, Advanced Technology Systems, Inc (ATS) and Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. (AER) as subcontractors, is evaluating the impact of emissions from coal-fired power plants in the Ohio River Valley region as they relate to the transport and deposition of mercury, arsenic, and associated fine particulate matter. This evaluation will involve two interrelated areas of effort: ambient air monitoring and regional-scale modeling analysis. The scope of work for the ambient air monitoring will include the deployment of a surface air monitoring (SAM) station in southeastern Ohio. The SAM station will contain sampling equipment to collect and measure mercury (including speciated forms of mercury and wet and dry deposited mercury), arsenic, particulate matter (PM) mass, PM composition, and gaseous criteria pollutants (CO, NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2}, O{sub 3}, etc.). Laboratory analysis of time-integrated samples will be used to obtain chemical speciation of ambient PM composition and mercury in precipitation. Near-real-time measurements will be used to measure the ambient concentrations of PM mass and all gaseous species including Hg0 and RGM. Approximately 18 months of field data will be collected at the SAM site to validate the proposed regional model simulations for episodic and seasonal model runs. The ambient air quality data will also provide mercury, arsenic, and fine particulate matter data that can be used by Ohio Valley industries to assess performance on multi-pollutant control systems. The scope of work for the modeling analysis will include (1) development of updated inventories of mercury and arsenic emissions from coal plants and other important sources in the modeled domain; (2) adapting an existing 3-D atmospheric chemical transport model to incorporate recent advancements in the understanding of mercury transformations in the atmosphere; (3) analyses of the flux of Hg{sup 0

  16. Evaluation of the Emission, Transport, and Deposition of Mercury, Fine Particulate Matter, and Arsenic from Coal-Based Power Plants in the Ohio River Valley Region

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin Crist

    2005-10-02

    Ohio University, in collaboration with CONSOL Energy, Advanced Technology Systems, Inc (ATS) and Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. (AER) as subcontractors, is evaluating the impact of emissions from coal-fired power plants in the Ohio River Valley region as they relate to the transport and deposition of mercury, arsenic, and associated fine particulate matter. This evaluation will involve two interrelated areas of effort: ambient air monitoring and regional-scale modeling analysis. The scope of work for the ambient air monitoring will include the deployment of a surface air monitoring (SAM) station in southeastern Ohio. The SAM station will contain sampling equipment to collect and measure mercury (including speciated forms of mercury and wet and dry deposited mercury), arsenic, particulate matter (PM) mass, PM composition, and gaseous criteria pollutants (CO, NOx, SO{sub 2}, O{sub 3}, etc.). Laboratory analysis of time-integrated samples will be used to obtain chemical speciation of ambient PM composition and mercury in precipitation. Near-real-time measurements will be used to measure the ambient concentrations of PM mass and all gaseous species including Hg{sup 0} and RGM. Approximately of 18 months of field data will be collected at the SAM site to validate the proposed regional model simulations for episodic and seasonal model runs. The ambient air quality data will also provide mercury, arsenic, and fine particulate matter data that can be used by Ohio Valley industries to assess performance on multi-pollutant control systems. The scope of work for the modeling analysis will include (1) development of updated inventories of mercury and arsenic emissions from coal plants and other important sources in the modeled domain; (2) adapting an existing 3-D atmospheric chemical transport model to incorporate recent advancements in the understanding of mercury transformations in the atmosphere; (3) analyses of the flux of Hg0, RGM, arsenic, and fine

  17. EVALUATION OF THE EMISSION, TRANSPORT, AND DEPOSITION OF MERCURY, FINE PARTICULATE MATTER, AND ARSENIC FROM COAL-BASED POWER PLANTS IN THE OHIO RIVER VALLEY REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin Crist

    2004-04-02

    Ohio University, in collaboration with CONSOL Energy, Advanced Technology Systems, Inc. (ATS) and Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. (AER) as subcontractors, is evaluating the impact of emissions from coal-fired power plants in the Ohio River Valley region as they relate to the transport and deposition of mercury, arsenic, and associated fine particulate matter. This evaluation will involve two interrelated areas of effort: ambient air monitoring and regional-scale modeling analysis. The scope of work for the ambient air monitoring will include the deployment of a surface air monitoring (SAM) station in southeastern Ohio. The SAM station will contain sampling equipment to collect and measure mercury (including speciated forms of mercury and wet and dry deposited mercury), arsenic, particulate matter (PM) mass, PM composition, and gaseous criteria pollutants (CO, NOx, SO{sub 2}, O{sub 3}, etc.). Laboratory analysis of time-integrated samples will be used to obtain chemical speciation of ambient PM composition and mercury in precipitation. Near-real-time measurements will be used to measure the ambient concentrations of PM mass and all gaseous species including Hg{sup 0} and RGM. Approximately 18 months of field data will be collected at the SAM site to validate the proposed regional model simulations for episodic and seasonal model runs. The ambient air quality data will also provide mercury, arsenic, and fine particulate matter data that can be used by Ohio Valley industries to assess performance on multi-pollutant control systems. The scope of work for the modeling analysis will include (1) development of updated inventories of mercury and arsenic emissions from coal-fired power plants and other important sources in the modeled domain; (2) adapting an existing 3-D atmospheric chemical transport model to incorporate recent advancements in the understanding of mercury transformations in the atmosphere; (3) analyses of the flux of Hg{sup 0}, RGM, arsenic

  18. EVALUATION OF THE EMISSION, TRANSPORT, AND DEPOSITION OF MERCURY, FINE PARTICULATE MATTER, AND ARSENIC FROM COAL-BASED POWER PLANTS IN THE OHIO RIVER VALLEY REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin Crist

    2004-10-02

    Ohio University, in collaboration with CONSOL Energy, Advanced Technology Systems, Inc (ATS) and Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. (AER) as subcontractors, is evaluating the impact of emissions from coal-fired power plants in the Ohio River Valley region as they relate to the transport and deposition of mercury, arsenic, and associated fine particulate matter. This evaluation will involve two interrelated areas of effort: ambient air monitoring and regional-scale modeling analysis. The scope of work for the ambient air monitoring will include the deployment of a surface air monitoring (SAM) station in southeastern Ohio. The SAM station will contain sampling equipment to collect and measure mercury (including speciated forms of mercury and wet and dry deposited mercury), arsenic, particulate matter (PM) mass, PM composition, and gaseous criteria pollutants (CO, NOx, SO{sub 2}, O{sub 3}, etc.). Laboratory analysis of time-integrated samples will be used to obtain chemical speciation of ambient PM composition and mercury in precipitation. Near-real-time measurements will be used to measure the ambient concentrations of PM mass and all gaseous species including Hg{sup 0} and RGM. Approximately of 18 months of field data will be collected at the SAM site to validate the proposed regional model simulations for episodic and seasonal model runs. The ambient air quality data will also provide mercury, arsenic, and fine particulate matter data that can be used by Ohio Valley industries to assess performance on multi-pollutant control systems. The scope of work for the modeling analysis will include (1) development of updated inventories of mercury and arsenic emissions from coal plants and other important sources in the modeled domain; (2) adapting an existing 3-D atmospheric chemical transport model to incorporate recent advancements in the understanding of mercury transformations in the atmosphere; (3) analyses of the flux of Hg{sup 0}, RGM, arsenic, and fine

  19. EVALUATION OF THE EMISSION, TRANSPORT, AND DEPOSITION OF MERCURY, FINE PARTICULATE MATTER, AND ARSENIC FROM COAL-BASED POWER PLANTS IN THE OHIO RIVER VALLEY REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin Crist

    2005-04-02

    Ohio University, in collaboration with CONSOL Energy, Advanced Technology Systems, Inc (ATS) and Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. (AER) as subcontractors, is evaluating the impact of emissions from coal-fired power plants in the Ohio River Valley region as they relate to the transport and deposition of mercury, arsenic, and associated fine particulate matter. This evaluation will involve two interrelated areas of effort: ambient air monitoring and regional-scale modeling analysis. The scope of work for the ambient air monitoring will include the deployment of a surface air monitoring (SAM) station in southeastern Ohio. The SAM station will contain sampling equipment to collect and measure mercury (including speciated forms of mercury and wet and dry deposited mercury), arsenic, particulate matter (PM) mass, PM composition, and gaseous criteria pollutants (CO, NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2}, O{sub 3}, etc.). Laboratory analysis of time-integrated samples will be used to obtain chemical speciation of ambient PM composition and mercury in precipitation. Near-real-time measurements will be used to measure the ambient concentrations of PM mass and all gaseous species including Hg{sup 0} and RGM. Approximately of 18 months of field data will be collected at the SAM site to validate the proposed regional model simulations for episodic and seasonal model runs. The ambient air quality data will also provide mercury, arsenic, and fine particulate matter data that can be used by Ohio Valley industries to assess performance on multi-pollutant control systems. The scope of work for the modeling analysis will include (1) development of updated inventories of mercury and arsenic emissions from coal plants and other important sources in the modeled domain; (2) adapting an existing 3-D atmospheric chemical transport model to incorporate recent advancements in the understanding of mercury transformations in the atmosphere; (3) analyses of the flux of Hg{sup 0}, RGM, arsenic, and

  20. Evaluation of the Emission, Transport, and Deposition of Mercury and Fine Particulate Matter from Coal-Based Power Plants in the Ohio River Valley Region

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin Crist

    2008-12-31

    As stated in the proposal: Ohio University, in collaboration with CONSOL Energy, Advanced Technology Systems, Inc (ATS) and Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. (AER) as subcontractors, evaluated the impact of emissions from coal-fired power plants in the Ohio River Valley region as they relate to the transport and deposition of mercury and associated fine particulate matter. This evaluation involved two interrelated areas of effort: ambient air monitoring and regional-scale modeling analysis. The scope of work for the ambient air monitoring included the deployment of a surface air monitoring (SAM) station in southeastern Ohio. The SAM station contains sampling equipment to collect and measure mercury (including speciated forms of mercury and wet and dry deposited mercury), particulate matter (PM) mass, PM composition, and gaseous criteria pollutants (CO, NOx, SO2, O3, etc.). Laboratory analyses of time-integrated samples were used to obtain chemical speciation of ambient PM composition and mercury in precipitation. Nearreal- time measurements were used to measure the ambient concentrations of PM mass and all gaseous species including Hg0 and RGM. Approximately 30 months of field data were collected at the SAM site to validate the proposed regional model simulations for episodic and seasonal model runs. The ambient air quality data provides mercury, and fine particulate matter data that can be used by Ohio Valley industries to assess performance on multi-pollutant control systems. The scope of work for the modeling analysis includes (1) development of updated inventories of mercury emissions from coal plants and other important sources in the modeled domain; (2) adapting an existing 3-D atmospheric chemical transport model to incorporate recent advancements in the understanding of mercury transformations in the atmosphere; (3) analyses of the flux of Hg0, RGM, and fine particulate matter in the different sectors of the study region to identify key transport

  1. EVALUATION OF THE EMISSION, TRANSPORT, AND DEPOSITION OF MERCURY, FINE PARTICULATE MATTER, AND ARSENIC FROM COAL-BASED POWER PLANTS IN THE OHIO RIVER VALLEY REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin Crist

    2003-10-02

    Ohio University, in collaboration with CONSOL Energy, Advanced Technology Systems, Inc (ATS) and Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. (AER) as subcontractors, is evaluating the impact of emissions from coal-fired power plants in the Ohio River Valley region as they relate to the transport and deposition of mercury, arsenic, and associated fine particulate matter. This evaluation will involve two interrelated areas of effort: ambient air monitoring and regional-scale modeling analysis. The scope of work for the ambient air monitoring will include the deployment of a surface air monitoring (SAM) station in southeastern Ohio. The SAM station will contain sampling equipment to collect and measure mercury (including speciated forms of mercury and wet and dry deposited mercury), arsenic, particulate matter (PM) mass, PM composition, and gaseous criteria pollutants (CO, NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2}, O{sub 3}, etc.). Laboratory analysis of time-integrated samples will be used to obtain chemical speciation of ambient PM composition and mercury in precipitation. Near-real-time measurements will be used to measure the ambient concentrations of PM mass and all gaseous species including Hg{sup 0} and RGM. Approximately of 18 months of field data will be collected at the SAM site to validate the proposed regional model simulations for episodic and seasonal model runs. The ambient air quality data will also provide mercury, arsenic, and fine particulate matter data that can be used by Ohio Valley industries to assess performance on multi-pollutant control systems. The scope of work for the modeling analysis will include (1) development of updated inventories of mercury and arsenic emissions from coal plants and other important sources in the modeled domain; (2) adapting an existing 3-D atmospheric chemical transport model to incorporate recent advancements in the understanding of mercury transformations in the atmosphere; (3) analyses of the flux of Hg{sup 0}, RGM, arsenic, and

  2. Assessment of common soybean-infecting viruses in Ohio, USA, through multisite sampling and high-throughput sequencing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To assess the scope of virus disease problems of soybean in Ohio, USA, a survey was conducted during 2011 and 2012 soybean growing seasons. A total of 259 samples were collected from 80 soybean fields distributed in 42 Ohio counties, accounting for more than 90% of major soybean-growing counties in ...

  3. Losing Ohio's Future: Why College Graduates Flee the Buckeye State and What Might Be Done about It

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas B. Fordham Institute, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Thomas B. Fordham Institute became interested in Ohio's human-talent issues via its work to improve public education. Fordham wanted answers to two related questions: what would it take to excite, attract, and retain more top college students to work in Ohio, and what else would it take to draw them into the field of education? To seek…

  4. Geology and hydrogeology of Naval Air Station Chase Field and Naval Auxiliary Landing Field Goliad, Bee and Goliad counties, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Snyder, G.L.

    1995-01-01

    Large vertical hydraulic-head gradients are present between the unconfined Evangeline aquifer and confined Fleming aquifers at Naval Air Station Chase Field and Naval Auxiliary Landing Field Goliad. These gradients, together with the results of the aquifer test at Naval Air Station Chase Field and assumed characteristics of the confining units, indicate that downward flow of ground water probably occurs from the water-table aquifer to the underlying aquifers. The rate of downward flow between the two confined Fleming aquifers (from A-sand to B-sand) can be approximated using an estimate of vertical hydraulic conductivity of the intervening confining unit obtained from assumed storage characteristics and data from the aquifer test. Under the relatively high vertical hydraulic-head gradient induced by the aquifer test, ground-water movement from the A-sand aquifer to the B-sand aquifer could require about 490 years; and about 730 years under the natural gradient. Future increases in ground-water withdrawals from the B-sand aquifer might increase downward flow in the aquifer system of the study area.

  5. Elemental composition and size distribution of particulates in Cleveland, Ohio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leibecki, H. F.; King, R. B.; Fordyce, J. S.; Neustadter, H. E.

    1975-01-01

    Measurements have been made of the elemental particle size distribution at five contrasting urban environments with different source-type distributions in Cleveland, Ohio. Air quality conditions ranged from normal to air pollution alert levels. A parallel network of high-volume cascade impactors (5-stage) were used for simultaneous sampling on glass fiber surfaces for mass determinations and on Whatman-41 surfaces for elemental analysis by neutron activation for 25 elements. The elemental data are assessed in terms of distribution functions and interrelationships and are compared between locations as a function of resultant wind direction in an attempt to relate the findings to sources.

  6. Elemental composition and size distribution of particulates in Cleveland, Ohio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, R. B.; Fordyce, J. S.; Neustadter, H. E.; Leibecki, H. F.

    1975-01-01

    Measurements were made of the elemental particle size distribution at five contrasting urban environments with different source-type distributions in Cleveland, Ohio. Air quality conditions ranged from normal to air pollution alert levels. A parallel network of high-volume cascade impactors (5-state) were used for simultaneous sampling on glass fiber surfaces for mass determinations and on Whatman-41 surfaces for elemental analysis by neutron activation for 25 elements. The elemental data are assessed in terms of distribution functions and interrelationships and are compared between locations as a function of resultant wind direction in an attempt to relate the findings to sources.

  7. Laboratory validation and field verification of a new passive air monitoring badge for sampling ethylene oxide in air.

    PubMed

    Kring, E V; Damrell, D J; Basilio, A N; McGibney, P D; Douglas, J J; Henry, T J; Ansul, G R

    1984-10-01

    A new diffusion colorimetric air monitoring badge for sampling ethylene oxide is described. The Du Pont Pro-Tek C-70 badge has been laboratory validated over the range of 4-375 ppm-hours (0.5-47 ppm on an 8-hour TWA) using standard spectrophotometer readout in 1 centimeter (10 mm) cells. The lower range can be extended to 2 ppm-hours (0.25 ppm) by using 4 cm (40 mm) cells. The badge has an overall sampling and analytical method accuracy of +/- 13.5%. It meets NIOSH accuracy criteria and has a mean coefficient of variation CVT = 0.059. The badge has no temperature, pressure, relative humidity or face velocity effects over practical ranges. The response time is adequate to sample peak concentrations over short time periods. The badge may be used to determine ambient formaldehyde levels if suspected to be present along with ethylene oxide. Badges are shown to agree very well with the industry accepted and proposed ASTM pump/charcoal tube method in three extensive plant field tests. Badges were more precise than the charcoal tube/pump method in all field tests conducted. PMID:6496316

  8. Using Field-Metered Data to Quantify Annual Energy Use of Portable Air Conditioners

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, Thomas; Willem, Henry; Ni, Chun Chun; Stratton, Hannah; Chen, Yuting; Ganeshalingam, Mohan; Iyer, Maithili; Price, Sarah; Dunham, Camilla

    2014-12-01

    As many regions of the United States experience rising temperatures, consumers have come to rely increasingly on cooling appliances (including portable air conditioners) to provide a comfortable indoor temperature. Home occupants sometimes use a portable air conditioner (PAC) to maintain a desired indoor temperature in a single room or enclosed space. Although PACs in residential use are few compared to centrally installed and room air conditioning (AC) units, the past few years have witnessed an increase of PACs use throughout the United States. There is, however, little information and few research projects focused on the energy consumption and performance of PACs, particularly studies that collect information from field applications of PACs. The operation and energy consumption of PACs may differ among geographic locations and households, because of variations in cooling load, frequency, duration of use, and other user-selected settings. In addition, the performance of building envelope (thermal mass and air leakage) as well as inter-zonal mixing within the building would substantially influence the ability to control and maintain desirable indoor thermal conditions. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) conducted an initial field-metering study aimed at increasing the knowledge and data related to PAC operation and energy consumption in the United States.

  9. Air Quality in Megacities: Lessons Learned from Mexico City Field Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molina, L. T.

    2014-12-01

    More than half of the world's population now lives in urban areas because of the opportunities for better jobs, access to city services, cultural and educational activities, and a desire for more stimulating human interaction. At the same time, many of these urban centers are expanding rapidly, giving rise to the phenomenon of megacities. In recent decades air pollution has become not only one of the most important environmental problems of megacities, but also presents serious consequences to human health and ecosystems and economic costs to society. Although the progress to date in combating air pollution problems in developed and some developing world megacities has been impressive, many challenges remain including the need to improve air quality while simultaneously mitigating climate change. This talk will present the results and the lessons learned from field measurements conducted in Mexico City Metropolitan Area - one of the world's largest megacities - over the past decade. While each city has its own unique circumstances, the need for an integrated assessment approach in addressing complex environmental problems is the same. There is no single strategy in solving air pollution problems in megacities; a mix of policy measures based on sound scientific findings will be necessary to improve air quality, protect public health, and mitigate climate change.

  10. Observation of the avalanche of runaway electrons in air in a strong electric field.

    PubMed

    Gurevich, A V; Mesyats, G A; Zybin, K P; Yalandin, M I; Reutova, A G; Shpak, V G; Shunailov, S A

    2012-08-24

    The generation of an avalanche of runaway electrons is demonstrated for the first time in a laboratory experiment. Two flows of runaway electrons are formed sequentially in an extended air discharge gap at the stage of delay of a pulsed breakdown. The first, picosecond, runaway electron flow is emitted in the cathode region where the field is enhanced. Being accelerated in the gap, this beam generates electrons due to impact ionization. These secondary electrons form a delayed avalanche of runaway electrons if the field is strong enough. The properties of the avalanche correspond to the existing notions about the runaway breakdown in air. The measured current of the avalanche exceeds up to an order the current of the initiating electron beam. PMID:23002751

  11. Observation of the Avalanche of Runaway Electrons in Air in a Strong Electric Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurevich, A. V.; Mesyats, G. A.; Zybin, K. P.; Yalandin, M. I.; Reutova, A. G.; Shpak, V. G.; Shunailov, S. A.

    2012-08-01

    The generation of an avalanche of runaway electrons is demonstrated for the first time in a laboratory experiment. Two flows of runaway electrons are formed sequentially in an extended air discharge gap at the stage of delay of a pulsed breakdown. The first, picosecond, runaway electron flow is emitted in the cathode region where the field is enhanced. Being accelerated in the gap, this beam generates electrons due to impact ionization. These secondary electrons form a delayed avalanche of runaway electrons if the field is strong enough. The properties of the avalanche correspond to the existing notions about the runaway breakdown in air. The measured current of the avalanche exceeds up to an order the current of the initiating electron beam.

  12. Health assessment for Middletown Air Field, Middletown, Pennsylvania, Region 3. CERCLIS No. PAD980538763. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-04-01

    The Middletown Air Field is located southeast of Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. Past waste disposal activities at the Middletown Air Field have resulted in contamination of the groundwater aquifer with trichloroethylene (TCE), tetrachloroethylene (PCE), and other volatile organic chemicals (VOCs). Since 1983, the selective pumping of wells and periodic monitoring of water from the wells and distribution system have maintained VOC concentrations in finished water below acceptable health-based values. It is not possible to assess potential health effects that may have resulted from exposure to VOCs in potable water prior to 1983 because of the lack of data. Additional studies are needed to determine whether there is any human exposure to contamination sources from private potable wells or through other routes of exposure.

  13. Numerical Simulations of Blast Loads from Near-Field Ground Explosions in Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrociński, Stanisław; Flis, Leszek

    2015-12-01

    Numerical simulations of air blast loading in the near-field acting on the ground have been performed. A simplified blast model based on empirical blast loading data representing spherical and hemispherical explosive shapes has been simulated. Conwep is an implementation of the empirical blast models presented by Kingery and Bulmash, which is also implemented in the commercial code LS-DYNA based on work done by Rahnders-Pehrson and Bannister. This makes it possible to simulate blast loads acting on structures representing spherical and hemispherical explosive shapes of TNT with reasonable computational effort as an alternative to the SPH and Eulerian model. The CPU time for the simplified blast model is however considerably shorter and may still be useful in time consuming concept studies. Reasonable numerical results using reasonable model sizes can be achieved not only for modelling near-field explosions in air but most areas of geotechnical. Calculation was compared with blast SPH and Eulerian model.

  14. 75 FR 65572 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Ohio Ambient Air Quality...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-26

    ... and Budget under Executive Order 12866 (58 FR 51735, October 4, 1993); Does not impose an information...); Does not have Federalism implications as specified in Executive Order 13132 (64 FR 43255, August 10... Executive Order 13045 (62 FR 19885, April 23, 1997); Is not a significant regulatory action subject...

  15. Small field in-air output factors: The role of miniphantom design and dosimeter type

    SciTech Connect

    Warrener, Kirbie; Hug, Benjamin; Ebert, Martin A.; Liu, Paul; McKenzie, David R.; Ralston, Anna; Suchowerska, Natalka

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: The commissioning of treatment planning systems and beam modeling requires measured input parameters. The measurement of relative output in-air, S{sub c} is particularly difficult for small fields. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of miniphantom design and detector selection on measured S{sub c} values for small fields and to validate the measurements against Monte Carlo simulations. Methods: Measurements were performed using brass caps (with sidewalls) or tops (no sidewalls) of varying heights and widths. The performance of two unshielded diodes (60012 and SFD), EBT2 radiochromic film, and a fiber optic dosimeter (FOD) were compared for fields defined by MLCs (5–100 mm) and SRS cones (4–30 mm) on a Varian Novalis linear accelerator. Monte Carlo simulations were performed to theoretically predict S{sub c} as measured by the FOD. Results: For all detectors, S{sub c} agreed to within 1% for fields larger than 10 mm and to within 2.3% for smaller fields. Monte Carlo simulation matched the FOD measurements for all size of cone defined fields to within 0.5%. Conclusions: Miniphantom design is the most important variable for reproducible and accurate measurements of the in-air output ratio, S{sub c}, in small photon fields (less than 30 mm). Sidewalls are not required for fields ≤ 30 mm and tops are therefore preferred over the larger caps. Unlike output measurements in water, S{sub cp,} the selection of detector type for S{sub c} is not critical, provided the active dosimeter volume is small relative to the field size.

  16. Hydrogen-bonded semiconducting pigments for air-stable field-effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Głowacki, Eric Daniel; Irimia-Vladu, Mihai; Kaltenbrunner, Martin; Gsiorowski, Jacek; White, Matthew S; Monkowius, Uwe; Romanazzi, Giuseppe; Suranna, Gian Paolo; Mastrorilli, Piero; Sekitani, Tsuyoshi; Bauer, Siegfried; Someya, Takao; Torsi, Luisa; Sariciftci, Niyazi Serdar

    2013-03-20

    Extensive intramolecular π-conjugation is considered to be requisite in the design of organic semiconductors. Here, two inkjet pigments, epindolidione and quinacridone, that break this design rule are explored. These molecules afford intermolecular π-stacking reinforced by hydrogen-bonding bridges. Air-stable organic field effect transistors are reported that support mobilities up to 1.5 cm(2)/Vs with T80 lifetimes comparable with the most stable reported organic semiconducting materials. PMID:23239229

  17. Probing Atmospheric Electric Fields through Radio Emission from Cosmic-Ray-Induced Air Showers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholten, Olaf; Trinh, Gia; Buitink, Stijn; Corstanje, Arthur; Ebert, Ute; Enriquez, Emilio; Falcke, Heino; Hoerandel, Joerg; Nelles, Anna; Schellart, Pim; Rachen, Joerg; Rutjes, Casper; ter Veen, Sander; Rossetto, Laura; Thoudam, Satyendra

    2016-04-01

    Energetic cosmic rays impinging on the atmosphere create a particle avalanche called an extensive air shower. In the leading plasma of this shower electric currents are induced that generate coherent radio wave emission that has been detected with LOFAR, a large and dense array of simple radio antennas primarily developed for radio-astronomy observations. Our measurements are performed in the 30-80 MHz frequency band. For fair weather conditions the observations are in excellent agreement with model calculations. However, for air showers measured under thunderstorm conditions we observe large differences in the intensity and polarization patterns from the predictions of fair weather models. We will show that the linear as well as the circular polarization of the radio waves carry clear information on the magnitude and orientation of the electric fields at different heights in the thunderstorm clouds. We will show that from the measured data at LOFAR the thunderstorm electric fields can be reconstructed. We thus have established the measurement of radio emission from extensive air showers induced by cosmic rays as a new tool to probe the atmospheric electric fields present in thunderclouds in a non-intrusive way. In part this presentation is based on the work: P. Schellart et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 165001 (2015).

  18. Intensive probing of a clear air convective field by radar and instrumental drone aircraft.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowland, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    An instrumented drone aircraft was used in conjunction with ultrasensitive radar to study the development of a convective field in the clear air. Radar data are presented which show an initial constant growth rate in the height of the convective field of 3.8 m/min, followed by a short period marked by condensation and rapid growth at a rate in excess of 6.1 m/min. Drone aircraft soundings show general features of a convective field including progressive lifting of the inversion at the top of the convection and a cooling of the air at the top of the field. Calculations of vertical heat flux as a function of time and altitude during the early stages of convection show a linear decrease in heat flux with altitude to near the top of the convective field and a negative heat flux at the top. Evidence is presented which supports previous observations that convective cells overshoot their neutral buoyancy level into a region where they are cool and moist compared to their surroundings. Furthermore, only that portion of the convective cell that has overshot its neutral buoyancy level is generally visible to the radar.

  19. Ohio Space Grant Funds for Scholarship/Fellowship Students

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The Ohio Aerospace Institute (OAT), a consortium of university, industry, and government, was formed to promote collaborative aerospace-related research, graduate education, and technology transfer among the nine Ohio universities with doctoral level engineering programs, NASA Lewis Research Center, Air Force Wright Laboratory, and industry. OAT provides enhanced opportunities for affiliates to utilize federal government research laboratories and facilities at Lewis Research Center (LeRC) and Wright Laboratory. As a component of the graduate education and research programs, students and faculty from the member universities, LeRC engineers and scientists, and visiting investigators from industry, government and non-member universities conduct collaborative research projects using the unique facilities at LeRC, and will participate in collaborative education programs. Faculty from the member universities who hold collateral appointments at OAT, and government and industry experts serving as adjunct faculty, can participate in the supervision of student research.

  20. The Passy-2015 field experiment: wintertime atmospheric dynamics and air quality in a narrow alpine valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paci, Alexandre; Staquet, Chantal

    2016-04-01

    Wintertime anticyclonic conditions lead to the formation of persistent stable boundary layers which may induce severe air pollution episodes in urban or industrialized area, particularly in mountain regions. The Arve river valley in the Northern Alps is very sensitive to this phenomenon, in particular close to the city of Passy (Haute-Savoie), 20 km down valley past Chamonix. This place is indeed one of the worst place in France regarding air quality, the concentration of fine particles and Benzo(a)pyrene (a carcinogenic organic compound) regularly exceeding the EU legal admissible level during winter. Besides air quality measurements, such as the ones presently carried in the area by the local air quality agency Air Rhône-Alpes or in the DECOMBIO project led by LGGE, it is crucial to improve our knowledge of the atmospheric boundary layer dynamics and processes at the valley scale under these persistent stable conditions in order to improve our understanding on how it drives pollutant dispersion. These issues motivated the Passy-2015 field experiment which took place during the winter 2014-2015. A relatively large set-up of instruments was deployed on a main measurement site in the valley center and on four other satellite sites. It includes several remote sensing instruments, a surface flux station, a 10 m instrumented tower, a large aperture scintillometer, a fog monitoring station among others. Most of the instruments were present from early January to the end of February. During two intensive observation periods, 6-14 February and 17-20 February, the instrumental set-up was completed on the main site with high frequency radio-soundings (up to one per 1h30), a tethered balloon, a remote controlled drone quadcopter and a sodar. The field campaign, the instruments, the meteorological situations observed and preliminary results will be presented. This field experiment is part of the Passy project funded by ADEME through the French national programme LEFE/INSU and

  1. An argon ICP-based continuous emissions monitor for hazardous air pollutant metals: Field evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Seltzer, M.D.; Mayer, G.A.

    1997-12-31

    A fully-operational, argon ICP-based continuous emissions monitor (CEM) for hazardous air pollutant (HAP) metals has recently been demonstrated. The CEM has undergone extensive field evaluation in conjunction with a variety of combustor configurations including coal-fired power plants, waste incinerators, and ordnance deactivation furnaces. The CEM has been successfully demonstrated to provide both speed and sensitivity for simultaneous, multielement detection of HAP metals while exhibiting considerable tolerance for both particulate and moisture loading in sample air streams. The CEM employs a state-of-the-art argon inductively coupled plasma spectrometer as an elemental analyzer. Stack air, continuously extracted under strictly isokinetic conditions, is transported to the CEM through heated sample lines. A sampling interface of novel design permits extraction of air at the high, often variable flow rates required for isokinetic sampling while at the same time, provides aliquots of sample air to the plasma spectrometer at the relatively low but constant analytical flow rates that are appropriate for plasma injection. The CEM is automated to high degree and can operate unattended for several hours at a time. CEM calibration is accomplished using precision-generated metal aerosols. Provision is made for correction of spectral interferences from concomitant metals and molecular species in stack gases. The prototype instrumentation described here is presently considered to be the leading candidate for multimetals CEM application. While specifically designed and implemented to monitor metal emissions from military furnaces used for ordnance deactivation, the CEM has exhibited versatility that makes it well-suited for numerous compliance and process control applications. Results of field testing under various conditions and relative accuracy assessments will be presented.

  2. Alcohol fuel from Ohio farms

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    Brief descriptions of on-farm ethanol production methods including feedstock preparation, cooking, fermentation, and distillation are presented. Safety conditions are described. Investment in on-farm ethanol production facilities and their potential returns are addressed. The market for ethanol and ethanol blends as well as for by-products is encouraging. Legal aspects for permitting and environmental regulations both for Ohio and federal agencies are discussed. (DMC)

  3. Impact of air traffic emissions on airport air quality. Multi-scale modeling, test bed and field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramaroson, R.; Vuillot, F.; Durand, Y.; Courbet, B.; Janin, F.; Copalle, A.; Guin, C.; Paux, E.; Vannier, F.; Talbaut, M.; Weill, M.

    2004-12-01

    Air traffic emissions are playing a significant role in airport air quality. Engine emissions contribute to the ozone and PM formation. There is an emergence of a need to develop advanced numerical tools and airport emission databases for air pollution studies. Field monitoring at airports necessary to support model assessment is still limited in time and space. The French ONERA AIRPUR project has focused on three objectives: emission inventories; dispersion models; field measurements. Results are presented and discussed in this paper. The ground spatial distribution of LTO emissions using realistic aircraft trajectories, aircraft-engine classification by ICAO, fuel flow methodology and diurnal variations of fleet number, is presented and discussed. Exhaust species time evolution is simulated using a chemical-dispersion model. Results show high emissions of NOx during LTO, and a maximum of CO and Hydrocarbons during taxi. Depending on seasons, the NOx lifetime is varying differently; lower concentration is calculated far away from LTO emissions. Longer-lived pollutants such as ozone are formed downstream and require the use of advanced dispersion models. For this reason, two interactive models coupling the micro and the regional scales are developed and used in this work. A 3D CFD model (CEDRE) simulates the flow characteristics around buildings and the dispersion of emissions. CEDRE boundary conditions are provided by the 3D nested dispersion model MEDIUM/MM5, which includes a surface boundary layer chemistry and calculates the concentration of pollutants from the local to the airport vicinities. The CFD results show a tracer accumulation calculated downstream beside terminals, consistent with observations at some mega-airports. Sensibility studies are conducted to highlight the impact of emissions on ozone formation with MEDIUM. Results show that longer-lived species are produced downstream, their concentration depending on NOx, aromatics and VOC released by

  4. Effect of a uniform electric field on soot in laminar premixed ethylene/air flames

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y.; Yao, Q.; Nathan, G.J.; Alwahabi, Z.T.; King, K.D.; Ho, K.

    2010-07-15

    The effect of a nominally uniform electric field on the initially uniform distribution of soot has been assessed for laminar premixed ethylene/air flames from a McKenna burner. An electrophoretic influence on charged soot particles was measured through changes to the deposition rate of soot on the McKenna plug, using laser extinction (LE). Soot volume fraction was measured in situ using laser-induced incandescence (LII). Particle size and morphologies were assessed through ex situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) using thermophoretic sampling particle diagnostics (TSPD). The results show that the majority of these soot particles are positively charged. The presence of a negatively charged plug was found to decrease the particle residence times in the flame and to influence the formation and oxidation progress. A positively charged plug has the opposite effect. The effect on soot volume fraction, particles size and morphology with electric field strength is also reported. Flame stability was also found to be affected by the presence of the electric field, with the balance of the electrophoretic force and drag force controlling the transition to unstable flame flicker. The presence of charged species generated by the flame was found to reduce the dielectric field strength to one seventh that of air. (author)

  5. [Negative air ions generated by plants upon pulsed electric field stimulation applied to soil].

    PubMed

    Wu, Ren-ye; Deng, Chuan-yuan; Yang, Zhi-jian; Weng, Hai-yong; Zhu, Tie-jun-rong; Zheng, Jin-gui

    2015-02-01

    This paper investigated the capacity of plants (Schlumbergera truncata, Aloe vera var. chinensis, Chlorophytum comosum, Schlumbergera bridgesii, Gymnocalycium mihanovichii var. friedrichii, Aspidistra elatior, Cymbidium kanran, Echinocactus grusonii, Agave americana var. marginata, Asparagus setaceus) to generate negative air ions (NAI) under pulsed electric field stimulation. The results showed that single plant generated low amounts of NAI in natural condition. The capacity of C. comosum and G. mihanovichii var. friedrichii generated most NAI among the above ten species, with a daily average of 43 ion · cm(-3). The least one was A. americana var. marginata with the value of 19 ion · cm(-3). When proper pulsed electric field stimulation was applied to soil, the NAI of ten plant species were greatly improved. The effect of pulsed electric field u3 (average voltage over the pulse period was 2.0 x 10(4) V, pulse frequency was 1 Hz, and pulse duration was 50 ms) was the greatest. The mean NAI concentration of C. kanran was the highest 1454967 ion · cm(-3), which was 48498.9 times as much as that in natural condition. The lowest one was S. truncata with the value of 34567 ion · cm(-3), which was 843.1 times as much as that in natural condition. The capacity of the same plants to generate negative air ion varied extremely under different intensity pulsed electric fields. PMID:26094455

  6. History Untold: Celebrating Ohio History Through ABLE Students. Ohio History Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kent State Univ., OH. Ohio Literacy Resource Center.

    This document is a compilation of 33 pieces of writing presenting Ohio adult basic and literacy education (ABLE) students' perspectives of community and personal history. The items included in the compilation were written by ABLE students across Ohio in celebration of Ohio History Day. The compilation is organized in five sections as follows: (1)…

  7. Air compressor battery duration with mechanical ventilation in a field anesthesia machine.

    PubMed

    Szpisjak, Dale F; Giberman, Anthony A

    2015-05-01

    Compressed air to power field anesthesia machine ventilators may be supplied by air compressor with battery backup. This study determined the battery duration when the compPAC ventilator's air compressor was powered by NiCd battery to ventilate the Vent Aid Training Test Lung modeling high (HC = 0.100 L/cm H2O) and low (LC = 0.020 L/cm H2O) pulmonary compliance. Target tidal volumes (VT) were 500, 750, and 1,000 mL. Respiratory rate = 10 bpm, inspiratory-to-expiratory time ratio = 1:2, and fresh gas flow = 1 L/min air. N = 5 in each group. Control limits were determined from the first 150 minutes of battery power for each run and lower control limit = mean VT - 3SD. Battery depletion occurred when VT was below the lower control limit. Battery duration ranged from 185.8 (±3.2) minutes in the LC-1000 group to 233.3 (±3.6) minutes in the HC-750 group. Battery duration of the LC-1000 group was less than all others (p = 0.027). The differences among the non-LC-1000 groups were not clinically significant. PMID:25939102

  8. TECNAIRE winter field campaign: turbulent characteristics and their influence on air quality conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagüe, Carlos; Román Cascón, Carlos; Maqueda, Gregorio; Sastre, Mariano; Arrillaga, Jon A.; Artíñano, Begoña; Diaz-Ramiro, Elías; Gómez-Moreno, Francisco J.; Borge, Rafael; Narros, Adolfo; Pérez, Javier

    2016-04-01

    An urban field campaign was conducted at an air pollution hot spot in Madrid city (Spain) during winter 2015 (from 16th February to 2nd March). The zone selected for the study is a square (Plaza Fernández Ladreda) located in the southern part of the city. This area is an important intersection of several principal routes, and therefore a significant impact in the air quality of the area is found due to the high traffic density. Meteorological data (wind speed and direction, air temperature, relative humidity, pressure, precipitation and global solar radiation) were daily recorded as well as micrometeorological measurements obtained from two sonic anemometers. To characterize this urban atmospheric boundary layer (uABL), micrometeorological parameters (turbulent kinetic energy -TKE-, friction velocity -u∗- and sensible heat flux -H-) are calculated, considering 5-minute average for variance and covariance evaluations. Furthermore, synoptic atmospheric features were analyzed. As a whole, a predominant influence of high pressure systems was found over the Atlantic Ocean and western Spain, affecting Madrid, but during a couple of days (17th and 21st February) some atmospheric instability played a role. The influence of the synoptic situation and specially the evolution of the micrometeorological conditions along the day on air quality characteristics (Particulate Matter concentrations: PM10, PM2.5 and PM1, and NOx concentrations) are analyzed and shown in detail. This work has been financed by Madrid Regional Research Plan through TECNAIRE (P2013/MAE-2972).

  9. Geothermal investigations in Ohio and Pennsylvania

    SciTech Connect

    Eckstein, Y.; Heimlich, R.A.; Palmer, D.F.; Shannon, S.S. Jr.

    1982-04-01

    New values of heat flow were determined for the Appalachian Plateau in eastern Ohio and northwestern Pennsylvania. Corrected values for wells in Washington and Summit Counties, Ohio, are 1.36 and 1.37 heat-flow units (HFU), respectively. Those of 1.84 and 2.00 HFU define a previously unknown heat-flow high in Venango and Clarion counties, Pennsylvania. Thermal conductivity was measured for core samples from 12 wells in Ohio and 6 wells in Pennsylvania. Heat production was determined for 34 core and outcrop samples from Ohio, Pennsylvania, and New Jersey.

  10. Laser electric field measurement in open-air dielectric barrier discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Tsuyohito; Kanazawa, Tatsuya; Hamaguchi, Satoshi

    2011-10-01

    Electric field induced coherent Raman scattering (E-CRS) measurement is a promising technique for measuring electric field in high-pressure environments. In this study, the discharge initiation mechanism of nanosecond dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs) in open air has been examined with time dependent measurement of the discharge electric field by E-CRS. Two pulsed ns laser beams (532 nm and 607 nm) are employed. In the presence of nitrogen molecules the two laser beams together with the electric field induce a coherent IR signal at a wavelength of 4.29 μm and the normal coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) signal at 473 nm. The ratio of these two signals (IR and CARS) is a function of the electric field strength, so that the magnitude of the electric field can be estimated. Our experimental observations have revealed that, in the pre-breakdown phase of a nanosecond DBD discharge, the externally applied fast-rising electric field is strongly enhanced near the cathode due to large accumulation of space charge, which then strongly enhances ionization near the cathode. This process is essentially different from the well-known Townsend mechanism for slower discharges.

  11. Near-field dispersal modeling for liquid fuel-air explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, D.R.

    1990-07-01

    The near-field, explosive dispersal of a liquid into air has been explored using a combination of analytical and numerical models. The near-field flow regime is transient, existing only as long as the explosive forces produced by the detonation of the burster charge dominate or are approximately equal in magnitude to the aerodynamic drag forces on the liquid. The near-field model provides reasonable initial conditions for the far-field model, which is described in a separate report. The near-field model consists of the CTH hydrodynamics code and a film instability model. In particular, the CTH hydrodynamics code is used to provide initial temperature, pressure, and velocity fields, and bulk material distribution for the far-field model. The film instability model is a linear stability model for a radially expanding fluid film, and is used to provide a lower bound on the breakup time and an upper and lower bound on the initial average drop diameter for the liquid following breakup. Predictions of the liquid breakup time and the initial arithmetic average drop diameter from the model compare favorably with the sparse experimental data. 26 refs., 20 figs., 8 tabs.

  12. Analysis of the sensitivity of soils to the leaching of agricultural pesticides in Ohio

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schalk, C.W.

    1998-01-01

    Pesticides have not been found frequently in the ground waters of Ohio even though large amounts of agricultural pesticides are applied to fields in Ohio every year. State regulators, including representatives from Ohio Environmental Protection Agency and Departments of Agriculture, Health, and Natural Resources, are striving to limit the presence of pesticides in ground water at a minimum. A proposed pesticide management plan for the State aims at protecting Ohio's ground water by assessing pesticide-leaching potential using geographic information system (GIS) technology and invoking a monitoring plan that targets aquifers deemed most likely to be vulnerable to pesticide leaching. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with Ohio Department of Agriculture, assessed the sensitivity of mapped soil units in Ohio to pesticide leaching. A soils data base (STATSGO) compiled by U.S. Department of Agriculture was used iteratively to estimate soil units as being of high to low sensitivity on the basis of soil permeability, clay content, and organic-matter content. Although this analysis did not target aquifers directly, the results can be used as a first estimate of areas most likely to be subject to pesticide contamination from normal agricultural practices. High-sensitivity soil units were found in lakefront areas and former lakefront beach ridges, buried valleys in several river basins, and parts of central and south- central Ohio. Medium-high-sensitivity soil units were found in other river basins, along Lake Erie in north-central Ohio, and in many of the upland areas of the Muskingum River Basin. Low-sensitivity map units dominated the northwestern quadrant of Ohio.

  13. Ohio History: A Professional Development Manual. Using State History To Prepare Students for Ohio's 4th Grade Citizenship Proficiency Test. 3rd Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franks, Betty Barclay; Taylor, Nancy

    This booklet contains 12 lessons about the history of Ohio correlated to the proficiency outcomes of the "Grade 4 Proficiency Test Outcomes in Ohio." Lessons include: (1) "Emigrating to Ohio"; (2) "The Era of Expansion"; (3) "Finding Out about Ohio"; (4) "Emigrating to Ohio"; (5) "Settling in Ohio"; (6) "Settlements Along the Ohio River"; (7) "The…

  14. Electric Field Effects on an Injected Air Bubble at Detachment in a Low Gravity Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iacona, Estelle; Herman, Cila; Chang, Shinan

    2002-01-01

    The objective of the study is to investigate the behavior of individual air bubbles injected through an orifice into an electrically insulating liquid under the influence of a static and uniform electric field. Bubble formation and detachment were visualized and recorded in microgravity using a high-speed video camera. Bubble volume, dimensions and contact angle at detachment were measured. In addition to the experimental studies, a simple model, predicting bubble characteristics at detachment was developed. The model, based on thermodynamic considerations, accounts for the level of gravity as well as the magnitude of the uniform electric field. Measured data and model predictions show good agreement, and indicate that the level of gravity and the electric field magnitude significantly affect bubble shape, volume and dimensions.

  15. Intensive probing of clear air convective fields by radar and instrumented drone aircraft.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowland, J. R.

    1972-01-01

    Clear air convective fields were probed in three summer experiments (1969, 1970, and 1971) on an S-band monopulse tracking radar at Wallops Island, Virginia, and a drone aircraft with a takeoff weight of 5.2 kg, wingspan of 2.5 m, and cruising glide speed of 10.3 m/sec. The drone was flown 23.2 km north of the radar and carried temperature, pressure/altitude, humidity, and vertical and airspeed velocity sensors. Extensive time-space convective field data were obtained by taking a large number of RHI and PPI pictures at short intervals of time. The rapidly changing overall convective field data obtained from the radar could be related to the meteorological information telemetered from the drone at a reasonably low cost by this combined technique.

  16. Large Field of View PIV Measurements of Air Entrainment by SLS SMAT Water Sound Suppression System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stegmeir, Matthew; Pothos, Stamatios; Bissell, Dan

    2015-11-01

    Water-based sound suppressions systems have been used to reduce the acoustic impact of space vehicle launches. Water flows at a high rate during launch in order to suppress Engine Generated Acoustics and other potentially damaging sources of noise. For the Space Shuttle, peak flow rates exceeded 900,000 gallons per minute. Such large water flow rates have the potential to induce substantial entrainment of the surrounding air, affecting the launch conditions and generating airflow around the launch vehicle. Validation testing is necessary to quantify this impact for future space launch systems. In this study, PIV measurements were performed to map the flow field above the SMAT sub-scale launch vehicle scaled launch stand. Air entrainment effects generated by a water-based sound suppression system were studied. Mean and fluctuating fluid velocities were mapped up to 1m above the test stand deck and compared to simulation results. Measurements performed with NASA MSFC.

  17. Quantitative Determination of the Breakdown Field of Air from Van de Graaff Generator Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beach, John; Chartrand, Bridget; Gallagher, Hugh

    2016-03-01

    The Van de Graaff generator (VG) is ubiquitous in electrostatic demonstrations because of the large static charge and dramatic sparks produced. We have developed a novel technique for determining the breakdown field of air using the VG. When a spark occurs, the force of attraction between the VG and a discharge sphere suspended above it is measured by a Pasco force sensor. At this time the charge is not symmetric but pulled towards the near side of the spheres by mutual attraction. In order to interpret the measured force in terms of the breakdown field, an accurate model of the charge distribution is needed. Using the method of images for a spherical conductor in an iterative fashion we can provide this model. The electric field in the vicinity of the spheres is then calculated from the charge distribution and its maximum value is the breakdown field. In preliminary work, we determined the breakdown field to be 3.1x106 N/C at 24.9 C and 18% relative humidity. We will report our most recent determination of the breakdown field using this method and discuss the validity of the results in terms of accepted values, experimental limitations and sensitivity to the charge distribution model.

  18. Sub-nanosecond dynamics of atmospheric air discharge under highly inhomogeneous and transient electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tardiveau, Pierre; Magne, Lionel; Pasquiers, Stephane; Jeanney, Pascal; Bournonville, Blandine

    2015-09-01

    The effects of the application of extreme overvoltages (>500%) in air gaps over less than a few nanoseconds bring us to reconsider the classical physics of streamer used to describe air discharges at atmospheric pressure. Non equilibrium discharges created by extremely transient and intense electric fields in standard conditions of pressure and temperature exhibit unusual diffuse and large structure. In point-to-plane electrode configurations, a plasma cloud is observed which properties depend on voltage pulses features (amplitude, rise time, length, and frequency) and electrodes properties (material, shape, and gap length). Our parametric experimental study is based on fast electrical characterization and sub-nanosecond imaging and shows the different stages of propagation of the cloud. This work details the conditions to maximize the cloud size without moving towards a multi-channel streamer regime. Based on the analysis and the Abel transform processing of the emission of excited states of nitrogen from the discharge, a focus is made on the structuration of the plasma cloud while it is propagating. It shows how much, according to the experimental conditions, the external electric field can be screened by the plasma and, inversely, how deep and how long a high electric field can be sustained in the gap, that is challenging for pulsed atmospheric plasmas applications. This work benefits from the financial support of the National Agency of Research within the framework of the project ANR-13-BS09-0014.

  19. Numerical simulation of cantilevered ramp injector flow fields for hypervelocity fuel/air mixing enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumacher, Jurgen Christian

    Increasing demand for affordable access to space and high speed terrestrial transport has spawned research interest into various air-breathing hypersonic propulsion systems. Propulsion concepts such as the supersonic combustion ramjet (scramjet) and the shock-induced combustion ramjet (shcramjet) utilize oxygen freely available in the atmosphere and thereby substantially reduce the weight penalty of on-board oxidizer tankage used in rocket based systems. Of key importance to the ultimate success of an air-breathing concept is the ability to efficiently mix the fuel with atmospheric air. In the case of a hypersonic air-breather the challenge is accentuated due to the requirement of supersonic combustion. Flow velocities through the combustor on the order of thousands of meters per second provide the fuel and air with only a brief time to adequately combine. Contemporary mixing augmentation methods to address this issue have focused on fuel injection devices which promote axial vortices to enhance the mixing process. Much research effort has been expended on investigation of ramp injectors for this purpose. The present study introduces a new ramp injector design, based on the conventional ramp injector, dubbed the cantilevered ramp injector. A two-pronged numerical approach was employed to investigate the mixing performance and characteristics of the cantilevered injector consisting of, (1) comparison with conventional designs and (2) a parametric study of various cantilevered injector geometries. A laminar, three-dimensional, multispecies flowsolver was developed in generalized coordinates to solve the Navier-Stokes equations for the flow fields of injected H2 into high-enthalpy air. The scheme consists of an upwind TVD scheme for discretization of the convective fluxes coupled with a semi-implicit LU-SGS scheme for temporal discretization. Through analysis of the numerical solutions, it has been shown that the cantilevered ramp injector is a viable fuel injection

  20. Field estimates of polyurethane foam - air partition coefficients for hexachlorobenzene, alpha-hexachlorocyclohexane and bromoanisoles.

    PubMed

    Bidleman, Terry F; Nygren, Olle; Tysklind, Mats

    2016-09-01

    Partition coefficients of gaseous semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) between polyurethane foam (PUF) and air (KPA) are needed in the estimation of sampling rates for PUF disk passive air samplers. We determined KPA in field experiments by conducting long-term (24-48 h) air sampling to saturate PUF traps and shorter runs (2-4 h) to measure air concentrations. Sampling events were done at daily mean temperatures ranging from 1.9 to 17.5 °C. Target compounds were hexachlorobenzene (HCB), alpha-hexachlorocyclohexane (α-HCH), 2,4-dibromoanisole (2,4-DiBA) and 2,4,6-tribromoanisole (2,4,6-TriBA). KPA (mL g(-1)) was calculated from quantities on the PUF traps at saturation (ng g(-1)) divided by air concentrations (ng mL(-1)). Enthalpies of PUF-to-air transfer (ΔHPA, kJ mol(-1)) were determined from the slopes of log KPA/mL g(-1) versus 1/T(K) for HCB and the bromoanisoles, KPA of α-HCH was measured only at 14.3 to 17.5 °C and ΔHPA was not determined. Experimental log KPA/mL g(-1) at 15 °C were HCB = 7.37; α-HCH = 8.08; 2,4-DiBA = 7.26 and 2,4,6-TriBA = 7.26. Experimental log KPA/mL g(-1) were compared with predictions based on an octanol-air partition coefficient (log KOA) model (Shoeib and Harner, 2002a) and a polyparameter linear free relationship (pp-LFER) model (Kamprad and Goss, 2007) using different sets of solute parameters. Predicted KP values varied by factors of 3 to over 30, depending on the compound and the model. Such discrepancies provide incentive for experimental measurements of KPA for other SVOCs. PMID:27285381

  1. Field Results from Application of the Outdoor-Air/Economizer Diagnostician for Commissioning and O&M

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, Robert G.; Katipamula, Srinivas; Brambley, Michael R.; Blanc, Steven L.

    2000-05-31

    This paper presents results of field testing an automated diagnostician for outdoor-air-supply and economizer systems that can be used for commissioning purposes. The fundamental capabilities of the tool are described and key results of its application on six air handlers in a large hotel building are discussed. Ancillary issues pertinent to the development and application of such tools are also presented.

  2. DIRECT TRACE ANALYSIS OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN AIR USING ION TRAP MASS SPECTROMETERS WITH FILTERED NOISE FIELDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two ion trap mass spectrometers and direct air sampling interfaces are being evaluated in the laboratory for monitoring toxic air pollutants in real time. he mass spectrometers are the large, laboratory-based Finnigan MAT ion trap (ITMS) and the compact, field-deployable Teledyne...

  3. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 91-257-2184, Ohio Civil Rights Commission, 200 Goodall Complex, Cincinnati, Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Echt, A.; Wilcox, T.G.; Crandall, M.S.; Martinez, K.F.

    1992-03-01

    In response to an employer request, an investigation was undertaken of poor indoor air quality at the Ohio Civil Rights Commission (SIC-9441), Cincinnati, Ohio. The Commission occupied three floors of an office building which was newly renovated in 1985. Complaints began following water leaks from condensate pans in the air handling units on third floor east and third floor west beginning in August of 1990. Carbon-dioxide (124389) concentrations, temperature and relative humidity were measured during the study at six different locations inside the building. Carbon-dioxide levels rose from a mean of 366 parts per million (ppm) in the morning to a mean of 638ppm in the afternoon. Temperatures ranged from 69.9 to 75.3 degrees-F. Relative humidity ranged from 51.5 to 75.5%. Over half the employees had experienced symptoms such as nasal congestion, headaches, or eye irritation while in the building. The filters for the outside air supply fit poorly and allowed dust from the outside to go around the filters, permitting entrance of organic material into the air handling system. Significant moisture blowby of the cooling coils was also noted. According to the authors, there was no clear evidence that the employees' respiratory symptoms were caused by contaminants in the building; however, the presence of thermophilic actinomycetes within the building raises concern. The authors recommend specific measures to help reduce complaints related to the indoor climate of the building.

  4. An Autosampler and Field Sample Carrier for Maximizing Throughput Using an Open-Air, Surface Sampling Ion Source for MS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A recently developed, commercially available, open-air, surface sampling ion source for mass spectrometers provides individual analyses in several seconds. To realize its full throughput potential, an autosampler and field sample carrier were designed and built. The autosampler ...

  5. Comparison of the macroscopic properties of field-accelerated electrons in dry air and in pure oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, G.; Bonnet, J.; Pigache, D.

    1980-06-01

    The numerical solution of the Boltzmann equation for an ionized gas yields the macroscopic properties of electrons accelerated by an electric field in dry air and in pure oxygen. For the purpose of ozone generation, the stronger the field, the better the efficiency of oxygen dissociation. In air, the oxygen dissociation is found to be much less easy than that at the same amount of pure oxygen.

  6. Current Environmental Efforts in Ohio School Districts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Timothy Alan

    In an effort to better describe the environmental education needs of the secondary schools in the State of Ohio, this thesis sought to determine whether or not Ohio high schools were incorporating environmental education into their curricula. Educators from 100 randomly selected high schools were administered questionnaires in 1982-83, and again…

  7. 21 CFR 808.85 - Ohio.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ohio. 808.85 Section 808.85 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EXEMPTIONS FROM FEDERAL PREEMPTION OF STATE AND LOCAL MEDICAL DEVICE REQUIREMENTS Listing of Specific State and Local Exemptions § 808.85 Ohio. (a)...

  8. Ohio Schools and Privatization: Opportunity or Risk?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, William

    Food service, transportation and building cleaning and maintenance are big business and are seen as candidates for privatization. In Ohio, a 30-item questionnaire was developed for the state's school district superintendents. Results were generated from the 143 questionnaires that were returned (70 percent response rate). Findings show that Ohio's…

  9. Ohio Library Development and Interlibrary Cooperation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flaherty, Kevin

    Background information is provided to give an overall picture of the status of Ohio's libraries. The demographic, economic, and governmental characteristics of Ohio are discussed, and the financial and organizational structure of the state's libraries are examined in detail. Interlibrary cooperation and the role of state and federal governments…

  10. 77 FR 8185 - Ohio Regulatory Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-14

    ... approval of the Ohio program in the August 16, 1982, Federal Register (41 FR 34688). You can also find... April 30, 2007, Federal Register (72 FR 21176). The submission was a result of the adoption of Ohio... House Bill 443 in the April 30, 2007, Federal Register (72 FR 21176). Since that publication,...

  11. Ohio Valley Community Health Information Network.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guard, Roger; And Others

    The Ohio Valley Community Health Information Network (OVCHIN) works to determine the efficacy of delivering health information to residents of rural southern Ohio and the urban and suburban Cincinnati area. OVCHIN is a community-based, consumer-defined demonstration grant program funded by the National Telecommunications and Information…

  12. Selected Health Practices Among Ohio's Rural Residents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, G. Howard; Pugh, Albert

    Using a stratified random sample of 12 of Ohio's 88 counties, this 1967 study had as its objectives (1) to measure the level of participation in selected health practices by Ohio's rural residents, (2) to compare the level of participation in selected health practices of farm and rural nonfarm residents, and (3) to examine levels of participation…

  13. Security Problems of Ohio Academic Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lorenzen, Michael

    A survey was conducted of 104 Ohio academic libraries to determine how these libraries define security problems, what type of security problems existed in the libraries and what the extent of these problems was. The survey of 11 questions revealed the following: few Ohio academic libraries have a written security policy; a significant number…

  14. The Ohio Vocational Education Achievement Test Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Trade and Industrial Education Instructional Materials Lab.

    The Ohio Vocational Achievement Tests are specially designed instruments for use by teachers, supervisors, and administrators to evaluate and diagnose vocational achievement for improving instruction in secondary vocational programs at the 11th and 12th grade levels. This guide explains the Ohio Vocational Achievement Tests and how they are used.…

  15. Sexual Assault Reporting Procedures at Ohio Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krivoshey, Mira S.; Adkins, Rachel; Hayes, Rebecca; Nemeth, Julianna M.; Klein, Elizabeth G.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To assess how Ohio colleges conform to recommendations that address barriers to reporting sexual assault. Participants: A study sample of Ohio 4-year colleges ("N" = 105). Methods: College Web sites were examined between March and November 2011 for their availability of sexual assault policies using 8 measures. Results: Of the colleges…

  16. 77 FR 46346 - Ohio Regulatory Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-03

    ..., Federal Register (41 FR 34688). You can also find later actions concerning Ohio's program and program... Information; Transfer, Assignment, or Sale of Permit Rights; Final Rule'' on December 7, 2007 (72 FR 68000... Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement 30 CFR Part 935 Ohio Regulatory Program...

  17. 33 CFR 117.417 - Ohio River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ohio River. 117.417 Section 117.417 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Kentucky § 117.417 Ohio River. The draw of the Southern...

  18. 33 CFR 117.417 - Ohio River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Ohio River. 117.417 Section 117.417 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Kentucky § 117.417 Ohio River. The draw of the Southern...

  19. 33 CFR 117.417 - Ohio River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Ohio River. 117.417 Section 117.417 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Kentucky § 117.417 Ohio River. The draw of the Southern...

  20. 33 CFR 117.417 - Ohio River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Ohio River. 117.417 Section 117.417 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Kentucky § 117.417 Ohio River. The draw of the Southern...

  1. 33 CFR 117.417 - Ohio River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Ohio River. 117.417 Section 117.417 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Kentucky § 117.417 Ohio River. The draw of the Southern...

  2. Simultaneous measurement of temperature and velocity fields in convective air flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmeling, Daniel; Bosbach, Johannes; Wagner, Claus

    2014-03-01

    Thermal convective air flows are of great relevance in fundamental studies and technical applications such as heat exchangers or indoor ventilation. Since these kinds of flow are driven by temperature gradients, simultaneous measurements of instantaneous velocity and temperature fields are highly desirable. A possible solution is the combination of particle image velocimetry (PIV) and particle image thermography (PIT) using thermochromic liquid crystals (TLCs) as tracer particles. While combined PIV and PIT is already state of the art for measurements in liquids, this is not yet the case for gas flows. In this study we address the adaptation of the measuring technique to gaseous fluids with respect to the generation of the tracer particles, the particle illumination and the image filtering process. Results of the simultaneous PIV/PIT stemming from application to a fluid system with continuous air exchange are presented. The measurements were conducted in a cuboidal convection sample with air in- and outlet at a Rayleigh number Ra ≈ 9.0 × 107. They prove the feasibility of the method by providing absolute and relative temperature accuracies of σT = 0.19 K and σΔT = 0.06 K, respectively. Further open issues that have to be addressed in order to mature the technique are identified.

  3. A self-consistent field study of a hydrocarbon droplet at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Hilz, Emilia; Leermakers, Frans A M; Vermeer, Arnoldus W P

    2012-04-14

    A molecularly detailed self-consistent field (SCF) approach is applied to describe a sessile hydrocarbon droplet placed at the air-water interface. Predictions of the contact angle for macroscopic droplets follow from using Neumann's equation, wherein the macroscopic interfacial tensions are computed from one-gradient calculations for flat interfaces. A two-gradient cylindrical coordinate system with mirror-like boundary conditions is used to analyse the three dimensional shape of the nano-scale oil droplet at the air-water interface. These small droplets have a finite value of the Laplace pressure and concomitant line tension. It has been calculated that the oil-water and oil-vapour interfacial tensions are curvature dependent and increase slightly with increasing interfacial curvature. In contrast, the line tension tends to decrease with curvature. In all cases there is only a weak influence of the line tension on the droplet shape. We therefore argue that the nano-scale droplets, which are described in the SCF approach, are representative for macroscopic droplets and that the method can be used to efficiently generate accurate information on the spreading of oil droplets at the air-water interface in molecularly more complex situations. As an example, non-ionic surfactants have been included in the system to illustrate how a molecularly more complex situation will change the wetting properties of the sessile drop. This short forecast is aimed to outline and to stress the potential of the method. PMID:22395192

  4. Lightning strike at Bryan, Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, B. E.

    1980-02-01

    A week before the 29 August 1979 dedication of the photovoltaic power system at daytime AM radio station WBNO, in Bryan, Ohio, a lightning superbolt struck the FM radio tower, one of two towers at the station. Minor damage to the station and to components of the photovoltaic system, the latter designed by MIT Lincoln Laboratory under US Department of Energy sponsorship, is described. This rare strike suggested the need for increased protection and more voltage-transient suppressors were added to those already in place as a preventive measure in the event that such a phenomenon reoccurs.

  5. From the Field to the Laboratory: Air Pollutant-Induced Genomic Effects in Lung Cells

    PubMed Central

    Vizuete, William; Sexton, Kenneth G.; Nguyen, Hang; Smeester, Lisa; Aagaard, Kjersti Marie; Shope, Cynthia; Lefer, Barry; Flynn, James H.; Alvarez, Sergio; Erickson, Mathew H.; Fry, Rebecca C.

    2015-01-01

    Current in vitro studies do not typically assess cellular impacts in relation to real-world atmospheric mixtures of gases. In this study, we set out to examine the feasibility of measuring biological responses at the level of gene expression in human lung cells upon direct exposures to air in the field. This study describes the successful deployment of lung cells in the heavily industrialized Houston Ship Channel. By examining messenger RNA (mRNA) levels from exposed lung cells, we identified changes in genes that play a role as inflammatory responders in the cell. The results show anticipated responses from negative and positive controls, confirming the integrity of the experimental protocol and the successful deployment of the in vitro instrument. Furthermore, exposures to ambient conditions displayed robust changes in gene expression. These results demonstrate a methodology that can produce gas-phase toxicity data in the field. PMID:26917966

  6. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 86-005-1679, Dutch Girl Cleaners, Springdale, Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Burr, G.A.; Todd, W.

    1986-03-01

    An environmental survey at Dutch Girl Cleaners in the Thriftway Mini Mall, Springdale, Ohio, was conducted on October 25, 1985, and air samples collected on October 30, 1985 from the cleaners, an adjacent supermarket and the enclosed pedestrian mall were analyzed for perchloroethylene.

  7. GASEOUS AND PARTICULATE AMMONIA AND NITRIC ACID CONCENTRATIONS, COLUMBUS, OHIO AREA--SUMMER 1980

    EPA Science Inventory

    Data is presented for gaseous ammonia and nitric acid and particulate ammonium ion and nitrate ion concentrations in air samples collected in support of the PEPE-NEROS study during the summer of 1980. Ground-level samples were collected near Croton, Ohio; aerial samples were also...

  8. Field investigation source area ST58 old Quartermaster service station, Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Liikala, T.L.; Evans, J.C.

    1995-01-01

    Source area ST58 is the site of the old Quartermaster service station at Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. The source area is one of several Source Evaluation Report sites being investigated by Pacific Northwest Laboratory for the US Air Force as candidates for no further remedial action, interim removal action, or a remedial investigation/feasibility study under a Federal Facilities Agreement. The purpose of this work was to characterize source area ST58 and excavate the most contaminated soils for use in composting treatability studies. A field investigation was conducted to determine the nature and extent of soil contamination. The field investigation entailed a records search; grid node location, surface geophysical, and soil gas surveys; and test pit soil sampling. Soil excavation followed based on the results of the field investigation. The site was backfilled with clean soil. Results from this work indicate close spatial correlation between screening instruments, used during the field investigation and soil excavation, and laboratory analyses. Gasoline was identified as the main subsurface contaminant based on the soil gas surveys and test pit soil sampling. A center of contamination was located near the northcentral portion of the source area, and a center was located in the northwestern comer. The contamination typically occurred near or below a former soil horizon probably as a result of surface spills and leaks from discontinuities and/or breaks in the underground piping. Piping locations were delineated during the surface geophysical surveys and corresponded very well to unscaled drawings of the site. The high subsurface concentrations of gasoline detected in the northwestern comer of the source area probably reflect ground-water contamination and/or possibly floating product.

  9. Circular polarization of radio emission from air showers probes atmospheric electric fields in thunderclouds.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gia Trinh, Thi Ngoc; Scholten, Olaf; Buitink, Stijn; Corstanje, Arthur; Ebert, Ute; Enriquez, Emilio; Falcke, Heino; Horandel, Jörg R.; Nelles, Anna; Schellart, Pim; Rachen, Jorg; Rossetto, Laura; Rutjes, Casper; ter Veen, Sander; Thoudam, Satyendra

    2016-04-01

    When a high-energy cosmic-ray particle enters the upper layer of the atmosphere, it generates many secondary high-energy particles and forms a cosmic-ray-induced air shower. In the leading plasma of this shower electric currents are induced that emit electromagnetic radiation. These radio waves can be detected with LOw-Frequency ARray (LOFAR) radio telescope. Events have been collected under fair-weather conditions as well as under atmospheric conditions where thunderstorms occur. For the events under the fair weather conditions the emission process is well understood by present models. For the events measured under the thunderstorm conditions, we observe a large fraction of the circular polarization near the core of the shower which is not shown in the events under the fair-weather conditions. This can be explained by the change of direction of the atmospheric electric fields with altitude. Therefore, measuring the circular polarization of radio emission from cosmic ray extensive air showers during the thunderstorm conditions helps to have a better understanding about the structure of atmospheric electric fields in the thunderclouds.

  10. Determination of methyl bromide in air resulting from pre-plant fumigations of plowed fields

    SciTech Connect

    Woodrow, J.E.; Honaganahalli, P.; Seiber, J.N.

    1995-12-31

    A method for measuring residues of methyl bromide in air entails concentrating the fumigant on charcoal from an airstream at a flowrate of 100 ml/min, desorption of the trapped material with benzyl alcohol solvent in a sealed vial at 60-110{degrees}C for 10-15 min, and then sampling of the equilibrated vapor for gas chromatographic assay using electron-capture detection. The desorbed vapor is chromatographed on a 27 in x 0.32 mm (id) porous-layer open tubular column, on which methyl bromide has a retention time of about 6 min at 90{degrees}C and at a carrier gas flowrate of 3-3.5 ml/min. Using this method, standard curves were linear over at least three orders of magnitude and a practical limit of detection for field air was about 20 ng/m{sup 3} ({approximately}5 ppt). This method has been used in studies concerned with methyl bromide volatilization from fumigated fields and with ambient background levels.

  11. A newly designed compact remote TDL sensing system for air pollutants -- Field experiments and comparison measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, A.; Herzog, R.; Lamp, T.; Ropertz, A.; Weber, K.

    1999-07-01

    The remote sensing system for local or diffuse concentrations of gaseous air pollutants developed and realized by the ILK Dresden is a very compact and low mass apparatus based on the tunable diode laser (TDL) techniques in pulse or cw mode regime. The prototypes are characterized by compact design (300x150x300mm3) and stand-alone and mains-independent operation that allows a fast, flexible and mobile use in different applications. The first hardware version works as an one laser monitor while the advanced version provides for the simultaneous operation of two lasers and can thus measure two gaseous pollutants at the same time. The sensitivity limits for CO and NO were determined at 13ppb x 100m and at 22ppb x 100m respectively. Optical measurement paths are possible up to 700m. The paper presented results of field measurements of the gaseous pollutants in the open atmosphere, i.e. traffic-induced CO and NO as well as CH{sub 4} and NH{sub 3} landfill gases. Furthermore, the authors have investigated in co-operation with the FH Duesseldorf the ILK TDL-system and commercial remote sensing systems for air pollutant monitoring, especially the FTIR and DOAS systems, in different comparison measurements under real field conditions.

  12. Pouring it on in Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Malloy, M.G.

    1996-03-01

    For IMCO Recycling, Inc. (Irving, Texas), scrap is anything but a dirty word. Sheet scrap, used beverage cans (UBCs), and other types of aluminum recovered from the waste stream are the major feedstock for the company`s 335-million-pound per-year (ppy) aluminum recycling facility in Uhrichsville, Ohio, about halfway between Akron, Ohio, and Wheeling, West Virginia. The facility is the largest for IMCO, which, in turn, claims to be the world`s largest aluminum recycling company. The company upgraded the facility to its current capacity in 1994, just two years after the plant went on line. IMCO had foreseen the need for expansion when it built the facility, leaving space for two more furnaces than the eight that it had originally. IMCO, whose name was derived from the company`s predecessor, International metals Co., was organized in its current form in 1988. It now has an annual total capacity of about 1.7 billion ppy, according to Paul Dufour, the company`s CEO.

  13. Chamber and field evaluations of air pollution tolerances of urban trees

    SciTech Connect

    Karnosky, D.F.

    1981-04-01

    Results are presented for a study of the relative air pollution tolerances of 32 urban-tree cultivars as determined by both chamber fumigations and field exposures. Tolerances to ozone and sulfur dioxide, alone and in combination, were determined using short-term, acute doses administered while the plants were inside a plastic fumigation chamber located inside the Cary Arboretum greenhouses. In a follow-up study still underway, representatives of the same cultivars were outplanted at four locations in the greater New York City area. To date, only oxidant-type injury has been observed on trees in the field plots. Cultivars tolerant to all chamber and field exposures were Acer platanoides Cleveland, Crimson King, Emerald Queen, Jade Glen, and Summershade; Acer rubrum Autumn Flame and Red Sunset; Acer saccharum Green Mountain and Temple's Upright; Fagus sylvatica Rotundifolia; Fraxinus pennsylvanica Summit; and Ginkgo biloba Fastigate and Sentry. Cultivars sensitive to ozone as determined by the chamber and field tests and that may serve as bioindicators of the presence of ozone were Gleditsia triacanthos inermis imperial and Platanus acerifolia Bloodgood.

  14. ZT-P: an advanced air core reversed field pinch prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenberg, K.F.; Buchenauer, C.J.; Burkhardt, L.C.; Caudill, L.D.; Dike, R.S.; Dominguez, T.; Downing, J.N.; Forman, P.R.; Garcia, J.A.; Giger, A.J.

    1986-01-01

    The ZT-P experiment, with a major radius of 0.45 m and a minor radius of 0.07 m, was designed to prototype the next generation of reversed field pinch (RFP) machines at Los Alamos. ZT-P utilizes an air-core poloidal field system, with precisely wound and positioned rigid copper coils, to drive the plasma current and provide plasma equilibrium with intrinsically low magnetic field errors. ZT-P's compact configuration is adaptable to test various first wall and limiter designs at reactor-relevant current densities in the range of 5 to 20 MA/m/sup 2/. In addition, the load assembly design allows for the installation of toroidal field divertors. Design of ZT-P began in October 1983, and assembly was completed in October 1984. This report describes the magnetic, electrical, mechanical, vacuum, diagnostic, data acquisition, and control aspects of the machine design. In addition, preliminary data from initial ZT-P operation are presented. Because of ZT-P's prototypical function, many of its design aspects and experimental results are directly applicable to the design of a next generation RFP. 17 refs., 47 figs.

  15. Test Data of Flow Field of Shuttle SRM Nozzle Joint with Bond Defects, Using Unheated Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hair, Leroy M.; McAnally, James V.; Hengel, John E.

    1989-01-01

    The nozzle-to-case joint on the Shuttle SRM (as redesigned after the Challenger accident) features an adhesive sealant filling and bonding the joint, with a wiper O-ring to prevent the adhesive from reaching and disabling the closure O-ring. Flawless implementation of that joint design would ensure that hot, corrosive propellant combustion gases never reach the closure O-ring. However, understanding the flow field related to bonding defects is prudent. A comprehensive test program was conducted to quantify such flow fields and associated heating environments. A two-dimensional, full-scale model represented 65 inches of the nozzle joint, using unheated air as the test medium, in a blowdown mode. Geometry variations modeled RSRM assembly tolerances, and two types of bonding defects: pullaways and blowholes. A range of the magnitude of each type defect was tested. Also a range of operational parameters was tested, representative of the RSRM flow environment, including duplication of RSRM Mach and Reynolds numbers. Extensive instrumentation was provided to quantify pressures, heat rates, and velocities. The resulting data established that larger geometric defects cause larger pressure and larger heating, at the closure O-ring region. Velocity trends were not so straight-forward. Variations in assembly tolerances did not generally affect flow fields or heating. Operational parameters affected flow fields and heating as might be expected, increasing density or velocity increased heating. Complete details of this test effort are presented.

  16. Emergence of Ixodes scapularis and Borrelia burgdorferi, the Lyme disease vector and agent, in Ohio.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Glowacki, Meaghan N; Hoet, Armando E; Needham, Glen R; Smith, Kathleen A; Gary, Richard E; Li, Xin

    2014-01-01

    Lyme disease, the most common vector-borne disease in the United States, is caused by a tick-borne infection with Borrelia burgdorferi. Currently, Ohio is considered by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to be non-endemic for Lyme disease. The low incidence of Lyme disease in this state was largely attributed to the absence of the transmitting vector, Ixodes scapularis, commonly known as the blacklegged tick. However, a tick surveillance program established by Ohio Department of Health indicated that the number of I. scapularis in Ohio had increased sharply in recent years, from 0 - 5 ticks per year during 1983-2008 to 15 in 2009, 40 in 2010, and 184 in 2011. During the fall deer hunting season, examination of deer heads submitted to Ohio Department of Agriculture found 29 I. scapularis from 7 counties in 2010 and 1,830 from 25 counties in 2011. As of 2012, the tick had been found in 57 of the 88 counties of Ohio. In addition, all three active stages (larva, nymph, and adult) of I. scapularis were found in Tiverton Township of Coshocton County, demonstrating the presence of established tick populations at this central Ohio location. Of 530 nymphal or adult I. scapularis analyzed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), 32 (6.1%) tested positive for the B. burgdorferi flaB gene, ranging from 36 to 390,000 copies per tick. Antibodies to B. burgdorferi antigens were detected in 2 of 10 (20%) field-captured Peromyscus leucopus from Tiverton Township, and in 41 of 355 (11.5%) dogs residing in Ohio. Collectively, these data suggest that the enzootic life cycle of B. burgdorferi has become established in Ohio, which poses risk of Lyme disease to people and animals in the area. PMID:24926441

  17. Emergence of Ixodes scapularis and Borrelia burgdorferi, the Lyme disease vector and agent, in Ohio

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Peng; Glowacki, Meaghan N.; Hoet, Armando E.; Needham, Glen R.; Smith, Kathleen A.; Gary, Richard E.; Li, Xin

    2014-01-01

    Lyme disease, the most common vector-borne disease in the United States, is caused by a tick-borne infection with Borrelia burgdorferi. Currently, Ohio is considered by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to be non-endemic for Lyme disease. The low incidence of Lyme disease in this state was largely attributed to the absence of the transmitting vector, Ixodes scapularis, commonly known as the blacklegged tick. However, a tick surveillance program established by Ohio Department of Health indicated that the number of I. scapularis in Ohio had increased sharply in recent years, from 0 - 5 ticks per year during 1983–2008 to 15 in 2009, 40 in 2010, and 184 in 2011. During the fall deer hunting season, examination of deer heads submitted to Ohio Department of Agriculture found 29 I. scapularis from 7 counties in 2010 and 1,830 from 25 counties in 2011. As of 2012, the tick had been found in 57 of the 88 counties of Ohio. In addition, all three active stages (larva, nymph, and adult) of I. scapularis were found in Tiverton Township of Coshocton County, demonstrating the presence of established tick populations at this central Ohio location. Of 530 nymphal or adult I. scapularis analyzed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), 32 (6.1%) tested positive for the B. burgdorferi flaB gene, ranging from 36 to 390,000 copies per tick. Antibodies to B. burgdorferi antigens were detected in 2 of 10 (20%) field-captured Peromyscus leucopus from Tiverton Township, and in 41 of 355 (11.5%) dogs residing in Ohio. Collectively, these data suggest that the enzootic life cycle of B. burgdorferi has become established in Ohio, which poses risk of Lyme disease to people and animals in the area. PMID:24926441

  18. A Rising Tide of Digitization--The Ohio Memory Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kupfer, Shannon

    2010-01-01

    In 2009, after a year of planning and preparation, the second generation of Ohio Memory was launched. A collaborative effort of the Ohio Historical Society (OHS) and the State Library of Ohio, Ohio Memory is a repository for more than 75,000 digital items, including photographs, journals, and other manuscript materials, as well as print documents…

  19. OhioLINK: Implementing Integrated Library Services across Institutional Boundaries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawks, Carol Pitts

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the implementation of the OhioLINK (Ohio Library and Information Network) system, an integrated library system linking 23 public and private academic institutions and the Ohio State Library. Topics include a history of OhioLINK; organizational structure; decision-making procedures; public relations strategies; cooperative circulation;…

  20. WIND TUNNEL STUDY OF THE FLOW FIELD WITHIN AND AROUND OPEN-TOP CHAMBERS USED FOR AIR POLLUTION STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The EPA Meteorological Wind Tunnel was used to examine the flow field in and around models of open-top field plant growth chambers used to assess the effects of pollutant gases on plant growth. Baffles designed to reduce the ingress of ambient air into the chamber through the ope...

  1. 33 CFR 334.845 - Wisconsin Air National Guard, Volk Field military exercise area located in Lake Michigan offshore...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., Volk Field military exercise area located in Lake Michigan offshore from Manitowoc and Sheboygan... Air National Guard, Volk Field military exercise area located in Lake Michigan offshore from Manitowoc.... (b) The regulation. (1) During specific, infrequent periods when Military exercises will be...

  2. Improving design factors of air diffuser systems based on field conditions of dam reservoirs: CFD simulation approach.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sangmin; Lee, Seungjae; Lee, Sangeun; Yum, Kyungtaek; Park, Heekyung

    2012-01-01

    This study aims to improve the design factors of air diffuser systems that have been analyzed in laboratory experiments, with consideration of the field conditions of dam reservoirs. In this study, the destratification number (D(N)), destratification radius, and efficiency are considered as design factors. The computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation experiment is performed in diverse field conditions in order to analyze these factors. The results illustrate the wider range of D(N) values in field conditions and the relationship of the destratification radius and efficiency to D(N). The results can lead to better performance of air diffuser systems and water quality management in dam reservoir sites. PMID:22678200

  3. The Oklahoma Field Test: Air-Conditioning Electricity Savings from Standard Energy Conservation Measures, Radiant Barriers, and High-Efficiency Window Air Conditioners

    SciTech Connect

    Ternes, M.P.

    1992-01-01

    A field test involving 104 houses was performed in Tulsa, Oklahoma, to measure the air-conditioning electricity consumption of low-income houses equipped with window air conditioners, the reduction in this electricity consumption attributed to the installation of energy conservation measures (ECMs) as typically installed under the Oklahoma Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP), and the reduction achieved by the replacement of low-efficiency window air conditioners with high-efficiency units and the installation of attic radiant barriers. Air-conditioning electricity consumption and indoor temperature were monitored weekly during the pre-weatherization period (June to September 1988) and post-weatherization period (May to September 1989). House energy consumption models and regression analyses were used to normalize the air-conditioning electricity savings to average outdoor temperature conditions and the pre-weatherization indoor temperature of each house. The average measured pre-weatherization air-conditioning electricity consumption was 1664 kWh/year ($119/year). Ten percent of the houses used less than 250 kWh/year, while another 10% used more than 3000 kWh/year. An average reduction in air-conditioning electricity consumption of 535 kWh/year ($38/year and 28% of pre-weatherization consumption) was obtained from replacement of one low-efficiency window air conditioner (EER less than 7.0) per house with a high-efficiency unit (EER greater than 9.0). For approximately the same cost, savings tripled to 1503 kWh/year ($107/year and 41% of pre-weatherization consumption) in those houses with initial air-conditioning electricity consumption greater than 2750 kWh/year. For these houses, replacement of a low-efficiency air conditioner with a high-efficiency unit was cost effective using the incremental cost of installing a new unit now rather than later; the average installation cost for these houses under a weatherization program was estimated to be $786. The

  4. A neural network based ensemble approach for improving the accuracy of meteorological fields used for regional air quality modeling.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shuiyuan; Li, Li; Chen, Dongsheng; Li, Jianbing

    2012-12-15

    A neural network based ensemble methodology was presented in this study to improve the accuracy of meteorological input fields for regional air quality modeling. Through nonlinear integration of simulation results from two meteorological models (MM5 and WRF), the ensemble approach focused on the optimization of meteorological variable values (temperature, surface air pressure, and wind field) in the vertical layer near ground. To illustrate the proposed approach, a case study in northern China during two selected air pollution events, in 2006, was conducted. The performances of the MM5, the WRF, and the ensemble approach were assessed using different statistical measures. The results indicated that the ensemble approach had a higher simulation accuracy than the MM5 and the WRF model. Performance was improved by more than 12.9% for temperature, 18.7% for surface air pressure field, and 17.7% for wind field. The atmospheric PM(10) concentrations in the study region were also simulated by coupling the air quality model CMAQ with the MM5 model, the WRF model, and the ensemble model. It was found that the modeling accuracy of the ensemble-CMAQ model was improved by more than 7.0% and 17.8% when compared to the MM5-CMAQ and the WRF-CMAQ models, respectively. The proposed neural network based meteorological modeling approach holds great potential for improving the performance of regional air quality modeling. PMID:23000477

  5. Field Demonstration of Active Desiccant-Based Outdoor Air Preconditioning Systems, Final Report: Phase 3

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, J.

    2001-07-09

    This report summarizes an investigation of the performance of two active desiccant cooling systems that were installed as pilot systems in two locations--a college dormitory and a research laboratory--during the fall of 1999. The laboratory system was assembled in the field from commercially available Trane air-handling modules combined with a standard total energy recovery module and a customized active desiccant wheel, both produced by SEMCO. The dormitory system was a factory-built, integrated system produced by SEMCO that included both active desiccant and sensible-only recovery wheels, a direct-fired gas regeneration section, and a pre-piped Trane heat pump condensing section. Both systems were equipped with direct digital control systems, complete with full instrumentation and remote monitoring capabilities. This report includes detailed descriptions of these two systems, installation details, samples of actual performance, and estimations of the energy savings realized. These pilot sites represent a continuation of previous active desiccant product development research (Fischer, Hallstrom, and Sand 2000; Fischer 2000). Both systems performed as anticipated, were reliable, and required minimal maintenance. The dehumidification/total-energy-recovery hybrid approach was particularly effective in all respects. System performance showed remarkable improvement in latent load handling capability and operating efficiency compared with the original conventional cooling system and with the conventional system that remained in another, identical wing of the facility. The dehumidification capacity of the pilot systems was very high, the cost of operation was very low, and the system was cost-effective, offering a simple payback for these retrofit installations of approximately 5 to 6 years. Most important, the dormitory system resolved numerous indoor air quality problems in the dormitory by providing effective humidity control and increased, continuous ventilation air.

  6. The Oklahoma Field Test: Air-conditioning electricity savings from standard energy conservation measures, radiant barriers, and high-efficiency window air conditioners

    SciTech Connect

    Ternes, M.P.; Levins, W.P.

    1992-08-01

    A field test Involving 104 houses was performed in Tulsa, Oklahoma, to measure the air-conditioning electricity consumption of low-income houses equipped with window air conditioners, the reduction in this electricity consumption attributed to the installation of energy conservation measures (ECMS) as typically installed under the Oklahoma Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP), and the reduction achieved by the replacement of low-efficiency window air conditioners with high-efficiency units and the installation of attic radiant barriers. Air-conditioning electricity consumption and indoor temperature were monitored weekly during the pre-weatherization period (June to September 1988) and post-weatherization period (May to September 1989). House energy consumption models and regression analyses were used to normalize the air-conditioning electricity savings to average outdoor temperature conditions and the pre-weatherization indoor temperature of each house. The following conclusions were drawn from the study: (1) programs directed at reducing air-conditioning electricity consumption should be targeted at clients with high consumption to improve cost effectiveness; (2) replacing low-efficiency air conditioners with high-efficiency units should be considered an option in a weatherization program directed at reducing air-conditioning electricity consumption; (3) ECMs currently being installed under the Oklahoma WAP (chosen based on effectiveness at reducing space-heating energy consumption) should continue to be justified based on their space-heating energy savings potential only; and (4) attic radiant barriers should not be included in the Oklahoma WAP if alternatives with verified savings are available or until further testing demonstrates energy savings or other benefits in this typo of housing.

  7. Air flow and concentration fields at urban road intersections for improved understanding of personal exposure.

    PubMed

    Tiwary, Abhishek; Robins, Alan; Namdeo, Anil; Bell, Margaret

    2011-07-01

    This paper reviews the state of knowledge on modelling air flow and concentration fields at road intersections. The first part covers the available literature from the past two decades on experimental (both field and wind tunnel) and modelling activities in order to provide insight into the physical basis of flow behaviour at a typical cross-street intersection. This is followed by a review of associated investigations of the impact of traffic-generated localised turbulence on the concentration fields due to emissions from vehicles. There is a discussion on the role of adequate characterisation of vehicle-induced turbulence in making predictions using hybrid models, combining the merits of conventional approaches with information obtained from more detailed modelling. This concludes that, despite advancements in computational techniques, there are crucial knowledge gaps affecting the parameterisations used in current models for individual exposure. This is specifically relevant to the growing impetus on walking and cycling activities on urban roads in the context of current drives for sustainable transport and healthy living. Due to inherently longer travel times involved during such trips, compared to automotive transport, pedestrians and cyclists are subjected to higher levels of exposure to emissions. Current modelling tools seem to under-predict this exposure because of limitations in their design and in the empirical parameters employed. PMID:21435722

  8. Coupling field observations, soil modeling, and air dispersion algorithms to estimate 1,3-dichloropropene and chloropicrin flux and exposure.

    PubMed

    Cryer, S A; van Wesenbeeck, I J

    2011-01-01

    Soil fumigants are volatile compounds applied to agricultural land to control nematode populations, weeds, and crop diseases. Field trials used for measuring fumigant loss from soil to the atmosphere encompass only a small proportion of the near semi-infinite parameter combinations of environmental, agronomic, and meteorological conditions. One approach to supplement field observations uses a soil physics model for fumigant emission predictions. A model is first validated against existing field study observations and then used to extrapolate results to a wider range of edaphic and climatic conditions. This work compares field observations of 1,3-dichloropropene and chloropicrin emissions to predictions from the USDA soil model CHAIN_2D. Comparison between model predictions and field observations for a Florida and California study had values between 0.62 to 0.81 and 0.99 to 1.0 for discrete and cumulative emission flux, respectively. CHAIN_2D emission rates were then coupled to several USEPA air dispersion models (ISCST3, CALPUFF6) to extend emission estimates to near field air concentrations. CALPUFF6 predicted slightly higher 1-h maximum air concentrations than ISCST3 for the same source strength (26.2-36.0% for setbacks between 1 and 250 m from the field edge, respectively). A sensitivity analysis for the CHAIN_2D/ISCST3 coupled numerical system is provided, with several soil and irrigation parameters consistently the most sensitive. Changes in the depth of incorporation, tarp material, and initial soil water content illustrate the predicted impact to emission strength and resulting near-field air concentrations with reductions of cumulative emission loss from 8.1 to 71% and average 1-h maximum air concentration reductions between 6.2 and 41% depending on the mitigation strategy chosen. Additionally, a stochastic framework based on the published SOFEA system that couples variability in experiment, model sensitivity, and site specific attributes is outlined should

  9. Field evaluation of advanced controls for the retrofit of packaged air conditioners and heat pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Weimin; Katipamula, Srinivas; Ngo, Hung; Underhill, Ronald M.; Taasevigen, Danny J.; Lutes, Robert G.

    2015-09-01

    This paper documents the magnitude of energy savings achievable in the field by retrofitting existing packaged rooftop units (RTUs) with advanced control strategies not ordinarily used for RTUs. A total of 66 RTUs on 8 different buildings were retrofitted with a commercially available advanced controller for improving RTU operational efficiency. The controller features enhanced air-side economizer control, multi-speed fan control, and demand controlled ventilation. Of the 66 RTUs, 18 are packaged heat pumps and the rest are packaged air conditioners with gas heat. The eight buildings cover four building types and four climate conditions. Based on the data collected for about a whole year, the advanced controller reduced the normalized annual RTU energy consumption between 22% and 90%, with an average of 57% for all RTUs. The average fractional savings uncertainty was 12% at 95% confidence level. Normalized annual electricity savings were in the range between 0.47 kWh/h (kWh per hour of RTU operation) and 7.21 kWh/h, with an average of 2.39 kWh/h. RTUs greater than 53 kW and runtime greater than 14 hours per day had payback periods less than 3 years even at $0.05/kWh.

  10. Field-emplaceable air samplers for automated ambient, site, and IAQ use (including TO-17 applications)

    SciTech Connect

    Padden, H.F.

    1996-12-31

    Air samples taken on collection media for laboratory analysis remain a highly sensitive and cost-effective means of assessment. However, collection of samples can be difficult using non-automated samplers, particularly over long terms or at remote locations. This paper describes a number of automated air samplers for sorbent-tube and filter use. The samplers are battery-powered, portable and weatherproof. They are suitable for: (1) Very rapid sampling of dual sorbent tubes for survey use. The sampler is very small and lightweight for ease of field use. (2) Sequential sampling of 24 tubes over a period up to 1 month. This technology is suitable for long-term ambient and superfund site monitoring. A meteorological station can be integrated. (3) Simultaneous sampling of 4 separate media at different flows during multiple events over a one month maximum period. This technology is useful for hazard identification and location. One application of interest to the environmental community is the use of a variant of the 24 tube sequential samplers by the United Nations for chemical weapon ban verification. 2 refs.

  11. Field demonstration and commercialization of silent discharge plasma hazardous air pollutant control technology

    SciTech Connect

    Rosocha, L.A.; Coogan, J.J.; Korzekwa, R.A.; Secker, D.A.; Reimers, R.F.; Herrmann, P.G.; Chase, P.J.; Gross, M.P. |; Jones, M.R.

    1996-07-01

    Silent electrical discharge plasma (dielectric barrier) reactors can decompose gas-phase pollutants by free-radical attack or electron-induced fragmentation. The radicals or electrons are produced by the large average volume nonthermal plasmas generated in the reactor. In the past decade, the barrier configuration has attracted attention for destroying toxic chemical agents for the military, removing harmful greenhouse gases, and treating other environmentally- hazardous chemical compounds. At the Los Alamos National Laboratory, we have been studying the silent discharge plasma (SDP) for processing gaseous-based hazardous chemicals for approximately five years. The key objective is to convert hazardous or toxic chemicals into non-hazardous compounds or into materials which are more easily managed. The main applications have been for treating off-gases from thermal treatment units, and for abating hazardous air-pollutant emissions (e.g., industrial air emissions, vapors extracted from contaminated soil or groundwater). In this paper, we will summarize the basic principles of SDP processing, discuss illustrative applications of the technology, and present results from small-scale field tests that are relevant to our commercialization effort.

  12. CONTROL OF AIR EMISSIONS FROM HAZARDOUS WASTE COMBUSTION SOURCES: FIELD EVALUATIONS OF PILOT-SCALE AIR POLLUTION CONTROL DEVICES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pilot scale air pollution control devices supplied by Hydro-Sonic Systems, ETS, Inc., and Vulcan Engineering Company were installed at the ENSCO, Inc. Incinerator in El Dorado, Arkansas, in the spring of 1984. Each of these units treated an uncontrolled slipstream of the incinera...

  13. Field test of an air-to-ground communication link using a bare optical fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juarez, Juan C.; Dwivedi, Anurag; Sova, Raymond M.; Sluz, Joseph E.; Young, David W.

    2007-04-01

    Results of a field demonstration of an air-to-ground communication link using an airborne bare optical fiber are presented. The demonstration was conducted by the Johns Hopkins University, Applied Physics Laboratory at the TCOM, L.P. Test Facility in Elizabeth City, NC in May 2006 using a 38 m, tethered aerostat raised to an altitude of 2100 ft. A bare, single mode optical fiber attached between the aerostat and its mooring station was evaluated as an optical link for several hours. Wavelength Division Multiplexed channels operating in the 1550 nm band with data rates of 1 and 10 Gbps were tested to achieve error free data transfers. A separate, continuous wave channel was also multiplexed for performance monitoring. BER vs. link power measurements and eye diagrams will be analyzed for data transfer performance over the airborne bare optical fiber.

  14. Air Pollutant Mapping with a Mobile Laboratory During the BEE-TEX Field Study

    PubMed Central

    Yacovitch, Tara I.; Herndon, Scott C.; Roscioli, Joseph R.; Floerchinger, Cody; Knighton, W. Berk; Kolb, Charles E.

    2015-01-01

    The Aerodyne Mobile Laboratory was deployed to the Houston Ship Channel and surrounding areas during the Benzene and Other Toxics Exposure field study in February 2015. We evaluated atmospheric concentrations of volatile organic hydrocarbons and other hazardous air pollutants of importance to human health, including benzene, 1,3-butadiene, toluene, xylenes, ethylbenzenes, styrene, and NO2. Ambient concentration measurements were focused on the neighborhoods of Manchester, Harrisburg, and Galena Park. The most likely measured concentration of 1,3-butadiene in the Manchester neighborhood (0.17 ppb) exceeds the Environmental Protection Agency’s E-5 lifetime cancer risk level of 0.14 ppb. In all the three neighborhoods, the measured benzene concentration falls below or within the E-5 lifetime cancer risk levels of 0.4–1.4 ppb for benzene. Pollution maps as a function of wind direction show the impact of nearby sources. PMID:26819556

  15. Air Pollutant Mapping with a Mobile Laboratory During the BEE-TEX Field Study.

    PubMed

    Yacovitch, Tara I; Herndon, Scott C; Roscioli, Joseph R; Floerchinger, Cody; Knighton, W Berk; Kolb, Charles E

    2015-01-01

    The Aerodyne Mobile Laboratory was deployed to the Houston Ship Channel and surrounding areas during the Benzene and Other Toxics Exposure field study in February 2015. We evaluated atmospheric concentrations of volatile organic hydrocarbons and other hazardous air pollutants of importance to human health, including benzene, 1,3-butadiene, toluene, xylenes, ethylbenzenes, styrene, and NO2. Ambient concentration measurements were focused on the neighborhoods of Manchester, Harrisburg, and Galena Park. The most likely measured concentration of 1,3-butadiene in the Manchester neighborhood (0.17 ppb) exceeds the Environmental Protection Agency's E-5 lifetime cancer risk level of 0.14 ppb. In all the three neighborhoods, the measured benzene concentration falls below or within the E-5 lifetime cancer risk levels of 0.4-1.4 ppb for benzene. Pollution maps as a function of wind direction show the impact of nearby sources. PMID:26819556

  16. Experimental study of near-field air entrainment by subsonic volcanic jets

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Solovitz, S.A.; Mastin, L.G.

    2009-01-01

    The flow structure in the developing region of a turbulent jet has been examined using particle image velocimetry methods, considering the flow at steady state conditions. The velocity fields were integrated to determine the ratio of the entrained air speed to the jet speed, which was approximately 0.03 for a range of Mach numbers up to 0.89 and. Reynolds numbers up to 217,000. This range of experimental Mach and Reynolds numbers is higher than previously considered for high-accuracy entrainment measures, particularly in the near-vent region. The entrainment values are below those commonly used for geophysical analyses of volcanic plumes, suggesting that existing 1-D models are likely to understate the tendency for column collapse. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  17. The use of total simulator training in transitioning air-carrier pilots: A field evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Randle, R. J., Jr.; Tanner, T. A.; Hamerman, J. A.; Showalter, T. H.

    1981-01-01

    A field study was conducted in which the performance of air carrier transitioning pilots who had landing training in a landing maneuver approved simulator was compared with the performance of pilots who had landing training in the aircraft. Forty-eight trainees transitioning to the B-727 aircraft and eighty-seven trainees transitioning to the DC-10 were included in the study. The study results in terms of both objectively measured performance indicants and observer and check-pilot ratings did not demonstrate a clear distinction between the two training groups. The results suggest that, for these highly skilled transitioning pilots, a separate training module in the aircraft may be of dubious value.

  18. Thermal stability effects on the structure of the velocity field above an air-water interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papadimitrakis, Y. A.; Hsu, Y.-H. L.; Wu, J.

    1987-01-01

    Mean velocity and turbulence measurements are described for turbulent flows above laboratory water waves, under various wind and thermal stratification conditions. Experimental results, when presented in the framework of Monin-Obukhov (1954) similarity theory, support local scaling based on evaluation of stratification effects at the same nondimensional distance from the mean water surface. Such scaling allows an extension of application of the above theory to the outer region of the boundary layer. Throughout the fully turbulent region, ratios of mean velocity gradients, eddy viscosities, and turbulence intensities under nonneutral and neutral conditions correlate well with the parameter z/Lambda (Lambda being a local Obukhov length and z the vertical coordinate of the mean air flow) and show good agreement with established field correlations. The influence of stratification on the wind-stress coefficient can be estimated from an empirical relationship in terms of its value under neutral conditions and a bulk Richardson number.

  19. Viruses in maize and johnsongrass in southern ohio.

    PubMed

    Stewart, L R; Teplier, R; Todd, J C; Jones, M W; Cassone, B J; Wijeratne, S; Wijeratne, A; Redinbaugh, M G

    2014-12-01

    ABSTRACT The two major U.S. maize viruses, Maize dwarf mosaic virus (MDMV) and Maize chlorotic dwarf virus (MCDV), emerged in southern Ohio and surrounding regions in the 1960s and caused significant losses. Planting resistant varieties and changing cultural practices has dramatically reduced virus impact in subsequent decades. Current information on the distribution, diversity, and impact of known and potential U.S. maize disease-causing viruses is lacking. To assess the current reservoir of viruses present at the sites of past disease emergence, we used a combination of serological testing and next-generation RNA sequencing approaches. Here, we report enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and RNA-Seq data from samples collected over 2 years to assess the presence of viruses in cultivated maize and an important weedy reservoir, Johnsongrass (Sorghum halepense). Results revealed a persistent reservoir of MDMV and two strains of MCDV in Ohio Johnsongrass. We identified sequences of several other grass-infecting viruses and confirmed the presence of Wheat mosaic virus in Ohio maize. Together, these results provide important data for managing virus disease in field corn and sweet corn maize crops, and identifying potential future virus threats. PMID:24918609

  20. The Effect of Air Density on Atmospheric Electric Fields Required for Lightning Initiation from a Long Airborne Object

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bazelyan, E. M.; Aleksandrov, N. L.; Raizer, Yu. Pl.; Konchankov, A. M.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of the work was to determine minimum atmospheric electric fields required for lightning initiation from an airborne vehicle at various altitudes up to 10 km. The problem was reduced to the determination of a condition for initiation of a viable positive leader from a conductive object in an ambient electric field. It was shown that, depending on air density and shape and dimensions of the object, critical atmospheric fields are governed by the condition for leader viability or that for corona onset. To establish quantitative criteria for reduced air densities, available observations of spark discharges in long laboratory gaps were analyzed, the effect of air density on leader velocity was discussed and evolution in time of the properties of plasma in the leader channel was numerically simulated. The results obtained were used to evaluate the effect of pressure on the quantitative relationships between the potential difference near the leader tip, leader current and its velocity; based on these relationships, criteria for steady development of a leader were determined for various air pressures. Atmospheric electric fields required for lightning initiation from rods and ellipsoidal objects of various dimensions were calculated at different air densities. It was shown that there is no simple way to extend critical ambient fields obtained for some given objects and pressures to other objects and pressures.

  1. Testing flow-through air samplers for use in near-field vapour drift studies by measuring pyrimethanil in air after spraying.

    PubMed

    Geoghegan, Trudyanne S; Hageman, Kimberly J; Hewitt, Andrew J

    2014-03-01

    Pesticide volatilisation and subsequent vapour drift reduce a pesticide's efficiency and contribute to environmental contamination. High-volume air samplers (HVSs) are often used to measure pesticide concentrations in air but these samplers are expensive to purchase and require network electricity, limiting the number and type of sites where they can be deployed. The flow-through sampler (FTS) presents an opportunity to overcome these limitations. The FTS is a wind-driven passive sampler that has been developed to quantify organic contaminants in remote ecosystems. FTSs differ from other passive samplers in that they turn into the wind and use the wind to draw air through the sampling media. The main objective of this work was to evaluate the FTS in a near-field pesticide vapour drift study by comparing the concentrations of pyrimethanil in air measured using one HVS and three FTSs placed in the same location. Pyrimethanil was sprayed onto a vineyard as part of normal pest management procedures. Air samples were collected every eight hours for 48 h. The volume of air sampled by the FTSs was calculated using the measured relationship between ambient wind speed and the wind speed inside the sampler as determined with a separate wind tunnel study. The FTSs sampled 1.7 to 40.6 m(3) of air during each 8 h sampling period, depending on wind speed, whereas the mean volume sampled by the HVS was 128.7 m(3). Mean pyrimethanil concentrations ranged from 0.4 to 3.2 μg m(-3) of air. Inter-sampler reproducibility, as represented by percent relative standard deviation, for the three FTSs was ∼20%. The largest difference in FTS-derived versus HVS-derived pyrimethanil concentrations occurred during the lowest wind-speed period. During this period, it is likely that the FTS predominately acted like a traditional diffusion-based passive sampler. As indicated by both types of sampler, pyrimethanil concentrations in air changed by a factor of ∼2 during the two days after spaying

  2. AirSWOT: An Airborne Platform for Surface Water Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, E.; Moller, D.; Smith, L. C.; Pavelsky, T. M.; Alsdorf, D. E.

    2010-12-01

    The SWOT mission, expected to launch in 2020, will provide global measurements of surface water extent and elevation from which storage change and discharge can be derived. SWOT-like measurements are not routinely used by the hydrology community, and their optimal use and associated errors are areas of active research. The purpose of AirSWOT, a system that has been proposed to NASA’s Instrument Incubator Program, is to provide SWOT-like measurements to the hydrology and ocean community to be used to advance the understanding and use of SWOT data in the pre-launch phase. In the post-launch phase, AirSWOT will be used as the SWOT calibration/validation platform. The AirSWOT payload will consist of Kaspar, a multi-beam Ka-band radar interferometer able to produce elevations over a 5 km swath with centimetric precision. The absolute elevation accuracy of the AirSWOT system will be achieved with a combination of high precision Inertial Motion Units (IMUs), ground calibration points, and advanced calibration techniques utilizing a priori knowledge. It is expected that the accuracy of AirSWOT will exceed or match SWOT’s accuracy requirements. In addition to elevation measurements, the AirSWOT payload will include a near-infrared camera able to provide coincident high-resolution optical imagery of the water bodies imaged by the radar. In its initial hydrology deployments, AirSWOT will investigate four field sites: the Ohio-Mississippi confluence, the lower Atchafalaya River on the Mississippi River Delta, the Yukon River basin near Fairbanks, and the Sacramento River, California. The Ohio-Mississippi confluence is targeted for its large discharge, modest slope, and control structures that modulate Ohio but not Mississippi River slopes and elevations. The lower Atchafalaya River includes low slopes, wetlands with differing vegetation types, and some open lakes. Vegetation includes Cyprus forests, floating macrophytes, and grass marshes, all of which impact radar returns

  3. Laboratory validation and field verification of a new passive colorimetric air monitoring badge for sampling hydrogen sulfide in air.

    PubMed

    Kring, E V; Damrell, D J; Henry, T J; DeMoor, H M; Basilio, A N; Simon, C E

    1984-01-01

    The Pro-Tek passive colorimetric air monitoring badge for personal or area sampling of hydrogen sulfide is described. The badge has been validated over the range of 1.8 to 164 ppm-hours (0.23-21 ppm on an 8-hour TWA basis). It has an overall accuracy throughout this range of +/- 15.9% and meets the NIOSH accuracy criteria for an analytical and sampling method. The colorimetric analytical method used is based on the Texas Air Control Board's Molybdenum Blue method. Color-activated exposed badge solutions are read out on a standard laboratory spectrophotometer using 1 centimeter (10 mm) cells. Variations in exposure temperature (between 10 degrees and 40 degrees C), relative humidity, and face velocity (between 2 and 250 ft/min) do not affect badge performance. Unexposed badges are stable for more than 12 months refrigerated and for two months at room temperature. PMID:6702591

  4. NORTHERN OHIO AEROSOL STUDY: STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS EVALUATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A consortium of Universities, located in northwest Ohio have received funds to conduct a comprehensive evaluation of land applied biosolids in that state. This USDA funded study includes observing land application practices and evaluating biosolids, soils, runoff water and bioaer...

  5. Measurement of volatile plant compounds in field ambient air by thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cai, Xiao-Ming; Xu, Xiu-Xiu; Bian, Lei; Luo, Zong-Xiu; Chen, Zong-Mao

    2015-12-01

    Determination of volatile plant compounds in field ambient air is important to understand chemical communication between plants and insects and will aid the development of semiochemicals from plants for pest control. In this study, a thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TD-GC-MS) method was developed to measure ultra-trace levels of volatile plant compounds in field ambient air. The desorption parameters of TD, including sorbent tube material, tube desorption temperature, desorption time, and cold trap temperature, were selected and optimized. In GC-MS analysis, the selected ion monitoring mode was used for enhanced sensitivity and selectivity. This method was sufficiently sensitive to detect part-per-trillion levels of volatile plant compounds in field ambient air. Laboratory and field evaluation revealed that the method presented high precision and accuracy. Field studies indicated that the background odor of tea plantations contained some common volatile plant compounds, such as (Z)-3-hexenol, methyl salicylate, and (E)-ocimene, at concentrations ranging from 1 to 3400 ng m(-3). In addition, the background odor in summer was more abundant in quality and quantity than in autumn. Relative to previous methods, the TD-GC-MS method is more sensitive, permitting accurate qualitative and quantitative measurements of volatile plant compounds in field ambient air. PMID:26493981

  6. Airborne Multiangle SpectroPolarimetric Imager (AirMSPI) observations during several 2013 NASA field campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diner, D. J.; Garay, M. J.; Xu, F.; Kalashnikova, O.; Rheingans, B.; Geier, S.; Val, S.; Bull, M.; Jovanovic, V.; Bruegge, C.; Seidel, F. C.; Daugherty, B.; Chipman, R.; Davis, A.

    2013-12-01

    The Airborne Multiangle SpectroPolarimetric Imager (AirMSPI) is an ultraviolet/visible/near-infrared pushbroom camera mounted on a single-axis gimbal to acquire multiangle imagery over a ×67° along-track range. The instrument flies aboard NASA's high-altitude ER-2 aircraft, and acquires Earth imagery with ~10 m spatial resolution across an 11-km wide swath. Intensity (I) images are obtained in eight spectral bands (355, 380, 445, 470, 555, 660, 865, and 935 nm). Dual photoelastic modulators (PEMs), achromatic quarter-wave plates, and wire-grid polarizers enable imagery of the linear polarization Stokes components Q and U at 470, 660, and 865 nm. The data are used to derive degree of linear polarization (DOLP) and angle of linear polarization (AOLP). Example flight data acquired during various NASA field campaigns in 2013, including the Aerosol-Cloud-Ecosystem (ACE) Polarimeter Definition Experiment (PODEX), Hyperspectral Infrared Imager (HyspIRI), and Studies of Emissions and Atmospheric Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys (SEAC4RS) are presented. Observations of aerosols, low- and mid-level cloud fields, cirrus, and different types of surfaces under clear skies were obtained for a variety of land and ocean targets. Radiance and polarization imagery for several scenes, along with modeling of aerosol, cloud, and surface scattering, are presented to illustrate quantitatively some of the instrument's capabilities. Laboratory and vicarious calibration results are also discussed.

  7. Streamer development in barrier discharge in air: spectral signatures and electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoder, Tomas; Simek, Milan; Bonaventura, Zdenek; Prukner, Vaclav

    2015-09-01

    Electrical breakdown in the upper atmosphere takes form of so called Transient Luminous Events (TLE). Down to the certain pressure limit, the first phases of the TLE-phenomena are controlled by the streamer mechanism. In order to understand the development of these events, streamers in 10 torr air were generated in volume barrier discharge. Stability and reproducibility of generated streamers were secured by proper electrode geometry and specific applied voltage waveform. In this work, spectrally resolved measurements of the streamer head emission with high spatial and temporal resolution are presented. Precise recordings of the emission of the second positive and first negative systems of molecular nitrogen allowed the determination of the spatio-temporal development of the reduced electric field in the streamer head. This unique experimental result reveals in more details the early stages of the streamer development and gives, besides values for streamer velocity and its diameter, quantitative information on the magnitude of the electric field. T.H. was financed through the ESF Programme TEA-IS (Grant No. 4219), M.S. and V.P. by the AVCR under collaborative project M100431201 and Z.B. acknowledges the support of grant of Czech Science Foundation GA15-04023S.

  8. Flood of March 1997 in southern Ohio

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jackson, K.S.; Vivian, S.A.; Diam, F.J.; Crecelius, C.J.

    1997-01-01

    Rainfall amounts of up to 12 inches produced by thunderstorms during March 1-2, 1997 resulted in severe flooding throughout much of southern Ohio. Eighteen counties were declared Federal and State disaster areas. Cost estimates of damage in Ohio from the flooding are nearly $180 million. About 6,500 residences and more than 800 businesses were affected by flooding. Nearly 20,000 persons were evacuated, and 5 deaths were attributed to the flooding. Record peak stage and streamflow were recorded at U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) streamflow-gaging stations on Ohio Brush Creek near West Union and Shade River near Chester. The peak streamflow at these two locations exceeded the estimate of the 100-year-recurrence- interval peak streamflow. The recurrence intervals of peak stream flow at selected USGS streamflow gaging stations throughout southern Ohio ranged from less than 2 years to greater than 100 years. The most severe flooding in the State was generally confined to areas within 50 to 70 miles of the Ohio River. Many communities along the Ohio River experienced the worst flooding in more than 30 years.

  9. Performance analysis of innovative collector fields for solar-electric plants, using air as heat transfer medium

    SciTech Connect

    De Marchi Desenzani, P.; Gaia, M.

    1984-08-01

    The production of electricity by thermodynamic conversion of the heat supplied by flat plate collectors has been tried many times. The use of air as heat transfer medium could allow a dramatic simplification of the collector field and a relevant reduction of thermal inertia. The paper discusses the characteristics of a system based on air collectors and ORC engine. Both multilayer inflated plastic sheet collectors and vacuum tubes collectors are proposed as suitable solutions. The field fan power consumption is optimized jointly with the power cycle evaporator design. Both the envisaged solutions are investigated on the point of view of overall cost/performance ratio.

  10. MODELED MESOSCALE METEOROLOGICAL FIELDS WITH FOUR-DIMENSIONAL DATA ASSIMILATION IN REGIONAL SCALE AIR QUALITY MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper addresses the need to increase the temporal and spatial resolution of meteorological data currently used in air quality simulation models, AQSMs. ransport and diffusion parameters including mixing heights and stability used in regulatory air quality dispersion models a...

  11. Field Assessment of the Village Green Project: An Autonomous Community Air Quality Monitoring System

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent findings on air pollution levels in communities motivate new technologies to assess air pollution at finer spatial scale. The Village Green Project (VGP) is a novel approach using commercially-available technology for long-term community environments air pollution measure...

  12. Field evaluation of sampling and analysis for organic pollutants in indoor air. Project summary

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, J.C.; Mack, G.A.; Stockrahm, J.W.; Hannan, S.W.; Bridges, C.

    1988-09-01

    The objectives of the study were to determine the feasibility of the use of newly developed indoor air samplers in residential indoor air sampling and to evaluate methodology for characterization of the concentrations of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), PAH derivatives, and nicotine in residential air.

  13. Ohio Advanced Energy Manufacturing Center

    SciTech Connect

    Kimberly Gibson; Mark Norfolk

    2012-07-30

    The program goal of the Ohio Advanced Energy Manufacturing Center (OAEMC) is to support advanced energy manufacturing and to create responsive manufacturing clusters that will support the production of advanced energy and energy-efficient products to help ensure the nation's energy and environmental security. This goal cuts across a number of existing industry segments critical to the nation's future. Many of the advanced energy businesses are starting to make the transition from technology development to commercial production. Historically, this transition from laboratory prototypes through initial production for early adopters to full production for mass markets has taken several years. Developing and implementing manufacturing technology to enable production at a price point the market will accept is a key step. Since these start-up operations are configured to advance the technology readiness of the core energy technology, they have neither the expertise nor the resources to address manufacturing readiness issues they encounter as the technology advances toward market entry. Given the economic realities of today's business environment, finding ways to accelerate this transition can make the difference between success and failure for a new product or business. The advanced energy industry touches a wide range of industry segments that are not accustomed to working together in complex supply chains to serve large markets such as automotive and construction. During its first three years, the Center has catalyzed the communication between companies and industry groups that serve the wide range of advanced energy markets. The Center has also found areas of common concern, and worked to help companies address these concerns on a segment or industry basis rather than having each company work to solve common problems individually. EWI worked with three industries through public-private partnerships to sew together disparate segments helping to promote overall industry

  14. Measuring remanence anisotropy of hematite in red beds: anisotropy of high-field isothermal remanence magnetization (hf-AIR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilardello, Dario; Kodama, Kenneth P.

    2009-09-01

    The potential of using high-field anisotropy of isothermal remanence magnetization (hf-AIR) measurements for determining the origin of natural remanent magnetization in red beds and for identifying and correcting possible red-bed inclination shallowing was investigated for specimens of the Carboniferous Shepody Formation of New Brunswick and Nova Scotia, Canada. The technique makes it possible for a typical paleomagnetic laboratory to measure the remanence anisotropy of high-coercivity hematite. High-field (hf) AIR was used in conjunction with 100 mT alternating field (af) and 120°C thermal demagnetization to separate the contribution of hematite to the remanence anisotropy from that of magnetite/maghemite and goethite, respectively. A 5-T impulse DC magnetic field was used for the hf-AIR to reset the magnetic moment of high-coercivity hematite so that demagnetization between AIR orientations was not necessary. The ability of a 5-T field to reset the magnetization was tested by generating an isothermal remanent magnetization acquisition curve for hematite by using impulse DC magnetic fields up to 5 T in one orientation and followed by applying a field in the opposite direction at each step. Each field application was treated by 120°C heating and 100 mT af demagnetization before measurement. At 5 T, the difference between the magnetizations applied in opposite directions disappeared indicating that no magnetic memory persisted at this field strength. We performed a validity and reproducibility test of our hf-AIR measurement technique by measuring three specimens multiple times along two orthogonal coordinate systems. The method yielded highly reproducible results and, on rotating the specimen's coordinates, the fabric rotated by 90° as expected, showing that it is not an artifact of the technique. We also measured hf-AIR on samples that had previously been chemically demagnetized in 3N HCl to remove the secondary, chemically grown pigmentary hematite. The hf-AIR

  15. The Ohio & Erie Canal: Catalyst of Economic Development for Ohio. Teaching with Historic Places.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayers, Deborah

    In the 19th century, canal boats pulled along by mules carried much cargo. The canal boat was the family business, their livelihood, and their home. In Ohio, these boats glided gracefully along the Ohio and Erie Canal, heavily laden with lumber on its way north to Lake Erie where it was transferred to a lake freighter and sent to Buffalo (New…

  16. Simulating smoke transport from wildland fires with a regional-scale air quality model: Sensitivity to uncertain wind fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Menendez, Fernando; Hu, Yongtao; Odman, Mehmet Talat

    2013-06-01

    Uncertainties associated with meteorological inputs which are propagated through atmospheric chemical transport models may constrain their ability to replicate the effects of wildland fires on air quality. Here, we investigate the sensitivity of predicted fine particulate matter (PM2.5) levels to uncertain wind fields by simulating the air quality impacts of two fires on an urban area with the Community Multiscale Air Quality modeling system (CMAQ). Brute-force sensitivity analyses show that modeled concentrations at receptors downwind from the fires are highly sensitive to variations in wind speed and direction. Additionally, uncertainty in wind fields produced with the Weather Research and Forecasting model was assessed by evaluating meteorological predictions against surface and upper air observations. Significant differences between predicted and observed wind fields were identified. Simulated PM2.5 concentrations at urban sites displayed large sensitivities to wind perturbations within the error range of meteorological inputs. The analyses demonstrate that normalized errors in CMAQ predictions attempting to model the regional impacts of fires on PM2.5 levels could be as high as 100% due to inaccuracies in wind data. Meteorological drivers may largely account for the considerable discrepancies between monitoring site observations and predicted concentrations. The results of this study demonstrate that limitations in fire-related air quality simulations cannot be overcome by solely improving emission rates.

  17. Compensating for the impact of non-stationary spherical air cavities on IMRT dose delivery in transverse magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bol, G. H.; Lagendijk, J. J. W.; Raaymakers, B. W.

    2015-01-01

    With the development of the 1.5 T MRI linear accelerator and the clinical introduction of the 0.35 T ViewRay™ system, delivering intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in a transverse magnetic field becomes increasingly important. When delivering dose in the presence of a transverse magnetic field, one of the most prominent phenomena occurs around air cavities: the electron return effect (ERE). For stationary, spherical air cavities which are centrally located in the phantom, the ERE can be compensated by using opposing beams configurations in combination with IMRT. In this paper we investigate the effects of non-stationary spherical air cavities, centrally located within the target in a phantom containing no organs at risk, on IMRT dose delivery in 0.35 T and 1.5 T transverse magnetic fields by using Monte Carlo simulations. We show that IMRT can be used for compensating ERE around those air cavities, except for intrafraction appearing or disappearing air cavities. For these cases, gating or plan re-optimization should be used. We also analyzed the option of using IMRT plans optimized at 0 T to be delivered in the presence of 0.35 T and 1.5 T magnetic field. When delivering dose at 0.35 T, IMRT plans optimized at 0 T and 0.35 T perform equally well regarding ERE compensation. Within a 1.5 T environment, the 1.5 T optimized plans perform slightly better for the static and random intra- and interfraction air cavity movement cases than the 0 T optimized plans. For non-stationary spherical air cavities with a baseline shift (intra- and interfraction) the 0 T optimized plans perform better. These observations show the intrinsic ERE compensation by equidistant and opposing beam configurations for spherical air cavities within the target area. IMRT gives some additional compensation, but only in case of correct positioning of the air cavity according to the IMRT compensation. For intrafraction appearing or disappearing air cavities this correct positioning is absent

  18. Water Resources Data. Ohio - Water Year 1992. Volume 1. Ohio River Basin excluding project data

    SciTech Connect

    H.L. Shindel; J.H. Klingler; J.P. Mangus; L.E. Trimble

    1993-03-01

    Water-resources data for the 1992 water year for Ohio consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of ground-water wells. This report, in two volumes, contains records for water discharge at 121 gaging stations, 336 wells, and 72 partial-record sites; and water levels at 312 observation wells. Also included are data from miscellaneous sites. Additional water data were collected at various sites not involved in the systematic data-collection program and are published as miscellaneous measurements and analyses. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System collected by the US Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in Ohio. Volume 1 covers the central and southern parts of Ohio, emphasizing the Ohio River Basin. (See Order Number DE95010451 for Volume 2 covering the northern part of Ohio.)

  19. Evaluation of near surface ozone and particulate matter in air quality simulations driven by dynamically downscaled historical meteorological fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seltzer, Karl M.; Nolte, Christopher G.; Spero, Tanya L.; Appel, K. Wyat; Xing, Jia

    2016-08-01

    In this study, techniques typically used for future air quality projections are applied to a historical 11-year period to assess the performance of the modeling system when the driving meteorological conditions are obtained using dynamical downscaling of coarse-scale fields without correcting toward higher-resolution observations. The Weather Research and Forecasting model and the Community Multiscale Air Quality model are used to simulate regional climate and air quality over the contiguous United States for 2000-2010. The air quality simulations for that historical period are then compared to observations from four national networks. Comparisons are drawn between defined performance metrics and other published modeling results for predicted ozone, fine particulate matter, and speciated fine particulate matter. The results indicate that the historical air quality simulations driven by dynamically downscaled meteorology are typically within defined modeling performance benchmarks and are consistent with results from other published modeling studies using finer-resolution meteorology. This indicates that the regional climate and air quality modeling framework utilized here does not introduce substantial bias, which provides confidence in the method's use for future air quality projections.

  20. THE UNIVERSITY OF AKRON URBAN AIR POLLUTION AND HUMAN HEALTH STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Approximately 350 volunteers from East Cleveland, Ohio and 320 counterparts from Elyria, Ohio were studied for the chronic effects of air pollution. The East Cleveland area was chosen for its proximity to heavy industrial air pollution, and Elyria, because it is an urban area wit...

  1. East Ohio gas 'bridges' service to reach new customers

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-12-01

    A lift bridge across the Cuyahoga River at the eastern end of Whiskey Island provided the most feasible route to five new industrial customers for East Ohio Gas Co. in Cleveland. Previously considered ''unpipeable'', the island was reached by building a line along the stationary bridgework 125 ft above the bridge. The 6-in pipe is protected by a heat-fused epoxy coating; welded joints were covered in the field with heat-shrink sleeves. The line is fully electrically insulated and protected from lightning.

  2. Bioremediation Techniques of Oil Contaminated Soils in Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Hodges, David

    1996-10-03

    The objective of this project is to develop environmentally sound and cost-effective remediation techniques for crude oil contaminated soils. By providing a guidance manual to oil and gas operators, the Ohio Division of Oil and Gas regulatory authority hopes to reduce remediation costs while improving voluntary compliance with soil clean-up requirements. This shall be accomplished by conducting a series of field tests to define the optimum range for nutrient and organic enhancement to biologically remediate soils contaminated with brines and crude oil having a wide rage of viscosity.

  3. Field-scale demonstration of induced biogeochemical reductive dechlorination at Dover Air Force Base, Dover, Delaware

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Lonnie G.; Everett, Jess W.; Becvar, Erica; DeFeo, Donald

    2006-11-01

    Biogeochemical reductive dechlorination (BiRD) is a new remediation approach for chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs). The approach stimulates common sulfate-reducing soil bacteria, facilitating the geochemical conversion of native iron minerals into iron sulfides. Iron sulfides have the ability to chemically reduce many common CAH compounds including PCE, TCE, DCE, similar to zero valent iron (Fe 0). Results of a field test at Dover Air Force Base, Dover, Delaware, are given in this paper. BiRD was stimulated by direct injection of Epson salt (MgSO 4·7H 2O) and sodium (L) lactate (NaC 3H 5O 3) in five injection wells. Sediment was sampled before and 8 months after injection. Significant iron sulfide minerals developed in the sandy aquifer matrix. From ground water analyses, treatment began a few weeks after injection with up to 95% reduction in PCE, TCE, and cDCE in less than 1 year. More complete CAH treatment is likely at a larger scale than this demonstration.

  4. Field-scale demonstration of induced biogeochemical reductive dechlorination at Dover Air Force Base, Dover, Delaware.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Lonnie G; Everett, Jess W; Becvar, Erica; DeFeo, Donald

    2006-11-20

    Biogeochemical reductive dechlorination (BiRD) is a new remediation approach for chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs). The approach stimulates common sulfate-reducing soil bacteria, facilitating the geochemical conversion of native iron minerals into iron sulfides. Iron sulfides have the ability to chemically reduce many common CAH compounds including PCE, TCE, DCE, similar to zero valent iron (Fe(0)). Results of a field test at Dover Air Force Base, Dover, Delaware, are given in this paper. BiRD was stimulated by direct injection of Epson salt (MgSO(4).7H(2)O) and sodium (L) lactate (NaC(3)H(5)O(3)) in five injection wells. Sediment was sampled before and 8 months after injection. Significant iron sulfide minerals developed in the sandy aquifer matrix. From ground water analyses, treatment began a few weeks after injection with up to 95% reduction in PCE, TCE, and cDCE in less than 1 year. More complete CAH treatment is likely at a larger scale than this demonstration. PMID:16949177

  5. Soot formation and temperature field structure in laminar propane-air diffusion flames at elevated pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Bento, Decio S.; Guelder, OEmer L.; Thomson, Kevin A.

    2006-06-15

    The effect of pressure on soot formation and the structure of the temperature field was studied in coflow propane-air laminar diffusion flames over the pressure range of 0.1 to 0.73 MPa in a high-pressure combustion chamber. The fuel flow rate was selected so that the soot was completely oxidized within the visible flame and the flame was stable at all pressures. Spectral soot emission was used to measure radially resolved soot volume fraction and soot temperature as a function of pressure. Additional soot volume fraction measurements were made at selected heights using line-of-sight light attenuation. Soot concentration values from these two techniques agreed to within 30% and both methods exhibited similar trends in the spatial distribution of soot concentration. Maximum line-of-sight soot concentration along the flame centerline scaled with pressure; the pressure exponent was about 1.4 for pressures between 0.2 and 0.73 MPa. Peak carbon conversion to soot, defined as the percentage of fuel carbon content converted to soot, also followed a power-law dependence on pressure, where the pressure exponent was near to unity for pressures between 0.2 and 0.73 MPa. Soot temperature measurements indicated that the overall temperatures decreased with increasing pressure; however, the temperature gradients increased with increasing pressure. (author)

  6. Differential Responses in Two Varieties of Winter Wheat to Elevated Ozone Concentration Under Fully Open-air Field Conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two modern cultivars (Yangmai16 (Y16) and Yangfumai 2 (Y2)) of winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) of almost identical phenology were investigated for impacts of elevated ozone concentration (E-O3) on physiological characters related to photosynthesis under fully open-air field conditions in China. ...

  7. Evaluation of near surface ozone and particulate matter in air quality simulations driven by dynamically downscaled historical meteorological fields

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study, techniques typically used for future air quality projections are applied to a historical 11-year period to assess the performance of the modeling system when the driving meteorological conditions are obtained using dynamical downscaling of coarse-scale fields witho...

  8. Direct measurement of the characteristic three-body electron attachment time in the atmospheric air in direct current electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Shutov, A. V.; Smetanin, I. V.; Ionin, A. A.; Levchenko, A. O.; Seleznev, L. V.; Sinitsyn, D. V.; Ustinovskii, N. N.; Zvorykin, V. D.

    2013-07-15

    We report the results of theoretical and experimental study of the characteristic time for three-body attachment of electrons produced by 100 fs UV laser pulse in the atmosphere air in the external DC electric field ranged from 0.2 to 10 kV/cm.

  9. FIELD AUDIT RESULTS WITH ORGANIC GAS STANDARDS ON VOLATILE ORGANIC AMBIENT AIR SAMPLERS EQUIPPED WITH TENAX GC (GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The results from two field audits of Tenax-equipped sampling systems measuring the volatile organic (VOC) concentrations in ambient air are reported. The audited samplers collected the VOC's on Tenax GC (a solid adsorbent) with the VOC's later thermally desorbed and then analyzed...

  10. Field Operations and Enforcement Manual for Air Pollution Control. Volume II: Control Technology and General Source Inspection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weisburd, Melvin I.

    The Field Operations and Enforcement Manual for Air Pollution Control, Volume II, explains in detail the following: technology of source control, modification of operations, particulate control equipment, sulfur dioxide removal systems for power plants, and control equipment for gases and vapors; inspection procedures for general sources, fuel…

  11. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 4): Naval Air Station Cecil Field, Operable Unit 6, Jacksonville, FL, September 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    The site name is the Golf Course Pesticide Disposal Area, Site 11, Operable Unit (OU) 6. The site is located in a wooded area between the 11th fairway and the 17th green at the Naval Air Station (NAS) Cecil Field golf course, Jacksonville, Florida. The purpose of the interim remedial action is to remove buried containers of pesticides and associated contaminated soil.

  12. Source evaluation report phase 2 investigation: Limited field investigation. Final report: United States Air Force Environmental Restoration Program, Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-10-01

    This report describes the limited field investigation work done to address issues and answer unresolved questions regarding a collection of potential contaminant sources at Eielson Air Force Base (AFB), near Fairbanks, Alaska. These sources were listed in the Eielson AFB Federal Facility Agreement supporting the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) cleanup of the base. The limited field investigation began in 1993 to resolve all remaining technical issues and provide the data and analysis required to evaluate the environmental hazard associated with these sites. The objective of the limited field investigation was to allow the remedial project managers to sort each site into one of three categories: requiring remedial investigation/feasibility study, requiring interim removal action, or requiring no further remedial action.

  13. Crop losses from air pollutants: A computer and field-based assessment program and crop and forest losses from air pollutants: An assessment program. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Mutters, R.; Guzy, M.; Thompson, C.R.

    1993-10-01

    The Air Resources Board-sponsored Crop Loss Assessment Program quantifies potential ozone-caused yield losses in 26 crops grown in California. Statewide yield loss estimates were made with aggregated county statistics, and at a subcounty level for the southern San Joaquin Valley. Interpolations of statewide 7-hr mean zone levels were made for selected air basins delimited by a 2000-ft altitudinal barrier. Estimated yield losses were calculated using 2.50 pphm as a background 12-hr average concentration. Regression analyses were performed in a detailed analysis of cotton yield responses in Kern County. Statistically significant regressions of yield vs. ozone concentration, soil characteristics and cotton variety were observed. A field survey to identify ozone injury in cotton, almond and grape was conducted at 11 sites in the Central Valley.

  14. Field assessment of induction motor efficiency through air-gap torque

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, J.S.; Sorenson, P.L.

    1995-11-01

    Induction motors are the most popular motors used in industry. This paper further suggests the use of air-gap torque method to evaluate their efficiency and load changes. The fundamental difference between Method E and the air-gap torque method is discussed. Efficiency assessments conducted on induction motors under various conditions show the accuracy and potential of the air-gap torque method.

  15. Electric air filtration: theory, laboratory studies, hardware development, and field evaluations

    SciTech Connect

    Bergman, W.; Biermann, A.; Kuhl, W.; Lum, B.; Bogdanoff, A.; Hebard, H.; Hall, M.; Banks, D.; Mazumder, M.; Johnson, J.

    1983-09-01

    We summarize the results of a seven-year research project for the US Department of Energy (DOE) to develop electric air filters that extend the service life of high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters used in the nuclear industry. This project was unique to Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and it entailed comprehensive theory, laboratory studies, and hardware development. We present our work in three major areas: (1) theory of and instrumentation for filter test methods, (2) theoretical and laboratory studies of electric air filters, and (3) development and evaluation of eight experimental electric air filters.

  16. 3. Photocopied 1974 from The Baltimore and Ohio Railroad and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Photocopied 1974 from The Baltimore and Ohio Railroad and Its Branches, from the Lakes to the Sea, Baltimore, 1872. EARLY VIEW AT TRACK LEVEL. - Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, Tray Run Viaduct, Spanning Tray Run, Rowlesburg, Preston County, WV

  17. 26. Photocopy of drawing, Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, District Engineer's ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. Photocopy of drawing, Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, District Engineer's Office, 1942 PILE RECORD PLAN, RECONSTRUCTION OF FELLS STREET WHARF, TOBACCO WAREHOUSE - Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, Tobacco Warehouse, 1000-1001 Fell Street, Baltimore, Independent City, MD

  18. GULF MOBILE & OHIO WOOD TRESTLE BRIDGE LINKING TUSCALOOSA AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    GULF MOBILE & OHIO WOOD TRESTLE BRIDGE LINKING TUSCALOOSA AND NORTHPORT ACROSS THE WARRIOR RIVER. - Gulf, Mobile & Ohio Railroad Bridge, Spans Black Warrior River between Northport & Tuscaloosa, Tuscaloosa, Tuscaloosa County, AL

  19. VIEW LOOKING TOWARDS NORTHPORT, GULF MOBILE & OHIO RAILROAD BRIDGE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW LOOKING TOWARDS NORTHPORT, GULF MOBILE & OHIO RAILROAD BRIDGE LINKS TUSCALOOSA AND NORTHPORT. - Gulf, Mobile & Ohio Railroad Bridge, Spans Black Warrior River between Northport & Tuscaloosa, Tuscaloosa, Tuscaloosa County, AL

  20. Evaluation of CMAQ and CAMx Ensemble Air Quality Forecasts during the 2015 MAPS-Seoul Field Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, E.; Kim, S.; Bae, C.; Kim, H. C.; Kim, B. U.

    2015-12-01

    The performance of Air quality forecasts during the 2015 MAPS-Seoul Field Campaign was evaluated. An forecast system has been operated to support the campaign's daily aircraft route decisions for airborne measurements to observe long-range transporting plume. We utilized two real-time ensemble systems based on the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF)-Sparse Matrix Operator Kernel Emissions (SMOKE)-Comprehensive Air quality Model with extensions (CAMx) modeling framework and WRF-SMOKE- Community Multi_scale Air Quality (CMAQ) framework over northeastern Asia to simulate PM10 concentrations. Global Forecast System (GFS) from National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) was used to provide meteorological inputs for the forecasts. For an additional set of retrospective simulations, ERA Interim Reanalysis from European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) was also utilized to access forecast uncertainties from the meteorological data used. Model Inter-Comparison Study for Asia (MICS-Asia) and National Institute of Environment Research (NIER) Clean Air Policy Support System (CAPSS) emission inventories are used for foreign and domestic emissions, respectively. In the study, we evaluate the CMAQ and CAMx model performance during the campaign by comparing the results to the airborne and surface measurements. Contributions of foreign and domestic emissions are estimated using a brute force method. Analyses on model performance and emissions will be utilized to improve air quality forecasts for the upcoming KORUS-AQ field campaign planned in 2016.

  1. The impact of rising electric power generation on vegetation in Southeastern Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, J.S.; Showman, R.E.

    1983-06-01

    This report summarizes the results of annual field surveys of lichens and higher vegetation that were conducted from 1971 through 1982 in the vicinity of power generating stations in southeastern Ohio. Despite an increase of more than two-fold in SO/sub 2/ emissions during that period, foliar injury to vegetation by SO/sub 2/ was observed only in 1973.

  2. Assessment and Decision Making in Two Schools: The Ohio Site. Technical Report No. 596.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scharer, Patricia L.; Rogers, Theresa

    A study examined the relationship between assessment and decision making in one of five school districts participating in a national study. Data collected in two alternative elementary schools (one literature-based and one informal) in a large urban school district in Ohio included field notes of classroom observations during reading and language…

  3. Time of travel of solutes in selected reaches of Ohio streams, 1973 and 1975

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Westfall, Arthur O.

    1977-01-01

    The basic field data for time-of-travel measurements on six streams in Ohio are presented. In gereral, additional data on stream cross sections, tributary inflows, and chemical analyses for mainstream and tributary flows are given. Insufficient data were obtained to establish time-distance or time-discharge relationships.

  4. Ultrasonic extraction and field-portable anodic stripping voltammetry for the determination of lead in workplace air samples.

    PubMed

    Ashley, K; Mapp, K J; Millson, M

    1998-10-01

    An on-site, field-portable analytical method for the determination of lead in workplace air samples, based on the use of ultrasonic extraction and anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV), was evaluated. Workplace air samples were obtained using a standard method involving particulate collection onto mixed cellulose ester membrane filters. Samples were collected at work sites where airborne particulates were generated from the abrasive blasting of lead-containing paint on highway bridges. Ultrasonic extraction (UE) of air filter samples in diluted nitric acid, followed by portable ASV, was used for the determination of lead. Also, performance evaluation samples consisting of reference materials of known lead concentration were subjected to the UE-ASV procedure for lead determination. Confirmatory analyses of the air filters and performance evaluation samples subjected to the UE-ASV lead measurement method were conducted by hotplate digestion in concentrated nitric acid and 30% hydrogen peroxide, followed by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometric (ICP-AES) determination of lead. Recoveries of lead from performance evaluation materials (when using the UE-ASV method) were found to be quantitative. The performance of the UE-ASV method for lead in air filters was found to be acceptable, as evaluated by comparison with results from hotplate strong acid digestion followed by ICP-AES analysis. Based on the results of this study, the ultrasonic extraction/portable ASV procedure demonstrates potential for the on-site determination of lead in personal breathing zone and area air samples. PMID:9794065

  5. Is mudflow in Sidoarjo, East Java due to the pumping mechanism of hot air bubbles? : Laboratory simulations and field observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nurhandoko, Bagus Endar B.

    2015-09-01

    Extraordinary mudflow has happened in Sidoarjo, East Java, Indonesia since 2006. This mud comes from the giant crater that is located close to the BJP - 01. Thousands of homes have been submerged due to mudflow. Till today this giant mud crater is still has great strength despite the mud flowing over 8 years. This is a very rare phenomenon in the world. This mud flow mechanism raises big questions, because it has been going on for years, naturally the mudflow will stop by itself because the pressure should be reduced. This research evaluates all aspects of integrated observations, laboratory tests and field observations since the beginning of this ongoing mudflow. Laboratory tests were done by providing hot air bubbles into the fluid inside the inverted funnel showed that the fluid can flow with a high altitude. It is due to the mechanism of buoyant force from air bubbles to the water where the contrast density of the water and the air is quite large. Quantity of air bubbles provides direct effect to the debit of fluid flow. Direct observation in the field, in 2006 and 2007, with TIMNAS and LPPM ITB showed the large number of air bubbles on the surface of the mud craters. Temperature observation on the surface of mud crater is around 98 degree C whereas at greater depth shows the temperature is increasingly rising. This strengthens the hypothesis or proves that the mud pumping mechanism comes from buoyant force of hot air bubbles. Inversion gravity images show that the deep subsurface of main crater is close to volcanic layers or root of Arjuna mountain. Based on the simulation laboratory and field observation data, it can be concluded that the geothermal factor plays a key role in the mudflow mechanism.

  6. Prevalence of permanent threshold shifts in the United States Air Force hearing conservation program by career field, 2005-2011.

    PubMed

    Lloyd Soderlund, Laurel; McKenna, Elizabeth A; Tastad, Katie; Paul, Marika

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe changes in hearing, using the permanent threshold shift metric, among United States Air Force servicemembers, including active duty, Reserve and Air National Guard components, for demographics, job categories, and career fields. In the United States Air Force, only servicemembers who are occupationally exposed routinely to hazardous noise are monitored. Audiogram records and demographic variables were analyzed for servicemembers from 2005-2011 using data from the Department of Defense system that captures occupational hearing tests worldwide. Results suggest that occupational hearing loss was larger in males than females, in officers than enlisted populations, and in Reserve and Air National Guard than in active duty. Compared to similar civilian career fields, active duty has lower prevalence rates for occupational hearing loss overall, although Reserve and Air National Guard prevalence rates were more similar to the civilian reported rates. The proportion of personnel with permanent threshold shifts varied between 4.6-16.7% within active duty career fields, which includes 76% of the population for study timeframe. Permanent threshold shift was larger in small job categories, and in jobs that are not considered exposed to hazardous noise routinely which is comparative with results from civilian data analysis of occupational hearing loss. Further investigation into testing practices for Air Force specific groups, use of the system for nonoccupational hearing testing, and challenges to follow-up compliance is warranted. Increased surveillance procedures for occupational hearing loss are needed to address concerns on the prevalence of servicemember hearing loss, the role of recreational and lifestyle factors to contribute the high reported hearing loss prevalence of veterans compared to nonveterans. PMID:26720128

  7. FIELD EVALUATION OF SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS FOR ORGANIC POLLUTANTS IN INDOOR AIR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objectives of the study were to determine the feasibility of the use of newly developed indoor air samplers in residential indoor air sampling and to evaluate methodology for characterization of the concentrations of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), PAH derivatives, a...

  8. Field validation of sound mitigation models and air pollutant emission testing in support of missile motor disposal activities.

    PubMed

    McFarland, Michael J; Palmer, Glenn R; Kordich, Micheal M; Pollet, Dean A; Jensen, James A; Lindsay, Mitchell H

    2005-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Defense approved activities conducted at the Utah Test and Training Range (UTTR) include both operational readiness test firing of intercontinental ballistic missile motors as well as the destruction of obsolete or otherwise unusable intercontinental ballistic missile motors through open burn/open detonation (OB/ OD). Within the Utah Division of Air Quality, these activities have been identified as having the potential to generate unacceptable noise levels, as well as significant amounts of hazardous air pollutants. Hill Air Force Base, UT, has completed a series of field tests at the UTTR in which sound-monitoring surveillance of OB/OD activities was conducted to validate the Sound Intensity Prediction System (SIPS) model. Using results generated by the SIPS model to support the decision to detonate, the UTTR successfully disposed of missile motors having an aggregate net explosive weight (NEW) of 56,500 lbs without generating adverse noise levels within populated areas. These results suggest that, under appropriate conditions, missile motors of even larger NEW may be detonated without exceeding regulatory noise limits. In conjunction with collecting noise monitoring data, air quality data was collected to support the development of air emission factors for both static missile motor firings and OB/OD activities. Through the installation of 15 ground-based air samplers, the generation of combustion fixed gases, hazardous air pollutants, and chlorides were monitored during the 56,500-lb NEW detonation event. Comparison of field measurements to predictions generated from the U.S. Navy's energetic combustion pollutant formation model, POLU4WN, indicated that, as the detonation fireball expanded from ground zero, organic compounds as well as carbon monoxide continued to oxidize as the hot gases reacted with ambient air. Hazardous air pollutant analysis of air samplers confirmed the presence of chloromethane, benzene, toluene, 1,2-propadiene, and

  9. The Medina County, Ohio, central processing facility

    SciTech Connect

    White, K.M.

    1994-08-01

    Before deciding on the appropriate county recycling facility for their communities, waste management officials from Medina County, Ohio, spent three years researching their options. First and foremost, they wanted to generate a recycling amount that would at least double House Bill 592's requirements which calls for a 25% reduction in reliance on landfill space. After issuing a request for proposals, the county opted for a central processing facility (CPF)--which was designed, built, and is now operated by Norton Environmental (Independence, Ohio). Currently, the CPF extracts and processes recyclables, materials for refuse-derived fuel (RDF), and compostables from a mixed solid waste stream. After operating for just over one year, the facility, which is located in Seville, Ohio, is well on its way to achieving its goal of recovering two-thirds of the county's incoming mixed solid waste stream, and waste management officials there couldn't be happier with their selection.

  10. Field Measurements of Heating Efficiency of Electric Forced-Air Furnaces in Six Manufactured Homes.

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Bob; Palmiter, Larry S.; Siegel, Jeff

    1994-07-26

    This report presents the results of field measurements of heating efficiency for six manufactured homes in the Pacific Northwest heated with electric forced-air systems. This is the first in a series of regional and national efforts to measure in detail the heating efficiency of manufactured homes. Only six homes were included in this study because of budgetary constraints; therefore this is not a representative sample. These investigations do provide some useful information on the heating efficiency of these homes. Useful comparisons can be drawn between these study homes and site-built heating efficiencies measured with a similar protocol. The protocol used to test these homes is very similar to another Ecotope protocol used in the study conducted in 1992 and 1993 for the Bonneville Power Administration to test the heating efficiency of 24 homes. This protocol combined real-time power measurements of furnace energy usage with energy usage during co-heat periods. Accessory data such as house and duct tightness measurements and tracer gas measurements were used to describe these homes and their heating system efficiency. Ensuring that manufactured housing is constructed in an energy and resource efficient manner is of increasing concern to manufactured home builders and consumers. No comparable work has been done to measure the heating system efficiency of MCS manufactured homes, although some co-heat tests have been performed on manufactured homes heated with natural gas to validate HUD thermal standards. It is expected that later in 1994 more research of this kind will be conducted, and perhaps a less costly and less time-consuming method for testing efficiencies will be develops.

  11. Preliminary survey report: evaluation of brake-drum-service controls at Ohio Department of Transportation, Maintenance Facility, Lebanon, Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Sheehy, J.W.

    1986-07-01

    The Ohio Department of Transportation, Maintenance Facility, Lebanon, Ohio, was visited as part of a study of asbestos control during the maintenance and repair of vehicular brakes. The effectiveness of various control technologies designed to reduce asbestos exposure were evaluated.

  12. Exploring Ohio's Private Education Sector. School Survey Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Catt, Andrew D.

    2014-01-01

    Exploring Ohio's Private Education Sector is the second entry in the Friedman Foundation for Educational Choice's "School Survey Series." This report synthesizes information on Ohio's private schools collected by the U.S. Department of Education and the Ohio Department of Education (ODE). Two appendices provide supplementary tables and…

  13. Ohio Vocational Education and Its Relationship to America 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Dept. of Education, Columbus. Div. of Vocational and Career Education.

    Ohio's mission in the 1990s is to prepare youth and adults to make informed choices and to enter, compete, and advance successfully in the changing work world. One way to measure Ohio's progress is to examine the Ohio vocational system and its direct relationship to the National Education Goals presented in America 2000. Goal 1 is readiness for…

  14. Implementation of Ohio's School-to-Work System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metis Associates, Inc., New York, NY.

    The Ohio School-to-Work (STW) Office was created in 1994 to manage state agencies' efforts to support 11 school-to-work pilot projects across Ohio. The STW Office shared its management responsibilities with the School-to-Work "A Team," which consisted of representatives from five Ohio departments and agencies, key business organizations, major…

  15. Review of "Yearning to Break Free: Ohio Superintendents Speak out"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horn, Catherine; Dworkin, Gary

    2011-01-01

    The report, Yearning to Break Free: Ohio Superintendents Speak Out, describes findings of a survey of 246 Ohio school superintendents about critical issues facing the state's educational system. In particular, the intent of the study was to examine how superintendents might do more with fewer resources. The authors conclude that Ohio districts…

  16. Applying Systems Thinking to Improve Special Education in Ohio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levenson, Nathan

    2012-01-01

    This report was written at the request of the Thomas B. Fordham Institute and the Educational Service Center of Central Ohio, to inform the discussion of state-level policy makers and other stakeholders on how to improve the quality and cost-effectiveness of services provided to Ohio's students with special needs. It is critical for Ohio to find…

  17. Basic Data Series. Ohio Higher Education System. 1987 Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio Board of Regents, Columbus.

    A biennial publication of data collections (historical, comparative, student, staffing, space, and financial) from Ohio's state-assisted colleges and universities is presented. Six sections provide information on the following: (1) historical data (student enrollment, U.S., Ohio public and private totals; student enrollment, Ohio public…

  18. Elemental composition of suspended particulates as functions of space and time in Cleveland, Ohio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neustadter, H. E.; King, R. B.; Fordyce, J. S.

    1975-01-01

    An approach to the analysis of a very large elemental concentration data set. The particular data considered was generated by instrumental neutron activation and emission spectroscopy analyses of over 750 24-hour ambient air particulate samples collected at 16 sites in Cleveland, Ohio, during the 15 months from August 1971 thru October 1972. Examples are presented that show the use of multiple approaches to interpreting the data, including pairwise correlation statistics, selective data plotting and cluster analysis.

  19. Thermal comfort in the humid tropics: Field experiments in air conditioned and naturally ventilated buildings in Singapore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Dear, R. J.; Leow, K. G.; Foo, S. C.

    1991-12-01

    Thermal comfort field experiments were conducted in Singapore in both naturally ventilated highrise residential buildings and air conditioned office buildings. Each of the 818 questionnaire responses was made simultaneously with a detailed set of indoor climatic measurements, and estimates of clothing insulation and metabolic rate. Results for the air conditioned sample indicated that office buildings were overcooled, causing up to one-third of their occupants to experience cool thermal comfort sensations. These observations in air conditioned buildings were broadly consistent with the ISO, ASHRAE and Singapore indoor climatic standards. Indoor climates of the naturally ventilated apartments during the day and early evening were on average three degrees warmer than the ISO comfort standard prescriptions, but caused much less thermal discomfort than expected. Discrepancies between thermal comfort responses in apartment blocks and office buildings are discussed in terms of contemporary perceptual theory.

  20. 78 FR 68367 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Ohio NOX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-14

    ... and Executive Order Reviews I. Background On October 27, 1998 (63 FR 57356), EPA published the... 1176 (D.C. Cir. 2008). In response to the remand of CAIR, on August 8, 2011 (76 FR 48208), EPA... review by the Office of Management and Budget under Executive Order 12866 (58 FR 51735, October 4,...

  1. 78 FR 69299 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Ohio SO2

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-19

    ..., 2008 at 73 FR 15083. For a full history of the federally approved revisions to OAC 3745-18, see the Background section of rulemaking published in the Federal Register on May 1, 2007 at 72 FR 23783. II. Review... and Budget under Executive Order 12866 (58 FR 51735, October 4, 1993); ] Does not impose...

  2. Field evaluation of nanofilm detectors for measuring acidic particles in indoor and outdoor air.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Beverly S; Heikkinen, Maire S A; Hazi, Yair; Gao, Hai; Peters, Paul; Lippmann, Morton

    2004-09-01

    This field evaluation study was conducted to assess new technology designed to measure number concentrations of strongly acidic ultrafine particles. Interest in these particles derives from their potential to cause adverse health effects. Current methods for counting and sizing airborne ultrafine particles cannot isolate those particles that are acidic. We hypothesized that the size-resolved number concentration of such particles to which people are exposed could be measured by newly developed iron nanofilm detectors on which sulfuric acid (H2SO4*) droplets produce distinctive ringed reaction sites visible by atomic force microscopy (AFM). We carried out field measurements using an array of samplers, with and without the iron nanofilm detectors, that allowed indirect comparison of particle number concentrations and size-resolved measures of acidity. The iron nanofilm detectors are silicon chips (5 mm x 5 mm x 0.6 mm) that are coated with iron by vapor deposition. The iron layer was 21.5 or 26 nm thick for the two batches used in these experiments. After exposure the detector surface was scanned topographically by AFM to view and enumerate the ringed acid reaction sites and deposited nonacidic particles. The number of reaction sites and particles per scan can be counted directly on the image displayed by AFM. Sizes can also be measured, but for this research we did not size particles collected in the field. The integrity of the surface of iron nanofilm detectors was monitored by laboratory analysis and by deploying blank detectors and detectors that had previously been exposed to H2SO4 calibration aerosols. The work established that the detectors could be used with confidence in temperate climates. Under extreme high humidity and high temperature, the surface film was liable to detach from the support, but remaining portions of the film still produced reliable data. Exposure to ambient gases in a filtered air canister during the field tests did not affect the film

  3. A comparison of methods for the assessment of odor impacts on air quality: Field inspection (VDI 3940) and the air dispersion model CALPUFF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranzato, Laura; Barausse, Alberto; Mantovani, Alice; Pittarello, Alberto; Benzo, Maurizio; Palmeri, Luca

    2012-12-01

    Unpleasant odors are a major cause of public complaints concerning air quality and represent a growing social problem in industrialized countries. However, the assessment of odor pollution is still regarded as a difficult task, because olfactory nuisance can be caused by many different chemical compounds, often found in hard-to-detect concentrations, and the perception of odors is influenced by subjective thresholds; moreover, the impact of odor sources on air quality is mediated by complex atmospheric dispersion processes. The development of standardized assessment approaches to odor pollution and proper international regulatory tools are urgently needed. In particular, comparisons of the methodologies commonly used nowadays to assess odor impacts on air quality are required. Here, we assess the olfactory nuisance caused by an anaerobic treatment plant for municipal solid waste by means of two alternative techniques: the field inspection procedure and the atmospheric dispersion model CALPUFF. Our goal was to compare rigorously their estimates of odor nuisance, both qualitatively (spatial extent of odor impact) and quantitatively (intensity of odor nuisance). To define the impact of odors, we referred to the German standards, based on the frequency of odor episodes in terms of odor hours. We report a satisfying, although not perfect agreement between the estimates provided by the two techniques. For example, they assessed similar spatial extents of odor pollution, but different frequencies of odor episodes in locations where the odor nuisance was highest. The comparison highlights strengths and weaknesses for both approaches. CALPUFF is a cheaper methodology which can be used predictively, but fugitive emissions are difficult to model reliably, because of uncertainty regarding timing, location and emission rate. Field inspection takes into account the role of human perception, but unlike the model it does not always characterize precisely the extent of the odor

  4. 41. AUXILIARY CHAMBER, CONCRETE ENCLOSURE CHAMBER AIR LOCK (EXTERIOR), LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    41. AUXILIARY CHAMBER, CONCRETE ENCLOSURE CHAMBER AIR LOCK (EXTERIOR), LOOKING NORTHEAST FROM SOUTHWEST CORNER (LOCATION AAA) - Shippingport Atomic Power Station, On Ohio River, 25 miles Northwest of Pittsburgh, Shippingport, Beaver County, PA

  5. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 89-065-2119, One Government Center, Toledo, Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Burr, G.A.; Alderfer, R.J.

    1991-06-01

    In response to a request from the Ohio Department of Health, an investigation was undertaken of possible hazardous working conditions at One Government Center, a modern 22 story municipal office building located in downtown Toledo, Ohio. Employees reported fatigue, nausea, headache, and other effects perhaps linked to poor indoor air quality. The building housed offices for the city of Toledo, the county and the state of Ohio. Questionnaires were administered to workers, and air quality measurements were made on floors 15 through 22. For the most part the concentration of carbon-dioxide (124389) was below the acceptable limit (1000 parts per million) with two exceptions which probably reflected a higher occupancy level and more extensive use of office partitions. Temperature and humidity levels measured were all within the acceptable limits. Respirable particulate levels in a smoking lounge located on the seventeenth floor were 454 micrograms/cubic meter and exceeded the recommended limit of 150 micrograms/cubic meter. The authors conclude that the indoor air quality parameters were within acceptable limits in most of the areas. The authors recommend that the existing smoking policy should be modified, and that the number of employees in specific areas be reduced or the ventilation in these same areas should be increased.

  6. Development of Gridded Fields of Urban Canopy Parameters for Advanced Urban Meteorological and Air Quality Models

    EPA Science Inventory

    Urban dispersion and air quality simulation models applied at various horizontal scales require different levels of fidelity for specifying the characteristics of the underlying surfaces. As the modeling scales approach the neighborhood level (~1 km horizontal grid spacing), the...

  7. Field survey of indoor air quality in detached houses in Niigata Prefecture.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, J; Akabayashi, S

    2003-01-01

    In this study, measurements of indoor air quality and ventilation rate of detached wooden houses in Niigata Prefecture are carried out. The air quality (the concentration of formaldehyde (HCHO) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs), the air-tightness of the houses and the life style of the occupants were investigated. The temperature and humidity were logged for 1 week at 10-min intervals using stand-alone data loggers. The measuring points were at 110 and 5 cm above the floor and 10 cm below the ceiling. A 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine-coated silica (DNPH) cartridge (Waters Sep-Pak XpoSure) was used to measure the concentration of HCHO and a passive air sampler (3M Organic Vapor Monitor) was used to measure the concentration of VOCs in the living room for 1 week. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and gas chromatography with mass spectrometry (GC/MS) were used to analyze the average weekly concentration of VOCs. The weekly averaged ventilation rate of the house was measured by perfluorocarbon tracer gas technique (PFT). The main results can be summarized as follows. 1. A total of 38.2% of the occupants felt that the indoor air quality was bad when cooking or smoking in the house took place. 2. The HCHO concentration in the houses is inversely proportional to the air leakage from the house, i.e. it was high for airtight houses. 3. The HCHO concentration in older houses is lower than in new houses of similar air-tightness. 4. When building age increases, HCHO concentration in indoor air decreases. 5. Generally the concentration of benzene, toluene, p-dichlorobenzene, o-, m-, p-xylene is high, especially in a newly constructed house. PMID:12572914

  8. Field assessment of the Village Green Project: an autonomous community air quality monitoring system.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Wan; Hagler, Gayle S W; Williams, Ronald W; Sharpe, Robert N; Weinstock, Lewis; Rice, Joann

    2015-05-19

    Continuous, long-term, and time-resolved measurement of outdoor air pollution has been limited by logistical hurdles and resource constraints. Measuring air pollution in more places is desired to address community concerns regarding local air quality impacts related to proximate sources, to provide data in areas lacking regional air monitoring altogether, or to support environmental awareness and education. This study integrated commercially available technologies to create the Village Green Project (VGP), a durable, solar-powered air monitoring park bench that measures real-time ozone, PM2.5, and meteorological parameters. The data are wirelessly transmitted via cellular modem to a server, where automated quality checks take place before data are provided to the public nearly instantaneously. Over 5500 h of data were successfully collected during the first ten months of pilot testing in Durham, North Carolina, with about 13 days (5.5%) of downtime because of low battery power. Additional data loss (4-14% depending on the measurement) was caused by infrequent wireless communication interruptions and instrument maintenance. The 94.5% operational time via solar power was within 1.5% of engineering calculations using historical solar data for the location. The performance of the VGP was evaluated by comparing the data to nearby air monitoring stations operating federal equivalent methods (FEM), which exhibited good agreement with the nearest benchmark FEMs for hourly ozone (r(2) = 0.79) and PM2.5 (r(2) = 0.76). PMID:25905923

  9. Field determination of vertical permeability to air in the unsaturated zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weeks, Edwin P.

    1978-01-01

    The vertical permeability to air of layered materials in the unsaturated zone may be determined from air pressure data obtained at depth during a period when air pressure is changing at land surface. Such data may be obtained by monitoring barometric pressure with a microbarograph or surveying altimeter and simultaneously measuring down-hole pneumatic head differences in specially constructed piezometers. These data, coupled with air-filled porosity data from other sources, may be compared with the results of electric-analog or numerical solution of the one-dimensional diffusion equation to make a trial-and-error determination of the air permeability for each layer. The permeabilities to air may in turn be converted to equivalent hydraulic conductivity values if the materials are well drained, are permeable enough that the Klinkenberg effect is small, and are structurally unaffected by wetting. The method offers potential advantages over present methods to evaluate sites for artificial recharge by spreading; to evaluate ground-water pollution hazards from feedlots, sanitary landfills , and land irrigated with sewage effluent; and to evaluate sites for temporary storage of gas in the unsaturated zone. (Woodard-USGS)

  10. Cloudy Sounding and Cloud-Top Height Retrieval From AIRS Alone Single Field-of-View Radiance Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisz, Elisabeth; Li, Jun; Li, Jinlong; Zhou, Daniel K.; Huang, Hung-Lung; Goldberg, Mitchell D.; Yang, Ping

    2007-01-01

    High-spectral resolution measurements from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) onboard the EOS (Earth Observing System) Aqua satellite provide unique information about atmospheric state, surface and cloud properties. This paper presents an AIRS alone single field-of-view (SFOV) retrieval algorithm to simultaneously retrieve temperature, humidity and ozone profiles under all weather conditions, as well as cloud top pressure (CTP) and cloud optical thickness (COT) under cloudy skies. For optically thick cloud conditions the above-cloud soundings are derived, whereas for clear skies and optically thin cloud conditions the profiles are retrieved from 0.005 hPa down to the earth's surface. Initial validation has been conducted by using the operational MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) product, ECMWF (European Center of Medium range Weather Forecasts) analysis fields and radiosonde observations (RAOBs). These inter-comparisons clearly demonstrate the potential of this algorithm to process data from 38 high-spectral infrared (IR) sounder instruments.

  11. Calibration and validation of a two-dimensional hydrodynamic model of the Ohio River, Jefferson County, Kentucky

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wagner, C.R.; Mueller, D.S.

    2001-01-01

    The quantification of current patterns is an essential component of a Water Quality Analysis Simulation Program (WASP) application in a riverine environment. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) provided a field validated two-dimensional Resource Management Associates-2 (RMA-2) hydrodynamic model capable of quantifying the steady-flowpatterns in the Ohio River extending from river mile 590 to 630 for the Ohio River Valley Water Sanitation Commission (ORSANCO) water-quality modeling efforts on that reach. Because of the hydrodynamic complexities induced by McAlpine Locks and Dam (Ohio River mile 607), the model was split into two segments: an upstream reach, which extended from the dam upstream to the upper terminus of the study reach at Ohio River mile 590; and a downstream reach, which extended from the dam downstream to a lower terminus at Ohio River mile 636. The model was calibrated to a low-flow hydraulic survey (approximately 35,000 cubic feet per second (ft3/s)) and verified with data collected during a high-flow survey (approximately 390,000 ft3/s). The model calibration and validation process included matching water-surface elevations at 10 locations and velocity profiles at 30 cross sections throughout the study reach. Based on the calibration and validation results, the model is a representative simulation of the Ohio River steady-flow patterns below discharges of approximately 400,000 ft3/s.

  12. SNRB{trademark} air toxics monitoring. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) is currently conducting a project under the DOE`s Clean Coal Technology (CCT II) Program to demonstrate its SO{sub x}NO{sub x}-Rox Box{trademark} (SNRB{trademark}) process in a 5 MWe Field Demonstration Unit at Ohio Edison`s R. E. Burger Plant near Shadyside, Ohio. The objective of the SNRB{trademark} Air Toxics Monitoring Project was to provide data on SNRB{trademark} air toxics emissions control performance to B&W and to add to the DOE/EPRI/EPA data base by quantifying the flow rates of selected hazardous substances (or air toxics) in all of the major input and output streams of the SNRB{trademark} process as well as the power plant. Work under the project included the collection and analysis of representative samples of all major input and output streams of the SNRB{trademark} demonstration unit and the power plant, and the subsequent laboratory analysis of these samples to determine the partitioning of the hazardous substances between the various process streams. Material balances for selected air toxics were subsequently calculated around the SNRB{trademark} and host boiler systems, including the removal efficiencies across each of the major air pollution control devices. This report presents results of the SNRB{trademark} Air Toxics Monitoring Project. In addition to the Introduction, a brief description of the test site, including the Boiler No. 8 and the SNRB{trademark} process, is included in Section H. The concentrations of air toxic emissions are presented in Section II according to compound class. Material balances are included in Section IV for three major systems: boiler, electrostatic precipitator, and SNRB{trademark}. Emission factors and removal efficiencies are also presented according to compound class in Sections V and VI, respectively. A data evaluation is provided in Section VII.

  13. Ohio's Appalachian Children [with] County Factsheets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joyce, Erin; Stoneburner, Chris; Wachtel, Mary

    Noting that one of every eight Ohio children live in Appalachian counties and that preparing these children to become productive, contributing members of Appalachia's culture and economy hinges on making sure that all children are healthy, ready for school, and attend safe and effective public schools, this report is the first to examine health…

  14. Medical Assistant. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    This Ohio Competency Analysis Profile (OCAP), derived from a modified Developing a Curriculum (DACUM) process, is a comprehensive and verified employer competency list for a medical assistant program. It contains units (with or without subunits), competencies, and competency builders that identify the occupational, academic, and employability…

  15. Meat Processor. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    Developed through a modified DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) process involving business, industry, labor, and community agency representatives in Ohio, this document is a comprehensive and verified employer competency profile for meat processing occupations. The list contains units (with and without subunits), competencies, and competency builders…

  16. Improving Ohio's Education Management Information System (EMIS).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Legislative Office of Education Oversight, Columbus.

    Due to legislative mandate, the Ohio Department of Education (ODE) was required to develop a system (the Education Management Information System) that would increase the amount of information available to state-level policy makers and the public. Some recommendations for improving the function of EMIS are offered in this report. The text provides…

  17. Resource Conservation. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    Developed through a modified DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) process involving business, industry, labor, and community agency representatives in Ohio, this document is a comprehensive and verified employer competency profile for resource conservation occupations. The list contains units (with and without subunits), competencies, and competency…

  18. Ohio Conference on Migrant Education, 1969.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rivera, Carlos; And Others

    A workshop conducted in Bowling Green, Ohio, in the summer of 1969 focused attention on identifying problem areas of migrant education and considered some solutions to these problems. The report includes 3 presentations made to the seminar participants. The presentations are entitled (1) The Linguistic Approach in Teaching English as a Second…

  19. Commercial Art. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    This comprehensive and verified employer competency list was developed from a modified DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) process involving business, industry, labor, and community agency representatives from Ohio. This competency list contains 16 units (with or without subunits), competencies, and competency builders that identify the occupational,…

  20. Ohio School-to-Work Glossary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio Office of School-to-Work, Columbus.

    This glossary, which defines 81 terms, is designed as a step toward a common lexicon for developers of school-to-work systems across Ohio. The following are among the terms defined: adult full service centers; advanced or early placement; all aspects of an industry; applied academics; (registered) apprenticeship; articulation; basic skills; career…

  1. Dental Assistant. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    Developed through a modified DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) process involving business, industry, labor, and community agency representatives in Ohio, this document is a comprehensive and verified employer competency profile for dental assistants. The list contains units (with and without subunits), competencies, and competency builders that…

  2. Drafting. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    Developed through a modified DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) process involving business, industry, labor, and community agency representatives in Ohio, this document is a comprehensive and verified employer competency profile for drafting occupations. The list contains units (with and without subunits), competencies, and competency builders that…

  3. OHIO RIVER BASIN ENERGY STUDY: HEALTH ASPECTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report was prepared as part of the Ohio River Basin Energy Study (ORBES), a multi-disciplinary program supported by the Environmental Protection Agency. It attempts to establish health damage functions for energy resource extraction, conversion (i.e., burning of coal to prod...

  4. Ohio Physical Educators' Perceived Professional Development Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hovatter, Rhonda

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation describes research designed to investigate the influence of select teacher and school characteristics on the perceived professional development needs of in-service physical educators in the state of Ohio. Data were collected using a self-report survey instrument comprised of the Professional Development Needs…

  5. Venture Capital Initiative: Ohio's School Improvement Effort.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoo, Soonhwa; Loadman, William E.

    In 1994 the Ohio State Legislature established Venture Capital to support school restructuring. The Venture Capital school initiative is a concept borrowed from the business community in which the corporate entity provides risk capital to parts of the organization to stimulate creative ideas and to provide opportunities for local entities to try…

  6. Practical Nursing. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    Developed through a modified DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) process involving business, industry, labor, and community agency representatives in Ohio, this document is a comprehensive and verified employer competency profile for practical nursing. The list contains units (with and without subunits), competencies, and competency builders that…

  7. Nurse Aide. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    Developed through a modified DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) process involving business, industry, labor, and community agency representatives in Ohio, this document is a comprehensive and verified employer competency profile for nurses' aides. The list contains units (with and without subunits), competencies, and competency builders that identify…

  8. Dairy Producer. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    This Ohio Competency Analysis Profile (OCAP), derived from a modified Developing a Curriculum (DACUM) process, is a current comprehensive and verified employer competency program list for dairy producers. Each unit (with or without subunits) contains competencies and competency builders that identify the occupational, academic, and employability…

  9. Ohio Business Management. Technical Competency Profile (TCP).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ray, Gayl M.; Wilson, Nick; Mangini, Rick

    This document describes the essential competencies from secondary through post-secondary associate degree programs for a career in business management. Ohio College Tech Prep Program standards are described, and a key to profile codes is provided. Sample occupations in this career area, such as management trainee, product manager, and advertising…

  10. Implementation of Head Start in Ohio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Legislative Office of Education Oversight, Columbus.

    This report from the Legislative Office of Education Oversight (LOEO) focuses on Head Start implementation in Ohio, describing its growth over the last 8 years, services provided to children and their families, costs, program quality and how it is monitored, and the challenges faced in expansion. After an extensive summary, chapter 1 describes the…

  11. 75 FR 72947 - Ohio Regulatory Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-29

    ... the August 16, 1982, Federal Register (47 FR 34688). You can also find later actions concerning Ohio's... Comments We asked for public comments on the amendment (Administrative Record No. OH-2188-04) 74 FR 17802... environment from the adverse effects of surface coal mining operations.'' Section 503(a)(1) of SMCRA...

  12. GENOTOXIC PROPERTIES OF MUNICIPAL WASTEWATERS IN OHIO

    EPA Science Inventory

    Wastewaters from six municipal wastewater treatment plants in Ohio were tested at different stages of treatment for mutagenicity in the Ames/Salmonella assay. The chlorinated secondary effluents were also evaluated for induction of sister chromatid exchanges in Chinese hamster ov...

  13. Swine Producer. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    This Ohio Competency Analysis Profile (OCAP), derived from a modified Developing a Curriculum (DACUM) process, is a comprehensive and verified employer competency list for a swine producer program. It contains units (with or without subunits), competencies, and competency builders that identify the occupational, academic, and employability skills…

  14. Agricultural Production. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    This list consists of essential competencies from the following specialized Ohio Competency Analysis Profiles: Beef and Sheep Producers; Crop Producer; Dairy Producer; Poultry Producer; and Swine Producer. Developed through a modified DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) process involving business, industry, labor, and community agency representatives…

  15. Microscopy & microanalysis 2016 in Columbus, Ohio

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Michael, Joseph R.

    2016-01-08

    The article provides information about an upcoming conference from the program chair. The Microscopy Society of America (MSA), the Microanalysis Society (MAS), and the International Metallographic Society (IMS) invite participation in Microscopy & Microanalysis 2016 in Columbus, Ohio, July 24 through July 28, 2016.

  16. Machine Trades. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    This Ohio Competency Analysis Profile (OCAP), derived from a modified Developing a Curriculum (DACUM) process, is a current comprehensive and verified employer competency program list for machine trades. Each unit (with or without subunits) contains competencies and competency builders that identify the occupational, academic, and employability…

  17. Poultry Producer. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    This Ohio Competency Analysis Profile (OCAP), derived from a modified Developing a Curriculum (DACUM) process, is a comprehensive and verified employer competency list for a poultry producer program. It contains units (with or without subunits), competencies, and competency builders that identify the occupational, academic, and employability…

  18. Survey of Public Libraries Summit County, Ohio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blasingame, Ralph

    Library surveys are a means to an objective examination of the library and its services, helping to clarify the purposes that are being served and to assess the methods of providing these services. This survey was undertaken as a cooperative project of the seven public libraries of Summit County, Ohio. Its purpose was to develop a long-range plan…

  19. Entertainment Marketing. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    This Ohio Competency Analysis Profile (OCAP), derived from a modified Developing a Curriculum (DACUM) process, is a current comprehensive and verified employer competency program list for entertainment marketing. Each unit (with or without subunits) contains competencies and competency builders that identify the occupational, academic, and…

  20. Security Issues of Ohio Public Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lorenzen, Michael

    A survey was conducted in January 1997 to determine security issues of Ohio public libraries. The survey was distributed to 100 libraries of differing sizes with a 70% completion rate. The following questions were asked: (1) Do you believe that security is a problem at your library? (2) Do you believe that mutilation of periodicals is a problem at…

  1. Forest Industry Worker. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    Developed through a modified DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) process involving business, industry, labor, and community agency representatives in Ohio, this document is a comprehensive and verified employer competency profile for forest industry occupations. The list contains units (with and without subunits), competencies, and competency builders…

  2. Children Out of School in Ohio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Fleet, Alanson A.

    This publication describes the factors which account for the 84,000 Ohio children between the ages of 6 and 18 who are not attending school. Attendance rates are presented for seven major cities, with school by school variation noted. Factors influencing the actual nonenrollment of school age children are mentioned. Characteristics of the enrolled…

  3. Auto Mechanics. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    This comprehensive and verified employer competency list was developed from a modified DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) process involving business, industry, labor, and community agency representatives from Ohio. This competency list contains 11 units (with or without subunits), competencies, and competency builders that identify the occupational,…

  4. Is Ohio Experiencing "Brain Drain?" The Issue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio Board of Regents, 2004

    2004-01-01

    Is Ohio losing its best and brightest minds to other states? Is the state investing hundreds of millions of dollars in public higher education every year only to see graduates move out of state upon graduating in search of greener pastures? The Governor's Commission on Higher Education and the Economy (CHEE) commissioned a report about this issue…

  5. Diesel Mechanics. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    This Ohio Competency Analysis Profile (OCAP), derived from a modified Developing a Curriculum (DACUM) process, is a current comprehensive and verified employer competency program list for diesel mechanics. Each unit (with or without subunits) contains competencies and competency builders that identify the occupational, academic, and employability…

  6. 78 FR 47816 - Ohio Disaster # OH-00040

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Ohio Disaster OH-00040 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration . ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This... Deadline Date: 04/29/2014. ADDRESSES: Submit completed loan applications to: U.S. Small...

  7. 78 FR 2708 - Ohio Disaster # OH-00039

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Ohio Disaster OH-00039 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This...: 10/03/2013. ADDRESSES: Submit completed loan applications to: U.S. Small Business...

  8. Ohio State Gets Jump on Doctoral Evaluations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glenn, David

    2008-01-01

    Not later than this winter, the National Research Council plans to release its assessments of American doctoral programs. Due to its inability to wait for the results, Ohio State University took steps last year to review its doctoral programs. Of its 90 doctoral programs, the university found five programs tagged as "candidates for disinvestment…

  9. Power Equipment Technology. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    Developed through a modified DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) process involving business, industry, labor, and community agency representatives in Ohio, this document is a comprehensive and verified employer competency profile for power equipment technology occupations. The list contains units (with and without subunits), competencies, and…

  10. General Marketing. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    Developed through a modified DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) process involving business, industry, labor, and community agency representatives in Ohio, this document is a comprehensive and verified employer competency profile for general marketing occupations. The list contains units (with and without subunits), competencies, and competency…

  11. A Guide to Ohio Outdoor Education Areas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melvin, Ruth W.

    More than 700 areas in Ohio, useful as sites for environmental and outdoor studies, are catalogued in this guide. They include national forests; state parks; forest and wildlife areas; historic sites and memorials; metropolitan, country, and city parks; agency and private camps; conservation agency properties; conservancy district lands and…

  12. Hollenbeck Hall, Wittenberg University, Springfield, Ohio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Design Cost Data, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Describes the university building named in the title in Ohio, including the educational context and design goals. Includes information on the architects, manufacturers/suppliers, and construction team; a general building description; and a case study of construction costs and specifications. Also provides the floor plan and photographs. (EV)

  13. Columbus Saves: Saving Money in Ohio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shockey, Susan

    2004-01-01

    The "Columbus Saves" educational program is a broad-based community coalition made up of more than 40 local organizations from the education, nonprofit, government, faith-based, and private sectors. Common goals of partners in reaching Columbus, Ohio's 1.5 million residents are to: (a) promote increased savings through education and social service…

  14. Substance Abuse Policies in Ohio Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, William

    Ohio substance abuse policies, discipline codes, and educational drug abuse prevention programs are reviewed. An effective substance abuse policy is an essential element in the school's efforts to deal with drug and alcohol use. In many U.S. schools, the use of alcohol and drugs interferes with the education process, and it appears that substance…

  15. Crop Producer. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    This comprehensive and verified employer competency list was developed from a modified DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) process involving business, industry, labor, and community agency representatives from Ohio. This competency list contains six units (with or without subunits), competencies, and competency builders that identify the occupational,…

  16. Migrant Programs in Wisconsin and Ohio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vega, Jaime I., Ed.; And Others

    Compiled for use by agencies working with migrant and seasonal farmworkers, this directory lists programs and services available to these farmworkers during their stay in Ohio and Wisconsin. Data were obtained from Federal, State, and local agencies in each State. Special emphasis was placed on information and data current as of summer 1973.…

  17. Building partnerships -- The Ohio Materials Exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Covey, S.K.

    1999-07-01

    As this century comes to a close, landfills are being opened, closed and mined for resources; commercial businesses and manufacturers are under pressure to be responsible both environmentally and economically. The timing is right for individuals and organizations to start listening to each other and working cooperatively for a greater good. In 1996, an ad hoc group of state government agencies, private business, not-for-profits and educational institutions met to discuss the potential for a materials exchange in Ohio. The Ohio Materials Exchange (OMEX) exists today from the cooperation and funding form the Ohio Environmental Education Fund (OEEF), The Association of Ohio Recyclers (AOR) in cooperation with Waste Alternatives, Inc., The Ohio Environmental Protection Agency (OhEPA) (Division of Solid and Infectious Waste Management and the Office of Pollution Prevention), The Ohio Department of Natural Resources (Division of Recycling and Litter Prevention) and the Ohio Department of Development (ODOD) (Office of Energy Efficiency OEE). In addition, private business, solid waste management districts and individual organizations who use the exchange actively help guide and market the program. The author was employed with the ODOD-OEE and a member of the planning team. A materials exchange allows companies to trade, sell or give away unwanted materials to one another and use it as raw material for manufacturing or reuse in its existing form (Table 1.). Materials exchanges were both out of necessity in World War II but are continuing due to foresight. (EPA 1994) The exchange of raw product, rejects or waste can reduce waste and save energy. Not only do recycled materials often use less energy to produce the product, the trading may save hauling or disposal costs, that could then be diverted to purchase new, more efficient equipment. The materials available or wanted are collected into lists. These lists may take the form of catalogs, fax-back systems, Internet or

  18. Hydrogen-air ignition torch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Repas, G. A.

    1986-01-01

    The design and operation of a hydrogen-air ignition torch presently being used to burn off excess hydrogen that accumulates in the scrubber exhaust ducts of two rocket engine test facilities at the NASA Lewis Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio, is described.

  19. Measurement of absolute regional lung air volumes from near-field x-ray speckles.

    PubMed

    Leong, Andrew F T; Paganin, David M; Hooper, Stuart B; Siew, Melissa L; Kitchen, Marcus J

    2013-11-18

    Propagation-based phase contrast x-ray (PBX) imaging yields high contrast images of the lung where airways that overlap in projection coherently scatter the x-rays, giving rise to a speckled intensity due to interference effects. Our previous works have shown that total and regional changes in lung air volumes can be accurately measured from two-dimensional (2D) absorption or phase contrast images when the subject is immersed in a water-filled container. In this paper we demonstrate how the phase contrast speckle patterns can be used to directly measure absolute regional lung air volumes from 2D PBX images without the need for a water-filled container. We justify this technique analytically and via simulation using the transport-of-intensity equation and calibrate the technique using our existing methods for measuring lung air volume. Finally, we show the full capabilities of this technique for measuring regional differences in lung aeration. PMID:24514306

  20. RESULTS OF A PILOT FIELD STUDY TO EVALUATE THE EFFECTIVENESS OF CLEANING RESIDENTIAL HEATING AND AIR-CONDITIONING SYSTEMS AND THE IMPACT ON INDOOR AIR QUALITY AND SYSTEM PERFORMANCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report discusses and gives results of a pilot field study to evaluate the effectiveness of air duct cleaning (ADC) as a source removal technique in residential heating and air-conditioning (HAC) systems and its impact on airborne particle, fiber, and bioaerosol concentrations...

  1. Locations and monitoring well completion logs of wells surveyed by U.S. Geological Survey at Air Force Plant 4 and Naval Air Station, Joint Reserve Base, Carswell Field, Fort Worth area, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, M.D.; Kuniansky, E.L.

    1996-01-01

    Completion logs are presented for 16 monitoring wells installed by the U.S. Geological Survey at Air Force Plant 4 and Naval Air Station, Joint Reserve Base, Carswell Field, in the Fort Worth area, Texas. Natural gamma-ray logs are presented for selected monitoring wells. Also included are survey data for eight wells installed by Geo-Marine, Inc.

  2. Cost effectiveness of the stream-gaging program in Ohio

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shindel, H.L.; Bartlett, W.P.

    1986-01-01

    This report documents the results of the cost effectiveness of the stream-gaging program in Ohio. Data uses and funding sources were identified for 107 continuous stream gages currently being operated by the U.S. Geological Survey in Ohio with a budget of $682,000; this budget includes field work for other projects and excludes stations jointly operated with the Miami Conservancy District. No stream gage were identified as having insufficient reason to continue their operation; nor were any station identified as having uses specifically only for short-term studies. All 107 station should be maintained in the program for the foreseeable future. The average standard error of estimation of stream flow records is 29.2 percent at its present level of funding. A minimum budget of $679,000 is required to operate the 107-gage program; a budget less than this does no permit proper service and maintenance of the gages and recorders. At the minimum budget, the average standard error is 31.1 percent The maximum budget analyzed was $1,282,000, which resulted in an average standard error of 11.1 percent. A need for additional gages has been identified by the other agencies that cooperate in the program. It is suggested that these gage be installed as funds can be made available.

  3. Spherical Ethylene/Air Diffusion Flames Subject to Concentric DC Electric Field in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, Z. -G.; Hegde, U.; Faeth, G. M.

    2001-01-01

    It is well known that microgravity conditions, by eliminating buoyant flow, enable many combustion phenomena to be observed that are not possible to observe at normal gravity. One example is the spherical diffusion flame surrounding a porous spherical burner. The present paper demonstrates that by superimposing a spherical electrical field on such a flame, the flame remains spherical so that we can study the interaction between the electric field and flame in a one-dimensional fashion. Flames are susceptible to electric fields that are much weaker than the breakdown field of the flame gases owing to the presence of ions generated in the high temperature flame reaction zone. These ions and the electric current of the moving ions, in turn, significantly change the distribution of the electric field. Thus, to understand the interplay between the electric field and the flame is challenging. Numerous experimental studies of the effect of electric fields on flames have been reported. Unfortunately, they were all involved in complex geometries of both the flow field and the electric field, which hinders detailed study of the phenomena. In a one-dimensional domain, however, the electric field, the flow field, the thermal field and the chemical species field are all co-linear. Thus the problem is greatly simplified and becomes more tractable.

  4. Field monitoring and performance evaluation of an in situ air sparging system at a gasoline-contaminated site.

    PubMed

    Hall, B L; Lachmar, T E; Dupont, R R

    2000-06-30

    In situ air sparging (IAS) has been used since the mid-1980s, but few carefully designed field studies have been performed to evaluate its effectiveness. In this study, 27 discrete monitoring points (MPs) were installed at a gasoline-contaminated site to investigate the efficacy of IAS. Each MP was instrumented with a pressure transducer and a Technalithics dissolved oxygen (DO) probe, and located so they could be used to characterize subsurface changes in total head and DO with depth, distance and orientation around a central injection well. Because the blower over-heated and automatically shut down after approximately 30 min and short-circuiting of air into two MPs occurred within 2 min, the study was designed as three sets of three 30-min trials. Longer trials would not have yielded different nor more insightful results. A volume of soil was not oxygenated during any injection. Instead, air traveled directly to at least four of seven different MPs during eight of the nine trials, probably as a result of an air bubble forming beneath a confining layer. The order of air arrival at the MPs varied during the first few trials, but once a preferential pathway was established, it did not collapse between trials and provided the shortest distance to the vadose zone during subsequent trials. Oxygen uptake rates estimated for MPs that received air during any trial exceeded the consumption rates of the Technalithics DO probes, and indicate that the probes could be used for estimating oxygen transfer during system operation or for oxygen uptake measurements during shut-down tests. The data from the monitoring system indicate that IAS is infeasible for remediation of soil and groundwater at this site due to its low horizontal hydraulic conductivity. Similar behavior is anticipated when IAS is applied at other sites with low hydraulic conductivity materials. PMID:10794912

  5. Compressed-air work is entering the field of high pressures.

    PubMed

    Le Péchon, J Cl; Gourdon, G

    2010-01-01

    Since 1850, compressed-air work has been used to prevent shafts or tunnels under construction from flooding. Until the 1980s, workers were digging in compressed-air environments. Since the introduction of tunnel boring machines (TBMs), very little digging under pressure is needed. However, the wearing out of cutter-head tools requires inspection and repair. Compressed-air workers enter the pressurized working chamber only occasionally to perform such repairs. Pressures between 3.5 and 4.5 bar, that stand outside a reasonable range for air breathing, were reached by 2002. Offshore deep diving technology had to be adapted to TBM work. Several sites have used mixed gases: in Japan for deep shaft sinking (4.8 bar), in The Netherlands at Western Scheldt Tunnels (6.9 bar), in Russia for St. Petersburg Metro (5.8 bar) and in the United States at Seattle (5.8 bar). Several tunnel projects are in progress that may involve higher pressures: Hallandsås (Sweden) interventions in heliox saturation up to 13 bar, and Lake Mead (U.S.) interventions to about 12 bar (2010). Research on TBMs and grouting technologies tries to reduce the requirements for hyperbaric works. Adapted international rules, expertise and services for saturation work, shuttles and trained personnel matching industrial requirements are the challenges. PMID:20737925

  6. Non-Print Instructional Materials for the Air Conditioning and Refrigeration Maintenance Field.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golitko, Raymond L., Ed.; And Others

    This catalog contains a listing of air conditioning/refrigeration maintenance audiovisual training materials from the Houston Community College System library media collection. The material is organized by subject heading. The media titles are listed in alphabetical order by title under each subject heading in the catalog. The citation for each…

  7. Presence of Fusarium spp. in air and soil associated with sorghum fields

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sorghum grain, valuable for feed, food and bioenergy, can be colonized by several Fusarium species; therefore, it was of interest to identify possible sources of conidia. Analysis of air and soil samples provided evidence for the presence of propagules from Fusarium genotypes that may cause grain in...

  8. Near-rail yard air quality--assessment through field measurements and computational fluid dynamics modeling

    EPA Science Inventory

    Compared to truck transport, goods movement by rail produces generally lower air pollutant emissions (e.g., particulate matter, carbon dioxide) per ton of freight transported. Emissions associated with rail transport are also confined to rail corridors which may lower the risk of...

  9. Study of Various Slanted Air-Gap Structures of Interior Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motor with Brushless Field Excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Tolbert, Leon M; Lee, Seong T

    2010-01-01

    This paper shows how to maximize the effect of the slanted air-gap structure of an interior permanent magnet synchronous motor with brushless field excitation (BFE) for application in a hybrid electric vehicle. The BFE structure offers high torque density at low speed and weakened flux at high speed. The unique slanted air-gap is intended to increase the output torque of the machine as well as to maximize the ratio of the back-emf of a machine that is controllable by BFE. This irregularly shaped air-gap makes a flux barrier along the d-axis flux path and decreases the d-axis inductance; as a result, the reluctance torque of the machine is much higher than a uniform air-gap machine, and so is the output torque. Also, the machine achieves a higher ratio of the magnitude of controllable back-emf. The determination of the slanted shape was performed by using magnetic equivalent circuit analysis and finite element analysis (FEA).

  10. Field testing passive air samplers for current use pesticides in a tropical environment.

    PubMed

    Gouin, Todd; Wania, Frank; Ruepert, Clemens; Castillo, Luisa E

    2008-09-01

    Air was sampled for one year in the central valley of Costa Rica using an active high-volume sampler as well as passive samplers (PAS) based on polyurethane foam (PUF) disks and XAD-resin filled mesh cylinders. Extracts were analyzed for pesticides that are either banned or currently used in Costa Rican agriculture. Sampling rates for PUF-based passive air samplers, determined from the loss of depuration compounds spiked on the disks prior to deployment averaged 5.9 +/- 0.9 m3 x d(-1) and were higher during the windier dry season than during the rainy season. Sampling rates for the XAD-based passive sampler were determined from the slopes of linear relationships that were observed between the amount of pesticide sequestered in the resin and the length of deployment, which varied from 4 months to 1 year. Those sampling rates increased with decreasing molecular size of a pesticide, and their average of 2.1 +/- 1.5 m3 x d(-1) is higher than rates previously reported for temperate and polar sampling sites. Even though the trends of the sampling rate with molecular size and temperature are consistent with the hypothesis that molecular diffusion controls uptake in passive samplers, the trends are much more pronounced than a direct proportionality between sampling rate and molecular diffusivity would suggest. Air concentrations derived by the three sampling methods are within a factor of 2 of each other, suggesting that properly calibrated PAS can be effective tools for monitoring levels of pesticides in the tropical atmosphere. In particular, HiVol samplers, PUF-disk samplers, and XAD-based passive samplers are suitable for obtaining information on air concentration variability on the time scale of days, seasons and years, respectively. This study represents the first calibration study for the uptake of current use pesticides by passive air samplers. PMID:18800540

  11. Single-crystal field-effect transistors of new Cl2-NDI polymorph processed by sublimation in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Tao; Stolte, Matthias; Burschka, Christian; Hansen, Nis Hauke; Musiol, Thomas; Kälblein, Daniel; Pflaum, Jens; Tao, Xutang; Brill, Jochen; Würthner, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Physical properties of active materials built up from small molecules are dictated by their molecular packing in the solid state. Here we demonstrate for the first time the growth of n-channel single-crystal field-effect transistors and organic thin-film transistors by sublimation of 2,6-dichloro-naphthalene diimide in air. Under these conditions, a new polymorph with two-dimensional brick-wall packing mode (β-phase) is obtained that is distinguished from the previously reported herringbone packing motif obtained from solution (α-phase). We are able to fabricate single-crystal field-effect transistors with electron mobilities in air of up to 8.6 cm2 V-1 s-1 (α-phase) and up to 3.5 cm2 V-1 s-1 (β-phase) on n-octadecyltriethoxysilane-modified substrates. On silicon dioxide, thin-film devices based on β-phase can be manufactured in air giving rise to electron mobilities of 0.37 cm2 V-1 s-1. The simple crystal and thin-film growth procedures by sublimation under ambient conditions avoid elaborate substrate modifications and costly vacuum equipment-based fabrication steps.

  12. 40 CFR 81.20 - Metropolitan Cincinnati Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.20 Metropolitan Cincinnati Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Cincinnati Interstate Air Quality Control Region (Ohio-Kentucky-Indiana) is revised to consist...

  13. 40 CFR 81.43 - Metropolitan Toledo Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.43 Metropolitan Toledo Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Toledo Interstate Air Quality Control Region (Ohio-Michigan) consists of the territorial...

  14. 40 CFR 81.20 - Metropolitan Cincinnati Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.20 Metropolitan Cincinnati Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Cincinnati Interstate Air Quality Control Region (Ohio-Kentucky-Indiana) is revised to consist...

  15. 40 CFR 81.43 - Metropolitan Toledo Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.43 Metropolitan Toledo Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Toledo Interstate Air Quality Control Region (Ohio-Michigan) consists of the territorial...

  16. 40 CFR 81.20 - Metropolitan Cincinnati Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.20 Metropolitan Cincinnati Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Cincinnati Interstate Air Quality Control Region (Ohio-Kentucky-Indiana) is revised to consist...

  17. 40 CFR 81.43 - Metropolitan Toledo Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.43 Metropolitan Toledo Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Toledo Interstate Air Quality Control Region (Ohio-Michigan) consists of the territorial...

  18. Geophysical Characterization for a CO2 Sequestration Potential in the Ohio River Valley Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, N.; Jagucki, P.; Meggyesy, D.; Janosy, R.; Sminchak, J.; Ramakrishan, T.; Boyd, A.

    2003-12-01

    A site at the American Electric Power's (AEP) Mountaineer Power Plant, WV in the Ohio River Valley in the Midwestern U.S., a region with the economy heavily dependent on fossil fuels, such as coal, oil, and gas, is being evaluated to determine the potential for geologic sequestration. The project is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Battelle, AEP, BP, The Ohio Air Quality Development Office, and Schlumberger. The major objective of the current phase is to characterize the reservoir at the plant site. Future decisions with regard to CO2 injection will be subject to the evaluated reservoir properties. The effort includes acquisition of 2-dimensional seismic data, assessment of regional geology, drilling to PreCambrian rocks and formation analysis and testing in a 2,800 meters deep well, reservoir simulations, risk assessment, and stakeholder outreach. The test well reached total depth in summer 2003. Wireline logging and reservoir testing was performed for each section of the borehole, including extensive tests in the lowermost 885 meters to estimate formation properties and pressure gradients. The logs included gamma-ray, neutron and density, and array resistivity, magnetic resonance relaxation for permeability information, elemental composition via capture spectroscopy, and resistivity based formation image. The seismic survey was conducted over approximately 11 miles along 2 lines: one along strike and one along dip. The results of the geophysical surveys combined with the field observations provide an integrated assessment of the major injection parameters for the two main injection reservoirs of interest, the Rose Run Formation and the Lower Maryville formation. In addition, the properties of the potential caprock formations overlying the candidate injection zones were also determined. The results of this characterization will be presented with emphasis on geophysical testing and seismic survey. These results are also being used to conduct reservoir

  19. Radiation Detection Field Test at the Federal Express (FedEx) Air Cargo Facility at Denver International Airport (DIA)

    SciTech Connect

    Weirup, D; Waters, A; Hall, H; Dougan, A; Trombino, D; Mattesich, G; Hull, E; Bahowick, S; Loshak, A; Gruidl, J

    2004-02-11

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) recently conducted a field-test of radiation detection and identification equipment at the air cargo facility of Federal Express (FedEx) located at Denver International Airport (DIA) over a period of two weeks. Comprehensive background measurements were performed and were analyzed, and a trial strategy for detection and identification of parcels displaying radioactivity was implemented to aid in future development of a comprehensive protection plan. The purpose of this project was threefold: {sm_bullet} Quantify background radiation environments at an air cargo facility. {sm_bullet} Quantify and identify ''nuisance'' alarms. {sm_bullet} Evaluate the performance of various isotope identifiers deployed in an operational environment (in this case, the operational environment included the biggest blizzard in over 90 years!).

  20. Field test of two high-pressure, direct-contact downhole steam generators. Volume I. Air/diesel system

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, B.W.

    1983-05-01

    As a part of the Project DEEP STEAM to develop technology to more efficiently utilize steam for the recovery of heavy oil from deep reservoirs, a field test of a downhole steam generator (DSG) was performed. The DSG burned No. 2 diesel fuel in air and was a direct-contact, high pressure device which mixed the steam with the combustion products and injected the resulting mixture directly into the oil reservoir. The objectives of the test program included demonstration of long-term operation of a DSG, development of operational methods, assessment of the effects of the steam/combustion gases on the reservoir and comparison of this air/diesel DSG with an adjacent oxygen/diesel direct contact generator. Downhole operation of the air/diesel DSG was started in June 1981 and was terminated in late February 1982. During this period two units were placed downhole with the first operating for about 20 days. It was removed, the support systems were slightly modified, and the second one was operated for 106 days. During this latter interval the generator operated for 70% of the time with surface air compressor problems the primary source of the down time. Thermal contact, as evidenced by a temperature increase in the production well casing gases, and an oil production increase were measured in one of the four wells in the air/diesel pattern. Reservoir scrubbing of carbon monoxide was observed, but no conclusive data on scrubbing of SO/sub x/ and NO/sub x/ were obtained. Corrosion of the DSG combustor walls and some other parts of the downhole package were noted. Metallurgical studies have been completed and recommendations made for other materials that are expected to better withstand the downhole combustion environment. 39 figures, 8 tables.