Science.gov

Sample records for air filled porosity

  1. Estimation of water-filled and air-filled porosity in the unsaturated zone, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, Philip H.

    1993-01-01

    The responses of density and dielectric logs are formulated in terms if the matrix properties, air-filled porosity and water-filled porosity. Porosity values obtained from logs from borehole USW G-2 are in reasonable agreement with estimates from core determinations.

  2. On the air-filled effective porosity parameter of Rogers and Nielson's (1991) bulk radon diffusion coefficient in unsaturated soils.

    PubMed

    Saâdi, Zakaria

    2014-05-01

    The radon exhalation rate at the earth's surface from soil or rock with radium as its source is the main mechanism behind the radon activity concentrations observed in both indoor and outdoor environments. During the last two decades, many subsurface radon transport models have used Rogers and Nielson's formula for modeling the unsaturated soil bulk radon diffusion coefficient. This formula uses an "air-filled effective porosity" to account for radon adsorption and radon dissolution in the groundwater. This formula is reviewed here, and its hypotheses are examined for accuracy in dealing with subsurface radon transport problems. The author shows its limitations by comparing one dimensional steady-state analytical solutions of the two-phase (air/water) transport equation (Fick's law) with Rogers and Nielson's formula. For radon diffusion-dominated transport, the calculated Rogers and Nielson's radon exhalation rate is shown to be unrealistic as it is independent of the values of the radon adsorption and groundwater dissolution coefficients. For convective and diffusive transport, radon exhalation rates calculated using Fick's law and this formula agree only for high values of gas-phase velocity and groundwater saturation. However, these conditions are not usually met in most shallow subsurface environments where radon migration takes place under low gas phase velocities and low water saturation. PMID:24670909

  3. The Relationship Between Soil Air Filled Porosity and Soil Methane Oxidation is Almost Identical in Both Dry and Wet Temperate Eucalypt Forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fest, B. J.; Wardlaw, T.; Hinko-Najera, N.; Arndt, S. K.

    2015-12-01

    In order to gain a better understanding of the temporal variation in soil methane (CH4) exchange in temperate evergreen eucalypt forests in south-eastern Australia we measured soil CH4 exchange in high temporal resolution (every 2 hours or less) over two consecutive years (Wombat State Forest, Victoria, AUS) and over one year (Warra, Tasmania, AUS) in two temperate Eucalyptus obliqua (L. Her) forests with contrasting annual precipitation (Wombat State Forest = 870 mm yr-1, Warra = 1700 mm yr-1). Both forests were continuous CH4 sinks with the Victorian site having a sink strength of -1.79 kg CH4 ha-1 yr-1 and the Tasmanian site having a sink strength of -3.83 kg CH4 ha-1 yr-1. Our results show that CH4 uptake was strongly controlled by soil moisture at both sites and explained up to 90% of the temporal variability in CH4 uptake. Furthermore, when soil moisture was expressed as soil air filled porosity (AFP) we were able to predict the CH4 uptake of one site by the linear regression between AFP and CH4 uptake from the other site. Soil temperature only had an apparent control over seasonal variation in CH4 uptake during periods when soil moisture and soil temperature were closely correlated. The fluctuation of the generally low soil nitrogen levels did not influence soil CH4 uptake at either site.

  4. Rapid assessment of methanotrophic capacity of compost-based materials considering the effects of air-filled porosity, water content and dissolved organic carbon.

    PubMed

    Mancebo, Uriel; Hettiaratchi, J Patrick A

    2015-02-01

    Since the global warming potential of CH4 is 25 times that of CO2 on a 100-year time horizon, the development of methanotrophic applications for the conversion of CH4 to CO2 is emerging as an area of interest for researchers and practicing engineers. Compost exhibits most of the characteristics required for methanotroph growth media and has been used in several projects. This paper presents results from a study that was undertaken to assess the influence of physical and chemical characteristics of compost-based materials on the biological oxidation of CH4 when used in methane biofilters. The results showed that easily-measurable parameters, such as air filled porosity, water content and dissolved organic carbon, are correlated with maximum CH4 removal rates. The results obtained were used to develop an empirical relationship that could be regarded as a rapid assessment tool for the estimation of the performance of compost-based materials in engineered methanotrophic applications. PMID:25484123

  5. Four-phase fully-coupled mold-filling and solidification simulation for gas porosity prediction in aluminum sand casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakumeit, J.; Jana, S.; Waclawczyk, T.; Mehdizadeh, A.; Sadiki, A.; Jouani, J.

    2012-07-01

    The impact of mold-filling and oxide film enclosure on gas porosity in A356 was investigated using a three-phase, fully-coupled, mold-filling and solidification simulation. For the prediction of gas porosity, a fourth hydrogen phase was added. At the solidification front hydrogen is rejected from the solid and accumulates in the melt. Pores nucleate if the solute gas exceeds the solubility limit. Air and melt are separated by a volume of fluid interface and special treatment of the hydrogen phase convection was necessary to limit the hydrogen to the melt. Folding of the melt surface was used as a source for oxide film entrainment. These oxide films were transported with the melt and used as nucleation sites for gas porosity formation. The influence of melt flow due to filling and oxide film distribution was analyzed using a simple 3-block test geometry. The test geometry was cast in A356 and analyzed by computer tomography to validate the porosity prediction.

  6. Plastic Foam Porosity Characterization by Air-Borne Ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffrén, H.; Karppinen, T.; Hæggström, E.

    2006-03-01

    We continue to develop an ultrasonic burst-reflection method for estimating porosity and tortuosity of solid materials. As a first step we report on method design considerations and measurements on polyurethane foams (Sylomer® vibration dampener) with well-defined porosity. The ultrasonic method is experimentally tested by measuring 235 kHz and 600 kHz air-borne ultrasound reflection from a foam surface at two incidence angles. The reflected sound wave from different foam samples (32% - 64% porosity) was compared to a wave that had traveled from the transmitter to the detector without reflection. The ultrasonically estimated sample porosities coincided within 8% with the porosity estimates obtained by a gravimetric reference method. This parallels the uncertainty of the gravimetric method, 8%. The repeatability of the ultrasonic porosity measurements was better than 5%.

  7. Polystyrene foam products equation of state as a function of porosity and fill gas

    SciTech Connect

    Mulford, Roberta N; Swift, Damian C

    2009-01-01

    An accurate EOS for polystyrene foam is necessary for analysis of numerous experiments in shock compression, inertial confinement fusion, and astrophysics. Plastic to gas ratios vary between various samples of foam, according to the density and cell-size of the foam. A matrix of compositions has been investigated, allowing prediction of foam response as a function of the plastic-to-air ratio. The EOS code CHEETAH allows participation of the air in the decomposition reaction of the foam. Differences between air-filled, Ar-blown, and CO{sub 2}-blown foams are investigated, to estimate the importance of allowing air to react with products of polystyrene decomposition. O{sub 2}-blown foams are included in some comparisons, to amplify any consequences of reaction with oxygen in air. He-blown foams are included in some comparisons, to provide an extremum of density. Product pressures are slightly higher for oxygen-containing fill gases than for non-oxygen-containing fill gases. Examination of product species indicates that CO{sub 2} decomposes at high temperatures.

  8. Polystyrene Foam Products Equation of State as a Function of Porosity and Fill Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulford, R. N.; Swift, D. C.

    2009-12-01

    An accurate EOS for polystyrene foam is necessary for analysis of numerous experiments in shock compression, inertial confinement fusion, and astrophysics. Plastic to gas ratios vary between various samples of foam, according to the density and cell-size of the foam. A matrix of compositions has been investigated, allowing prediction of foam response as a function of the plastic-to-air ratio. The EOS code CHEETAH allows participation of the air in the decomposition reaction of the foam. Differences between air-filled, Ar-blown, and CO2-blown foams are investigated, to estimate the importance of allowing air to react with products of polystyrene decomposition. O2-blown foams are included in some comparisons, to amplify any consequences of reaction with oxygen in air. He-blown foams are included in some comparisons, to provide an extremum of density. Product pressures are slightly higher for oxygen-containing fill gases than for non-oxygen-containing fill gases. Examination of product species indicates that CO2 decomposes at high temperatures.

  9. Polystyrene Foam EOS as a Function of Porosity and Fill Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulford, Roberta; Swift, Damian

    2009-06-01

    An accurate EOS for polystyrene foam is necessary for analysis of numerous experiments in shock compression, inertial confinement fusion, and astrophysics. Plastic to gas ratios vary between various samples of foam, according to the density and cell-size of the foam. A matrix of compositions has been investigated, allowing prediction of foam response as a function of the plastic-to-air ratio. The EOS code CHEETAH allows participation of the air in the decomposition reaction of the foam, Differences between air-filled, nitrogen-blown, and CO2-blown foams are investigated, to estimate the importance of allowing air to react with plastic products during decomposition. Results differ somewhat from the conventional EOS, which are generated from values for plastic extrapolated to low densities.

  10. Effects of fluids on frictional strength, slip stability and porosity of gouge-filled faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiers, Christopher James

    2013-04-01

    strengthening at high temperatures, delineating three regimes of steady state frictional behaviour. In experimental studies where dilation has been measured or estimated, the velocity weakening regime seems further characterised by significant porosity development. Putting all this information together leads to the conclusion that a micromechanism-based description of the frictional behaviour of gouge-filled faults, under mid to upper crustal conditions, needs to account for mechanisms such as pressure solution and stress corrosion cracking of clast phases, and for both dilatant and non-dilatant slip on intervening, weak phyllosilicates. First attempts to do this, assuming pressure solution as the fluid-assisted clast deformation mechanism, successfully predict three-regime behaviour of the type seen in hydrothermal gouge friction experiments on phyllosilicate-quartz mixtures, as well as other key observations. Both steady state and transient frictional behaviour similar to that seen in experiments can be predicted. The key factor here controlling both frictional response (i.e a, b, a-b and Dc in the terminlogy of RSF modelling) and porosity turns out to be competition between dilatation due to intergranular slip on phyllosillicates versus flow and compaction by pressure solution. In particular, velocity weakening slip, hence rupture nucleation, and postseismic fault healing are predicted to be caused by the effects of the fluid phase in promoting compaction by pressure solution during dilatant shear.

  11. Apparatus and methods for determining gas saturation and porosity of a formation penetrated by a gas filled or liquid filled borehole

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Robert D.

    2001-03-27

    Methods and apparatus are disclosed for determining gas saturation, liquid saturation, porosity and density of earth formations penetrated by a well borehole. Determinations are made from measures of fast neutron and inelastic scatter gamma radiation induced by a pulsed, fast neutron source. The system preferably uses two detectors axially spaced from the neutron source. One detector is preferably a scintillation detector responsive to gamma radiation, and a second detector is preferably an organic scintillator responsive to both neutron and gamma radiation. The system can be operated in cased boreholes which are filled with either gas or liquid. Techniques for correcting all measurements for borehole conditions are disclosed.

  12. Partitioned airs at microscale and nanoscale: thermal diffusivity in ultrahigh porosity solids of nanocellulose

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, Koh; Kobayashi, Yuri; Saito, Tsuguyuki; Isogai, Akira

    2016-01-01

    High porosity solids, such as plastic foams and aerogels, are thermally insulating. Their insulation performance strongly depends on their pore structure, which dictates the heat transfer process in the material. Understanding such a relationship is essential to realizing highly efficient thermal insulators. Herein, we compare the heat transfer properties of foams and aerogels that have very high porosities (97.3–99.7%) and an identical composition (nanocellulose). The foams feature rather closed, microscale pores formed with a thin film-like solid phase, whereas the aerogels feature nanoscale open pores formed with a nanofibrous network-like solid skeleton. Unlike the aerogel samples, the thermal diffusivity of the foam decreases considerably with a slight increase in the solid fraction. The results indicate that for suppressing the thermal diffusion of air within high porosity solids, creating microscale spaces with distinct partitions is more effective than directly blocking the free path of air molecules at the nanoscale. PMID:26830144

  13. Partitioned airs at microscale and nanoscale: thermal diffusivity in ultrahigh porosity solids of nanocellulose.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Koh; Kobayashi, Yuri; Saito, Tsuguyuki; Isogai, Akira

    2016-01-01

    High porosity solids, such as plastic foams and aerogels, are thermally insulating. Their insulation performance strongly depends on their pore structure, which dictates the heat transfer process in the material. Understanding such a relationship is essential to realizing highly efficient thermal insulators. Herein, we compare the heat transfer properties of foams and aerogels that have very high porosities (97.3-99.7%) and an identical composition (nanocellulose). The foams feature rather closed, microscale pores formed with a thin film-like solid phase, whereas the aerogels feature nanoscale open pores formed with a nanofibrous network-like solid skeleton. Unlike the aerogel samples, the thermal diffusivity of the foam decreases considerably with a slight increase in the solid fraction. The results indicate that for suppressing the thermal diffusion of air within high porosity solids, creating microscale spaces with distinct partitions is more effective than directly blocking the free path of air molecules at the nanoscale. PMID:26830144

  14. Partitioned airs at microscale and nanoscale: thermal diffusivity in ultrahigh porosity solids of nanocellulose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Koh; Kobayashi, Yuri; Saito, Tsuguyuki; Isogai, Akira

    2016-02-01

    High porosity solids, such as plastic foams and aerogels, are thermally insulating. Their insulation performance strongly depends on their pore structure, which dictates the heat transfer process in the material. Understanding such a relationship is essential to realizing highly efficient thermal insulators. Herein, we compare the heat transfer properties of foams and aerogels that have very high porosities (97.3-99.7%) and an identical composition (nanocellulose). The foams feature rather closed, microscale pores formed with a thin film-like solid phase, whereas the aerogels feature nanoscale open pores formed with a nanofibrous network-like solid skeleton. Unlike the aerogel samples, the thermal diffusivity of the foam decreases considerably with a slight increase in the solid fraction. The results indicate that for suppressing the thermal diffusion of air within high porosity solids, creating microscale spaces with distinct partitions is more effective than directly blocking the free path of air molecules at the nanoscale.

  15. Protection of organic carbon in soil microaggregates occurs via restructuring of aggregate porosity and filling of pores with accumulating organic matter.

    SciTech Connect

    McCarthy, J. F.; Ilavsky, J.; Jastrow, J. D.; Mayer, L. M.; Perfect, E.; Zhuang, J.; Biosciences Division; Univ. of Tennessee; Univ. of Maine

    2008-10-01

    We examined relationships between the pore structure of microaggregates and the protection of organic matter (OM) within that structure. By using ultra-small angle X-ray scattering (USAXS) before and after combustion of microaggregates at 350 degrees C, we took advantage of differences in X-ray scattering contrast among soil minerals, OM, and air to evaluate the distribution of the total- and OM-filled porosity within microaggregates (53-250 {mu}m in diameter). Systematic changes in microaggregate structure were observed for long-term field manipulations of land use (a chronosequence of tallgrass prairie restorations) and agricultural management (conventional tillage versus no-till at two levels of nitrogen fertilization). Our results imply that OM preservation arose from the evolution of the architectural system of microaggregates during their formation and stabilization. Soils and treatments with increasing OM in microaggregates were associated with encapsulation of colloidal OM by minerals, thereby creating protected OM-filled pores at the submicron scale within the microaggregate structure. For example, in the prairie chronosequence, microaggregates from the cultivated soil had the lowest concentration of OM, but 75% of the OM that had survived cultivation was in OM-filled pores. Following restoration, the concentration of OM in microaggregates increased rapidly, but the proportion of OM in OM-filled pores declined initially and then increased over time until 90% of the OM was in OM-filled pores. OM totally encapsulated within the pore structure can create spatial and kinetic constraints on microbial access to and degradation of OM. Encapsulation of OM increases the capacity for its protection relative to sorption on mineral surfaces, and comparison of its extent among treatments suggests important feedback loops. The use of USAXS, which has not previously been applied to the study of soil aggregate structures and the distribution of OM within those structures

  16. Interaction of finite-amplitude sound with air-filled porous materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, D. A.

    1985-01-01

    The propagation of high intensity sound waves through an air-filled porus material was studied. The material is assumed: (1) to be rigid, incompressible, and homogeneous, and (2) to be adequately described by two properties: resistivity r and porosity. The resulting wave equation is still nonlinear, however, because of the u sgn(u) term in the resistivity. The equation is solved in the frequency domain as an infinite set of coupled inhomogeneous Helmholtz equations, one for each harmonic. An approximate but analytical solution leads to predictions of excess attenuation, saturation, and phase speed reduction for the fundamental component. A more general numerical solution is used to calculate the propagation curves for the higher harmonics. The u sgn(u) nonlinearity produces a cubic distortion pattern; when the input signal is a pure tone, only odd harmonic distortion products are generated.

  17. Wave intensity analysis in air-filled flexible vessels.

    PubMed

    Clavica, Francesco; Parker, Kim H; Khir, Ashraf W

    2015-02-26

    Wave intensity analysis (WIA) is an analytical technique generally used to investigate the propagation of waves in the cardiovascular system. Despite its increasing usage in the cardiovascular system, to our knowledge WIA has never been applied to the respiratory system. Given the analogies between arteries and airways (i.e. fluid flow in flexible vessels), the aim of this work is to test the applicability of WIA with gas flow instead of liquid flow. The models employed in this study are similar to earlier studies used for arterial investigations. Simultaneous pressure (P) and velocity (U) measurements were initially made in a single tube and then in several flexible tubes connected in series. Wave speed was calculated using the foot-to-foot method (cf), which was used to separate analytically the measured P and U waveforms into their forward and backward components. Further, the data were used to calculate wave intensity, which was also separated into its forward and backward components. Although the measured wave speed was relatively high, the results showed that the onsets and the nature of reflections (compression/expansion) derived with WIA, corresponded well to those anticipated using the theory of waves in liquid-filled elastic tubes. On average the difference between the experimental and theoretical arrival time of reflection was 6.1% and 3.6% for the single vessel and multivessel experiment, respectively. The results suggest that WIA can provide relatively accurate information on reflections in air-filled flexible tubes, warranting further studies to explore the full potential of this technique in the respiratory system. PMID:25595424

  18. Using soft computing techniques to predict corrected air permeability using Thomeer parameters, air porosity and grain density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nooruddin, Hasan A.; Anifowose, Fatai; Abdulraheem, Abdulazeez

    2014-03-01

    Soft computing techniques are recently becoming very popular in the oil industry. A number of computational intelligence-based predictive methods have been widely applied in the industry with high prediction capabilities. Some of the popular methods include feed-forward neural networks, radial basis function network, generalized regression neural network, functional networks, support vector regression and adaptive network fuzzy inference system. A comparative study among most popular soft computing techniques is presented using a large dataset published in literature describing multimodal pore systems in the Arab D formation. The inputs to the models are air porosity, grain density, and Thomeer parameters obtained using mercury injection capillary pressure profiles. Corrected air permeability is the target variable. Applying developed permeability models in recent reservoir characterization workflow ensures consistency between micro and macro scale information represented mainly by Thomeer parameters and absolute permeability. The dataset was divided into two parts with 80% of data used for training and 20% for testing. The target permeability variable was transformed to the logarithmic scale as a pre-processing step and to show better correlations with the input variables. Statistical and graphical analysis of the results including permeability cross-plots and detailed error measures were created. In general, the comparative study showed very close results among the developed models. The feed-forward neural network permeability model showed the lowest average relative error, average absolute relative error, standard deviations of error and root means squares making it the best model for such problems. Adaptive network fuzzy inference system also showed very good results.

  19. Hot air balloons fill gap in atmospheric and sensing platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Steven M.; Price, Russ

    Eric Edgerton was having a problem he could not solve: how to noninvasively collect in situ incinerator plume data. So he called in the Air Force and learned about its Atmospheric and Sensor Test Platform program; its platform is a manned hot air balloon. Many investigators are discovering the advantages of hot air balloons as stable, inexpensive platforms for performing in situ atmospheric measurements. Some are also using remote sensing capabilities on the balloon platforms.

  20. Mathematical model of an air-filled alpha stirling refrigerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFarlane, Patrick; Semperlotti, Fabio; Sen, Mihir

    2013-10-01

    This work develops a mathematical model for an alpha Stirling refrigerator with air as the working fluid and will be useful in optimizing the mechanical design of these machines. Two pistons cyclically compress and expand air while moving sinusoidally in separate chambers connected by a regenerator, thus creating a temperature difference across the system. A complete non-linear mathematical model of the machine, including air thermodynamics, and heat transfer from the walls, as well as heat transfer and fluid resistance in the regenerator, is developed. Non-dimensional groups are derived, and the mathematical model is numerically solved. The heat transfer and work are found for both chambers, and the coefficient of performance of each chamber is calculated. Important design parameters are varied and their effect on refrigerator performance determined. This sensitivity analysis, which shows what the significant parameters are, is a useful tool for the design of practical Stirling refrigeration systems.

  1. Effects of Sand-Filled Hydraulic Fractures during Air Sparging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, R. J.; Murdoch, L. C.; Falta, R. W.

    2003-12-01

    The effectiveness of air sparging is limited in fine-grained formations, such as clay-rich saprolite, where low permeability restricts flow rates. The purpose of this work is to investigate the effectiveness of using hydraulic fractures to increase the performance of air sparging in relatively low permeability materials. The approach has been to conduct step-rate, air-injection tests into conventional wells and wells intersecting fractures, and then to evaluate the results of these tests using analytical and numerical models. Fieldwork is being conducted in an area underlain by saprolite weathered from granitoid gneiss. Permeability of the saprolite ranges from 1x10-12 to 5x10 -12 m2 according to slug test data. Five wells have been used for testing: three non-fractured and two fractured wells. Well tests involved injecting air at constant pressure and monitoring transient flow rates until the flow approximately equilibrated over 10 to 60 minutes, then incrementally increasing pressure and repeating the flow monitoring. Field results were expressed in terms of the initial specific sparge capacity (Q/(P-H-E)) where Q is mass flow rate, P is injection pressure, H is hydrostatic pressure, and E is air entry pressure. The specific sparge capacity of conventional wells ranges from 0.3 to 0.6 m3/(Mpa min), whereas it is several times greater for fractured wells (0.8 to 3.5 m3/(Mpa min)) at the field site. Field data have been analyzed using analytical and numerical models. We use the step-rate data and invert an analytical solution adapted from Philip (J. Contam. Hydro., 1998) to estimate the in situ relative permeability function during sparging. This approach indicates that permeability ranges from 0.4x10-12 to 2x10-12 m2, which is remarkably similar to the slug test data. It also indicates that the in situ air entry pressure is approximately 31 kPa, and the exponent constant in the Gardner relative permeability function ranges from 0.12 to 0.25 m-1. Numerical analyses

  2. Substances To Fill Lighter-Than-Air Balloons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A.

    1995-01-01

    Various combinations of solid and liquid chemicals proposed as sources of hydrogen and other gases for inflating lighter-than-air balloons. In all cases energy used to propel balloon upward or downward comes from temperature differences in planet's atmosphere itself. Phase changes and/or reversible chemical reactions used to vary quantities of gases in balloons as functions of pressure and temperature and, as functions of altitude: provides means to control altitude of balloon.

  3. Response of air-filled ion chambers to high-intensity radiation pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, M.; Brown, D.

    1993-01-01

    Ion chambers are one of the most popular types of detectors used for beam loss-monitor systems. To provide a foundation for the development of future loss-monitor systems, and to fully characterize the ion chambers in use at LAMPF, we have studied the response of air-filled cylindrical ion chambers to high-intensity, short-duration radiation pulses. The most intense pulses were about 180 rad in 250 ns (the equivalent steady-state dose rate was about 700 Mrad/h). We filled our chambers with nitrogen gas at 760 Torr and air at 600 Torr. The ion chambers were driven into extreme nonlinear response. We hope these data will be used to design loss-monitor systems based on air-filled ion chambers, thus eliminating the need for gas-flow systems and/or airtight ion chambers.

  4. Response of air-filled ion chambers to high-intensity radiation pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, M.; Brown, D.

    1993-06-01

    Ion chambers are one of the most popular types of detectors used for beam loss-monitor systems. To provide a foundation for the development of future loss-monitor systems, and to fully characterize the ion chambers in use at LAMPF, we have studied the response of air-filled cylindrical ion chambers to high-intensity, short-duration radiation pulses. The most intense pulses were about 180 rad in 250 ns (the equivalent steady-state dose rate was about 700 Mrad/h). We filled our chambers with nitrogen gas at 760 Torr and air at 600 Torr. The ion chambers were driven into extreme nonlinear response. We hope these data will be used to design loss-monitor systems based on air-filled ion chambers, thus eliminating the need for gas-flow systems and/or airtight ion chambers.

  5. Experimental Studies of the Acoustic Properties of a Finite Elastic Pipe Filled with Water/air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, L.

    1996-02-01

    Vibration of, and sound power radiated from, a water/air-filled steel pipe are measured and analyzed. Two types of pipe terminal are employed in the experiments: embedded in sand boxes or without any absorption treatment. Comparisons are made between experiments and theoretical analysis. The measured wavenumbers agree well with those predicted as do modal responses are sound power of the air-filled pipe. For the water-filled steel pipe used in the test (inner diameter 150 mm), measured modal responses and sound power at high frequencies (higher than 4·5 kHz) are much lower than expected for the lossless model. Influences of pipe terminals on the coupling between the water and pipe are also examined.

  6. Optimum values of air-filling fraction for photonic crystal fibers with different configurations and fixed number of air rings.

    PubMed

    Zendehnam, Akbar; Hosseinpour, Maryam; Mirzaei, Mahmood; Hedayati, Kambiz

    2014-02-20

    In this study, a Gaussian amp function related to the Gaussian family is employed to approximate the output intensity profile of various arrangements of air holes in photonic crystal fibers (PCFs) with a fixed number of air rings (N=4). It is shown that d/Λ=0.5 can be the best minimum value of air-filling fraction for all of the studied PCFs when λ=1.35  μm, whereas, for λ=1.55 and 1.65 μm, d/Λ=0.6 is suitable for achieving the maximum output intensity with very low confinement loss. PMID:24663304

  7. Enhanced pore filling of spiro-OMeTAD by enlarging the porosity of TiO2 films and its effects on the photovoltaic performance of ss-DSCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Yanling; Wang, Qi; Huang, Jianguo; Wu, Tao

    2015-03-01

    Four kinds of TiO2 electrodes with different porosities were prepared by adding different ratios of ethyl cellulous into a Dyesol 18-NRT paste. Higher polymer ratios contributed to the higher porosity of TiO2 films. All electrodes were spin-coated with spiro-OMeTAD and fabricated into solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells (ss-DSCs). This simple method allowed more spiro-OMeTAD penetrated into the more porous TiO2 films. This result demonstrated the pore-filling effect of hole transport materials on the photovoltaic performance of ss-DSCs. Photoluminescence and electrical impedance spectra measurements were introduced to investigate the dye regeneration, charge transport, and recombination kinetics of the solar cells. The increased pore filling of spiro-OMeTAD could enhance hole injection, hole transport, and recombination retardation, thus providing good charge collection efficiency and long recombination lifetime and resulting in the high short-circuit current density, open-circuit voltage, fill factor, and energy conversion efficiency of the solar cells. An efficiency enhancement of 34 % was obtained by using this method. However, further increasing the TiO2 porosity decreased the electron transport, thus causing a low charge collection and reducing cell performance.

  8. [The application of air-lift loop column filling with porous carrier in wastewater treatment].

    PubMed

    Fan, Y; Ding, F; Yang, H; Chen, S; Zhang, W; Xing, X

    2001-09-01

    An air lift loop reactor filling with porous carrier particles was utilized as aeration column. Experiments were carried out in wide operating conditions. The experimental results showed that in the range of gas flow rate from 0.117 to 0.156 m3/(min.m3), a higher efficiency of removal of ammonium-N was achieved, and when the gas flow rate was above 0.039 m3/(min.m3), the COD was completely degraded in about 1 h. The filling ratio of the porous carriers in the column was an important factor for the removal of C and N compounds, and a filling ratio of 15% was proved to be most suitable in the operation ranges. The experimental results also indicated that the effect of aeration temperature on the removal efficiency was significant and the highest efficiency was obtained at around 25 degrees C. PMID:11769236

  9. A micro-gap, air-filled ionisation chamber as a detector for criticality accident dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Murawski, Ł; Zielczyński, M; Golnik, N; Gryziński, M A

    2014-10-01

    A micro-gap air-filled ionisation chamber was designed for criticality dosimetry. The special feature of the chamber is its very small gap between electrodes of only 0.3 mm. This prevents ion recombination at high dose rates and minimises the influence of gas on secondary particles spectrum. The electrodes are made of polypropylene because of higher content of hydrogen in this material, when compared with soft tissue. The difference between neutron and gamma sensitivity in such chamber becomes practically negligible. The chamber's envelope contains two specially connected capacitors, one for polarising the electrodes and the other for collecting the ionisation charge. PMID:24324250

  10. Reconfigurable optothermal microparticle trap in air-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, O A; Garbos, M K; Euser, T G; Russell, P St J

    2012-07-13

    We report a novel optothermal trapping mechanism that occurs in air-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber. In the confined environment of the core, the motion of a laser-guided particle is strongly influenced by the thermal-gradient-driven flow of air along the core surface. Known as "thermal creep flow," this can be induced either statically by local heating, or dynamically by the absorption (at a black mark placed on the fiber surface) of light scattered by the moving particle. The optothermal force on the particle, which can be accurately measured in hollow-core fiber by balancing it against the radiation forces, turns out to exceed the conventional thermophoretic force by 2 orders of magnitude. The system makes it possible to measure pN-scale forces accurately and to explore thermally driven flow in micron-scale structures. PMID:23030165

  11. Reconfigurable Optothermal Microparticle Trap in Air-Filled Hollow-Core Photonic Crystal Fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, O. A.; Garbos, M. K.; Euser, T. G.; Russell, P. St. J.

    2012-07-01

    We report a novel optothermal trapping mechanism that occurs in air-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber. In the confined environment of the core, the motion of a laser-guided particle is strongly influenced by the thermal-gradient-driven flow of air along the core surface. Known as “thermal creep flow,” this can be induced either statically by local heating, or dynamically by the absorption (at a black mark placed on the fiber surface) of light scattered by the moving particle. The optothermal force on the particle, which can be accurately measured in hollow-core fiber by balancing it against the radiation forces, turns out to exceed the conventional thermophoretic force by 2 orders of magnitude. The system makes it possible to measure pN-scale forces accurately and to explore thermally driven flow in micron-scale structures.

  12. Measurements of two types of dilatational waves in an air-filled unconsolidated sand

    SciTech Connect

    Hickey, C.J.; Sabatier, J.M.

    1997-07-01

    This study consists of laboratory measurements of dilatational waves propagating through an air-filled unconsolidated sand. One excitation technique consists of a loudspeaker suspended in the air above the packing of sand. A second excitation technique uses a mechanical shaker in contact with the sand. The transmitted signals are received using microphones and geophones located at various depths within the sand. An interpretation based on measured phase speeds indicates that the transmitted energy from the suspended loudspeaker source is partitioned primarily but not exclusively into the type-II dilatational wave. This wave attenuates rapidly and is only detected at depths of less than about 15 cm for this particular sample. At the deeper depths the detected signal is associated with the type-I dilatational wave. The mechanical shaker produces only a type-I dilatational wave. Both the geophone and microphone sensors can detect both types of dilatational waves. {copyright} {ital 1997 Acoustical Society of America.}

  13. Bulk densities and porosities of Cenozoic and Cretaceous basin-filling strata and Cretaceous and older basement rocks, Los Angeles Basin, California, determined from measurements of core samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beyer, L.A.; McCulloh, T.H.

    1998-01-01

    This report describes and provides a digital data file of selected bulk properties of subsurface rocks sampled in and around Los Angeles basin, California. Selected properties include measured dry bulk density (range 0.78 to 3.01 g/cm3), measured or estimated grain (matrix) density, calculated water saturated bulk density (range 1.47 to 3.01 g/cm3), calculated total porosity (range 0 to 69 porosity percent), geologic age, and lithology. Most of the rocks are conventional core samples taken from wells drilled by the petroleum industry. A small percentage of the core samples are from shallow borings. Rocks studied range in age from pre-Cambrian (?) to Recent and include sedimentary (98.8%), and volcanic, metamorphic and intrusive (1.2%) samples. Core samples studied were taken from measured drillhole depths that range from 35 to 20,234 ft (11 to 6,167 m). Version 1.0 of the data base (dated June 1998) contains information for 7378 samples from 234 wells, including two redrilled wells. This report/data base can be accessed on U. S. Geological Survey servers at http://geopubs.wr.usgs.gov/open-file/of98-788. Periodic additions to the on-line data base will be provided as new data is gathered.

  14. Concentration of dimethylnitrosamine in the air of smoke-filled rooms

    SciTech Connect

    Stehlik, G.; Richter, O.; Altmann, H.

    1982-12-01

    In order to evaluate the contribution of volatile nitrosamines from tobacco smoke to indoor air pollution, N-nitroso-dimethylamine (NDMA) and N-nitroso-diethylamine (NDEA) were measured in indoor air under artificial and natural conditions. In controlled experiments under extreme conditions, we found that tobacco smoke-related NDMA levels above 0.07 ng/liter were associated with a highly irritating atmosphere which was scarcely tolerable to those present. In smoke-filled rooms under natural conditions NDMA levels ranged from 0.02 to 0.05 ng/liter except a minimum value of less than 0.01 ng/liter in a restaurant and a maximum of 0.07 ng/liter in a dancing bar. These NDMA levels are thus below comparable values reported by others. The NDMA/NDEA ratios found in air samples taken from some rooms under conditions of everyday life are quite different from those found in sidestream smoke of cigarettes. Irritation was not reported under natural conditions. From the results it is concluded that NDMA levels, measured under real life conditions, are usually not caused by tobacco smoke alone. Evidence for other sources of volatile nitrosamines is discussed.

  15. Mode-based microparticle conveyor belt in air-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Oliver A; Euser, Tijmen G; Russell, Philip St J

    2013-12-01

    We show how microparticles can be moved over long distances and precisely positioned in a low-loss air-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber using a coherent superposition of two co-propagating spatial modes, balanced by a backward-propagating fundamental mode. This creates a series of trapping positions spaced by half the beat-length between the forward-propagating modes (typically a fraction of a millimeter). The system allows a trapped microparticle to be moved along the fiber by continuously tuning the relative phase between the two forward-propagating modes. This mode-based optical conveyor belt combines long-range transport of microparticles with a positional accuracy of 1 µm. The technique also has potential uses in waveguide-based optofluidic systems. PMID:24514492

  16. High-resolution ion pulse ionization chamber with air filling for the 222Rn decays detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrilyuk, Yu. M.; Gangapshev, A. M.; Gezhaev, A. M.; Etezov, R. A.; Kazalov, V. V.; Kuzminov, V. V.; Panasenko, S. I.; Ratkevich, S. S.; Tekueva, D. A.; Yakimenko, S. P.

    2015-11-01

    The construction and characteristics of the cylindrical ion pulse ionization chamber (CIPIC) with a working volume of 3.2 L are described. The chamber is intended to register α-particles from the 222Rn and its daughter's decays in the filled air sample. The detector is less sensitive to electromagnetic pick-ups and mechanical noises. The digital pulse processing method is proposed to improve the energy resolution of the ion pulse ionization chamber. An energy resolution of 1.6% has been achieved for the 5.49 MeV α-line. The dependence of the energy resolution on high voltage and working media pressure has been investigated and the results are presented.

  17. Air Sampling System for use in monitoring viable and non-viable particulate air quality under dynamic operating conditions of blow/fill/seal processing.

    PubMed

    Probert, Steve; Sinclair, Colin S; Tallentire, Alan

    2002-01-01

    An Air Sampling Link (ASL), employed in conjunction with an Air Sampling Device (ASD) or a laser particle counter, has been developed for sampling flowing air for viable and non-viable particulate analyses. Typically, the ASL could be used to sample filtered air supplied to an air shower of a Blow/Fill/Seal machine operating in the dynamic state. The ASL allows sample volumes of air to be taken from flowing air without significant loss from the sample flow of airborne particles possessing aerodynamic sizes relevant to those found in practice. The link has no moving parts, is steam sterilizable in-situ, and allows for the taking of continuous samples of air without the need for intervention into the 'critical zone' of the filling machine. This article describes (i) the design criteria for the ASL and the ASD, (ii) the rationale underlying the concept of the ASL design, (iii) the collection performance of the ASL against that of a conventional sampling arrangement, and (iv) a functionality assessment of the ASL-based sampling system installed on a Rommelag style 305 B/F/S machine over a seven week period. PMID:12404722

  18. Controlled porosity in electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, Yet-Ming; Bae, Chang-Jun; Halloran, John William; Fu, Qiang; Tomsia, Antoni P.; Erdonmez, Can K.

    2015-06-23

    Porous electrodes in which the porosity has a low tortuosity are generally provided. In some embodiments, the porous electrodes can be designed to be filled with electrolyte and used in batteries, and can include low tortuosity in the primary direction of ion transport during charge and discharge of the battery. In some embodiments, the electrodes can have a high volume fraction of electrode active material (i.e., low porosity). The attributes outlined above can allow the electrodes to be fabricated with a higher energy density, higher capacity per unit area of electrode (mAh/cm.sup.2), and greater thickness than comparable electrodes while still providing high utilization of the active material in the battery during use. Accordingly, the electrodes can be used to produce batteries with high energy densities, high power, or both compared to batteries using electrodes of conventional design with relatively highly tortuous pores.

  19. Representative elementary volume estimation for porosity, moisture saturation, and air-water interfacial areas in unsaturated porous media: Data quality implications

    SciTech Connect

    Costanza-Robinson, Molly S.; Estabrook, Benjamin D.; Fouhey, David F.

    2011-09-16

    Achieving a representative elementary volume (REV) has become a de facto criterion for demonstrating the quality of {mu}CT measurements in porous media systems. However, the data quality implications of an REV requirement have not been previously examined. In this work, deterministic REVs for porosity, moisture saturation (S{sub W}), and air-water interfacial area (A{sub I}) were estimated using a set of 49 {mu}CT images of eight unsaturated homogeneous porous media with heterogeneity in moisture distributions present in varying degrees. Estimated porosity REVs were <8 mm{sup 3} for all cases, smaller than typical CT image sizes ({approx}100 mm{sup 3}). Estimated S{sub W} and A{sub I} REVs were <55 mm{sup 3} for cases with homogeneous moisture distributions but could not be estimated for cases with heterogeneous moisture distributions, due to the absence of a distinct 'REV plateau' within the maximum imaged volume. Conventionally, S{sub W} and A{sub I} data from such non-REV cases would be excluded. The implications of excluding data on the basis of REV were examined by comparing A{sub I}-S{sub W} data measured on image windows of increasing size against the expected linear A{sub I}-S{sub W} relationship. At measurement scales exceeding porosity REV, random fluctuations in A{sub I}-S{sub W} data were excluded, even for cases containing heterogeneous moisture distributions. In contrast, requiring measurement scales to exceed S{sub W} and A{sub I} REV appeared overly restrictive and resulted in visible loss of reliable A{sub I}-S{sub W} data. We attribute these findings to overestimation of REVs due to inherently problematic estimation of deterministic REVs in real systems. Implications of these findings for ensuring CT data quality and the efficient use of CT data are discussed.

  20. Impact of Blow/Fill/Seal process variables in determining rate of vial contamination by air dispersed microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Leo, Frank; Poisson, Patrick; Sinclair, Colin S; Tallentire, Alan

    2005-01-01

    Controlled challenges of air dispersed spores of Bacillus subtilis NCIMB 8649 have been generated in a custom-built challenge room housing a Blow/Fill/Seal machine filling filter-sterilized trypticase soy broth into 5.5 cm3 low density polyethylene vials. The effects on the rate of vial contamination of systematic changes in the process variables, rate of provision of ballooning air, delay in the application of mould vacuum and duration of transfer of the open vial, have been examined. Overall, the findings show that the conditions of vial formation can affect appreciably the rate of vial contamination from airborne spores. The indications are that heat lethality, associated with the elevated temperature required for polymer extrusion and vial formation, has a role in determining such contamination. PMID:16316067

  1. Beam focusing and unidirectional excitation from four nanoslits filled with air and non-linear material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Yan; Quan, Wei; Wei, Qi; Qiu, Peng

    2016-05-01

    We theoretically design a device composed of four nanoslits to dynamically modulate the propagation direction of light beam by embedding non-linear material and air, respectively. Directions of radiation fields are determined by the phase difference of the surface waves at the exit interface and distance of each slit. Numerical simulations using finite element method verify that the unidirectional excitation and beam focusing can be achieved easily by changing the intensity of incident light.

  2. Preparation and in vitro evaluation of poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) air-filled nanocapsules as a contrast agent for ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Néstor, Mendoza-Muñoz; Kei, Noriega-Peláez Eddy; Guadalupe, Nava-Arzaluz María; Elisa, Mendoza-Elvira Susana; Adriana, Ganem-Quintanar; David, Quintanar-Guerrero

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this study was to prepare air-filled nanocapsules intended ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) with a biodegradable polymeric shell composed of poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA). Because of their size, current commercial UCAs are not capable of penetrating the irregular vasculature that feeds growing tumors. The new generation of UCAs should be designed on the nanoscale to enhance tumor detection, in addition, the polymeric shell in contrast with monomolecular stabilized UCAs improves the mechanical properties against ultrasound pressure and lack of stability. The preparation method of air-filled nanocapsules was based on a modification of the double-emulsion solvent evaporation technique. Air-filled nanocapsules with a mean diameter of 370±96nm were obtained. Electronic microscopies revealed spherical-shaped particles with smooth surfaces and a capsular morphology, with a shell thickness of ∼50nm. Air-filled nanocapsules showed echogenic power in vitro, providing an enhancement of up to 15dB at a concentration of 0.045mg/mL at a frequency of 10MHz. Loss of signal for air-filled nanocapsules was 2dB after 30min, suggesting high stability. The prepared contrast agent in this work has the potential to be used in ultrasound imaging. PMID:21570702

  3. Isolating scattering resonances of an air-filled spherical shell using iterative, single-channel time reversal.

    PubMed

    Waters, Zachary J; Dzikowicz, Benjamin R; Simpson, Harry J

    2012-01-01

    Iterative, single-channel time reversal is employed to isolate backscattering resonances of an air-filled spherical shell in a frequency range of 0.5-20 kHz. Numerical simulations of free-field target scattering suggest improved isolation of the dominant target response frequency in the presence of varying levels of stochastic noise, compared to processing returns from a single transmission and also coherent averaging. To test the efficacy of the technique in a realistic littoral environment, monostatic scattering experiments are conducted in the Gulf of Mexico near Panama City, Florida. The time reversal technique is applied to returns from a hollow spherical shell target sitting proud on a sandy bottom in 14 m deep water. Distinct resonances in the scattering response of the target are isolated, depending upon the bandwidth of the sonar system utilized. PMID:22280594

  4. Spectral broadening and temporal compression of ∼ 100 fs pulses in air-filled hollow core capillary fibers.

    PubMed

    Li, C; Rishad, K P M; Horak, P; Matsuura, Y; Faccio, D

    2014-01-13

    We experimentally study the spectral broadening of intense, ∼ 100 femtosecond laser pulses at 785 nm coupled into different kinds of hollow core capillary fibers, all filled with air at ambient pressure. Differently from observations in other gases, the spectra are broadened with a strong red-shift due to highly efficient intrapulse Raman scattering. Numerical simulations show that such spectra can be explained only by increasing the Raman fraction of the third order nonlinearity close to 100%. Experimentally, these broadened and red-shifted pulses do not generally allow for straightforward compression using, for example, standard chirped mirrors. However, using special hollow fibers that are internally coated with silver and polymer we obtain pulse durations in the sub-20 fs regime with energies up to 300 μJ. PMID:24515074

  5. Quantitative analysis of sandstone porosity

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrell, R.E. Jr.; Carpenter, P.K.

    1988-01-01

    A quantitative analysis of changes in porosity associated with sandstone diagenesis was accomplished with digital back-scattered electron image analysis techniques. The volume percent (vol. %) of macroporosity, quartz, clay minerals, feldspar, and other constituents combined with stereological parameters, such as the size and shape of the analyzed features, permitted the determination of cement volumes, the ratio of primary to secondary porosity, and the relative abundance of detrital and authigenic clay minerals. The analyses were produced with a JEOL 733 Superprobe and a TRACOR/NORTHERN 5700 Image Analyzer System. The results provided a numerical evaluation of sedimentological facies controls and diagenetic effects on the permeabilities of potential reservoirs. In a typical application, subtle differences in the diagnetic development of porosity were detected in Wilcox sandstones from central Louisiana. Mechanical compaction of these shoreface sandstones has reduced the porosity to approximately 20%. In most samples with permeabilities greater than 10 md, the measured ratio of macroporosity to microporosity associated with pore-filling kaolinite was 3:1. In other sandstones with lower permeabilities, the measured ratio was higher, but the volume of pore-filling clay was essentially the same. An analysis of the frequency distribution of pore diameters and shapes revealed that the latter samples contained 2-3 vol% of grain-dissolution or moldic porosity. Fluid entry to these large pores was restricted and the clays produced from the grain dissolution products reduced the observed permeability. The image analysis technique provided valuable data for the distinction of productive and nonproductive intervals in this reservoir.

  6. Porosity reduction in Monterey Formation, California

    SciTech Connect

    Compton, J.S.

    1987-05-01

    Porosity and grain density were determined for different lithologies from throughout a 1.2-km thick section of the Monterey and Sisquoc formations in the Santa Maria basin area, California. Porosity reduction by physical and chemical compaction in the predominantly siliceous sediment is controlled largely by the bulk sediment composition and silica phase transformations. Physical compaction of sediment grains from increasing overburden pressure is responsible for most of the gradual porosity reduction with increasing burial depth in opal-A siliceous ooze and diatomite. The porous, incompressible diatom frustule maintains a high porosity relative to clayey and calcareous sediment. Therefore, a positive correlation exists between porosity and biogenic silica (diatom) content of the sediment. During the opal-A to opal-CT silica phase transformation, solution of the porous diatom frustule and precipitation of cryptocrystalline opal-CT results in a porosity reduction that roughly correlates with the biogenic silica content of the sediment. Local porosity reduction occurs in pore-filling dolomite and chert nodules. Dry bulk density as well as porosity reduction tend to increase with sediment depth. Dolomite and organic matter have the most significant influence on the bulk density because of their respective high and low density. The maximum burial depth of the uplifted and eroded section is estimated by overlapping the porosity-depth relation of average deep-sea siliceous ooze.

  7. Response of ozone to changes in hydrocarbon and nitrogen oxide concentrations in outdoor smog chambers filled with Los Angeles air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Nelson A.; Gunst, Richard F.

    During the summer portion of the 1987 Southern California Air Quality Study (SCAQS), outdoor smog chamber experiments were performed on Los Angeles air to determine the response of maximum ozone levels, O 3(max), to changes in the initial concentrations of hydrocarbons, HC, and nitrogen oxides, NO x. These captive-air experiments were conducted in downtown Los Angeles and in the downwind suburb of Claremont. Typically, eight chambers were filled with LA air in the morning. In some chambers the initial HC and/or NO x concentrations were changed by 25% to 50% by adding various combinations of a mixture of HC, clean air, or NO x. The O 3 concentration in each chamber was monitored throughout the day to determine O 3(max). An empirical mathematical model for O 3(max) was developed from regression fits to the initial HC and NO x concentrations and to the average daily temperature at both sites. This is the first time that a mathematical expression for the O 3-precursor relationship and the positive effect of temperature on O 3(max) have been quantified using captive-air experiments. An ozone isopleth diagram prepared from the empirical model was qualitatively similar to those prepared from photochemical mechanisms. This constitutes the first solely empirical corroboration of the O 3 contour shape for Los Angeles. To comply with the Federal Ozone Standard in LA, O 3(max) must be reduced by approximately 50%. Several strategies for reducing O 3(max) by 50% were evaluated using the empirical model. For the average initial conditions that we measured in LA, the most efficient strategy is one that reduces HC by 55-75%, depending on the ambient HC/NO x ratio. Any accompanying reduction in NO x would be counter-productive to the benefits of HC reductions. In fact, reducing HC and NO x simultaneously requires larger percentage reductions for both than the reduction required when HC alone is reduced. The HC-reduction strategy is the most efficient on average, but no single

  8. Spectral Evidence for Ionization in Air-Filled Glow Discharge Tubes: Application to Sprites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, R. A.; Williams, E. R.; Golka, R. K.; Williams, D. R.

    2001-12-01

    The question of ionization in sprites and the evidence for VLF backscatter from sprites has motivated a quantitative spectral analysis of the various (classical) regions of the glow discharge tube under DC excitation and at air densities appropriate for sprites in the mesosphere. A PR-650 colorimeter (Photo Research, Inc.) has enabled calibrated irradiance measurements for localized zones along the axis of the discharge tube--in the dominantly blue negative glow, in the Faraday dark space and in the red/pink positive column. Consistent with historical nomenclature, nitrogen first and second positive emission is dominant in the positive column (associated with neutral N2), and nitrogen first negative emission, with a prominent peak at 4278 A, is dominant in the blue negative glow (associated with ionized N2+). Whereas nitrogen first and second positive emission are also detected in the negative glow, no spectral evidence for ionization (no 4279, no 3914, no Meinel) is found in the red/pink positive column. This negative result is attributed not to an absence of ionization in the positive column, but rather to a sparse population of N2+ relative to neutral nitrogen in this region, and to the prominent emission in the blue part of the spectrum due to nitrogen second positive. A similar interpretation may be appropriate for the time-integrated spectra from the red body of sprites, also lacking direct evidence for ionization.

  9. Photoacoustic Detection of Perfluorocarbon Tracers in Air for Application to Leak Detection in Oil-Filled Cables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zajarevich, N.; Slezak, V.; Peuriot, A.; Villa, G.; Láttero, A.; Crivicich, R.

    2013-09-01

    The underground oil-filled cable consists of a hollow copper conductor surrounded by oiled paper which acts as electrical insulation. The oil flows along the conductor and diffuses through it to the insulating paper. A lead sheath is used as the outer retaining wall. As the deterioration of this cover may cause a loss of insulation fluid, its detection is very important since this high voltage and power cable is used in cities even under sidewalks. The method of perfluorocarbon vapor tracers, based on the injection and subsequent detection of these volatile chemical substances in the vicinity of the cable, is one of the most promising methods, so far used in combination with gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. In this study, the possibility of detecting two different tracers, and , by means of resonant photoacoustic spectroscopy is studied. The beam from a tunable amplitude-modulated laser goes through an aluminum cell with quarter wave filters at both ends of an open resonator and an electret microphone in its center, attached to the walls. The calibration of the system for either substance diluted in chromatographic air showed a higher sensitivity for , so the experiment was completed checking the behavior of this substance in samples prepared with ambient air in order to analyze the application of the system to field studies.

  10. Multiple Solutions in Natural Convection in an Air Filled Square Enclosure: Fractal Dimension of Attractors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aklouche Benouaguef, S.; Zeghmati, B.; Bouhadef, K.; Daguenet, M.

    In this study, we investigated numerically the transient natural convection in a square cavity with two horizontal adiabatic sides and vertical walls composed of two regions of same size maintained at different temperatures. The flow has been assumed to be laminar and bi-dimensional. The governing equations written in dimensionless form and expressed in terms of stream function and vorticity, have been solved using the Alternating Direction Implicit (ADI) method and the GAUSS elimination method. Calculations were performed for air (Pr = 0.71), with a Rayleigh number varying from 2.5x105 to 3.7x106. We analysed the effect of the Rayleigh number on the route to the chaos of the system. The first transition has been found from steady-state to oscillatory flow and the second is a subharmonic bifurcation as the Rayleigh number is increased further. For sufficiently small Rayleigh numbers, present results show that the flow is characterized by four cells with horizontal and vertical symmetric axes. The attractor bifurcates from a stable fixed point to a limit cycle for a Rayleigh number varying from 2.5x105 to 2.51x105. A limit cycle settles from Ra = 3x105 and persists until Ra = 5x105. At a Rayleigh number of 2.5x105 the temporal evolution of the Nusselt number Nu(t) was stationary. As the Rayleigh number increases, the flow becomes unstable and bifurcates to a time periodic solution at a critical Rayleigh number between 2.5x105 and 2.51x105. After the first HOPF bifurcation at Ra = 2.51x105, the oscillatory flow undergoes several bifurcations and ultimately evolves into a chaotic flow.

  11. Small bowel necrosis as a consequence of spontaneous deflation and migration of an air-filled intragastric balloon - a potentially life-threatening complication.

    PubMed

    Drozdowski, Robert; Wyleżoł, Mariusz; Frączek, Mariusz; Hevelke, Piotr; Giaro, Marcin; Sobański, Paweł

    2014-06-01

    Intragastric balloon placement is a common method of treatment of obesity and is often used by non-surgical teams in endoscopy departments. The likelihood of spontaneous intragastric balloon damage is a well-known phenomenon. We describe a patient who was disqualified from surgical obesity treatment and in whom intragastric fluid-filled balloons had already been inserted twice and removed due to their intolerance. Therefore we qualified this patient for placement of the air-filled balloon Heliosphere BAG. Two months after the planned check-up, he arrived at the surgery department complaining of nausea and vomiting and due to symptoms of ileus diagnosed with an X-ray and ultrasound examination we qualified him for emergency surgery. We would like to emphasise the following issues: the necessity of air-filled balloon removal according to the producer's instructions and multidisciplinary specialist team care along with appropriate diagnostic tools in every case of intragastric balloon insertion. PMID:25097704

  12. Influence of porosity on thermophysical properties of a composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grishaeva, N. Yu.; Ljukshin, B. A.; Strukov, Yu. S.; Bochkareva, S. A.

    2015-10-01

    In many modern information systems, the heat generated during the operation of electronic devices is usually dissipated by heat-conductive pads between the casing of the respective equipment and a massive base (platform). For newly developed pads, the promising materials are composites on the basis of various types of silicone rubber. At the same time, during the production of the pads without a vacuum setup, the material can contain air bubbles, which causes the porosity potentially negative for the thermal properties of the material. This work studies the thermal conductivity depending on the degree of silicone matrix filling by copper particles, introduced to improve thermal conductivity, and by air bubbles that are considered as reinforcing inclusions.

  13. Influence of porosity on thermophysical properties of a composite

    SciTech Connect

    Grishaeva, N. Yu. Ljukshin, B. A. Bochkareva, S. A.; Strukov, Yu. S.

    2015-10-27

    In many modern information systems, the heat generated during the operation of electronic devices is usually dissipated by heat-conductive pads between the casing of the respective equipment and a massive base (platform). For newly developed pads, the promising materials are composites on the basis of various types of silicone rubber. At the same time, during the production of the pads without a vacuum setup, the material can contain air bubbles, which causes the porosity potentially negative for the thermal properties of the material. This work studies the thermal conductivity depending on the degree of silicone matrix filling by copper particles, introduced to improve thermal conductivity, and by air bubbles that are considered as reinforcing inclusions.

  14. On models of double porosity poroelastic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutin, Claude; Royer, Pascale

    2015-12-01

    This paper focuses on the modelling of fluid-filled poroelastic double porosity media under quasi-static and dynamic regimes. The double porosity model is derived from a two-scale homogenization procedure, by considering a medium locally characterized by blocks of poroelastic Biot microporous matrix and a surrounding system of fluid-filled macropores or fractures. The derived double porosity description is a two-pressure field poroelastic model with memory and viscoelastic effects. These effects result from the `time-dependent' interaction between the pressure fields in the two pore networks. It is shown that this homogenized double porosity behaviour arises when the characteristic time of consolidation in the microporous domain is of the same order of magnitude as the macroscopic characteristic time of transient regime. Conversely, single porosity behaviours occur when both timescales are clearly distinct. Moreover, it is established that the phenomenological approaches that postulate the coexistence of two pressure fields in `instantaneous' interaction only describe media with two pore networks separated by an interface flow barrier. Hence, they fail at predicting and reproducing the behaviour of usual double porosity media. Finally, the results are illustrated for the case of stratified media.

  15. Fabrication of dual porosity electrode structure

    DOEpatents

    Smith, James L.; Kucera, Eugenia H.

    1991-01-01

    A substantially entirely fibrous ceramic which may have dual porosity of both micro and macro pores. Total porosity may be 60-75% by volume. A method of spraying a slurry perpendicularly to an ambient stream of air is disclosed along with a method of removing binders without altering the fiber morphology. Adding fine ceramic particulates to the green ceramic fibers enhances the sintering characteristics of the fibers.

  16. Fabrication of dual porosity electrode structure

    DOEpatents

    Smith, J.L.; Kucera, E.H.

    1991-02-12

    A substantially entirely fibrous ceramic is described which may have dual porosity of both micro and macro pores. Total porosity may be 60-75% by volume. A method of spraying a slurry perpendicularly to an ambient stream of air is disclosed along with a method of removing binders without altering the fiber morphology. Adding fine ceramic particulates to the green ceramic fibers enhances the sintering characteristics of the fibers. 3 figures.

  17. Carbonate diagenesis and porosity

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, C.H. )

    1989-01-01

    Carbonate diagenesis is a subject of enormous complexity because of the basic chemical reactivity of carbonate minerals. These carbonate minerals react quickly with natural waters that either dissolve the carbonates, or precipitate new carbonates to bring the water into equilibrium with the host carbonate sediments and rocks. These rock-water interactions either create porosity by dissolution, or destroy porosity by the precipitation of carbonate cements into pore spaces. This book examines these relationships in detail.

  18. Enhancement of fill factor in air-processed inverted organic solar cells using self-assembled monolayer of fullerene catechol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Il; Ogumi, Keisuke; Nakagawa, Takafumi; Matsuo, Yutaka

    2016-08-01

    [60]Fullerene catechol self-assembled monolayers were prepared and applied to inverted organic solar cells by an immersion method, and their energy conversion properties were measured. By introducing fullerenes at the surface, we improved the hole-blocking capability of electron-transporting metal oxide, as shown by the fill factor enhancement. The fullerene catechol-treated TiO x -containing device gave a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 2.81% with a fill factor of 0.56 while the non treated device gave a PCE of 2.46% with a fill factor of 0.49. The solar cell efficiency improved by 13% compared with the non treated reference device.

  19. Investigation of the Gas-Diffusion-Electrode Used as Lithium/Air Cathode in Non-aqueous Electrolyte and the Importance of Carbon Material Porosity

    SciTech Connect

    Qu, D.; Yang, X.; Tran, C.

    2010-04-02

    The gas-diffusion-electrode used in a Li-air cell has been studied in a unique homemade electrochemical cell. Three major obstacles for the development of a feasible Li-air system were discussed with a focus on the development of a functional gas-diffusion-electrode in non-aqueous electrolytes and the way of avoiding the passivation of gas-diffusion-electrodes caused by the deposition of the reduction products. It is the first time that the importance of establishing the 3-phase electrochemical interface in non-aqueous electrolyte is demonstrated by creating air-diffusion paths and an air saturated portion for an air cathode. A model mechanism of electrode passivation by the reaction products was also proposed. Lithium oxides formed during O{sub 2} reduction tend to block small pores, preventing them from further utilization in the electrochemical reaction. On the other hand, lithium oxides would accumulate inside the large pores during the reduction until the density of oxides becomes high enough to choke-off the mass transfer. Carbon materials with a high surface area associated with larger pores should be selected to make the gas-diffusion-electrode for Li-air battery. For the first time, a near linear relationship between the capacity of GDE in a non-aqueous electrolyte and the average pore diameter was demonstrated, which could be used to estimate the capacity of the GDE quantitatively.

  20. Understanding the Relationship Between Filling Pattern and Part Quality in Die Casting

    SciTech Connect

    Jerald Brevick; R. Allen Miller

    2004-03-15

    The overall objective of this research project was to investigate phenomena involved in the filling of die cavities with molten alloy in the cold chamber die-casting process. It has long been recognized that the filling pattern of molten metal entering a die cavity influences the quality of die-cast parts. Filling pattern may be described as the progression of molten metal filling the die cavity geometry as a function of time. The location, size and geometric configuration of points of metal entry (gates), as well as the geometry of the casting cavity itself, have great influence on filling patterns. Knowledge of the anticipated filling patterns in die-castings is important for designers. Locating gates to avoid undesirable flow patterns that may entrap air in the casting is critical to casting quality - as locating vents to allow air to escape from the cavity (last places to fill). Casting quality attributes that are commonly flow related are non-fills, poor surface finish, internal porosity due to trapped air, cold shuts, cold laps, flow lines, casting skin delamination (flaking), and blistering during thermal treatment.

  1. Single-mode pumped high air-fill fraction photonic crystal fiber taper for high-power deep-blue supercontinuum sources.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Simon T; Larsen, Casper; Jakobsen, Christian; Thomsen, Carsten L; Bang, Ole

    2014-02-15

    Dispersion control with axially nonuniform photonic crystal fibers (PCFs) permits supercontinuum (SC) generation into the deep-blue from an ytterbium pump laser. In this Letter, we exploit the full degrees of freedom afforded by PCFs to fabricate a fiber with longitudinally increasing air-fill fraction and decreasing diameter directly on the draw-tower. We demonstrate SC generation extending down to 375 nm in one such monolithic fiber device that is single-mode at 1064 nm at the input end. PMID:24562287

  2. Microparticles with hierarchical porosity

    DOEpatents

    Petsev, Dimiter N; Atanassov, Plamen; Pylypenko, Svitlana; Carroll, Nick; Olson, Tim

    2012-12-18

    The present disclosure provides oxide microparticles with engineered hierarchical porosity and methods of manufacturing the same. Also described are structures that are formed by templating, impregnating, and/or precipitating the oxide microparticles and method for forming the same. Suitable applications include catalysts, electrocatalysts, electrocatalysts support materials, capacitors, drug delivery systems, sensors and chromatography.

  3. A morphology, porosity and surface conductive layer optimized MnCo2O4 microsphere for compatible superior Li(+) ion/air rechargeable battery electrode materials.

    PubMed

    Yun, Young Jun; Kim, Jin Kyu; Ju, Ji Young; Unithrattil, Sanjith; Lee, Sun Sook; Kang, Yongku; Jung, Ha-Kyun; Park, Jin-Seong; Im, Won Bin; Choi, Sungho

    2016-03-15

    Uniform surface conductive layers with porous morphology-conserved MnCo2O4 microspheres are successfully synthesized, and their electrochemical performances are thoroughly investigated. It is found that the microwave-assisted hydrothermally grown MnCo2O4 using citric acid as the carbon source shows a maximum Li(+) ion lithiation/delithiation capacity of 501 mA h g(-1) at 500 mA g(-1) with stable capacity retention. Besides, the given microsphere compounds are effectively activated as air cathode catalysts in Li-O2 batteries with reduced charge overpotentials and improved cycling performance. We believe that such an affordable enhanced performance results from the appropriate quasi-hollow nature of MnCo2O4 microspheres, which can effectively mitigate the large volume change of electrodes during Li(+) migration and/or enhance the surface transport of the LiOx species in Li-air batteries. Thus, the rationally designed porous media for the improved Li(+) electrochemical reaction highlight the importance of the 3D macropores, the high specific area and uniformly overcoated conductive layer for the promising Li(+) redox reaction platforms. PMID:26877264

  4. Evolution of porosity and geochemistry in Marcellus Formation black shale during weathering

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Lixin; Mathur, Ryan; Rother, Gernot; Cole, David; Bazilevskaya, Ekaterina; Williams, Jennifer; Carone, Alex; Brantley, Susan L

    2013-01-01

    Soils developed on the Oatka Creek member of the Marcellus Formation in Huntingdon, Pennsylvania were analyzed to understand the evolution of black shale matrix porosity and the associated changes in elemental and mineralogical composition during infiltration of water into organic-rich shale. Making the reasonable assumption that soil erosion rates are the same as those measured in a nearby location on a less organic-rich shale, we suggest that soil production rates have on average been faster for this black shale compared to the gray shale in similar climate settings. This difference is attributed to differences in composition: both shales are dominantly quartz, illite, and chlorite, but the Oatka Creek member at this location has more organic matter (1.25 wt% organic carbon in rock fragments recovered from the bottom of the auger cores and nearby outcrops) and accessory pyrite. During weathering, the extremely low-porosity bedrock slowly disaggregates into shale chips with intergranular pores and fractures. Some of these pores are either filled with organic matter or air-filled but remain unconnected, and thus inaccessible to water. Based on weathering bedrock/soil profiles, disintegration is initiated with oxidation of pyrite and organic matter, which increases the overall porosity and most importantly allows water penetration. Water infiltration exposes fresh surface area and thus promotes dissolution of plagioclase and clays. As these dissolution reactions proceed, the porosity in the deepest shale chips recovered from the soil decrease from 9 to 7 % while kaolinite and Fe oxyhydroxides precipitate. Eventually, near the land surface, mineral precipitation is outcompeted by dissolution or particle loss of illite and chlorite and porosity in shale chips increases to 20%. As imaged by computed tomographic analysis, weathering causes i) greater porosity, ii) greater average length of connected pores, and iii) a more branched pore network compared to the

  5. Air-bridged lateral growth of an Al0.98Ga0.02N layer by introduction of porosity in an AlN buffer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, T.; Bai, J.; Parbrook, P. J.; Cullis, A. G.

    2005-10-01

    We demonstrated air-bridged lateral growth of an Al0.98Ga0.02N layer with significant dislocation reduction by introduction of a porous AlN buffer underneath via metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. By modifying growth conditions, a porous AlN layer and an atomically flat AlN layer have been obtained for comparison, confirmed by atomic force microscopy. An Al0.98Ga0.02N layer was subsequently grown on both the porous AlN layer and the atomically flat AlN layer under identical conditions. Significant dislocation reduction was achieved for the Al0.98Ga0.02N layer grown on the porous AlN buffer layer, compared to the layer grown on the atomically flat AlN layer, as observed by transmission electron microscopy. Clear bubbles from the layer grown on the porous AlN buffer layer have been observed, while in contrast, there was not any bubble from the layer on the flat AlN buffer, confirming the mechanism of lateral growth for dislocation reduction. Asymmetric x-ray diffraction studies also indicated that the crystal quality was dramatically improved using the porous AlN buffer layer.

  6. The performance of a two-layer biotrickling filter filled with new mixed packing materials for the removal of H2S from air.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yingwen; Wang, Xiaojun; He, Shuo; Zhu, Shemin; Shen, Shubao

    2016-01-01

    In the work described here, a two-layer biotrickling filter filled with new packing materials was used to remove H2S from air. The upper layer of the filter was packed with activated carbon-loaded polyurethane, whereas the lower layer was filled with modified organism-suspended fillers. The effects of inlet load, empty bed residence time (EBRT) from 79 s to 53 s, pH and contaminant starvation time were investigated. For loads of 15-50 g/(m(3) h), the average removal efficiency (RE) was higher than 96% under a consistent supply of pollutants. The critical elimination capacity was 39.95 g/(m(3) h) for an EBRT of 53 s with an RE of 99.9%. The two-layer BTF was capable of withstanding contaminant starvation periods for 1.5 d and 7 d with only a few hours of recovery time. The biodegradation kinetics was studied using Michaelis-Menten type equations under different EBRTs. At an EBRT of 66 s, the optimal kinetic constants rmax and Km were 333.3 g/(m(3) h) and 0.93 g/m(3), respectively. During the operation, the two-layer BTF performed well under various reasonable conditions. PMID:26397031

  7. Liquids with permanent porosity.

    PubMed

    Giri, Nicola; Del Pópolo, Mario G; Melaugh, Gavin; Greenaway, Rebecca L; Rätzke, Klaus; Koschine, Tönjes; Pison, Laure; Gomes, Margarida F Costa; Cooper, Andrew I; James, Stuart L

    2015-11-12

    Porous solids such as zeolites and metal-organic frameworks are useful in molecular separation and in catalysis, but their solid nature can impose limitations. For example, liquid solvents, rather than porous solids, are the most mature technology for post-combustion capture of carbon dioxide because liquid circulation systems are more easily retrofitted to existing plants. Solid porous adsorbents offer major benefits, such as lower energy penalties in adsorption-desorption cycles, but they are difficult to implement in conventional flow processes. Materials that combine the properties of fluidity and permanent porosity could therefore offer technological advantages, but permanent porosity is not associated with conventional liquids. Here we report free-flowing liquids whose bulk properties are determined by their permanent porosity. To achieve this, we designed cage molecules that provide a well-defined pore space and that are highly soluble in solvents whose molecules are too large to enter the pores. The concentration of unoccupied cages can thus be around 500 times greater than in other molecular solutions that contain cavities, resulting in a marked change in bulk properties, such as an eightfold increase in the solubility of methane gas. Our results provide the basis for development of a new class of functional porous materials for chemical processes, and we present a one-step, multigram scale-up route for highly soluble 'scrambled' porous cages prepared from a mixture of commercially available reagents. The unifying design principle for these materials is the avoidance of functional groups that can penetrate into the molecular cage cavities. PMID:26560299

  8. Liquids with permanent porosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giri, Nicola; Del Pópolo, Mario G.; Melaugh, Gavin; Greenaway, Rebecca L.; Rätzke, Klaus; Koschine, Tönjes; Pison, Laure; Gomes, Margarida F. Costa; Cooper, Andrew I.; James, Stuart L.

    2015-11-01

    Porous solids such as zeolites and metal-organic frameworks are useful in molecular separation and in catalysis, but their solid nature can impose limitations. For example, liquid solvents, rather than porous solids, are the most mature technology for post-combustion capture of carbon dioxide because liquid circulation systems are more easily retrofitted to existing plants. Solid porous adsorbents offer major benefits, such as lower energy penalties in adsorption-desorption cycles, but they are difficult to implement in conventional flow processes. Materials that combine the properties of fluidity and permanent porosity could therefore offer technological advantages, but permanent porosity is not associated with conventional liquids. Here we report free-flowing liquids whose bulk properties are determined by their permanent porosity. To achieve this, we designed cage molecules that provide a well-defined pore space and that are highly soluble in solvents whose molecules are too large to enter the pores. The concentration of unoccupied cages can thus be around 500 times greater than in other molecular solutions that contain cavities, resulting in a marked change in bulk properties, such as an eightfold increase in the solubility of methane gas. Our results provide the basis for development of a new class of functional porous materials for chemical processes, and we present a one-step, multigram scale-up route for highly soluble ‘scrambled’ porous cages prepared from a mixture of commercially available reagents. The unifying design principle for these materials is the avoidance of functional groups that can penetrate into the molecular cage cavities.

  9. Porosity in polysilsesquioxane xerogels

    SciTech Connect

    LOY,DOUGLAS A.; SCHNEIDER,DUANE A.; BAUGHER,BRIGITTA M.; RAHIMIAN,KAMYAR

    2000-05-09

    Polysilsesquioxanes, [RSiO{sub 1.5}]{sub n} are a class of hybrid organic-inorganic materials in which silicon atoms are linked with up to three siloxane bonds to other monomer units in the polymer and the organic group is a pendent functionality. Polysilsesquioxanes are prepared by the hydrolysis and condensation of organotrialkoxysilanes (Scheme l). Organotrialkoxysilanes RSi(OR{prime}){sub 3}, have been extensively used as coupling agents for composites or surface treatments for materials. Polysilsesquioxanes have become increasingly popular for generating specialty coatings such as low k dielectric materials for microelectronic applications. While there is extensive information on the formation of polysilsesquioxanes, there has not been a survey of the ability of organotrialkoxysilanes to form gels until recently. The formation of polysilsesquioxanes gels has been shown to be very sensitive to the nature of the organic group. Many monomers will only form soluble oligomers or polymers upon hydrolysis and condensation, even when the reaction is conducted solvent-free with neat monomer and aqueous catalyst. Furthermore, there is little information concerning the influence of the organic group, R, on the porosity of the polysilsesquioxanes gels that are formed. In this paper the authors describe the preparation of polysilsesquioxane gels where R = H, methyl, ethyl, cyanoethyl, vinyl, dodecyl, hexadecyl, octadecyl, chloromethyl, and chloromethylphenyl, and the characterization of the porosity of the respective xerogels. Gels were prepared from the hydrolysis and condensation of organotrimethoxysilanes, RSi(OEt){sub 3}, and organotriethoxy-silanes, RSi(OEt){sub 3}.

  10. Numerical study of porosity in titanium dental castings.

    PubMed

    Wu, M; Sahm, P R; Augthun, M; Spiekermann, H; Schädlich-Stubenrauch, J

    1999-09-01

    A commercial software package, MAGMASOFT (MAGMA Giessereitechnologie GmbH, Aachen, Germany), was used to study shrinkage and gas porosity in titanium dental castings. A geometrical model for two simplified tooth crowns connected by a connector bar was created. Both mold filling and solidification of this casting model were numerically simulated. Shrinkage porosity was quantitatively predicted by means of a built-in feeding criterion. The risk of gas pore formation was investigated using the numerical filling and solidification results. The results of the numerical simulations were compared with experiments, which were carried out on a centrifugal casting machine with an investment block mold. The block mold was made of SiO2 based slurry with a 1 mm thick Zr2 face coat to reduce metal-mold reactions. Both melting and casting were carried out under protective argon (40 kPa). The finished castings were sectioned and the shrinkage porosity determined. The experimentally determined shrinkage porosity coincided with the predicted numerical simulation results. No apparent gas porosity was found in these model castings. Several running and gating systems for the above model casting were numerically simulated. An optimized running and gating system design was then experimentally cast, which resulted in porosity-free castings. PMID:15348102

  11. Porosity in Polysilsesquioxane Xerolgels

    SciTech Connect

    Baugher, B.M.; Loy, D.A.; Rahimian, K.

    1999-08-17

    Polymerization of organotrialkoxysilanes is a convenient method for introducing organic functionality into hybrid organic-inorganic materials. However, not much is known about the effects of the organic substituent on the porosity of the resulting xerogels. In this study, we prepared a series of polysilsesquioxane xerogels from organotrialkoxysilanes, RSi(OR{sup 1}){sub 3}, with different organic groups (R = H, Me, Et dodecyl, hexadecyl, octadecyl, vinyl, chloromethyl, (p-chloromethyl) phenyl, cyanoethyl). Polymerizations of the monomers were carried out under a variety of conditions, varying monomer concentration, type of catalyst, and alkoxide substituent. The effect of the organic substituent on the sol-gel process was often dramatic. In many cases, gels were formed only at very high monomer concentration and/or with only one type of catalyst. All of the gels were processed as xerogels and characterized by scanning electron microscopy and nitrogen sorption porosimetry to evaluate their pore structure.

  12. Prediction of Thermal Conductivity of Aluminum Nanocluster-Filled Mesoporous Silica (Al/MCM-41)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Congliang; Feng, Yanhui; Zhang, Xinxin; Li, Jing; Cui, Liu; Wang, Ge; Yang, Mu

    2013-12-01

    MCM-41 consists of a hexagonal array of long, unconnected cylindrical pores with diameters that can be tailored within the range 1.6 nm to 10 nm. As a porous silica nanomaterial, MCM-41 is a promising porous substrate for mesoporous composites with extremely high or low thermal conductivity. In this article, the structural unit of MCM-41 was established first and an equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation was performed to determine the shell thermal conductivity of MCM-41. Then, based on one-dimensional (1D) heat transfer analysis, a mathematical expression for the effective thermal conductivity (ETC) of Al nanocluster-filled mesoporous MCM-41 (Al/MCM-41) was obtained. The effects of porosity and the filling ratio of nanoclusters in the mesochannels were further investigated. As the porosity is greater than 75 %, the ETC of only-air-filling mesoporous MCM-41 in all directions tends to approach the thermal conductivity of air. It seems that Al nanoclusters have negligible effects on the ETC of the composite, except that mesochannels are almost completely filled with Al nanowires.

  13. Evolution of porosity and geochemistry in Marcellus Formation black shale during weathering

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Lixin; Ryan, Mathur; Rother, Gernot; Cole, David; Bazilevskaya, Ekaterina; Williams, Jennifer; Alex, Carone; Brantley, S. L.

    2013-01-01

    Soils developed on the Oatka Creek member of the Marcellus Formation in Huntingdon, Pennsylvania were analyzed to understand the evolution of black shale matrix porosity and the associated changes in elemental and mineralogical composition during infiltration of water into organic-rich shale. Making the reasonable assumption that soil erosion rates are the same as those measured in a nearby location on a less organic-rich shale, we suggest that soil production rates have on average been faster for this black shale compared to the gray shale in similar climate settings. This difference is attributed to differences in composition: both shales are dominantly quartz, illite, and chlorite, but the Oatka Creek member at this location has more organic matter (1.25 wt.% organic carbon in rock fragments recovered from the bottom of the auger cores and nearby outcrops) and accessory pyrite. During weathering, the extremely low-porosity bedrock slowly disaggregates into shale chips with intergranular pores and fractures. Some of these pores are eitherfilled with organic matter or air-filled but remain unconnected, and thus inaccessible to water. Based on weathering bedrock/soil profiles, disintegration is initiated with oxidation of pyrite and organic matter, which increases the overall porosity and most importantly allows water penetration. Water infiltration exposes fresh surface area and thus promotes dissolution of plagioclase and clays. As these dissolution reactions proceed, the porosity in the deepest shale chips recovered from the soil decrease from 9 to 7% while kaolinite and Fe oxyhydroxides precipitate. Eventually, near the land surface, mineral precipitation is outcompeted by dissolution or particle loss of illite and chlorite and porosity in shale chips increases to 20%. As imaged by computed tomographic analysis, weathering causes i) greater porosity, ii) greater average length of connected pores, and iii) a more branched pore network compared to the unweathered

  14. Air

    MedlinePlus

    ... do to protect yourself from dirty air . Indoor air pollution and outdoor air pollution Air can be polluted indoors and it can ... this chart to see what things cause indoor air pollution and what things cause outdoor air pollution! Indoor ...

  15. Mechanistic Effects of Porosity on Structural Composite Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siver, Andrew

    As fiber reinforced composites continue to gain popularity as primary structures in aerospace, automotive, and powersports industries, quality control becomes an extremely important aspect of materials and mechanical engineering. The ability to recognize and control manufacturing induced defects can greatly reduce the likelihood of unexpected catastrophic failure. Porosity is the result of trapped volatiles or air bubbles during the layup process and can significantly compromise the strength of fiber reinforced composites. A comprehensive study was performed on an AS4C-UF3352 TCR carbon fiber-epoxy prepreg system to determine the effect of porosity on flexural, shear, low-velocity impact, and damage residual strength properties. Autoclave cure pressure was controlled to induce varying levels of porosity to construct six laminates with porosity concentrations between 0-40%. Porosity concentrations were measured using several destructive and nondestructive techniques including resin burnoff, sectioning and optical analysis, and X-ray computed tomography (CT) scanning. Ultrasonic transmission, thermography, and CT scanning provided nondestructive imaging to evaluate impact damage. A bilinear relationship accurately characterizes the change in mechanical properties with increasing porosity. Strength properties are relatively unaffected when porosity concentrations are below approximately 2.25% and decrease linearly by up to 40% in high porosity specimens.

  16. Rechargeability of Li-air cathodes pre-filled with discharge products using an ether-based electrolyte solution: implications for cycle-life of Li-air cells.

    PubMed

    Meini, Stefano; Tsiouvaras, Nikolaos; Schwenke, K Uta; Piana, Michele; Beyer, Hans; Lange, Lukas; Gasteiger, Hubert A

    2013-07-21

    The instability of currently used electrolyte solutions and of the carbon support during charge-discharge in non-aqueous lithium-oxygen cells can lead to discharge products other than the desired Li2O2, such as Li2CO3, which is believed to reduce cycle-life. Similarly, discharge in an O2 atmosphere which contains H2O and CO2 impurities would lead to LiOH and Li2CO3 discharge products. In this work we therefore investigate the rechargeability of model cathodes pre-filled with four possible Li-air cell discharge products, namely Li2O2, Li2CO3, LiOH, and Li2O. Using Online Electrochemical Mass Spectrometry (OEMS), we determined the charge voltages and the gases evolved upon charge of pre-filled electrodes, thus determining the reversibility of the formation/electrooxidation reactions. We show that Li2O2 is the only reversible discharge product in ether-based electrolyte solutions, and that the formation of Li2CO3, LiOH, or Li2O is either irreversible and/or reacts with the electrolyte solution or the carbon during its oxidation. PMID:23748698

  17. Thermoelectric materials having porosity

    SciTech Connect

    Heremans, Joseph P.; Jaworski, Christopher M.; Jovovic, Vladimir; Harris, Fred

    2014-08-05

    A thermoelectric material and a method of making a thermoelectric material are provided. In certain embodiments, the thermoelectric material comprises at least 10 volume percent porosity. In some embodiments, the thermoelectric material has a zT greater than about 1.2 at a temperature of about 375 K. In some embodiments, the thermoelectric material comprises a topological thermoelectric material. In some embodiments, the thermoelectric material comprises a general composition of (Bi.sub.1-xSb.sub.x).sub.u(Te.sub.1-ySe.sub.y).sub.w, wherein 0.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.1, 0.ltoreq.y.ltoreq.1, 1.8.ltoreq.u.ltoreq.2.2, 2.8.ltoreq.w.ltoreq.3.2. In further embodiments, the thermoelectric material includes a compound having at least one group IV element and at least one group VI element. In certain embodiments, the method includes providing a powder comprising a thermoelectric composition, pressing the powder, and sintering the powder to form the thermoelectric material.

  18. Impermeable high-porosity magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heap, Michael; Vona, Alessandro; Kolzenburg, Stephan; Ryan, Amy; Russell, Kelly

    2016-04-01

    Magma vesiculation (i.e., porosity increase) is the consequence of decompression-driven volatile release during ascent and/or heating. The ease at which these exsolved volatiles can escape is thought to strongly impact volcanic explosivity. Permeability is usually considered to increase as a function of porosity. High and low porosity are typically associated with high and low permeability, respectively. Here we present permeability experiments on foamed natural rhyolitic melts containing total porosities from 0.12 to 0.65; we compliment these data with measurements on synthetic foamed glasses (prepared by FOAMGLAS®) that contain a total porosity of 0.9. The rhyolitic melts (from Krafla, Iceland: Tg = 690 °C) were kept at atmospheric pressure and 1000 °C for 0.5, 1, 2, and 4 hours, followed by quenching. The four experiments yielded total porosities of 0.12, 0.44, 0.51, and 0.65, respectively. The permeability of these samples was then measured using a steady-state, benchtop permeameter under a confining pressure of 1 MPa. The permeability of the foamed samples containing a porosity of 0.12 and 0.44 were not measurable in our system, meaning their permeabilities are lower than ~10-18 m2. The permeability of the samples containing a porosity of 0.51 and 0.65 were 8.7 × 10-15 and 1.0 × 10-15 m2, respectively. Both types of FOAMGLAS® - containing a porosity of 0.9 - also have permeabilities lower than ~10-18 m2. Our study highlights that highly porous magmas are not necessarily permeable due to the absence of a connected network of pores. These data suggest that (1) the percolation threshold for magma requires further thought and, (2) that the liberation of exsolved volatiles will require the fracturing of bubble walls to connect the network of pores within the magma.

  19. Effect of paper porosity on OCT images: Monte Carlo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirillin, Mikhail Yu.; Priezzhev, Alexander V.; Myllylä, Risto

    2008-06-01

    Non-invasive measurement of paper porosity is an important problem for papermaking industry. Presently used techniques are invasive and require long time for processing the sample. In recent years optical coherence tomography (OCT) has been proved to be an effective tool for non-invasive study of optically non-uniform scattering media including paper. The aim of present work is to study the potential ability of OCT for sensing the porosity of a paper sample by means of numerical simulations. The paper sample is characterized by variation of porosity along the sample while numerical simulations allow one to consider the samples with constant porosity which is useful for evaluation of the technique abilities. The calculations were performed implementing Monte Carlo-based technique developed earlier for simulation of OCT signals from multilayer paper models. A 9-layer model of paper consisting of five fiber layers and four air layers with non-planar boundaries was considered. The porosity of the samples was varied from 30 to 80% by varying the thicknesses of the layers. The simulations were performed for model paper samples without and with optical clearing agents (benzyl alcohol, 1-pentanol, isopropanol) applied. It was shown that the simulated OCT images of model paper with various porosities significantly differ revealing the potentiality of the OCT technique for sensing the porosity. When obtaining the images of paper samples with optical clearing agents applied, the inner structure of the samples is also revealed providing additional information about the samples under study.

  20. Data Qualification Report: Calculated Porosity and Porosity-Derived Values for Lithostratigraphic Units for use on the Yucca Mountain Project

    SciTech Connect

    P. Sanchez

    2001-05-30

    The qualification is being completed in accordance with the Data Qualification Plan DQP-NBS-GS-000006, Rev. 00 (CRWMS M&O 2001). The purpose of this data qualification activity is to evaluate for qualification the unqualified developed input and porosity output included in Data Tracking Number (DTN) M09910POROCALC.000. The main output of the analyses documented in DTN M09910POROCALC.000 is the calculated total porosity and effective porosity for 40 Yucca Mountain Project boreholes. The porosity data are used as input to Analysis Model Report (AMR) 10040, ''Rock Properties Model'' (MDL-NBS-GS-000004, Rev. 00), Interim Change Notice [ICN] 02 (CRWMS M&O 2000b). The output from the rock properties model is used as input to numerical physical-process modeling within the context of a relationship developed in the AMR between hydraulic conductivity, bound water and zeolitic zones for use in the unsaturated zone model. In accordance with procedure AP-3.15Q, the porosity output is not used in the direct calculation of Principal Factors for post-closure safety or disruptive events. The original source for DTN M09910POROCALC.000 is a Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) Management and Operating Contractor (M&O) report, ''Combined Porosity from Geophysical Logs'' (CRWMS M&O 1999a and hereafter referred to as Rael 1999). That report recalculated porosity results for both the historical boreholes covered in Nelson (1996), and the modern boreholes reported in CRWMS M&O (1996a,b). The porosity computations in Rael (1999) are based on density-porosity mathematical relationships requiring various input parameters, including bulk density, matrix density and air and/or fluid density and volumetric water content. The main output is computed total porosity and effective porosity reported on a foot-by-foot basis for each borehole, although volumetric water content is derived from neutron data as an interim output. This qualification report uses technical assessment and

  1. Crater Fill

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA03082 Crater Fill

    This VIS image shows part of the floor of an unnamed crater located between the Hellas and Argyre Basins. At some point in time the entire floor of the crater was filled by material. That material is now being eroded away to form the depressions seen in the center and bottom of the image.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 46.6S, Longitude 5.0E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  2. Influence of porosity on collisions between dust aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunkelmann, Nina; Ringl, Christian; Urbassek, Herbert M.

    2016-04-01

    Context. Collisions between dust particles may lead to agglomerate growth or fragmentation, depending on the porosity of the dust and the collision velocity. Aims: We study the effect of agglomerate porosity and collision velocity on aggregate fragmentation and agglomeration. Methods: Granular-mechanics simulations are used to study the outcome of head-on dust aggregate collisions. The aggregates are composed of silica grains of 0.76 μm radius and have filling factors of between 0.08 and 0.21. The simulations incorporate repulsive and viscoelastic, dissipative normal forces, and intergrain adhesion. The tangential forces are composed of gliding, rolling, and torsional friction. To study the effect of aggregate porosity, we prepared spherical aggregates with identical radius but differing particle numbers. Results: The threshold velocity for agglomerate fragmentation decreases with the porosity of the aggregates. Porous aggregates tend to fragment more easily, and the fragments are irregularly shaped. In the agglomeration regime, the merged aggregate is more compact than the initial collision partners. The collision velocity at which compaction is highest is independent of the initial porosity.

  3. Nanoscale porosity in SAFOD core samples (San Andreas Fault)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janssen, Christoph; Wirth, Richard; Reinicke, Andreas; Rybacki, Erik; Naumann, Rudolf; Wenk, Hans-Rudolf; Dresen, Georg

    2011-01-01

    With transmission electron microscopy (TEM) we observed nanometer-sized pores in four ultracataclastic and fractured core samples recovered from different depths of the main bore hole of the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD). Cutting of foils with a focused ion beam technique (FIB) allowed identifying porosity down to the nm scale. Between 40 and 50% of all pores could be identified as in-situ pores without any damage related to sample preparation. The total porosity estimated from TEM micrographs (1-5%) is comparable to the connected fault rock porosity (2.8-6.7%) estimated by pressure-induced injection of mercury. Permeability estimates for cataclastic fault rocks are 10- 21-10- 19 m2 and 10- 17 m2 for the fractured fault rock. Porosity and permeability are independent of sample depth. TEM images reveal that the porosity is intimately linked to fault rock composition and associated with deformation. The TEM-estimated porosity of the samples increases with increasing clay content. The highest porosity was estimated in the vicinity of an active fault trace. The largest pores with an equivalent radius > 200 nm occur around large quartz and feldspar grains or grain-fragments while the smallest pores (equivalent radius < 50 nm) are typically observed in the extremely fine-grained matrix (grain size < 1 μm). Based on pore morphology we distinguish different pore types varying with fault rock fabric and alteration. The pores were probably filled with formation water and/or hydrothermal fluids at elevated pore fluid pressure, preventing pore collapse. The pore geometry derived from TEM observations and BET (Brunauer, Emmett and Teller) gas adsorption/desorption hysteresis curves indicates pore blocking effects in the fine-grained matrix. Observations of isolated pores in TEM micrographs and high pore body to pore throat ratios inferred from mercury injection suggest elevated pore fluid pressure in the low permeability cataclasites, reducing shear strength

  4. Dual porosity gas evolving electrode

    DOEpatents

    Townsend, Carl W.

    1994-01-01

    A dual porosity electrode for use in thermoelectrochemical systems where simultaneous transport of gas and liquid into and/or out of the electrode is required. The electrode includes catalytic electrode particles having diameters ranging from about 25 to 100 angstroms. The catalytic electrode particles are anchored to a support network in clusters which have internal pores ranging in size from 25 to 100 angstroms. The pores between the clusters range in size from between about 1 to 20 microns. A method for making the dual porosity electrodes is also disclosed.

  5. Dual porosity gas evolving electrode

    DOEpatents

    Townsend, C.W.

    1994-11-15

    A dual porosity electrode is described for use in thermoelectrochemical systems where simultaneous transport of gas and liquid into and/or out of the electrode is required. The electrode includes catalytic electrode particles having diameters ranging from about 25 to 100 angstroms. The catalytic electrode particles are anchored to a support network in clusters which have internal pores ranging in size from 25 to 100 angstroms. The pores between the clusters range in size from between about 1 to 20 microns. A method for making the dual porosity electrodes is also disclosed.

  6. Relationship between Arterial Inflow Rate and Venous Filling Index of the Lower Extremities Assessed by Air Plethysmography in Subjects with or without Axial Reflux in the Great Saphenous Vein

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the relationship between arterial inflow rate (AIR) and venous filling index (VFI) in limbs with or without varicose veins, assessed by air plethysmography (APG). Materials and Methods: A total of 142 patients (142 limbs) visiting our clinic with leg complaints, but without arterial and venous disease, were defined as the normal group (NG), and 65 patients (65 limbs) with leg varices were defined as the varicose vein group (VG). Both groups underwent duplex ultrasonography and APG to identify venous reflux and measure hemodynamic parameters, respectively. Examinations were performed at the first visit in the NG and before and one month after treatment in the VG. Results: A strong correlation between resting AIR and VFI was found in the NG (r = 0.72) and postoperative VG (r = 0.71). Twenty-two and three limbs in the NG and postoperative VG, respectively, had a VFI over 2.0 mL/s because of the high AIR. In the VG, AIR tended to decrease after treatment (P >0.01). Conclusions: High leg AIR lead to high VFI measured by APG. AIR and VFI should be measured at the same session to assess venous hemodynamic changes after varicose vein treatment when residual venous reflux cannot be diagnosed with duplex ultrasonography. PMID:25298834

  7. The Porosity of 433 Eros

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britt, D. T.; Yeomans, Donald K.; Consolmagno, G. J.

    2001-01-01

    Data from the NEAR mission show the bulk density of 433 Eros is 2.67 g/cm 3 . Given an L or LL composition, the bulk porosity of Eros is in the range of 25-29% and the macroporosity is 14-18%. This is consistent with a fractured, but coherent asteroid. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  8. Optimization of High Porosity Thermal Barrier Coatings Generated with a Porosity Former

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medřický, Jan; Curry, Nicholas; Pala, Zdenek; Vilemova, Monika; Chraska, Tomas; Johansson, Jimmy; Markocsan, Nicolaie

    2015-04-01

    Yttria-stabilized zirconia thermal barrier coatings are extensively used in turbine industry; however, increasing performance requirements have begun to make conventional air plasma sprayed coatings insufficient for future needs. Since the thermal conductivity of bulk material cannot be lowered easily; the design of highly porous coatings may be the most efficient way to achieve coatings with low thermal conductivity. Thus the approach of fabrication of coatings with a high porosity level based on plasma spraying of ceramic particles of dysprosia-stabilized zirconia mixed with polymer particles, has been tested. Both polymer and ceramic particles melt in plasma and after impact onto a substrate they form a coating. When the coating is subjected to heat treatment, polymer burns out and a complex structure of pores and cracks is formed. In order to obtain desired porosity level and microstructural features in coatings; a design of experiments, based on changes in spray distance, powder feeding rate, and plasma-forming atmosphere, was performed. Acquired coatings were evaluated for thermal conductivity and thermo-cyclic fatigue, and their morphology was assessed using scanning electron microscopy. It was shown that porosity level can be controlled by appropriate changes in spraying parameters.

  9. Porosity prediction of calcium phosphate cements based on chemical composition.

    PubMed

    Öhman, Caroline; Unosson, Johanna; Carlsson, Elin; Ginebra, Maria Pau; Persson, Cecilia; Engqvist, Håkan

    2015-07-01

    The porosity of calcium phosphate cements has an impact on several important parameters, such as strength, resorbability and bioactivity. A model to predict the porosity for biomedical cements would hence be a useful tool. At the moment such a model only exists for Portland cements. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a first porosity prediction model for calcium phosphate cements. On the basis of chemical reaction, molar weight and density of components, a volume-based model was developed and validated using calcium phosphate cement as model material. 60 mol% β-tricalcium phosphate and 40 mol% monocalcium phosphate monohydrate were mixed with deionized water, at different liquid-to-powder ratios. Samples were set for 24 h at 37°C and 100% relative humidity. Thereafter, samples were dried either under vacuum at room temperature for 24 h or in air at 37 °C for 7 days. Porosity and phase composition were determined. It was found that the two drying protocols led to the formation of brushite and monetite, respectively. The model was found to predict well the experimental values and also data reported in the literature for apatite cements, as deduced from the small absolute average residual errors (<2.0%). In conclusion, a theoretical model for porosity prediction was developed and validated for brushite, monetite and apatite cements. The model gives a good estimate of the final porosity and has the potential to be used as a porosity prediction tool in the biomedical cement field. PMID:26169187

  10. Numerical simulation of porosity-free titanium dental castings.

    PubMed

    Wu, M; Augthun, M; Schädlich-Stubenrauch, J; Sahm, P R; Spiekermann, H

    1999-08-01

    The objective of this research was to analyse, predict and control the porosity in titanium dental castings by the use of numerical simulation. A commercial software package (MAGMASOFT) was used. In the first part of the study, a model casting (two simplified tooth crowns connected by a connector bar) was simulated to analyse shrinkage porosity. Secondly, gas pores were numerically examined by means of a ball specimen with a "snake" sprue. The numerical simulation results were compared with the experimental casting results, which were made on a centrifugal casting machine. The predicted shrinkage levels coincided well with the experimentally determined levels. Based on the above numerical analyses, an optimised running and gating system design for the crown model was proposed. The numerical filling and solidification results of the ball specimen showed that this simulation model could be helpful for the explanation of the experimentally indicated gas pores. It was concluded that shrinkage porosity in titanium dental casting was predictable, and it could be minimised by improving the running and gating system design. Entrapped gas pores can be explained from the simulation results of the mould filling and solidification. PMID:10467947

  11. Microcomputed tomographic comparison of posterior composite resin restorative techniques: sonicated bulk fill versus incremental fill.

    PubMed

    Jarisch, Justin; Lien, Wen; Guevara, Peter H; Greenwood, William J; Dunn, William J

    2016-01-01

    Sonication technology has recently been touted to decrease composite viscosity during delivery and may allow better cavity preparation adaptation and minimize voids. The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the difference between conventional, hand-placed, incremental application of a standard hybrid resin-based composite (RBC) and sonicated application of a bulk-fill RBC in box-type and cylindrical cavity preparations. Experimental restorations were fabricated using molds of box-type or cylindrical preparations. For bulk-filled specimens, a single compule of bulk-fill composite was dispensed with a sonic handpiece. The conventional hybrid material was placed in 3 increments (2 mm, 2 mm, and 1 mm). Microfocus x-ray computed tomography was used to analyze voids for percentage and total volume porosity as well as number of actual pores. An analysis of variance indicated that RBC restorations that were applied to cylindrical cavities using a sonicated bulk-filled application method exhibited significantly less porosity (1.42%; P < 0.001) than incrementally placed cylindrical restorations (2.87%); sonicated bulk-filled, cube-shaped restorations (3.12%); and incrementally placed cube-shaped restorations (5.16%). When the groups were subcategorized into the specific characteristics of shape (cube vs cylinder) and application method (bulk vs incremental), the cylindrical group, which included both bulk-filled and incrementally placed specimens, demonstrated significantly less porosity (2.00%; P < 0.001) than other groups. Restorations that were incrementally placed into cube-shaped cavities produced the largest amount of porosity. PMID:27599276

  12. Thermal diffusivity measurements on composite porosity samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zalameda, Joseph N.; Winfree, William P.

    1990-01-01

    A phase lag technique is used to make quantitative measurements of diffusivity in composite porosity samples. Changes in through-ply diffusivity in a graphite composite due to varying porosity levels are examined. The relationship between the amount of porosity and the change in diffusivity is analyzed using an electrical analog for modeling heat flow in the composite.

  13. Measurement of the open porosity of agricultural soils with acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luong, Jeanne; Mercatoris, Benoit; Destain, Marie-France

    2015-04-01

    soil, since there are more voids filled with air and water, increasing the viscous losses. Fellah et al. (2003) showed that porosity can be determined from phase speed and reflection coefficient. The propagation of acoustic waves in soil is investigated to develop a rapid method for the quantification of the porosity level of agricultural soils. In the present contribution, correlations are determined between the acoustic signatures of agricultural soil in function of its structural properties. In laboratory, compression tests are performed on unsaturated soil samples to reproduce different porosity levels. Ultrasonic pulses are sent through the considered samples. The propagated signals are treated in both time and frequency domains in order to determine the speed of the phase velocity and the reflection. Porosity is then determined and compared with water content measured by gravimetric method. Alaoui, A., Lipiec, J. & Gerke, H.H., 2011. A review of the changes in the soil pore system due to soil deformation: A hydrodynamic perspective. Soil and Tillage Research, 115-116, pp.1-15. Fellah Z.E.A., Berger S., Lauriks W., Depollier C., Aristegui C., Chapelon J.Y., 2003. Measuring the porosity and the tortuosity of porous materials via reflected waves at oblique incidence. The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 113 (5), pp 2424-2433 Hamza, M.A. & Anderson, W.K., 2005. Soil compaction in cropping systems. Soil and Tillage Research, 82(2), pp.121-145. Lu, Z., 2005. Role of hysteresis in propagating acousitcs waves in soils. Geophysical Research Letter, pp.32:1-4. Lu, Z., Hickey, C.J. & Sabatier, J.M., 2004. Effects of compaction on the acoustic velocity in soils. Soil Science Society of America Journal, 68(1), pp.7-16. Lu, Z. & Sabatier, J.M., 2009. Effects of soil water potential and moisture content on sound speed. Soil Science Society of America Journal, 73(5), pp.1614-1625. Le Maitre, D.C., Kotzee, I.M. & O'Farrell, P.J., 2014. Impacts of land-cover change on

  14. Measurement of the open porosity of agricultural soils with acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luong, Jeanne; Mercatoris, Benoit; Destain, Marie-France

    2015-04-01

    soil, since there are more voids filled with air and water, increasing the viscous losses. Fellah et al. (2003) showed that porosity can be determined from phase speed and reflection coefficient. The propagation of acoustic waves in soil is investigated to develop a rapid method for the quantification of the porosity level of agricultural soils. In the present contribution, correlations are determined between the acoustic signatures of agricultural soil in function of its structural properties. In laboratory, compression tests are performed on unsaturated soil samples to reproduce different porosity levels. Ultrasonic pulses are sent through the considered samples. The propagated signals are treated in both time and frequency domains in order to determine the speed of the phase velocity and the reflection. Porosity is then determined and compared with water content measured by gravimetric method. Alaoui, A., Lipiec, J. & Gerke, H.H., 2011. A review of the changes in the soil pore system due to soil deformation: A hydrodynamic perspective. Soil and Tillage Research, 115-116, pp.1-15. Fellah Z.E.A., Berger S., Lauriks W., Depollier C., Aristegui C., Chapelon J.Y., 2003. Measuring the porosity and the tortuosity of porous materials via reflected waves at oblique incidence. The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 113 (5), pp 2424-2433 Hamza, M.A. & Anderson, W.K., 2005. Soil compaction in cropping systems. Soil and Tillage Research, 82(2), pp.121-145. Lu, Z., 2005. Role of hysteresis in propagating acousitcs waves in soils. Geophysical Research Letter, pp.32:1-4. Lu, Z., Hickey, C.J. & Sabatier, J.M., 2004. Effects of compaction on the acoustic velocity in soils. Soil Science Society of America Journal, 68(1), pp.7-16. Lu, Z. & Sabatier, J.M., 2009. Effects of soil water potential and moisture content on sound speed. Soil Science Society of America Journal, 73(5), pp.1614-1625. Le Maitre, D.C., Kotzee, I.M. & O'Farrell, P.J., 2014. Impacts of land-cover change on

  15. Porosity and mechanical properties of zirconium ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Buyakova, S. Kulkov, S.; Sablina, T.

    2015-11-17

    Has been studied a porous ceramics obtained from ultra-fine powders. Porous ceramic ZrO{sub 2}(MgO), ZrO{sub 2}(Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}) powder was prepared by pressing and subsequent sintering of compacts homologous temperatures ranging from 0.63 to 0.56 during the isothermal holding duration of 1 to 5 hours. The porosity of ceramic samples was from 15 to 80%. The structure of the ceramic materials produced from plasma-sprayed ZrO{sub 2} powder was represented as a system of cell and rod structure elements. Cellular structure formed by stacking hollow powder particles can be easily seen at the images of fracture surfaces of obtained ceramics. There were three types of pores in ceramics: large cellular hollow spaces, small interparticle pores which are not filled with powder particles and the smallest pores in the shells of cells. The cells generally did not have regular shapes. The size of the interior of the cells many times exceeded the thickness of the walls which was a single-layer packing of ZrO{sub 2} grains. A distinctive feature of all deformation diagrams obtained in the experiment was their nonlinearity at low deformations which was described by the parabolic law. It was shown that the observed nonlinear elasticity for low deformation on deformation diagrams is due to mechanical instability of the cellular elements in the ceramic carcass.

  16. Porosity and mechanical properties of zirconium ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buyakova, S.; Sablina, T.; Kulkov, S.

    2015-11-01

    Has been studied a porous ceramics obtained from ultra-fine powders. Porous ceramic ZrO2(MgO), ZrO2(Y2O3) powder was prepared by pressing and subsequent sintering of compacts homologous temperatures ranging from 0.63 to 0.56 during the isothermal holding duration of 1 to 5 hours. The porosity of ceramic samples was from 15 to 80%. The structure of the ceramic materials produced from plasma-sprayed ZrO2 powder was represented as a system of cell and rod structure elements. Cellular structure formed by stacking hollow powder particles can be easily seen at the images of fracture surfaces of obtained ceramics. There were three types of pores in ceramics: large cellular hollow spaces, small interparticle pores which are not filled with powder particles and the smallest pores in the shells of cells. The cells generally did not have regular shapes. The size of the interior of the cells many times exceeded the thickness of the walls which was a single-layer packing of ZrO2 grains. A distinctive feature of all deformation diagrams obtained in the experiment was their nonlinearity at low deformations which was described by the parabolic law. It was shown that the observed nonlinear elasticity for low deformation on deformation diagrams is due to mechanical instability of the cellular elements in the ceramic carcass.

  17. COMPARISON OF 24H AVERAGE VOC MONITORING RESULTS FOR RESIDENTIAL INDOOR AND OUTDOOR AIR USING CARBOPACK X-FILLED DIFFUSIVE SAMPLERS AND ACTIVE SAMPLING - A PILOT STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Analytical results obtained by thermal desorption GC/MS for 24h diffusive sampling of 11 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are compared with results of time-averaged active sampling at a known constant flow rate. Air samples were collected with co-located duplicate diffusive samp...

  18. Filling the launch gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoeser, S.

    1986-05-01

    Vehicles proposed to fill the gap in the U.S. space program's space transport needs for the next decade resulting from the January Challenger disaster, are discussed. Prior to the accident, the Air Force planned to purchase a Complementary Expendable Launch Vehicle system consisting of 10 single-use Titan-34D7 rockets. Another heavy lift booster now considered is the Phoenix H. Commercial launch vehicle systems projected to be available in the necessary time frame include the 215,000-pound thrust 4000-pound LEO payload capacity NASA Delta, the 11,300-pound LEO payload capacity Atlas Centaur the first ICBM, and the all-solid propellant expendable 2000-pound LEO payload Conestoga rocket. Also considered is the man-rated fully reusable Phoenix vertical take-off and vertical-landing launch vehicle.

  19. Brief exposure of air-filled guinea-pig isolated trachea to low levels of toluene diisocyanate (TDI) vapor in vitro increases reactivity to methacholine.

    PubMed

    Huang, J; Frazer, D G; Millecchia, L L; Fedan, J S

    1997-12-26

    Toluene diisocyanate (TDI) causes occupational asthma characterized by inflammation and hyperreactivity of airways to irritants and bronchoconstrictor drugs. We examined the non-immune, direct effect of TDI on airway reactivity in vitro in the absence of an inflammatory response using the guinea-pig isolated, perfused trachea preparation to measure reactivity to methacholine (MCh), and fixed point ion mobility spectrometry to measure moment to moment levels of TDI vapor in air that was delivered to the tracheal mucosa. MCh was added to the mucosal modified Krebs-Henseleit (MKH) perfusing solution to generate control concentration-response curves for contractile responses. The lumen was then emptied and perfused with air or air containing 5, 20 or 70 ppb TDI vapor, after which the trachea was perfused with MKH solution and reactivity to MCh was re-examined. After only 30 min of treatment, TDI vapor concentration-dependently increased reactivity of the trachea to MCh (2.4- and 2.9-fold, respectively, for 20 and 70 ppb TDI; 5 ppb TDI and air alone had no effect). In tracheas treated in vitro with 2 microM capsaicin to deplete tachykinins, TDI caused the same (4-fold) increase in reactivity to MCh that was observed in control tracheas. However, TDI vapor (70 ppb) no longer enhanced reactivity to MCh in tracheas from which the epithelium had been removed. Our results indicate that a direct, non-immune, non-inflammatory action of TDI on respiratory epithelium leads to hyperreactivity of airways in vitro. PMID:9457998

  20. Thermal properties of heterogeneous granular materials - control of grain porosity,packing porosity, and paste-phase -

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurita, K.; Iwasaki, A.; Toyota, T.; Baratoux, D.

    2010-12-01

    more evident for polydispersed samples than monodispersed ones, which indicates the conductivity is controlled by increasing number of contact points between grains. Under vacuum the conductivity decreases depending on the grain size, which completely follows the model (Piqueux and Christensen 2009 ) . An interesting crossover occurs: the sample with higher grain porosity and larger grain size has a similar value as the sample with lower grain porosity and smaller grain size around 1000Pa. Similar crossover also occurs in polydispersed samples. On the surface of Mars ice phase can condensate/sublimate in the surface granular layer. This process is proposed to critically control the thermal conductivity (Presley et al 2009,Piqueux and Christensen 2009) because it fills the space around grain contacts and it increases/decreases contact area. To see this effect we add soft agar to glass beads sample as an analog of ice phase. Agar is easily deformable material which glues contact points well. Small addition is found to increase the conductivity largely, which confirms this effect. We consider this should play a significant role in controlling thermal inertia value on the surface of Mars, thermal inertia feedback.

  1. Porosity in metal-organic framework glasses.

    PubMed

    Thornton, A W; Jelfs, K E; Konstas, K; Doherty, C M; Hill, A J; Cheetham, A K; Bennett, T D

    2016-03-01

    The porosity of a glass formed by melt-quenching a metal-organic framework, has been characterized by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy. The results reveal porosity intermediate between the related open and dense crystalline frameworks ZIF-4 and ZIF-zni. A structural model for the glass was constructed using an amorphous polymerization algorithm, providing additional insight into the gas-inaccessible nature of porosity and the possible applications of hybrid glasses. PMID:26800518

  2. Porosity determination of thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Roode, Mark; Beardsley, Brad

    1988-01-01

    Coating porosity is believed to be a critical factor for the thermal conductivity of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs). A number of different techniques have been used to determine the porosities of thermal barrier coatings for diesel applications as part of a NASA/DOE sponsored study. A comparison is made between methods based on water immersion, optical microscopy, eddy current thickness measurements, and Archimedes principle for TBC porosity determination.

  3. Estimation of Fracture Porosity in an Unsaturated Fractured Welded Tuff Using Gas Tracer Testing

    SciTech Connect

    B.M. Freifeild

    2001-10-18

    Kinematic fracture porosity is an important hydrologic transport parameter for predicting the potential of rapid contaminant migration through fractured rock. The transport velocity of a solute moving within a fracture network is inversely related to the fracture porosity. Since fracture porosity is often one or two orders of magnitude smaller than matrix porosity, and fracture permeability is often orders of magnitude greater than matrix permeability, solutes may travel significantly faster in the fracture network than in the surrounding matrix. This dissertation introduces a new methodology for conducting gas tracer tests using a field portable mass spectrometer along with analytical tools for estimating fracture porosity using the measured tracer concentration breakthrough curves. Field experiments were conducted at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, consisting of air-permeability transient testing and gas-tracer-transport tests. The experiments were conducted from boreholes drilled within an underground tunnel as part of an investigation of rock mass hydrological behavior. Air-permeability pressure transients, recorded during constant mass flux injections, have been analyzed using a numerical inversion procedure to identify fracture permeability and porosity. Dipole gas tracer tests have also been conducted from the same boreholes used for air-permeability testing. Mass breakthrough data has been analyzed using a random walk particle-tracking model, with a dispersivity that is a function of the advective velocity. The estimated fracture porosity using the tracer test and air-injection test data ranges from .001 to .015. These values are an order of magnitude greater than the values estimated by others using hydraulically estimated fracture apertures. The estimates of porosity made using air-permeability test data are shown to be highly sensitive to formation heterogeneity. Uncertainty analyses performed on the gas tracer test results show high confidence in the parameter

  4. Measurement of effective air diffusion coefficients for trichloroethene in undisturbed soil cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartelt-Hunt, Shannon L.; Smith, James A.

    2002-06-01

    In this study, we measure effective diffusion coefficients for trichloroethene in undisturbed soil samples taken from Picatinny Arsenal, New Jersey. The measured effective diffusion coefficients ranged from 0.0053 to 0.0609 cm 2/s over a range of air-filled porosity of 0.23-0.49. The experimental data were compared to several previously published relations that predict diffusion coefficients as a function of air-filled porosity and porosity. A multiple linear regression analysis was developed to determine if a modification of the exponents in Millington's [Science 130 (1959) 100] relation would better fit the experimental data. The literature relations appeared to generally underpredict the effective diffusion coefficient for the soil cores studied in this work. Inclusion of a particle-size distribution parameter, d10, did not significantly improve the fit of the linear regression equation. The effective diffusion coefficient and porosity data were used to recalculate estimates of diffusive flux through the subsurface made in a previous study performed at the field site. It was determined that the method of calculation used in the previous study resulted in an underprediction of diffusive flux from the subsurface. We conclude that although Millington's [Science 130 (1959) 100] relation works well to predict effective diffusion coefficients in homogeneous soils with relatively uniform particle-size distributions, it may be inaccurate for many natural soils with heterogeneous structure and/or non-uniform particle-size distributions.

  5. Olive Crown Porosity Measurement Based on Radiation Transmittance: An Assessment of Pruning Effect.

    PubMed

    Castillo-Ruiz, Francisco J; Castro-Garcia, Sergio; Blanco-Roldan, Gregorio L; Sola-Guirado, Rafael R; Gil-Ribes, Jesus A

    2016-01-01

    Crown porosity influences radiation interception, air movement through the fruit orchard, spray penetration, and harvesting operation in fruit crops. The aim of the present study was to develop an accurate and reliable methodology based on transmitted radiation measurements to assess the porosity of traditional olive trees under different pruning treatments. Transmitted radiation was employed as an indirect method to measure crown porosity in two olive orchards of the Picual and Hojiblanca cultivars. Additionally, three different pruning treatments were considered to determine if the pruning system influences crown porosity. This study evaluated the accuracy and repeatability of four algorithms in measuring crown porosity under different solar zenith angles. From a 14° to 30° solar zenith angle, the selected algorithm produced an absolute error of less than 5% and a repeatability higher than 0.9. The described method and selected algorithm proved satisfactory in field results, making it possible to measure crown porosity at different solar zenith angles. However, pruning fresh weight did not show any relationship with crown porosity due to the great differences between removed branches. A robust and accurate algorithm was selected for crown porosity measurements in traditional olive trees, making it possible to discern between different pruning treatments. PMID:27213391

  6. Olive Crown Porosity Measurement Based on Radiation Transmittance: An Assessment of Pruning Effect

    PubMed Central

    Castillo-Ruiz, Francisco J.; Castro-Garcia, Sergio; Blanco-Roldan, Gregorio L.; Sola-Guirado, Rafael R.; Gil-Ribes, Jesus A.

    2016-01-01

    Crown porosity influences radiation interception, air movement through the fruit orchard, spray penetration, and harvesting operation in fruit crops. The aim of the present study was to develop an accurate and reliable methodology based on transmitted radiation measurements to assess the porosity of traditional olive trees under different pruning treatments. Transmitted radiation was employed as an indirect method to measure crown porosity in two olive orchards of the Picual and Hojiblanca cultivars. Additionally, three different pruning treatments were considered to determine if the pruning system influences crown porosity. This study evaluated the accuracy and repeatability of four algorithms in measuring crown porosity under different solar zenith angles. From a 14° to 30° solar zenith angle, the selected algorithm produced an absolute error of less than 5% and a repeatability higher than 0.9. The described method and selected algorithm proved satisfactory in field results, making it possible to measure crown porosity at different solar zenith angles. However, pruning fresh weight did not show any relationship with crown porosity due to the great differences between removed branches. A robust and accurate algorithm was selected for crown porosity measurements in traditional olive trees, making it possible to discern between different pruning treatments. PMID:27213391

  7. Permeability-porosity data sets for sandstones

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, P.H.

    2004-01-01

    Due to the variable nature of permeability-porosity relations, core should be obtained and permeability (k) and porosity (??) should be determined on core plugs in the laboratory for the formation of interest. A catalog of k versus (??) data sets is now available on the Web. Examples from the catalog are considered to illustrate some aspects of k versus ?? dependencies in siliciclastic reservoirs.

  8. DETERMINATION OF EFFECTIVE POROSITY OF SOIL MATERIALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The performance of a compacted soil liner is partly a function of the porosity, where the transport of materials through the liner occurs via the pore space. The project studies the pore spaces of compacted soil materials to estimate the effective porosity, which is the portion o...

  9. Porosity-formation factor and porosity-velocity relationships in Barbados prism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, Stephanie N.; Jarrard, Richard D.

    1999-07-01

    Ocean Drilling Program Leg 171A collected logging while drilling (LWD) data to investigate the porosity and velocity structure of Barbados accretionary complex. Porosity and velocity measurements were needed for interpretation of prism dynamics. However, the LWD tool string did not measure velocity, and previous velocity data from Barbados prism are scarce and generally of low quality. Furthermore, most density-based porosities are subject to errors associated with variations in smectite content. To determine porosities more accurately, we use smectite-corrected, density-based porosities to calibrate a porosity-formation factor (FF) transform, then calculate porosities from resistivity logs. We used cation exchange capacity (CEC) measurements and LWD logs to evaluate the possibility that resistivity is affected by clay conduction. The CEC data warn of potential clay conduction, especially in smectite-rich zones, but LWD data indicate that clay conduction is minor in these high-porosity sediments. Instead, tortuosity is the secondary control of FF, after porosity. By comparing resistivity-based porosities to velocities from vertical seismic profiles, we determine a porosity-velocity transform applicable to Barbados. We then use this transform to calculate velocity logs from resistivity-based porosity logs.

  10. Seismic Response of In-filled Fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acosta-Colon, A. A.; Pyrak-Nolte, L. J.; Olander, M.

    2008-12-01

    Current and ancient karsts environments contain mechanical discontinuities, such as fractures, pipes and caves that range in size from a few millimeters to several meters. These discontinuities are either unfilled, partially-filled or completely in-filled with sediments that range in size from a few microns (clays) to meters (boulders). Sediment within a fracture creates a sub-porosity that quite clearly affects fracture porosity, permeability and storativity. This study investigates the affect of a sub-porosity on the seismic response of in-filled fractures and consequently our ability to probe changes in the subsurface caused by the deposition or erosion of a sub-porosity. Experiments were performed to study the seismic response of a water-saturated fracture filled with sediments (acrylic spheres). The experimental setup consisted of a synthetic fracture created by the separation of two acrylic (Lucite) cylinders. The separation of the fracture was controlled by using computer-controlled linear actuators that incremented the aperture of the fracture in 50 μm steps over a distance of 20 mm. The fracture was water-saturated and filled with acrylic spheres (grains). The spheres ranged in size from 250 microns to 7.79 mm. Several different grain packings were used to infill the fracture. The packings included single layer and multiple layers with a single grain size, and layers composed of multiple grain sizes. Compressional and shear waves were propagated across the fracture using contact piezoelectric transducers (central frequency of 1 MHz) to send and receive the signal. A water-saturated fracture with no grains was used as a standard. The infill material affected the phase, spectral content and velocity of the transmitted compressional wave because of acoustic scattering and wave interference within the infill layer. To study these differences, a time-frequency analysis was performed to determine velocity dispersion and the spectral content of the waves. The

  11. Porosity and Permeability of Chondritic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zolensky, Michael E.; Corrigan, Catherine M.; Dahl, Jason; Long, Michael

    1996-01-01

    We have investigated the porosity of a large number of chondritic interplanetary dust particles and meteorites by three techniques: standard liquid/gas flow techniques, a new, non-invasive ultrasonic technique, and image processing of backscattered images . The latter technique is obviously best suited to sub-kg sized samples. We have also measured the gas and liquid permeabilities of some chondrites by two techniques: standard liquid/gas flow techniques, and a new, non-destructive pressure release technique. We find that chondritic IDP's have a somewhat bimodal porosity distribution. Peaks are present at 0 and 4% porosity; a tail then extends to 53%. These values suggest IDP bulk densities of 1.1 to 3.3 g/cc. Type 1-3 chondrite matrix porosities range up to 30%, with a peak at 2%. The bulk porosities for type 1-3 chondrites have the same approximate range as exhibited by matrix, indicating that other components of the bulk meteorites (including chondrules and aggregates) have the same average porosity as matrix. These results reveal that the porosity of primitive materials at scales ranging from nanogram to kilogram are similar, implying similar accretion dynamics operated through 12 orders of size magnitude. Permeabilities of the investigated chondrites vary by several orders of magnitude, and there appears to be no simple dependence of permeability with degree of aqueous alteration, or chondrite type.

  12. Effect of Porosity on Surface Catalytic Efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, David A.; Pallix, Joan; Rasky, Daniel J. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the effect of surface porosity of thermal protection materials on surface catalytic efficiency using test data taken from both arc-jet and side-arm reactor facilities. Relative surface porosity of the samples varied from 6% to 50%. Surface porosity was measured using a flow apparatus and Bernoulli equation. The surface catalytic efficiency of the materials was calculated using aerothermodynamic, and kinetic theories. The catalytic efficiency of the materials are compared at surface temperatures between room temperature and 2500 F. The data are presented in the form of graphs and tables.

  13. Correlation between roughness and porosity in rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebollo, M. A.; Hogert, E. N.; Albano, J.; Raffo, C. A.; Gaggioli, N. G.

    1996-02-01

    The porosity of rocks is a very important parameter in the determination of the performance of oil wells. Optical methods allow us to study surface roughness and different materials that have surface properties with random characteristics. Therefore, we have extended these applications to porosity analysis. In our method, we have used the speckle produced by the scattered light from a porous rock, illuminated by a laser beam, and found a linear relationship between the decorrelation of the speckle intensity distribution and the porosity magnitude. In this paper we present the results for samples extracted from oil wells in Argentina.

  14. Porosity prediction in sandstones using erosional unconformities

    SciTech Connect

    Shanmugam, G.

    1989-03-01

    Erosional unconformities of subaerial origin are created by tectonic uplifts and eustatic sea level fall. Most erosional unconformities developed on sandstones are planes of increased porosity because uplifted sandstones are exposed to undersaturated CO/sub 2/-charged meteoric waters that result in dissolution of unstable framework grains and cements. The chemical weathering of sandstones is intensified in humid regions by the heavy rainfall, soil zones, lush vegetation, and accompanying voluminous production of organic and inorganic acids. Erosional unconformities are considered hydrologically open systems because of abundant supply of fresh meteoric water and relatively unrestricted transport of dissolved constituents away from the site of dissolution, causing a net gain in porosity near unconformities. Thus, porosity in sandstones tends to increase toward overlying unconformities. Such porosity trends have been observed in hydrocarbon-bearing sandstone reservoirs in Alaska, Algeria, Australia, China, Libya, Netherlands, Norwegian North Sea, Norwegian Sea, and Texas. A common attribute of these reservoirs is that they were all subaerially exposed under heavy rainfall conditions. An empirical model has been developed for the Triassic and Jurassic sandstone reservoirs in the Norwegian North Sea on the basis of the observed relationship that shows an increase in porosity in these reservoirs with increasing proximity to the overlying base of Cretaceous unconformity. An important practical attribute of this model is that it allows for the prediction of porosity in the neighboring undrilled areas by recognizing the base of Cretaceous unconformity in seismic reflection profiles and by constructing subcrop maps.

  15. Estimation of Concrete's Porosity by Ultrasounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benouis, A.; Grini, A.

    Durability of concrete depends strongly on porosity; this conditions the intensity of the interactions of the concrete with the aggressive agents. The pores inside the concrete facilitate the process of damage, which is generally initiated on the surface. The most used measurement is undoubtedly the measurement of porosity accessible to water. The porosimetry by intrusion with mercury constitutes a tool for investigation of the mesoporosity. The relationship between concrete mixtures, porosity and ultrasonic velocity of concrete samples measured by ultrasonic NDT is investigated. This experimental study is interested in the relations between the ultrasonic velocity measured by transducers of 7.5 mm and 49.5 mm diameter and with 54 kHz frequency. Concrete specimens (160 mm diameter and 320 mm height) are fabricated with concrete of seven different mixtures (various W/C and S/S + G ratios), which gave porosities varying between 7% and 16%. Ultrasonic velocities in concrete were measured in longitudinal direction. Finally the results showed the influence of ratio W/C, where the porosity of the concretes of a ratio W/C _0,5 have correctly estimated by ultrasonic velocity. The integration of the concretes of a lower ratio, in this relation, caused a great dispersion. Porosity estimation of concretes with a ratio W/C lower than 0,5 became specific to each ratio.

  16. Squirt flow in highly deformable multi-porosity materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurzeja, Patrick; Bertoldi, Katia

    2015-11-01

    Squirt flow is a phenomenon that typically occurs in porous structures with more than one length scale, e.g., in fractured rocks or multi-porosity organic material. Due to a heterogeneous pore space, external compression induces fluid flow between the pores of different compressibility and finally causes a delayed and attenuated response. While this phenomenon is well understood in natural materials, little it is known about how to trigger and control it in artificially architected materials. Here, we will first show that squirt flow can occur in highly deformable, fluid-filled artificial materials if overall fluid drainage is prevented and then we will demonstrate how this can be controlled. Interestingly, this viscous-flow mechanism opens avenues for the design of smart materials with delayed stress-strain response (e.g., for high-impact applications) or additional attenuation regimes (e.g., below frequencies of internal resonance). Supported by DFG Grant KU 3351/1-1.

  17. Fluid bed porosity mathematical model for an inverse fluidized bed bioreactor with particles growing biofilm.

    PubMed

    Campos-Díaz, K E; Bandala-González, E R; Limas-Ballesteros, R

    2012-08-15

    A new mathematic model to estimate bed porosity as a function of Reynolds and Archimedes numbers was developed based in experimental data. Experiments were performed using an inverse fluidized bed bioreactor filled with polypropylene particles, Lactobacillus acidophillus as the immobilized strain and fluidized with a Man-Rogosa-Sharpe culture medium under controlled temperature and pH conditions. Bed porosity was measured at different flow rates, starting from 0.95 to 9.5 LPM. The new model has several advantages when compared with previously reported. Among them, advantages such as standard deviation values ≤ 1% between experimental and calculated bed porosity, its applicability in traditional and inverse fluidization, wall effects do not take account, it gives excellent agreement with spherical particles with or without biofilm, and inertial drag coefficient allow extend the new model a non-spherical particles. PMID:22484706

  18. Pressurized gas filled tendons

    SciTech Connect

    Silcox, W. H.

    1985-06-04

    Pressurized gas filled tubular tendons provide a means for detecting leaks therein. Filling the tendon with a gaseous fluid provides increased buoyancy and reduces the weight supported by the buoyant structure. The use of a corrosion inhibiting gaseous fluid reduces the corrosion of the interior tendon wall.

  19. Self-Assembling Sup-porosity: The Effect On Fluid Flow And Seismic Wave Propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Pyrak-Nolte, Laura J.

    2013-04-27

    Fractures and joints in the field often contain debris within the void spaces. Debris originates from many different mechanisms: organic and/or inorganic chemical reactions/mineralization, sediment transport, formation of a fracture, mechanical weathering or combinations of these processes. In many cases, the presence of debris forms a sub-porosity within the fracture void space. This sub-porosity often is composed of material that differs from the fracture walls in mineralogy and morphology. The sub-porosity may partially fill voids that are on the order of hundreds of microns and thereby reduce the local porosity to lengths scales on the order of sub-microns to tens of microns. It is quite clear that a sub-porosity affects fracture porosity, permeability and storativity. What is not known is how the existence/formation of a sub-porosity affects seismic wave propagation and consequently our ability to probe changes in the subsurface caused by the formation or alteration of a sub-porosity. If seismic techniques are to be developed to monitor the injection and containment of phases in sequestration reservoirs or the propping of hydraulically induced fracture to enhance oil & gas production, it is important to understand how a sub-porosity within a fracture affects macroscopic seismic and hydraulic measurements. A sub-porosity will directly affect the interrelationship between the seismic and hydraulic properties of a fracture. This reports contains the results of the three main topics of research that were performed (1) to determine the effect of a sub-porosity composed of spherical grains on seismic wave propagation across fractures, (2) to determine the effect of biofilm growth in pores and between grains on seismic wave propagation in sediment, and (3) to determine the effect of the scale of observation (field-of-view) on monitoring alteration the pore space within a fracture caused by reactive flow. A brief summary of the results for each topic is contained in

  20. Filling Tanks with Hydrazine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krueger, K.

    2004-10-01

    At the Hydrazine workshop in 2002 in Noordwijk several presentations dealt with the filling of satellite tanks. I was a bit surprised about the amount of manpower that is needed for this work. But I saw the same during the filling of the SCA system tanks some years ago in Trauen/Germany. I want to present the work flow of filling RESUS Hydrazine tanks. This bladder tanks have a capacity of 64 litres and are similar to some of the satellite tanks. We fill this tanks 25 to 50 times a year. Although the specifications are not exactly the same as those for satellite tank filling, it might be interesting to see how this work can be done half-automatically, because handling with Hydrazine is not a nice job, and the faster it goes, the better.

  1. Lower Permittivity Characteristic of Mesoporous-Alumina/Epoxy Composite due to Particle Porosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurimoto, Muneaki; Murakami, Yoshinobu; Nagao, Masayuki

    Introduction of metal oxide nanoparticles to polymer composite material is known to have unique dielectric behavior and significant advantage in the electrical insulation performance of electrical power apparatus. This paper presents an attempt to derive the dielectric characteristics of polymer composite filled with the metal oxide particle which has mesoporous structure. Experiments were carried out in the epoxy composites filled with alumina microparticles which have the mesoporous structure (mesoporous-alumina/epoxy composites) with different particle content. Based on the measurement of the specific gravity of mesoporous-alumina/epoxy composites, the porosity of mesoporous-alumina particle in the epoxy matrix was found to be higher than that of nonporous-alumina particle. Furthermore, we evaluated relative permittivity of mesoporous-alumina/epoxy composites by measuring the capacitance of its specimens. As the results, we verified that the permittivity of mesoporous-alumina/epoxy composites was lower than that of nonporous-alumina/epoxy composites due to the particle porosity.

  2. Comparison of the predictions of universal scaling of the saturation dependence of the air permeability with experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanbarian-Alavijeh, Behzad; Hunt, Allen G.

    2012-08-01

    We compare predictions of the saturation dependence of air permeability from percolation theory with experimental results taken from the last 60 years. We selected experiments with sufficient density of data points to verify a functional dependence. The typical number of such data points was about 10, but actual values ranged from 4 to 31. The predicted saturation dependence is a universal power law in the air-filled porosity (less a threshold value) with an exponent of 2.00. Our investigation showed that the experimental power was 2.028 ± 0.028 with an R2 value, averaged across all the experiments, of greater than 0.96 for database 1 (including 16 samples from the literature) and 1.814 ± 0.386 with an R2value of larger than 0.90 for database 2 (including 23 samples from Tang et al. (2011)). The threshold value of the air-filled porosity could be predicted reasonably from the wet end of the soil water retention curves. The threshold varied systematically with soil texture. We also compare the proposed model with three other methods, e.g., Millington and Quirk, Burdine-Brooks-Corey, and Kawamoto et al., in estimation of air permeability. The results indicate that the universal scaling approach estimates air permeability more accurately than other methods. Thus, we believe that we have confirmed the universal scaling predicted as well as demonstrated its usefulness in predicting the air permeability.

  3. SALTSTONE VARIABILITY STUDY - MEASUREMENT OF POROSITY

    SciTech Connect

    Harbour, J; Vickie Williams, V; Tommy Edwards, T; Russell Eibling, R; Ray Schumacher, R

    2007-08-23

    One of the goals of the Saltstone Variability Study is to identify the operational and compositional variables that control or influence the important processing and performance properties of Saltstone mixes. One of the key performance properties is porosity which is a measure of the volume percent of a cured grout that is occupied by salt solution (for the saturated case). This report presents (1) the results of efforts to develop a method for the measurement of porosity of grout samples and (2) initial results of porosity values for samples that have been previously produced as part of the Saltstone Variability Study. A cost effective measurement method for porosity was developed that provides reproducible results, is relatively fast (30 to 60 minutes per sample) and uses a Mettler Toledo HR83 Moisture Analyzer that is already operational and routinely calibrated at Aiken County Technology Laboratory. The method involves the heating of the sample at 105 C until no further mass loss is observed. This mass loss value, which is due to water evaporation, is then used to calculate the volume percent porosity of the mix. The results of mass loss for mixes at 105 C were equivalent to the results obtained using thermal gravimetric analysis. The method was validated by comparing measurements of mass loss at 105 C for cured portland cement in water mixes to values presented in the literature for this system. A stereopycnometer from Quantachrome Instruments was selected to measure the cured grout bulk densities. Density is a property that is required to calculate the porosities. A stereopycnometer was already operational at Aiken County Technology Laboratory, has been calibrated using a solid stainless steel sphere of known volume, is cost effective and fast ({approx}15 minutes per sample). Cured grout densities are important in their own right because they can be used to project the volume of waste form produced from a given amount of salt feed of known composition. For

  4. Simple and Inexpensive Method of Wood Pellets Macro-porosity Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    C. Igathinathane; Jaya Shankar Tumuluru; S. Sokhansanj; X. Bi; C. J. Lim; S. Melin; E. Mohammad

    2010-08-01

    A novel simplified stereometric measurement method for determining the macro-porosity of wood pellets through geometrical approach was successfully developed and tested. The irregular ends of pellets of circular cross-section were sanded flat so that their geometry becomes cylinder and their volumes evaluated using mensuration formula. Such formed cylindrical pellets were loose or tap filled to selected volumes to evaluate the macro-porosity and the constant specific weight. The method was extended to evaluate actual wood pellets properties. Overall macro-porosity of actual wood pellets was determined as 41.0±2.5% and 35.5±2.7%, mean bulk density as and , and classified as “Class-3:Medium” and “Class-3&4:Medium to Low” for loose and tapped fills, respectively. Hausner ratio and Carr’s compressibility index classify wood pellets as “freely flowing.” The developed stereometric method can be used as a handy inexpensive laboratory procedure to estimate the macro-porosity of different types and makes of wood pellets and other similar packaged materials.

  5. Simple and inexpensive method of wood pellets macro-porosity measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Igathinathane, C.; Tumuluru, J.S.; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine; Bi, X.T.; Lim, C. Jim; Melin, Staffan; Mohammad, E.

    2010-01-01

    A novel simplified stereometric measurement method for determining the macro-porosity of wood pellets through geometrical approach was successfully developed and tested. The irregular ends of pellets of circular cross-section were sanded flat so that their geometry becomes cylinder and their volumes evaluated using mensuration formula. Such formed cylindrical pellets were loose or tap filled to selected volumes to evaluate the macro-porosity and the constant specific weight. The method was extended to evaluate actual wood pellets properties. Overall macro-porosity of actual wood pellets was determined as 41.0 2.5% and 35.5 2.7%, mean bulk density as and, and classified as Class-3:Medium and Class-3&4:Medium to Low for loose and tapped fills, respectively. Hausner ratio and Carr s compressibility index classify wood pellets as freely flowing. The developed stereometric method can be used as a handy inexpensive laboratory procedure to estimate the macro-porosity of different types and makes of wood pellets and other similar packaged materials.

  6. Simple and inexpensive method of wood pellets macro-porosity measurement.

    PubMed

    Igathinathane, C; Tumuluru, Jaya Shankar; Sokhansanj, S; Bi, X; Lim, C J; Melin, S; Mohammad, E

    2010-08-01

    A novel simplified stereometric measurement method for determining the macro-porosity of wood pellets through geometrical approach was successfully developed and tested. The irregular ends of pellets of circular cross-section were sanded flat so that their geometry becomes cylinder and their volumes evaluated using mensuration formula. Such formed cylindrical pellets were loose or tap filled to selected volumes to evaluate the macro-porosity and the constant specific weight. The method was extended to evaluate actual wood pellets properties. Overall macro-porosity of actual wood pellets was determined as 41.0+/-2.5% and 35.5+/-2.7%, mean bulk density as 670+/-29 kg m(-3) and 731+/-31 kg m(-3), and classified as "Class-3:Medium" and "Class-3&4:Medium to Low" for loose and tapped fills, respectively. Hausner ratio and Carr's compressibility index classify wood pellets as "freely flowing." The developed stereometric method can be used as a handy inexpensive laboratory procedure to estimate the macro-porosity of different types and makes of wood pellets and other similar packaged materials. PMID:20371174

  7. Predicting porosity distribution within oolitic tidal bars

    SciTech Connect

    Cavallo, L.J.; Smosna, R.A.

    1996-09-01

    The Mississippian Greenbrier Limestone is a major gas reservoir in the Appalachian basin, but its complex porosity patterns often deter active exploration. In southern West Virginia, the reservoir consists of oolitic tidal bars which are composites of smaller shoals. Porosity trends closely follow the ooid-grainstone facies which occupied shoal crests, where coarse-grained, well-sorted ooid sand was generated with either unidirectional or bidirectional cross-beds. Nonporous packstone occurred in adjacent tidal channels, and a transitional grainstone/packstone facies of marginal porosity was situated along the flanks of the shoals. The key to drilling successful wells is in understanding the complex internal geometry of Greenbrier ooid shoals. A well penetrating the oolite with good porosity and bimodal cross-beds should be offset perpendicular to the dip directions, that is, parallel to the shoal axis. However, a well penetrating thin, porous limestone with one dominant cross-bed azimuth should be offset opposite to that dip direction, that is, up the flank of the ooid shoal. Shaly interbeds characterize the edges of the shoals and mark the limit of productive wells. Schlumberger`s Formation MicroScanner (FMS) log, which provides data on both lithology and cross-bedding, has proven to be a useful tool in predicting the distribution of oolite porosity.

  8. Effects of ultrasound on polymeric foam porosity.

    PubMed

    Torres-Sanchez, C; Corney, J R

    2008-04-01

    A variety of materials require functionally graded cellular microstructures whose porosity is engineered to meet specific applications (e.g. mimic bone structure for orthopaedic applications; fulfil mechanical, thermal or acoustic constraints in structural foamed components, etc.). Although a huge variety of foams can be manufactured with homogenous porosity, there are no generic processes for controlling the distribution of porosity within the resulting matrix. Motivated by the desire to create a flexible process for engineering heterogeneous foams, the authors have investigated how ultrasound, applied during the formation of a polyurethane foam, affects its cellular structure. The experimental results demonstrated how the parameters of ultrasound exposure (i.e. frequency and applied power) influenced the volume and distribution of pores within the final polyurethane matrix: the data demonstrates that porosity (i.e. volume fraction) varies in direct proportion to both the acoustic pressure and frequency of the ultrasound signal. The effects of ultrasound on porosity demonstrated by this work offer the prospect of a manufacturing process that can adjust the cellular geometry of foam and hence ensure that the resulting characteristics match the functional requirements. PMID:17602849

  9. High=porosity Cenozoic carbonate rocks of South Florida: progressive loss of porosity with depth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Halley, Robert B.; Schmoker, James W.

    1983-01-01

    Porosity measurements by borehole gravity meter in subsurface Cenozoic carbonates of South Florida reveal an extremely porous mass of limestone and dolomite which is transitional in total pore volume between typical porosity values for modern carbonate sediments and ancient carbonate rocks. A persistent decrease of porosity with depth, similar to that of chalks of the Gulf Coast, occurs in these rocks. Carbonate strata with less than 20% porosity are absent from the rocks studied here. Aquifers and aquicludes cannot be distinguished on the basis of porosity. Aquifers are not exceptionally porous when compared to other Tertiary carbonate rocks in South Florida. Permeability in these strata is governed more by the spacial distribution of pore space and matrix than by total volume of porosity present. Dolomite is as porous as, or slightly less porous than, limestones in these rocks. This observation places limits on any model proposed for dolomitization and suggests that dolomitization does not take place by a simple ion-for-ion replacement of magnesium for calcium. Dolomitization may be selective for less porous limestone, or it may involve the incorporation of significant amounts of carbonate as well as magnesium into the rock. The great volume of pore space in these rocks serves to highlight the inefficiency of early diagenesis in reducing carbonate porosity and to emphasize the importance of later porosity reduction which occurs during the burial or late near-surface history of limestones and dolomites.

  10. Empirical relation between carbonate porosity and thermal maturity: an approach to regional porosity prediction.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schmoker, J.W.

    1984-01-01

    Carbonate porosity can be predicted approximately on a regional scale as a function of thermal maturity. Thus: theta = a (TTI) b, where theta = regional porosity, a = a constant for a given region and varies by an order of magnitude, TTI = Lopatin's time-T index of thermal maturity and b approx -0.372. -K.A.R.

  11. Graded-porosity heat-pipe wicks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eninger, J. E.

    1976-01-01

    To maximize the capacity of a nonarterial heat pipe, a wick is considered whose porosity is allowed to vary axially along its length. At every axial location the porosity is set no lower than required to maintain the wick in a nearly saturated state under the maximum heat-transport rate. The result is a wick whose permeability is everywhere as high as possible. The differential equation that governs the optimum porosity variation is solved numerically between a condenser-end boundary condition that just prevents a liquid slug or puddle in the vapor spaces and an evaporator-end boundary condition that just prevents circumferential groove dry-up. Experimental performance measurements for an ammonia heat pipe are presented.

  12. Porosity estimation of concrete by ultrasonic NDE

    PubMed

    Hernandez; Izquierdo; Ibanez; Anaya; Ullate

    2000-03-01

    The increasing number of concrete structures with symptoms of premature deterioration due to environmental action demands procedures to estimate the durability of this type of component. Concrete durability is related to porosity, which determines the intensity of interactions of the material with aggressive agents. The pores and capillaries inside the structure facilitate the destructive processes that generally begin in the surface. In this work, an ultrasonic NDE technique to estimate the porosity of concrete is developed. The method is based on the analysis of the mechanical behaviour of mortar probes built with calibrated sand, in which the concentration of water-cement mixture has been varied. In this sense, data of sound velocity are correlated with data of porosity, which have been previously measured by destructive measurements. PMID:10829720

  13. Permeability-porosity relationships in sedimentary rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, Philip H.

    1994-01-01

    In many consolidated sandstone and carbonate formations, plots of core data show that the logarithm of permeability (k) is often linearly proportional to porosity (??). The slope, intercept, and degree of scatter of these log(k)-?? trends vary from formation to formation, and these variations are attributed to differences in initial grain size and sorting, diagenetic history, and compaction history. In unconsolidated sands, better sorting systematically increases both permeability and porosity. In sands and sandstones, an increase in gravel and coarse grain size content causes k to increase even while decreasing ??. Diagenetic minerals in the pore space of sandstones, such as cement and some clay types, tend to decrease log(k) proportionately as ?? decreases. Models to predict permeability from porosity and other measurable rock parameters fall into three classes based on either grain, surface area, or pore dimension considerations. (Models that directly incorporate well log measurements but have no particular theoretical underpinnings from a fourth class.) Grain-based models show permeability proportional to the square of grain size times porosity raised to (roughly) the fifth power, with grain sorting as an additional parameter. Surface-area models show permeability proportional to the inverse square of pore surface area times porosity raised to (roughly) the fourth power; measures of surface area include irreducible water saturation and nuclear magnetic resonance. Pore-dimension models show permeability proportional to the square of a pore dimension times porosity raised to a power of (roughly) two and produce curves of constant pore size that transgress the linear data trends on a log(k)-?? plot. The pore dimension is obtained from mercury injection measurements and is interpreted as the pore opening size of some interconnected fraction of the pore system. The linear log(k)-?? data trends cut the curves of constant pore size from the pore-dimension models

  14. The modified cam clay model for constrained compression of human morsellised bone: effects of porosity on the mechanical behaviour.

    PubMed

    Lunde, Knut B; Skallerud, Bjørn

    2009-01-01

    Morsellised cortico-cancellous bone (MCB) is often used in revision surgery for filling skeletal defects. The MCB porosity is found to influence the degree of bone ingrowth. Thus expressing a material model in terms of porosity may be attractive from a clinical point of view. We analysed the moisture content and performed constrained compression testing of human impacted and unimpacted MCB, in order to determine material parameters for the common constitutive soil model: modified cam clay. The model seemed to be suitable for the unimpacted pellets with a logarithmic bulk modulus kappa=0.059+/-0.0019 and a logarithmic hardening constant lambda=0.36+/-0.014. This model, relating the specific volume (and porosity) to the logarithm of stress, may be suited to find the best compromise of stiffness and porosity for MCB. PMID:19627806

  15. Getting a prescription filled

    MedlinePlus

    ... to get prescription filled; Pharmacy - mail order; Pharmacy - internet; Types of pharmacies ... stored at certain temperatures at a local pharmacy. INTERNET (ONLINE) PHARMACIES Internet pharmacies can be used for ...

  16. Pyrotechnic filled molding powder

    DOEpatents

    Hartzel, Lawrence W.; Kettling, George E.

    1978-01-01

    The disclosure relates to thermosetting molding compounds and more particularly to a pyrotechnic filled thermosetting compound comprising a blend of unfilled diallyl phthalate molding powder and a pyrotechnic mixture.

  17. Petrologic and petrophysical evaluation of the Dallas Center Structure, Iowa, for compressed air energy storage in the Mount Simon Sandstone.

    SciTech Connect

    Heath, Jason E.; Bauer, Stephen J.; Broome, Scott Thomas; Dewers, Thomas A.; Rodriguez, Mark Andrew

    2013-03-01

    The Iowa Stored Energy Plant Agency selected a geologic structure at Dallas Center, Iowa, for evaluation of subsurface compressed air energy storage. The site was rejected due to lower-than-expected and heterogeneous permeability of the target reservoir, lower-than-desired porosity, and small reservoir volume. In an initial feasibility study, permeability and porosity distributions of flow units for the nearby Redfield gas storage field were applied as analogue values for numerical modeling of the Dallas Center Structure. These reservoir data, coupled with an optimistic reservoir volume, produced favorable results. However, it was determined that the Dallas Center Structure cannot be simplified to four zones of high, uniform permeabilities. Updated modeling using field and core data for the site provided unfavorable results for air fill-up. This report presents Sandia National Laboratories' petrologic and petrophysical analysis of the Dallas Center Structure that aids in understanding why the site was not suitable for gas storage.

  18. Coatings with controlled porosity and chemical properties

    DOEpatents

    Frye, Gregory C.; Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Doughty, Daniel H.; Bein, Thomas; Moller, Karin

    1993-01-01

    Coatings and sensors having both steric and chemical selectivity. Controlled porosity provides the steric selectivity, whereas chemically tailored film properties, using controlled composition or modification by coupling agents, chemical species replacement, or chemical species within pores, provide the chemical selectivity. Single or multiple layers may be provided.

  19. Coatings with controlled porosity and chemical properties

    DOEpatents

    Frye, Gregory C.; Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Doughty, Daniel H.; Bein, Thomas; Moller, Karin

    1996-01-01

    Coatings and sensors having both steric and chemical selectivity. Controlled porosity provides the steric selectivity, whereas chemically tailored film properties, using controlled composition or modification by coupling agents, chemical species replacement, or chemical species within pores, provide the chemical selectivity. Single or multiple layers may be provided.

  20. Coatings with controlled porosity and chemical properties

    DOEpatents

    Frye, G.C.; Brinker, C.J.; Doughty, D.H.; Bein, T.; Moller, K.

    1996-12-31

    Coatings and sensors are disclosed having both steric and chemical selectivity. Controlled porosity provides the steric selectivity, whereas chemically tailored film properties, using controlled composition or modification by coupling agents, chemical species replacement, or chemical species within pores, provide the chemical selectivity. Single or multiple layers may be provided. 7 figs.

  1. Coatings with controlled porosity and chemical properties

    DOEpatents

    Frye, G.C.; Brinker, C.J.; Doughty, D.H.; Bein, T.; Moller, K.

    1993-07-06

    Coatings and sensors are described having both steric and chemical selectivity. Controlled porosity provides the steric selectivity, whereas chemically tailored film properties, using controlled composition or modification by coupling agents, chemical species replacement, or chemical species within pores, provide the chemical selectivity. Single or multiple layers may be provided.

  2. Determination of Meteorite Porosity Using Liquid Nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohout, T.; Kletetschka, G.; Pesonen, L. J.; Wasilewski, P. J.

    2005-01-01

    We introduce a new harmless method for porosity measurement suitable for meteorite samples. The method is a modification of the traditional Archimedean method based on immersion of the samples in a liquid medium like water or organic liquids. In our case we used liquid nitrogen for its chemically inert characteristics.

  3. Formulas for sediment porosity and settling velocity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The formulas of Komura (1963) and Han et al. (1981) for the initial porosity of sediment deposits were tested using data sets collected in different countries and regions. It was found that Komura’s formula slightly underestimates the dry density for sand and gravel deposits and overestimates those ...

  4. Attempts to Produce D2-Gas-Filled Be Shells

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, B; McElfresh, M; Alford, C; Fought, E; Letts, S

    2005-01-14

    We have attempted to fabricate some 0.5 mm diameter D{sub 2}-gas-filled Be shells by coating gas-filled PVA-coated GDP mandrels with Cu-doped Be. We find that during the coating all (or most) of the gas leaks out. This is likely due to either small cracks or holes in the coating that are formed at the earliest points and are maintained during the thickness build-up of the coating, and/or to some level of intrinsic porosity in the coating. This memo documents our efforts.

  5. A simple procedure for estimating soil porosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emmet-Booth, Jeremy; Forristal, Dermot; Fenton, Owen; Holden, Nick

    2016-04-01

    Soil degradation from mismanagement is of international concern. Simple, accessible tools for rapidly assessing impacts of soil management are required. Soil structure is a key component of soil quality and porosity is a useful indicator of structure. We outline a version of a procedure described by Piwowarczyk et al. (2011) used to estimate porosity of samples taken during a soil quality survey of 38 sites across Ireland as part of the Government funded SQUARE (Soil Quality Assessment Research) project. This required intact core (r = 2.5 cm, H = 5cm) samples taken at 5-10 cm and 10-20 cm depth, to be covered with muslin cloth at one end and secured with a jubilee clip. Samples were saturated in sealable water tanks for ≈ 64 hours, then allowed to drain by gravity for 24 hours, at which point Field Capacity (F.C.) was assumed to have been reached, followed by oven drying with weight determined at each stage. This allowed the calculation of bulk density and the estimation of water content at saturation and following gravitational drainage, thus total and functional porosity. The assumption that F.C. was reached following 24 hours of gravitational drainage was based on the Soil Moisture Deficit model used in Ireland to predict when soils are potentially vulnerable to structural damage and used nationally as a management tool. Preliminary results indicate moderately strong, negative correlations between estimated total porosity at 5-10 cm and 10-20 cm depth (rs = -0.7, P < 0.01 in both cases) and soil quality scores of the Visual Evaluation of Soil Structure (VESS) method which was conducted at each survey site. Estimated functional porosity at 5-10 cm depth was found to moderately, negatively correlate with VESS scores (rs = - 0.5, P < 0.05). This simple procedure requires inexpensive equipment and appears useful in indicating porosity of a large quantity of samples taken at numerous sites or if done periodically, temporal changes in porosity at a field scale

  6. Porosity evolution in Icelandic hydrothermal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thien, B.; Kosakowski, G.; Kulik, D. A.

    2014-12-01

    Mineralogical alteration of reservoir rocks, driven by fluid circulation in natural or enhanced hydrothermal systems, is likely to influence the long-term performance of geothermal power generation. A key factor is the change of porosity due to dissolution of primary minerals and precipitation of secondary phases. Porosity changes will affect fluid circulation and solute transport, which, in turn, influence mineralogical alteration. This study is part of the Sinergia COTHERM project (COmbined hydrological, geochemical and geophysical modeling of geotTHERMal systems, grant number CRSII2_141843/1) that is an integrative research project aimed at improving our understanding of the sub-surface processes in magmatically-driven natural geothermal systems. These are typically high enthalphy systems where a magmatic pluton is located at a few kilometers depth. These shallow plutons increase the geothermal gradient and trigger the circulation of hydrothermal waters with a steam cap forming at shallow depth. Field observations suggest that active and fossil Icelandic hydrothermal systems are built from a superposition of completely altered and completely unaltered layers. With help of 1D and 2D reactive transport models (OpenGeoSys-GEM code), we investigate the reasons for this finding, by studying the mineralogical evolution of protoliths with different initial porosities at different temperatures and pressures, different leaching water composition and gas content, and different porosity geometries (i.e. porous medium versus fractured medium). From this study, we believe that the initial porosity of protoliths and volume changes due to their transformation into secondary minerals are key factors to explain the different alteration extents observed in field studies. We also discuss how precipitation and dissolution kinetics can influence the alteration time scales.

  7. Porosity Dependence of Piezoelectric Properties for Porous Potassium Niobate System Ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, S.; Mase, Y.; Shimizu, S.; Maeda, K.; Fujii, I.; Nakashima, K.; Pulpan, P.; Miyajima, N.

    2011-10-01

    Porous potassium niobate (KNbO3, KN) system ceramics were prepared by a conventional sintering method using carbon black (CB) nanoparticles. First, KN nanoparticles with a size of 100 nm was mixed with CB nanoparticles and binder using ball milling with ethanol. The mixture was dried, and pressed into pellets using uniaxial pressing. After binder burnout, these ceramics was sintered in air. Their piezoelectric properties were measured and discussed a relationship between porosity and piezoelectric properties. As the results, with increasing porosity, piezoelectric g33 constant increased significantly, which suggested that porous ceramics were effective for stress sensor application.

  8. Porosity and the ecology of icy satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Croft, Steven K.

    1993-01-01

    The case for a significant role for porosity in the structure and evolution of icy bodies in the Solar System has been difficult to establish. We present a relevant new data set and a series of structure models including a mechanical compression, not thermal creep, model for porosity that accounts satisfactorily for observed densities, moments of inertia, geologic activity, and sizes of tectonic features on icy satellites. Several types of observational data sets have been used to infer significant porosity, but until recently, alternative explanations have been preferred. Our first area of concern is the occurrence of cryovolcanism as a function of satellite radius; simple radiogenic heating models of icy satellites suggest minimum radii for melting and surface cryovolcanism to be 400 to 500 km, yet inferred melt deposits are seen on satellites half that size. One possible explanation is a deep, low conductivity regolith which lowers conductivity and raises internal temperatures, but other possibilities include tidal heating or crustal compositions of low conductivity. Our second area of concern is the occurrence and magnitude of tectonic strain; tectonic structures have been seen on icy satellites as small as Mimas and Proteus. The structures are almost exclusively extensional, with only a few possible compression Al features, and inferred global strains are on the order of 1 percent expansion. Expansions of this order in small bodies like Mimas and prevention of late compressional tectonics due to formation of ice mantles in larger bodies like Rhea are attained only in structure models including low-conductivity, and thus possibly high porosity, crusts. Thirdly, inferred moments of inertia less than 0.4 in Mimas and Tethys can be explained by high-porosity crusts, but also by differentiation of a high density core. Finally, the relatively low densities of smaller satellites like Mimas and Miranda relative to larger neighbors can be explained by deep porosity

  9. Porosities of lunar meteorites: Strength, porosity, and petrologic screening during the meteorite delivery process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Paul H.

    2001-05-01

    Porosity has been directly measured for eight lunar meteorite breccias and calculated for two more on the basis of literature density measurements. Lunar meteorite regolith breccias display systematically low porosity in comparison to otherwise analogous Apollo regolith breccias. Among seven meteoritic regolith breccias, porosity ranges from 1 to 11% and averages 7.5+/-(1-σ)3.2%, whereas for 44 analogous Apollo samples (porosities mostly calculated from literature density data) the average is 25+/-(1-σ)7%. The origin of this disparity is enigmatic, but the trend probably reflects mainly a bias in favor of strong, compact breccias among fragments that manage to survive the violent process of launch to lunar escape velocity (2.38 km/s). In addition, compaction during launch may play an important role. The population of lunar meteorites is clearly not a random, unmodified sample of lithic materials near the surface of the parent body.

  10. Loose-fill insulations

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    Whether you are increasing the insulation levels in your current home or selecting insulation for a new home, choosing the right insulation material can be challenging. Fibrous loose-fill insulations such as cellulose, fiberglass, and rock wool are options you may wish to consider. This publication will introduce you to these materials--what they are, how they are applied, how they compare with each other, and other considerations regarding their use--so that you can decide whether loose fills are right for your home.

  11. Building 930, oblique view to southeast from fill slope covering ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Building 930, oblique view to southeast from fill slope covering building 932, 135 mm lens. - Travis Air Force Base, Snack Bar, North of W Street, Armed Forces Special Weapons Project Q Area, Fairfield, Solano County, CA

  12. Primary porosity and submarine diagenesis in Lower Cretaceous Coral-Rudist reefs

    SciTech Connect

    Cross, S.L.; Lighty, R.G.

    1986-05-01

    Coral-rudist reefs of the Lower Cretaceous Mural limestone, southeastern Arizona, show a pronounced relationship between specific reef facies, primary porosity, and early submarine diagenesis. These large open-shelf reefs differ from the well-studied low-relief rudist buildups, and provide an alternate analog for many Cretaceous reef reservoirs. Arizona buildups have diverse corals, high depositional relief, and a well-developed facies zonation from fore reef to back reef: skeletal grainstone talus, muddy fore reef with branching and lamellar corals, massive reef crest with abundant lamellar corals and sandy matrix, protected thickets of delicate branching corals and large rudist mounds, and a wide sediment apron of well-washed coral, rudist, and benthic foraminiferal sands. These well-exposed outcrops permit a detailed facies comparison of primary interparticle porosity. Porosity as high as 40% in grainstones was occluded by later subsurface cements. Reef-framework interparticle porosity was negligible because fore-reef coral and back-reef rudist facies were infilled by muds, and high-energy reef-crest frameworks were filled by peloidal submarine cement crusts and muddy skeletal sands. These thick crusts coated lamellar corals in cryptic and open reef-crest areas, and are laminated with ripple and draped bed forms that suggest current influence. Similar peloidal crusts and laminated textures are common magnesium-calcite submarine cement features in modern reefs. By documenting specific facies control on early cementation and textural variability, patterns of late-stage subsurface diagenesis and secondary porosity may be more easily explained for Cretaceous reef reservoirs. Significant primary porosity might be retained between sands in back-reef facies and within coral skeletons.

  13. Dolomite reservoirs: Porosity evolution and reservoir characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, S.Q.

    1995-02-01

    Systematic analyses of the published record of dolomite reservoirs worldwide reveal that the majority of hydrocarbon-producing dolomite reservoirs occurs in (1) peritidal-dominated carbonate, (2) subtidal carbonate associated with evaporitic tidal flat/lagoon, (3) subtidal carbonate associated with basinal evaporite, and (4) nonevaporitic carbonate sequence associated with topographic high/unconformity, platform-margin buildup or fault/fracture. Reservoir characteristics vary greatly from one dolomite type to another depending upon the original sediment fabric, the mechanism by which dolomite was formed, and the extent to which early formed dolomite was modified by post-dolomitization diagenetic processes (e.g., karstification, fracturing, and burial corrosion). This paper discusses the origin of dolomite porosity and demonstrates the porosity evolution and reservoir characteristics of different dolomite types.

  14. Correlation of Water Frost Porosity in Laminar Flow over Flat Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandula, Max

    2011-01-01

    A dimensionless correlation has been proposed for water frost porosity expressing its dependence on frost surface temperature and Reynolds number for laminar forced flow over a flat surface. The correlation is presented in terms of a dimensionless frost surface temperature scaled with the cold plate temperature, and the freezing temperature. The flow Reynolds number is scaled with reference to the critical Reynolds number for laminar-turbulent transition. The proposed correlation agrees satisfactorily with the simultaneous measurements of frost density and frost surface temperature covering a range of plate temperature, ambient air velocity, humidity, and temperature. It is revealed that the frost porosity depends primarily on the frost surface and the plate temperatures and the flow Reynolds number, and is only weakly dependent on the relative humidity. The results also point out the general character of frost porosity displaying a decrease with an increase in flow Reynolds number.

  15. Reducing the open porosity of pyroboroncarbon articles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martyushov, G. G.; Zakharevich, A. M.; Pichkhidze, S. Ya.; Koshuro, V. A.

    2016-02-01

    It is established that a decrease in the open porosity of pyroboroncarbon, a pyrolytic glassy composite material of interest for manufacturing prosthetic heart valves (PHVs), can be achieved via impregnation of articles with an alcohol solution of 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane and subsequent thermal treatment. The maximum roughness height and linear size of open pores on the surface of PHV parts made of pyroboroncarbon can additionally be reduced by final mechanical processing of a silicon oxide film formed on the surface.

  16. Getting a prescription filled

    MedlinePlus

    ... health plan: Call the phone number on the back of your insurance card. Call the pharmacy you want to use to see if they have a contract with your insurance plan. To help the pharmacist fill the prescription: Make sure all of the information ...

  17. The porosity of the upper lunar regolith

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hapke, Bruce; Sato, Hiroyuki

    2016-07-01

    The porosity of the upper centimeter or so of the lunar regolith strongly affects several properties that are commonly studied remotely. Hence, it is important to determine its value. We have reanalyzed the data of Ohtake et al. (Ohtake et al. [2010]. Space Sci. Rev., 154, 57-77), who used spacecraft and laboratory reflectance measurements of the Moon by Kaguya Multiband Imager instruments and an Apollo sample to infer a lunar regolith porosity of 74-87%. Our analysis was augmented by using Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Wide and Narrow Angle Camera images. We confirm the Ohtake et al. (Ohtake et al. [2010]. Space Sci. Rev., 154, 57-77) estimate and refine it to 83 ± 3%. However, depending on the validity of key assumptions, this value could be a lower limit, so that the actual porosity could be somewhat higher. Even though the magnetic resonance index of the sample indicates that it is mature, it is appears to be optically less mature than a standard photometric site near the sample collection site.

  18. Porosity measurements of interstellar ice mixtures using optical laser interference and extended effective medium approximations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bossa, J.-B.; Isokoski, K.; Paardekooper, D. M.; Bonnin, M.; van der Linden, E. P.; Triemstra, T.; Cazaux, S.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Linnartz, H.

    2014-01-01

    Aims: This article aims to provide an alternative method of measuring the porosity of multi-phase composite ices from their refractive indices and of characterising how the abundance of a premixed contaminant (e.g., CO2) affects the porosity of water-rich ice mixtures during omni-directional deposition. Methods: We combine optical laser interference and extended effective medium approximations (EMAs) to measure the porosity of three astrophysically relevant ice mixtures: H2O:CO2 = 10:1, 4:1, and 2:1. Infrared spectroscopy is used as a benchmarking test of this new laboratory-based method. Results: By independently monitoring the O-H dangling modes of the different water-rich ice mixtures, we confirm the porosities predicted by the extended EMAs. We also demonstrate that CO2 premixed with water in the gas phase does not significantly affect the ice morphology during omni-directional deposition, as long as the physical conditions favourable to segregation are not reached. We propose a mechanism in which CO2 molecules diffuse on the surface of the growing ice sample prior to being incorporated into the bulk and then fill the pores partly or completely, depending on the relative abundance and the growth temperature.

  19. Terahertz study on porosity and mass fraction of active pharmaceutical ingredient of pharmaceutical tablets.

    PubMed

    Bawuah, Prince; Tan, Nicholas; Tweneboah, Samuel Nana A; Ervasti, Tuomas; Axel Zeitler, J; Ketolainen, Jarkko; Peiponen, Kai-Erik

    2016-08-01

    In this study, terahertz time-domain spectroscopic (THz-TDS) technique has been used to ascertain the change in the optical properties, as a function of changing porosity and mass fraction of active pharmaceutical ingredient (API), of training sets of pharmaceutical tablets. Four training sets of pharmaceutical tablets were compressed with microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) excipient and indomethacin API by varying either the porosity, height, and API mass fraction or all three tablet parameters. It was observed, as far as we know, for the first time, that the THz time-domain and frequency-domain effective refractive index, as well as, the frequency-domain effective absorption coefficient both show linear correlations with the porosity and API mass fraction for training sets of real pharmaceutical tablets. We suggest that, the observed linear correlations can be useful in basic research and quality inspection of pharmaceutical tablets. Additionally, we propose a novel optical strain parameter, based on THz measurement, which yields information on the conventional strain parameter of a tablet as well as on the change of fill fraction of solid material during compression of porous pharmaceutical tablets. We suggest that the THz measurement and proposed method of data analysis, in addition to providing an efficient tool for basic research of porous media, can serve as one of the novel quality by design (QbD) implementation techniques to predict critical quality attributes (CQA) such as porosity, API mass fraction and strain of flat-faced pharmaceutical tablets before production. PMID:27288937

  20. Air emissions from exposed contaminated sediments and dredged material

    SciTech Connect

    Valsaraj, K.T.; Ravikrishna, R.; Reible, D.D.; Thibodeaux, L.J.; Choy, B.; Price, C.B.; Brannon, J.M.; Myers, T.E.; Yost, S.

    1999-01-01

    The sediment-to-air fluxes of two polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (phenanthrene and pyrene) and a heterocyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (dibenzofuran) from a laboratory-contaminated sediment and those of three polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (naphthalene, phenanthrene, and pyrene) from three field sediments were investigated in experimental microcosms. The flux was dependent on the sediment moisture content, air-filled porosity, and the relative humidity of the air flowing over the sediment surface. The mathematical model predictions of flux from the laboratory-spiked sediment agreed with observed values. The fluxes of compounds with higher hydrophobicity were more air-side resistance controlled. Conspicuous differences were observed between the fluxes from the laboratory-spiked and two of the three field sediments. Two field sediments showed dramatic increases in mass-transfer resistances with increasing exposure time and had significant fractions of oil and grease. The proposed mathematical model was inadequate for predicting the flux from the latter field sediments. Sediment reworking enhanced the fluxes from the field sediments due to exposure of fresh solids to the air. Variations in flux from the lab-spiked sediment as a result of change in air relative humidity were due to differences in retardation of chemicals on a dry or wet surface sediment. High moisture in the air over the dry sediment increased the competition for sorption sites between water and contaminant and increased the contaminant flux.

  1. Effect of quartz overgrowth precipitation on the multiscale porosity of sandstone: A (U)SANS and imaging analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Anovitz, Lawrence M.; Cole, David R.; Jackson, Andrew J.; Rother, Gernot; Littrell, Kenneth C.; Allard, Lawrence F.; Pollington, Anthony D.; Wesolowski, David J.

    2015-06-01

    We have performed a series of experiments to understand the effects of quartz overgrowths on nanometer to centimeter scale pore structures of sandstones. Blocks from two samples of St. Peter Sandstone with different initial porosities (5.8 and 18.3%) were reacted from 3 days to 7.5 months at 100 and 200 °C in aqueous solutions supersaturated with respect to quartz by reaction with amorphous silica. Porosity in the resultant samples was analyzed using small and ultrasmall angle neutron scattering and scanning electron microscope/backscattered electron (SEM/BSE)-based image-scale processing techniques.Significant changes were observed in the multiscale pore structures. By three days much of the overgrowth in the low-porosity sample dissolved away. The reason for this is uncertain, but the overgrowths can be clearly distinguished from the original core grains in the BSE images. At longer times the larger pores are observed to fill with plate-like precipitates. As with the unreacted sandstones, porosity is a step function of size. Grain boundaries are typically fractal, but no evidence of mass fractal or fuzzy interface behavior was observed suggesting a structural difference between chemical and clastic sediments. After the initial loss of the overgrowths, image scale porosity (>~1 cm) decreases with time. Submicron porosity (typically ~25% of the total) is relatively constant or slightly decreasing in absolute terms, but the percent change is significant. Fractal dimensions decrease at larger scales, and increase at smaller scales with increased precipitation.

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging assessed cortical porosity is highly correlated with μCT porosity

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Won C; Patil, Shantanu; Biswas, Reni; Li, Shihong; Chang, Eric Y; Statum, Sheronda; D'Lima, Darryl D; Chung, Christine B; Du, Jiang

    2014-01-01

    Cortical bone is typically regarded as “MR invisible” with conventional clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) pulse sequences. However, recent studies have demonstrated that free water in the microscopic pores of cortical bone has a short T2* but a relatively long T2, and may be detectable with conventional clinical spin echo (SE) or fast spin echo (FSE) sequences. In this study we describe the use of a conventional two-dimensional (2D) FSE sequence to assess cortical bone microstructure and measure cortical porosity using a clinical 3T scanner. Twelve cadaveric human cortical bone samples were studied with MRI and micro computed tomography (μCT) (downsampled to the same spatial resolution). Preliminary results show that FSE-determined porosity is highly correlated (R2 = 0.83; P < 0.0001) with μCT porosity. Bland Altman analysis suggested a good agreement between FSE and μCT with tight limit of agreement at around 3%. There is also a small bias of -2% for the FSE data, which suggested that the FSE approach slightly underestimated μCT porosity. The results demonstrate that cortical porosity can be directly assessed using conventional clinical FSE sequences. The clinical feasibility of this approach was also demonstrated on six healthy volunteers using 2D FSE sequences as well as 2D ultrashort echo time (UTE) sequences with a minimal echo time (TE) of 8 μs, which provide high contrast imaging of cortical bone in vivo. PMID:24928498

  3. The Bacterivorous Soil Flagellate Heteromita globosa Reduces Bacterial Clogging under Denitrifying Conditions in Sand-Filled Aquifer Columns

    PubMed Central

    Mattison, Richard G.; Taki, Hironori; Harayama, Shigeaki

    2002-01-01

    An exopolymer (slime)-producing soil bacterium Pseudomonas sp. (strain PS+) rapidly clogged sand-filled columns supplied with air-saturated artificial groundwater containing glucose (500 mg liter−1) as a sole carbon source and nitrate (300 mg liter−1) as an alternative electron acceptor. After 80 days of operation under denitrifying conditions, the effective porosity and saturated hydraulic conductivity (permeability) of sand in these columns had fallen by 2.5- and 26-fold, respectively. Bacterial biofilms appeared to induce clogging by occluding pore spaces with secreted exopolymer, although there may also have been a contribution from biogas generated during denitrification. The bacterivorous soil flagellate Heteromita globosa minimized reductions in effective porosity (1.6-fold) and permeability (13-fold), presumably due to grazing control of biofilms. Grazing may have limited growth of bacterial biomass and hence the rate of exopolymer and biogas secretion into pore spaces. Evidence for reduction in biogas production is suggested by increased nitrite efflux from columns containing flagellates, without a concomitant increase in nitrate consumption. There was no evidence that flagellates could improve flow conditions if added once clogging had occurred (60 days). Presumably, bacterial biofilms and their secretions were well established at that time. Nevertheless, this study provides evidence that bacterivorous flagellates may play a positive role in maintaining permeability in aquifers undergoing remediation treatments. PMID:12200311

  4. Electrode porosity and effective electrocatalyst activity in electrode-membrane-assemblies (MEAs) of PEMFCs

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, A.; Wendt, H.

    1996-12-31

    New production technologies of membrane-electrode-assemblies for PEWCs which ensure almost complete catalyst utilization by {open_quotes}wetting{close_quotes} the internal catalyst surface with the ionomeric electrolyte, allow for a reduction of Pt-loadings from prior 4 mg cm{sup -2} to now less than 0.5 mg cm{sup -2}. Such electrodes are not thicker than from 5 to 10 {mu}m. Little has been published hitherto about the detailed micromorphology of such electrodes and the role of electrode porosity on electrode performance. It is well known, that the porosity of thicker fuel cell electrodes, e.g. of PAFC or AFC electrodes is decisive for their performance. Therefore the issue of this investigation is to measure and to modify the porosity of electrodes prepared by typical MEA production procedures and to investigate the influence of this porosity on the effective catalyst activity for cathodic reduction of oxygen from air in membrane cells. It may be anticipated that any mass transfer hindrance of gaseous reactants into porous electrodes would manifest itself rather in the conversion of dilute gases than in the conversion of pure gases (e.g. neat oxygen). Therefore in this investigation the performance of membrane cell cathodes with non pressurized air had been compared to that with neat oxygen at cathodes which had a relatively low Pt-loading of 0.15 mg cm{sup -2}.

  5. Gas filled panel insulation

    DOEpatents

    Griffith, B.T.; Arasteh, D.K.; Selkowitz, S.E.

    1993-12-14

    A structural or flexible highly insulative panel which may be translucent, is formed from multi-layer polymeric material in the form of an envelope surrounding a baffle. The baffle is designed so as to minimize heat transfer across the panel, by using material which forms substantially closed spaces to suppress convection of the low conductivity gas fill. At least a portion of the baffle carries a low emissivity surface for suppression of infrared radiation. 18 figures.

  6. Gas filled panel insulation

    DOEpatents

    Griffith, Brent T.; Arasteh, Dariush K.; Selkowitz, Stephen E.

    1993-01-01

    A structural or flexible highly insulative panel which may be translucent, is formed from multi-layer polymeric material in the form of an envelope surrounding a baffle. The baffle is designed so as to minimize heat transfer across the panel, by using material which forms substantially closed spaces to suppress convection of the low conductivity gas fill. At least a portion of the baffle carries a low emissivity surface for suppression of infrared radiation.

  7. Voids in Sonic Fill(TM) restorations compared to traditional incrementally-filled composite restorations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abourezq, Ibraheem A.

    SonicFill(TM) is a new composite resin and delivery system designed to provide rapid filling of cavity preparations by decreasing viscosity through application of sonic energy. However, it may produce unwanted air voids in the final restoration due to the short filling time. Air voids compromise long-term performance by providing weak foci, discontinuity at cavosurface margins and at internal cavity walls, and potential crack propagation. This study assessed the locations, sizes, and numbers of voids in SonicFill restorations compared with traditional composite resin restorations in a set of extracted molars with mesio-occlusal-distal (MOD) cavity preparations. Fifty noncarious intact extracted third molars were collected randomly from a large collection of discarded anonymous tooth specimens. Standardized MOD cavity preparations were cut, and teeth were assigned randomly to one of two groups ( n = 25). The first group was restored with SonicFill composite in two steps. The second group was restored with Herculite Ultra(TM) using an multiple increment layering technique (1-2 mm per layer). Cross-sectional images of the filling were taken by digital microscope. A total of 196 voids were found in the 50 specimens: 97 in SonicFill restorations and 99 in conventional restorations. Mean number of voids in SonicFill restorations was 3.88 versus 3.96 for conventional restorations. Mean percentage of void area in SonicFill restorations was 0.588% versus 0.508% for conventional restorations. Unpaired t tests for these differences indicated no statistically significant differences (p =.931 and p =.629, respectively). One-way ANOVA tests for mean void count and mean void area percentage differences by three location zones for conventional and SonicFill restorations also indicated no significant differences among the groups. The bulk-fill SonicFill system does not result in increased or decreased numbers or ii area of voids within Class II MOD restorations compared with a

  8. A numerical solution of variable porosity effects on natural convection in a packed-sphere cavity

    SciTech Connect

    David, E.; Lauriat, G. ); Cheng, P. )

    1991-05-01

    The problem of natural convection in differentially heated vertical cavities filled with spherical particles saturated with Newtonian fluids is investigated numerically. The Brinkman-Darcy-Ergun equation is used as the momentum equation, and the wall effect on porosity variation is approximated by an exponential function. The effect of variable stagnant thermal conductivities is taken into consideration in the energy equation. The formulation of the problem shows that the flow and heat transfer characteristics depend on six dimensionless parameters, namely, the Rayleigh and Prandtl numbers of the fluid phase, the dimensionless particle diameter, the conductivity ratio of the two phases, the bulk porosity, and the aspect ratio of the cavity. The influences of these parameters on the heat transfer rate are thoroughly investigated. The predicted Nusselt numbers are compared with existing experimental results. It is found that the computed Nusselt numbers based on the present model compare the best with experimental data.

  9. Modeling added compressibility of porosity and the thermomechanical response of wet porous rock

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, M.B.; Elata, D.; Attia, A.V.

    1995-06-01

    This paper concerned with modeling the response of a porous brittle solid whose pores may be dry or partially filled with fluid. A form for the Helmholtz free energy is proposed which incorporated known Mie-Grueneisen constitutive equations for the nonporous solid and for the fluid, and which uses an Eilnstein formulation with variable specific heat. In addition, a functional form for porosity is postulated which porous rock. Restrictions on constitutive assumptions for the composite of porous solid ad fluid are obtained which ensure thermodynamic consistency. Examples show that although the added compressibility of porosity is determined by fitting data for dry Mt. Helen Tuff, the predicted responses of saturated and partially saturated tuff agree well with experimental data.

  10. Carbonate sequence stratigraphy, diagenesis, and porosity prediction

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, M.E. )

    1993-09-01

    Considering carbonate rocks in the context of changes of relative sea level and accommodation space enables a degree of prediction of sediment body geometry and stacking patterns and of the course of early diagenesis and evolution of porosity. During a major sea level fall and in a humid climate, the sediments of the previous highstand systems tracts (HST) and transgressive systems tracts (TST) are subjected to meteoric leaching and cementation, and karstification from the sequence boundary. Both porosity occlusion and enhancement may occur. In an arid climate, reflux dolomitization is likely to be important. TST facies are typified by marine cementation followed by burial in marine pore fluids where no significant diagenetic reactions take place until compaction begins or meteoric flushing occurs. TST facies have major reservoir potential, commonly retaining significant primary porosity into the deep burial realm. If dolomitization by circulating seawater is an important process, then it is most likely to occur during the TST, when the relative sea level rise pushes marine groundwaters through the sediments. Very porous rocks can be produced in this way if there is concominant aragonite dissolution. During the HST, sediments may be subjected to marine cementation, but this would soon be followed by meteoric diagenesis in a humid climate or by evaporative dolomitization if the climate is arid. Many carbonate platforms consist of numerous parasequences and their diagenesis depends on their position within the sequence. Those parasequences deposited during the third-order sea level fall generally show the effects of surface-related diagenesis (supratidal dolomitization or karstification) to a much greater degree than those deposited during the third-order sea level rise. Relative sea level changes have varied through time and these have had a strong influence on the nature of sequences and parasequences, as well as on their diagenesis.

  11. Modeling of porosity formation and feeding flow during casting of steel and aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Zhiping

    Porosity is one of the most important defects in metal casting. To quantitatively predict the porosity formation during casting two numerical models are developed for steel and aluminum alloys respectively. For steel, a multi-phase model is developed that predicts melt pressure, feeding flow, porosity (both microscopic and macroscopic), and riser pipe formation during casting. The phases included in the model are solid, liquid, porosity, and air. An energy equation is solved to determine solid fraction. A multi-phase momentum equation, which is valid everywhere in the solution domain, is derived. A pressure equation is then derived from this momentum equation and a mixture continuity equation developed that accounts for all phases. The partial pressure of a gas species dissolved in the melt is determined using the species concentration, which is found by solving a species conservation equation that accounts for convection. Porosity forms once the gas pressure exceeds the sum of the melt pressure and the capillary pressure. The amount of porosity that forms is determined from the mixture continuity equation. The riser pipe is determined from an air continuity equation. A pore size model, which considers the effects of the solidifying steel microstructure on pore size, is incorporated into the multi-phase model. The multi-phase model is applied to one-dimensional, two-dimensional, and three-dimensional simulations. The results clearly illustrate the basic physical phenomena involved and predict microporosity and macroporosity distributions, as well as a riser pipe. For aluminum alloys a gas microsegregation model is developed to quantitatively predict porosity, coupled with the calculations of the pressure field, feeding flow, and distribution of dissolved gas species throughout the casting. The effects of dendritic and eutectic microstructure on the pore shape and size are considered in a pore size model. The model is applied to one-dimensional simulations of A319

  12. Determination of effective porosity of mudrocks: a feasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    Dorsch, J.

    1995-11-01

    Matrix diffusion is believed to be an important transport process within the double-porosity (primary sedimentary porosity and secondary fracture porosity) mudrock-dominated stratigraphic units on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). Effective porosity is identified as an important parameter for evaluating and modeling matrix diffusion as a transport process. This report identifies, summarizes and evaluates petrophysical techniques, which can be used to determine the effective porosity of mudrock. Most of the techniques found their original application in the petroleum industry for the evaluation of reservoir rocks.

  13. Porosity and mechanical properties of zirconium ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Kalatur, Ekaterina Narikovich, Anton; Buyakova, Svetlana E-mail: kulkov@ispms.tsc.ru; Kulkov, Sergey E-mail: kulkov@ispms.tsc.ru

    2014-11-14

    The article studies the porous ceramics consisting of ultra-fine ZrO{sub 2} powders. The porosity of ceramic samples varied from 15% to 80%. The structure of the ceramic materials had a cellular configuration. The distinctive feature of all experimentally obtained strain diagrams is their nonlinearity at low deformations characterized by the parabolic law. It was shown that the observed nonlinear elasticity for low deformations shown in strain diagrams is due to the mechanical instability of cellular elements of the ceramic framework.

  14. Porosity in plasma sprayed alumina coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Ilavsky, J.; Herman, H.; Berndt, C.C.; Goland, A.N.; Long, G.G.; Krueger, S.; Allen, A.J.

    1994-03-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) was used to study the porosity of plasma sprayed deposits of alumina in as-sprayed and heat-treated conditions. SANS results were compared with mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) and water immersion techniques. Multiple small-angle neutron scattering yields a volume-weighted effective pore radius (R{sub eff}), for pores with sizes between 0.08 and 10{mu}m, the pore volume in this size region, and from the Porod region, the surface area of pores of all sizes.

  15. Evaluation of heterogeneous porosity in reservoirs on Arabian platforms

    SciTech Connect

    Nurmi, R.; Charara, M.; Waterhouse, M.

    1988-01-01

    A common heterogeneity is the occurrence of patchy porosity, which may occur at any scale of examination. The occurrence of patchy porosity at a scale of kilometers is a factor controlling the areal distribution of reservoirs. Although often related to depositional facies, in some areas this distribution has not been adequately explained. The three-dimensional mapping of such large-scale porosity has been carried out by well mapping and/or seismic velocity mapping. The presence of meter-scale patchy porosity is routinely detected in Cretaceous-age reservoirs using borehole electrical imagery. Although the patterns of patchy porosity are revealed in these images, porosity variation is only shown in relative terms. It is possible, however, to use high-resolution porosity measurements to quantify these variations, which is especially important when there is a continuous network of high porosity. This type of heterogeneity sometimes erroneously causes indications of secondary porosity. Although the origin of these porosity variations is not well understood, SEM examination of some low-porosity areas indicate that they are the result of an abundance of micron-scale patchy recrystallization.

  16. Porosity of additive manufacturing parts for process monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Slotwinski, J. A.; Garboczi, E. J.

    2014-02-18

    Some metal additive manufacturing processes can produce parts with internal porosity, either intentionally (with careful selection of the process parameters) or unintentionally (if the process is not well-controlled.) Material porosity is undesirable for aerospace parts - since porosity could lead to premature failure - and desirable for some biomedical implants, since surface-breaking pores allow for better integration with biological tissue. Changes in a part's porosity during an additive manufacturing build may also be an indication of an undesired change in the process. We are developing an ultrasonic sensor for detecting changes in porosity in metal parts during fabrication on a metal powder bed fusion system, for use as a process monitor. This paper will describe our work to develop an ultrasonic-based sensor for monitoring part porosity during an additive build, including background theory, the development and detailed characterization of reference additive porosity samples, and a potential design for in-situ implementation.

  17. Porosity of additive manufacturing parts for process monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slotwinski, J. A.; Garboczi, E. J.

    2014-02-01

    Some metal additive manufacturing processes can produce parts with internal porosity, either intentionally (with careful selection of the process parameters) or unintentionally (if the process is not well-controlled.) Material porosity is undesirable for aerospace parts - since porosity could lead to premature failure - and desirable for some biomedical implants, since surface-breaking pores allow for better integration with biological tissue. Changes in a part's porosity during an additive manufacturing build may also be an indication of an undesired change in the process. We are developing an ultrasonic sensor for detecting changes in porosity in metal parts during fabrication on a metal powder bed fusion system, for use as a process monitor. This paper will describe our work to develop an ultrasonic-based sensor for monitoring part porosity during an additive build, including background theory, the development and detailed characterization of reference additive porosity samples, and a potential design for in-situ implementation.

  18. Porosity estimation based on seismic wave velocity at shallow depths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jong-Sub; Yoon, Hyung-Koo

    2014-06-01

    Seismic wave velocity and porosity are used for the estimation of dynamic behaviors in the Earth, including seismicity and liquefaction. To increase the resolution of subsurface observations, seismic wave velocity and porosity can be combined in a compound method. To this end, in this paper, we utilize and rearrange the Wood, Gassmann, and Foti methods - three techniques commonly used to estimate porosity based on seismic wave velocity at shallow depths. Seismic wave velocity is obtained by a field velocity probe using the horizontal transmission technique. Porosity calculated using the Gassmann method shows the highest reliability considering observed porosity criteria. The sensitivities of each method are compared using the error norm. Results show that the Gassmann method has low sensitivity for calculating porosity, whereas the Wood and Foti methods have high sensitivity. Consequently, the Gassmann method is recommended for estimating porosity at shallow depths when using measured elastic wave velocity.

  19. Porosity, permeability, and their relationship in granite, basalt, and tuff

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-04-01

    This report discusses the porosity, storage, and permeability of fractured (mainly crystalline) rock types proposed as host rock for nuclear waste repositories. The emphasis is on the inter-relationships of these properties, but a number of reported measurements are included as well. The porosity of rock is shown to consist of fracture porosity and matrix porosity; techniques are described for determining the total interconnected porosity through both laboratory and field measurement. Permeability coefficient, as obtained by experiments ranging from laboratory to crustal scale, is discussed. Finally, the problem of determining the relationship between porosity and permeability is discussed. There is no simple, all encompassing relationship that describes the dependence of permeability upon porosity. However, two particular cases have been successfully analyzed: flow through a single rough fracture, and flow through isotropic porous rock. These two cases are discussed in this report.

  20. Watching dehydration: transient vein-shaped porosity in the oceanic mantle of the subducting Nazca slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloch, Wasja; John, Timm; Kummerow, Jörn; Wigger, Peter; Salazar, Pablo; Shapiro, Serge

    2016-04-01

    Subduction zones around the world show the common pattern of a Double Seismicity Zone, where seismicity is organized in the form of two sub-parallel planes, one at the plate contact and the other one, 10 to 30 km below, in the mantle of the oceanic lithosphere (Lower Seismicity Zone, LSZ). A commonly held hypothesis states that dehydration processes and the associated mineral reactions promote the earthquakes of the LSZ. Fluids filling a porespace strongly alter the petropyhsical properties of a rock. Especially the seismic P- to S-wave velocity ratio (Vp/Vs) has been shown to be sensitive to the presence of fluid-filled porosity. It transforms uniquely to Poisson's ratio. To test the mineral-dehydration-hypothesis, we use local earthquake data to measure Vp/Vs in the oceanic mantle of the subducting Nazca slab at 21°S. We determine it as the slope of the de-meaned differential P- vs. S-wave arrivaltimes of a dense seismicity cluster in the LSZ. This measurement yields a value for Vp/Vs of 2.10 ± 0.09, i.e. a Poisson's ratio of ˜0.35. This value clearly exceeds the range of Vp/Vs values expected for oceanic mantle rocks in their purely solid form at ˜50km depth. We follow a poroelastic approach to model the rock's elastic properties, including Vp/Vs, as a function of porosity and porespace-geometry. This results in a porespace model for the target volume having a vein-like porosity occupying only a minor volume fraction. Porosity is in the order of 0.1%. These findings are in very good agreement with field surveys and laboratory experiments of mantle dehydration. The pore-geometry is close to the geometrical percolation threshold, where long-ranged interconnectivity statistically emerges, suggesting good draining capabilities. Indeed, porosity is soft so that the amount of porosity and, consequently, permeability is very sensitive to local fluid pressure. We conclude that in the oceanic mantle of the subducting Nazca slab, mineral dehydration reactions are

  1. Relationships among low frequency (2 Hz) electrical resistivity, porosity, clay content and permeability in reservoir sandstones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Tongcheng; Best, Angus I.; Sothcott, Jeremy; North, Laurence J.; MacGregor, Lucy M.

    2015-01-01

    The improved interpretation of marine controlled source electromagnetic (CSEM) data requires knowledge of the inter-relationships between reservoir parameters and low frequency electrical resistivity. Hence, the electrical resistivities of 67 brine (35 g/l) saturated sandstone samples with a range of petrophysical properties (porosity from 2% to 29%, permeability from 0.0001 mD to 997.49 mD and volumetric clay content from 0 to 28%) were measured in the laboratory at a frequency of 2 Hz using a four-electrode circumferential resistivity method with an accuracy of ± 2%. The results show that sandstones with porosity higher than 9% and volumetric clay content up to 22% behave like clean sandstones and follow Archie's law for a brine concentration of 35 g/l. By contrast, at this brine salinity, sandstones with porosity less than 9% and volumetric clay content above 10% behave like shaly sandstones with non-negligible grain surface conductivity. A negative, linear correlation was found between electrical resistivity and hydraulic permeability on a logarithmic scale. We also found good agreement between our experimental results and a clay pore blocking model based on pore-filling and load-bearing clay in a sand/clay mixture, variable (non-clay) cement fraction and a shaly sandstone resistivity model. The model results indicate a general transition in shaly sandstones from clay-controlled resistivity to sand-controlled resistivity at about 9% porosity. At such high brine concentrations, no discernible clay conduction effect was observed above 9% porosity.

  2. Nanoporous Metal - Combining Strength and Porosity

    SciTech Connect

    Biener, J; Hodge, A M; Hayes, J R; Volkert, C A; Zepeda-Ruiz, L A; Hamza, A V; Abraham, F F

    2006-05-17

    Recent nanomechanical tests on submicron metal columns and wires have revealed a dramatic increase in yield strength with decreasing sample size. This effect seems to be related to the increased strength observed in metals on decreasing grain size or film thickness, and has been explained by a dislocation nucleation/activation controlled plasticity regime in small sample volumes. The question arises whether one can utilize this new size effect to design materials with improved bulk properties. Here, we demonstrate that nanoporous metal foams can be envisioned as a three-dimensional network of ultrahigh-strength nanocolumns/wires, thus bringing together two seemingly conflicting properties: high strength and high porosity. Specifically, we studied the mechanical properties of nanoporous (np) Au using a combination of nanoindentation and column microcompression tests, as well as supplemental molecular dynamics simulations. We find that np-Au can be as strong as bulk Au, despite being a highly porous material, and that the ligaments in np-Au approach the theoretical yield strength of Au. The combination of high yield strength and high porosity can be used to design a new generation of energy absorbing materials for various engineering applications.

  3. Dye filled security seal

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Dennis C. W.

    1982-04-27

    A security seal for providing an indication of unauthorized access to a sealed object includes an elongate member to be entwined in the object such that access is denied unless the member is removed. The elongate member has a hollow, pressurizable chamber extending throughout its length that is filled with a permanent dye under greater than atmospheric pressure. Attempts to cut the member and weld it together are revealed when dye flows through a rupture in the chamber wall and stains the outside surface of the member.

  4. Influence of the porosity on the ²²²Rn exhalation rate of concrete.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Peter; van Dijk, Willem; de Rooij, Mario

    2011-02-01

    The composition of 23 concrete mixtures was varied in five separate series to evaluate the influence of porosity on the ²²²Rn exhalation rate. In each series, a range in porosities is obtained by varying (1) the amount of cement, (2) type of cement (Portland or blast furnace slag cement), (3) the amount of water at a fixed cement level, (4) addition of an air entraining agent, or (5) the amount of recycled aggregates. The porosities ranged from 1% to 16%. The ²²²Rn exhalation rate is normalized to the ²²⁶Ra activity concentration and expressed as the ²²²Rn release factor to eliminate the effect of differences in ²²⁶Ra activity concentrations among the various concrete mixtures. Since most ²²²Rn originates from the cement, a ²²²Rn release factor based on the amount of ²²⁶Ra introduced by the cements appeared to be more adequate. Although the methods to attain the porosities in the concrete mixtures differ widely, this cement-related factor corresponds well with the capillary porosity of the mixtures. Since the water-to-cement ratio of the fresh paste is a good indicator of the capillary porosity, this is the guiding factor in the fabrication of concretes low in ²²²Rn exhalation. The lower the water-to-cement ratio, the less capillary pore area will be available from which ²²²Rn can emanate from the mineral matrix into the pore system. The good correlation between the cement-based ²²²Rn release factor and literature data on the internal capillary pore area support the results of this study. PMID:21399427

  5. Porosity advisor - expert system used as aid in interpreting origin of porosity in carbonate rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Watney, W.L.; Anderson, J.; Wong, J.

    1989-03-01

    Porosity Advisor was developed to assist in interpreting the origin of porosity in carbonate rocks and to evaluate inexpensive rule-based expert-system shells in solving practical geological problems. The shells are programs that facilitate development of a knowledge base and an inference program to link rules and draw conclusions. The knowledge base consists of fact and rules. The facts include pore types and their relationships to matrix and cement. The rules relate these facts and, in turn, are used to make conclusions about the genesis of the pores. The genetic classification of P. Choquette and L. Pray is utilized to draw conclusions regarding process, direction, and timing of porosity development. The facts and rules of Porosity Advisor are derived from studies of Upper Pennsylvanian carbonate rocks in the Mid-Continent. Particular facts in this data base include type of pores, crosscutting relationships, geochemical parameters, association with megascopic, mappable features, and burial history. Facts and rules have different levels of significance because of imprecise measurement of facts and nonuniqueness of fact-rule relationships. Accordingly, confidence levels can be applied to both facts and rules. Some expert-system shells can read facts and rules from spreadsheet programs such as Lotus-1-2-3 and permit processing of large data sets. Programming options and tools such as these greatly facilitate the application and utility of these programs.

  6. Hydrogen Filling Station

    SciTech Connect

    Boehm, Robert F; Sabacky, Bruce; Anderson II, Everett B; Haberman, David; Al-Hassin, Mowafak; He, Xiaoming; Morriseau, Brian

    2010-02-24

    future. Project partners also conducted a workshop on hydrogen safety and permitting. This provided an opportunity for the various permitting agencies and end users to gather to share experiences and knowledge. As a result of this workshop, the permitting process for the hydrogen filling station on the Las Vegas Valley Water District’s land was done more efficiently and those who would be responsible for the operation were better educated on the safety and reliability of hydrogen production and storage. The lessons learned in permitting the filling station and conducting this workshop provided a basis for future hydrogen projects in the region. Continuing efforts to increase the working pressure of electrolysis and efficiency have been pursued. Research was also performed on improving the cost, efficiency and durability of Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) hydrogen technology. Research elements focused upon PEM membranes, electrodes/catalysts, membrane-electrode assemblies, seals, bipolar plates, utilization of renewable power, reliability issues, scale, and advanced conversion topics. Additionally, direct solar-to-hydrogen conversion research to demonstrate stable and efficient photoelectrochemistry (PEC) hydrogen production systems based on a number of optional concepts was performed. Candidate PEC concepts included technical obstacles such as inefficient photocatalysis, inadequate photocurrent due to non-optimal material band gap energies, rapid electron-hole recombination, reduced hole mobility and diminished operational lifetimes of surface materials exposed to electrolytes. Project Objective 1: Design, build, operate hydrogen filling station Project Objective 2: Perform research and development for utilizing solar technologies on the hydrogen filling station and convert two utility vehicles for use by the station operators Project Objective 3: Increase capacity of hydrogen filling station; add additional vehicle; conduct safety workshop; develop a roadmap for

  7. Porosity evolution of upper Miocene reefs, Almeria Province, Southern Spain

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, A.K.; Snavely, P.D. Jr.; Addicott, W.O.

    1980-02-01

    In the reef cores and fore-reef breccia beds, porosity in both primary and postdepositional. Primary porosity is of three types: (a) boring clam holes in the scleractinian coral heads, cemented reef rocks, and breccias; (b) intraparticle porosity within the corals, Halimeda plates, and vermetid worm tubes; and (c) interparticle porosity between bioclastic fragments and in the reef breccia. Postdepositional moldic porosity was formed by the solution of aragonitic material such as molluscan and coral fragments. The Polomo reef carbonate rocks have high porosity and permeability, and retain a great amount of depositional porosity. Pores range in size from a few micrometers to 30 cm. The extensive intercrystalline porosity and high permeability resulted from dolomitization of micritic matrix. Some porosity reduction has occured by incomplete and partial sparry calcite infilling of interparticular, moldic, and intercrystalline voids. The high porosity and permeability of these reefs make them important targets for petroleum exploration in the western Mediterranean off southern Spain. In these offshore areas in the subsuface the volcanic ridge and the Plomo reef complex are locally onlapped or overlapped by 350 m or more of Miocene and Pliocene fine-grained sedimentary rocks. The possibility exists that the buried Plomo reef deposits may form traps for oil and gas in the offshore areas southwest of the type locality. Stratigraphic traps also may occur where the Neogene sequence above the Plomo reef complex onlaps the volcanic ridge. 17 figures.

  8. Porosity change after gypsum crust formation on macro-porous limestones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewanckele, Jan; Cnudde, Veerle; de Kock, Tim; Boone, Marijn; Boone, Matthieu; van Hoorebeke, Luc; Jacobs, Patric

    2010-05-01

    filter, etc. were applied for the reconstruction. Total porosity, open and closed porosity and radial porosity were calculated for each sample by using the in-house developed software program Morpho+. The analysis of the various scans revealed that the Euville limestone developed a distinct gypsum crust, behind which a secondary porous layer of 100 μm thickness had developed. Inside the sample the porosity decreased by infilling of the large pore spaces with gypsum. However, after 6 days exposure the total porosity of the sample increased from 5.70% to 8.45%. In this case, the formation of secondary porosity behind the newly formed exterior gypsum layer prevailed upon the crystallizing of gypsum inside the pores located in the sample's interior. Also, the firstly formed gypsum crystals prevented the further interaction of the sulphuric acid with the stone material. After 21 days, the total porosity of the sample still reached 8.45%. The results of the radial porosity measurements were also the same after 6 and 21 days, indicating that the secondary porosity and the filling of pores inside the samples were stabilized. On the other hand, the gypsum crust on the Savonnières limestone was less visible. No secondary formed porous layer was measured and the total porosity decreased from 12.10% to 10.94% after 6 days and further to 10.31% at the end of the test. The decrease of porosity was still measurable at a depth of 500 μm inside the sample. The combination of micro-CT, image analysis and induced weathering tests are a promising combination of tools and techniques that allow for a better understanding of gypsum crust formation and pore structure change just behind the crust and deeper inside the rock sample.

  9. Development of model hydroxyapatite bone scaffolds with multiscale porosity for potential load bearing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dellinger, Jennifer Gwynne

    2005-11-01

    Model hydroxyapatite (HA) bone scaffolds consisting of a latticed pattern of rods were fabricated by a solid freeform fabrication (SFF) technique based on the robotic deposition of colloidal pastes. An optimal HA paste formulation for this method was developed. Local porosity, i.e. microporosity (1--30 mum) and sintering porosity (less than 1 mum), were produced by including polymer microsphere porogens in the HA pastes and by controlling the sintering of the scaffolds. Scaffolds with and without local porosity were evaluated with and without in vitro accelerated degradation. Percent weight loss of the scaffolds and calcium and phosphorus concentrations in solution increased with degradation time. After degradation, compressive strength and modulus decreased significantly for scaffolds with local porosity, but did not change significantly for scaffolds without local porosity. The compressive strength and modulus of scaffolds without local porosity were comparable to human cortical bone and were significantly greater than the scaffolds with local porosity. Micropores in HA disks caused surface pits that increased the surface roughness as compared to non-microporous HA disks. Mouse mesenchymal stem cells extended their cell processes into these microporous pits on HA disks in vitro. ALP expression was prolonged, cell attachment strength increased, and ECM production appeared greater on microporous HA disks compared to non-microporous HA disks and tissue culture treated polystyrene controls. Scaffolds with and without microporosity were implanted in goats bones. Microporous scaffolds with rhBMP-2 increased the percent of the scaffold filled with bone tissue compared to microporous scaffolds without rhBMP-2. Lamellar bone inside scaffolds was aligned near the rods junctions whereas lamellar bone was aligned in a more random configuration away from the rod junctions. Microporous scaffolds stained darkly with toluidine blue beneath areas of contact with new bone. This

  10. 3D Porosity Estimation of the Nankai Trough Sediments from Core-log-seismic Integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J. O.

    2015-12-01

    The Nankai Trough off southwest Japan is one of the best subduction-zone to study megathrust earthquake fault. Historic, great megathrust earthquakes with a recurrence interval of 100-200 yr have generated strong motion and large tsunamis along the Nankai Trough subduction zone. At the Nankai Trough margin, the Philippine Sea Plate (PSP) is being subducted beneath the Eurasian Plate to the northwest at a convergence rate ~4 cm/yr. The Shikoku Basin, the northern part of the PSP, is estimated to have opened between 25 and 15 Ma by backarc spreading of the Izu-Bonin arc. The >100-km-wide Nankai accretionary wedge, which has developed landward of the trench since the Miocene, mainly consists of offscraped and underplated materials from the trough-fill turbidites and the Shikoku Basin hemipelagic sediments. Particularly, physical properties of the incoming hemipelagic sediments may be critical for seismogenic behavior of the megathrust fault. We have carried out core-log-seismic integration (CLSI) to estimate 3D acoustic impedance and porosity for the incoming sediments in the Nankai Trough. For the CLSI, we used 3D seismic reflection data, P-wave velocity and density data obtained during IODP (Integrated Ocean Drilling Program) Expeditions 322 and 333. We computed acoustic impedance depth profiles for the IODP drilling sites from P-wave velocity and density data. We constructed seismic convolution models with the acoustic impedance profiles and a source wavelet which is extracted from the seismic data, adjusting the seismic models to observed seismic traces with inversion method. As a result, we obtained 3D acoustic impedance volume and then converted it to 3D porosity volume. In general, the 3D porosities show decrease with depth. We found a porosity anomaly zone with alteration of high and low porosities seaward of the trough axis. In this talk, we will show detailed 3D porosity of the incoming sediments, and present implications of the porosity anomaly zone for the

  11. Preparation of high porosity metal foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jee, C. S. Y.; Guo, Z. X.; Evans, J. R. G.; Özgüven, N.

    2000-12-01

    Metal foams with porosities greater than 90 pct were prepared by a novel powder metallurgy route using a polymeric vehicle. Coarse titanium powder and fine carbonyl iron powder were tested. The powders were blended with each component of a two-part polyol-isocyanate foaming system, and the resulting suspensions were mixed and allowed to expand. Although the resulting polymer-metal foam was closed cell, particles were not retained in the windows. Upon pyrolysis to remove the resin, the windows opened and the final sintered metal foam was reticulated. Such foams present very low sintered density and are correspondingly weak after sintering but offer a fine reticulated structure with cell diameters in the region of 100 to 200 µm. They may have applications in the areas of catalysis, biomaterials, and composites.

  12. Designed porosity materials in nuclear reactor components

    DOEpatents

    Yacout, A. M.; Pellin, Michael J.; Stan, Marius

    2016-09-06

    A nuclear fuel pellet with a porous substrate, such as a carbon or tungsten aerogel, on which at least one layer of a fuel containing material is deposited via atomic layer deposition, and wherein the layer deposition is controlled to prevent agglomeration of defects. Further, a method of fabricating a nuclear fuel pellet, wherein the method features the steps of selecting a porous substrate, depositing at least one layer of a fuel containing material, and terminating the deposition when the desired porosity is achieved. Also provided is a nuclear reactor fuel cladding made of a porous substrate, such as silicon carbide aerogel or silicon carbide cloth, upon which layers of silicon carbide are deposited.

  13. Acoustical properties of double porosity granular materials.

    PubMed

    Venegas, Rodolfo; Umnova, Olga

    2011-11-01

    Granular materials have been conventionally used for acoustic treatment due to their sound absorptive and sound insulating properties. An emerging field is the study of the acoustical properties of multiscale porous materials. An example of these is a granular material in which the particles are porous. In this paper, analytical and hybrid analytical-numerical models describing the acoustical properties of these materials are introduced. Image processing techniques have been employed to estimate characteristic dimensions of the materials. The model predictions are compared with measurements on expanded perlite and activated carbon showing satisfactory agreement. It is concluded that a double porosity granular material exhibits greater low-frequency sound absorption at reduced weight compared to a solid-grain granular material with similar mesoscopic characteristics. PMID:22087905

  14. Diagenesis and late-stage porosity development in the pennsylvanian strawn formation, val verde basin, Texas, U.S.A

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    David, Newell K.; Goldstein, R.H.; Burdick, C.J.

    2005-01-01

    The Middle Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Strawn Formation in the Trans-Pecos area of Texas was deposited during relative tectonic quiescence that prevailed before rapid infilling of the Val Verde Basin. It represents one of a series of backstepping carbonate ramps formed on the craton side of this foreland basin. Strawn Formation carbonate rocks in three cores - Conoco Anna McClung #3-1, Alex Mitchell S2-1R, and Creek Ranch #10-1 - show several shallowing-up ward sequences, each a few meters thick. The Creek Ranch core displays the deepest-water characteristics of the three cores; the lower part of this core is dominated by graded bedding. The Mitchell and McClung cores contain skeletal-rich carbonates. Both of these cores display characteristics of shallow-water bank or lagoonal environments. All three cores have approximately the same diagenetic history. Primary fluid inclusions indicate early porosity-occluding interparticle and mold-filling calcite precipitated from water with a narrow range of salinities. Modal salinities are that of seawater, but slightly lesser salinities (indicating mixing of seawater and meteoric water) and slightly greater salinities (indicating evaporative concentration of seawater) are also indicated. The influence of meteoric groundwater can be detected by stable-isotope analyses of the early cements at stratigraphic levels that correlate to the tops of the major shallowing-upward depositional sequences. However, subaerial exposure surfaces are not demonstrated in these cores but were likely to be present updip. Most porosity is cement-reduced vugs, dissolution-enlarged (and cement-reduced) molds (> 1/16 mm, < 4 mm), and fractures. Minor intraparticle, intercrystalline, and shelter porosity is also present. Reservoir porosity is caused by fracturing and a late-stage dissolution event. Dissolution in the Creek Ranch core is not as pronounced as in the other cores because of a dearth of skeletal material. Porous zones in the McClung and

  15. Collision and impact simulations including porosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benz, Willy; Jutzi, Martin

    2007-05-01

    We present a numerical tool based on the Smooth Particle Hydrodynamic (SPH) method which can be used to model impacts and collisions involving small solid bodies in a strength-dominated regime. This method was already successfully tested at different scales. At small scales, the method was validated by simulating laboratory impacts. Our model predicts shapes, locations and velocities of the largest fragment with hight accuracy (Benz and Asphaug, 1994). A natural laboratory for studying collision physics at larger scales is provided by the twenty or more asteroid families identified in the asteroid belt. By simulating classes of collisions, our model was able to reproduce the main characteristics of such families (e.g. Michel et al. 2003). Spacecraft missions and ground-based observations are providing increasing evidence that many or even most asteroids are porous (Housenand Holsapple 2003). Porosity may also play an important role in the formation of planets as the dissipative properties of porous media will enhance the collisional sticking mechanism required to build planetesimals. We have developed a numerical model suitable for the calculation of shock dynamics and fracture In porous media. It is based on the so called P-alpha model (Herrmann 1969) which was adapted for implementation in our SPH impact code (Jutzi 2004). We are now capable of performing SPH simulations including fracture AND porosity and can report some very encouraging results. References: Benz and Asphaug (1994), Icarus 107, 98-116 Herrmann W. (1969), J. Appl. Phys. 40, 2490-2499 Michel P., Benz W, Richardson D.C. (2003), Nature 421, 608-611 Housen K.R. and Holsapple K.A., (2003) Icarus 163, 102- 119 Jutzi M. (2004), Diploma thesis, University of Bern.

  16. Analysis of the porosity formation during HVOF spraying

    SciTech Connect

    Sobolev, V.V.; Guilemany, J.M.

    1994-12-31

    On the basis of the proposed physical and mathematical models the formation of the gas and shrinkage porosity during the thermal spraying is investigated. The gas porosity model takes into account the parameters of spraying, powder particle material and substrate, droplet flattening and solidification heat and mass transfer processes and pores interaction. A model of the shrinkage porosity development includes the equations describing its formation under the solidification of the coating layers of the different shapes on account of the melt tension with the shrinkage. The shrinkage porosity microzones are shown to be formed near the crystals of the different shapes and its macrozones are established to be developed in the surface parts of the coating layers. The porosity parameters evolution is studied. The obtained results agree well with the tendencies of the gas and shrinkage porosity behavior observed experimentally.

  17. Preimpact porosity controls the gravity signature of lunar craters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milbury, C.; Johnson, B. C.; Melosh, H. J.; Collins, G. S.; Blair, D. M.; Soderblom, J. M.; Nimmo, F.; Bierson, C. J.; Phillips, R. J.; Zuber, M. T.

    2015-11-01

    We model the formation of lunar complex craters and investigate the effect of preimpact porosity on their gravity signatures. We find that while preimpact target porosities less than ~7% produce negative residual Bouguer anomalies (BAs), porosities greater than ~7% produce positive anomalies whose magnitude is greater for impacted surfaces with higher initial porosity. Negative anomalies result from pore space creation due to fracturing and dilatant bulking, and positive anomalies result from destruction of pore space due to shock wave compression. The central BA of craters larger than ~215 km in diameter, however, are invariably positive because of an underlying central mantle uplift. We conclude that the striking differences between the gravity signatures of craters on the Earth and Moon are the result of the higher average porosity and variable porosity of the lunar crust.

  18. Investigation of Porosity Evolution and Orthotropic Axes on Anisotropic Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahimi, Raheleh Mohammad

    Advancement of porosities that happens in shear deformation of anisotropic materials is investigated by Dr. Kweon. As the hydrostatic stress in shear deformation is zero, in the solid mechanics' researches it is proved several times that porosity will not be expanded in shear deformation. Dr. Kweon showed that this statement can be wrong in large deformation of simple shear. He proposed anisotropic ductile fracture model to show that hydrostatic stress becomes nonzero and porosities are increased in the simple shear deformation of anisotropic materials. This study investigates the effect of the evolution of anisotropy which means the rotation of the orthotropic axes onto the porosity changes. Hill coefficient shows that how orthotropic materials indicate different ductile fracture manners in shear deformation. Also the effect of void aspect ratio on change of porosity is investigated. It has been found that the interaction among porosity, the matrix anisotropy and void aspect ratio play a crucial role in the ductile damage of porous materials.

  19. Experimental evidence of the double-porosity effects in geomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran Ngoc, Tien; Lewandowska, Jolanta; Bertin, Henri

    2014-06-01

    Double-porosity is an important characteristic of microstructure in a large range of geomaterials. It designs porous media with connected fissures/fractures or aggregated soils. The origin of double-porosity can be natural or/and it can result from mechanical, chemical or biological damage. The presence of double-porosity can significantly affect the behaviour of geomaterials. In this paper we provide an experimental evidence of the double-porosity effects by performing laboratory experiments. Series of tracer dispersion experiments (in saturated and unsaturated steady-state water flow conditions) in a physical model of double-porosity geomaterial were carried out. For the comparative purposes, experiments of the same type were also performed in a singleporosity model medium. The results clearly showed that the double-porosity microstructure leads to the non-Fickian behaviour of the tracer (early breakthrough and long tail) in both saturated and unsaturated cases.

  20. Effect of Porosity Correlations on Sensitivity of Contaminant Travel Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohlmann, K. F.; Zhu, J.; Chapman, J. B.; Russell, C. E.; Shafer, D. S.; Carroll, R. W.

    2010-12-01

    Effective porosity of hydrogeologic units (HGUs) is an important parameter influencing contaminant travel time and is particularly significant for applications where steady state Darcy flux is calculated from calibrated groundwater flow models. Under such circumstances, the effective porosities of HGUs along flowpaths are the primary control on advective velocities of particles and therefore contaminant travel times. As a result, the uncertainty in effective porosity is a critical source of uncertainty in the prediction of contaminant travel time, which is often required for designing networks for monitoring long-term migration of contaminants. In this study, uncorrelated and correlated sensitivities of advective contaminant travel times to porosities of HGUs were quantified using the advective travel time of contaminants from underground nuclear detonations at the Nevada Test Site to the Yucca Mountain area in Nevada U.S. as an example. First we investigated the importance of HGU porosities to the uncertainty of advective contaminant travel time based on Monte Carlo sampling techniques. We then partitioned the uncertainty of the advective travel time of contaminants into two portions: the correlated portion by the correlated variances (i.e. variances of an HGU porosity which are correlated with other HGU porosities) and the uncorrelated portion by the uncorrelated variations (i.e. the unique variations of an HGU porosity which cannot be expressed from other HGU porosities). Various correlation scenarios of HGU porosities were considered to examine the impacts of porosity correlations on the uncertainty and sensitivity of advective contaminant travel times. The emphasis is on how HGU porosity correlation scenarios influence uncorrelated and correlated uncertainty contributions.

  1. Thermographic measurement of the effect of humidity in mortar porosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poblete, A.; Acebes Pascual, M.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this analysis is to examine the influence of the moisture in the porosity measurement by means of thermal non-destructive test and ultrasound techniques. It is possible to determine the concrete durability by the calculation of its porosity. Porosity is determined in an indirect way, measuring mortar diffusivity by means of active thermography. Using ultrasound techniques, the porosity is related with the ultrasonic propagation of velocity. The diffusivity has been calculated using the W.J. Parker equation. In the ultrasound technique, using the pulse transmission method, ultrasonic propagation velocity was measured as a function of the water content. The conclusions express the correlation between both methods.

  2. EFFECTIVE POROSITY IMPLIES EFFECTIVE BULK DENSITY IN SORBING SOLUTE TRANSPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Flach, G.

    2012-02-27

    The concept of an effective porosity is widely used in solute transport modeling to account for the presence of a fraction of the medium that effectively does not influence solute migration, apart from taking up space. This non-participating volume or ineffective porosity plays the same role as the gas phase in single-phase liquid unsaturated transport: it increases pore velocity, which is useful towards reproducing observed solute travel times. The prevalent use of the effective porosity concept is reflected by its prominent inclusion in popular texts, e.g., de Marsily (1986), Fetter (1988, 1993) and Zheng and Bennett (2002). The purpose of this commentary is to point out that proper application of the concept for sorbing solutes requires more than simply reducing porosity while leaving other material properties unchanged. More specifically, effective porosity implies the corresponding need for an effective bulk density in a conventional single-porosity model. The reason is that the designated non-participating volume is composed of both solid and fluid phases, both of which must be neglected for consistency. Said another way, if solute does not enter the ineffective porosity then it also cannot contact the adjoining solid. Conceptually neglecting the fluid portion of the non-participating volume leads to a lower (effective) porosity. Likewise, discarding the solid portion of the non-participating volume inherently leads to a lower or effective bulk density. In the author's experience, practitioners virtually never adjust bulk density when adopting the effective porosity approach.

  3. Carbonate porosity versus depth: a predictable relation for south Florida.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schmoker, J.W.; Halley, R.B.

    1982-01-01

    Examines the porosity of limestones and dolomites in the south Florida basin. Porosity data are derived from wire-line measurements which sample large volumes of rock, relative to petrographic methods, and can be examined at vertical scales approaching those of aquifers and hydrocarbon reservoirs. Investigation depths range from the surface to about 5500m. Curves of porosity versus depth, reflecting large-scale porosity-loss processes in the subsurface, are derived for a composite carbonate section and for carbonate strata of different ages and compositions.-from Authors

  4. Porosity effect on the electrical conductivity of sintered powder compacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montes, J. M.; Cuevas, F. G.; Cintas, J.

    2008-08-01

    A new equation for calculating the electrical conductivity of sintered powder compacts is proposed. In this equation, the effective resistivity of porous compacts is a function of the fully dense material conductivity, the porosity of the compact and the tap porosity of the starting powder. The new equation is applicable to powder sintered compacts from zero porosity to tap porosity. A connection between this equation and the percolation conduction theory is stated. The proposed equation has been experimentally validated with sintered compacts of six different metallic powders. Results confirm very good agreement with theoretical predictions.

  5. Mesogenetic dissolution: Its role in porosity development in carbonate reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Mazzullo, S.J. ); Harris, P.M. )

    1992-05-01

    Models of porosity formation in carbonate rocks have stressed subaerial exposure and attendant shallow meteoric diagenesis. Porosity formation also occurs in deep-burial, or mesogenetic, settings as a result of dissolution enlargement of preexisting pores (porosity enhancement) and creation of new pore systems. Brines charged with organic acids, carbon dioxide, and/or hydrogen sulfide derived from organic matter diagenesis and thermochemical sulfate reduction are the likely fluids causing significant mesogenetic dissolution. Enhanced and newly created mesogenetic pore types can mimic pore types formed in shallow meteoric environments, and therefore, the mesogenetic origin of some porosity may go unrecognized.

  6. Experimental study on the influence of the porosity of parallel plate stack on the temperature decrease of a thermoacoustic refrigerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setiawan, Ikhsan; Bambang Setio Utomo, Agung; Mitrayana; Katsuta, Masafumi; Nohtomi, Makoto

    2013-04-01

    Thermoacoustic refrigerators are cooling devices which are environmentally friendly because they don't use hazardous gases like chlorofuorocarbons (CFCs) or hydrofuorocarbons (HFCs) but rather air or inert gases as working medium. They apply sound wave with high intensity to pump heat from the cold to hot the regions through a stack in a resonator tube. One of the important parameters of thermoacoustic refrigerators is the porosity (blockage ratio) of stack which is a fraction of cross sectional area of the resonator unblocked for the gas movement by the stack. This paper describes an experimental study on how the porosity of parallel plate stack affects the temperature decrease of a thermoacoustic refrigerator. The porosity of parallel plate stack is specified by the thickness of plates and the spacing between plates. We measured the maximum temperature decreases of thermacoustic refrigerator using stacks with various porosities in the range of 0.5 - 0.85, with plate spacing from 0.5 mm to 1.5 mm and plate thicknesses 0.3 mm, 0.4 mm, and 0.5 mm. The measurements were done with two resonators with length of 0.8 m and 1.0 m, with air at atmospheric pressure and room temperature, correspond to thermal penetration depths (δκ) of 0.26 mm and 0.29 mm, respectively. It was found that there is an optimum porosity which gives the largest temperature decreases, and there is a tendency that the optimum porosity shifts to a larger value and the temperature decrease become larger when we used a stack with thinner plates. On the other hand, the study on the dependence of the temperature decrease on the plate thickness and the plate spacing reveals more useful information than that on the stack porosity itself. We found that stack with thinner plates tends to give larger temperature decrease, and the plate spacing of around 4δκ leads to the largest temperature decrease.

  7. Origin of dolomites in the Lower Cambrian Xiaoerbulak Formation in the Tarim Basin, NW China: Implications for porosity development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qing; Jiang, Zaixing; Hu, Wenxuan; You, Xuelian; Hao, Guoli; Zhang, Juntao; Wang, Xiaolin

    2016-01-01

    Dolomites occur pervasively in the Cambrian strata in the Tarim Basin, NW China. Although the Cambrian strata have been deeply buried and affected by multiple phases of dolomitization, some intervals in the upper part of the Lower Cambrian Xiaoerbulak Formation developed high porosity. The goal of this study is to understand the origin of different types of dolomites and the formation mechanism of the porosity in the Xiaoerbulak Formation. The geochemistry of matrix dolomites suggests that they formed from middle rare earth element (MREE)-enriched anoxic pore fluids, close to or within the zone of iron reduction. The similar REE + Y patterns and overlapping δ13C values between pore-filling and matrix dolomites indicate that the fluids that were responsible for the precipitation of pore-filling dolomite apparently inherited the signatures of the formation waters that were stored in the host strata. Low δ18O values coupled with high Ba, Zn, and rare earth element (REE) content of pore-filling dolomites indicate that pore-filling dolomites were formed at elevated temperatures. The precipitation of authigenic quartz and saddle dolomites and high Mn content in pore-filling dolomites indicate that hydrothermal fluids that mostly originated from Cambrian basinal clastic units or basement rocks were involved. The mixture of formation water and external hydrothermal fluids is the most likely explanation for the formation of significant porosity and precipitation of pore-filling dolomites at depth. Breccia dolomite, zebra dolomite, and saddle dolomite occur mostly in areas that are close to faults, which suggests that hydrothermal fluids passed through strike-slip faults in this area when these faults were activated. The development of permeable layers in the upper part of the Xiaoerbulak Formation overlain by impermeable layers of the Wusongger Formation suggests a possible potential diagenetic trap. When the faults were activated, high-pressure and high

  8. Treatment of domestic wastewater by subsurface flow constructed wetlands filled with gravel and tire chip media.

    PubMed

    Richter, A Y; Weaver, R W

    2003-12-01

    Subsurface flow constructed wetlands (SFCWs) are becoming increasingly common in on-site treatment of wastewater. Gravel is the most popular form of wetland fill medium, but tire chips provide more porosity, are less dense, and less expensive. This study determines the treatment efficiency of SFCWs filled with gravel or tire chip media to treat domestic wastewater. The influent and effluent of six SFCWs filled with tire chip medium and six SFCWs filled with gravel were monitored for 5 to 16 consecutive months. Parameters measured included pH, biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5), total and volatile suspended solids, NH4, P, and fecal and total coliforms. The only clear difference between medium types in wetland performance was for P. Soluble P in the effluent averaged 1.6 +/- 1.0 mg l(-1) in the tire chip-filled wetlands and 4.8 +/- 3.2 mg l(-1) in the gravel-filled wetlands. Most likely, Fe from exposed wires in shredded steel-belted tires complexed with P to create an insoluble compound. Tire chips may be a better fill medium for SFCWs than gravel because of higher porosity, lower cost, and greater reduction of P in effluent. PMID:14977152

  9. Occurrence of pore-filling halite in carbonate rocks, Nesson Anticline, Williston basin, North Dakota

    SciTech Connect

    Bucher, E.J.

    1988-07-01

    Clear, colorless pore-filling halite of late diagenetic origin occurs locally in the Devonian Dawson Bay, Winnipegosis, and Ashern Formations, the Silurian Interlake Formation, and the Ordovician Red River Formation. The halite occludes a variety of pore types and individual pores are filled with single crystals or aggregates of only a few crystals. This halite is present in quantities ranging from a trace to approximately 12%. Cores from McGregor field, Williams County, show the Winnipegosis Formation consists of mixed-skeletal lime wackestones and mudstones. These contain vugs up to 4 in. (10 cm) in size, intraparticle pores, and shelter porosity within pelecypod shells, up to 4 in. (10 cm) in size, which are occluded with halite. Halite also fills common small discontinuous vertical fractures. The upper 200 ft (61 m) of the Interlake Formation locally exhibits the most striking occurrences of pore-filling halite. These dolostones consist predominantly of intraclast-peloid mudstones, wackestones, packstones, occasional grainstones, algal boundstones, and solution-collapse breccias containing vug, fenestral, interparticle, shelter, intercrystalline, moldic, channel, breccia, and fracture porosity types. All porosity types, except intercrystalline, can be halite filled. A rare occurrence of pore-filling halite exists in Red River cores from Blue Buttes field, McKenzie County, where a dolomitic, mixed-skeletal, lime mudstone and wackestone lithofacies contains vugs, discontinuous vertical fractures, and intraparticle porosity types occluded with halite. In most occurrences, the pore systems were noneffective prior to halite infilling and had no potential as hydrocarbon reservoirs. However, it has been demonstrated that halite plugging in the Interlake Formation has locally formed updip seals to hydrocarbon migration.

  10. Selective-fluid-filled photonic crystal fibers and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yiping; Liao, Changrui; Zhong, Xiaoyong; Li, Zhengyong; Liu, Yingjie; Zhou, Jiangtao; Yang, Kaiming

    2013-08-01

    A selective-filling technique was demonstrated to improve the optical properties of photonic crystal fibres (PCFs). Such a technique can be used to fill one or more fluid samples selectively into desired air holes. The technique is based on drilling a hole or carving a groove on the surface of a PCF to expose selected air holes to atmosphere by the use of a micromachining system comprising of a femtosecond infrared laser and a microscope. The exposed section was immersed into a fluid and the air holes are then filled through the well-known capillarity action. Provided two or more grooves are fabricated on different locations and different orientation along the fibre surface, different fluids may be filled into different airholes to form a hybrid fibre. As an example, we filled half of a pure-silica PCF by a fluid with n=1.480 by carving a rectangular groove on the fibre. Consequently, the half-filled PCF became a bandgap-guiding structure (upper half), resulted from a higher refractive index in the fluid rods than in the fibre core, and three bandgaps were observed within the wavelength range from 600 to 1700 nm. Whereas, the lower half (unfilled holes) of the fibre remains an air/silica index-guiding structure. When the hybrid PCF is bent, its bandgaps gradually narrowed, resulted from the shifts of the bandgap edges. The bandgap edges had distinct bend-sensitivities when the hybrid PCF was bent toward different directions. Especially, the bandgaps are hardly affected when the half-filled PCF was bent toward the fluid-filled region. Such unique bend properties could be used to monitor simultaneously the bend directions and the curvature of the engineering structures.

  11. Gradient porous electrode architectures for rechargeable metal-air batteries

    DOEpatents

    Dudney, Nancy J.; Klett, James W.; Nanda, Jagjit; Narula, Chaitanya Kumar; Pannala, Sreekanth

    2016-03-22

    A cathode for a metal air battery includes a cathode structure having pores. The cathode structure has a metal side and an air side. The porosity decreases from the air side to the metal side. A metal air battery and a method of making a cathode for a metal air battery are also disclosed.

  12. Probing the structure and porosity of the lunar highlands crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soderblom, Jason M.; Evans, Alexander J.; Johnson, Brandon C.; Melosh, H. Jay; Miljković, Katarina; Phillips, Roger J.; Andrews-Hanna, Jeffrey C.; Milbury, Colleen; Neumann, Gregory A.; Nimmo, Francis; Smith, David E.; Solomon, Sean C.; Sori, Michael M.; Thomason, Carver J.; Wieczorek, Mark A.; Zuber, Maria T.

    2015-04-01

    Impact cratering is held to be the primary mechanism responsible for regulating porosity in primordial planetary lithospheres, increasing porosity via fracturing and dilatant bulking and decreasing porosity via localized heating and compaction. Constraints on these processes, however, are limited to gravity profiles of four lunar craters and gravity and seismic observations of ~50 terrestrial craters, many of which have been substantially modified by erosion and weathering. The Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) mission has afforded unprecedented insight into the structure of the lithosphere of the Moon. We use a Bouguer-corrected GRAIL gravity field to investigate the porosity associated with ~1200 complex lunar highlands craters. We find that the Bouguer anomaly (BA) of these craters is generally negative and scales inversely with crater size, implying that larger impacts result in more extensive fracturing and dilatant bulking. The BA of craters larger than ~93 km is independent of crater diameter, indicating that impact-generated porosity is truncated at depth. Considerable variability in the BA of craters is observed. Some craters, in fact, exhibit positive Bouguer anomalies. We find that positive values of the residual BA, the average BA within the crater rim less the average BA within an outer annulus from the outer flank of the rim to two crater radii from the crater center, correlate with high porosity in the surrounding crust. Our analysis shows that, whereas early impacts generally increased crustal porosity, when crustal porosity becomes too high, impacts reduce porosity, leading to the concept of a steady-state porosity, which we estimate to be ~15±1% for the lunar highlands. Knowledge of the extent and variability of crustal porosity is critical to understanding the thermal and geologic evolution of planetary bodies and to the ancient ecology of Earth.

  13. Porosity and Health: Perspective of Traditional Persian Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Tafazoli, Vahid; Nimrouzi, Majid; Daneshfard, Babak

    2016-01-01

    Background: The authors of this manuscript aimed to show the importance of porosity and condensation in health according to traditional Persian medicine (TPM) with consideration of new evidence in conventional medicine. Methods: Cardinal traditional medical and pharmacological texts were searched for the traditional terms of takhalkhol (porosity) and takassof (condensity) focused on preventive methods. The findings were classified and compared with new medical findings. Results: According to traditional Persian medicine, porosity and condensity are the two crucial items that contribute to human health. Somatotype is a taxonomy based on embryonic development, which may be considered in parallel with porosity and condensation. However, these terms are not completely the same. There are many causes for acquired porosity comprising hot weather, too much intercourse, rage, starvation, and heavy exercises. In general, porosity increases the risk of diseases as it makes the body organs vulnerable to external hot and cold weather. On the other hand, the porose organs are more susceptible to accumulation of morbid matters because the cellular wastes cannot be evacuated in the normal way. There are some common points between traditional and conventional medicine in the context of porosity and condensity. The relation between diet and somatotype is an example. Conclusion: Condensity and porosity are the two basic items cited in the TPM resources and contribute to health maintenance and disease prevention of body organs. Creating a balance between these two states in different body organs, strongly contributes to disease prevention, treatment and diminishing chronic diseases period. Choosing proper modality including diet, drug therapy, and manual therapy depends on the amount porosity and stiffness of the considered organ and the preferred porosity of the affected organ keeping in a normal healthy state. PMID:27516679

  14. Porosity and permeability of tuffs from the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Soeder, D.J.; Dishart, J.E. )

    1992-01-01

    An investigation of the intrinsic flow properties of the rock matrix in the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, was carried out by performing single-phase water or air permeability measurements on about 150 selected samples representing all of the different rock units in the unsaturated zone. Pores were studied by examining thin sections of samples impregnated with fluorescent-dyed epoxy. Yucca Mountain is made up of volcanic tuff, which occurs in three distinct textures: welded, nonwelded, and bedded. Welded tuffs occur in two thick, rhyolitic, pyroclastic flow units. In thin sections, the typical welded-tuff pore structure appears to consist of isolated voids interconnected by microfractures. Porosities average about 10 percent, and matrix permeabilities are generally 1 microdarcy or less. The nonwelded tuffs occur in several thin pyroclastic flows between and below the two main welded units. Porosities average about 20 to 30%, and permeabilities are in the microdarcy to millidarcy range. The nonwelded tuffs appear in thin sections to have an open, well-interconnected pore system with significant intragranular porosity in pumice and lithic grains. These tuffs often contain various amounts of secondary clay and zeolite minerals in the pores, which may account for the wide range in permeabilities. The bedded tuffs consist of friable, low-density volcanic ash with porosities of 50% or more and permeabilities often above 1 darcy. These tuffs are the most porous and permeable rock units in the unsaturated zone, and contain large intergranular pores and significant intragranular porosity in frothy pumice clasts. Results of this investigation will help improve the understanding of groundwater movement through the unsaturated zone.

  15. Defining filled and empty space: reassessing the filled space illusion for active touch and vision.

    PubMed

    Collier, Elizabeth S; Lawson, Rebecca

    2016-09-01

    In the filled space illusion, an extent filled with gratings is estimated as longer than an equivalent extent that is apparently empty. However, researchers do not seem to have carefully considered the terms filled and empty when describing this illusion. Specifically, for active touch, smooth, solid surfaces have typically been used to represent empty space. Thus, it is not known whether comparing gratings to truly empty space (air) during active exploration by touch elicits the same illusionary effect. In Experiments 1 and 2, gratings were estimated as longer if they were compared to smooth, solid surfaces rather than being compared to truly empty space. Consistent with this, Experiment 3 showed that empty space was perceived as longer than solid surfaces when the two were compared directly. Together these results are consistent with the hypothesis that, for touch, the standard filled space illusion only occurs if gratings are compared to smooth, solid surfaces and that it may reverse if gratings are compared to empty space. Finally, Experiment 4 showed that gratings were estimated as longer than both solid and empty extents in vision, so the direction of the filled space illusion in vision was not affected by the nature of the comparator. These results are discussed in relation to the dual nature of active touch. PMID:27233286

  16. Electroactive thermoset shape memory polymer nanocomposite filled with nanocarbon powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leng, Jinsong; Lan, Xin; Liu, Yanju; Du, Shanyi

    2009-07-01

    This paper concerns an electroactive thermoset styrene-based shape memory polymer (SMP) nanocomposite filled with nanosized (30 nm) carbon powders. With an increase of the incorporated nanocarbon powders of the SMP composite, its glass transition temperature (Tg) decreases and storage modulus increases. Due to the high micro-porosity and homogeneous distributions of nanocarbon powders in the SMP matrix, the SMP composite shows good electrical conductivity with a percolation of about 3.8%. This percolation threshold is slightly lower than that of many other carbon-based conductive polymer composites. Consequently, due to the relatively high electrical conductivity, a sample filled with 10 vol% nanocarbon powders shows a good electroactive shape recovery performance heating by a voltage of 30 V above a transition temperature of 56-69 °C.

  17. Tunable-Porosity Membranes From Discrete Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Marchetti, Patrizia; Mechelhoff, Martin; Livingston, Andrew G

    2015-01-01

    Thin film composite membranes were prepared through a facile single-step wire-wound rod coating procedure in which internally crosslinked poly(styrene-co-butadiene) polymer nanoparticles self-assembled to form a thin film on a hydrophilic ultrafiltration support. This nanoparticle film provided a defect-free separation layer 130-150 nm thick, which was highly permeable and able to withstand aggressive pH conditions beyond the range of available commercial membranes. The nanoparticles were found to coalesce to form a rubbery film when heated above their glass transition temperature (Tg). The retention properties of the novel membrane were strongly affected by charge repulsion, due to the negative charge of the hydroxyl functionalized nanoparticles. Porosity was tuned by annealing the membranes at different temperatures, below and above the nanoparticle Tg. This enabled fabrication of membranes with varying performance. Nanofiltration properties were achieved with a molecular weight cut-off below 500 g mol(-1) and a low fouling tendency. Interestingly, after annealing above Tg, memory of the interstitial spaces between the nanoparticles persisted. This memory led to significant water permeance, in marked contrast to the almost impermeable films cast from a solution of the same polymer. PMID:26626565

  18. Tunable-Porosity Membranes From Discrete Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchetti, Patrizia; Mechelhoff, Martin; Livingston, Andrew G.

    2015-12-01

    Thin film composite membranes were prepared through a facile single-step wire-wound rod coating procedure in which internally crosslinked poly(styrene-co-butadiene) polymer nanoparticles self-assembled to form a thin film on a hydrophilic ultrafiltration support. This nanoparticle film provided a defect-free separation layer 130-150 nm thick, which was highly permeable and able to withstand aggressive pH conditions beyond the range of available commercial membranes. The nanoparticles were found to coalesce to form a rubbery film when heated above their glass transition temperature (Tg). The retention properties of the novel membrane were strongly affected by charge repulsion, due to the negative charge of the hydroxyl functionalized nanoparticles. Porosity was tuned by annealing the membranes at different temperatures, below and above the nanoparticle Tg. This enabled fabrication of membranes with varying performance. Nanofiltration properties were achieved with a molecular weight cut-off below 500 g mol-1 and a low fouling tendency. Interestingly, after annealing above Tg, memory of the interstitial spaces between the nanoparticles persisted. This memory led to significant water permeance, in marked contrast to the almost impermeable films cast from a solution of the same polymer.

  19. Tunable-Porosity Membranes From Discrete Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Marchetti, Patrizia; Mechelhoff, Martin; Livingston, Andrew G.

    2015-01-01

    Thin film composite membranes were prepared through a facile single-step wire-wound rod coating procedure in which internally crosslinked poly(styrene-co-butadiene) polymer nanoparticles self-assembled to form a thin film on a hydrophilic ultrafiltration support. This nanoparticle film provided a defect-free separation layer 130–150 nm thick, which was highly permeable and able to withstand aggressive pH conditions beyond the range of available commercial membranes. The nanoparticles were found to coalesce to form a rubbery film when heated above their glass transition temperature (Tg). The retention properties of the novel membrane were strongly affected by charge repulsion, due to the negative charge of the hydroxyl functionalized nanoparticles. Porosity was tuned by annealing the membranes at different temperatures, below and above the nanoparticle Tg. This enabled fabrication of membranes with varying performance. Nanofiltration properties were achieved with a molecular weight cut-off below 500 g mol−1 and a low fouling tendency. Interestingly, after annealing above Tg, memory of the interstitial spaces between the nanoparticles persisted. This memory led to significant water permeance, in marked contrast to the almost impermeable films cast from a solution of the same polymer. PMID:26626565

  20. Changes in porosity and organic matter phase distribution monitored by NMR relaxometry following hydrous pyrolysis under uniaxial confinement

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Washburn, Kathryn E.; Birdwell, Justin E.; Lewan, Michael D.; Miller, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Artificial maturation methods are used to induce changes in source rock thermal maturity without the uncertainties that arise when comparing natural samples from a particular basin that often represent different levels of maturation and different lithofacies. A novel uniaxial confinement clamp was used on Woodford Shale cores in hydrous pyrolysis experiments to limit sample expansion by simulating the effect of overburden present during thermal maturation in natural systems. These samples were then subjected to X-ray computed tomography (X-CT) imaging and low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (LF-NMR) relaxometry measurements. LF-NMR relaxometry is a noninvasive technique commonly used to measure porosity and pore-size distributions in fluid-filled porous media, but may also measure hydrogen present in hydrogen-bearing organic solids. Standard T1 and T2 relaxation distributions were determined and two dimensional T1-T2 correlation measurements were performed on the Woodford Shale cores. The T1-T2 correlations facilitate resolution of organic phases in the system. The changes observed in NMR-relaxation times correspond to bitumen and lighter hydrocarbon production that occur as source rock organic matter matures. The LF-NMR porosities of the core samples at maximum oil generation are significantly higher than porosities measured by other methods. This discrepancy likely arises from the measurement of highly viscous organic constituents in addition to fluid-filled porosity. An unconfined sample showed shorter relaxation times and lower porosity. This difference is attributed to the lack of fractures observed in the unconfined sample by X-CT.

  1. Porosity formation and gas bubble retention in laser metal deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, G. K. L.; Jarfors, A. E. W.; Bi, G.; Zheng, H. Y.

    2009-11-01

    One of the inherent problems associated with laser metal deposition using gas-assisted powder transfer is the formation of porosity, which can be detrimental to the mechanical properties of the bulk material. In this work, a comprehensive investigation of porosity is carried out using gas atomised Inconel 718 powder. In the analysis, a clear distinction is made between two types of porosity; namely lack of fusion and gas porosity. The results show that the two types of porosity are attributed by different factors. The gas porosity, which is more difficult to eliminate than the lack of fusion, can be as high as 0.7%. The study shows that the gas porosity is dependent on the process parameters and the melt pool dynamics. The flotation of entrapped gas bubbles was analysed, showing that in a stationary melt pool the gas would be retained by Marangoni-driven flow. The overall Marangoni-driven flow of the melt pool is in the order of five times higher than the flotation effect, and this is the reason why the melt pool geometry would tend to dominate the flow direction of the gas bubbles. Through optimisation, the gas porosity can be reduced to 0.037%.

  2. The Porosity of Eros and Implications for Its Internal Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkison, S. L.; Robinson, M. S.; Thomas, P. C.; Veverka, J.; McCoy, T. J.; Murchie, S. L.; Prockter, L.; Yeomans, D.

    2001-01-01

    We estimate the porosity of Eros to be between 21-33%. Based on this porosity range and morphologic observations of the surface, we suggest that the asteroid is heavily fractured (but not a rubble pile). Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  3. Casting Porosity-Free Grain Refined Magnesium Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Schwam, David

    2013-08-12

    The objective of this project was to identify the root causes for micro-porosity in magnesium alloy castings and recommend remedies that can be implemented in production. The findings confirm the key role played by utilizing optimal gating and risering practices in minimizing porosity in magnesium castings. 

  4. Water uptake in biochars: The roles of porosity and hydrophobicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    We assessed the effects of porosity and hydrophobicity on water uptake by biochars. Biochars were produced from two feedstocks (hazelnut shells and Douglas fir chips) at three production temperatures (370 °C, 500 °C, and 620 °C). To distinguish the effects of porosity from the ...

  5. The dynamic response of carbon fiber-filled polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dattelbaum, D. M.; Gustavsen, R. L.; Sheffield, S. A.; Stahl, D. B.; Scharff, R. J.; Rigg, P. A.; Furmanski, J.; Orler, E. B.; Patterson, B.; Coe, J. D.

    2012-08-01

    The dynamic (shock) responses of two carbon fiber-filled polymer composites have been quantified using gas gun-driven plate impact experimentation. The first composite is a filament-wound, highly unidirectional carbon fiber-filled epoxy with a high degree of porosity. The second composite is a chopped carbon fiber- and graphite-filled phenolic resin with little-to-no porosity. Hugoniot data are presented for the carbon fiber-epoxy (CE) composite to 18.6 GPa in the through-thickness direction, in which the shock propagates normal to the fibers. The data are best represented by a linear Rankine-Hugoniot fit: Us = 2.87 + 1.17 ×up(ρ0 = 1.536g/cm3). The shock wave structures were found to be highly heterogeneous, both due to the anisotropic nature of the fiber-epoxy microstructure, and the high degree of void volume. Plate impact experiments were also performed on a carbon fiber-filled phenolic (CP) composite to much higher shock input pressures, exceeding the reactants-to-products transition common to polymers. The CP was found to be stiffer than the filament-wound CE in the unreacted Hugoniot regime, and transformed to products near the shock-driven reaction threshold on the principal Hugoniot previously shown for the phenolic binder itself. [19] On-going research is focused on interrogating the direction-dependent dyanamic response and dynamic failure strength (spall) for the CE composite in the TT and 0∘ (fiber) directions.

  6. Advanced Aerodynamic Design of Passive Porosity Control Effectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Craig A.; Viken, Sally A.; Wood, Richard M.; Bauer, Steven X. S.

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes aerodynamic design work aimed at developing a passive porosity control effector system for a generic tailless fighter aircraft. As part of this work, a computational design tool was developed and used to layout passive porosity effector systems for longitudinal and lateral-directional control at a low-speed, high angle of attack condition. Aerodynamic analysis was conducted using the NASA Langley computational fluid dynamics code USM3D, in conjunction with a newly formulated surface boundary condition for passive porosity. Results indicate that passive porosity effectors can provide maneuver control increments that equal and exceed those of conventional aerodynamic effectors for low-speed, high-alpha flight, with control levels that are a linear function of porous area. This work demonstrates the tremendous potential of passive porosity to yield simple control effector systems that have no external moving parts and will preserve an aircraft's fixed outer mold line.

  7. Probing soil and aquifer material porosity with nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinedi, Z. R.; Kabala, Z. J.; Skaggs, T. H.; Borchardt, D. B.; Lee, R. W. K.; Chang, A. C.

    1993-12-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation measurements were used to identify different characteristic porosity domains in soil and aquifer materials. The porosity distribution can be inferred from these measurements by a regularization method applicable to any nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation, or by an analytic method applicable only to multiexponential relaxations (D. Orazio et al., 1989). The porosity distribution obtained from NMR relaxation measurements strongly depends on the pore shape factor. For the Borden aquifer material, both the regularized and the analytic pore size distribution obtained from NMR relaxation measurements are consistent with those obtained by Ball et al. (1990) using Hg porosimetry and N2 adsorption. For the Eustis and the Webster soils, the measured porosity domains are qualitatively consistent with those expected based on their respective composition. Our findings suggest that due to the long time required to saturate fine pores, NMR measurements of porosity distribution that are collected at short saturation times are biased toward larger pore sizes.

  8. Results from a new Cocks-Ashby style porosity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, Nathan

    2015-06-01

    A new porosity evolution model will be described, along with preliminary results. The formulation makes use of a Cocks-Ashby style treatment of porosity kinetics that includes rate dependent flow in the mechanics of porosity growth. The porosity model is implemented in a framework that allows for a variety of strength models to be used for the matrix material, including ones with significant changes in rate sensitivity as a function of strain rate. Results of the effect of changing strain rate sensitivity on porosity evolution will be shown. The overall constitutive model update involves the coupled solution of a system of nonlinear equations - efficiency and robustness of the numerical implementation are significant issues. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 (LLNL-ABS-666658).

  9. Processing of thermal insulation materials with controlled porosity

    SciTech Connect

    Lyckfeldt, O.; Liden, E.; Carlsson, R.

    1995-08-01

    Slip-cast cordierite-based materials with reduced thermal conductivity have been manufactured with controlled introduction of porosity. The porosity was obtained by addition of different kinds of fillers (hollow Al-silicate spheres, paraffin, polystyrene, carbon black or starch particles). The processing and the ultimate thermal and mechanical properties were evaluated. The results showed that additions of corn or potato starch gave the most favourable concept, considering the processing and porosity control. A homogeneous distribution of spherical pores with the sizes 5-25 or 15-40 {mu}m was obtained after sintering. Slip-cast cordierite with 37% porosity had a thermal conductivity of 1.7 W/mK (compared with 3.7 W/mK for fully dense cordierite), and a bending strength above 50 MPa. The porosity effect correlated very well to theoretical models by Maxwell and, hence, the thermal conductivity of the porous ceramic material could be predicted.

  10. Noninvasive porosity measurement of biconvex tablets using terahertz pulses.

    PubMed

    Bawuah, Prince; Ervasti, Tuomas; Tan, Nicholas; Zeitler, J Axel; Ketolainen, Jarkko; Peiponen, Kai-Erik

    2016-07-25

    Biconvex pharmaceutical microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) compacts were investigated by the detection of terahertz (THz) pulse delay in the transmission measurement mode. The dimensions of the tablets were kept as constants but the porosity was a priori known variable. It is shown that the porosity of the biconvex compact has a linear correlation with the THz pulse delay. By constructing a calibration line between these two parameters (i.e. porosity and THz pulse delay), it is possible to non-invasively detect porosity of biconvex tablets. We suggest that this preliminary study could be the starting point of in-depth future studies on the screening of porosity and related properties of real biconvex pharmaceutical tablets using terahertz sensing techniques. PMID:27289013

  11. Filling an Unvented Cryogenic Tank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, Phillip; Willen, Gary S.

    1987-01-01

    Slow-cooling technique enables tank lacking top vent to be filled with cryogenic liquid. New technique: pressure buildup prevented through condensation of accumulating gas resulting in condensate being added to bulk liquid. Filling method developed for vibration test on vacuum-insulated spherical tank containing liquid hydrogen.

  12. Gas-filled hohlraum fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Salazar, M.A.; Gobby, P.L.; Foreman, L.R.; Bush, H. Jr.; Gomez, V.M.; Moore, J.E.; Stone, G.F.

    1995-09-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) researchers have fabricated and fielded gas-filled hohlraums at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Nova laser. Fill pressures of 1--5 atmospheres have been typical. We describe the production of the parts, their assembly and fielding. Emphasis is placed on the production of gas-tight polyimide windows and the fielding apparatus and procedure.

  13. Deep to shallow kaolinite relocation generates porosity

    SciTech Connect

    Mc Laughlin, O.M.; Mc Aulay, G.E.; Haszeldine, R.S. )

    1996-01-01

    Eocene and Paleocene sands make up the reservoir in the West Brae Field, which is located on the Fladen Ground Spur, Quadrant 16/7a, UK North Sea. The Tertiary sandstones were derived from a mixed source area of sediments and volcanics. Early carbonate cementation and late dissolution of carbonate cement and feldspars has resulted in sandstones possessing excellent poroperm characteristics, similar to the high quality upper reservoir sandstones described in the South, Central and North Brae fields. The diagenetic feature which most adversely affects these sandstones is the presence of large amounts of authigenic, kaolinite. Quantities of up to 13% kaolinite have been reported for the West Brae reservoir, an unusually high volume considering its current depth of 7,700ft. In contrast, the South, Central and North Brae fields exhibit only 1-3% diagenetic kaolinite, even though up to 8% feldspar dissolution porosity has been recorded. This study tests the hypothesis that feldspar dissolution at 12,000 ft in the Upper Jurassic reservoirs of South, Central and North Brae, has enabled aluminum to be exported from the deep Jurassic sandstones, to form kaolinite in the shallow Tertiary sandstones of West Brae. As Jurassic derived fluids have a distinct radiogenic: strontium signature, in contrast with Paleocene fluids which have an unradiogenic Sr signature, Sr isotope studies provide a test for this hypothesis. [sup 87]Sr/[sup 86]Sr analyses of the clays have been carried out to ascertain if their signature has been derived from dissolution of Jurassic minerals at depth, or if the signature is locally derived from Palaeocene sediments.

  14. Deep to shallow kaolinite relocation generates porosity

    SciTech Connect

    Mc Laughlin, O.M.; Mc Aulay, G.E.; Haszeldine, R.S.

    1996-12-31

    Eocene and Paleocene sands make up the reservoir in the West Brae Field, which is located on the Fladen Ground Spur, Quadrant 16/7a, UK North Sea. The Tertiary sandstones were derived from a mixed source area of sediments and volcanics. Early carbonate cementation and late dissolution of carbonate cement and feldspars has resulted in sandstones possessing excellent poroperm characteristics, similar to the high quality upper reservoir sandstones described in the South, Central and North Brae fields. The diagenetic feature which most adversely affects these sandstones is the presence of large amounts of authigenic, kaolinite. Quantities of up to 13% kaolinite have been reported for the West Brae reservoir, an unusually high volume considering its current depth of 7,700ft. In contrast, the South, Central and North Brae fields exhibit only 1-3% diagenetic kaolinite, even though up to 8% feldspar dissolution porosity has been recorded. This study tests the hypothesis that feldspar dissolution at 12,000 ft in the Upper Jurassic reservoirs of South, Central and North Brae, has enabled aluminum to be exported from the deep Jurassic sandstones, to form kaolinite in the shallow Tertiary sandstones of West Brae. As Jurassic derived fluids have a distinct radiogenic: strontium signature, in contrast with Paleocene fluids which have an unradiogenic Sr signature, Sr isotope studies provide a test for this hypothesis. {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr analyses of the clays have been carried out to ascertain if their signature has been derived from dissolution of Jurassic minerals at depth, or if the signature is locally derived from Palaeocene sediments.

  15. Airborne contamination during blow-fill-seal pharmaceutical production.

    PubMed

    Whyte, W; Matheis, W; Dean-Netcher, M; Edwards, A

    1998-01-01

    The routes of airborne contamination, during Blow-Fill-Seal (BFS) production, were studied using tracer gas, particles and bacteria. The prevention of airborne contamination, by the air shower at the point of fill, was effective (> 99.2% efficient). However, microbe-carrying particles could gain access, by deposition or air exchange, when the containers were cut open and before they shuttled under the protection of the air shower. The use of SF6 tracer gas demonstrated that when the air shower was not on, 50% of the air within the containers came from the area round the machine. When the air shower was switched on, only about 5% of the air came from the surroundings. Airborne microbial contamination of containers is in proportion to: the number of airborne microbes around the machine, the time the container is open, the neck area and the amount of air left within the container. The likely microbial contamination rate can be calculated from a model incorporating these variables. Microbial contamination of containers during BFS manufacturing is normally very low, but by increasing the naturally occurring bacteria in the air of the production rooms by about 100-fold, it was possible to verify the accuracy of this model. The contamination model agrees well with the observation that microbial contamination levels of between 1 in 10(5) and in 10(7) will be found when small containers (< 10 ml) are filled in conventionally ventilated rooms. To achieve similar contamination rates when filling of larger bottles, it is likely that unidirectional flow, or barrier technology will be required. PMID:9691671

  16. Porosity evolution, contact metamorphism, and fluid flow in the host basalts of the Skaergaard magma-hydrothermal system

    SciTech Connect

    Manning, C.E.

    1989-01-01

    Temporal and spatial variations in porosity during contact metamorphism of the basaltic country rocks to the Skaergaard intrusion in East Greenland resulted in a complex hydrological evolution of the metamorphic aureole. Contrasts in macroscopic porosities in different lithologies led to differences in mineralogical, bulk chemical, and oxygen isotopic alteration, and units with greater macroscopic porosities record larger fluid flux during metamorphism. Calculated Darcy velocities indicate that the horizontal component of fluid flow in the aureole was toward the intrusive contact. In the actinolite + chlorite zone time-integrated fluid flux was higher in aa units ({approximately} 300 kg cm{sup {minus}2}) than in massive units ({approximately} 130 kg cm{sup {minus}2}). Approximately equal time-integrated fluxes of respectively 4 and 5 kg cm{sup {minus}2} in aa and massive units in the pyroxene zone indicate that the volume of fluid flow in the higher grade rocks was independent of primary porosity. These results are consistent with inward fluid migration in the actinolite + chlorite zone through an open network of pores whose abundance varied as a function of primary lava morphology. At higher metamorphic grades fluid fluxes were lower and were independent of primary porosity, probably as a consequence of (1) channelization of fluids due to more extensive pore filling and (2) decreasing horizontal component of flow due to upward migration of fluids near the contact. The results of this study indicate that explicit provision for rock porosity aids interpretation of the nature of fluid flow during contact metamorphism in magma-hydrothermal systems.

  17. Effect of quartz overgrowth precipitation on the multiscale porosity of sandstone: A (U)SANS and imaging analysis

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Anovitz, Lawrence M.; Cole, David R.; Jackson, Andrew J.; Rother, Gernot; Littrell, Kenneth C.; Allard, Lawrence F.; Pollington, Anthony D.; Wesolowski, David J.

    2015-06-01

    We have performed a series of experiments to understand the effects of quartz overgrowths on nanometer to centimeter scale pore structures of sandstones. Blocks from two samples of St. Peter Sandstone with different initial porosities (5.8 and 18.3%) were reacted from 3 days to 7.5 months at 100 and 200 °C in aqueous solutions supersaturated with respect to quartz by reaction with amorphous silica. Porosity in the resultant samples was analyzed using small and ultrasmall angle neutron scattering and scanning electron microscope/backscattered electron (SEM/BSE)-based image-scale processing techniques.Significant changes were observed in the multiscale pore structures. By three days much ofmore » the overgrowth in the low-porosity sample dissolved away. The reason for this is uncertain, but the overgrowths can be clearly distinguished from the original core grains in the BSE images. At longer times the larger pores are observed to fill with plate-like precipitates. As with the unreacted sandstones, porosity is a step function of size. Grain boundaries are typically fractal, but no evidence of mass fractal or fuzzy interface behavior was observed suggesting a structural difference between chemical and clastic sediments. After the initial loss of the overgrowths, image scale porosity (>~1 cm) decreases with time. Submicron porosity (typically ~25% of the total) is relatively constant or slightly decreasing in absolute terms, but the percent change is significant. Fractal dimensions decrease at larger scales, and increase at smaller scales with increased precipitation.« less

  18. Porosity as a significant factor for asteroid survival

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, G. J.

    2014-07-01

    Most asteroids, for which porosities have been inferred, have porosities ranging from 20 % to > 50 %, with a mean around 30 % porosity (Britt et al. 2002). Since porous targets react differently to hypervelocity impact cratering and disruption than non-porous targets of the same mass, porosity is likely to play a role in asteroid survival. Measurements show the threshold collisional specific energy, Q^*_D, required to produce a disruption with the largest fragment equal to one-half the original target mass is much higher for porous targets (Table). Ordinary chondrite meteorites, with a mean porosity of ˜9 % (Britt et al. 2002), disrupted at the NASA Ames Vertical Gun Range (AVGR), required almost twice as much impactor kinetic energy per unit target mass to produce an equivalent disruption as did targets of low-porosity terrestrial basalt or granodiorite (Flynn and Durda 2004). Limited data from hypervelocity disruption of three CM2 carbonaceous chondrites (Flynn et al. 2009), all to the right of the ordinary chondrite points on a Q^* vs. M_L/M_T plot, indicate CM2 meteorites, with a mean porosity of 23 % (Consolmagno et al. 2008), have even higher Q^*_D, ˜1900 to 2100 J/kg. The CI carbonaceous chondrites, e.g., Orgueil, with a density of 1.5 g/cm^3 (Britt and Consolmagno 2003) and porosity of 35 % (Consolmagno et al. 2008), are the most porous known meteorites, approaching the C-type asteroid Mathilde, which has a bulk density of 1.3 and > 50 % porosity (Britt et al., 2002). However, the CI meteorites are so scarce than none have yet been studied in impact experiments. As an extreme end member for high-porosity, rigid targets, Flynn et al. (2014) disrupted eleven terrestrial pumice targets, obtaining a Q^*_D of ˜2300 J/kg. However, porosity increases the target's cross section. The ''Required Disruption Energy'' to produce a largest fragment mass equal to one- half the target mass for spherical asteroids of 10-m, 1-km, and 100-km radius having the same physical

  19. Correlation between the dielectric constant and porosity of nanoporous silica thin films deposited by the gas evaporation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Si, J. J.; Ono, H.; Uchida, K.; Nozaki, S.; Morisaki, H.; Itoh, N.

    2001-11-01

    Nanoporous silica thin films with low dielectric constants were deposited by gas evaporation of SiO2 nanoparticles in an argon atmosphere. With increasing gas pressure during the evaporation, the dielectric constant decreases, while the porosity increases. The correlation between the dielectric constant and porosity is well modeled by a serial connection of two capacitors, one with air and the other with SiO2 as the dielectric medium. This suggests that the dielectric constant of the nanoporous silica thin film using the gas evaporation technique is more effectively lowered by forming "uniformly" distributed voids of closed gaps than those of the nanoporous silica films with pores extending from the back to front surface. Therefore, the former nanoporous silica thin film requires less porosity to obtain a low dielectric constant and is regarded as an ideal low-k material.

  20. Soil surface roughness and porosity under different tillage systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Gonzalez, J.; Saa-Requejo, A.; Gómez, J. A.; Valencia, J. L.; Zarco, P.; Tarquis, A. M.

    2012-04-01

    Both soil porosity and surface elevation can be altered by tillage operation. Even though the surface porosity is an important parameter of a tilled field, however, no practical technique for rapid and non-contact measurement of surface porosity has been developed yet. On the contrary, the surface elevation of tilled soil can be quickly determined with a laser profiler. Working under the assumption that the surface elevation of a tilled field is a complicated superposition of the soil terrain profile at a larger-scale and the roughness at a fine-scale, this study included three aspects: (i) to establish an index (Roughness Index, RI) at a fine-scale to associate the surface roughness with porosity; (ii) to examine the correlation between surface porosity and the proposed RI by three types of tillage treatment in the field; and (iii) to check the scaling/multiscaling behavior among different grid sizes of calculating RI on predicting surface porosity. Consequently, the statistical results from each tilled plot show a strong correlation between the surface porosity and the defined RI in an early stage (ca. 2 days) after tillage. Acknowledgements Funding provided by CEIGRAM (Research Centre for the Management of Agricultural and Environmental Risks)and Spanish Ministerio de Ciencia e Innovación (MICINN) through project AGL2010-21501/AGR is greatly appreciated.

  1. Porosity in collapsible Ball Grid Array solder joints

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, C.A. |

    1998-05-01

    Ball Grid Array (BGA) technology has taken off in recent years due to the increased need for high interconnect density. Opposite to all the advantages BGA packages offer, porosity in collapsible BGA solder joints is often a major concern in the reliability of such packages. The effect of pores on the strength of collapsible BGA solder-joints was studied by manufacturing samples with different degrees of porosity and testing them under a shear load. It was found that the shear strength of the solder joints decreased in a linear fashion with increasing porosity. Failure occurred by internal necking of the interpore matrix. It was confirmed that entrapment of flux residues leads to porosity by manufacturing fluxless samples in a specially made furnace, and comparing them with samples assembled using flux. Also, contamination of Au electrodeposits (in substrate metallization) was determined to cause significant porosity. It was found that hard-Au (Co hardened Au) electrodeposits produce high degrees of porosity even in the absence of flux. Finally, increasing the time the solder spends in the molten state was proven to successfully decrease porosity.

  2. Effect of Porosity on Strength Distribution of Microcrystalline Cellulose.

    PubMed

    Keleṣ, Özgür; Barcenas, Nicholas P; Sprys, Daniel H; Bowman, Keith J

    2015-12-01

    Fracture strength of pharmaceutical compacts varies even for nominally identical samples, which directly affects compaction, comminution, and tablet dosage forms. However, the relationships between porosity and mechanical behavior of compacts are not clear. Here, the effects of porosity on fracture strength and fracture statistics of microcrystalline cellulose compacts were investigated through diametral compression tests. Weibull modulus, a key parameter in Weibull statistics, was observed to decrease with increasing porosity from 17 to 56 vol.%, based on eight sets of compacts at different porosity levels, each set containing ∼ 50 samples, a total of 407 tests. Normal distribution fits better to fracture data for porosity less than 20 vol.%, whereas Weibull distribution is a better fit in the limit of highest porosity. Weibull moduli from 840 unique finite element simulations of isotropic porous materials were compared to experimental Weibull moduli from this research and results on various pharmaceutical materials. Deviations from Weibull statistics are observed. The effect of porosity on fracture strength can be described by a recently proposed micromechanics-based formula. PMID:26022545

  3. Friction Factor Characterization for High-Porosity Random Fiber Regenerators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thieme, Lanny G.

    2001-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center, the Department of Energy (DOE), and Stirling Technology Company (STC) of Kennewick, Washington are developing a Stirling convertor for a high-efficiency Stirling Radioisotope Power System to provide electric power for NASA Space Science Missions. STC is developing the 55-We Technology Demonstration Convertor (TDC) under contract to DOE. Steady-flow tests were completed to determine the friction factor for the high-porosity regenerators that are used in the TDC. STC fabricated a flow test fixture and three random fiber regenerator test samples, one each at approximately 80, 88, and 96 percent porosities. The flow tests were then completed by the NASA Glenn Flow Calibration Laboratory, and the data reduced to Reynolds number and friction factor. The results showed that the 80 and 88 percent porosity samples had similar characteristics while the 96 percent porosity sample had significantly higher friction factors for given Reynolds numbers compared to the samples with lower porosities. Comparisons were also made between the test data and existing correlations. STC used this data to derive a modified regenerator friction factor correlation for use in the Stirling design code GLIMPS for porosities greater than 88 percent. Using this new correlation, the final optimized regenerator design porosity was reduced from 96 to 90 percent.

  4. A feasible research of rock porosity and water saturation impact on audio-magnetotelluric propagation in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Z.; Liu, J.

    2015-12-01

    Abstract: Although various factors have impact on the resistivity of subsurface rock formation, in depth range of general electrical prospecting, the conductive actions of rocks are basically realized relying on the aqueous solutions filled in the pores. Therefore, quantitatively studying the impact of the water level on rock resistivity is important to analyze and classify strata, investigate the underground structures. In this research, we proposed a feasible research on building electric property rock formation models with different porosity and water saturation based on theories of two-phase media. The propagation of audio-magnetotelluric (AMT) waves is simulated by using finite-difference (FD) scheme, and theoretic resistivity distribution is calculated on account of the response of AMT. According to a sequence of synthetic examples, through comparing and analyzing the simulated results with various porosity and water saturation respectively, we discuss the impact on layers resistivity while porosity and water saturation of rock stratum are changing. The results shows the extent that the mentioned factors can have impact on the propagation of AMT waves. Key words: audio-magnetotelluric modeling, two-phase media, porosity, water saturation, finite-difference

  5. A thermo-hydro-mechanical coupled model in local thermal non-equilibrium for fractured HDR reservoir with double porosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelet, R.; Loret, B.; Khalili, N.

    2012-07-01

    The constitutive thermo-hydro-mechanical equations of fractured media are embodied in the theory of mixtures applied to three-phase poroelastic media. The solid skeleton contains two distinct cavities filled with the same fluid. Each of the three phases is endowed with its own temperature. The constitutive relations governing the thermomechanical behavior, generalized diffusion and transfer are structured by, and satisfy, the dissipation inequality. The cavities exchange both mass and energy. Mass exchanges are driven by the jump in scaled chemical potential, and energy exchanges by the jump in coldness. The finite element approximation uses the displacement vector, the two fluid pressures and the three temperatures as primary variables. It is used to analyze a generic hot dry rock geothermal reservoir. Three parameters of the model are calibrated from the thermal outputs of Fenton Hill and Rosemanowes HDR reservoirs. The calibrated model is next applied to simulate circulation tests at the Fenton Hill HDR reservoir. The finer thermo-hydro-mechanical response provided by the dual porosity model with respect to a single porosity model is highlighted in a parameter analysis. Emphasis is put on the influence of the fracture spacing, on the effective stress response and on the permeation of the fluid into the porous blocks. The dual porosity model yields a thermally induced effective stress that is less tensile compared with the single porosity response. This effect becomes significant for large fracture spacings. In agreement with field data, fluid loss is observed to be high initially and to decrease with time.

  6. Convective Mixing in Porosity Waves during Melt Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, J.; Hesse, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    Models of trace element partitioning during non-reactive, one-dimensional melt migration predict the decoupling of tracers with different partition coefficients (e.g. La and Sm)(Navon & Stolper 1987, DePaolo 1996 Liang 2008). Such decoupling is often not observed in igneous products at the surface. We propose a numeric melt migration model derived from first principles to aid our understanding of mixing during melt migration in the mantle. We assert that circulation within a porosity wave could provide an explanation for this disparity. Buoyancy drives regions of elevated melt fraction through the overlying mantle as porosity waves (Richter & McKenzie 1984, Spiegelman 1993). Within those waves we expect porous flow to lead to the transport and mixing of distinct peridotite-derived lithologies (Kelemen 1997). A consequence of this mixing includes partitioning of trace elements in the partially molten, mixing lithologies. We begin our numeric experiment by imposing a partially molten region in a nearly impermeable background. As the partially molten region rises, the buoyant melt races to the front of the porosity wave. Once the melt reaches the edge of the porosity wave, it encounters an extreme drop in permeability. Though the melt within the porosity wave may move faster than the wave itself, the permeable region confines the melt. Since the melt cannot outrun the porosity wave, it would pool at the edge of the impermeable region. However, the porosity wave continues to rise around the melt. This causes the melt to appear to double back into the more permeable region within the porosity wave. After "turning back", the buoyant melt hugs the low permeability wall of the porosity wave as it continues to migrate. Near the bottom of the porosity wave the melt changes direction and begins to move upward again. The porosity wave and melt create a convective mixing cell. Modeled circulation of melt within the porosity wave could explain why the linear decoupling of trace

  7. Acute sensitivity of landslide rates to initial soil porosity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iverson, R.M.; Reid, M.E.; Iverson, N.R.; LaHusen, R.G.; Logan, M.; Mann, J.E.; Brien, D.L.

    2000-01-01

    Some landslides move imperceptibly downslope, whereas others accelerate catastrophically. Experimental landslides triggered by rising pore water pressure moved at sharply contrasting rates due to small differences in initial porosity. Wet sandy soil with porosity of about 0.5 contracted during slope failure, partially liquefied, and accelerated within 1 second to speeds over I meter per second. The same soil with porosity of about 0.4 dilated during failure and supped episodically at rates averaging 0.002 meter per second. Repeated slip episodes were induced by gradually rising pore water pressure and were arrested by pore dilation and attendant pore pressure decline.

  8. Porosity in Ocean Racing Yacht Composites: a Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baley, Christophe; Lan, Marine; Davies, Peter; Cartié, Denis

    2015-02-01

    Ocean racing yachts are mainly manufactured from carbon/epoxy composites similar to those used by the aeronautical industry but, with some exceptions such as masts, these structures are not produced in autoclaves. This leads to the presence of higher porosity levels. This paper will first present the different types of porosity found in traditional racing yacht structures. Difficulties in evaluating defect levels will then be discussed and published work characterizing the influence of defects will be reviewed. Current developments to improve racing yacht composite quality such as thin ply technology, out-of-autoclave processing and automated fibre placement will then be described, and their implications for porosity will be discussed.

  9. Silica Transport, Deposition and Porosity Evolution in a Fracture : Insights from Hydrothermal Flow-through Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, A.; Yamada, R.; Saishu, H.; Tsuchiya, N.

    2014-12-01

    Geofluids contain a large amount of silica, which solubility changes depending on temperature and pressure. Ubiquitous occurrences of various silica deposits (quartz veins, silica sinter, scales) suggest that silica precipitation plays an important role on temporal and spatial variation of hydrological properties of the Earth's crusts. A pressure drop, for example, induced by seismicity, is one of the driving forces for silica precipitation within the crusts. In spite of the importance of silica depositions in fractures, how porosity and permeability evolution during silica precipitation is still poorly understood. In this study, we conducted the hydrothermal experiments for silica precipitation from supersaturated solutions in vapor (370˚C, 20 MPa) and supercritical (420 ˚C, 30 MPa) conditions with flow rate of 1 g/min. After the experiments, we analyzed the 3-D porosity structures by X-ray CT, and then by making thin section. We developed a tube-in-tube vessel, which is composed of main vessel (made of SUS316), and inner alumina tube (6 mm inner diameter), to make a horizontal flow path. We did not used rock/mineral substrates, and alumina balls (1 mm diameter) are closely packed in the inner tube. In both situations, a significant amount of silica deposited within a week, showing contrasting porosity structures between vapor and supercritical conditions. In vapor conditions, the precipitates are fine-grained quartz aggregate, and the most deposited at around 38 mm from the inlet. The pores were filled from the bottom to the top in the tube. In contrast, in the supercritical conditions, the precipitates are composites of amorphous silica and quartz; which accumulated around the alumina balls uniformly. Quartz grains are formed in amorphous silica layers, and the most porosity reduction occurred at around 25 mm from the inlet. A simple model of cellular automaton involving particle flow, adsorption, settling and deposition reveals that the relative magnitude of

  10. Control of Porosity and Pore Size of Metal Reinforced Carbon Nanotube Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Dumee, Ludovic; Velleman, Leonora; Sears, Kallista; Hill, Matthew; Schutz, Jurg; Finn, Niall; Duke, Mikel; Gray, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Membranes are crucial in modern industry and both new technologies and materials need to be designed to achieve higher selectivity and performance. Exotic materials such as nanoparticles offer promising perspectives, and combining both their very high specific surface area and the possibility to incorporate them into macrostructures have already shown to substantially increase the membrane performance. In this paper we report on the fabrication and engineering of metal-reinforced carbon nanotube (CNT) Bucky-Paper (BP) composites with tuneable porosity and surface pore size. A BP is an entangled mesh non-woven like structure of nanotubes. Pure CNT BPs present both very high porosity (>90%) and specific surface area (>400 m2/g). Furthermore, their pore size is generally between 20–50 nm making them promising candidates for various membrane and separation applications. Both electro-plating and electroless plating techniques were used to plate different series of BPs and offered various degrees of success. Here we will report mainly on electroless plated gold/CNT composites. The benefit of this method resides in the versatility of the plating and the opportunity to tune both average pore size and porosity of the structure with a high degree of reproducibility. The CNT BPs were first oxidized by short UV/O3 treatment, followed by successive immersion in different plating solutions. The morphology and properties of these samples has been investigated and their performance in air permeation and gas adsorption will be reported. PMID:24957493

  11. Method and apparatus for filling thermal insulating systems

    DOEpatents

    Arasteh, Dariush K.

    1992-01-01

    A method for filling insulated glazing units is disclosed. The method utilizes a vacuum chamber in which the insulated glazing units are placed. The insulated glazing units and vacuum chamber are evacuated simultaneously. The units are then refilled with a low conductance gas such as Krypton while the chamber is simultaneously refilled with air.

  12. Method and apparatus for filling thermal insulating systems

    DOEpatents

    Arasteh, D.K.

    1992-01-14

    A method for filling insulated glazing units is disclosed. The method utilizes a vacuum chamber in which the insulated glazing units are placed. The insulated glazing units and vacuum chamber are evacuated simultaneously. The units are then refilled with a low conductance gas such as Krypton while the chamber is simultaneously refilled with air. 3 figs.

  13. Positron annihilation characteristics in mesostructural silica films with various porosities

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, Bangyun; Mao, Wenfeng; Tang, Xiuqin; He, Chunqing

    2014-03-07

    Porous silica films with various porosities were prepared via a sol-gel method using a nonionic amphiphilic triblock copolymer F127 as the structure-directing agent. Doppler broadening of positron annihilation radiation (DBAR) spectra were collected for the prepared films using a variable energy slow positron beam. Different linear relationships between positron annihilation line shape parameters S and W are found for the as-deposited films and calcined ones, indicative of the decomposition of the copolymer porogen in the as-deposited films upon calcination. This also reveals the variation of positron annihilation sites as a function of F127 loading or porosity. Strong correlations between positronium 3γ annihilation fraction, S parameter and porosity of the mesoporous silica films with isolated pores are obtained, which may provide a complementary method to determine closed porosities of mesoporous silica films by DBAR.

  14. High porosity of basal till at Burroughs glacier, southeastern Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Ronnert, L.; Mickelson, D.M. )

    1992-09-01

    Debris-rich basal ice at Burroughs glacier, southeastern Alaska, has 60 vol% to 70 vol% debris. Recently deposited basal till exceeds 60 vol% sediment with 30% to almost 40% porosity. Where basal ice is very rich in debris, basal till is deposited through melt out with only slight compaction of the debris. Porosity this high in till is commonly associated with subglacially deforming and dilated sediment. However, the recently deposited basal melt-out till at Burroughs glacier has not been deformed after deposition, but has porosity values similar to tills elsewhere interpreted to be subglacially deforming and dilated in an unfrozen state. High porosity can occur in basal melt-out till deposited directly by basal melt out.

  15. Porosity, pore size distribution and in situ strength of concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Rakesh; Bhattacharjee, B

    2003-01-01

    In this study, in situ strength of concrete was determined through compression test of cores drilled out from laboratory cast beams. The apparent porosity and pore size distribution of the same concrete were determined through mercury intrusion porosimetry, performed on small-drilled cores. The normal-strength concrete mixes used in the experimental investigation were designed to exhibit a wide variation in their strengths. To ensure further variation in porosity, pore size distribution and strength, two modes of compaction, two varieties of coarse aggregates, different levels of age, curing period and exposure condition of concrete were also introduced in experimental scheme. With the data so generated, an appraisal of the most frequently referred relationships involving strength, porosity and pore size of cement-based materials was carried out. Finally, a new empirical model relating the in situ strength of concrete with porosity, pore size characteristics, cement content, aggregate type, exposure conditions, etc., is presented.

  16. Earth formation porosity determination with dual epithermal neutron detector system

    SciTech Connect

    Mongne, M. L.

    1985-03-19

    A method of determining the porosity of earth formations surrounding a wellbore despite shielding of that formation by well casing, cement or mud cake. The method includes producing fast neutrons in a wellbore and detecting a first epithermal neutron population resulting from passage of neutrons from the source through a designated first region and a second epithermal neutron population resulting from passage of neutrons through a designated second region. The relationship of the logarithms of a first and a second epithermal neutron population resulting from passage of neutrons through a plurality of known porosity homogenous mediums is determined and plotted as a first curve with each point representing a unique value of porosity. A second curve of the logarithms of the first and second epithermal neutron populations in the actual wellbore is plotted. Individual points on the second curve are then corrected to the first curve utilizing known attenuating factors to determine the porosity of the earth formation.

  17. A global prediction of seafloor sediment porosity using machine learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Kylara M.; Wood, Warren T.; Becker, Joseph J.

    2015-12-01

    Porosity (void ratio) is a critical parameter in models of acoustic propagation, bearing strength, and many other seafloor phenomena. However, like many seafloor phenomena, direct measurements are expensive and sparse. We show here how porosity everywhere at the seafloor can be estimated using a machine learning technique (specifically, Random Forests). Such techniques use sparsely acquired direct samples and dense grids of other parameters to produce a statistically optimal estimate where direct measurements are lacking. Our porosity estimate is both qualitatively more consistent with geologic principles than the results produced by interpolation and quantitatively more accurate than results produced by interpolation or regression methods. We present here a seafloor porosity estimate on a 5 arc min, pixel registered grid, produced using widely available, densely sampled grids of other seafloor properties. These techniques represent the only practical means of estimating seafloor properties in inaccessible regions of the seafloor (e.g., the Arctic).

  18. Porosity-dependent fractal nature of the porous silicon surface

    SciTech Connect

    Rahmani, N.; Dariani, R. S.

    2015-07-15

    Porous silicon films with porosity ranging from 42% to 77% were fabricated by electrochemical anodization under different current density. We used atomic force microscopy and dynamic scaling theory for deriving the surface roughness profile and processing the topography of the porous silicon layers, respectively. We first compared the topography of bare silicon surface with porous silicon and then studied the effect of the porosity of porous silicon films on their scaling behavior by using their self-affinity nature. Our work demonstrated that silicon compared to the porous silicon films has the highest Hurst parameter, indicating that the formation of porous layer due to the anodization etching of silicon surface leads to an increase of its roughness. Fractal analysis revealed that the evolution of the nanocrystallites’ fractal dimension along with porosity. Also, we found that both interface width and Hurst parameter are affected by the increase of porosity.

  19. Judy Creek: Successful use of offset VSP to find porosity

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, A.; Pearcy, R.; Lee, H.; Hemingson, P.

    1994-12-31

    In March of 1993, Imperial Oil Resources Ltd. drilled the Judy Creek 14-7-64-10w5 well. The target was porosity on the front of the Judy Creek ``A`` reef. The well encountered poor porosity development. Available surface seismic was of low resolution, so an alternative method was sought to locate better porosity. An offset VSP was acquired, and an anomaly was observed on the P-wave data at a distance of 125 meters form the well. A short radius horizontal radial was drilled from the existing wellbore and encountered porosity development at 125 meters from the well bore. Subsequently, S-wave processing was carried out. Once again, an anomaly was observed at 125 meters form the well bore. The S-waves had the additional advantage of providing better resolution of the porous zone than the P-wave image.

  20. Electronic neutron sources for compensated porosity well logging

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Allan Xi; Antolak, Arlyn J; Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2012-02-01

    The viability of replacing Americium–Beryllium (Am–Be) radiological neutron sources in compensated porosity nuclear well logging tools with D–T or D–D accelerator-driven neutron sources is explored. The analysis consisted of developing a model for a typical well-logging borehole configuration and computing the helium-3 detector response to varying formation porosities using three different neutron sources (Am–Be, D–D, and D–T). The results indicate that, when normalized to the same source intensity, the use of a D–D neutron source has greater sensitivity for measuring the formation porosity than either an Am–Be or D–T source. The results of the study provide operational requirements that enable compensated porosity well logging with a compact, low power D–D neutron generator, which the current state-of-the-art indicates is technically achievable.

  1. Electronic neutron sources for compensated porosity well logging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, A. X.; Antolak, A. J.; Leung, K.-N.

    2012-08-01

    The viability of replacing Americium-Beryllium (Am-Be) radiological neutron sources in compensated porosity nuclear well logging tools with D-T or D-D accelerator-driven neutron sources is explored. The analysis consisted of developing a model for a typical well-logging borehole configuration and computing the helium-3 detector response to varying formation porosities using three different neutron sources (Am-Be, D-D, and D-T). The results indicate that, when normalized to the same source intensity, the use of a D-D neutron source has greater sensitivity for measuring the formation porosity than either an Am-Be or D-T source. The results of the study provide operational requirements that enable compensated porosity well logging with a compact, low power D-D neutron generator, which the current state-of-the-art indicates is technically achievable.

  2. Porosity evolution of upper Miocene reefs, Almeria Province, southern Spain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Armstrong, A.K.; Snavely, P.D.; Addicott, W.O.

    1980-01-01

    Sea cliffs 40 km east of Almeria, southeastern Spain, expose upper Miocene reefs and patch reefs of the Plomo formation. These reefs are formed of scleractinian corals, calcareous algae, and mollusks. The reef cores are as much as 65 m thick and several hundred meters wide. Fore-reef talus beds extend 1,300 m across and are 40 m thick. The reefs and reef breccias are composed of calcific dolomite. They lie on volcanic rocks that have a K-Ar date of 11.5 m.y. and in turn are overlain by the upper Miocene Vicar Formation. In the reef cores and fore-reef breccia beds, porosity is both primary and postdepositional. Primary porosity is of three types: (a) boring clam holes in the scleractinian coral heads, cemented reef rocks, and breccias; (b) intraparticle porosity within the corals, Halimeda plates, and vermetid worm tubes; and (c) interparticle porosity between bioclastic fragments and in the reef breccia. Postdepositional moldic porosity was formed by the solution of aragonitic material such as molluscan and coral fragments. The Plomo reef carbonate rocks have high porosity and permeability, and retain a great amount of depositional porosity. Pores range in size from a few micrometers to 30 cm. The extensive intercrystalline porosity and high permeability resulted from dolomitization of micritic matrix. Dolomite rhombs are between 10 and 30 μ across. More moldic porosity was formed by the dissolution of the calclte bioclasts. Some porosity reduction has occurred by incomplete and partial sparry calcite infilling of interparticular, moldic, and intercrystalline voids. The high porosity and permeability of these reefs make them important targets for petroleum exploration in the western Mediterranean off southern Spain. In these offshore areas in the subsurface the volcanic ridge and the Plomo reef complex are locally onlapped or overlapped by 350 m or more of Miocene(?) and Pliocene fine-grained sedimentary rocks. The possibility exists that the buried Plomo reef

  3. Effect of porosity and the inlet heat transfer fluid temperature variation on the performance of cool thermal energy storage system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheralathan, M.; Velraj, R.; Renganarayanan, S.

    2007-06-01

    This paper discusses the results of numerical and experimental study of an encapsulated cool thermal energy storage system. The storage system is a cylindrical storage tank filled with phase change material encapsulated in spherical container, placed in a refrigeration loop. A simulation program was developed to evaluate the temperature histories of the heat transfer fluid and the phase change material at any axial location during the charging period. The present analysis aims at studying the influence of the inlet heat transfer fluid temperature and porosity on system performance. An experimental setup was designed and constructed to conduct the experiments. The results of the model were validated by comparison with experimental results of temperature profiles for different inlet heat transfer fluid temperatures and porosity. The results are in good agreement with the experimental results. The results reported are much useful for designing cool thermal energy storage systems.

  4. Cell filling in gravure printing for printed electronics.

    PubMed

    Cen, Jialiang; Kitsomboonloha, Rungrot; Subramanian, Vivek

    2014-11-18

    Highly scaled direct gravure is a promising printing technique for printed electronics due to its large throughput, high resolution, and simplicity. Gravure can print features in the single micron range at printing speeds of ∼1 m/s by using an optimized cell geometry and optimized printing conditions. The filling of the cells on the gravure cylinder is a critical process, since the amount of ink in the cells strongly impacts printed feature size and quality. Therefore, an understanding of cell filling is crucial to make highly scaled gravure printed electronics viable. In this work we report a novel experimental setup to investigate the filling process in real time, coupled with numerical simulations to gain insight into the experimental observations. By varying viscosity and filling speed, we ensure that the dimensionless capillary number is a good indicator of filling regime in real gravure printing. In addition, we also examine the effect of cell size on filling as this is important for increasing printing resolution. In the light of experimental and simulation results, we are able to rationalize the dominant failure in the filling process, i.e., air entrapment, which is caused by contact line pinning and interface deformation over the cell opening. PMID:25343219

  5. Spatial distribution of intracortical porosity varies across age and sex

    PubMed Central

    Nirody, Jasmine A.; Cheng, Karen P.; Parrish, Robin M.; Burghardt, Andrew J.; Majumdar, Sharmila; Link, Thomas M.; Kazakia, Galateia J.

    2015-01-01

    Cortical bone porosity is a major determinant of strength, stiffness, and fracture toughness of cortical tissue. The goal of this work was to investigate changes in spatial distribution and microstructure of cortical porosity associated with aging in men and women. The specific aims were to: 1) develop an automated technique for spatial analysis of cortical microstructure based on HR-pQCT data, and; 2) apply this technique to explore sex- and age-specific spatial distribution and microstructure of porosity within the cortex. We evaluated HR-pQCT images of the distal tibia from a cross-sectional cohort of 145 individuals, characterizing detectable pores as being in the endosteal, midcortical, or periosteal layers of the cortex. Metrics describing porosity, pore number, and pore size were quantifiedwithin each layer and compared across sexes, age groups, and cortical layers. The elderly cohort (65–78 years, n=22) displayed higher values than the young cohort (20–29 years, n=29) for all parameters both globally and within each layer. While all three layers displayed significant age-related porosity increases, the greatest difference in porosity between the young and elderly cohort was in the midcortical layer (+344%, p < 0.001). Similarly, the midcortical layer reflected the greatest differences between young and elderly cohorts in both pore number (+243%, p < 0.001) and size (+28%, p < 0.001). Females displayed greater age-related changes in porosity and pore number than males. Females and males displayed comparable small to non-significant changes with age in pore size. In summary, considerable variability exists in the spatial distribution of detectable cortical porosity at the distal tibia, and this variability is dependent on age and sex. Intracortical pore distribution analysis may ultimately provide insight into both mechanisms of pore network expansion and biomechanical consequences of pore distribution. PMID:25701139

  6. Permeability-porosity relationships of subduction zone sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gamage, K.; Screaton, E.; Bekins, B.; Aiello, I.

    2011-01-01

    Permeability-porosity relationships for sediments from the northern Barbados, Costa Rica, Nankai, and Peru subduction zones were examined based on sediment type, grain size distribution, and general mechanical and chemical compaction history. Greater correlation was observed between permeability and porosity in siliciclastic sediments, diatom oozes, and nannofossil chalks than in nannofossil oozes. For siliciclastic sediments, grouping of sediments by percentage of clay-sized material yields relationships that are generally consistent with results from other marine settings and suggests decreasing permeability as percentage of clay-sized material increases. Correction of measured porosities for smectite content improved the correlation of permeability-porosity relationships for siliciclastic sediments and diatom oozes. The relationship between permeability and porosity for diatom oozes is very similar to the relationship in siliciclastic sediments, and permeabilities of both sediment types are related to the amount of clay-size particles. In contrast, nannofossil oozes have higher permeability values by 1.5 orders of magnitude than siliciclastic sediments of the same porosity and show poor correlation between permeability and porosity. More indurated calcareous sediments, nannofossil chalks, overlap siliciclastic permeabilities at the lower end of their measured permeability range, suggesting similar consolidation patterns at depth. Thus, the lack of correlation between permeability and porosity for nannofossil oozes is likely related to variations in mechanical and chemical compaction at shallow depths. This study provides the foundation for a much-needed global database with fundamental properties that relate to permeability in marine settings. Further progress in delineating controls on permeability requires additional carefully documented permeability measurements on well-characterized samples. ?? 2010 Elsevier B.V.

  7. Modulus Dependence on Large Scale Porosity of Powder Metallurgy Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, P. G.; Horstemeyer, M. F.; Brown, H. R.

    2012-07-01

    This article compares the existing theoretical expressions for the porosity dependence on elastic constants to experimental data for a commercially available material, FC-0205 powder metallurgy (PM) steel. The modulus of compression, tension, effective torsion, and ultrasound-based data at varying porosity levels are plotted graphically against the theoretical expressions. An equation by McAdam ( J. Iron Steel Inst. Lond., 1950, 168, p 346) was able to most accurately predict the experimental data with the adjustment of only one material constant.

  8. Properties of Bulk Sintered Silver As a Function of Porosity

    SciTech Connect

    Wereszczak, Andrew A; Vuono, Daniel J; Wang, Hsin; Ferber, Mattison K; Liang, Zhenxian

    2012-06-01

    This report summarizes a study where various properties of bulk-sintered silver were investigated over a range of porosity. This work was conducted within the National Transportation Research Center's Power Device Packaging project that is part of the DOE Vehicle Technologies Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Motors Program. Sintered silver, as an interconnect material in power electronics, inherently has porosity in its produced structure because of the way it is made. Therefore, interest existed in this study to examine if that porosity affected electrical properties, thermal properties, and mechanical properties because any dependencies could affect the intended function (e.g., thermal transfer, mechanical stress relief, etc.) or reliability of that interconnect layer and alter how its performance is modeled. Disks of bulk-sintered silver were fabricated using different starting silver pastes and different sintering conditions to promote different amounts of porosity. Test coupons were harvested out of the disks to measure electrical resistivity and electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity, coefficient of thermal expansion, elastic modulus, Poisson's ratio, and yield stress. The authors fully recognize that the microstructure of processed bulk silver coupons may indeed not be identical to the microstructure produced in thin (20-50 microns) layers of sintered silver. However, measuring these same properties with such a thin actual structure is very difficult, requires very specialized specimen preparation and unique testing instrumentation, is expensive, and has experimental shortfalls of its own, so the authors concluded that the herein measured responses using processed bulk sintered silver coupons would be sufficient to determine acceptable values of those properties. Almost all the investigated properties of bulk sintered silver changed with porosity content within a range of 3-38% porosity. Electrical resistivity, electrical conductivity, thermal

  9. Porosity measurements of electrodes used in lead-acid batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferg, E. E.; Loyson, P.; Rust, N.

    A method is presented that determines the porosity of a complete electrode plate used in lead-acid batteries. It requires only elementary equipment and is simple to operate, so that laboratory workers can use it as a routine method during manufacturing to determine the complete electrode's average porosity over a range of electrode sizes and types of both flat plate and tubular configuration. The method makes use of Archimedes' principle and uses glycerol as displacement medium. This allows for the porosity determination of both cured and formed positive and negative electrodes, without the detrimental effect of lead oxidation, which is common when using water as a displacement medium. The study showed that the method of using glycerol as a displacement medium gave on average, good repeatable results for both cured and formed positive and negative electrode plates used in the manufacture of automotive lead-acid batteries. The porosity results of the method were compared to the results obtained using Hg porosimetry, where a statistical paired t-test showed the two techniques to produce comparable results for all types of plates analyzed. The porosity of various plates was compared to the surface area of the respective active material of both positive and negative electrodes. These results showed unusual trends in that, depending on the manufacturing conditions, the surface area of formed positive electrodes could vary significantly from sample to sample of different batches without little change in its respective porosity. The surface area of different formed negative electrodes, however, would only vary slightly with significant changes in their corresponding porosity. The glycerol displacement method was also shown to be suitable to determine the effective porosity of cured and formed positive tubular electrodes.

  10. Porosity Effects on Impact Processes in Solar System Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Sarah T.; Ahrens, Thomas J.

    1999-06-01

    We will present calculations and experiments on the effect of porosity on the elastic moduli and dynamic fragmentation energy of porous, brittle materials. These results are part of our developing theory of porosity effects on impact processes in solar system materials. We will also examine the effects of porosity on the dynamic strength, fragment distribution, crack propagation and shock attenuation in ice and comet analog materials. The strength of comets, porous aggregates of ice and dust, is basically unknown with only one data point from the tidal breakup of Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9, which had a tensile strength of ~100s Pa. The porosity of comets has never been measured directly and models predict a range from 40-80%. Planned spacecraft missions ESA's Rosetta and NASA's Deep Space 4 will measure porosity and other physical properties of comets. To isolate the effects of porosity, we are conducting experiments on Plaster of Paris, a gypsum plaster, which may be made in porosities ranging from 30-80%. The static tensile strength of the plaster is similar to ice, ranging from 2-4 MPa, depending on the porosity. These data and theories will be necessary to construct a collisional model of the Kuiper Belt, the source of short period comets, which will be visited by the NASA's Pluto-Kuiper Express spacecraft mission in the next century. The strength properties of comets are necessary to understand the transition zone to gravity scaling and also to interpret the cratering history that will be observed on the icy surfaces of outer solar system objects.

  11. General rules for the optimal external porosity of LC supports.

    PubMed

    Gzil, Piotr; Vervoort, Nico; Baron, Gino V; Desmet, Gert

    2004-11-15

    We present a series of numerically calculated plate height and flow resistance data obtained for an idealized chromatographic support mimic with variable bed porosity (0.3 porosity, unbiased by any differences in molecular diffusivity or retention factor. The influence of pore heterogeneity effects is considered as well. It is found that the product h(min)nu(opt) depends only very weakly on epsilon and on the degree of pore heterogeneity. It is also found that the minimal separation impedance E(min) decreases monotonically with epsilon. This shows that the minimal plate height increase that can be expected for large porosity systems is always more than compensated by their reduced flow resistance, in agreement with the current observations in real silica monolith columns. Using the computed plate height data in an optimization analysis, it is found that large porosity supports can always potentially yield shorter analysis times or larger plate numbers than small porosity supports but need submicrometer feature sizes to actually achieve this. Assuming a lower limit on the producible or useable structural feature sizes, it is found that small N separations can best be performed with a small porosity packing, whereas large N separations require a large porosity packing if the column length (L) is left free. A plot yielding epsilon(opt) as a function of the required plate number has been established, showing that roughly epsilon(opt) approximately log(N) in both the ordered and the disordered support cases. It is also shown that the maximal increase in peak capacity ever to be expected from the use of high porosity supports is a factor of 2 (if the mobile-phase viscosity can be kept constant), potentially to be increased by a factor of 1.5 by increasing the homogeneity of the packing. PMID:15538795

  12. LNFCS. Liquid Nitrogen Fill Control System

    SciTech Connect

    Reber, E.

    1998-12-01

    The Liquid Nitrogen Fill Control System controls the periodic filling of Germanium detector dewars with liquid nitrogen, as well as, filling portable LN2 supply tanks with liquid nitrogen from a high pressure LN2 storage tank. LNFCS major features are: Remote access, Fills detectors periodically, Monitors fills and logs results, Fully adjustable set of preferences, Graphical interface, Fully operational by command line entry, Senses if LN2 flow has stopped after fill, Individual detector fills without interrupting periodic fill, Automatic repeat fill when detectors fail to fill, Automatic filling of supply tank when 2 or more detectors fail to fill, Easy addition/deletion of detectors from fill cycle, Authorized access only, No clogging by ice of LN2 flow.

  13. Bone porosity and longevity in early medieval Southern Croatia.

    PubMed

    Bečić, Kristijan; Jandrić Bečić, Darija; Definis-Gojanović, Marija; Zekić Tomaš, Sandra; Anterić, Ivana; Bašić, Zeljana

    2014-03-01

    Porosity of the skull and skeletal remains, especially of the orbital roof, are one of the most frequent pathological findings on ancient human skeletal remains. There are several presumed causes of this condition and anthropologists consider skull porosities as a marker of physical and nutritional stress. A total of 115 graves were discovered at the early-medieval graveyard near Zadar (Croatia) that contained 128 partially preserved skeletons. Average estimated age at death was 37.2 ± 12.6 years for men, 31.9 ± 13.9 for women, and 5.3 ± 3.6 years for subadults. Pathological bone porosity was analysed. Cribra orbitalia was observed on 21 skulls (28.7%), signs of temporal porosity were noticed on six skulls and signs of subperiosteal bleeding on three skulls. Nineteen skulls had bone porosities in other areas. There was a significant difference (p = 0.039) in achieved age of adults with and without cribra orbitalia as those with cribra orbitalia lived on average 8.1 years longer. The bone porosity was probably caused by malnutrition that might have had a beneficial effect on longevity of adults, similar to effects of restricted food intake on extending lifespan through epigenetic signatures influencing gene expression. PMID:24219154

  14. Porosity Measurements and Analysis for Metal Additive Manufacturing Process Control

    PubMed Central

    Slotwinski, John A; Garboczi, Edward J; Hebenstreit, Keith M

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing techniques can produce complex, high-value metal parts, with potential applications as critical metal components such as those found in aerospace engines and as customized biomedical implants. Material porosity in these parts is undesirable for aerospace parts - since porosity could lead to premature failure - and desirable for some biomedical implants - since surface-breaking pores allows for better integration with biological tissue. Changes in a part’s porosity during an additive manufacturing build may also be an indication of an undesired change in the build process. Here, we present efforts to develop an ultrasonic sensor for monitoring changes in the porosity in metal parts during fabrication on a metal powder bed fusion system. The development of well-characterized reference samples, measurements of the porosity of these samples with multiple techniques, and correlation of ultrasonic measurements with the degree of porosity are presented. A proposed sensor design, measurement strategy, and future experimental plans on a metal powder bed fusion system are also presented. PMID:26601041

  15. Porosity Measurements and Analysis for Metal Additive Manufacturing Process Control.

    PubMed

    Slotwinski, John A; Garboczi, Edward J; Hebenstreit, Keith M

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing techniques can produce complex, high-value metal parts, with potential applications as critical metal components such as those found in aerospace engines and as customized biomedical implants. Material porosity in these parts is undesirable for aerospace parts - since porosity could lead to premature failure - and desirable for some biomedical implants - since surface-breaking pores allows for better integration with biological tissue. Changes in a part's porosity during an additive manufacturing build may also be an indication of an undesired change in the build process. Here, we present efforts to develop an ultrasonic sensor for monitoring changes in the porosity in metal parts during fabrication on a metal powder bed fusion system. The development of well-characterized reference samples, measurements of the porosity of these samples with multiple techniques, and correlation of ultrasonic measurements with the degree of porosity are presented. A proposed sensor design, measurement strategy, and future experimental plans on a metal powder bed fusion system are also presented. PMID:26601041

  16. Double porosity modeling in elastic wave propagation for reservoir characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Berryman, J. G., LLNL

    1998-06-01

    Phenomenological equations for the poroelastic behavior of a double porosity medium have been formulated and the coefficients in these linear equations identified. The generalization from a single porosity model increases the number of independent coefficients from three to six for an isotropic applied stress. In a quasistatic analysis, the physical interpretations are based upon considerations of extremes in both spatial and temporal scales. The limit of very short times is the one most relevant for wave propagation, and in this case both matrix porosity and fractures behave in an undrained fashion. For the very long times more relevant for reservoir drawdown,the double porosity medium behaves as an equivalent single porosity medium At the macroscopic spatial level, the pertinent parameters (such as the total compressibility) may be determined by appropriate field tests. At the mesoscopic scale pertinent parameters of the rock matrix can be determined directly through laboratory measurements on core, and the compressibility can be measured for a single fracture. We show explicitly how to generalize the quasistatic results to incorporate wave propagation effects and how effects that are usually attributed to squirt flow under partially saturated conditions can be explained alternatively in terms of the double-porosity model. The result is therefore a theory that generalizes, but is completely consistent with, Biot`s theory of poroelasticity and is valid for analysis of elastic wave data from highly fractured reservoirs.

  17. Field determination of vertical permeability to air in the unsaturated zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weeks, Edwin P.

    1978-01-01

    The vertical permeability to air of layered materials in the unsaturated zone may be determined from air pressure data obtained at depth during a period when air pressure is changing at land surface. Such data may be obtained by monitoring barometric pressure with a microbarograph or surveying altimeter and simultaneously measuring down-hole pneumatic head differences in specially constructed piezometers. These data, coupled with air-filled porosity data from other sources, may be compared with the results of electric-analog or numerical solution of the one-dimensional diffusion equation to make a trial-and-error determination of the air permeability for each layer. The permeabilities to air may in turn be converted to equivalent hydraulic conductivity values if the materials are well drained, are permeable enough that the Klinkenberg effect is small, and are structurally unaffected by wetting. The method offers potential advantages over present methods to evaluate sites for artificial recharge by spreading; to evaluate ground-water pollution hazards from feedlots, sanitary landfills , and land irrigated with sewage effluent; and to evaluate sites for temporary storage of gas in the unsaturated zone. (Woodard-USGS)

  18. Time-series analysis for determining vertical air permeability in unsaturated zones

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, N.

    1999-01-01

    The air pressure in the unsaturated subsurface changes dynamically as the barometric pressure varies with time. Depending on the material properties and boundary conditions, the intensity of the correlation between the atmospheric and subsurface pressures may be evidenced in two persistent patterns: (1) the amplitude attenuation; and (2) the phase lag for the principal modes, such as the diurnal, semidiurnal, and 8-h tides. The amplitude attenuation and the phase lag generally depend on properties that can be classified into two categories: (1) The barometric pressure parameters, such as the apparent pressure amplitudes and frequencies controlled by the atmospheric tides and others; and (2) the material properties of porous media, such as the air viscosity, air-filled porosity, and permeability. Based on the principle of superposition and a Fourier time-series analysis, an analytical solution for predicting the subsurface air pressure variation caused by the atmospheric pressure fluctuation is presented. The air permeability (or pneumatic diffusivity) can be quantitatively determined by using the calculated amplitude attenuations (or phase lags) and the appropriate analytical relations among the parameters of the atmosphere and the porous medium. An analysis using the field data shows that the Fourier time-series analysis may provide a potentially reliable and simple method for predicting the subsurface barometric pressure variation and for determining the air permeability of unsaturated zones.

  19. Electrical Transport Through Micro Porous Track Etch Membranes of same Porosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garg, Ravish; Kumar, Vijay; Kumar, Dinesh; Chakarvarti, S. K.

    2012-12-01

    Porosity, pore size and thickness of membrane are vital factors to influence the transport phenomena through micro porous track etch membranes (TEMs) and affect the various applications like separations, drug release, flow control, bio-sensing and cell size detection etc. based on transport process. Therefore, a better understanding of transport mechanism through TEMs is required for new applications in various thrust areas like biomedical devices and packaging of foods and drugs. Transport studies of electrolytic solutions of potassium chloride, through porous polycarbonate TEMS having cylindrical pores of size 0.2 μm and 0.4 μm with same porosity of 15%, have been carried out using an electrochemical cell. In this technique, the etched filter is sandwiched between two compartments of cell in such a way that the TEM acts as a membrane separating the cell into two chambers. The two chambers are then filled with electrolyte solution (KCl in distilled water). The current voltage characteristics have been drawn by stepping the voltage ranging 0 to 10 V using Keithley 2400 Series Source Measurement Unit. The results indicate that rate of ion transport through cylindrical pores although is independent of pore size of TEMs of same porosity but there seems to be effect of TEM aperture size exposed to the electrolyte used in conducting cell on ion transport magnitude. From the experimental studies, a large deviation in the conduction through TEMs was observed when compared with theoretical consideration which led to the need for modification in the applicability of simple Ohm's law to the conduction through TEMs. It is found that ion transport increases with increase in area of aperture of TEM but much lower than the expected theoretically value.

  20. Elastic mesh with thermoplastic polyurethane filaments preserves effective porosity of textile implants.

    PubMed

    Lambertz, Andreas; Vogels, Ruben R M; Binnebösel, Marcel; Schöb, Dominik S; Kossel, Klas; Klinge, Uwe; Neumann, Ulf P; Klink, Christian D

    2015-08-01

    In hernia surgery, meshes with small pores tend to be filled by fibrous tissue, which reduces their stretchability and causes patient complaints. Because of the inelasticity of current meshes, mechanical strain might cause pores to collapse even in large-pore mesh constructions. In this study, a mesh with elastic thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) filaments was constructed to prevent pore size changes even under mechanical strain, and its biocompatibility in comparison with polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) was evaluated. A mesh was constructed using PVDF with elastic TPU filaments and mechanically tested. After midline laparotomy in 20 rabbits, we placed a 15 cm × 3 cm mesh as inlay in the defect. Animals were randomized to either the TPU or PVDF group. After 7 or 21 days, mesh expansion was measured under pneumoperitoneum, and abdominal walls were explanted for immunohistochemical investigations. In vitro, TPU meshes showed a slight reduction in effective porosity from 46% at tension-free conditions to 26% under longitudinal and to 34% under transverse strain. The nonelastic PVDF meshes showed a marked reduction in effective porosity from 70% to 7% and 52%, respectively. The TPU mesh had a breaking elongation of 101% and a tensile strength of 35 N/cm. In vivo, both meshes achieved healing of the incision without hernial defect. The TPU mesh maintained its elasticity under pneumoperitoneum. The amount of CD68-positive, Ki67-positive, and apoptotic cells was significantly lower in the TPU group after 7 and 21 days. The newly developed TPU mesh shows elasticity, structural stability, and preserved effective porosity under mechanical strain. Immunohistochemistry indicates superior biocompatibility of TPU mesh compared with PVDF after 7 and 21 days. PMID:25630828

  1. Dual-Porosity Hollow Nanoparticles for the Immunoprotection and Delivery of Nonhuman Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Although enzymes of nonhuman origin have been studied for a variety of therapeutic and diagnostic applications, their use has been limited by the immune responses generated against them. The described dual-porosity hollow nanoparticle platform obviates immune attack on nonhuman enzymes paving the way to in vivo applications including enzyme-prodrug therapies and enzymatic depletion of tumor nutrients. This platform is manufactured with a versatile, scalable, and robust fabrication method. It efficiently encapsulates macromolecular cargos filled through mesopores into a hollow interior, shielding them from antibodies and proteases once the mesopores are sealed with nanoporous material. The nanoporous shell allows small molecule diffusion allowing interaction with the large macromolecular payload in the hollow center. The approach has been validated in vivo using l-asparaginase to achieve l-asparagine depletion in the presence of neutralizing antibodies. PMID:24471767

  2. Permeability Evolution and the Mechanisms of Porosity Change (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, W.; Gribbin, J. L.; Tivey, M. K.

    2013-12-01

    Understanding subsurface fluid flow is of critical importance to such geological and engineering applications as faulting mechanics, hydrothermal venting and resource recovery. Mechanical, chemical and thermal loads can significantly alter microscopic pore geometry and thus affect macroscopic permeability. Recently, we measured the permeability and porosity of massive anhydrite deposits recovered from various seafloor hydrothermal vent fields. Together, these deposits comprise anhydrite samples that have undergone different stages of formation. For anhydrite samples with porosities greater than 5%, the dependence of permeability to porosity change is best characterized by a power-law relationship with an exponent n~9. At porosities less than 5%, a much gentler trend of n~1 is observed. These permeability-porosity relationships (PPRs) in anhydrite deposits are in stark contrast to those of Fontainebleau sandstone, a quartz arenite with various degrees of quartz cementation. Fontainebleau sandstone shows a power-law dependence of PPR with an exponent of n~3 for samples with porosities greater than 7%, and a much steeper trend of n~8 at low porosities [Bourbie and Zinszner, 1985]. Microstructural analysis and numerical models suggest that the significant loss in pore connectivity below 7% is responsible for the steeper PPR trend in Fontainebleau sandstone [Zhu et al., 1995]. In anhydrite deposits, petrographic analyses show evidence for both dissolution and precipitation, consistent with the observed PPRs resulting from pore-size controlled solubility. Precipitation of anhydrite takes place preferentially in large pores within the anhydrite deposits, with precipitation limited in small pores, which is proposed to be due to the change in interfacial energy of the growing crystal (e.g., as described by Emmanuel and Ague [2009]). With abundant large voids in high porosity anhydrite samples, the growth of sulfates would result in a drastic loss of pore connectivity and

  3. Quantification of trapped gas redistribution in dual-porosity media with continuous and discontinuous domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snehota, Michal; Sacha, Jan; Jelinkova, Vladimira; Cislerova, Milena; Vontobel, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Nonwetting phase (residual air) is trapped in the porous media at water contents close to the saturation. Trapped gas phase resides in pores in form of bubbles, blobs or cluster forming residual gas saturation. In homogeneous soil media trapped gas is relatively stable until it is released upon porous media drainage. If porous media remain saturated, trapped gas can slowly dissolve in response to changed air solubility of surrounding water. In heterogeneous media, relatively rapid change in the trapped gas distribution can be observed soon after the gas is initially trapped during infiltration. It has been recently shown that the mass transfer of gas is directed from regions of fine porosity to regions of coarse porosity. The mass transfer was quantified by means of neutron tomography for the case of dual porosity sample under steady state flow. However the underlying mechanism of the gas mass transfer is still not clear. Based on the robust experience of visualization of the flow within heterogeneous samples, it seems that due to the huge local (microscopic) pressure gradients between contrasting pore radii the portion of faster flowing water becomes attracted into small pores of high capillary pressure. The process depends on the initial distribution of entrapped air which has to be considered as random in dependence on the history and circumstances of wetting/drying. In this study, the redistribution of trapped gas was quantitatively studied by 3D neutron imaging on samples composed of fine porous ceramic and coarse sand. The redistribution of water was studied under no-flow and steady state flow conditions. Two different inner geometries of the samples were developed. In the first case the low permeability regions (ceramics) were disconnected, while in the second structure, the fine porosity material was continuous from the top to the bottom of the sample. Quantitative 3D neutron tomography imaging revealed similar redistribution process in both cases of

  4. Seismic prediction of porosity and hydrocarbon traps in carbonate rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Thomasson, M.R.

    1987-11-01

    Seismic stratigraphy has been used in many areas to identify stratigraphic carbonate traps such as shelf margins, pinnacle reefs, mounds, and updip porosity pinch-outs. Many large oil fields are the result of oil entrapment in these types of stratigraphic traps. Examples include fields from the Gulf Coast, Permian basin, Mid-Continent, and Rocky Mountain provinces in the US, as well as fields in the Middle East, Canada, North Sea, and the Far East. During the Carboniferous in the Mid-Continent, a sequence of depositional and diagenetic events created irregular pods of porosity in otherwise tight limestones. The areal extent, thickness, and quality of this porosity are the primary factors that determine the location, geometry, and productivity of major oil fields in the area. A twenty-million-barrel oil field has been studied in detail, and the initial production rates and overall production richness correspond closely to measurable seismic phenomena. A seismic line shot through the producing interval at a depth of 4000 ft, using 30-fold, broad band (20-120 hertz) data has allowed the recovery of frequencies of 100 hertz. These data confirm (1) the presence of porosity and (2) field limits that correspond to the field limits known from subsurface information. The Geoquest System work station was used to model (1) the key porous interval as known from core and petrophysical data in the analog field and (2) evaluate similar phenomena in the surrounding play area and measure both porosity thickness and quality in prospective stratigraphic traps. Two specific trap types occur regionally. The first type evidences porosity that developed locally and has an acoustically recognizable event over it (and between it and an overlying shale). The second type shows evidence of local porosity extending vertically to the shale seal. In both types, the lateral limits can be mapped seismically.

  5. PALS and DSC study of nanopores partially filled by hexadecane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šauša, O.; Illeková, E.; Krištiak, J.; Berek, D.; Macová, E.

    2013-06-01

    The controlled porosity glasses (CPG) filled with various amount of hexadecane (HXD) in nanopores were studied both by the positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) and the differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) methods. Two types of CPG matrices were used with average pore sizes 12.6 and 22.2 nm. The PALS measurements showed, that when the process of large pores filling by HXD has started, the long o-Ps lifetime went down to HXD o-Ps lifetime about 3ns [1]. DSC measurements at partially filled nanopores showed always two crystallization peaks [2]. Their positions depended on average pore size of matrix. Third crystallization peak was identified in overfilled samples (only short o-Ps lifetimes were present) and their position in temperature scale was the same as for the bulk HXD peak. The latter peak was independent of the average pore size of matrices. This fact confirms the assumption that processes studied by PALS with the samples that contained smaller amount of HXD in CPG occured inside of nanopores of the matrix.

  6. Thermal management improvement of an air-cooled high-power lithium-ion battery by embedding metal foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadian, Shahabeddin K.; Rassoulinejad-Mousavi, Seyed Moein; Zhang, Yuwen

    2015-11-01

    Effect of embedding aluminum porous metal foam inside the flow channels of an air-cooled Li-ion battery module was studied to improve its thermal management. Four different cases of metal foam insert were examined using three-dimensional transient numerical simulations. The effects of permeability and porosity of the porous medium as well as state of charge were investigated on the standard deviation of the temperature field and maximum temperature inside the battery in all four cases. Compared to the case of no porous insert, embedding aluminum metal foam in the air flow channel significantly improved the thermal management of Li-ion battery cell. The results also indicated that, decreasing the porosity of the porous structure decreases both standard deviation of the temperature field and maximum temperature inside the battery. Moreover, increasing the permeability of the metal foam drops the maximum temperature inside the battery while decreasing this property leads to improving the temperature uniformity. Our results suggested that, among the all studied cases, desirable temperature uniformity and maximum temperature were achieved when two-third and the entire air flow channel is filled with aluminum metal foam, respectively.

  7. Partially liquid-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber polarizer.

    PubMed

    Qian, Wenwen; Zhao, Chun-Liu; Wang, Yunpeng; Chan, Chi Chiu; Liu, Shujing; Jin, Wei

    2011-08-15

    A compact fiber polarizer is demonstrated by the filling of selected air holes of a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (PCF) with a liquid. The liquid-filling results in an asymmetric waveguide structure, leading to a large polarization dependent loss. A 6 mm long ethanol-filled PCF exhibits a polarization extinction ratio of ∼18 dB over a wavelength range from 1480 nm to 1600 nm. PMID:21847239

  8. Prevention of Porosity Formation and Other Effects of Gaseous Elements in Iron Castings

    SciTech Connect

    Albany Research Center

    2005-04-01

    Iron foundries have observed porosity primarily as interdendritic porosity in large freezing range alloys such as Ni-Hard I and hypoeutectic high Cr alloys or pinholes and fissure defects in gray and ductile irons. For most iron foundries, porosity problems occur sporadically, but even occasional outbreaks can be costly since even a very small amount of porosity can significantly reduce the mechanical properties of the castings. As a result when porosity is detected, the castings are scrapped and remelted, or when the porosity is undetected, defective parts are shipped to the consumer. Neither case is desirable. This project was designed to examine various factors contributing to the porosity formation in iron castings. Factors such as solubility of gases in liquid and solid iron alloys, surface tension of liquid iron alloys, and permeability of dendritic structures were investigated in terms of their effect on the porosity formation. A method was developed to predict how much nitrogen the molten alloy picks up from air after a given amount of holding time for a given melting practice. It was shown that small batches of iron melts in an induction furnace can end up with very high concentration of nitrogen (near solubility limit). Surface tension of liquid iron alloys was measured as a function of temperature. Effect of minor additions of S, Ti, and Al on the surface tension of liquid iron alloys was investigated. Up to 18% change in surface tension was detected by minor element additions. This translates to the same amount of change in gas pressure required in a bubble of a given size to keep the bubble stable. A new method was developed to measure the permeability of dendritic structures in situ. The innovative aspect of these experiments, with respect to previous interdendritic permeability measurements, was the fact that the dendritic structure was allowed to form in situ and was not cooled and re-heated for permeability tests. A permeability model was developed

  9. Testing Mercury Porosimetry with 3D Printed Porosity Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasiuk, F.; Ewing, R. P.; Hu, Q.

    2014-12-01

    Mercury intrusion porosimetry is one of the most widely used techniques to study the porous nature of a geological and man-made materials. In the geosciences, it is commonly used to describe petroleum reservoir and seal rocks as well as to grade aggregates for the design of asphalt and portland cement concretes. It's wide utility stems from its ability to characterize a wide range of pore throat sizes (from nanometers to around a millimeter). The fundamental physical model underlying mercury intrusion porosimetry, the Washburn Equation, is based on the assumption that rock porosity can be described as a bundle of cylindrical tubes. 3D printing technology, also known as rapid prototyping, allows the construction of intricate and accurate models, exactly what is required to build models of rock porosity. We evaluate the applicability of the Washburn Equation by comparing properties (like porosity, pore and pore throat size distribution, and surface area) computed on digital porosity models (built from CT data, CAD designs, or periodic geometries) to properties measured via mercury intrusion porosimetry on 3D printed versions of the same digital porosity models.

  10. Shale diagenesis: an important factor in development of secondary porosity

    SciTech Connect

    McMahon, D.A. Jr.

    1988-02-01

    Abundant secondary porosity due to the dissolution of feldspar grains, volcanic rock fragments, and carbonate cement has been observed in thin-section studies of reservoir sandstones in the McAllen Ranch field in south Texas. Secondary porosity develops in fluid flow pathways within the sandstones. Potentiometric profiles indicate that within the overpressured Oligocene strata, head gradients cause pore fluids to flow from the shales into the sandstones and toward major growth faults that bound the fields. The dissolution reactions responsible for the secondary porosity require that the pore fluid be acidic. Shale diagenesis provides an important source of hydrogen ions for these reactions. The transformation of smectite clay to illite has been well documented in the Oligocene shales in this area. The smectite to illite reaction (assuming mobile Al/sup +3/) is discussed as well as the reduction of Fe/sup +3/. Mass balance calculations in the study area indicate that the amount of acid produced by these reactions within the adjacent shales can easily account for the amount of secondary dissolution porosity observed in the sandstones. The exploration and exploitation of these types of sandstone reservoirs can be improved by a better understanding of the processes involved in the formation of secondary porosity.

  11. Predicting permeability from porosity using artificial neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, S.J.; Fang, J.H.; Chen, H.C. Kopaska-Merkel, D.C.

    1995-12-01

    Permeability values in a borehole are predicted by an artificial neural network from the porosity values at the same depths. THe network used in this study employs an architecture called backpropagation that is good at making predictions. The traditional approach for permeability prediction is regression analysis, the relationship between porosity and permeability is assumed to be known. In reality, the functional form of this relationship, i.e., the model equation, is unknown. In contrast, the neural-network approach assumes no functional relationship. Six wells from Big Escambia Creek (Jurassic Smackover carbonate) field in southern Alabama were used to test predicting permeability from porosity using a neural network. Porosity and spatial data alone were used to predict permeability because these data are readily available from any hydrocarbon field. Three scenarios were performed; in each one, a subset of the six wells was used for a training set, one well for calibration, and one or two wells were used for prediction. For each scenario, simple linear regression was also used to predict permeability from porosity. The neural net predicted permeability much better than did regression in one scenario; in the other two scenarios the two methods performed equally well. The neural net predicted permeability accurately using minimal data, but other kinds of information (e.g., log- or core-derived lithologic information) are easily incorporated if available. In addition, compartmentalization of carbonate reservoirs may be recognizable by this approach.

  12. Weaving and bonding method to prevent warp and fill distortion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Gary L. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A method to prevent fiber distortion in textile materials employed in a modified weaving process. In a first embodiment, a tacifier in powder form is applied to the yarn and melted while on the fabric. Cool air is then supplied after the tacifier has melted to expedite the solidification of the tacifier. In a second embodiment, a solution form of a tacifier is used by dissolving the tacifier into a solvent that has a high evaporation rate. The solution is then sprayed onto the fabric or fill yarn as each fill yarn is inserted into a shed of the fabric. A third embodiment applies the tacifier in a liquid form that has not been dissolved in a solvent. That is, the tacifier is melted and is sprayed as a liquid onto the fabric or fill yarn as it is being extracted from a fill yarn spool prior to the fill yarn being inserted into the shed of the fabric. A fourth embodiment employs adhesive yarns contained as an integral part of the warp or fill yarn. Additional tacifier material is not required because a matrix is used as the tacifier. The matrix is then locally melted using heating elements on clamping bars or take-up rollers, is cooled, if necessary, and solidified.

  13. Study of oil sorption behavior of filled and structured fiber assemblies made from polypropylene, kapok and milkweed fibers.

    PubMed

    Rengasamy, R S; Das, Dipayan; Karan, C Praba

    2011-02-15

    This article reports on oil sorption behavior of fiber assemblies made up of single natural and synthetic fibers as well as blend of natural and synthetic fibers when tested with high density oil and diesel oil. A series of filled fiber assemblies were prepared from 100% polypropylene, kapok, and milkweed fibers and another series of bonded structured fiber assemblies were prepared from a 70/30 blend of kapok and polypropylene fibers and a 70/30 blend of milkweed and polypropylene fibers. It was observed that the porosity of the fiber assemblies played a very important role in determining its oil sorption capacity. The polypropylene fiber assembly exhibited the highest sorption capacity (g/g) followed by the kapok and milkweed fiber assemblies at porosity <0.98. At higher porosities (above 0.98), polypropylene filled fiber assembly has poor sorption capacity due to large sized inter fiber pore. The kapok and milkweed fibers have intra fiber porosities of 0.81 and 0.83, respectively. All the fiber assemblies showed higher oil sorption capacity with the high density oil as compared to the diesel oil. As the kapok and milkweed fiber have low cellulose content, hence their slow degradation is an advantage in fresh and marine water applications. The good sorption capacity of kapok and milkweed fiber assemblies along with their bio-degradable nature offer great scope for structuring them into fiber assemblies with large porosity and uniform pores to have efficient oil sorbents. PMID:21146290

  14. Can-Filled Crash Barrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, A. H.

    1983-01-01

    Crash barrier composed largely of used aluminum beverage cans protects occupants of cars in collisions with poles or trees. Lightweight, can-filled barrier very effective in softening impact of an automobile in head-on and off-angle collisions. Preliminary results indicate barrier is effective in collisions up to 40 mi/h (64 km/h).

  15. Brain Responses to Filled Gaps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hestvik, Arild; Maxfield, Nathan; Schwartz, Richard G.; Shafer, Valerie

    2007-01-01

    An unresolved issue in the study of sentence comprehension is whether the process of gap-filling is mediated by the construction of empty categories (traces), or whether the parser relates fillers directly to the associated verb's argument structure. We conducted an event-related potentials (ERP) study that used the violation paradigm to examine…

  16. Space-filling polyhedral sorbents

    DOEpatents

    Haaland, Peter

    2016-06-21

    Solid sorbents, systems, and methods for pumping, storage, and purification of gases are disclosed. They derive from the dynamics of porous and free convection for specific gas/sorbent combinations and use space filling polyhedral microliths with facial aplanarities to produce sorbent arrays with interpenetrating interstitial manifolds of voids.

  17. Loose-fill, thermal insulation

    SciTech Connect

    Nath, N.; Ruff, D.L.

    1981-11-24

    Fire resistant, loose-fill, thermal insulation made of a mixture of particulate expanded perlite and cellulose fiber is described. The mixture is rendered non-settling and resistant to separation by applying a permanently tacky material to the particulate expanded perlite.

  18. Determining the Porosity and Saturated Hydraulic Conductivity of Binary Mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z. F.; Ward, Anderson L.; Keller, Jason M.

    2011-02-14

    Gravels and coarse sands make up significant portions of some environmentally important sediments, while the hydraulic properties of the sediments are typically obtained in the laboratory using only the fine fraction (e.g., <2 mm or 4.75 mm). Researchers have found that the content of gravel has significant impacts on the hydraulic properties of the bulk soils. Laboratory experiments were conducted to measure the porosity and the saturated hydraulic conductivity of binary mixtures with different fractions of coarse and fine components. We proposed a mixing-coefficient model to estimate the porosity and a power-averaging method to determine the effective particle diameter and further to predict the saturated hydraulic conductivity of binary mixtures. The proposed methods could well estimate the porosity and saturated hydraulic conductivity of the binary mixtures for the full range of gravel contents and was successfully applied to two data sets in the literature.

  19. Determining the Porosity and Saturated Hydraulic Conductivity of Binary Mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z. F.; Ward, Anderson L.; Keller, Jason M.

    2009-09-27

    Gravels and coarse sands make up significant portions of some environmentally important sediments, while the hydraulic properties of the sediments are typically obtained in the laboratory using only the fine fraction (e.g., <2 mm or 4.75 mm). Researchers have found that the content of gravel has significant impacts on the hydraulic properties of the bulk soils. Laboratory experiments were conducted to measure the porosity and the saturated hydraulic conductivity of binary mixtures with different fractions of coarse and fine components. We proposed a mixing-coefficient model to estimate the porosity and a power-averaging method to determine the effective particle diameter and further to predict the saturated hydraulic conductivity of binary mixtures. The proposed methods could well estimate the porosity and saturated hydraulic conductivity of the binary mixtures for the full range of gravel contents and was successfully applied to two data sets in the literature.

  20. Relationship of pressure regressions to secondary porosity development: exploration model for secondary porosity development in deep Wilcox of south Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Painter, J.

    1989-03-01

    In the deep Wilcox, as well as other deep Gulf Coast Tertiary formations, secondary porosity development is very important to reservoir quality. four major Wilcox fields and several abandoned wells were studied with respect to shale pore-pressure gradients to show the relationship between secondary porosity and shale pore-pressure regression. Secondary porosity is the result of chemical leaching and alteration of framework grains and clays in a rock by organic acids, fresh water, and other fluids or gases reacting with the rock constituents. These chemicals, water, and gases are formed in shales adjoining the sandstone reservoir rock and migrate into the adjoining aquifer sandstone, which is then leached. This release of fluids from the shale forms a pore-pressure regression which can be plotted using electric logs. The presence or absence of a pore-pressure regression gives indications of secondary porosity development in the adjoining reservoir rocks. If a regression is documented, the risk of inadequate reservoir porosity of a prospect can be lowered.

  1. Diagenesis and porosity evolution of upper Cretaceous dolomites, northern Egypt

    SciTech Connect

    Holail, H.M.; Lohmann, K.C.

    1988-08-01

    Porosity patterns in the Upper Cretaceous marine carbonate sequence of northern Egypt record a complex history of diagenesis in marine, hypersaline, and meteoric waters. Depositional facies and fabrics suggest an overall upward-shallowing sequence which, in turn, is bounded above by a major pre-middle Eocene unconformity. Associated with this unconformity, subaerial exposure resulted in a regional influx of meteoric waters. In this context, analysis of the paragenetic relationships and geochemical character of diagenetic phases has allowed for unique determination of the timing and environments of porosity evolution within this sequence.

  2. Tensile strengths and porosities of solar system primitive bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trigo-Rodriguez, J. M.; Llorca, J.; Blum, J.

    Recent measurements of asteroid bulk densities suggest that rubble-pile asteroids with typical porosities of 30 to 50% may be common (Britt et al., 2006). However, the presence of such objects doesn't mean necessarily that the initial porosity had been preserved (Kerridge, 1993). In fact, the fluffy aggregates produced in laboratory experiments that we expect to be representative of the oldest protoplanetary disk materials, exhibit even higher porosities (Blum et al., 2006). Recent results confirm that primitive meteorites (like e.g. CM carbonaceous chondrites) are compacted samples of the nebula matter exhibiting different density and porosity that their precursors materials (Trigo-Rodríguez et al., 2006). Consequently, aqueous alteration, brecciation, and impact-induced metamorphism make very unlikely to find pristine bodies between the asteroidal population. However, there is clear evidence for the existence of high-porosity bodies between the C-type asteroids like e.g. Mathilde (Housen et al., 1999) or the Tagish Lake parent body (Brown et al., 2002). Although extensive post-accretionary processing of meteorite parent bodies can produce high degrees of porosity, only the most pristine ones seem to preserve more than 50% of porosity. Consequently, we should look for these low strength bodies among the C-type asteroids, or very especially in some unprocessed comets that continue being representative of the precursor materials. Recent suggestion that CI1 chondrites are originated from comets should be studied in this context (Gounelle et al., 2006). Particularly, we think that studies of the porosity and strength of primitive meteorites would provide valuable clues on the origin and nature of their parent bodies. REFERENCES Blum J., R. Schräpler, B.J.R. Davidson and J.M. Trigo-Rodríguez (2006) Astroph. J., submitted. Britt D.T., G.J. Consolmagno, and W.J. Merline (2006) Lunar Planet. Sci. Conf. Abstract #2214. Brown, P. G., D. O. Revelle, E. Tagliaferri, and A

  3. Surface porosity and permeability of porous media with a periodic microstructure

    SciTech Connect

    Dmitriev, N.M.

    1995-07-01

    Various ways of determining the surface porosity, the relation between the porosity and the surface porosity and the presentation of the permeability in terms of the characteristics of the microstructure of the porous medium are analyzed with reference to model porous media with a periodic microstructure. It is shown that it is necessary to distinguish between the geometric (scalar) and physical (tensor) surface porosities and that the geometric surface porosity, the physical surface porosity and the porosity are different characteristics of the porous medium.

  4. Low-velocity collisions between centimeter-sized snowballs: Porosity dependence of coefficient of restitution for ice aggregates analogues in the Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimaki, Yuri; Arakawa, Masahiko

    2012-09-01

    Understanding the collisional behavior of ice dust aggregates at low velocity is a key to determining the formation process of small icy bodies such as icy planetesimals, comets and icy satellites, and this collisional behavior is also closely related to the energy dissipation mechanism in Saturn’s rings. We performed head-on collision experiments in air by means of free-falling centimeter-sized sintered snowballs with porosities from 44% to 80% at impact velocities from 0.44 m s-1 to 4.12 m s-1 at -10 °C. In cases of porosity larger than 70%, impact sticking was the dominant collision outcome, while bouncing was dominant at lower porosity. Coefficients of restitution of snow in this velocity range were found to depend strongly on the porosity rather than the impact velocity and to decrease with the increase of the porosity. We successfully measured the compaction volume of snowballs after the impact, and it enabled us to estimate the dynamic compressive strength of snow with the assumption of the energy conservation between kinetic energy and work for deformation, which was found to be consistent with the upper limit of static compressive strength. The velocity dependence of coefficients of restitution of snow was analyzed using a Johnson’s model, and a diagram for collision outcomes among equal-sized sintered snowballs was successfully drawn as a function of porosity and impact velocity.

  5. Constitutive parameter de-embedding using inhomogeneously-filled rectangular waveguides with longitudinal section modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, A.; Dominek, A. K.

    1990-01-01

    Constitutive parameter extraction from S parameter data using a rectangular waveguide whose cross section is partially filled with a material sample as opposed to being completely filled was examined. One reason for studying a partially filled geometry is to analyze the effect of air gaps between the sample and fixture for the extraction of constitutive parameters. Air gaps can occur in high temperature parameter measurements when the sample was prepared at room temperature. Single port and two port measurement approaches to parameter extraction are also discussed.

  6. EFFECTS OF DRYING TREATMENTS ON POROSITY OF SOIL MATERIALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of three drying techniques on total porosity and pore size distribution of three soil materials were studied by Hg intrusion porosimetry. Some samples were dried in an oven at 40 C for 7 d; some samples were quick frozen in liquid N and lyophilized; some samples were ...

  7. Porosity development in deep sandstones, Taranaki Basin, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collen, J. D.; Newman, R. H.

    Reservoir quality in the Taranaki Basin is controlled by both depositional facies and diagenesis. High initial porosities and permeabilities in manyfluvial and littoral sandstones directed fluid flow such that these facies underwater widespread cementation by silica, carbonate and authigenic clays, and later dissolution of carbonates. Current commercial production of hydrocarbons in mainly from secondary, dissolution porosity in sandstones at depths of 1750-3600 m. Recent studies suggest that oil may not be released from terrestrial source rocks in western New Zealand until depths of 5.5 km or more. Knowledge of porosity development at such depths is therefore essential for understanding migration pathways and the controls on hydrocarbon accumulation. Organic species and/or carbon dioxide evolved from kerogen before liquid hydrocarbons are important to the formation of secondary porosity in sandstones by carbonate dissolution. Further, hydrocarbon migration should follow soon after the evolution of these, in order that re-cementation does not occur. High resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy shows that in western New Zealand basins, the evolution of solvents continues to at least 4 km and may persist almost until the expulsion of liquid hydrocarbons.

  8. Permeability porosity relationships (K, Phi cut-off)

    SciTech Connect

    Djettou, F.; Reda, H.

    1995-08-01

    Several reservoirs of Lower Devonian in Ghadames basin present porosities greater than 10 Pu, but during the test they are rather impermeable. It seems that this phenomena extends to BERKINE and Rhourd Messaoud areas. This seriously affect the estimation of recovery reserves. The best we can do is to study and try to understand reservoir problems. The method we choose is based on statistical analysis of test results and their comparison with core and log measurements. It concerns mainly cummulative curves of productive and non-productive tests (dry test). This involves about 20 wells where are can define: Siegenian with: Fine grained in BBK and ROM Coarse grained toward BRN - Emsian is rather homogeneous in the region. The sand cut-off porosity is greater than 11 Pu. However the reservoir can`t produce itself then we can not take account in reserve estimation. In conclusion, a sandy reservoir of Lower Devonian in Ghadames basin may be very porous (11-12%) and impermeable while in the other cases reservoirs can produce with porosity of 7 or 8 Po. However a HC definition based on cut-off porosity in Ghadames basin should be done before net pay an recovery reserves estimation.

  9. Predicting pore pressure and porosity from VSP data

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, D.G.

    1984-04-01

    Presently, VSP is being used to predict interval velocity and depth beneath the drill bit. The method is to exploit special properties of the VSP to produce a successful inversion to acoustic impedance. Depth and interval velocity are derived from the acoustic impedance prediction. This technique is often a valuable aid in making drilling decisions. Other rock properties may be computed from the same data. Pore pressure is one such rock parameter that can be computed from interval transit times and depth. The product of interval transit times, depth, normal compaction ratios, and an area constant is pore pressure. Pore pressure prediction is as reliable as the predicted velocities and depths. In reservoir evaluation, and sometimes in the well completion program, porosity is the important rock property. The interval transit times predicted beneath the bit can be used to compute porosity. Unlike pore pressure, porosity computations require knowledge or assumptions about the rock matrix and shale percentages. For certain conditions these values are known. Further penetration of a reef in search of deeper porous zones is an example of a viable condition for porosity prediction. For both these rock properties the same conventions employed by well log analysis in modifying and interpreting results are needed. Where the parameters assumed fit the actual conditions, the results should have merit. If not, further interpretation is required.

  10. Particle-filled microporous materials

    DOEpatents

    McAllister, Jerome W.; Kinzer, Kevin E.; Mrozinski, James S.; Johnson, Eric J.; Dyrud, James F.

    1990-01-01

    A microporous particulate-filled thermoplastic polymeric article is provided. The article can be in the form of a film, a fiber, or a tube. The article has a thermoplastic polymeric structure having a plurality of interconnected passageways to provide a network of communicating pores. The microporous structure contains discrete submicron or low micron-sized particulate filler, the particulate filler being substantially non-agglomerated.

  11. Particle-filled microporous materials

    DOEpatents

    McAllister, J.W.; Kinzer, K.E.; Mrozinski, J.S.; Johnson, E.J.; Dyrud, J.F.

    1990-09-18

    A microporous particulate-filled thermoplastic polymeric article is provided. The article can be in the form of a film, a fiber, or a tube. The article has a thermoplastic polymeric structure having a plurality of interconnected passageways to provide a network of communicating pores. The microporous structure contains discrete submicron or low micron-sized particulate filler, the particulate filler being substantially non-agglomerated. 3 figs.

  12. Particle-filled microporous materials

    DOEpatents

    McAllister, Jerome W.; Kinzer, Kevin E.; Mrozinski, James S.; Johnson, Eric J.

    1992-07-14

    A microporous particulate-filled thermoplastic polymeric article is provided. The article can be in the form of a film, a fiber, or a tube. The article has a thermoplastic polymeric structure having a plurality of interconnected passageways to provide a network of communicating pores. The microporous structure contains discrete submicron or low micron-sized particulate filler, the particulate filler being substantially non-agglomerated.

  13. Filling of charged cylindrical capillaries.

    PubMed

    Das, Siddhartha; Chanda, Sourayon; Eijkel, J C T; Tas, N R; Chakraborty, Suman; Mitra, Sushanta K

    2014-10-01

    We provide an analytical model to describe the filling dynamics of horizontal cylindrical capillaries having charged walls. The presence of surface charge leads to two distinct effects: It leads to a retarding electrical force on the liquid column and also causes a reduced viscous drag force because of decreased velocity gradients at the wall. Both these effects essentially stem from the spontaneous formation of an electric double layer (EDL) and the resulting streaming potential caused by the net capillary-flow-driven advection of ionic species within the EDL. Our results demonstrate that filling of charged capillaries also exhibits the well-known linear and Washburn regimes witnessed for uncharged capillaries, although the filling rate is always lower than that of the uncharged capillary. We attribute this to a competitive success of the lowering of the driving forces (because of electroviscous effects), in comparison to the effect of weaker drag forces. We further reveal that the time at which the transition between the linear and the Washburn regime occurs may become significantly altered with the introduction of surface charges, thereby altering the resultant capillary dynamics in a rather intricate manner. PMID:25375597

  14. The Effect of Volumetric Porosity on Roughness Element Drag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillies, John; Nickling, William; Nikolich, George; Etyemezian, Vicken

    2016-04-01

    Much attention has been given to understanding how the porosity of two dimensional structures affects the drag force exerted by boundary-layer flow on these flow obstructions. Porous structures such as wind breaks and fences are typically used to control the sedimentation of sand and snow particles or create micro-habitats in their lee. Vegetation in drylands also exerts control on sediment transport by wind due to aerodynamic effects and interaction with particles in transport. Recent research has also demonstrated that large spatial arrays of solid three dimensional roughness elements can be used to reduce sand transport to specified targets for control of wind erosion through the effect of drag partitioning and interaction of the moving sand with the large (>0.3 m high) roughness elements, but porous elements may improve the effectiveness of this approach. A thorough understanding of the role porosity plays in affecting the drag force on three-dimensional forms is lacking. To provide basic understanding of the relationship between the porosity of roughness elements and the force of drag exerted on them by fluid flow, we undertook a wind tunnel study that systematically altered the porosity of roughness elements of defined geometry (cubes, rectangular cylinders, and round cylinders) and measured the associated change in the drag force on the elements under similar Reynolds number conditions. The elements tested were of four basic forms: 1) same sized cubes with tubes of known diameter milled through them creating three volumetric porosity values and increasing connectivity between the tubes, 2) cubes and rectangular cylinders constructed of brass screen that nested within each other, and 3) round cylinders constructed of brass screen that nested within each other. The two-dimensional porosity, defined as the ratio of total surface area of the empty space to the solid surface area of the side of the element presented to the fluid flow was conserved at 0.519 for

  15. The effects of material attributes on capsule fill weight and weight variability in dosator nozzle machines.

    PubMed

    Faulhammer, Eva; Llusa, Marcos; Radeke, Charles; Scheibelhofer, Otto; Lawrence, Simon; Biserni, Stefano; Calzolari, Vittorio; Khinast, J G

    2014-08-25

    The goal of this work is to identify and understand the complex relationship between the material attributes, capsule fill weight and weight variability of capsules filled with a dosator nozzle machine. Six powders were characterized and filled into size-3 capsules in three volumes of dosing chambers and at two filling speeds. Subsequent multivariate data analysis was used to identify the influence of the material attributes on the capsule fill weight and weight variability. We observed a clear correlation between the capsule fill weight and the particle size, the air permeability and the compressibility. As the fill weight decreases, more factors affect capsule fill weight. For example, the wall friction angle, the tapped density, and the particle shape proved to be important factors. Larger fill weights were more affected by density while lower fill weights by flow and friction characteristics. No correlation was found between the material attributes and the weight variability. Rather, we could also see the major effect of process parameters on capsule fill weight and weight variability. PMID:24939614

  16. A Novel Porosity Model for Use in Hydrocode Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wuennemann, K.; Collins, G. S.; Melosh, H. J.

    2005-01-01

    Introduction: Numerical modeling of impact cratering has reached a high degree of sophistication; however, the treatment of porous materials still poses a large problem in hydrocode calculations. Porosity plays only a minor role in the formation of large craters on most planetary objects, but impacts on comets are believed to be highly affected by the presence of porosity, which may be as much as 80%. The upcoming Deep Impact Mission (launched January 2005) will provide more detailed data about the composition of a comet (Tempel 1) by shooting a approx.370 kg projectile onto the surface of its nucleus. The numerical simulations of such impact events requires an appropriate model for how pore space in the comet is crushed out during the violent initial stage of the impact event. Most hydro-codes compute the pressure explicitly using an "equation of state" (EOS) for each material, which relates changes in density and internal energy to changes in pressure. The added complication introduced by porosity is that changes in a material s density are due to both the closing of pore space (compaction) and compression of the matrix. The amount of resistance to volume change and the amount of irreversible work done during these two processes is very different; it is far easier to compact a porous material sample than to compress a non-porous sample of the same material. As an alternative to existing porosity models, like the Pdot(alpha) model [1], we present a novel approach for dealing with the compaction of porosity in hydrocode calculations.

  17. Binding behaviour of molecularly imprinted polymers prepared by a hierarchical approach in mesoporous silica beads of varying porosity.

    PubMed

    Baggiani, Claudio; Baravalle, Patrizia; Giovannoli, Cristina; Anfossi, Laura; Passini, Cinzia; Giraudi, Gianfranco

    2011-04-01

    One of the most interesting methods for preparing molecularly imprinted polymers with controlled morphology consists in filling the pores of silica beads with an imprinting mixture, polymerizing it and dissolving the support, leaving porous imprinted beads that are the "negative image" of the silica beads. The main advantage of such an approach consists in the easy preparation of spherical imprinted polymeric particles with narrow diameter and pore size distribution, particularly indicated for chromatographic applications. In this approach it has been shown that the resulting morphology of polymeric beads depends essentially on the porosity and surface properties of the silica beads that act as microreactors for the thermopolymerization process. Anyway, it is not yet clear if the porosity of the silica beads influences the binding properties of the resulting imprinted beads. In this paper, we report the effect of different porosities of the starting mesoporous silica beads on the resulting binding properties of imprinted polymers with molecular recognition properties towards the fungicide carbendazim. The morphological properties of the imprinted beads prepared through this hierarchical approach were measured by nitrogen adsorption porosimetry and compared with a reference imprinted material prepared by bulk polymerization. The chromatographic behaviour of HPLC columns packed with the imprinted materials were examined by eluting increasing amounts of carbendazim and extracting the binding parameters through a peak profiling approach. The experimental results obtained show that the resulting binding properties of the imprinted beads are strongly affected by the polymerization approach used but not by the initial porosity of the silica beads, with the sole exception of the binding site density, which appears to be inversely proportional to them. PMID:21349526

  18. 24. BUILDING NO. 452, ORDNANCE FACILITY (BAG CHARGE FILLING PLANT), ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. BUILDING NO. 452, ORDNANCE FACILITY (BAG CHARGE FILLING PLANT), INTERIOR VIEW LOOKING WEST AT NORTH END OF CENTRAL CORRIDOR (ROOM 3). STAIRWAY WORKBENCH WITH COMPRESSED-AIR POWERED CARTRIDGE LOADER. ARMORED PASS-THROUGH OF TRANSFER BOX FOR PASSING EXPLOSIVES MATERIALS THROUGH TO NEXT ROOM TO THE NORTH. - Picatinny Arsenal, 400 Area, Gun Bag Loading District, State Route 15 near I-80, Dover, Morris County, NJ

  19. Fracture Toughness and Slow Crack Growth Behavior of Ni-YSZ and YSZ as a Function of Porosity and Temperature.

    SciTech Connect

    Radovic, Miladin; Lara-Curzio, Edgar; Nelson, George

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we report on the fracture toughness of YSZ and Ni-YSZ and slow-crack growth behavior of Ni-YSZ at 20C and 800C. Results are presented for tests carried out in air for YSZ and in a gas mixture of 4%H2 and 96%Ar for Ni-YSZ containing various levels of porosity. The double-torsion test method was utilized to determine the fracture toughness from the peak load obtained during fast loading test specimens that had been precracked, while crack velocity versus stress intensity curves were obtained in the double torsion using hte load relaxation method. It was found that fracture toughness of these materials decreases with temperature and int he case of Ni-YSZ it also decreases with increasing porosity. The effect of temperature and microstructure, which was characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy, on the fracture behavior of these materials, is discussed.

  20. Oxide film defects in Al alloys and the formation of hydrogen- related porosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, W. D.; Gerrard, A. J.; Yue, Y.

    2016-03-01

    Double oxide film defects have also been held responsible for the origins of hydrogen porosity, where hydrogen dissolved in the Al melt passes into the interior atmosphere of the double oxide film defect causing it to inflate. However, this is in opposition to long- established evidence that H cannot readily diffuse through aluminium oxide. To investigate this further, samples of commercial purity Al were first degassed to remove their initial H content, and then heated to above their melting point and held in atmospheres of air and nitrogen respectively, to determine any differences in H pick-up. The experiment showed that samples held in an oxidising atmosphere, and having an oxide skin, picked up significantly less H than when the samples were held in a nitrogen atmosphere, which resulted in the formation of AlN in cracks in the oxide skin of the sample. It is suggested that double oxide film defects can give rise to hydrogen-related porosity, but this occurs more quickly when the oxygen in the original oxide film defect has been consumed by reaction with the surrounding melt and nitrogen reacts to form AlN, which is more permeable to H than alumina, more easily allowing the oxide film defect to give rise to a hydrogen pore. This is used to interpret results from an earlier synchrotron experiment, in which a small pore was seen to grow into a larger pore, while an adjacent large pore remained at a constant size.

  1. Correlation between porosity and space holder content at different sintering temperatures of aluminum foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rushdi, N. M. F. M.; Jamaludin, S. B.; Mazlee, M. N.; Jamal, Z. A. Z.

    2016-07-01

    Aluminum foam is the most popular metal foam that can be used as energy absorbers, heat exchangers, air-oil separators and structure core of fuel cells. Melt-foaming agent, melt-gas injection, investment casting and powder-foaming agent techniques can be used to manufacture aluminum foam, but these techniques are too expensive. In this study, the aluminum foam was manufactured via a sintering dissolution process (SDP). Powders of aluminum and sodium chloride as space holder (25, 40, 50 wt. %) were mixed together to produce a homogeneous mixture. The mixture was compacted at 200 MPa followed by sintering at 500, 550 and 600˚C for 2 hours. A warm running water stream was used to dissolve the space holder that was embedded in the aluminum. The result showed that, the space holder content performed a significant role to control the total porosity to a value between 18 and 40%, and the porosity increased with increasing content of space holder and sintering temperature.

  2. Effect of twist and porosity on the electrical conductivity of carbon nanofiber yarns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chawla, S.; Naraghi, M.; Davoudi, A.

    2013-06-01

    This study focuses on the effect of twist and porosity on the electrical conductivity of carbon nanofiber (CNF) yarns. The process of fabrication of CNF yarns included the synthesis of aligned ribbons of polyacrylonitrile (PAN) nanofibers via electrospinning. The PAN ribbons were twisted into yarns with twist levels ranging from zero twist to high twists of 1300 turn per meter (tpm). The twist imposed on the ribbons substantially improved the interactions between nanofibers and reduced the porosity. The PAN yarns were subsequently stabilized in air, and then carbonized in nitrogen at 1100 ° C for 1 h. Compressive stresses developed between the PAN nanofibers as a result of twist promoted interfusion between neighboring nanofibers, which was accelerated by heating the yarns during stabilization to temperatures above the glass transition of PAN. The electrical conductivity of the yarns was measured with a four point probe measurement technique. Although increasing the twist promotes electrical conductivity between nanofibers by forming junctions between them, our results indicate that the electrical conductivity does not continuously increase with increasing twist, but reaches a threshold value after which it starts to decrease. The causes for this behavior were studied through experimental techniques and further explored using a yarn-equivalent electrical circuit model.

  3. Estimates of frequency-dependent compressibility from a quasistatic double-porosity model

    SciTech Connect

    Berryman, J. G.; Wang, H. F.

    1998-09-16

    Gassmann's relationship between the drained and undrained bulk modulus of a porous medium is often used to relate the dry bulk modulus to the saturated bulk modulus for elastic waves, because the compressibility of air is considered so high that the dry rock behaves in a drained fashion and the frequency of elastic waves is considered so high that the saturated rock behaves in an undrained fashion. The bulk modulus calculated from ultrasonic velocities, however, often does not match the Gassmann prediction. Mavko and Jizba examined how local flow effects and unequilibrated pore pressures can lead to greater stiffnesses. Their conceptual model consists of a distribution of porosities obtained from the strain-versus-confining-pressure behavior. Stiff pores that close at higher confining pressures are considered to remain undrained (unrelaxed) while soft pores drain even for high-frequency stress changes. If the pore shape distribution is bimodal, then the rock approximately satisfies the assumptions of a double-porosity, poroelastic material. Berryman and Wang [1995] established linear constitutive equations and identified four different time scales of ow behavior: (1) totally drained, (2) soft pores are drained but stiff pores are undrained, (3) soft and stiff pores are locally equilibrated, but undrained beyond the grain scale, and (4) both soft and stiff pores are undrained. The relative magnitudes of the four associated bulk moduli will be examined for all four moduli and illustrated for several sandstones.

  4. Porosity of an Anhydrous Chondritic Interplanetary Dust Particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strait, M. M.; Thomas, K. L.; McKay, D. S.

    1995-09-01

    Determination of the density and porosity of Interplanetary Dust Particles (IDPs) is important in the dynamics of collisional and orbital evolution of small-sized particles. These measurements are also useful to suggest possible sources for IDPs based on comparisons with known extraterrestrial materials (e.g., chondrites). Previous work on IDPs shows a wide range of densities from very low (0.08 g/cm3 [1]) through low (0.3 g/cm3 [2]) to high (6.2 g/cm3 [3]), with an average density at 2.0 g/cm3 for 150 particles [2]. In another study, IDPs fall into two distinct density groups with mean values of 0.6 g/cm3 and 1.9g/cm3 [3]. In general, chondritic IDPs with lower density values most likely have appreciable porosity, suggesting they are primitive, uncompacted particles. It is believed that porosities greater than 70% are rare [2]. Sample In this study, porosity measurements were determined for one IDP, Clu17. This chondritic particle is a fragment of a large-sized IDP (L2008#5) known as a cluster particle. The cluster is composed of 53 fragments >5 micrometers in diameter; a detailed description of the cluster is given in [4]. IDP Clu17 has ~12 wt.% C and contains chondritic abundances (within 2xCI) for major elements. This fragment is dominated by fine-grained aggregates, also known as GEMS (glass with embedded metal and sulfide [5]), and contains some olivine, pyroxene, Fe-Ni sulfides, and carbonaceous material. Methods IDP Clu17 was analyzed for light elements quantitatively analysis using scanning electron microscopy and thin-window energy dispersive spectrometry [details of technique in 4]. Following the initial bulk chemical analysis, the particle was embedded in epoxy, thin sectioned using an ultramicrotome, and examined with a JEOL 2000 FX transmission electron microscope. Many of the sections were not complete; individual grains in some sections are lost during microtoming. Photos from nine of the best sections were digitized by scanning at 1200 dpi. The

  5. Porosity and distribution of water in perlite from the island of Milos, Greece.

    PubMed

    Kaufhold, Stephan; Reese, Anke; Schwiebacher, Werner; Dohrmann, Reiner; Grathoff, Georg H; Warr, Laurence N; Halisch, Matthias; Müller, Cornelia; Schwarz-Schampera, Ulrich; Ufer, Kristian

    2014-01-01

    A perlite sample representative of an operating mine in Milos was investigated with respect to the type and spatial distribution of water. A set of different methods was used which finally provided a consistent view on the water at least in this perlite. Infrared spectroscopy showed the presence of different water species (molecular water and hydroxyl groups / strongly bound water). The presence of more than 0.5 mass% smectite, however, could be excluded considering the cation exchange capacity results. The dehydration measured by thermal analysis occurred over a wide range of temperatures hence confirming the infrared spectroscopical results. Both methods point to the existence of a continuous spectrum of water binding energies. The spatial distribution of water and/or pores was investigated using different methods (CT: computer tomography, FIB: scanning electron microscopy including focused ion beam technology, IRM: infrared microscopy). Computer tomography (CT) showed large macropores (20 - 100 μm) and additionally revealed a mottled microstructure of the silicate matrix with low density areas up to a few μm in diameter. Scanning electron microscopy (FIB) confirmed the presence of μm sized pores and IRM showed the filling of these pores with water. In summary, two types of pores were found. Airfilled 20 - 100 μm pores and μm-sized pores disseminated in the glass matrix containing at least some water. Porosity measurements indicate a total porosity of 26 Vol%, 11 Vol% corresponding to the μm-sized pores. It remains unsolved wether the water in the μm-sized pores entered after or throughout perlite formation. However, the pores are sealed and no indications of cracks were found which indicated a primary source of the water, i.e. water was probably entrapped by quenching of the lava. The water in these pores may be the main reason for the thermal expandability which results in the extraordinarily porous expanded perlite building materials. PMID:25392772

  6. 40 CFR 63.5714 - How do I demonstrate compliance if I use filled resins?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true How do I demonstrate compliance if I use filled resins? 63.5714 Section 63.5714 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES National Emission Standards...

  7. Numerical Study to Examine the Effect of Porosity on In-Flight Particle Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamnis, S.; Gu, S.; Vardavoulias, M.

    2011-03-01

    High velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) thermal spray has been widely used to deposit hard composite materials such as WC-Co powders for wear-resistant applications. Powder morphology varies according to production methods while new powder manufacturing techniques produce porous powders containing air voids which are not interconnected. The porous microstructure within the powder will influence in-flight thermal and aerodynamic behavior of particles which is expected to be different from fully solid powder. This article is devoted to study the heat and momentum transfer in a HVOF sprayed WC-Co particles with different sizes and porosity levels. The results highlight the importance of thermal gradients inside the particles as a result of microporosity and how HVOF operating parameters need to be modified considering such temperature gradient.

  8. Reversibly switching the surface porosity of a DNA tetrahedron.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chuan; Tian, Cheng; Li, Xiang; Qian, Hang; Hao, Chenhui; Jiang, Wen; Mao, Chengde

    2012-07-25

    The ability to reversibly switch the surface porosity of nanocages would allow controllable matter transport in and out of the nanocages. This would be a desirable property for many technological applications, such as drug delivery. To achieve such capability, however, is challenging. Herein we report a strategy for reversibly changing the surface porosity of a self-assembled DNA nanocage (a DNA tetrahedron) that is based on DNA hydridization and strand displacement. The involved DNA nanostructures were thoroughly characterized by multiple techniques, including polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, dynamic light scattering, atomic force microscopy, and cryogenic electron microscopy. This work may lead to the design and construction of stimuli-responsive nanocages that might find applications as smart materials. PMID:22800434

  9. Constitutive Theory for Velocity Dispersion in Rock with Dual Porosity

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, H F; Berryman, J G

    2002-03-28

    The high frequency behavior of the bulk modulus of fluid-saturated rock can be obtained from a double-porosity constitutive model, which is a direct conceptual extension of Biot's (1941) constitutive equations and which provides additional stiffening due to unrelaxed induced pore pressures in the soft porosity phase. Modeling the stiffening of the shear modulus at high frequency requires an effective medium average over the unequal induced pore pressures in cracks of different orientations. The implicit assumptions are that pore fluid equilibration does not occur between cracks of different orientations and between cracks and porous matrix. The correspondence between the constitutive equations of Berryman and Wang (1995) and Mavko and Jizba (1991) is explicitly noted.

  10. Stresses, deformations and porosities in standard fracture specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Fashang Ma; Zhenbang Kuang,

    1994-02-01

    The stresses, deformations and porosities in vicinity of a blunting crack in different specimens were studied by a large-deformation finite element method. The presence and subsequent growth of smaller-scale voids were taken into account by using a modified Gurson model to describe the constitutive behavior of the material. The dependence of the stresses, deformations and porosities on specimen configurations was associated with the crack-tip constraint. The results showed that the constraint of different specimens was lower than that of the HRR singularity. The interaction between a crack and a hole in CT specimen was analyzed, and the results showed that the critical COD (crack tip opening displacement) was larger than that obtained in SSY model. The complete loss of the total carrying capacity in a ligament between the crack-tip and the hole was recommended as a crack initiation criterion.

  11. Porosity Measurement in Laminated Composites by Thermography and FEA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Tsuchin Philip; Russell, Samuel S.; Walker, James L.; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents the correlation between the through-thickness thermal diffusivity and the porosity of composites. Finite element analysis (FEA) was used to determine the transient thermal response of composites that were subjected to laser heating. A series of finite element models were built and thermal responses for isotropic and orthographic materials with various thermal diffusivities subjected to different heating conditions were investigated. Experiments were conducted to verify the models and to estimate the unknown parameters such as the amount of heat flux. The analysis and experimental results show good correlation between thermal diffusivity and porosity in the composite materials. They also show that both laser and flash heating can be used effectively to obtain thermal diffusivity. The current infrared thermography system is developed for use with flash heating. The laser heating models and the FEA results can provide useful tools to develop practical thermal diffusivity measurement scheme using laser heat.

  12. Carbon composition with hierarchical porosity, and methods of preparation

    DOEpatents

    Mayes, Richard T; Dai, Sheng

    2014-10-21

    A method for fabricating a porous carbon material possessing a hierarchical porosity, the method comprising subjecting a precursor composition to a curing step followed by a carbonization step, the precursor composition comprising: (i) a templating component comprised of a block copolymer, (ii) a phenolic component, (iii) a dione component in which carbonyl groups are adjacent, and (iv) an acidic component, wherein said carbonization step comprises heating the precursor composition at a carbonizing temperature for sufficient time to convert the precursor composition to a carbon material possessing a hierarchical porosity comprised of mesopores and macropores. Also described are the resulting hierarchical porous carbon material, a capacitive deionization device in which the porous carbon material is incorporated, as well as methods for desalinating water by use of said capacitive deionization device.

  13. Toughening Mechanisms in Silica-Filled Epoxy Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Binay S.

    and modeled fracture energy results. Furthermore, the contribution of microcracking was most prevalent at lower filler contents which suggests that the presence of microcracking may account for the previously unexplained improvements in fracture behavior attained in silica-filled epoxy nanocomposites at low filler contents. Secondly, surface modification through the application of three different propriety surface treatments ("A", "B" and "C") was found to greatly influence the processibility and fracture behavior of silica-filled epoxy nanocomposites. B-treated silica nanoparticles were found to readily form micron-scale agglomerates, settled during nanocomposite curing and showed no improvement in fracture toughness with increasing filler content. In contrast, the nanocomposites consisting of A-treated and C-treated silica nanoparticles yielded morphologies primarily containing well-dispersed nanoparticles. Therefore, fracture toughness improved with increasing filler content. Finally, particle porosity was found to have no significant effect on fracture behavior for the range of silica-filled epoxy nanocomposites investigated. Lower density porous silica nanoparticles were just as effective toughening agents as higher density non-porous silica nanoparticles. Consequently, the potential exists for the use of toughened-epoxies in lightweight structural applications.

  14. The effective porosity and grain size relations in permeability functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urumović, K.; Urumović, K., Sr.

    2014-06-01

    Hydrogeological parameters of coherent and incoherent deposits are deeply dependent of their granulometric characteristics. These relations were shaped in formulas and defaultly used for calculation of hydraulic conductivity, and are valid only for uniform incoherent materials, mostly sands. In this paper, the results of analyses of permeability and specific surface area as a function of granulometric composition of various sediments - from siltey clays to very well graded gravels are presented. The effective porosity and the referential grain size are presented as fundamental granulometric parameters which express an effect of forces operating fluid movement through the saturated porous media. Suggested procedures for calculating referential grain size and determining effective (flow) porosity result with parameters that reliably determine specific surface area and permeability. These procedures ensure successful appliance of Kozeny-Carman model up to the limits of validity of Darcy's law. The value of an effective porosity in function of referential mean grain size has been calibrated within range from 1.5 μm to 6.0 mm. Reliability of these parameters application in KC model was confirmed by very high correlation between predicted and tested hydraulic conductivity - R2 = 0.99 for sandy and gravelly materials and R2 = 0.70 for clayey-siltey materials. Group representation of hydraulic conductivity (ranged from 10-12 m s-1 up to 10-2 m s-1) presents coefficient of correlation R2 = 0.97, for total sum of 175 samples of various deposits. These results present the new road to researches of porous material's effective porosity, permeability and specific surface area distribution, since these three parameters are critical conditions for successful groundwater flow modelling and contaminant transport. From the practical point of view, it is very important to be able to identify these parameters swiftly, cheaply and very accurately.

  15. Dehydration-induced porosity waves and episodic tremor and slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skarbek, Rob M.; Rempel, Alan W.

    2016-02-01

    Episodic tremor and slip (ETS) along the subduction interface takes place where there is abundant evidence for elevated, near-lithostatic pore pressures, at sufficiently great depths (30-45 km) that chemical dehydration reactions must act as their dominant source. We simulate fluid and heat flow while tracking the location of a vertically oriented, one-dimensional column of material as it subducts through the slow slip and tremor zone. The material in the column is transformed through a pressure-dependent and temperature-dependent dehydration reaction that we describe with a generalized nonlinear kinetic rate law. Column deformation is largely dominated by viscous creep, with a closure rate that depends linearly on porosity. This behavior causes the dehydration reaction to generate traveling porosity waves that transport increased fluid pressures within the slow slip region. To explore the possibility that the observed periodicity of slow slip and tremor in subduction zones can be explained by the migration of such porosity waves, we derive a dispersion relation that accurately describes our numerical results. We also obtain an expression for how the thickness of the dehydrating layer is expected to vary as a function of the parameters in the reaction rate law. Although the amplitudes of pore pressure perturbations rival those that are produced by known external forcings (e.g., tides or passing surface waves), our analysis suggests that given reasonable estimates of rock viscosity, permeabilities in the range 6.5×10-15 to 5×10-10 m2 are required for porosity wave trains to form at periods comparable to those of slow slip and tremor.

  16. Dependence of tablet brittleness on tensile strength and porosity.

    PubMed

    Gong, Xingchu; Chang, Shao-Yu; Osei-Yeboah, Frederick; Paul, Shubhajit; Perumalla, Sathyanarayana Reddy; Shi, Limin; Sun, Wei-Jhe; Zhou, Qun; Sun, Changquan Calvin

    2015-09-30

    An analysis of data collected from 25 sets of diverse pharmaceutical powders has identified that an exponential growth function satisfactorily describes the relationship between tablet brittleness and tablet porosity while a power law function well describes the relationship between tablet brittleness and tensile strength. These equations have the potential to facilitate better characterization of tablet mechanical properties and to guide the design and optimization of pharmaceutical tablet products. PMID:26226338

  17. 7 CFR 58.923 - Filling containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Filling containers. 58.923 Section 58.923 Agriculture... Procedures § 58.923 Filling containers. (a) The filling of small containers with product shall be done in a sanitary manner. The containers shall not contaminate or detract from the quality of the product in any...

  18. Filling of carbon nanotubes and nanofibres

    PubMed Central

    Gately, Reece D

    2015-01-01

    Summary The reliable production of carbon nanotubes and nanofibres is a relatively new development, and due to their unique structure, there has been much interest in filling their hollow interiors. In this review, we provide an overview of the most common approaches for filling these carbon nanostructures. We highlight that filled carbon nanostructures are an emerging material for biomedical applications. PMID:25821693

  19. Injectable polyHIPEs as high-porosity bone grafts.

    PubMed

    Moglia, Robert S; Holm, Jennifer L; Sears, Nicholas A; Wilson, Caitlin J; Harrison, Dawn M; Cosgriff-Hernandez, Elizabeth

    2011-10-10

    Polymerization of high internal phase emulsions (polyHIPEs) is a relatively new method for the production of high-porosity scaffolds. The tunable architecture of these polyHIPE foams makes them attractive candidates for tissue engineered bone grafts. Previously studied polyHIPE systems require either toxic diluents or high cure temperatures which prohibit their use as an injectable bone graft. In contrast, we have developed an injectable polyHIPE that cures at physiological temperatures to a rigid, high-porosity foam. First, a biodegradable macromer, propylene fumarate dimethacrylate (PFDMA), was synthesized that has appropriate viscosity and hydrophobicity for emulsification. The process of surfactant selection is detailed with particular focus on the key structural features of both polymer (logP values, hydrogen bond acceptor sites) and surfactant (HLB values, hydrogen bond donor sites) that enable stable HIPE formation. Incubation of HIPEs at 37 °C was used to initiate radical cross-linking of the unsaturated double bond of the methacrylate groups to polymerize the continuous phase and lock in the emulsion geometry. The resulting polyHIPEs exhibited ~75% porosity, pore sizes ranging from 4 to 29 μm, and an average compressive modulus and strength of 33 and 5 MPa, respectively. These findings highlight the great potential of these scaffolds as injectable, tissue engineered bone grafts. PMID:21861465

  20. Revisiting the statistical analysis of pyroclast density and porosity data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, B.; Kueppers, U.; Ortiz, H.

    2015-03-01

    Explosive volcanic eruptions are commonly characterized based on a thorough analysis of the generated deposits. Amongst other characteristics in physical volcanology, density and porosity of juvenile clasts are some of the most frequently used characteristics to constrain eruptive dynamics. In this study, we evaluate the sensitivity of density and porosity data and introduce a weighting parameter to correct issues raised by the use of frequency analysis. Results of textural investigation can be biased by clast selection. Using statistical tools as presented here, the meaningfulness of a conclusion can be checked for any dataset easily. This is necessary to define whether or not a sample has met the requirements for statistical relevance, i.e. whether a dataset is large enough to allow for reproducible results. Graphical statistics are used to describe density and porosity distributions, similar to those used for grain-size analysis. This approach helps with the interpretation of volcanic deposits. To illustrate this methodology we chose two large datasets: (1) directed blast deposits of the 3640-3510 BC eruption of Chachimbiro volcano (Ecuador) and (2) block-and-ash-flow deposits of the 1990-1995 eruption of Unzen volcano (Japan). We propose add the use of this analysis for future investigations to check the objectivity of results achieved by different working groups and guarantee the meaningfulness of the interpretation.

  1. Injectable PolyHIPEs as High Porosity Bone Grafts

    PubMed Central

    Moglia, Robert S.; Holm, Jennifer L.; Sears, Nicholas A.; Wilson, Caitlin J.; Harrison, Dawn M.; Cosgriff-Hernandez, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    Polymerization of high internal phase emulsions (polyHIPEs) is a relatively new method for the production of high porosity scaffolds. The tunable architecture of these polyHIPE foams make them attractive candidates for tissue engineered bone grafts. Previously studied polyHIPE systems require either toxic diluents or high cure temperatures which prohibit their use as an injectable bone graft. In contrast, we have developed an injectable polyHIPE that cures at physiological temperatures to a rigid, high-porosity foam. First, a biodegradable macromer, propylene fumarate dimethacrylate (PFDMA), was synthesized that has appropriate viscosity and hydrophobicity for emulsification. The process of surfactant selection is detailed with particular focus on the key structural features of both polymer (log P values, hydrogen bond acceptor sites) and surfactant (HLB values, hydrogen bond donor sites) that enable stable HIPE formation. Incubation of HIPEs at 37°C was used to initiate radical crosslinking of the unsaturated double bond of the methacrylate groups to polymerize the continuous phase and lock in the emulsion geometry. The resulting polyHIPEs exhibited ~75% porosity, pore sizes ranging from 4 to 29 μm, and an average compressive modulus and strength of 33 and 5 MPa, respectively. These findings highlight the great potential of these scaffolds as injectable, tissue engineered bone grafts. PMID:21861465

  2. Compost addition reduces porosity and chlordecone transfer in soil microstructure.

    PubMed

    Woignier, Thierry; Clostre, Florence; Fernandes, Paula; Rangon, Luc; Soler, Alain; Lesueur-Jannoyer, Magalie

    2016-01-01

    Chlordecone, an organochlorine insecticide, pollutes soils and contaminates crops and water resources and is biomagnified by food chains. As chlordecone is partly trapped in the soil, one possible alternative to decontamination may be to increase its containment in the soil, thereby reducing its diffusion into the environment. Containing the pesticide in the soil could be achieved by adding compost because the pollutant has an affinity for organic matter. We hypothesized that adding compost would also change soil porosity, as well as transport and containment of the pesticide. We measured the pore features and studied the nanoscale structure to assess the effect of adding compost on soil microstructure. We simulated changes in the transport properties (hydraulic conductivity and diffusion) associated with changes in porosity. During compost incubation, the clay microstructure collapsed due to capillary stresses. Simulated data showed that the hydraulic conductivity and diffusion coefficient were reduced by 95 and 70% in the clay microstructure, respectively. Reduced transport properties affected pesticide mobility and thus helped reduce its transfer from the soil to water and to the crop. We propose that the containment effect is due not only to the high affinity of chlordecone for soil organic matter but also to a trapping mechanism in the soil porosity. PMID:26250815

  3. Computer Based Porosity Design by Multi Phase Topology Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burblies, Andreas; Busse, Matthias

    2008-02-01

    A numerical simulation technique called Multi Phase Topology Optimization (MPTO) based on finite element method has been developed and refined by Fraunhofer IFAM during the last five years. MPTO is able to determine the optimum distribution of two or more different materials in components under thermal and mechanical loads. The objective of optimization is to minimize the component's elastic energy. Conventional topology optimization methods which simulate adaptive bone mineralization have got the disadvantage that there is a continuous change of mass by growth processes. MPTO keeps all initial material concentrations and uses methods adapted from molecular dynamics to find energy minimum. Applying MPTO to mechanically loaded components with a high number of different material densities, the optimization results show graded and sometimes anisotropic porosity distributions which are very similar to natural bone structures. Now it is possible to design the macro- and microstructure of a mechanical component in one step. Computer based porosity design structures can be manufactured by new Rapid Prototyping technologies. Fraunhofer IFAM has applied successfully 3D-Printing and Selective Laser Sintering methods in order to produce very stiff light weight components with graded porosities calculated by MPTO.

  4. Reduction of Wake-Stator Interaction Noise Using Passive Porosity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinetti, Ana F.; Kelly, Jeffrey J.; Thomas, Russell H.; Bauer, Steven X. S.

    2002-01-01

    The present study was conducted to assess the potential of Passive Porosity Technology as a mechanism to reduce interaction noise in turbomachinery by reducing the fluctuating forces acting on the vane surfaces. To do so, a typical fan stator airfoil was subjected to the effects of a transversely moving wake; time histories of the primitive aerodynamic variables, obtained from Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) solutions, were then input into an acoustic prediction code. This procedure was performed on the solid airfoil to obtain a baseline, and on a series of porous configurations in order to isolate those that yield maximum noise reductions without compromising the aerodynamic performance of the stator. It was found that communication between regions of high pressure differential - made possible by the use of passive porosity - is necessary to significantly alter the noise radiation pattern of the stator airfoil. In general, noise reductions were obtained for those configurations incorporating passive porosity in the region between x/c is approximately 0.15 on the suction side of the airfoil and x/c is approximately 0.20 on the pressure side. Reductions in overall radiated noise of approximately 1.0 dB were obtained. The noise benefit increased to about 2.5 dB when the effects of loading noise alone were considered.

  5. Core image analysis of matrix porosity in The Geysers reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Nielson, Dennis L.; Nash, Greg; Hulen, Jeffrey B.; Tripp, Alan C.

    1993-01-28

    Adsorption is potentially an important consideration when calculating reserves at The Geysers. Our investigations of the mineralogical relationships in core samples have shown matrix pore spaces to be largely associated with fractures. Dissolution of calcite from hydrothermal veins increases porosity in the graywacke reservoir. The high relative surface area of secondary alteration phases could promote adsorption. In order to quantify porosity distribution and surface area, Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) images were analyzed using software developed for the interpretation of satellite imagery, This software classifies the images as either crystal or pore and then accumulates data on pore size, total porosity and surface area of the mineral-pore interface. Review of literature shows that data on thickness of adsorbed water layer does not exist for many of the mineral phases of interest in The Geysers. We have assumed thicknesses of 10, 100, and 5300 Angstroms for the adsorbed layer and calculated the relative proportions of adsorbed water. These calculations show 0.005%, 0.05%, and 2.5% of total water would be adsorbed using the above thicknesses.

  6. Emulsion Inks for 3D Printing of High Porosity Materials.

    PubMed

    Sears, Nicholas A; Dhavalikar, Prachi S; Cosgriff-Hernandez, Elizabeth M

    2016-08-01

    Photocurable emulsion inks for use with solid freeform fabrication (SFF) to generate constructs with hierarchical porosity are presented. A high internal phase emulsion (HIPE) templating technique was utilized to prepare water-in-oil emulsions from a hydrophobic photopolymer, surfactant, and water. These HIPEs displayed strong shear thinning behavior that permitted layer-by-layer deposition into complex shapes and adequately high viscosity at low shear for shape retention after extrusion. Each layer was actively polymerized with an ultraviolet cure-on-dispense (CoD) technique and compositions with sufficient viscosity were able to produce tall, complex scaffolds with an internal lattice structure and microscale porosity. Evaluation of the rheological and cure properties indicated that the viscosity and cure rate both played an important role in print fidelity. These 3D printed polyHIPE constructs benefit from the tunable pore structure of emulsion templated material and the designed architecture of 3D printing. As such, these emulsion inks can be used to create ultra high porosity constructs with complex geometries and internal lattice structures not possible with traditional manufacturing techniques. PMID:27305061

  7. Revisiting the statistical analysis of pyroclast density and porosity data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, B.; Kueppers, U.; Ortiz, H.

    2015-07-01

    Explosive volcanic eruptions are commonly characterized based on a thorough analysis of the generated deposits. Amongst other characteristics in physical volcanology, density and porosity of juvenile clasts are some of the most frequently used to constrain eruptive dynamics. In this study, we evaluate the sensitivity of density and porosity data to statistical methods and introduce a weighting parameter to correct issues raised by the use of frequency analysis. Results of textural investigation can be biased by clast selection. Using statistical tools as presented here, the meaningfulness of a conclusion can be checked for any data set easily. This is necessary to define whether or not a sample has met the requirements for statistical relevance, i.e. whether a data set is large enough to allow for reproducible results. Graphical statistics are used to describe density and porosity distributions, similar to those used for grain-size analysis. This approach helps with the interpretation of volcanic deposits. To illustrate this methodology, we chose two large data sets: (1) directed blast deposits of the 3640-3510 BC eruption of Chachimbiro volcano (Ecuador) and (2) block-and-ash-flow deposits of the 1990-1995 eruption of Unzen volcano (Japan). We propose the incorporation of this analysis into future investigations to check the objectivity of results achieved by different working groups and guarantee the meaningfulness of the interpretation.

  8. Interaction of Porosity with a Planar Solid/Liquid Interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Catalina, Adrian V.; Stefanescu, Doru M.; Sen, Subhayu; Kaukler, William F.

    2004-01-01

    In this article, an investigation of the interaction between gas porosity and a planar solid/liquid (SL) interface is reported. A two-dimensional numerical model able to accurately track sharp SL interfaces during solidification of pure metals and alloys is proposed. The finite-difference method and a rectangular undeformed grid are used for computation. The SL interface is described through the points of intersection with the grid lines. Its motion is determined by the thermal and solute gradients at each particular point. Changes of the interface temperature because of capillarity or solute redistribution as well as any perturbation of the thermal and solute field produced by the presence of non-metallic inclusions can be computed. To validate the model, the dynamics of the interaction between a gas pore and a solidification front in metal alloys was observed using a state of the art X-ray transmission microscope (XTM). The experiments included observation of the distortion of the SL interface near a pore, real-time measurements of the growth rate, and the change in shape of the porosity during interaction with the SL interface in pure Al and Al-0.25 wt pct Au alloy. In addition, porosity-induced solute segregation patterns surrounding a pore were also quantified.

  9. Effective Thermal Conductivity of High Porosity Open Cell Nickel Foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullins, Alan D.; Daryabeigi, Kamran

    2001-01-01

    The effective thermal conductivity of high-porosity open cell nickel foam samples was measured over a wide range of temperatures and pressures using a standard steady-state technique. The samples, measuring 23.8 mm, 18.7 mm, and 13.6 mm in thickness, were constructed with layers of 1.7 mm thick foam with a porosity of 0.968. Tests were conducted with the specimens subjected to temperature differences of 100 to 1000 K across the thickness and at environmental pressures of 10(exp -4) to 750 mm Hg. All test were conducted in a gaseous nitrogen environment. A one-dimensional finite volume numerical model was developed to model combined radiation/conduction heat transfer in the foam. The radiation heat transfer was modeled using the two-flux approximation. Solid and gas conduction were modeled using standard techniques for high porosity media. A parameter estimation technique was used in conjunction with the measured and predicted thermal conductivities at pressures of 10(exp -4) and 750 mm Hg to determine the extinction coefficient, albedo of scattering, and weighting factors for modeling the conduction thermal conductivity. The measured and predicted conductivities over the intermediate pressure values differed by 13%.

  10. Interaction of Porosity with a Planar Solid/Liquid Interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Catalina, Adrian V.; Stefanescu, Doru M.; Sen, Subhayu; Kaukler, William K.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, an investigation of the interaction between gas porosity and a planar solid/liquid (SL) interface is reported. A two-dimensional numerical model able to accurately track sharp SL interfaces during solidification of pure metals and alloys is proposed. The finite difference method and a rectangular undeformed grid are used for computation. The SL interface is described through the points of intersection with the grid lines. Its motion is determined by the thermal and solute gradients at each particular point. Changes of the interface temperature because of capillarity or solute redistribution as well as any perturbation of the thermal and solute field produced by the presence of non-metallic inclusions can be computed. To validate the model, the dynamics of the interaction between a gas pore and a solidification front in metal alloys was observed using a state of the art X-ray Transmission Microscope. The experiments included observation of the distortion of the SL interface near a pore, real-time measurements of the growth rate and the change in shape of the porosity during interaction with an advancing SL interface in pure Al and Al-0.25 wt% Au alloy. In addition, porosity induced solute segregation patterns surrounding a pore were also quantified.

  11. Defect-enhanced void filling and novel filled phases of open-structure skutterudites

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Xi, Lili; Qiu, Yuting; Zhang, Wenqing; Chen, Lidong; Singh, David J.; Yang, Jihui

    2015-05-14

    Here, we report the design of novel filled CoSb3 skutterudite phases based on a combination of filling and Sb-substituted Ga/In defects. Ga/In doped skutterudite phases with Li-, Nd-, and Sm-fillings can be formed via this strategy, which can have relatively wider ranges of carrier concentration than other conventional filled skutterudite phases.

  12. Defect-enhanced void filling and novel filled phases of open-structure skutterudites

    SciTech Connect

    Xi, Lili; Qiu, Yuting; Zhang, Wenqing; Chen, Lidong; Singh, David J.; Yang, Jihui

    2015-05-14

    Here, we report the design of novel filled CoSb3 skutterudite phases based on a combination of filling and Sb-substituted Ga/In defects. Ga/In doped skutterudite phases with Li-, Nd-, and Sm-fillings can be formed via this strategy, which can have relatively wider ranges of carrier concentration than other conventional filled skutterudite phases.

  13. Fatigue Crack and Porosity Measurement in Composite Materials by Thermographic and Ultrasonic Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, James L.; Russell, Samuel S.; Suits, Michael W.; Workman, Gary L.

    2003-01-01

    Contents include the following: 1. Purpose. Detect thermo-mechanically induced intra-ply fatigue microcracking and manufactured porosity in unlined composite pressure vessels. 2. Defect descriptions. Porosity, microcracking. 3. Thermography. Overview of technique. Strengths and Weaknesses. Examples of its use for porosity detection. 4. Resonant ultrasound spectroscopy. Overview of technique. Strengths and Weaknesses. Examples of its use for microcracking detection. Conclusions.

  14. Thermal Performance Evaluation of Walls with Gas Filled Panel Insulation

    SciTech Connect

    Shrestha, Som S.; Desjarlais, Andre Omer; Atchley, Jerald Allen

    2014-11-01

    Gas filled insulation panels (GFP) are very light weight and compact (when uninflated) advanced insulation products. GFPs consist of multiple layers of thin, low emittance (low-e) metalized aluminum. When expanded, the internal, low-e aluminum layers form a honeycomb structure. These baffled polymer chambers are enveloped by a sealed barrier and filled with either air or a low-conductivity gas. The sealed exterior aluminum foil barrier films provide thermal resistance, flammability protection, and properties to contain air or a low conductivity inert gas. This product was initially developed with a grant from the U.S. Department of Energy. The unexpanded product is nearly flat for easy storage and transport. Therefore, transportation volume and weight of the GFP to fill unit volume of wall cavity is much smaller compared to that of other conventional insulation products. This feature makes this product appealing to use at Army Contingency Basing, when transportation cost is significant compared to the cost of materials. The objective of this study is to evaluate thermal performance of walls, similar to those used at typical Barracks Hut (B-Hut) hard shelters, when GFPs are used in the wall cavities. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) tested performance of the wall in the rotatable guarded hotbox (RGHB) according to the ASTM C 1363 standard test method.

  15. Investigation and calculation of filling factor of SnO2 inverse opal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jinquan; Wu, Shimin; Ji, Xiaoyuan; Li, Jinpeng; Zhang, Rong; Zhang, Ming

    2016-04-01

    In the process of preparing inverse opal, the structure of inverse opal is affected by many factors, and the filling factor of inverse opal is difficult to directly test. In this paper, SnO2 inverse opal was prepared with the sol–gel method by cooperative opal template. The repetition times of the infiltrating precursor into the opal templates were investigated in detail. The band-gap positions of SnO2 inverse opal were tested. In order to prepare perfect inverse opal structure, the filling quantity of the precursor is greater, as the diameter of the PS microsphere of opal is bigger. The filling factor of air in inverse opal can be calculated with a formula derived from Bragg’s law. For inverse opal, the filling factor of air in inverse opal gradually enlarges as the diameter of the void increases.

  16. System-level simulation of liquid filling in microfluidic chips.

    PubMed

    Song, Hongjun; Wang, Yi; Pant, Kapil

    2011-06-01

    Liquid filling in microfluidic channels is a complex process that depends on a variety of geometric, operating, and material parameters such as microchannel geometry, flow velocity∕pressure, liquid surface tension, and contact angle of channel surface. Accurate analysis of the filling process can provide key insights into the filling time, air bubble trapping, and dead zone formation, and help evaluate trade-offs among the various design parameters and lead to optimal chip design. However, efficient modeling of liquid filling in complex microfluidic networks continues to be a significant challenge. High-fidelity computational methods, such as the volume of fluid method, are prohibitively expensive from a computational standpoint. Analytical models, on the other hand, are primarily applicable to idealized geometries and, hence, are unable to accurately capture chip level behavior of complex microfluidic systems. This paper presents a parametrized dynamic model for the system-level analysis of liquid filling in three-dimensional (3D) microfluidic networks. In our approach, a complex microfluidic network is deconstructed into a set of commonly used components, such as reservoirs, microchannels, and junctions. The components are then assembled according to their spatial layout and operating rationale to achieve a rapid system-level model. A dynamic model based on the transient momentum equation is developed to track the liquid front in the microchannels. The principle of mass conservation at the junction is used to link the fluidic parameters in the microchannels emanating from the junction. Assembly of these component models yields a set of differential and algebraic equations, which upon integration provides temporal information of the liquid filling process, particularly liquid front propagation (i.e., the arrival time). The models are used to simulate the transient liquid filling process in a variety of microfluidic constructs and in a multiplexer, representing a

  17. Simulating Woodchip Bioreactor Performance Using a Dual-Porosity Model.

    PubMed

    Jaynes, Dan B; Moorman, Tom B; Parkin, Timothy B; Kaspar, Tom C

    2016-05-01

    There is a general understanding in the scientific community as to how denitrifying bioreactors operate, but we lack a quantitative understanding of the details of the denitrification process acting within them and comprehensive models for simulating their performance. We hypothesized that nitrate transport through woodchip bioreactors would be best described by a dual-porosity transport model where the bioreactor water is divided into a mobile domain (i.e., the water between the woodchips where it is free to flow and solute movement is by advection and dispersion) and an immobile domain of water (i.e., the water mostly within the woodchips that is stagnant and where solute movement is by diffusion alone). We calibrated the dual-porosity model contained in the HYDRUS model for a woodchip bioreactor using the results of a Br breakthrough experiment where we treated Br as a conservative nonadsorbing tracer. We then used the resulting model parameters to describe 2 yr of NO transport and denitrification within a bioreactor supplied by tile drainage. The only model parameters fitted to the NO data were either the zero- or first-order denitrification rate and its temperature dependence. The bioreactor denitrified 2.23 kg N (38%) of the NO entering it in 2013 and 3.73 kg N (49%) of the NO that entered it in 2014. The dual-porosity model fit the NO data very well, with fitted zero-order reaction rates of 8.7 and 6.8 mg N L d in 2013 and 2014, respectively, and corresponding first-order reaction rates of 0.99 and 1.02 d. For the 2-yr data set, both reaction rate models fit the data equally well. Consistent model parameters fitted for the 2 yr indicated that the model used was robust and a promising approach for modeling fate and transport of NO in woodchip bioreactors. PMID:27136148

  18. Porosity, mechanical strength and permeability variations associated with the presence of stylolites in carbonate rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolland, A.; Baud, P.; Heap, M. J.; Meredith, P. G.; Reuschlé, T.

    2011-12-01

    Stylolites are serrated planar features that form as a result of pressure-dissolution (i.e., due to the dissolution of calcite in stressed zones). They usually form orientated perpendicular to the maximum principal stress during their development (weight of the overburden or maximum tectonic stress). They typically form clay-enriched seams; and can sometimes reach a few hundred metres in length. The pores surrounding the stylolites are also often filled with precipitation material. Stylolites are ubiquitous features in carbonate rocks (and are also found in sandstones). Hence, they could potentially play an important role in modifying the transport and mechanical properties of their host rock. In this study, we conducted systematic porosity and permeability measurements on stylolite rich cores from limestone formations surrounding the Andra Underground Research Laboratory (URL) at Bure in the south of the Meuse district, France. Eight different limestones from the Dogger and Oxfordian ages were selected for study. The rocks are essentially composed of pure calcite and their average porosities range between 2 and 18%. Porosity measurements (performed by the water saturation technique) revealed a systematic increase of the porosity in the area approaching the stylolites, with respect to the stylolite free material. This was also visible on X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) images performed at resolutions between 4 to 40 microns. These measurements were made for two typical examples from the Dogger and Oxfordian formations. A suite of permeability measurements (using both gas and water) were performed under different hydrostatic conditions on samples specially prepared to contain either: (1) no stylolites, (2) stylolites parallel to the imposed flow and, (3) stylolites perpendicular to the imposed flow. Our new data showed that the presence of stylolites was associated, in all cases, with a moderate increase in permeability relative to stylolite-free material. A weak

  19. Porosity structures in synthetic quartz veins examined by micro X-ray CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, R.; Okamoto, A.; Saishu, H.; Nakamura, M.; Okumura, S.; Sasaki, O.; Tsuchiya, N.

    2013-12-01

    Ubiquitous occurrences of quartz veins suggest that dissolution/precipitation of silica provides significant effects on the hydrological and mechanical properties within the crust. For example, a model has been proposed that fracture sealing processes control the change of pore fluid pressure and thus earthquake cycle. Previous studies on natural quartz veins have focused on estimates of P-T conditions, stress and strain fields and fluid compositions; however, details of dynamics of fluid flow and how fractures are sealed during vein formation are still unclear. In this study, we synthesized quartz veins by the hydrothermal experiments, and observed the aperture structures by using X-ray CT. The purpose of this study is to clarify how aperture structures evolve during vein formation especially focusing on effect of the state of water (vapor and supercritical region). We conducted the hydrothermal flow-through experiments for quartz precipitation from Si-supersaturated solutions under supercritical (430C, 30MPa) and vapor condition (370C, 20MPa). The experimental apparatus consists of two vessels for preparation of the Si-supersaturated solution and for precipitation, respectively. The precipitation vessel has double-structure: the main flow path was the inner alumina tube (diameter=4mm), and the outer SUS tube was filled with static solutions. Two situations were examined as the inner tubes; one is porous media composed of closed packed alumina balls(1mm in size), and the other one is fracture. The advantage of this system is that we can take out the non-destructive sample for the analyses by X-ray CT. Significant porosity reduction by silica precipitation at porous media. Under supercritical condition, amorphous silica was predominantly formed with covering the surfaces of the alumina balls and alumina tube, and discrete quartz crystal (50μm) within the amorphous silica layers. The porosity (Φ) gradually decreases with minimal porosity (Φ = 0.4) at ˜ 38mm from

  20. On the relationship between formation resistivity factor and porosity

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Rosales, C.

    1982-08-01

    A theory on the relationship between formation resistivity factor and porosity is presented. This theory considers that, from the standpoint of the flow of electric current within a porous medium saturated with a conducting fluid, the pore space can be divided into flowing and stagnant regions. This assumption leads to a general expression, and formulas currently used in practice are special cases of this expression. The validity of the new expression is established by the use of data corresponding to sandstones and packings and suspensions of particles. For the case of natural rocks, the theory confirms Darcy's equation and gives an interpretation of the physical significance of the so-called cementation exponent.

  1. Thermal and ultrasonic evaluation of porosity in composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Patrick H.; Winfree, William P.; Long, Edward R., Jr.; Kullerd, Susan M.; Nathan, N.; Partos, Richard D.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of porosity on damage incurred by low-velocity impact are investigated. Specimens of graphite/epoxy composite were fabricated with various volume fractions of voids. The void fraction was independently determined using optical examination and acid resin digestion methods. Thermal diffusivity and ultrasonic attenuation were measured, and these results were related to the void volume fraction. The relationship between diffusivity and fiber volume fraction was also considered. The slope of the ultrasonic attenuation coefficient was found to increase linearly with void content, and the diffusivity decreased linearly with void volume fraction, after compensation for an approximately linear dependence on the fiber volume fraction.

  2. Architected Materials with Ultra-Low Porosity for Vibration Control.

    PubMed

    Javid, Farhad; Wang, Pai; Shanian, Ali; Bertoldi, Katia

    2016-07-01

    Periodic structures with extremely low porosities capable of forming large band gaps-frequency ranges with strong wave attenuation-are designed by patterning an elastic sheet with an array of alternating crack-like pores separated by small ligaments. The results indicate that the presence and size of the band gaps are controlled by the smallest geometric -feature in the system (which can be easily controlled by tuning the aspect ratio of the pores), providing an important guideline for the design of systems with the -desired response. PMID:27165948

  3. Modeling the quantum efficiency of controlled porosity dispenser photocathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Z.; Jensen, K.; O'Shea, P.

    2012-01-01

    A theoretical model of diffusion, evaporation, and rejuvenation of cesium on the surface of a controlled porosity dispenser photocathode is developed. The model applies a novel hexagonal meshgrid for increased numerical accuracy. For activation temperatures within the range of 400 K-1000 K, simulation found differences of less than 5% between the quantum efficiency (QE) maximum and minimum over ideal homogenous surfaces. Simulations suggest more variation for real cases to include real surface non uniformity. Changes in the QE map across the surface suggest that the emittance can change depending on temperature. Extensions to the model as well as connections to experiment are discussed.

  4. Process of making porous ceramic materials with controlled porosity

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Marc A.; Ku, Qunyin

    1993-01-01

    A method of making metal oxide ceramic material is disclosed by which the porosity of the resulting material can be selectively controlled by manipulating the sol used to make the material. The method can be used to make a variety of metal oxide ceramic bodies, including membranes, but also pellets, plugs or other bodies. It has also been found that viscous sol materials can readily be shaped by extrusion into shapes typical of catalytic or adsorbent bodies used in industry, to facilitate the application of such materials for catalytic and adsorbent applications.

  5. Seismic Anisotropy and Velocity-Porosity Relationships in the Seafloor.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berge, Patricia A.

    In this dissertation, I investigate the structure and composition of marine sediments and the upper oceanic crust using seismic data and rock physics theories. Common marine sediments such as silty clays exhibit anisotropy because they are made up of thin sub-parallel lamellae of contrasting mineralogical composition and differing elastic properties. In 1986, Rondout Associates, Inc. and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution recorded direct shear waves in shallow marine sediments in 21-m-deep water by using a newly developed ocean-bottom shear source and a multicomponent on-bottom receiver. A nearby drill hole showed that the sediments are interbedded silty clays, clays, and sands. I used an anisotropic reflectivity program written by Geo-Pacific Corporation to produce synthetic seismograms to estimate the five independent elastic stiffnesses necessary for describing transverse isotropy, the form of anisotropy found in these sediments. The synthetics fit the vertical and two horizontal components for two intersecting profiles, 150 and 200 m long. The data require low shear velocities (<400 m/s) and high attenuation (Q_{S} < 100) in about the top 30 m of the sediments. In the top 10 m, silty clay exhibits 12-15% anisotropy for shear waves. In this dissertation, I also consider the applicability of various rock physics theories to modeling the oceanic crust. Seismic velocities are controlled by the porosity, typically 20-30% for the top of layer 2. Most rock physics theories that relate seismic velocities to porosities are invalid for such high porosities. I combined elements of the self-consistent and noninteraction approaches to extend some rock physics theories for porosities up to at least 30-35%. Since the oceanic crust contains pores and cracks of many shapes, an appropriate theory must model round pores as well as flat cracks. I present examples of how layer 2A of the oceanic crust might be represented using an extended version of the Kuster-Toksoz theory

  6. Modeling mineral dissolution and precipitation in dual-porosity systems

    SciTech Connect

    Novak, C.F.; Gelbard, F.

    1991-10-01

    A dual-porosity chemical transport model is applied to saturated fractured porous media. In this model, transport through fractures is advection-dominated while transport between the matrix and the fractures is diffusion-dominated. Recent studies in the literature indicate that conservative tracers and radionuclides in these systems will be retarded by matrix diffusion in the absence of chemical reactions. This study examines systems that include chemical reactions (e.g., dissolution/precipitation and aqueous complexation) and examines changes in retardation caused by precipitation.

  7. Numerical analysis of heat transfer by conduction and natural convection in loose-fill fiberglass insulation--effects of convection on thermal performance

    SciTech Connect

    Delmas, A.A.; Wilkes, K.E.

    1992-04-01

    A two-dimensional code for solving equations of convective heat transfer in porous media is used to analyze heat transfer by conduction and convection in the attic insulation configuration. The particular cases treated correspond to loose-fill fiberglass insulation, which is characterized by high porosity and air permeability. The effects of natural convection on the thermal performance of the insulation are analyzed for various densities, permeabilities, and thicknesses of insulation. With convection increasing the total heat transfer through the insulation, the thermal resistance was found to decrease as the temperature difference across the insulating material increases. The predicted results for the thermal resistance are compared with data obtained in the large-scale climate simulator at the Roof Research Center using the attic test module, where the same phenomenon has already been observed. The way the wood joists within the insulation influence the start of convection is studied for differing thermophysical and dynamic properties of the insulating material. The presence of wood joists induces convection at a lower temperature difference.

  8. Filling cavities or restoring teeth?

    PubMed

    Versluis, Antheunis; Versluis-Tantbirojn, Daranee

    2011-01-01

    Teeth seldom fracture under normal functional loading. This indicates that the natural tooth design is optimized for the distribution of regular masticatory forces by means of its properties and structure. When a tooth is restored with an intracoronal restoration, however, the incidence of tooth fracture increases. Since remaining tissues do not change, the restorative actions apparently alter the original stress distributions. In this study, the effect of different restoration types (unbonded amalgam and bonded composite restorations) were compared with the original stress conditions of the intact tooth, using finite element analysis. It was shown that an unbonded amalgam restoration did not restore the original stress conditions but led to much higher stresses in the buccal and lingual enamel and to higher tensile stresses in the cavity floor. The unbonded amalgam thus filled the cavity but did not restore the tooth. In contrast, a bonded composite restoration restored the original stress pattern in the tooth if there was no polymerization shrinkage. Polymerization shrinkage causes residual tensile stresses in the dentin around the cavity and in the buccal and lingual enamel. Residual tensile stresses in the buccal and lingual enamel are momentary compensated by compressive stress components during occlusal loading. It was concluded that bonding and elimination of residual stresses are prerequisites for restoring the original tooth integrity. PMID:21748978

  9. Applying machine learning to electronic form filling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermens, Leonard A.; Schlimmer, Jeffrey C.

    1993-03-01

    Forms of all types are used in businesses and government agencies and most of them are filled in by hand. Yet much time and effort has been expended to automate form-filling by programming specific systems on computers. The high cost of programmers and other resources prohibits many organizations from benefitting from efficient office automation. A learning apprentice can be used for such repetitious form-filling tasks. In this paper, we establish the need for learning apprentices, describe a framework for such a system, explain the difficulties of form-filling, and present empirical results of a form-filling system used in our department from September 1991 to April 1992. The form-filling apprentice saves up to 84% in keystroke effort and correctly predicts nearly 90% of the values on the form.

  10. Filling of orbital fluid management systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merino, F.; Blatt, M. H.; Thies, N. C.

    1978-01-01

    A study was performed with three objectives: (1) analyze fluid management system fill under orbital conditions; (2) determine what experimentation is needed; and (3) develop an experimental program. The fluid management system was a 1.06m (41.7 in) diameter pressure vessel with screen channel device. Analyses were conducted using liquid hydrogen and N2O4. The influence of helium and autogenous pressurization systems was considered. Analyses showed that fluid management system fill will be more difficult with a cryogen than with an earth storable. The key to a successful fill with cryogens is in devising techniques for filling without vent liquid, and removing trapped vapor from the screen device at tank fill completion. This will be accomplished with prechill, fill, and vapor condensation processes. Refill will require a vent and purge process, to dilute the residual helium, prior to introducing liquid. Neither prechill, chill, nor purge processes will be required for earth storables.

  11. Mechanisms of tracheal filling in insects.

    PubMed

    Förster, Thomas D; Woods, H Arthur

    2013-02-01

    Insects exchange respiratory gases primarily using tracheal systems that are filled with gas. However, in different developmental and environmental circumstances, liquid can occupy the tracheal system, which can significantly impair its respiratory function. Insects therefore use a suite of mechanisms for tracheal filling, which is the process of replacing tracheal liquids with gas. We review these mechanisms for liquid removal and gas filling. By integrating recent molecular work with older physiological literature, we show that liquid removal likely involves active ion transport in the whole tracheal system. Gas filling reveals fascinating interactions between geometry, surface chemistry of the tracheal walls, the tracheal liquid, and dissolved gases. The temporal proximity to moulting allows for potentially complex interdependencies between gas filling, moult-associated hormone signaling, and cuticle sclerotization. We propose a mechanistic model for tracheal filling. However, because the composition of the liquid is unknown, it remains hypothetical. PMID:22616845

  12. Classification of munition fill using laser acoustics

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, J.G.; Blackwood, L.G.

    1997-08-01

    Identification of a munition fill is easier if one can determine if there is fill material present (empty versus full), and if so, the phase (solid or liquid) of the fill. Previous munition inspection efforts by the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) determined that resonance information could determine the fill. A portable, noncontacting laser-acoustic system was developed by INEEL that uses a low-power laser system to measure the container`s vibration characteristics in response to an acoustic excitation. These vibration characteristics were shown to be functions of the fill material and munition geometry. The laser acoustic system was used to characterize the fill of over one hundred 155-mm munitions. Additional research and development using this system is being performed for the Mobile Munitions Assessment System.

  13. Intragranular porosity in Hanford sand grains after reaction with caustic tank wastes: Quantification and implications for reactive transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crandell, L. E.; Peters, C. A.; Um, W.; Jones, K. W.; Lindquist, W. B.

    2011-12-01

    Reactions of caustic tank waste with sediments in the 200 East Area of the Hanford site cause quartz and primary aluminosilicate minerals to dissolve. Secondary minerals of sodalite and cancrinite have been shown to nucleate on, and cement together, quartz grains. These secondary precipitates have been found to uptake radionuclides in their network of channels and cages. In this work, thin sections from unreacted and reacted column experiments packed with Hanford sand grains were imaged using 2D Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). SEM image analysis reveals large amounts of intragranular pore space in both the reacted and unreacted sands. Grayscale Backscattered Electron (BSE) images were thresholded to separate grain and pore pixels. To quantify the amount of intragranular pore space, a set of images were manually created with the intragranular pore space removed, or the grains filled-in. Porosity, and intragranular porosity, was determined by counting and comparing the number of pore pixels in each pair of images. Intragranular pore space accounts for up to 14% of total porosity. Quartz dissolution in intragranular regions increases the proportion of intragranular pore space in reacted samples. Diffusion of tank waste into these free silica rich areas provides a favorable environment for cancrinite precipitates to form and a potential significant trapping mechanism for radionuclides. Part of this work was to quantify where, within a single pore and a network of pores, precipitation occurred. While the bulk amount of cancrinite precipitation occurred on grain surfaces, cancrinite precipitates were also found in intragranular pore spaces. Up to 10% of total precipitation occurred in intragranular pore space. However, as the system recovers and clean water flow returns, radionuclides incorporated into precipitates in intragranular regions may act as a secondary long term leaching source for contaminants. To determine the trapping or leaching potential from

  14. Modeling ozone removal to indoor materials, including the effects of porosity, pore diameter, and thickness.

    PubMed

    Gall, Elliott T; Siegel, Jeffrey A; Corsi, Richard L

    2015-04-01

    We develop an ozone transport and reaction model to determine reaction probabilities and assess the importance of physical properties such as porosity, pore diameter, and material thickness on reactive uptake of ozone to five materials. The one-dimensional model accounts for molecular diffusion from bulk air to the air-material interface, reaction at the interface, and diffusive transport and reaction through material pore volumes. Material-ozone reaction probabilities that account for internal transport and internal pore area, γ(ipa), are determined by a minimization of residuals between predicted and experimentally derived ozone concentrations. Values of γ(ipa) are generally less than effective reaction probabilities (γ(eff)) determined previously, likely because of the inclusion of diffusion into substrates and reaction with internal surface area (rather than the use of the horizontally projected external material areas). Estimates of γ(ipa) average 1 × 10(-7), 2 × 10(-7), 4 × 10(-5), 2 × 10(-5), and 4 × 10(-7) for two types of cellulose paper, pervious pavement, Portland cement concrete, and an activated carbon cloth, respectively. The transport and reaction model developed here accounts for observed differences in ozone removal to varying thicknesses of the cellulose paper, and estimates a near constant γ(ipa) as material thickness increases from 0.02 to 0.16 cm. PMID:25748309

  15. Waste Package Neutron Absorber, Thermal Shunt, and Fill Gas Selection Report

    SciTech Connect

    V. Pasupathi

    2000-01-28

    Materials for neutron absorber, thermal shunt, and fill gas for use in the waste package were selected using a qualitative approach. For each component, selection criteria were identified; candidate materials were selected; and candidates were evaluated against these criteria. The neutron absorber materials evaluated were essentially boron-containing stainless steels. Two candidates were evaluated for the thermal shunt material. The fill gas candidates were common gases such as helium, argon, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, and dry air. Based on the performance of each candidate against the criteria, the following selections were made: Neutron absorber--Neutronit A978; Thermal shunt--Aluminum 6061 or 6063; and Fill gas--Helium.

  16. Undercut and fill system for pitching coal. Open file report Aug 79-Jun 81

    SciTech Connect

    Mangolds, A.; Fisk, A.

    1981-06-01

    A study of the technical and economic feasibility of using a unique undercut and fill system developed by Bureau of Mines engineers to mine steeply pitching coal is discussed. The undercut and fill system combines hydraulic coal cutting with unassisted gravity fluming of the coal slurry. Mining occurs across strike and the extended entry is backfilled to provide uniform strata control and an impermeable water and air barrier. Subsequent mining occurs beneath the previously filled stope such that the roof consists of a solid, controlled back.

  17. WO₃ nanolamella gas sensor: porosity control using SnO₂ nanoparticles for enhanced NO₂ sensing.

    PubMed

    Kida, Tetsuya; Nishiyama, Aya; Hua, Zhongqiu; Suematsu, Koichi; Yuasa, Masayoshi; Shimanoe, Kengo

    2014-03-11

    Tungsten trioxide (WO3) is one of the important multifunctional materials used for photocatalytic, photoelectrochemical, battery, and gas sensor applications. Nanostructured WO3 holds great potential for enhancing the performance of these applications. Here, we report highly sensitive NO2 sensors using WO3 nanolamellae and their sensitivity improvement by morphology control using SnO2 nanoparticles. WO3 nanolamellae were synthesized by an acidification method starting from Na2WO4 and H2SO4 and subsequent calcination at 300 °C. The lamellae were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), which clearly showed the formation of single-crystalline nanolamellae with a c-axis orientation. The stacking of each nanolamella to form larger lamellae that were 50-250 nm in lateral size and 15-25 nm in thickness was also revealed. From pore size distribution measurements, we found that introducing monodisperse SnO2 nanoparticles (ca. 4 nm) into WO3 lamella-based films improved their porosity, most likely because of effective insertion of nanoparticles into lamella stacks or in between assemblies of lamella stacks. In contrast, the crystallite size was not significantly changed, even by introducing SnO2. Because of the improvement in porosity, the composites of WO3 nanolamellae and SnO2 nanoparticles displayed enhanced sensitivity (sensor response) to NO2 at dilute concentrations of 20-1000 ppb in air, demonstrating the effectiveness of microstructure control of WO3 lamella-based films for highly sensitive NO2 detection. Electrical sensitization by SnO2 nanoparticles was also considered. PMID:24520922

  18. Characterization of Porosity Development in Oxidized Graphite using Automated Image Analysis Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Contescu, Cristian I; Burchell, Timothy D

    2009-09-01

    This document reports on initial activities at ORNL aimed at quantitative characterization of porosity development in oxidized graphite specimens using automated image analysis (AIA) techniques. A series of cylindrical shape specimens were machined from nuclear-grade graphite (type PCEA, from GrafTech International). The specimens were oxidized in air to various levels of weight loss (between 5 and 20 %) and at three oxidation temperatures (between 600 and 750 oC). The procedure used for specimen preparation and oxidation was based on ASTM D-7542-09. Oxidized specimens were sectioned, resin-mounted and polished for optical microscopy examination. Mosaic pictures of rectangular stripes (25 mm x 0.4 mm) along a diameter of sectioned specimens were recorded. A commercial software (ImagePro) was evaluated for automated analysis of images. Because oxidized zones in graphite are less reflective in visible light than the pristine, unoxidized material, the microstructural changes induced by oxidation can easily be identified and analyzed. Oxidation at low temperatures contributes to development of numerous fine pores (< 100 m2) distributed more or less uniformly over a certain depth (5-6 mm) from the surface of graphite specimens, while causing no apparent external damage to the specimens. In contrast, oxidation at high temperatures causes dimensional changes and substantial surface damage within a narrow band (< 1 mm) near the exposed graphite surface, but leaves the interior of specimens with little or no changes in the pore structure. Based on these results it appears that weakening and degradation of mechanical properties of graphite materials produced by uniform oxidation at low temperatures is related to the massive development of fine pores in the oxidized zone. It was demonstrated that optical microscopy enhanced by AIA techniques allows accurate determination of oxidant penetration depth and of distribution of porosity in oxidized graphite materials.

  19. New method for quantification of vuggy porosity from digital optical borehole images as applied to the karstic Pleistocene limestone of the Biscayne aquifer, southeastern Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cunningham, K.J.; Carlson, J.I.; Hurley, N.F.

    2004-01-01

    Vuggy porosity is gas- or fluid-filled openings in rock matrix that are large enough to be seen with the unaided eye. Well-connected vugs can form major conduits for flow of ground water, especially in carbonate rocks. This paper presents a new method for quantification of vuggy porosity calculated from digital borehole images collected from 47 test coreholes that penetrate the karstic Pleistocene limestone of the Biscayne aquifer, southeastern Florida. Basically, the method interprets vugs and background based on the grayscale color of each in digital borehole images and calculates a percentage of vuggy porosity. Development of the method was complicated because environmental conditions created an uneven grayscale contrast in the borehole images that makes it difficult to distinguish vugs from background. The irregular contrast was produced by unbalanced illumination of the borehole wall, which was a result of eccentering of the borehole-image logging tool. Experimentation showed that a simple, single grayscale threshold would not realistically differentiate between the grayscale contrast of vugs and background. Therefore, an equation was developed for an effective subtraction of the changing grayscale contrast, due to uneven illumination, to produce a grayscale threshold that successfully identifies vugs. In the equation, a moving average calculated around the circumference of the borehole and expressed as the background grayscale intensity is defined as a baseline from which to identify a grayscale threshold for vugs. A constant was derived empirically by calibration with vuggy porosity values derived from digital images of slabbed-core samples and used to make the subtraction from the background baseline to derive the vug grayscale threshold as a function of azimuth. The method should be effective in estimating vuggy porosity in any carbonate aquifer. ?? 2003 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Mineral-Biochar Composites: Molecular Structure and Porosity.

    PubMed

    Rawal, Aditya; Joseph, Stephen D; Hook, James M; Chia, Chee H; Munroe, Paul R; Donne, Scott; Lin, Yun; Phelan, David; Mitchell, David R G; Pace, Ben; Horvat, Joseph; Webber, J Beau W

    2016-07-19

    Dramatic changes in molecular structure, degradation pathway, and porosity of biochar are observed at pyrolysis temperatures ranging from 250 to 550 °C when bamboo biomass is pretreated by iron-sulfate-clay slurries (iron-clay biochar), as compared to untreated bamboo biochar. Electron microscopy analysis of the biochar reveals the infusion of mineral species into the pores of the biochar and the formation of mineral nanostructures. Quantitative (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy shows that the presence of the iron clay prevents degradation of the cellulosic fraction at pyrolysis temperatures of 250 °C, whereas at higher temperatures (350-550 °C), the clay promotes biomass degradation, resulting in an increase in both the concentrations of condensed aromatic, acidic, and phenolic carbon species. The porosity of the biochar, as measured by NMR cryoporosimetry, is altered by the iron-clay pretreatment. In the presence of the clay, at lower pyrolysis temperatures, the biochar develops a higher pore volume, while at higher temperature, the presence of clay causes a reduction in the biochar pore volume. The most dramatic reduction in pore volume is observed in the kaolinite-infiltrated biochar at 550 °C, which is attributed to the blocking of the mesopores (2-50 nm pore) by the nonporous metakaolinite formed from kaolinite. PMID:27284608

  1. Electrode formulation to reduce weld metal hydrogen and porosity

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, S.; Olson, D.L.; Ibarra, S.

    1994-12-31

    Residual weld metal hydrogen is a major concern in high strength steel welding, especially when the weld is performed under high cooling rate conditions. In the case of underwater wet welding, weld metal porosity is also of importance because of the water environment. The control of both problems can be achieved by means of pyrochemical reactions in the weld pool. The hydrogen-oxygen reaction and carbon-oxygen reaction are fundamental in the control of residual hydrogen in the weld metal and the amount of gas pores entrapped. A simple model was proposed to estimate weld metal residual hydrogen content by monitoring the weld pool deoxidation reactions. Potent deoxidizers such as aluminum will first react with oxygen in the liquid weld pool, followed by other elements present such as silicon and manganese. Carbon and hydrogen will be the last ones to react with oxygen prior to the iron atoms. The Ellingham-Richardson diagram frequently applied in describing steel and iron making processes was used in the modeling. Following the sequence of deoxidation, the chemical make-up of the gas pores and the amount of each chemical species in the pores could be estimated. Carbon monoxide and hydrogen were determined to be the major components in the weld pores. To minimize the amount of weld metal porosity and residual hydrogen content, specially designed consumables that will control the oxygen potential of the weld pool must be developed.

  2. MOISTURE CONTENT AND POROSITY OF CONCRETE RUBBLE STUDY.

    SciTech Connect

    Phifer, M

    2005-10-07

    Tritium contaminated concrete rubble from the 232-F Tritium Facility was disposed in the Slit 1 Trenches 1 and 2 in 1997. A Special Analysis (SA) has been performed to evaluate any impact this disposal may have on the groundwater. The SA assumed that the disposed concrete rubble was fully saturated at the time of disposal, however if the concrete was less than fully saturated, migration of tritium out of the concrete would be slower than under fully saturated conditions. Therefore if the concrete at disposal was less than fully saturated, the PA assumption of full saturation would be a conservative assumption. In order to evaluate whether the PA assumption resulted in a conservative analysis from the standpoint of the concrete saturation, concrete rubble samples were collected from various facilities being demolished at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and evaluated for in-field moisture content, absorbable moisture, and water exchangeable porosity. The purpose of this task was to collect concrete rubble samples from various demolished SRS facilities for the purpose of determining in-field moisture content, absorbable moisture, and water exchangeable porosity. Since moisture content testing for concrete rubble is not typical, existing ASTM Standards were reviewed for method and procedure development.

  3. Method and apparatus for epithermal neutron porosity well logging

    SciTech Connect

    Hertzog, R.C.; Loomis, W.A.; Wraight, P.

    1991-09-24

    This patent describes a method for investigating the porosity of a subsurface earth formation surrounding a borehole. It comprises repetitively irradiating the borehole and earth formation with discrete bursts of high energy neutrons from a neutron source, which neutrons interact with nuclei of the materials in the borehole and the formation to produce therein populations of epithermal neutrons; detecting the populations of epithermal neutrons at near and far locations in the borehole spaced apart longitudinally by different distances from the neutron source; generating count signals indicative of the magnitudes of the detected epithermal neutron populations at the respective near and far locations; detecting the decay of the epithermal neutron populations following the neutron bursts at least at one location in the borehole and generating signals representative thereof; deriving from the decay signals a signal indicative of the slowing down time of epithermal neutrons in the formation of the at least one location; and deriving from the near and far count signals and the slowing down time signal a measurement signal representative of the porosity of the formation surrounding the borehole inherently compensated for the effects of tool standoff on the responses of the logging tool.

  4. Smooth regression to estimate effective porosity using seismic attributes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iturrarán-Viveros, Ursula

    2012-01-01

    Data mining is very important to characterize complex geological structures, where a large variety of geophysical and petrophysical variables are typically involved and interrelated. In this paper we apply smooth regression for data analysis, by means of the Gamma test (a revolutionary estimator of the noise in a data set) to aid in the construction of Artificial Neural Network (ANN) models to predict effective porosity ( φe) using seismic attributes. As a result, we obtain the best combination of seismic attributes to estimate φe. We briefly describe the Gamma test, its benefits in model identification and model building. The first validation of the Neural Network based on leave-one-out was poor. Therefore, we generate a complementary set of synthetic data (from the original well-log data), varying the effective porosity and applying the Gassmann's equation for fluid substitution to obtain resulting velocities and densities. The complete procedure is repeated including the new synthetic well-logs and the best suited selection of seismic attributes is used to train a new ANN producing a better validation and more accurate results. The advantage of smooth regression over other techniques is that it tells us how well we can predict φe using any model. This information saves time during training of the ANN and also sets a lower bound for the mean squared error to prevent over-training.

  5. Improved Cellular Infiltration in Electrospun Fiber via Engineered Porosity

    PubMed Central

    NAM, JIN; HUANG, YAN; AGARWAL, SUDHA; LANNUTTI, JOHN

    2016-01-01

    Small pore sizes inherent to electrospun matrices can hinder efficient cellular ingrowth. To facilitate infiltration while retaining its extracellular matrix-like character, electrospinning was combined with salt leaching to produce a scaffold having deliberate, engineered delaminations. We made elegant use of a specific randomizing component of the electrospinning process, the Taylor Cone and the falling fiber beneath it, to produce a uniform, well-spread distribution of salt particles. After 3 weeks of culture, up to 4 mm of cellular infiltration was observed, along with cellular coverage of up to 70% within the delaminations. To our knowledge, this represents the first observation of extensive cellular infiltration of electrospun matrices. Infiltration appears to be driven primarily by localized proliferation rather than coordinated cellular locomotion. Cells also moved from the salt-generated porosity into the surrounding electrospun fiber matrix. Given that the details of salt deposition (amount, size, and number density) are far from optimized, the result provides a convincing illustration of the ability of mammalian cells to interact with appropriately tailored electrospun matrices. These layered structures can be precisely fabricated by varying the deposition interval and particle size conceivably to produce in vivo-like gradients in porosity such that the resulting scaffolds better resemble the desired final structure. PMID:17536926

  6. Controlled porosity solubility modulated osmotic pump tablets of gliclazide.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Arti; Verma, P R P; Gore, Subhash

    2015-06-01

    A system that can deliver drug at a controlled rate is very important for the treatment of various chronic diseases such as diabetes, asthma, and heart disease. Poorly water-soluble drug with pH-dependent solubility such as gliclazide (GLZ) offers challenges in the controlled-release formulation because of low dissolution rate and poor bioavailability. Solid dispersion (SD) of GLZ consisted of hydroxypropyl cellulose (HPC-SSL) as a polymeric solubilizer was manufactured by hot melt extrusion (HME) technology. Then, controlled porosity osmotic pump (CPOP) tablet of gliclazide was designed to deliver drug in a controlled manner up to 16 h. The developed formulation was optimized for type and level of pore former and coating weight gain. The optimized formulation was found to exhibit zero order kinetics independent of pH and agitation speed but depends on osmotic pressure of dissolution media indicated that mechanism of drug release was osmotic pressure. The in vivo performance prediction of developed formulation using convolution approach revealed that the developed formulation was superior to the existing marketed extended-release formulation in terms of attaining steady state plasma levels and indicated adequate exposure in translating hypoglycemic response. The prototype solubilization method combined with controlled porosity osmotic pump based technique could provide a unique way to increase dissolution rate and bioavailability of many poorly water-soluble, narrow therapeutic index drugs used in diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, etc. PMID:25378281

  7. Clinical use of low porosity woven ultrafine polyester fiber grafts.

    PubMed

    Satoh, S; Niu, S; Kanda, K; Hirai, J; Nakazima, S; Wada, Y; Oka, T; Noishiki, Y

    1995-01-01

    A woven fabric graft made of ultrafine polyester fibers (UFPF) (Toray Graft, water porosity: 100 ml/min/cm2:120 mm Hg H2O) was clinically applied in 81 cases (28 thoracic aortic aneurysms, 6 thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysms, 42 abdominal aortic aneurysms, and 5 atherosclerotic obstructions of the peripheral arteries). Eight patients died after surgery due to causes unrelated to the graft. The other 73 patients were in good condition after surgery. For operations requiring extracorporeal circulation, the graft was presealed with human albumin. For the abdominal aortic aneurysms, the graft was preclotted in situ with nonheparinized autoblood after the completion of the proximal anastomosis. It took about 2 min to complete the preclotting. A nonsealed graft was used for the reconstruction of peripheral arteries for the intraaortic balloon pumping procedure. The graft was easy to handle. There was no cut edge fraying problem with the graft in any direction of cutting. Even after presealing, the graft was soft and pliable enough to enable easy adaptation and anastomosis. Just after implantation, bleeding was minimal from the graft wall, anastomotic sites, and suture pores, and it stopped spontaneously. These clinical data showed that the woven UFPF graft exhibited both easy handling despite in spite of low porosity and safe application in the reconstruction of arterial systems even under totally heparinized conditions during extracorporeal circulation. PMID:7741640

  8. Effect of shelter porosity on downwind flow characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nosek, Š.; Kellnerová, R.; Jurčáková, K.; Jaňour, Z.; Chaloupecká, H.; Jakubcová, M.

    2016-03-01

    Previous wind-tunnel studies were focused mainly on lonely standing windbreaks or wind fences with respect to their wind velocity reduction efficiency and effective shelter distance. In presented wind-tunnel study, we investigated the effects of a three different fence porosities (0.5, 0.25 and 0) embodied in a shelter-like building for coal convey by means of two-component Laser Doppler Anemometry (LDA). The turbulent flow characteristics behind the fences were compared with those performed without the fence. For characterization of the fence effectiveness we used following quantities: wind-speed and turbulence kinetic energy reduction, and time fractions of the turbulent coherent structures associated with the sediment transport (sweeps and outward interactions). Results from mentioned quantities revealed that for the case of embodied fence the shelter construction has significant impact on the flow characteristics behind. The fence of the 0.5 porosity has been indicated as the most shelter effective considering the studied quantities.

  9. Dolomitization and porosity development in the middle and upper Wabamun Group, southeast Peace River Arch, Alberta, Canada

    SciTech Connect

    Saller, A.H.; Yaremko, K.

    1994-09-01

    Dolomitization and fracturing are critical to porosity development in most Wabamun Group reservoirs in the southern part of the Peace River arch. Cores from Peoria, Normandville, and Eaglesham fields and adjacent areas were examined to determine the relationship between depositional facies, dolomitization, fracturing, and porosity. Three-dimensional (3-D) seismic data indicate that most upper Wabamun dolomites are coincident with mound-like structural highs at the top of the Wabamun, with structural relief due largely to differential compaction between dolomite and adjacent limestone. When this depositional/diagenetic model for dolomitization was integrated into 3-D seismic interpretations, Canadian Occidental`s discovery rate in the Wabamun increased from approximately 25 to 80%. The early dolomite is facies, fabric, and mineralogy selective with some burrow fills and aragonitic mollusks being preferentially dolomitized in dolomitic limestones. Most fracturing occurred after early, replacive Dolornitization. Late dolomitization, karst-like dissolution and collapse apparently were localized near the margins of the early dolomites where adjacent limestones were dolomitized or dissolved. Dissolution of calcite in partially dolomitized limestones resulted in geopetal accumulations of dolomite rhombs (porous sucrosic dolomite) in some fractures and burrow fills. Hydrothermal fluids apparently moved updip through the underlying Winterburn and/or Leduc formations, and then upward through porous, early dolomites in the Wabamun, causing Dolomitization of adjacent limestones and karst-like dissolution. Stable oxygen isotope ratios of the dolomites are quite variable ({delta}{sup 18}O ranges from -2.0 to -11.4{per_thousand}, PDB), supporting multiple stages of dolomitization during progressive burial.

  10. Air cathode structure manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Momyer, William R.; Littauer, Ernest L.

    1985-01-01

    An improved air cathode structure for use in primary batteries and the like. The cathode structure includes a matrix active layer, a current collector grid on one face of the matrix active layer, and a porous, nonelectrically conductive separator on the opposite face of the matrix active layer, the collector grid and separator being permanently bonded to the matrix active layer. The separator has a preselected porosity providing low IR losses and high resistance to air flow through the matrix active layer to maintain high bubble pressure during operation of the battery. In the illustrated embodiment, the separator was formed of porous polypropylene. A thin hydrophobic film is provided, in the preferred embodiment, on the current collecting metal grid.

  11. Mekong Floods Fill Tonle Sap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The monsoon season in Southeast Asia brings recurring, often devastating floods to countries in the region, but these floods also play a necessary role in the region's water cycle. These MODIS images centered on Cambodia reveal extensive flooding of the Mekong River, which comes in from Laos in the north, to the right of center in the images, and flows south through Cambodia and southeast through Vietnam to empty into the South China Sea. The true-color image shows the brownish, sediment-laden floodwaters filling the Mekong Delta in southern Cambodia and Vietnam on September 15, 2001. The false color image above has been enhanced to bring out the contrast between the floodwaters and the lands, with sediment-carrying floodwaters in purple. Sediment can be seen flowing into the South China Sea as well. This year's floods have affected over a million people, and 100 people have been killed in Vietnam alone. The monsoon floods bring not only devastation, but renewal. The large body of water just left of center in Cambodia is the Tonle Sap. This shallow lake plays a changing role in the regional water cycle. During the dry season, the stream-fed Tonle Sap drains via the Tonle Sab River into the Mekong River. During the wet season (June-November), flooding of the Mekong reverses the course of the Tonle Sab, roughly tripling the lake's size from about 3000 km2 to about 10,000. When the dry season returns, the lake once again begins to drain into the Mekong Delta, where it provides a flow of fresh water that balances the intrusion of salty seawater into the delta's agricultural lands. Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  12. Aerosol Synthesis of Cargo-Filled Graphene Nanosacks

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yantao; Guo, Fei; Jachak, Ashish; Kim, Sang-Pil; Datta, Dibakar; Liu, Jingyu; Kulaots, Indrek; Vaslet, Charles; Jang, Hee Dong; Huang, Jiaxing; Kane, Agnes; Shenoy, Vivek B.; Hurt, Robert H.

    2012-01-01

    Water microdroplets containing graphene oxide and a second solute are shown to spontaneously segregate into sack-cargo nanostructures upon drying. Analytical modelling and molecular dynamics suggest the sacks form when slow-diffusing graphene oxide preferentially accumulates and adsorbs at the receding air-water interface, followed by capillary collapse. Cargo-filled graphene nanosacks can be nanomanufactured by a simple, continuous, scalable process and are promising for many applications where nanoscale materials should be isolated from the environment or biological tissue. PMID:22429091

  13. ECO fill: automated fill modification to support late-stage design changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Greg; Wilson, Jeff; Yu, J. J.; Chiu, Anderson; Chuang, Yao-Jen; Yang, Ricky

    2014-03-01

    One of the most critical factors in achieving a positive return for a design is ensuring the design not only meets performance specifications, but also produces sufficient yield to meet the market demand. The goal of design for manufacturability (DFM) technology is to enable designers to address manufacturing requirements during the design process. While new cell-based, DP-aware, and net-aware fill technologies have emerged to provide the designer with automated fill engines that support these new fill requirements, design changes that arrive late in the tapeout process (as engineering change orders, or ECOs) can have a disproportionate effect on tapeout schedules, due to the complexity of replacing fill. If not handled effectively, the impacts on file size, run time, and timing closure can significantly extend the tapeout process. In this paper, the authors examine changes to design flow methodology, supported by new fill technology, that enable efficient, fast, and accurate adjustments to metal fill late in the design process. We present an ECO fill methodology coupled with the support of advanced fill tools that can quickly locate the portion of the design affected by the change, remove and replace only the fill in that area, while maintaining the fill hierarchy. This new fill approach effectively reduces run time, contains fill file size, minimizes timing impact, and minimizes mask costs due to ECO-driven fill changes, all of which are critical factors to ensuring time-to-market schedules are maintained.

  14. A comparison of estimated and calculated effective porosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, Daniel B.; Hsu, Kuo-Chin; Prieksat, Mark A.; Ankeny, Mark D.; Blandford, Neil; Roth, Tracy L.; Kelsey, James A.; Whitworth, Julia R.

    Effective porosity in solute-transport analyses is usually estimated rather than calculated from tracer tests in the field or laboratory. Calculated values of effective porosity in the laboratory on three different textured samples were compared to estimates derived from particle-size distributions and soil-water characteristic curves. The agreement was poor and it seems that no clear relationships exist between effective porosity calculated from laboratory tracer tests and effective porosity estimated from particle-size distributions and soil-water characteristic curves. A field tracer test in a sand-and-gravel aquifer produced a calculated effective porosity of approximately 0.17. By comparison, estimates of effective porosity from textural data, moisture retention, and published values were approximately 50-90% greater than the field calibrated value. Thus, estimation of effective porosity for chemical transport is highly dependent on the chosen transport model and is best obtained by laboratory or field tracer tests. Résumé La porosité effective dans les analyses de transport de soluté est habituellement estimée, plutôt que calculée à partir d'expériences de traçage sur le terrain ou au laboratoire. Les valeurs calculées de la porosité effective au laboratoire sur trois échantillons de textures différentes ont été comparées aux estimations provenant de distributions de taille de particules et de courbes caractéristiques sol-eau. La concordance était plutôt faible et il semble qu'il n'existe aucune relation claire entre la porosité effective calculée à partir des expériences de traçage au laboratoire et la porosité effective estimée à partir des distributions de taille de particules et de courbes caractéristiques sol-eau. Une expérience de traçage de terrain dans un aquifère de sables et de graviers a fourni une porosité effective calculée d'environ 0,17. En comparaison, les estimations de porosité effective de données de

  15. Effect of Porosity on Deformation, Damage, and Fracture of Cast Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardin, R. A.; Beckermann, C.

    2013-12-01

    A combined experimental and computational study is performed to investigate the effect of centerline shrinkage porosity on deformation, damage, and fracture of cast steel under tensile testing. Steel plates containing shrinkage porosity are cast in sand molds, machined into test coupons, and tensile tested to fracture. The average volumetric porosity in the gage section of the specimens with porosity ranges from 0.10 to 0.27 pct. Ductility in the test castings with porosity is markedly reduced with the percent elongation data ranging from 12.8 to 19.6 pct; vs 22 pct elongation for the sound material. Radiographic imaging is used to measure and reconstruct the porosity field in the test specimens. The reconstructed porosity field is then used in a finite-element stress analysis simulating the tensile testing. Local elastic properties are reduced according to the porosity fraction present. Porous metal plasticity theory is used to model the damage due to porosity and the fracture. Good agreement is obtained between the measured and predicted stress-strain curves and fracture behaviors. The reduction in ductility is predicted well by comparing the measured and the simulated elongations. The computational modeling approach used in this study allows for a detailed evaluation of the effect of porosity, including its size, shape, and location, on the fracture behavior of steel castings.

  16. Consistent small-scale porosity contrasts in reservoir sandstones and their relevance to reservoir characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Etris, E.L.; Ehrlich, R.

    1988-01-01

    Although grain size may gradually increase or decrease vertically through a sandstone reservoir, porosity need not change appreciably. Yet porosity does vary greatly at all scales. Large-scale changes, commonly measured by wireline logs, are used in assessing not only reservoir capacity, but also (not always correctly) reservoir efficiency. Systematic porosity variation at smaller scales, however, is usually not considered in reservoir modeling or assessment because it is thought to be difficult to measure, insignificant compared to variation at larger scales, and difficult to simulate in numerical models. The authors' data indicate there there is a common mode of small-scale porosity contrast in reservoir sandstones and that this contrast is important in understanding the behavior of multiphase flow in such rocks. Using image analysis procedures, they measured porosity between adjacent laminate in 50 thin sections taken from four contrasting reservoir sandstones (Kekiktuk, Rotliegendes, Wilcox, and Satun), and have found consistent small-scale contrasts in porosity between laminae. In all but a few samples, porosity alternates, with contrasts of a factor of three or more. The bimodal distribution of porosity in laminated sandstones means theat few if any laminate contain the porosity measured form wireline logs. The authors' data indicate that permeability, pore sizes, and throat sizes also alternate - a fact that can affect the localization of residual oil. Although this phenomenon increases the complexity of the sandstone system, the simple alternation of porosity allows ease in modeling.

  17. Influence of template fill in graphoepitaxy DSA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doise, Jan; Bekaert, Joost; Chan, Boon Teik; Hong, SungEun; Lin, Guanyang; Gronheid, Roel

    2016-03-01

    Directed self-assembly (DSA) of block copolymers (BCP) is considered a promising patterning approach for the 7 nm node and beyond. Specifically, a grapho-epitaxy process using a cylindrical phase BCP may offer an efficient solution for patterning randomly distributed contact holes with sub-resolution pitches, such as found in via and cut mask levels. In any grapho-epitaxy process, the pattern density impacts the template fill (local BCP thickness inside the template) and may cause defects due to respectively over- or underfilling of the template. In order to tackle this issue thoroughly, the parameters that determine template fill and the influence of template fill on the resulting pattern should be investigated. In this work, using three process flow variations (with different template surface energy), template fill is experimentally characterized as a function of pattern density and film thickness. The impact of these parameters on template fill is highly dependent on the process flow, and thus pre-pattern surface energy. Template fill has a considerable effect on the pattern transfer of the DSA contact holes into the underlying layer. Higher fill levels give rise to smaller contact holes and worse critical dimension uniformity. These results are important towards DSA-aware design and show that fill is a crucial parameter in grapho-epitaxy DSA.

  18. Eggshell Porosity Provides Insight on Evolution of Nesting in Dinosaurs.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Kohei; Zelenitsky, Darla K; Therrien, François

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge about the types of nests built by dinosaurs can provide insight into the evolution of nesting and reproductive behaviors among archosaurs. However, the low preservation potential of their nesting materials and nesting structures means that most information can only be gleaned indirectly through comparison with extant archosaurs. Two general nest types are recognized among living archosaurs: 1) covered nests, in which eggs are incubated while fully covered by nesting material (as in crocodylians and megapodes), and 2) open nests, in which eggs are exposed in the nest and brooded (as in most birds). Previously, dinosaur nest types had been inferred by estimating the water vapor conductance (i.e., diffusive capacity) of their eggs, based on the premise that high conductance corresponds to covered nests and low conductance to open nests. However, a lack of statistical rigor and inconsistencies in this method render its application problematic and its validity questionable. As an alternative we propose a statistically rigorous approach to infer nest type based on large datasets of eggshell porosity and egg mass compiled for over 120 extant archosaur species and 29 archosaur extinct taxa/ootaxa. The presence of a strong correlation between eggshell porosity and nest type among extant archosaurs indicates that eggshell porosity can be used as a proxy for nest type, and thus discriminant analyses can help predict nest type in extinct taxa. Our results suggest that: 1) covered nests are likely the primitive condition for dinosaurs (and probably archosaurs), and 2) open nests first evolved among non-avian theropods more derived than Lourinhanosaurus and were likely widespread in non-avian maniraptorans, well before the appearance of birds. Although taphonomic evidence suggests that basal open nesters (i.e., oviraptorosaurs and troodontids) were potentially the first dinosaurs to brood their clutches, they still partially buried their eggs in sediment. Open nests

  19. Eggshell Porosity Provides Insight on Evolution of Nesting in Dinosaurs

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge about the types of nests built by dinosaurs can provide insight into the evolution of nesting and reproductive behaviors among archosaurs. However, the low preservation potential of their nesting materials and nesting structures means that most information can only be gleaned indirectly through comparison with extant archosaurs. Two general nest types are recognized among living archosaurs: 1) covered nests, in which eggs are incubated while fully covered by nesting material (as in crocodylians and megapodes), and 2) open nests, in which eggs are exposed in the nest and brooded (as in most birds). Previously, dinosaur nest types had been inferred by estimating the water vapor conductance (i.e., diffusive capacity) of their eggs, based on the premise that high conductance corresponds to covered nests and low conductance to open nests. However, a lack of statistical rigor and inconsistencies in this method render its application problematic and its validity questionable. As an alternative we propose a statistically rigorous approach to infer nest type based on large datasets of eggshell porosity and egg mass compiled for over 120 extant archosaur species and 29 archosaur extinct taxa/ootaxa. The presence of a strong correlation between eggshell porosity and nest type among extant archosaurs indicates that eggshell porosity can be used as a proxy for nest type, and thus discriminant analyses can help predict nest type in extinct taxa. Our results suggest that: 1) covered nests are likely the primitive condition for dinosaurs (and probably archosaurs), and 2) open nests first evolved among non-avian theropods more derived than Lourinhanosaurus and were likely widespread in non-avian maniraptorans, well before the appearance of birds. Although taphonomic evidence suggests that basal open nesters (i.e., oviraptorosaurs and troodontids) were potentially the first dinosaurs to brood their clutches, they still partially buried their eggs in sediment. Open nests

  20. On the Use of Surface Porosity to Reduce Unsteady Lift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinetti, Ana F.; Kelly, Jeffrey J.; Bauer, Steven X. S.; Thomas, Russell H.

    2001-01-01

    An innovative application of existing technology is proposed for attenuating the effects of transient phenomena, such as rotor-stator and rotor-strut interactions, linked to noise and fatigue failure in turbomachinery environments. A computational study was designed to assess the potential of passive porosity technology as a mechanism for alleviating interaction effects by reducing the unsteady lift developed on a stator airfoil subject to wake impingement. The study involved a typical high bypass fan Stator airfoil (solid baseline and several porous configurations), immersed in a free field and exposed to the effects of a transversely moving wake. It was found that, for the airfoil under consideration, the magnitude of the unsteady lift could be reduced more than 18% without incurring significant performance losses.

  1. Steady and Unsteady Aerodynamics of Thin Airfoils with Porosity Gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajian, Rozhin; Jaworski, Justin W.

    2015-11-01

    Porous treatments have been shown in previous studies to reduce turbulence noise generation from the edges of wings and blades. However, this acoustical benefit can come at the cost of aerodynamic performance that is degraded by seepage flow through the wing. To better understand the trade-off between acoustic stealth and the desired airfoil performance, the aerodynamic loads of a thin airfoil in uniform flow with a prescribed porosity distribution are determined analytically in closed form, provided that the distribution is Hölder-continuous. The theoretical model is extended to include unsteady heaving and pitching motions of the airfoil section, which has applications to the performance estimation of biologically-inspired swimmers and fliers and to the future assessment of vortex noise production from porous airfoils.

  2. Micrometer-scale porosity as a biosignature in carbonate crusts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosak, Tanja; Souza-Egipsy, Virginia; Corsetti, Frank A.; Newman, Dianne K.

    2004-09-01

    We formed calcite crusts in the presence and absence of the heterotrophic bacterium Desulfovibrio desulfuricans strain G20 to investigate microbial morphological signatures in fast-accreting carbonate precipitates. Submicrometer- to micrometer-sized pores (micropores) were present and ubiquitous in the G20 crusts but absent in abiotically precipitated crusts. Bacterial micropores resemble inclusions under transmitted light, but have distinct size, biological shapes and patterns (swirling or dendritic) and are distributed differently from common fluid inclusions. We observed similar porosity in both modern and ancient carbonate crusts of putative biotic origin. Our experiments support the microbial origin of micropores and help define specific criteria whereby to recognize these features as biosignatures in the rock record.

  3. ASTROMETRIC MASSES OF 26 ASTEROIDS AND OBSERVATIONS ON ASTEROID POROSITY

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, James; Chesley, Steven R.; Matson, Robert D. E-mail: steve.chesley@jpl.nasa.gov

    2011-05-15

    As an application of our recent observational error model, we present the astrometric masses of 26 main-belt asteroids. We also present an integrated ephemeris of 300 large asteroids, which was used in the mass determination algorithm to model significant perturbations from the rest of the main belt. After combining our mass estimates with those of other authors, we study the bulk porosities of over 50 main-belt asteroids and observe that asteroids as large as 300 km in diameter may be loose aggregates. This finding may place specific constraints on models of main-belt collisional evolution. Additionally, we observe that C-group asteroids tend to have significantly higher macroporosity than S-group asteroids.

  4. Porosity estimation of alumina samples based on resonant backscattering spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokhles Gerami, F.; Kakuee, O.; Mohammadi, S.

    2016-04-01

    In this work, columnar porous alumina samples were investigated using the 16O(α,α)16O resonance scattering at 3.045 MeV. If the incident energy is slightly above the resonance energy, a resonance peak appears in the energy spectra of the backscattered ions. The position and width of this peak for non-porous samples are mainly determined by the experimental setup, whilst for porous materials, the peak position shifts towards higher energies under certain conditions. This effect can be explained by the lower amount of material which the ions encounter along the backscattered trajectories. The energy shift of the resonance peak towards higher energies was revealed experimentally and discussed theoretically. The estimated porosities of the samples based on this energy shift were compared with those evaluated from the graphical analysis of the images obtained by field emission scanning electron microscopy.

  5. Porosity in hexylene-bridged polysilsesquioxanes: Effects of monomer concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Baugher, B.; Loy, D.A.; Assink, R.A.; Prabakar, S.; Shea, K.J.; Oviatt, H.

    1994-12-31

    Hexylene-bridged polysilsesquioxanes can be prepared as mesoporous or non-porous xerogels simply by switching from basic to acidic polymerization conditions. In this study, we looked at the effect of monomer concentration on porosity of hexylene-bridged xerogels prepared under acidic and basic conditions. 1, 6-Hexylene-bridged polysilsesquioxanes were prepared by sol-gel polymerizations of 1, 6-bis(triethoxysilyl)hexane 1 with concentrations between 0. 1 to 1.2 M in ethanol. Gelation times ranged from seconds for 1.2 M concentration to months for 0.2 M. The gels were processed into xerogels by an aqueous work-up and the dry gels characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), solid state {sup 13}C and {sup 29}Si CP MAS NMR spectroscopy, and gas sorption porosimetry.

  6. Controlling porosity in bridged polysilsesquioxanes through elimination reactions

    SciTech Connect

    McClain, M.D.; Loy, D.A.; Prabakar, S.

    1996-06-01

    The retro Diels-Alder reaction was used to modify porosity in hydrocarbon-bridged polysilsesquioxane gels. Microporous polysilsesquioxanes incorporating a thermally labile Diels-Alder adduct as the hydrocarbon bridging group were prepared by sol-gel polymerization of trans-2,3-bis(triethoxysilyl)norbornene. Upon heating the 2,3-norbornenylene-bridges polymers at temperatures above 250 C, the norbornenylene-bridging group underwent a retro Diels-Alder reaction losing cyclopentadiene and leaving behind a ethenylene-bridged polysilsesquioxane. Less than theoretical quantities of cyclopentadiene were volatilized indicating that some of the diene was either reacting with the silanol and olefinic rich material or undergoing oligomerization. Both scanning electron microscopy and nitrogen sorption porosimetry revealed net coarsening of pores (and reduction of surface area) in the materials with thermolysis.

  7. Tunable Porosities and Shapes of Fullerene-Like Spheres

    PubMed Central

    Dielmann, Fabian; Fleischmann, Matthias; Heindl, Claudia; Peresypkina, Eugenia V; Virovets, Alexander V; Gschwind, Ruth M; Scheer, Manfred

    2015-01-01

    The formation of reversible switchable nanostructures monitored by solution and solid-state methods is still a challenge in supramolecular chemistry. By a comprehensive solid state and solution study we demonstrate the potential of the fivefold symmetrical building block of pentaphosphaferrocene in combination with CuI halides to switch between spheres of different porosity and shape. With increasing amount of CuX, the structures of the formed supramolecules change from incomplete to complete spherically shaped fullerene-like assemblies possessing an Ih-C80 topology at one side and to a tetrahedral-structured aggregate at the other. In the solid state, the formed nano-sized aggregates reach an outer diameter of 3.14 and 3.56 nm, respectively. This feature is used to reversibly encapsulate and release guest molecules in solution. PMID:25759976

  8. Discrimination of porosity and fluid saturation using seismic velocity analysis

    DOEpatents

    Berryman, James G.

    2001-01-01

    The method of the invention is employed for determining the state of saturation in a subterranean formation using only seismic velocity measurements (e.g., shear and compressional wave velocity data). Seismic velocity data collected from a region of the formation of like solid material properties can provide relatively accurate partial saturation data derived from a well-defined triangle plotted in a (.rho./.mu., .lambda./.mu.)-plane. When the seismic velocity data are collected over a large region of a formation having both like and unlike materials, the method first distinguishes the like materials by initially plotting the seismic velocity data in a (.rho./.lambda., .mu./.lambda.)-plane to determine regions of the formation having like solid material properties and porosity.

  9. Spark plasma sintering and porosity studies of uranium nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Kyle D.; Wallenius, Janne; Jolkkonen, Mikael; Claisse, Antoine

    2016-05-01

    In this study, a number of samples of UN sintered by the SPS method have been fabricated, and highly pure samples ranging in density from 68% to 99.8%TD - corresponding to an absolute density of 14.25 g/cm3 out of a theoretical density of 14.28 g/cm3 - have been fabricated. By careful adjustment of the sintering parameters of temperature and applied pressure, the production of pellets of specific porosity may now be achieved between these ranges. The pore closure behaviour of the material has also been documented and compared to previous studies of similar materials, which demonstrates that full pore closure using these methods occurs near 97.5% of relative density.

  10. Porosity at photo-induced fat cell lipolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doubrovsky, V. A.; Yanina, I. Y.; Tuchin, V. V.

    2012-06-01

    The "specific structures" on the fat cells' membranes in vitro as a result of photodynamic treatment was registered. These structures were identified as cytoplasm/oil microdrops flowed out through the pores in the membranes. The impact of Brilliant Green dissolved in water-ethanol solutions and irradiation by a LED lamp on the quantity and size of "specific structures" on the membranes was investigated. It was demonstrated that optical selective action on fat cells sensitized by Brilliant Green led to the growth of "specific structures" (pores) number during the time interval after light exposure. A high degree of correlation between the optical clearing of fat tissue and quantity of "specific structures" (pores) was found. This result proves our early prediction about mechanism of light-induced fat cells' lipolysis via increased cell membrane porosity.

  11. Assembly of nothing: equilibrium fluids with designed structured porosity.

    PubMed

    Lindquist, Beth A; Jadrich, Ryan B; Truskett, Thomas M

    2016-03-14

    Controlled micro- to meso-scale porosity is a common materials design goal with possible applications ranging from molecular gas adsorption to particle size selective permeability or solubility. Here, we use inverse methods of statistical mechanics to design an isotropic pair interaction that, in the absence of an external field, assembles particles into an inhomogeneous fluid matrix surrounding pores of prescribed size ordered in a lattice morphology. The pore size can be tuned via modification of temperature or particle concentration. Moreover, modulating density reveals a rich series of microphase-separated morphologies including pore- or particle-based lattices, pore- or particle-based columns, and bicontinuous or lamellar structures. Sensitivity of pore assembly to the form of the designed interaction potential is explored. PMID:26883309

  12. Matrix-fracture interactions in dual porosity simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Shook, G.M.

    1996-01-01

    A new method for simulating flow in fractured media is presented which uses a truncated version of the analytical solution to resolve pressure transients in the rock matrix. The point at which the series solution may be truncated is a known function of the problem, and may therefore be readily determined. Furthermore, the functional form of the method is essentially dimension-independent, and implementation of the method requires only minimal modification to an existing dual porosity simulator. Three test cases are presented comparing results from fine grid simulations, Warren and Root simulations, and the new formulation. In each of the three cases presented, excellent agreement with the fine grid simulations is obtained using the new method. The W&R formulation exhibits excessive error throughout the simulated time, first underpredicting outflow rates, and then overpredicting rates. The error using the W&R formulation is largest for 3-D fracture networks, but is large for all cases tested.

  13. Hayward Fault rocks: porosity, density, and strength measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morrow, C.A.; Lockner, D.A.

    2001-01-01

    Porosity, density and strength measurements were conducted on rock samples collected from the Hayward Fault region in Northern California as part of the Hayward Fault Working Group’s efforts to create a working model of the Hayward Fault. The rocks included in this study were both fine and coarse grained gabbros, altered keratophyre, basalt, sandstone, and serpentinite from various rock formations adjacent to the Hayward Fault. Densities ranged from a low of 2.25 gm/cc (altered keratophyre) to 3.05 gm/cc (fine gabbro), with an average of 2.6 gm/cc, typical of many other rocks. Porosities were generally around 1% or less, with the exception of the sandstone (7.6%) and altered keratophyre (13.5%). Failure and frictional sliding tests were conducted on intact rock cylinders at room temperature under effective pressure conditions of up to 192 MPa, simulating depths of burial to 12 km. Axial shortening of the samples progressed at a rate of 0.1 µm/sec (fine samples) or 0.2 µm/sec (porous samples) for 6 mm of displacement. Velocity stepping tests were then conducted for an additional 2 mm of displacement, for a total of 8 mm. Both peak strength (usually failure strength) and frictional strength, determined at 8 mm of displacement, increased systematically with effective pressure. Coefficients of friction, based on the observed fracture angles, ranged from 0.6 to 0.85, consistent with Byerlee’s Law. Possible secondary influences on the strength of the Hayward rock samples may be surface weathering, or a larger number of pre-existing fractures due to the proximity to the Hayward Fault. All samples showed velocity strengthening, so that the average a-b values were all strongly positive. There was no systematic relation between a-b values and effective pressure. Velocity strengthening behavior is associated with stable sliding (creep), as observed in the shallow portions of the Hayward Fault.

  14. Controlled ceramic porosity and membrane fabrication via alumoxane nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Christopher Daniel

    Carboxylate-alumoxanes, [Al(O)x(OH)y(O2CR) z]n, are organic substituted alumina nano-particles synthesized from boehmite in aqueous solution which are an inexpensive and environmentally-benign precursor for the fabrication of aluminum based ceramic bodies. The carboxylate-ligand on the alumoxane determines the morphology and the porosity of the derived alumina. Investigations of A-, MA-, MEA-, and MEEA-alumoxanes, were undertaken to determine the effects of these organic peripheries on the properties of the alumina at different sintering temperatures including the morphology, surface area, pore volume, pore size, pore size distribution, and crystal phase. The effects of physically or chemically mixing different carboxylate-alumoxanes were also investigated. The alumina derived from the thermolysis of the carboxylate-alumoxanes exhibits small pore diameters and narrow pore size distributions that are desirable for use in ceramic ultrafiltration membranes. In addition, it is possible to form alumina membranes with a range of pore sizes and porosity by changing the organic periphery. This lead to investigating the ability to produce asymmetric alumina filters with characteristics that at the lower end of the ultrafiltration range. The flux, permeability, molecular weight cut-off, roughness, and wettability of the asymmetric alumina membranes derived from carboxylate-alumoxanes are determined. Comparisons of these filters are made with commercially available filters. The ability to dope carboxylate-alumoxanes via a transmetallation reaction followed by thermolysis has previously shown to result in catalytically active alumina based materials. This lead to investigations into forming catalytically active membranes. Dip-coating aqueous solutions of the doped carboxylate-alumoxanes onto porous alumina supports, followed by thermolysis, resulted in the formation of doped-alumina asymmetric filters. In addition, a novel method to form surface-modified carboxylate

  15. Porosity and permeability of eastern Devonian gas shale

    SciTech Connect

    Soeder, D.J.

    1986-01-01

    High-precision core analysis has been performed on eight samples of Devonian gas shale from the Appalachian Basin. Seven of the core samples consist of the Upper Devonian age Huron Member of the Ohio Shale, six of which came from wells in the Ohio River valley, and the seventh from a well in east-central Kentucky. The eighth core sample consists of Middle Devonian age Marcellus Shale obtained from a well in Morgantown, West Virginia. The core analysis was originally intended to supply accurate input data for Devonian shale numerical reservoir simulation. Unexpectedly, the results have also shown that there are a number of previously unknown factors which influence or control gas production from organic-rich shales of the Appalachian Basin. The presence of petroleum as a mobile liquid phase in the pores of all seven Huron Shale samples effectively limits the gas porosity of this formation to less than 0.2%, and permeability of the rock matrix to gas is less than 0.1 microdarcy at reservoir stress. The Marcellus Shale core, on the other hand, was free of a mobile liquid phase and had a measured gas porosity of approximately 10% under stress with a fairly strong ''adsorption'' component. Permeability to gas (K/sub infinity/ was highly stress-dependent, ranging from about 20 microdarcies at a net stress of 3000 psi down to about 5 microdarcies at a net stress of 6000 psi. The conclusion reached from this study is that Devonian shale in the Appalachian Basin is a considerably more complex natural gas resource than previously thought. Production potential varies widely with geographic location and stratigraphy, just as it does with other gas and oil resources. 15 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Porosity and permeability evolution of clay faults: in situ experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, P.; Guglielmi, Y.; Seguy, S.; Lefevre, M.; Ghani, I.; Gent, G.; Castilla, R.; Gout, C.; Dick, P.; Nussbaum, C.; Durand, J.

    2015-12-01

    Fault models associating low permeability cores with high permeability damage zones are widely accepted, however, constitutive laws relating permeability with fault structure, stress, and strain remain poorly constrained. We here present preliminary results of hydromechanical experiments performed at the 10 m scale in fault zones in Toarcian and Aalenian black shale formations. Intact formations have a very low permeability (10-19 to 10-22 m2). One case (in IRSN's Tournemire Underground Research Laboratory) displays a porosity increase in and around the fault core and abundant veins and calcite cemented small faults in the damage zone. The other case (Mont Terri Swisstopo Underground Research Laboratory) displays a porosity decrease in the fault core zone and few veins. However, under the present stress state, the static permeability of the fractured zones at both locations is higher than that of the intact formation by up to 3 orders of magnitude. During borehole pressurization tests three regimes of permeability variations are observed. (1) Fracture permeability first increases progressively as a function of fluid pressure (2) When a threshold is reached, permeability further increases by 100 or more, but strain as well as permeability variations remain in most part reversible. (3) When a steady pressure is maintained in the injection borehole (from 20 minutes to several days) flow rate tends to decrease with time. These results show that high transient permeability may locally occur in a fault zone under conditions when most of the deformation is reversible, opening the possibility of transient fluid migration decoupled from slip along faults that are not favorably oriented. However, during one test, more than 1 mm of irreversible slip occurred along one of the main interfaces, associated with a sudden increase in flow rate (from 11 to more than 40 l/min). This suggests that when slip occurs, it could result in permeability variations that may remain difficult

  17. Differential effective medium modeling of rock elastic moduli with critical porosity constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Mukerji, T.; Mavko, G.; Berryman, J.; Berge, P.

    1995-03-01

    Rocks generally have a percolation porosity at which they lose rigidity and fall apart. Percolation behaviour is a purely geometrical property, independent of any physical properties, and is a powerful constraint on any valid velocity-porosity relation. The authors show how the conventional Differential Effective Medium (DEM) theory can be modified to incorporate percolation of elastic moduli in rocks by taking the material at the critical porosity as one of the constituents of a two-phase composite. Any desired percolation porosity can be specified as an input. In contrast, the conventional DEM model always predicts percolation at a porosity of either 0 or 100 percent. Most sedimentary rocks however have intermediate percolation porosities and are therefore not well represented by the conventional theory. The modified DEM model incorporates percolation behavior, and at the same time is always consistent with the Hashin-Shtrikman bounds. The predictions compare favorably with laboratory sandstone data. 24 refs., 3 figs.

  18. Study of Porosity on Titania Slag Obtained by Conventional Sintering and Thermal Plasma Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samal, S.

    2016-07-01

    This article investigates the development of porosity in titania-rich slag obtained by sintering via conventional and thermal plasma heating at 1000°C in inert atmosphere. The holder in the plasma reactor acted as the discharge anode confined within a hollow graphite cathode. Quantitative evaluation of the porosity in the conventionally sintered and plasma-sintered titania-rich slag was performed via pycnometry. Specifically, the physical dimension and morphology of the pores were characterized according to the area fraction, mean diameter, shape factor, and elongation factor. Under both conventional and thermal plasma heating conditions, porosity developed on the surface of titania-rich slag. The titania-rich slag obtained by two processes showed different porosity features in terms of the morphology and porosity. A lower porosity was observed in the plasma-sintered sample when compared with that obtained via conventional heating.

  19. Ge growth on porous silicon: The effect of buffer porosity on the epilayer crystalline quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calabrese, G.; Baricordi, S.; Bernardoni, P.; De Salvador, D.; Ferroni, M.; Guidi, V.; Morandi, V.; Vincenzi, D.

    2014-09-01

    We report on the epitaxial growth of Ge virtual substrates directly on Si (001) and on different porosity porous silicon (pSi) buffers. Obtained results indicate that Ge grown on low porosity (22%) pSi buffer has a better crystalline quality compared to Ge grown on bulk Si and on higher porosity buffers. This result is attributed to the compliant nature of pSi and to its reduced Young's modulus, which leads to plastic tensile deformation of the 22% porosity buffer under the in-plane tensile stress introduced by Ge lattice. The same result is not observed for higher porosity buffers, this effect being attributed to the higher buffer fragility. A low porosity pSi layer can hence be used as buffer for the growth of Ge on Si virtual substrates with reduced dislocation content and for the growth of Ge based devices or the successive integration of III-V semiconductors on Si.

  20. Secondary compaction after secondary porosity: Can it form a pressure seal?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weedman, Suzanne D.; Brantley, Susan L.; Albrecht, Wolfgang

    1992-04-01

    Petrography analysis of sandstones from the vicinity of a pressure seal (transition from normal to overpressure) at 5.5-km depth in the lower Tuscaloosa Formation in Louisiana documents local, high porosity above and below the seal. Packing analysis shows that compaction is greater in normally pressured, high-porosity sandstones than in overpressured, high-porosity sandstones; compaction in overpressured, high-porosity sandstones is similar to that in normally pressured, well-cemented sandstones. We propose that focused corrosive fluids created a zone of high secondary porosity, allowing further compaction that we call "secondary compaction." Secondary compaction is greater above the seal than below, suggesting that high-pressure fluid below the seal has preserved porosity and that the pressure seal became effective soon after dissolution of cement. Cuttings from the pressure-seal zone reveal an unusual texture of fragmented, pressure-solved grains and matrix, which may be a result of extensive secondary compaction.

  1. Temperature and air velocity effects on ethanol emission from corn silage with the characteristics of an exposed silo face

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montes, Felipe; Hafner, Sasha D.; Rotz, C. Alan; Mitloehner, Frank M.

    2010-05-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from agricultural sources are believed to be an important contributor to tropospheric ozone in some locations. Recent research suggests that silage is a major source of VOCs emitted from agriculture, but only limited data exist on silage emissions. Ethanol is the most abundant VOC emitted from corn silage; therefore, ethanol was used as a representative compound to characterize the pattern of emission over time and to quantify the effect of air velocity and temperature on emission rate. Ethanol emission was measured from corn silage samples removed intact from a bunker silo. Emission rate was monitored over 12 h for a range in air velocity (0.05, 0.5, and 5 m s -1) and temperature (5, 20, and 35 °C) using a wind tunnel system. Ethanol flux ranged from 0.47 to 210 g m -2 h -1 and 12 h cumulative emission ranged from 8.5 to 260 g m -2. Ethanol flux was highly dependent on exposure time, declining rapidly over the first hour and then continuing to decline more slowly over the duration of the 12 h trials. The 12 h cumulative emission increased by a factor of three with a 30 °C increase in temperature and by a factor of nine with a 100-fold increase in air velocity. Effects of air velocity, temperature, and air-filled porosity were generally consistent with a conceptual model of VOC emission from silage. Exposure duration, temperature, and air velocity should be taken into consideration when measuring emission rates of VOCs from silage, so emission rate data obtained from studies that utilize low air flow methods are not likely representative of field conditions.

  2. Air Pollution

    MedlinePlus

    Air pollution is a mixture of solid particles and gases in the air. Car emissions, chemicals from factories, dust, ... a gas, is a major part of air pollution in cities. When ozone forms air pollution, it's ...

  3. Air Pollution

    MedlinePlus

    Air pollution is a mixture of solid particles and gases in the air. Car emissions, chemicals from factories, ... Ozone, a gas, is a major part of air pollution in cities. When ozone forms air pollution, it's ...

  4. Droplet Measurement below Single-Layer Grid Fill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitkovic, Pavol

    2016-03-01

    The main part of the heat transfer in a cooling tower is in a fill zone. This one is consist of a cooling fill. For the cooling tower is used a film fill or grid fill or splash fill in the generally. The grid fill has lower heat transfer performance like film fill usually. But their advantage is high resistance to blockage of the fill. The grid fill is consisted with independent layers made from plastic usually. The layers consist of several bars connected to the different shapes. For experiment was used the rhombus shape. The drops diameter was measured above and below the Grid fill.

  5. Evaluation of Porosity and Permeability for an Oil Prospect, Offshore Vietnam by using Artificial Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bui, H. T.; Ho, L. T.; Ushijima, K.; Nur, A.

    2006-12-01

    Determination of porosity and permeability plays a key role either in characterization of a reservoir or in development of an oil field. Their distribution helps to predict the major faults or fractured zones that are related to high porosity area in order to reduce drilling hazards. Porosity and permeability of the rock can be determined directly from the core sample or obtained from well log data such as: sonic, density, neutron or resistivity. These input parameters depend not only on porosity (?) but also on the rock matrix, fluids contained in the rocks, clay mineral component, or geometry of pore structures. Therefore, it is not easy to estimate exactly porosity and permeability since having corrected those values by conventional well log interpretation method. In this study, the Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) have been used to derive porosity and permeability directly from well log data for Vung Dong oil prospect, southern offshore Vietnam. Firstly, we designed a training patterns for ANNs from neutron porosity, bulk density, P-sonic, deep resistivity, shallow resistivity and MSFL log curves. Then, ANNs were trained by core samples data for porosity and permeability. Several ANNs paradigms have been tried on a basis of trial and error. The batch back- propagation algorithm was found more proficient in training porosity network meanwhile the quick propagation algorithm is more effective in the permeability network. Secondly, trained ANNs was tested and applied for real data set of some wells to calculate and reveal the distribution maps of porosity or permeability. Distributions of porosity and permeability have been correlated with seismic data interpretation to map the faults and fractured zones in the study. The ANNs showed good results of porosity and permeability distribution with high reliability, fast, accurate and low cost features. Therefore, the ANNs should be widely applied in oil and gas industry.

  6. Porosity occurring in modification of hypoeutectic silumins with strontium and zirconium

    SciTech Connect

    Kutsenok, N.L.; Ganiev, I.N.; Yanchuk, V.N.

    1987-07-01

    The authors investigate modifications in castability, temperature effects, porosity, and fracture properties in silicon-aluminium alloys after being alloyed with strontium and zirconium. The porosity observed in alloys containing strontium was found to have a microshrinkage character. Alloying with zirconium was found to reduce somewhat the tendency of the alloy toward the formation of microshrinkage porosity but did not compensate for the influence of strontium.

  7. The reopening of a collapsed fluid-filled elastic tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juel, Anne; Heap, Alexandra

    We present an experimental study of the reopening mechanics of a collapsed liquid-filled elastic tube. The experiment is a simple mechanical model of pulmonary airway reopening and aims to assess the robustness of existing theoretical models. A metre-long horizontal elastic tube of inner radius R_i {=} 4.88 ± 0.14mm is filled with silicone oil and is carefully collapsed mechanically. The injection of nitrogen at a constant flow rate results in the steady propagation of an air finger, after the decay of initial transients. This behaviour is observed over the realizable range of the capillary numbers Ca, which measures the ratio of viscous and capillary forces. With increasing Ca, the transition region between the collapsed and reopened sections of the tube shortens, and the height of the tube behind the bubble tip increases. We also find that air fingers can propagate in partially reopened tubes, in which the transmural pressure is negative far behind the finger tip.

  8. Validation of a stochastic digital packing algorithm for porosity prediction in fluvial gravel deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Rui; Schruff, Tobias; Jia, Xiaodong; Schüttrumpf, Holger; Frings, Roy M.

    2015-11-01

    Porosity as one of the key properties of sediment mixtures is poorly understood. Most of the existing porosity predictors based upon grain size characteristics have been unable to produce satisfying results for fluvial sediment porosity, due to the lack of consideration of other porosity-controlling factors like grain shape and depositional condition. Considering this, a stochastic digital packing algorithm was applied in this work, which provides an innovative way to pack particles of arbitrary shapes and sizes based on digitization of both particles and packing space. The purpose was to test the applicability of this packing algorithm in predicting fluvial sediment porosity by comparing its predictions with outcomes obtained from laboratory measurements. Laboratory samples examined were two natural fluvial sediments from the Rhine River and Kall River (Germany), and commercial glass beads (spheres). All samples were artificially combined into seven grain size distributions: four unimodal distributions and three bimodal distributions. Our study demonstrates that apart from grain size, grain shape also has a clear impact on porosity. The stochastic digital packing algorithm successfully reproduced the measured variations in porosity for the three different particle sources. However, the packing algorithm systematically overpredicted the porosity measured in random dense packing conditions, mainly because the random motion of particles during settling introduced unwanted kinematic sorting and shape effects. The results suggest that the packing algorithm produces loose packing structures, and is useful for trend analysis of packing porosity.

  9. Simulation of the impact of 3-D porosity distribution in metallic U-10Zr fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Di; Yacout, Abdellatif M.; Stan, Marius; Bauer, Theodore H.; Wright, Arthur E.

    2014-05-01

    Evolution of porosity generated in metallic U-Zr fuel irradiated in fast spectrum reactors leads to changes in fuel properties and impacts important phenomena such as heat transport and constituent redistribution. The porosity is generated as a result of the accumulation of fission gases and is affected by the possible bond sodium infiltration into the fuel. Typically, the impact of porosity development on properties, such as thermal conductivity, is accounted for through empirical correlations that are dependent on porosity and infiltrated sodium fractions. Currently available simulation tools make it possible to take into account fuel 3-D porosity distributions, potentially eliminating the need for such correlations. This development allows for a more realistic representation of the porosity evolution in metallic fuel and creates a framework for truly mechanistic fuel development models. In this work, COMSOL multi-physics simulation platform is used to model 3-D porosity distributions and simulate heat transport in metallic U-10Zr fuel. Available experimental data regarding microstructural evolution of fuel that was irradiated in EBR-II and associated phase stability information are used to guide the simulation. The impact of changes in porosity characteristics on material properties is estimated and the results are compared with calculated temperature distributions. The simulations demonstrate the developed capability and importance of accounting for detailed porosity distribution features for accurate fuel performance evaluation.

  10. Post-flight Analysis of the Argon Filled Ion Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tai, H.; Goldhagen, P.; Jones, I. W.; Wilson, J. W.; Maiden, D. L.; Shinn, J. L.

    2003-01-01

    Atmospheric ionizing radiation is a complex mixture of primary galactic and solar cosmic rays and a multitude of secondary particles produced in collision with air nuclei. The first series of Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation (AIR) measurement flights on the NASA research aircraft ER-2 took place in June 1997. The ER-2 flight package consisted of fifteen instruments from six countries and were chosen to provide varying sensitivity to specific components. These AIR ER-2 flight measurements are to characterize the AIR environment during solar minimum to allow the continued development of environmental models of this complex mixture of ionizing radiation. This will enable scientists to study the ionizing radiation health hazard associated with the high-altitude operation of a commercial supersonic transport and to allow estimates of single event upsets for advanced avionics systems design. The argon filled ion chamber representing about 40 percent of the contributions to radiation risks are analyzed herein and model discrepancies for solar minimum environment are on the order of 5 percent and less. Other biologically significant components remain to be analyzed.

  11. Influence of structural-phase state of ferritic-martensitic steels on the helium porosity development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernov, I. I.; Staltsov, M. S.; Kalin, B. A.; Bogachev, I. A.; Guseva, L. Yu; Dzhumaev, P. S.; Emelyanova, O. V.; Drozhzhina, M. V.; Manukovsky, K. V.; Nikolaeva, I. D.

    2016-04-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has been used to study the effect of the initial structural-phase state (SPhS) of ferritic-martensitic steels EK-181, EP-450 and EP-450- ODS (with 0.5 wt.% nanoparticles of Y2O3) on the of helium porosity formation and gas swelling. Different SPhS of steel EK-181 was produced by water quenching, annealing, normalizing plus tempered, intensive plastic deformation by torsion (HPDT). Irradiation was carried out by He+-40 keV ions at 923 K up to fluence of 5-1020 He+/m2. It is shown that the water quenching causes the formation of uniformly distributed small bubbles (d¯ ∼ 2 nm) of the highest density (ρ∼ 1025 m-3). After normalization followed by tempering as well as after annealing bubbles distribution is highly non-uniform both by volume and in size. Very large faceted bubbles (pre-equilibrium gas-filled voids) are formed in ferrite grains resulting in high level of gas swelling of the irradiated layer with S = 4,9 ± 1,2 and 3.8 ± 0.9% respectively. Nano- and microcrystalline structure created by HPDT completely degenerate at irradiation temperature and ion irradiation formed bubbles of the same parameters as in the annealed steel. Bubbles formed in EP-450-ODS steel are smaller in size and density, which led to a decrease of helium swelling by 4 times (S = 0.8 ± 0.2%) as compared to the swelling of the matrix steel EP-450 (S = 3.1 ± 0.7%).

  12. Dynamics of hydrocarbon vents: Focus on primary porosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansen, C.; Shedd, W.; Abichou, T.; Pineda-Garcia, O.; Silva, M.; MacDonald, I. R.

    2012-12-01

    at least three degrees of porosity (i.e. traveling through faulted consolidated sediment, unconsolidated sediment, and finally the gas hydrate outcroppings as described here). The oil and gas travel from the sub-bottom reservoir along, what is thought, an interface between the salt and sediment, and then up a fault in the consolidated sediment. When it reaches the unconsolidated sediments, vertical pathways bifurcate due to lack of sediment strength to allow for the oil and gas to reach different clusters of hydrocarbon vents at the sea floor. Hydrocarbon vents are formed and sustained by a combination of pressure, temperature, and gas solubility (Peltzer & Brewer, 2000) creating persistent primary porosity conduits, from which the bubbles escape at different rates depending on the size of the tubes. Previous research has been carried out in order to determine the effect of temperature fluxes on hydrocarbon outcroppings (MacDonald et al, 2005), however, a focus on the dynamics at this level of primary porosity is lacking. By determining the rate and size of bubbles and pore size distribution of the hydrocarbon outcropping, we can explore the hydraulic properties. Therefore, examination of biological and physical effects, such as the role of ice-worms, and the effect of tides, allow for a better understanding of the dynamics and persistency of hydrocarbon vent outcroppings.

  13. Storage-dependent drainable porosity for complex hillslopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilberts, A. G. J.; Troch, P. A.; Paniconi, C.

    2005-06-01

    In hydraulic groundwater theory the parameter drainable porosity f (a storage coefficient that accounts for the effect of the unsaturated zone on water table dynamics) is usually treated as a constant. For shallow unconfined aquifers the value of this parameter, however, depends on the depth to the water table and the water retention characteristics of the soil. In this study an analytical expression for f as a function of water table depth is derived under the assumption of quasi-steady state hydraulic equilibrium, in this way accounting, in part, for the effects of the unsaturated zone on groundwater dynamics. The derived expression is implemented in the nonlinear hillslope-storage Boussinesq (HSB) model (Troch et al., 2003) to simulate the drainage response of complex hillslopes. The model's behavior is analyzed by comparison to (1) the HSB model with a constant value for f and (2) measurements of water tables and outflow hydrographs on a 6.0 × 2.5 × 0.5 m laboratory hillslope experiment. The comparison is conducted for a pure drainage case on two different hillslope shapes (linearly convergent and divergent) and for three different slope inclinations (5%, 10%, and 15%). Comparison 1 is run in an uncalibrated and a fully calibrated mode, and it enables us to evaluate the effect of a dynamic, state-dependent value for f on model output. Comparison 2 allows us to test the HSB model on several hillslope configurations and to analyze whether the concept of a storage-dependent f enhances the model performance. The comparison of the HSB models to the measurements from the laboratory hillslopes shows that it is possible to capture the general features of the outflow hydrograph during a drainage experiment using either one of the HSB models. Overall, the original (constant f) HSB model, with one fitting parameter more than the revised HSB model, shows a slightly better fit on the hydrographs when compared to the revised (variable f) HSB model. However, the peak

  14. Fault rock texture and porosity type in Triassic dolostones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agosta, Fabrizio; Grieco, Donato; Bardi, Alessandro; Prosser, Giacomo

    2015-04-01

    Preliminary results of an ongoing project aimed at deciphering the micromechanics and porosity evolution associated to brittle deformation of Triassic dolostones are presented. Samples collected from high-angle, oblique-slip, 10's to 100's m-throw normal faults crosscutting Mesozoic carbonates of the Neo Tethys (Campanian-Lucanian Platform) are investigated by mean of field geological mapping, optical microscopy, SEM and image analyses. The goal is to characterize in detail composition, texture and porosity of cataclastic rocks in order to assess the structural architecture of dolomitic fault cores. Moreover, the present study addresses the time-space control exerted by several micro-mechanisms such as intragranular extensional fracturing, chipping and shear fracturing, which took place during grain rolling and crushing within the evolving faults, on type, amount, dimensions and distribution of micropores present within the cataclastic fault cores. Study samples are representative of well-exposed dolomitic fault cores of oblique-slip normal faults trending either NW-SE or NE-SW. The high-angle normal faults crosscut the Mesozoic carbonates of the Campanian-Lucanian Platform, which overrode the Lagonegro succession by mean of low-angle thrust faults. Fault throws are measured by considering the displaced thrust faults as key markers after large scale field mapping (1:10,000 scale) of the study areas. In the field, hand samples were selected according to their distance from main slip surfaces and, in some case, along secondary slip surfaces. Microscopy analysis of about 100 oriented fault rock samples shows that, mostly, the study cataclastic rocks are made up of dolomite and sparse, minute survivor silicate grains deriving from the Lagonegro succession. In order to quantitatively assess the main textural classes, a great attention is paid to the grain-matrix ratio, grain sphericity, grain roundness, and grain sorting. By employing an automatic box-counting technique

  15. 5 CFR 362.303 - Filling positions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... possesses a Ph.D. or equivalent degree directly related to the STEM position the agency is seeking to fill... candidate possesses a Ph.D. or equivalent degree directly related to the position the agency is seeking...

  16. 5 CFR 362.303 - Filling positions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... possesses a Ph.D. or equivalent degree directly related to the STEM position the agency is seeking to fill... candidate possesses a Ph.D. or equivalent degree directly related to the position the agency is seeking...

  17. PERVAPORATION USING ADSORBENT-FILLED MEMBRANES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Membranes containing selective fillers, such as zeolites and activated carbon, can improve the separation by pervaporation. Applications of adsorbent-filled membranes in pervaporation have been demonstrated by a number of studies. These applications include removal of organic co...

  18. Foam-filled cushions for sliding trays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nahin, S. B.; Robb, P. H.

    1980-01-01

    Polytetrafluoroethylene tube filled with polyurethane foam forms low friction sliding surface that cushions vibrations and absorbs manufacturing tolerances and misalignment. Possible uses include packaging of components for shipping and seals for doors in lockers, cars, and refrigerators.

  19. REMEDIATION OF TCE-CONTAMINATED GROUNDWATER BY A PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIER FILLED WITH PLANT MULCH (BIOWALL)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A pilot-scale permeable reactive barrier filled with plant mulch was installed at Altus Air Force Base (in Oklahoma, USA) to treat trichloroethylene (TCE) contamination in ground water emanating from a landfill. The barrier was constructed in June 2002. It was 139 meters long, 7 ...

  20. The Interfacial Interaction Problem in Complex Multiple Porosity Fractured Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suarez-Arriaga, Mario-Cesar

    2003-04-01

    Many productive reservoirs (oil, gas, water, geothermal) are associated to natural fracturing. Fault zones and fractures act as open networks for fluid and energy flow from depth. Their petrophysical parameters are heterogeneous and randomly distributed, conforming extremely complex natural systems. Here, the simultaneous heat and mass flows are coupled to the deformation of thermoporoelastic rocks. The system's volume is divided into N interacting continua, each one occupying a region of space Vn wrapped by a surface Sn (n=1,N). The mass flow is represented by: ∂/∂t ∫ Vn ρf φdV + ∫ Sn F⃗M ṡ n⃗dS = ∫ Vn qMdV (3) Taking into account a non-isothermal process the coupled equation of energy is: ∂/∂t ∫ Vn [φρf hf + (1 - φ)ρrhr]dV + ∫ Sn F⃗E ṡ n⃗dS = ∫ Vn qEdV (4) Where t means time, φ is porosity, ρf, ρr are fluid and rock densities, F⃗M and F⃗E are total mass and energy flows, qM and qE are volumetric mass and energy extracted or injected into Vn, hf and hr are specific enthalpies for fluid and rock respectively. Rock deformation is coupled through the equation: ∇⃗ ṡ (ρf/μK ṡ ∇⃗pφ)Vn = φ (Dtρf + ρf/VφdVφ/dt)Vn (5) K is the absolute permeability tensor, μ means dynamic fluid viscosity, Dt is a total derivative, pφ is pore pressure and Vφ is the volume of pores in Vn. The N media interact with each other, every one has its own parameters and its own interporosity flow. Modelling these coupled phenomena requires to average highly contrasting physical properties, independently of the method used in the solution of equations. A lot of attention has been devoted to develop realistic numerical models to describe flows in reservoirs under exploitation. But to the best of our knowledge very little attention has been focused on the problem of interfacial interaction and averaging petrophysical parameters in multiple porosity reservoirs.

  1. Porosity reduction within shear deformation bands in unconsolidated Pleistocene sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandes, Christian; Tanner, David

    2016-04-01

    Deformation bands are important structural elements that occur in the upper crust and develop in porous sandstones and even in unconsolidated sands. In contrast to discrete surfaces such as faults, deformation bands represent tabular zones of continuous displacement over several centimeters (Fossen et al., 2007). We present an outcrop-based study on the internal fabric of shear deformation bands that developed in Pleistocene unconsolidated sands in northern Germany. The deformation bands formed in an extensional stress regime, have a normal sense of displacement in a range of centimeters to decimeters, and form conjugate sets that intersect at angles between 70° and 90° (Brandes & Tanner, 2012). Due to their near-surface position, they are a perfect target for the study of deformation band formation prior to burial and diagenesis. Thin section analysis show a significant pore space reduction from the host sediment to the shear deformation band. The boundary between the host sediment and the shear deformation bands can be very sharp. The grains within the deformation band are of the same grain size as the host sediment. Grain shape varies from angular to well-rounded. Many elliptic grains have a long-axis orientation parallel to the trend of the deformation band. The grains in the analysed thin sections are all intact, i.e., there is no evidence for cataclasis. We believe the shear deformation bands are created by a grain-sliding process that decreases the porosity and leads to a denser packing of the sand. This is a porosity reduction mechanism in sandstone that occurs prior to burial without cataclasis. This can have an impact on fluid-flow in unconsolidated sediments in the near-surface. References: Brandes, C. & Tanner, D.C. (2012) Three-dimensional geometry and fabric of shear deformation bands in unconsolidated Pleistocene sediments. Tectonophysics, 518-521, 84-92. Fossen, H., Schultz, R.A., Shipton, Z.K., & Mair, K. (2007) Deformation bands in sandstone: a

  2. Evaluation of heterogeneous porosity in reservoirs on Arabian platform: microns to kilometers

    SciTech Connect

    Nurmi, R.; Charara, M.; Waterhouse, M.

    1988-02-01

    A common heterogeneity is the occurrence of patchy porosity, which may occur at any scale of examination. The occurrence of patchy porosity at a scale of kilometers is a factor controlling the areal distribution of reservoirs. Although often related to depositional facies, in some areas this distribution has not been adequately explained. The three-dimensional mapping of such large-scale porosity has been carried out by well mapping and/or seismic velocity mapping. The presence of meter-scale patchy porosity is routinely detected in Cretaceous-age reservoirs using borehole electrical imagery. Although the patterns of patchy porosity are revealed in these images, porosity variation is only shown in relative terms. It is possible, however, to use high-resolution porosity measurements to quantify these variations, which is especially important when there is a continuous network of high porosity. This type of heterogeneity sometimes erroneously causes indications of secondary porosity. Although the origin of these porosity variations is not well understood, SEM examination of some low-porosity areas indicates that they are the result of an abundance of micron-scale patchy recrystallization. Patchy distribution of anhydrite is a common form of reservoir heterogeneity in Jurassic and Tertiary reservoirs. Electrical images clearly reveal the various fabrics of anhydrite within carbonate and sandstone reservoirs. Although this type of heterogeneity has been long recognized by geologists, it is only now being included in thorough log evaluation efforts. Unless such heterogeneously distributed anhydrite is recognized and accounted for, the evaluation of these reservoir zones can be inappropriately pessimistic or falsely indicative of hydrocarbons.

  3. Using Grail Data to Assess the Effect of Porosity and Dilatancy on the Gravity Signature of Impact Craters on the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milbury, C.; Johnson, B. C.; Melosh, J., IV; Collins, G. S.; Blair, D. M.; Soderblom, J. M.; Zuber, M. T.

    2014-12-01

    NASA's dual Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) spacecraft have globally mapped the lunar gravity field at unprecedented resolution; this has enabled the study of craters of all sizes and ages. Soderblom et al. [2014, LPSC abstract #1777] calculated the residual Bouguer anomalies for ~2700 craters 27-184 km in diameter (D). They found that the residual Bouguer anomaly over craters smaller than D~100 km is essentially 0±50 mGal, there is a transition for D~100-150 km, and craters larger than 184 km have a positive residual Bouguer anomaly that increases with increasing crater size. We use the iSALE shock physics hydrocode to model crater formation, including the effect of porosity and dilatancy (shear bulking). We use strength parameters of gabbroic anorthosite for the crust and dunite for the mantle. Our impactor sizes range from 6-30 km, which produce craters between 86-450 km in diameter for pre-impact target porosities of 0, 6.8, and 13.6%. We calculate the free-air and Bouguer gravity anomalies from our models and compare them to gravity data from GRAIL. We find that target porosity has the greatest effect on the gravity signature of lunar craters and can explain the observed ±50 mGal scatter in the residual Bouguer anomaly. We investigate variations of impact velocity, crustal thickness, and dilatancy angle; we find that these parameters do not affect the gravity as significantly as target porosity does. We find that the crater diameter at which mantle uplift dominates the crater gravity is dependent on target porosity, and that it occurs at a crater diameter that is close to the complex crater to peak-ring basin transition.

  4. Drum silencer with shallow cavity filled with helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choy, Y. S.; Huang, Lixi

    2003-09-01

    The motivation of this study is twofold: (a) to produce a flow-through silencer with zero pressure loss for pressure-critical applications, and (b) to tackle low frequency noise with limited sideway space using cavities filled with helium. The work represents a further development of our recently conceived device of a drum-like silencer with conventional air cavity [Huang, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 112, 2014-2025 (2002); Choy and Huang, ibid. 112, 2026-2035 (2002)]. Theoretical predictions are validated by experimental data. The new silencer consists of two highly tensioned membranes lining part of a duct, and each membrane is backed by a cavity filled with helium. For a typical configuration of a duct with height h, membrane length L=7h, cavity depth hc=0.2h, and tension T=0.52ρ0c02h2, where ρ0 and c0 are the ambient density and speed of sound in air, respectively, the transmission loss has a continuous stop band of TL>6.35 dB for frequency 0.03c0/h to 0.064c0/h, which is much better than traditional duct lining. In addition to the mechanisms at work for drum silencers with air cavity, the low density of helium reduces the masslike reactance of the cavity on the second in vacuo mode of membrane vibration. The reduction greatly enhances the membrane response at this mode, which is found to be critical for achieving a broadband performance in the low-frequency regime.

  5. Integrative Chemistry: Advanced functional cellular materials bearing multiscale porosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Depardieu, M.; Kinadjian, N.; Backov, R.

    2015-07-01

    With this mini review we show through the sol-gel and emulsion-based Integrative Chemistry how it is possible to trigger materials dimensionality and beyond their functionalities when reaching enhanced applications. In here we focus on 3D macrocellular monolithic foams bearing hierarchical porosities and applications thereof. We first depict the general background of emulsions focusing on concentrated ones, acting as soft templates for the design of PolyHIPE foams, HIPE being the acronym of High Internal Phase Emulsions while encompassing both sol-gel and polymer chemistry. Secondly we extend this approach toward the design of hybrid organic-inorganic foams, labeled Organo-Si(HIPE), where photonics and heterogeneous catalysis applications are addressed. In a third section we show how inorganic Si(HIPE) matrices can be employed as sacrificial hard templates for the generation carbonaceous foams, labeled Carbon(HIPE). These foams being conductive we show applications when employed as electrodes for Li-S battery and as hosts for Li(BH4)-based hydrogen storage.

  6. Towards accurate porosity descriptors based on guest-host interactions.

    PubMed

    Paik, Dooam; Haranczyk, Maciej; Kim, Jihan

    2016-05-01

    For nanoporous materials at the characterization level, geometry-based approaches have become the methods of choice to provide information, often encoded in numerical descriptors, about the pores and the channels of a porous material. Examples of most common descriptors of the latter are pore limiting diameters, accessible surface area and accessible volume. The geometry-based methods exploit hard-sphere approximation for atoms, which (1) reduces costly computations of the interatomic interactions between the probe guest molecule and the porous material framework atoms, (2) effectively exploit applied mathematics methods such as Voronoi decomposition to represent and characterize porosity. In this work, we revisit and quantify the shortcoming of the geometry-based approaches. To do so, we have developed a series of algorithms to calculate pore descriptors such as void fraction, accessible surface area, pore limiting diameters (largest included sphere, and largest free sphere) based on a classical force field model of interactions between the guest and the framework atoms. Our resulting energy-based methods are tested on diverse sets of metal-organic frameworks and zeolite structures and comparisons against results obtained from geometric-based method indicate deviations in the cases for structures with small pore sizes. The method provides both high accuracy and performance making it suitable when screening a large database of materials. PMID:27054971

  7. Mechanical characterization of dense calcium phosphate bioceramics with interconnected porosity.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Y H; Turner, I G; Miles, A W

    2007-12-01

    Porous hydroxyapatite/tricalcium phosphate (HA/TCP) bioceramics were fabricated by a novel technique of vacuum impregnation of reticulated polymeric foams with ceramic slip. The samples had approximately 5-10% interconnected porosity and controlled pore sizes appropriate to allow bone ingrowth, combined with good mechanical properties. A range of polyurethane foams with 20, 30 and 45 pores per inch (ppi) were used as templates to produce samples for testing. The foams were inpregnated with solid loadings in the range of 60-140 wt%. The results indicated that the average apparent density of the HA/TCP samples was 2.48 g/cm(3), the four-point bending strength averaged 16.98 MPa, the work of fracture averaged 15.46 J/m(2) and the average compressive strength was 105.56 MPa. A range of mechanical properties resulted from the various combinations of different grades of PU foam and the solid loading of slips. The results indicated that it is possible to manufacture open pore HA/TCP bioceramics, with compressive strengths comparable to human bone, which could be of significant clinical interest. PMID:17569009

  8. Boiling radial flow in fractures of varying wall porosity

    SciTech Connect

    Barnitt, Robb Allan

    2000-06-01

    The focus of this report is the coupling of conductive heat transfer and boiling convective heat transfer, with boiling flow in a rock fracture. A series of experiments observed differences in boiling regimes and behavior, and attempted to quantify a boiling convection coefficient. The experimental study involved boiling radial flow in a simulated fracture, bounded by a variety of materials. Nonporous and impermeable aluminum, highly porous and permeable Berea sandstone, and minimally porous and permeable graywacke from The Geysers geothermal field. On nonporous surfaces, the heat flux was not strongly coupled to injection rate into the fracture. However, for porous surfaces, heat flux, and associated values of excess temperature and a boiling convection coefficient exhibited variation with injection rate. Nucleation was shown to occur not upon the visible surface of porous materials, but a distance below the surface, within the matrix. The depth of boiling was a function of injection rate, thermal power supplied to the fracture, and the porosity and permeability of the rock. Although matrix boiling beyond fracture wall may apply only to a finite radius around the point of injection, higher values of heat flux and a boiling convection coefficient may be realized with boiling in a porous, rather than nonporous surface bounded fracture.

  9. Microbubble Fabrication of Concave-porosity PDMS Beads.

    PubMed

    Bertram, John R; Nee, Matthew J

    2015-01-01

    Microbubble fabrication (by use of a fine emulsion) provides a means of increasing the surface-area-to-volume (SAV) ratio of polymer materials, which is particularly useful for separations applications. Porous polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) beads can be produced by heat-curing such an emulsion, allowing the interface between the aqueous and aliphatic phases to mold the morphology of the polymer. In the procedures described here, both polymer and crosslinker (triethoxysilane) are sonicated together in a cold-bath sonicator. Following a period of cross-linking, emulsions are added dropwise to a hot surfactant solution, allowing the aqueous phase of the emulsion to separate, and forming porous polymer beads. We demonstrate that this method can be tuned, and the SAV ratio optimized, by adjusting the electrolyte content of the aqueous phase in the emulsion. Beads produced in this way are imaged with scanning electron microscopy, and representative SAV ratios are determined using Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) analysis. Considerable variability with the electrolyte identity is observed, but the general trend is consistent: there is a maximum in SAV obtained at a specific concentration, after which porosity decreases markedly. PMID:26709997

  10. Patterning of dispenser cathode surfaces to a controlled porosity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garner, Charles E.; Deininger, William D.; Gibson, John; Thomas, Richard

    1989-01-01

    A process to pattern slots approximately 1.25 microns in width into 25-micron-thick W films that have been deposited onto flat or concave surfaces is discussed. A 25-micron-thick W film with a high degree of (100) orientation is chemically vapor deposited (CVD) onto a flat or concave Mo mandrel. A 5-micron-thick Al film is deposited onto the CVD W, followed by 2 microns of photoresist. On concave cathodes, XeCl2 laser ablation or X-ray lithography is used to pattern the photoresist, whereas on flat cathodes deep UV lithography can be used. The patterned photoresist serves as the mask in a Cl ion-beam-assisted etching (IBAE) process to pattern the Al. An alternative process is to deposit Al2O3 films onto the W and pattern the Al2O3 using laser ablation. The W film is then patterned to 3-6-micron slot widths using IBAE + ClF3 with the patterned Al or Al2O3 as the mask. Finally, a sputter deposition step is required to close up the slots to approximately 1 micron. The process described is capable of patterning concave dispenser cathodes to a controlled and precise porosity.

  11. Oxide Film and Porosity Defects in Magnesium Alloy AZ91

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Liang; Rhee, Hongjoo; Felicelli, Sergio D.; Sabau, Adrian S; Berry, John T.

    2009-01-01

    Porosity is a major concern in the production of light metal parts. This work aims to identify some of the mechanisms of microporosity formation in magnesium alloy AZ91. Microstructure analysis was performed on several samples obtained from gravity-poured ingots in graphite plate molds. Temperature data during cooling was acquired with type K thermocouples at 60 Hz at three locations of each casting. The microstructure of samples extracted from the regions of measured temperature was then characterized with optical metallography. Tensile tests and conventional four point bend tests were also conducted on specimens cut from the cast plates. Scanning electron microscopy was then used to observe the microstructure on the fracture surface of the specimens. The results of this study revealed the existence of abundant oxide film defects, similar to those observed in aluminum alloys. Remnants of oxide films were detected on some pore surfaces, and folded oxides were observed in fracture surfaces indicating the presence of double oxides entrained during pouring.

  12. ROLE OF POROSITY LOSS IN LIMITING SO2 CAPTURE BY CALCIUM BASED SORBENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The extent of high temperature (900-1,300°C), short time (<1 s) SO2 capture was found to be limited by temperature-dependent losses in the porosity of calcium based sorbents. At 970°C these porosity losses were caused by CO2-activated sintering. Sulfation of the sorbents either p...

  13. Effect of Porosity of Alumina and Zirconia Ceramics toward Pre-Osteoblast Response

    PubMed Central

    Hadjicharalambous, Chrystalleni; Prymak, Oleg; Loza, Kateryna; Buyakov, Ales; Kulkov, Sergei; Chatzinikolaidou, Maria

    2015-01-01

    It is acknowledged that cellular responses are highly affected by biomaterial porosity. The investigation of this effect is important for the development of implanted biomaterials that integrate with bone tissue. Zirconia and alumina ceramics exhibit outstanding mechanical properties and are among the most popular implant materials used in orthopedics, but few data exist regarding the effect of porosity on cellular responses to these materials. The present study investigates the effect of porosity on the attachment and proliferation of pre-osteoblastic cells on zirconia and alumina. For each composition, ceramics of three different porosities are fabricated by sintering, and characterized using scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray powder diffraction. Cell proliferation is quantified, and microscopy is employed to qualitatively support the proliferation results and evaluate cell morphology. Cell adhesion and metabolic activity are found comparable among low porosity zirconia and alumina. In contrast, higher porosity favors better cell spreading on zirconia and improves growth, but does not significantly affect cell response on alumina. Between the highest porosity materials, cell response on zirconia is found superior to alumina. Results show that an average pore size of ~150 μm and ~50% porosity can be considered beneficial to cellular growth on zirconia ceramics. PMID:26579516

  14. Geometry Properties of Porosity Waves during Magma Migration: The Influence of Viscosities and Damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Z.; Bercovici, D.

    2014-12-01

    Partial melting occurs along grain boundaries and migrates through porous flow, leading to magma segregation in the mantle. Solitary porosity waves created by a perturbation in melting have been studied in the flow of a low viscosity fluid in a deformable matrix (McKenzie 1984, Scott and Stevenson 1986, Barcilon and Richter 1986, Spiegelman 1993, Wiggins and Spiegelman 1995). However, in a fairly complicated multi-physics, multi-scale process of magma migration, the geometry and instability of porosity waves can be affected by both mechanical and thermal factors, leaving different propagation signatures. In this work we develop a two-dimensional, two-phase damage model of magma-fracturing, and study the influence of viscosities and damage (void generation and microcracking) on the geometry properties of porosity waves. We first benchmark our solitary solutions with previous works and solve 2-D finite-amplitude waves numerically using spectral and semi-spectral method. We show that damage, decompaction weakening of the matrix and porosity-driven viscosities can alter the geometry of stable porosity waves, and result in an elongated or flattened wave front with a trail of smaller porosity. Such trails may localize subsequent waves and form porosity passage in the matrix. Scaling analysis of the time-dependent porosity waves are conducted and amount of magma reaching to the top of the melting region are estimated. Future work will include evaluating the thermal and seismic signatures during and after melt migration in two-phase porous flow.

  15. The effect of capsule-filling machine vibrations on average fill weight.

    PubMed

    Llusa, Marcos; Faulhammer, Eva; Biserni, Stefano; Calzolari, Vittorio; Lawrence, Simon; Bresciani, Massimo; Khinast, Johannes

    2013-09-15

    The aim of this paper is to study the effect of the speed of capsule filling and the inherent machine vibrations on fill weight for a dosator-nozzle machine. The results show that increasing speed of capsule filling amplifies the vibration intensity (as measured by Laser Doppler vibrometer) of the machine frame, which leads to powder densification. The mass of the powder (fill weight) collected via the nozzle is significantly larger at a higher capsule filling speed. Therefore, there is a correlation between powder densification under more intense vibrations and larger fill weights. Quality-by Design of powder based products should evaluate the effect of environmental vibrations on material attributes, which in turn may affect product quality. PMID:23872302

  16. The impact of carbonate texture on the quantification of total porosity by image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haines, Thomas J.; Neilson, Joyce E.; Healy, David; Michie, Emma A. H.; Aplin, Andrew C.

    2015-12-01

    Image analysis is widely used to quantify porosity because, in addition to porosity, it can provide quantitative pore system information, such as pore sizes and shapes. Despite its wide use, no standard image analysis workflow exists. When employing image analysis, a workflow must be developed and evaluated to understand the methodological pitfalls and assumptions to enable accurate quantification of total porosity. This study presents an image analysis workflow that is used to quantify total porosity in a range of carbonate lithofacies. This study uses stitched BSE-SEM photomicrographs to construct greyscale pore system images, which are systematically thresholded to produce binary images composed of a pore phase and a rock phase. The ratio of the area of the pore phase to the total area of the pore system image defines the total porosity. Image analysis total porosity is compared with total porosity quantified by standard porosimetry techniques (He-porosimetry and mercury injection capillary pressure (MICP) porosimetry) to understand the systematics of the workflow. The impact of carbonate textures on image analysis porosity quantification is also assessed. A comparison between image analysis, He-porosimetry and MICP total porosity indicates that the image analysis workflow used in this study can accurately quantify or underestimate total porosity depending on the lithofacies textures and pore systems. The porosity of wackestone lithofacies tends to be significantly underestimated (i.e. greater than 10%) by image analysis, whereas packstone, grainstone, rudstone and floatstone lithofacies tend to be accurately estimated or slightly underestimated (i.e. 5% or less) by image analysis. The underestimation of image analysis porosity in the wackestone lithofacies is correlated to the quantity of matrix pore types and is thought to be caused by incomplete imaging of microporosity and by unrepresentative fields of view. Image analysis porosity, which is calculated from

  17. A modeling and numerical algorithm for thermoporomechanics in multiple porosity media for naturally fractured reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J.; Sonnenthal, E. L.; Rutqvist, J.

    2011-12-01

    Rigorous modeling of coupling between fluid, heat, and geomechanics (thermo-poro-mechanics), in fractured porous media is one of the important and difficult topics in geothermal reservoir simulation, because the physics are highly nonlinear and strongly coupled. Coupled fluid/heat flow and geomechanics are investigated using the multiple interacting continua (MINC) method as applied to naturally fractured media. In this study, we generalize constitutive relations for the isothermal elastic dual porosity model proposed by Berryman (2002) to those for the non-isothermal elastic/elastoplastic multiple porosity model, and derive the coupling coefficients of coupled fluid/heat flow and geomechanics and constraints of the coefficients. When the off-diagonal terms of the total compressibility matrix for the flow problem are zero, the upscaled drained bulk modulus for geomechanics becomes the harmonic average of drained bulk moduli of the multiple continua. In this case, the drained elastic/elastoplastic moduli for mechanics are determined by a combination of the drained moduli and volume fractions in multiple porosity materials. We also determine a relation between local strains of all multiple porosity materials in a gridblock and the global strain of the gridblock, from which we can track local and global elastic/plastic variables. For elastoplasticity, the return mapping is performed for all multiple porosity materials in the gridblock. For numerical implementation, we employ and extend the fixed-stress sequential method of the single porosity model to coupled fluid/heat flow and geomechanics in multiple porosity systems, because it provides numerical stability and high accuracy. This sequential scheme can be easily implemented by using a porosity function and its corresponding porosity correction, making use of the existing robust flow and geomechanics simulators. We implemented the proposed modeling and numerical algorithm to the reaction transport simulator

  18. A review of recent advances in the assessment of bone porosity, permeability, and interstitial fluid flow

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, Luis; Fritton, Susannah P.; Gailani, Gaffar; Benalla, Mohammed; Cowin, Stephen C.

    2012-01-01

    This contribution reviews recent research performed to assess the porosity and permeability of bone tissue with the objective of understanding interstitial fluid movement. Bone tissue mechanotransduction is considered to occur due to the passage of interstitial pore fluid adjacent to dendritic cell structures in the lacunar-canalicular porosity. The movement of interstitial fluid is also necessary for the nutrition of osteocytes. This review will focus on four topics related to improved assessment of bone interstitial fluid flow. First, the advantages and limitations of imaging technologies to visualize bone porosities and architecture at several length scales are summarized. Second, recent efforts to measure the vascular porosity and lacunar-canalicular microarchitecture are discussed. Third, studies associated with the measurement and estimation of the fluid pressure and permeability in the vascular and lacunar-canalicular domains are summarized. Fourth, the development of recent models to represent the interchange of fluids between the bone porosities is described. PMID:23174418

  19. EVALUATION OF OVEN-CURED, SOLID CARBON/EPOXY COMPOSITES WITH VARIOUS POROSITY LEVELS

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, M. A.

    2009-03-03

    Cirrus has developed a strong core competency fabricating composite components using oven cure vacuum bag technology. When using this process, porosity levels must be carefully managed and effects of porosity well understood. Excessive porosity negatively affects material performance and reduces the effectiveness of the ultrasonic NDI method. This paper will present material characterization results from carbon/epoxy composite panels produced with various levels of porosity. Panels were inspected using two different ultrasonic methods. Panels were destructively tested to correlate static mechanical and physical properties to ultrasonic absorption coefficients. The goal of this work is to characterize material behavior to allow ultrasonic inspection in a manufacturing environment on vacuum bag oven-cured parts where porosity may be a factor.

  20. Evolution of porosity and diffusivity associated with chemical weathering of a basalt clast

    SciTech Connect

    Navarre-Sitchler, A.; Steefel, C.I.; Yang, L.; Tomutsa, L.; Brantley, S.L.

    2009-02-15

    Weathering of rocks as a result of exposure to water and the atmosphere can cause significant changes in their chemistry and porosity. In low-porosity rocks, such as basalts, changes in porosity, resulting from chemical weathering, are likely to modify the rock's effective diffusivity and permeability, affecting the rate of solute transport and thus potentially the rate of overall weathering to the extent that transport is the rate limiting step. Changes in total porosity as a result of mineral dissolution and precipitation have typically been used to calculate effective diffusion coefficients through Archie's law for reactive transport simulations of chemical weathering, but this approach fails to account for unconnected porosity that does not contribute to transport. In this study, we combine synchrotron X-ray microcomputed tomography ({mu}CT) and laboratory and numerical diffusion experiments to examine changes in both total and effective porosity and effective diffusion coefficients across a weathering interface in a weathered basalt clast from Costa Rica. The {mu}CT data indicate that below a critical value of {approx}9%, the porosity is largely unconnected in the basalt clast. The {mu}CT data were further used to construct a numerical pore network model to determine upscaled, effective diffusivities as a function of total porosity (ranging from 3 to 30%) for comparison with diffusivities determined in laboratory tracer experiments. By using effective porosity as the scaling parameter and accounting for critical porosity, a model is developed that accurately predicts continuum-scale effective diffusivities across the weathering interface of the basalt clast.

  1. A field method to quantify exchange with less-mobile porosity in streambeds using electrical hysteresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, M. A.; Day-Lewis, F. D.; Zarnetske, J. P.; Harvey, J. W.; Lane, J. W., Jr.

    2015-12-01

    Heterogeneous streambed materials may be expected to develop two general porosity domains: a more-mobile porosity dominated by advective exchange, and a less-mobile porosity dominated by diffusive exchange. Less-mobile porosity containing unique redox conditions or contaminant mass may be invisible to traditional porewater sampling methods, even using "low-flow" techniques, because these methods sample water preferentially from the mobile porosity domain. Further, most tracer breakthrough curve analyses have only provided indirect information (tailing) regarding the prevalence and connectivity of less-mobile porosity, typically over experimental flowpath scales between 1-10 meters. To address the limitations of conventional methods, we use electrical geophysical methods to aid in the inference of less-mobile porosity parameters. Unlike traditional fluid sampling, electrical methods can directly sense less-mobile solute and can target specific points along subsurface flowpaths. We demonstrate how the geophysical methodology developed for dual-domain groundwater transport can be scaled to the streambed through synthetic, laboratory column, and field experiments; further we show how previously-used numerical modeling techniques can be replaced by a more-simple analytical approach. The new analytical method is based on electrical theory, and involves characteristics of electrical hysteresis patterns (e.g. hinge point values) that are used to quantify (1) the size of paired mobile and less-mobile porosities, and (2) the exchange rate coefficient through simple curve fitting. Results from the analytical approach compare favorably with results from calibration of numerical models and also independent measurements of mobile and less-mobile porosity. Lastly, we demonstrate a method of focused solute streambed injection to quantify less-mobile porosity and explain redox zonation in contrasting stream environments.

  2. Laboratory measurements of Vp and Vs in a porosity-developed crustal rock: Experimental investigation into the effects of porosity at deep crustal pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Satoshi; Ishikawa, Masahiro; Arima, Makoto; Tatsumi, Yoshiyuki

    2016-05-01

    In order to evaluate the influence of porosity on the elastic properties of crustal rocks at deep crustal pressures, we performed laboratory measurements of compressional-wave (Vp) and shear-wave (Vs) velocities in a porosity-developed gabbro sample up to 1.0 GPa at room temperature. Based on the measured Vp and Vs data, we evaluated the changes in velocities, Vp/Vs, Poisson's ratio (σ), and total porosity of the rock as a function of pressure. Compared with the 'porosity-free' intrinsic elastic values of the gabbro sample, our results suggest that the development of porosity in crustal rocks lowers their Vp, Vs, Vp/Vs, and Poisson's ratio. Deviations (ΔVp, ΔVs, ΔVp/Vs, and Δσ) of the measured values from the intrinsic values are enhanced with increasing porosity. We evaluated the ΔVp from previous experimental study on the rocks of Tanzawa plutonic complex providing constraints on interpretation of the seismic velocity profiles of the Izu-Bonin-Mariana (IBM) arc and found a large negative ΔVp (up to - 22.7%) at lower pressures. The intrinsic velocity combined with the measured velocity data at in situ pressure conditions suggest that the ranges of Vp (6.0-6.5 km/s) in the middle crust of the IBM arc reflect the presence of considerable porosity and its closure in intermediate rocks and/or the change of composition from felsic to intermediate in mid-crustal rocks.

  3. Median-porosity contour maps of the J Sandstone, Dakota Group, in the Denver Basin, Colorado, Nebraska, and Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Higley, D.K.; Gautier, D.L.

    1987-01-01

    Porosity data compiled in this study were determined from J sandstone cores from 134 widely spaced boreholes. Porosity in areas of poor core coverage was determined from neutron density logs from an additional 20 boreholes ( corrected to core average grain density). Median, rather than average, porosity was used in order to minimize the statistical effect of anomalously high and low porosity values. Thirty-five oil companies and independent operators supplied core porosity data. Core porosities were determined by means of helium porosimetry, primarily by Core Laboratories of Denver, Colo.

  4. Gap Filling as Exact Path Length Problem.

    PubMed

    Salmela, Leena; Sahlin, Kristoffer; Mäkinen, Veli; Tomescu, Alexandru I

    2016-05-01

    One of the last steps in a genome assembly project is filling the gaps between consecutive contigs in the scaffolds. This problem can be naturally stated as finding an s-t path in a directed graph whose sum of arc costs belongs to a given range (the estimate on the gap length). Here s and t are any two contigs flanking a gap. This problem is known to be NP-hard in general. Here we derive a simpler dynamic programming solution than already known, pseudo-polynomial in the maximum value of the input range. We implemented various practical optimizations to it, and compared our exact gap-filling solution experimentally to popular gap-filling tools. Summing over all the bacterial assemblies considered in our experiments, we can in total fill 76% more gaps than the best previous tool, and the gaps filled by our method span 136% more sequence. Furthermore, the error level of the newly introduced sequence is comparable to that of the previous tools. The experiments also show that our exact approach does not easily scale to larger genomes, where the problem is in general difficult for all tools. PMID:26959081

  5. Air Abrasion

    MedlinePlus

    ... delivered directly to your desktop! more... What Is Air Abrasion? Article Chapters What Is Air Abrasion? What Happens? The Pros and Cons Will I Feel Anything? Is Air Abrasion for Everyone? print full article print this ...

  6. Soil porosity correlation and its influence in percolation dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Alfredo; Capa-Morocho, Mirian; Ruis-Ramos, Margarita; Tarquis, Ana M.

    2016-04-01

    The prediction of percolation in natural soils is relevant for modeling root growth and optimizing infiltration of water and nutrients. Also, it would improve our understanding on how pollutants as pesticides, and virus and bacteria (Darnault et al., 2003) reach significant depths without being filtered out by the soil matrix (Beven and Germann, 2013). Random walk algorithms have been used successfully to date to characterize the dynamical characteristics of disordered media. This approach has been used here to describe how soil at different bulk densities and with different threshold values applied to the 3D gray images influences the structure of the pore network and their implications on particle flow and distribution (Ruiz-Ramos et al., 2009). In order to do so first we applied several threshold values to each image analyzed and characterized them through Hurst exponents, then we computed random walks algorithms to calculate distances reached by the particles and speed of those particles. At the same time, 3D structures with a Hurst exponent of ca 0.5 and with different porosities were constructed and the same random walks simulations were replicated over these generated structures. We have found a relationship between Hurst exponents and the speed distribution of the particles reaching percolation of the total soil depth. REFERENCES Darnault, C.J. G., P. Garnier, Y.J. Kim, K.L. Oveson, T.S. Steenhuis, J.Y. Parlange, M. Jenkins, W.C. Ghiorse, and P. Baveye (2003), Preferential transport of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in variably saturated subsurface environments, Water Environ. Res., 75, 113-120. Beven, Keith and Germann, Peter. 2013. Macropores and water flow in soils revisited. Water Resources Research, 49(6), 3071-3092. DOI: 10.1002/wrcr.20156. Ruiz-Ramos, M., D. del Valle, D. Grinev, and A.M. Tarquis. 2009. Soil hydraulic behaviour at different bulk densities. Geophysical Research Abstracts, 11, EGU2009-6234.

  7. Kinetic controls on early karst aquifer porosity development

    SciTech Connect

    Groves, C.G. ); Howard, A.D. . Dept. of Environmental Sciences)

    1992-01-01

    A series of simulations using the newly developed model KARST has been performed to investigate limiting kinetic controls on limestone dissolution during the earliest stages of karst aquifer porosity development. This FORTRAN model couples fluid flow within and dissolution of circular cross section conduits, and considers surface reaction rates (both far from and close to thermodynamic equilibrium), mass transfer rates of reaction products to the bulk fluid, and rates of homogeneous reactions associated with dissolution of CO[sub 2] gas in water. Mass transfer theory for both laminar and turbulent flow cases is included. Runs were made with a wide variety of initial conditions of passage geometry, head gradient, and initial PCO[sub 2]. Results show a consistent pattern of kinetic control that varies as functions of time as well as position along the conduit. Slow, higher order surface reaction rates (close to equilibrium), diffusion rates, and rapid, lower order reaction rates (far from equilibrium) are found to be limiting steps at various times and location. Under no conditions in the simulations did the rate of CO[sub 2] hydration limit dissolution. Thresholds between the various kinetic regimes were found to be associated with a critical distance from equilibrium, as well as the transition from laminar to turbulent flow. As a result of interactions between flow and chemical conditions, passage growth (measure by fluid discharge rates) can be divided into an initial, slow period initiation and a more rapid one (enlargement). The onset of the enlargement phase was not found to coincide with any single kinetic event.

  8. Visualizing bone porosities using a tabletop scanning electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnamoorthy, D.; DaPonte, J.; Broadbridge, C. C.; Daniel, D.; Alter, L.

    2010-04-01

    Pores are naturally occurring entities in bone. Changes in pore size and number are often associated with diseases such as Osteoporosis and even microgravity during spaceflight. Studying bone perforations may yield great insight into bone's material properties, including bone density and may contribute to identifying therapies to halt or potentially reverse bone loss. Current technologies used in this field include nuclear magnetic resonance, micro-computed tomography and the field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) 2, 5. However, limitations in each method limit further advancement. The objective of this study was to assess the effectiveness of using a new generation of analytical instruments, the TM-1000 tabletop, SEM with back-scatter electron (BSE) detector, to analyze cortical bone porosities. Hind limb unloaded and age-based controlled mouse femurs were extracted and tested in vitro for changes in pores on the periosteal surface. An important advantage of using the tabletop is the simplified sample preparation that excludes extra coatings, dehydration and fixation steps that are otherwise required for conventional SEM. For quantitative data, pores were treated as particles in order to use an analyze particles feature in the NIH ImageJ software. Several image-processing techniques for background smoothing, thresholding and filtering were employed to produce a binary image suitable for particle analysis. It was hypothesized that the unloaded bones would show an increase in pore area, as the lack of mechanical loading would affect bone-remodeling processes taking place in and around pores. Preliminary results suggest only a slight different in frequency but not in size of pores between unloaded and control femurs.

  9. One-dimensional Gromov minimal filling problem

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, Alexandr O; Tuzhilin, Alexey A

    2012-05-31

    The paper is devoted to a new branch in the theory of one-dimensional variational problems with branching extremals, the investigation of one-dimensional minimal fillings introduced by the authors. On the one hand, this problem is a one-dimensional version of a generalization of Gromov's minimal fillings problem to the case of stratified manifolds. On the other hand, this problem is interesting in itself and also can be considered as a generalization of another classical problem, the Steiner problem on the construction of a shortest network connecting a given set of terminals. Besides the statement of the problem, we discuss several properties of the minimal fillings and state several conjectures. Bibliography: 38 titles.

  10. Slotted Polyimide-Aerogel-Filled-Waveguide Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez-Solis, Rafael A.; Pacheco, Hector L.; Miranda, Felix A.; Meador, Mary Ann B.

    2013-01-01

    Polyimide aerogels were considered to serve as a filling for millimeter-wave waveguides. While these waveguides present a slightly higher loss than hollow waveguides, they have less losses than Duroid substrate integrated waveguides (less than 0.15 dB at Ka-band, in a 20 mm section), and exhibit an order of magnitude of mass reduction when compared to commercial waveguides. A Ka-band slotted aerogel-filled-waveguide array was designed, which provided the same gain (9 dBi) as its standard waveguide counterpart, and a slotted aerogel-filled-waveguide array using folded-slots was designed for comparison, obtaining a gain of 9 dB and a bandwidth of 590 MHz.

  11. Alkaline earth filled nickel skutterudite antimonide thermoelectrics

    DOEpatents

    Singh, David Joseph

    2013-07-16

    A thermoelectric material including a body centered cubic filled skutterudite having the formula A.sub.xFe.sub.yNi.sub.zSb.sub.12, where A is an alkaline earth element, x is no more than approximately 1.0, and the sum of y and z is approximately equal to 4.0. The alkaline earth element includes guest atoms selected from the group consisting of Be, Mb, Ca, Sr, Ba, Ra and combinations thereof. The filled skutterudite is shown to have properties suitable for a wide variety of thermoelectric applications.

  12. 30 CFR 816.72 - Disposal of excess spoil: Valley fills/head-of-hollow fills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., 6-hour precipitation event. (b) Rock-core chimney drains. A rock-core chimney drain may be used in a... as the fill is not located in an area containing intermittent or perennial streams. A rock-core... upstream drainage is diverted around the fill. The alternative rock-core chimney drain system shall...

  13. 30 CFR 816.72 - Disposal of excess spoil: Valley fills/head-of-hollow fills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... such that the final slope after settlement will be toward properly designed drainage channels.... The maximum slope of the top of the fill shall be 33h:1v (3 percent). A drainage pocket may be... the runoff through or over the rock drain, if stability of the fill is not impaired. In no case...

  14. 30 CFR 816.72 - Disposal of excess spoil: Valley fills/head-of-hollow fills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... such that the final slope after settlement will be toward properly designed drainage channels.... The maximum slope of the top of the fill shall be 33h:1v (3 percent). A drainage pocket may be... the runoff through or over the rock drain, if stability of the fill is not impaired. In no case...

  15. 30 CFR 817.72 - Disposal of excess spoil: Valley fill/head-of-hollow fills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... such that the final slope after settlement will be toward properly designed drainage channels... slope of the top of the fill shall be 33h:lv (3 percent). A drainage pocket may be maintained at the... through or over the rock drain, if stability of the fill is not impaired. In no case shall this pocket...

  16. 30 CFR 816.72 - Disposal of excess spoil: Valley fills/head-of-hollow fills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... such that the final slope after settlement will be toward properly designed drainage channels.... The maximum slope of the top of the fill shall be 33h:1v (3 percent). A drainage pocket may be... the runoff through or over the rock drain, if stability of the fill is not impaired. In no case...

  17. 30 CFR 817.72 - Disposal of excess spoil: Valley fill/head-of-hollow fills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... such that the final slope after settlement will be toward properly designed drainage channels... slope of the top of the fill shall be 33h:lv (3 percent). A drainage pocket may be maintained at the... through or over the rock drain, if stability of the fill is not impaired. In no case shall this pocket...

  18. 30 CFR 817.72 - Disposal of excess spoil: Valley fill/head-of-hollow fills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... such that the final slope after settlement will be toward properly designed drainage channels... slope of the top of the fill shall be 33h:lv (3 percent). A drainage pocket may be maintained at the... through or over the rock drain, if stability of the fill is not impaired. In no case shall this pocket...

  19. Effects of carbonation and leaching on porosity in cement-bound waste.

    PubMed

    Van Gerven, T; Cornelis, G; Vandoren, E; Vandecasteele, C

    2007-01-01

    Porosity is possibly an important parameter with respect to leaching of constituents from cement monoliths. During its lifetime, the pore structure of cementitious matrices changes due to carbonation and leaching. This paper discusses the effects of both accelerated carbonation and continuous leaching on the porosity, and, conversely, how porosity affects leaching properties. Two sample types are investigated: a mortar with MSWI-bottom ash substituting the sand fraction and a cement paste with 30 wt% of the cement substituted by a flue gas cleaning residue. The samples have been intensively carbonated in a 20% CO(2) atmosphere for up to 60 days and were subsequently leached. The porosity was investigated by mercury intrusion porosimetry. Accelerated carbonation decreases total porosity by 12% in the case of 60 days of treatment of bottom ash mortars, whereas continuous leaching during 225 days increases it by 16%. Both carbonation and leaching decrease the amount of smaller capillary pores. Carbonation decreases both porosity and pH. Decreasing porosity diminishes leaching of sodium and potassium, while the decrease in pH increases leaching. However, the former process dominates the latter, resulting in a net decreasing effect of carbonation on the release of sodium and potassium from these cement matrices. PMID:16843650

  20. Quantification of Organic Porosity and Water Accessibility in Marcellus Shale Using Neutron Scattering

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gu, Xin; Mildner, David F. R.; Cole, David R.; Rother, Gernot; Slingerland, Rudy; Brantley, Susan L.

    2016-04-28

    Pores within organic matter (OM) are a significant contributor to the total pore system in gas shales. These pores contribute most of the storage capacity in gas shales. Here we present a novel approach to characterize the OM pore structure (including the porosity, specific surface area, pore size distribution, and water accessibility) in Marcellus shale. By using ultrasmall and small-angle neutron scattering, and by exploiting the contrast matching of the shale matrix with suitable mixtures of deuterated and protonated water, both total and water-accessible porosity were measured on centimeter-sized samples from two boreholes from the nanometer to micrometer scale withmore » good statistical coverage. Samples were also measured after combustion at 450 °C. Analysis of scattering data from these procedures allowed quantification of OM porosity and water accessibility. OM hosts 24–47% of the total porosity for both organic-rich and -poor samples. This porosity occupies as much as 29% of the OM volume. In contrast to the current paradigm in the literature that OM porosity is organophilic and therefore not likely to contain water, our results demonstrate that OM pores with widths >20 nm exhibit the characteristics of water accessibility. In conclusion, our approach reveals the complex structure and wetting behavior of the OM porosity at scales that are hard to interrogate using other techniques.« less

  1. Effect of porosity distribution in the propagation direction on ultrasound waves through cancellous bone.

    PubMed

    Hosokawa, Atsushi

    2010-06-01

    Cancellous bone is a porous material composed of numerous trabecular elements, and its porosity changes according to its position within a bone. In this study, the effect of porosity distribution in the propagation direction on ultrasound waves through cancellous bone was numerically investigated using finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulations. Fifty four numerical models of cancellous bone were reconstructed from 3-D X-ray microcomputed tomographic (microCT) images at 6 positions in a bovine femoral bone. To generate trabecular structures with distinct porosity distributions, 3 erosion procedures were performed in which the trabecular elements in each cancellous bone model were eroded. In one procedure, erosion was uniformly distributed over the whole spatial region of the cancellous bone model, but in the other 2 procedures, the spatial distribution of erosion was changed in a specific direction. Fast and slow waves propagating through the 3-D microCT cancellous bone models in the porosity-distributed direction were simulated using the viscoelastic FDTD method. The wave amplitudes and propagation speeds of the fast and slow waves were measured for the cancellous bone models eroded by each procedure, and the effect of porosity distribution was investigated in terms of change in the trabecular microstructure. The results suggest that both wave amplitudes increased when porosity distribution was low and when trabecular structure was more uniform, but that the speed of the fast wave increased when porosity distribution was high and when longer trabecular elements were present. PMID:20529708

  2. Examining the influence of heterogeneous porosity fields on conservative solute transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hu, B.X.; Meerschaert, M.M.; Barrash, W.; Hyndman, D.W.; He, C.; Li, X.; Guo, Laodong

    2009-01-01

    It is widely recognized that groundwater flow and solute transport in natural media are largely controlled by heterogeneities. In the last three decades, many studies have examined the effects of heterogeneous hydraulic conductivity fields on flow and transport processes, but there has been much less attention to the influence of heterogeneous porosity fields. In this study, we use porosity and particle size measurements from boreholes at the Boise Hydrogeophysical Research Site (BHRS) to evaluate the importance of characterizing the spatial structure of porosity and grain size data for solute transport modeling. Then we develop synthetic hydraulic conductivity fields based on relatively simple measurements of porosity from borehole logs and grain size distributions from core samples to examine and compare the characteristics of tracer transport through these fields with and without inclusion of porosity heterogeneity. In particular, we develop horizontal 2D realizations based on data from one of the less heterogeneous units at the BHRS to examine effects where spatial variations in hydraulic parameters are not large. The results indicate that the distributions of porosity and the derived hydraulic conductivity in the study unit resemble fractal normal and lognormal fields respectively. We numerically simulate solute transport in stochastic fields and find that spatial variations in porosity have significant effects on the spread of an injected tracer plume including a significant delay in simulated tracer concentration histories.

  3. Regional diagenetic variation in Norphlet sandstone: Implications for reservoir quality and the origin of porosity

    SciTech Connect

    Kugler, R.L.; McHugh, A. )

    1990-09-01

    Although deeply buried (18,000->20,000 ft) eolian and reworked marine Norphlet arkose and subarkose in Mississippi, Alabama, and Florida have been intensely studied by several workers, fundamental questions remain regarding diagenetic controls on reservoir quality and the origin of porosity. In spite of a regionally uniform framework composition of quartz, albite, and potassium feldspar, the diagenetic character of the unit is variable on a scale ranging from individual laminations to single hydrocarbon-producing fields to areas encompassing several fields or offshore blocks. The presence or absence of clay minerals in various forms clearly is a dominant control on porosity-permeability trends. In deep reservoirs in Mobile Bay and offshore Alabama and Florida, petrographic evidence for dissolution of pervasive authigenic carbonate and/or evaporite minerals to produce high secondary porosity values is equivocal or absent. Although evidence exists for some secondary porosity, much porosity appears to be relict primary porosity. On a regional scale, including both onshore and offshore areas, sandstones with radial, authigenic chlorite coats consistently have high porosity and permeability. In Mobile Bay and offshore Alabama, the distribution of this form of chlorite may be controlled by the presence of precursor clay/iron-oxide grain coats. The occurrence of these coats likely is related to environment of deposition.

  4. 62. VIEW LOOKING NORTHWEST AT THE OIL FILLED CIRCUIT BREAKER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    62. VIEW LOOKING NORTHWEST AT THE OIL FILLED CIRCUIT BREAKER FOR GENERATOR NUMBER 1. CIRCUIT BREAKERS ARE AUTOMATED SWITCHES WHICH DISCONNECT THE GENERATORS FROM THE LINE WHEN SHORT CIRCUITS OCCUR. WHEN CIRCUITS INVOLVING HIGH CURRENTS AND VOLTAGES ARE BROKEN, THE AIR SURROUNDING MECHANICAL PARTS OF THE SWITCH BECOMES IONIZED AND CONTINUES TO CONDUCT ELECTRIC POWER ACROSS ANY GAP IN THE SWITCH CONTACTS. TO PREVENT THIS AND INSURE A POSITIVE INTERRUPTION OF CURRENT, THE SWITCH CONTACTS ARE IMMERSED IN A CONTAINER OF OIL. THE OIL DOES NOT SUPPORT THE FORMATION OF AN ARC AND EFFECTIVELY CUTS OFF THE CURRENT WHEN THE SWITCH CONTACTS ARE OPENED. - New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Cos Cob Power Plant, Sound Shore Drive, Greenwich, Fairfield County, CT

  5. Coupled discrete element and smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of the die filling process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breinlinger, Thomas; Kraft, Torsten

    2015-08-01

    Die filling is an important part of the powder compaction process chain, where defects in the final part can be introduced—or prevented. Simulation of this process is therefore a goal for many part producers and has been studied by some researchers already. In this work, we focus on the influence of the surrounding air on the powder flow. We demonstrate the implementing and coupling of the discrete element method for the granular powder and the smoothed particle hydrodynamics method for the gas flow. Application of the method to the die filling process is demonstrated.

  6. Cortical Porosity Identifies Women with Osteopenia at Increased Risk for Forearm Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Bala, Yohann; Zebaze, Roger; Ghasem-Zadeh, Ali; Atkinson, Elizabeth J.; Iuliano, Sandra; Peterson, James M.; Amin, Shreyasee; Bjørnerem, Åshild; Melton, L. Joseph; Johansson, Helena; Kanis, John A.; Khosla, Sundeep; Seeman, Ego

    2014-01-01

    Background Most fragility fractures arise among the many women with osteopenia, not the smaller number with osteoporosis at high risk for fracture. Thus, most women at risk for fracture assessed only by measuring areal bone mineral density (aBMD) will remain untreated. Methods We measured cortical porosity and trabecular bone volume/total volume (BV/TV) of the ultradistal radius (UDR) using high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography, aBMD using densitometry, and 10-year fracture probability using the country-specific FRAX tool in 68 postmenopausal women with forearm fractures and 70 age-matched community controls in Olmsted County, Minnesota. Results Women with forearm fractures had 0.4 standard deviations (SD) higher cortical porosity and 0.6 SD lower trabecular BV/TV. Compact-appearing cortical porosity predicted fracture independent of aBMD; odds ratio [OR] 1.92 (95%CI, 1.10–3.33). In women with osteoporosis at the UDR, cortical porosity did not distinguish those with, from those without, fractures because high porosity was present in 92% and 86% of each group respectively. By contrast, in women with osteopenia at the UDR, high porosity of the compact-appearing cortex conferred an OR for fracture of 4.00 (95%CI, 1.15–13.90). Conclusion In women with osteoporosis, porosity is captured by aBMD and so measuring UDR cortical porosity does not improve diagnostic sensitivity. However, in women with osteopenia, cortical porosity was associated with forearm fractures. PMID:24519558

  7. Can regional porosity occurrence in carbonate slope and basin facies systems be predicted

    SciTech Connect

    Mazzullo, S.J. )

    1994-03-01

    Subsurface carbonate depositional sequences (i.e., coeval platform-to-basin facies mosaics), which can most readily be identified by application of seismic sequence analysis, include porous units of complex geometry and occurrence. A highly sought-after occurrence of reservoir-grade porosity commonly, but not always, is associated with sequence boundaries. Therefore, porosity can be predicted to possible occur in already-lithified platform strata beneath significant unconformities of regional extent (e.g., cavernous porosity). By this method, however, the possible existence of porosity in carbonate slope and basin deposits may be overlooked because they do not lie beneath sequence-bounding unconformities insofar as they are not usually exposed subaerially during platform emergence. Yet, such facies compose locally significant hydrocarbon reservoirs in the Permian basin by virtue of high porosities and permeabilities and water-free production histories. Short of drilling or seismic wavelet analysis, can porosity in such facies be predicted a priori Reservoirs in carbonate slope and basin deposits in the Midland basin include both porous limestones and dolomites. Petrographic and geochemical studies indicate that syndepositional and shallow-burial diagenesis of such deposits mainly involved porosity reduction via calcite cementation, dolomitization, and compaction. Most of the porosity present in reservoirs in these facies was created by later dissolution in the deep-burial environment as a consequence of rock interaction with connate fluids enriched in carbonic and sulfuric acid and/or organic acids generated during hydrocarbon maturation. These fluids migrated up and out from deeper parts of the basin through slope and basin deposits and into platform carbonate strata. Insofar as fluid migration pathways can be mapped or at least inferred by various means, it follows that porosity created (or destroyed) by these fluids also can be mapped predictively.

  8. Brittle and semibrittle creep in a low porosity carbonate rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolas, Aurélien; Fortin, Jérôme; Regnet, Jean-Baptiste; Dimanov, Alexandre; Guéguen, Yves

    2016-04-01

    The mechanical behavior of limestones at room temperature is brittle at low confining pressure and becomes semi-brittle with the increase of the confining pressure. The brittle behavior is characterized by a macroscopic dilatancy due to crack propagation, leading to a stress drop when cracks coalesce at failure. The semi-brittle behavior is characterized by diffuse deformation due to intra-crystalline plasticity (dislocation movements and twinning) and microcracking. The aim of this work is to examine the influence of pore fluid and time on the mechanical behavior. Constant strain rate triaxial deformation experiments and stress-stepping creep experiments were performed on white Tavel limestone (porosity 14.7%). Elastic wave velocity evolutions were recorded during each experiment and inverted to crack densities. Constant strain rate triaxial experiments were performed for confining pressure in the range of 5-90 MPa. For Pc≤55 MPa our results show that the behavior is brittle. In this regime, water-saturation decreases the differential stress at the onset of crack propagation and enhances macroscopic dilatancy. For Pc≥70 MPa, the behavior is semi-brittle. Inelastic compaction is due to intra-crystalline plasticity and micro-cracking. However, in this regime, our results show that water-saturation has no clear effect at the onset of inelastic compaction. Stress stepping creep experiments were performed in a range of confining pressures crossing the brittle-ductile transition. In the brittle regime, the time-dependent axial deformation is coupled with dilatancy and a decrease of elastic wave velocities, which is characteristic of crack propagation and/or nucleation. In the semi-brittle regime, the first steps are inelastic compactant because of plastic pore collapse. But, following stress steps are dilatant because of crack nucleation and/or propagation. However, our results show that the axial strain rate is always controlled by plastic phenomena, until the last

  9. Nanoscale transient porosity controls large-scale metamorphic fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plümper, Oliver; Botan, Alexandru; Los, Catharina; Malthe-Sørenssen, Anders; Jamtveit, Bjørn

    2016-04-01

    The reaction of fluids with rocks is fundamental for Earth's dynamics as they facilitate heat/mass transfer and induce volume changes, weaknesses and instabilities in rock masses that localize deformation enabling tectonic responses to plate motion. During these fluid-rock interactions it is the ability of a rock to transmit fluid, its permeability, that controls the rates of metamorphic reactions. However, although some geological environments (e.g., sediments) are open to fluids, the majority of solid rocks (e.g., granites, elcogites, peridotites, etc.) are nearly impermeable. Surprisingly though, even in rocks that are nominally impermeable widespread fluid-rock interactions are observed leading to the question: How can fluids migrate through vast amounts of nominally impermeable rocks? Here we investigate one of the most wide-spread fluid-mediated metamorphic processes in the Earth's crust, the albitization of feldspatic rocks. We show that fluid flow and element mobilization during albitization is controlled by an interaction between grain boundary diffusion and reaction front migration through an interface-coupled dissolution-precipitation process. Using a combination of focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM)-assisted nanotomography combined with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) reveals that the porosity is dictated by pore channels with a pore diameter ranging between 10 to 100 nm. Three-dimensional visualization of the feldspar pore network reveals that the pore channels must have been connected during the replacement reaction. Analysis of the pore aspect ratios suggests that a Rayleigh-Taylor-type instability associated to surface energy minimization caused the disconnection of the pore channels. Fluid transport in nanometer-sized objects with at least one characteristic dimension below 100 nm enables the occurrence of physical phenomena that are impossible at bigger length scales. Thus, on the basis of our microstructural

  10. Porosity, Pore Size, and Permeability of Sediments from Site C0002, IODP Expedition 338

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dugan, B.; Huepers, A.; Song, I.; Kitajima, H.; Esteban, L.

    2013-12-01

    Mercury injection capillary pressure (MICP) measurements were made on cuttings and core samples from Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Site C0002 to evaluate porosity, pore throat size, and permeability of mud(stone) at the centerpiece drill site of the Nankai Trough Seismogenic Zone Experiment (NanTroSEIZE). Core samples from 221-464 meters below sea floor (mbsf) in the Kumano forearc basin have MICP-determined porosities from 40-56%, median pore radii from 0.077-0.205 microns, and permeability from 3.3x10-10 - 2.0x10-9 m2. The porosity of these core samples is similar to shipboard porosity determined from moisture and density (MAD) analyses. During IODP Expedition 338 cuttings samples were recovered from ~865-2005 mbsf during riser drilling at Site C0002F. MICP analyses of cuttings samples, greater than 4 mm size fraction, from 928-1980 mbsf in the inner wedge of the accretionary prism constrain porosities from 21-44%, median pore radii from 0.021-0.032 microns, and permeability from 1.2x10-11 - 1.6x10-10 m2. The porosity of these cuttings samples is consistently lower than the MAD-determined porosity on cuttings from the >4mm size fraction, however the values are consistent with core-based, MAD-derived porosity from Hole C0002B above 1057 mbsf and with cuttings-based, MAD-derived porosity on select samples from 1700-2000 mbsf that were determined to be intact formation and not influenced by drilling disturbance. These results suggest that select formation cuttings or MICP-analyses can help define in situ porosity. Additional post-expedition research will be used to better understand the ability of MICP data to define mudstone permeability and to constrain permeability-porosity and permeability-grain size-pore throat relations for sediments at Site C0002. A detailed model of permeability and porosity behavior will inform modeling studies of pore pressure generation and fluid and heat transport.

  11. The influence of porosity and vesicle size on the brittle strength of volcanic rocks and magma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heap, Michael J.; Xu, Tao; Chen, Chong-feng

    2014-09-01

    Volcanic rocks and magma display a wide range of porosity and vesicle size, a result of their complex genesis. While the role of porosity is known to exert a fundamental control on strength in the brittle field, less is known as to the influence of vesicle size. To help resolve this issue, here, we lean on a combination of micromechanical (Sammis and Ashby's pore-emanating crack model) and stochastic (rock failure and process analysis code) modelling. The models show, for a homogenous vesicle size, that an increase in porosity (in the form of circular vesicles, from 0 to 40 %) and/or vesicle diameter (from 0.1 to 2.0 mm) results in a dramatic reduction in strength. For example, uniaxial compressive strength can be reduced by about a factor of 5 as porosity is increased from 0 to 40 %. The presence of vesicles locally amplifies the stress within the groundmass and promotes the nucleation of vesicle-emanating microcracks that grow in the direction of the applied macroscopic stress. As strain increases, these microcracks continue to grow and eventually coalesce leading to macroscopic failure. Vesicle clustering, which promotes the overlap and interaction of the tensile stress lobes at the north and south poles of neighbouring vesicles, and the increased ease of microcrack interaction, is encouraged at higher porosity and reduces sample strength. Once a microcrack nucleates at the vesicle wall, larger vesicles impart higher stress intensities at the crack tips, allowing microcracks to propagate at a lower applied macroscopic stress. Larger vesicles also permit a shorter route through the groundmass for the macroscopic shear fracture. This explains the reduction in strength at higher vesicle diameters (at a constant porosity). The modelling highlights that the reduction in strength as porosity or vesicle size increases is nonlinear; the largest reductions are observed at low porosity and small vesicle diameters. In detail, we find that vesicle diameter can play an

  12. 7 CFR 58.924 - Aseptic filling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Aseptic filling. 58.924 Section 58.924 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS UNDER THE AGRICULTURAL MARKETING ACT OF 1946 AND...

  13. 7 CFR 58.924 - Aseptic filling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Aseptic filling. 58.924 Section 58.924 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS UNDER THE AGRICULTURAL MARKETING ACT OF 1946 AND...

  14. 7 CFR 58.924 - Aseptic filling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Aseptic filling. 58.924 Section 58.924 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS UNDER THE AGRICULTURAL MARKETING ACT OF 1946 AND...

  15. 7 CFR 58.924 - Aseptic filling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Aseptic filling. 58.924 Section 58.924 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS UNDER THE AGRICULTURAL MARKETING ACT OF 1946 AND...

  16. 7 CFR 58.924 - Aseptic filling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Aseptic filling. 58.924 Section 58.924 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS UNDER THE AGRICULTURAL MARKETING ACT OF 1946 AND...

  17. 5 CFR 362.203 - Filling positions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... PROGRAMS Internship Program § 362.203 Filling positions. (a) Announcement. (1) When an agency accepts... opportunities to participate in the agency's Internship Program. For the purposes of this paragraph (a), “agency... Internship opportunities; and (iv) Any other information OPM considers appropriate. (2) OPM will...

  18. 5 CFR 362.203 - Filling positions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... PROGRAMS Internship Program § 362.203 Filling positions. (a) Announcement. (1) When an agency accepts... opportunities to participate in the agency's Internship Program. For the purposes of this paragraph (a), “agency... Internship opportunities; and (iv) Any other information OPM considers appropriate. (2) OPM will...

  19. Irregularly Shaped Space-Filling Truncated Octahedra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, John Robert

    2008-01-01

    For any parent tetrahedron ABCD, centroids of selected sub-tetrahedra form the vertices of an irregularly shaped space-filling truncated octahedron. To reflect these properties, such a figure will be called an ISTO. Each edge of the ISTO is parallel to and one-eighth the length of one of the edges of tetrahedron ABCD and the volume of the ISTO is…

  20. The Chemistry of Modern Dental Filling Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicholson, John W.; Anstice, H. Mary

    1999-01-01

    Discusses materials used by dentists to restore teeth after decay has been removed. Shows how dental-material science is an interdisciplinary field in which chemistry plays a major part. Reviews the many developments polymer chemistry has contributed to the field of dental fillings. (CCM)