Science.gov

Sample records for air filled porosity

  1. Estimation of water-filled and air-filled porosity in the unsaturated zone, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, Philip H.

    1993-01-01

    The responses of density and dielectric logs are formulated in terms if the matrix properties, air-filled porosity and water-filled porosity. Porosity values obtained from logs from borehole USW G-2 are in reasonable agreement with estimates from core determinations.

  2. On the air-filled effective porosity parameter of Rogers and Nielson's (1991) bulk radon diffusion coefficient in unsaturated soils.

    PubMed

    Saâdi, Zakaria

    2014-05-01

    The radon exhalation rate at the earth's surface from soil or rock with radium as its source is the main mechanism behind the radon activity concentrations observed in both indoor and outdoor environments. During the last two decades, many subsurface radon transport models have used Rogers and Nielson's formula for modeling the unsaturated soil bulk radon diffusion coefficient. This formula uses an "air-filled effective porosity" to account for radon adsorption and radon dissolution in the groundwater. This formula is reviewed here, and its hypotheses are examined for accuracy in dealing with subsurface radon transport problems. The author shows its limitations by comparing one dimensional steady-state analytical solutions of the two-phase (air/water) transport equation (Fick's law) with Rogers and Nielson's formula. For radon diffusion-dominated transport, the calculated Rogers and Nielson's radon exhalation rate is shown to be unrealistic as it is independent of the values of the radon adsorption and groundwater dissolution coefficients. For convective and diffusive transport, radon exhalation rates calculated using Fick's law and this formula agree only for high values of gas-phase velocity and groundwater saturation. However, these conditions are not usually met in most shallow subsurface environments where radon migration takes place under low gas phase velocities and low water saturation.

  3. On the air-filled effective porosity parameter of Rogers and Nielson's (1991) bulk radon diffusion coefficient in unsaturated soils.

    PubMed

    Saâdi, Zakaria

    2014-05-01

    The radon exhalation rate at the earth's surface from soil or rock with radium as its source is the main mechanism behind the radon activity concentrations observed in both indoor and outdoor environments. During the last two decades, many subsurface radon transport models have used Rogers and Nielson's formula for modeling the unsaturated soil bulk radon diffusion coefficient. This formula uses an "air-filled effective porosity" to account for radon adsorption and radon dissolution in the groundwater. This formula is reviewed here, and its hypotheses are examined for accuracy in dealing with subsurface radon transport problems. The author shows its limitations by comparing one dimensional steady-state analytical solutions of the two-phase (air/water) transport equation (Fick's law) with Rogers and Nielson's formula. For radon diffusion-dominated transport, the calculated Rogers and Nielson's radon exhalation rate is shown to be unrealistic as it is independent of the values of the radon adsorption and groundwater dissolution coefficients. For convective and diffusive transport, radon exhalation rates calculated using Fick's law and this formula agree only for high values of gas-phase velocity and groundwater saturation. However, these conditions are not usually met in most shallow subsurface environments where radon migration takes place under low gas phase velocities and low water saturation. PMID:24670909

  4. The Relationship Between Soil Air Filled Porosity and Soil Methane Oxidation is Almost Identical in Both Dry and Wet Temperate Eucalypt Forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fest, B. J.; Wardlaw, T.; Hinko-Najera, N.; Arndt, S. K.

    2015-12-01

    In order to gain a better understanding of the temporal variation in soil methane (CH4) exchange in temperate evergreen eucalypt forests in south-eastern Australia we measured soil CH4 exchange in high temporal resolution (every 2 hours or less) over two consecutive years (Wombat State Forest, Victoria, AUS) and over one year (Warra, Tasmania, AUS) in two temperate Eucalyptus obliqua (L. Her) forests with contrasting annual precipitation (Wombat State Forest = 870 mm yr-1, Warra = 1700 mm yr-1). Both forests were continuous CH4 sinks with the Victorian site having a sink strength of -1.79 kg CH4 ha-1 yr-1 and the Tasmanian site having a sink strength of -3.83 kg CH4 ha-1 yr-1. Our results show that CH4 uptake was strongly controlled by soil moisture at both sites and explained up to 90% of the temporal variability in CH4 uptake. Furthermore, when soil moisture was expressed as soil air filled porosity (AFP) we were able to predict the CH4 uptake of one site by the linear regression between AFP and CH4 uptake from the other site. Soil temperature only had an apparent control over seasonal variation in CH4 uptake during periods when soil moisture and soil temperature were closely correlated. The fluctuation of the generally low soil nitrogen levels did not influence soil CH4 uptake at either site.

  5. Rapid assessment of methanotrophic capacity of compost-based materials considering the effects of air-filled porosity, water content and dissolved organic carbon.

    PubMed

    Mancebo, Uriel; Hettiaratchi, J Patrick A

    2015-02-01

    Since the global warming potential of CH4 is 25 times that of CO2 on a 100-year time horizon, the development of methanotrophic applications for the conversion of CH4 to CO2 is emerging as an area of interest for researchers and practicing engineers. Compost exhibits most of the characteristics required for methanotroph growth media and has been used in several projects. This paper presents results from a study that was undertaken to assess the influence of physical and chemical characteristics of compost-based materials on the biological oxidation of CH4 when used in methane biofilters. The results showed that easily-measurable parameters, such as air filled porosity, water content and dissolved organic carbon, are correlated with maximum CH4 removal rates. The results obtained were used to develop an empirical relationship that could be regarded as a rapid assessment tool for the estimation of the performance of compost-based materials in engineered methanotrophic applications. PMID:25484123

  6. Estimating the change of porosity in the saturated zone during air sparging.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yih-jin; Kuo, Yu-chia; Chen, Tsu-chi; Chou, Feng-chih

    2006-01-01

    Air sparging is a remedial method for groundwater. The remedial region is similar to the air flow region in the saturated zone. If soil particles are transported during air sparging, the porosity distributions in the saturated zone change, which may alter the flow path of the air. To understand better the particle movement, this study performed a sandbox test to estimate the soil porosity change during air sparging. A clear fracture was formed and the phenomenon of particle movement was observed when the air injection was started. The moved sand filled the porous around the fracture and the reparked sand filled the fracture, reducing the porosity around the fracture. The results obtained from the photographs of the sandbox, the current measurements and the direct sand sample measurements were close to each other and are credible. Therefore, air injection during air sparging causes sand particle movement of sand, altering the characteristic of the sand matrix and the air distribution.

  7. Role of heat transfer in the stabilization of the flame in a closed volume filled with high-porosity medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrego, K. V.; Kozlov, I. M.; Gnezdilov, N. N.; Shmelev, E. S.

    2013-03-01

    The results of modeling of the combustion of a gas-air mixture in a closed volume filled with high-porosity medium have been given. A comparison of the calculation results to experimental data has shown their qualitative agreement. It has been established that a quasistationary regime of propagation of the flame is possible in the case of fairly large relative length of the system and specific surface of the porous medium. Rapid deceleration of the flame is attributed to the decrease in the area of its surface because of the quenching on the reactor walls and the intense heat exchange between the hot combustion products and the porous medium. Stabilization of the flame propagation occurs when the heat release in gaseous combustion and the heat loss during the heat exchange between the combustion products and the porous medium are approximately equal.

  8. Polystyrene Foam Products Equation of State as a Function of Porosity and Fill Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulford, R. N.; Swift, D. C.

    2009-12-01

    An accurate EOS for polystyrene foam is necessary for analysis of numerous experiments in shock compression, inertial confinement fusion, and astrophysics. Plastic to gas ratios vary between various samples of foam, according to the density and cell-size of the foam. A matrix of compositions has been investigated, allowing prediction of foam response as a function of the plastic-to-air ratio. The EOS code CHEETAH allows participation of the air in the decomposition reaction of the foam. Differences between air-filled, Ar-blown, and CO2-blown foams are investigated, to estimate the importance of allowing air to react with products of polystyrene decomposition. O2-blown foams are included in some comparisons, to amplify any consequences of reaction with oxygen in air. He-blown foams are included in some comparisons, to provide an extremum of density. Product pressures are slightly higher for oxygen-containing fill gases than for non-oxygen-containing fill gases. Examination of product species indicates that CO2 decomposes at high temperatures.

  9. Polystyrene foam products equation of state as a function of porosity and fill gas

    SciTech Connect

    Mulford, Roberta N; Swift, Damian C

    2009-01-01

    An accurate EOS for polystyrene foam is necessary for analysis of numerous experiments in shock compression, inertial confinement fusion, and astrophysics. Plastic to gas ratios vary between various samples of foam, according to the density and cell-size of the foam. A matrix of compositions has been investigated, allowing prediction of foam response as a function of the plastic-to-air ratio. The EOS code CHEETAH allows participation of the air in the decomposition reaction of the foam. Differences between air-filled, Ar-blown, and CO{sub 2}-blown foams are investigated, to estimate the importance of allowing air to react with products of polystyrene decomposition. O{sub 2}-blown foams are included in some comparisons, to amplify any consequences of reaction with oxygen in air. He-blown foams are included in some comparisons, to provide an extremum of density. Product pressures are slightly higher for oxygen-containing fill gases than for non-oxygen-containing fill gases. Examination of product species indicates that CO{sub 2} decomposes at high temperatures.

  10. Polystyrene Foam EOS as a Function of Porosity and Fill Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulford, Roberta; Swift, Damian

    2009-06-01

    An accurate EOS for polystyrene foam is necessary for analysis of numerous experiments in shock compression, inertial confinement fusion, and astrophysics. Plastic to gas ratios vary between various samples of foam, according to the density and cell-size of the foam. A matrix of compositions has been investigated, allowing prediction of foam response as a function of the plastic-to-air ratio. The EOS code CHEETAH allows participation of the air in the decomposition reaction of the foam, Differences between air-filled, nitrogen-blown, and CO2-blown foams are investigated, to estimate the importance of allowing air to react with plastic products during decomposition. Results differ somewhat from the conventional EOS, which are generated from values for plastic extrapolated to low densities.

  11. Effects of fluids on frictional strength, slip stability and porosity of gouge-filled faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiers, Christopher James

    2013-04-01

    strengthening at high temperatures, delineating three regimes of steady state frictional behaviour. In experimental studies where dilation has been measured or estimated, the velocity weakening regime seems further characterised by significant porosity development. Putting all this information together leads to the conclusion that a micromechanism-based description of the frictional behaviour of gouge-filled faults, under mid to upper crustal conditions, needs to account for mechanisms such as pressure solution and stress corrosion cracking of clast phases, and for both dilatant and non-dilatant slip on intervening, weak phyllosilicates. First attempts to do this, assuming pressure solution as the fluid-assisted clast deformation mechanism, successfully predict three-regime behaviour of the type seen in hydrothermal gouge friction experiments on phyllosilicate-quartz mixtures, as well as other key observations. Both steady state and transient frictional behaviour similar to that seen in experiments can be predicted. The key factor here controlling both frictional response (i.e a, b, a-b and Dc in the terminlogy of RSF modelling) and porosity turns out to be competition between dilatation due to intergranular slip on phyllosillicates versus flow and compaction by pressure solution. In particular, velocity weakening slip, hence rupture nucleation, and postseismic fault healing are predicted to be caused by the effects of the fluid phase in promoting compaction by pressure solution during dilatant shear.

  12. Apparatus and methods for determining gas saturation and porosity of a formation penetrated by a gas filled or liquid filled borehole

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Robert D.

    2001-03-27

    Methods and apparatus are disclosed for determining gas saturation, liquid saturation, porosity and density of earth formations penetrated by a well borehole. Determinations are made from measures of fast neutron and inelastic scatter gamma radiation induced by a pulsed, fast neutron source. The system preferably uses two detectors axially spaced from the neutron source. One detector is preferably a scintillation detector responsive to gamma radiation, and a second detector is preferably an organic scintillator responsive to both neutron and gamma radiation. The system can be operated in cased boreholes which are filled with either gas or liquid. Techniques for correcting all measurements for borehole conditions are disclosed.

  13. Air flow paths and porosity/permeability change in a saturated zone during in situ air sparging.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yih-Jin

    2007-04-01

    This study develops methods to estimate the change in soil characteristics and associated air flow paths in a saturated zone during in situ air sparging. These objectives were achieved by performing combined in situ air sparging and tracer testing, and comparing the breakthrough curves obtained from the tracer gas with those obtained by a numerical simulation model that incorporates a predicted change in porosity that is proportional to the air saturation. The results reveal that revising the porosity and permeability according to the distribution of gas saturation is helpful in breakthrough curve fitting, however, these changes are unable to account for the effects of preferential air flow paths, especially in the zone closest to the points of air injection. It is not known the extent to which these preferential air flow paths were already present versus created, increased, or reduced as a result of the air sparging experiment. The transport of particles from around the sparging well could account for the overall increase in porosity and permeability observed in the study. Collection of soil particles in a monitoring well within 2m of the sparging well provided further evidence of the transport of particles. Transport of particles from near the sparging well also appeared to decrease the radius of influence (ROI). Methods for predicting the effects of pressurized air injection and water flow on the creation or modification of preferential air flow paths are still needed to provide a full description of the change in soil conditions that accompany air sparging.

  14. Partitioned airs at microscale and nanoscale: thermal diffusivity in ultrahigh porosity solids of nanocellulose.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Koh; Kobayashi, Yuri; Saito, Tsuguyuki; Isogai, Akira

    2016-01-01

    High porosity solids, such as plastic foams and aerogels, are thermally insulating. Their insulation performance strongly depends on their pore structure, which dictates the heat transfer process in the material. Understanding such a relationship is essential to realizing highly efficient thermal insulators. Herein, we compare the heat transfer properties of foams and aerogels that have very high porosities (97.3-99.7%) and an identical composition (nanocellulose). The foams feature rather closed, microscale pores formed with a thin film-like solid phase, whereas the aerogels feature nanoscale open pores formed with a nanofibrous network-like solid skeleton. Unlike the aerogel samples, the thermal diffusivity of the foam decreases considerably with a slight increase in the solid fraction. The results indicate that for suppressing the thermal diffusion of air within high porosity solids, creating microscale spaces with distinct partitions is more effective than directly blocking the free path of air molecules at the nanoscale. PMID:26830144

  15. Partitioned airs at microscale and nanoscale: thermal diffusivity in ultrahigh porosity solids of nanocellulose.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Koh; Kobayashi, Yuri; Saito, Tsuguyuki; Isogai, Akira

    2016-02-02

    High porosity solids, such as plastic foams and aerogels, are thermally insulating. Their insulation performance strongly depends on their pore structure, which dictates the heat transfer process in the material. Understanding such a relationship is essential to realizing highly efficient thermal insulators. Herein, we compare the heat transfer properties of foams and aerogels that have very high porosities (97.3-99.7%) and an identical composition (nanocellulose). The foams feature rather closed, microscale pores formed with a thin film-like solid phase, whereas the aerogels feature nanoscale open pores formed with a nanofibrous network-like solid skeleton. Unlike the aerogel samples, the thermal diffusivity of the foam decreases considerably with a slight increase in the solid fraction. The results indicate that for suppressing the thermal diffusion of air within high porosity solids, creating microscale spaces with distinct partitions is more effective than directly blocking the free path of air molecules at the nanoscale.

  16. Partitioned airs at microscale and nanoscale: thermal diffusivity in ultrahigh porosity solids of nanocellulose

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, Koh; Kobayashi, Yuri; Saito, Tsuguyuki; Isogai, Akira

    2016-01-01

    High porosity solids, such as plastic foams and aerogels, are thermally insulating. Their insulation performance strongly depends on their pore structure, which dictates the heat transfer process in the material. Understanding such a relationship is essential to realizing highly efficient thermal insulators. Herein, we compare the heat transfer properties of foams and aerogels that have very high porosities (97.3–99.7%) and an identical composition (nanocellulose). The foams feature rather closed, microscale pores formed with a thin film-like solid phase, whereas the aerogels feature nanoscale open pores formed with a nanofibrous network-like solid skeleton. Unlike the aerogel samples, the thermal diffusivity of the foam decreases considerably with a slight increase in the solid fraction. The results indicate that for suppressing the thermal diffusion of air within high porosity solids, creating microscale spaces with distinct partitions is more effective than directly blocking the free path of air molecules at the nanoscale. PMID:26830144

  17. Partitioned airs at microscale and nanoscale: thermal diffusivity in ultrahigh porosity solids of nanocellulose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Koh; Kobayashi, Yuri; Saito, Tsuguyuki; Isogai, Akira

    2016-02-01

    High porosity solids, such as plastic foams and aerogels, are thermally insulating. Their insulation performance strongly depends on their pore structure, which dictates the heat transfer process in the material. Understanding such a relationship is essential to realizing highly efficient thermal insulators. Herein, we compare the heat transfer properties of foams and aerogels that have very high porosities (97.3-99.7%) and an identical composition (nanocellulose). The foams feature rather closed, microscale pores formed with a thin film-like solid phase, whereas the aerogels feature nanoscale open pores formed with a nanofibrous network-like solid skeleton. Unlike the aerogel samples, the thermal diffusivity of the foam decreases considerably with a slight increase in the solid fraction. The results indicate that for suppressing the thermal diffusion of air within high porosity solids, creating microscale spaces with distinct partitions is more effective than directly blocking the free path of air molecules at the nanoscale.

  18. Protection of organic carbon in soil microaggregates occurs via restructuring of aggregate porosity and filling of pores with accumulating organic matter.

    SciTech Connect

    McCarthy, J. F.; Ilavsky, J.; Jastrow, J. D.; Mayer, L. M.; Perfect, E.; Zhuang, J.; Biosciences Division; Univ. of Tennessee; Univ. of Maine

    2008-10-01

    We examined relationships between the pore structure of microaggregates and the protection of organic matter (OM) within that structure. By using ultra-small angle X-ray scattering (USAXS) before and after combustion of microaggregates at 350 degrees C, we took advantage of differences in X-ray scattering contrast among soil minerals, OM, and air to evaluate the distribution of the total- and OM-filled porosity within microaggregates (53-250 {mu}m in diameter). Systematic changes in microaggregate structure were observed for long-term field manipulations of land use (a chronosequence of tallgrass prairie restorations) and agricultural management (conventional tillage versus no-till at two levels of nitrogen fertilization). Our results imply that OM preservation arose from the evolution of the architectural system of microaggregates during their formation and stabilization. Soils and treatments with increasing OM in microaggregates were associated with encapsulation of colloidal OM by minerals, thereby creating protected OM-filled pores at the submicron scale within the microaggregate structure. For example, in the prairie chronosequence, microaggregates from the cultivated soil had the lowest concentration of OM, but 75% of the OM that had survived cultivation was in OM-filled pores. Following restoration, the concentration of OM in microaggregates increased rapidly, but the proportion of OM in OM-filled pores declined initially and then increased over time until 90% of the OM was in OM-filled pores. OM totally encapsulated within the pore structure can create spatial and kinetic constraints on microbial access to and degradation of OM. Encapsulation of OM increases the capacity for its protection relative to sorption on mineral surfaces, and comparison of its extent among treatments suggests important feedback loops. The use of USAXS, which has not previously been applied to the study of soil aggregate structures and the distribution of OM within those structures

  19. Interaction of finite-amplitude sound with air-filled porous materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, D. A.

    1985-01-01

    The propagation of high intensity sound waves through an air-filled porus material was studied. The material is assumed: (1) to be rigid, incompressible, and homogeneous, and (2) to be adequately described by two properties: resistivity r and porosity. The resulting wave equation is still nonlinear, however, because of the u sgn(u) term in the resistivity. The equation is solved in the frequency domain as an infinite set of coupled inhomogeneous Helmholtz equations, one for each harmonic. An approximate but analytical solution leads to predictions of excess attenuation, saturation, and phase speed reduction for the fundamental component. A more general numerical solution is used to calculate the propagation curves for the higher harmonics. The u sgn(u) nonlinearity produces a cubic distortion pattern; when the input signal is a pure tone, only odd harmonic distortion products are generated.

  20. Restoration of middle-ear input in fluid-filled middle ears by controlled introduction of air or a novel air-filled implant.

    PubMed

    Ravicz, Michael E; Chien, Wade W; Rosowski, John J

    2015-10-01

    The effect of small amounts of air on sound-induced umbo velocity in an otherwise saline-filled middle ear (ME) was investigated to examine the efficacy of a novel balloon-like air-filled ME implant suitable for patients with chronically non-aerated MEs. In this study, air bubbles or air-filled implants were introduced into saline-filled human cadaveric MEs. Umbo velocity, a convenient measure of ME response, served as an indicator of hearing sensitivity. Filling the ME with saline reduced umbo velocity by 25-30 dB at low frequencies and more at high frequencies, consistent with earlier work (Ravicz et al., Hear. Res. 195: 103-130 (2004)). Small amounts of air (∼30 μl) in the otherwise saline-filled ME increased umbo velocity substantially, to levels only 10-15 dB lower than in the dry ME, in a frequency- and location-dependent manner: air in contact with the tympanic membrane (TM) increased umbo velocity at all frequencies, while air located away from the TM increased umbo velocity only below about 500 Hz. The air-filled implant also affected umbo velocity in a manner similar to an air bubble of equivalent compliance. Inserting additional implants into the ME had the same effect as increasing air volume. These results suggest these middle-ear implants would significantly reduce conductive hearing loss in patients with chronically fluid-filled MEs.

  1. Numerical Analysis of Air Pressure Effects on the Flow Pattern during the Filling of a Vertical Die Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Ortega, J. J.; Zamora, R.; López, J.; Faura, F.

    2011-05-01

    Porosity due to air entrapment in the molten metal during the injection process is one of the most important problems encountered in die-casting processes. The causes of air entrapment can be attributed mainly to the evolution of the free surface of the fluid flow during the filling and the use of inadequate air evacuation systems. Different studies of the main characteristics of the flow during the filling of a vertical die cavity can be found in the literature. In most of these studies, the effects of the air on the flow of molten metal during the injection are usually neglected. However, under certain conditions, specially when there is a poor evacuation of air through vents, these effects may substantially affect the filling pattern and the final amount of air trapped in the molten metal. The aim of this work is to study numerically the effects of air on the fluid flow during the early stages of the filling of a vertical die cavity with rectangular shape. To this end, numerical simulations of the fluid flow in the die cavity are carried out using a commercial CFD code (FLOW-3D) based on the SOLA-VOF approach to solve the coupling between the momentum and mass conservation equations and to treat the free surface. The main characteristics of the flow are analyzed for a wide range of operating conditions. Also, filling visualization experiments are carried out on a test bench for validation purpose using water as working fluid in a transparent die model and a high-speed camera. The viability of the numerical model used in the simulations is finally discussed.

  2. Wave intensity analysis in air-filled flexible vessels.

    PubMed

    Clavica, Francesco; Parker, Kim H; Khir, Ashraf W

    2015-02-26

    Wave intensity analysis (WIA) is an analytical technique generally used to investigate the propagation of waves in the cardiovascular system. Despite its increasing usage in the cardiovascular system, to our knowledge WIA has never been applied to the respiratory system. Given the analogies between arteries and airways (i.e. fluid flow in flexible vessels), the aim of this work is to test the applicability of WIA with gas flow instead of liquid flow. The models employed in this study are similar to earlier studies used for arterial investigations. Simultaneous pressure (P) and velocity (U) measurements were initially made in a single tube and then in several flexible tubes connected in series. Wave speed was calculated using the foot-to-foot method (cf), which was used to separate analytically the measured P and U waveforms into their forward and backward components. Further, the data were used to calculate wave intensity, which was also separated into its forward and backward components. Although the measured wave speed was relatively high, the results showed that the onsets and the nature of reflections (compression/expansion) derived with WIA, corresponded well to those anticipated using the theory of waves in liquid-filled elastic tubes. On average the difference between the experimental and theoretical arrival time of reflection was 6.1% and 3.6% for the single vessel and multivessel experiment, respectively. The results suggest that WIA can provide relatively accurate information on reflections in air-filled flexible tubes, warranting further studies to explore the full potential of this technique in the respiratory system. PMID:25595424

  3. Wave intensity analysis in air-filled flexible vessels.

    PubMed

    Clavica, Francesco; Parker, Kim H; Khir, Ashraf W

    2015-02-26

    Wave intensity analysis (WIA) is an analytical technique generally used to investigate the propagation of waves in the cardiovascular system. Despite its increasing usage in the cardiovascular system, to our knowledge WIA has never been applied to the respiratory system. Given the analogies between arteries and airways (i.e. fluid flow in flexible vessels), the aim of this work is to test the applicability of WIA with gas flow instead of liquid flow. The models employed in this study are similar to earlier studies used for arterial investigations. Simultaneous pressure (P) and velocity (U) measurements were initially made in a single tube and then in several flexible tubes connected in series. Wave speed was calculated using the foot-to-foot method (cf), which was used to separate analytically the measured P and U waveforms into their forward and backward components. Further, the data were used to calculate wave intensity, which was also separated into its forward and backward components. Although the measured wave speed was relatively high, the results showed that the onsets and the nature of reflections (compression/expansion) derived with WIA, corresponded well to those anticipated using the theory of waves in liquid-filled elastic tubes. On average the difference between the experimental and theoretical arrival time of reflection was 6.1% and 3.6% for the single vessel and multivessel experiment, respectively. The results suggest that WIA can provide relatively accurate information on reflections in air-filled flexible tubes, warranting further studies to explore the full potential of this technique in the respiratory system.

  4. Mathematical model of an air-filled alpha stirling refrigerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFarlane, Patrick; Semperlotti, Fabio; Sen, Mihir

    2013-10-01

    This work develops a mathematical model for an alpha Stirling refrigerator with air as the working fluid and will be useful in optimizing the mechanical design of these machines. Two pistons cyclically compress and expand air while moving sinusoidally in separate chambers connected by a regenerator, thus creating a temperature difference across the system. A complete non-linear mathematical model of the machine, including air thermodynamics, and heat transfer from the walls, as well as heat transfer and fluid resistance in the regenerator, is developed. Non-dimensional groups are derived, and the mathematical model is numerically solved. The heat transfer and work are found for both chambers, and the coefficient of performance of each chamber is calculated. Important design parameters are varied and their effect on refrigerator performance determined. This sensitivity analysis, which shows what the significant parameters are, is a useful tool for the design of practical Stirling refrigeration systems.

  5. Substances To Fill Lighter-Than-Air Balloons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A.

    1995-01-01

    Various combinations of solid and liquid chemicals proposed as sources of hydrogen and other gases for inflating lighter-than-air balloons. In all cases energy used to propel balloon upward or downward comes from temperature differences in planet's atmosphere itself. Phase changes and/or reversible chemical reactions used to vary quantities of gases in balloons as functions of pressure and temperature and, as functions of altitude: provides means to control altitude of balloon.

  6. Response of air-filled ion chambers to high-intensity radiation pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, M.; Brown, D.

    1993-06-01

    Ion chambers are one of the most popular types of detectors used for beam loss-monitor systems. To provide a foundation for the development of future loss-monitor systems, and to fully characterize the ion chambers in use at LAMPF, we have studied the response of air-filled cylindrical ion chambers to high-intensity, short-duration radiation pulses. The most intense pulses were about 180 rad in 250 ns (the equivalent steady-state dose rate was about 700 Mrad/h). We filled our chambers with nitrogen gas at 760 Torr and air at 600 Torr. The ion chambers were driven into extreme nonlinear response. We hope these data will be used to design loss-monitor systems based on air-filled ion chambers, thus eliminating the need for gas-flow systems and/or airtight ion chambers.

  7. Response of air-filled ion chambers to high-intensity radiation pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, M.; Brown, D.

    1993-01-01

    Ion chambers are one of the most popular types of detectors used for beam loss-monitor systems. To provide a foundation for the development of future loss-monitor systems, and to fully characterize the ion chambers in use at LAMPF, we have studied the response of air-filled cylindrical ion chambers to high-intensity, short-duration radiation pulses. The most intense pulses were about 180 rad in 250 ns (the equivalent steady-state dose rate was about 700 Mrad/h). We filled our chambers with nitrogen gas at 760 Torr and air at 600 Torr. The ion chambers were driven into extreme nonlinear response. We hope these data will be used to design loss-monitor systems based on air-filled ion chambers, thus eliminating the need for gas-flow systems and/or airtight ion chambers.

  8. Enhanced pore filling of spiro-OMeTAD by enlarging the porosity of TiO2 films and its effects on the photovoltaic performance of ss-DSCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Yanling; Wang, Qi; Huang, Jianguo; Wu, Tao

    2015-03-01

    Four kinds of TiO2 electrodes with different porosities were prepared by adding different ratios of ethyl cellulous into a Dyesol 18-NRT paste. Higher polymer ratios contributed to the higher porosity of TiO2 films. All electrodes were spin-coated with spiro-OMeTAD and fabricated into solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells (ss-DSCs). This simple method allowed more spiro-OMeTAD penetrated into the more porous TiO2 films. This result demonstrated the pore-filling effect of hole transport materials on the photovoltaic performance of ss-DSCs. Photoluminescence and electrical impedance spectra measurements were introduced to investigate the dye regeneration, charge transport, and recombination kinetics of the solar cells. The increased pore filling of spiro-OMeTAD could enhance hole injection, hole transport, and recombination retardation, thus providing good charge collection efficiency and long recombination lifetime and resulting in the high short-circuit current density, open-circuit voltage, fill factor, and energy conversion efficiency of the solar cells. An efficiency enhancement of 34 % was obtained by using this method. However, further increasing the TiO2 porosity decreased the electron transport, thus causing a low charge collection and reducing cell performance.

  9. Porosity control in nanoporous carbide-derived carbon by oxidation in air and carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Osswald, S.; Portet, C.; Gogotsi, Y.; Laudisio, G.; Singer, J.P.; Fischer, J.E.; Sokolov, V.V.; Kukushkina, J.A.; Kravchik, A.E.

    2009-07-15

    Carbide-derived carbons (CDC) allow a precise control over the pore size through the selection of the carbide precursor and varying of the synthesis conditions. However, their pore volume is limited by the carbide stoichiometry. While activation of carbons derived from various organic precursors has been widely studied, this process may similarly be able to increase the pore volume and specific surface area of CDC. Oxidation of carbide-derived carbon in air and CO{sub 2} at different temperatures and times allows for significant increase in pore volume and specific surface area as well as control over average pore size with subnanometer accuracy. The effect of activation and associated changes in the pore volume and surface area on the hydrogen uptake are also discussed. - Graphical abstract: Carbide-derived carbons (CDC) provide great potential for sorption of toxicants and gas storage applications. Activation of CDC in air and CO{sub 2} at different temperatures and times is applied in order to maximize pore volume and specific surface area, and control the average pore size with subnanometer accuracy.

  10. Neonatal Presentation of an Air-Filled Neck Mass that Enlarges with Valsalva: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Jasminkumar Bharatbhai; Kilbride, Howard; Paulson, Lorien

    2015-01-01

    Branchial cleft cysts are common causes of congenital neck masses in the pediatric population. However, neonatal presentation of branchial cleft cysts is uncommon, but recognizable secondary to acute respiratory distress from airway compression or complications secondary to infection. We report a 1-day-old infant presenting with an air-filled neck mass that enlarged with Valsalva and was not associated with respiratory distress. The infant was found to have a third branchial cleft cyst with an internal opening into the pyriform sinus. The cyst was conservatively managed with endoscopic surgical decompression and cauterization of the tract and opening. We review the embryology of branchial cleft cysts and current management. PMID:26495186

  11. Measurements of two types of dilatational waves in an air-filled unconsolidated sand

    SciTech Connect

    Hickey, C.J.; Sabatier, J.M.

    1997-07-01

    This study consists of laboratory measurements of dilatational waves propagating through an air-filled unconsolidated sand. One excitation technique consists of a loudspeaker suspended in the air above the packing of sand. A second excitation technique uses a mechanical shaker in contact with the sand. The transmitted signals are received using microphones and geophones located at various depths within the sand. An interpretation based on measured phase speeds indicates that the transmitted energy from the suspended loudspeaker source is partitioned primarily but not exclusively into the type-II dilatational wave. This wave attenuates rapidly and is only detected at depths of less than about 15 cm for this particular sample. At the deeper depths the detected signal is associated with the type-I dilatational wave. The mechanical shaker produces only a type-I dilatational wave. Both the geophone and microphone sensors can detect both types of dilatational waves. {copyright} {ital 1997 Acoustical Society of America.}

  12. Reconfigurable optothermal microparticle trap in air-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, O A; Garbos, M K; Euser, T G; Russell, P St J

    2012-07-13

    We report a novel optothermal trapping mechanism that occurs in air-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber. In the confined environment of the core, the motion of a laser-guided particle is strongly influenced by the thermal-gradient-driven flow of air along the core surface. Known as "thermal creep flow," this can be induced either statically by local heating, or dynamically by the absorption (at a black mark placed on the fiber surface) of light scattered by the moving particle. The optothermal force on the particle, which can be accurately measured in hollow-core fiber by balancing it against the radiation forces, turns out to exceed the conventional thermophoretic force by 2 orders of magnitude. The system makes it possible to measure pN-scale forces accurately and to explore thermally driven flow in micron-scale structures. PMID:23030165

  13. Bulk densities and porosities of Cenozoic and Cretaceous basin-filling strata and Cretaceous and older basement rocks, Los Angeles Basin, California, determined from measurements of core samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beyer, L.A.; McCulloh, T.H.

    1998-01-01

    This report describes and provides a digital data file of selected bulk properties of subsurface rocks sampled in and around Los Angeles basin, California. Selected properties include measured dry bulk density (range 0.78 to 3.01 g/cm3), measured or estimated grain (matrix) density, calculated water saturated bulk density (range 1.47 to 3.01 g/cm3), calculated total porosity (range 0 to 69 porosity percent), geologic age, and lithology. Most of the rocks are conventional core samples taken from wells drilled by the petroleum industry. A small percentage of the core samples are from shallow borings. Rocks studied range in age from pre-Cambrian (?) to Recent and include sedimentary (98.8%), and volcanic, metamorphic and intrusive (1.2%) samples. Core samples studied were taken from measured drillhole depths that range from 35 to 20,234 ft (11 to 6,167 m). Version 1.0 of the data base (dated June 1998) contains information for 7378 samples from 234 wells, including two redrilled wells. This report/data base can be accessed on U. S. Geological Survey servers at http://geopubs.wr.usgs.gov/open-file/of98-788. Periodic additions to the on-line data base will be provided as new data is gathered.

  14. Development of Porosity Measurement Method in Shale Gas Reservoir Rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siswandani, Alita; Nurhandoko, BagusEndar B.

    2016-08-01

    The pore scales have impacts on transport mechanisms in shale gas reservoirs. In this research, digital helium porosity meter is used for porosity measurement by considering real condition. Accordingly it is necessary to obtain a good approximation for gas filled porosity. Shale has the typical effective porosity that is changing as a function of time. Effective porosity values for three different shale rocks are analyzed by this proposed measurement. We develop the new measurement method for characterizing porosity phenomena in shale gas as a time function by measuring porosity in a range of minutes using digital helium porosity meter. The porosity of shale rock measured in this experiment are free gas and adsorbed gas porosoty. The pressure change in time shows that porosity of shale contains at least two type porosities: macro scale porosity (fracture porosity) and fine scale porosity (nano scale porosity). We present the estimation of effective porosity values by considering Boyle-Gay Lussaac approximation and Van der Waals approximation.

  15. RECORDING FLAME SPEED DATA OF FUEL AND AIR RATIO MIXTURES - THE HORIZONTAL GLASS TUBE IS FILLED WITH

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1949-01-01

    RECORDING FLAME SPEED DATA OF FUEL AND AIR RATIO MIXTURES - THE HORIZONTAL GLASS TUBE IS FILLED WITH A HOMOGENOUS MIXTURE OF FUEL AND AIR - THE RATE OF FLAME TRAVEL IS PICKED UP BY PHOTO CELLS SHOWN ABOVE THE TUBE AND RECORDED ON THE ELECTRONIC TIME

  16. Prediction of the collection efficiency, the porosity, and the pressure drop across filter cakes in particulate air filtration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Otoom, Awni Y.

    This study presents a new statistical model to predict the collection efficiency, cake thickness, cake porosity, and pressure drop across filter cakes during the particulate filtration of gases. This model is based on generation of a random distribution of particle sizes and particle falling locations. The model predicts the cake collection efficiency, which was found to be strongly dependent on the ratio of the mean particle size to the mean pore size of the filter medium. The average cake porosity decreases with increasing cake thickness and the pressure drop increases when the mean particle diameter decreases.

  17. High-resolution ion pulse ionization chamber with air filling for the 222Rn decays detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrilyuk, Yu. M.; Gangapshev, A. M.; Gezhaev, A. M.; Etezov, R. A.; Kazalov, V. V.; Kuzminov, V. V.; Panasenko, S. I.; Ratkevich, S. S.; Tekueva, D. A.; Yakimenko, S. P.

    2015-11-01

    The construction and characteristics of the cylindrical ion pulse ionization chamber (CIPIC) with a working volume of 3.2 L are described. The chamber is intended to register α-particles from the 222Rn and its daughter's decays in the filled air sample. The detector is less sensitive to electromagnetic pick-ups and mechanical noises. The digital pulse processing method is proposed to improve the energy resolution of the ion pulse ionization chamber. An energy resolution of 1.6% has been achieved for the 5.49 MeV α-line. The dependence of the energy resolution on high voltage and working media pressure has been investigated and the results are presented.

  18. Mode-based microparticle conveyor belt in air-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Oliver A; Euser, Tijmen G; Russell, Philip St J

    2013-12-01

    We show how microparticles can be moved over long distances and precisely positioned in a low-loss air-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber using a coherent superposition of two co-propagating spatial modes, balanced by a backward-propagating fundamental mode. This creates a series of trapping positions spaced by half the beat-length between the forward-propagating modes (typically a fraction of a millimeter). The system allows a trapped microparticle to be moved along the fiber by continuously tuning the relative phase between the two forward-propagating modes. This mode-based optical conveyor belt combines long-range transport of microparticles with a positional accuracy of 1 µm. The technique also has potential uses in waveguide-based optofluidic systems. PMID:24514492

  19. Flow patterns of natural convection in an air-filled vertical cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakitani, Shunichi

    1998-08-01

    Flow patterns of two-dimensional natural convection in a vertical air-filled tall cavity with differentially heated sidewalls are investigated. Numerical simulations based on a finite difference method are carried out for a wide range of Rayleigh numbers and aspect ratios from the onset of the steady multicellular flow, through the reverse transition to the unicellular pattern, to the unsteady multicellular flow. For aspect ratios (height/width) from 10 to 24, the various cellular structures characterized by the number of secondary cells are clarified from the simulations by means of gradually increasing Rayleigh number to 106. Unsteady multicellular solutions are found in some region of Rayleigh numbers less than those at which the reverse transition has occurred.

  20. Design and analysis of stepped impedance transformer from air filled waveguide to dielectric filled waveguide for high power microwave window applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sindam, Bashaiah; Sharma, P. K.; Raju, K. C. James

    2014-03-01

    This paper describes a design to achieve good microwave power transmission from an air filled rectangular waveguide to a narrow dielectric filled waveguide using a stepped impedance transformer. A novel material Ba(Zn1/3Ta2/3)O3 (BZT) having high dielectric constant and low dielectric loss has been proposed as a microwave window. The advantages of using such dielectric resonator materials for these applications is that they make the size reduction of such microwave components possible without unleashing microwave dissipation. A high density (more than 97%) and good microwave dielectric properties are obtained for BZT samples through the solid state reaction method. The obtained dielectric parameters are used to calculate the dimensions of the narrow dielectric window section in waveguide geometry and the resulting dielectric window structure is simulated using the IMST Empire simulator. The maximum power transmission is obtained by the simulated structure with a dielectric filled waveguide window of thickness 7.4 mm at 3.7 GHz with bandwidth of 780 MHz, which corresponds to an insertion loss (S21) magnitude of 0.008 dB, and the return loss (S11) obtained at the same frequency is -43 dB. The microwave dielectric properties of the material used as well as the simulated results for the BZT based window are studied and compared with those of a conventional window.

  1. Autonomous generation of a thermoacoustic solitary wave in an air-filled tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Dai; Sugimoto, Nobumasa

    2016-10-01

    Experiments are performed to demonstrate the autonomous generation of an acoustic solitary wave in an air-filled, looped tube with an array of Helmholtz resonators. The solitary wave is generated spontaneously due to thermoacoustic instability by a pair of stacks installed in the tube and subject to a temperature gradient axially. No external drivers are used to create initial disturbances. Once the solitary wave is generated, it keeps on propagating to circulate along the loop endlessly. The stacks, which are made of ceramics and of many pores of square cross section, are placed in the tube diametrically on exactly the opposite side of the loop, and they are sandwiched by hot and cold (ambient) heat exchangers. When the temperature gradient along both stacks is appropriate, pulses of smooth profiles are generated and propagated in both directions of the tube. From good agreements of not only the pressure profile measured but also the propagation speed with the theory, the pulse is identified as the acoustic solitary wave, and it can be called thermoacoustic solitary wave or thermoacoustic soliton corresponding to the soliton solution of the K-dV equation in one limit.

  2. Controlled porosity in electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, Yet-Ming; Bae, Chang-Jun; Halloran, John William; Fu, Qiang; Tomsia, Antoni P.; Erdonmez, Can K.

    2015-06-23

    Porous electrodes in which the porosity has a low tortuosity are generally provided. In some embodiments, the porous electrodes can be designed to be filled with electrolyte and used in batteries, and can include low tortuosity in the primary direction of ion transport during charge and discharge of the battery. In some embodiments, the electrodes can have a high volume fraction of electrode active material (i.e., low porosity). The attributes outlined above can allow the electrodes to be fabricated with a higher energy density, higher capacity per unit area of electrode (mAh/cm.sup.2), and greater thickness than comparable electrodes while still providing high utilization of the active material in the battery during use. Accordingly, the electrodes can be used to produce batteries with high energy densities, high power, or both compared to batteries using electrodes of conventional design with relatively highly tortuous pores.

  3. Packing Bunker and Pile Silos to Minimize Porosity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This article discusses the issue of porosity (i.e., the portion of volume filled with gas) in silages. As porosity increases, the silage is subject to greater losses. Porosity can be reduced by adequately packing the crop at ensiling. To keep porosity below 40% a minimum bulk density of 44 lbs./cu. ...

  4. Effects of the Nd:YAG laser, air-abrasion, and acid-etchant on filling materials.

    PubMed

    Türkmen, C; Sazak, H; Günday, M

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine any inadvertent effects of the neodymium: yttrium-aluminium-garnet (Nd:YAG) laser, air-abrasion, and ortho-phosphoric acid on some conventionally used dental filling materials [amalgam, composite resin, compomer, glass-ionomer cement (GIC), and ceromer], when they were used for purposes of margin etching and assessed according to standard enamel etching parameters using a total of five fillings. The surfaces of the filling materials were polished. One sample from each material group was exposed to laser (at 0.75 J, 15 pps) and air abrasion (with Al-oxide powder, 60 psi) for 2 s and to the 37% ortho-phosphoric acid for 60 s. The exposed materials were examined under Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). After laser treatment most specimens showed recrystallized areas, the GIC surface being the most affected. There were some pores and cavities on the amalgam surface following laser treatment. The abraded surfaces showed mechanical abrasions. The acid etchant showed the least effect. During the application of laser or air-abrasion, the adjacent tooth or filling surface must be protected or the dentist must be careful.

  5. The effects of porosity and permeability on fluid flow and heat transfer of multi walled carbon nano-tubes suspended in oil (MWCNT/Oil nano-fluid) in a microchannel filled with a porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nojoomizadeh, Mehdi; Karimipour, Arash

    2016-10-01

    The forced convection heat transfer and laminar flow in a two-dimensional microchannel filled with a porous medium is numerically investigated. The nano-particles which have been used are multi walled carbon nano-tubes (MWCNT) suspended in oil as the based fluid. The assumption of no-slip condition between the base fluid and nano-particles as well as the thermal equilibrium between them allows us to study the nanofluid in a single phase. The nanofluid flow through the microchannel has been modeled using the Darcy-Forchheimer equation. It is also assumed that there is a thermal equilibrium between the solid phase and the nanofluid for energy transfer. The walls of the microchannel are under the influence of a fluctuating heat flux. Also, the slip velocity boundary condition has been assumed along the walls. The effects of Darcy number, porosity and slip coefficients and Reynolds number on the velocity and temperature profiles and Nusselt number will be studied in this research.

  6. Air-filled postcranial bones in theropod dinosaurs: physiological implications and the 'reptile'-bird transition.

    PubMed

    Benson, Roger B J; Butler, Richard J; Carrano, Matthew T; O'Connor, Patrick M

    2012-02-01

    Pneumatic (air-filled) postcranial bones are unique to birds among extant tetrapods. Unambiguous skeletal correlates of postcranial pneumaticity first appeared in the Late Triassic (approximately 210 million years ago), when they evolved independently in several groups of bird-line archosaurs (ornithodirans). These include the theropod dinosaurs (of which birds are extant representatives), the pterosaurs, and sauropodomorph dinosaurs. Postulated functions of skeletal pneumatisation include weight reduction in large-bodied or flying taxa, and density reduction resulting in energetic savings during foraging and locomotion. However, the influence of these hypotheses on the early evolution of pneumaticity has not been studied in detail previously. We review recent work on the significance of pneumaticity for understanding the biology of extinct ornithodirans, and present detailed new data on the proportion of the skeleton that was pneumatised in 131 non-avian theropods and Archaeopteryx. This includes all taxa known from significant postcranial remains. Pneumaticity of the cervical and anterior dorsal vertebrae occurred early in theropod evolution. This 'common pattern' was conserved on the line leading to birds, and is likely present in Archaeopteryx. Increases in skeletal pneumaticity occurred independently in as many as 12 lineages, highlighting a remarkably high number of parallel acquisitions of a bird-like feature among non-avian theropods. Using a quantitative comparative framework, we show that evolutionary increases in skeletal pneumaticity are significantly concentrated in lineages with large body size, suggesting that mass reduction in response to gravitational constraints at large body sizes influenced the early evolution of pneumaticity. However, the body size threshold for extensive pneumatisation is lower in theropod lineages more closely related to birds (maniraptorans). Thus, relaxation of the relationship between body size and pneumatisation preceded

  7. Porosity reduction in Monterey Formation, California

    SciTech Connect

    Compton, J.S.

    1987-05-01

    Porosity and grain density were determined for different lithologies from throughout a 1.2-km thick section of the Monterey and Sisquoc formations in the Santa Maria basin area, California. Porosity reduction by physical and chemical compaction in the predominantly siliceous sediment is controlled largely by the bulk sediment composition and silica phase transformations. Physical compaction of sediment grains from increasing overburden pressure is responsible for most of the gradual porosity reduction with increasing burial depth in opal-A siliceous ooze and diatomite. The porous, incompressible diatom frustule maintains a high porosity relative to clayey and calcareous sediment. Therefore, a positive correlation exists between porosity and biogenic silica (diatom) content of the sediment. During the opal-A to opal-CT silica phase transformation, solution of the porous diatom frustule and precipitation of cryptocrystalline opal-CT results in a porosity reduction that roughly correlates with the biogenic silica content of the sediment. Local porosity reduction occurs in pore-filling dolomite and chert nodules. Dry bulk density as well as porosity reduction tend to increase with sediment depth. Dolomite and organic matter have the most significant influence on the bulk density because of their respective high and low density. The maximum burial depth of the uplifted and eroded section is estimated by overlapping the porosity-depth relation of average deep-sea siliceous ooze.

  8. Nonlinear compression of high energy fiber amplifier pulses in air-filled hypocycloid-core Kagome fiber.

    PubMed

    Guichard, Florent; Giree, Achut; Zaouter, Yoann; Hanna, Marc; Machinet, Guillaume; Debord, Benoît; Gérôme, Frédéric; Dupriez, Pascal; Druon, Frédéric; Hönninger, Clemens; Mottay, Eric; Benabid, Fetah; Georges, Patrick

    2015-03-23

    We report on the generation of 34 fs and 50 µJ pulses from a high energy fiber amplifier system with nonlinear compression in an air-filled hypocycloid-core Kagome fiber. The unique properties of such fibers allow bridging the gap between solid core fibers-based and hollow capillary-based post-compression setups, thereby operating with pulse energies obtained with current state-of-the-art fiber systems. The overall transmission of the compression setup is over 70%. Together with Yb-doped fiber amplifier technologies, Kagome fibers therefore appear as a promising tool for efficient generation of pulses with durations below 50 fs, energies ranging from 10 to several hundreds of µJ, and high average powers.

  9. Isolating scattering resonances of an air-filled spherical shell using iterative, single-channel time reversal.

    PubMed

    Waters, Zachary J; Dzikowicz, Benjamin R; Simpson, Harry J

    2012-01-01

    Iterative, single-channel time reversal is employed to isolate backscattering resonances of an air-filled spherical shell in a frequency range of 0.5-20 kHz. Numerical simulations of free-field target scattering suggest improved isolation of the dominant target response frequency in the presence of varying levels of stochastic noise, compared to processing returns from a single transmission and also coherent averaging. To test the efficacy of the technique in a realistic littoral environment, monostatic scattering experiments are conducted in the Gulf of Mexico near Panama City, Florida. The time reversal technique is applied to returns from a hollow spherical shell target sitting proud on a sandy bottom in 14 m deep water. Distinct resonances in the scattering response of the target are isolated, depending upon the bandwidth of the sonar system utilized.

  10. Response of ozone to changes in hydrocarbon and nitrogen oxide concentrations in outdoor smog chambers filled with Los Angeles air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Nelson A.; Gunst, Richard F.

    During the summer portion of the 1987 Southern California Air Quality Study (SCAQS), outdoor smog chamber experiments were performed on Los Angeles air to determine the response of maximum ozone levels, O 3(max), to changes in the initial concentrations of hydrocarbons, HC, and nitrogen oxides, NO x. These captive-air experiments were conducted in downtown Los Angeles and in the downwind suburb of Claremont. Typically, eight chambers were filled with LA air in the morning. In some chambers the initial HC and/or NO x concentrations were changed by 25% to 50% by adding various combinations of a mixture of HC, clean air, or NO x. The O 3 concentration in each chamber was monitored throughout the day to determine O 3(max). An empirical mathematical model for O 3(max) was developed from regression fits to the initial HC and NO x concentrations and to the average daily temperature at both sites. This is the first time that a mathematical expression for the O 3-precursor relationship and the positive effect of temperature on O 3(max) have been quantified using captive-air experiments. An ozone isopleth diagram prepared from the empirical model was qualitatively similar to those prepared from photochemical mechanisms. This constitutes the first solely empirical corroboration of the O 3 contour shape for Los Angeles. To comply with the Federal Ozone Standard in LA, O 3(max) must be reduced by approximately 50%. Several strategies for reducing O 3(max) by 50% were evaluated using the empirical model. For the average initial conditions that we measured in LA, the most efficient strategy is one that reduces HC by 55-75%, depending on the ambient HC/NO x ratio. Any accompanying reduction in NO x would be counter-productive to the benefits of HC reductions. In fact, reducing HC and NO x simultaneously requires larger percentage reductions for both than the reduction required when HC alone is reduced. The HC-reduction strategy is the most efficient on average, but no single

  11. Influence of porosity on thermophysical properties of a composite

    SciTech Connect

    Grishaeva, N. Yu. Ljukshin, B. A. Bochkareva, S. A.; Strukov, Yu. S.

    2015-10-27

    In many modern information systems, the heat generated during the operation of electronic devices is usually dissipated by heat-conductive pads between the casing of the respective equipment and a massive base (platform). For newly developed pads, the promising materials are composites on the basis of various types of silicone rubber. At the same time, during the production of the pads without a vacuum setup, the material can contain air bubbles, which causes the porosity potentially negative for the thermal properties of the material. This work studies the thermal conductivity depending on the degree of silicone matrix filling by copper particles, introduced to improve thermal conductivity, and by air bubbles that are considered as reinforcing inclusions.

  12. Influence of porosity on thermophysical properties of a composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grishaeva, N. Yu.; Ljukshin, B. A.; Strukov, Yu. S.; Bochkareva, S. A.

    2015-10-01

    In many modern information systems, the heat generated during the operation of electronic devices is usually dissipated by heat-conductive pads between the casing of the respective equipment and a massive base (platform). For newly developed pads, the promising materials are composites on the basis of various types of silicone rubber. At the same time, during the production of the pads without a vacuum setup, the material can contain air bubbles, which causes the porosity potentially negative for the thermal properties of the material. This work studies the thermal conductivity depending on the degree of silicone matrix filling by copper particles, introduced to improve thermal conductivity, and by air bubbles that are considered as reinforcing inclusions.

  13. Small bowel necrosis as a consequence of spontaneous deflation and migration of an air-filled intragastric balloon – a potentially life-threatening complication

    PubMed Central

    Drozdowski, Robert; Wyleżoł, Mariusz; Frączek, Mariusz; Hevelke, Piotr; Sobański, Paweł

    2013-01-01

    Intragastric balloon placement is a common method of treatment of obesity and is often used by non-surgical teams in endoscopy departments. The likelihood of spontaneous intragastric balloon damage is a well-known phenomenon. We describe a patient who was disqualified from surgical obesity treatment and in whom intragastric fluid-filled balloons had already been inserted twice and removed due to their intolerance. Therefore we qualified this patient for placement of the air-filled balloon Heliosphere BAG. Two months after the planned check-up, he arrived at the surgery department complaining of nausea and vomiting and due to symptoms of ileus diagnosed with an X-ray and ultrasound examination we qualified him for emergency surgery. We would like to emphasise the following issues: the necessity of air-filled balloon removal according to the producer's instructions and multidisciplinary specialist team care along with appropriate diagnostic tools in every case of intragastric balloon insertion. PMID:25097704

  14. On models of double porosity poroelastic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutin, Claude; Royer, Pascale

    2015-12-01

    This paper focuses on the modelling of fluid-filled poroelastic double porosity media under quasi-static and dynamic regimes. The double porosity model is derived from a two-scale homogenization procedure, by considering a medium locally characterized by blocks of poroelastic Biot microporous matrix and a surrounding system of fluid-filled macropores or fractures. The derived double porosity description is a two-pressure field poroelastic model with memory and viscoelastic effects. These effects result from the `time-dependent' interaction between the pressure fields in the two pore networks. It is shown that this homogenized double porosity behaviour arises when the characteristic time of consolidation in the microporous domain is of the same order of magnitude as the macroscopic characteristic time of transient regime. Conversely, single porosity behaviours occur when both timescales are clearly distinct. Moreover, it is established that the phenomenological approaches that postulate the coexistence of two pressure fields in `instantaneous' interaction only describe media with two pore networks separated by an interface flow barrier. Hence, they fail at predicting and reproducing the behaviour of usual double porosity media. Finally, the results are illustrated for the case of stratified media.

  15. Limitations of quantitative oculoplethysmography and of directional Doppler ultrasonography in cerebrovascular diagnosis: assessment of an air-filled OPG system.

    PubMed

    Ginsberg, M D; Greenwood, S A; Goldberg, H I

    1981-01-01

    500 consecutive patients were evaluated for extracranial disease of the internal carotid arteries by an automated, air-filled, digital oculoplethysmographic system (OPG) of the Kartchner type (Zira) and by supraorbital (SO) and supratrochlear (ST) directional Doppler ultrasonography. Cerebral arteriograms were performed in 58 patients (110 vessels), and OPG timing criteria for detecting hemodynamically significant carotid artery stenosis (60% or greater diameter reduction) were ascertained. Optimal criteria were a delay of one ocular pulse, relative to the other, of greater than 12 msec; and a delay of an ocular pulse, relative to the earlier ear (external carotid) pulse, of greater than 36 msec. These criteria correctly identified 73% of vessels with 0 to 59% stenosis and 76% of vessels with 60 to 100% stenosis. However, in 26% of the vessels, OPG was either inconclusive or inaccurate. Correct diagnosis of bilateral hemodynamically significant carotid artery stenoses was made by OPG in 6 of 9 affected patients. SO Doppler was normal in 70% of vessels with 0-59% stenosis, and abnormal in 75% of vessels with 60-100% stenosis. Corresponding percentages for ST Doppler were 95% and 44%. Abnormal Doppler responses to compression of contralateral facial branches were predictive of intracranial cross-collateralization in only 25% of patients. These results suggest that both quantitative OPG in its present form and directional Doppler studies have serious limitations as non-invasive diagnostic methods.

  16. Fabrication of dual porosity electrode structure

    DOEpatents

    Smith, J.L.; Kucera, E.H.

    1991-02-12

    A substantially entirely fibrous ceramic is described which may have dual porosity of both micro and macro pores. Total porosity may be 60-75% by volume. A method of spraying a slurry perpendicularly to an ambient stream of air is disclosed along with a method of removing binders without altering the fiber morphology. Adding fine ceramic particulates to the green ceramic fibers enhances the sintering characteristics of the fibers. 3 figures.

  17. Fabrication of dual porosity electrode structure

    DOEpatents

    Smith, James L.; Kucera, Eugenia H.

    1991-01-01

    A substantially entirely fibrous ceramic which may have dual porosity of both micro and macro pores. Total porosity may be 60-75% by volume. A method of spraying a slurry perpendicularly to an ambient stream of air is disclosed along with a method of removing binders without altering the fiber morphology. Adding fine ceramic particulates to the green ceramic fibers enhances the sintering characteristics of the fibers.

  18. Enhancement of fill factor in air-processed inverted organic solar cells using self-assembled monolayer of fullerene catechol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Il; Ogumi, Keisuke; Nakagawa, Takafumi; Matsuo, Yutaka

    2016-08-01

    [60]Fullerene catechol self-assembled monolayers were prepared and applied to inverted organic solar cells by an immersion method, and their energy conversion properties were measured. By introducing fullerenes at the surface, we improved the hole-blocking capability of electron-transporting metal oxide, as shown by the fill factor enhancement. The fullerene catechol-treated TiO x -containing device gave a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 2.81% with a fill factor of 0.56 while the non treated device gave a PCE of 2.46% with a fill factor of 0.49. The solar cell efficiency improved by 13% compared with the non treated reference device.

  19. Understanding the Relationship Between Filling Pattern and Part Quality in Die Casting

    SciTech Connect

    Jerald Brevick; R. Allen Miller

    2004-03-15

    The overall objective of this research project was to investigate phenomena involved in the filling of die cavities with molten alloy in the cold chamber die-casting process. It has long been recognized that the filling pattern of molten metal entering a die cavity influences the quality of die-cast parts. Filling pattern may be described as the progression of molten metal filling the die cavity geometry as a function of time. The location, size and geometric configuration of points of metal entry (gates), as well as the geometry of the casting cavity itself, have great influence on filling patterns. Knowledge of the anticipated filling patterns in die-castings is important for designers. Locating gates to avoid undesirable flow patterns that may entrap air in the casting is critical to casting quality - as locating vents to allow air to escape from the cavity (last places to fill). Casting quality attributes that are commonly flow related are non-fills, poor surface finish, internal porosity due to trapped air, cold shuts, cold laps, flow lines, casting skin delamination (flaking), and blistering during thermal treatment.

  20. Microparticles with hierarchical porosity

    SciTech Connect

    Petsev, Dimiter N; Atanassov, Plamen; Pylypenko, Svitlana; Carroll, Nick; Olson, Tim

    2012-12-18

    The present disclosure provides oxide microparticles with engineered hierarchical porosity and methods of manufacturing the same. Also described are structures that are formed by templating, impregnating, and/or precipitating the oxide microparticles and method for forming the same. Suitable applications include catalysts, electrocatalysts, electrocatalysts support materials, capacitors, drug delivery systems, sensors and chromatography.

  1. Evolution of porosity and geochemistry in Marcellus Formation black shale during weathering

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Lixin; Mathur, Ryan; Rother, Gernot; Cole, David; Bazilevskaya, Ekaterina; Williams, Jennifer; Carone, Alex; Brantley, Susan L

    2013-01-01

    Soils developed on the Oatka Creek member of the Marcellus Formation in Huntingdon, Pennsylvania were analyzed to understand the evolution of black shale matrix porosity and the associated changes in elemental and mineralogical composition during infiltration of water into organic-rich shale. Making the reasonable assumption that soil erosion rates are the same as those measured in a nearby location on a less organic-rich shale, we suggest that soil production rates have on average been faster for this black shale compared to the gray shale in similar climate settings. This difference is attributed to differences in composition: both shales are dominantly quartz, illite, and chlorite, but the Oatka Creek member at this location has more organic matter (1.25 wt% organic carbon in rock fragments recovered from the bottom of the auger cores and nearby outcrops) and accessory pyrite. During weathering, the extremely low-porosity bedrock slowly disaggregates into shale chips with intergranular pores and fractures. Some of these pores are either filled with organic matter or air-filled but remain unconnected, and thus inaccessible to water. Based on weathering bedrock/soil profiles, disintegration is initiated with oxidation of pyrite and organic matter, which increases the overall porosity and most importantly allows water penetration. Water infiltration exposes fresh surface area and thus promotes dissolution of plagioclase and clays. As these dissolution reactions proceed, the porosity in the deepest shale chips recovered from the soil decrease from 9 to 7 % while kaolinite and Fe oxyhydroxides precipitate. Eventually, near the land surface, mineral precipitation is outcompeted by dissolution or particle loss of illite and chlorite and porosity in shale chips increases to 20%. As imaged by computed tomographic analysis, weathering causes i) greater porosity, ii) greater average length of connected pores, and iii) a more branched pore network compared to the

  2. Liquids with permanent porosity.

    PubMed

    Giri, Nicola; Del Pópolo, Mario G; Melaugh, Gavin; Greenaway, Rebecca L; Rätzke, Klaus; Koschine, Tönjes; Pison, Laure; Gomes, Margarida F Costa; Cooper, Andrew I; James, Stuart L

    2015-11-12

    Porous solids such as zeolites and metal-organic frameworks are useful in molecular separation and in catalysis, but their solid nature can impose limitations. For example, liquid solvents, rather than porous solids, are the most mature technology for post-combustion capture of carbon dioxide because liquid circulation systems are more easily retrofitted to existing plants. Solid porous adsorbents offer major benefits, such as lower energy penalties in adsorption-desorption cycles, but they are difficult to implement in conventional flow processes. Materials that combine the properties of fluidity and permanent porosity could therefore offer technological advantages, but permanent porosity is not associated with conventional liquids. Here we report free-flowing liquids whose bulk properties are determined by their permanent porosity. To achieve this, we designed cage molecules that provide a well-defined pore space and that are highly soluble in solvents whose molecules are too large to enter the pores. The concentration of unoccupied cages can thus be around 500 times greater than in other molecular solutions that contain cavities, resulting in a marked change in bulk properties, such as an eightfold increase in the solubility of methane gas. Our results provide the basis for development of a new class of functional porous materials for chemical processes, and we present a one-step, multigram scale-up route for highly soluble 'scrambled' porous cages prepared from a mixture of commercially available reagents. The unifying design principle for these materials is the avoidance of functional groups that can penetrate into the molecular cage cavities. PMID:26560299

  3. Quantification of VX vapor in ambient air by liquid chromatography isotope dilution tandem mass spectrometric analysis of glass bead filled sampling tubes.

    PubMed

    Evans, Ronald A; Smith, Wendy L; Nguyen, Nam-Phuong; Crouse, Kathy L; Crouse, Charles L; Norman, Steven D; Jakubowski, E Michael

    2011-02-15

    An analysis method has been developed for determining low parts-per-quadrillion by volume (ppqv) concentrations of nerve agent VX vapor actively sampled from ambient air. The method utilizes glass bead filled depot area air monitoring system (DAAMS) sampling tubes with isopropyl alcohol extraction and isotope dilution using liquid chromatography coupled with a triple-quadrupole mass spectrometer (LC/MS/MS) with positive ion electrospray ionization for quantitation. The dynamic range was from one-tenth of the worker population limit (WPL) to the short-term exposure limit (STEL) for a 24 L air sample taken over a 1 h period. The precision and accuracy of the method were evaluated using liquid-spiked tubes, and the collection characteristics of the DAAMS tubes were assessed by collecting trace level vapor generated in a 1000 L continuous flow chamber. The method described here has significant improvements over currently employed thermal desorption techniques that utilize a silver fluoride pad during sampling to convert VX to a higher volatility G-analogue for gas chromatographic analysis. The benefits of this method are the ability to directly analyze VX with improved selectivity and sensitivity, the injection of a fraction of the extract, quantitation using an isotopically labeled internal standard, and a short instrument cycle time.

  4. Porosity in polysilsesquioxane xerogels

    SciTech Connect

    LOY,DOUGLAS A.; SCHNEIDER,DUANE A.; BAUGHER,BRIGITTA M.; RAHIMIAN,KAMYAR

    2000-05-09

    Polysilsesquioxanes, [RSiO{sub 1.5}]{sub n} are a class of hybrid organic-inorganic materials in which silicon atoms are linked with up to three siloxane bonds to other monomer units in the polymer and the organic group is a pendent functionality. Polysilsesquioxanes are prepared by the hydrolysis and condensation of organotrialkoxysilanes (Scheme l). Organotrialkoxysilanes RSi(OR{prime}){sub 3}, have been extensively used as coupling agents for composites or surface treatments for materials. Polysilsesquioxanes have become increasingly popular for generating specialty coatings such as low k dielectric materials for microelectronic applications. While there is extensive information on the formation of polysilsesquioxanes, there has not been a survey of the ability of organotrialkoxysilanes to form gels until recently. The formation of polysilsesquioxanes gels has been shown to be very sensitive to the nature of the organic group. Many monomers will only form soluble oligomers or polymers upon hydrolysis and condensation, even when the reaction is conducted solvent-free with neat monomer and aqueous catalyst. Furthermore, there is little information concerning the influence of the organic group, R, on the porosity of the polysilsesquioxanes gels that are formed. In this paper the authors describe the preparation of polysilsesquioxane gels where R = H, methyl, ethyl, cyanoethyl, vinyl, dodecyl, hexadecyl, octadecyl, chloromethyl, and chloromethylphenyl, and the characterization of the porosity of the respective xerogels. Gels were prepared from the hydrolysis and condensation of organotrimethoxysilanes, RSi(OEt){sub 3}, and organotriethoxy-silanes, RSi(OEt){sub 3}.

  5. Porosity in Polysilsesquioxane Xerolgels

    SciTech Connect

    Baugher, B.M.; Loy, D.A.; Rahimian, K.

    1999-08-17

    Polymerization of organotrialkoxysilanes is a convenient method for introducing organic functionality into hybrid organic-inorganic materials. However, not much is known about the effects of the organic substituent on the porosity of the resulting xerogels. In this study, we prepared a series of polysilsesquioxane xerogels from organotrialkoxysilanes, RSi(OR{sup 1}){sub 3}, with different organic groups (R = H, Me, Et dodecyl, hexadecyl, octadecyl, vinyl, chloromethyl, (p-chloromethyl) phenyl, cyanoethyl). Polymerizations of the monomers were carried out under a variety of conditions, varying monomer concentration, type of catalyst, and alkoxide substituent. The effect of the organic substituent on the sol-gel process was often dramatic. In many cases, gels were formed only at very high monomer concentration and/or with only one type of catalyst. All of the gels were processed as xerogels and characterized by scanning electron microscopy and nitrogen sorption porosimetry to evaluate their pore structure.

  6. Evolution of porosity and geochemistry in Marcellus Formation black shale during weathering

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Lixin; Ryan, Mathur; Rother, Gernot; Cole, David; Bazilevskaya, Ekaterina; Williams, Jennifer; Alex, Carone; Brantley, S. L.

    2013-01-01

    Soils developed on the Oatka Creek member of the Marcellus Formation in Huntingdon, Pennsylvania were analyzed to understand the evolution of black shale matrix porosity and the associated changes in elemental and mineralogical composition during infiltration of water into organic-rich shale. Making the reasonable assumption that soil erosion rates are the same as those measured in a nearby location on a less organic-rich shale, we suggest that soil production rates have on average been faster for this black shale compared to the gray shale in similar climate settings. This difference is attributed to differences in composition: both shales are dominantly quartz, illite, and chlorite, but the Oatka Creek member at this location has more organic matter (1.25 wt.% organic carbon in rock fragments recovered from the bottom of the auger cores and nearby outcrops) and accessory pyrite. During weathering, the extremely low-porosity bedrock slowly disaggregates into shale chips with intergranular pores and fractures. Some of these pores are eitherfilled with organic matter or air-filled but remain unconnected, and thus inaccessible to water. Based on weathering bedrock/soil profiles, disintegration is initiated with oxidation of pyrite and organic matter, which increases the overall porosity and most importantly allows water penetration. Water infiltration exposes fresh surface area and thus promotes dissolution of plagioclase and clays. As these dissolution reactions proceed, the porosity in the deepest shale chips recovered from the soil decrease from 9 to 7% while kaolinite and Fe oxyhydroxides precipitate. Eventually, near the land surface, mineral precipitation is outcompeted by dissolution or particle loss of illite and chlorite and porosity in shale chips increases to 20%. As imaged by computed tomographic analysis, weathering causes i) greater porosity, ii) greater average length of connected pores, and iii) a more branched pore network compared to the unweathered

  7. Mechanistic Effects of Porosity on Structural Composite Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siver, Andrew

    As fiber reinforced composites continue to gain popularity as primary structures in aerospace, automotive, and powersports industries, quality control becomes an extremely important aspect of materials and mechanical engineering. The ability to recognize and control manufacturing induced defects can greatly reduce the likelihood of unexpected catastrophic failure. Porosity is the result of trapped volatiles or air bubbles during the layup process and can significantly compromise the strength of fiber reinforced composites. A comprehensive study was performed on an AS4C-UF3352 TCR carbon fiber-epoxy prepreg system to determine the effect of porosity on flexural, shear, low-velocity impact, and damage residual strength properties. Autoclave cure pressure was controlled to induce varying levels of porosity to construct six laminates with porosity concentrations between 0-40%. Porosity concentrations were measured using several destructive and nondestructive techniques including resin burnoff, sectioning and optical analysis, and X-ray computed tomography (CT) scanning. Ultrasonic transmission, thermography, and CT scanning provided nondestructive imaging to evaluate impact damage. A bilinear relationship accurately characterizes the change in mechanical properties with increasing porosity. Strength properties are relatively unaffected when porosity concentrations are below approximately 2.25% and decrease linearly by up to 40% in high porosity specimens.

  8. Causes and remedies for porosity in composite manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernlund, G.; Wells, J.; Fahrang, L.; Kay, J.; Poursartip, A.

    2016-07-01

    Porosity is a challenge in virtually all composite processes but in particular in low pressure processes such as out of autoclave processing of prepregs, where the maximum pressure is one atmosphere. This paper discusses the physics behind important transport phenomena that control porosity and how we can use our understanding of the underlying science to develop strategies to achieve low porosity for these materials and processes in an industrial setting. A three step approach is outlined that addresses and discusses: gas evacuation of trapped air, volatiles and off-gassing, and resin infiltration of evacuated void space.

  9. Thermoelectric materials having porosity

    SciTech Connect

    Heremans, Joseph P.; Jaworski, Christopher M.; Jovovic, Vladimir; Harris, Fred

    2014-08-05

    A thermoelectric material and a method of making a thermoelectric material are provided. In certain embodiments, the thermoelectric material comprises at least 10 volume percent porosity. In some embodiments, the thermoelectric material has a zT greater than about 1.2 at a temperature of about 375 K. In some embodiments, the thermoelectric material comprises a topological thermoelectric material. In some embodiments, the thermoelectric material comprises a general composition of (Bi.sub.1-xSb.sub.x).sub.u(Te.sub.1-ySe.sub.y).sub.w, wherein 0.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.1, 0.ltoreq.y.ltoreq.1, 1.8.ltoreq.u.ltoreq.2.2, 2.8.ltoreq.w.ltoreq.3.2. In further embodiments, the thermoelectric material includes a compound having at least one group IV element and at least one group VI element. In certain embodiments, the method includes providing a powder comprising a thermoelectric composition, pressing the powder, and sintering the powder to form the thermoelectric material.

  10. Air

    MedlinePlus

    ... do to protect yourself from dirty air . Indoor air pollution and outdoor air pollution Air can be polluted indoors and it can ... this chart to see what things cause indoor air pollution and what things cause outdoor air pollution! Indoor ...

  11. Xiphinema americanum as Affected by Soil Organic Matter and Porosity.

    PubMed

    Ponchillia, P E

    1972-07-01

    The effects of four soil types, soil porosity, particle size, and organic matter were tested on survival and migration of Xiphinema americanum. Survival and migration were significantly greater in silt loam than in clay loam and silty clay soils. Nematode numbers were significantly greater in softs planted with soybeans than in fallow softs. Nematode survival was greatest at the higher of two pore space levels in four softs. Migration of X. americanum through soft particle size fractions of 75-150, 150-250, 250-500, 500-700, and 700-1,000 mu was significantly greater in the middle three fractions, with the least occurring in the smallest fraction. Additions of muck to silt loam and loamy sand soils resulted in reductions in survival and migration of the nematode. The fulvic acid fraction of muck, extracted with sodium hydroxide, had a deleterious effect on nematode activity. I conclude that soils with small amounts of air-filled pore space, extremes in pore size, or high organic matter content are deleterious to the migration and survival of X. americanum, and that a naturally occurring toxin affecting this species may be present in native soft organic matter.

  12. Rechargeability of Li-air cathodes pre-filled with discharge products using an ether-based electrolyte solution: implications for cycle-life of Li-air cells.

    PubMed

    Meini, Stefano; Tsiouvaras, Nikolaos; Schwenke, K Uta; Piana, Michele; Beyer, Hans; Lange, Lukas; Gasteiger, Hubert A

    2013-07-21

    The instability of currently used electrolyte solutions and of the carbon support during charge-discharge in non-aqueous lithium-oxygen cells can lead to discharge products other than the desired Li2O2, such as Li2CO3, which is believed to reduce cycle-life. Similarly, discharge in an O2 atmosphere which contains H2O and CO2 impurities would lead to LiOH and Li2CO3 discharge products. In this work we therefore investigate the rechargeability of model cathodes pre-filled with four possible Li-air cell discharge products, namely Li2O2, Li2CO3, LiOH, and Li2O. Using Online Electrochemical Mass Spectrometry (OEMS), we determined the charge voltages and the gases evolved upon charge of pre-filled electrodes, thus determining the reversibility of the formation/electrooxidation reactions. We show that Li2O2 is the only reversible discharge product in ether-based electrolyte solutions, and that the formation of Li2CO3, LiOH, or Li2O is either irreversible and/or reacts with the electrolyte solution or the carbon during its oxidation.

  13. Rechargeability of Li-air cathodes pre-filled with discharge products using an ether-based electrolyte solution: implications for cycle-life of Li-air cells.

    PubMed

    Meini, Stefano; Tsiouvaras, Nikolaos; Schwenke, K Uta; Piana, Michele; Beyer, Hans; Lange, Lukas; Gasteiger, Hubert A

    2013-07-21

    The instability of currently used electrolyte solutions and of the carbon support during charge-discharge in non-aqueous lithium-oxygen cells can lead to discharge products other than the desired Li2O2, such as Li2CO3, which is believed to reduce cycle-life. Similarly, discharge in an O2 atmosphere which contains H2O and CO2 impurities would lead to LiOH and Li2CO3 discharge products. In this work we therefore investigate the rechargeability of model cathodes pre-filled with four possible Li-air cell discharge products, namely Li2O2, Li2CO3, LiOH, and Li2O. Using Online Electrochemical Mass Spectrometry (OEMS), we determined the charge voltages and the gases evolved upon charge of pre-filled electrodes, thus determining the reversibility of the formation/electrooxidation reactions. We show that Li2O2 is the only reversible discharge product in ether-based electrolyte solutions, and that the formation of Li2CO3, LiOH, or Li2O is either irreversible and/or reacts with the electrolyte solution or the carbon during its oxidation. PMID:23748698

  14. Impermeable high-porosity magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heap, Michael; Vona, Alessandro; Kolzenburg, Stephan; Ryan, Amy; Russell, Kelly

    2016-04-01

    Magma vesiculation (i.e., porosity increase) is the consequence of decompression-driven volatile release during ascent and/or heating. The ease at which these exsolved volatiles can escape is thought to strongly impact volcanic explosivity. Permeability is usually considered to increase as a function of porosity. High and low porosity are typically associated with high and low permeability, respectively. Here we present permeability experiments on foamed natural rhyolitic melts containing total porosities from 0.12 to 0.65; we compliment these data with measurements on synthetic foamed glasses (prepared by FOAMGLAS®) that contain a total porosity of 0.9. The rhyolitic melts (from Krafla, Iceland: Tg = 690 °C) were kept at atmospheric pressure and 1000 °C for 0.5, 1, 2, and 4 hours, followed by quenching. The four experiments yielded total porosities of 0.12, 0.44, 0.51, and 0.65, respectively. The permeability of these samples was then measured using a steady-state, benchtop permeameter under a confining pressure of 1 MPa. The permeability of the foamed samples containing a porosity of 0.12 and 0.44 were not measurable in our system, meaning their permeabilities are lower than ~10-18 m2. The permeability of the samples containing a porosity of 0.51 and 0.65 were 8.7 × 10-15 and 1.0 × 10-15 m2, respectively. Both types of FOAMGLAS® - containing a porosity of 0.9 - also have permeabilities lower than ~10-18 m2. Our study highlights that highly porous magmas are not necessarily permeable due to the absence of a connected network of pores. These data suggest that (1) the percolation threshold for magma requires further thought and, (2) that the liberation of exsolved volatiles will require the fracturing of bubble walls to connect the network of pores within the magma.

  15. Data Qualification Report: Calculated Porosity and Porosity-Derived Values for Lithostratigraphic Units for use on the Yucca Mountain Project

    SciTech Connect

    P. Sanchez

    2001-05-30

    The qualification is being completed in accordance with the Data Qualification Plan DQP-NBS-GS-000006, Rev. 00 (CRWMS M&O 2001). The purpose of this data qualification activity is to evaluate for qualification the unqualified developed input and porosity output included in Data Tracking Number (DTN) M09910POROCALC.000. The main output of the analyses documented in DTN M09910POROCALC.000 is the calculated total porosity and effective porosity for 40 Yucca Mountain Project boreholes. The porosity data are used as input to Analysis Model Report (AMR) 10040, ''Rock Properties Model'' (MDL-NBS-GS-000004, Rev. 00), Interim Change Notice [ICN] 02 (CRWMS M&O 2000b). The output from the rock properties model is used as input to numerical physical-process modeling within the context of a relationship developed in the AMR between hydraulic conductivity, bound water and zeolitic zones for use in the unsaturated zone model. In accordance with procedure AP-3.15Q, the porosity output is not used in the direct calculation of Principal Factors for post-closure safety or disruptive events. The original source for DTN M09910POROCALC.000 is a Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) Management and Operating Contractor (M&O) report, ''Combined Porosity from Geophysical Logs'' (CRWMS M&O 1999a and hereafter referred to as Rael 1999). That report recalculated porosity results for both the historical boreholes covered in Nelson (1996), and the modern boreholes reported in CRWMS M&O (1996a,b). The porosity computations in Rael (1999) are based on density-porosity mathematical relationships requiring various input parameters, including bulk density, matrix density and air and/or fluid density and volumetric water content. The main output is computed total porosity and effective porosity reported on a foot-by-foot basis for each borehole, although volumetric water content is derived from neutron data as an interim output. This qualification report uses technical assessment and

  16. Dual porosity gas evolving electrode

    DOEpatents

    Townsend, Carl W.

    1994-01-01

    A dual porosity electrode for use in thermoelectrochemical systems where simultaneous transport of gas and liquid into and/or out of the electrode is required. The electrode includes catalytic electrode particles having diameters ranging from about 25 to 100 angstroms. The catalytic electrode particles are anchored to a support network in clusters which have internal pores ranging in size from 25 to 100 angstroms. The pores between the clusters range in size from between about 1 to 20 microns. A method for making the dual porosity electrodes is also disclosed.

  17. Dual porosity gas evolving electrode

    DOEpatents

    Townsend, C.W.

    1994-11-15

    A dual porosity electrode is described for use in thermoelectrochemical systems where simultaneous transport of gas and liquid into and/or out of the electrode is required. The electrode includes catalytic electrode particles having diameters ranging from about 25 to 100 angstroms. The catalytic electrode particles are anchored to a support network in clusters which have internal pores ranging in size from 25 to 100 angstroms. The pores between the clusters range in size from between about 1 to 20 microns. A method for making the dual porosity electrodes is also disclosed.

  18. Nanoscale porosity in SAFOD core samples (San Andreas Fault)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janssen, Christoph; Wirth, Richard; Reinicke, Andreas; Rybacki, Erik; Naumann, Rudolf; Wenk, Hans-Rudolf; Dresen, Georg

    2011-01-01

    With transmission electron microscopy (TEM) we observed nanometer-sized pores in four ultracataclastic and fractured core samples recovered from different depths of the main bore hole of the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD). Cutting of foils with a focused ion beam technique (FIB) allowed identifying porosity down to the nm scale. Between 40 and 50% of all pores could be identified as in-situ pores without any damage related to sample preparation. The total porosity estimated from TEM micrographs (1-5%) is comparable to the connected fault rock porosity (2.8-6.7%) estimated by pressure-induced injection of mercury. Permeability estimates for cataclastic fault rocks are 10- 21-10- 19 m2 and 10- 17 m2 for the fractured fault rock. Porosity and permeability are independent of sample depth. TEM images reveal that the porosity is intimately linked to fault rock composition and associated with deformation. The TEM-estimated porosity of the samples increases with increasing clay content. The highest porosity was estimated in the vicinity of an active fault trace. The largest pores with an equivalent radius > 200 nm occur around large quartz and feldspar grains or grain-fragments while the smallest pores (equivalent radius < 50 nm) are typically observed in the extremely fine-grained matrix (grain size < 1 μm). Based on pore morphology we distinguish different pore types varying with fault rock fabric and alteration. The pores were probably filled with formation water and/or hydrothermal fluids at elevated pore fluid pressure, preventing pore collapse. The pore geometry derived from TEM observations and BET (Brunauer, Emmett and Teller) gas adsorption/desorption hysteresis curves indicates pore blocking effects in the fine-grained matrix. Observations of isolated pores in TEM micrographs and high pore body to pore throat ratios inferred from mercury injection suggest elevated pore fluid pressure in the low permeability cataclasites, reducing shear strength

  19. Spatially resolved measurement of rock core porosity.

    PubMed

    Marica, F; Chen, Q; Hamilton, A; Hall, C; Al, T; Balcom, B J

    2006-01-01

    Density weighted, centric scan, Conical SPRITE MRI techniques are applied in the current work for local porosity measurements in fluid saturated porous media. The methodology is tested on a series of sandstone core samples. These samples vary in both porosity and degree of local heterogeneity due to bedding plane structure. The MRI porosity measurement is in good agreement with traditional gravimetric measurements of porosity. Spatially resolved porosity measurements reveal significant porosity variation in some samples. This novel MRI technique should have applications to the characterization of local porosity in a wide variety of porous media. PMID:16216540

  20. Spatially resolved measurement of rock core porosity.

    PubMed

    Marica, F; Chen, Q; Hamilton, A; Hall, C; Al, T; Balcom, B J

    2006-01-01

    Density weighted, centric scan, Conical SPRITE MRI techniques are applied in the current work for local porosity measurements in fluid saturated porous media. The methodology is tested on a series of sandstone core samples. These samples vary in both porosity and degree of local heterogeneity due to bedding plane structure. The MRI porosity measurement is in good agreement with traditional gravimetric measurements of porosity. Spatially resolved porosity measurements reveal significant porosity variation in some samples. This novel MRI technique should have applications to the characterization of local porosity in a wide variety of porous media.

  1. Filling agents.

    PubMed

    Glavas, Ioannis P

    2005-06-01

    Injectable fillers have become an important component of minimally invasive facial rejuvenation modalities. Their ease of use, effectiveness, low morbidity, and fast results with minimal downtime are factors that have made them popular among patients. Soft tissue augmentation has evolved to a unique combination of medicine and art. A wide selection of available agents and new products, each one with unique properties, may be used alone or in combination. The physician acquires the tools to rebalance facial characteristics not only by filling wrinkles but also by having the ability to shape the face and restore bony contours and lines. Careful selection of candidates, realistic expectations, and an understanding of the limitations of fillers are crucial for a successful result.

  2. The Porosity of 433 Eros

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britt, D. T.; Yeomans, Donald K.; Consolmagno, G. J.

    2001-01-01

    Data from the NEAR mission show the bulk density of 433 Eros is 2.67 g/cm 3 . Given an L or LL composition, the bulk porosity of Eros is in the range of 25-29% and the macroporosity is 14-18%. This is consistent with a fractured, but coherent asteroid. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  3. Optimization of High Porosity Thermal Barrier Coatings Generated with a Porosity Former

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medřický, Jan; Curry, Nicholas; Pala, Zdenek; Vilemova, Monika; Chraska, Tomas; Johansson, Jimmy; Markocsan, Nicolaie

    2015-04-01

    Yttria-stabilized zirconia thermal barrier coatings are extensively used in turbine industry; however, increasing performance requirements have begun to make conventional air plasma sprayed coatings insufficient for future needs. Since the thermal conductivity of bulk material cannot be lowered easily; the design of highly porous coatings may be the most efficient way to achieve coatings with low thermal conductivity. Thus the approach of fabrication of coatings with a high porosity level based on plasma spraying of ceramic particles of dysprosia-stabilized zirconia mixed with polymer particles, has been tested. Both polymer and ceramic particles melt in plasma and after impact onto a substrate they form a coating. When the coating is subjected to heat treatment, polymer burns out and a complex structure of pores and cracks is formed. In order to obtain desired porosity level and microstructural features in coatings; a design of experiments, based on changes in spray distance, powder feeding rate, and plasma-forming atmosphere, was performed. Acquired coatings were evaluated for thermal conductivity and thermo-cyclic fatigue, and their morphology was assessed using scanning electron microscopy. It was shown that porosity level can be controlled by appropriate changes in spraying parameters.

  4. Measurement of the open porosity of agricultural soils with acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luong, Jeanne; Mercatoris, Benoit; Destain, Marie-France

    2015-04-01

    soil, since there are more voids filled with air and water, increasing the viscous losses. Fellah et al. (2003) showed that porosity can be determined from phase speed and reflection coefficient. The propagation of acoustic waves in soil is investigated to develop a rapid method for the quantification of the porosity level of agricultural soils. In the present contribution, correlations are determined between the acoustic signatures of agricultural soil in function of its structural properties. In laboratory, compression tests are performed on unsaturated soil samples to reproduce different porosity levels. Ultrasonic pulses are sent through the considered samples. The propagated signals are treated in both time and frequency domains in order to determine the speed of the phase velocity and the reflection. Porosity is then determined and compared with water content measured by gravimetric method. Alaoui, A., Lipiec, J. & Gerke, H.H., 2011. A review of the changes in the soil pore system due to soil deformation: A hydrodynamic perspective. Soil and Tillage Research, 115-116, pp.1-15. Fellah Z.E.A., Berger S., Lauriks W., Depollier C., Aristegui C., Chapelon J.Y., 2003. Measuring the porosity and the tortuosity of porous materials via reflected waves at oblique incidence. The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 113 (5), pp 2424-2433 Hamza, M.A. & Anderson, W.K., 2005. Soil compaction in cropping systems. Soil and Tillage Research, 82(2), pp.121-145. Lu, Z., 2005. Role of hysteresis in propagating acousitcs waves in soils. Geophysical Research Letter, pp.32:1-4. Lu, Z., Hickey, C.J. & Sabatier, J.M., 2004. Effects of compaction on the acoustic velocity in soils. Soil Science Society of America Journal, 68(1), pp.7-16. Lu, Z. & Sabatier, J.M., 2009. Effects of soil water potential and moisture content on sound speed. Soil Science Society of America Journal, 73(5), pp.1614-1625. Le Maitre, D.C., Kotzee, I.M. & O'Farrell, P.J., 2014. Impacts of land-cover change on

  5. Measurement of the open porosity of agricultural soils with acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luong, Jeanne; Mercatoris, Benoit; Destain, Marie-France

    2015-04-01

    soil, since there are more voids filled with air and water, increasing the viscous losses. Fellah et al. (2003) showed that porosity can be determined from phase speed and reflection coefficient. The propagation of acoustic waves in soil is investigated to develop a rapid method for the quantification of the porosity level of agricultural soils. In the present contribution, correlations are determined between the acoustic signatures of agricultural soil in function of its structural properties. In laboratory, compression tests are performed on unsaturated soil samples to reproduce different porosity levels. Ultrasonic pulses are sent through the considered samples. The propagated signals are treated in both time and frequency domains in order to determine the speed of the phase velocity and the reflection. Porosity is then determined and compared with water content measured by gravimetric method. Alaoui, A., Lipiec, J. & Gerke, H.H., 2011. A review of the changes in the soil pore system due to soil deformation: A hydrodynamic perspective. Soil and Tillage Research, 115-116, pp.1-15. Fellah Z.E.A., Berger S., Lauriks W., Depollier C., Aristegui C., Chapelon J.Y., 2003. Measuring the porosity and the tortuosity of porous materials via reflected waves at oblique incidence. The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 113 (5), pp 2424-2433 Hamza, M.A. & Anderson, W.K., 2005. Soil compaction in cropping systems. Soil and Tillage Research, 82(2), pp.121-145. Lu, Z., 2005. Role of hysteresis in propagating acousitcs waves in soils. Geophysical Research Letter, pp.32:1-4. Lu, Z., Hickey, C.J. & Sabatier, J.M., 2004. Effects of compaction on the acoustic velocity in soils. Soil Science Society of America Journal, 68(1), pp.7-16. Lu, Z. & Sabatier, J.M., 2009. Effects of soil water potential and moisture content on sound speed. Soil Science Society of America Journal, 73(5), pp.1614-1625. Le Maitre, D.C., Kotzee, I.M. & O'Farrell, P.J., 2014. Impacts of land-cover change on

  6. Porosity/bubble formation mechanism in laser surface enamelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhter, R.; Li, L.; Edwards, R. E.; Gale, A. W.

    2003-03-01

    The grouts between commercial tiles applied to walls and floors can be contaminated over time and normally have to be removed by manual or mechanical processes. To overcome the contamination problem, a specially developed tile grout was used to fill the voids between the tiles. The base filler was overlaid with an enamel surface that glazes after laser irradiation. One problem discovered in this work is that bubbles and porosities were formed after laser treatment. The use of water glass (sodium silicate) as a binder has been undertaken in this study. This paper investigates the mechanism of bubble formation and its effects on the enamel surface. It has been found that the CO 2 gas released during the reaction causes bubble formation. The results and the technique for the removal of bubbles/porosities are presented in the paper.

  7. Porosity and mechanical properties of zirconium ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buyakova, S.; Sablina, T.; Kulkov, S.

    2015-11-01

    Has been studied a porous ceramics obtained from ultra-fine powders. Porous ceramic ZrO2(MgO), ZrO2(Y2O3) powder was prepared by pressing and subsequent sintering of compacts homologous temperatures ranging from 0.63 to 0.56 during the isothermal holding duration of 1 to 5 hours. The porosity of ceramic samples was from 15 to 80%. The structure of the ceramic materials produced from plasma-sprayed ZrO2 powder was represented as a system of cell and rod structure elements. Cellular structure formed by stacking hollow powder particles can be easily seen at the images of fracture surfaces of obtained ceramics. There were three types of pores in ceramics: large cellular hollow spaces, small interparticle pores which are not filled with powder particles and the smallest pores in the shells of cells. The cells generally did not have regular shapes. The size of the interior of the cells many times exceeded the thickness of the walls which was a single-layer packing of ZrO2 grains. A distinctive feature of all deformation diagrams obtained in the experiment was their nonlinearity at low deformations which was described by the parabolic law. It was shown that the observed nonlinear elasticity for low deformation on deformation diagrams is due to mechanical instability of the cellular elements in the ceramic carcass.

  8. Porosity and mechanical properties of zirconium ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Buyakova, S. Kulkov, S.; Sablina, T.

    2015-11-17

    Has been studied a porous ceramics obtained from ultra-fine powders. Porous ceramic ZrO{sub 2}(MgO), ZrO{sub 2}(Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}) powder was prepared by pressing and subsequent sintering of compacts homologous temperatures ranging from 0.63 to 0.56 during the isothermal holding duration of 1 to 5 hours. The porosity of ceramic samples was from 15 to 80%. The structure of the ceramic materials produced from plasma-sprayed ZrO{sub 2} powder was represented as a system of cell and rod structure elements. Cellular structure formed by stacking hollow powder particles can be easily seen at the images of fracture surfaces of obtained ceramics. There were three types of pores in ceramics: large cellular hollow spaces, small interparticle pores which are not filled with powder particles and the smallest pores in the shells of cells. The cells generally did not have regular shapes. The size of the interior of the cells many times exceeded the thickness of the walls which was a single-layer packing of ZrO{sub 2} grains. A distinctive feature of all deformation diagrams obtained in the experiment was their nonlinearity at low deformations which was described by the parabolic law. It was shown that the observed nonlinear elasticity for low deformation on deformation diagrams is due to mechanical instability of the cellular elements in the ceramic carcass.

  9. Microcomputed tomographic comparison of posterior composite resin restorative techniques: sonicated bulk fill versus incremental fill.

    PubMed

    Jarisch, Justin; Lien, Wen; Guevara, Peter H; Greenwood, William J; Dunn, William J

    2016-01-01

    Sonication technology has recently been touted to decrease composite viscosity during delivery and may allow better cavity preparation adaptation and minimize voids. The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the difference between conventional, hand-placed, incremental application of a standard hybrid resin-based composite (RBC) and sonicated application of a bulk-fill RBC in box-type and cylindrical cavity preparations. Experimental restorations were fabricated using molds of box-type or cylindrical preparations. For bulk-filled specimens, a single compule of bulk-fill composite was dispensed with a sonic handpiece. The conventional hybrid material was placed in 3 increments (2 mm, 2 mm, and 1 mm). Microfocus x-ray computed tomography was used to analyze voids for percentage and total volume porosity as well as number of actual pores. An analysis of variance indicated that RBC restorations that were applied to cylindrical cavities using a sonicated bulk-filled application method exhibited significantly less porosity (1.42%; P < 0.001) than incrementally placed cylindrical restorations (2.87%); sonicated bulk-filled, cube-shaped restorations (3.12%); and incrementally placed cube-shaped restorations (5.16%). When the groups were subcategorized into the specific characteristics of shape (cube vs cylinder) and application method (bulk vs incremental), the cylindrical group, which included both bulk-filled and incrementally placed specimens, demonstrated significantly less porosity (2.00%; P < 0.001) than other groups. Restorations that were incrementally placed into cube-shaped cavities produced the largest amount of porosity. PMID:27599276

  10. COMPARISON OF 24H AVERAGE VOC MONITORING RESULTS FOR RESIDENTIAL INDOOR AND OUTDOOR AIR USING CARBOPACK X-FILLED DIFFUSIVE SAMPLERS AND ACTIVE SAMPLING - A PILOT STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Analytical results obtained by thermal desorption GC/MS for 24h diffusive sampling of 11 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are compared with results of time-averaged active sampling at a known constant flow rate. Air samples were collected with co-located duplicate diffusive samp...

  11. Brief exposure of air-filled guinea-pig isolated trachea to low levels of toluene diisocyanate (TDI) vapor in vitro increases reactivity to methacholine.

    PubMed

    Huang, J; Frazer, D G; Millecchia, L L; Fedan, J S

    1997-12-26

    Toluene diisocyanate (TDI) causes occupational asthma characterized by inflammation and hyperreactivity of airways to irritants and bronchoconstrictor drugs. We examined the non-immune, direct effect of TDI on airway reactivity in vitro in the absence of an inflammatory response using the guinea-pig isolated, perfused trachea preparation to measure reactivity to methacholine (MCh), and fixed point ion mobility spectrometry to measure moment to moment levels of TDI vapor in air that was delivered to the tracheal mucosa. MCh was added to the mucosal modified Krebs-Henseleit (MKH) perfusing solution to generate control concentration-response curves for contractile responses. The lumen was then emptied and perfused with air or air containing 5, 20 or 70 ppb TDI vapor, after which the trachea was perfused with MKH solution and reactivity to MCh was re-examined. After only 30 min of treatment, TDI vapor concentration-dependently increased reactivity of the trachea to MCh (2.4- and 2.9-fold, respectively, for 20 and 70 ppb TDI; 5 ppb TDI and air alone had no effect). In tracheas treated in vitro with 2 microM capsaicin to deplete tachykinins, TDI caused the same (4-fold) increase in reactivity to MCh that was observed in control tracheas. However, TDI vapor (70 ppb) no longer enhanced reactivity to MCh in tracheas from which the epithelium had been removed. Our results indicate that a direct, non-immune, non-inflammatory action of TDI on respiratory epithelium leads to hyperreactivity of airways in vitro. PMID:9457998

  12. Thermal properties of heterogeneous granular materials - control of grain porosity,packing porosity, and paste-phase -

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurita, K.; Iwasaki, A.; Toyota, T.; Baratoux, D.

    2010-12-01

    more evident for polydispersed samples than monodispersed ones, which indicates the conductivity is controlled by increasing number of contact points between grains. Under vacuum the conductivity decreases depending on the grain size, which completely follows the model (Piqueux and Christensen 2009 ) . An interesting crossover occurs: the sample with higher grain porosity and larger grain size has a similar value as the sample with lower grain porosity and smaller grain size around 1000Pa. Similar crossover also occurs in polydispersed samples. On the surface of Mars ice phase can condensate/sublimate in the surface granular layer. This process is proposed to critically control the thermal conductivity (Presley et al 2009,Piqueux and Christensen 2009) because it fills the space around grain contacts and it increases/decreases contact area. To see this effect we add soft agar to glass beads sample as an analog of ice phase. Agar is easily deformable material which glues contact points well. Small addition is found to increase the conductivity largely, which confirms this effect. We consider this should play a significant role in controlling thermal inertia value on the surface of Mars, thermal inertia feedback.

  13. Porosity in metal-organic framework glasses.

    PubMed

    Thornton, A W; Jelfs, K E; Konstas, K; Doherty, C M; Hill, A J; Cheetham, A K; Bennett, T D

    2016-03-01

    The porosity of a glass formed by melt-quenching a metal-organic framework, has been characterized by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy. The results reveal porosity intermediate between the related open and dense crystalline frameworks ZIF-4 and ZIF-zni. A structural model for the glass was constructed using an amorphous polymerization algorithm, providing additional insight into the gas-inaccessible nature of porosity and the possible applications of hybrid glasses.

  14. Porosity determination of thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Roode, Mark; Beardsley, Brad

    1988-01-01

    Coating porosity is believed to be a critical factor for the thermal conductivity of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs). A number of different techniques have been used to determine the porosities of thermal barrier coatings for diesel applications as part of a NASA/DOE sponsored study. A comparison is made between methods based on water immersion, optical microscopy, eddy current thickness measurements, and Archimedes principle for TBC porosity determination.

  15. Estimation of Fracture Porosity in an Unsaturated Fractured Welded Tuff Using Gas Tracer Testing

    SciTech Connect

    B.M. Freifeild

    2001-10-18

    Kinematic fracture porosity is an important hydrologic transport parameter for predicting the potential of rapid contaminant migration through fractured rock. The transport velocity of a solute moving within a fracture network is inversely related to the fracture porosity. Since fracture porosity is often one or two orders of magnitude smaller than matrix porosity, and fracture permeability is often orders of magnitude greater than matrix permeability, solutes may travel significantly faster in the fracture network than in the surrounding matrix. This dissertation introduces a new methodology for conducting gas tracer tests using a field portable mass spectrometer along with analytical tools for estimating fracture porosity using the measured tracer concentration breakthrough curves. Field experiments were conducted at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, consisting of air-permeability transient testing and gas-tracer-transport tests. The experiments were conducted from boreholes drilled within an underground tunnel as part of an investigation of rock mass hydrological behavior. Air-permeability pressure transients, recorded during constant mass flux injections, have been analyzed using a numerical inversion procedure to identify fracture permeability and porosity. Dipole gas tracer tests have also been conducted from the same boreholes used for air-permeability testing. Mass breakthrough data has been analyzed using a random walk particle-tracking model, with a dispersivity that is a function of the advective velocity. The estimated fracture porosity using the tracer test and air-injection test data ranges from .001 to .015. These values are an order of magnitude greater than the values estimated by others using hydraulically estimated fracture apertures. The estimates of porosity made using air-permeability test data are shown to be highly sensitive to formation heterogeneity. Uncertainty analyses performed on the gas tracer test results show high confidence in the parameter

  16. Whisker Formation in Porosity in Al Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, William David; Elsayed, Ahmed; El-Sayed, Mahmoud Ahmed

    2016-09-01

    An examination of the fracture surfaces of tensile test bars from Al alloy castings held in the liquid state for up to 20 minutes revealed porosity which in some cases contained whisker-like features. Energy-dispersive X-ray analysis in a SEM suggested that these might be oxide whiskers forming in an oxide-related pore or double oxide film defect. Such entrainment defects (also known as bifilms) may entrap a small amount of the local atmosphere when they form and become incorporated into the liquid metal. This atmosphere may be predominantly air, which then subsequently reacts with the surrounding melt, firstly by reaction with oxygen and secondly by reaction with nitrogen. A CFD model of the heat distribution associated with the reactions between the interior atmosphere of a double oxide film defect and the surrounding liquid alloy suggested that highly localized increases in temperature, up to about 2000 K to 5000 K (1727 °C to 4727 °C), could occur, over a scale of a few hundred micrometers. Such localized increases in temperature might lead to the evaporation or disassociation of oxide within the pore, followed by condensation, to form the whisker structures observed. Hydrogen might also be expected to diffuse into the bifilm and may play a role in the chemical reactions associated with the development of the bifilm.

  17. Comparison of 24 h averaged VOC monitoring results for residential indoor and outdoor air using Carbopack X-filled diffusive samplers and active sampling--a pilot study.

    PubMed

    McClenny, William A; Jacumin, Henry H; Oliver, Karen D; Daughtrey, E Hunter; Whitaker, Donald A

    2006-02-01

    Analytical results obtained by thermal desorption GC/MS for 24 h diffusive sampling of 11 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are compared with results of time-averaged active sampling at a known constant flow rate. Air samples were collected with co-located duplicate diffusive sampling tubes and one passivated canister. A total of eight multiple-component sampling events took place at fixed positions inside and outside three private homes. Subsequently, a known amount of sample air was transferred from the canister to an adsorbent tube for analysis by thermal desorption GC/MS. Results for the 11 most prevalent compounds--Freon 11, 1,3-butadiene, benzene, toluene, tetrachloroethene, ethylbenzene, m,p-xylene, o-xylene, 4-ethyltoluene, 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene, and p-dichlorobenzene--show that the ratio of average study values (diffusive sampling to active sampling) is 0.92 with 0.70 and 1.14 extreme ratios. Absolute percent difference for duplicate samples using diffusive sampling was <10% for the four most prevalent compounds. Agreement between the two sampling approaches indicates that the prediction of approximately constant diffusive sampling rates based on previous laboratory studies is valid under the field conditions.

  18. Olive Crown Porosity Measurement Based on Radiation Transmittance: An Assessment of Pruning Effect

    PubMed Central

    Castillo-Ruiz, Francisco J.; Castro-Garcia, Sergio; Blanco-Roldan, Gregorio L.; Sola-Guirado, Rafael R.; Gil-Ribes, Jesus A.

    2016-01-01

    Crown porosity influences radiation interception, air movement through the fruit orchard, spray penetration, and harvesting operation in fruit crops. The aim of the present study was to develop an accurate and reliable methodology based on transmitted radiation measurements to assess the porosity of traditional olive trees under different pruning treatments. Transmitted radiation was employed as an indirect method to measure crown porosity in two olive orchards of the Picual and Hojiblanca cultivars. Additionally, three different pruning treatments were considered to determine if the pruning system influences crown porosity. This study evaluated the accuracy and repeatability of four algorithms in measuring crown porosity under different solar zenith angles. From a 14° to 30° solar zenith angle, the selected algorithm produced an absolute error of less than 5% and a repeatability higher than 0.9. The described method and selected algorithm proved satisfactory in field results, making it possible to measure crown porosity at different solar zenith angles. However, pruning fresh weight did not show any relationship with crown porosity due to the great differences between removed branches. A robust and accurate algorithm was selected for crown porosity measurements in traditional olive trees, making it possible to discern between different pruning treatments. PMID:27213391

  19. Olive Crown Porosity Measurement Based on Radiation Transmittance: An Assessment of Pruning Effect.

    PubMed

    Castillo-Ruiz, Francisco J; Castro-Garcia, Sergio; Blanco-Roldan, Gregorio L; Sola-Guirado, Rafael R; Gil-Ribes, Jesus A

    2016-01-01

    Crown porosity influences radiation interception, air movement through the fruit orchard, spray penetration, and harvesting operation in fruit crops. The aim of the present study was to develop an accurate and reliable methodology based on transmitted radiation measurements to assess the porosity of traditional olive trees under different pruning treatments. Transmitted radiation was employed as an indirect method to measure crown porosity in two olive orchards of the Picual and Hojiblanca cultivars. Additionally, three different pruning treatments were considered to determine if the pruning system influences crown porosity. This study evaluated the accuracy and repeatability of four algorithms in measuring crown porosity under different solar zenith angles. From a 14° to 30° solar zenith angle, the selected algorithm produced an absolute error of less than 5% and a repeatability higher than 0.9. The described method and selected algorithm proved satisfactory in field results, making it possible to measure crown porosity at different solar zenith angles. However, pruning fresh weight did not show any relationship with crown porosity due to the great differences between removed branches. A robust and accurate algorithm was selected for crown porosity measurements in traditional olive trees, making it possible to discern between different pruning treatments. PMID:27213391

  20. Porosity and Permeability of Chondritic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zolensky, Michael E.; Corrigan, Catherine M.; Dahl, Jason; Long, Michael

    1996-01-01

    We have investigated the porosity of a large number of chondritic interplanetary dust particles and meteorites by three techniques: standard liquid/gas flow techniques, a new, non-invasive ultrasonic technique, and image processing of backscattered images . The latter technique is obviously best suited to sub-kg sized samples. We have also measured the gas and liquid permeabilities of some chondrites by two techniques: standard liquid/gas flow techniques, and a new, non-destructive pressure release technique. We find that chondritic IDP's have a somewhat bimodal porosity distribution. Peaks are present at 0 and 4% porosity; a tail then extends to 53%. These values suggest IDP bulk densities of 1.1 to 3.3 g/cc. Type 1-3 chondrite matrix porosities range up to 30%, with a peak at 2%. The bulk porosities for type 1-3 chondrites have the same approximate range as exhibited by matrix, indicating that other components of the bulk meteorites (including chondrules and aggregates) have the same average porosity as matrix. These results reveal that the porosity of primitive materials at scales ranging from nanogram to kilogram are similar, implying similar accretion dynamics operated through 12 orders of size magnitude. Permeabilities of the investigated chondrites vary by several orders of magnitude, and there appears to be no simple dependence of permeability with degree of aqueous alteration, or chondrite type.

  1. Effect of Porosity on Surface Catalytic Efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, David A.; Pallix, Joan; Rasky, Daniel J. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the effect of surface porosity of thermal protection materials on surface catalytic efficiency using test data taken from both arc-jet and side-arm reactor facilities. Relative surface porosity of the samples varied from 6% to 50%. Surface porosity was measured using a flow apparatus and Bernoulli equation. The surface catalytic efficiency of the materials was calculated using aerothermodynamic, and kinetic theories. The catalytic efficiency of the materials are compared at surface temperatures between room temperature and 2500 F. The data are presented in the form of graphs and tables.

  2. Method for determining effective reservoir porosity

    SciTech Connect

    Devries, M.R.; Fertl, W.H.

    1982-08-31

    A clay content curve, for the borehole under investigation is developed through logging procedures such as a gamma ray log or a spectral gamma ray log. Additionally, compaction trend curves based upon historic logging data are obtained for the geologic area of interest. Information provided by the total porosity trend curve is corrected using a function of the shaliness indicator curve. This correction allows the deviation of an effective porosity log for the reservoir which can be recorded or can be used to edit porosity logs.

  3. Evolution of porosity in geotechnical composites.

    PubMed

    Tyrologou, Pavlos; Dudeney, Alvan William L; Grattoni, Carlos A

    2005-07-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) (H1) transverse relaxation measurements were carried out on 37x70-mm cylindrical mineral/organic composites to determine and monitor the porosity evolution. Porosity is related, in principle, to the stability of such materials in geotechnical applications, for example, engineering foundations. The specimens represented novel formulations of mixed "wastes" containing coarse screened mineral, digested sewage sludge, quicklime, and pulverized fuel ash mixed and compacted together to form mechanically competent material. The measurements on a selected formulation indicated initially low porosity (<12%) that becomes lower over 6 months ( approximately 8%) due to pozzolanic reactions occurring. A relaxation time cutoff of 1.5 ms between "bound" and 'mobile' pore water much lower than sandstones (33 ms) was observed. The results confirmed that the NMR method allows a more reliable assessment of porosity and pore-size evolution.

  4. Porosity prediction in sandstones using erosional unconformities

    SciTech Connect

    Shanmugam, G.

    1989-03-01

    Erosional unconformities of subaerial origin are created by tectonic uplifts and eustatic sea level fall. Most erosional unconformities developed on sandstones are planes of increased porosity because uplifted sandstones are exposed to undersaturated CO/sub 2/-charged meteoric waters that result in dissolution of unstable framework grains and cements. The chemical weathering of sandstones is intensified in humid regions by the heavy rainfall, soil zones, lush vegetation, and accompanying voluminous production of organic and inorganic acids. Erosional unconformities are considered hydrologically open systems because of abundant supply of fresh meteoric water and relatively unrestricted transport of dissolved constituents away from the site of dissolution, causing a net gain in porosity near unconformities. Thus, porosity in sandstones tends to increase toward overlying unconformities. Such porosity trends have been observed in hydrocarbon-bearing sandstone reservoirs in Alaska, Algeria, Australia, China, Libya, Netherlands, Norwegian North Sea, Norwegian Sea, and Texas. A common attribute of these reservoirs is that they were all subaerially exposed under heavy rainfall conditions. An empirical model has been developed for the Triassic and Jurassic sandstone reservoirs in the Norwegian North Sea on the basis of the observed relationship that shows an increase in porosity in these reservoirs with increasing proximity to the overlying base of Cretaceous unconformity. An important practical attribute of this model is that it allows for the prediction of porosity in the neighboring undrilled areas by recognizing the base of Cretaceous unconformity in seismic reflection profiles and by constructing subcrop maps.

  5. Self-Assembling Sup-porosity: The Effect On Fluid Flow And Seismic Wave Propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Pyrak-Nolte, Laura J.

    2013-04-27

    Fractures and joints in the field often contain debris within the void spaces. Debris originates from many different mechanisms: organic and/or inorganic chemical reactions/mineralization, sediment transport, formation of a fracture, mechanical weathering or combinations of these processes. In many cases, the presence of debris forms a sub-porosity within the fracture void space. This sub-porosity often is composed of material that differs from the fracture walls in mineralogy and morphology. The sub-porosity may partially fill voids that are on the order of hundreds of microns and thereby reduce the local porosity to lengths scales on the order of sub-microns to tens of microns. It is quite clear that a sub-porosity affects fracture porosity, permeability and storativity. What is not known is how the existence/formation of a sub-porosity affects seismic wave propagation and consequently our ability to probe changes in the subsurface caused by the formation or alteration of a sub-porosity. If seismic techniques are to be developed to monitor the injection and containment of phases in sequestration reservoirs or the propping of hydraulically induced fracture to enhance oil & gas production, it is important to understand how a sub-porosity within a fracture affects macroscopic seismic and hydraulic measurements. A sub-porosity will directly affect the interrelationship between the seismic and hydraulic properties of a fracture. This reports contains the results of the three main topics of research that were performed (1) to determine the effect of a sub-porosity composed of spherical grains on seismic wave propagation across fractures, (2) to determine the effect of biofilm growth in pores and between grains on seismic wave propagation in sediment, and (3) to determine the effect of the scale of observation (field-of-view) on monitoring alteration the pore space within a fracture caused by reactive flow. A brief summary of the results for each topic is contained in

  6. SALTSTONE VARIABILITY STUDY - MEASUREMENT OF POROSITY

    SciTech Connect

    Harbour, J; Vickie Williams, V; Tommy Edwards, T; Russell Eibling, R; Ray Schumacher, R

    2007-08-23

    One of the goals of the Saltstone Variability Study is to identify the operational and compositional variables that control or influence the important processing and performance properties of Saltstone mixes. One of the key performance properties is porosity which is a measure of the volume percent of a cured grout that is occupied by salt solution (for the saturated case). This report presents (1) the results of efforts to develop a method for the measurement of porosity of grout samples and (2) initial results of porosity values for samples that have been previously produced as part of the Saltstone Variability Study. A cost effective measurement method for porosity was developed that provides reproducible results, is relatively fast (30 to 60 minutes per sample) and uses a Mettler Toledo HR83 Moisture Analyzer that is already operational and routinely calibrated at Aiken County Technology Laboratory. The method involves the heating of the sample at 105 C until no further mass loss is observed. This mass loss value, which is due to water evaporation, is then used to calculate the volume percent porosity of the mix. The results of mass loss for mixes at 105 C were equivalent to the results obtained using thermal gravimetric analysis. The method was validated by comparing measurements of mass loss at 105 C for cured portland cement in water mixes to values presented in the literature for this system. A stereopycnometer from Quantachrome Instruments was selected to measure the cured grout bulk densities. Density is a property that is required to calculate the porosities. A stereopycnometer was already operational at Aiken County Technology Laboratory, has been calibrated using a solid stainless steel sphere of known volume, is cost effective and fast ({approx}15 minutes per sample). Cured grout densities are important in their own right because they can be used to project the volume of waste form produced from a given amount of salt feed of known composition. For

  7. Gas phase dispersion in compost as a function of different water contents and air flow rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Prabhakar; Poulsen, Tjalfe G.

    2009-07-01

    Gas phase dispersion in a natural porous medium (yard waste compost) was investigated as a function of gas flow velocity and compost volumetric water content using oxygen and nitrogen as tracer gases. The compost was chosen because it has a very wide water content range and because it represents a wide range of porous media, including soils and biofilter media. Column breakthrough curves for oxygen and nitrogen were measured at relatively low pore gas velocities, corresponding to those observed in for instance soil vapor extraction systems or biofilters for air cleaning at biogas plants or composting facilities. Total gas mechanical dispersion-molecular diffusion coefficients were fitted from the breakthrough curves using a one-dimensional numerical solution to the advection-dispersion equation and used to determine gas dispersivities at different volumetric gas contents. The results showed that gas mechanical dispersion dominated over molecular diffusion with mechanical dispersion for all water contents and pore gas velocities investigated. Importance of mechanical dispersion increased with increasing pore gas velocity and compost water content. The results further showed that gas dispersivity was relatively constant at high values of compost gas-filled porosity but increased with decreasing gas-filled porosity at lower values of gas-filled porosity. Results finally showed that measurement uncertainty in gas dispersivity is generally highest at low values of pore gas velocity.

  8. Simple and Inexpensive Method of Wood Pellets Macro-porosity Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    C. Igathinathane; Jaya Shankar Tumuluru; S. Sokhansanj; X. Bi; C. J. Lim; S. Melin; E. Mohammad

    2010-08-01

    A novel simplified stereometric measurement method for determining the macro-porosity of wood pellets through geometrical approach was successfully developed and tested. The irregular ends of pellets of circular cross-section were sanded flat so that their geometry becomes cylinder and their volumes evaluated using mensuration formula. Such formed cylindrical pellets were loose or tap filled to selected volumes to evaluate the macro-porosity and the constant specific weight. The method was extended to evaluate actual wood pellets properties. Overall macro-porosity of actual wood pellets was determined as 41.0±2.5% and 35.5±2.7%, mean bulk density as and , and classified as “Class-3:Medium” and “Class-3&4:Medium to Low” for loose and tapped fills, respectively. Hausner ratio and Carr’s compressibility index classify wood pellets as “freely flowing.” The developed stereometric method can be used as a handy inexpensive laboratory procedure to estimate the macro-porosity of different types and makes of wood pellets and other similar packaged materials.

  9. Simple and inexpensive method of wood pellets macro-porosity measurement.

    PubMed

    Igathinathane, C; Tumuluru, Jaya Shankar; Sokhansanj, S; Bi, X; Lim, C J; Melin, S; Mohammad, E

    2010-08-01

    A novel simplified stereometric measurement method for determining the macro-porosity of wood pellets through geometrical approach was successfully developed and tested. The irregular ends of pellets of circular cross-section were sanded flat so that their geometry becomes cylinder and their volumes evaluated using mensuration formula. Such formed cylindrical pellets were loose or tap filled to selected volumes to evaluate the macro-porosity and the constant specific weight. The method was extended to evaluate actual wood pellets properties. Overall macro-porosity of actual wood pellets was determined as 41.0+/-2.5% and 35.5+/-2.7%, mean bulk density as 670+/-29 kg m(-3) and 731+/-31 kg m(-3), and classified as "Class-3:Medium" and "Class-3&4:Medium to Low" for loose and tapped fills, respectively. Hausner ratio and Carr's compressibility index classify wood pellets as "freely flowing." The developed stereometric method can be used as a handy inexpensive laboratory procedure to estimate the macro-porosity of different types and makes of wood pellets and other similar packaged materials.

  10. Simple and inexpensive method of wood pellets macro-porosity measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Igathinathane, C.; Tumuluru, J.S.; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine; Bi, X.T.; Lim, C. Jim; Melin, Staffan; Mohammad, E.

    2010-01-01

    A novel simplified stereometric measurement method for determining the macro-porosity of wood pellets through geometrical approach was successfully developed and tested. The irregular ends of pellets of circular cross-section were sanded flat so that their geometry becomes cylinder and their volumes evaluated using mensuration formula. Such formed cylindrical pellets were loose or tap filled to selected volumes to evaluate the macro-porosity and the constant specific weight. The method was extended to evaluate actual wood pellets properties. Overall macro-porosity of actual wood pellets was determined as 41.0 2.5% and 35.5 2.7%, mean bulk density as and, and classified as Class-3:Medium and Class-3&4:Medium to Low for loose and tapped fills, respectively. Hausner ratio and Carr s compressibility index classify wood pellets as freely flowing. The developed stereometric method can be used as a handy inexpensive laboratory procedure to estimate the macro-porosity of different types and makes of wood pellets and other similar packaged materials.

  11. High=porosity Cenozoic carbonate rocks of South Florida: progressive loss of porosity with depth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Halley, Robert B.; Schmoker, James W.

    1983-01-01

    Porosity measurements by borehole gravity meter in subsurface Cenozoic carbonates of South Florida reveal an extremely porous mass of limestone and dolomite which is transitional in total pore volume between typical porosity values for modern carbonate sediments and ancient carbonate rocks. A persistent decrease of porosity with depth, similar to that of chalks of the Gulf Coast, occurs in these rocks. Carbonate strata with less than 20% porosity are absent from the rocks studied here. Aquifers and aquicludes cannot be distinguished on the basis of porosity. Aquifers are not exceptionally porous when compared to other Tertiary carbonate rocks in South Florida. Permeability in these strata is governed more by the spacial distribution of pore space and matrix than by total volume of porosity present. Dolomite is as porous as, or slightly less porous than, limestones in these rocks. This observation places limits on any model proposed for dolomitization and suggests that dolomitization does not take place by a simple ion-for-ion replacement of magnesium for calcium. Dolomitization may be selective for less porous limestone, or it may involve the incorporation of significant amounts of carbonate as well as magnesium into the rock. The great volume of pore space in these rocks serves to highlight the inefficiency of early diagenesis in reducing carbonate porosity and to emphasize the importance of later porosity reduction which occurs during the burial or late near-surface history of limestones and dolomites.

  12. Empirical relation between carbonate porosity and thermal maturity: an approach to regional porosity prediction.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schmoker, J.W.

    1984-01-01

    Carbonate porosity can be predicted approximately on a regional scale as a function of thermal maturity. Thus: theta = a (TTI) b, where theta = regional porosity, a = a constant for a given region and varies by an order of magnitude, TTI = Lopatin's time-T index of thermal maturity and b approx -0.372. -K.A.R.

  13. Graded-porosity heat-pipe wicks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eninger, J. E.

    1976-01-01

    To maximize the capacity of a nonarterial heat pipe, a wick is considered whose porosity is allowed to vary axially along its length. At every axial location the porosity is set no lower than required to maintain the wick in a nearly saturated state under the maximum heat-transport rate. The result is a wick whose permeability is everywhere as high as possible. The differential equation that governs the optimum porosity variation is solved numerically between a condenser-end boundary condition that just prevents a liquid slug or puddle in the vapor spaces and an evaporator-end boundary condition that just prevents circumferential groove dry-up. Experimental performance measurements for an ammonia heat pipe are presented.

  14. Pressurized gas filled tendons

    SciTech Connect

    Silcox, W. H.

    1985-06-04

    Pressurized gas filled tubular tendons provide a means for detecting leaks therein. Filling the tendon with a gaseous fluid provides increased buoyancy and reduces the weight supported by the buoyant structure. The use of a corrosion inhibiting gaseous fluid reduces the corrosion of the interior tendon wall.

  15. Porosity evolution and crystallization-driven fragmentation during weathering of andesite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamtveit, BjøRn; Kobchenko, Maya; Austrheim, HâKon; Malthe-SøRenssen, Anders; RøYne, Anja; Svensen, Henrik

    2011-12-01

    A 10 m thick andesitic sill intrusion from the Neuquén Basin, Argentina, shows spectacular examples of spheroidal weathering and Liesegang banding. The Liesegang patterns demonstrate how andesite blocks, initially cut out by a preweathering joint set, are subdivided by fractures formed during the spheroidal weathering process. The stresses that cause fracturing originate from the growth of ferrihydrite and calcite in the pore space of the andesite, partly at the expense of original ilmenite, amphibole, and plagioclase. The porosity evolution and fracture formation during progressive weathering was characterized by scanning electron microscopy studies, X-ray computed tomography, and He- and Hg-porosimetry. Fresh andesite has a porosity of approximately 8%, and a major fraction (>80%) of the pore volume is composed of pores less than 10 μm in diameter. The extent of pore filling during weathering increases with pore size. Pores more than 100 μm are almost completely filled by an intimate intergrowth of calcite and ferrihydrite, whereas pores less than 10 μm are filled less than 50%. The fracturing associated with spheroidal weathering is caused by mineral growth in the largest pores, which account for 10%-20% of the total porosity. The periodic precipitation of the weathering product to form Liesegang bands indicates a significant supersaturation threshold before nucleation commences. The increase in the weathering product growth rate with increasing size is therefore most likely due to higher nucleation probabilities in larger pores.

  16. Permeability-porosity relationships in sedimentary rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, Philip H.

    1994-01-01

    In many consolidated sandstone and carbonate formations, plots of core data show that the logarithm of permeability (k) is often linearly proportional to porosity (??). The slope, intercept, and degree of scatter of these log(k)-?? trends vary from formation to formation, and these variations are attributed to differences in initial grain size and sorting, diagenetic history, and compaction history. In unconsolidated sands, better sorting systematically increases both permeability and porosity. In sands and sandstones, an increase in gravel and coarse grain size content causes k to increase even while decreasing ??. Diagenetic minerals in the pore space of sandstones, such as cement and some clay types, tend to decrease log(k) proportionately as ?? decreases. Models to predict permeability from porosity and other measurable rock parameters fall into three classes based on either grain, surface area, or pore dimension considerations. (Models that directly incorporate well log measurements but have no particular theoretical underpinnings from a fourth class.) Grain-based models show permeability proportional to the square of grain size times porosity raised to (roughly) the fifth power, with grain sorting as an additional parameter. Surface-area models show permeability proportional to the inverse square of pore surface area times porosity raised to (roughly) the fourth power; measures of surface area include irreducible water saturation and nuclear magnetic resonance. Pore-dimension models show permeability proportional to the square of a pore dimension times porosity raised to a power of (roughly) two and produce curves of constant pore size that transgress the linear data trends on a log(k)-?? plot. The pore dimension is obtained from mercury injection measurements and is interpreted as the pore opening size of some interconnected fraction of the pore system. The linear log(k)-?? data trends cut the curves of constant pore size from the pore-dimension models

  17. The modified cam clay model for constrained compression of human morsellised bone: effects of porosity on the mechanical behaviour.

    PubMed

    Lunde, Knut B; Skallerud, Bjørn

    2009-01-01

    Morsellised cortico-cancellous bone (MCB) is often used in revision surgery for filling skeletal defects. The MCB porosity is found to influence the degree of bone ingrowth. Thus expressing a material model in terms of porosity may be attractive from a clinical point of view. We analysed the moisture content and performed constrained compression testing of human impacted and unimpacted MCB, in order to determine material parameters for the common constitutive soil model: modified cam clay. The model seemed to be suitable for the unimpacted pellets with a logarithmic bulk modulus kappa=0.059+/-0.0019 and a logarithmic hardening constant lambda=0.36+/-0.014. This model, relating the specific volume (and porosity) to the logarithm of stress, may be suited to find the best compromise of stiffness and porosity for MCB. PMID:19627806

  18. Petrologic and petrophysical evaluation of the Dallas Center Structure, Iowa, for compressed air energy storage in the Mount Simon Sandstone.

    SciTech Connect

    Heath, Jason E.; Bauer, Stephen J.; Broome, Scott Thomas; Dewers, Thomas A.; Rodriguez, Mark A

    2013-03-01

    The Iowa Stored Energy Plant Agency selected a geologic structure at Dallas Center, Iowa, for evaluation of subsurface compressed air energy storage. The site was rejected due to lower-than-expected and heterogeneous permeability of the target reservoir, lower-than-desired porosity, and small reservoir volume. In an initial feasibility study, permeability and porosity distributions of flow units for the nearby Redfield gas storage field were applied as analogue values for numerical modeling of the Dallas Center Structure. These reservoir data, coupled with an optimistic reservoir volume, produced favorable results. However, it was determined that the Dallas Center Structure cannot be simplified to four zones of high, uniform permeabilities. Updated modeling using field and core data for the site provided unfavorable results for air fill-up. This report presents Sandia National Laboratories petrologic and petrophysical analysis of the Dallas Center Structure that aids in understanding why the site was not suitable for gas storage.

  19. Reduction of porosity in aluminum weldments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, W. S.

    1972-01-01

    Method is described for elimination of porosity of aluminum weldments by replacing polyvinyl chloride tubing (used to connect welder to gas source, and is permeable to moisture at high humidity) with copper tubing. In addition liquid argon gas is used at weld stations.

  20. Porosity Log Prediction Using Artificial Neural Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwi Saputro, Oki; Lazuardi Maulana, Zulfikar; Dzar Eljabbar Latief, Fourier

    2016-08-01

    Well logging is important in oil and gas exploration. Many physical parameters of reservoir is derived from well logging measurement. Geophysicists often use well logging to obtain reservoir properties such as porosity, water saturation and permeability. Most of the time, the measurement of the reservoir properties are considered expensive. One of method to substitute the measurement is by conducting a prediction using artificial neural network. In this paper, artificial neural network is performed to predict porosity log data from other log data. Three well from ‘yy’ field are used to conduct the prediction experiment. The log data are sonic, gamma ray, and porosity log. One of three well is used as training data for the artificial neural network which employ the Levenberg-Marquardt Backpropagation algorithm. Through several trials, we devise that the most optimal input training is sonic log data and gamma ray log data with 10 hidden layer. The prediction result in well 1 has correlation of 0.92 and mean squared error of 5.67 x10-4. Trained network apply to other well data. The result show that correlation in well 2 and well 3 is 0.872 and 0.9077 respectively. Mean squared error in well 2 and well 3 is 11 x 10-4 and 9.539 x 10-4. From the result we can conclude that sonic log and gamma ray log could be good combination for predicting porosity with neural network.

  1. Coatings with controlled porosity and chemical properties

    DOEpatents

    Frye, G.C.; Brinker, C.J.; Doughty, D.H.; Bein, T.; Moller, K.

    1993-07-06

    Coatings and sensors are described having both steric and chemical selectivity. Controlled porosity provides the steric selectivity, whereas chemically tailored film properties, using controlled composition or modification by coupling agents, chemical species replacement, or chemical species within pores, provide the chemical selectivity. Single or multiple layers may be provided.

  2. Coatings with controlled porosity and chemical properties

    DOEpatents

    Frye, Gregory C.; Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Doughty, Daniel H.; Bein, Thomas; Moller, Karin

    1993-01-01

    Coatings and sensors having both steric and chemical selectivity. Controlled porosity provides the steric selectivity, whereas chemically tailored film properties, using controlled composition or modification by coupling agents, chemical species replacement, or chemical species within pores, provide the chemical selectivity. Single or multiple layers may be provided.

  3. Coatings with controlled porosity and chemical properties

    DOEpatents

    Frye, Gregory C.; Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Doughty, Daniel H.; Bein, Thomas; Moller, Karin

    1996-01-01

    Coatings and sensors having both steric and chemical selectivity. Controlled porosity provides the steric selectivity, whereas chemically tailored film properties, using controlled composition or modification by coupling agents, chemical species replacement, or chemical species within pores, provide the chemical selectivity. Single or multiple layers may be provided.

  4. Coatings with controlled porosity and chemical properties

    DOEpatents

    Frye, G.C.; Brinker, C.J.; Doughty, D.H.; Bein, T.; Moller, K.

    1996-12-31

    Coatings and sensors are disclosed having both steric and chemical selectivity. Controlled porosity provides the steric selectivity, whereas chemically tailored film properties, using controlled composition or modification by coupling agents, chemical species replacement, or chemical species within pores, provide the chemical selectivity. Single or multiple layers may be provided. 7 figs.

  5. Determination of Meteorite Porosity Using Liquid Nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohout, T.; Kletetschka, G.; Pesonen, L. J.; Wasilewski, P. J.

    2005-01-01

    We introduce a new harmless method for porosity measurement suitable for meteorite samples. The method is a modification of the traditional Archimedean method based on immersion of the samples in a liquid medium like water or organic liquids. In our case we used liquid nitrogen for its chemically inert characteristics.

  6. A simple procedure for estimating soil porosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emmet-Booth, Jeremy; Forristal, Dermot; Fenton, Owen; Holden, Nick

    2016-04-01

    Soil degradation from mismanagement is of international concern. Simple, accessible tools for rapidly assessing impacts of soil management are required. Soil structure is a key component of soil quality and porosity is a useful indicator of structure. We outline a version of a procedure described by Piwowarczyk et al. (2011) used to estimate porosity of samples taken during a soil quality survey of 38 sites across Ireland as part of the Government funded SQUARE (Soil Quality Assessment Research) project. This required intact core (r = 2.5 cm, H = 5cm) samples taken at 5-10 cm and 10-20 cm depth, to be covered with muslin cloth at one end and secured with a jubilee clip. Samples were saturated in sealable water tanks for ≈ 64 hours, then allowed to drain by gravity for 24 hours, at which point Field Capacity (F.C.) was assumed to have been reached, followed by oven drying with weight determined at each stage. This allowed the calculation of bulk density and the estimation of water content at saturation and following gravitational drainage, thus total and functional porosity. The assumption that F.C. was reached following 24 hours of gravitational drainage was based on the Soil Moisture Deficit model used in Ireland to predict when soils are potentially vulnerable to structural damage and used nationally as a management tool. Preliminary results indicate moderately strong, negative correlations between estimated total porosity at 5-10 cm and 10-20 cm depth (rs = -0.7, P < 0.01 in both cases) and soil quality scores of the Visual Evaluation of Soil Structure (VESS) method which was conducted at each survey site. Estimated functional porosity at 5-10 cm depth was found to moderately, negatively correlate with VESS scores (rs = - 0.5, P < 0.05). This simple procedure requires inexpensive equipment and appears useful in indicating porosity of a large quantity of samples taken at numerous sites or if done periodically, temporal changes in porosity at a field scale

  7. Neutron porosity logging and core porosity measurements in the Beauvoir granite, Massif Central Range, France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallé, C.

    1994-08-01

    A large suite of geophysical logs have been run in the Beauvoir granite. The drillhole (900 m deep), first target of the French Deep Geology programme, is located in the Hercynian bedrock of Echassières in central France (Massif Central Range). After geochemical and petrological studies, the batholith was used for experiments pertaining to the storage of radioactive wastes. With its low porosity, its weak fracturing and its high homogeneity, the Beauvoir granite was chosen for the analysis of the relationship between logged data and the properties measured in the core. The study focused on neutron porosity and core water porosity. The Beauvoir granite has a total free water porosity of around 2% (average value of 54 core samples of rock mass) and an average neutron porosity of around 10%. We show that the origin of this significant difference is related to the neutron matrix effect of the granite. This phenomenon is partly due to the slowing-down effect of the combined water of clays and micas but also to the neutronic capture effect linked with the relatively high lepidolite (lithium mica) content of the granite. The Li 2O content controls 85% of the granite macroscopic capture cross-section. These two factors represent around 75% of the global neutron porosity of the Beauvoir granite. They have to be taken into consideration to get representative water contents of a low-porosity igneous rock from a neutron porosity log. Further investigations also demonstrated the necessity of choosing a better adapted neutron tool calibration for crystalline rocks. Instead of a standard calibration with limestone blocks, a calibration in granite blocks was simulated in order to obtain a better evaluation of the global neutron response of the granite. Then, by correcting this new neutron porosity for the matrix effect, it has been possible to determine water contents in accordance with laboratory water porosity values measured on core samples (2% average porosity). This

  8. Getting a prescription filled

    MedlinePlus

    ... to get prescription filled; Pharmacy - mail order; Pharmacy - internet; Types of pharmacies ... stored at certain temperatures at a local pharmacy. INTERNET (ONLINE) PHARMACIES Internet pharmacies can be used for ...

  9. Pyrotechnic filled molding powder

    DOEpatents

    Hartzel, Lawrence W.; Kettling, George E.

    1978-01-01

    The disclosure relates to thermosetting molding compounds and more particularly to a pyrotechnic filled thermosetting compound comprising a blend of unfilled diallyl phthalate molding powder and a pyrotechnic mixture.

  10. Porosity Dependence of Piezoelectric Properties for Porous Potassium Niobate System Ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, S.; Mase, Y.; Shimizu, S.; Maeda, K.; Fujii, I.; Nakashima, K.; Pulpan, P.; Miyajima, N.

    2011-10-01

    Porous potassium niobate (KNbO3, KN) system ceramics were prepared by a conventional sintering method using carbon black (CB) nanoparticles. First, KN nanoparticles with a size of 100 nm was mixed with CB nanoparticles and binder using ball milling with ethanol. The mixture was dried, and pressed into pellets using uniaxial pressing. After binder burnout, these ceramics was sintered in air. Their piezoelectric properties were measured and discussed a relationship between porosity and piezoelectric properties. As the results, with increasing porosity, piezoelectric g33 constant increased significantly, which suggested that porous ceramics were effective for stress sensor application.

  11. Porosity and the ecology of icy satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Croft, Steven K.

    1993-01-01

    The case for a significant role for porosity in the structure and evolution of icy bodies in the Solar System has been difficult to establish. We present a relevant new data set and a series of structure models including a mechanical compression, not thermal creep, model for porosity that accounts satisfactorily for observed densities, moments of inertia, geologic activity, and sizes of tectonic features on icy satellites. Several types of observational data sets have been used to infer significant porosity, but until recently, alternative explanations have been preferred. Our first area of concern is the occurrence of cryovolcanism as a function of satellite radius; simple radiogenic heating models of icy satellites suggest minimum radii for melting and surface cryovolcanism to be 400 to 500 km, yet inferred melt deposits are seen on satellites half that size. One possible explanation is a deep, low conductivity regolith which lowers conductivity and raises internal temperatures, but other possibilities include tidal heating or crustal compositions of low conductivity. Our second area of concern is the occurrence and magnitude of tectonic strain; tectonic structures have been seen on icy satellites as small as Mimas and Proteus. The structures are almost exclusively extensional, with only a few possible compression Al features, and inferred global strains are on the order of 1 percent expansion. Expansions of this order in small bodies like Mimas and prevention of late compressional tectonics due to formation of ice mantles in larger bodies like Rhea are attained only in structure models including low-conductivity, and thus possibly high porosity, crusts. Thirdly, inferred moments of inertia less than 0.4 in Mimas and Tethys can be explained by high-porosity crusts, but also by differentiation of a high density core. Finally, the relatively low densities of smaller satellites like Mimas and Miranda relative to larger neighbors can be explained by deep porosity

  12. Relative air permeability as function of saturation in soil venting

    SciTech Connect

    Stylianou, C.; DeVantier, B.A.

    1995-04-01

    Traditionally, soil remediation involved soil flushing, or excavation followed by landfilling or treatment. In recent years, recognizing the major environmental problem of soil contamination by VOCs, soil vapor extraction (SVE, also known as soil venting) has been applied as a form of in situ remediation. A key parameter in modeling soil-venting systems is relative air permeability, determined as a function of liquid saturation. The focus of the present study was to characterize the relationship of the relative air permeability as a function of air saturation in soil-venting systems. A new laboratory apparatus was used to simulate the soil venting and measure the air permeability of soil samples. Sand samples wetted with mixtures of water and gasoline at different ratios were used. It was revealed that the prediction of relative air permeability for moist noncohesive soil can be made in terms of intrinsic permeability and air-filled porosity alone, and not the type of liquid present in the pores. Comparisons of measured data with existing relations for relative air permeability as a function of total liquid saturation were made to determine the most accurate and practical forms for engineering applications. For the sand sample used, the evaluation revealed that compared to the existing relations, a derived second-order polynomial expression provides a good estimate of relative air permeability and does not require estimation of soil-water-retention curve parameters.

  13. Re-structuring protein crystals porosity for biotemplating by chemical modification of lysine residues.

    PubMed

    Cohen-Hadar, Noa; Lagziel-Simis, Shira; Wine, Yariv; Frolow, Felix; Freeman, Amihay

    2011-01-01

    Protein crystals are routinely prepared for the elucidation of protein structure by X-ray crystallography. These crystals present an highly accurate periodical array of protein molecules with accompanying highly ordered porosity made of interconnected voids. The permeability of the porous protein crystals to a wide range of solutes has recently triggered attempts to explore their potential application as biotemplates by a controlled "filling" process for the fabrication of novel, nano-structured composite materials. Gaining control of the porosity of a given protein crystal may lead to the preparation of a series of "biotemplates" enabling different 'filler'/protein content ratios, resulting in different nanostructured composites. One way to gain such control is to produce a series of polymorphic forms of a given "parent-protein" crystal. As protein packing throughout crystallization is primarily dominated by the chemical composition of the surface of protein molecules and its impact on protein-protein interactions, modification of residues exposed on the surface will affect protein packing, leading to modified porosity. Here we propose to provide influence on the porosity of protein crystals for biotemplating by pre-crystallization chemical modification of lysine residues exposed on protein's surface. The feasibility of this approach was demonstrated by the serial application of chemical "modifiers" leading to protein derivatives exhibiting altered porosity by affecting protein "packing" throughout protein crystallization. Screening of a series of modifying agents for lysine modification of hen egg white lysozyme revealed that pre-crystallization modification preserving their positive charge did not affect crystal porosity, while modification resulting in their conversion to negatively charged groups induced dramatic change in protein crystal's packing and porosity. Furthermore, we demonstrate that chemical modification of lysine residues affecting modified

  14. Petrology, porosity development, and diagenesis of the Upper Devonian Elk Sands, Council Run field, Centre and Clinton Counties, Pennsylvania

    SciTech Connect

    Billman, D.A. ); Smosna, R.; Bruner, K.R. )

    1991-08-01

    The Council Run field procedures from sandstones in the Upper Devonian Lock Haven Formation and is located approximately 5 mi from the outcrop celt, west of the Allegheny front. The reservoir sandstones generally are fine to medium grained, subrounded to subangular, well to poorly sorted, and well cemented. Cementation is in two forms: (1) formation of a pseudomatrix by compaction of ductile rock fragments, and (2) point-to-point cementation of quartz grains. Quartz is dominant in the reservoir sandstones; however, much of this is polycrystalline or metamorphic quartz. Rock fragments are abundant. Metamorphic schist fragments make up the bulk of these, though some sedimentary rock fragments are present. Minor amounts of feldspars, marine fossils, and carbonate minerals are also present. Clays include feldspars, marine fossils, and carbonate minerals are also present. Clays include chlorite, illite, and minor kaolinite. Due to the diverse mineralogy, rock types range from quartzarenites to litharenites to subarkose. Porosities in the reservoir sandstones at Council Run field range from negligible to greater than 15%. Porosity is a combination of intergranular primary porosity and secondary porosity including (1) intragranular dissolution, (2) channel porosity due to dissolution of pseudomatrix, and (3) fracture porosity. The sandstones of the Lock Haven Formation have followed a complex diagenetic history due to structural position and diverse mineralogy. Illite coats on quartz grains have preserved some primary porosity whereas deformation of ductile micas and schist fragments destroyed it. This was followed by a combination of (1) the alteration of feldspars to dolomite, which continued to fill pores, and (2) the dissolution of the feldspars and rock fragments creating intragranular and channel porosity. Lastly, continued deformation created fracture porosity.

  15. Primary porosity and submarine diagenesis in Lower Cretaceous Coral-Rudist reefs

    SciTech Connect

    Cross, S.L.; Lighty, R.G.

    1986-05-01

    Coral-rudist reefs of the Lower Cretaceous Mural limestone, southeastern Arizona, show a pronounced relationship between specific reef facies, primary porosity, and early submarine diagenesis. These large open-shelf reefs differ from the well-studied low-relief rudist buildups, and provide an alternate analog for many Cretaceous reef reservoirs. Arizona buildups have diverse corals, high depositional relief, and a well-developed facies zonation from fore reef to back reef: skeletal grainstone talus, muddy fore reef with branching and lamellar corals, massive reef crest with abundant lamellar corals and sandy matrix, protected thickets of delicate branching corals and large rudist mounds, and a wide sediment apron of well-washed coral, rudist, and benthic foraminiferal sands. These well-exposed outcrops permit a detailed facies comparison of primary interparticle porosity. Porosity as high as 40% in grainstones was occluded by later subsurface cements. Reef-framework interparticle porosity was negligible because fore-reef coral and back-reef rudist facies were infilled by muds, and high-energy reef-crest frameworks were filled by peloidal submarine cement crusts and muddy skeletal sands. These thick crusts coated lamellar corals in cryptic and open reef-crest areas, and are laminated with ripple and draped bed forms that suggest current influence. Similar peloidal crusts and laminated textures are common magnesium-calcite submarine cement features in modern reefs. By documenting specific facies control on early cementation and textural variability, patterns of late-stage subsurface diagenesis and secondary porosity may be more easily explained for Cretaceous reef reservoirs. Significant primary porosity might be retained between sands in back-reef facies and within coral skeletons.

  16. Dolomite reservoirs: Porosity evolution and reservoir characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, S.Q.

    1995-02-01

    Systematic analyses of the published record of dolomite reservoirs worldwide reveal that the majority of hydrocarbon-producing dolomite reservoirs occurs in (1) peritidal-dominated carbonate, (2) subtidal carbonate associated with evaporitic tidal flat/lagoon, (3) subtidal carbonate associated with basinal evaporite, and (4) nonevaporitic carbonate sequence associated with topographic high/unconformity, platform-margin buildup or fault/fracture. Reservoir characteristics vary greatly from one dolomite type to another depending upon the original sediment fabric, the mechanism by which dolomite was formed, and the extent to which early formed dolomite was modified by post-dolomitization diagenetic processes (e.g., karstification, fracturing, and burial corrosion). This paper discusses the origin of dolomite porosity and demonstrates the porosity evolution and reservoir characteristics of different dolomite types.

  17. Calorific and porosity development in carbonized wood

    SciTech Connect

    Baileys, R.T.; Blankenhorn, P.R.

    1982-07-01

    Wood of four species (red oak, southern yellow pine, black cherry, and hybrid poplar) were carbonized in a flowing nitrogen atmosphere at an average heating rate of 3 degrees Centigrade/minute to selected final temperatures up to 700 degrees Centigrade. The effects of final carbonization temperature on selected properties of the char were obtained using an adiabatic oxygen bomb calorimeter to investigate heat of combustion and a mercury porosimeter to investigate total porosity, real density, apparent density, and pore size distribution. Pore characteristics of carbonized wood developed before 300 degrees Centigrade in southern yellow pine and before 400 degrees Centigrade in red oak, black cherry, and hybrid poplar. Statistical analysis established linear relationships between heat of combustion versus final carbonization temperature in the carbonization temperature ranges investigated. The results of this study will aid in understanding optimum pryrolysis conditions for the development of calorific and porosity values. (Refs. 22).

  18. Correlation of Water Frost Porosity in Laminar Flow over Flat Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandula, Max

    2011-01-01

    A dimensionless correlation has been proposed for water frost porosity expressing its dependence on frost surface temperature and Reynolds number for laminar forced flow over a flat surface. The correlation is presented in terms of a dimensionless frost surface temperature scaled with the cold plate temperature, and the freezing temperature. The flow Reynolds number is scaled with reference to the critical Reynolds number for laminar-turbulent transition. The proposed correlation agrees satisfactorily with the simultaneous measurements of frost density and frost surface temperature covering a range of plate temperature, ambient air velocity, humidity, and temperature. It is revealed that the frost porosity depends primarily on the frost surface and the plate temperatures and the flow Reynolds number, and is only weakly dependent on the relative humidity. The results also point out the general character of frost porosity displaying a decrease with an increase in flow Reynolds number.

  19. Use of 3D photogrammetry for measurement of river bed porosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frings, R. M.; Vollmer, S.

    2012-04-01

    Porosity is one of the key characteristics of the sediments on a river bed. It defines the suitability of a river as spawning place for salmonids, the amount of oil that is contained in geological river deposits and the life-time of hydropower reservoirs. Nevertheless, little is known about natural variations in porosity, partly due to a lack of proper measuring equipment. The recommended technique for porosity measurements in field conditions is the water replacement method, in which a sediment sample is taken and the amount of water needed to fill the pores of the sample is measured. Division of pore volume by total volume of the sample then returns the porosity. The weakness of this technique is the determination of the in-situ sample volume. Normally, this is done by positioning a plastic ring on top of the sediments prior to sampling and placing a plastic liner is into it. After shaping the liner to conform to the irregular soil surface, the ring is filled with water. After removing the water and liner, a sediment sample is taken, and the pit is covered with the liner and filled with water again. The difference in water volume before and after excavation of the pit represents the sample volume. Because it is very difficult to fill the pit two times to exactly the same level with water, the uncertainties in sample volume can be large. Moreover there is a risk of holes in the liner, and the technique becomes very time-consuming if large samples are needed (for instance in case of heterogeneous coarse sediments). The objective of this study was to determine if the accuracy of porosity measurements can be improved by using 3D photogrammetry to determine the in-situ sample volume. We performed two series of each about 50 porosity measurements in the Rhine River: the first series with the traditional method to measure sample volumes and the second series with a structured-light 3D scanner (Z-Snapper, Vialux) to measure sample volumes. The scanner was placed about

  20. Diagenesis and porosity development in Oriskany sandstone of West Virginia

    SciTech Connect

    Bruner, K.R.; Heald, M.T. )

    1988-08-01

    Petrographic investigation of 12 Oriskany cores from West Virginia and surrounding states shows a complex relationship between diagenesis and porosity development. Deposited as a fossiliferous marine sandstone, the Oriskany is cemented by calcium carbonate and/or quartz, depending on the predominant clastic material (fossils or quartz). Porosity ranges from less than 2% to approximately 8%, and pore types vary across the state. Primary-intergranular and fracture are the major porosity types observed in all cores. Primary porosity is best developed in central and western areas where cementation is incomplete. Petroleumlike materials (paraffin in nature) commonly occur as pore linings or inclusions in secondary quartz. To the east, fracture porosity dominated in tightly cemented sandstones, but vertical and horizontal fractures are observed in all cores. Many fractures, however, have been healed with quartz and calcite. Minor amounts of carbonate leaching supplements primary porosity. In Marion County, partial replacement of carbonate fossils by fringing microcrystalline quartz, along with recrystallization and subsequent leaching of the carbonate, has produced distinctive secondary pores. Porosity increases dramatically in western areas of the state. In addition to primary and secondary porosity, microcrystalline porosity within chert and phosphatic zones is present. Other minor and relatively insignificant porosity types in the Oriskany from all regions include intraskeletal, intragranular quartz and feldspar, and intercrystalline dolomite. Although overall porosity is low, intergranular porosity and fracture porosity are best developed in quartz-rich zones.

  1. Porosity evolution in a creeping single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, A.; Needleman, A.

    2012-04-01

    Experimental observations on tensile specimens in Srivastava et al (2012 in preparation) indicated that the growth of initially present processing induced voids in a nickel-based single crystal superalloy played a significant role in limiting creep life. Also, creep tests on single crystal superalloy specimens typically show greater creep strain rates and/or reduced creep life for thinner specimens than predicted by current theories. In order to quantify the role of void growth in single crystals in creep loading, we have carried out three-dimensional finite deformation finite element analyses of unit cells containing a single initially spherical void. The materials are characterized by a rate-dependent crystal plasticity constitutive relation accounting for primary and secondary creep. Two types of imposed loading are considered: an applied true stress (force/unit current area) that is time independent; and an applied nominal stress (force/unit initial area) that is time independent. Isothermal conditions are assumed. The evolution of porosity is calculated for various values of stress triaxiality and of the Lode parameter. The evolution of porosity with time is sensitive to whether constant true stress or constant nominal stress loading is applied. However, the evolution of porosity with the overall unit cell strain is insensitive to the mode of loading. At high values of stress triaxiality, the response is essentially independent of the value of the Lode parameter. At sufficiently low values of the stress triaxiality, the porosity evolution depends on the value of the Lode parameter and void collapse can occur. Also, rather large stress concentrations can develop which could play a role in the observed thickness dependence.

  2. Reducing the open porosity of pyroboroncarbon articles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martyushov, G. G.; Zakharevich, A. M.; Pichkhidze, S. Ya.; Koshuro, V. A.

    2016-02-01

    It is established that a decrease in the open porosity of pyroboroncarbon, a pyrolytic glassy composite material of interest for manufacturing prosthetic heart valves (PHVs), can be achieved via impregnation of articles with an alcohol solution of 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane and subsequent thermal treatment. The maximum roughness height and linear size of open pores on the surface of PHV parts made of pyroboroncarbon can additionally be reduced by final mechanical processing of a silicon oxide film formed on the surface.

  3. The porosity of the upper lunar regolith

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hapke, Bruce; Sato, Hiroyuki

    2016-07-01

    The porosity of the upper centimeter or so of the lunar regolith strongly affects several properties that are commonly studied remotely. Hence, it is important to determine its value. We have reanalyzed the data of Ohtake et al. (Ohtake et al. [2010]. Space Sci. Rev., 154, 57-77), who used spacecraft and laboratory reflectance measurements of the Moon by Kaguya Multiband Imager instruments and an Apollo sample to infer a lunar regolith porosity of 74-87%. Our analysis was augmented by using Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Wide and Narrow Angle Camera images. We confirm the Ohtake et al. (Ohtake et al. [2010]. Space Sci. Rev., 154, 57-77) estimate and refine it to 83 ± 3%. However, depending on the validity of key assumptions, this value could be a lower limit, so that the actual porosity could be somewhat higher. Even though the magnetic resonance index of the sample indicates that it is mature, it is appears to be optically less mature than a standard photometric site near the sample collection site.

  4. Porosity evolution and crystallization-driven fragmentation during weathering of andesite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamtveit, B.; Kobchenko, M.; Royne, A.

    2011-12-01

    A 10 meter thick andesitic sill intrusion from the Neuquen Basin, Argentina, shows spectacular examples of spheroidal weathering and Liesegang banding (see Figure). The Liesegang patterns demonstrate how andesite blocks, initially cut out by a pre-weathering joint set, are subdivided by fractures forming during the spheroidal weathering process. The stresses causing fracturing originate from the growth of ferrihydrite and calcite in the pore space of the andesite, partly at the expense of original ilmenite, amphibole, and plagioclase. The porosity evolution and fracture formation during progressive weathering has been characterized by SEM studies, X-ray computed tomography (CT), He- and Hg-porosimetry. Fresh andesite has a porosity of ca. 8%, and a major fraction (>80%) of the pore volume is comprised of pores < 10 μm in diameter. The extent of pore filling during weathering increases with pore-size. Pores > 100 μm are almost completely filled by an intimate intergrowth of calcite and ferrihydrite, whereas pores < 10 μm stay open. The fracturing associated with spheroidal weathering is caused by growth in pores comprising the largest 10-20% of the total porosity. Periodic precipitation of weathering product to form Liesegang bands indicates a significant superaturation treshold before nucleation commences. Preferential growth of weathering products in large pores is most likely due to a higher probability of nucleation in pores with a large surface area. A simple model that couple the mechanical and chemical processes involved will be presented.

  5. On the tensorial nature of advective porosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuman, Shlomo P.

    2005-02-01

    Field tracer tests indicate that advective porosity, the quantity relating advective velocity to Darcy flux, may exhibit directional dependence. Hydraulic anisotropy explains some but not all of the reported directional results. The present paper shows mathematically that directional variations in advective porosity may arise simply from incomplete mixing of an inert tracer between directional flow channels within a sampling (or support) volume ω of soil or rock that may be hydraulically isotropic or anisotropic. In the traditional fully homogenized case, our theory yields trivially a scalar advective porosity equal to the interconnected porosity ϕ, thus explaining neither the observed directional effects nor the widely reported experimental finding that advective porosity is generally smaller than ϕ. We consider incomplete mixing under conditions in which the characteristic time tD of longitudinal diffusion along channels across ω is much shorter than the characteristic time tH required for homogenization through transverse diffusion between channels. This may happen where flow takes place preferentially through relatively conductive channels and/or fractures of variable orientation separated by material that forms a partial barrier to diffusive transport. Our solution is valid for arbitrary channel Peclet numbers on a correspondingly wide range of time scales tD ⩽ t ≪ tH. It shows that the tracer center of mass is advected at a macroscopic velocity which is generally not collinear with the macroscopic Darcy flux and exceeds it in magnitude. These two vectors are related through a second-rank symmetric advective dispersivity tensor Φ. If the permeability k of ω is a symmetric positive-definite tensor, so is Φ. However, the principal directions and values of these two tensors are generally not the same; whereas those of k are a fixed property of the medium and the length-scale of ω, those of Φ depend additionally on the direction and magnitude of the

  6. Building 930, oblique view to southeast from fill slope covering ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Building 930, oblique view to southeast from fill slope covering building 932, 135 mm lens. - Travis Air Force Base, Snack Bar, North of W Street, Armed Forces Special Weapons Project Q Area, Fairfield, Solano County, CA

  7. Loose-fill insulations

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    Whether you are increasing the insulation levels in your current home or selecting insulation for a new home, choosing the right insulation material can be challenging. Fibrous loose-fill insulations such as cellulose, fiberglass, and rock wool are options you may wish to consider. This publication will introduce you to these materials--what they are, how they are applied, how they compare with each other, and other considerations regarding their use--so that you can decide whether loose fills are right for your home.

  8. Terahertz study on porosity and mass fraction of active pharmaceutical ingredient of pharmaceutical tablets.

    PubMed

    Bawuah, Prince; Tan, Nicholas; Tweneboah, Samuel Nana A; Ervasti, Tuomas; Axel Zeitler, J; Ketolainen, Jarkko; Peiponen, Kai-Erik

    2016-08-01

    In this study, terahertz time-domain spectroscopic (THz-TDS) technique has been used to ascertain the change in the optical properties, as a function of changing porosity and mass fraction of active pharmaceutical ingredient (API), of training sets of pharmaceutical tablets. Four training sets of pharmaceutical tablets were compressed with microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) excipient and indomethacin API by varying either the porosity, height, and API mass fraction or all three tablet parameters. It was observed, as far as we know, for the first time, that the THz time-domain and frequency-domain effective refractive index, as well as, the frequency-domain effective absorption coefficient both show linear correlations with the porosity and API mass fraction for training sets of real pharmaceutical tablets. We suggest that, the observed linear correlations can be useful in basic research and quality inspection of pharmaceutical tablets. Additionally, we propose a novel optical strain parameter, based on THz measurement, which yields information on the conventional strain parameter of a tablet as well as on the change of fill fraction of solid material during compression of porous pharmaceutical tablets. We suggest that the THz measurement and proposed method of data analysis, in addition to providing an efficient tool for basic research of porous media, can serve as one of the novel quality by design (QbD) implementation techniques to predict critical quality attributes (CQA) such as porosity, API mass fraction and strain of flat-faced pharmaceutical tablets before production. PMID:27288937

  9. Effect of quartz overgrowth precipitation on the multiscale porosity of sandstone: A (U)SANS and imaging analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Anovitz, Lawrence M.; Cole, David R.; Jackson, Andrew J.; Rother, Gernot; Littrell, Kenneth C.; Allard, Lawrence F.; Pollington, Anthony D.; Wesolowski, David J.

    2015-06-01

    We have performed a series of experiments to understand the effects of quartz overgrowths on nanometer to centimeter scale pore structures of sandstones. Blocks from two samples of St. Peter Sandstone with different initial porosities (5.8 and 18.3%) were reacted from 3 days to 7.5 months at 100 and 200 °C in aqueous solutions supersaturated with respect to quartz by reaction with amorphous silica. Porosity in the resultant samples was analyzed using small and ultrasmall angle neutron scattering and scanning electron microscope/backscattered electron (SEM/BSE)-based image-scale processing techniques.Significant changes were observed in the multiscale pore structures. By three days much of the overgrowth in the low-porosity sample dissolved away. The reason for this is uncertain, but the overgrowths can be clearly distinguished from the original core grains in the BSE images. At longer times the larger pores are observed to fill with plate-like precipitates. As with the unreacted sandstones, porosity is a step function of size. Grain boundaries are typically fractal, but no evidence of mass fractal or fuzzy interface behavior was observed suggesting a structural difference between chemical and clastic sediments. After the initial loss of the overgrowths, image scale porosity (>~1 cm) decreases with time. Submicron porosity (typically ~25% of the total) is relatively constant or slightly decreasing in absolute terms, but the percent change is significant. Fractal dimensions decrease at larger scales, and increase at smaller scales with increased precipitation.

  10. Air emissions from exposed contaminated sediments and dredged material

    SciTech Connect

    Valsaraj, K.T.; Ravikrishna, R.; Reible, D.D.; Thibodeaux, L.J.; Choy, B.; Price, C.B.; Brannon, J.M.; Myers, T.E.; Yost, S.

    1999-01-01

    The sediment-to-air fluxes of two polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (phenanthrene and pyrene) and a heterocyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (dibenzofuran) from a laboratory-contaminated sediment and those of three polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (naphthalene, phenanthrene, and pyrene) from three field sediments were investigated in experimental microcosms. The flux was dependent on the sediment moisture content, air-filled porosity, and the relative humidity of the air flowing over the sediment surface. The mathematical model predictions of flux from the laboratory-spiked sediment agreed with observed values. The fluxes of compounds with higher hydrophobicity were more air-side resistance controlled. Conspicuous differences were observed between the fluxes from the laboratory-spiked and two of the three field sediments. Two field sediments showed dramatic increases in mass-transfer resistances with increasing exposure time and had significant fractions of oil and grease. The proposed mathematical model was inadequate for predicting the flux from the latter field sediments. Sediment reworking enhanced the fluxes from the field sediments due to exposure of fresh solids to the air. Variations in flux from the lab-spiked sediment as a result of change in air relative humidity were due to differences in retardation of chemicals on a dry or wet surface sediment. High moisture in the air over the dry sediment increased the competition for sorption sites between water and contaminant and increased the contaminant flux.

  11. Changes in pit membrane porosity due to deflection and stretching: the role of vestured pits.

    PubMed

    Choat, Brendan; Jansen, Steven; Zwieniecki, Maciej A; Smets, Erik; Holbrook, N Michele

    2004-07-01

    The effect of increasing pressure difference (DeltaP) on intervessel pit membrane porosity was studied in two angiosperm tree species with differing pit architecture. Fraxinus americana L. possesses typical angiosperm bordered pit structure while Sophora japonica L. exhibits well-developed vestures in intervessel pit chambers. It was hypothesized (a) that large DeltaP across intervessel pits would cause the deflection of pit membranes in the stems of F. americana resulting in significant increases in porosity and thus lower cavitation thresholds, and (b) that the presence of vestures would prevent the deflection of pit membranes in S. japonica. To determine if the porosity of pit membranes increased under mechanical stress, suspensions of colloidal gold, 5 nm and 20 nm in diameter, were perfused across intervessel pit membranes at DeltaP ranging from 0.25 MPa to 6.0 MPa. The effect of increasing DeltaP on membrane porosity was also tested by comparing air seeding thresholds (Pa) in stems perfused with water or a solution with lower surface tension. Air seeding and colloidal gold experiments indicated that pit membrane porosity increased significantly with DeltaP in F. americana. In S. japonica, increases in permeability to colloidal gold with DeltaP were small and maximum pore diameters predicted from Pa were independent of DeltaP, suggesting that vestures limited the degree to which the membrane can be deflected from the centre of the pit cavity. This provides the first experimental evidence that vestures reduce the probability of air seeding through pit membranes. PMID:15181107

  12. Electrode porosity and effective electrocatalyst activity in electrode-membrane-assemblies (MEAs) of PEMFCs

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, A.; Wendt, H.

    1996-12-31

    New production technologies of membrane-electrode-assemblies for PEWCs which ensure almost complete catalyst utilization by {open_quotes}wetting{close_quotes} the internal catalyst surface with the ionomeric electrolyte, allow for a reduction of Pt-loadings from prior 4 mg cm{sup -2} to now less than 0.5 mg cm{sup -2}. Such electrodes are not thicker than from 5 to 10 {mu}m. Little has been published hitherto about the detailed micromorphology of such electrodes and the role of electrode porosity on electrode performance. It is well known, that the porosity of thicker fuel cell electrodes, e.g. of PAFC or AFC electrodes is decisive for their performance. Therefore the issue of this investigation is to measure and to modify the porosity of electrodes prepared by typical MEA production procedures and to investigate the influence of this porosity on the effective catalyst activity for cathodic reduction of oxygen from air in membrane cells. It may be anticipated that any mass transfer hindrance of gaseous reactants into porous electrodes would manifest itself rather in the conversion of dilute gases than in the conversion of pure gases (e.g. neat oxygen). Therefore in this investigation the performance of membrane cell cathodes with non pressurized air had been compared to that with neat oxygen at cathodes which had a relatively low Pt-loading of 0.15 mg cm{sup -2}.

  13. Longhi Games, Internal Reservoirs, and Cumulate Porosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morse, S. A.

    2009-05-01

    Fe in plagioclase at an early age, T-rollers (or not) on the Di-Trid boundary in Fo-Di-Sil, the mantle solidus, origins of anorthosites, esoteric uses of Schreinemakers rules and many more topics are all fresh and pleasant memories of John Longhi's prolific and creative work. The Fram-Longhi experimental effect of pressure on plagioclase partitioning with liquid in mafic rocks became essential to an understanding of multiphase Rayleigh fractionation of plagioclase in big layered intrusions. Only by using the pressure effect could I find a good equation through the data for the Kiglapait intrusion, and that result among others required the existence with probability 1.0 of an internal reservoir (Morse, JPet 2008). Knowledge of cumulate porosity is a crucial key to the understanding of layered igneous rocks. We seek both the initial (inverse packing fraction) and residual porosity to find the time and process path from sedimentation to solidification. In the Kiglapait Lower Zone we have a robust estimate of mean residual porosity from the modes of the excluded phases augite, oxides, sulfide, and apatite. To this we apply the maximum variance of plagioclase composition (the An range) to find an algorithm that extends through the Upper Zone and to other intrusions. Of great importance is that all these measurements were made in grain mounts concentrated from typically about 200 g of core or hand specimen, hence the represented sample volume is thousands of times greater than for a thin section. The resulting distribution and scatter of the An range is novel and remarkable. It is V-shaped in the logarithmic representation of stratigraphic height, running from about 20 mole % at both ends (base to top of the Layered Series) to near-zero at 99 PCS. The intercept of the porosity-An range relation gives An range = 3.5 % at zero residual porosity. Petrographic analysis reveals that for PCS less than 95 and greater than 99.9, the An range is intrinsic, i.e. pre-cumulus, for

  14. Porosity in plasma sprayed alumina coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Ilavsky, J.; Herman, H.; Berndt, C.C.; Goland, A.N.; Long, G.G.; Krueger, S.; Allen, A.J.

    1994-03-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) was used to study the porosity of plasma sprayed deposits of alumina in as-sprayed and heat-treated conditions. SANS results were compared with mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) and water immersion techniques. Multiple small-angle neutron scattering yields a volume-weighted effective pore radius (R{sub eff}), for pores with sizes between 0.08 and 10{mu}m, the pore volume in this size region, and from the Porod region, the surface area of pores of all sizes.

  15. Porosity and mechanical properties of zirconium ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Kalatur, Ekaterina Narikovich, Anton; Buyakova, Svetlana E-mail: kulkov@ispms.tsc.ru; Kulkov, Sergey E-mail: kulkov@ispms.tsc.ru

    2014-11-14

    The article studies the porous ceramics consisting of ultra-fine ZrO{sub 2} powders. The porosity of ceramic samples varied from 15% to 80%. The structure of the ceramic materials had a cellular configuration. The distinctive feature of all experimentally obtained strain diagrams is their nonlinearity at low deformations characterized by the parabolic law. It was shown that the observed nonlinear elasticity for low deformations shown in strain diagrams is due to the mechanical instability of cellular elements of the ceramic framework.

  16. The bacterivorous soil flagellate Heteromita globosa reduces bacterial clogging under denitrifying conditions in sand-filled aquifer columns.

    PubMed

    Mattison, Richard G; Taki, Hironori; Harayama, Shigeaki

    2002-09-01

    An exopolymer (slime)-producing soil bacterium Pseudomonas sp. (strain PS+) rapidly clogged sand-filled columns supplied with air-saturated artificial groundwater containing glucose (500 mg liter(-1)) as a sole carbon source and nitrate (300 mg liter(-1)) as an alternative electron acceptor. After 80 days of operation under denitrifying conditions, the effective porosity and saturated hydraulic conductivity (permeability) of sand in these columns had fallen by 2.5- and 26-fold, respectively. Bacterial biofilms appeared to induce clogging by occluding pore spaces with secreted exopolymer, although there may also have been a contribution from biogas generated during denitrification. The bacterivorous soil flagellate Heteromita globosa minimized reductions in effective porosity (1.6-fold) and permeability (13-fold), presumably due to grazing control of biofilms. Grazing may have limited growth of bacterial biomass and hence the rate of exopolymer and biogas secretion into pore spaces. Evidence for reduction in biogas production is suggested by increased nitrite efflux from columns containing flagellates, without a concomitant increase in nitrate consumption. There was no evidence that flagellates could improve flow conditions if added once clogging had occurred (60 days). Presumably, bacterial biofilms and their secretions were well established at that time. Nevertheless, this study provides evidence that bacterivorous flagellates may play a positive role in maintaining permeability in aquifers undergoing remediation treatments.

  17. Determination of effective porosity of mudrocks: a feasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    Dorsch, J.

    1995-11-01

    Matrix diffusion is believed to be an important transport process within the double-porosity (primary sedimentary porosity and secondary fracture porosity) mudrock-dominated stratigraphic units on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). Effective porosity is identified as an important parameter for evaluating and modeling matrix diffusion as a transport process. This report identifies, summarizes and evaluates petrophysical techniques, which can be used to determine the effective porosity of mudrock. Most of the techniques found their original application in the petroleum industry for the evaluation of reservoir rocks.

  18. Porosity of additive manufacturing parts for process monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Slotwinski, J. A.; Garboczi, E. J.

    2014-02-18

    Some metal additive manufacturing processes can produce parts with internal porosity, either intentionally (with careful selection of the process parameters) or unintentionally (if the process is not well-controlled.) Material porosity is undesirable for aerospace parts - since porosity could lead to premature failure - and desirable for some biomedical implants, since surface-breaking pores allow for better integration with biological tissue. Changes in a part's porosity during an additive manufacturing build may also be an indication of an undesired change in the process. We are developing an ultrasonic sensor for detecting changes in porosity in metal parts during fabrication on a metal powder bed fusion system, for use as a process monitor. This paper will describe our work to develop an ultrasonic-based sensor for monitoring part porosity during an additive build, including background theory, the development and detailed characterization of reference additive porosity samples, and a potential design for in-situ implementation.

  19. Porosity, permeability, and their relationship in granite, basalt, and tuff

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-04-01

    This report discusses the porosity, storage, and permeability of fractured (mainly crystalline) rock types proposed as host rock for nuclear waste repositories. The emphasis is on the inter-relationships of these properties, but a number of reported measurements are included as well. The porosity of rock is shown to consist of fracture porosity and matrix porosity; techniques are described for determining the total interconnected porosity through both laboratory and field measurement. Permeability coefficient, as obtained by experiments ranging from laboratory to crustal scale, is discussed. Finally, the problem of determining the relationship between porosity and permeability is discussed. There is no simple, all encompassing relationship that describes the dependence of permeability upon porosity. However, two particular cases have been successfully analyzed: flow through a single rough fracture, and flow through isotropic porous rock. These two cases are discussed in this report.

  20. Porosity of additive manufacturing parts for process monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slotwinski, J. A.; Garboczi, E. J.

    2014-02-01

    Some metal additive manufacturing processes can produce parts with internal porosity, either intentionally (with careful selection of the process parameters) or unintentionally (if the process is not well-controlled.) Material porosity is undesirable for aerospace parts - since porosity could lead to premature failure - and desirable for some biomedical implants, since surface-breaking pores allow for better integration with biological tissue. Changes in a part's porosity during an additive manufacturing build may also be an indication of an undesired change in the process. We are developing an ultrasonic sensor for detecting changes in porosity in metal parts during fabrication on a metal powder bed fusion system, for use as a process monitor. This paper will describe our work to develop an ultrasonic-based sensor for monitoring part porosity during an additive build, including background theory, the development and detailed characterization of reference additive porosity samples, and a potential design for in-situ implementation.

  1. Voids in Sonic Fill(TM) restorations compared to traditional incrementally-filled composite restorations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abourezq, Ibraheem A.

    SonicFill(TM) is a new composite resin and delivery system designed to provide rapid filling of cavity preparations by decreasing viscosity through application of sonic energy. However, it may produce unwanted air voids in the final restoration due to the short filling time. Air voids compromise long-term performance by providing weak foci, discontinuity at cavosurface margins and at internal cavity walls, and potential crack propagation. This study assessed the locations, sizes, and numbers of voids in SonicFill restorations compared with traditional composite resin restorations in a set of extracted molars with mesio-occlusal-distal (MOD) cavity preparations. Fifty noncarious intact extracted third molars were collected randomly from a large collection of discarded anonymous tooth specimens. Standardized MOD cavity preparations were cut, and teeth were assigned randomly to one of two groups ( n = 25). The first group was restored with SonicFill composite in two steps. The second group was restored with Herculite Ultra(TM) using an multiple increment layering technique (1-2 mm per layer). Cross-sectional images of the filling were taken by digital microscope. A total of 196 voids were found in the 50 specimens: 97 in SonicFill restorations and 99 in conventional restorations. Mean number of voids in SonicFill restorations was 3.88 versus 3.96 for conventional restorations. Mean percentage of void area in SonicFill restorations was 0.588% versus 0.508% for conventional restorations. Unpaired t tests for these differences indicated no statistically significant differences (p =.931 and p =.629, respectively). One-way ANOVA tests for mean void count and mean void area percentage differences by three location zones for conventional and SonicFill restorations also indicated no significant differences among the groups. The bulk-fill SonicFill system does not result in increased or decreased numbers or ii area of voids within Class II MOD restorations compared with a

  2. Watching dehydration: transient vein-shaped porosity in the oceanic mantle of the subducting Nazca slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloch, Wasja; John, Timm; Kummerow, Jörn; Wigger, Peter; Salazar, Pablo; Shapiro, Serge

    2016-04-01

    Subduction zones around the world show the common pattern of a Double Seismicity Zone, where seismicity is organized in the form of two sub-parallel planes, one at the plate contact and the other one, 10 to 30 km below, in the mantle of the oceanic lithosphere (Lower Seismicity Zone, LSZ). A commonly held hypothesis states that dehydration processes and the associated mineral reactions promote the earthquakes of the LSZ. Fluids filling a porespace strongly alter the petropyhsical properties of a rock. Especially the seismic P- to S-wave velocity ratio (Vp/Vs) has been shown to be sensitive to the presence of fluid-filled porosity. It transforms uniquely to Poisson's ratio. To test the mineral-dehydration-hypothesis, we use local earthquake data to measure Vp/Vs in the oceanic mantle of the subducting Nazca slab at 21°S. We determine it as the slope of the de-meaned differential P- vs. S-wave arrivaltimes of a dense seismicity cluster in the LSZ. This measurement yields a value for Vp/Vs of 2.10 ± 0.09, i.e. a Poisson's ratio of ˜0.35. This value clearly exceeds the range of Vp/Vs values expected for oceanic mantle rocks in their purely solid form at ˜50km depth. We follow a poroelastic approach to model the rock's elastic properties, including Vp/Vs, as a function of porosity and porespace-geometry. This results in a porespace model for the target volume having a vein-like porosity occupying only a minor volume fraction. Porosity is in the order of 0.1%. These findings are in very good agreement with field surveys and laboratory experiments of mantle dehydration. The pore-geometry is close to the geometrical percolation threshold, where long-ranged interconnectivity statistically emerges, suggesting good draining capabilities. Indeed, porosity is soft so that the amount of porosity and, consequently, permeability is very sensitive to local fluid pressure. We conclude that in the oceanic mantle of the subducting Nazca slab, mineral dehydration reactions are

  3. Gas filled panel insulation

    DOEpatents

    Griffith, Brent T.; Arasteh, Dariush K.; Selkowitz, Stephen E.

    1993-01-01

    A structural or flexible highly insulative panel which may be translucent, is formed from multi-layer polymeric material in the form of an envelope surrounding a baffle. The baffle is designed so as to minimize heat transfer across the panel, by using material which forms substantially closed spaces to suppress convection of the low conductivity gas fill. At least a portion of the baffle carries a low emissivity surface for suppression of infrared radiation.

  4. Gas filled panel insulation

    DOEpatents

    Griffith, B.T.; Arasteh, D.K.; Selkowitz, S.E.

    1993-12-14

    A structural or flexible highly insulative panel which may be translucent, is formed from multi-layer polymeric material in the form of an envelope surrounding a baffle. The baffle is designed so as to minimize heat transfer across the panel, by using material which forms substantially closed spaces to suppress convection of the low conductivity gas fill. At least a portion of the baffle carries a low emissivity surface for suppression of infrared radiation. 18 figures.

  5. Influence of the porosity on the ²²²Rn exhalation rate of concrete.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Peter; van Dijk, Willem; de Rooij, Mario

    2011-02-01

    The composition of 23 concrete mixtures was varied in five separate series to evaluate the influence of porosity on the ²²²Rn exhalation rate. In each series, a range in porosities is obtained by varying (1) the amount of cement, (2) type of cement (Portland or blast furnace slag cement), (3) the amount of water at a fixed cement level, (4) addition of an air entraining agent, or (5) the amount of recycled aggregates. The porosities ranged from 1% to 16%. The ²²²Rn exhalation rate is normalized to the ²²⁶Ra activity concentration and expressed as the ²²²Rn release factor to eliminate the effect of differences in ²²⁶Ra activity concentrations among the various concrete mixtures. Since most ²²²Rn originates from the cement, a ²²²Rn release factor based on the amount of ²²⁶Ra introduced by the cements appeared to be more adequate. Although the methods to attain the porosities in the concrete mixtures differ widely, this cement-related factor corresponds well with the capillary porosity of the mixtures. Since the water-to-cement ratio of the fresh paste is a good indicator of the capillary porosity, this is the guiding factor in the fabrication of concretes low in ²²²Rn exhalation. The lower the water-to-cement ratio, the less capillary pore area will be available from which ²²²Rn can emanate from the mineral matrix into the pore system. The good correlation between the cement-based ²²²Rn release factor and literature data on the internal capillary pore area support the results of this study. PMID:21399427

  6. Porosity evolution of upper Miocene reefs, Almeria Province, Southern Spain

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, A.K.; Snavely, P.D. Jr.; Addicott, W.O.

    1980-02-01

    In the reef cores and fore-reef breccia beds, porosity in both primary and postdepositional. Primary porosity is of three types: (a) boring clam holes in the scleractinian coral heads, cemented reef rocks, and breccias; (b) intraparticle porosity within the corals, Halimeda plates, and vermetid worm tubes; and (c) interparticle porosity between bioclastic fragments and in the reef breccia. Postdepositional moldic porosity was formed by the solution of aragonitic material such as molluscan and coral fragments. The Polomo reef carbonate rocks have high porosity and permeability, and retain a great amount of depositional porosity. Pores range in size from a few micrometers to 30 cm. The extensive intercrystalline porosity and high permeability resulted from dolomitization of micritic matrix. Some porosity reduction has occured by incomplete and partial sparry calcite infilling of interparticular, moldic, and intercrystalline voids. The high porosity and permeability of these reefs make them important targets for petroleum exploration in the western Mediterranean off southern Spain. In these offshore areas in the subsuface the volcanic ridge and the Plomo reef complex are locally onlapped or overlapped by 350 m or more of Miocene and Pliocene fine-grained sedimentary rocks. The possibility exists that the buried Plomo reef deposits may form traps for oil and gas in the offshore areas southwest of the type locality. Stratigraphic traps also may occur where the Neogene sequence above the Plomo reef complex onlaps the volcanic ridge. 17 figures.

  7. 3D Porosity Estimation of the Nankai Trough Sediments from Core-log-seismic Integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J. O.

    2015-12-01

    The Nankai Trough off southwest Japan is one of the best subduction-zone to study megathrust earthquake fault. Historic, great megathrust earthquakes with a recurrence interval of 100-200 yr have generated strong motion and large tsunamis along the Nankai Trough subduction zone. At the Nankai Trough margin, the Philippine Sea Plate (PSP) is being subducted beneath the Eurasian Plate to the northwest at a convergence rate ~4 cm/yr. The Shikoku Basin, the northern part of the PSP, is estimated to have opened between 25 and 15 Ma by backarc spreading of the Izu-Bonin arc. The >100-km-wide Nankai accretionary wedge, which has developed landward of the trench since the Miocene, mainly consists of offscraped and underplated materials from the trough-fill turbidites and the Shikoku Basin hemipelagic sediments. Particularly, physical properties of the incoming hemipelagic sediments may be critical for seismogenic behavior of the megathrust fault. We have carried out core-log-seismic integration (CLSI) to estimate 3D acoustic impedance and porosity for the incoming sediments in the Nankai Trough. For the CLSI, we used 3D seismic reflection data, P-wave velocity and density data obtained during IODP (Integrated Ocean Drilling Program) Expeditions 322 and 333. We computed acoustic impedance depth profiles for the IODP drilling sites from P-wave velocity and density data. We constructed seismic convolution models with the acoustic impedance profiles and a source wavelet which is extracted from the seismic data, adjusting the seismic models to observed seismic traces with inversion method. As a result, we obtained 3D acoustic impedance volume and then converted it to 3D porosity volume. In general, the 3D porosities show decrease with depth. We found a porosity anomaly zone with alteration of high and low porosities seaward of the trough axis. In this talk, we will show detailed 3D porosity of the incoming sediments, and present implications of the porosity anomaly zone for the

  8. Designed porosity materials in nuclear reactor components

    DOEpatents

    Yacout, A. M.; Pellin, Michael J.; Stan, Marius

    2016-09-06

    A nuclear fuel pellet with a porous substrate, such as a carbon or tungsten aerogel, on which at least one layer of a fuel containing material is deposited via atomic layer deposition, and wherein the layer deposition is controlled to prevent agglomeration of defects. Further, a method of fabricating a nuclear fuel pellet, wherein the method features the steps of selecting a porous substrate, depositing at least one layer of a fuel containing material, and terminating the deposition when the desired porosity is achieved. Also provided is a nuclear reactor fuel cladding made of a porous substrate, such as silicon carbide aerogel or silicon carbide cloth, upon which layers of silicon carbide are deposited.

  9. Dye filled security seal

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Dennis C. W.

    1982-04-27

    A security seal for providing an indication of unauthorized access to a sealed object includes an elongate member to be entwined in the object such that access is denied unless the member is removed. The elongate member has a hollow, pressurizable chamber extending throughout its length that is filled with a permanent dye under greater than atmospheric pressure. Attempts to cut the member and weld it together are revealed when dye flows through a rupture in the chamber wall and stains the outside surface of the member.

  10. Diagenesis and late-stage porosity development in the pennsylvanian strawn formation, val verde basin, Texas, U.S.A

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    David, Newell K.; Goldstein, R.H.; Burdick, C.J.

    2005-01-01

    The Middle Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Strawn Formation in the Trans-Pecos area of Texas was deposited during relative tectonic quiescence that prevailed before rapid infilling of the Val Verde Basin. It represents one of a series of backstepping carbonate ramps formed on the craton side of this foreland basin. Strawn Formation carbonate rocks in three cores - Conoco Anna McClung #3-1, Alex Mitchell S2-1R, and Creek Ranch #10-1 - show several shallowing-up ward sequences, each a few meters thick. The Creek Ranch core displays the deepest-water characteristics of the three cores; the lower part of this core is dominated by graded bedding. The Mitchell and McClung cores contain skeletal-rich carbonates. Both of these cores display characteristics of shallow-water bank or lagoonal environments. All three cores have approximately the same diagenetic history. Primary fluid inclusions indicate early porosity-occluding interparticle and mold-filling calcite precipitated from water with a narrow range of salinities. Modal salinities are that of seawater, but slightly lesser salinities (indicating mixing of seawater and meteoric water) and slightly greater salinities (indicating evaporative concentration of seawater) are also indicated. The influence of meteoric groundwater can be detected by stable-isotope analyses of the early cements at stratigraphic levels that correlate to the tops of the major shallowing-upward depositional sequences. However, subaerial exposure surfaces are not demonstrated in these cores but were likely to be present updip. Most porosity is cement-reduced vugs, dissolution-enlarged (and cement-reduced) molds (> 1/16 mm, < 4 mm), and fractures. Minor intraparticle, intercrystalline, and shelter porosity is also present. Reservoir porosity is caused by fracturing and a late-stage dissolution event. Dissolution in the Creek Ranch core is not as pronounced as in the other cores because of a dearth of skeletal material. Porous zones in the McClung and

  11. Fluid Dynamics of Bottle Filling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGough, Patrick; Gao, Haijing; Appathurai, Santosh; Basaran, Osman

    2011-11-01

    Filling of bottles is a widely practiced operation in a large number of industries. Well known examples include filling of ``large'' bottles with shampoos and cleaners in the household products and beauty care industries and filling of ``small'' bottles in the pharmaceutical industry. Some bottle filling operations have recently drawn much attention from the fluid mechanics community because of the occurrence of a multitude of complex flow regimes, transitions, and instabilities such as mounding and coiling that occur as a bottle is filled with a fluid. In this talk, we present a primarily computational study of the fluid dynamical challenges that can arise during the rapid filling of bottles. Given the diversity of fluids used in filling applications, we consider four representative classes of fluids that exhibit Newtonian, shear-thinning, viscoelastic, and yield-stress rheologies. The equations governing the dynamics of bottle filling are solved either in their full 3D but axisymmetric form or using the slender-jet approximation.

  12. Hydrogen Filling Station

    SciTech Connect

    Boehm, Robert F; Sabacky, Bruce; Anderson II, Everett B; Haberman, David; Al-Hassin, Mowafak; He, Xiaoming; Morriseau, Brian

    2010-02-24

    future. Project partners also conducted a workshop on hydrogen safety and permitting. This provided an opportunity for the various permitting agencies and end users to gather to share experiences and knowledge. As a result of this workshop, the permitting process for the hydrogen filling station on the Las Vegas Valley Water District’s land was done more efficiently and those who would be responsible for the operation were better educated on the safety and reliability of hydrogen production and storage. The lessons learned in permitting the filling station and conducting this workshop provided a basis for future hydrogen projects in the region. Continuing efforts to increase the working pressure of electrolysis and efficiency have been pursued. Research was also performed on improving the cost, efficiency and durability of Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) hydrogen technology. Research elements focused upon PEM membranes, electrodes/catalysts, membrane-electrode assemblies, seals, bipolar plates, utilization of renewable power, reliability issues, scale, and advanced conversion topics. Additionally, direct solar-to-hydrogen conversion research to demonstrate stable and efficient photoelectrochemistry (PEC) hydrogen production systems based on a number of optional concepts was performed. Candidate PEC concepts included technical obstacles such as inefficient photocatalysis, inadequate photocurrent due to non-optimal material band gap energies, rapid electron-hole recombination, reduced hole mobility and diminished operational lifetimes of surface materials exposed to electrolytes. Project Objective 1: Design, build, operate hydrogen filling station Project Objective 2: Perform research and development for utilizing solar technologies on the hydrogen filling station and convert two utility vehicles for use by the station operators Project Objective 3: Increase capacity of hydrogen filling station; add additional vehicle; conduct safety workshop; develop a roadmap for

  13. Carbonate porosity versus depth: a predictable relation for south Florida.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schmoker, J.W.; Halley, R.B.

    1982-01-01

    Examines the porosity of limestones and dolomites in the south Florida basin. Porosity data are derived from wire-line measurements which sample large volumes of rock, relative to petrographic methods, and can be examined at vertical scales approaching those of aquifers and hydrocarbon reservoirs. Investigation depths range from the surface to about 5500m. Curves of porosity versus depth, reflecting large-scale porosity-loss processes in the subsurface, are derived for a composite carbonate section and for carbonate strata of different ages and compositions.-from Authors

  14. EFFECTIVE POROSITY IMPLIES EFFECTIVE BULK DENSITY IN SORBING SOLUTE TRANSPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Flach, G.

    2012-02-27

    The concept of an effective porosity is widely used in solute transport modeling to account for the presence of a fraction of the medium that effectively does not influence solute migration, apart from taking up space. This non-participating volume or ineffective porosity plays the same role as the gas phase in single-phase liquid unsaturated transport: it increases pore velocity, which is useful towards reproducing observed solute travel times. The prevalent use of the effective porosity concept is reflected by its prominent inclusion in popular texts, e.g., de Marsily (1986), Fetter (1988, 1993) and Zheng and Bennett (2002). The purpose of this commentary is to point out that proper application of the concept for sorbing solutes requires more than simply reducing porosity while leaving other material properties unchanged. More specifically, effective porosity implies the corresponding need for an effective bulk density in a conventional single-porosity model. The reason is that the designated non-participating volume is composed of both solid and fluid phases, both of which must be neglected for consistency. Said another way, if solute does not enter the ineffective porosity then it also cannot contact the adjoining solid. Conceptually neglecting the fluid portion of the non-participating volume leads to a lower (effective) porosity. Likewise, discarding the solid portion of the non-participating volume inherently leads to a lower or effective bulk density. In the author's experience, practitioners virtually never adjust bulk density when adopting the effective porosity approach.

  15. Experimental study on the influence of the porosity of parallel plate stack on the temperature decrease of a thermoacoustic refrigerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setiawan, Ikhsan; Bambang Setio Utomo, Agung; Mitrayana; Katsuta, Masafumi; Nohtomi, Makoto

    2013-04-01

    Thermoacoustic refrigerators are cooling devices which are environmentally friendly because they don't use hazardous gases like chlorofuorocarbons (CFCs) or hydrofuorocarbons (HFCs) but rather air or inert gases as working medium. They apply sound wave with high intensity to pump heat from the cold to hot the regions through a stack in a resonator tube. One of the important parameters of thermoacoustic refrigerators is the porosity (blockage ratio) of stack which is a fraction of cross sectional area of the resonator unblocked for the gas movement by the stack. This paper describes an experimental study on how the porosity of parallel plate stack affects the temperature decrease of a thermoacoustic refrigerator. The porosity of parallel plate stack is specified by the thickness of plates and the spacing between plates. We measured the maximum temperature decreases of thermacoustic refrigerator using stacks with various porosities in the range of 0.5 - 0.85, with plate spacing from 0.5 mm to 1.5 mm and plate thicknesses 0.3 mm, 0.4 mm, and 0.5 mm. The measurements were done with two resonators with length of 0.8 m and 1.0 m, with air at atmospheric pressure and room temperature, correspond to thermal penetration depths (δκ) of 0.26 mm and 0.29 mm, respectively. It was found that there is an optimum porosity which gives the largest temperature decreases, and there is a tendency that the optimum porosity shifts to a larger value and the temperature decrease become larger when we used a stack with thinner plates. On the other hand, the study on the dependence of the temperature decrease on the plate thickness and the plate spacing reveals more useful information than that on the stack porosity itself. We found that stack with thinner plates tends to give larger temperature decrease, and the plate spacing of around 4δκ leads to the largest temperature decrease.

  16. Origin of dolomites in the Lower Cambrian Xiaoerbulak Formation in the Tarim Basin, NW China: Implications for porosity development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qing; Jiang, Zaixing; Hu, Wenxuan; You, Xuelian; Hao, Guoli; Zhang, Juntao; Wang, Xiaolin

    2016-01-01

    Dolomites occur pervasively in the Cambrian strata in the Tarim Basin, NW China. Although the Cambrian strata have been deeply buried and affected by multiple phases of dolomitization, some intervals in the upper part of the Lower Cambrian Xiaoerbulak Formation developed high porosity. The goal of this study is to understand the origin of different types of dolomites and the formation mechanism of the porosity in the Xiaoerbulak Formation. The geochemistry of matrix dolomites suggests that they formed from middle rare earth element (MREE)-enriched anoxic pore fluids, close to or within the zone of iron reduction. The similar REE + Y patterns and overlapping δ13C values between pore-filling and matrix dolomites indicate that the fluids that were responsible for the precipitation of pore-filling dolomite apparently inherited the signatures of the formation waters that were stored in the host strata. Low δ18O values coupled with high Ba, Zn, and rare earth element (REE) content of pore-filling dolomites indicate that pore-filling dolomites were formed at elevated temperatures. The precipitation of authigenic quartz and saddle dolomites and high Mn content in pore-filling dolomites indicate that hydrothermal fluids that mostly originated from Cambrian basinal clastic units or basement rocks were involved. The mixture of formation water and external hydrothermal fluids is the most likely explanation for the formation of significant porosity and precipitation of pore-filling dolomites at depth. Breccia dolomite, zebra dolomite, and saddle dolomite occur mostly in areas that are close to faults, which suggests that hydrothermal fluids passed through strike-slip faults in this area when these faults were activated. The development of permeable layers in the upper part of the Xiaoerbulak Formation overlain by impermeable layers of the Wusongger Formation suggests a possible potential diagenetic trap. When the faults were activated, high-pressure and high

  17. Air Ejection by a Flux of Particles of a Bulk Material in a Vertical Porous Pipe with a Bypass Cylindrical Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Averkova, O. A.; Logachev, I. N.; Logachev, K. I.

    2015-07-01

    Hydrodynamic equations have been derived for a fl ux of particles free falling in an air-filled circular porous pipe which is surrounded by a cylindrical bypass chamber. In these equations, the reverse influence of air on the particles' dynamics is disregarded. Numerical and analytical investigations of the derived equations made it possible to establish the regularities of change in the velocity of ejected air in the porous chute and in the pressure in the bypass chamber along the chute length as a function of the porosity of the walls and the dimensions of the chamber, and also on the ejection number. A rational range has been determined for ejection parameters ensuring the greatest reduction in the ejection volume due to the recycling of air.

  18. Gradient porous electrode architectures for rechargeable metal-air batteries

    DOEpatents

    Dudney, Nancy J.; Klett, James W.; Nanda, Jagjit; Narula, Chaitanya Kumar; Pannala, Sreekanth

    2016-03-22

    A cathode for a metal air battery includes a cathode structure having pores. The cathode structure has a metal side and an air side. The porosity decreases from the air side to the metal side. A metal air battery and a method of making a cathode for a metal air battery are also disclosed.

  19. Porosity and permeability of tuffs from the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Soeder, D.J.; Dishart, J.E. )

    1992-01-01

    An investigation of the intrinsic flow properties of the rock matrix in the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, was carried out by performing single-phase water or air permeability measurements on about 150 selected samples representing all of the different rock units in the unsaturated zone. Pores were studied by examining thin sections of samples impregnated with fluorescent-dyed epoxy. Yucca Mountain is made up of volcanic tuff, which occurs in three distinct textures: welded, nonwelded, and bedded. Welded tuffs occur in two thick, rhyolitic, pyroclastic flow units. In thin sections, the typical welded-tuff pore structure appears to consist of isolated voids interconnected by microfractures. Porosities average about 10 percent, and matrix permeabilities are generally 1 microdarcy or less. The nonwelded tuffs occur in several thin pyroclastic flows between and below the two main welded units. Porosities average about 20 to 30%, and permeabilities are in the microdarcy to millidarcy range. The nonwelded tuffs appear in thin sections to have an open, well-interconnected pore system with significant intragranular porosity in pumice and lithic grains. These tuffs often contain various amounts of secondary clay and zeolite minerals in the pores, which may account for the wide range in permeabilities. The bedded tuffs consist of friable, low-density volcanic ash with porosities of 50% or more and permeabilities often above 1 darcy. These tuffs are the most porous and permeable rock units in the unsaturated zone, and contain large intergranular pores and significant intragranular porosity in frothy pumice clasts. Results of this investigation will help improve the understanding of groundwater movement through the unsaturated zone.

  20. Ultrahigh porosity in metal-organic frameworks.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Hiroyasu; Ko, Nakeun; Go, Yong Bok; Aratani, Naoki; Choi, Sang Beom; Choi, Eunwoo; Yazaydin, A Ozgür; Snurr, Randall Q; O'Keeffe, Michael; Kim, Jaheon; Yaghi, Omar M

    2010-07-23

    Crystalline solids with extended non-interpenetrating three-dimensional crystal structures were synthesized that support well-defined pores with internal diameters of up to 48 angstroms. The Zn4O(CO2)6 unit was joined with either one or two kinds of organic link, 4,4',4''-[benzene-1,3,5-triyl-tris(ethyne-2,1-diyl)]tribenzoate (BTE), 4,4',44''-[benzene-1,3,5-triyl-tris(benzene-4,1-diyl)]tribenzoate (BBC), 4,4',44''-benzene-1,3,5-triyl-tribenzoate (BTB)/2,6-naphthalenedicarboxylate (NDC), and BTE/biphenyl-4,4'-dicarboxylate (BPDC), to give four metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), MOF-180, -200, -205, and -210, respectively. Members of this series of MOFs show exceptional porosities and gas (hydrogen, methane, and carbon dioxide) uptake capacities. For example, MOF-210 has Brunauer-Emmett-Teller and Langmuir surface areas of 6240 and 10,400 square meters per gram, respectively, and a total carbon dioxide storage capacity of 2870 milligrams per gram. The volume-specific internal surface area of MOF-210 (2060 square meters per cubic centimeter) is equivalent to the outer surface of nanoparticles (3-nanometer cubes) and near the ultimate adsorption limit for solid materials. PMID:20595583

  1. Tunable-Porosity Membranes From Discrete Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Marchetti, Patrizia; Mechelhoff, Martin; Livingston, Andrew G.

    2015-01-01

    Thin film composite membranes were prepared through a facile single-step wire-wound rod coating procedure in which internally crosslinked poly(styrene-co-butadiene) polymer nanoparticles self-assembled to form a thin film on a hydrophilic ultrafiltration support. This nanoparticle film provided a defect-free separation layer 130–150 nm thick, which was highly permeable and able to withstand aggressive pH conditions beyond the range of available commercial membranes. The nanoparticles were found to coalesce to form a rubbery film when heated above their glass transition temperature (Tg). The retention properties of the novel membrane were strongly affected by charge repulsion, due to the negative charge of the hydroxyl functionalized nanoparticles. Porosity was tuned by annealing the membranes at different temperatures, below and above the nanoparticle Tg. This enabled fabrication of membranes with varying performance. Nanofiltration properties were achieved with a molecular weight cut-off below 500 g mol−1 and a low fouling tendency. Interestingly, after annealing above Tg, memory of the interstitial spaces between the nanoparticles persisted. This memory led to significant water permeance, in marked contrast to the almost impermeable films cast from a solution of the same polymer. PMID:26626565

  2. Tunable-Porosity Membranes From Discrete Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchetti, Patrizia; Mechelhoff, Martin; Livingston, Andrew G.

    2015-12-01

    Thin film composite membranes were prepared through a facile single-step wire-wound rod coating procedure in which internally crosslinked poly(styrene-co-butadiene) polymer nanoparticles self-assembled to form a thin film on a hydrophilic ultrafiltration support. This nanoparticle film provided a defect-free separation layer 130-150 nm thick, which was highly permeable and able to withstand aggressive pH conditions beyond the range of available commercial membranes. The nanoparticles were found to coalesce to form a rubbery film when heated above their glass transition temperature (Tg). The retention properties of the novel membrane were strongly affected by charge repulsion, due to the negative charge of the hydroxyl functionalized nanoparticles. Porosity was tuned by annealing the membranes at different temperatures, below and above the nanoparticle Tg. This enabled fabrication of membranes with varying performance. Nanofiltration properties were achieved with a molecular weight cut-off below 500 g mol-1 and a low fouling tendency. Interestingly, after annealing above Tg, memory of the interstitial spaces between the nanoparticles persisted. This memory led to significant water permeance, in marked contrast to the almost impermeable films cast from a solution of the same polymer.

  3. Tunable-Porosity Membranes From Discrete Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Marchetti, Patrizia; Mechelhoff, Martin; Livingston, Andrew G

    2015-12-02

    Thin film composite membranes were prepared through a facile single-step wire-wound rod coating procedure in which internally crosslinked poly(styrene-co-butadiene) polymer nanoparticles self-assembled to form a thin film on a hydrophilic ultrafiltration support. This nanoparticle film provided a defect-free separation layer 130-150 nm thick, which was highly permeable and able to withstand aggressive pH conditions beyond the range of available commercial membranes. The nanoparticles were found to coalesce to form a rubbery film when heated above their glass transition temperature (Tg). The retention properties of the novel membrane were strongly affected by charge repulsion, due to the negative charge of the hydroxyl functionalized nanoparticles. Porosity was tuned by annealing the membranes at different temperatures, below and above the nanoparticle Tg. This enabled fabrication of membranes with varying performance. Nanofiltration properties were achieved with a molecular weight cut-off below 500 g mol(-1) and a low fouling tendency. Interestingly, after annealing above Tg, memory of the interstitial spaces between the nanoparticles persisted. This memory led to significant water permeance, in marked contrast to the almost impermeable films cast from a solution of the same polymer.

  4. Treatment of domestic wastewater by subsurface flow constructed wetlands filled with gravel and tire chip media.

    PubMed

    Richter, A Y; Weaver, R W

    2003-12-01

    Subsurface flow constructed wetlands (SFCWs) are becoming increasingly common in on-site treatment of wastewater. Gravel is the most popular form of wetland fill medium, but tire chips provide more porosity, are less dense, and less expensive. This study determines the treatment efficiency of SFCWs filled with gravel or tire chip media to treat domestic wastewater. The influent and effluent of six SFCWs filled with tire chip medium and six SFCWs filled with gravel were monitored for 5 to 16 consecutive months. Parameters measured included pH, biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5), total and volatile suspended solids, NH4, P, and fecal and total coliforms. The only clear difference between medium types in wetland performance was for P. Soluble P in the effluent averaged 1.6 +/- 1.0 mg l(-1) in the tire chip-filled wetlands and 4.8 +/- 3.2 mg l(-1) in the gravel-filled wetlands. Most likely, Fe from exposed wires in shredded steel-belted tires complexed with P to create an insoluble compound. Tire chips may be a better fill medium for SFCWs than gravel because of higher porosity, lower cost, and greater reduction of P in effluent.

  5. Treatment of domestic wastewater by subsurface flow constructed wetlands filled with gravel and tire chip media.

    PubMed

    Richter, A Y; Weaver, R W

    2003-12-01

    Subsurface flow constructed wetlands (SFCWs) are becoming increasingly common in on-site treatment of wastewater. Gravel is the most popular form of wetland fill medium, but tire chips provide more porosity, are less dense, and less expensive. This study determines the treatment efficiency of SFCWs filled with gravel or tire chip media to treat domestic wastewater. The influent and effluent of six SFCWs filled with tire chip medium and six SFCWs filled with gravel were monitored for 5 to 16 consecutive months. Parameters measured included pH, biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5), total and volatile suspended solids, NH4, P, and fecal and total coliforms. The only clear difference between medium types in wetland performance was for P. Soluble P in the effluent averaged 1.6 +/- 1.0 mg l(-1) in the tire chip-filled wetlands and 4.8 +/- 3.2 mg l(-1) in the gravel-filled wetlands. Most likely, Fe from exposed wires in shredded steel-belted tires complexed with P to create an insoluble compound. Tire chips may be a better fill medium for SFCWs than gravel because of higher porosity, lower cost, and greater reduction of P in effluent. PMID:14977152

  6. A simplistic analytical unit cell based model for the effective thermal conductivity of high porosity open-cell metal foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, X. H.; Kuang, J. J.; Lu, T. J.; Han, F. S.; Kim, T.

    2013-06-01

    We present a simplistic yet accurate analytical model for the effective thermal conductivity of high porosity open-cell metal foams saturated in a low conducting fluid (air). The model is derived analytically based on a realistic representative unit cell (a tetrakaidecahedron) under the assumption of one-dimensional heat conduction along highly tortuous-conducting ligaments at high porosity ranges (ε ⩾ 0.9). Good agreement with existing experimental data suggests that heat conduction along highly conducting and tortuous ligaments predominantly defines the effective thermal conductivity of open-cell metal foams with negligible conduction in parallel through the fluid phase.

  7. Casting Porosity-Free Grain Refined Magnesium Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Schwam, David

    2013-08-12

    The objective of this project was to identify the root causes for micro-porosity in magnesium alloy castings and recommend remedies that can be implemented in production. The findings confirm the key role played by utilizing optimal gating and risering practices in minimizing porosity in magnesium castings. 

  8. The Porosity of Eros and Implications for Its Internal Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkison, S. L.; Robinson, M. S.; Thomas, P. C.; Veverka, J.; McCoy, T. J.; Murchie, S. L.; Prockter, L.; Yeomans, D.

    2001-01-01

    We estimate the porosity of Eros to be between 21-33%. Based on this porosity range and morphologic observations of the surface, we suggest that the asteroid is heavily fractured (but not a rubble pile). Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  9. Water uptake in biochars: The roles of porosity and hydrophobicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    We assessed the effects of porosity and hydrophobicity on water uptake by biochars. Biochars were produced from two feedstocks (hazelnut shells and Douglas fir chips) at three production temperatures (370 °C, 500 °C, and 620 °C). To distinguish the effects of porosity from the ...

  10. Modeling variations of medium porosity in rotating drum biofilter.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chunping; Chen, Hong; Zeng, Guangming; Yu, Guanlong; Liu, Xianfeng; Zhang, Xiaoming

    2009-01-01

    Rotating drum biofilters (RDBs) mounted with reticulated polyurethane sponge media has showed high removal efficiencies over a long period of time when used for volatile organic compound (VOC) removal. Due to the accumulation of biomass within the sponge medium, the porosity of a filter bed usually changes dynamically, which makes it difficult to predict and to control. In this paper, the porosity of a multi-layer RDB bed was investigated by a diffusion-reaction model in which biofilm growth and decay were taken into account at the pore scale of the sponge medium. Temporal and spatial changes of porosity were studied under various organic loadings and gas empty bed contact times (EBCTs). The porosity of the biofilter bed was assumed to be a function of biofilm thickness, and all the pores were assumed to be uniform. Toluene was selected as the model VOC. The model was solved using numerical methods through the MATLAB software. Results show that the porosity decreased with increased time of operation, increased toluene loading, or decreased gas EBCT value. The porosity in the outermost medium layer was less than that in the inner medium layers. Toluene removal efficiencies and porosities calculated from this model correlated with the experimental data well. Porosity variation was proposed to be an indicator for prediction of biofilter performance in biofilters as a consequence. PMID:18951611

  11. Changes in porosity and organic matter phase distribution monitored by NMR relaxometry following hydrous pyrolysis under uniaxial confinement

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Washburn, Kathryn E.; Birdwell, Justin E.; Lewan, Michael D.; Miller, Michael; Baez, Luis; Beeney, Ken; Sonnenberg, Steve

    2013-01-01

    Artificial maturation methods are used to induce changes in source rock thermal maturity without the uncertainties that arise when comparing natural samples from a particular basin that often represent different levels of maturation and different lithofacies. A novel uniaxial confinement clamp was used on Woodford Shale cores in hydrous pyrolysis experiments to limit sample expansion by simulating the effect of overburden present during thermal maturation in natural systems. These samples were then subjected to X-ray computed tomography (X-CT) imaging and low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (LF-NMR) relaxometry measurements. LF-NMR relaxometry is a noninvasive technique commonly used to measure porosity and pore-size distributions in fluid-filled porous media, but may also measure hydrogen present in hydrogen-bearing organic solids. Standard T1 and T2 relaxation distributions were determined and two dimensional T1-T2 correlation measurements were performed on the Woodford Shale cores. The T1-T2 correlations facilitate resolution of organic phases in the system. The changes observed in NMR-relaxation times correspond to bitumen and lighter hydrocarbon production that occur as source rock organic matter matures. The LF-NMR porosities of the core samples at maximum oil generation are significantly higher than porosities measured by other methods. This discrepancy likely arises from the measurement of highly viscous organic constituents in addition to fluid-filled porosity. An unconfined sample showed shorter relaxation times and lower porosity. This difference is attributed to the lack of fractures observed in the unconfined sample by X-CT.

  12. Probing soil and aquifer material porosity with nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinedi, Z. R.; Kabala, Z. J.; Skaggs, T. H.; Borchardt, D. B.; Lee, R. W. K.; Chang, A. C.

    1993-12-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation measurements were used to identify different characteristic porosity domains in soil and aquifer materials. The porosity distribution can be inferred from these measurements by a regularization method applicable to any nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation, or by an analytic method applicable only to multiexponential relaxations (D. Orazio et al., 1989). The porosity distribution obtained from NMR relaxation measurements strongly depends on the pore shape factor. For the Borden aquifer material, both the regularized and the analytic pore size distribution obtained from NMR relaxation measurements are consistent with those obtained by Ball et al. (1990) using Hg porosimetry and N2 adsorption. For the Eustis and the Webster soils, the measured porosity domains are qualitatively consistent with those expected based on their respective composition. Our findings suggest that due to the long time required to saturate fine pores, NMR measurements of porosity distribution that are collected at short saturation times are biased toward larger pore sizes.

  13. Advanced Aerodynamic Design of Passive Porosity Control Effectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Craig A.; Viken, Sally A.; Wood, Richard M.; Bauer, Steven X. S.

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes aerodynamic design work aimed at developing a passive porosity control effector system for a generic tailless fighter aircraft. As part of this work, a computational design tool was developed and used to layout passive porosity effector systems for longitudinal and lateral-directional control at a low-speed, high angle of attack condition. Aerodynamic analysis was conducted using the NASA Langley computational fluid dynamics code USM3D, in conjunction with a newly formulated surface boundary condition for passive porosity. Results indicate that passive porosity effectors can provide maneuver control increments that equal and exceed those of conventional aerodynamic effectors for low-speed, high-alpha flight, with control levels that are a linear function of porous area. This work demonstrates the tremendous potential of passive porosity to yield simple control effector systems that have no external moving parts and will preserve an aircraft's fixed outer mold line.

  14. Results from a new Cocks-Ashby style porosity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, Nathan

    2015-06-01

    A new porosity evolution model will be described, along with preliminary results. The formulation makes use of a Cocks-Ashby style treatment of porosity kinetics that includes rate dependent flow in the mechanics of porosity growth. The porosity model is implemented in a framework that allows for a variety of strength models to be used for the matrix material, including ones with significant changes in rate sensitivity as a function of strain rate. Results of the effect of changing strain rate sensitivity on porosity evolution will be shown. The overall constitutive model update involves the coupled solution of a system of nonlinear equations - efficiency and robustness of the numerical implementation are significant issues. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 (LLNL-ABS-666658).

  15. Noninvasive porosity measurement of biconvex tablets using terahertz pulses.

    PubMed

    Bawuah, Prince; Ervasti, Tuomas; Tan, Nicholas; Zeitler, J Axel; Ketolainen, Jarkko; Peiponen, Kai-Erik

    2016-07-25

    Biconvex pharmaceutical microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) compacts were investigated by the detection of terahertz (THz) pulse delay in the transmission measurement mode. The dimensions of the tablets were kept as constants but the porosity was a priori known variable. It is shown that the porosity of the biconvex compact has a linear correlation with the THz pulse delay. By constructing a calibration line between these two parameters (i.e. porosity and THz pulse delay), it is possible to non-invasively detect porosity of biconvex tablets. We suggest that this preliminary study could be the starting point of in-depth future studies on the screening of porosity and related properties of real biconvex pharmaceutical tablets using terahertz sensing techniques. PMID:27289013

  16. Two-dimensional photonic crystals from semiconductor material with polymer filled holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Heijden, Rob; Kjellander, Charlotte; Carlström, Carl-Fredrik; Snijders, Juri; van der Heijden, Rob W.; Bastiaansen, Kees; Broer, Dick; Karouta, Fouad; Nötzel, Richard; van der Drift, Emile; Salemink, Huub W. M.

    2006-04-01

    Polymer filling of the air holes of indiumphosphide based two-dimensional photonic crystals is reported. The filling is performed by infiltration with a liquid monomer and solidification of the infill in situ by thermal polymerization. Complete hole filling is obtained with infiltration under ambient pressure. This conclusion is based both on cross-sectional scanning electron microscope inspection of the filled samples as well as on optical transmission measurements.

  17. Deep to shallow kaolinite relocation generates porosity

    SciTech Connect

    Mc Laughlin, O.M.; Mc Aulay, G.E.; Haszeldine, R.S. )

    1996-01-01

    Eocene and Paleocene sands make up the reservoir in the West Brae Field, which is located on the Fladen Ground Spur, Quadrant 16/7a, UK North Sea. The Tertiary sandstones were derived from a mixed source area of sediments and volcanics. Early carbonate cementation and late dissolution of carbonate cement and feldspars has resulted in sandstones possessing excellent poroperm characteristics, similar to the high quality upper reservoir sandstones described in the South, Central and North Brae fields. The diagenetic feature which most adversely affects these sandstones is the presence of large amounts of authigenic, kaolinite. Quantities of up to 13% kaolinite have been reported for the West Brae reservoir, an unusually high volume considering its current depth of 7,700ft. In contrast, the South, Central and North Brae fields exhibit only 1-3% diagenetic kaolinite, even though up to 8% feldspar dissolution porosity has been recorded. This study tests the hypothesis that feldspar dissolution at 12,000 ft in the Upper Jurassic reservoirs of South, Central and North Brae, has enabled aluminum to be exported from the deep Jurassic sandstones, to form kaolinite in the shallow Tertiary sandstones of West Brae. As Jurassic derived fluids have a distinct radiogenic: strontium signature, in contrast with Paleocene fluids which have an unradiogenic Sr signature, Sr isotope studies provide a test for this hypothesis. [sup 87]Sr/[sup 86]Sr analyses of the clays have been carried out to ascertain if their signature has been derived from dissolution of Jurassic minerals at depth, or if the signature is locally derived from Palaeocene sediments.

  18. Deep to shallow kaolinite relocation generates porosity

    SciTech Connect

    Mc Laughlin, O.M.; Mc Aulay, G.E.; Haszeldine, R.S.

    1996-12-31

    Eocene and Paleocene sands make up the reservoir in the West Brae Field, which is located on the Fladen Ground Spur, Quadrant 16/7a, UK North Sea. The Tertiary sandstones were derived from a mixed source area of sediments and volcanics. Early carbonate cementation and late dissolution of carbonate cement and feldspars has resulted in sandstones possessing excellent poroperm characteristics, similar to the high quality upper reservoir sandstones described in the South, Central and North Brae fields. The diagenetic feature which most adversely affects these sandstones is the presence of large amounts of authigenic, kaolinite. Quantities of up to 13% kaolinite have been reported for the West Brae reservoir, an unusually high volume considering its current depth of 7,700ft. In contrast, the South, Central and North Brae fields exhibit only 1-3% diagenetic kaolinite, even though up to 8% feldspar dissolution porosity has been recorded. This study tests the hypothesis that feldspar dissolution at 12,000 ft in the Upper Jurassic reservoirs of South, Central and North Brae, has enabled aluminum to be exported from the deep Jurassic sandstones, to form kaolinite in the shallow Tertiary sandstones of West Brae. As Jurassic derived fluids have a distinct radiogenic: strontium signature, in contrast with Paleocene fluids which have an unradiogenic Sr signature, Sr isotope studies provide a test for this hypothesis. {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr analyses of the clays have been carried out to ascertain if their signature has been derived from dissolution of Jurassic minerals at depth, or if the signature is locally derived from Palaeocene sediments.

  19. Defining filled and empty space: reassessing the filled space illusion for active touch and vision.

    PubMed

    Collier, Elizabeth S; Lawson, Rebecca

    2016-09-01

    In the filled space illusion, an extent filled with gratings is estimated as longer than an equivalent extent that is apparently empty. However, researchers do not seem to have carefully considered the terms filled and empty when describing this illusion. Specifically, for active touch, smooth, solid surfaces have typically been used to represent empty space. Thus, it is not known whether comparing gratings to truly empty space (air) during active exploration by touch elicits the same illusionary effect. In Experiments 1 and 2, gratings were estimated as longer if they were compared to smooth, solid surfaces rather than being compared to truly empty space. Consistent with this, Experiment 3 showed that empty space was perceived as longer than solid surfaces when the two were compared directly. Together these results are consistent with the hypothesis that, for touch, the standard filled space illusion only occurs if gratings are compared to smooth, solid surfaces and that it may reverse if gratings are compared to empty space. Finally, Experiment 4 showed that gratings were estimated as longer than both solid and empty extents in vision, so the direction of the filled space illusion in vision was not affected by the nature of the comparator. These results are discussed in relation to the dual nature of active touch.

  20. Defining filled and empty space: reassessing the filled space illusion for active touch and vision.

    PubMed

    Collier, Elizabeth S; Lawson, Rebecca

    2016-09-01

    In the filled space illusion, an extent filled with gratings is estimated as longer than an equivalent extent that is apparently empty. However, researchers do not seem to have carefully considered the terms filled and empty when describing this illusion. Specifically, for active touch, smooth, solid surfaces have typically been used to represent empty space. Thus, it is not known whether comparing gratings to truly empty space (air) during active exploration by touch elicits the same illusionary effect. In Experiments 1 and 2, gratings were estimated as longer if they were compared to smooth, solid surfaces rather than being compared to truly empty space. Consistent with this, Experiment 3 showed that empty space was perceived as longer than solid surfaces when the two were compared directly. Together these results are consistent with the hypothesis that, for touch, the standard filled space illusion only occurs if gratings are compared to smooth, solid surfaces and that it may reverse if gratings are compared to empty space. Finally, Experiment 4 showed that gratings were estimated as longer than both solid and empty extents in vision, so the direction of the filled space illusion in vision was not affected by the nature of the comparator. These results are discussed in relation to the dual nature of active touch. PMID:27233286

  1. Effect of quartz overgrowth precipitation on the multiscale porosity of sandstone: A (U)SANS and imaging analysis

    DOE PAGES

    Anovitz, Lawrence M.; Cole, David R.; Jackson, Andrew J.; Rother, Gernot; Littrell, Kenneth C.; Allard, Lawrence F.; Pollington, Anthony D.; Wesolowski, David J.

    2015-06-01

    We have performed a series of experiments to understand the effects of quartz overgrowths on nanometer to centimeter scale pore structures of sandstones. Blocks from two samples of St. Peter Sandstone with different initial porosities (5.8 and 18.3%) were reacted from 3 days to 7.5 months at 100 and 200 °C in aqueous solutions supersaturated with respect to quartz by reaction with amorphous silica. Porosity in the resultant samples was analyzed using small and ultrasmall angle neutron scattering and scanning electron microscope/backscattered electron (SEM/BSE)-based image-scale processing techniques.Significant changes were observed in the multiscale pore structures. By three days much ofmore » the overgrowth in the low-porosity sample dissolved away. The reason for this is uncertain, but the overgrowths can be clearly distinguished from the original core grains in the BSE images. At longer times the larger pores are observed to fill with plate-like precipitates. As with the unreacted sandstones, porosity is a step function of size. Grain boundaries are typically fractal, but no evidence of mass fractal or fuzzy interface behavior was observed suggesting a structural difference between chemical and clastic sediments. After the initial loss of the overgrowths, image scale porosity (>~1 cm) decreases with time. Submicron porosity (typically ~25% of the total) is relatively constant or slightly decreasing in absolute terms, but the percent change is significant. Fractal dimensions decrease at larger scales, and increase at smaller scales with increased precipitation.« less

  2. Porosity evolution, contact metamorphism, and fluid flow in the host basalts of the Skaergaard magma-hydrothermal system

    SciTech Connect

    Manning, C.E.

    1989-01-01

    Temporal and spatial variations in porosity during contact metamorphism of the basaltic country rocks to the Skaergaard intrusion in East Greenland resulted in a complex hydrological evolution of the metamorphic aureole. Contrasts in macroscopic porosities in different lithologies led to differences in mineralogical, bulk chemical, and oxygen isotopic alteration, and units with greater macroscopic porosities record larger fluid flux during metamorphism. Calculated Darcy velocities indicate that the horizontal component of fluid flow in the aureole was toward the intrusive contact. In the actinolite + chlorite zone time-integrated fluid flux was higher in aa units ({approximately} 300 kg cm{sup {minus}2}) than in massive units ({approximately} 130 kg cm{sup {minus}2}). Approximately equal time-integrated fluxes of respectively 4 and 5 kg cm{sup {minus}2} in aa and massive units in the pyroxene zone indicate that the volume of fluid flow in the higher grade rocks was independent of primary porosity. These results are consistent with inward fluid migration in the actinolite + chlorite zone through an open network of pores whose abundance varied as a function of primary lava morphology. At higher metamorphic grades fluid fluxes were lower and were independent of primary porosity, probably as a consequence of (1) channelization of fluids due to more extensive pore filling and (2) decreasing horizontal component of flow due to upward migration of fluids near the contact. The results of this study indicate that explicit provision for rock porosity aids interpretation of the nature of fluid flow during contact metamorphism in magma-hydrothermal systems.

  3. The dynamic response of carbon fiber-filled polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dattelbaum, D. M.; Gustavsen, R. L.; Sheffield, S. A.; Stahl, D. B.; Scharff, R. J.; Rigg, P. A.; Furmanski, J.; Orler, E. B.; Patterson, B.; Coe, J. D.

    2012-08-01

    The dynamic (shock) responses of two carbon fiber-filled polymer composites have been quantified using gas gun-driven plate impact experimentation. The first composite is a filament-wound, highly unidirectional carbon fiber-filled epoxy with a high degree of porosity. The second composite is a chopped carbon fiber- and graphite-filled phenolic resin with little-to-no porosity. Hugoniot data are presented for the carbon fiber-epoxy (CE) composite to 18.6 GPa in the through-thickness direction, in which the shock propagates normal to the fibers. The data are best represented by a linear Rankine-Hugoniot fit: Us = 2.87 + 1.17 ×up(ρ0 = 1.536g/cm3). The shock wave structures were found to be highly heterogeneous, both due to the anisotropic nature of the fiber-epoxy microstructure, and the high degree of void volume. Plate impact experiments were also performed on a carbon fiber-filled phenolic (CP) composite to much higher shock input pressures, exceeding the reactants-to-products transition common to polymers. The CP was found to be stiffer than the filament-wound CE in the unreacted Hugoniot regime, and transformed to products near the shock-driven reaction threshold on the principal Hugoniot previously shown for the phenolic binder itself. [19] On-going research is focused on interrogating the direction-dependent dyanamic response and dynamic failure strength (spall) for the CE composite in the TT and 0∘ (fiber) directions.

  4. Mobilizing particles in a saturated zone during air sparging.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yih-Jin; Lin, Da-Feng

    2004-01-15

    The mobilization of soil particles changes the porosity of saturated zone during air sparging. Soil porosity is shown to be correlated with soil electrical resistivity. This study performs porosity-resistivity tests to establish the relationship between porosity and resistivity of quartz sand. Experiments, involving a large sandbox to simulate the saturated zone, are then performed to compare the resistivity of compacted sand before air injection with that after air injection. The relevant data enable the mobilization of quartz sand particles to be quantified. Results of the experiments indicate the mobilization of sand particles and an increase in porosity directly proportional to the rate at which air is injected. Besides, a layer of fine-grained particles covered the compacted sand at the upper boundary of sandbox after each air injection experiment. This is direct evidence that finer particles were transported upward during air sparging. Two methods were applied to verify the results of this study. The first verification method indicated that changes in porosity increased directly proportional to the air injection rate, which is consistent with shear theory. The other validation method indicated that the mass of sand in the tank did not change after air sparging, which indicates that the resistivity-porosity method is unbiased.

  5. The filling strategy of the Borexino experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ianni, Andrea; Pallavicini, Marco

    2014-06-01

    The detection of solar neutrinos by means of a liquid scintillator requires very low levels of radioactivity throughout the whole active volume. The selection of clean detector materials and the purification of the scintillator are necessary, but not sufficient conditions. It is also crucial that during the filling operations the scintillator is not contaminated, either by air or by getting in contact with dirty surfaces. This paper describes the procedures which we adopted to minimize these risks and achieve very good levels of radio-purity which we finally got in Borexino.

  6. Porosity in collapsible Ball Grid Array solder joints

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, C.A. |

    1998-05-01

    Ball Grid Array (BGA) technology has taken off in recent years due to the increased need for high interconnect density. Opposite to all the advantages BGA packages offer, porosity in collapsible BGA solder joints is often a major concern in the reliability of such packages. The effect of pores on the strength of collapsible BGA solder-joints was studied by manufacturing samples with different degrees of porosity and testing them under a shear load. It was found that the shear strength of the solder joints decreased in a linear fashion with increasing porosity. Failure occurred by internal necking of the interpore matrix. It was confirmed that entrapment of flux residues leads to porosity by manufacturing fluxless samples in a specially made furnace, and comparing them with samples assembled using flux. Also, contamination of Au electrodeposits (in substrate metallization) was determined to cause significant porosity. It was found that hard-Au (Co hardened Au) electrodeposits produce high degrees of porosity even in the absence of flux. Finally, increasing the time the solder spends in the molten state was proven to successfully decrease porosity.

  7. Friction Factor Characterization for High-Porosity Random Fiber Regenerators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thieme, Lanny G.

    2001-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center, the Department of Energy (DOE), and Stirling Technology Company (STC) of Kennewick, Washington are developing a Stirling convertor for a high-efficiency Stirling Radioisotope Power System to provide electric power for NASA Space Science Missions. STC is developing the 55-We Technology Demonstration Convertor (TDC) under contract to DOE. Steady-flow tests were completed to determine the friction factor for the high-porosity regenerators that are used in the TDC. STC fabricated a flow test fixture and three random fiber regenerator test samples, one each at approximately 80, 88, and 96 percent porosities. The flow tests were then completed by the NASA Glenn Flow Calibration Laboratory, and the data reduced to Reynolds number and friction factor. The results showed that the 80 and 88 percent porosity samples had similar characteristics while the 96 percent porosity sample had significantly higher friction factors for given Reynolds numbers compared to the samples with lower porosities. Comparisons were also made between the test data and existing correlations. STC used this data to derive a modified regenerator friction factor correlation for use in the Stirling design code GLIMPS for porosities greater than 88 percent. Using this new correlation, the final optimized regenerator design porosity was reduced from 96 to 90 percent.

  8. Soil surface roughness and porosity under different tillage systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Gonzalez, J.; Saa-Requejo, A.; Gómez, J. A.; Valencia, J. L.; Zarco, P.; Tarquis, A. M.

    2012-04-01

    Both soil porosity and surface elevation can be altered by tillage operation. Even though the surface porosity is an important parameter of a tilled field, however, no practical technique for rapid and non-contact measurement of surface porosity has been developed yet. On the contrary, the surface elevation of tilled soil can be quickly determined with a laser profiler. Working under the assumption that the surface elevation of a tilled field is a complicated superposition of the soil terrain profile at a larger-scale and the roughness at a fine-scale, this study included three aspects: (i) to establish an index (Roughness Index, RI) at a fine-scale to associate the surface roughness with porosity; (ii) to examine the correlation between surface porosity and the proposed RI by three types of tillage treatment in the field; and (iii) to check the scaling/multiscaling behavior among different grid sizes of calculating RI on predicting surface porosity. Consequently, the statistical results from each tilled plot show a strong correlation between the surface porosity and the defined RI in an early stage (ca. 2 days) after tillage. Acknowledgements Funding provided by CEIGRAM (Research Centre for the Management of Agricultural and Environmental Risks)and Spanish Ministerio de Ciencia e Innovación (MICINN) through project AGL2010-21501/AGR is greatly appreciated.

  9. Saturated hydraulic conductivity and porosity within macroaggregates modified by tillage

    SciTech Connect

    Park, E.J.; Smucker, A.J.M.

    2010-07-20

    Greater knowledge of intraaggregate porosity modifications by tillage conveys new information for identifying additional hydrologic, ion retention, and aggregate stability responses to specific management practices. Macroaggregates, 2 to 4, 4 to 6.3, and 6.3 to 9.5 mm across, were separated into multiple concentric layers and their porosities were determined. Saturated hydraulic conductivity (K{sub s}) of multiple aggregate fractions from two soil types subjected to conventional tillage (CT), no tillage (NT), and native forest (NF) soils were measured individually to identify the effects of tillage on aggregate structure, porosity, and K{sub s}. Intraaggregate porosities were the highest in NF aggregates. Greater porosities were identified in exterior layers of soil aggregates from all treatments. Lowest intraaggregate porosities were observed in the central regions of CT aggregates. Soil aggregates, 6.3 to 9.5 mm across, had the greatest total porosities, averaging 37.5% for both soil types. Long-term CT reduced intraaggregate porosities and K, within macroaggregates, of the same size fraction, from both the Hoytville silty clay loam and Wooster silt loam soil types. Values for K, of NF aggregates, 5.0 x 10{sup -5} cm s{sup -1}, were reduced 50-fold by long-term CT treatments of the Hoytville series. The K, values through Wooster aggregates from NF, 16.0 x 10{sup -5} cm s{sup -1}, were reduced 80-fold by long-term CT treatments. The K{sub s} values through NF and NT aggregates were positively correlated with their intraaggregate porosities (R{sup 2} = 0.84 for NF and R{sup 2} = 0.45 for NT at P < 0.005). Additional studies are needed to identify rates at which pore geometries within macroaggregates are degraded by CT or improved by NT.

  10. Acute sensitivity of landslide rates to initial soil porosity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iverson, R.M.; Reid, M.E.; Iverson, N.R.; LaHusen, R.G.; Logan, M.; Mann, J.E.; Brien, D.L.

    2000-01-01

    Some landslides move imperceptibly downslope, whereas others accelerate catastrophically. Experimental landslides triggered by rising pore water pressure moved at sharply contrasting rates due to small differences in initial porosity. Wet sandy soil with porosity of about 0.5 contracted during slope failure, partially liquefied, and accelerated within 1 second to speeds over I meter per second. The same soil with porosity of about 0.4 dilated during failure and supped episodically at rates averaging 0.002 meter per second. Repeated slip episodes were induced by gradually rising pore water pressure and were arrested by pore dilation and attendant pore pressure decline.

  11. Ultrasonic measurement of porosity in casts and welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adler, L.; Wang, S. W.

    1986-01-01

    The development of a quantitative nondestructive method which involves ultrasonic attenuation measurements in frequency domain to determine volume fraction of porosity in aluminum cast is discussed. The aluminum alloy A357 casting samples were produced at the Ohio State University Foundry with controlled porosity contents ranging from 0% to 6%. A computer controlled system was used to direct ultrasonic beam to a test sample to different places to conduct ultrasonic attenuation measurements. The plot of attenuation coefficients as a function of frequency was then evaluated based on existing theories to determine volume fraction of porosity and pore size.

  12. Convective Mixing in Porosity Waves during Melt Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, J.; Hesse, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    Models of trace element partitioning during non-reactive, one-dimensional melt migration predict the decoupling of tracers with different partition coefficients (e.g. La and Sm)(Navon & Stolper 1987, DePaolo 1996 Liang 2008). Such decoupling is often not observed in igneous products at the surface. We propose a numeric melt migration model derived from first principles to aid our understanding of mixing during melt migration in the mantle. We assert that circulation within a porosity wave could provide an explanation for this disparity. Buoyancy drives regions of elevated melt fraction through the overlying mantle as porosity waves (Richter & McKenzie 1984, Spiegelman 1993). Within those waves we expect porous flow to lead to the transport and mixing of distinct peridotite-derived lithologies (Kelemen 1997). A consequence of this mixing includes partitioning of trace elements in the partially molten, mixing lithologies. We begin our numeric experiment by imposing a partially molten region in a nearly impermeable background. As the partially molten region rises, the buoyant melt races to the front of the porosity wave. Once the melt reaches the edge of the porosity wave, it encounters an extreme drop in permeability. Though the melt within the porosity wave may move faster than the wave itself, the permeable region confines the melt. Since the melt cannot outrun the porosity wave, it would pool at the edge of the impermeable region. However, the porosity wave continues to rise around the melt. This causes the melt to appear to double back into the more permeable region within the porosity wave. After "turning back", the buoyant melt hugs the low permeability wall of the porosity wave as it continues to migrate. Near the bottom of the porosity wave the melt changes direction and begins to move upward again. The porosity wave and melt create a convective mixing cell. Modeled circulation of melt within the porosity wave could explain why the linear decoupling of trace

  13. Acute sensitivity of landslide rates to initial soil porosity.

    PubMed

    Iverson, R M; Reid, M E; Iverson, N R; LaHusen, R G; Logan, M; Mann, J E; Brien, D L

    2000-10-20

    Some landslides move imperceptibly downslope, whereas others accelerate catastrophically. Experimental landslides triggered by rising pore water pressure moved at sharply contrasting rates due to small differences in initial porosity. Wet sandy soil with porosity of about 0.5 contracted during slope failure, partially liquefied, and accelerated within 1 second to speeds over 1 meter per second. The same soil with porosity of about 0.4 dilated during failure and slipped episodically at rates averaging 0.002 meter per second. Repeated slip episodes were induced by gradually rising pore water pressure and were arrested by pore dilation and attendant pore pressure decline. PMID:11039931

  14. A thermo-hydro-mechanical coupled model in local thermal non-equilibrium for fractured HDR reservoir with double porosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelet, R.; Loret, B.; Khalili, N.

    2012-07-01

    The constitutive thermo-hydro-mechanical equations of fractured media are embodied in the theory of mixtures applied to three-phase poroelastic media. The solid skeleton contains two distinct cavities filled with the same fluid. Each of the three phases is endowed with its own temperature. The constitutive relations governing the thermomechanical behavior, generalized diffusion and transfer are structured by, and satisfy, the dissipation inequality. The cavities exchange both mass and energy. Mass exchanges are driven by the jump in scaled chemical potential, and energy exchanges by the jump in coldness. The finite element approximation uses the displacement vector, the two fluid pressures and the three temperatures as primary variables. It is used to analyze a generic hot dry rock geothermal reservoir. Three parameters of the model are calibrated from the thermal outputs of Fenton Hill and Rosemanowes HDR reservoirs. The calibrated model is next applied to simulate circulation tests at the Fenton Hill HDR reservoir. The finer thermo-hydro-mechanical response provided by the dual porosity model with respect to a single porosity model is highlighted in a parameter analysis. Emphasis is put on the influence of the fracture spacing, on the effective stress response and on the permeation of the fluid into the porous blocks. The dual porosity model yields a thermally induced effective stress that is less tensile compared with the single porosity response. This effect becomes significant for large fracture spacings. In agreement with field data, fluid loss is observed to be high initially and to decrease with time.

  15. Filling an Unvented Cryogenic Tank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, Phillip; Willen, Gary S.

    1987-01-01

    Slow-cooling technique enables tank lacking top vent to be filled with cryogenic liquid. New technique: pressure buildup prevented through condensation of accumulating gas resulting in condensate being added to bulk liquid. Filling method developed for vibration test on vacuum-insulated spherical tank containing liquid hydrogen.

  16. Control of Porosity and Pore Size of Metal Reinforced Carbon Nanotube Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Dumee, Ludovic; Velleman, Leonora; Sears, Kallista; Hill, Matthew; Schutz, Jurg; Finn, Niall; Duke, Mikel; Gray, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Membranes are crucial in modern industry and both new technologies and materials need to be designed to achieve higher selectivity and performance. Exotic materials such as nanoparticles offer promising perspectives, and combining both their very high specific surface area and the possibility to incorporate them into macrostructures have already shown to substantially increase the membrane performance. In this paper we report on the fabrication and engineering of metal-reinforced carbon nanotube (CNT) Bucky-Paper (BP) composites with tuneable porosity and surface pore size. A BP is an entangled mesh non-woven like structure of nanotubes. Pure CNT BPs present both very high porosity (>90%) and specific surface area (>400 m2/g). Furthermore, their pore size is generally between 20–50 nm making them promising candidates for various membrane and separation applications. Both electro-plating and electroless plating techniques were used to plate different series of BPs and offered various degrees of success. Here we will report mainly on electroless plated gold/CNT composites. The benefit of this method resides in the versatility of the plating and the opportunity to tune both average pore size and porosity of the structure with a high degree of reproducibility. The CNT BPs were first oxidized by short UV/O3 treatment, followed by successive immersion in different plating solutions. The morphology and properties of these samples has been investigated and their performance in air permeation and gas adsorption will be reported. PMID:24957493

  17. High porosity of basal till at Burroughs glacier, southeastern Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Ronnert, L.; Mickelson, D.M. )

    1992-09-01

    Debris-rich basal ice at Burroughs glacier, southeastern Alaska, has 60 vol% to 70 vol% debris. Recently deposited basal till exceeds 60 vol% sediment with 30% to almost 40% porosity. Where basal ice is very rich in debris, basal till is deposited through melt out with only slight compaction of the debris. Porosity this high in till is commonly associated with subglacially deforming and dilated sediment. However, the recently deposited basal melt-out till at Burroughs glacier has not been deformed after deposition, but has porosity values similar to tills elsewhere interpreted to be subglacially deforming and dilated in an unfrozen state. High porosity can occur in basal melt-out till deposited directly by basal melt out.

  18. A global prediction of seafloor sediment porosity using machine learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Kylara M.; Wood, Warren T.; Becker, Joseph J.

    2015-12-01

    Porosity (void ratio) is a critical parameter in models of acoustic propagation, bearing strength, and many other seafloor phenomena. However, like many seafloor phenomena, direct measurements are expensive and sparse. We show here how porosity everywhere at the seafloor can be estimated using a machine learning technique (specifically, Random Forests). Such techniques use sparsely acquired direct samples and dense grids of other parameters to produce a statistically optimal estimate where direct measurements are lacking. Our porosity estimate is both qualitatively more consistent with geologic principles than the results produced by interpolation and quantitatively more accurate than results produced by interpolation or regression methods. We present here a seafloor porosity estimate on a 5 arc min, pixel registered grid, produced using widely available, densely sampled grids of other seafloor properties. These techniques represent the only practical means of estimating seafloor properties in inaccessible regions of the seafloor (e.g., the Arctic).

  19. Controlling the Porosity and Microarchitecture of Hydrogels for Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Annabi, Nasim; Nichol, Jason W.; Zhong, Xia; Ji, Chengdong; Koshy, Sandeep; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2010-01-01

    Tissue engineering holds great promise for regeneration and repair of diseased tissues, making the development of tissue engineering scaffolds a topic of great interest in biomedical research. Because of their biocompatibility and similarities to native extracellular matrix, hydrogels have emerged as leading candidates for engineered tissue scaffolds. However, precise control of hydrogel properties, such as porosity, remains a challenge. Traditional techniques for creating bulk porosity in polymers have demonstrated success in hydrogels for tissue engineering; however, often the conditions are incompatible with direct cell encapsulation. Emerging technologies have demonstrated the ability to control porosity and the microarchitectural features in hydrogels, creating engineered tissues with structure and function similar to native tissues. In this review, we explore the various technologies for controlling the porosity and microarchitecture within hydrogels, and demonstrate successful applications of combining these techniques. PMID:20121414

  20. Judy Creek: Successful use of offset VSP to find porosity

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, A.; Pearcy, R.; Lee, H.; Hemingson, P.

    1994-12-31

    In March of 1993, Imperial Oil Resources Ltd. drilled the Judy Creek 14-7-64-10w5 well. The target was porosity on the front of the Judy Creek ``A`` reef. The well encountered poor porosity development. Available surface seismic was of low resolution, so an alternative method was sought to locate better porosity. An offset VSP was acquired, and an anomaly was observed on the P-wave data at a distance of 125 meters form the well. A short radius horizontal radial was drilled from the existing wellbore and encountered porosity development at 125 meters from the well bore. Subsequently, S-wave processing was carried out. Once again, an anomaly was observed at 125 meters form the well bore. The S-waves had the additional advantage of providing better resolution of the porous zone than the P-wave image.

  1. Electronic neutron sources for compensated porosity well logging

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Allan Xi; Antolak, Arlyn J; Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2012-02-01

    The viability of replacing Americium–Beryllium (Am–Be) radiological neutron sources in compensated porosity nuclear well logging tools with D–T or D–D accelerator-driven neutron sources is explored. The analysis consisted of developing a model for a typical well-logging borehole configuration and computing the helium-3 detector response to varying formation porosities using three different neutron sources (Am–Be, D–D, and D–T). The results indicate that, when normalized to the same source intensity, the use of a D–D neutron source has greater sensitivity for measuring the formation porosity than either an Am–Be or D–T source. The results of the study provide operational requirements that enable compensated porosity well logging with a compact, low power D–D neutron generator, which the current state-of-the-art indicates is technically achievable.

  2. Porosity-dependent fractal nature of the porous silicon surface

    SciTech Connect

    Rahmani, N.; Dariani, R. S.

    2015-07-15

    Porous silicon films with porosity ranging from 42% to 77% were fabricated by electrochemical anodization under different current density. We used atomic force microscopy and dynamic scaling theory for deriving the surface roughness profile and processing the topography of the porous silicon layers, respectively. We first compared the topography of bare silicon surface with porous silicon and then studied the effect of the porosity of porous silicon films on their scaling behavior by using their self-affinity nature. Our work demonstrated that silicon compared to the porous silicon films has the highest Hurst parameter, indicating that the formation of porous layer due to the anodization etching of silicon surface leads to an increase of its roughness. Fractal analysis revealed that the evolution of the nanocrystallites’ fractal dimension along with porosity. Also, we found that both interface width and Hurst parameter are affected by the increase of porosity.

  3. Electronic neutron sources for compensated porosity well logging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, A. X.; Antolak, A. J.; Leung, K.-N.

    2012-08-01

    The viability of replacing Americium-Beryllium (Am-Be) radiological neutron sources in compensated porosity nuclear well logging tools with D-T or D-D accelerator-driven neutron sources is explored. The analysis consisted of developing a model for a typical well-logging borehole configuration and computing the helium-3 detector response to varying formation porosities using three different neutron sources (Am-Be, D-D, and D-T). The results indicate that, when normalized to the same source intensity, the use of a D-D neutron source has greater sensitivity for measuring the formation porosity than either an Am-Be or D-T source. The results of the study provide operational requirements that enable compensated porosity well logging with a compact, low power D-D neutron generator, which the current state-of-the-art indicates is technically achievable.

  4. Positron annihilation characteristics in mesostructural silica films with various porosities

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, Bangyun; Mao, Wenfeng; Tang, Xiuqin; He, Chunqing

    2014-03-07

    Porous silica films with various porosities were prepared via a sol-gel method using a nonionic amphiphilic triblock copolymer F127 as the structure-directing agent. Doppler broadening of positron annihilation radiation (DBAR) spectra were collected for the prepared films using a variable energy slow positron beam. Different linear relationships between positron annihilation line shape parameters S and W are found for the as-deposited films and calcined ones, indicative of the decomposition of the copolymer porogen in the as-deposited films upon calcination. This also reveals the variation of positron annihilation sites as a function of F127 loading or porosity. Strong correlations between positronium 3γ annihilation fraction, S parameter and porosity of the mesoporous silica films with isolated pores are obtained, which may provide a complementary method to determine closed porosities of mesoporous silica films by DBAR.

  5. Porosity evolution of upper Miocene reefs, Almeria Province, southern Spain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Armstrong, A.K.; Snavely, P.D.; Addicott, W.O.

    1980-01-01

    Sea cliffs 40 km east of Almeria, southeastern Spain, expose upper Miocene reefs and patch reefs of the Plomo formation. These reefs are formed of scleractinian corals, calcareous algae, and mollusks. The reef cores are as much as 65 m thick and several hundred meters wide. Fore-reef talus beds extend 1,300 m across and are 40 m thick. The reefs and reef breccias are composed of calcific dolomite. They lie on volcanic rocks that have a K-Ar date of 11.5 m.y. and in turn are overlain by the upper Miocene Vicar Formation. In the reef cores and fore-reef breccia beds, porosity is both primary and postdepositional. Primary porosity is of three types: (a) boring clam holes in the scleractinian coral heads, cemented reef rocks, and breccias; (b) intraparticle porosity within the corals, Halimeda plates, and vermetid worm tubes; and (c) interparticle porosity between bioclastic fragments and in the reef breccia. Postdepositional moldic porosity was formed by the solution of aragonitic material such as molluscan and coral fragments. The Plomo reef carbonate rocks have high porosity and permeability, and retain a great amount of depositional porosity. Pores range in size from a few micrometers to 30 cm. The extensive intercrystalline porosity and high permeability resulted from dolomitization of micritic matrix. Dolomite rhombs are between 10 and 30 μ across. More moldic porosity was formed by the dissolution of the calclte bioclasts. Some porosity reduction has occurred by incomplete and partial sparry calcite infilling of interparticular, moldic, and intercrystalline voids. The high porosity and permeability of these reefs make them important targets for petroleum exploration in the western Mediterranean off southern Spain. In these offshore areas in the subsurface the volcanic ridge and the Plomo reef complex are locally onlapped or overlapped by 350 m or more of Miocene(?) and Pliocene fine-grained sedimentary rocks. The possibility exists that the buried Plomo reef

  6. Permeability-porosity relationships of subduction zone sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gamage, K.; Screaton, E.; Bekins, B.; Aiello, I.

    2011-01-01

    Permeability-porosity relationships for sediments from the northern Barbados, Costa Rica, Nankai, and Peru subduction zones were examined based on sediment type, grain size distribution, and general mechanical and chemical compaction history. Greater correlation was observed between permeability and porosity in siliciclastic sediments, diatom oozes, and nannofossil chalks than in nannofossil oozes. For siliciclastic sediments, grouping of sediments by percentage of clay-sized material yields relationships that are generally consistent with results from other marine settings and suggests decreasing permeability as percentage of clay-sized material increases. Correction of measured porosities for smectite content improved the correlation of permeability-porosity relationships for siliciclastic sediments and diatom oozes. The relationship between permeability and porosity for diatom oozes is very similar to the relationship in siliciclastic sediments, and permeabilities of both sediment types are related to the amount of clay-size particles. In contrast, nannofossil oozes have higher permeability values by 1.5 orders of magnitude than siliciclastic sediments of the same porosity and show poor correlation between permeability and porosity. More indurated calcareous sediments, nannofossil chalks, overlap siliciclastic permeabilities at the lower end of their measured permeability range, suggesting similar consolidation patterns at depth. Thus, the lack of correlation between permeability and porosity for nannofossil oozes is likely related to variations in mechanical and chemical compaction at shallow depths. This study provides the foundation for a much-needed global database with fundamental properties that relate to permeability in marine settings. Further progress in delineating controls on permeability requires additional carefully documented permeability measurements on well-characterized samples. ?? 2010 Elsevier B.V.

  7. Properties of Bulk Sintered Silver As a Function of Porosity

    SciTech Connect

    Wereszczak, Andrew A; Vuono, Daniel J; Wang, Hsin; Ferber, Mattison K; Liang, Zhenxian

    2012-06-01

    This report summarizes a study where various properties of bulk-sintered silver were investigated over a range of porosity. This work was conducted within the National Transportation Research Center's Power Device Packaging project that is part of the DOE Vehicle Technologies Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Motors Program. Sintered silver, as an interconnect material in power electronics, inherently has porosity in its produced structure because of the way it is made. Therefore, interest existed in this study to examine if that porosity affected electrical properties, thermal properties, and mechanical properties because any dependencies could affect the intended function (e.g., thermal transfer, mechanical stress relief, etc.) or reliability of that interconnect layer and alter how its performance is modeled. Disks of bulk-sintered silver were fabricated using different starting silver pastes and different sintering conditions to promote different amounts of porosity. Test coupons were harvested out of the disks to measure electrical resistivity and electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity, coefficient of thermal expansion, elastic modulus, Poisson's ratio, and yield stress. The authors fully recognize that the microstructure of processed bulk silver coupons may indeed not be identical to the microstructure produced in thin (20-50 microns) layers of sintered silver. However, measuring these same properties with such a thin actual structure is very difficult, requires very specialized specimen preparation and unique testing instrumentation, is expensive, and has experimental shortfalls of its own, so the authors concluded that the herein measured responses using processed bulk sintered silver coupons would be sufficient to determine acceptable values of those properties. Almost all the investigated properties of bulk sintered silver changed with porosity content within a range of 3-38% porosity. Electrical resistivity, electrical conductivity, thermal

  8. Effect of porosity and the inlet heat transfer fluid temperature variation on the performance of cool thermal energy storage system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheralathan, M.; Velraj, R.; Renganarayanan, S.

    2007-06-01

    This paper discusses the results of numerical and experimental study of an encapsulated cool thermal energy storage system. The storage system is a cylindrical storage tank filled with phase change material encapsulated in spherical container, placed in a refrigeration loop. A simulation program was developed to evaluate the temperature histories of the heat transfer fluid and the phase change material at any axial location during the charging period. The present analysis aims at studying the influence of the inlet heat transfer fluid temperature and porosity on system performance. An experimental setup was designed and constructed to conduct the experiments. The results of the model were validated by comparison with experimental results of temperature profiles for different inlet heat transfer fluid temperatures and porosity. The results are in good agreement with the experimental results. The results reported are much useful for designing cool thermal energy storage systems.

  9. Porosity Measurements and Analysis for Metal Additive Manufacturing Process Control.

    PubMed

    Slotwinski, John A; Garboczi, Edward J; Hebenstreit, Keith M

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing techniques can produce complex, high-value metal parts, with potential applications as critical metal components such as those found in aerospace engines and as customized biomedical implants. Material porosity in these parts is undesirable for aerospace parts - since porosity could lead to premature failure - and desirable for some biomedical implants - since surface-breaking pores allows for better integration with biological tissue. Changes in a part's porosity during an additive manufacturing build may also be an indication of an undesired change in the build process. Here, we present efforts to develop an ultrasonic sensor for monitoring changes in the porosity in metal parts during fabrication on a metal powder bed fusion system. The development of well-characterized reference samples, measurements of the porosity of these samples with multiple techniques, and correlation of ultrasonic measurements with the degree of porosity are presented. A proposed sensor design, measurement strategy, and future experimental plans on a metal powder bed fusion system are also presented.

  10. Porosity Measurements and Analysis for Metal Additive Manufacturing Process Control.

    PubMed

    Slotwinski, John A; Garboczi, Edward J; Hebenstreit, Keith M

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing techniques can produce complex, high-value metal parts, with potential applications as critical metal components such as those found in aerospace engines and as customized biomedical implants. Material porosity in these parts is undesirable for aerospace parts - since porosity could lead to premature failure - and desirable for some biomedical implants - since surface-breaking pores allows for better integration with biological tissue. Changes in a part's porosity during an additive manufacturing build may also be an indication of an undesired change in the build process. Here, we present efforts to develop an ultrasonic sensor for monitoring changes in the porosity in metal parts during fabrication on a metal powder bed fusion system. The development of well-characterized reference samples, measurements of the porosity of these samples with multiple techniques, and correlation of ultrasonic measurements with the degree of porosity are presented. A proposed sensor design, measurement strategy, and future experimental plans on a metal powder bed fusion system are also presented. PMID:26601041

  11. Porosity Measurements and Analysis for Metal Additive Manufacturing Process Control

    PubMed Central

    Slotwinski, John A; Garboczi, Edward J; Hebenstreit, Keith M

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing techniques can produce complex, high-value metal parts, with potential applications as critical metal components such as those found in aerospace engines and as customized biomedical implants. Material porosity in these parts is undesirable for aerospace parts - since porosity could lead to premature failure - and desirable for some biomedical implants - since surface-breaking pores allows for better integration with biological tissue. Changes in a part’s porosity during an additive manufacturing build may also be an indication of an undesired change in the build process. Here, we present efforts to develop an ultrasonic sensor for monitoring changes in the porosity in metal parts during fabrication on a metal powder bed fusion system. The development of well-characterized reference samples, measurements of the porosity of these samples with multiple techniques, and correlation of ultrasonic measurements with the degree of porosity are presented. A proposed sensor design, measurement strategy, and future experimental plans on a metal powder bed fusion system are also presented. PMID:26601041

  12. Double porosity modeling in elastic wave propagation for reservoir characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Berryman, J. G., LLNL

    1998-06-01

    Phenomenological equations for the poroelastic behavior of a double porosity medium have been formulated and the coefficients in these linear equations identified. The generalization from a single porosity model increases the number of independent coefficients from three to six for an isotropic applied stress. In a quasistatic analysis, the physical interpretations are based upon considerations of extremes in both spatial and temporal scales. The limit of very short times is the one most relevant for wave propagation, and in this case both matrix porosity and fractures behave in an undrained fashion. For the very long times more relevant for reservoir drawdown,the double porosity medium behaves as an equivalent single porosity medium At the macroscopic spatial level, the pertinent parameters (such as the total compressibility) may be determined by appropriate field tests. At the mesoscopic scale pertinent parameters of the rock matrix can be determined directly through laboratory measurements on core, and the compressibility can be measured for a single fracture. We show explicitly how to generalize the quasistatic results to incorporate wave propagation effects and how effects that are usually attributed to squirt flow under partially saturated conditions can be explained alternatively in terms of the double-porosity model. The result is therefore a theory that generalizes, but is completely consistent with, Biot`s theory of poroelasticity and is valid for analysis of elastic wave data from highly fractured reservoirs.

  13. Integrated design of castings: effect of porosity on mechanical performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardin, R. A.; Beckermann, C.

    2012-07-01

    Porosity can significantly reduce the strength and durability of castings in service. An integrated design approach has been developed where casting simulation is combined with mechanical performance simulations. Predictions of the porosity distribution from the casting process simulation are transferred to and used in stress and fatigue life simulations. Thus, the effect of casting quality on service performance can be evaluated. Results of a study are presented where the measured porosity distribution in cast steel specimens is transferred to an elasto-plastic finite-element stress analysis model. Methods are developed to locally reduce the mechanical properties according to the porosity present, without having to resolve individual pores. Plastic deformation is modeled using porous metal plasticity theory. The predictions are compared to tensile measurements performed on the specimens. The complex deformations and the reductions in the ductility of the specimens due to porosity are predicted well. The predicted stresses are transferred to a fatigue analysis code that takes the porosity distribution into account as well. The measured and predicted fatigue lives are also in good agreement. Finally, the results of a case study are presented that illustrate the utility of the present integrated approach in optimizing the design of a steel casting.

  14. Maxillary Air Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Doucette-Preville, Stephane; Tamm, Alexander; Khetani, Justin; Wright, Erin; Emery, Derek

    2013-01-01

    Pathologic dilatation of the maxillary sinus by air is a rare condition with unclear etiology. We present a case of a 17 year old male with a maxillary air cyst diagnosed by computed tomography. The CT demonstrated air-filled expansion of the maxillary sinus beyond the normal anatomical limits with associated cortical bone thinning. The case report highlights the pathognomonic computed tomography findings of this rare entity and discusses the perplexing nomenclature, proposed etiologies and various treatment options. PMID:24421932

  15. Time-series analysis for determining vertical air permeability in unsaturated zones

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, N.

    1999-01-01

    The air pressure in the unsaturated subsurface changes dynamically as the barometric pressure varies with time. Depending on the material properties and boundary conditions, the intensity of the correlation between the atmospheric and subsurface pressures may be evidenced in two persistent patterns: (1) the amplitude attenuation; and (2) the phase lag for the principal modes, such as the diurnal, semidiurnal, and 8-h tides. The amplitude attenuation and the phase lag generally depend on properties that can be classified into two categories: (1) The barometric pressure parameters, such as the apparent pressure amplitudes and frequencies controlled by the atmospheric tides and others; and (2) the material properties of porous media, such as the air viscosity, air-filled porosity, and permeability. Based on the principle of superposition and a Fourier time-series analysis, an analytical solution for predicting the subsurface air pressure variation caused by the atmospheric pressure fluctuation is presented. The air permeability (or pneumatic diffusivity) can be quantitatively determined by using the calculated amplitude attenuations (or phase lags) and the appropriate analytical relations among the parameters of the atmosphere and the porous medium. An analysis using the field data shows that the Fourier time-series analysis may provide a potentially reliable and simple method for predicting the subsurface barometric pressure variation and for determining the air permeability of unsaturated zones.

  16. Field determination of vertical permeability to air in the unsaturated zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weeks, Edwin P.

    1978-01-01

    The vertical permeability to air of layered materials in the unsaturated zone may be determined from air pressure data obtained at depth during a period when air pressure is changing at land surface. Such data may be obtained by monitoring barometric pressure with a microbarograph or surveying altimeter and simultaneously measuring down-hole pneumatic head differences in specially constructed piezometers. These data, coupled with air-filled porosity data from other sources, may be compared with the results of electric-analog or numerical solution of the one-dimensional diffusion equation to make a trial-and-error determination of the air permeability for each layer. The permeabilities to air may in turn be converted to equivalent hydraulic conductivity values if the materials are well drained, are permeable enough that the Klinkenberg effect is small, and are structurally unaffected by wetting. The method offers potential advantages over present methods to evaluate sites for artificial recharge by spreading; to evaluate ground-water pollution hazards from feedlots, sanitary landfills , and land irrigated with sewage effluent; and to evaluate sites for temporary storage of gas in the unsaturated zone. (Woodard-USGS)

  17. Method and apparatus for filling thermal insulating systems

    DOEpatents

    Arasteh, Dariush K.

    1992-01-01

    A method for filling insulated glazing units is disclosed. The method utilizes a vacuum chamber in which the insulated glazing units are placed. The insulated glazing units and vacuum chamber are evacuated simultaneously. The units are then refilled with a low conductance gas such as Krypton while the chamber is simultaneously refilled with air.

  18. Method and apparatus for filling thermal insulating systems

    DOEpatents

    Arasteh, D.K.

    1992-01-14

    A method for filling insulated glazing units is disclosed. The method utilizes a vacuum chamber in which the insulated glazing units are placed. The insulated glazing units and vacuum chamber are evacuated simultaneously. The units are then refilled with a low conductance gas such as Krypton while the chamber is simultaneously refilled with air. 3 figs.

  19. Electrical Transport Through Micro Porous Track Etch Membranes of same Porosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garg, Ravish; Kumar, Vijay; Kumar, Dinesh; Chakarvarti, S. K.

    2012-12-01

    Porosity, pore size and thickness of membrane are vital factors to influence the transport phenomena through micro porous track etch membranes (TEMs) and affect the various applications like separations, drug release, flow control, bio-sensing and cell size detection etc. based on transport process. Therefore, a better understanding of transport mechanism through TEMs is required for new applications in various thrust areas like biomedical devices and packaging of foods and drugs. Transport studies of electrolytic solutions of potassium chloride, through porous polycarbonate TEMS having cylindrical pores of size 0.2 μm and 0.4 μm with same porosity of 15%, have been carried out using an electrochemical cell. In this technique, the etched filter is sandwiched between two compartments of cell in such a way that the TEM acts as a membrane separating the cell into two chambers. The two chambers are then filled with electrolyte solution (KCl in distilled water). The current voltage characteristics have been drawn by stepping the voltage ranging 0 to 10 V using Keithley 2400 Series Source Measurement Unit. The results indicate that rate of ion transport through cylindrical pores although is independent of pore size of TEMs of same porosity but there seems to be effect of TEM aperture size exposed to the electrolyte used in conducting cell on ion transport magnitude. From the experimental studies, a large deviation in the conduction through TEMs was observed when compared with theoretical consideration which led to the need for modification in the applicability of simple Ohm's law to the conduction through TEMs. It is found that ion transport increases with increase in area of aperture of TEM but much lower than the expected theoretically value.

  20. Elastic mesh with thermoplastic polyurethane filaments preserves effective porosity of textile implants.

    PubMed

    Lambertz, Andreas; Vogels, Ruben R M; Binnebösel, Marcel; Schöb, Dominik S; Kossel, Klas; Klinge, Uwe; Neumann, Ulf P; Klink, Christian D

    2015-08-01

    In hernia surgery, meshes with small pores tend to be filled by fibrous tissue, which reduces their stretchability and causes patient complaints. Because of the inelasticity of current meshes, mechanical strain might cause pores to collapse even in large-pore mesh constructions. In this study, a mesh with elastic thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) filaments was constructed to prevent pore size changes even under mechanical strain, and its biocompatibility in comparison with polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) was evaluated. A mesh was constructed using PVDF with elastic TPU filaments and mechanically tested. After midline laparotomy in 20 rabbits, we placed a 15 cm × 3 cm mesh as inlay in the defect. Animals were randomized to either the TPU or PVDF group. After 7 or 21 days, mesh expansion was measured under pneumoperitoneum, and abdominal walls were explanted for immunohistochemical investigations. In vitro, TPU meshes showed a slight reduction in effective porosity from 46% at tension-free conditions to 26% under longitudinal and to 34% under transverse strain. The nonelastic PVDF meshes showed a marked reduction in effective porosity from 70% to 7% and 52%, respectively. The TPU mesh had a breaking elongation of 101% and a tensile strength of 35 N/cm. In vivo, both meshes achieved healing of the incision without hernial defect. The TPU mesh maintained its elasticity under pneumoperitoneum. The amount of CD68-positive, Ki67-positive, and apoptotic cells was significantly lower in the TPU group after 7 and 21 days. The newly developed TPU mesh shows elasticity, structural stability, and preserved effective porosity under mechanical strain. Immunohistochemistry indicates superior biocompatibility of TPU mesh compared with PVDF after 7 and 21 days.

  1. Permeability Evolution and the Mechanisms of Porosity Change (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, W.; Gribbin, J. L.; Tivey, M. K.

    2013-12-01

    Understanding subsurface fluid flow is of critical importance to such geological and engineering applications as faulting mechanics, hydrothermal venting and resource recovery. Mechanical, chemical and thermal loads can significantly alter microscopic pore geometry and thus affect macroscopic permeability. Recently, we measured the permeability and porosity of massive anhydrite deposits recovered from various seafloor hydrothermal vent fields. Together, these deposits comprise anhydrite samples that have undergone different stages of formation. For anhydrite samples with porosities greater than 5%, the dependence of permeability to porosity change is best characterized by a power-law relationship with an exponent n~9. At porosities less than 5%, a much gentler trend of n~1 is observed. These permeability-porosity relationships (PPRs) in anhydrite deposits are in stark contrast to those of Fontainebleau sandstone, a quartz arenite with various degrees of quartz cementation. Fontainebleau sandstone shows a power-law dependence of PPR with an exponent of n~3 for samples with porosities greater than 7%, and a much steeper trend of n~8 at low porosities [Bourbie and Zinszner, 1985]. Microstructural analysis and numerical models suggest that the significant loss in pore connectivity below 7% is responsible for the steeper PPR trend in Fontainebleau sandstone [Zhu et al., 1995]. In anhydrite deposits, petrographic analyses show evidence for both dissolution and precipitation, consistent with the observed PPRs resulting from pore-size controlled solubility. Precipitation of anhydrite takes place preferentially in large pores within the anhydrite deposits, with precipitation limited in small pores, which is proposed to be due to the change in interfacial energy of the growing crystal (e.g., as described by Emmanuel and Ague [2009]). With abundant large voids in high porosity anhydrite samples, the growth of sulfates would result in a drastic loss of pore connectivity and

  2. Failure mechanisms of nano-silicon anodes upon cycling: an electrode porosity evolution model.

    PubMed

    Radvanyi, Etienne; Porcher, Willy; De Vito, Eric; Montani, Alexandre; Franger, Sylvain; Jouanneau Si Larbi, Séverine

    2014-08-28

    With a specific capacity of 3600 mA h g(-1), silicon is a promising anode active material for Li-ion batteries (LIBs). However, because of the huge volume changes undergone by Si particles upon (de)alloying with lithium, Si electrodes suffer from rapid capacity fading. A deep understanding of the associated failure mechanisms is necessary to improve these electrochemical performances. To reach this goal, we investigate here nano-Si based electrodes by several characterization techniques. Thanks to all these techniques, many aspects, such as the behaviour of the active material or the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) and the lithiation mechanisms, are studied upon cycling. A clear picture of the failure mechanisms of nano-Si based electrodes is provided. In particular, by combining Hg analyses, SEM observations of electrode cross-sections, and EIS measurements, we follow the evolution of the porosity within the electrode. For the first time, our results clearly show a real dynamic of the pore size distribution: the first cycles lead to the formation of a micrometric porosity which is not present initially. During the following cycles, these large pores are progressively filled up with SEI products which form continuously at the Si particle surface. Thus, from the 50th cycle, Li(+) ion diffusion is dramatically hindered leading to a strongly heterogeneous lithiation of the electrode and a rapid capacity fading.

  3. Quantification of trapped gas redistribution in dual-porosity media with continuous and discontinuous domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snehota, Michal; Sacha, Jan; Jelinkova, Vladimira; Cislerova, Milena; Vontobel, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Nonwetting phase (residual air) is trapped in the porous media at water contents close to the saturation. Trapped gas phase resides in pores in form of bubbles, blobs or cluster forming residual gas saturation. In homogeneous soil media trapped gas is relatively stable until it is released upon porous media drainage. If porous media remain saturated, trapped gas can slowly dissolve in response to changed air solubility of surrounding water. In heterogeneous media, relatively rapid change in the trapped gas distribution can be observed soon after the gas is initially trapped during infiltration. It has been recently shown that the mass transfer of gas is directed from regions of fine porosity to regions of coarse porosity. The mass transfer was quantified by means of neutron tomography for the case of dual porosity sample under steady state flow. However the underlying mechanism of the gas mass transfer is still not clear. Based on the robust experience of visualization of the flow within heterogeneous samples, it seems that due to the huge local (microscopic) pressure gradients between contrasting pore radii the portion of faster flowing water becomes attracted into small pores of high capillary pressure. The process depends on the initial distribution of entrapped air which has to be considered as random in dependence on the history and circumstances of wetting/drying. In this study, the redistribution of trapped gas was quantitatively studied by 3D neutron imaging on samples composed of fine porous ceramic and coarse sand. The redistribution of water was studied under no-flow and steady state flow conditions. Two different inner geometries of the samples were developed. In the first case the low permeability regions (ceramics) were disconnected, while in the second structure, the fine porosity material was continuous from the top to the bottom of the sample. Quantitative 3D neutron tomography imaging revealed similar redistribution process in both cases of

  4. Porosity and Velocity Relations of Grosmont Formation, Alberta, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keehm, Y.; Hu, D.

    2010-12-01

    We present results on porosty-velocity relations of Grosmont formation, Alberta, Canada, which is one of largest bitumen carbonate reservoirs. Grosmont formation is divided into four units: LG; UG-1; UG-2; and UG-3 from the bottom. Two lower units are mainly imestone, while upper units are mostly dolomite with vuggy porosity and fractures, which makes the upper units be a good reservoir. Rock physics modeling was then performed to quantify porosity-velocity relations for the four units, which enables us to predict porosity from seismic data. To incorporate the pore-scale details in the modeling, we used DEM (differential effective medium) models. Two lower units are very similar in velocity-porosity domain, thus the relations can be represented by one velocity-porosity model, which is used as our reference model. For the UG-2 unit, we found that one model cannot represent the unit since the degree of fracturing are heterogeneous from location to location. We thus suggested three different DEM models for the UG-2 unit: vuggy-dominant; mildly-fractured; and heavily-fractured. The UG-3 units can be modeled with vuggy porosity, and fractures were not very noticeable. We also investigated the spatial variation of the UG-2 unit, and found that the degree of fracturing is generally proportional to the proximity to the unconformity boundary, where the fresh water invasion can be dominant. In conclusion, we proposed velocity-porosity relations for the four units in Grosmont formation, and believe that these models can help to characterize the reservoir quality. In addition, since the proximity of reservoir to the unconformity boundary highly affects the degree of fracturing, a careful analysis of spatial variation would be essential for the successful characterization of Grosmont formation. Acknowledgement: This work was supported by the Energy R&D program of the Korea Institute of Energy Technology Evaluation and Planning (KETEP) grant funded by the Korea government

  5. Prevention of Porosity Formation and Other Effects of Gaseous Elements in Iron Castings

    SciTech Connect

    Albany Research Center

    2005-04-01

    Iron foundries have observed porosity primarily as interdendritic porosity in large freezing range alloys such as Ni-Hard I and hypoeutectic high Cr alloys or pinholes and fissure defects in gray and ductile irons. For most iron foundries, porosity problems occur sporadically, but even occasional outbreaks can be costly since even a very small amount of porosity can significantly reduce the mechanical properties of the castings. As a result when porosity is detected, the castings are scrapped and remelted, or when the porosity is undetected, defective parts are shipped to the consumer. Neither case is desirable. This project was designed to examine various factors contributing to the porosity formation in iron castings. Factors such as solubility of gases in liquid and solid iron alloys, surface tension of liquid iron alloys, and permeability of dendritic structures were investigated in terms of their effect on the porosity formation. A method was developed to predict how much nitrogen the molten alloy picks up from air after a given amount of holding time for a given melting practice. It was shown that small batches of iron melts in an induction furnace can end up with very high concentration of nitrogen (near solubility limit). Surface tension of liquid iron alloys was measured as a function of temperature. Effect of minor additions of S, Ti, and Al on the surface tension of liquid iron alloys was investigated. Up to 18% change in surface tension was detected by minor element additions. This translates to the same amount of change in gas pressure required in a bubble of a given size to keep the bubble stable. A new method was developed to measure the permeability of dendritic structures in situ. The innovative aspect of these experiments, with respect to previous interdendritic permeability measurements, was the fact that the dendritic structure was allowed to form in situ and was not cooled and re-heated for permeability tests. A permeability model was developed

  6. Thermal management improvement of an air-cooled high-power lithium-ion battery by embedding metal foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadian, Shahabeddin K.; Rassoulinejad-Mousavi, Seyed Moein; Zhang, Yuwen

    2015-11-01

    Effect of embedding aluminum porous metal foam inside the flow channels of an air-cooled Li-ion battery module was studied to improve its thermal management. Four different cases of metal foam insert were examined using three-dimensional transient numerical simulations. The effects of permeability and porosity of the porous medium as well as state of charge were investigated on the standard deviation of the temperature field and maximum temperature inside the battery in all four cases. Compared to the case of no porous insert, embedding aluminum metal foam in the air flow channel significantly improved the thermal management of Li-ion battery cell. The results also indicated that, decreasing the porosity of the porous structure decreases both standard deviation of the temperature field and maximum temperature inside the battery. Moreover, increasing the permeability of the metal foam drops the maximum temperature inside the battery while decreasing this property leads to improving the temperature uniformity. Our results suggested that, among the all studied cases, desirable temperature uniformity and maximum temperature were achieved when two-third and the entire air flow channel is filled with aluminum metal foam, respectively.

  7. Shale diagenesis: an important factor in development of secondary porosity

    SciTech Connect

    McMahon, D.A. Jr.

    1988-02-01

    Abundant secondary porosity due to the dissolution of feldspar grains, volcanic rock fragments, and carbonate cement has been observed in thin-section studies of reservoir sandstones in the McAllen Ranch field in south Texas. Secondary porosity develops in fluid flow pathways within the sandstones. Potentiometric profiles indicate that within the overpressured Oligocene strata, head gradients cause pore fluids to flow from the shales into the sandstones and toward major growth faults that bound the fields. The dissolution reactions responsible for the secondary porosity require that the pore fluid be acidic. Shale diagenesis provides an important source of hydrogen ions for these reactions. The transformation of smectite clay to illite has been well documented in the Oligocene shales in this area. The smectite to illite reaction (assuming mobile Al/sup +3/) is discussed as well as the reduction of Fe/sup +3/. Mass balance calculations in the study area indicate that the amount of acid produced by these reactions within the adjacent shales can easily account for the amount of secondary dissolution porosity observed in the sandstones. The exploration and exploitation of these types of sandstone reservoirs can be improved by a better understanding of the processes involved in the formation of secondary porosity.

  8. Hemodynamic transition driven by stent porosity in sidewall aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Bouillot, Pierre; Brina, Olivier; Ouared, Rafik; Lovblad, Karl-Olof; Farhat, Mohamed; Pereira, Vitor Mendes

    2015-05-01

    The healing process of intracranial aneurysms (IAs) treated with flow diverter stents (FDSs) depends on the IA flow modifications and on the epithelization process over the neck. In sidewall IA models with straight parent artery, two main hemodynamic regimes with different flow patterns and IA flow magnitude were broadly observed for unstented and high porosity stented IA on one side, and low porosity stented IA on the other side. The hemodynamic transition between these two regimes is potentially involved in thrombosis formation. In the present study, CFD simulations and multi-time lag (MTL) particle imaging velocimetry (PIV) measurements were combined to investigate the physical nature of this transition. Measurable velocity fields and non-measurable shear stress and pressure fields were assessed experimentally and numerically in the aneurysm volume in the presence of stents with various porosities. The two main regimes observed in both PIV and CFD showed typical flow features of shear and pressure driven regimes. In particular, the waveform of the averaged IA velocities was matching both the shear stress waveform at IA neck or the pressure gradient waveform in parent artery. Moreover, the transition between the two regimes was controlled by stent porosity: a decrease of stent porosity leads to an increase (decrease) of pressure differential (shear stress) through IA neck. Finally, a good PIV-CFD agreement was found except in transitional regimes and low motion eddies due to small mismatch of PIV-CFD running conditions. PMID:25798761

  9. Porosity investigation of compacted bentonite using XRD profile modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmboe, Michael; Wold, Susanna; Jonsson, Mats

    2012-02-01

    Many countries intend to use compacted bentonite as a barrier in their deep geological repositories for nuclear waste. In order to describe and predict hydraulic conductivity or radionuclide transport through the bentonite barrier, fundamental understanding of the microstructure of compacted bentonite is needed. This study examined the interlayer swelling and overall microstructure of Wyoming Bentonite MX-80 and the corresponding homo-ionic Na + and Ca 2 + forms, using XRD with samples saturated under confined swelling conditions and free swelling conditions. For the samples saturated under confined conditions, the interparticle, or so-called free or external porosity was estimated by comparing the experimental interlayer distances obtained from one-dimensional XRD profile fitting against the maximum interlayer distances possible for the corresponding water content. The results showed that interlayer porosity dominated total porosity, irrespective of water content, and that the interparticle porosity was lower than previously reported in the literature. At compactions relevant for the saturated bentonite barrier (1.4-1.8 g/cm 3), the interparticle porosity was estimated to ≤ 3%.

  10. Testing Mercury Porosimetry with 3D Printed Porosity Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasiuk, F.; Ewing, R. P.; Hu, Q.

    2014-12-01

    Mercury intrusion porosimetry is one of the most widely used techniques to study the porous nature of a geological and man-made materials. In the geosciences, it is commonly used to describe petroleum reservoir and seal rocks as well as to grade aggregates for the design of asphalt and portland cement concretes. It's wide utility stems from its ability to characterize a wide range of pore throat sizes (from nanometers to around a millimeter). The fundamental physical model underlying mercury intrusion porosimetry, the Washburn Equation, is based on the assumption that rock porosity can be described as a bundle of cylindrical tubes. 3D printing technology, also known as rapid prototyping, allows the construction of intricate and accurate models, exactly what is required to build models of rock porosity. We evaluate the applicability of the Washburn Equation by comparing properties (like porosity, pore and pore throat size distribution, and surface area) computed on digital porosity models (built from CT data, CAD designs, or periodic geometries) to properties measured via mercury intrusion porosimetry on 3D printed versions of the same digital porosity models.

  11. Fluid-structure interaction modeling of ringsail parachutes with disreefing and modified geometric porosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takizawa, Kenji; Fritze, Matthew; Montes, Darren; Spielman, Timothy; Tezduyar, Tayfun E.

    2012-12-01

    Fluid-structure interaction (FSI) modeling of parachutes poses a number of computational challenges. These include the lightness of the parachute canopy compared to the air masses involved in the parachute dynamics, in the case of ringsail parachutes the geometric porosity created by the construction of the canopy from "rings" and "sails" with hundreds of "ring gaps" and "sail slits," in the case of parachute clusters the contact between the parachutes, and "disreefing" from one stage to another when the parachute is used in multiple stages. The Team for Advanced Flow Simulation and Modeling (T⋆AFSM) has been successfully addressing these computational challenges with the Stabilized Space-Time FSI (SSTFSI) technique, which was developed and improved over the years by the T⋆AFSM and serves as the core numerical technology, and a number of special techniques developed in conjunction with the SSTFSI technique. The quasi-direct and direct coupling techniques developed by the T⋆AFSM, which are applicable to cases with nonmatching fluid and structure meshes at the interface, yield more robust algorithms for FSI computations where the structure is light. The special technique used in dealing with the geometric complexities of the rings and sails is the homogenized modeling of geometric porosity (HMGP), which was developed and improved in recent years by the T⋆AFSM. The surface-edge-node contact tracking (SENCT) technique was introduced by the T⋆AFSM as a contact algorithm where the objective is to prevent the structural surfaces from coming closer than a minimum distance in an FSI computation. The recently-introduced conservative version of the SENCT technique is more robust and is now an essential technology in the parachute cluster computations carried out by the T⋆AFSM. As an additional computational challenge, the parachute canopy might, by design, have some of its panels and sails removed. In FSI computation of parachutes with such "modified geometric

  12. Determining the Porosity and Saturated Hydraulic Conductivity of Binary Mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z. F.; Ward, Anderson L.; Keller, Jason M.

    2009-09-27

    Gravels and coarse sands make up significant portions of some environmentally important sediments, while the hydraulic properties of the sediments are typically obtained in the laboratory using only the fine fraction (e.g., <2 mm or 4.75 mm). Researchers have found that the content of gravel has significant impacts on the hydraulic properties of the bulk soils. Laboratory experiments were conducted to measure the porosity and the saturated hydraulic conductivity of binary mixtures with different fractions of coarse and fine components. We proposed a mixing-coefficient model to estimate the porosity and a power-averaging method to determine the effective particle diameter and further to predict the saturated hydraulic conductivity of binary mixtures. The proposed methods could well estimate the porosity and saturated hydraulic conductivity of the binary mixtures for the full range of gravel contents and was successfully applied to two data sets in the literature.

  13. Porosity estimation of aged mortar using a micromechanical model.

    PubMed

    Hernández, M G; Anaya, J J; Sanchez, T; Segura, I

    2006-12-22

    Degradation of concrete structures located in high humidity atmospheres or under flowing water is a very important problem. In this study, a method for ultrasonic non-destructive characterization in aged mortar is presented. The proposed method makes a prediction of the behaviour of aged mortar accomplished with a three phase micromechanical model using ultrasonic measurements. Aging mortar was accelerated by immersing the probes in ammonium nitrate solution. Both destructive and non-destructive characterization of mortar was performed. Destructive tests of porosity were performed using a vacuum saturation method and non-destructive characterization was carried out using ultrasonic velocities. Aging experiments show that mortar degradation not only involves a porosity increase, but also microstructural changes in the cement matrix. Experimental results show that the estimated porosity using the proposed non-destructive methodology had a comparable performance to classical destructive techniques.

  14. Tensile strengths and porosities of solar system primitive bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trigo-Rodriguez, J. M.; Llorca, J.; Blum, J.

    Recent measurements of asteroid bulk densities suggest that rubble-pile asteroids with typical porosities of 30 to 50% may be common (Britt et al., 2006). However, the presence of such objects doesn't mean necessarily that the initial porosity had been preserved (Kerridge, 1993). In fact, the fluffy aggregates produced in laboratory experiments that we expect to be representative of the oldest protoplanetary disk materials, exhibit even higher porosities (Blum et al., 2006). Recent results confirm that primitive meteorites (like e.g. CM carbonaceous chondrites) are compacted samples of the nebula matter exhibiting different density and porosity that their precursors materials (Trigo-Rodríguez et al., 2006). Consequently, aqueous alteration, brecciation, and impact-induced metamorphism make very unlikely to find pristine bodies between the asteroidal population. However, there is clear evidence for the existence of high-porosity bodies between the C-type asteroids like e.g. Mathilde (Housen et al., 1999) or the Tagish Lake parent body (Brown et al., 2002). Although extensive post-accretionary processing of meteorite parent bodies can produce high degrees of porosity, only the most pristine ones seem to preserve more than 50% of porosity. Consequently, we should look for these low strength bodies among the C-type asteroids, or very especially in some unprocessed comets that continue being representative of the precursor materials. Recent suggestion that CI1 chondrites are originated from comets should be studied in this context (Gounelle et al., 2006). Particularly, we think that studies of the porosity and strength of primitive meteorites would provide valuable clues on the origin and nature of their parent bodies. REFERENCES Blum J., R. Schräpler, B.J.R. Davidson and J.M. Trigo-Rodríguez (2006) Astroph. J., submitted. Britt D.T., G.J. Consolmagno, and W.J. Merline (2006) Lunar Planet. Sci. Conf. Abstract #2214. Brown, P. G., D. O. Revelle, E. Tagliaferri, and A

  15. Released micromachined beams utilizing laterally uniform porosity porous silicon

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Suspended micromachined porous silicon beams with laterally uniform porosity are reported, which have been fabricated using standard photolithography processes designed for compatibility with complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) processes. Anodization, annealing, reactive ion etching, repeated photolithography, lift off and electropolishing processes were used to release patterned porous silicon microbeams on a Si substrate. This is the first time that micromachined, suspended PS microbeams have been demonstrated with laterally uniform porosity, well-defined anchors and flat surfaces. PACS 81.16.-c; 81.16.Nd; 81.16.Rf PMID:25221457

  16. Porosity evaluation in aircraft composite parts using laser-ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubois, Marc; Deaton, John B.; Lorraine, Peter W.; Drake, Tommy E.; Acres, Paul H.; Osterkamp, Mark A.

    2001-04-01

    In polymer-matrix composites, porosity must be evaluated and ultrasonic inspection is a proven technique to assess this parameter. To standardize reject criteria among different ultrasonic systems, ultrasonic systems must be quantitatively compared. Samples with different levels of porosity fabricated especially for a round robin were scanned using the laser-ultrasound facility built at Lockheed Martin Aerospace Fort Worth. The results obtained agree qualitatively and quantitatively with the results obtained on the same samples using conventional ultrasonic systems. Overall, the laser-ultrasound accuracy is equivalent to the average conventional system but with an inspection speed more than ten times faster.

  17. Paleovalley fills: Trunk vs. tributary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kvale, E.P.; Archer, A.W.

    2007-01-01

    A late Mississippian-early Pennsylvanian eustatic sea level drop resulted in a complex lowstand drainage network being eroded across the Illinois Basin in the eastern United States. This drainage system was filled during the early part of the Pennsylvanian. Distinct differences can be recognized between the trunk and tributary paleovalley fills. Fills preserved within the trunk systems tend to be fluvially dominated and consist of bed-load deposits of coarse- to medium-grained sandstone and conglomerate. Conversely, the incised valleys of tributary systems tend to be filled with dark mudstone, thinly interbedded sandstones, and mudstones and siltstones. These finer grained facies exhibit marine influences manifested by tidal rhythmites, certain traces fossils, and macro- and microfauna. Examples of tributary and trunk systems, separated by no more than 7 km (4.3 mi) along strike, exhibit these styles of highly contrasting fills. Useful analogs for understanding this Pennsylvanian system include the Quaternary glacial sluiceways present in the lower Ohio, White, and Wabash river valleys of Indiana (United States) and the modern Amazon River (Brazil). Both the Amazon River and the Quaternary rivers of Indiana have (or had) trunk rivers that are (were) dominated by large quantities of bed load relative to their tributaries. The trunk valley systems of these analogs aggraded much more rapidly than their tributary valleys, which evolved into lakes because depositional rates along the trunk are (were) so high that the mouths of the tributaries have been dammed by bed-load deposits. These Holocene systems illustrate that sediment yields can significantly influence the nature of fill successions within incised valleys independent of rates of sea level changes or proximity to highstand coastlines. Copyright ?? 2007. The American Association of Petroleum Geologists. All rights reserved.

  18. Low-velocity collisions between centimeter-sized snowballs: Porosity dependence of coefficient of restitution for ice aggregates analogues in the Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimaki, Yuri; Arakawa, Masahiko

    2012-09-01

    Understanding the collisional behavior of ice dust aggregates at low velocity is a key to determining the formation process of small icy bodies such as icy planetesimals, comets and icy satellites, and this collisional behavior is also closely related to the energy dissipation mechanism in Saturn’s rings. We performed head-on collision experiments in air by means of free-falling centimeter-sized sintered snowballs with porosities from 44% to 80% at impact velocities from 0.44 m s-1 to 4.12 m s-1 at -10 °C. In cases of porosity larger than 70%, impact sticking was the dominant collision outcome, while bouncing was dominant at lower porosity. Coefficients of restitution of snow in this velocity range were found to depend strongly on the porosity rather than the impact velocity and to decrease with the increase of the porosity. We successfully measured the compaction volume of snowballs after the impact, and it enabled us to estimate the dynamic compressive strength of snow with the assumption of the energy conservation between kinetic energy and work for deformation, which was found to be consistent with the upper limit of static compressive strength. The velocity dependence of coefficients of restitution of snow was analyzed using a Johnson’s model, and a diagram for collision outcomes among equal-sized sintered snowballs was successfully drawn as a function of porosity and impact velocity.

  19. Gas-Filled Capillary Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinhauer, L. C.; Kimura, W. D.

    2006-11-01

    We have developed a 1-D, quasi-steady-state numerical model for a gas-filled capillary discharge that is designed to aid in selecting the optimum capillary radius in order to guide a laser beam with the required intensity through the capillary. The model also includes the option for an external solenoid B-field around the capillary, which increases the depth of the parabolic density channel in the capillary, thereby allowing for propagation of smaller laser beam waists. The model has been used to select the parameters for gas-filled capillaries to be utilized during the Staged Electron Laser Acceleration — Laser Wakefield (STELLA-LW) experiment.

  20. Study of oil sorption behavior of filled and structured fiber assemblies made from polypropylene, kapok and milkweed fibers.

    PubMed

    Rengasamy, R S; Das, Dipayan; Karan, C Praba

    2011-02-15

    This article reports on oil sorption behavior of fiber assemblies made up of single natural and synthetic fibers as well as blend of natural and synthetic fibers when tested with high density oil and diesel oil. A series of filled fiber assemblies were prepared from 100% polypropylene, kapok, and milkweed fibers and another series of bonded structured fiber assemblies were prepared from a 70/30 blend of kapok and polypropylene fibers and a 70/30 blend of milkweed and polypropylene fibers. It was observed that the porosity of the fiber assemblies played a very important role in determining its oil sorption capacity. The polypropylene fiber assembly exhibited the highest sorption capacity (g/g) followed by the kapok and milkweed fiber assemblies at porosity <0.98. At higher porosities (above 0.98), polypropylene filled fiber assembly has poor sorption capacity due to large sized inter fiber pore. The kapok and milkweed fibers have intra fiber porosities of 0.81 and 0.83, respectively. All the fiber assemblies showed higher oil sorption capacity with the high density oil as compared to the diesel oil. As the kapok and milkweed fiber have low cellulose content, hence their slow degradation is an advantage in fresh and marine water applications. The good sorption capacity of kapok and milkweed fiber assemblies along with their bio-degradable nature offer great scope for structuring them into fiber assemblies with large porosity and uniform pores to have efficient oil sorbents. PMID:21146290

  1. Weaving and bonding method to prevent warp and fill distortion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Gary L. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A method to prevent fiber distortion in textile materials employed in a modified weaving process. In a first embodiment, a tacifier in powder form is applied to the yarn and melted while on the fabric. Cool air is then supplied after the tacifier has melted to expedite the solidification of the tacifier. In a second embodiment, a solution form of a tacifier is used by dissolving the tacifier into a solvent that has a high evaporation rate. The solution is then sprayed onto the fabric or fill yarn as each fill yarn is inserted into a shed of the fabric. A third embodiment applies the tacifier in a liquid form that has not been dissolved in a solvent. That is, the tacifier is melted and is sprayed as a liquid onto the fabric or fill yarn as it is being extracted from a fill yarn spool prior to the fill yarn being inserted into the shed of the fabric. A fourth embodiment employs adhesive yarns contained as an integral part of the warp or fill yarn. Additional tacifier material is not required because a matrix is used as the tacifier. The matrix is then locally melted using heating elements on clamping bars or take-up rollers, is cooled, if necessary, and solidified.

  2. Generation of slanted gas-filled icicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wäscher, Thomas

    1991-04-01

    A procedure for the generation of slanted gas-filled icicles by freezing, using a domestic refrigerator, is described. The freezing vessel was a plastic ice-cube tray, which was filled both with tap and deionized water and was frozen successively from the outer to the inner compartments of the tray. Icicles having slanted elevations grew out of the surface of the deionized water of the innermost compartments. The erection angle of the icicles to the horizontal lay between 30° and 60°, for the three longest and thinnest specimens it was almost exactly 30°. All icicles have gas inclusions. Their shape varies between an irregular distribution of circular bubbles and a nearly uninterrupted axial gas channel together with dendrite-like, radially distorted bubbles. If a cold (-18°C) specimen comes into contact with warm and humid room-air, then hoarfrost is observed at the bottom and the top of the icicle, while the area in between remains transparent.

  3. Relationship between regolith particle size and porosity on small bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiuchi, M.; Nakamura, A.

    2014-07-01

    Small planetary bodies are covered by a particle layer called the regolith. The particle size and porosity of the regolith surface of the small bodies are important physical properties. The responses of the surface to solar irradiation depend on the particle size and porosity. The particle size and porosity have influences on the dynamic responses of the surface, such as cratering efficiency. In previous studies, these two quantities were measured or estimated by various methods. Here we propose a semi-empirical relationship between the particle size and porosity for small bodies' surfaces. An empirical relationship between the porosity of granular materials in loose packing state under 1G and the ratio of the magnitudes of the interparticle force and gravity which act on a particle was presented in a previous study [1]. In this study, we assume that the van der Waals force F_{V} is predominant in the interparticle forces and adopt a model formula [2] which is different from that adopted in the previous study [1]: F_{V} = {AS^{2}}/{48Ω ^{2}}r, where A is the Hamaker constant, r is the particle radius, Ω is the diameter of an O^{-2} ion, and S is the cleanliness ratio which shows the smallness of a number of the adsorbate molecules [2]. It was shown that the cleanliness ratio S is approximately 0.1 on the Earth, and is almost unity in the interplanetary space. In addition to the data of the several previous studies, our own measurement result for micron-sized fly-ash particles in atmospheric conditions is used in the present analysis. We calculate F_{V} using Eq. (1), and obtain a relationship between porosity and the ratio R_{F} = F_{V}/F_{g}, where F_{g} is gravity. An empirical formula used in the previous study [1], p = p_{0}+(1-p_{0})exp(-m{R_{F}}^{-n}), is applied to fit the data, where p is the porosity and p_{0}, m and n are constants. We assume that p_{0} is 0.36. By substituting Eq. (1) to Eq. 2, we obtain p = p_{0}+(1-p_{0})exp {-m({AS^{2}}/{64πΩ ^{2

  4. Porosity trends of the Lower Cretaceous J Sandstone, Denver Basin, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schmoker, J.W.; Higley, D.K.

    1991-01-01

    The petrographic factors that most affect J sandstone porosity variability at a given level of thermal maturity are carbonate cementation and clay content. Carbonate cement, where present, reduces porosity. If previously more widespread, carbonate cement could also introduce porosity heterogeneity by temporarily preserving the pore network relative to uncemented intervals. Abundant detrital and authigenic clay reduces porosity by occupying pores. Low clay content indirectly reduces porosity because the inhibiting effects of clay upon quartz cementation and pressure solution are largely absent. -from Authors

  5. How is the ocean filled?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebbie, Geoffrey; Huybers, Peter

    2011-03-01

    The ocean surface rapidly exchanges heat, freshwater, and gases with the atmosphere, but once water sinks into the ocean interior, the inherited properties of seawater are closely conserved. Previous water-mass decompositions have described the oceanic interior as being filled by just a few different property combinations, or water masses. Here we apply a new inversion technique to climatological tracer distributions to find the pathways by which the ocean is filled from over 10,000 surface regions, based on the discretization of the ocean surface at 2° by 2° resolution. The volume of water originating from each surface location is quantified in a global framework, and can be summarized by the estimate that 15% of the surface area fills 85% of the ocean interior volume. Ranked from largest to smallest, the volume contributions scaled by surface area follow a power-law distribution with an exponent of -1.09 ± 0.03 that appears indicative of the advective-diffusive filling characteristics of the ocean circulation, as demonstrated using a simple model. This work quantifies the connection between the surface and interior ocean, allowing insight into ocean composition, atmosphere-ocean interaction, and the transient response of the ocean to a changing climate.

  6. Can-Filled Crash Barrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, A. H.

    1983-01-01

    Crash barrier composed largely of used aluminum beverage cans protects occupants of cars in collisions with poles or trees. Lightweight, can-filled barrier very effective in softening impact of an automobile in head-on and off-angle collisions. Preliminary results indicate barrier is effective in collisions up to 40 mi/h (64 km/h).

  7. Space-filling polyhedral sorbents

    DOEpatents

    Haaland, Peter

    2016-06-21

    Solid sorbents, systems, and methods for pumping, storage, and purification of gases are disclosed. They derive from the dynamics of porous and free convection for specific gas/sorbent combinations and use space filling polyhedral microliths with facial aplanarities to produce sorbent arrays with interpenetrating interstitial manifolds of voids.

  8. Brain Responses to Filled Gaps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hestvik, Arild; Maxfield, Nathan; Schwartz, Richard G.; Shafer, Valerie

    2007-01-01

    An unresolved issue in the study of sentence comprehension is whether the process of gap-filling is mediated by the construction of empty categories (traces), or whether the parser relates fillers directly to the associated verb's argument structure. We conducted an event-related potentials (ERP) study that used the violation paradigm to examine…

  9. (De)compaction of porous viscoelastoplastic media: Solitary porosity waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarushina, Viktoriya M.; Podladchikov, Yuri Y.; Connolly, James A. D.

    2015-07-01

    Buoyancy-driven flow in deformable porous media is important for understanding sedimentary compaction as well as magmatic and metamorphic differentiation processes. Here mathematical analysis of the viscoplastic compaction equations is used to develop an understanding of the porosity wave instability and its sensitivity to the choice of rheological model. The conditions of propagation, size, speed, and shape of the porosity waves depend strongly on the properties of the solid rock frame. Whereas most of the previous studies on porosity waves were focused on viscous or viscoelastic mode, here we consider the ability of a solid matrix to undergo simultaneous plastic (rate-independent) and viscous (rate-dependent) deformation in parallel. Plastic yielding is identified as a cause of compaction-decompaction asymmetry in porous media—this is known to lead to a strong focusing of porous flow. Speed and amplitude of a porosity wave are given as functions of material parameters and a volume of a source region. Formulation is applicable to fluid flow in sedimentary rocks where viscous deformation is due to pressure solution as well as in deep crustal or upper mantle rocks deforming in a semibrittle regime.

  10. Acoustics of porous materials with partially opened porosity.

    PubMed

    Leclaire, P; Dupont, T; Panneton, R

    2013-12-01

    A theoretical and experimental study of the acoustic properties of porous materials containing dead-end (or partially opened) porosity was recently proposed by Dupont, Leclaire, Sicot, Gong, and Panneton [J. Appl. Phys. 110, 094903 (2011)]. The present article provides a description of partially opened porosity systems and their numerous potential applications in the general context of the study of porous materials, the classical models describing them, and the characterization techniques. It is shown that the dead-end pore effect can be treated independently and that the description of this effect can be associated with any acoustic model of porous media. Different theoretical developments describing the dead-end porosity effect are proposed. In particular, a model involving the average effective length of the dead-end pores is presented. It is also shown that if the dead-end effect can be treated separately, the transfer matrix method is particularly well suited for the description of single or multilayer systems with dead-end porosity.

  11. Laboratory photometry of regolith analogues: Effect of porosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kar, A.; Sen, A. K.; Gupta, R.

    2016-10-01

    New Laboratory phase curves are presented, to examine the effect of porosity on reflectance as a function of phase angle for grain size having dimension about half, twice and those larger than the illuminating wavelength. The experimental setup used for generating reflectance data is a goniometric device developed at the Department of Physics, Assam University, Silchar, India. Some of the well-documented samples having different sizes were chosen; alumina, olivine, basalt, rutile, chromite and iron. The sample surfaces were prepared with different porosities, in order to simulate natural regolith surface as much as possible. The wavelength of observation is 632.8 nm. A model based on the Radiative Transfer Equation is presented here to analyze and model the laboratory data. In the present modelling work, the empirical relation of Hapke, Mie theory and Henyey-Greenstein phase function are used. For particles having dimension about half, twice to the wavelength, Mie theory is used to calculate single scattering albedo. Although the Mie theory is insufficient for describing the scattering properties of particles larger than the wavelength, for such large particle single scattering albedo (SSA) is estimated through method of best fit. It has been found that, the porosity has a distinguishable effect on reflectance. Also the contribution of multiple scattering function for different porosity is examined. Further the results presented in the current work, demonstrates the light scattering properties of a diverse collections of regolith like samples.

  12. Permeability porosity relationships (K, Phi cut-off)

    SciTech Connect

    Djettou, F.; Reda, H.

    1995-08-01

    Several reservoirs of Lower Devonian in Ghadames basin present porosities greater than 10 Pu, but during the test they are rather impermeable. It seems that this phenomena extends to BERKINE and Rhourd Messaoud areas. This seriously affect the estimation of recovery reserves. The best we can do is to study and try to understand reservoir problems. The method we choose is based on statistical analysis of test results and their comparison with core and log measurements. It concerns mainly cummulative curves of productive and non-productive tests (dry test). This involves about 20 wells where are can define: Siegenian with: Fine grained in BBK and ROM Coarse grained toward BRN - Emsian is rather homogeneous in the region. The sand cut-off porosity is greater than 11 Pu. However the reservoir can`t produce itself then we can not take account in reserve estimation. In conclusion, a sandy reservoir of Lower Devonian in Ghadames basin may be very porous (11-12%) and impermeable while in the other cases reservoirs can produce with porosity of 7 or 8 Po. However a HC definition based on cut-off porosity in Ghadames basin should be done before net pay an recovery reserves estimation.

  13. The Effect of Volumetric Porosity on Roughness Element Drag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillies, John; Nickling, William; Nikolich, George; Etyemezian, Vicken

    2016-04-01

    Much attention has been given to understanding how the porosity of two dimensional structures affects the drag force exerted by boundary-layer flow on these flow obstructions. Porous structures such as wind breaks and fences are typically used to control the sedimentation of sand and snow particles or create micro-habitats in their lee. Vegetation in drylands also exerts control on sediment transport by wind due to aerodynamic effects and interaction with particles in transport. Recent research has also demonstrated that large spatial arrays of solid three dimensional roughness elements can be used to reduce sand transport to specified targets for control of wind erosion through the effect of drag partitioning and interaction of the moving sand with the large (>0.3 m high) roughness elements, but porous elements may improve the effectiveness of this approach. A thorough understanding of the role porosity plays in affecting the drag force on three-dimensional forms is lacking. To provide basic understanding of the relationship between the porosity of roughness elements and the force of drag exerted on them by fluid flow, we undertook a wind tunnel study that systematically altered the porosity of roughness elements of defined geometry (cubes, rectangular cylinders, and round cylinders) and measured the associated change in the drag force on the elements under similar Reynolds number conditions. The elements tested were of four basic forms: 1) same sized cubes with tubes of known diameter milled through them creating three volumetric porosity values and increasing connectivity between the tubes, 2) cubes and rectangular cylinders constructed of brass screen that nested within each other, and 3) round cylinders constructed of brass screen that nested within each other. The two-dimensional porosity, defined as the ratio of total surface area of the empty space to the solid surface area of the side of the element presented to the fluid flow was conserved at 0.519 for

  14. A Novel Porosity Model for Use in Hydrocode Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wuennemann, K.; Collins, G. S.; Melosh, H. J.

    2005-01-01

    Introduction: Numerical modeling of impact cratering has reached a high degree of sophistication; however, the treatment of porous materials still poses a large problem in hydrocode calculations. Porosity plays only a minor role in the formation of large craters on most planetary objects, but impacts on comets are believed to be highly affected by the presence of porosity, which may be as much as 80%. The upcoming Deep Impact Mission (launched January 2005) will provide more detailed data about the composition of a comet (Tempel 1) by shooting a approx.370 kg projectile onto the surface of its nucleus. The numerical simulations of such impact events requires an appropriate model for how pore space in the comet is crushed out during the violent initial stage of the impact event. Most hydro-codes compute the pressure explicitly using an "equation of state" (EOS) for each material, which relates changes in density and internal energy to changes in pressure. The added complication introduced by porosity is that changes in a material s density are due to both the closing of pore space (compaction) and compression of the matrix. The amount of resistance to volume change and the amount of irreversible work done during these two processes is very different; it is far easier to compact a porous material sample than to compress a non-porous sample of the same material. As an alternative to existing porosity models, like the Pdot(alpha) model [1], we present a novel approach for dealing with the compaction of porosity in hydrocode calculations.

  15. Binding behaviour of molecularly imprinted polymers prepared by a hierarchical approach in mesoporous silica beads of varying porosity.

    PubMed

    Baggiani, Claudio; Baravalle, Patrizia; Giovannoli, Cristina; Anfossi, Laura; Passini, Cinzia; Giraudi, Gianfranco

    2011-04-01

    One of the most interesting methods for preparing molecularly imprinted polymers with controlled morphology consists in filling the pores of silica beads with an imprinting mixture, polymerizing it and dissolving the support, leaving porous imprinted beads that are the "negative image" of the silica beads. The main advantage of such an approach consists in the easy preparation of spherical imprinted polymeric particles with narrow diameter and pore size distribution, particularly indicated for chromatographic applications. In this approach it has been shown that the resulting morphology of polymeric beads depends essentially on the porosity and surface properties of the silica beads that act as microreactors for the thermopolymerization process. Anyway, it is not yet clear if the porosity of the silica beads influences the binding properties of the resulting imprinted beads. In this paper, we report the effect of different porosities of the starting mesoporous silica beads on the resulting binding properties of imprinted polymers with molecular recognition properties towards the fungicide carbendazim. The morphological properties of the imprinted beads prepared through this hierarchical approach were measured by nitrogen adsorption porosimetry and compared with a reference imprinted material prepared by bulk polymerization. The chromatographic behaviour of HPLC columns packed with the imprinted materials were examined by eluting increasing amounts of carbendazim and extracting the binding parameters through a peak profiling approach. The experimental results obtained show that the resulting binding properties of the imprinted beads are strongly affected by the polymerization approach used but not by the initial porosity of the silica beads, with the sole exception of the binding site density, which appears to be inversely proportional to them. PMID:21349526

  16. Fracture Toughness and Slow Crack Growth Behavior of Ni-YSZ and YSZ as a Function of Porosity and Temperature.

    SciTech Connect

    Radovic, Miladin; Lara-Curzio, Edgar; Nelson, George

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we report on the fracture toughness of YSZ and Ni-YSZ and slow-crack growth behavior of Ni-YSZ at 20C and 800C. Results are presented for tests carried out in air for YSZ and in a gas mixture of 4%H2 and 96%Ar for Ni-YSZ containing various levels of porosity. The double-torsion test method was utilized to determine the fracture toughness from the peak load obtained during fast loading test specimens that had been precracked, while crack velocity versus stress intensity curves were obtained in the double torsion using hte load relaxation method. It was found that fracture toughness of these materials decreases with temperature and int he case of Ni-YSZ it also decreases with increasing porosity. The effect of temperature and microstructure, which was characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy, on the fracture behavior of these materials, is discussed.

  17. Constitutive parameter de-embedding using inhomogeneously-filled rectangular waveguides with longitudinal section modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, A.; Dominek, A. K.

    1990-01-01

    Constitutive parameter extraction from S parameter data using a rectangular waveguide whose cross section is partially filled with a material sample as opposed to being completely filled was examined. One reason for studying a partially filled geometry is to analyze the effect of air gaps between the sample and fixture for the extraction of constitutive parameters. Air gaps can occur in high temperature parameter measurements when the sample was prepared at room temperature. Single port and two port measurement approaches to parameter extraction are also discussed.

  18. Effect of twist and porosity on the electrical conductivity of carbon nanofiber yarns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chawla, S.; Naraghi, M.; Davoudi, A.

    2013-06-01

    This study focuses on the effect of twist and porosity on the electrical conductivity of carbon nanofiber (CNF) yarns. The process of fabrication of CNF yarns included the synthesis of aligned ribbons of polyacrylonitrile (PAN) nanofibers via electrospinning. The PAN ribbons were twisted into yarns with twist levels ranging from zero twist to high twists of 1300 turn per meter (tpm). The twist imposed on the ribbons substantially improved the interactions between nanofibers and reduced the porosity. The PAN yarns were subsequently stabilized in air, and then carbonized in nitrogen at 1100 ° C for 1 h. Compressive stresses developed between the PAN nanofibers as a result of twist promoted interfusion between neighboring nanofibers, which was accelerated by heating the yarns during stabilization to temperatures above the glass transition of PAN. The electrical conductivity of the yarns was measured with a four point probe measurement technique. Although increasing the twist promotes electrical conductivity between nanofibers by forming junctions between them, our results indicate that the electrical conductivity does not continuously increase with increasing twist, but reaches a threshold value after which it starts to decrease. The causes for this behavior were studied through experimental techniques and further explored using a yarn-equivalent electrical circuit model.

  19. Correlation between porosity and space holder content at different sintering temperatures of aluminum foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rushdi, N. M. F. M.; Jamaludin, S. B.; Mazlee, M. N.; Jamal, Z. A. Z.

    2016-07-01

    Aluminum foam is the most popular metal foam that can be used as energy absorbers, heat exchangers, air-oil separators and structure core of fuel cells. Melt-foaming agent, melt-gas injection, investment casting and powder-foaming agent techniques can be used to manufacture aluminum foam, but these techniques are too expensive. In this study, the aluminum foam was manufactured via a sintering dissolution process (SDP). Powders of aluminum and sodium chloride as space holder (25, 40, 50 wt. %) were mixed together to produce a homogeneous mixture. The mixture was compacted at 200 MPa followed by sintering at 500, 550 and 600˚C for 2 hours. A warm running water stream was used to dissolve the space holder that was embedded in the aluminum. The result showed that, the space holder content performed a significant role to control the total porosity to a value between 18 and 40%, and the porosity increased with increasing content of space holder and sintering temperature.

  20. Oxide film defects in Al alloys and the formation of hydrogen- related porosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, W. D.; Gerrard, A. J.; Yue, Y.

    2016-03-01

    Double oxide film defects have also been held responsible for the origins of hydrogen porosity, where hydrogen dissolved in the Al melt passes into the interior atmosphere of the double oxide film defect causing it to inflate. However, this is in opposition to long- established evidence that H cannot readily diffuse through aluminium oxide. To investigate this further, samples of commercial purity Al were first degassed to remove their initial H content, and then heated to above their melting point and held in atmospheres of air and nitrogen respectively, to determine any differences in H pick-up. The experiment showed that samples held in an oxidising atmosphere, and having an oxide skin, picked up significantly less H than when the samples were held in a nitrogen atmosphere, which resulted in the formation of AlN in cracks in the oxide skin of the sample. It is suggested that double oxide film defects can give rise to hydrogen-related porosity, but this occurs more quickly when the oxygen in the original oxide film defect has been consumed by reaction with the surrounding melt and nitrogen reacts to form AlN, which is more permeable to H than alumina, more easily allowing the oxide film defect to give rise to a hydrogen pore. This is used to interpret results from an earlier synchrotron experiment, in which a small pore was seen to grow into a larger pore, while an adjacent large pore remained at a constant size.

  1. Porosity of an Anhydrous Chondritic Interplanetary Dust Particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strait, M. M.; Thomas, K. L.; McKay, D. S.

    1995-09-01

    Determination of the density and porosity of Interplanetary Dust Particles (IDPs) is important in the dynamics of collisional and orbital evolution of small-sized particles. These measurements are also useful to suggest possible sources for IDPs based on comparisons with known extraterrestrial materials (e.g., chondrites). Previous work on IDPs shows a wide range of densities from very low (0.08 g/cm3 [1]) through low (0.3 g/cm3 [2]) to high (6.2 g/cm3 [3]), with an average density at 2.0 g/cm3 for 150 particles [2]. In another study, IDPs fall into two distinct density groups with mean values of 0.6 g/cm3 and 1.9g/cm3 [3]. In general, chondritic IDPs with lower density values most likely have appreciable porosity, suggesting they are primitive, uncompacted particles. It is believed that porosities greater than 70% are rare [2]. Sample In this study, porosity measurements were determined for one IDP, Clu17. This chondritic particle is a fragment of a large-sized IDP (L2008#5) known as a cluster particle. The cluster is composed of 53 fragments >5 micrometers in diameter; a detailed description of the cluster is given in [4]. IDP Clu17 has ~12 wt.% C and contains chondritic abundances (within 2xCI) for major elements. This fragment is dominated by fine-grained aggregates, also known as GEMS (glass with embedded metal and sulfide [5]), and contains some olivine, pyroxene, Fe-Ni sulfides, and carbonaceous material. Methods IDP Clu17 was analyzed for light elements quantitatively analysis using scanning electron microscopy and thin-window energy dispersive spectrometry [details of technique in 4]. Following the initial bulk chemical analysis, the particle was embedded in epoxy, thin sectioned using an ultramicrotome, and examined with a JEOL 2000 FX transmission electron microscope. Many of the sections were not complete; individual grains in some sections are lost during microtoming. Photos from nine of the best sections were digitized by scanning at 1200 dpi. The

  2. Physicochemical properties and surfaces morphologies evaluation of MTA FillApex and AH plus.

    PubMed

    Borges, Álvaro Henrique; Orçati Dorileo, Maura Cristiane Gonçales; Dalla Villa, Ricardo; Borba, Alexandre Meireles; Semenoff, Tereza Aparecida Delle Vedove; Guedes, Orlando Aguirre; Estrela, Cyntia Rodrigues Araújo; Bandeca, Matheus Coelho

    2014-01-01

    The solubility, pH, electrical conductivity, and radiopacity of AH Plus and MTA FillApex were evaluated. In addition, the surfaces morphologies of the sealers were analyzed by using scanning electron microscopy. For pH test, the samples were immersed in distilled water at different periods of time. The same solution was used for electrical conductivity measurement. The solubility and radiopacity were evaluated according to ANSI/ADA. Statistical analyses were carried out at 5% level of significance. MTA FillApex presented higher mean value for solubility and electrical conductivity. No significant difference was observed in the mean values for pH reading. AH Plus presented higher radiopacity mean values. MTA FillApex presented an external surface with porosities and a wide range of sizes. In conclusion, the materials fulfill the ANSI/ADA requirements when considering the radiopacity and solubility. AH Plus revealed a compact and homogeneous surface with more regular aspects and equal particle sizes.

  3. [Long-lasting filling procedures].

    PubMed

    Môle, B

    2008-01-01

    A long-lasting filling product is accepted as such when, once the result has been obtained, no correction is required before the end of an arbitrary 2-year period. Other than silicone oil, which is not officially recognized for this indication in France, pure products can be distinguished from microparticle suspensions in a vector that will disappear in a short time. Flexible implants represent a totally separate entity and remain relatively little used since surgery is necessary for implantation. Our experience has led us to prefer monomolecular filling gels, in particular polyacrylamide hydrogels, with which we have had extensive experience, over gels with microparticles that we believe expose the patient to much greater inflammatory reactions that are sometimes difficult to overcome.

  4. Particle-filled microporous materials

    DOEpatents

    McAllister, J.W.; Kinzer, K.E.; Mrozinski, J.S.; Johnson, E.J.; Dyrud, J.F.

    1990-09-18

    A microporous particulate-filled thermoplastic polymeric article is provided. The article can be in the form of a film, a fiber, or a tube. The article has a thermoplastic polymeric structure having a plurality of interconnected passageways to provide a network of communicating pores. The microporous structure contains discrete submicron or low micron-sized particulate filler, the particulate filler being substantially non-agglomerated. 3 figs.

  5. Particle-filled microporous materials

    DOEpatents

    McAllister, Jerome W.; Kinzer, Kevin E.; Mrozinski, James S.; Johnson, Eric J.; Dyrud, James F.

    1990-01-01

    A microporous particulate-filled thermoplastic polymeric article is provided. The article can be in the form of a film, a fiber, or a tube. The article has a thermoplastic polymeric structure having a plurality of interconnected passageways to provide a network of communicating pores. The microporous structure contains discrete submicron or low micron-sized particulate filler, the particulate filler being substantially non-agglomerated.

  6. Particle-filled microporous materials

    DOEpatents

    McAllister, Jerome W.; Kinzer, Kevin E.; Mrozinski, James S.; Johnson, Eric J.

    1992-07-14

    A microporous particulate-filled thermoplastic polymeric article is provided. The article can be in the form of a film, a fiber, or a tube. The article has a thermoplastic polymeric structure having a plurality of interconnected passageways to provide a network of communicating pores. The microporous structure contains discrete submicron or low micron-sized particulate filler, the particulate filler being substantially non-agglomerated.

  7. Permeability-Porosity Relationships in Deep Sea Hydrothermal Vent Deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, W.; Gittings, H.; Tivey, M. K.

    2003-12-01

    To map out the thermal and chemical regimes within vent deposits where micro-and macro-organisms reside requires accurate modeling of mixing and reaction between hydrothermal fluid and seawater within the vent structures. However, a critical piece of information, quantitative knowledge of the permeability of vent deposits, and how it relates to porosity and pore geometry, is still missing. To address this, systematic laboratory measurements of permeability and porosity were conducted on 3 large vent structures from the Mothra Hydrothermal vent field on the Endeavor Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. Twenty-five cylindrical cores with diameters of 2.54 cm and various lengths were taken from Phang (a tall sulfide-dominated spire that was not actively venting when sampled), Roane (a lower temperature spire with dense macrofaunal communities growing on its sides that was venting diffuse fluid of < 300° C) and Finn (an active black smoker with a well-defined inner conduit that was venting 302° C fluids prior to recovery (Delaney et al., 2000; Kelley et al, 2000)). Measurements were made to obtain porosity and permeability of these drill cores using a helium porosimeter (UltraPoreTM300) and a nitrogen permeameter (UltrapermTM400) from Core Laboratories Instruments. The porosimeter uses Boyle's law to determine pore volume from the expansion of a know mass of helium into a calibrated sample holder, whereas the permeameter uses Darcy's law to determine permeability by measuring the steady-state flow rate through the sample under a given pressure gradient. A moderate confining pressure of 1.38 MPa was applied during the measurements to prevent leakage between the sample surface and the sample holder. The permeability and porosity relationship is best described by two different power law relationships with exponents of ˜9 (group I) and ˜3 (group II), respectively. Microstructural observations suggest that the difference in the two permeability-porosity relationships

  8. Porosity and distribution of water in perlite from the island of Milos, Greece.

    PubMed

    Kaufhold, Stephan; Reese, Anke; Schwiebacher, Werner; Dohrmann, Reiner; Grathoff, Georg H; Warr, Laurence N; Halisch, Matthias; Müller, Cornelia; Schwarz-Schampera, Ulrich; Ufer, Kristian

    2014-01-01

    A perlite sample representative of an operating mine in Milos was investigated with respect to the type and spatial distribution of water. A set of different methods was used which finally provided a consistent view on the water at least in this perlite. Infrared spectroscopy showed the presence of different water species (molecular water and hydroxyl groups / strongly bound water). The presence of more than 0.5 mass% smectite, however, could be excluded considering the cation exchange capacity results. The dehydration measured by thermal analysis occurred over a wide range of temperatures hence confirming the infrared spectroscopical results. Both methods point to the existence of a continuous spectrum of water binding energies. The spatial distribution of water and/or pores was investigated using different methods (CT: computer tomography, FIB: scanning electron microscopy including focused ion beam technology, IRM: infrared microscopy). Computer tomography (CT) showed large macropores (20 - 100 μm) and additionally revealed a mottled microstructure of the silicate matrix with low density areas up to a few μm in diameter. Scanning electron microscopy (FIB) confirmed the presence of μm sized pores and IRM showed the filling of these pores with water. In summary, two types of pores were found. Airfilled 20 - 100 μm pores and μm-sized pores disseminated in the glass matrix containing at least some water. Porosity measurements indicate a total porosity of 26 Vol%, 11 Vol% corresponding to the μm-sized pores. It remains unsolved wether the water in the μm-sized pores entered after or throughout perlite formation. However, the pores are sealed and no indications of cracks were found which indicated a primary source of the water, i.e. water was probably entrapped by quenching of the lava. The water in these pores may be the main reason for the thermal expandability which results in the extraordinarily porous expanded perlite building materials.

  9. 24. BUILDING NO. 452, ORDNANCE FACILITY (BAG CHARGE FILLING PLANT), ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. BUILDING NO. 452, ORDNANCE FACILITY (BAG CHARGE FILLING PLANT), INTERIOR VIEW LOOKING WEST AT NORTH END OF CENTRAL CORRIDOR (ROOM 3). STAIRWAY WORKBENCH WITH COMPRESSED-AIR POWERED CARTRIDGE LOADER. ARMORED PASS-THROUGH OF TRANSFER BOX FOR PASSING EXPLOSIVES MATERIALS THROUGH TO NEXT ROOM TO THE NORTH. - Picatinny Arsenal, 400 Area, Gun Bag Loading District, State Route 15 near I-80, Dover, Morris County, NJ

  10. 30 CFR 816.72 - Disposal of excess spoil: Valley fills/head-of-hollow fills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...-hollow fills. 816.72 Section 816.72 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND... STANDARDS-SURFACE MINING ACTIVITIES § 816.72 Disposal of excess spoil: Valley fills/head-of-hollow fills. Valley fills and head-of-hollow fills shall meet the requirements of § 816.71 and the...

  11. 30 CFR 817.72 - Disposal of excess spoil: Valley fill/head-of-hollow fills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-hollow fills. 817.72 Section 817.72 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND... STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND MINING ACTIVITIES § 817.72 Disposal of excess spoil: Valley fill/head-of-hollow fills. Valley fills and head-of-hollow fills shall meet the requirements of § 817.71 and the...

  12. 30 CFR 816.72 - Disposal of excess spoil: Valley fills/head-of-hollow fills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-hollow fills. 816.72 Section 816.72 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND... STANDARDS-SURFACE MINING ACTIVITIES § 816.72 Disposal of excess spoil: Valley fills/head-of-hollow fills. Valley fills and head-of-hollow fills shall meet the requirements of § 816.71 and the...

  13. 30 CFR 817.72 - Disposal of excess spoil: Valley fill/head-of-hollow fills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...-hollow fills. 817.72 Section 817.72 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND... STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND MINING ACTIVITIES § 817.72 Disposal of excess spoil: Valley fill/head-of-hollow fills. Valley fills and head-of-hollow fills shall meet the requirements of § 817.71 and the...

  14. Opening carbon nanotubes with oxygen and implications for filling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajayan, P. M.; Ebbesen, T. W.; Ichihashi, T.; Iijima, S.; Tanigaki, K.; Hiura, H.

    1993-04-01

    CAPPED hollow carbon nanotubes1,2 can be modified into nanocomposite fibres by simultaneous opening of the caps (by heating in the presence of air and lead metal) and filling of the interior with an inorganic phase3. To generalize this approach, greater understanding is needed of the reaction mechanism between the tube caps and oxygen. Here we report that the oxidation of carbon nanotubes in air for short durations above about 700 °C results in the etching away of the tube caps and the thinning of tubes through layer-by-layer peeling of the outer layers, starting from the cap region. The oxidation reaction follows an Arrhenius-type relation with an activation energy barrier of about 225 kJ mol-1 in air. Heating of closed nanotubes with an oxide (Pb3O4) in an inert atmosphere lowers the activation barrier for the reaction and opening of the tubes occurs at lower temperatures. Contrary to intuition, however, open tubes are much more difficult to fill with inorganic materials than in the one-step filling of tubes reported previously3. But various other experiments might be possible in the inner nano-cavities of the open tubes such as studies of catalysis and of low-dimensional chemistry and physics.

  15. Porosity Measurement in Laminated Composites by Thermography and FEA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Tsuchin Philip; Russell, Samuel S.; Walker, James L.; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents the correlation between the through-thickness thermal diffusivity and the porosity of composites. Finite element analysis (FEA) was used to determine the transient thermal response of composites that were subjected to laser heating. A series of finite element models were built and thermal responses for isotropic and orthographic materials with various thermal diffusivities subjected to different heating conditions were investigated. Experiments were conducted to verify the models and to estimate the unknown parameters such as the amount of heat flux. The analysis and experimental results show good correlation between thermal diffusivity and porosity in the composite materials. They also show that both laser and flash heating can be used effectively to obtain thermal diffusivity. The current infrared thermography system is developed for use with flash heating. The laser heating models and the FEA results can provide useful tools to develop practical thermal diffusivity measurement scheme using laser heat.

  16. Reversibly switching the surface porosity of a DNA tetrahedron.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chuan; Tian, Cheng; Li, Xiang; Qian, Hang; Hao, Chenhui; Jiang, Wen; Mao, Chengde

    2012-07-25

    The ability to reversibly switch the surface porosity of nanocages would allow controllable matter transport in and out of the nanocages. This would be a desirable property for many technological applications, such as drug delivery. To achieve such capability, however, is challenging. Herein we report a strategy for reversibly changing the surface porosity of a self-assembled DNA nanocage (a DNA tetrahedron) that is based on DNA hydridization and strand displacement. The involved DNA nanostructures were thoroughly characterized by multiple techniques, including polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, dynamic light scattering, atomic force microscopy, and cryogenic electron microscopy. This work may lead to the design and construction of stimuli-responsive nanocages that might find applications as smart materials.

  17. Carbon composition with hierarchical porosity, and methods of preparation

    SciTech Connect

    Mayes, Richard T; Dai, Sheng

    2014-10-21

    A method for fabricating a porous carbon material possessing a hierarchical porosity, the method comprising subjecting a precursor composition to a curing step followed by a carbonization step, the precursor composition comprising: (i) a templating component comprised of a block copolymer, (ii) a phenolic component, (iii) a dione component in which carbonyl groups are adjacent, and (iv) an acidic component, wherein said carbonization step comprises heating the precursor composition at a carbonizing temperature for sufficient time to convert the precursor composition to a carbon material possessing a hierarchical porosity comprised of mesopores and macropores. Also described are the resulting hierarchical porous carbon material, a capacitive deionization device in which the porous carbon material is incorporated, as well as methods for desalinating water by use of said capacitive deionization device.

  18. Dependence of tablet brittleness on tensile strength and porosity.

    PubMed

    Gong, Xingchu; Chang, Shao-Yu; Osei-Yeboah, Frederick; Paul, Shubhajit; Perumalla, Sathyanarayana Reddy; Shi, Limin; Sun, Wei-Jhe; Zhou, Qun; Sun, Changquan Calvin

    2015-09-30

    An analysis of data collected from 25 sets of diverse pharmaceutical powders has identified that an exponential growth function satisfactorily describes the relationship between tablet brittleness and tablet porosity while a power law function well describes the relationship between tablet brittleness and tensile strength. These equations have the potential to facilitate better characterization of tablet mechanical properties and to guide the design and optimization of pharmaceutical tablet products. PMID:26226338

  19. Dehydration-induced porosity waves and episodic tremor and slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skarbek, Rob M.; Rempel, Alan W.

    2016-02-01

    Episodic tremor and slip (ETS) along the subduction interface takes place where there is abundant evidence for elevated, near-lithostatic pore pressures, at sufficiently great depths (30-45 km) that chemical dehydration reactions must act as their dominant source. We simulate fluid and heat flow while tracking the location of a vertically oriented, one-dimensional column of material as it subducts through the slow slip and tremor zone. The material in the column is transformed through a pressure-dependent and temperature-dependent dehydration reaction that we describe with a generalized nonlinear kinetic rate law. Column deformation is largely dominated by viscous creep, with a closure rate that depends linearly on porosity. This behavior causes the dehydration reaction to generate traveling porosity waves that transport increased fluid pressures within the slow slip region. To explore the possibility that the observed periodicity of slow slip and tremor in subduction zones can be explained by the migration of such porosity waves, we derive a dispersion relation that accurately describes our numerical results. We also obtain an expression for how the thickness of the dehydrating layer is expected to vary as a function of the parameters in the reaction rate law. Although the amplitudes of pore pressure perturbations rival those that are produced by known external forcings (e.g., tides or passing surface waves), our analysis suggests that given reasonable estimates of rock viscosity, permeabilities in the range 6.5×10-15 to 5×10-10 m2 are required for porosity wave trains to form at periods comparable to those of slow slip and tremor.

  20. Shell porosity of recent planktonic foraminifera as a climatic index.

    PubMed

    Bé, A W

    1968-08-30

    Despite variations in pore diameter and pore concentration between 22 species of planktonic Foraminifera, shell porosites are relatively uniform for those co-occurring in the same latitudinal belts: over 10 percent for tropicalsubtropical species; 5 to 10 percent for temperate species; and less than 5 percent for subpolar-polar species. Shell porosities of fossil planktonic Foraminifera may be useful indices for interpreting Cenozoic climates.

  1. Studies of cell pellets: I. Electrical properties and porosity.

    PubMed Central

    Abidor, I G; Li, L H; Hui, S W

    1994-01-01

    Cell pellets formed by centrifugation provided a good system to study the osmotic behavior, electroporation, and interaction between cells. Rabbit erythrocyte pellets were used in this study because they were simpler than nucleated cells to model analytically. Structurally, cell pellets possessed properties of porous solid bodies and gels. Electrically, cell pellets were shown to behave as a parallel set of resistance, Rp, and capacitance, Cp. Information on pellet structures was obtained from electric measurements. The pellet resistance reflected the intercellular conductivity (porosity and gap conductivity), whereas the pellet capacitance depended mostly on membrane capacitance. The pellet resistance was more sensitive to experimental conditions. The intercellular gap distance can be derived from pellet porosity measurements, providing the cell volume and surface area were known. Rp increased and relaxed exponentially with time when centrifugation started and stopped; the cycles were reversible. When supernatants were exchanged with solutions containing hypotonic electrolytes or macromolecules (such as PEG) after the pellets were formed, complicated responses to different colloidal osmotic effects were observed. A transient decrease followed by a large increase of Rp was observed after the application of a porating electric pulse, as expected from a momentary membrane breakdown, followed by a limited colloidal-osmotic swelling of pelleted cells. The equilibrium values of Rp, Cp, pellet porosity, and intercellular distances were measured and calculated as functions of cell number, centrifugation force, and ionic strength of the exchanged supernatant. Thus, the structure and properties of cell pellets can be completely characterized by electrical measurements. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 11 PMID:7919015

  2. Effective Thermal Conductivity of High Porosity Open Cell Nickel Foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullins, Alan D.; Daryabeigi, Kamran

    2001-01-01

    The effective thermal conductivity of high-porosity open cell nickel foam samples was measured over a wide range of temperatures and pressures using a standard steady-state technique. The samples, measuring 23.8 mm, 18.7 mm, and 13.6 mm in thickness, were constructed with layers of 1.7 mm thick foam with a porosity of 0.968. Tests were conducted with the specimens subjected to temperature differences of 100 to 1000 K across the thickness and at environmental pressures of 10(exp -4) to 750 mm Hg. All test were conducted in a gaseous nitrogen environment. A one-dimensional finite volume numerical model was developed to model combined radiation/conduction heat transfer in the foam. The radiation heat transfer was modeled using the two-flux approximation. Solid and gas conduction were modeled using standard techniques for high porosity media. A parameter estimation technique was used in conjunction with the measured and predicted thermal conductivities at pressures of 10(exp -4) and 750 mm Hg to determine the extinction coefficient, albedo of scattering, and weighting factors for modeling the conduction thermal conductivity. The measured and predicted conductivities over the intermediate pressure values differed by 13%.

  3. Compost addition reduces porosity and chlordecone transfer in soil microstructure.

    PubMed

    Woignier, Thierry; Clostre, Florence; Fernandes, Paula; Rangon, Luc; Soler, Alain; Lesueur-Jannoyer, Magalie

    2016-01-01

    Chlordecone, an organochlorine insecticide, pollutes soils and contaminates crops and water resources and is biomagnified by food chains. As chlordecone is partly trapped in the soil, one possible alternative to decontamination may be to increase its containment in the soil, thereby reducing its diffusion into the environment. Containing the pesticide in the soil could be achieved by adding compost because the pollutant has an affinity for organic matter. We hypothesized that adding compost would also change soil porosity, as well as transport and containment of the pesticide. We measured the pore features and studied the nanoscale structure to assess the effect of adding compost on soil microstructure. We simulated changes in the transport properties (hydraulic conductivity and diffusion) associated with changes in porosity. During compost incubation, the clay microstructure collapsed due to capillary stresses. Simulated data showed that the hydraulic conductivity and diffusion coefficient were reduced by 95 and 70% in the clay microstructure, respectively. Reduced transport properties affected pesticide mobility and thus helped reduce its transfer from the soil to water and to the crop. We propose that the containment effect is due not only to the high affinity of chlordecone for soil organic matter but also to a trapping mechanism in the soil porosity.

  4. Reduction of Wake-Stator Interaction Noise Using Passive Porosity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinetti, Ana F.; Kelly, Jeffrey J.; Thomas, Russell H.; Bauer, Steven X. S.

    2002-01-01

    The present study was conducted to assess the potential of Passive Porosity Technology as a mechanism to reduce interaction noise in turbomachinery by reducing the fluctuating forces acting on the vane surfaces. To do so, a typical fan stator airfoil was subjected to the effects of a transversely moving wake; time histories of the primitive aerodynamic variables, obtained from Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) solutions, were then input into an acoustic prediction code. This procedure was performed on the solid airfoil to obtain a baseline, and on a series of porous configurations in order to isolate those that yield maximum noise reductions without compromising the aerodynamic performance of the stator. It was found that communication between regions of high pressure differential - made possible by the use of passive porosity - is necessary to significantly alter the noise radiation pattern of the stator airfoil. In general, noise reductions were obtained for those configurations incorporating passive porosity in the region between x/c is approximately 0.15 on the suction side of the airfoil and x/c is approximately 0.20 on the pressure side. Reductions in overall radiated noise of approximately 1.0 dB were obtained. The noise benefit increased to about 2.5 dB when the effects of loading noise alone were considered.

  5. Interaction of Porosity with a Planar Solid/Liquid Interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Catalina, Adrian V.; Stefanescu, Doru M.; Sen, Subhayu; Kaukler, William K.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, an investigation of the interaction between gas porosity and a planar solid/liquid (SL) interface is reported. A two-dimensional numerical model able to accurately track sharp SL interfaces during solidification of pure metals and alloys is proposed. The finite difference method and a rectangular undeformed grid are used for computation. The SL interface is described through the points of intersection with the grid lines. Its motion is determined by the thermal and solute gradients at each particular point. Changes of the interface temperature because of capillarity or solute redistribution as well as any perturbation of the thermal and solute field produced by the presence of non-metallic inclusions can be computed. To validate the model, the dynamics of the interaction between a gas pore and a solidification front in metal alloys was observed using a state of the art X-ray Transmission Microscope. The experiments included observation of the distortion of the SL interface near a pore, real-time measurements of the growth rate and the change in shape of the porosity during interaction with an advancing SL interface in pure Al and Al-0.25 wt% Au alloy. In addition, porosity induced solute segregation patterns surrounding a pore were also quantified.

  6. Interaction of Porosity with a Planar Solid/Liquid Interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Catalina, Adrian V.; Stefanescu, Doru M.; Sen, Subhayu; Kaukler, William F.

    2004-01-01

    In this article, an investigation of the interaction between gas porosity and a planar solid/liquid (SL) interface is reported. A two-dimensional numerical model able to accurately track sharp SL interfaces during solidification of pure metals and alloys is proposed. The finite-difference method and a rectangular undeformed grid are used for computation. The SL interface is described through the points of intersection with the grid lines. Its motion is determined by the thermal and solute gradients at each particular point. Changes of the interface temperature because of capillarity or solute redistribution as well as any perturbation of the thermal and solute field produced by the presence of non-metallic inclusions can be computed. To validate the model, the dynamics of the interaction between a gas pore and a solidification front in metal alloys was observed using a state of the art X-ray transmission microscope (XTM). The experiments included observation of the distortion of the SL interface near a pore, real-time measurements of the growth rate, and the change in shape of the porosity during interaction with the SL interface in pure Al and Al-0.25 wt pct Au alloy. In addition, porosity-induced solute segregation patterns surrounding a pore were also quantified.

  7. Compost addition reduces porosity and chlordecone transfer in soil microstructure.

    PubMed

    Woignier, Thierry; Clostre, Florence; Fernandes, Paula; Rangon, Luc; Soler, Alain; Lesueur-Jannoyer, Magalie

    2016-01-01

    Chlordecone, an organochlorine insecticide, pollutes soils and contaminates crops and water resources and is biomagnified by food chains. As chlordecone is partly trapped in the soil, one possible alternative to decontamination may be to increase its containment in the soil, thereby reducing its diffusion into the environment. Containing the pesticide in the soil could be achieved by adding compost because the pollutant has an affinity for organic matter. We hypothesized that adding compost would also change soil porosity, as well as transport and containment of the pesticide. We measured the pore features and studied the nanoscale structure to assess the effect of adding compost on soil microstructure. We simulated changes in the transport properties (hydraulic conductivity and diffusion) associated with changes in porosity. During compost incubation, the clay microstructure collapsed due to capillary stresses. Simulated data showed that the hydraulic conductivity and diffusion coefficient were reduced by 95 and 70% in the clay microstructure, respectively. Reduced transport properties affected pesticide mobility and thus helped reduce its transfer from the soil to water and to the crop. We propose that the containment effect is due not only to the high affinity of chlordecone for soil organic matter but also to a trapping mechanism in the soil porosity. PMID:26250815

  8. Emulsion Inks for 3D Printing of High Porosity Materials.

    PubMed

    Sears, Nicholas A; Dhavalikar, Prachi S; Cosgriff-Hernandez, Elizabeth M

    2016-08-01

    Photocurable emulsion inks for use with solid freeform fabrication (SFF) to generate constructs with hierarchical porosity are presented. A high internal phase emulsion (HIPE) templating technique was utilized to prepare water-in-oil emulsions from a hydrophobic photopolymer, surfactant, and water. These HIPEs displayed strong shear thinning behavior that permitted layer-by-layer deposition into complex shapes and adequately high viscosity at low shear for shape retention after extrusion. Each layer was actively polymerized with an ultraviolet cure-on-dispense (CoD) technique and compositions with sufficient viscosity were able to produce tall, complex scaffolds with an internal lattice structure and microscale porosity. Evaluation of the rheological and cure properties indicated that the viscosity and cure rate both played an important role in print fidelity. These 3D printed polyHIPE constructs benefit from the tunable pore structure of emulsion templated material and the designed architecture of 3D printing. As such, these emulsion inks can be used to create ultra high porosity constructs with complex geometries and internal lattice structures not possible with traditional manufacturing techniques.

  9. Core image analysis of matrix porosity in The Geysers reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Nielson, Dennis L.; Nash, Greg; Hulen, Jeffrey B.; Tripp, Alan C.

    1993-01-28

    Adsorption is potentially an important consideration when calculating reserves at The Geysers. Our investigations of the mineralogical relationships in core samples have shown matrix pore spaces to be largely associated with fractures. Dissolution of calcite from hydrothermal veins increases porosity in the graywacke reservoir. The high relative surface area of secondary alteration phases could promote adsorption. In order to quantify porosity distribution and surface area, Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) images were analyzed using software developed for the interpretation of satellite imagery, This software classifies the images as either crystal or pore and then accumulates data on pore size, total porosity and surface area of the mineral-pore interface. Review of literature shows that data on thickness of adsorbed water layer does not exist for many of the mineral phases of interest in The Geysers. We have assumed thicknesses of 10, 100, and 5300 Angstroms for the adsorbed layer and calculated the relative proportions of adsorbed water. These calculations show 0.005%, 0.05%, and 2.5% of total water would be adsorbed using the above thicknesses.

  10. Injectable polyHIPEs as high-porosity bone grafts.

    PubMed

    Moglia, Robert S; Holm, Jennifer L; Sears, Nicholas A; Wilson, Caitlin J; Harrison, Dawn M; Cosgriff-Hernandez, Elizabeth

    2011-10-10

    Polymerization of high internal phase emulsions (polyHIPEs) is a relatively new method for the production of high-porosity scaffolds. The tunable architecture of these polyHIPE foams makes them attractive candidates for tissue engineered bone grafts. Previously studied polyHIPE systems require either toxic diluents or high cure temperatures which prohibit their use as an injectable bone graft. In contrast, we have developed an injectable polyHIPE that cures at physiological temperatures to a rigid, high-porosity foam. First, a biodegradable macromer, propylene fumarate dimethacrylate (PFDMA), was synthesized that has appropriate viscosity and hydrophobicity for emulsification. The process of surfactant selection is detailed with particular focus on the key structural features of both polymer (logP values, hydrogen bond acceptor sites) and surfactant (HLB values, hydrogen bond donor sites) that enable stable HIPE formation. Incubation of HIPEs at 37 °C was used to initiate radical cross-linking of the unsaturated double bond of the methacrylate groups to polymerize the continuous phase and lock in the emulsion geometry. The resulting polyHIPEs exhibited ~75% porosity, pore sizes ranging from 4 to 29 μm, and an average compressive modulus and strength of 33 and 5 MPa, respectively. These findings highlight the great potential of these scaffolds as injectable, tissue engineered bone grafts.

  11. Emulsion Inks for 3D Printing of High Porosity Materials.

    PubMed

    Sears, Nicholas A; Dhavalikar, Prachi S; Cosgriff-Hernandez, Elizabeth M

    2016-08-01

    Photocurable emulsion inks for use with solid freeform fabrication (SFF) to generate constructs with hierarchical porosity are presented. A high internal phase emulsion (HIPE) templating technique was utilized to prepare water-in-oil emulsions from a hydrophobic photopolymer, surfactant, and water. These HIPEs displayed strong shear thinning behavior that permitted layer-by-layer deposition into complex shapes and adequately high viscosity at low shear for shape retention after extrusion. Each layer was actively polymerized with an ultraviolet cure-on-dispense (CoD) technique and compositions with sufficient viscosity were able to produce tall, complex scaffolds with an internal lattice structure and microscale porosity. Evaluation of the rheological and cure properties indicated that the viscosity and cure rate both played an important role in print fidelity. These 3D printed polyHIPE constructs benefit from the tunable pore structure of emulsion templated material and the designed architecture of 3D printing. As such, these emulsion inks can be used to create ultra high porosity constructs with complex geometries and internal lattice structures not possible with traditional manufacturing techniques. PMID:27305061

  12. Computer Based Porosity Design by Multi Phase Topology Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burblies, Andreas; Busse, Matthias

    2008-02-01

    A numerical simulation technique called Multi Phase Topology Optimization (MPTO) based on finite element method has been developed and refined by Fraunhofer IFAM during the last five years. MPTO is able to determine the optimum distribution of two or more different materials in components under thermal and mechanical loads. The objective of optimization is to minimize the component's elastic energy. Conventional topology optimization methods which simulate adaptive bone mineralization have got the disadvantage that there is a continuous change of mass by growth processes. MPTO keeps all initial material concentrations and uses methods adapted from molecular dynamics to find energy minimum. Applying MPTO to mechanically loaded components with a high number of different material densities, the optimization results show graded and sometimes anisotropic porosity distributions which are very similar to natural bone structures. Now it is possible to design the macro- and microstructure of a mechanical component in one step. Computer based porosity design structures can be manufactured by new Rapid Prototyping technologies. Fraunhofer IFAM has applied successfully 3D-Printing and Selective Laser Sintering methods in order to produce very stiff light weight components with graded porosities calculated by MPTO.

  13. Porosity of temporary denture soft liners containing antifungal agents

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Jozely Francisca Mello; Maciel, Janaína Gomes; Hotta, Juliana; Vizoto, Ana Carolina Pero; Honório, Heitor Marques; Urban, Vanessa Migliorini; Neppelenbroek, Karin Hermana

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Incorporation of antifungals in temporary denture soft liners has been recommended for denture stomatitis treatment; however, it may affect their properties. Objective: To evaluate the porosity of a tissue conditioner (Softone) and a temporary resilient liner (Trusoft) modified by minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of antifungal agents for Candida albicans biofilm. Material and Methods: The porosity was measured by water absorption, based on exclusion of the plasticizer effect. Initially, it was determined by sorption isotherms that the adequate storage solution for specimens (65×10×3.3 mm) of both materials was 50% anhydrous calcium chloride (S50). Then, the porosity factor (PF) was calculated for the study groups (n=10) formed by specimens without (control) or with drug incorporation at MICs (nystatin: Ny-0.032 g, chlorhexidine diacetate: Chx-0.064 g, or ketoconazole: Ke-0.128 g each per gram of soft liner powder) after storage in distilled water or S50 for 24 h, seven and 14 d. Data were statistically analyzed by 4-way repeated measures ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=.05). Results: Ke resulted in no significant changes in PF for both liners in water over 14 days (p>0.05). Compared with the controls, Softone and Trusoft PFs were increased at 14-day water immersion only after addition of Ny and Chx, and Chx, respectively (p<0.05). Both materials showed no significant changes in PF in up to 14 days of S50 immersion, compared with the controls (p>0.05). In all experimental conditions, Softone and Trusoft PFs were significantly lower when immersed in S50 compared with distilled water (p<0.05). Conclusions: The addition of antifungals at MICs resulted in no harmful effects for the porosity of both temporary soft liners in different periods of water immersion, except for Chx and Ny in Softone and Chx in Trusoft at 14 days. No deleterious effect was observed for the porosity of both soft liners modified by the drugs at MICs over 14 days of S50 immersion

  14. On the influence of porosity on the Portevin-Le Chatelier effect in sintered iron

    SciTech Connect

    Palma, E.S.

    1996-10-01

    Sintered irons of four different porosities were strained in tension at temperatures between 295 (room temperature) and 873 K. Serrated stress-strain curves and high work hardening in the temperature range from 333 to 693 K, for all porosities, were characteristic of dynamic strain aging. The activation energy for the onset of serration was {+-}0.82 eV and was independent of porosity. On the contrary, the parameter {beta} from the relation for dislocation density increased with increasing porosity.

  15. Toughening Mechanisms in Silica-Filled Epoxy Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Binay S.

    and modeled fracture energy results. Furthermore, the contribution of microcracking was most prevalent at lower filler contents which suggests that the presence of microcracking may account for the previously unexplained improvements in fracture behavior attained in silica-filled epoxy nanocomposites at low filler contents. Secondly, surface modification through the application of three different propriety surface treatments ("A", "B" and "C") was found to greatly influence the processibility and fracture behavior of silica-filled epoxy nanocomposites. B-treated silica nanoparticles were found to readily form micron-scale agglomerates, settled during nanocomposite curing and showed no improvement in fracture toughness with increasing filler content. In contrast, the nanocomposites consisting of A-treated and C-treated silica nanoparticles yielded morphologies primarily containing well-dispersed nanoparticles. Therefore, fracture toughness improved with increasing filler content. Finally, particle porosity was found to have no significant effect on fracture behavior for the range of silica-filled epoxy nanocomposites investigated. Lower density porous silica nanoparticles were just as effective toughening agents as higher density non-porous silica nanoparticles. Consequently, the potential exists for the use of toughened-epoxies in lightweight structural applications.

  16. Fatigue Crack and Porosity Measurement in Composite Materials by Thermographic and Ultrasonic Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, James L.; Russell, Samuel S.; Suits, Michael W.; Workman, Gary L.

    2003-01-01

    Contents include the following: 1. Purpose. Detect thermo-mechanically induced intra-ply fatigue microcracking and manufactured porosity in unlined composite pressure vessels. 2. Defect descriptions. Porosity, microcracking. 3. Thermography. Overview of technique. Strengths and Weaknesses. Examples of its use for porosity detection. 4. Resonant ultrasound spectroscopy. Overview of technique. Strengths and Weaknesses. Examples of its use for microcracking detection. Conclusions.

  17. Sound propagation in and low frequency noise absorption by helium-filled porous material.

    PubMed

    Choy, Y S; Huang, Lixi; Wang, Chunqi

    2009-12-01

    Low-frequency noise is difficult to deal with by traditional porous material due to its inherent high acoustic impedance. This study seeks to extend the effective range of sound absorption to lower frequencies by filling a low density gas, such as helium, in the porous material. Compared with conventional air-filled absorption material, the helium-filled porous material has a much reduced characteristic impedance; hence, a good impedance matching with pure air becomes more feasible at low frequencies. The acoustic properties of a series of helium-filled porous materials are investigated with a specially designed test rig. The characteristic of the sound propagation in a helium-filled porous material is established and validated experimentally. Based on the measured acoustic properties, the sound absorption performance of a helium-filled absorber (HA) of finite thickness is studied numerically as well as experimentally. For a random incidence field, the HA is found to perform much better than the air-filled absorber at low frequencies. The main advantage of HA lies in the middle range of oblique incidence angles where wave refraction in the absorber enhances sound absorption. The advantage of HA as duct lining is demonstrated both numerically and experimentally.

  18. 7 CFR 58.923 - Filling containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Filling containers. 58.923 Section 58.923 Agriculture... Procedures § 58.923 Filling containers. (a) The filling of small containers with product shall be done in a sanitary manner. The containers shall not contaminate or detract from the quality of the product in any...

  19. Filling of carbon nanotubes and nanofibres

    PubMed Central

    Gately, Reece D

    2015-01-01

    Summary The reliable production of carbon nanotubes and nanofibres is a relatively new development, and due to their unique structure, there has been much interest in filling their hollow interiors. In this review, we provide an overview of the most common approaches for filling these carbon nanostructures. We highlight that filled carbon nanostructures are an emerging material for biomedical applications. PMID:25821693

  20. Tabletting behaviour of pellets of a series of porosities--a comparisonbetween pellets of two different compositions.

    PubMed

    Nicklasson, F; Johansson, B; Alderborn, G

    1999-04-01

    The tabletting behaviour of pellets prepared from a 4:1 mixture of dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCP) and microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) was studied and compared with the tabletting behaviour of pellets made solely from microcrystalline cellulose (results from an earlier study by Johansson et al.). A series of pellets with porosities in the range 26-55% were prepared and tabletted at applied pressures of 25-200 MPa. Tablets were also formed from lubricated pellets. The degree of compression during compaction was calculated, and the porosity and tensile strength of the tablets and their permeability to air flow were determined. The porosity of the pellets was found to significantly affect the tabletting behaviour of the DCP/MCC pellets. However, the relationship between pellet porosity and tablet data for the DCP/MCC pellets was different from that for the MCC pellets. The DCP/MCC pellets were generally less prone to a reduction in volume during tabletting, and the pore structure of the DCP/MCC tablets was more closed. It was concluded that the DCP/MCC pellets were more rigid and underwent a different mode of deformation during tabletting than the MCC pellets. This mode of deformation was characterised by a more limited bulk deformation and a more extensive surface deformation at the pellet surfaces. The DCP/MCC pellets tended to give tablets of a lower mechanical strength. They were also less sensitive to lubrication in terms of their compactability, which may be explained either by less surface coverage by the lubricant before compression or rupture of the lubricant film during compression caused by the more extensive surface deformation of DCP/MCC pellets.

  1. Crystal plasticity and grain crushing in high-porosity rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmani, H.; Tjioe, M.; Borja, R. I.

    2012-12-01

    Previous studies show the significance of considering microstructure of individual crystals in modeling the inelastic behavior of high-porosity rocks. Plastic deformation of high-porosity crystalline rocks, exemplified by limestone, is mainly attributed to crystal plasticity and cataclastic flow. Crystal plasticity is defined as the plastic deformation along potential slip systems within the crystal lattice. In the context of continuum mechanics this micro-mechanism is modeled by a nonlinear relationship between stresses and strains. Two types of nonlinearity characterize the inelastic behavior of the crystal grains: material nonlinearity and geometric nonlinearity. Material nonlinearity defines the changes in stiffness matrix due to plastic slip along slip systems. Geometric nonlinearity contributes to the changes in stiffness matrix due to changes in the geometry of the crystal grains. Geometric nonlinearity is modeled using theory of finite deformation, which assumes the geometry of slip systems to be a function of crystal deformation. This type of nonlinearity is very important in modeling crystal deformation mainly because of plastic spin induced by anisotropy in the crystal structure. However, considering the geometry of slip systems as a function of crystal slip makes the equations highly nonlinear. As a result, many studies either ignore geometric nonlinearity or make other assumptions to simplify the equations. Cataclastic flow, on the other hand, is characterized by pervasive grain crushing in which larger grains are converted into smaller ones. We model cataclastic flow as strong discontinuity in the grain scale via an assumed enhanced strain method formulated within the context of nonlinear finite elements. The method allows the individual finite elements, identified to be in critical condition, to break into two pieces along a plane identified by theory of bifurcation. We show that modeling cataclastic flow combined with finite deformation crystal

  2. Depositional model, dolomitization, and porosity of Henryhouse Formation (Silurian), Anadarko basin, Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    Beardall, G.B.

    1987-08-01

    The Upper Silurian Henryhouse Formation, which is part of the Hunton Group, is a major hydrocarbon reservoir in the Anadarko basin. Three basic lithofacies are present in the Henryhouse, based on sedimentary structures, lithology, fossil content, and fabric relationships. These facies, represented in general by massive lime mudstone with diverse fauna, burrowed dolowackestone/packstone with mainly crinoids, and massive to laminated dolomudstone with fenestral fabrics and sparse fauna, are inferred to represent subtidal, intertidal, and supratidal environments, respectively. These facies comprise a vertical sequence that represents regressive deposition. The Henryhouse consists of several of these sequences. The Henryhouse commonly is partly or completely dolomitized in western Oklahoma. Three stages of dolomitization were documented: (1) penecontemporaneous hypersaline dolomite occurring as brownish, hypidiotopic rhombs concentrated in the supratidal and intertidal facies, (2) mixed marine and freshwater dolomite occurring as white rims around preexisting hypersaline dolomite, and as subhedral, white rhombs in vugs and molds, and (3) deep-burial vug, mold, and fracture-filling saddle dolomite. Production in the Henryhouse is generally from porous zones in dolomite. However, lithofacies reflecting depositional environments in which they were formed are equally important in porosity development.

  3. Porosity, mechanical strength and permeability variations associated with the presence of stylolites in carbonate rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolland, A.; Baud, P.; Heap, M. J.; Meredith, P. G.; Reuschlé, T.

    2011-12-01

    Stylolites are serrated planar features that form as a result of pressure-dissolution (i.e., due to the dissolution of calcite in stressed zones). They usually form orientated perpendicular to the maximum principal stress during their development (weight of the overburden or maximum tectonic stress). They typically form clay-enriched seams; and can sometimes reach a few hundred metres in length. The pores surrounding the stylolites are also often filled with precipitation material. Stylolites are ubiquitous features in carbonate rocks (and are also found in sandstones). Hence, they could potentially play an important role in modifying the transport and mechanical properties of their host rock. In this study, we conducted systematic porosity and permeability measurements on stylolite rich cores from limestone formations surrounding the Andra Underground Research Laboratory (URL) at Bure in the south of the Meuse district, France. Eight different limestones from the Dogger and Oxfordian ages were selected for study. The rocks are essentially composed of pure calcite and their average porosities range between 2 and 18%. Porosity measurements (performed by the water saturation technique) revealed a systematic increase of the porosity in the area approaching the stylolites, with respect to the stylolite free material. This was also visible on X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) images performed at resolutions between 4 to 40 microns. These measurements were made for two typical examples from the Dogger and Oxfordian formations. A suite of permeability measurements (using both gas and water) were performed under different hydrostatic conditions on samples specially prepared to contain either: (1) no stylolites, (2) stylolites parallel to the imposed flow and, (3) stylolites perpendicular to the imposed flow. Our new data showed that the presence of stylolites was associated, in all cases, with a moderate increase in permeability relative to stylolite-free material. A weak

  4. Condensation Enhancement by Surface Porosity: Three-Stage Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Yarom, Michal; Marmur, Abraham

    2015-08-18

    Surface defects, such as pores, cracks, and scratches, are naturally occurring and commonly found on solid surfaces. However, the mechanism by which such imperfections promote condensation has not been fully explored. In the current paper we thermodynamically analyze the ability of surface porosity to enhance condensation on a hydrophilic solid. We show that the presence of a surface-embedded pore brings about three distinct stages of condensation. The first is capillary condensation inside the pore until it is full. This provides an ideal hydrophilic surface for continuing the condensation. As a result, spontaneous condensation and wetting can be achieved at lower vapor pressure than on a smooth surface.

  5. Seismic Anisotropy and Velocity-Porosity Relationships in the Seafloor.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berge, Patricia A.

    In this dissertation, I investigate the structure and composition of marine sediments and the upper oceanic crust using seismic data and rock physics theories. Common marine sediments such as silty clays exhibit anisotropy because they are made up of thin sub-parallel lamellae of contrasting mineralogical composition and differing elastic properties. In 1986, Rondout Associates, Inc. and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution recorded direct shear waves in shallow marine sediments in 21-m-deep water by using a newly developed ocean-bottom shear source and a multicomponent on-bottom receiver. A nearby drill hole showed that the sediments are interbedded silty clays, clays, and sands. I used an anisotropic reflectivity program written by Geo-Pacific Corporation to produce synthetic seismograms to estimate the five independent elastic stiffnesses necessary for describing transverse isotropy, the form of anisotropy found in these sediments. The synthetics fit the vertical and two horizontal components for two intersecting profiles, 150 and 200 m long. The data require low shear velocities (<400 m/s) and high attenuation (Q_{S} < 100) in about the top 30 m of the sediments. In the top 10 m, silty clay exhibits 12-15% anisotropy for shear waves. In this dissertation, I also consider the applicability of various rock physics theories to modeling the oceanic crust. Seismic velocities are controlled by the porosity, typically 20-30% for the top of layer 2. Most rock physics theories that relate seismic velocities to porosities are invalid for such high porosities. I combined elements of the self-consistent and noninteraction approaches to extend some rock physics theories for porosities up to at least 30-35%. Since the oceanic crust contains pores and cracks of many shapes, an appropriate theory must model round pores as well as flat cracks. I present examples of how layer 2A of the oceanic crust might be represented using an extended version of the Kuster-Toksoz theory

  6. Process of making porous ceramic materials with controlled porosity

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Marc A.; Ku, Qunyin

    1993-01-01

    A method of making metal oxide ceramic material is disclosed by which the porosity of the resulting material can be selectively controlled by manipulating the sol used to make the material. The method can be used to make a variety of metal oxide ceramic bodies, including membranes, but also pellets, plugs or other bodies. It has also been found that viscous sol materials can readily be shaped by extrusion into shapes typical of catalytic or adsorbent bodies used in industry, to facilitate the application of such materials for catalytic and adsorbent applications.

  7. Thermal and ultrasonic evaluation of porosity in composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Patrick H.; Winfree, William P.; Long, Edward R., Jr.; Kullerd, Susan M.; Nathan, N.; Partos, Richard D.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of porosity on damage incurred by low-velocity impact are investigated. Specimens of graphite/epoxy composite were fabricated with various volume fractions of voids. The void fraction was independently determined using optical examination and acid resin digestion methods. Thermal diffusivity and ultrasonic attenuation were measured, and these results were related to the void volume fraction. The relationship between diffusivity and fiber volume fraction was also considered. The slope of the ultrasonic attenuation coefficient was found to increase linearly with void content, and the diffusivity decreased linearly with void volume fraction, after compensation for an approximately linear dependence on the fiber volume fraction.

  8. Defect-enhanced void filling and novel filled phases of open-structure skutterudites

    DOE PAGES

    Xi, Lili; Qiu, Yuting; Zhang, Wenqing; Chen, Lidong; Singh, David J.; Yang, Jihui

    2015-05-14

    Here, we report the design of novel filled CoSb3 skutterudite phases based on a combination of filling and Sb-substituted Ga/In defects. Ga/In doped skutterudite phases with Li-, Nd-, and Sm-fillings can be formed via this strategy, which can have relatively wider ranges of carrier concentration than other conventional filled skutterudite phases.

  9. Defect-enhanced void filling and novel filled phases of open-structure skutterudites

    SciTech Connect

    Xi, Lili; Qiu, Yuting; Zhang, Wenqing; Chen, Lidong; Singh, David J.; Yang, Jihui

    2015-05-14

    Here, we report the design of novel filled CoSb3 skutterudite phases based on a combination of filling and Sb-substituted Ga/In defects. Ga/In doped skutterudite phases with Li-, Nd-, and Sm-fillings can be formed via this strategy, which can have relatively wider ranges of carrier concentration than other conventional filled skutterudite phases.

  10. Thermal Performance Evaluation of Walls with Gas Filled Panel Insulation

    SciTech Connect

    Shrestha, Som S.; Desjarlais, Andre Omer; Atchley, Jerald Allen

    2014-11-01

    Gas filled insulation panels (GFP) are very light weight and compact (when uninflated) advanced insulation products. GFPs consist of multiple layers of thin, low emittance (low-e) metalized aluminum. When expanded, the internal, low-e aluminum layers form a honeycomb structure. These baffled polymer chambers are enveloped by a sealed barrier and filled with either air or a low-conductivity gas. The sealed exterior aluminum foil barrier films provide thermal resistance, flammability protection, and properties to contain air or a low conductivity inert gas. This product was initially developed with a grant from the U.S. Department of Energy. The unexpanded product is nearly flat for easy storage and transport. Therefore, transportation volume and weight of the GFP to fill unit volume of wall cavity is much smaller compared to that of other conventional insulation products. This feature makes this product appealing to use at Army Contingency Basing, when transportation cost is significant compared to the cost of materials. The objective of this study is to evaluate thermal performance of walls, similar to those used at typical Barracks Hut (B-Hut) hard shelters, when GFPs are used in the wall cavities. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) tested performance of the wall in the rotatable guarded hotbox (RGHB) according to the ASTM C 1363 standard test method.

  11. Wetting process of copper filling in through silicon vias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Junhong; Luo, Wei; Li, Yi; Gao, Liming; Li, Ming

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, wetting process of copper filling in through silicon vias was investigated by agitation and vacuum pretreatment. Copper filling followed the pretreatment was fabricated in electrolyte with optimal additives concentration. By agitation pretreatment, a large void was observed at the bottom of the vias where the copper seed layer was clearly seen, which was attributed to the insufficient wetting of vias. In the blind vias with higher aspect ratio, the ambient gas phase was difficult to be completely removed from the vias by agitation. This resulted in electrolyte having better wettability does not reach all the places of the vias by capillarity. The vacuum pretreatment results suggested that the air inside the vias was almost completely evacuated. Hence, the deionized water used as wetting solution easily permeated the blind vias relying on atmospheric pressure. Consequently, the uniform, complete and void-free copper filling was achieved due to better wettability of 273 K deionized water. Nevertheless, deionized water with temperature higher than the critical vaporization temperature yielded a void formation at the bottom of the vias, which resulted from the insufficient wetting caused by the vaporization of deionized water. The conclusions drawn by the experimental results were employed in the through silicon vias, and void-free copper filling in the vias having aspect ratio as high as 16 was fabricated.

  12. Intragranular porosity in Hanford sand grains after reaction with caustic tank wastes: Quantification and implications for reactive transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crandell, L. E.; Peters, C. A.; Um, W.; Jones, K. W.; Lindquist, W. B.

    2011-12-01

    Reactions of caustic tank waste with sediments in the 200 East Area of the Hanford site cause quartz and primary aluminosilicate minerals to dissolve. Secondary minerals of sodalite and cancrinite have been shown to nucleate on, and cement together, quartz grains. These secondary precipitates have been found to uptake radionuclides in their network of channels and cages. In this work, thin sections from unreacted and reacted column experiments packed with Hanford sand grains were imaged using 2D Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). SEM image analysis reveals large amounts of intragranular pore space in both the reacted and unreacted sands. Grayscale Backscattered Electron (BSE) images were thresholded to separate grain and pore pixels. To quantify the amount of intragranular pore space, a set of images were manually created with the intragranular pore space removed, or the grains filled-in. Porosity, and intragranular porosity, was determined by counting and comparing the number of pore pixels in each pair of images. Intragranular pore space accounts for up to 14% of total porosity. Quartz dissolution in intragranular regions increases the proportion of intragranular pore space in reacted samples. Diffusion of tank waste into these free silica rich areas provides a favorable environment for cancrinite precipitates to form and a potential significant trapping mechanism for radionuclides. Part of this work was to quantify where, within a single pore and a network of pores, precipitation occurred. While the bulk amount of cancrinite precipitation occurred on grain surfaces, cancrinite precipitates were also found in intragranular pore spaces. Up to 10% of total precipitation occurred in intragranular pore space. However, as the system recovers and clean water flow returns, radionuclides incorporated into precipitates in intragranular regions may act as a secondary long term leaching source for contaminants. To determine the trapping or leaching potential from

  13. Modeling ozone removal to indoor materials, including the effects of porosity, pore diameter, and thickness.

    PubMed

    Gall, Elliott T; Siegel, Jeffrey A; Corsi, Richard L

    2015-04-01

    We develop an ozone transport and reaction model to determine reaction probabilities and assess the importance of physical properties such as porosity, pore diameter, and material thickness on reactive uptake of ozone to five materials. The one-dimensional model accounts for molecular diffusion from bulk air to the air-material interface, reaction at the interface, and diffusive transport and reaction through material pore volumes. Material-ozone reaction probabilities that account for internal transport and internal pore area, γ(ipa), are determined by a minimization of residuals between predicted and experimentally derived ozone concentrations. Values of γ(ipa) are generally less than effective reaction probabilities (γ(eff)) determined previously, likely because of the inclusion of diffusion into substrates and reaction with internal surface area (rather than the use of the horizontally projected external material areas). Estimates of γ(ipa) average 1 × 10(-7), 2 × 10(-7), 4 × 10(-5), 2 × 10(-5), and 4 × 10(-7) for two types of cellulose paper, pervious pavement, Portland cement concrete, and an activated carbon cloth, respectively. The transport and reaction model developed here accounts for observed differences in ozone removal to varying thicknesses of the cellulose paper, and estimates a near constant γ(ipa) as material thickness increases from 0.02 to 0.16 cm.

  14. Investigation and calculation of filling factor of SnO2 inverse opal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jinquan; Wu, Shimin; Ji, Xiaoyuan; Li, Jinpeng; Zhang, Rong; Zhang, Ming

    2016-04-01

    In the process of preparing inverse opal, the structure of inverse opal is affected by many factors, and the filling factor of inverse opal is difficult to directly test. In this paper, SnO2 inverse opal was prepared with the sol-gel method by cooperative opal template. The repetition times of the infiltrating precursor into the opal templates were investigated in detail. The band-gap positions of SnO2 inverse opal were tested. In order to prepare perfect inverse opal structure, the filling quantity of the precursor is greater, as the diameter of the PS microsphere of opal is bigger. The filling factor of air in inverse opal can be calculated with a formula derived from Bragg’s law. For inverse opal, the filling factor of air in inverse opal gradually enlarges as the diameter of the void increases.

  15. Characterization of Porosity Development in Oxidized Graphite using Automated Image Analysis Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Contescu, Cristian I; Burchell, Timothy D

    2009-09-01

    This document reports on initial activities at ORNL aimed at quantitative characterization of porosity development in oxidized graphite specimens using automated image analysis (AIA) techniques. A series of cylindrical shape specimens were machined from nuclear-grade graphite (type PCEA, from GrafTech International). The specimens were oxidized in air to various levels of weight loss (between 5 and 20 %) and at three oxidation temperatures (between 600 and 750 oC). The procedure used for specimen preparation and oxidation was based on ASTM D-7542-09. Oxidized specimens were sectioned, resin-mounted and polished for optical microscopy examination. Mosaic pictures of rectangular stripes (25 mm x 0.4 mm) along a diameter of sectioned specimens were recorded. A commercial software (ImagePro) was evaluated for automated analysis of images. Because oxidized zones in graphite are less reflective in visible light than the pristine, unoxidized material, the microstructural changes induced by oxidation can easily be identified and analyzed. Oxidation at low temperatures contributes to development of numerous fine pores (< 100 m2) distributed more or less uniformly over a certain depth (5-6 mm) from the surface of graphite specimens, while causing no apparent external damage to the specimens. In contrast, oxidation at high temperatures causes dimensional changes and substantial surface damage within a narrow band (< 1 mm) near the exposed graphite surface, but leaves the interior of specimens with little or no changes in the pore structure. Based on these results it appears that weakening and degradation of mechanical properties of graphite materials produced by uniform oxidation at low temperatures is related to the massive development of fine pores in the oxidized zone. It was demonstrated that optical microscopy enhanced by AIA techniques allows accurate determination of oxidant penetration depth and of distribution of porosity in oxidized graphite materials.

  16. Porosities and permeability of Paleozoic sandstones derived from Nuclear Magnetic Resonance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorand, Rachel; Koch, Andreas; Mohnke, Oliver; Klitzsch, Norbert; Clauser, Christoph

    2010-05-01

    A major obstacle for an increased use of geothermal energy often lies in the high success risk for the development of geothermal reservoirs due to the unknown rock properties. In general, the ranges of porosity and permeability in existing compilations of rock properties are too large to be useful to constrain properties for specific sites. Usually, conservative assumptions are made about these properties, resulting in greater drilling depth and increased exploration cost. In this study, data from direct measurements on thirty-three sandstones from different borehole locations and depths enable to derive statistical values of the desired hydraulic properties for selected sandstones in the German subsurface. We used Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) measurements to estimate the porosity and the permeability of sandstones from North Rhine-Westphalia (Germany). Besides NMR standard poro-perm-measurements were performed on the samples to obtain independent data sets for comparison. Porosity was measured by Archimedes principle and pore-size distribution by mercury injection. Also permeability was determined by gas flow measurements taking into account the Klinkenberg effect. The porosities of the studied samples vary between 0 % and 16 %. NMR yields suitable porosity results whereas the porosities obtain by T1 relaxation measurements fit better to the Archimedes porosities than the porosities obtained by T2 relaxation measurements. For porosities up to 10 %, T2 relaxation measurements overestimate the porosity. Furthermore, we calculate the effective porosity using a cutoff time of 3 ms. This effective porosity agrees much better with Archimedes porosities, particularly for the low porosity samples. The gas permeability of studied sandstones varies between 10-21 m2 and 2.10-17 m2. A large number of empirical relationships between relaxation times and gas permeability have been published. We have applied several of these relationships to select the appropriate law for

  17. Controlled porosity solubility modulated osmotic pump tablets of gliclazide.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Arti; Verma, P R P; Gore, Subhash

    2015-06-01

    A system that can deliver drug at a controlled rate is very important for the treatment of various chronic diseases such as diabetes, asthma, and heart disease. Poorly water-soluble drug with pH-dependent solubility such as gliclazide (GLZ) offers challenges in the controlled-release formulation because of low dissolution rate and poor bioavailability. Solid dispersion (SD) of GLZ consisted of hydroxypropyl cellulose (HPC-SSL) as a polymeric solubilizer was manufactured by hot melt extrusion (HME) technology. Then, controlled porosity osmotic pump (CPOP) tablet of gliclazide was designed to deliver drug in a controlled manner up to 16 h. The developed formulation was optimized for type and level of pore former and coating weight gain. The optimized formulation was found to exhibit zero order kinetics independent of pH and agitation speed but depends on osmotic pressure of dissolution media indicated that mechanism of drug release was osmotic pressure. The in vivo performance prediction of developed formulation using convolution approach revealed that the developed formulation was superior to the existing marketed extended-release formulation in terms of attaining steady state plasma levels and indicated adequate exposure in translating hypoglycemic response. The prototype solubilization method combined with controlled porosity osmotic pump based technique could provide a unique way to increase dissolution rate and bioavailability of many poorly water-soluble, narrow therapeutic index drugs used in diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, etc.

  18. Mineral-Biochar Composites: Molecular Structure and Porosity.

    PubMed

    Rawal, Aditya; Joseph, Stephen D; Hook, James M; Chia, Chee H; Munroe, Paul R; Donne, Scott; Lin, Yun; Phelan, David; Mitchell, David R G; Pace, Ben; Horvat, Joseph; Webber, J Beau W

    2016-07-19

    Dramatic changes in molecular structure, degradation pathway, and porosity of biochar are observed at pyrolysis temperatures ranging from 250 to 550 °C when bamboo biomass is pretreated by iron-sulfate-clay slurries (iron-clay biochar), as compared to untreated bamboo biochar. Electron microscopy analysis of the biochar reveals the infusion of mineral species into the pores of the biochar and the formation of mineral nanostructures. Quantitative (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy shows that the presence of the iron clay prevents degradation of the cellulosic fraction at pyrolysis temperatures of 250 °C, whereas at higher temperatures (350-550 °C), the clay promotes biomass degradation, resulting in an increase in both the concentrations of condensed aromatic, acidic, and phenolic carbon species. The porosity of the biochar, as measured by NMR cryoporosimetry, is altered by the iron-clay pretreatment. In the presence of the clay, at lower pyrolysis temperatures, the biochar develops a higher pore volume, while at higher temperature, the presence of clay causes a reduction in the biochar pore volume. The most dramatic reduction in pore volume is observed in the kaolinite-infiltrated biochar at 550 °C, which is attributed to the blocking of the mesopores (2-50 nm pore) by the nonporous metakaolinite formed from kaolinite. PMID:27284608

  19. Kinetic-Impact Asteroid Defense: Dependence on Porosity and Composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gisler, G. R.; Ferguson, J. M.; Plesko, C. S.; Weaver, R.

    2015-12-01

    In this work we study the deflection of hazardous near-earth asteroids using a kinetic impactor. The momentum delivered to the asteroid can be greater than the momentum of the impactor because of the reaction force produced by ablation from the impact crater. We use an adaptive-mesh hydrocode to study the momentum-enhancement factor, or beta, varying the assumptions regarding the equation of state, strength, and porosity of the target. Spall from the back side of the asteroid, which partly counters the favorable effect of ablation, is also included in the calculations. The efficiency is shown to be most strongly dependent on the asteroid's porosity, which unfortunately is the most difficult quantity to obtain via remote observations. This study is applied both to the proposed deflection of the 150-meter diameter moon of the binary asteroid 65803 Didymos by the AIDA/DART mission, and to the potential deflection of the 492-meter diameter asteroid 101955 Bennu, which has some possible Earth impacts late in the 22nd century, and is the target of the planned OSIRIS-Rex mission. Figures of merit from both these studies include the bulk momentum imparted to the asteroid and the degree to which the asteroid is disrupted. (LA-UR-15-26214)

  20. Improved Cellular Infiltration in Electrospun Fiber via Engineered Porosity

    PubMed Central

    NAM, JIN; HUANG, YAN; AGARWAL, SUDHA; LANNUTTI, JOHN

    2016-01-01

    Small pore sizes inherent to electrospun matrices can hinder efficient cellular ingrowth. To facilitate infiltration while retaining its extracellular matrix-like character, electrospinning was combined with salt leaching to produce a scaffold having deliberate, engineered delaminations. We made elegant use of a specific randomizing component of the electrospinning process, the Taylor Cone and the falling fiber beneath it, to produce a uniform, well-spread distribution of salt particles. After 3 weeks of culture, up to 4 mm of cellular infiltration was observed, along with cellular coverage of up to 70% within the delaminations. To our knowledge, this represents the first observation of extensive cellular infiltration of electrospun matrices. Infiltration appears to be driven primarily by localized proliferation rather than coordinated cellular locomotion. Cells also moved from the salt-generated porosity into the surrounding electrospun fiber matrix. Given that the details of salt deposition (amount, size, and number density) are far from optimized, the result provides a convincing illustration of the ability of mammalian cells to interact with appropriately tailored electrospun matrices. These layered structures can be precisely fabricated by varying the deposition interval and particle size conceivably to produce in vivo-like gradients in porosity such that the resulting scaffolds better resemble the desired final structure. PMID:17536926

  1. Effect of shelter porosity on downwind flow characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nosek, Š.; Kellnerová, R.; Jurčáková, K.; Jaňour, Z.; Chaloupecká, H.; Jakubcová, M.

    2016-03-01

    Previous wind-tunnel studies were focused mainly on lonely standing windbreaks or wind fences with respect to their wind velocity reduction efficiency and effective shelter distance. In presented wind-tunnel study, we investigated the effects of a three different fence porosities (0.5, 0.25 and 0) embodied in a shelter-like building for coal convey by means of two-component Laser Doppler Anemometry (LDA). The turbulent flow characteristics behind the fences were compared with those performed without the fence. For characterization of the fence effectiveness we used following quantities: wind-speed and turbulence kinetic energy reduction, and time fractions of the turbulent coherent structures associated with the sediment transport (sweeps and outward interactions). Results from mentioned quantities revealed that for the case of embodied fence the shelter construction has significant impact on the flow characteristics behind. The fence of the 0.5 porosity has been indicated as the most shelter effective considering the studied quantities.

  2. Porosity and hydric behavior of typical calcite microfabrics in stalagmites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz-García, M. B.; López-Arce, P.; Fernández-Valle, M. E.; Martín-Chivelet, J.; Fort, R.

    2012-07-01

    Petrophysical techniques commonly used for material characterization are applied for the first time to speleothem samples to investigate the porosity and hydric behavior of calcite stalagmites used in paleoclimatology. These techniques allow the determination of the stalagmites' potential to undergo diagenetic transformations when substantial changes in drip waters occur in the cave environment. The petrophysical techniques include water absorption under vacuum and by capillarity, nuclear magnetic resonance, environmental scanning electron microscopy, and mercury intrusion porosimetry. The studied samples comprise five common calcite microfabrics, which have markedly different porosities and hydric behaviors and, as a consequence, different sensibilities to diagenetic processes related to the influx of water. The experiments show that stalagmites can behave as complex, small-scale hydrological systems and that the circulation of water through them by complex nets of interconnected pores might be common. As the circulation of water favors diagenetic transformations that involve geochemical and isotopic changes, the characterization of flow patterns is key for outlining areas that are susceptible to such modifications, which is critical to paleoclimatic studies that are based on speleothems because geochemical and stable isotopic data are used as paleoenvironmental proxies and absolute ages are obtained by using radioactive isotope ratios. These potential modifications also have obvious implications for studies based on fluid inclusions in speleothems. The integrated methodology, which uses primarily non-destructive techniques, shows a high potential for characterization of any type of speleothem and other continental carbonates such as tufas or sinters.

  3. Porosity of mixed granular media of hard and soft grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verneuil, Emilie; Durian, Douglas J.

    2009-03-01

    The addition of soft particles to granular materials modifies the packing properties such as the volume fraction and the interconnection of pores as a consequence of the particles squishiness. A macroscopic property that depends on the local arrangement of the grains is the hydraulic conductivity. Hence, hydrogel particles are developed as additives to sandy soils to improve the irrigation efficiency by decreasing the rate of far depth infiltration. However the parameters that control the mixed material porosity have not been explored. Our experimental study of the flow properties of mixtures of glass beads and swollen hydrogels aims at deriving simple arguments to connect the macro-scale measurement of the hydraulic conductivity to the arrangement of the grains around the soft particles, which determines the fraction of blocked pores. Our results show that the porosity decreases with the number of swollen gel per unit volume of the mixture. The conductivity also decreases as the size ratio of gel to glass bead decreases down to 1. A simple description accounting for the elastic contacts between glass beads and gel surface qualitatively accounts for the data.

  4. An Unsteady Dual Porosity Representation Of Concrete Rubble Disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Flach, G

    2006-03-29

    Decontamination and decommissioning at the Savannah River Site have produced on-site disposals of low-level solid radioactive waste in the form of concrete rubble. In the case of a former tritium extraction facility, building demolition produced a significant volume of rubble embedded with tritium. The contaminated debris comprises a heterogeneous mixture of sizes, shapes, and internal tritium distributions. The rubble was disposed in long, shallow, unlined, earthen trenches, that were subsequently backfilled with excavated soil and exposed to normal infiltration. To forecast tritium flux to the water table, an unsteady dual porosity model was developed to describe vadose zone leaching and transport. Tritium was assumed to be released through unsteady, one-dimensional, molecular diffusion within concrete, while advective and diffusive transport occur in the surrounding backfill. Rubble size and shape variations were characterized through a combination of physical measurement and photographic image analysis. For simplicity, the characterization data were reduced to an approximately equivalent distribution of one-dimensional slab thicknesses for representation in the dual porosity formulation. Each size classification was simulated separately, and individual flux results were then blended in proportion to the thickness distribution to produce a composite flux. The fractional flux from concrete rubble was predicted to be roughly 40% of that from tritium-contaminated soil. The lower flux is a result of slower release to soil pore water, and a reduced effective trench conductivity from the presence of impervious concrete.

  5. MOISTURE CONTENT AND POROSITY OF CONCRETE RUBBLE STUDY.

    SciTech Connect

    Phifer, M

    2005-10-07

    Tritium contaminated concrete rubble from the 232-F Tritium Facility was disposed in the Slit 1 Trenches 1 and 2 in 1997. A Special Analysis (SA) has been performed to evaluate any impact this disposal may have on the groundwater. The SA assumed that the disposed concrete rubble was fully saturated at the time of disposal, however if the concrete was less than fully saturated, migration of tritium out of the concrete would be slower than under fully saturated conditions. Therefore if the concrete at disposal was less than fully saturated, the PA assumption of full saturation would be a conservative assumption. In order to evaluate whether the PA assumption resulted in a conservative analysis from the standpoint of the concrete saturation, concrete rubble samples were collected from various facilities being demolished at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and evaluated for in-field moisture content, absorbable moisture, and water exchangeable porosity. The purpose of this task was to collect concrete rubble samples from various demolished SRS facilities for the purpose of determining in-field moisture content, absorbable moisture, and water exchangeable porosity. Since moisture content testing for concrete rubble is not typical, existing ASTM Standards were reviewed for method and procedure development.

  6. System-level simulation of liquid filling in microfluidic chips.

    PubMed

    Song, Hongjun; Wang, Yi; Pant, Kapil

    2011-06-01

    Liquid filling in microfluidic channels is a complex process that depends on a variety of geometric, operating, and material parameters such as microchannel geometry, flow velocity∕pressure, liquid surface tension, and contact angle of channel surface. Accurate analysis of the filling process can provide key insights into the filling time, air bubble trapping, and dead zone formation, and help evaluate trade-offs among the various design parameters and lead to optimal chip design. However, efficient modeling of liquid filling in complex microfluidic networks continues to be a significant challenge. High-fidelity computational methods, such as the volume of fluid method, are prohibitively expensive from a computational standpoint. Analytical models, on the other hand, are primarily applicable to idealized geometries and, hence, are unable to accurately capture chip level behavior of complex microfluidic systems. This paper presents a parametrized dynamic model for the system-level analysis of liquid filling in three-dimensional (3D) microfluidic networks. In our approach, a complex microfluidic network is deconstructed into a set of commonly used components, such as reservoirs, microchannels, and junctions. The components are then assembled according to their spatial layout and operating rationale to achieve a rapid system-level model. A dynamic model based on the transient momentum equation is developed to track the liquid front in the microchannels. The principle of mass conservation at the junction is used to link the fluidic parameters in the microchannels emanating from the junction. Assembly of these component models yields a set of differential and algebraic equations, which upon integration provides temporal information of the liquid filling process, particularly liquid front propagation (i.e., the arrival time). The models are used to simulate the transient liquid filling process in a variety of microfluidic constructs and in a multiplexer, representing a

  7. System-level simulation of liquid filling in microfluidic chips.

    PubMed

    Song, Hongjun; Wang, Yi; Pant, Kapil

    2011-06-01

    Liquid filling in microfluidic channels is a complex process that depends on a variety of geometric, operating, and material parameters such as microchannel geometry, flow velocity∕pressure, liquid surface tension, and contact angle of channel surface. Accurate analysis of the filling process can provide key insights into the filling time, air bubble trapping, and dead zone formation, and help evaluate trade-offs among the various design parameters and lead to optimal chip design. However, efficient modeling of liquid filling in complex microfluidic networks continues to be a significant challenge. High-fidelity computational methods, such as the volume of fluid method, are prohibitively expensive from a computational standpoint. Analytical models, on the other hand, are primarily applicable to idealized geometries and, hence, are unable to accurately capture chip level behavior of complex microfluidic systems. This paper presents a parametrized dynamic model for the system-level analysis of liquid filling in three-dimensional (3D) microfluidic networks. In our approach, a complex microfluidic network is deconstructed into a set of commonly used components, such as reservoirs, microchannels, and junctions. The components are then assembled according to their spatial layout and operating rationale to achieve a rapid system-level model. A dynamic model based on the transient momentum equation is developed to track the liquid front in the microchannels. The principle of mass conservation at the junction is used to link the fluidic parameters in the microchannels emanating from the junction. Assembly of these component models yields a set of differential and algebraic equations, which upon integration provides temporal information of the liquid filling process, particularly liquid front propagation (i.e., the arrival time). The models are used to simulate the transient liquid filling process in a variety of microfluidic constructs and in a multiplexer, representing a

  8. Numerical analysis of heat transfer by conduction and natural convection in loose-fill fiberglass insulation--effects of convection on thermal performance

    SciTech Connect

    Delmas, A.A.; Wilkes, K.E.

    1992-04-01

    A two-dimensional code for solving equations of convective heat transfer in porous media is used to analyze heat transfer by conduction and convection in the attic insulation configuration. The particular cases treated correspond to loose-fill fiberglass insulation, which is characterized by high porosity and air permeability. The effects of natural convection on the thermal performance of the insulation are analyzed for various densities, permeabilities, and thicknesses of insulation. With convection increasing the total heat transfer through the insulation, the thermal resistance was found to decrease as the temperature difference across the insulating material increases. The predicted results for the thermal resistance are compared with data obtained in the large-scale climate simulator at the Roof Research Center using the attic test module, where the same phenomenon has already been observed. The way the wood joists within the insulation influence the start of convection is studied for differing thermophysical and dynamic properties of the insulating material. The presence of wood joists induces convection at a lower temperature difference.

  9. New method for quantification of vuggy porosity from digital optical borehole images as applied to the karstic Pleistocene limestone of the Biscayne aquifer, southeastern Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cunningham, K.J.; Carlson, J.I.; Hurley, N.F.

    2004-01-01

    Vuggy porosity is gas- or fluid-filled openings in rock matrix that are large enough to be seen with the unaided eye. Well-connected vugs can form major conduits for flow of ground water, especially in carbonate rocks. This paper presents a new method for quantification of vuggy porosity calculated from digital borehole images collected from 47 test coreholes that penetrate the karstic Pleistocene limestone of the Biscayne aquifer, southeastern Florida. Basically, the method interprets vugs and background based on the grayscale color of each in digital borehole images and calculates a percentage of vuggy porosity. Development of the method was complicated because environmental conditions created an uneven grayscale contrast in the borehole images that makes it difficult to distinguish vugs from background. The irregular contrast was produced by unbalanced illumination of the borehole wall, which was a result of eccentering of the borehole-image logging tool. Experimentation showed that a simple, single grayscale threshold would not realistically differentiate between the grayscale contrast of vugs and background. Therefore, an equation was developed for an effective subtraction of the changing grayscale contrast, due to uneven illumination, to produce a grayscale threshold that successfully identifies vugs. In the equation, a moving average calculated around the circumference of the borehole and expressed as the background grayscale intensity is defined as a baseline from which to identify a grayscale threshold for vugs. A constant was derived empirically by calibration with vuggy porosity values derived from digital images of slabbed-core samples and used to make the subtraction from the background baseline to derive the vug grayscale threshold as a function of azimuth. The method should be effective in estimating vuggy porosity in any carbonate aquifer. ?? 2003 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Dolomitization and porosity development in the middle and upper Wabamun Group, southeast Peace River Arch, Alberta, Canada

    SciTech Connect

    Saller, A.H.; Yaremko, K.

    1994-09-01

    Dolomitization and fracturing are critical to porosity development in most Wabamun Group reservoirs in the southern part of the Peace River arch. Cores from Peoria, Normandville, and Eaglesham fields and adjacent areas were examined to determine the relationship between depositional facies, dolomitization, fracturing, and porosity. Three-dimensional (3-D) seismic data indicate that most upper Wabamun dolomites are coincident with mound-like structural highs at the top of the Wabamun, with structural relief due largely to differential compaction between dolomite and adjacent limestone. When this depositional/diagenetic model for dolomitization was integrated into 3-D seismic interpretations, Canadian Occidental`s discovery rate in the Wabamun increased from approximately 25 to 80%. The early dolomite is facies, fabric, and mineralogy selective with some burrow fills and aragonitic mollusks being preferentially dolomitized in dolomitic limestones. Most fracturing occurred after early, replacive Dolornitization. Late dolomitization, karst-like dissolution and collapse apparently were localized near the margins of the early dolomites where adjacent limestones were dolomitized or dissolved. Dissolution of calcite in partially dolomitized limestones resulted in geopetal accumulations of dolomite rhombs (porous sucrosic dolomite) in some fractures and burrow fills. Hydrothermal fluids apparently moved updip through the underlying Winterburn and/or Leduc formations, and then upward through porous, early dolomites in the Wabamun, causing Dolomitization of adjacent limestones and karst-like dissolution. Stable oxygen isotope ratios of the dolomites are quite variable ({delta}{sup 18}O ranges from -2.0 to -11.4{per_thousand}, PDB), supporting multiple stages of dolomitization during progressive burial.

  11. Air cathode structure manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Momyer, William R.; Littauer, Ernest L.

    1985-01-01

    An improved air cathode structure for use in primary batteries and the like. The cathode structure includes a matrix active layer, a current collector grid on one face of the matrix active layer, and a porous, nonelectrically conductive separator on the opposite face of the matrix active layer, the collector grid and separator being permanently bonded to the matrix active layer. The separator has a preselected porosity providing low IR losses and high resistance to air flow through the matrix active layer to maintain high bubble pressure during operation of the battery. In the illustrated embodiment, the separator was formed of porous polypropylene. A thin hydrophobic film is provided, in the preferred embodiment, on the current collecting metal grid.

  12. Classification of munition fill using laser acoustics

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, J.G.; Blackwood, L.G.

    1997-08-01

    Identification of a munition fill is easier if one can determine if there is fill material present (empty versus full), and if so, the phase (solid or liquid) of the fill. Previous munition inspection efforts by the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) determined that resonance information could determine the fill. A portable, noncontacting laser-acoustic system was developed by INEEL that uses a low-power laser system to measure the container`s vibration characteristics in response to an acoustic excitation. These vibration characteristics were shown to be functions of the fill material and munition geometry. The laser acoustic system was used to characterize the fill of over one hundred 155-mm munitions. Additional research and development using this system is being performed for the Mobile Munitions Assessment System.

  13. Capillary filling dynamics of viscoelastic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandopadhyay, Aditya; Ghosh, Uddipta; Chakraborty, Suman

    2014-05-01

    We consider the filling of a capillary by a viscoelastic fluid described by the Phan-Thien-Tanner (PTT) constitutive behavior. By considering both vertical capillary filling and horizontal capillary filling, we demarcate the role played by gravity and fluid rheology towards long-time oscillations in the capillary penetration depth. We also consider the isothermal filling of the capillary for a closed channel and thus bring out the fundamental differences in the nature of capillary filling for PTT and Newtonian fluids for closed channels in comparison to open channels. Through a scaling analysis, we highlight a distinct viscoelastic regime in the horizontal capillary filling which is in contrast to the Washburn scaling seen in the case of Newtonian fluids. Such an analysis with a very general constitutive behavior is therefore expected to shed light on many areas of microfluidics which focus on biofluids that are often well described by the PTT constitutive behavior.

  14. Filling of orbital fluid management systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merino, F.; Blatt, M. H.; Thies, N. C.

    1978-01-01

    A study was performed with three objectives: (1) analyze fluid management system fill under orbital conditions; (2) determine what experimentation is needed; and (3) develop an experimental program. The fluid management system was a 1.06m (41.7 in) diameter pressure vessel with screen channel device. Analyses were conducted using liquid hydrogen and N2O4. The influence of helium and autogenous pressurization systems was considered. Analyses showed that fluid management system fill will be more difficult with a cryogen than with an earth storable. The key to a successful fill with cryogens is in devising techniques for filling without vent liquid, and removing trapped vapor from the screen device at tank fill completion. This will be accomplished with prechill, fill, and vapor condensation processes. Refill will require a vent and purge process, to dilute the residual helium, prior to introducing liquid. Neither prechill, chill, nor purge processes will be required for earth storables.

  15. Mechanisms of tracheal filling in insects.

    PubMed

    Förster, Thomas D; Woods, H Arthur

    2013-02-01

    Insects exchange respiratory gases primarily using tracheal systems that are filled with gas. However, in different developmental and environmental circumstances, liquid can occupy the tracheal system, which can significantly impair its respiratory function. Insects therefore use a suite of mechanisms for tracheal filling, which is the process of replacing tracheal liquids with gas. We review these mechanisms for liquid removal and gas filling. By integrating recent molecular work with older physiological literature, we show that liquid removal likely involves active ion transport in the whole tracheal system. Gas filling reveals fascinating interactions between geometry, surface chemistry of the tracheal walls, the tracheal liquid, and dissolved gases. The temporal proximity to moulting allows for potentially complex interdependencies between gas filling, moult-associated hormone signaling, and cuticle sclerotization. We propose a mechanistic model for tracheal filling. However, because the composition of the liquid is unknown, it remains hypothetical. PMID:22616845

  16. Undercut and fill system for pitching coal. Open file report Aug 79-Jun 81

    SciTech Connect

    Mangolds, A.; Fisk, A.

    1981-06-01

    A study of the technical and economic feasibility of using a unique undercut and fill system developed by Bureau of Mines engineers to mine steeply pitching coal is discussed. The undercut and fill system combines hydraulic coal cutting with unassisted gravity fluming of the coal slurry. Mining occurs across strike and the extended entry is backfilled to provide uniform strata control and an impermeable water and air barrier. Subsequent mining occurs beneath the previously filled stope such that the roof consists of a solid, controlled back.

  17. A comparison of estimated and calculated effective porosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, Daniel B.; Hsu, Kuo-Chin; Prieksat, Mark A.; Ankeny, Mark D.; Blandford, Neil; Roth, Tracy L.; Kelsey, James A.; Whitworth, Julia R.

    Effective porosity in solute-transport analyses is usually estimated rather than calculated from tracer tests in the field or laboratory. Calculated values of effective porosity in the laboratory on three different textured samples were compared to estimates derived from particle-size distributions and soil-water characteristic curves. The agreement was poor and it seems that no clear relationships exist between effective porosity calculated from laboratory tracer tests and effective porosity estimated from particle-size distributions and soil-water characteristic curves. A field tracer test in a sand-and-gravel aquifer produced a calculated effective porosity of approximately 0.17. By comparison, estimates of effective porosity from textural data, moisture retention, and published values were approximately 50-90% greater than the field calibrated value. Thus, estimation of effective porosity for chemical transport is highly dependent on the chosen transport model and is best obtained by laboratory or field tracer tests. Résumé La porosité effective dans les analyses de transport de soluté est habituellement estimée, plutôt que calculée à partir d'expériences de traçage sur le terrain ou au laboratoire. Les valeurs calculées de la porosité effective au laboratoire sur trois échantillons de textures différentes ont été comparées aux estimations provenant de distributions de taille de particules et de courbes caractéristiques sol-eau. La concordance était plutôt faible et il semble qu'il n'existe aucune relation claire entre la porosité effective calculée à partir des expériences de traçage au laboratoire et la porosité effective estimée à partir des distributions de taille de particules et de courbes caractéristiques sol-eau. Une expérience de traçage de terrain dans un aquifère de sables et de graviers a fourni une porosité effective calculée d'environ 0,17. En comparaison, les estimations de porosité effective de données de

  18. Single-step fabrication of microfluidic channels filled with nanofibrous membrane using femtosecond laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavangar, Amirhossein; Tan, Bo; Venkatakrishnan, K.

    2010-08-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate a new method of fabricating silicon microfluidic channels filled with a porous nanofibrous structure utilizing a femtosecond laser. The nanofibrous structure can act as a membrane used for microfiltration. This method allows us to generate both the microfluidic channel and the fibrous nanostructure in a single step under ambient conditions. Due to laser irradiation, a large number of nanoparticles ablate from the channel surface, and then aggregate and grow into porous nanofibrous structures and fill the channels. Energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analysis was conducted to examine the oxygen concentration in the membrane structure. Our results demonstrated that by controlling the laser parameters including pulse repetition, pulse width and scanning speed, different microfluidic channels with a variety of porosity could be obtained.

  19. Effect of Porosity on Deformation, Damage, and Fracture of Cast Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardin, R. A.; Beckermann, C.

    2013-12-01

    A combined experimental and computational study is performed to investigate the effect of centerline shrinkage porosity on deformation, damage, and fracture of cast steel under tensile testing. Steel plates containing shrinkage porosity are cast in sand molds, machined into test coupons, and tensile tested to fracture. The average volumetric porosity in the gage section of the specimens with porosity ranges from 0.10 to 0.27 pct. Ductility in the test castings with porosity is markedly reduced with the percent elongation data ranging from 12.8 to 19.6 pct; vs 22 pct elongation for the sound material. Radiographic imaging is used to measure and reconstruct the porosity field in the test specimens. The reconstructed porosity field is then used in a finite-element stress analysis simulating the tensile testing. Local elastic properties are reduced according to the porosity fraction present. Porous metal plasticity theory is used to model the damage due to porosity and the fracture. Good agreement is obtained between the measured and predicted stress-strain curves and fracture behaviors. The reduction in ductility is predicted well by comparing the measured and the simulated elongations. The computational modeling approach used in this study allows for a detailed evaluation of the effect of porosity, including its size, shape, and location, on the fracture behavior of steel castings.

  20. Eggshell Porosity Provides Insight on Evolution of Nesting in Dinosaurs.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Kohei; Zelenitsky, Darla K; Therrien, François

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge about the types of nests built by dinosaurs can provide insight into the evolution of nesting and reproductive behaviors among archosaurs. However, the low preservation potential of their nesting materials and nesting structures means that most information can only be gleaned indirectly through comparison with extant archosaurs. Two general nest types are recognized among living archosaurs: 1) covered nests, in which eggs are incubated while fully covered by nesting material (as in crocodylians and megapodes), and 2) open nests, in which eggs are exposed in the nest and brooded (as in most birds). Previously, dinosaur nest types had been inferred by estimating the water vapor conductance (i.e., diffusive capacity) of their eggs, based on the premise that high conductance corresponds to covered nests and low conductance to open nests. However, a lack of statistical rigor and inconsistencies in this method render its application problematic and its validity questionable. As an alternative we propose a statistically rigorous approach to infer nest type based on large datasets of eggshell porosity and egg mass compiled for over 120 extant archosaur species and 29 archosaur extinct taxa/ootaxa. The presence of a strong correlation between eggshell porosity and nest type among extant archosaurs indicates that eggshell porosity can be used as a proxy for nest type, and thus discriminant analyses can help predict nest type in extinct taxa. Our results suggest that: 1) covered nests are likely the primitive condition for dinosaurs (and probably archosaurs), and 2) open nests first evolved among non-avian theropods more derived than Lourinhanosaurus and were likely widespread in non-avian maniraptorans, well before the appearance of birds. Although taphonomic evidence suggests that basal open nesters (i.e., oviraptorosaurs and troodontids) were potentially the first dinosaurs to brood their clutches, they still partially buried their eggs in sediment. Open nests

  1. Eggshell Porosity Provides Insight on Evolution of Nesting in Dinosaurs

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge about the types of nests built by dinosaurs can provide insight into the evolution of nesting and reproductive behaviors among archosaurs. However, the low preservation potential of their nesting materials and nesting structures means that most information can only be gleaned indirectly through comparison with extant archosaurs. Two general nest types are recognized among living archosaurs: 1) covered nests, in which eggs are incubated while fully covered by nesting material (as in crocodylians and megapodes), and 2) open nests, in which eggs are exposed in the nest and brooded (as in most birds). Previously, dinosaur nest types had been inferred by estimating the water vapor conductance (i.e., diffusive capacity) of their eggs, based on the premise that high conductance corresponds to covered nests and low conductance to open nests. However, a lack of statistical rigor and inconsistencies in this method render its application problematic and its validity questionable. As an alternative we propose a statistically rigorous approach to infer nest type based on large datasets of eggshell porosity and egg mass compiled for over 120 extant archosaur species and 29 archosaur extinct taxa/ootaxa. The presence of a strong correlation between eggshell porosity and nest type among extant archosaurs indicates that eggshell porosity can be used as a proxy for nest type, and thus discriminant analyses can help predict nest type in extinct taxa. Our results suggest that: 1) covered nests are likely the primitive condition for dinosaurs (and probably archosaurs), and 2) open nests first evolved among non-avian theropods more derived than Lourinhanosaurus and were likely widespread in non-avian maniraptorans, well before the appearance of birds. Although taphonomic evidence suggests that basal open nesters (i.e., oviraptorosaurs and troodontids) were potentially the first dinosaurs to brood their clutches, they still partially buried their eggs in sediment. Open nests

  2. Effective use of fly ash slurry as fill material.

    PubMed

    Horiuchi, S; Kawaguchi, M; Yasuhara, K

    2000-09-15

    A lot of effort has been put into increasing coal ash utilization; however, 50% of total amount is disposed of on land and in the sea. Several attempts have been reported recently concerning slurried coal fly ash use for civil engineering materials, such as for structural fill and backfill. The authors have studied this issue for more than 15 years and reported its potential for (1) underwater fills, (2) light weight backfills, and (3) light weight structural fills, through both laboratory tests and construction works. This paper is an overview of the results obtained for slurry, focusing on the following. (1) Coal fly ash reclaimed by slurry placement shows lower compressibility, higher ground density, and higher strength than by the other methods. This higher strength increases stability against liquefaction during earthquake. (2) Higher stability of the fly ash ground formed by slurry placement is caused by higher density and its self-hardening property. (3) Stability of fly ash reclaimed ground can be increased by increasing density and also by strength enhancement by cement addition. (4) Technical data obtained through a man-made island construction project shows the advantages of fly ash slurry in terms of mechanical properties such as higher stability against sliding failure, sufficient ground strength, and also in terms of cost saving. (5) Concentration in leachates from the placed slurry is lower than the Japanese environmental law. (6) In order to enlarge the fly ash slurry application toward a lightweight fill, mixtures of air foam, cement and fly ash were examined. Test results shows sufficient durability of this material against creep failure. This material was then used as lightweight structural fill around a high-rise building, and showed sufficient quality. From the above data, it can be concluded that coal fly ash slurry can be effectively utilized in civil engineering projects.

  3. Steady and Unsteady Aerodynamics of Thin Airfoils with Porosity Gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajian, Rozhin; Jaworski, Justin W.

    2015-11-01

    Porous treatments have been shown in previous studies to reduce turbulence noise generation from the edges of wings and blades. However, this acoustical benefit can come at the cost of aerodynamic performance that is degraded by seepage flow through the wing. To better understand the trade-off between acoustic stealth and the desired airfoil performance, the aerodynamic loads of a thin airfoil in uniform flow with a prescribed porosity distribution are determined analytically in closed form, provided that the distribution is Hölder-continuous. The theoretical model is extended to include unsteady heaving and pitching motions of the airfoil section, which has applications to the performance estimation of biologically-inspired swimmers and fliers and to the future assessment of vortex noise production from porous airfoils.

  4. Matrix-fracture interactions in dual porosity simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Shook, G.M.

    1996-01-01

    A new method for simulating flow in fractured media is presented which uses a truncated version of the analytical solution to resolve pressure transients in the rock matrix. The point at which the series solution may be truncated is a known function of the problem, and may therefore be readily determined. Furthermore, the functional form of the method is essentially dimension-independent, and implementation of the method requires only minimal modification to an existing dual porosity simulator. Three test cases are presented comparing results from fine grid simulations, Warren and Root simulations, and the new formulation. In each of the three cases presented, excellent agreement with the fine grid simulations is obtained using the new method. The W&R formulation exhibits excessive error throughout the simulated time, first underpredicting outflow rates, and then overpredicting rates. The error using the W&R formulation is largest for 3-D fracture networks, but is large for all cases tested.

  5. Micrometer-scale porosity as a biosignature in carbonate crusts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosak, Tanja; Souza-Egipsy, Virginia; Corsetti, Frank A.; Newman, Dianne K.

    2004-09-01

    We formed calcite crusts in the presence and absence of the heterotrophic bacterium Desulfovibrio desulfuricans strain G20 to investigate microbial morphological signatures in fast-accreting carbonate precipitates. Submicrometer- to micrometer-sized pores (micropores) were present and ubiquitous in the G20 crusts but absent in abiotically precipitated crusts. Bacterial micropores resemble inclusions under transmitted light, but have distinct size, biological shapes and patterns (swirling or dendritic) and are distributed differently from common fluid inclusions. We observed similar porosity in both modern and ancient carbonate crusts of putative biotic origin. Our experiments support the microbial origin of micropores and help define specific criteria whereby to recognize these features as biosignatures in the rock record.

  6. Porosity estimation of alumina samples based on resonant backscattering spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokhles Gerami, F.; Kakuee, O.; Mohammadi, S.

    2016-04-01

    In this work, columnar porous alumina samples were investigated using the 16O(α,α)16O resonance scattering at 3.045 MeV. If the incident energy is slightly above the resonance energy, a resonance peak appears in the energy spectra of the backscattered ions. The position and width of this peak for non-porous samples are mainly determined by the experimental setup, whilst for porous materials, the peak position shifts towards higher energies under certain conditions. This effect can be explained by the lower amount of material which the ions encounter along the backscattered trajectories. The energy shift of the resonance peak towards higher energies was revealed experimentally and discussed theoretically. The estimated porosities of the samples based on this energy shift were compared with those evaluated from the graphical analysis of the images obtained by field emission scanning electron microscopy.

  7. Porosity at photo-induced fat cell lipolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doubrovsky, V. A.; Yanina, I. Y.; Tuchin, V. V.

    2012-06-01

    The "specific structures" on the fat cells' membranes in vitro as a result of photodynamic treatment was registered. These structures were identified as cytoplasm/oil microdrops flowed out through the pores in the membranes. The impact of Brilliant Green dissolved in water-ethanol solutions and irradiation by a LED lamp on the quantity and size of "specific structures" on the membranes was investigated. It was demonstrated that optical selective action on fat cells sensitized by Brilliant Green led to the growth of "specific structures" (pores) number during the time interval after light exposure. A high degree of correlation between the optical clearing of fat tissue and quantity of "specific structures" (pores) was found. This result proves our early prediction about mechanism of light-induced fat cells' lipolysis via increased cell membrane porosity.

  8. Porosity Controls Spread of Excitation in Tectorial Membrane Traveling Waves

    PubMed Central

    Sellon, Jonathan B.; Ghaffari, Roozbeh; Farrahi, Shirin; Richardson, Guy P.; Freeman, Dennis M.

    2014-01-01

    Cochlear frequency selectivity plays a key role in our ability to understand speech, and is widely believed to be associated with cochlear amplification. However, genetic studies targeting the tectorial membrane (TM) have demonstrated both sharper and broader tuning with no obvious changes in hair bundle or somatic motility mechanisms. For example, cochlear tuning of Tectb–/– mice is significantly sharper than that of TectaY1870C/+ mice, even though TM stiffnesses are similarly reduced relative to wild-type TMs. Here we show that differences in TM viscosity can account for these differences in tuning. In the basal cochlear turn, nanoscale pores of TectaY1870C/+ TMs are significantly larger than those of Tectb–/– TMs. The larger pore size reduces shear viscosity (by ∼70%), thereby reducing traveling wave speed and increasing spread of excitation. These results demonstrate the previously unrecognized importance of TM porosity in cochlear and neural tuning. PMID:24655516

  9. Spark plasma sintering and porosity studies of uranium nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Kyle D.; Wallenius, Janne; Jolkkonen, Mikael; Claisse, Antoine

    2016-05-01

    In this study, a number of samples of UN sintered by the SPS method have been fabricated, and highly pure samples ranging in density from 68% to 99.8%TD - corresponding to an absolute density of 14.25 g/cm3 out of a theoretical density of 14.28 g/cm3 - have been fabricated. By careful adjustment of the sintering parameters of temperature and applied pressure, the production of pellets of specific porosity may now be achieved between these ranges. The pore closure behaviour of the material has also been documented and compared to previous studies of similar materials, which demonstrates that full pore closure using these methods occurs near 97.5% of relative density.

  10. ASTROMETRIC MASSES OF 26 ASTEROIDS AND OBSERVATIONS ON ASTEROID POROSITY

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, James; Chesley, Steven R.; Matson, Robert D. E-mail: steve.chesley@jpl.nasa.gov

    2011-05-15

    As an application of our recent observational error model, we present the astrometric masses of 26 main-belt asteroids. We also present an integrated ephemeris of 300 large asteroids, which was used in the mass determination algorithm to model significant perturbations from the rest of the main belt. After combining our mass estimates with those of other authors, we study the bulk porosities of over 50 main-belt asteroids and observe that asteroids as large as 300 km in diameter may be loose aggregates. This finding may place specific constraints on models of main-belt collisional evolution. Additionally, we observe that C-group asteroids tend to have significantly higher macroporosity than S-group asteroids.

  11. Discrimination of porosity and fluid saturation using seismic velocity analysis

    DOEpatents

    Berryman, James G.

    2001-01-01

    The method of the invention is employed for determining the state of saturation in a subterranean formation using only seismic velocity measurements (e.g., shear and compressional wave velocity data). Seismic velocity data collected from a region of the formation of like solid material properties can provide relatively accurate partial saturation data derived from a well-defined triangle plotted in a (.rho./.mu., .lambda./.mu.)-plane. When the seismic velocity data are collected over a large region of a formation having both like and unlike materials, the method first distinguishes the like materials by initially plotting the seismic velocity data in a (.rho./.lambda., .mu./.lambda.)-plane to determine regions of the formation having like solid material properties and porosity.

  12. Porosity in hexylene-bridged polysilsesquioxanes: Effects of monomer concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Baugher, B.; Loy, D.A.; Assink, R.A.; Prabakar, S.; Shea, K.J.; Oviatt, H.

    1994-12-31

    Hexylene-bridged polysilsesquioxanes can be prepared as mesoporous or non-porous xerogels simply by switching from basic to acidic polymerization conditions. In this study, we looked at the effect of monomer concentration on porosity of hexylene-bridged xerogels prepared under acidic and basic conditions. 1, 6-Hexylene-bridged polysilsesquioxanes were prepared by sol-gel polymerizations of 1, 6-bis(triethoxysilyl)hexane 1 with concentrations between 0. 1 to 1.2 M in ethanol. Gelation times ranged from seconds for 1.2 M concentration to months for 0.2 M. The gels were processed into xerogels by an aqueous work-up and the dry gels characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), solid state {sup 13}C and {sup 29}Si CP MAS NMR spectroscopy, and gas sorption porosimetry.

  13. Controlling porosity in bridged polysilsesquioxanes through elimination reactions

    SciTech Connect

    McClain, M.D.; Loy, D.A.; Prabakar, S.

    1996-06-01

    The retro Diels-Alder reaction was used to modify porosity in hydrocarbon-bridged polysilsesquioxane gels. Microporous polysilsesquioxanes incorporating a thermally labile Diels-Alder adduct as the hydrocarbon bridging group were prepared by sol-gel polymerization of trans-2,3-bis(triethoxysilyl)norbornene. Upon heating the 2,3-norbornenylene-bridges polymers at temperatures above 250 C, the norbornenylene-bridging group underwent a retro Diels-Alder reaction losing cyclopentadiene and leaving behind a ethenylene-bridged polysilsesquioxane. Less than theoretical quantities of cyclopentadiene were volatilized indicating that some of the diene was either reacting with the silanol and olefinic rich material or undergoing oligomerization. Both scanning electron microscopy and nitrogen sorption porosimetry revealed net coarsening of pores (and reduction of surface area) in the materials with thermolysis.

  14. Assembly of nothing: equilibrium fluids with designed structured porosity.

    PubMed

    Lindquist, Beth A; Jadrich, Ryan B; Truskett, Thomas M

    2016-03-14

    Controlled micro- to meso-scale porosity is a common materials design goal with possible applications ranging from molecular gas adsorption to particle size selective permeability or solubility. Here, we use inverse methods of statistical mechanics to design an isotropic pair interaction that, in the absence of an external field, assembles particles into an inhomogeneous fluid matrix surrounding pores of prescribed size ordered in a lattice morphology. The pore size can be tuned via modification of temperature or particle concentration. Moreover, modulating density reveals a rich series of microphase-separated morphologies including pore- or particle-based lattices, pore- or particle-based columns, and bicontinuous or lamellar structures. Sensitivity of pore assembly to the form of the designed interaction potential is explored. PMID:26883309

  15. On the Use of Surface Porosity to Reduce Unsteady Lift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinetti, Ana F.; Kelly, Jeffrey J.; Bauer, Steven X. S.; Thomas, Russell H.

    2001-01-01

    An innovative application of existing technology is proposed for attenuating the effects of transient phenomena, such as rotor-stator and rotor-strut interactions, linked to noise and fatigue failure in turbomachinery environments. A computational study was designed to assess the potential of passive porosity technology as a mechanism for alleviating interaction effects by reducing the unsteady lift developed on a stator airfoil subject to wake impingement. The study involved a typical high bypass fan Stator airfoil (solid baseline and several porous configurations), immersed in a free field and exposed to the effects of a transversely moving wake. It was found that, for the airfoil under consideration, the magnitude of the unsteady lift could be reduced more than 18% without incurring significant performance losses.

  16. Ultrasound Attenuation in Liquid ^3He/High Porosity Aerogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, H. C.; Mulders, N.

    2005-11-01

    High porosity silica aerogels have been extensively used to study the influence of disorder in p-wave superfluid ^3He. Experimental investigations performed during the last decade revealed three distinct superfluid phases in liquid ^3He /98% aerogel system. The three phases found in this system are called as A, B, and A1-like phases (using the same nomenclature as in the bulk), although only the spin component of the order parameter has been studied and found to resemble that of corresponding bulk phases. A complete understanding of the microscopic structure of the p-wave superfluid phases requires identification of both orbital and spin components of the order parameter. Until now, there is no experimental attempt to directly probe the orbital structure in ^3He/aerogel system. To resolve this issue, we performed acoustic measurements by direct transmission of ultrasound through the ^3He/98% aerogel sample. We will present and discuss our preliminary results.

  17. Mekong Floods Fill Tonle Sap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The monsoon season in Southeast Asia brings recurring, often devastating floods to countries in the region, but these floods also play a necessary role in the region's water cycle. These MODIS images centered on Cambodia reveal extensive flooding of the Mekong River, which comes in from Laos in the north, to the right of center in the images, and flows south through Cambodia and southeast through Vietnam to empty into the South China Sea. The true-color image shows the brownish, sediment-laden floodwaters filling the Mekong Delta in southern Cambodia and Vietnam on September 15, 2001. The false color image above has been enhanced to bring out the contrast between the floodwaters and the lands, with sediment-carrying floodwaters in purple. Sediment can be seen flowing into the South China Sea as well. This year's floods have affected over a million people, and 100 people have been killed in Vietnam alone. The monsoon floods bring not only devastation, but renewal. The large body of water just left of center in Cambodia is the Tonle Sap. This shallow lake plays a changing role in the regional water cycle. During the dry season, the stream-fed Tonle Sap drains via the Tonle Sab River into the Mekong River. During the wet season (June-November), flooding of the Mekong reverses the course of the Tonle Sab, roughly tripling the lake's size from about 3000 km2 to about 10,000. When the dry season returns, the lake once again begins to drain into the Mekong Delta, where it provides a flow of fresh water that balances the intrusion of salty seawater into the delta's agricultural lands. Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  18. Hayward Fault rocks: porosity, density, and strength measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morrow, C.A.; Lockner, D.A.

    2001-01-01

    Porosity, density and strength measurements were conducted on rock samples collected from the Hayward Fault region in Northern California as part of the Hayward Fault Working Group’s efforts to create a working model of the Hayward Fault. The rocks included in this study were both fine and coarse grained gabbros, altered keratophyre, basalt, sandstone, and serpentinite from various rock formations adjacent to the Hayward Fault. Densities ranged from a low of 2.25 gm/cc (altered keratophyre) to 3.05 gm/cc (fine gabbro), with an average of 2.6 gm/cc, typical of many other rocks. Porosities were generally around 1% or less, with the exception of the sandstone (7.6%) and altered keratophyre (13.5%). Failure and frictional sliding tests were conducted on intact rock cylinders at room temperature under effective pressure conditions of up to 192 MPa, simulating depths of burial to 12 km. Axial shortening of the samples progressed at a rate of 0.1 µm/sec (fine samples) or 0.2 µm/sec (porous samples) for 6 mm of displacement. Velocity stepping tests were then conducted for an additional 2 mm of displacement, for a total of 8 mm. Both peak strength (usually failure strength) and frictional strength, determined at 8 mm of displacement, increased systematically with effective pressure. Coefficients of friction, based on the observed fracture angles, ranged from 0.6 to 0.85, consistent with Byerlee’s Law. Possible secondary influences on the strength of the Hayward rock samples may be surface weathering, or a larger number of pre-existing fractures due to the proximity to the Hayward Fault. All samples showed velocity strengthening, so that the average a-b values were all strongly positive. There was no systematic relation between a-b values and effective pressure. Velocity strengthening behavior is associated with stable sliding (creep), as observed in the shallow portions of the Hayward Fault.

  19. Porosity and permeability evolution of clay faults: in situ experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, P.; Guglielmi, Y.; Seguy, S.; Lefevre, M.; Ghani, I.; Gent, G.; Castilla, R.; Gout, C.; Dick, P.; Nussbaum, C.; Durand, J.

    2015-12-01

    Fault models associating low permeability cores with high permeability damage zones are widely accepted, however, constitutive laws relating permeability with fault structure, stress, and strain remain poorly constrained. We here present preliminary results of hydromechanical experiments performed at the 10 m scale in fault zones in Toarcian and Aalenian black shale formations. Intact formations have a very low permeability (10-19 to 10-22 m2). One case (in IRSN's Tournemire Underground Research Laboratory) displays a porosity increase in and around the fault core and abundant veins and calcite cemented small faults in the damage zone. The other case (Mont Terri Swisstopo Underground Research Laboratory) displays a porosity decrease in the fault core zone and few veins. However, under the present stress state, the static permeability of the fractured zones at both locations is higher than that of the intact formation by up to 3 orders of magnitude. During borehole pressurization tests three regimes of permeability variations are observed. (1) Fracture permeability first increases progressively as a function of fluid pressure (2) When a threshold is reached, permeability further increases by 100 or more, but strain as well as permeability variations remain in most part reversible. (3) When a steady pressure is maintained in the injection borehole (from 20 minutes to several days) flow rate tends to decrease with time. These results show that high transient permeability may locally occur in a fault zone under conditions when most of the deformation is reversible, opening the possibility of transient fluid migration decoupled from slip along faults that are not favorably oriented. However, during one test, more than 1 mm of irreversible slip occurred along one of the main interfaces, associated with a sudden increase in flow rate (from 11 to more than 40 l/min). This suggests that when slip occurs, it could result in permeability variations that may remain difficult

  20. Porosity and permeability of eastern Devonian gas shale

    SciTech Connect

    Soeder, D.J.

    1986-01-01

    High-precision core analysis has been performed on eight samples of Devonian gas shale from the Appalachian Basin. Seven of the core samples consist of the Upper Devonian age Huron Member of the Ohio Shale, six of which came from wells in the Ohio River valley, and the seventh from a well in east-central Kentucky. The eighth core sample consists of Middle Devonian age Marcellus Shale obtained from a well in Morgantown, West Virginia. The core analysis was originally intended to supply accurate input data for Devonian shale numerical reservoir simulation. Unexpectedly, the results have also shown that there are a number of previously unknown factors which influence or control gas production from organic-rich shales of the Appalachian Basin. The presence of petroleum as a mobile liquid phase in the pores of all seven Huron Shale samples effectively limits the gas porosity of this formation to less than 0.2%, and permeability of the rock matrix to gas is less than 0.1 microdarcy at reservoir stress. The Marcellus Shale core, on the other hand, was free of a mobile liquid phase and had a measured gas porosity of approximately 10% under stress with a fairly strong ''adsorption'' component. Permeability to gas (K/sub infinity/ was highly stress-dependent, ranging from about 20 microdarcies at a net stress of 3000 psi down to about 5 microdarcies at a net stress of 6000 psi. The conclusion reached from this study is that Devonian shale in the Appalachian Basin is a considerably more complex natural gas resource than previously thought. Production potential varies widely with geographic location and stratigraphy, just as it does with other gas and oil resources. 15 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. ECO fill: automated fill modification to support late-stage design changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Greg; Wilson, Jeff; Yu, J. J.; Chiu, Anderson; Chuang, Yao-Jen; Yang, Ricky

    2014-03-01

    One of the most critical factors in achieving a positive return for a design is ensuring the design not only meets performance specifications, but also produces sufficient yield to meet the market demand. The goal of design for manufacturability (DFM) technology is to enable designers to address manufacturing requirements during the design process. While new cell-based, DP-aware, and net-aware fill technologies have emerged to provide the designer with automated fill engines that support these new fill requirements, design changes that arrive late in the tapeout process (as engineering change orders, or ECOs) can have a disproportionate effect on tapeout schedules, due to the complexity of replacing fill. If not handled effectively, the impacts on file size, run time, and timing closure can significantly extend the tapeout process. In this paper, the authors examine changes to design flow methodology, supported by new fill technology, that enable efficient, fast, and accurate adjustments to metal fill late in the design process. We present an ECO fill methodology coupled with the support of advanced fill tools that can quickly locate the portion of the design affected by the change, remove and replace only the fill in that area, while maintaining the fill hierarchy. This new fill approach effectively reduces run time, contains fill file size, minimizes timing impact, and minimizes mask costs due to ECO-driven fill changes, all of which are critical factors to ensuring time-to-market schedules are maintained.

  2. Tuning magnetoelectric coupling using porosity in multiferroic nanocomposites of ALD-grown Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 and templated mesoporous CoFe2O4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chien, Diana; Buditama, Abraham N.; Schelhas, Laura T.; Kang, Hye Yeon; Robbennolt, Shauna; Chang, Jane P.; Tolbert, Sarah H.

    2016-09-01

    In this manuscript, we examine ways to create multiferroic composites with controlled nanoscale architecture. We accomplished this by uniformly depositing piezoelectric lead zirconate titanate (PZT) into templated mesoporous, magnetostrictive cobalt ferrite (CFO) thin films to form nanocomposites in which strain can be transferred at the interface between the two materials. To study the magnetoelectric coupling, the nanostructure was electrically poled ex situ prior to magnetic measurements. No samples showed a change in in-plane magnetization as a function of voltage due to substrate clamping. Out-of-plane changes were observed, but contrary to expectations based on total PZT volume fraction, mesoporous CFO samples partially filled with PZT showed more change in out-of-plane magnetization than the sample with fully filled pores. This result suggests that residual porosity in the composite adds mechanical flexibility and results in greater magnetoelectric coupling.

  3. Contaminants in ventilated filling boxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolster, D. T.; Linden, P. F.

    While energy efficiency is important, the adoption of energy-efficient ventilation systems still requires the provision of acceptable indoor air quality. Many low-energy systems, such as displacement or natural ventilation, rely on temperature stratification within the interior environment, always extracting the warmest air from the top of the room. Understanding buoyancy-driven convection in a confined ventilated space is key to understanding the flow that develops with many of these modern low-energy ventilation schemes. In this work we study the transport of an initially uniformly distributed passive contaminant in a displacement-ventilated space. Representing a heat source as an ideal sourced of buoyancy, analytical and numerical models are developed that allow us to compare the average efficiency of contaminant removal between traditional mixing and modern low-energy systems. A set of small-scale analogue laboratory experiments was also conducted to further validate our analytical and numerical solutions.We find that on average traditional and low-energy ventilation methods are similar with regard to pollutant flushing efficiency. This is because the concentration being extracted from the system at any given time is approximately the same for both systems. However, very different vertical concentration gradients exist. For the low-energy system, a peak in contaminant concentration occurs at the temperature interface that is established within the space. This interface is typically designed to sit at some intermediate height in the space. Since this peak does not coincide with the extraction point, displacement ventilation does not offer the same benefits for pollutant flushing as it does for buoyancy removal.

  4. Effects of compositions of filler, binder and porosity on elastic and fracture properties of nuclear graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyaw, S. T.; Sun, W.; Becker, A. A.

    2015-02-01

    Physical mechanisms at different length scales have to be taken into account while predicting the overall failure of nuclear graphite structures of advanced gas cooled graphite reactors. In this paper, the effect of composition of meso graphite phases and porosity on the aggregate elastic properties is predicted using the Eshelby homogenisation method. Results indicate an overall decrease in elastic modulus with an increase in porosity. Subsequently, the moduli at different porosity levels are used to predict the critical strain energy release rates for crack propagation of graphite, and fracture behaviour is studied using compact tension and four point bending tests. Compared to flexural strength at zero porosity level, significant reduction in strength of up to 80% at 30% porosity level is observed. Evolution of flexural strength due to porosity is also compared against available experimental values of graphite from UK nuclear plants.

  5. Secondary compaction after secondary porosity: Can it form a pressure seal?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weedman, Suzanne D.; Brantley, Susan L.; Albrecht, Wolfgang

    1992-04-01

    Petrography analysis of sandstones from the vicinity of a pressure seal (transition from normal to overpressure) at 5.5-km depth in the lower Tuscaloosa Formation in Louisiana documents local, high porosity above and below the seal. Packing analysis shows that compaction is greater in normally pressured, high-porosity sandstones than in overpressured, high-porosity sandstones; compaction in overpressured, high-porosity sandstones is similar to that in normally pressured, well-cemented sandstones. We propose that focused corrosive fluids created a zone of high secondary porosity, allowing further compaction that we call "secondary compaction." Secondary compaction is greater above the seal than below, suggesting that high-pressure fluid below the seal has preserved porosity and that the pressure seal became effective soon after dissolution of cement. Cuttings from the pressure-seal zone reveal an unusual texture of fragmented, pressure-solved grains and matrix, which may be a result of extensive secondary compaction.

  6. Effect of particle size and density on the die fill of powders.

    PubMed

    Mills, L A; Sinka, I C

    2013-08-01

    The flow behaviour of powders during the process of die fill was examined. Gravity and suction fill experiments were carried out using a model shoe-die system. Five grades of microcrystalline cellulose were studied to identify the effect of particle size and density on flow. Flowability was quantified using the concept of critical velocity. Under gravity fill, the critical velocity was one order of magnitude higher for powders with large particle size compared to smaller particles. Under suction fill conditions, the critical velocity increased significantly compared to gravity fill, showed no consistent relationship with particle size, and the powders performed more similar to one another. Using high speed video, the gravity and suction fill mechanisms were discussed in the context of air flow and pressure build-up. The effect of shoe velocity, suction velocity and height of the powder in the shoe was explored in more detail. It was shown that one can identify individual contributions from material properties and process parameters to the flow behaviour during die fill; however, the flow performance depends on the inter-relationships between powder characteristics and process parameters. The die fill mechanisms described can be used to assist the optimisation of powder formulation and process design.

  7. Effect of porosity on electrical conduction of simulated nanostructures by Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dariani, R. S.; Abbas Hadi, N.

    2016-09-01

    Electrical conduction of deposited nanostructures is studied by oblique angle deposition. At first, a medium is simulated as nanocolumns by Monte Carlo method, then the effects of porosity on electron transport in 1D and 2D are investigated. The results show that more electrons transfer in media with low porosity, but with increasing porosity, the distance between nanocolumns expands and less electrons transfer. Therefore, the transport current reduces at the surface.

  8. Porosity occurring in modification of hypoeutectic silumins with strontium and zirconium

    SciTech Connect

    Kutsenok, N.L.; Ganiev, I.N.; Yanchuk, V.N.

    1987-07-01

    The authors investigate modifications in castability, temperature effects, porosity, and fracture properties in silicon-aluminium alloys after being alloyed with strontium and zirconium. The porosity observed in alloys containing strontium was found to have a microshrinkage character. Alloying with zirconium was found to reduce somewhat the tendency of the alloy toward the formation of microshrinkage porosity but did not compensate for the influence of strontium.

  9. Temperature and air velocity effects on ethanol emission from corn silage with the characteristics of an exposed silo face

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montes, Felipe; Hafner, Sasha D.; Rotz, C. Alan; Mitloehner, Frank M.

    2010-05-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from agricultural sources are believed to be an important contributor to tropospheric ozone in some locations. Recent research suggests that silage is a major source of VOCs emitted from agriculture, but only limited data exist on silage emissions. Ethanol is the most abundant VOC emitted from corn silage; therefore, ethanol was used as a representative compound to characterize the pattern of emission over time and to quantify the effect of air velocity and temperature on emission rate. Ethanol emission was measured from corn silage samples removed intact from a bunker silo. Emission rate was monitored over 12 h for a range in air velocity (0.05, 0.5, and 5 m s -1) and temperature (5, 20, and 35 °C) using a wind tunnel system. Ethanol flux ranged from 0.47 to 210 g m -2 h -1 and 12 h cumulative emission ranged from 8.5 to 260 g m -2. Ethanol flux was highly dependent on exposure time, declining rapidly over the first hour and then continuing to decline more slowly over the duration of the 12 h trials. The 12 h cumulative emission increased by a factor of three with a 30 °C increase in temperature and by a factor of nine with a 100-fold increase in air velocity. Effects of air velocity, temperature, and air-filled porosity were generally consistent with a conceptual model of VOC emission from silage. Exposure duration, temperature, and air velocity should be taken into consideration when measuring emission rates of VOCs from silage, so emission rate data obtained from studies that utilize low air flow methods are not likely representative of field conditions.

  10. Influence of template fill in graphoepitaxy DSA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doise, Jan; Bekaert, Joost; Chan, Boon Teik; Hong, SungEun; Lin, Guanyang; Gronheid, Roel

    2016-03-01

    Directed self-assembly (DSA) of block copolymers (BCP) is considered a promising patterning approach for the 7 nm node and beyond. Specifically, a grapho-epitaxy process using a cylindrical phase BCP may offer an efficient solution for patterning randomly distributed contact holes with sub-resolution pitches, such as found in via and cut mask levels. In any grapho-epitaxy process, the pattern density impacts the template fill (local BCP thickness inside the template) and may cause defects due to respectively over- or underfilling of the template. In order to tackle this issue thoroughly, the parameters that determine template fill and the influence of template fill on the resulting pattern should be investigated. In this work, using three process flow variations (with different template surface energy), template fill is experimentally characterized as a function of pattern density and film thickness. The impact of these parameters on template fill is highly dependent on the process flow, and thus pre-pattern surface energy. Template fill has a considerable effect on the pattern transfer of the DSA contact holes into the underlying layer. Higher fill levels give rise to smaller contact holes and worse critical dimension uniformity. These results are important towards DSA-aware design and show that fill is a crucial parameter in grapho-epitaxy DSA.

  11. Air Pollution

    MedlinePlus

    Air pollution is a mixture of solid particles and gases in the air. Car emissions, chemicals from factories, ... Ozone, a gas, is a major part of air pollution in cities. When ozone forms air pollution, it's ...

  12. The polystyrene microsphere filling with hydrogen isotopes through the fill tube with consequent freezing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izgorodin, V. M.; Solomatina, E. Y.; Pepelyaev, A. P.; Rogozhina, M. A.; Osetrov, E. I.

    2016-09-01

    Process of spherical polystyrene capsules filling with hydrogen isotopes through the fill tube for the purpose of a cryogenic target building is described. The scheme of the stand for researches and a technique of carrying out of experiments is represented. Results of capsules filling and subsequent freezing for protium, deuterium and protium- deuterium mixture are shown.

  13. Influence of structural-phase state of ferritic-martensitic steels on the helium porosity development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernov, I. I.; Staltsov, M. S.; Kalin, B. A.; Bogachev, I. A.; Guseva, L. Yu; Dzhumaev, P. S.; Emelyanova, O. V.; Drozhzhina, M. V.; Manukovsky, K. V.; Nikolaeva, I. D.

    2016-04-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has been used to study the effect of the initial structural-phase state (SPhS) of ferritic-martensitic steels EK-181, EP-450 and EP-450- ODS (with 0.5 wt.% nanoparticles of Y2O3) on the of helium porosity formation and gas swelling. Different SPhS of steel EK-181 was produced by water quenching, annealing, normalizing plus tempered, intensive plastic deformation by torsion (HPDT). Irradiation was carried out by He+-40 keV ions at 923 K up to fluence of 5-1020 He+/m2. It is shown that the water quenching causes the formation of uniformly distributed small bubbles (d¯ ∼ 2 nm) of the highest density (ρ∼ 1025 m-3). After normalization followed by tempering as well as after annealing bubbles distribution is highly non-uniform both by volume and in size. Very large faceted bubbles (pre-equilibrium gas-filled voids) are formed in ferrite grains resulting in high level of gas swelling of the irradiated layer with S = 4,9 ± 1,2 and 3.8 ± 0.9% respectively. Nano- and microcrystalline structure created by HPDT completely degenerate at irradiation temperature and ion irradiation formed bubbles of the same parameters as in the annealed steel. Bubbles formed in EP-450-ODS steel are smaller in size and density, which led to a decrease of helium swelling by 4 times (S = 0.8 ± 0.2%) as compared to the swelling of the matrix steel EP-450 (S = 3.1 ± 0.7%).

  14. Determination of interstitial water chemistry and porosity in consolidated aquifer materials by diffusion equilibrium-exchange.

    PubMed

    Spence, Michael J; Thornton, Steven F; Bottrell, Simon H; Spence, Keith H

    2005-02-15

    Diffusion equilibrium exchange (DEE) is presented as a novel, practical alternative to centrifugation for the recovery and chemical analysis of interstitial water in contaminated core samples from consolidated rocks and aquifers. The methodology is suitable for sampling organic and inorganic compounds, including redox sensitive species such as SO4(2-), NO3-, NO2-, Mn(II), Fe(II), and sulfide (HS-). DEE also permits analyte extraction from kilogram quantities of core, which avoids extended centrifugation or sample amalgamation and provides analyte masses appropriate for stable isotope analysis. The procedure involves simple and rapid on-site sectioning of representative core samples, which are preserved in the field by storage in airtight bottles filled with deoxygenated deionized water containing a conservative tracer (Br-). Equilibration times for individual solutes can be estimated in advance to reduce the need for time-series analysis; for an effective diffusion coefficient of 2.5 x 10(-10) m2 s(-1) (Br- in chalk rock) equilibration was >90% completed after 30 h, consistent with the predicted equilibration time. The DEE method presented minimizes sampling errors from temperature changes, oxidation of reduced chemical species, and loss of volatile compounds, which can occur with other interstitial water sampling techniques. It also gives superior resolution of in situ solute distributions and geochemical processes in consolidated sediments than centrifugation and can provide estimates of aquifer porosity in core samples. Laboratory experiments using chalk rock core and simulated extraction procedures confirm the superior performance of the DEE method over centrifugation for a range of solutes. The method has been used to generate detailed interstitial water profiles of electron acceptor and contaminant concentrations along the flow path of a petroleum hydrocarbon plume in the U.K. Upper Chalk aquifer as part of a natural attenuation assessment.

  15. Fault rock texture and porosity type in Triassic dolostones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agosta, Fabrizio; Grieco, Donato; Bardi, Alessandro; Prosser, Giacomo

    2015-04-01

    Preliminary results of an ongoing project aimed at deciphering the micromechanics and porosity evolution associated to brittle deformation of Triassic dolostones are presented. Samples collected from high-angle, oblique-slip, 10's to 100's m-throw normal faults crosscutting Mesozoic carbonates of the Neo Tethys (Campanian-Lucanian Platform) are investigated by mean of field geological mapping, optical microscopy, SEM and image analyses. The goal is to characterize in detail composition, texture and porosity of cataclastic rocks in order to assess the structural architecture of dolomitic fault cores. Moreover, the present study addresses the time-space control exerted by several micro-mechanisms such as intragranular extensional fracturing, chipping and shear fracturing, which took place during grain rolling and crushing within the evolving faults, on type, amount, dimensions and distribution of micropores present within the cataclastic fault cores. Study samples are representative of well-exposed dolomitic fault cores of oblique-slip normal faults trending either NW-SE or NE-SW. The high-angle normal faults crosscut the Mesozoic carbonates of the Campanian-Lucanian Platform, which overrode the Lagonegro succession by mean of low-angle thrust faults. Fault throws are measured by considering the displaced thrust faults as key markers after large scale field mapping (1:10,000 scale) of the study areas. In the field, hand samples were selected according to their distance from main slip surfaces and, in some case, along secondary slip surfaces. Microscopy analysis of about 100 oriented fault rock samples shows that, mostly, the study cataclastic rocks are made up of dolomite and sparse, minute survivor silicate grains deriving from the Lagonegro succession. In order to quantitatively assess the main textural classes, a great attention is paid to the grain-matrix ratio, grain sphericity, grain roundness, and grain sorting. By employing an automatic box-counting technique

  16. Storage-dependent drainable porosity for complex hillslopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilberts, A. G. J.; Troch, P. A.; Paniconi, C.

    2005-06-01

    In hydraulic groundwater theory the parameter drainable porosity f (a storage coefficient that accounts for the effect of the unsaturated zone on water table dynamics) is usually treated as a constant. For shallow unconfined aquifers the value of this parameter, however, depends on the depth to the water table and the water retention characteristics of the soil. In this study an analytical expression for f as a function of water table depth is derived under the assumption of quasi-steady state hydraulic equilibrium, in this way accounting, in part, for the effects of the unsaturated zone on groundwater dynamics. The derived expression is implemented in the nonlinear hillslope-storage Boussinesq (HSB) model (Troch et al., 2003) to simulate the drainage response of complex hillslopes. The model's behavior is analyzed by comparison to (1) the HSB model with a constant value for f and (2) measurements of water tables and outflow hydrographs on a 6.0 × 2.5 × 0.5 m laboratory hillslope experiment. The comparison is conducted for a pure drainage case on two different hillslope shapes (linearly convergent and divergent) and for three different slope inclinations (5%, 10%, and 15%). Comparison 1 is run in an uncalibrated and a fully calibrated mode, and it enables us to evaluate the effect of a dynamic, state-dependent value for f on model output. Comparison 2 allows us to test the HSB model on several hillslope configurations and to analyze whether the concept of a storage-dependent f enhances the model performance. The comparison of the HSB models to the measurements from the laboratory hillslopes shows that it is possible to capture the general features of the outflow hydrograph during a drainage experiment using either one of the HSB models. Overall, the original (constant f) HSB model, with one fitting parameter more than the revised HSB model, shows a slightly better fit on the hydrographs when compared to the revised (variable f) HSB model. However, the peak

  17. Droplet Measurement below Single-Layer Grid Fill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitkovic, Pavol

    2016-03-01

    The main part of the heat transfer in a cooling tower is in a fill zone. This one is consist of a cooling fill. For the cooling tower is used a film fill or grid fill or splash fill in the generally. The grid fill has lower heat transfer performance like film fill usually. But their advantage is high resistance to blockage of the fill. The grid fill is consisted with independent layers made from plastic usually. The layers consist of several bars connected to the different shapes. For experiment was used the rhombus shape. The drops diameter was measured above and below the Grid fill.

  18. Porosity reduction within shear deformation bands in unconsolidated Pleistocene sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandes, Christian; Tanner, David

    2016-04-01

    Deformation bands are important structural elements that occur in the upper crust and develop in porous sandstones and even in unconsolidated sands. In contrast to discrete surfaces such as faults, deformation bands represent tabular zones of continuous displacement over several centimeters (Fossen et al., 2007). We present an outcrop-based study on the internal fabric of shear deformation bands that developed in Pleistocene unconsolidated sands in northern Germany. The deformation bands formed in an extensional stress regime, have a normal sense of displacement in a range of centimeters to decimeters, and form conjugate sets that intersect at angles between 70° and 90° (Brandes & Tanner, 2012). Due to their near-surface position, they are a perfect target for the study of deformation band formation prior to burial and diagenesis. Thin section analysis show a significant pore space reduction from the host sediment to the shear deformation band. The boundary between the host sediment and the shear deformation bands can be very sharp. The grains within the deformation band are of the same grain size as the host sediment. Grain shape varies from angular to well-rounded. Many elliptic grains have a long-axis orientation parallel to the trend of the deformation band. The grains in the analysed thin sections are all intact, i.e., there is no evidence for cataclasis. We believe the shear deformation bands are created by a grain-sliding process that decreases the porosity and leads to a denser packing of the sand. This is a porosity reduction mechanism in sandstone that occurs prior to burial without cataclasis. This can have an impact on fluid-flow in unconsolidated sediments in the near-surface. References: Brandes, C. & Tanner, D.C. (2012) Three-dimensional geometry and fabric of shear deformation bands in unconsolidated Pleistocene sediments. Tectonophysics, 518-521, 84-92. Fossen, H., Schultz, R.A., Shipton, Z.K., & Mair, K. (2007) Deformation bands in sandstone: a

  19. Volumetric Cortical Bone Porosity Assessment with MR Imaging: Validation and Clinical Feasibility

    PubMed Central

    Bashoor-Zadeh, Mahdieh; Li, Cheng; Sun, Wenli; Wright, Alexander C.; Wehrli, Felix W.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To develop a method to assess volumetric cortical bone porosity in clinically practical acquisition times by measuring the signal decay at only two echo times (TEs) as part of a single three-dimensional ultrashort TE (UTE) magnetic resonance (MR) examination. Materials and Methods The study was approved by the institutional review board and complied with HIPAA guidelines. Written informed consent was obtained from all subjects. A marker of cortical bone porosity called porosity index was defined as the ratio of UTE image intensities at a long and short TE, and the results were compared with biexponential analysis. Porosity index of midtibia cortical bone samples obtained from 16 donors was compared with ground-truth porosity by using micro–computed tomographic (CT) imaging and bone mineral density by peripheral quantitative CT scanner. Reproducibility of porosity index were tested in volunteers, and clinical feasibility was evaluated in postmenopausal women. Interparameter associations were assessed by using Pearson or Spearman correlation coefficient. Results Bone specimen porosity index was correlated with micro-CT imaging porosity (R2 = 0.79) and pore size (R2 = 0.81); age (R2 = 0.64); peripheral quantitative CT scanner density (R2 = 0.49, negatively); and pore water fraction (R2 = 0.62) and T2* (R2 = 0.64) by biexponential analysis. The reproducibility study yielded a coefficient of variation of 2.2% and intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.97. The study that involved postmenopausal women showed a wide range of porosity index (15%–38%). Conclusion A two-point MR imaging method to assess cortical bone porosity in humans was conceived and validated. This approach has the potential for clinical use to assess changes in cortical bone porosity that result from disease or in response to therapy. © RSNA, 2015 Online supplemental material is available for this article. PMID:26203710

  20. Evaluation of a Second-Generation Self-Expanding Variable-Porosity Flow Diverter in a Rabbit Elastase Aneurysm Model

    PubMed Central

    Ionita, C.N.; Natarajan, S.K.; Wang, W; Hopkins, L.N.; Levy, E.I.; Siddiqui, A.H.; Bednarek, D.R.; Rudin, S

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE The self-expanding V-POD is a second-generation flow-diverting device with a low-porosity PTFE patch on a self-expanding microstent. The authors evaluated this device for the treatment of elastase-induced aneurysms in rabbits. MATERIALS AND METHODS Three V-POD types (A, circumferential patch closed-cell stent [n = 9]; B, asymmetric patch closed-cell stent [n = 7]; and C, asymmetric patch open-cell stent [n = 4]) were evaluated by using angiography, conebeam micro-CT, histology, and SEM. Aneurysm flow modifications were expressed in terms of immediate poststent/prestent ratios of maximum CA volume entering the aneurysm dome tracked on procedural angiograms. Flow modifications were correlated with 4 weeks’ follow-up angiographic, micro-CT, histologic, and SEM results. RESULTS Mechanical stent-deployment difficulties in 4 aneurysms (1 type A; 3 type B) led to suboptimal results and exclusion from analysis. Of the remaining 16 aneurysms, 4-week posttreatment angiograms showed no aneurysm filling in 10 (63%), 3 (~19%) had no filling with a small remnant neck, and 3 (~19%) had <0.25 filling. Successfully treated aneurysms (n = 16) demonstrated an immediate poststent/prestent CA maximum volume ratio of 0.13 ± 0.18% (0.0%–0.5%). Favorable contrast-flow modification on immediate angiography after deployment correlated significantly with aneurysm occlusion on follow-up angiography, micro-CT, and histology. The occlusion percentage derived from micro-CT was 96 ± 6.8%. Histology indicated advanced healing (grade ≥3) in the aneurysm dome in 13 of 16 cases. SEM revealed 15 of 16 stents in an advanced state of endothelialization. CONCLUSIONS This study showed the feasibility and effectiveness of V-POD for aneurysm healing in a rabbit elastase model. PMID:21757527

  1. Modelling of air pressure effects in casting moulds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attar, E.; Homayonifar, P.; Babaei, R.; Asgari, K.; Davami, P.

    2005-09-01

    In the casting process, as a mould is filled with molten metal, air escapes through the vents. Air pressure in the mould cavity has serious effects upon the filling behaviour such as surface profile of the molten metal and filling time. In this project a computational model was developed for calculation of air pressure during the mould filling. A 3D single phase code based on the SOLA-VOF algorithm was used for the prediction of the fluid flow. The ideal gas assumption, conservation of mass equation and Bernoulli law were used for the calculation of air pressure. A new algorithm was developed to interpolate air pressure on the surface cells. The creation of air pressure was correlated with the sizes of the vents and their locations. An experimental test was designed to verify the modelling results. Comparison between the experimental data and simulation results has shown a good agreement.

  2. Post-flight Analysis of the Argon Filled Ion Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tai, H.; Goldhagen, P.; Jones, I. W.; Wilson, J. W.; Maiden, D. L.; Shinn, J. L.

    2003-01-01

    Atmospheric ionizing radiation is a complex mixture of primary galactic and solar cosmic rays and a multitude of secondary particles produced in collision with air nuclei. The first series of Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation (AIR) measurement flights on the NASA research aircraft ER-2 took place in June 1997. The ER-2 flight package consisted of fifteen instruments from six countries and were chosen to provide varying sensitivity to specific components. These AIR ER-2 flight measurements are to characterize the AIR environment during solar minimum to allow the continued development of environmental models of this complex mixture of ionizing radiation. This will enable scientists to study the ionizing radiation health hazard associated with the high-altitude operation of a commercial supersonic transport and to allow estimates of single event upsets for advanced avionics systems design. The argon filled ion chamber representing about 40 percent of the contributions to radiation risks are analyzed herein and model discrepancies for solar minimum environment are on the order of 5 percent and less. Other biologically significant components remain to be analyzed.

  3. Evolution of porosity and thermal conductivity during char oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, Y.; Benari, Y.; Kantorovich, I.I.; Bar-Ziv, E.; Krammer, G.; Modestino, A.; Sarofim, A.F.

    1994-05-01

    Measurements of the natural convection drag and the photophoretic force have been conducted for Spherocarb char particles as a function of carbon conversion. These forces were obtained by measuring the balancing voltage with and without laser heating during the reaction of single particles in an electrodynamic balance. The photophoretic force was determined by subtraction of the calculated natural convection force, after an initial transient corresponding to about five percent carbon conversion during which the natural convection force was dominant. The particle conductivity inferred from the photophoretic force was found to increase by more than one order of magnitude as the reaction progressed, qualitatively in agreement with models of the dependence of conductivity on porosity. Confirmation of the temperature gradient across the particle was provided by the development of asphericity in the particles when heated from below but not when heated uniformly. The simultaneous measurements of the mass, diameter, and particles conductivity as a function of carbon conversion provides a critical test of pore evolution models since the reaction rate is dependent on the accessibility of the internal surface area to the reactant gas through the open pore structure and the thermal conductivity is dependent on the connectivity of the solid structure. Induction periods were observed before the reaction rate accelerated and the particle conductivity declined, confirming the influence of pore structure on both. Particles could be reacted to a high conversion of greater than 95 percent without any evidence of fragmentation providing further insight on the connectivity of the solid surfaces.

  4. Integrative Chemistry: Advanced functional cellular materials bearing multiscale porosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Depardieu, M.; Kinadjian, N.; Backov, R.

    2015-07-01

    With this mini review we show through the sol-gel and emulsion-based Integrative Chemistry how it is possible to trigger materials dimensionality and beyond their functionalities when reaching enhanced applications. In here we focus on 3D macrocellular monolithic foams bearing hierarchical porosities and applications thereof. We first depict the general background of emulsions focusing on concentrated ones, acting as soft templates for the design of PolyHIPE foams, HIPE being the acronym of High Internal Phase Emulsions while encompassing both sol-gel and polymer chemistry. Secondly we extend this approach toward the design of hybrid organic-inorganic foams, labeled Organo-Si(HIPE), where photonics and heterogeneous catalysis applications are addressed. In a third section we show how inorganic Si(HIPE) matrices can be employed as sacrificial hard templates for the generation carbonaceous foams, labeled Carbon(HIPE). These foams being conductive we show applications when employed as electrodes for Li-S battery and as hosts for Li(BH4)-based hydrogen storage.

  5. Thermochemistry of zeolitic imidazolate frameworks of varying porosity.

    PubMed

    Hughes, James T; Bennett, Thomas D; Cheetham, Anthony K; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2013-01-16

    The first thermochemical analysis by room-temperature aqueous solution calorimetry of a series of zeolite imidazolate frameworks (ZIFs) has been completed. The enthalpies of formation of the evacuated ZIFs-ZIF-zni, ZIF-1, ZIF-4, CoZIF-4, ZIF-7, and ZIF-8-along with as-synthesized ZIF-4 (ZIF-4·DMF) and ball-milling amorphized ZIF-4 (a(m)ZIF-4) were measured with respect to dense components: metal oxide (ZnO or CoO), the corresponding imidazole linker, and N,N dimethylformamide (DMF) in the case of ZIF-4·DMF. Enthalpies of formation of ZIFs from these components at 298 K are exothermic, but the ZIFs are metastable energetically with respect to hypothetical dense components in which zinc is bonded to nitrogen rather than oxygen. These enthalpic destabilizations increase with increasing porosity and span a narrow range from 13.0 to 27.1 kJ/mol, while the molar volumes extend from 135.9 to 248.8 cm(3)/mol; thus, almost doubling the molar volume results in only a modest energetic destabilization. The experimental results are supported by DFT calculations. The series of ZIFs studied tie in with previously studied MOF-5, creating a broader trend that mirrors a similar pattern by porous inorganic oxides, zeolites, zeotypes, and mesoporous silicas. These findings suggest that no immediate thermodynamic barrier precludes the further development of highly porous materials. PMID:23270310

  6. Boiling radial flow in fractures of varying wall porosity

    SciTech Connect

    Barnitt, Robb Allan

    2000-06-01

    The focus of this report is the coupling of conductive heat transfer and boiling convective heat transfer, with boiling flow in a rock fracture. A series of experiments observed differences in boiling regimes and behavior, and attempted to quantify a boiling convection coefficient. The experimental study involved boiling radial flow in a simulated fracture, bounded by a variety of materials. Nonporous and impermeable aluminum, highly porous and permeable Berea sandstone, and minimally porous and permeable graywacke from The Geysers geothermal field. On nonporous surfaces, the heat flux was not strongly coupled to injection rate into the fracture. However, for porous surfaces, heat flux, and associated values of excess temperature and a boiling convection coefficient exhibited variation with injection rate. Nucleation was shown to occur not upon the visible surface of porous materials, but a distance below the surface, within the matrix. The depth of boiling was a function of injection rate, thermal power supplied to the fracture, and the porosity and permeability of the rock. Although matrix boiling beyond fracture wall may apply only to a finite radius around the point of injection, higher values of heat flux and a boiling convection coefficient may be realized with boiling in a porous, rather than nonporous surface bounded fracture.

  7. ROLE OF POROSITY LOSS IN LIMITING SO2 CAPTURE BY CALCIUM BASED SORBENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The extent of high temperature (900-1,300°C), short time (<1 s) SO2 capture was found to be limited by temperature-dependent losses in the porosity of calcium based sorbents. At 970°C these porosity losses were caused by CO2-activated sintering. Sulfation of the sorbents either p...

  8. Geometry Properties of Porosity Waves during Magma Migration: The Influence of Viscosities and Damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Z.; Bercovici, D.

    2014-12-01

    Partial melting occurs along grain boundaries and migrates through porous flow, leading to magma segregation in the mantle. Solitary porosity waves created by a perturbation in melting have been studied in the flow of a low viscosity fluid in a deformable matrix (McKenzie 1984, Scott and Stevenson 1986, Barcilon and Richter 1986, Spiegelman 1993, Wiggins and Spiegelman 1995). However, in a fairly complicated multi-physics, multi-scale process of magma migration, the geometry and instability of porosity waves can be affected by both mechanical and thermal factors, leaving different propagation signatures. In this work we develop a two-dimensional, two-phase damage model of magma-fracturing, and study the influence of viscosities and damage (void generation and microcracking) on the geometry properties of porosity waves. We first benchmark our solitary solutions with previous works and solve 2-D finite-amplitude waves numerically using spectral and semi-spectral method. We show that damage, decompaction weakening of the matrix and porosity-driven viscosities can alter the geometry of stable porosity waves, and result in an elongated or flattened wave front with a trail of smaller porosity. Such trails may localize subsequent waves and form porosity passage in the matrix. Scaling analysis of the time-dependent porosity waves are conducted and amount of magma reaching to the top of the melting region are estimated. Future work will include evaluating the thermal and seismic signatures during and after melt migration in two-phase porous flow.

  9. Effect of Porosity of Alumina and Zirconia Ceramics toward Pre-Osteoblast Response

    PubMed Central

    Hadjicharalambous, Chrystalleni; Prymak, Oleg; Loza, Kateryna; Buyakov, Ales; Kulkov, Sergei; Chatzinikolaidou, Maria

    2015-01-01

    It is acknowledged that cellular responses are highly affected by biomaterial porosity. The investigation of this effect is important for the development of implanted biomaterials that integrate with bone tissue. Zirconia and alumina ceramics exhibit outstanding mechanical properties and are among the most popular implant materials used in orthopedics, but few data exist regarding the effect of porosity on cellular responses to these materials. The present study investigates the effect of porosity on the attachment and proliferation of pre-osteoblastic cells on zirconia and alumina. For each composition, ceramics of three different porosities are fabricated by sintering, and characterized using scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray powder diffraction. Cell proliferation is quantified, and microscopy is employed to qualitatively support the proliferation results and evaluate cell morphology. Cell adhesion and metabolic activity are found comparable among low porosity zirconia and alumina. In contrast, higher porosity favors better cell spreading on zirconia and improves growth, but does not significantly affect cell response on alumina. Between the highest porosity materials, cell response on zirconia is found superior to alumina. Results show that an average pore size of ~150 μm and ~50% porosity can be considered beneficial to cellular growth on zirconia ceramics. PMID:26579516

  10. A modeling and numerical algorithm for thermoporomechanics in multiple porosity media for naturally fractured reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J.; Sonnenthal, E. L.; Rutqvist, J.

    2011-12-01

    Rigorous modeling of coupling between fluid, heat, and geomechanics (thermo-poro-mechanics), in fractured porous media is one of the important and difficult topics in geothermal reservoir simulation, because the physics are highly nonlinear and strongly coupled. Coupled fluid/heat flow and geomechanics are investigated using the multiple interacting continua (MINC) method as applied to naturally fractured media. In this study, we generalize constitutive relations for the isothermal elastic dual porosity model proposed by Berryman (2002) to those for the non-isothermal elastic/elastoplastic multiple porosity model, and derive the coupling coefficients of coupled fluid/heat flow and geomechanics and constraints of the coefficients. When the off-diagonal terms of the total compressibility matrix for the flow problem are zero, the upscaled drained bulk modulus for geomechanics becomes the harmonic average of drained bulk moduli of the multiple continua. In this case, the drained elastic/elastoplastic moduli for mechanics are determined by a combination of the drained moduli and volume fractions in multiple porosity materials. We also determine a relation between local strains of all multiple porosity materials in a gridblock and the global strain of the gridblock, from which we can track local and global elastic/plastic variables. For elastoplasticity, the return mapping is performed for all multiple porosity materials in the gridblock. For numerical implementation, we employ and extend the fixed-stress sequential method of the single porosity model to coupled fluid/heat flow and geomechanics in multiple porosity systems, because it provides numerical stability and high accuracy. This sequential scheme can be easily implemented by using a porosity function and its corresponding porosity correction, making use of the existing robust flow and geomechanics simulators. We implemented the proposed modeling and numerical algorithm to the reaction transport simulator

  11. Filling Squares: Variations on a Theme.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Senteni, Alain

    1986-01-01

    Four methods of filling a square using programing with Logo are presented, with comments on children's solutions. Analysis of the mathematical or programing concepts underlying a few simple algorithms is the focus. (MNS)

  12. Foam-filled cushions for sliding trays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nahin, S. B.; Robb, P. H.

    1980-01-01

    Polytetrafluoroethylene tube filled with polyurethane foam forms low friction sliding surface that cushions vibrations and absorbs manufacturing tolerances and misalignment. Possible uses include packaging of components for shipping and seals for doors in lockers, cars, and refrigerators.

  13. PERVAPORATION USING ADSORBENT-FILLED MEMBRANES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Membranes containing selective fillers, such as zeolites and activated carbon, can improve the separation by pervaporation. Applications of adsorbent-filled membranes in pervaporation have been demonstrated by a number of studies. These applications include removal of organic co...

  14. 5 CFR 362.303 - Filling positions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ....303 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PATHWAYS... to the Recent Graduates Program, pursuant to a Pathways MOU executed with the OPM, under Schedule D... fill. (v) Positions must have progressively more responsible duties that provide career...

  15. 5 CFR 362.303 - Filling positions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ....303 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PATHWAYS... to the Recent Graduates Program, pursuant to a Pathways MOU executed with the OPM, under Schedule D... fill. (v) Positions must have progressively more responsible duties that provide career...

  16. Riser simulation and radial porosity distribution characterization for gas-fluidized bed of cork particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Guorong; Ouyang, Jie; Li, Qiang

    2014-08-01

    Numerical simulations are carried out for gas-solid fluidized bed of cork particles, using discrete element method. Results exhibit the existence of a so-called anti core-annular porosity profile with lower porosity in the core and higher porosity near the wall for non-slugging fluidization. The tendency to form this unfamiliar anti core-annular porosity profile is stronger when the solid flux is higher. There exist multiple inflection points in the simulated axial solid volume fraction profile for non-slugging fluidization. Results also show that the familiar core-annular porosity profile still appears for slugging fluidization. In addition, the classical choking phenomenon can be captured at the superficial gas velocity slightly lower than the correlated transport velocity.

  17. A review of recent advances in the assessment of bone porosity, permeability, and interstitial fluid flow

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, Luis; Fritton, Susannah P.; Gailani, Gaffar; Benalla, Mohammed; Cowin, Stephen C.

    2012-01-01

    This contribution reviews recent research performed to assess the porosity and permeability of bone tissue with the objective of understanding interstitial fluid movement. Bone tissue mechanotransduction is considered to occur due to the passage of interstitial pore fluid adjacent to dendritic cell structures in the lacunar-canalicular porosity. The movement of interstitial fluid is also necessary for the nutrition of osteocytes. This review will focus on four topics related to improved assessment of bone interstitial fluid flow. First, the advantages and limitations of imaging technologies to visualize bone porosities and architecture at several length scales are summarized. Second, recent efforts to measure the vascular porosity and lacunar-canalicular microarchitecture are discussed. Third, studies associated with the measurement and estimation of the fluid pressure and permeability in the vascular and lacunar-canalicular domains are summarized. Fourth, the development of recent models to represent the interchange of fluids between the bone porosities is described. PMID:23174418

  18. Evaluation of Oven-Cured Solid Carbon/epoxy Composites with Various Porosity Levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, M. A.

    2009-03-01

    Cirrus has developed a strong core competency fabricating composite components using oven cure vacuum bag technology. When using this process, porosity levels must be carefully managed and effects of porosity well understood. Excessive porosity negatively affects material performance and reduces the effectiveness of the ultrasonic NDI method. This paper will present material characterization results from carbon/epoxy composite panels produced with various levels of porosity. Panels were inspected using two different ultrasonic methods. Panels were destructively tested to correlate static mechanical and physical properties to ultrasonic absorption coefficients. The goal of this work is to characterize material behavior to allow ultrasonic inspection in a manufacturing environment on vacuum bag oven-cured parts where porosity may be a factor.

  19. EVALUATION OF OVEN-CURED, SOLID CARBON/EPOXY COMPOSITES WITH VARIOUS POROSITY LEVELS

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, M. A.

    2009-03-03

    Cirrus has developed a strong core competency fabricating composite components using oven cure vacuum bag technology. When using this process, porosity levels must be carefully managed and effects of porosity well understood. Excessive porosity negatively affects material performance and reduces the effectiveness of the ultrasonic NDI method. This paper will present material characterization results from carbon/epoxy composite panels produced with various levels of porosity. Panels were inspected using two different ultrasonic methods. Panels were destructively tested to correlate static mechanical and physical properties to ultrasonic absorption coefficients. The goal of this work is to characterize material behavior to allow ultrasonic inspection in a manufacturing environment on vacuum bag oven-cured parts where porosity may be a factor.

  20. Influence of porosity formation on irradiated UO2 fuel thermal conductivity at high burnup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roostaii, B.; Kazeminejad, H.; Khakshournia, S.

    2016-10-01

    Based on the existing low temperature high burnup gaseous swelling model for UO2 fuel, the matrix swelling terms are calculated and the formation of total volume porosity up to burnup of 120 MWd/KgU is computed. The irradiated UO2 thermal conductivity model based on the Maxwell-Eucken correlation for porosity factor is selected as a case study and the calculation of porosity evolution with burnup is carried out. It is shown that taking into account the formation of porosity with burnup compared to the case with constant porosity equal to as-fabricated value leads to a decrease in the UO2 fuel thermal conductivity up to 15% at high burnup values of 120 MWd/kgU. Results of the calculations are also compared with the available experimental data and good agreement was found. The conducted parametric study clearly demonstrated the impact of the key parameters on the results of the present investigation.

  1. Contraction stresses of composite resin filling materials.

    PubMed

    Hegdahl, T; Gjerdet, N R

    1977-01-01

    The polymerization shrinkage of composite resin filling materials and the tensile stresses developed when the shrinkage is restrained were measured in an in vitro experiment. This allows an estimation to be made of the forces exerted upon the enamel walls of cavities filled with the resin in the acid etch technique. The results indicate that the stresses acting on the enamel are low compared to the tensile strength of the enamel.

  2. Evolution of porosity and diffusivity associated with chemical weathering of a basalt clast

    SciTech Connect

    Navarre-Sitchler, A.; Steefel, C.I.; Yang, L.; Tomutsa, L.; Brantley, S.L.

    2009-02-15

    Weathering of rocks as a result of exposure to water and the atmosphere can cause significant changes in their chemistry and porosity. In low-porosity rocks, such as basalts, changes in porosity, resulting from chemical weathering, are likely to modify the rock's effective diffusivity and permeability, affecting the rate of solute transport and thus potentially the rate of overall weathering to the extent that transport is the rate limiting step. Changes in total porosity as a result of mineral dissolution and precipitation have typically been used to calculate effective diffusion coefficients through Archie's law for reactive transport simulations of chemical weathering, but this approach fails to account for unconnected porosity that does not contribute to transport. In this study, we combine synchrotron X-ray microcomputed tomography ({mu}CT) and laboratory and numerical diffusion experiments to examine changes in both total and effective porosity and effective diffusion coefficients across a weathering interface in a weathered basalt clast from Costa Rica. The {mu}CT data indicate that below a critical value of {approx}9%, the porosity is largely unconnected in the basalt clast. The {mu}CT data were further used to construct a numerical pore network model to determine upscaled, effective diffusivities as a function of total porosity (ranging from 3 to 30%) for comparison with diffusivities determined in laboratory tracer experiments. By using effective porosity as the scaling parameter and accounting for critical porosity, a model is developed that accurately predicts continuum-scale effective diffusivities across the weathering interface of the basalt clast.

  3. A field method to quantify exchange with less-mobile porosity in streambeds using electrical hysteresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, M. A.; Day-Lewis, F. D.; Zarnetske, J. P.; Harvey, J. W.; Lane, J. W., Jr.

    2015-12-01

    Heterogeneous streambed materials may be expected to develop two general porosity domains: a more-mobile porosity dominated by advective exchange, and a less-mobile porosity dominated by diffusive exchange. Less-mobile porosity containing unique redox conditions or contaminant mass may be invisible to traditional porewater sampling methods, even using "low-flow" techniques, because these methods sample water preferentially from the mobile porosity domain. Further, most tracer breakthrough curve analyses have only provided indirect information (tailing) regarding the prevalence and connectivity of less-mobile porosity, typically over experimental flowpath scales between 1-10 meters. To address the limitations of conventional methods, we use electrical geophysical methods to aid in the inference of less-mobile porosity parameters. Unlike traditional fluid sampling, electrical methods can directly sense less-mobile solute and can target specific points along subsurface flowpaths. We demonstrate how the geophysical methodology developed for dual-domain groundwater transport can be scaled to the streambed through synthetic, laboratory column, and field experiments; further we show how previously-used numerical modeling techniques can be replaced by a more-simple analytical approach. The new analytical method is based on electrical theory, and involves characteristics of electrical hysteresis patterns (e.g. hinge point values) that are used to quantify (1) the size of paired mobile and less-mobile porosities, and (2) the exchange rate coefficient through simple curve fitting. Results from the analytical approach compare favorably with results from calibration of numerical models and also independent measurements of mobile and less-mobile porosity. Lastly, we demonstrate a method of focused solute streambed injection to quantify less-mobile porosity and explain redox zonation in contrasting stream environments.

  4. Laboratory measurements of Vp and Vs in a porosity-developed crustal rock: Experimental investigation into the effects of porosity at deep crustal pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Satoshi; Ishikawa, Masahiro; Arima, Makoto; Tatsumi, Yoshiyuki

    2016-05-01

    In order to evaluate the influence of porosity on the elastic properties of crustal rocks at deep crustal pressures, we performed laboratory measurements of compressional-wave (Vp) and shear-wave (Vs) velocities in a porosity-developed gabbro sample up to 1.0 GPa at room temperature. Based on the measured Vp and Vs data, we evaluated the changes in velocities, Vp/Vs, Poisson's ratio (σ), and total porosity of the rock as a function of pressure. Compared with the 'porosity-free' intrinsic elastic values of the gabbro sample, our results suggest that the development of porosity in crustal rocks lowers their Vp, Vs, Vp/Vs, and Poisson's ratio. Deviations (ΔVp, ΔVs, ΔVp/Vs, and Δσ) of the measured values from the intrinsic values are enhanced with increasing porosity. We evaluated the ΔVp from previous experimental study on the rocks of Tanzawa plutonic complex providing constraints on interpretation of the seismic velocity profiles of the Izu-Bonin-Mariana (IBM) arc and found a large negative ΔVp (up to - 22.7%) at lower pressures. The intrinsic velocity combined with the measured velocity data at in situ pressure conditions suggest that the ranges of Vp (6.0-6.5 km/s) in the middle crust of the IBM arc reflect the presence of considerable porosity and its closure in intermediate rocks and/or the change of composition from felsic to intermediate in mid-crustal rocks.

  5. Drum silencer with shallow cavity filled with helium.

    PubMed

    Choy, Y S; Huang, Lixi

    2003-09-01

    The motivation of this study is twofold: (a) to produce a flow-through silencer with zero pressure loss for pressure-critical applications, and (b) to tackle low frequency noise with limited sideway space using cavities filled with helium. The work represents a further development of our recently conceived device of a drum-like silencer with conventional air cavity [Huang, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 112, 2014-2025 (2002); Choy and Huang, ibid. 112, 2026-2035 (2002)]. Theoretical predictions are validated by experimental data. The new silencer consists of two highly tensioned membranes lining part of a duct, and each membrane is backed by a cavity filled with helium. For a typical configuration of a duct with height h, membrane length L = 7h, cavity depth h = 0.2h, and tension T = 0.52rho0c0(2)h2, where rho0 and c0 are the ambient density and speed of sound in air, respectively, the transmission loss has a continuous stop band of TL > 6.35 dB for frequency 0.03c0/h to 0.064c0/h, which is much better than traditional duct lining. In addition to the mechanisms at work for drum silencers with air cavity, the low density of helium reduces the masslike reactance of the cavity on the second in vacuo mode of membrane vibration. The reduction greatly enhances the membrane response at this mode, which is found to be critical for achieving a broadband performance in the low-frequency regime.

  6. Drum silencer with shallow cavity filled with helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choy, Y. S.; Huang, Lixi

    2003-09-01

    The motivation of this study is twofold: (a) to produce a flow-through silencer with zero pressure loss for pressure-critical applications, and (b) to tackle low frequency noise with limited sideway space using cavities filled with helium. The work represents a further development of our recently conceived device of a drum-like silencer with conventional air cavity [Huang, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 112, 2014-2025 (2002); Choy and Huang, ibid. 112, 2026-2035 (2002)]. Theoretical predictions are validated by experimental data. The new silencer consists of two highly tensioned membranes lining part of a duct, and each membrane is backed by a cavity filled with helium. For a typical configuration of a duct with height h, membrane length L=7h, cavity depth hc=0.2h, and tension T=0.52ρ0c02h2, where ρ0 and c0 are the ambient density and speed of sound in air, respectively, the transmission loss has a continuous stop band of TL>6.35 dB for frequency 0.03c0/h to 0.064c0/h, which is much better than traditional duct lining. In addition to the mechanisms at work for drum silencers with air cavity, the low density of helium reduces the masslike reactance of the cavity on the second in vacuo mode of membrane vibration. The reduction greatly enhances the membrane response at this mode, which is found to be critical for achieving a broadband performance in the low-frequency regime.

  7. Median-porosity contour maps of the J Sandstone, Dakota Group, in the Denver Basin, Colorado, Nebraska, and Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Higley, D.K.; Gautier, D.L.

    1987-01-01

    Porosity data compiled in this study were determined from J sandstone cores from 134 widely spaced boreholes. Porosity in areas of poor core coverage was determined from neutron density logs from an additional 20 boreholes ( corrected to core average grain density). Median, rather than average, porosity was used in order to minimize the statistical effect of anomalously high and low porosity values. Thirty-five oil companies and independent operators supplied core porosity data. Core porosities were determined by means of helium porosimetry, primarily by Core Laboratories of Denver, Colo.

  8. Soil porosity correlation and its influence in percolation dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Alfredo; Capa-Morocho, Mirian; Ruis-Ramos, Margarita; Tarquis, Ana M.

    2016-04-01

    The prediction of percolation in natural soils is relevant for modeling root growth and optimizing infiltration of water and nutrients. Also, it would improve our understanding on how pollutants as pesticides, and virus and bacteria (Darnault et al., 2003) reach significant depths without being filtered out by the soil matrix (Beven and Germann, 2013). Random walk algorithms have been used successfully to date to characterize the dynamical characteristics of disordered media. This approach has been used here to describe how soil at different bulk densities and with different threshold values applied to the 3D gray images influences the structure of the pore network and their implications on particle flow and distribution (Ruiz-Ramos et al., 2009). In order to do so first we applied several threshold values to each image analyzed and characterized them through Hurst exponents, then we computed random walks algorithms to calculate distances reached by the particles and speed of those particles. At the same time, 3D structures with a Hurst exponent of ca 0.5 and with different porosities were constructed and the same random walks simulations were replicated over these generated structures. We have found a relationship between Hurst exponents and the speed distribution of the particles reaching percolation of the total soil depth. REFERENCES Darnault, C.J. G., P. Garnier, Y.J. Kim, K.L. Oveson, T.S. Steenhuis, J.Y. Parlange, M. Jenkins, W.C. Ghiorse, and P. Baveye (2003), Preferential transport of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in variably saturated subsurface environments, Water Environ. Res., 75, 113-120. Beven, Keith and Germann, Peter. 2013. Macropores and water flow in soils revisited. Water Resources Research, 49(6), 3071-3092. DOI: 10.1002/wrcr.20156. Ruiz-Ramos, M., D. del Valle, D. Grinev, and A.M. Tarquis. 2009. Soil hydraulic behaviour at different bulk densities. Geophysical Research Abstracts, 11, EGU2009-6234.

  9. Kinetic controls on early karst aquifer porosity development

    SciTech Connect

    Groves, C.G. ); Howard, A.D. . Dept. of Environmental Sciences)

    1992-01-01

    A series of simulations using the newly developed model KARST has been performed to investigate limiting kinetic controls on limestone dissolution during the earliest stages of karst aquifer porosity development. This FORTRAN model couples fluid flow within and dissolution of circular cross section conduits, and considers surface reaction rates (both far from and close to thermodynamic equilibrium), mass transfer rates of reaction products to the bulk fluid, and rates of homogeneous reactions associated with dissolution of CO[sub 2] gas in water. Mass transfer theory for both laminar and turbulent flow cases is included. Runs were made with a wide variety of initial conditions of passage geometry, head gradient, and initial PCO[sub 2]. Results show a consistent pattern of kinetic control that varies as functions of time as well as position along the conduit. Slow, higher order surface reaction rates (close to equilibrium), diffusion rates, and rapid, lower order reaction rates (far from equilibrium) are found to be limiting steps at various times and location. Under no conditions in the simulations did the rate of CO[sub 2] hydration limit dissolution. Thresholds between the various kinetic regimes were found to be associated with a critical distance from equilibrium, as well as the transition from laminar to turbulent flow. As a result of interactions between flow and chemical conditions, passage growth (measure by fluid discharge rates) can be divided into an initial, slow period initiation and a more rapid one (enlargement). The onset of the enlargement phase was not found to coincide with any single kinetic event.

  10. Visualizing bone porosities using a tabletop scanning electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnamoorthy, D.; DaPonte, J.; Broadbridge, C. C.; Daniel, D.; Alter, L.

    2010-04-01

    Pores are naturally occurring entities in bone. Changes in pore size and number are often associated with diseases such as Osteoporosis and even microgravity during spaceflight. Studying bone perforations may yield great insight into bone's material properties, including bone density and may contribute to identifying therapies to halt or potentially reverse bone loss. Current technologies used in this field include nuclear magnetic resonance, micro-computed tomography and the field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) 2, 5. However, limitations in each method limit further advancement. The objective of this study was to assess the effectiveness of using a new generation of analytical instruments, the TM-1000 tabletop, SEM with back-scatter electron (BSE) detector, to analyze cortical bone porosities. Hind limb unloaded and age-based controlled mouse femurs were extracted and tested in vitro for changes in pores on the periosteal surface. An important advantage of using the tabletop is the simplified sample preparation that excludes extra coatings, dehydration and fixation steps that are otherwise required for conventional SEM. For quantitative data, pores were treated as particles in order to use an analyze particles feature in the NIH ImageJ software. Several image-processing techniques for background smoothing, thresholding and filtering were employed to produce a binary image suitable for particle analysis. It was hypothesized that the unloaded bones would show an increase in pore area, as the lack of mechanical loading would affect bone-remodeling processes taking place in and around pores. Preliminary results suggest only a slight different in frequency but not in size of pores between unloaded and control femurs.

  11. Diagenesis and porosity evolution, Norphlet Formation in Mobile Bay, Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Lock, B.E.; Broussard, S.W.

    1988-02-01

    Major deposits of natural gas were discovered in the Norphlet Formation beneath Mobile Bay in 1979. The reservoirs are in arkosic sandstones at depths greater than 20,000 ft, yet the productive interval has porosities up to 25%. Overlying the porous zone is a tight cap of thoroughly cemented sandstone of variable thickness, which poses problems for exploration and production. The tight zone, which together with overlying basal Smackover forms the reservoir seal, may be so thick that the underlying productive interval is substantially reduced. The upper parts of the Norphlet, in common with many other eolian sands, were reworked during a subsequent transgression. There is not a full correspondence, however, between the tight rock and the reworked facies. The origin of the impermeable zone is better understood as a function of the diagenetic history only partially related to depositional facies. It is proposed that, at an early stage of diagenesis, brines derived from the underlying Louann Salt and Werner Formation deposited anhydrite and possibly halite cements in the lower part of the Norphlet Formation. Marine working of the upper sands may have helped to disperse these brines from the upper part of the Norphlet, and the depth of reworking may even have been partially influenced by incipient cementation. The zones not already cemented by evaporites were subsequently cemented by quartz and feldspar overgrowths. At a very late stage, deep in the subsurface, the evaporite cements were flushed from the lower parts of the Norphlet, and locally abundant small feldspar crystals randomly nucleated in the pores. Gas migrated into the formation shortly afterward. Evaporites may play another important role in the petroleum geology of the deep Norphlet: the source of the gas may have been the underlying evaporites.

  12. Air Abrasion

    MedlinePlus

    ... delivered directly to your desktop! more... What Is Air Abrasion? Article Chapters What Is Air Abrasion? What Happens? The Pros and Cons Will I Feel Anything? Is Air Abrasion for Everyone? print full article print this ...

  13. Study of two-dimensional photonic crystal microcavities filled with polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benmerkhi, A.; Bouchemat, M.; Bouchemat, T.; Paraire, N.

    2010-11-01

    We present numerical study of microcavity biosensor in photonic crystal (PC) with triangular lattice of air holes patterned perpendicularly to an InP-based confining heterostructure. The microcavity is formed by varying the radius of one air hole. The 2D finite difference time domain (FDTD) method algorithm (fullwave simulator) is used to compute the light transmission efficiency and the quality factor (Q) when the refractive index (RI) filled in the air holes of water and polymer. The detected spectrum has a Lorentzian line shape, and the peak occurs when the PC cavity is at resonance. The resonance wavelength of this cavity will shift accordingly due to the variation of RI. The polymer filling of photonic crystal holes can be used to measure gas, fluids, biolayers, or bound chemical.

  14. A kinetic model of pressure solution/compaction for porosity prediction

    SciTech Connect

    Lahann, R.W. )

    1991-03-01

    A pressure/temperature history model for prediction of porosity of well-sorted, quartzose sandstones was developed and calibrated. The model assumes that porosity loss of quartzose sandstones is by pressure solution, which can be modeled by calculations of pressure solution/compaction of a uniform grain pack. The model assumes that all mass mobilized by the pressure solution is precipitated within the system and no mass is introduced from outside sources. A pressure solution rate law was developed that requires depth, temperature, and pressure information throughout the sandstone burial history. Rate of pressure solution is assumed to be proportional to effective lithostatic pressure, inversely proportional to te contact area between grains, and to have an Arrhenius-type dependence on temperature. The predicted porosities vary as a function of grain size and the pressure/temperature history of the sample. 'Unknowns' in the rate law were determined by calibration to a North Sea/Norwegian shelf data base of average porosities for well-sorted sandstones ranging in age from Devonian to Jurassic. Comparison of observed and model-predicted porosities indicates that, for the calibration data base, the model has a standard error if estimate of 3.6 porosity units. Sources of error include erroneous model assumptions, and grain size, sorting, and temperature and pressure history determinations on the calibration set. The model was tested on US Gulf Coast Miocene and Oligocene reservoirs and provided good estimates of observed porosities.

  15. Effect of porosities of bilayered porous scaffolds on spontaneous osteochondral repair in cartilage tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Jian; Ding, Jiandong

    2015-01-01

    Poly(lactide-co-glycolide)-bilayered scaffolds with the same porosity or different ones on the two layers were fabricated, and the porosity effect on in vivo repairing of the osteochondral defect was examined in a comparative way for the first time. The constructs of scaffolds and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells were implanted into pre-created osteochondral defects in the femoral condyle of New Zealand white rabbits. After 12 weeks, all experimental groups exhibited good cartilage repairing according to macroscopic appearance, cross-section view, haematoxylin and eosin staining, toluidine blue staining, immunohistochemical staining and real-time polymerase chain reaction of characteristic genes. The group of 92% porosity in the cartilage layer and 77% porosity in the bone layer resulted in the best efficacy, which was understood by more biomechanical mimicking of the natural cartilage and subchondral bone. This study illustrates unambiguously that cartilage tissue engineering allows for a wide range of scaffold porosity, yet some porosity group is optimal. It is also revealed that the biomechanical matching with the natural composite tissue should be taken into consideration in the design of practical biomaterials, which is especially important for porosities of a multi-compartment scaffold concerning connected tissues. PMID:26813511

  16. Examining the influence of heterogeneous porosity fields on conservative solute transport.

    PubMed

    Hu, Bill X; Meerschaert, Mark M; Barrash, Warren; Hyndman, David W; He, Changming; Li, Xinya; Guo, Luanjing

    2009-09-01

    It is widely recognized that groundwater flow and solute transport in natural media are largely controlled by heterogeneities. In the last three decades, many studies have examined the effects of heterogeneous hydraulic conductivity fields on flow and transport processes, but there has been much less attention to the influence of heterogeneous porosity fields. In this study, we use porosity and particle size measurements from boreholes at the Boise Hydrogeophysical Research Site (BHRS) to evaluate the importance of characterizing the spatial structure of porosity and grain size data for solute transport modeling. Then we develop synthetic hydraulic conductivity fields based on relatively simple measurements of porosity from borehole logs and grain size distributions from core samples to examine and compare the characteristics of tracer transport through these fields with and without inclusion of porosity heterogeneity. In particular, we develop horizontal 2D realizations based on data from one of the less heterogeneous units at the BHRS to examine effects where spatial variations in hydraulic parameters are not large. The results indicate that the distributions of porosity and the derived hydraulic conductivity in the study unit resemble fractal normal and lognormal fields respectively. We numerically simulate solute transport in stochastic fields and find that spatial variations in porosity have significant effects on the spread of an injected tracer plume including a significant delay in simulated tracer concentration histories. PMID:19683833

  17. Regional diagenetic variation in Norphlet sandstone: Implications for reservoir quality and the origin of porosity

    SciTech Connect

    Kugler, R.L.; McHugh, A. )

    1990-09-01

    Although deeply buried (18,000->20,000 ft) eolian and reworked marine Norphlet arkose and subarkose in Mississippi, Alabama, and Florida have been intensely studied by several workers, fundamental questions remain regarding diagenetic controls on reservoir quality and the origin of porosity. In spite of a regionally uniform framework composition of quartz, albite, and potassium feldspar, the diagenetic character of the unit is variable on a scale ranging from individual laminations to single hydrocarbon-producing fields to areas encompassing several fields or offshore blocks. The presence or absence of clay minerals in various forms clearly is a dominant control on porosity-permeability trends. In deep reservoirs in Mobile Bay and offshore Alabama and Florida, petrographic evidence for dissolution of pervasive authigenic carbonate and/or evaporite minerals to produce high secondary porosity values is equivocal or absent. Although evidence exists for some secondary porosity, much porosity appears to be relict primary porosity. On a regional scale, including both onshore and offshore areas, sandstones with radial, authigenic chlorite coats consistently have high porosity and permeability. In Mobile Bay and offshore Alabama, the distribution of this form of chlorite may be controlled by the presence of precursor clay/iron-oxide grain coats. The occurrence of these coats likely is related to environment of deposition.

  18. Quantification of Organic Porosity and Water Accessibility in Marcellus Shale Using Neutron Scattering

    DOE PAGES

    Gu, Xin; Mildner, David F. R.; Cole, David R.; Rother, Gernot; Slingerland, Rudy; Brantley, Susan L.

    2016-04-28

    Pores within organic matter (OM) are a significant contributor to the total pore system in gas shales. These pores contribute most of the storage capacity in gas shales. Here we present a novel approach to characterize the OM pore structure (including the porosity, specific surface area, pore size distribution, and water accessibility) in Marcellus shale. By using ultrasmall and small-angle neutron scattering, and by exploiting the contrast matching of the shale matrix with suitable mixtures of deuterated and protonated water, both total and water-accessible porosity were measured on centimeter-sized samples from two boreholes from the nanometer to micrometer scale withmore » good statistical coverage. Samples were also measured after combustion at 450 °C. Analysis of scattering data from these procedures allowed quantification of OM porosity and water accessibility. OM hosts 24–47% of the total porosity for both organic-rich and -poor samples. This porosity occupies as much as 29% of the OM volume. In contrast to the current paradigm in the literature that OM porosity is organophilic and therefore not likely to contain water, our results demonstrate that OM pores with widths >20 nm exhibit the characteristics of water accessibility. In conclusion, our approach reveals the complex structure and wetting behavior of the OM porosity at scales that are hard to interrogate using other techniques.« less

  19. Impact of double porosity flow on hydrologically driven failure of a hillside slope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choo, J.; White, J. A.; Borja, R. I.

    2015-12-01

    Soil deposits in hillside slopes often exhibit two dominant porosity scales, often referred to as the macropore and micropore scales. Fluid flow through this type of soils involves preferential flow through the macropore region and fluid storage in the micropore region. An explicit treatment of the two porosity scales, known as double porosity formulation, is necessary for a more realistic description of the hydromechanical behavior of this type of soils. In this work, we investigate how double porosity modeling of fluid flow and deformation could impact the ensuing hydromechanical responses of a hillslope under rainfall infiltration. For this purpose we use a hydromechanical continuum modeling approach developed in previous work by the authors and extend it to accommodate double porosity modeling by employing a recently developed hydromechanical framework along with a stabilized finite elements technique that allows the use of lower-order mixed finite elements for improved computationally efficiency. The numerical results demonstrate that preferential flow can be captured by the double porosity formulation, leading to a different slope failure mechanism than what is predicted by an equivalent single porosity formulation.

  20. Examining the influence of heterogeneous porosity fields on conservative solute transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hu, B.X.; Meerschaert, M.M.; Barrash, W.; Hyndman, D.W.; He, C.; Li, X.; Guo, Laodong

    2009-01-01

    It is widely recognized that groundwater flow and solute transport in natural media are largely controlled by heterogeneities. In the last three decades, many studies have examined the effects of heterogeneous hydraulic conductivity fields on flow and transport processes, but there has been much less attention to the influence of heterogeneous porosity fields. In this study, we use porosity and particle size measurements from boreholes at the Boise Hydrogeophysical Research Site (BHRS) to evaluate the importance of characterizing the spatial structure of porosity and grain size data for solute transport modeling. Then we develop synthetic hydraulic conductivity fields based on relatively simple measurements of porosity from borehole logs and grain size distributions from core samples to examine and compare the characteristics of tracer transport through these fields with and without inclusion of porosity heterogeneity. In particular, we develop horizontal 2D realizations based on data from one of the less heterogeneous units at the BHRS to examine effects where spatial variations in hydraulic parameters are not large. The results indicate that the distributions of porosity and the derived hydraulic conductivity in the study unit resemble fractal normal and lognormal fields respectively. We numerically simulate solute transport in stochastic fields and find that spatial variations in porosity have significant effects on the spread of an injected tracer plume including a significant delay in simulated tracer concentration histories.

  1. Porosity and grain size dependence of the longitudinal wave velocity of water-saturated beach sand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Masao; Noguchi, Masahiro

    2003-04-01

    The longitudinal wave velocity of water-saturated sand is dependent on the porosity. The data which show the relationship between the velocity and the porosity are dispersed [E. L. Hamilton and R. T. Bachman, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 72, 1891-1904 (1982)]. It seems that this dispersion is due to the grain size, the standard deviation of the grain size, and the grain shape. In this study, to investigate the dispersion, the longitudinal wave velocities, the porosities, and the grain sizes of many kinds of water-saturated beach sands are measured. The relationships between the velocity, the porosity, and the grain size are obtained. From these results, it is seen that the velocity of the water-saturated beach sand with the same porosity varies with the grain size. That is, the velocity of the water-saturated beach sand with the same porosity increases, as the grain size increases. It is considered that the frame bulk modulus of the water-saturated beach sand with the same porosity varies with the grain size.

  2. Pore morphology effect in microlog for porosity prediction in a mature field

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Teh, W.J.; Willhite, G.P.; Doveton, J.H.; Tsau, J.S.

    2011-01-01

    In an matured field, developed during the 1950s, no porosity logs were available from sources other than invaded zone resistivity Rxo . The microresistivity porosity is calibrated with the core porosity to yield an accurate estimate of the porosity. However, the procedure of calibrating the porosity with Rxo for a linear regression model may not be predictive without an understanding of the pore types in the reservoir interval. A thorough investigation of the pore types, based on the lithofacies description obtained from the core analysis, and its role in obtaining a good estimate of porosity is demonstrated in the Ogallah field. Therefore, the objective of this paper is to separate the porosity-microlog data into pore-type based zones with characteristic cementation exponents (m) in this multi-petrotype reservoir with a complex mixture of Arbuckle dolomite and sandstone rock. The value of m is critical in making estimates of water saturation. "Rule of thumb" values of cementation might lead to errors in water saturation on either the optimistic or the pessimistic side. The rock types in the Ogallah contain interparticle/intercrystalline, vugs and fractures distributed through the rock-facies, which influence the values of cementation factor. We use the modern typed well to shed light on the Archie's equation parameter values. Rock fabric numbers and flow zone indices have been identified for classification of dolomite and sandstone, respectively. The analysis brings out characteristic cementation factors for distinct pore types in the Arbuckle rock. The porosity predictions The analysis results also compliment the petrofacies delineation using LDA in this complicated rock layout as a quality control of the statistical application. The comparison between the predicted and core porosities shows a significant improvement over using a single m value for carbonates and sandstones which will lead to improved description of a matured field. Copyright 2011, Society of

  3. Physicochemical Properties and Surfaces Morphologies Evaluation of MTA FillApex and AH Plus

    PubMed Central

    Borges, Álvaro Henrique; Orçati Dorileo, Maura Cristiane Gonçales; Villa, Ricardo Dalla; Borba, Alexandre Meireles; Semenoff, Tereza Aparecida Delle Vedove; Guedes, Orlando Aguirre; Estrela, Cyntia Rodrigues Araújo; Bandeca, Matheus Coelho

    2014-01-01

    The solubility, pH, electrical conductivity, and radiopacity of AH Plus and MTA FillApex were evaluated. In addition, the surfaces morphologies of the sealers were analyzed by using scanning electron microscopy. For pH test, the samples were immersed in distilled water at different periods of time. The same solution was used for electrical conductivity measurement. The solubility and radiopacity were evaluated according to ANSI/ADA. Statistical analyses were carried out at 5% level of significance. MTA FillApex presented higher mean value for solubility and electrical conductivity. No significant difference was observed in the mean values for pH reading. AH Plus presented higher radiopacity mean values. MTA FillApex presented an external surface with porosities and a wide range of sizes. In conclusion, the materials fulfill the ANSI/ADA requirements when considering the radiopacity and solubility. AH Plus revealed a compact and homogeneous surface with more regular aspects and equal particle sizes. PMID:24883413

  4. Soft tissue augmentation with ArteFill.

    PubMed

    Hilinski, John M; Cohen, Steven R

    2009-05-01

    ArteFill is a novel, third-generation polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) injectable filler with unique properties. When compared with predecessor materials, ArteFill demonstrates improved biocompatibility as a result of more uniform PMMA microsphere size and shape. This translates into less adverse events after placement. ArteFill can provide a permanent volume enhancement by stimulation of fibroblasts that encapsulate nonabsorbable microspheres with collagen deposition. Currently, ArteFill is FDA approved for permanent augmentation of moderately deep nasolabial folds. It is also commonly used off-label for augmentation of other skin creases and regional areas of volume deficiency, such as the tear trough-malar and marionette line-prejowl sulcus regions. The key to success with ArteFill is a conservative approach with avoidance of overcorrection. Proper technique includes deep dermal to subcutaneous placement with full correction achieved gradually over several treatments. Complications are mostly limited to nodule formation, which is easily managed in most cases with conservative intervention.

  5. Gap Filling as Exact Path Length Problem.

    PubMed

    Salmela, Leena; Sahlin, Kristoffer; Mäkinen, Veli; Tomescu, Alexandru I

    2016-05-01

    One of the last steps in a genome assembly project is filling the gaps between consecutive contigs in the scaffolds. This problem can be naturally stated as finding an s-t path in a directed graph whose sum of arc costs belongs to a given range (the estimate on the gap length). Here s and t are any two contigs flanking a gap. This problem is known to be NP-hard in general. Here we derive a simpler dynamic programming solution than already known, pseudo-polynomial in the maximum value of the input range. We implemented various practical optimizations to it, and compared our exact gap-filling solution experimentally to popular gap-filling tools. Summing over all the bacterial assemblies considered in our experiments, we can in total fill 76% more gaps than the best previous tool, and the gaps filled by our method span 136% more sequence. Furthermore, the error level of the newly introduced sequence is comparable to that of the previous tools. The experiments also show that our exact approach does not easily scale to larger genomes, where the problem is in general difficult for all tools. PMID:26959081

  6. Brittle and semibrittle creep in a low porosity carbonate rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolas, Aurélien; Fortin, Jérôme; Regnet, Jean-Baptiste; Dimanov, Alexandre; Guéguen, Yves

    2016-04-01

    The mechanical behavior of limestones at room temperature is brittle at low confining pressure and becomes semi-brittle with the increase of the confining pressure. The brittle behavior is characterized by a macroscopic dilatancy due to crack propagation, leading to a stress drop when cracks coalesce at failure. The semi-brittle behavior is characterized by diffuse deformation due to intra-crystalline plasticity (dislocation movements and twinning) and microcracking. The aim of this work is to examine the influence of pore fluid and time on the mechanical behavior. Constant strain rate triaxial deformation experiments and stress-stepping creep experiments were performed on white Tavel limestone (porosity 14.7%). Elastic wave velocity evolutions were recorded during each experiment and inverted to crack densities. Constant strain rate triaxial experiments were performed for confining pressure in the range of 5-90 MPa. For Pc≤55 MPa our results show that the behavior is brittle. In this regime, water-saturation decreases the differential stress at the onset of crack propagation and enhances macroscopic dilatancy. For Pc≥70 MPa, the behavior is semi-brittle. Inelastic compaction is due to intra-crystalline plasticity and micro-cracking. However, in this regime, our results show that water-saturation has no clear effect at the onset of inelastic compaction. Stress stepping creep experiments were performed in a range of confining pressures crossing the brittle-ductile transition. In the brittle regime, the time-dependent axial deformation is coupled with dilatancy and a decrease of elastic wave velocities, which is characteristic of crack propagation and/or nucleation. In the semi-brittle regime, the first steps are inelastic compactant because of plastic pore collapse. But, following stress steps are dilatant because of crack nucleation and/or propagation. However, our results show that the axial strain rate is always controlled by plastic phenomena, until the last

  7. Nanoscale transient porosity controls large-scale metamorphic fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plümper, Oliver; Botan, Alexandru; Los, Catharina; Malthe-Sørenssen, Anders; Jamtveit, Bjørn

    2016-04-01

    The reaction of fluids with rocks is fundamental for Earth's dynamics as they facilitate heat/mass transfer and induce volume changes, weaknesses and instabilities in rock masses that localize deformation enabling tectonic responses to plate motion. During these fluid-rock interactions it is the ability of a rock to transmit fluid, its permeability, that controls the rates of metamorphic reactions. However, although some geological environments (e.g., sediments) are open to fluids, the majority of solid rocks (e.g., granites, elcogites, peridotites, etc.) are nearly impermeable. Surprisingly though, even in rocks that are nominally impermeable widespread fluid-rock interactions are observed leading to the question: How can fluids migrate through vast amounts of nominally impermeable rocks? Here we investigate one of the most wide-spread fluid-mediated metamorphic processes in the Earth's crust, the albitization of feldspatic rocks. We show that fluid flow and element mobilization during albitization is controlled by an interaction between grain boundary diffusion and reaction front migration through an interface-coupled dissolution-precipitation process. Using a combination of focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM)-assisted nanotomography combined with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) reveals that the porosity is dictated by pore channels with a pore diameter ranging between 10 to 100 nm. Three-dimensional visualization of the feldspar pore network reveals that the pore channels must have been connected during the replacement reaction. Analysis of the pore aspect ratios suggests that a Rayleigh-Taylor-type instability associated to surface energy minimization caused the disconnection of the pore channels. Fluid transport in nanometer-sized objects with at least one characteristic dimension below 100 nm enables the occurrence of physical phenomena that are impossible at bigger length scales. Thus, on the basis of our microstructural

  8. The influence of porosity and vesicle size on the brittle strength of volcanic rocks and magma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heap, Michael J.; Xu, Tao; Chen, Chong-feng

    2014-09-01

    Volcanic rocks and magma display a wide range of porosity and vesicle size, a result of their complex genesis. While the role of porosity is known to exert a fundamental control on strength in the brittle field, less is known as to the influence of vesicle size. To help resolve this issue, here, we lean on a combination of micromechanical (Sammis and Ashby's pore-emanating crack model) and stochastic (rock failure and process analysis code) modelling. The models show, for a homogenous vesicle size, that an increase in porosity (in the form of circular vesicles, from 0 to 40 %) and/or vesicle diameter (from 0.1 to 2.0 mm) results in a dramatic reduction in strength. For example, uniaxial compressive strength can be reduced by about a factor of 5 as porosity is increased from 0 to 40 %. The presence of vesicles locally amplifies the stress within the groundmass and promotes the nucleation of vesicle-emanating microcracks that grow in the direction of the applied macroscopic stress. As strain increases, these microcracks continue to grow and eventually coalesce leading to macroscopic failure. Vesicle clustering, which promotes the overlap and interaction of the tensile stress lobes at the north and south poles of neighbouring vesicles, and the increased ease of microcrack interaction, is encouraged at higher porosity and reduces sample strength. Once a microcrack nucleates at the vesicle wall, larger vesicles impart higher stress intensities at the crack tips, allowing microcracks to propagate at a lower applied macroscopic stress. Larger vesicles also permit a shorter route through the groundmass for the macroscopic shear fracture. This explains the reduction in strength at higher vesicle diameters (at a constant porosity). The modelling highlights that the reduction in strength as porosity or vesicle size increases is nonlinear; the largest reductions are observed at low porosity and small vesicle diameters. In detail, we find that vesicle diameter can play an

  9. Survival of the impactor during hypervelocity collisions II: An analogue for high porosity targets.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avdellidou, C.; Price, M. C.; Delbo, M.; Cole, M. J.

    2016-09-01

    We investigated how a target's porosity affects the outcome of a collision, with respect to the impactor's fate. Laboratory impact experiments using peridot projectiles were performed at a speed range between 0.3 and 3.0 km/s, onto high porosity water-ice (40%) and fine-grained calcium carbonate (70%) targets. We report that the amount of implanted material in the target body increases with increasing target's porosity, while the size frequency distribution of the projectile's ejecta fragments becomes steeper. A supplementary Raman study showed no sign of change of the Raman spectra of the recovered olivine projectile fragments indicate minimal physical change.

  10. Porosity estimates of the upper crust in the Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, E.; Toomey, D. R.; Hooft, E. E. E.; Wilcock, W. S. D.; Weekly, R. T.; Lee, S. M.; Kim, Y.

    2015-12-01

    We estimate upper crustal porosity variations using the differential effective medium (DEM) theory to interpret the observed seismic velocity variations for the Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge, an intermediate spreading center [Weekly et al., 2014]. We use six P-wave vertical velocity profiles averaged within 5 km × 10 km areas to estimate the porosity at depths from 0.4 km to 2 km. The profile regions cover on-axis, east and west flanks of the central Endeavour segment and three regions of the segment ends including the Endeavour-West Valley (E-WV) and the Cobb overlapping spreading centers (OSCs) and the relict Middle Valley. At the segment center, our calculated porosities on-axis and on the east and west flanks agree well with the apparent bulk porosities measured in Hole 504B at intermediate-spreading Costa Rica Rift [Becker, 1990] and decrease from 5-15% to 2-7% from 0.5 km to 1 km depth and seal by 2 km depth. At all depths, our calculated porosities on the east and west flanks are lower than those on-axis by ~1.3-3%. This indicates the infilling of cracks by mineral precipitation associated with near-axis hydrothermal circulation [Newman et al., 2011]. At the segment ends, upper crustal velocities are lower than those in the segment center at depths < 2 km. These lower velocities are attributed to higher porosities (10-20% at 0.4 km decreasing to 3-6% at 2 km depth). This may indicate that fracturing in the OSCs strongly affects porosity at shallow depths. Between 0.7 km and 1 km, porosities estimated in all regions using pore aspect ratios of 0.05, 0.1 and 0.2 are higher than those from Hole 504B indicating that the aspect ratio of cracks may be smaller than 0.05. There also appears to be a spreading rate dependence to upper crustal porosity structure. On-axis at the Endeavour segment, the calculated porosities from 0.4 km to 2 km are higher than those at the Lucky Strike segment, a slow spreading center [Seher et al., 2010]. Specifically at 2

  11. Slotted Polyimide-Aerogel-Filled-Waveguide Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez-Solis, Rafael A.; Pacheco, Hector L.; Miranda, Felix A.; Meador, Mary Ann B.

    2013-01-01

    Polyimide aerogels were considered to serve as a filling for millimeter-wave waveguides. While these waveguides present a slightly higher loss than hollow waveguides, they have less losses than Duroid substrate integrated waveguides (less than 0.15 dB at Ka-band, in a 20 mm section), and exhibit an order of magnitude of mass reduction when compared to commercial waveguides. A Ka-band slotted aerogel-filled-waveguide array was designed, which provided the same gain (9 dBi) as its standard waveguide counterpart, and a slotted aerogel-filled-waveguide array using folded-slots was designed for comparison, obtaining a gain of 9 dB and a bandwidth of 590 MHz.

  12. Confined-unconfined changes above longwall coal mining due to increases in fracture porosity

    SciTech Connect

    Booth, C.J.

    2007-11-15

    Subsidence and strata movement above longwall (total extraction) coal mines produce complex hydrologic responses that can occur independently of drainage to the mine. One response is dewatering from confined to unconfined conditions in bedrock aquifers as a result of loss of water into new void space created by fracture and bedding separations. This dewatering process has been little studied but accounts for several hydraulic and geochemical effects of longwall mining. This article presents a conceptual model of the process and reviews evidence from case studies. Confined bedrock aquifers in subsiding zones exhibit dramatically steep head drops because of the low value of confined storage coefficients relative to the volume of water drained into the new fracture void space. The aquifer changes rapidly to an unconfined condition. Tight units to which air entry is restricted may even develop negative water pressures. In the unconfined state, sulfide minerals present in the strata readily oxidize to soluble hydrated sulfates. When the aquifer re-saturates, these salts are rapidly mobilized and produce a flush of increased sulfate and total dissolved solids (TDS) levels. Observations made in our previous studies in Illinois are consistent with the confined-unconfined model and include rapid head drops, changes to unconfined conditions, and increases in sulfate and TDS during re-saturation of a sandstone aquifer. Studies reported from the Appalachian coalfield show aspects consistent with the model, but in this high-relief fractured setting it is often difficult to distinguish aquifers from aquitards, confined from unconfined states, and the fracture-porosity cause of head drops from several others that occur during mine subsidence.

  13. Experimental study on capillary filling in nanochannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Min; Cao, Bing-Yang; Wang, Wei; Yun, He-Ming; Chen, Bao-Ming

    2016-10-01

    We investigated the capillary filling kinetics of deionized water in nanochannels with heights of 50-120 nm. The measured position of the moving meniscus was proportional to the square root of time, as predicted by the LW equation. However, the extracted slopes were significantly smaller than the predictions based on the bulk properties. This unusual behavior was found to be mainly caused by the electro-viscous effect and dynamic contact angle, which was significantly larger than the static angle. In addition, when the filling distance reached about 600 μm, bubbles tended to be formed, leading to the main meniscus was almost immobile.

  14. [Coronal filling biomaterials. Criteria for selection].

    PubMed

    Degrange, M

    1990-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to assess filling biomaterials according to specification criteria, the foremost of which is the respective ability of each to form a tight seal along cavity walls. Their direct or indirect (cementing or bonding) adhesive potential is the determining factor in their durability and the biocompatibility of the restoration achieved. Gold inlay alloys and amalgams appear as yet to be the most reliable and well-tolerated biomaterials for posterior restorations. For filling small cavities in the anterior sector, microfilled composites are clearly indicated; bonded porcelain, while not yet validated over time, would seem to be a good alternative for more extensive restorations.

  15. Alkaline earth filled nickel skutterudite antimonide thermoelectrics

    DOEpatents

    Singh, David Joseph

    2013-07-16

    A thermoelectric material including a body centered cubic filled skutterudite having the formula A.sub.xFe.sub.yNi.sub.zSb.sub.12, where A is an alkaline earth element, x is no more than approximately 1.0, and the sum of y and z is approximately equal to 4.0. The alkaline earth element includes guest atoms selected from the group consisting of Be, Mb, Ca, Sr, Ba, Ra and combinations thereof. The filled skutterudite is shown to have properties suitable for a wide variety of thermoelectric applications.

  16. Diagenesis and porosity evolution of the Yongningzheng Formation grainstone (Lower Triassic) in southwest Guizhou, People's Republic of China

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, D.S.; Lui, S.H.; Zeng, Z.D.; Chen, Y.B.

    1988-02-01

    The Youngningzheng Formation (Lower Triassic) is a shallow platform deposit consisting of micrites interbedded with oolitic grainstones. The diagenetic history and porosity evolution of these grainstones are very complicated. Both near-surface and burial diagenesis are obvious, based on both petrographical and geochemical studies. The most important processes that influence porosity evolution are cementation, dissolution, and compaction. The primary porosity was about 40%. The porosity after the submarine cementation and compaction was about 25%. The porosity was 35% after freshwater dissolution. After the freshwater phreatic cementation, the porosity decreased to about 10%. The porosity was about 5% after burial cementation. During the period of oil emplacement, the porosity (i.e., the porosity of accumulation stage) was only 4-5% after stylolitization and associated infrequent dissolution. The present porosity (outside oil-bearing area) is just 1-2% after continuous cementation. The authors consider that neither primary nor present porosity (outside oil-bearing area) can be used to evaluate the reservoir quality. In order to evaluate reservoir quality correctly, only the porosity of accumulation stage can be used.

  17. Polarization splitter based on dual core liquid crystal-filled holey fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Er-Lei; Jiang, Hai-Ming; Xie, Kang; Chen, Chun; Hu, Zhi-Jia

    2016-09-01

    Through filling the liquid crystal into the air holes of a dual-core holey fiber with a simple structure, the transmission mechanism of the fiber is changed from total internal reflection to photonic bandgap (PBG), and a polarization splitter based on the liquid crystal-filled dual-core PBG holey fiber is investigated. The results demonstrate that, by setting appropriate geometrical parameters, the polarization splitter possesses a short length of 890.5 μm, and its wide bandwidth of ˜150 nm almost covers all the S, C, and L communication bands. Besides, it has an excellent electro-interference-resistance property and certain sensitivity to temperature.

  18. Coupled discrete element and smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of the die filling process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breinlinger, Thomas; Kraft, Torsten

    2015-08-01

    Die filling is an important part of the powder compaction process chain, where defects in the final part can be introduced—or prevented. Simulation of this process is therefore a goal for many part producers and has been studied by some researchers already. In this work, we focus on the influence of the surrounding air on the powder flow. We demonstrate the implementing and coupling of the discrete element method for the granular powder and the smoothed particle hydrodynamics method for the gas flow. Application of the method to the die filling process is demonstrated.

  19. Coupled discrete element and smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of the die filling process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breinlinger, Thomas; Kraft, Torsten

    2016-11-01

    Die filling is an important part of the powder compaction process chain, where defects in the final part can be introduced—or prevented. Simulation of this process is therefore a goal for many part producers and has been studied by some researchers already. In this work, we focus on the influence of the surrounding air on the powder flow. We demonstrate the implementing and coupling of the discrete element method for the granular powder and the smoothed particle hydrodynamics method for the gas flow. Application of the method to the die filling process is demonstrated.

  20. The effect of porosity on fault slip mechanisms at East Pacific Rise transform faults: insight from observations and models at the Gofar Fault (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roland, E. C.; McGuire, J. J.; Lizarralde, D.; Behn, M. D.; Collins, J. A.

    2013-12-01

    In this study, we combine recent local observations and numerical models to show that Pacific oceanic transform faults contain consistent high-porosity damage zones that extend throughout the crust within localized regions along the fault. Heterogeneity in fault zone material properties associated with along-strike changes in porosity and fluid-related effects may promote variations in fault-slip mechanisms, with slow, aseismic slip in some fault segments and fast, seismic rupture in others. Ocean bottom seismometer observations made during the 2008 rupture process of the Gofar fault (4° S on the East Pacific Rise), in combination with ~25 years of teleseismic observations, indicate significant along-strike variability in fault slip mechanisms; discrete fault segments fail regularly in Mw 6.0 earthquakes, and seismogenic segments are separated by velocity-strengthening, ~10-km-long rupture barriers that appear to fail during earthquake swarms, likely accompanied by aseismic slip. 3D models of the Gofar fault thermal structure suggest that swarm microearthquake hypocenters within the rupture barrier zones occur at depths greater than would be expected to sustain brittle failure, and at temperatures too hot to exhibit stick-slip behavior in lower crust and upper mantle rocks. This observation suggests that some mechanism leads to enhanced cooling within discrete zones along the fault. The seismic structure of the Gofar rupture barrier region is imaged using P-wave traveltime tomography as a ~2-km-wide low velocity zone that extends through the entire crust. Reduced velocities can be explained if the plate-boundary region is composed of fault material with enhanced fluid-filled porosity (1.5-8%). Enhanced porosity, and associated increased hydrothermal heat transport deep within the crust at Gofar is also consistent with the observed deep seismicity and apparently cooler fault structure in distinct fault segments. Dilatency strengthening is one mechanism that may be

  1. 62. VIEW LOOKING NORTHWEST AT THE OIL FILLED CIRCUIT BREAKER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    62. VIEW LOOKING NORTHWEST AT THE OIL FILLED CIRCUIT BREAKER FOR GENERATOR NUMBER 1. CIRCUIT BREAKERS ARE AUTOMATED SWITCHES WHICH DISCONNECT THE GENERATORS FROM THE LINE WHEN SHORT CIRCUITS OCCUR. WHEN CIRCUITS INVOLVING HIGH CURRENTS AND VOLTAGES ARE BROKEN, THE AIR SURROUNDING MECHANICAL PARTS OF THE SWITCH BECOMES IONIZED AND CONTINUES TO CONDUCT ELECTRIC POWER ACROSS ANY GAP IN THE SWITCH CONTACTS. TO PREVENT THIS AND INSURE A POSITIVE INTERRUPTION OF CURRENT, THE SWITCH CONTACTS ARE IMMERSED IN A CONTAINER OF OIL. THE OIL DOES NOT SUPPORT THE FORMATION OF AN ARC AND EFFECTIVELY CUTS OFF THE CURRENT WHEN THE SWITCH CONTACTS ARE OPENED. - New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Cos Cob Power Plant, Sound Shore Drive, Greenwich, Fairfield County, CT

  2. Measurement of porosity in a composite high explosive as a function of pressing conditions by ultra-small-angle neutron scattering with contrast variation

    SciTech Connect

    Mang, Joseph Thomas; Hjelm, Rex P; Francois, Elizabeth G

    2009-01-01

    We have used ultra-small-angle neutron scattering (USANS) with contrast variation to measure the porosity (voids and binder-filled regions) in a composite high explosive, PBX 9501, formulated with a deuterated binder. Little is known about the microstructure of pressed PBX 9501 parts and thus how it is affected by processing. Here, we explore the effect of varying the pressing intensity on the PBX 9501 microstructure. Disk-shaped samples of PBX 9501 were die-pressed with applied pressures ranging between 10,000 and 29,000 psi at 90 C. Five samples were prepared at each pressure that differed in the fraction of deuterated binder, facilitating variation of the neutron scattering length density contrast ({Delta}{rho}) and thus, the resolution of microstructural details. The sample composition was determined by calculation of the Porod Invariant as a function of {Delta}{rho} and compared with compositional estimates obtained from the bulk sample density. Structural modeling of the USANS data, at different levels of contrast, assuming both spherical and cylindrical morphologies, allowed the mean size and size distribution of voids and binder-filled regions to be determined. A decrease in the mean diameter of binder-filled regions was found with increasing pressing intensity, while the mean void diameter showed no significant change.

  3. Measurement of Meteorite Density, Porosity and Magnetic Susceptibility: Fast, Non- destructive, Non-contaminating and Very Informative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macke, R. J.; Britt, D. T.; Consolmagno, G. J.

    2009-05-01

    The development of the "glass bead" method [1] for measuring bulk density, coupled with other fast, non- destructive and non-contaminating methods for measuring grain density and magnetic susceptibility, has enabled broad surveys of large meteorite collections. We have employed these methods extensively on meteorites in numerous collections, including those at the Vatican, the American Museum of Natural History (New York), the National Museum of Natural History (Washington, DC), Texas Christian University, University of New Mexico, and Arizona State University. We present here a summary of some of the findings to date. Using the glass bead method, the meteorite is placed into a container which is then filled entirely with small (sub- millimeter) glass beads. The beads behave collectively as an Archimedean fluid, flowing around the sample to fill the empty space in the container. Through mass measurement, the volume displaced by the sample can be determined. Grain density is determined via helium ideal-gas pycnometry. Magnetic susceptibility is determined using a commercially available hand-held device [2]. Among notable findings to date, grain density and magnetic susceptibility together can distinguish H, L and LL ordinary chondrite falls into clearly distinct groupings [3]. On the other hand, enstatite chondrites of EH and EL subgroups are indistinguishable in these properties, indicating that EH and EL do not differ significantly in iron content [4]. Carbonaceous chondrites can have porosities that are significantly higher than ordinary chondrites and (especially for aqueously altered meteorites) lower density, though these also vary according to subgroups [5]. References: [1] Consolmagno and Britt, 1998. M&PS 33, 1231-1240. [2] Gattacceca et al., 2004. GJI 158, 42-49. [3] Consolmagno et al., 2006. M&PS 41, 331-342. [4] Macke et al., 2009. LPSC 40, 1598. [5] Consolmagno et al., 2008. MetSoc 71, 5038.

  4. Depositional environments, diagenesis, and porosity of upper cretaceous volcanic-rich Tokio sandstone reservoirs, Haynesville Field, Clairborne Parish, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, W.J.

    1995-10-01

    Tokio Formation sandstones produce oil from volcanic-rich to quartzose lithic sandstones in the Haynesville Field. The Tokio interval is approximately 210 feet thick and has been divided into four sandstone zones separated by shales or scoured contacts. In ascending order, the four zones are the RA, S3, S2, and S1. The RA is composed of quartzose sublitharenites inferred to have been deposited in delta front bars and distributary channels. The upper three zones are composed of sublitharenite and feldspathic litharenite to quartzose litharenite. The upper sands are interpreted to have been deposited in littoral environments including storm influenced shelf, tidal flats and channels, and barrier island/strand plain. The diagenesis of these sands is strongly related to composition: greater percentages of cements and secondary porosity occur in lithic-rich sandstones. Diagenetic cements in quartzose sandstones are mainly quartz overgrowths with minor early K-spar overgrowths on plagioclase, early chlorite-rims, and late patchy calcite, pyrite, and rare dolomite and siderite. Diagenesis in lithic-rich sands includes greater amounts of chlorite rim and pore-filling kaolinite cements and less quartz-overgrowth and other cements. The effect of the original mineralogy and diagenetic minerals on wireline logs includes: (1) reduction of SP due to cements, (2) increase in GR response due to K-spar and volcanic detritus, (3) higher resistivity due to carbonate minerals, and (4) increase in irreducible water saturation due to pore-lining and pore-filling clay. Thus, potential reservoir zones with lithic-rich sandstones like the Tokio could be overlooked in many areas around the world.

  5. Ag-Air Service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Econ, Inc.'s agricultural aerial application, "ag-air," involves more than 10,000 aircraft spreading insecticides, herbicides, fertilizer, seed and other materials over millions of acres of farmland. Difficult for an operator to estimate costs accurately and decide what to charge or which airplane can handle which assignment most efficiently. Computerized service was designed to improve business efficiency in choice of aircraft and determination of charge rates based on realistic operating cost data. Each subscriber fills out a detailed form which pertains to his needs and then receives a custom-tailored computer printout best suited to his particular business mix.

  6. The effect of porosity on the mechanical properties of cordierite diesel particulate filter substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Shyam, Amit; Lara-Curzio, Edgar; Watkins, Thomas R

    2009-01-01

    Diesel particulate filter (DPF) technology depends on porous ceramic structures that trap the particulate matter in the diesel engine exhaust gas stream. The design of DPFs requires balancing the functional requirement of soot filtration with the mechanical properties and both are influenced by the porosity of the substrate. In addition, increasing the porosity of the substrate can assist with the catalytic washcoating, engine back pressure and engine efficiency. The effect of porosity on the elastic and fracture mechanical properties of cordierite based ceramic particulate filters was examined and will be described. Elastic modulus of DPF substrates was determined using resonant ultrasound spectroscopy while fracture toughness was characterized using the double-torsion test method. The interrelationships among specimen thickness, wall orientation, porosity and mechanical properties of the filter substrates will be discussed. A materials selection procedure to obtain filters with high thermal shock resistance and optimal mechanical properties will be described.

  7. Tuning the porosity of zinc oxide electrodes: from dense to nanopillar films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanni, Lorenzo; Delaup, Benoît; Niesen, Bjoern; Milstein, Yonat; Shachal, Dubi; Morales-Masis, Monica; Nicolay, Sylvain; Ballif, Christophe

    2015-07-01

    Thin films with tunable porosity are of high interest in applications such as gas sensing and antireflective coatings. We report a facile and scalable method to fabricate ZnO electrodes with tuneable porosity. By adjusting the substrate temperature and ratio of precursor gasses during low-pressure chemical vapor deposition we can accurately tune the porosity of ZnO films, from 0 up to 24%. The porosity change of the films from dense layer to separated nanopillars results in an effective refractive index reduction from 1.9 to 1.65 at 550 nm, as determined by optical and x-ray spectroscopy. The low-refractive-index ZnO films are incorporated into amorphous silicon solar cells demonstrating reflection losses reduction down to 4% in the visible wavelengths range.

  8. Measurement of intergranular stress and porosity during dynamic compaction of porous beds of cyclotetramethylene tetranitramine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenaway, M. W.

    2005-05-01

    The dynamic compaction of granular beds of the propellant cyclotetramethylene tetranitramine (HMX) has been investigated using a modified split Hopkinson pressure bar system. Intergranular stress and bed porosity were simultaneously measured during controlled loading. The importance of grain size was investigated by comparing conventional HMX (mean particle size ˜260μm) to microfine HMX (<5μm). Samples were radially confined and compression was predetermined using special end caps. Initial porosity was varied by hydraulically pressing the beds prior to testing. With large grains, resistance to compaction increased with the solid volume fraction. Microfine HMX behaved like low porosity conventional HMX beds in all cases. Porosity was typically reduced by 5%-10% during compaction and intergranular stresses below the yield stress were ensured. Energy dissipation to plastic flow and fracture were largely eliminated. Optical particle size analysis and electron microscopy support the experimental observations.

  9. Variation of wave velocity and porosity of sandstone after high temperature heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Qiang; Zhang, ·Weiqiang; Su, Tianming; Zhu, Shuyun

    2016-05-01

    This paper reports the variations of mass, porosity, and wave velocity of sandstone after high temperature heating. The range of temperature to which the sandstone specimens have been exposed is 25-850°C, in a heating furnace. It has been shown that below 300°C, porosity and wave velocity change very little. Above 300°C, there is a rapid increase in porosity, but the wave velocity decreases significantly. The results of thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) suggest that a series of changes occurred between 400 and 600°C in sandstone could be responsible for the different patterns of variation in porosity and wave velocity.

  10. Study of the effects of stress sensitivity on the permeability and porosity of fractal porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Xiao-Hua; Li, Xiao-Ping; Liu, Jian-Yi; Zhang, Lie-Hui; Fan, Zhou

    2015-10-01

    Flow in porous media under stress is very important in various scientific and engineering fields. It has been shown that stress plays an important role in effect of permeability and porosity of porous media. In this work, novel predictive models for permeability and porosity of porous media considering stress sensitivity are developed based on the fractal theory and mechanics of materials. Every parameter in the proposed models has clear physical meaning. The proposed models are evaluated using previously published data for permeability and porosity measured in various natural materials. The predictions of permeability and porosity show good agreement with those obtained by the available experimental data and illustrate that the proposed models can be used to characterize the flow in porous media under stress accurately.

  11. Optimization of wave cancellation in variable porosity transonic wind tunnel flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, J. W.

    1973-01-01

    A technique has been developed which is capable of determining the optimum wall configuration for a variable porosity perforated wall transonic wind tunnel. The technique is based on a mathematical model arrived at by considering the results of theory and past experimental investigations. A performance index was determined as a function of the significant wind tunnel parameters by comparing a formulation of this mathematical model, using MSFC 14 inch Trisonic Wind Tunnel experimental results, to interference free results. The resulting relationship was then used to determine the combination of wind tunnel parameters which should yield minimum reflected wave interference. A theoretical development of wall porosity requirements for thick wall inclined hole test sections is included which follows the trends and generally the magnitude of available experimental data. This theory is useful in studying the present variable porosity case, but also should be of value in studies concerning the wave cancellation process for fixed porosity walls.

  12. Percolating porosity in ultrafine grained copper processed by High Pressure Torsion

    SciTech Connect

    Wegner, Matthias Leuthold, Jörn; Peterlechner, Martin; Divinski, Sergiy V. Wilde, Gerhard; Setman, Daria; Zehetbauer, Michael; Pippan, Reinhard

    2013-11-14

    Defect structures in copper of different purity (nominally 99.99 and 99.999 wt. %) deformed via High Pressure Torsion (HPT) with varying processing parameters are investigated utilizing the radiotracer diffusion technique. While the degree of deformation is kept constant, the effects of applied quasi-hydrostatic pressure, processing temperature, post-deformation annealing treatments, and of the impurity concentration on the deformed samples are analyzed in terms of the formation of interconnected internal porosity. Furthermore, the anisotropy of the developing porosity network is examined. The porosity channels occurred to be interconnected along the direction parallel to the surface normal with a volume fraction of the order of a few ppm while no long-range penetration along the internal porosity could be detected when measured along the azimuthal or radial directions of a HPT processed sample.

  13. Probabilistic simulation of hydrogen gas porosity formation in A356 base hypoeutectic alloy castings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asada, Jo

    Microporosity in cast aluminum alloy can be classified as gas porosity and/or shrinkage porosity. In prior research, two dimensional simulation programs employing a probabilistic modeling approach and cellular automaton method were developed to predict microporosity in cast aluminum alloys. In this research the 2D models were statistically compared with experimental data. Additionally, we investigated size and morphology distribution of grains and porosity in A356 alloy castings under variable hydrogen content and alloy treatment condition, i.e. eutectic phase modification and grain refinement. In order to improve the accuracy of the prediction method, new simulation models including a two and half dimensional analysis and a two phase evolution model were developed in the present body of work. The new models were statistically compared with experimental results changing silicon and hydrogen content and alloy treatment conditions. The new simulation technique exhibits improved agreement with experimental data tracking the morphology of gas porosities and the grain size distribution.

  14. Synthesis of Metal-Organic Zeolites with Homochirality and High Porosity for Enantioselective Separation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhong-Xuan; Liu, Liyang; Zhang, Jian

    2016-07-01

    Using lactic acid derivatives as chiral ligands, a pair of unprecedented homochiral metal-organic zeolites have been synthesized that feature zeotype CAN topology and have high porosity for enantioselective separation of racemates.

  15. Evolution of Porosity and Channelization of an Erosive Medium Driven by Fluid Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudrolli, Arshad; Clotet, Xavier

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate that a homogeneous porous medium composed of sedimentary particles develops channels due to curvature driven growth of fluid flow coupled with an increase in porosity. While the flux is increased linearly, the evolution of porosity is observed to be intermittent with erosion occurring at the boundaries between low and high porosity regions. Calculating the spatial distribution of the flow within the medium and the fluid stress given by the product of the fluid flux and the volume fraction of the particles, we find that the system organizes itself to be locally near the threshold needed to erode the weakest particles. A statistical model simulating the coupling of the erosion, transport, and deposition of the particles to the local fluid flow and porosity is found to capture the overall development of the observed channels.

  16. Types of secondary porosity of carbonate rocks in injection and test wells in southern peninsular Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duerr, A.D.

    1995-01-01

    The types of secondary porosity present in carbonate injection intervals and in the overlying carbonate rocks were determined at 11 injection well sites and 3 test well sites in southern peninsular Florida. The hydrogeologic system consists of a thick sequence of carbonate rocks overlain by clastic deposits. Principal hydrogeologic units are the surficial aquifer system, the intermediate aquifer system or the intermediate confining unit,the Floridan aquifer system, and the sub-Floridan confining unit.The concept of apparent secondary porosity was used in this study because the secondary porosity features observed in a borehole television survey could have been caused by geologic processes as well as by drilling activities. The secondary porosity features identified in a television survey were evaluated using driller's comments and caliper, flowmeter, and temperature logs. Borehole intervals that produced or received detectable amounts of flow, as shown by flowmeter and temperature logs, provided evidence that the secondary porosity of the interval was spatially distributed and interconnected beyond the immediate vicinity of a borehole and, thus, was related to geologic processes. Features associated with interconnected secondary porosity were identified as effective secondary porosity. Fracture porosity was identified as the most common type of effective secondary porosity and was observed predominantly in dolomite and dolomitic limestone. Cavity porosity was the least common type of effective secondary porosity at the study sites. In fact, of the more than 17,500 feet of borehole studied a total of only three cavities constituting effective secondary porosity were identified at only two sites. These cavities were detected in dolomite rocks. Most apparent cavities were caused by drilling-induced collapse of naturally fractured borehole walls. Also, fractures usually were observed above and below cavities. The majority of vugs observed in the television surveys did

  17. Characterization of porosity via secondary reactions. Final technical report, 1 September 1991--30 November 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Calo, J.M.; Zhang, L.; Hall, P.J.; Antxustegi, M.

    1997-09-01

    A new approach to the study of porosity and porosity development in coal chars during gasification was investigated. This approach involves the establishment of the relationships between the amount and type of surface complexes evolved during post-activation temperature programmed desorption (TPD), and the porosity, as measured by gas adsorption and small angle neutron scattering (SANS) techniques. With this new method, the total surface area and micropore volume can be determined by the interpretation of post-activation TPD spectra. The primary conclusion of this work is that it is possible to predict total surface area and micropore volume from TPD spectra. From the extended random pore model, additional information about the micropore surface area, the nonmicroporous surface area, and the mean micropore size development as a function of reaction time (or burn-off) can also be predicted. Therefore, combining the TPD technique and the extended random pore model provides a new method for the characterization of char porosity.

  18. Porosity Detection in Ceramic Armor Tiles via Ultrasonic Time-Of

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margetan, Frank J.; Richter, Nathaniel; Jensen, Terrence

    2011-06-01

    Some multilayer armor panels contain ceramic tiles as one constituent, and porosity in the tiles can affect armor performance. It is well known that porosity in ceramic materials leads to a decrease in ultrasonic velocity. We report on a feasibility study exploring the use of ultrasonic time-of-flight (TOF) to locate and characterize porous regions in armor tiles. The tiles in question typically have well-controlled thickness, thus simplifying the translation of TOF data into velocity data. By combining UT velocity measurements and X-ray absorption measurements on selected specimens, one can construct a calibration curve relating velocity to porosity. That relationship can then be used to translate typical ultrasonic C-scans of TOF-versus-position into C-scans of porosity-versus-position. This procedure is demonstrated for pulse/echo, focused-transducer inspections of silicon carbide (SiC) ceramic tiles.

  19. Porosity detection in ceramic armor tiles via ultrasonic time-of-flight

    SciTech Connect

    Margetan, Frank J.; Richter, Nathaniel; Jensen, Terrence

    2011-06-23

    Some multilayer armor panels contain ceramic tiles as one constituent, and porosity in the tiles can affect armor performance. It is well known that porosity in ceramic materials leads to a decrease in ultrasonic velocity. We report on a feasibility study exploring the use of ultrasonic time-of-flight (TOF) to locate and characterize porous regions in armor tiles. The tiles in question typically have well-controlled thickness, thus simplifying the translation of TOF data into velocity data. By combining UT velocity measurements and X-ray absorption measurements on selected specimens, one can construct a calibration curve relating velocity to porosity. That relationship can then be used to translate typical ultrasonic C-scans of TOF-versus-position into C-scans of porosity-versus-position. This procedure is demonstrated for pulse/echo, focused-transducer inspections of silicon carbide (SiC) ceramic tiles.

  20. Porosity evolution in reservoir sandstones in the West-Central San Joaquin basin, California

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, R.A. Jr.; McCullough, P.T.; Houghton, B.D.; Pennell, D.A.; Dunwoody, J.A. III; Menzie, R.J. Jr.

    1995-04-01

    Miocene reservoir sands (feldspathic and lithic arenites) in central San Joaquin basin oil fields show similar trends in porosity development despite differences in depositional environment, pore-fluid chemistry, and burial history. Burial and tectonic compaction caused grain rotation, deformation of altered lithics, and extensive fracturing of brittle grains, thereby eliminating most primary porosity. Diagenetic fluids, infiltrating along fractures in grains, reacted with freshly exposed mineral surfaces causing extensive leaching of framework components. All major grain types were affected but preferential removal of feldspars and lithics resulted in changes in QFL ratios. With continued compaction angular remnants of partially disolved grains were rotated and rearranged while secondary intergranular and moldic porosity collapsed to form secondary intergranular porosity. This resulted in reservoir sands that are less well sorted, more angular, and mineralogically more mature than they were at deposition. Such changes appear to widespread in the San Joaquin basin and may be more important than is generally acknowledged.

  1. SEM evaluation of the interface between filling and root-end filling materials.

    PubMed

    Rosa, R A; Santini, M F; Heiden, K; Só, B B; Kuga, M C; Pereira, J R; Só, M V R

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this ex vivo study was to evaluate, by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), the presence of gaps at the interface between filling material and three root-end filling materials. Thirty human upper molars disto-buccal roots were instrumented and filled with gutta-percha and eugenol-based sealer. The apicoectomy was performed 2 mm from the apex and retrograde cavities were prepared with ultrasonic points (3 mm in deep). The samples were divided into three experimental groups (n = 10): Group I-white mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA); Group II-Super EBA; and Group III-Portland cement. The root-end filling materials were inserted into the retocavities using a MTA carrier. After 48 h, the roots were transversally sectioned in order to obtain the apical 5 mm. Next, each specimen was prepared longitudinally with crescent granulation of abrasives water-wet sandpapers in order to expose the filling and root-end filling materials. Then, the specimens were subjected to slow dehydration with silica gel, mounted onto specific stubs and coated with paladium coverage for SEM analysis of the interface between filling and root-end filling materials. The percentage of gaps at the interfacial area was calculated by using Image Tool 3.0 software. Super EBA presented the higher percentage of gaps (1.5 ± 0.67%), whereas MTA presented the lowest values (0.33 ± 0.20%; p = 0.0004). Despite the statistical differences observed between Super EBA and MTA, all the root-end filling materials presented great adaptation to the filling material, presenting small amount of gaps. PMID:23733414

  2. Preoperative saline-filled computed tomography thoracography for awake video-assisted thoracic surgery: report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Tatsuaki; Noda, Masafumi; Okazaki, Toshimasa; Tsukidate, Hisakatsu; Sato, Kota; Notsuda, Hirotsugu; Niikawa, Hiromichi; Okada, Yoshinori; Matsumura, Yuji; Kondo, Takashi

    2015-12-01

    Awake video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) is a therapeutic option for patients with intractable secondary spontaneous pneumothorax (SSP) complicated by impaired pulmonary function. The preoperative identification of air leak points is one of the keys to the success of this procedure. We describe how we performed saline-filled computed tomography (CT) thoracography to detect pleural fistulae in three patients with intractable SSP. Saline-filled CT thoracography showed bubble signs in two patients and an air-water level in bulla in one patient. The preoperative identification of air leak points resulted in successful awake VATS for all three patients. Our experience demonstrates that saline-filled CT thoracography is a useful diagnostic tool for SSP, especially when used in preparation for awake VATS when minimally invasive procedures are desirable. PMID:26070908

  3. Evaluation of heat and water flow in porosity permeable horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasquale, Vincenzo; Verdoya, Massimo; Chiozzi, Paolo

    2010-05-01

    temperatures contain a discernible climatic signal, explainable with an increase of ground surface temperature over the past few decades. This could have caused a positive shift in the temperature-depth data. Thus, temperature data used in this study were preliminarily treated for such a climatic noise. Our approach assumes that water volumetric heat capacity and bulk thermal conductivity of the porosity permeable horizons are constant along the section of the borehole where groundwater movement occurs. Under natural conditions, this is not always the case, and curvatures in temperature profiles can be also explained by variation of such parameters. However, for the investigated boreholes, thermal conductivity measurements show a variation not larger than ten per cent about the average, thus excluding that distortion in temperature-depth curves is due to lithological change. This implies an uncertainty on the hydrothermal parameters of the same order of magnitude. Moreover, the temperature and pressure dependence of thermal parameters can be neglected, as the investigated depth range is relatively shallow.

  4. Acoustic Properties of Carbonate Rocks and Their Relation with Porosity and Mineral Composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scotellaro, C.; Vanorio, T.; Mavko, G.

    2007-12-01

    Carbonates are complex rocks characterized by a wide range of facies, texture, micro-structure, and rock fabrics. Understanding how this complexity affects the acoustic properties of carbonates is a key issue for interpreting and predicting changes in seismic images and acoustic log. Questions arise from the study of the porosity versus velocity relation for carbonate rocks which often consider the large scatter around the main velocity-porosity trend predominantly related to the porosity. We started a comprehensive laboratory study on carbonate rocks to understand how mineral composition, together with porosity, controls seismic wave propagation. The samples were collected capturing a wide range of porosities (from 1-52 percent) and different depositional environments in order to represent at best pore fabric and mineralogical heterogeneity in carbonates. Results of the hydraulic, transport, and acoustic properties of the collected samples were compared with those reported in the literature. The main results of this research show that a quite heterogeneous mineral composition of the samples (calcite, dolomite, and anhydrite), other than the pore type, controls the elastic behavior of carbonate rocks, and thus, the velocity-porosity trend. In particular, the samples showing the biggest departure from the general velocity-porosity trend show a non-negligible amount of anhydrite. Compared to calcite, anhydrite 1) causes rock softening and in turn, a decrease of P-wave velocity, because of the lower bulk modulus (k =56 GPa); 2) is characterized by a finer grain size (silt-size) which may create two elastic domains separated by a critical porosity approximately 30 percent.

  5. Electrical resistivity and porosity structure of the upper Biscayne Aquifer in Miami-Dade County, Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitman, Dean; Yeboah-Forson, Albert

    2015-12-01

    Square array electrical soundings were made at 13 sites in the Biscayne Aquifer distributed between 1 and 20 km from the shoreline. These soundings were modeled to investigate how resistivity varies spatially and with depth in the upper 15 m of the aquifer. Porosity was estimated from the modeled formation resistivity and observed pore fluid resistivity with Archie's Law. The models were used to interpolate resistivity and porosity surfaces at -2, -5, -8, and -15 m elevations. Modeled resistivity in the unsaturated zone is generally higher than 300 Ω m with the resistivity at sites with thick unsaturated zones greater than 1000 Ω m. Resistivity in the saturated zone ranges from 30 to 320 Ω m. At many sites in the western portions of the study area, resistivity is constant or increases with depth whereas sites in the center of the Atlantic Coastal Ridge exhibit a distinct low resistivity zone (ρ < 45 Ω m) at elevations ranging between -5 and -10 m. At one site near the shore of Biscayne Bay, the resistivity is less than 10 Ω m at -5 m elevation reflecting the presence of salt water in the aquifer. The estimated porosity ranges between 14% and 71% with modal values near 25%. The porosity structure varies both with depth and spatially. Western sites exhibit a high porosity zone at shallow depths best expressed in a NE-SW trending zone of 40-50% porosity situated near the western margin of the Atlantic Coastal Ridge. This zone roughly corresponds in depth with the Q5 chronostratigraphic unit of the Miami Fm. which constitutes the upper flow unit of the Biscayne Aquifer. The highest porosity (>50%) is seen at elevations below -5 m at sites in the center of the Atlantic Coastal Ridge and likely corresponds to solution features. The general NE-SW trend of the resistivity and porosity structure suggests a causal connection with the Pleistocene paleogeography and sedimentary environments.

  6. Elastic wave propagation and attenuation in a double-porosity dual-permeability medium

    SciTech Connect

    Berryman, J.G.; Wang, H.F.

    1998-10-12

    To account for large-volume low-permeability storage porosity and low-volume high-permeability fracture/crack porosity in oil and gas reservoirs, phenomenological equations for the poroelastic behavior of a double porosity medium have been formulated and the coefficients in these linear equations identified. The generalization from a single porosity model increases the number of independent inertial coefficients from three to six, the number of independent drag coefficients from three to six, and the number of independent stress-strain coefficients from three to six for an isotropic applied stress and assumed isotropy of the medium. The analysis leading to physical interpretations of the inertial and drag coefficients is relatively straightforward, whereas that for the stress-strain coefficients is more tedious. In a quasistatic analysis, the physical interpretations are based upon considerations of extremes in both spatial and temporal scales. The limit of very short times is the one most relevant for wave propagation, and in this case both matrix porosity and fractures are expected to behave in an undrained fashion, although our analysis makes no assumptions in this regard. For the very long times more relevant for reservoir drawdown, the double porosity medium behaves as an equivalent single porosity medium. At the macroscopic spatial level, the pertinent parameters (such as the total compressibility) may be determined by appropriate field tests. At the mesoscopic scale pertinent parameters of the rock matrix can be determined directly through laboratory measurements on core, and the compressibility can be measured for a single fracture. We show explicitly how to generalize the quasistatic results to incorporate wave propagation effects and how effects that are usually attributed to squirt flow under partially saturated conditions can be explained alternatively in terms of the double-porosity model. The result is therefore a theory that generalizes, but is

  7. Existence and stability results for thermoelastic dipolar bodies with double porosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marin, M.; Nicaise, S.

    2016-11-01

    This paper is concerned with the theory of thermoelastic dipolar bodies which have a double porosity structure. In contrast with previous papers dedicated to classical elastic bodies, in our context the double porosity structure of the body is influenced by the displacement field, which is consistent with real models. In this setting, we show instability of solution as the initial energy is negative while under an appropriated (and realistic) condition, we prove existence and uniqueness of solution using semi-group theory.

  8. SOIL AND FILL LABORATORY SUPPORT - 1991

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of soil analysis laboratory work by the University of Florida in Support of the Florida Radon Research Program (FRRP). Analyses were performed on soil and fill samples collected during 1991 by the FRRP Research House program and the New House Evaluation P...

  9. A dental cloud over a silver filling

    SciTech Connect

    Van Pelt, D.

    1990-10-01

    For 150 years, silver fillings have been used for cavities. Now some dentists are urging their colleagues to stop using the mixture because it includes mercury, which they say poses health risks. While a small group of dentists have complied, the mainstream profession says the claims are unsubstantiated.

  10. Irregularly Shaped Space-Filling Truncated Octahedra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, John Robert

    2008-01-01

    For any parent tetrahedron ABCD, centroids of selected sub-tetrahedra form the vertices of an irregularly shaped space-filling truncated octahedron. To reflect these properties, such a figure will be called an ISTO. Each edge of the ISTO is parallel to and one-eighth the length of one of the edges of tetrahedron ABCD and the volume of the ISTO is…

  11. Banach spaces that realize minimal fillings

    SciTech Connect

    Bednov, B. B.; Borodin, P. A. E-mail: pborodin@inbox.ru

    2014-04-30

    It is proved that a real Banach space realizes minimal fillings for all its finite subsets (a shortest network spanning a fixed finite subset always exists and has the minimum possible length) if and only if it is a predual of L{sub 1}. The spaces L{sub 1} are characterized in terms of Steiner points (medians). Bibliography: 25 titles. (paper)

  12. New Skeletal-Space-Filling Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Frank H.

    1977-01-01

    Describes plastic, skeletal molecular models that are color-coded and can illustrate both the conformation and overall shape of small molecules. They can also be converted to space-filling counterparts by the additions of color-coded polystyrene spheres. (MLH)

  13. The Chemistry of Modern Dental Filling Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicholson, John W.; Anstice, H. Mary

    1999-01-01

    Discusses materials used by dentists to restore teeth after decay has been removed. Shows how dental-material science is an interdisciplinary field in which chemistry plays a major part. Reviews the many developments polymer chemistry has contributed to the field of dental fillings. (CCM)

  14. 5 CFR 362.203 - Filling positions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... PROGRAMS Internship Program § 362.203 Filling positions. (a) Announcement. (1) When an agency accepts... opportunities to participate in the agency's Internship Program. For the purposes of this paragraph (a), “agency... Internship opportunities; and (iv) Any other information OPM considers appropriate. (2) OPM will...

  15. 5 CFR 362.203 - Filling positions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... PROGRAMS Internship Program § 362.203 Filling positions. (a) Announcement. (1) When an agency accepts... opportunities to participate in the agency's Internship Program. For the purposes of this paragraph (a), “agency... Internship opportunities; and (iv) Any other information OPM considers appropriate. (2) OPM will...

  16. Cotton-Fiber-Filled Rubber Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Floyd A.

    1987-01-01

    Carbonization of fibers at high temperatures improves strength and erosion resistance. Cotton linters tested as replacement for asbestos filler currently used in rubber insulation in solid rocket motors. Cotton-filled rubber insulation has industrial uses; in some kinds of chemical- or metal-processing equipment, hoses, and protective clothing.

  17. Postscript: Filling-in Models of Completion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Barton L.

    2007-01-01

    Presents some additional comments from the current author regarding his original article "Filling-in models of completion: Rejoinder to Kellman, Garrigan, Shipley, and Keane (2007) and Albert (2007)." Despite repeated assertions by Kellman et al., I have never claimed that luminance constraints block modal completion; rather, they merely weaken…

  18. Biomineral nanoparticles are space-filling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Li; Killian, Christopher E.; Kunz, Martin; Tamura, Nobumichi; Gilbert, P. U. P. A.

    2011-02-01

    Sea urchin biominerals have been shown to form from aggregating nanoparticles of amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC), which then crystallize into macroscopic single crystals of calcite. Here we measure the surface areas of these biominerals and find them to be comparable to those of space-filling macroscopic geologic calcite crystals. These biominerals differ from synthetic mesocrystals, which are invariably porous. We propose that space-filling ACC is the structural precursor for echinoderm biominerals.Sea urchin biominerals have been shown to form from aggregating nanoparticles of amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC), which then crystallize into macroscopic single crystals of calcite. Here we measure the surface areas of these biominerals and find them to be comparable to those of space-filling macroscopic geologic calcite crystals. These biominerals differ from synthetic mesocrystals, which are invariably porous. We propose that space-filling ACC is the structural precursor for echinoderm biominerals. This article was submitted as part of a Themed Issue on Crystallization and Formation Mechanisms of Nanostructures. Other papers on this topic can be found in issue 11 of vol. 2 (2010). This issue can be found from the Nanoscale homepage [http://www.rsc.org/nanoscale

  19. How to fill key leadership positions strategically.

    PubMed

    Sanford, Kathleen D

    2011-06-01

    To fill strategic positions in their organizations with top talent, nursing and finance leaders can: Start by determining which jobs are truly "mission critical". Align the individuals in these positions on strategic teams Strengthen partnerships between key clinical leaders, such as the CMO and CNO PMID:21692375

  20. Experimental and numerical study of water-filled vessel impacted by flat projectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Ren, Peng; Huang, Wei; Gao, Yu Bo

    2014-05-01

    To understand the failure modes and impact resistance of double-layer plates separated by water, a flat-nosed projectile was accelerated by a two-stage light gas gun against a water-filled vessel which was placed in an air-filled tank. Targets consisted of a tank made of two flat 5A06 aluminum alloy plates held by a high strength steel frame. The penetration process was recorded by a digital high-speed camera. The same projectile-target system was also used to fire the targets placed directly in air for comparison. Parallel numerical tests were also carried out. The result indicated that experimental and numerical results were in good agreement. Numerical simulations were able to capture the main physical behavior. It was also found that the impact resistance of double layer plates separated by water was lager than that of the target plates in air. Tearing was the main failure models of the water-filled vessel targets which was different from that of the target plates in air where the shear plugging was in dominate.