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Sample records for air filling fraction

  1. Composite fermions for fractionally filled Chern bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shankar, R.

    2012-02-01

    We consider fractionally filled bands with a non-zero Chern index that exhibit the Fractional Quantum Hall Effect in zero external fieldootnotetextR. Roy and S. Sondhi, Physics 4, 46 (2011) and papers reviewed therein. a possibility supported by numerical work.ootnotetextIbid. Analytic treatments are complicated by a non-constant Berry flux and the absence of Composite Fermions (CF), which would not only single out preferred fractions, but also allow us compute numerous response functions at nonzero frequencies, wavelengths and temperature using either Chern-Simons field theory or our Hamiltonian formalism.ootnotetextG. Murthy and R. Shankar, Rev. Mod. Phys., 75, 1101, (2003) We describe a way to introduce CF's by embedding the Chern band in an auxiliary problem involving Landau levels. The embedded band can be designed to approximate a prescribed Chern density in k space which determines the commutation relations of the charge densities and hence preserve all dynamical and algebraic aspects of the original problem. We find some states for which the filling fraction and dimensionless Hall conductance are not equal. The approach extends to two-dimensional time-reversal invariant topological insulators and to composite bosons.

  2. Optimal filling fraction of Ta2O5 inverse opals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tubio, C. R.; Guitian, F.; Gil, A.

    2013-12-01

    Tantalum pentoxide (Ta2O5) inverse opals were prepared by combining the self-assembly process and sol-gel chemistry-based opal infiltration. The inverse opal was made by the infiltration of a tantalum(V) ethoxide solution in the interstices of the polystyrene colloidal crystal template, and then removing the original opal template by calcination. The infiltration process as well as the optimal precursor concentration has been investigated in order to obtain Ta2O5 inverse opals with the optimal filling fraction. The effects of processing, template sphere size, morphology, structural properties, filling fraction and composition of the inverse opal are provided by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis (EDS) and powder X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results correlate the concentration of the precursor with the filling fraction of the template.

  3. Hall Crystal States in Fractionally Filled Chern Bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murthy, Ganpathy; Shankar, Ramamurti

    2012-02-01

    Two-dimensional time-reversal-invariant topological insulators can be thought of as a time-reversed pair of Chern bands. Numerical evidence shows the existence of states at fractional filling which are analogous to FQH states[1]. In [2] it was noted that at small momenta, the algebra of the density operators projected to the Chern band resembles the magnetic translation algebra. The authors have constructed a mapping[3] between Chern bands and a Landau level in a periodic potential which works at all momenta. This mapping is dynamically faithful, and reproduces the commutators of the projected density operator. There turn out to be Hall Crystal states, characterized by a Hall conductance, and another integer which described the charged dragged when the potential is adiabatically moved by a lattice unit. Using the Hamiltonian formalism developed by the authors some time ago for the FQHE[4], we calculate gaps and collective mode dispersions for such states. 1. D. N. Sheng et al, arxiv:1102.2568, N. Regnault and B. A. Bernevig, arxiv:1105.4867. 2. S. Parameswaran, R. Roy, and S. L. Sondhi, arxiv:1106.4025. 3. G. Murthy and R. Shankar, arxiv:1108.5501 4. G. Murthy and R. Shankar, Rev. Mod. Phys. 75, 1101 (2003)

  4. Quasiparticle Tunneling in the Fractional Quantum Hall effect at filling fraction ν=5/2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radu, Iuliana P.

    2009-03-01

    In a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG), in the fractional quantum Hall regime, the quasiparticles are predicted to have fractional charge and statistics, as well as modified Coulomb interactions. The state at filling fraction ν=5/2 is predicted by some theories to have non-abelian statistics, a property that might be exploited for topological quantum computing. However, alternative models with abelian properties have been proposed as well. Weak quasiparticle tunneling between counter-propagating edges is one of the methods that can be used to learn about the properties of the state and potentially distinguish between models describing it. We employ an electrostatically defined quantum point contact (QPC) fabricated on a high mobility GaAs/AlGaAs 2DEG to create a constriction where quasiparticles can tunnel between counter-propagating edges. We study the temperature and dc bias dependence of the tunneling conductance, while preserving the same filling fraction in the constriction and the bulk of the sample. The data show scaling of the bias-dependent tunneling over a range of temperatures, in agreement with the theory of weak quasiparticle tunneling, and we extract values for the effective charge and interaction parameter of the quasiparticles. The ranges of values obtained are consistent with those predicted by certain models describing the 5/2 state, indicating as more probable a non-abelian state. This work was done in collaboration with J. B. Miller, C. M. Marcus, M. A. Kastner, L. N. Pfeiffer and K. W. West. This work was supported in part by the Army Research Office (W911NF-05-1-0062), the Nanoscale Science and Engineering Center program of NSF (PHY-0117795), NSF (DMR-0701386), the Center for Materials Science and Engineering program of NSF (DMR-0213282) at MIT, the Microsoft Corporation Project Q, and the Center for Nanoscale Systems at Harvard University.

  5. Interactions in quantum Hall edge channels at filling fraction 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degiovanni, Pascal; Bocquillon, Erwann; Freulon, Vincent; Grenier, Charles; Berroir, Jean-Marc; Plaçais, Bernard; Cavanna, Antonella; Jin, Yong; Fève, Gwendal

    2013-03-01

    Coulomb interactions play a major role in one dimensional electronic transport. They modify the nature of the elementary excitations from Landau quasiparticles in higher dimensions to collective excitations in 1D. We report here on the direct observation of the collective neutral and charge modes of the two chiral co-propagating edge channels of opposite spins of the quantum Hall effect at filling factor ν = 2 . Generating a charge density wave at frequency f in the outer channel, we measure the current induced by inter-channel Coulomb interaction in the inner channel after a 3 microns propagation length. Varying the driving frequency from 0.7 to 11 GHz, we observe damped oscillations in the induced current that results from the phase shift between the fast charge and slow neutral eigenmodes. Measuring the dispersion relation and dissipation of the neutral mode from provides quantitative information on the scattering of quantum edge magnetoplasmons. We will then comment on the consequences of these results on quasi-particle relaxation and decoherence in the ν = 2 quantum Hall edge channel system. ANR Grant 1shot (ANR-2010-BLANC-0412)

  6. Vehicle type affects filling of fractional laser-ablated channels imaged by optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Olesen, Uffe Høgh; Mogensen, Mette; Haedersdal, Merete

    2017-04-01

    Ablative fractional laser (AFXL) is an emerging method that enhances topical drug delivery. Penetrating the skin in microscopic, vertical channels, termed microscopic treatment zones (MTZs), the fractional technique circumvents the skin barrier and allows increased uptake of topically applied drugs. This study aims to elucidate the impact of vehicle type on the filling of MTZs from application of liquid, gel, and cream vehicles. Ex vivo pig skin was exposed to 10,600 nm fractional CO2 laser at 5% density, 120 μm beam diameter, and fluences of 40 and 80 mJ/microbeam (mJ/mb). Six repetitions were performed for each of six interventions (2 fluences and 3 vehicle types, n = 36). MTZ dimensions and filling by vehicle type were evaluated by optical coherence tomography, using blue tissue dye as a contrast-enhancing agent. Outcome measure was degree of MTZ filling assessed as percentages of empty, partially filled, and completely filled MTZs (108-127 MTZs/intervention analyzed) and evaluated statistically using Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn's tests. MTZs reached mid-dermal levels of 225 μm (40 mJ/mb) and 375 μm (80 mJ/mb) penetration depths (p < 0.0001). Filling of MTZs depended on type of applied vehicle. At 80 mJ/mb, liquid (67% completely filled, p < 0.01) and gel (60%, p < 0.05) formulations filled MTZs significantly better than cream formulation (31%). At 40 mJ/mb, liquid and gel formulations filled 90% (p < 0.05) and 77% (p > 0.05) of MTZs completely versus 55% for cream formulation. Thus, filling was overall greater for more superficial MTZs. In conclusion, vehicle type affects filling of MTZs, which may be of importance for AFXL-assisted drug delivery.

  7. Effect of filling fraction on the performance of sponge-based moving bed biofilm reactor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinbo; Chen, Xun; Zhang, Chunqing; Wen, Haitao; Guo, Wenshan; Ngo, Huu Hao

    2016-11-01

    Cubic-shaped polyurethane sponges (15×15×15mm) in the form of biofilm carriers were used in a moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) for treating synthetic domestic wastewater. Results indicated there was no significant difference in total organic carbon (TOC) and ammonia (NH4(+)-N) removal at different filling fractions. Three reactors exhibited high removal efficiencies of over 93% TOC and 95% NH4(+)-N on average at an HRT of 12h and aeration flow of 0.09m(3)/h. However, total nitrogen (TN) removal and simultaneous nitrification and denitrification (SND) increased with increasing the filling fraction. TN removal averaged at 77.2, 85.5% and 86.7% in 10%, 20% and 30% filling fraction reactor, respectively. Correspondingly, SND were 85.5±8.7%, 91.3±9.4% and 93.3±10.2%. Moreover, it was observed that sponge carriers in the 20% filling fraction reactor achieved the maximum biomass amount per gram sponge, followed by the 10% and 30% filling fraction reactors.

  8. Restoration of middle-ear input in fluid-filled middle ears by controlled introduction of air or a novel air-filled implant.

    PubMed

    Ravicz, Michael E; Chien, Wade W; Rosowski, John J

    2015-10-01

    The effect of small amounts of air on sound-induced umbo velocity in an otherwise saline-filled middle ear (ME) was investigated to examine the efficacy of a novel balloon-like air-filled ME implant suitable for patients with chronically non-aerated MEs. In this study, air bubbles or air-filled implants were introduced into saline-filled human cadaveric MEs. Umbo velocity, a convenient measure of ME response, served as an indicator of hearing sensitivity. Filling the ME with saline reduced umbo velocity by 25-30 dB at low frequencies and more at high frequencies, consistent with earlier work (Ravicz et al., Hear. Res. 195: 103-130 (2004)). Small amounts of air (∼30 μl) in the otherwise saline-filled ME increased umbo velocity substantially, to levels only 10-15 dB lower than in the dry ME, in a frequency- and location-dependent manner: air in contact with the tympanic membrane (TM) increased umbo velocity at all frequencies, while air located away from the TM increased umbo velocity only below about 500 Hz. The air-filled implant also affected umbo velocity in a manner similar to an air bubble of equivalent compliance. Inserting additional implants into the ME had the same effect as increasing air volume. These results suggest these middle-ear implants would significantly reduce conductive hearing loss in patients with chronically fluid-filled MEs.

  9. Transient behavior of granular materials with symmetric conditions for tumbler shapes and fill fractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohlman, Nicholas; Si, Yun

    2014-11-01

    The typical granular motion in circular tumblers is considered steady-state since there are no features to disrupt the top surface layer dimension. In polygon tumblers, however, the flowing layer is perpetually changing length, which creates unsteady conditions with corresponding change in the flow behavior. Prior work showed the minimization of free surface energy is independent of tumbler dimension, particle size, and rotation rate. This subsequent research reports on experiments where dimensional symmetry of the free surface in triangular and square tumblers with varying fill fractions do not necessarily produce the symmetric flow behaviors. Results of the quasi-2D tumbler experiment show that other dimensions aligned with gravity and the instantaneous free surface influence the phase when extrema for angle of repose and other flow features occur. The conclusion is that 50% fill fraction may produce geometric symmetry of dimensions, but the symmetry point of flow likely occurs at a lower fill fraction.

  10. Crude protein fractions in common vetch (Vicia sativa L.) fresh forage during pod filling.

    PubMed

    Alzueta, C; Caballero, R; Rebolé, A; Treviño, J; Gil, A

    2001-09-01

    Crude protein (CP) of forages can be separated into fractions of differentiated abilities to provide available amino acids in the lower gut of ruminants. This knowledge is critical to develop feeding systems and to predict animal responses. We have measured during two growing seasons (1996 to 1997 and 1997 to 1998) the CP fractions of common vetch fresh forage with the objective being to assess the influence of maturity on concentration of CP fractions (as a percentage of total CP) and fraction yields. Fraction B2, which represents true protein of intermediate ruminal degradation rate, was the largest single fraction in common vetch forage (about 40% of CP across seasons and maturity stages). Soluble fractions (A plus B1) were less than 50% of total CP while the unavailable fraction C ranged from 4 to 8% of total CP. As a result, the remaining fraction B3 (true protein of very low degradation rate) only represented 2 to 9% of total CP. Concentration and yield of fraction B3 increased (P < 0.05) from flowering to pod-filling. Results showed that undegraded dietary protein represented a small proportion of total CP in common vetch forage. Moving the harvesting stage from flowering to the pod filling phase allowed for greater yield of undegraded dietary protein.

  11. Quantum Hall effect in a quantum point contact at Landau filling fraction ν=52

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Jeffrey; Radu, Iuliana; Zumbühl, Dominik; Levenson-Falk, Eli; Kastner, Marc; Marcus, Charles; Pfeiffer, Loren; West, Ken

    2007-03-01

    We study the transport properties of quantum point contacts (QPC) fabricated on a GaAs/AlGaAs two dimensional electron gas that exhibits excellent bulk fractional quantum Hall effect, including a strong plateau in the Hall resistance at Landau level filling fraction ν= 52. We find that the ν=52 plateau is identifiable in point contacts with lithographic separations as small as 0.8 microns, but is not present in a 0.5 micron QPC. We study the temperature and dc-current-bias dependence of the ν=52 plateau---as well as neighboring fractional and integer plateaus---in the QPC. We also discuss our method to study the QPC at one filling fraction while the bulk remains at a higher filling fraction. Research supported in part by Microsoft Corporation, Project Q, and HCRP at Harvard University, and ARO (W911NF-05-1-0062), the NSEC program of the NSF (PHY-0117795) and NSF (DMR-0353209) at MIT.

  12. Fractional Distillation of Air and Other Demonstrations with Condensed Gases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver-Hoyo, Maria; Switzer, William L., III; Eierman, Robert

    2005-01-01

    The learning objectives of the fractional distillation of air and other demonstrations includes observing N2, O2, CO2 and H2O in air, studying the fractional separation of components based on boiling point differences and so on. The materials, reagent and equipment preparation, experimental procedures, hazards of the demonstration are also…

  13. Mode-based microparticle conveyor belt in air-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Oliver A; Euser, Tijmen G; Russell, Philip St J

    2013-12-02

    We show how microparticles can be moved over long distances and precisely positioned in a low-loss air-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber using a coherent superposition of two co-propagating spatial modes, balanced by a backward-propagating fundamental mode. This creates a series of trapping positions spaced by half the beat-length between the forward-propagating modes (typically a fraction of a millimeter). The system allows a trapped microparticle to be moved along the fiber by continuously tuning the relative phase between the two forward-propagating modes. This mode-based optical conveyor belt combines long-range transport of microparticles with a positional accuracy of 1 µm. The technique also has potential uses in waveguide-based optofluidic systems.

  14. [Atrial filling fraction predicts left ventricular systolic function after myocardial infarction: pre-discharge echocardiographic evaluation].

    PubMed

    Galderisi, M; Fakher, A; Petrocelli, A; Alfieri, A; Garofalo, M; de Divitiis, O

    1995-10-01

    Aim of the study was to examine the relation between Doppler-derived indices of left ventricular diastolic and systolic function early after myocardial infarction. Fifty-three patients (31 males, 22 females) recovering from acute myocardial infarction underwent predischarge Doppler echocardiographic examination. Patients with age > 70 years, previous myocardial infarction, more than mild mitral and aortic regurgitation, mitral and aortic stenosis were excluded. Twenty-two healthy subjects (13 males; 9 females) free of coronary risk factors were selected as the control group. Both end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes and ejection fraction were measured by two-dimensional echocardiography. Pulsed Doppler was used to evaluate mitral inflow and left ventricular outflow velocity patterns. The following indices were measured: peak velocity of early (E) and late (A) flows, ratio of E/A peak velocities, ratio of early to late time velocity integrals, atrial filling fraction (time velocity integral A / time velocity integral of flow during total diastole) and deceleration time of E wave for mitral inflow; peak and time-velocity integral for left ventricular outflow. Stroke volume and cardiac output were obtained by pulsed Doppler using the left ventricular outflow method. The two groups were comparable for age, with blood pressure (p < 0.05) and heart rate (p < 0.01) reduced in myocardial infarction patients. Both end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes were significantly higher (both p < 0.0001) and ejection fraction (p < 0.0001) lower after myocardial infarction. Also stroke volume and cardiac output (both p < 0.0001) were reduced in myocardial infarction patients. No significant difference in Doppler indices of diastolic function was observed between the two groups, except for shortened deceleration time (p < 0.0001) in myocardial infarction patients. Multilinear regression analyses were performed separately into the two groups to identify determinants of left

  15. Fractional quantum Hall effect at Landau level filling ν = 4/11

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, W.; Baldwin, K. W.; West, K. W.; Pfeiffer, L. N.; Tsui, D. C.

    2015-01-09

    In this study, we report low temperature electronic transport results on the fractional quantum Hall effect of composite fermions at Landau level filling ν = 4/11 in a very high mobility and low density sample. Measurements were carried out at temperatures down to 15mK, where an activated magnetoresistance Rxx and a quantized Hall resistance Rxy, within 1% of the expected value of h/(4/11)e2, were observed. The temperature dependence of the Rxx minimum at 4/11 yields an activation energy gap of ~ 7 mK. Developing Hall plateaus were also observed at the neighboring states at ν = 3/8 and 5/13.

  16. Fractional quantum Hall effect at Landau level filling ν = 4/11

    DOE PAGES

    Pan, W.; Baldwin, K. W.; West, K. W.; ...

    2015-01-09

    In this study, we report low temperature electronic transport results on the fractional quantum Hall effect of composite fermions at Landau level filling ν = 4/11 in a very high mobility and low density sample. Measurements were carried out at temperatures down to 15mK, where an activated magnetoresistance Rxx and a quantized Hall resistance Rxy, within 1% of the expected value of h/(4/11)e2, were observed. The temperature dependence of the Rxx minimum at 4/11 yields an activation energy gap of ~ 7 mK. Developing Hall plateaus were also observed at the neighboring states at ν = 3/8 and 5/13.

  17. Mathematical model of an air-filled alpha stirling refrigerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFarlane, Patrick; Semperlotti, Fabio; Sen, Mihir

    2013-10-01

    This work develops a mathematical model for an alpha Stirling refrigerator with air as the working fluid and will be useful in optimizing the mechanical design of these machines. Two pistons cyclically compress and expand air while moving sinusoidally in separate chambers connected by a regenerator, thus creating a temperature difference across the system. A complete non-linear mathematical model of the machine, including air thermodynamics, and heat transfer from the walls, as well as heat transfer and fluid resistance in the regenerator, is developed. Non-dimensional groups are derived, and the mathematical model is numerically solved. The heat transfer and work are found for both chambers, and the coefficient of performance of each chamber is calculated. Important design parameters are varied and their effect on refrigerator performance determined. This sensitivity analysis, which shows what the significant parameters are, is a useful tool for the design of practical Stirling refrigeration systems.

  18. Size Control and Fractionation of Ionic Liquid Filled Polymersomes with Glassy and Rubbery Bilayer Membranes.

    PubMed

    So, Soonyong; Lodge, Timothy P

    2016-05-17

    We demonstrate control over the size of ionic liquid (IL) filled polymeric vesicles (polymersomes) by three distinct methods: mechanical extrusion, cosolvent-based processing in an IL, and fractionation of polymersomes in a biphasic system of IL and water. For the representative ionic liquid (1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl) imide ([EMIM][TFSI])), the size and dispersity of polymersomes formed from 1,2-polybutadiene-b-poly(ethylene oxide) (PB-PEO) and polystyrene-b-poly(ethylene oxide) (PS-PEO) diblock copolymers were shown to be sensitive to assembly conditions. During mechanical extrusion through a polycarbonate membrane, the relatively larger polymersomes were broken up and reorganized into vesicles with mean size comparable to the membrane pore (100 nm radius); the distribution width also decreased significantly after only a few passes. Other routes were studied using the solvent-switch or cosolvent (CS) method, whereby the initial content of the cosolvent and the PEO block length of PS-PEO were systemically changed. The nonvolatility of the ionic liquid directly led to the desired concentration of polymersomes in the ionic liquid using a single step, without the dialysis conventionally used in aqueous systems, and the mean vesicle size depended on the amount of cosolvent employed. Finally, selective phase transfer of PS-PEO polymersomes based on size was used to extract larger polymersomes from the IL to the aqueous phase via interfacial tension controlled phase transfer. The interfacial tension between the PS membrane and the aqueous phase was varied with the concentration of sodium chloride (NaCl) in the aqueous phase; then the larger polymersomes were selectively separated to the aqueous phase due to differences in shielding of the hydrophobic core (PS) coverage by the hydrophilic corona brush (PEO). This novel fractionation is a simple separation process without any special apparatus and can help to prepare monodisperse polymersomes

  19. Fractional quantum Hall bilayers at half filling: Tunneling-driven non-Abelian phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, W.; Liu, Zhao; Haldane, F. D. M.; Sheng, D. N.

    2016-12-01

    Multicomponent quantum Hall systems with internal degrees of freedom provide a fertile ground for the emergence of exotic quantum liquids. Here, we investigate the possibility of non-Abelian topological order in the half-filled fractional quantum Hall (FQH) bilayer system driven by the tunneling effect between two layers. By means of the state-of-the-art density-matrix renormalization group, we unveil "fingerprint" evidence of the non-Abelian Moore-Read Pfaffian state emerging in the intermediate-tunneling regime, including the ground-state degeneracy on the torus geometry and the topological entanglement spectroscopy (entanglement spectrum and topological entanglement entropy) on the spherical geometry, respectively. Remarkably, the phase transition from the previously identified Abelian (331) Halperin state to the non-Abelian Moore-Read Pfaffian state is determined to be continuous, which is signaled by the continuous evolution of the universal part of the entanglement spectrum, and discontinuities in the excitation gap and the derivative of the ground-state energy. Our results not only provide a "proof-of-principle" demonstration of realizing a non-Abelian state through coupling different degrees of freedom, but also open up a possibility in FQH bilayer systems for detecting different chiral p -wave pairing states.

  20. Edge state tunneling in a point contact at filling fraction ν=5/2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radu, Iuliana P.; Miller, J. B.; Dillard, C. R.; Marcus, C. M.; Kastner, M. A.; Pfeiffer, L. N.; West, K. W.

    2008-03-01

    We investigate low temperature transport properties of quantum point contacts (QPCs) fabricated in a GaAs/AlGaAs 2-dimensional electron gas (2-DEG) with mobility 2000 m^2/Vs in a perpendicular magnetic field. The 2-DEG exhibits fractional quantum Hall effect, including a well-quantized plateau at ν=5/2. We study the temperature and DC current bias dependence of the transport through the QPC at ν=5/2 while preserving the same filling number in both the QPC and the bulk of the sample. We compare our results to theoretical predictions for quasi-particle tunneling in the weak coupling regime, and extract the quasi-particle charge and the strength of the Coulomb interaction, as reflected by the Luttinger liquid parameter g. This work was partially supported by ARO (W911NF-05-1-0062), by the NSEC program of NSF (PHY-0117795), by NSF (DMR-0353209) at MIT and by Project Q of Microsoft Corporation at Harvard University.

  1. Response of air-filled ion chambers to high-intensity radiation pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, M.; Brown, D.

    1993-06-01

    Ion chambers are one of the most popular types of detectors used for beam loss-monitor systems. To provide a foundation for the development of future loss-monitor systems, and to fully characterize the ion chambers in use at LAMPF, we have studied the response of air-filled cylindrical ion chambers to high-intensity, short-duration radiation pulses. The most intense pulses were about 180 rad in 250 ns (the equivalent steady-state dose rate was about 700 Mrad/h). We filled our chambers with nitrogen gas at 760 Torr and air at 600 Torr. The ion chambers were driven into extreme nonlinear response. We hope these data will be used to design loss-monitor systems based on air-filled ion chambers, thus eliminating the need for gas-flow systems and/or airtight ion chambers.

  2. Response of air-filled ion chambers to high-intensity radiation pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, M.; Brown, D.

    1993-01-01

    Ion chambers are one of the most popular types of detectors used for beam loss-monitor systems. To provide a foundation for the development of future loss-monitor systems, and to fully characterize the ion chambers in use at LAMPF, we have studied the response of air-filled cylindrical ion chambers to high-intensity, short-duration radiation pulses. The most intense pulses were about 180 rad in 250 ns (the equivalent steady-state dose rate was about 700 Mrad/h). We filled our chambers with nitrogen gas at 760 Torr and air at 600 Torr. The ion chambers were driven into extreme nonlinear response. We hope these data will be used to design loss-monitor systems based on air-filled ion chambers, thus eliminating the need for gas-flow systems and/or airtight ion chambers.

  3. Use of palm mid-fraction in dark chocolate as base filling centre at different storage temperatures.

    PubMed

    Jinap, S; Ali, A A; Man, Y B; Suria, A M

    2000-11-01

    Dark chocolates filled with palm mid-fraction (PMF) were stored at different temperatures to evaluate the physical and chemical changes. Storage at low temperature (18 degrees C) reduces the PMF migration to negligible extent. Higher storage temperatures (30 and 35 degrees C) increased the PMF migration from the filling centre into the chocolate coating. As a consequence of fat migration, fatty acid composition, triglyceride composition, hardness, solid fat content, melting point and polymorphic structure changed, leading to bloom formation, which started by fat migration and was influenced by recrystallization tendency within the chocolate coating.

  4. Inflation pressure effect on performance of air-filled wheelchair cushions.

    PubMed

    Krouskop, T A; Williams, R; Noble, P; Brown, J

    1986-02-01

    Air-filled wheelchair cushions are frequently used in the prevention of pressure sores. Their effectiveness in reducing interface pressures and in redistributing body weight (BW) appears dependent on their internal inflation pressure. This pilot study examines and defines this relationship. Interface pressures were measured with the TIPE (Texas Interface Pressure Evaluator) system for 14 subjects while sitting on each of three commercially available air-filled wheelchair cushions. This relationship between interface pressure and internal pressure was then determined for each of the three body-build categories. In each category the interface pressure displayed a higher degree of sensitivity to underinflation than to overinflation. A high correlation found between BW and internal air pressure (IAP), may be useful in the design of a customized pressure indicator system. The study documents the influence of IAP on seating pressure and supports the need for further research in the development of an indicator system that alerts users to under- or overinflation of the cushion.

  5. Hybrid plasmonic microcavity with an air-filled gap for sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Meng; Liu, Binbin; Wu, Genzhu; Chen, Daru

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, a novel hybrid plasmonic microcavity with air-filled regions in the low-permittivity dielectric gap is proposed for sensing applications. Compared with the conventional structure with homogeneous gap, the introduced air-filled regions could improve the key modal characteristics of the hybrid mode. Simulation results reveal that this kind of hybrid microcavity maintains low loss with high quality factor ∼3062, and high field confinement with small mode volume 0.891 μm3. Moreover, in the sensing applications, this hybrid microcavity features simultaneously large refractive index sensitivity of 100 nm/RIU (refractive index unit) and relatively high quality factor of 3062. Hence, it shows that the hybrid plasmonic microcavity has potential applications in ultra-compact refractive index sensor.

  6. Fractional-filling loophole insulator domains for ultracold bosons in optical superlattices

    SciTech Connect

    Buonsante, P.; Penna, V.; Vezzani, A.

    2004-12-01

    The zero-temperature phase diagram of a Bose-Einstein condensate confined in realistic one-dimensional l-periodic optical superlattices is investigated. The system of interacting bosons is modeled in terms of a Bose-Hubbard Hamiltonian whose site-dependent local potentials and hopping amplitudes reflect the periodicity of the lattice partition in l-site cells. Relying on the exact mapping between the hardcore limit of the boson Hamiltonian and the model of spinless noninteracting fermions, incompressible insulator domains are shown to exist for rational fillings that are predicted to be compressible in the atomic limit. The corresponding boundaries, qualitatively described in a multiple-site mean-field approach, are shown to exhibit an unusual loophole shape. A more quantitative description of the loophole domain boundaries at half filling for the special case l=2 is supplied in terms of analytic strong-coupling expansions and quantum Monte Carlo simulations.

  7. Superperiods in Interference of eÕ3 Laughlin Quasiparticles Encircling Filling 2/5 FractionalQuantum Hall Island

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, P.V.; Camino, F.; Goldman, V.J.

    2009-12-01

    We report experiments in a large, 2.5 {mu}m diameter Fabry-Perot quantum Hall interferometer with two tunneling constrictions. Interference fringes are observed as conductance oscillations as a function of applied magnetic field (the Aharonov-Bohm flux through the electron island) or a global backgate voltage (electronic charge in the island). Depletion is such that in the fractional quantum Hall regime, filling 1/3 current-carrying chiral edge channels pass through constrictions when the island filling is 2/5. The interferometer device is calibrated with fermionic electrons in the integer quantum Hall regime. In the fractional regime, we observe magnetic flux and charge periods 5h/e and 2e, respectively, corresponding to creation of ten e/5 Laughlin quasiparticles in the island. These results agree with our prior report of the superperiods in a much smaller interferometer device. The observed experimental periods are interpreted as imposed by anyonic statistical interaction of fractionally charged quasiparticles.

  8. A micro-gap, air-filled ionisation chamber as a detector for criticality accident dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Murawski, Ł; Zielczyński, M; Golnik, N; Gryziński, M A

    2014-10-01

    A micro-gap air-filled ionisation chamber was designed for criticality dosimetry. The special feature of the chamber is its very small gap between electrodes of only 0.3 mm. This prevents ion recombination at high dose rates and minimises the influence of gas on secondary particles spectrum. The electrodes are made of polypropylene because of higher content of hydrogen in this material, when compared with soft tissue. The difference between neutron and gamma sensitivity in such chamber becomes practically negligible. The chamber's envelope contains two specially connected capacitors, one for polarising the electrodes and the other for collecting the ionisation charge.

  9. Measurements of two types of dilatational waves in an air-filled unconsolidated sand

    SciTech Connect

    Hickey, C.J.; Sabatier, J.M.

    1997-07-01

    This study consists of laboratory measurements of dilatational waves propagating through an air-filled unconsolidated sand. One excitation technique consists of a loudspeaker suspended in the air above the packing of sand. A second excitation technique uses a mechanical shaker in contact with the sand. The transmitted signals are received using microphones and geophones located at various depths within the sand. An interpretation based on measured phase speeds indicates that the transmitted energy from the suspended loudspeaker source is partitioned primarily but not exclusively into the type-II dilatational wave. This wave attenuates rapidly and is only detected at depths of less than about 15 cm for this particular sample. At the deeper depths the detected signal is associated with the type-I dilatational wave. The mechanical shaker produces only a type-I dilatational wave. Both the geophone and microphone sensors can detect both types of dilatational waves. {copyright} {ital 1997 Acoustical Society of America.}

  10. Properties of pinto beans air-classified high starch fraction and its extrudates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pinto beans were milled and air classified to obtain a high starch fraction, and then extruded. Properties of non-extruded high starch fraction (NE-HSF) and extruded high starch fraction (E-HSF) were compared with whole pinto flour (WPF). Composition (d.b.) of WPF was 4% ash, 1.6% extractable lipid ...

  11. Concentration of dimethylnitrosamine in the air of smoke-filled rooms

    SciTech Connect

    Stehlik, G.; Richter, O.; Altmann, H.

    1982-12-01

    In order to evaluate the contribution of volatile nitrosamines from tobacco smoke to indoor air pollution, N-nitroso-dimethylamine (NDMA) and N-nitroso-diethylamine (NDEA) were measured in indoor air under artificial and natural conditions. In controlled experiments under extreme conditions, we found that tobacco smoke-related NDMA levels above 0.07 ng/liter were associated with a highly irritating atmosphere which was scarcely tolerable to those present. In smoke-filled rooms under natural conditions NDMA levels ranged from 0.02 to 0.05 ng/liter except a minimum value of less than 0.01 ng/liter in a restaurant and a maximum of 0.07 ng/liter in a dancing bar. These NDMA levels are thus below comparable values reported by others. The NDMA/NDEA ratios found in air samples taken from some rooms under conditions of everyday life are quite different from those found in sidestream smoke of cigarettes. Irritation was not reported under natural conditions. From the results it is concluded that NDMA levels, measured under real life conditions, are usually not caused by tobacco smoke alone. Evidence for other sources of volatile nitrosamines is discussed.

  12. Interaction of finite-amplitude sound with air-filled porous materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, D. A.

    1985-01-01

    The propagation of high intensity sound waves through an air-filled porus material was studied. The material is assumed: (1) to be rigid, incompressible, and homogeneous, and (2) to be adequately described by two properties: resistivity r and porosity. The resulting wave equation is still nonlinear, however, because of the u sgn(u) term in the resistivity. The equation is solved in the frequency domain as an infinite set of coupled inhomogeneous Helmholtz equations, one for each harmonic. An approximate but analytical solution leads to predictions of excess attenuation, saturation, and phase speed reduction for the fundamental component. A more general numerical solution is used to calculate the propagation curves for the higher harmonics. The u sgn(u) nonlinearity produces a cubic distortion pattern; when the input signal is a pure tone, only odd harmonic distortion products are generated.

  13. Curvature effects on axisymmetric instability of conduction regime in a tall air-filled annulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pécheux, J.; Le Quéré, P.; Abcha, F.

    1994-10-01

    This paper numerically studies curvature effects on the instability of the conduction regime of natural convection in a tall air-filled differentially heated annulus of vertical aspect ratio 16 by integrating the two-dimensional axisymmetric Navier-Stokes equations in the Boussinesq approximation. The numerical algorithm combines a pseudospectral Chebyshev space discretization with a second-order time-stepping scheme. It is shown that, in contrast with linear stability analysis of the conduction solution, the time-periodic cross-roll instability does not take place in finite aspect ratio cavities for small values of the radius ratio. For all values of the radius ratio transition to unsteadiness occurs through supercritical Hopf bifurcations. Extensive computations show very complex behaviors of the unsteady solutions depending on the radius ratio. The nature of the reverse transition to steady state that occurs for increasing value of the Rayleigh number is also found to depend strongly on the value of the radius ratio.

  14. Flow patterns of natural convection in an air-filled vertical cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakitani, Shunichi

    1998-08-01

    Flow patterns of two-dimensional natural convection in a vertical air-filled tall cavity with differentially heated sidewalls are investigated. Numerical simulations based on a finite difference method are carried out for a wide range of Rayleigh numbers and aspect ratios from the onset of the steady multicellular flow, through the reverse transition to the unicellular pattern, to the unsteady multicellular flow. For aspect ratios (height/width) from 10 to 24, the various cellular structures characterized by the number of secondary cells are clarified from the simulations by means of gradually increasing Rayleigh number to 106. Unsteady multicellular solutions are found in some region of Rayleigh numbers less than those at which the reverse transition has occurred.

  15. High-resolution ion pulse ionization chamber with air filling for the 222Rn decays detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrilyuk, Yu. M.; Gangapshev, A. M.; Gezhaev, A. M.; Etezov, R. A.; Kazalov, V. V.; Kuzminov, V. V.; Panasenko, S. I.; Ratkevich, S. S.; Tekueva, D. A.; Yakimenko, S. P.

    2015-11-01

    The construction and characteristics of the cylindrical ion pulse ionization chamber (CIPIC) with a working volume of 3.2 L are described. The chamber is intended to register α-particles from the 222Rn and its daughter's decays in the filled air sample. The detector is less sensitive to electromagnetic pick-ups and mechanical noises. The digital pulse processing method is proposed to improve the energy resolution of the ion pulse ionization chamber. An energy resolution of 1.6% has been achieved for the 5.49 MeV α-line. The dependence of the energy resolution on high voltage and working media pressure has been investigated and the results are presented.

  16. Imaging air volume fraction in sea ice using non-destructive X-ray tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crabeck, Odile; Galley, Ryan; Delille, Bruno; Else, Brent; Geilfus, Nicolas-Xavier; Lemes, Marcos; Des Roches, Mathieu; Francus, Pierre; Tison, Jean-Louis; Rysgaard, Søren

    2016-05-01

    Although the presence of a gas phase in sea ice creates the potential for gas exchange with the atmosphere, the distribution of gas bubbles and transport of gases within the sea ice are still poorly understood. Currently no straightforward technique exists to measure the vertical distribution of air volume fraction in sea ice. Here, we present a new fast and non-destructive X-ray computed tomography technique to quantify the air volume fraction and produce separate images of air volume inclusions in sea ice. The technique was performed on relatively thin (4-22 cm) sea ice collected from an experimental ice tank. While most of the internal layers showed air volume fractions < 2 %, the ice-air interface (top 2 cm) systematically showed values up to 5 %. We suggest that the air volume fraction is a function of both the bulk ice gas saturation factor and the brine volume fraction. We differentiate micro bubbles (Ø < 1 mm), large bubbles (1 mm < Ø < 5 mm) and macro bubbles (Ø > 5 mm). While micro bubbles were the most abundant type of gas bubbles, most of the air porosity observed resulted from the presence of large and macro bubbles. The ice texture (granular and columnar) as well as the permeability state of ice are important factors controlling the air volume fraction. The technique developed is suited for studies related to gas transport and bubble migration.

  17. Bubble absorption by an air-filled helically-supported capillary channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beheshtipour, Negar; Thiessen, David

    2016-11-01

    Gas-liquid phase separation under microgravity conditions where buoyancy is not active represents a challenge for two-phase liquid-continuous space systems. Similar challenges are present in micro-scale electrochemical systems on Earth that generate gas bubbles in geometries where surface tension prevails over gravity. A possible ground-based application would be the removal of carbon dioxide bubbles from large aspect ratio channels in a direct-methanol fuel cell that could otherwise occlude the channel. In this study we use a 3-mm diameter stretched stainless-steel spring coated with a superhydrophobic layer to create a helically-supported capillary channel. Such a channel that is submerged in water and filled with air while vented to the atmosphere was found to absorb a stream of 2.5-mm diameter air bubbles at a rate of at least 36 bubbles/s. An optical detector and high-speed imaging system have been used to study bubble absorption dynamics. A significant finding is that the initial attachment of the bubble to the channel that involves the rupture of a thin film of water happens in less than 1 ms. The rapid rupture of the water film separating the bubble from the channel might be attributed to the roughness of the hydrophobic coating.

  18. Imaging air volume fraction in sea ice using non-destructive X-ray tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crabeck, O.; Galley, R. J.; Delille, B.; Else, B. G. T.; Geilfus, N.-X.; Lemes, M.; Des Roches, M.; Francus, P.; Tison, J.-L.; Rysgaard, S.

    2015-09-01

    Although the presence of a gas phase in sea ice creates the potential for gas exchange with the atmosphere, the distribution of gas bubbles and transport of gases within the sea ice are still poorly understood. Currently no straightforward technique exists to measure the vertical distribution of air volume fraction in sea ice. Here, we present a new fast and non-destructive X-ray computed tomography technique to quantify the air volume fraction and produce separate 3-D images of air-volume inclusions in sea ice. The technique was performed on relatively thin (4-22 cm) sea ice collected from an experimental ice tank. While most of the internal layers showed air-volume fractions < 2 %, the ice-air interface (top 2 cm) systematically showed values up to 5 %. We suggest that the air volume fraction is a function of both the bulk ice gas saturation factor and the size of the brine channel. We differentiate micro bubbles (∅ < 1 mm), large bubbles (1 < ∅ < 5 mm) and macro bubbles (∅ > 5 mm). While micro bubbles were the most abundant type of air inclusions, most of the air porosity observed resulted from the presence of large and macro bubbles. The ice microstructure (granular and columnar) as well as the permeability state of ice are important factors controlling the air volume fraction. The technique developed is suited for studies related to gas transport and bubble migration and can help considerably improving parameterization of these processes in sea ice biogeochemical models.

  19. Investigation of hybrid membrane-sorption technologies for air fractionating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laguntsov, N. I.; Kurchatov, I. M.; Korolev, M. V.; Tishin, A. V.

    2016-09-01

    Main aim of the work is to develop and to research single-circuit hybrid membrane- sorption system for enriching air with oxygen. The developed system allows to produce air, enriched with air up to 50%, purified from dust of any size, including nanoscale dust received in consequence of sorbent abrasion. In the course of the work the research of existing systems for air enrichment with oxygen, and the possibility of combining two methods of gas separation: membrane, and sorption, was conducted. The developed system differs from its analogues in that it has improved energy efficiency compared to methods of the membrane and sorption separation. Also work presents method of cyclogram determining of the hybrid system. In this methodic an algorithm for calculating of the cycles number, and determining of the stages duration in order to obtain the desired performance was presented.

  20. Autonomous generation of a thermoacoustic solitary wave in an air-filled tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Dai; Sugimoto, Nobumasa

    2016-10-01

    Experiments are performed to demonstrate the autonomous generation of an acoustic solitary wave in an air-filled, looped tube with an array of Helmholtz resonators. The solitary wave is generated spontaneously due to thermoacoustic instability by a pair of stacks installed in the tube and subject to a temperature gradient axially. No external drivers are used to create initial disturbances. Once the solitary wave is generated, it keeps on propagating to circulate along the loop endlessly. The stacks, which are made of ceramics and of many pores of square cross section, are placed in the tube diametrically on exactly the opposite side of the loop, and they are sandwiched by hot and cold (ambient) heat exchangers. When the temperature gradient along both stacks is appropriate, pulses of smooth profiles are generated and propagated in both directions of the tube. From good agreements of not only the pressure profile measured but also the propagation speed with the theory, the pulse is identified as the acoustic solitary wave, and it can be called thermoacoustic solitary wave or thermoacoustic soliton corresponding to the soliton solution of the K-dV equation in one limit.

  1. Detection of Air and Water-Filled Subsurface Defects in GFRP Composite Bridge Decks Using Infrared Thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halabe, Udaya B.; Roy, M.; Klinkhachorn, P.; GangaRao, Hota V. S.

    2006-03-01

    Any discontinuity within a structural component influences the transmission of thermal energy through its thickness, which leads to differences in surface temperatures just above the defective and defect-free areas. The variation in the surface temperatures are recorded using a digital infrared camera and the thermal images (thermograms) are analyzed to locate the presence of subsurface defects such as debonds and delaminations within the structure. While past studies focused on detection of air-filled subsurface defects (debonds and delaminations) in fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) composite bridge decks using infrared thermography, this paper includes the detection of fully and partially water-filled defects as well. Simulated water-filled defects were embedded within the flange-to-flange junction of adjacent GFRP bridge deck modules to create delaminations. The deck specimens were then tested before and after the application of a 3/8″ (9.5 mm) thick polymer concrete wearing surface. It was found that water-filled delaminations as small as 2″ × 2″ × 1/16″ (51 mm × 51 mm × 1.6 mm) could be detected in case of specimens without wearing surface, but this was not possible after application of the wearing surface. The heating source considered included heater and solar radiation. Use of cooling sources such as cold water and liquid carbon dioxide were also explored. These results helped establish the limits of detection for fully and partially water-filled delaminations using Infrared Thermograpy. Additional studies included the detection of debond between 2″ (51mm) thick asphalt overlay and the underlying composite deck and it was found that air-filled debonds as small as 4″ × 4″ × 1/16″ (102 mm × 102 mm × 1.6 mm) could be detected using heater as well as solar radiation as heat sources.

  2. Air-filled postcranial bones in theropod dinosaurs: physiological implications and the 'reptile'-bird transition.

    PubMed

    Benson, Roger B J; Butler, Richard J; Carrano, Matthew T; O'Connor, Patrick M

    2012-02-01

    Pneumatic (air-filled) postcranial bones are unique to birds among extant tetrapods. Unambiguous skeletal correlates of postcranial pneumaticity first appeared in the Late Triassic (approximately 210 million years ago), when they evolved independently in several groups of bird-line archosaurs (ornithodirans). These include the theropod dinosaurs (of which birds are extant representatives), the pterosaurs, and sauropodomorph dinosaurs. Postulated functions of skeletal pneumatisation include weight reduction in large-bodied or flying taxa, and density reduction resulting in energetic savings during foraging and locomotion. However, the influence of these hypotheses on the early evolution of pneumaticity has not been studied in detail previously. We review recent work on the significance of pneumaticity for understanding the biology of extinct ornithodirans, and present detailed new data on the proportion of the skeleton that was pneumatised in 131 non-avian theropods and Archaeopteryx. This includes all taxa known from significant postcranial remains. Pneumaticity of the cervical and anterior dorsal vertebrae occurred early in theropod evolution. This 'common pattern' was conserved on the line leading to birds, and is likely present in Archaeopteryx. Increases in skeletal pneumaticity occurred independently in as many as 12 lineages, highlighting a remarkably high number of parallel acquisitions of a bird-like feature among non-avian theropods. Using a quantitative comparative framework, we show that evolutionary increases in skeletal pneumaticity are significantly concentrated in lineages with large body size, suggesting that mass reduction in response to gravitational constraints at large body sizes influenced the early evolution of pneumaticity. However, the body size threshold for extensive pneumatisation is lower in theropod lineages more closely related to birds (maniraptorans). Thus, relaxation of the relationship between body size and pneumatisation preceded

  3. Quantification of VX vapor in ambient air by liquid chromatography isotope dilution tandem mass spectrometric analysis of glass bead filled sampling tubes.

    PubMed

    Evans, Ronald A; Smith, Wendy L; Nguyen, Nam-Phuong; Crouse, Kathy L; Crouse, Charles L; Norman, Steven D; Jakubowski, E Michael

    2011-02-15

    An analysis method has been developed for determining low parts-per-quadrillion by volume (ppqv) concentrations of nerve agent VX vapor actively sampled from ambient air. The method utilizes glass bead filled depot area air monitoring system (DAAMS) sampling tubes with isopropyl alcohol extraction and isotope dilution using liquid chromatography coupled with a triple-quadrupole mass spectrometer (LC/MS/MS) with positive ion electrospray ionization for quantitation. The dynamic range was from one-tenth of the worker population limit (WPL) to the short-term exposure limit (STEL) for a 24 L air sample taken over a 1 h period. The precision and accuracy of the method were evaluated using liquid-spiked tubes, and the collection characteristics of the DAAMS tubes were assessed by collecting trace level vapor generated in a 1000 L continuous flow chamber. The method described here has significant improvements over currently employed thermal desorption techniques that utilize a silver fluoride pad during sampling to convert VX to a higher volatility G-analogue for gas chromatographic analysis. The benefits of this method are the ability to directly analyze VX with improved selectivity and sensitivity, the injection of a fraction of the extract, quantitation using an isotopically labeled internal standard, and a short instrument cycle time.

  4. Urban air quality assessment using monitoring data of fractionized aerosol samples, chemometrics and meteorological conditions.

    PubMed

    Yotova, Galina I; Tsitouridou, Roxani; Tsakovski, Stefan L; Simeonov, Vasil D

    2016-01-01

    The present article deals with assessment of urban air by using monitoring data for 10 different aerosol fractions (0.015-16 μm) collected at a typical urban site in City of Thessaloniki, Greece. The data set was subject to multivariate statistical analysis (cluster analysis and principal components analysis) and, additionally, to HYSPLIT back trajectory modeling in order to assess in a better way the impact of the weather conditions on the pollution sources identified. A specific element of the study is the effort to clarify the role of outliers in the data set. The reason for the appearance of outliers is strongly related to the atmospheric condition on the particular sampling days leading to enhanced concentration of pollutants (secondary emissions, sea sprays, road and soil dust, combustion processes) especially for ultra fine and coarse particles. It is also shown that three major sources affect the urban air quality of the location studied-sea sprays, mineral dust and anthropogenic influences (agricultural activity, combustion processes, and industrial sources). The level of impact is related to certain extent to the aerosol fraction size. The assessment of the meteorological conditions leads to defining of four downwind patterns affecting the air quality (Pelagic, Western and Central Europe, Eastern and Northeastern Europe and Africa and Southern Europe). Thus, the present study offers a complete urban air assessment taking into account the weather conditions, pollution sources and aerosol fractioning.

  5. Gap reversal at filling factors 3+1/3 and 3+1/5: towards novel topological order in the fractional quantum Hall regime.

    PubMed

    Kleinbaum, Ethan; Kumar, Ashwani; Pfeiffer, L N; West, K W; Csáthy, G A

    2015-02-20

    In the region of the second Landau level several theories predict fractional quantum Hall states with novel topological order. We report the opening of an energy gap at the filling factor ν=3+1/3, firmly establishing the ground state as a fractional quantum Hall state. This and other odd-denominator states unexpectedly break particle-hole symmetry. Specifically, we find that the relative magnitudes of the energy gaps of the ν=3+1/3 and 3+1/5 states from the upper spin branch are reversed when compared to the ν=2+1/3 and 2+1/5 counterpart states in the lower spin branch. Our findings raise the possibility that at least one of the former states is of an unusual topological order.

  6. SU-E-T-297: Dosimetric Assessment of An Air-Filled Balloon Applicator in HDR Vaginal Cuff Brachytherapy Using the Monte Carlo Method

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, H; Lee, Y; Pokhrel, D; Badkul, R

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: As an alternative to cylindrical applicators, air inflated balloon applicators have been introduced into HDR vaginal cuff brachytherapy treatment to achieve sufficient dose to vagina mucosa as well as to spare rectum and bladder. In general, TG43 formulae based treatment planning systems do not take into account tissue inhomogeneity, and air in the balloon applicator can cause higher delivered dose to mucosa than treatment plan reported. We investigated dosimetric effect of air in balloon applicator using the Monte Carlo method. Methods: The thirteen-catheter Capri applicator with a Nucletron Ir-192 seed was modeled for various balloon diameters (2cm to 3.5cm) using the MCNP Monte Carlo code. Ir-192 seed was placed in both central and peripheral catheters to replicate real patient situations. Existence of charged particle equilibrium (CPE) with air balloon was evaluated by comparing kerma and dose at various distances (1mm to 70mm) from surface of air-filled applicator. Also mucosa dose by an air-filled applicator was compared with by a water-filled applicator to evaluate dosimetry accuracy of planning system without tissue inhomogeneity correction. Results: Beyond 1mm from air/tissue interface, the difference between kerma and dose was within 2%. CPE (or transient CPE) condition was deemed existent, and in this region no electron transport was necessary in Monte Carlo simulations. At 1mm or less, the deviation of dose from kerma became more apparent. Increase of dose to mucosa depended on diameter of air balloon. The increment of dose to mucosa was 2.5% and 4.3% on average for 2cm and 3.5cm applicators, respectively. Conclusion: After introduction of air balloon applicator, CPE fails only at the proximity of air/tissue interface. Although dose to mucosa is increased, there is no significant dosimetric difference (<5%) between air and water filled applicators. Tissue inhomogeneity correction is not necessary for air-filled applicators.

  7. Intraoperative measurement of intraocular pressure in vitrectomized aphakic air-filled eyes using the Tono-Pen XL.

    PubMed

    Badrinath, S S; Vasudevan, R; Murugesan, R; Basti, S; Nicholson, A D; Singh, P; Gopal, L; Sharma, T; Rao, S B; Abraham, C

    1993-01-01

    The Tono-Pen XL (Bio-Rad, Santa Ana, CA) was compared with manometer readings for intraoperative measurement of intraocular pressure (IOP) in 40 eyes of 40 consecutive patients after vitrectomy, lensectomy, and fluid-air exchange. Tono-Pen readings corresponding to manometer readings of 10, 20, 30, 40, and 50 mmHg were obtained in a masked fashion with a randomized sequence of manometer readings. A correlation was obtained between the manometer and Tono-Pen readings (r = 0.96 in emmetropic eyes and r = 0.93 in myopic eyes). The regression curve that represents the calibration curve of Tono-Pen in terms of the manometer readings for air-filled vitrectomized eyes was obtained. Any Tono-Pen reading can be easily translated into the corresponding manometer reading by referring to the curve. The Tono-Pen can therefore be effectively used to accurately determine intraoperative IOP in eyes undergoing vitrectomy, lensectomy, and fluid-air exchange.

  8. Accuracy of Geophysical Parameters Derived from AIRS/AMSU as a Function of Fractional Cloud Cover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Susskind, Joel; Barnet, Chris; Blaisdell, John; Iredell, Lena; Keita, Fricky; Kouvaris, Lou; Molnar, Gyula; Chahine, Moustafa

    2005-01-01

    AIRS was launched on EOS Aqua on May 4,2002, together with AMSU A and HSB, to form a next generation polar orbiting infrared and microwave atmospheric sounding system. The primary products of AIRS/AMSU are twice daily global fields of atmospheric temperature-humidity profiles, ozone profiles, sea/land surface skin temperature, and cloud related parameters including OLR. The sounding goals of AIRS are to produce 1 km tropospheric layer mean temperatures with an rms error of 1K, and layer precipitable water with an rms error of 20%, in cases with up to 80% effective cloud cover. The basic theory used to analyze AIRS/AMSU/HSB data in the presence of clouds, called the at-launch algorithm, was described previously. Pre-launch simulation studies using this algorithm indicated that these results should be achievable. Some modifications have been made to the at-launch retrieval algorithm as described in this paper. Sample fields of parameters retrieved from AIRS/AMSU/HSB data are presented and validated as a function of retrieved fractional cloud cover. As in simulation, the degradation of retrieval accuracy with increasing cloud cover is small. HSB failed in February 2005, and consequently HSB channel radiances are not used in the results shown in this paper. The AIRS/AMSU retrieval algorithm described in this paper, called Version 4, become operational at the Goddard DAAC in April 2005 and is being used to analyze near-real time AIRS/AMSU data. Historical AIRS/AMSU data, going backwards from March 2005 through September 2002, is also being analyzed by the DAAC using the Version 4 algorithm.

  9. Accuracy of Geophysical Parameters Derived from AIRS/AMSU as a Function of Fractional Cloud Cover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Susskind, Joel; Barnet, Chris; Blaisdell, John; Iredell, Lena; Keita, Fricky; Kouvaris, Lou; Molnar, Gyula; Chahine, Moustafa

    2006-01-01

    AIRS was launched on EOS Aqua on May 4,2002, together with AMSU A and HSB, to form a next generation polar orbiting infrared and microwave atmospheric sounding system. The primary products of AIRS/AMSU are twice daily global fields of atmospheric temperature-humidity profiles, ozone profiles, sea/land surface skin temperature, and cloud related parameters including OLR. The sounding goals of AIRS are to produce 1 km tropospheric layer mean temperatures with an rms error of lK, and layer precipitable water with an rms error of 20 percent, in cases with up to 80 percent effective cloud cover. The basic theory used to analyze Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder/Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit/Humidity Sounder Brazil (AIRS/AMSU/HSB) data in the presence of clouds, called the at-launch algorithm, was described previously. Pre-launch simulation studies using this algorithm indicated that these results should be achievable. Some modifications have been made to the at-launch retrieval algorithm as described in this paper. Sample fields of parameters retrieved from AIRS/AMSU/HSB data are presented and validated as a function of retrieved fractional cloud cover. As in simulation, the degradation of retrieval accuracy with increasing cloud cover is small and the RMS accuracy of lower tropospheric temperature retrieved with 80 percent cloud cover is about 0.5 K poorer than for clear cases. HSB failed in February 2003, and consequently HSB channel radiances are not used in the results shown in this paper. The AIRS/AMSU retrieval algorithm described in this paper, called Version 4, become operational at the Goddard DAAC (Distributed Active Archive Center) in April 2003 and is being used to analyze near-real time AIRS/AMSU data. Historical AIRS/AMSU data, going backwards from March 2005 through September 2002, is also being analyzed by the DAAC using the Version 4 algorithm.

  10. EFFECTS OF OXYGEN AND AIR MIXING ON VOID FRACTIONS IN A LARGE SCALE SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Leishear, R; Hector Guerrero, H; Michael Restivo, M

    2008-09-11

    Oxygen and air mixing with spargers was performed in a 30 foot tall by 30 inch diameter column, to investigate mass transfer as air sparged up through the column and removed saturated oxygen from solution. The mixing techniques required to support this research are the focus of this paper. The fluids tested included water, water with an antifoam agent (AFA), and a high, solids content, Bingham plastic, nuclear waste simulant with AFA, referred to as AZ01 simulant, which is non-radioactive. Mixing of fluids in the column was performed using a recirculation system and an air sparger. The re-circulation system consisted of the column, a re-circulating pump, and associated piping. The air sparger was fabricated from a two inch diameter pipe concentrically installed in the column and open near the bottom of the column. The column contents were slowly re-circulated while fluids were mixed with the air sparger. Samples were rheologically tested to ensure effective mixing, as required. Once the fluids were adequately mixed, oxygen was homogeneously added through the re-circulation loop using a sintered metal oxygen sparger followed by a static mixer. Then the air sparger was re-actuated to remove oxygen from solution as air bubbled up through solution. To monitor mixing effectiveness several variables were monitored, which included flow rates, oxygen concentration, differential pressures along the column height, fluid levels, and void fractions, which are defined as the percent of dissolved gas divided by the total volume of gas and liquid. Research showed that mixing was uniform for water and water with AFA, but mixing for the AZ101 fluid was far more complex. Although mixing of AZ101 was uniform throughout most of the column, gas entrapment and settling of solids significantly affected test results. The detailed test results presented here provide some insight into the complexities of mixing and void fractions for different fluids and how the mixing process itself

  11. Nonlinear compression of high energy fiber amplifier pulses in air-filled hypocycloid-core Kagome fiber.

    PubMed

    Guichard, Florent; Giree, Achut; Zaouter, Yoann; Hanna, Marc; Machinet, Guillaume; Debord, Benoît; Gérôme, Frédéric; Dupriez, Pascal; Druon, Frédéric; Hönninger, Clemens; Mottay, Eric; Benabid, Fetah; Georges, Patrick

    2015-03-23

    We report on the generation of 34 fs and 50 µJ pulses from a high energy fiber amplifier system with nonlinear compression in an air-filled hypocycloid-core Kagome fiber. The unique properties of such fibers allow bridging the gap between solid core fibers-based and hollow capillary-based post-compression setups, thereby operating with pulse energies obtained with current state-of-the-art fiber systems. The overall transmission of the compression setup is over 70%. Together with Yb-doped fiber amplifier technologies, Kagome fibers therefore appear as a promising tool for efficient generation of pulses with durations below 50 fs, energies ranging from 10 to several hundreds of µJ, and high average powers.

  12. Interaction-driven fractional quantum Hall state of hard-core bosons on kagome lattice at one-third filling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, W.; Gong, S. S.; Sheng, D. N.

    2016-07-01

    There has been a growing interest in realizing topologically nontrivial states of matter in band insulators, where a quantum Hall effect can appear as an intrinsic property of the band structure. While ongoing progress is under way with a number of directions, the possibility of realizing novel interaction-generated topological phases, without the requirement of a nontrivial invariant encoded in single-particle wave function or band structure, can significantly extend the class of topological materials and is thus of great importance. Here, we show an interaction-driven topological phase emerging in an extended Bose-Hubbard model on a kagome lattice, where the noninteracting band structure is topological trivial with zero Berry curvature in the Brillouin zone. By means of an unbiased state-of-the-art density-matrix renormalization group technique, we identify that the ground state in a broad parameter region is equivalent to a bosonic fractional quantum Hall Laughlin state, based on the characterization of universal properties including ground-state degeneracy, edge excitations, and anyonic quasiparticle statistics. Our work paves a way to finding an interaction-induced topological phase at the phase boundary of conventionally ordered solid phases.

  13. Foam fractionation as a tool to study the air-water interface structure-function relationship of wheat gluten hydrolysates.

    PubMed

    Wouters, Arno G B; Rombouts, Ine; Schoebrechts, Nele; Fierens, Ellen; Brijs, Kristof; Blecker, Christophe; Delcour, Jan A

    2017-03-01

    Enzymatic hydrolysis of wheat gluten protein improves its solubility and produces hydrolysates with foaming properties which may find applications in food products. First, we here investigated whether foam-liquid fractionation can concentrate wheat gluten peptides with foaming properties. Foam and liquid fractions had high and very low foam stability (FS), respectively. In addition, foam fractions were able to decrease surface tension more pronouncedly than un-fractionated samples and liquid fractions, suggesting they are able to arrange themselves more efficiently at an interface. As a second objective, foam fractionation served as a tool to study the structural properties of the peptides, causing these differences in air-water interfacial behavior. Zeta potential and surface hydrophobicity measurements did not fully explain these differences but suggested that hydrophobic interactions at the air-water interface are more important than electrostatic interactions. RP-HPLC showed a large overlap between foam and liquid fractions. However, a small fraction of very hydrophobic peptides with relatively high average molecular mass was clearly enriched in the foam fraction. These peptides were also more concentrated in un-fractionated DH 2 hydrolysates, which had high FS, than in DH 6 hydrolysates, which had low FS. These peptides most likely play a key role in stabilizing the air-water interface.

  14. Step-Wise Velocity of an Air Bubble Rising in a Vertical Tube Filled with a Liquid Dispersion of Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Cho, Heon Ki; Nikolov, Alex D; Wasan, Darsh T

    2017-03-21

    The motion of air bubbles in tubes filled with aqueous suspensions of nanoparticles (nanofluids) is of practical interest for bubble jets, lab-on-a-chip, and transporting media. Therefore, the focus of this study is the dynamics of air bubbles rising in a tube in a nanofluid. Many authors experimentally and analytically proposed that the velocity of rising air bubbles is constant for long air bubbles suspended in a vertical tube in common liquids (e.g. an aqueous glycerol solution) when the capillary number is larger than 10(-4). For the first time, we report here a systematic study of an air bubble rising in a vertical tube in a nanofluid (e.g. an aqueous silica dioxide nanoparticle suspension, nominal particle size, 19 nm). We varied the bubble length scaled by the diameter of the tubes (L/D), the concentration of the nanofluid (10 and 12.5 v %), and the tube diameter (0.45, 0.47, and 0.50 cm). The presence of the nanoparticles creates a significant change in the bubble velocity compared with the bubble rising in the common liquid with the same bulk viscosity. We observed a novel phenomenon of a step-wise increase in the air bubble rising velocity versus bubble length for small capillary numbers less than 10(-7). This step-wise velocity increase versus the bubble length was not observed in a common fluid. The step-wise velocity increase is attributed to the nanoparticle self-layering phenomenon in the film adjacent to the tube wall. To elucidate the role of the nanoparticle film self-layering on the bubble rising velocity, the effect of the capillary number, the tube diameter (e.g. the capillary pressure), and nanofilm viscosity are investigated. We propose a model that takes into consideration the nanoparticle layering in the film confinement to explain the step-wise velocity phenomenon versus the length of the bubble. The oscillatory film interaction energy isotherm is calculated and the Frenkel approach is used to estimate the film viscosity.

  15. On the air-filled effective porosity parameter of Rogers and Nielson's (1991) bulk radon diffusion coefficient in unsaturated soils.

    PubMed

    Saâdi, Zakaria

    2014-05-01

    The radon exhalation rate at the earth's surface from soil or rock with radium as its source is the main mechanism behind the radon activity concentrations observed in both indoor and outdoor environments. During the last two decades, many subsurface radon transport models have used Rogers and Nielson's formula for modeling the unsaturated soil bulk radon diffusion coefficient. This formula uses an "air-filled effective porosity" to account for radon adsorption and radon dissolution in the groundwater. This formula is reviewed here, and its hypotheses are examined for accuracy in dealing with subsurface radon transport problems. The author shows its limitations by comparing one dimensional steady-state analytical solutions of the two-phase (air/water) transport equation (Fick's law) with Rogers and Nielson's formula. For radon diffusion-dominated transport, the calculated Rogers and Nielson's radon exhalation rate is shown to be unrealistic as it is independent of the values of the radon adsorption and groundwater dissolution coefficients. For convective and diffusive transport, radon exhalation rates calculated using Fick's law and this formula agree only for high values of gas-phase velocity and groundwater saturation. However, these conditions are not usually met in most shallow subsurface environments where radon migration takes place under low gas phase velocities and low water saturation.

  16. Recovery of Extracellular Lipolytic Enzymes from Macrophomina phaseolina by Foam Fractionation with Air

    PubMed Central

    Germani, José Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Macrophomina phaseolina was cultivated in complex and simple media for the production of extracellular lipolytic enzymes. Culture supernatants were batch foam fractionated for the recovery of these enzymes, and column design and operation included the use of P 2 frit (porosity 40 to 100 μm), air as sparging gas at variable flow rates, and Triton X-100 added at the beginning or gradually in aliquots. Samples taken at intervals showed the progress of the kinetic and the efficiency parameters. Best results were obtained with the simple medium supernatant by combining the stepwise addition of small amounts of the surfactant with the variation of the air flow rates along the separation. Inert proteins were foamed out first, and the subsequent foamate was enriched in the enzymes, showing estimated activity recovery (R), enrichment ratio (E), and purification factor (P) of 45%, 34.7, and 2.9, respectively. Lipases were present in the enriched foamate. PMID:23738054

  17. Left-ventricular peak ejection rate, filling rate, and ejection fraction--frame rate requirements at rest and exercise: concise communication.

    PubMed

    Bacharach, S L; Green, M V; Borer, J S; Hyde, J E; Farkas, S P; Johnston, G S

    1979-03-01

    The effect of framing rate on the measurement of left-ventricular (LV) ejection fraction (EF), peak ejection rate (PER), and peak filling rate (PFR) was evaluated at rest and during exercise in 11 normal subjects and 21 patients who underwent gated equilibrium blood-pool imaging. Left-ventricular time-activity curves were obtained in each subject, at rest and during stress, at temporal resolutions of 10, 20, 30, 40, and 50 msec per frame. Ejection fraction, PER, and PFR were determined for each frame duration. By observing changes in the measured values of these quantities with framing rate we conclude that: a) for the measurement of EF, 50 msec per frame at rest and 40 msec per frame at exercise is sufficient; b) PER requires 40 msec per frame at rest and 20 msec per frame during exercise; and c) for the measurement of PFR, at least 40 msec per frame at rest and 20 msec per frame during exercise are needed. These results should hold for both first-pass and gated equilibrium studies.

  18. Multiple Solutions in Natural Convection in an Air Filled Square Enclosure: Fractal Dimension of Attractors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aklouche Benouaguef, S.; Zeghmati, B.; Bouhadef, K.; Daguenet, M.

    In this study, we investigated numerically the transient natural convection in a square cavity with two horizontal adiabatic sides and vertical walls composed of two regions of same size maintained at different temperatures. The flow has been assumed to be laminar and bi-dimensional. The governing equations written in dimensionless form and expressed in terms of stream function and vorticity, have been solved using the Alternating Direction Implicit (ADI) method and the GAUSS elimination method. Calculations were performed for air (Pr = 0.71), with a Rayleigh number varying from 2.5x105 to 3.7x106. We analysed the effect of the Rayleigh number on the route to the chaos of the system. The first transition has been found from steady-state to oscillatory flow and the second is a subharmonic bifurcation as the Rayleigh number is increased further. For sufficiently small Rayleigh numbers, present results show that the flow is characterized by four cells with horizontal and vertical symmetric axes. The attractor bifurcates from a stable fixed point to a limit cycle for a Rayleigh number varying from 2.5x105 to 2.51x105. A limit cycle settles from Ra = 3x105 and persists until Ra = 5x105. At a Rayleigh number of 2.5x105 the temporal evolution of the Nusselt number Nu(t) was stationary. As the Rayleigh number increases, the flow becomes unstable and bifurcates to a time periodic solution at a critical Rayleigh number between 2.5x105 and 2.51x105. After the first HOPF bifurcation at Ra = 2.51x105, the oscillatory flow undergoes several bifurcations and ultimately evolves into a chaotic flow.

  19. Chemical analysis and biological testing of a polar fraction of ambient air, diesel engine, and gasoline engine particulate extracts.

    PubMed Central

    Strandell, M; Zakrisson, S; Alsberg, T; Westerholm, R; Winquist, L; Rannug, U

    1994-01-01

    Extracts of gasoline and diesel vehicle exhaust and ambient air particles were fractionated into five fractions according to polarity on a silica gel column. Two medium polar fractions showing high genotoxic activity in the Ames test were further subfractionated, using normal-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Chemical analyses were performed by means of gas chromatography combined with mass spectrometry and flame ionization and detection. The crude extracts, fractions, and subfractions were assayed with the Ames test, with and without S9, and the most abundant compounds in the subfractions are reported. PMID:7529708

  20. Measurement of air distribution and void fraction of an upwards air-water flow using electrical resistance tomography and a wire-mesh sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olerni, Claudio; Jia, Jiabin; Wang, Mi

    2013-03-01

    Measurements on an upwards air-water flow are reported that were obtained simultaneously with a dual-plane electrical resistance tomograph (ERT) and a wire-mesh sensor (WMS). The ultimate measurement target of both ERT and WMS is the same, the electrical conductivity of the medium. The ERT is a non-intrusive device whereas the WMS requires a net of wires that physically crosses the flow. This paper presents comparisons between the results obtained simultaneously from the ERT and the WMS for evaluation and calibration of the ERT. The length of the vertical testing pipeline section is 3 m with an internal diameter of 50 mm. Two distinct sets of air-water flow rate scenarios, bubble and slug regimes, were produced in the experiments. The fast impedance camera ERT recorded the data at an approximate time resolution of 896 frames per second (fps) per plane in contrast with the 1024 fps of the wire-mesh sensor WMS200. The set-up of the experiment was based on well established knowledge of air-water upwards flow, particularly the specific flow regimes and wall peak effects. The local air void fraction profiles and the overall air void fraction were produced from two systems to establish consistency for comparison of the data accuracy. Conventional bulk flow measurements in air mass and electromagnetic flow metering, as well as pressure and temperature, were employed, which brought the necessary calibration to the flow measurements. The results show that the profiles generated from the two systems have a certain level of inconsistency, particularly in a wall peak and a core peak from the ERT and WMS respectively, whereas the two tomography instruments achieve good agreement on the overall air void fraction for bubble flow. For slug flow, when the void fraction is over 30%, the ERT underestimates the void fraction, but a linear relation between ERT and WMS is still observed.

  1. Assessing changes in stratospheric mean age of air and fractional release using historical trace gas observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laube, Johannes; Bönisch, Harald; Engel, Andreas; Röckmann, Thomas; Sturges, William

    2014-05-01

    Large-scale stratospheric transport is pre-dominantly governed by the Brewer-Dobson circulation. Due to climatic change a long-term acceleration of this residual stratospheric circulation has been proposed (e.g. Austin et al.,2006). Observational evidence has revealed indications for temporary changes (e.g. Bönisch et al., 2011) but a confirmation of a significant long-term trend is missing so far (e.g. Engel et al., 2009). A different aspect is a possible long-term change in the break-down of chemically important species such as chlorofluorocarbons as proposed by Butchart et al. 2001. Recent studies show significant differences adding up to more than 20 % in the chlorine released from such compounds (Newman et al., 2007; Laube et al., 2013). We here use a data set of three long-lived trace gases, namely SF6, CF2Cl2, and N2O, as measured in whole-air samples collected during balloon and aircraft flights between 1975 and 2011, to assess changes in stratospheric transport and chemistry. For this purpose we utilise the mean stratospheric transit times (or mean ages of air) in combination with a measure of the chemical decomposition (i.e. fractional release factors). We also evaluate the influence of different trend correction methods on these quantities and explore their variability with latitude, altitude, and season. References Austin, J. & Li, F.: On the relationship between the strength of the Brewer-Dobson circulation and the age of stratospheric air, Geophys. Res. Lett., 33, L17807, 2006. Bönisch, H., Engel, A., Birner, Th., Hoor, P., Tarasick, D. W., and Ray, E. A.: On the structural changes in the Brewer-Dobson circulation after 2000, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 11, 3937-3948, 2011. Butchart, N. & Scaife, A. A. Removal of chlorofluorocarbons by increased mass exchange between the stratosphere and troposphere in a changing climate. Nature, 410, 799-802, 2001. Engel, A., Möbius, T., Bönisch, H., Schmidt, U., Heinz, R., Levin, I., Atlas, E., Aoki, S., Nakazawa, T

  2. In vitro effects of pollutants from particulate and volatile fractions of air samples-day and night variability.

    PubMed

    Novák, Jiří; Giesy, John P; Klánová, Jana; Hilscherová, Klára

    2013-09-01

    Chemicals in air were characterized for potential interference with signaling of estrogen, androgen, and arylhydrocarbon (AhR) receptors, which are known to play an important role in endocrine-disruptive changes in vivo. Previously, effects of this type have been studied mainly in particulate matter in the ambient air from various localities. In this study, both volatile and particulate fractions of air from three sites in Banja Luka region (Bosnia and Herzegovina) were investigated to describe the distribution of endocrine-disrupting contaminants on a small spatial scale. Circadian variability of air pollution was investigated by collecting samples during both day and night. Air samples collected from urban localities at night were more potent in producing the AhR-mediated effects than those collected during daytime. This trend was not observed at the reference rural location. None of the samples showed significant estrogenic or androgenic activity. On the other hand, anti-androgenicity was detected in both particulate and vapor phases, while anti-estrogenicity was detected only in the particulate fraction of air from all localities. The AhR-mediated potencies of samples were associated primarily with non-persistent compounds. Based on the concentrations of 28 individual compounds, PAHs accounted for approximately 30 % of the AhR-mediated potency determined by the bioassay. The results show that there can be a significant difference between levels of bioactive compounds in air between daytime and nighttime.

  3. Enhancement of fill factor in air-processed inverted organic solar cells using self-assembled monolayer of fullerene catechol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Il; Ogumi, Keisuke; Nakagawa, Takafumi; Matsuo, Yutaka

    2016-08-01

    [60]Fullerene catechol self-assembled monolayers were prepared and applied to inverted organic solar cells by an immersion method, and their energy conversion properties were measured. By introducing fullerenes at the surface, we improved the hole-blocking capability of electron-transporting metal oxide, as shown by the fill factor enhancement. The fullerene catechol-treated TiO x -containing device gave a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 2.81% with a fill factor of 0.56 while the non treated device gave a PCE of 2.46% with a fill factor of 0.49. The solar cell efficiency improved by 13% compared with the non treated reference device.

  4. Air-Quality Impacts and Intake Fraction of PM2.5 during the 2013 Rim Megafire.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Kathleen M; Cisneros, Ricardo; O'Neill, Susan M; Schweizer, Don; Larkin, Narasimhan K; Balmes, John R

    2016-11-01

    The 2013 Rim Fire was the third largest wildfire in California history and burned 257 314 acres in the Sierra Nevada Mountains. We evaluated air-quality impacts of PM2.5 from smoke from the Rim Fire on receptor areas in California and Nevada. We employed two approaches to examine the air-quality impacts: (1) an evaluation of PM2.5 concentration data collected by temporary and permanent air-monitoring sites and (2) an estimation of intake fraction (iF) of PM2.5 from smoke. The Rim Fire impacted locations in the central Sierra nearest to the fire and extended to the northern Sierra Nevada Mountains of California and Nevada monitoring sites. Daily 24-h average PM2.5 concentrations measured at 22 air monitors had an average concentration of 20 μg/m(3) and ranged from 0 to 450 μg/m(3). The iF for PM2.5 from smoke during the active fire period was 7.4 per million, which is slightly higher than representative iF values for PM2.5 in rural areas and much lower than for urban areas. This study is a unique application of intake fraction to examine emissions-to-exposure for wildfires and emphasizes that air-quality impacts are not only localized to communities near large fires but can extend long distances and affect larger urban areas.

  5. Air fractionation in plate-like inclusions within the EPICA-DML deep ice core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedelcu, A.; Faria, S. H.; Kipfstuhl, S.; Schmidt, B.; Kuhs, W. F.

    2009-04-01

    than this, they suggest that the diffusion of chemical traces in the ice matrix may not be negligible, at least locally, on a timescale of few years. These results could be important for the interpretation of ice-core paleoclimate records. Muguruma, J., S. Mae and A. Higashi, 1966. Void formation by non-basal glide in ice single crystals, Philos. Mag., 13(123), 625-629. Mae, S., 1968. Void formation during non-basal glide in ice single crystals under tension, Philos. Mag., 18(151), 101-114. Gow, A. J., 1971. Relaxation of ice in deep drill cores from Antarctica, J. Glaciol., 76(11), 2533-2541. Nedelcu, A. F., S. H. Faria and W. F. Kuhs, in press. Raman spectra of plate-like inclusions in the EPICA-DML ice core. J. Glaciol., 55(189) Nakahara, J., Y. Shigesato, A. Higashi, T. Hondoh and C.C. Langway, 1988. Raman spectra of natural clathrates in deep ice cores, Philos. Mag. B, 57(3), 421-430. Ikeda, T., H. Fukazawa, S. Mae, L. Pepin, P. Duval, B. Champagnon, V. Y. Lipenkov and T. Hondoh, 1999. Extreme fractionation of gases caused by formation of clathrate hydrates in Vostok Antarctic ice, Geophys. Res. Lett., 26(1), 91-94. Ikeda-Fukazawa, T., T. Hondoh, T. Fukumura, H. Fukazawa and S. Mae, 2001. Variation in N2/O2 ratio of occluded air in Dome Fuji antarctic ice, J. Geophys. Res., 106(D16), 17799-17810. Ikeda-Fukazawa, T., K. Fukumizu, K. Kawamura, S. Aoki, T. Nakazawa and T. Hondoh, 2005. Effects of molecular diffusion on trapped gas composition in polar ice cores, Earth Planet.Sci.Lett.,229(3-4),183-192. Severinghaus, J. P., and M. O. Battle, 2006. Fractionation of gases in polar ice during bubble close-off: new constraints from firn air, Ne, Kr and Xe observations, Earth Planet. Sci. Lett., 244(1-2), 474-500.

  6. Performance of a hydrogen burner to simulate air entering scramjet combustors. [simulation of total temperature, total pressure, and volume fraction of oxygen of air at flight conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russin, W. R.

    1974-01-01

    Tests were conducted to determine the performance of a hydrogen burner used to produce a test gas that simulates air entering a scramjet combustor at various flight conditions. The test gas simulates air in that it duplicates the total temperature, total pressure, and the volume fraction of oxygen of air at flight conditions. The main objective of the tests was to determine the performance of the burner as a function of the effective exhaust port area. The conclusions were: (1) pressure oscillations of the chugging type were reduced in amplitude to plus or minus 2 percent of the mean pressure level by proper sizing of hydrogen, oxygen, and air injector flow areas; (2) combustion efficiency remained essentially constant as the exhaust port area was increased by a factor of 3.4; (3) the mean total temperature determined from integrating the exit radial gas property profiles was within plus or minus 5 percent of the theoretical bulk total temperature; (4) the measured exit total temperature profile had a local peak temperature more than 30 percent greater than the theoretical bulk total temperature; and (5) measured heat transfer to the burner liner was 75 percent of that predicted by theory based on a flat radial temperature profile.

  7. [Fractional and component composition of dust in the air of workplace at machinery enterprise].

    PubMed

    Maĭ, I V; Zagorodnov, S Iu; Maks, A A

    2012-01-01

    The authors present results of assessment of fractional and component composition of dust entering workplace of machinery enterprises. The results prove topicality of data accumulation on actual contents of dusts for more reliable and precise evaluation of the dusts mixture influence on the workers' health.

  8. FRACTIONAL AEROSOL FILTRATION EFFICIENCY OF IN-DUCT VENTILATION AIR CLEANERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The filtration efficiency of ventilation air cleaners is highly particle-size dependent over the 0.01 to 3 μm diameter size range. Current standardized test methods, which determine only overall efficiencies for ambient aerosol or other test aerosols, provide data of limited util...

  9. The performance of a two-layer biotrickling filter filled with new mixed packing materials for the removal of H2S from air.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yingwen; Wang, Xiaojun; He, Shuo; Zhu, Shemin; Shen, Shubao

    2016-01-01

    In the work described here, a two-layer biotrickling filter filled with new packing materials was used to remove H2S from air. The upper layer of the filter was packed with activated carbon-loaded polyurethane, whereas the lower layer was filled with modified organism-suspended fillers. The effects of inlet load, empty bed residence time (EBRT) from 79 s to 53 s, pH and contaminant starvation time were investigated. For loads of 15-50 g/(m(3) h), the average removal efficiency (RE) was higher than 96% under a consistent supply of pollutants. The critical elimination capacity was 39.95 g/(m(3) h) for an EBRT of 53 s with an RE of 99.9%. The two-layer BTF was capable of withstanding contaminant starvation periods for 1.5 d and 7 d with only a few hours of recovery time. The biodegradation kinetics was studied using Michaelis-Menten type equations under different EBRTs. At an EBRT of 66 s, the optimal kinetic constants rmax and Km were 333.3 g/(m(3) h) and 0.93 g/m(3), respectively. During the operation, the two-layer BTF performed well under various reasonable conditions.

  10. Low pressure premixed CH4/air flames with forced periodic mixture fraction oscillations: experimental approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ax, H.; Kutne, P.; Meier, W.; König, K.; Maas, U.; Class, A.; Aigner, M.

    2009-03-01

    An experimental setup for the generation and investigation of periodic equivalence ratio oscillations in laminar premixed flames is presented. A special low-pressure burner was developed which generates stable flames in a wide pressure range down to 20 mbar and provides the possibility of rapid mixture fraction variations. The technical realization of the mixture fraction variations and the characteristics of the burner are described. 1D laser Raman scattering was applied to determine the temperature and concentration profiles of the major species through the flame front in correlation to the phase-angle of the periodic oscillation. OH* chemiluminescence was detected to qualitatively analyze the response of the flame to mixture fraction variations by changing shape and position. Exemplary results from a flame at p=69 mbar, forced at a frequency of 10 Hz, are shown and discussed. The experiments are part of a cooperative research project including the development of kinetic models and numerical simulation tools with the aim of a better understanding and prediction of periodic combustion instabilities in gas turbines. The focus of the current paper lies on the presentation of the experimental realization and the measuring techniques.

  11. Stability of two-dimensional (2D) natural convection flows in air-filled differentially heated cavities: 2D/3D disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Shihe; Le Quéré, Patrick

    2012-06-01

    Following our previous two-dimensional (2D) studies of flows in differentially heated cavities filled with air, we studied the stability of 2D natural convection flows in these cavities with respect to 3D periodic perturbations. The basis of the numerical methods is a time-stepping code using the Chebyshev spectral collocation method and the direct Uzawa method for velocity-pressure coupling. Newton's iteration, Arnoldi's method and the continuation method have been used in order to, respectively, compute the 2D steady-state base solution, estimate the leading eigenmodes of the Jacobian and perform linear stability analysis. Differentially heated air-filled cavities of aspect ratios from 1 to 7 were investigated. Neutral curves (Rayleigh number versus wave number) have been obtained. It turned out that only for aspect ratio 7, 3D stationary instability occurs at slightly higher Rayleigh numbers than the onset of 2D time-dependent flow and that for other aspect ratios 3D instability always takes place before 2D time-dependent flows. 3D unstable modes are stationary and anti-centro-symmetric. 3D nonlinear simulations revealed that the corresponding pitchfork bifurcations are supercritical and that 3D instability leads only to weak flow in the third direction. Further 3D computations are also performed at higher Rayleigh number in order to understand the effects of the weak 3D fluid motion on the onset of time-dependent flow. 3D flow structures are responsible for the onset of time-dependent flow for aspect ratios 1, 2 and 3, while for larger aspect ratios they do not alter the transition scenario, which was observed in the 2D cases and that vertical boundary layers become unstable to traveling waves.

  12. Global intraurban intake fractions for primary air pollutants from vehicles and other distributed sources.

    PubMed

    Apte, Joshua S; Bombrun, Emilie; Marshall, Julian D; Nazaroff, William W

    2012-03-20

    We model intraurban intake fraction (iF) values for distributed ground-level emissions in all 3646 global cities with more than 100,000 inhabitants, encompassing a total population of 2.0 billion. For conserved primary pollutants, population-weighted median, mean, and interquartile range iF values are 26, 39, and 14-52 ppm, respectively, where 1 ppm signifies 1 g inhaled/t emitted. The global mean urban iF reported here is roughly twice as large as previous estimates for cities in the United States and Europe. Intake fractions vary among cities owing to differences in population size, population density, and meteorology. Sorting by size, population-weighted mean iF values are 65, 35, and 15 ppm, respectively, for cities with populations larger than 3, 0.6-3, and 0.1-0.6 million. The 20 worldwide megacities (each >10 million people) have a population-weighted mean iF of 83 ppm. Mean intraurban iF values are greatest in Asia and lowest in land-rich high-income regions. Country-average iF values vary by a factor of 3 among the 10 nations with the largest urban populations.

  13. Detection of the cytotoxicity of water-insoluble fraction of cigarette smoke by direct exposure to cultured cells at an air-liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Nara, Hidenori; Fukano, Yasuo; Nishino, Tomoki; Aufderheide, Michaela

    2013-07-01

    For the biological evaluation of cigarette smoke in vitro, the particulate phase (PP) and the gas vapor phase (GVP) of mainstream smoke have usually been collected individually and exposed to biological material such as cultured cells. Using this traditional method, the GVP is collected by bubbling in an aqueous solution such as phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). In such a way the water-insoluble GVP fraction is excluded from the GVP, meaning that the toxic potential of the water-insoluble GVP fraction has hardly been investigated so far. In our experiments we used a direct exposure method to expose cells at the air-liquid interface (ALI) to the water-insoluble GVP fraction for demonstrating its toxicological/biological activity. In order to isolate the water-insoluble GVP fraction from mainstream smoke, the GVP was passed through 6 impingers connected in series with PBS. After direct exposure of Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO-K1) with the water-insoluble GVP fraction in the CULTEX(®) system its cytotoxicity was assayed by using the neutral red uptake assay. The water-insoluble GVP fraction was proven to be less cytotoxic than the water-soluble GVP fraction, but showed a significant effect in a dose-dependent manner. The results of this study showed that the direct exposure of cultivated cells at the air-liquid interface offers the possibility to analyze the biological and toxicological activities of all fractions of cigarette smoke including the water-insoluble GVP fraction.

  14. Associations between size-fractionated particulate air pollution and blood pressure in a panel of type II diabetes mellitus patients.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ang; Chen, Renjie; Wang, Cuicui; Zhao, Zhuohui; Yang, Changyuan; Lu, Jianxiong; Chen, Xuan; Kan, Haidong

    2015-07-01

    Little is known regarding how the size distribution of particulate matter (PM) air pollution influences its effect on blood pressure (BP), especially among patients with diabetes. The objective of this study was to explore the short-term associations between size-fractionated PM and BP among diabetes patients. We scheduled 6 repeated BP examinations every 2 weeks from 13 April 2013 to 30 June 2013 in a panel of 35 type 2 diabetes mellitus patients recruited from an urban community in Shanghai, China. We measured real-time PM concentrations in the size range of 0.25 to 10 μm. We used linear mixed-effect models to examine the short-term association of size-fractionated PM and BP after controlling for individual characteristics, mean temperature, relative humidity, day of the week, years with diabetes and use of antihypertensive medication. The association with systolic BP and pulse pressure strengthened with decreasing diameter. The size fractions with the strongest associations were 0.25 to 0.40 μm for number concentrations and ≤ 2.5 μm for mass concentrations. Furthermore, these effects occurred immediately even after 0-2h and lasted for up to 48 h following exposure. An interquartile range increase in 24-h average number concentrations of PM0.25-0.40 was associated with increases of 3.61 mmHg in systolic BP and 2.96 mmHg in pulse pressure. Females, patients younger than 65 years of age and patients without antihypertensive treatment were more susceptible to these effects. Our results revealed important size and temporal patterns of PM in elevating BP among diabetes patients in China.

  15. Filling a Conical Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nye, Kyle; Eslam-Panah, Azar

    2016-11-01

    Root canal treatment involves the removal of infected tissue inside the tooth's canal system and filling the space with a dense sealing agent to prevent further infection. A good root canal treatment happens when the canals are filled homogeneously and tightly down to the root apex. Such a tooth is able to provide valuable service for an entire lifetime. However, there are some examples of poorly performed root canals where the anterior and posterior routes are not filled completely. Small packets of air can be trapped in narrow access cavities when restoring with resin composites. Such teeth can cause trouble even after many years and lead the conditions like acute bone infection or abscesses. In this study, the filling of dead-end conical cavities with various liquids is reported. The first case studies included conical cavity models with different angles and lengths to visualize the filling process. In this investigation, the rate and completeness at which a variety of liquids fill the cavity were observed to find ideal conditions for the process. Then, a 3D printed model of the scaled representation of a molar with prepared post spaces was used to simulate the root canal treatment. The results of this study can be used to gain a better understanding of the restoration for endodontically treated teeth.

  16. The Relationship Between Soil Air Filled Porosity and Soil Methane Oxidation is Almost Identical in Both Dry and Wet Temperate Eucalypt Forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fest, B. J.; Wardlaw, T.; Hinko-Najera, N.; Arndt, S. K.

    2015-12-01

    In order to gain a better understanding of the temporal variation in soil methane (CH4) exchange in temperate evergreen eucalypt forests in south-eastern Australia we measured soil CH4 exchange in high temporal resolution (every 2 hours or less) over two consecutive years (Wombat State Forest, Victoria, AUS) and over one year (Warra, Tasmania, AUS) in two temperate Eucalyptus obliqua (L. Her) forests with contrasting annual precipitation (Wombat State Forest = 870 mm yr-1, Warra = 1700 mm yr-1). Both forests were continuous CH4 sinks with the Victorian site having a sink strength of -1.79 kg CH4 ha-1 yr-1 and the Tasmanian site having a sink strength of -3.83 kg CH4 ha-1 yr-1. Our results show that CH4 uptake was strongly controlled by soil moisture at both sites and explained up to 90% of the temporal variability in CH4 uptake. Furthermore, when soil moisture was expressed as soil air filled porosity (AFP) we were able to predict the CH4 uptake of one site by the linear regression between AFP and CH4 uptake from the other site. Soil temperature only had an apparent control over seasonal variation in CH4 uptake during periods when soil moisture and soil temperature were closely correlated. The fluctuation of the generally low soil nitrogen levels did not influence soil CH4 uptake at either site.

  17. Distribution of PM(2.5) and PM(10-2.5) in PM(10) fraction in ambient air due to vehicular pollution in Kolkata megacity.

    PubMed

    Das, Manab; Maiti, Subodh Kumar; Mukhopadhyay, Ujjal

    2006-11-01

    This research paper aims at establishing baseline PM(10) and PM(2.5) concentration levels, which could be effectively used to develop and upgrade the standards in air pollution in developing countries. The relative contribution of fine fractions (PM(2.5)) and coarser fractions (PM(10-2.5)) to PM(10) fractions were investigates in a megacity which is overcrowded and congested due to lack of road network and deteriorated air quality because of vehicular pollution. The present study was carried out during the winter of 2002. The average 24h PM(10) concentration was 304 microg/m(3), which is 3 times more than the Indian National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) and higher PM(10) concentration was due to fine fraction (PM(2.5)) released by vehicular exhaust. The 24h average PM(2.5) concentration was found 179 microg/m(3), which is exceeded USEPA and EU standards of 65 and 50 microg/m(3) respectively for the winter. India does not have any PM(2.5) standards. The 24 h average PM(10-2.5) concentrations were found 126 microg/m(3). The PM(2.5) constituted more than 59% of PM(10) and whereas PM(10)-PM(2.5) fractions constituted 41% of PM(10). The correlation between PM(10) and PM(2.5) was found higher as PM(2.5) comprised major proportion of PM(10) fractions contributed by vehicular emissions.

  18. Air

    MedlinePlus

    ... do to protect yourself from dirty air . Indoor air pollution and outdoor air pollution Air can be polluted indoors and it can ... this chart to see what things cause indoor air pollution and what things cause outdoor air pollution! Indoor ...

  19. Nutrient digestibility of solvent-extracted Brassica napus and Brassica juncea canola meals and their air-classified fractions fed to ileal-cannulated grower pigs.

    PubMed

    Zhou, X; Zijlstra, R T; Beltranena, E

    2015-01-01

    Energy and nutrient digestibility of solvent-extracted canola meal (CM) is limited in pigs by its relatively high fiber content. The seed hull, which greatly contributes to the fiber content of CM, is denser than the oil-free cotyledon. By utilizing streams of air, air classification partially separates these seed components on the basis of their different sizes and densities to produce a low-fiber, light-particle fraction and a high-fiber, heavy-particle fraction. Compared with parent CM, ADF and NDF were reduced by 31.9% and 29.5% in the light-particle fraction and were enriched by 16.5% and 9.0% in the heavy-particle fraction (DM basis), respectively. Particle size was 638, 18.9, and 76.1 µm for the parent CM and light- and heavy-particle fractions, respectively. To determine the nutrient digestibility of CM and their air-classified fractions, Brassica napus and B. juncea CM and their 2 air-classified fractions were evaluated in a 2 × 3 factorial arrangement together with a basal diet and an N-free diet. The experiment was conducted as an 8 × 8 Latin square in which diets contained 40% B. napus or B. juncea CM or their air-classified fractions and 60% basal diet. Digesta data from pigs fed the N-free diet served to subtract basal endogenous AA losses. Eight ileal-cannulated barrows (32 kg initial BW) were fed the 8 diets at 2.7 times maintenance DE for eight 11-d periods. At the end of each period, feces were collected for 48 h, and ileal digesta were collected for two 12-h periods. The DE and calculated NE values and the apparent total tract digestibility (ATTD) of GE were 6.3%, 10.0%, and 7.8% greater (P < 0.001) for B. juncea CM than for B. napus CM; 6.1%, 10.8%, and 5.3% greater (P < 0.001) for the light-particle fraction than for parent CM; and 5.4%, 7.2%, and 3.8% lower (P < 0.001) for the heavy-particle fraction than for parent CM, respectively. The standardized ileal digestibilities (SID) of His, Ile, Val, Asp, and Tyr were greater (P < 0.05) for B

  20. Air quality in the German-Czech border region: A focus on harmful fractions of PM and ultrafine particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schladitz, Alexander; Leníček, Jan; Beneš, Ivan; Kováč, Martin; Skorkovský, Jiří; Soukup, Aleš; Jandlová, Jana; Poulain, Laurent; Plachá, Helena; Löschau, Gunter; Wiedensohler, Alfred

    2015-12-01

    A comprehensive air quality study has been carried out at two urban background sites in Annaberg-Buchholz (Germany) and Ústí nad Labem (Czech Republic) in the German-Czech border region between January 2012 and June 2014. Special attention was paid to quantify harmful fractions of particulate matter (PM) and ultrafine particle number concentration (UFP) from solid fuel combustion and vehicular traffic. Source type contributions of UFP were quantified by using the daily concentration courses of UFP and nitrogen oxide. Two different source apportionment techniques were used to quantify relative and absolute mass contributions: positive matrix factorization for total PM2.5 and elemental carbon in PM2.5 and chemical mass balance for total PM1 and organic carbon in PM1. Contributions from solid fuel combustion strongly differed between the non-heating period (April-September) and the heating period (October-March). Major sources of solid fuel combustion in this study were wood and domestic coal combustion, while the proportion of industrial coal combustion was low (<3%). In Ústí nad Labem combustion of domestic brown coal was the most important source of organic carbon ranging from 34% to 43%. Wood combustion was an important source of organic carbon in Annaberg-Buchholz throughout the year. Heavy metals and less volatile polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in the accumulation mode were related to solid fuel combustion with enhanced concentrations during the heating period. In contrast, vehicular PAH emissions were allocated to the Aitken mode. Only in Ústí nad Labem a significant contribution of photochemical new particle formation (e.g. from sulfur dioxide) to UFP of almost 50% was observed during noontime. UFPs from traffic emissions (nucleation particles) and primary emitted soot particles dominated at both sites during the rest of the day. The methodology of a combined source apportionment of UFP and PM can be adapted to other regions of the world with

  1. Soil methane oxidation in both dry and wet temperate eucalypt forests shows a near-identical relationship with soil air-filled porosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fest, Benedikt J.; Hinko-Najera, Nina; Wardlaw, Tim; Griffith, David W. T.; Livesley, Stephen J.; Arndt, Stefan K.

    2017-01-01

    Well-drained, aerated soils are important sinks for atmospheric methane (CH4) via the process of CH4 oxidation by methane-oxidising bacteria (MOB). This terrestrial CH4 sink may contribute towards climate change mitigation, but the impact of changing soil moisture and temperature regimes on CH4 uptake is not well understood in all ecosystems. Soils in temperate forest ecosystems are the greatest terrestrial CH4 sink globally. Under predicted climate change scenarios, temperate eucalypt forests in south-eastern Australia are predicted to experience rapid and extreme changes in rainfall patterns, temperatures and wild fires. To investigate the influence of environmental drivers on seasonal and inter-annual variation of soil-atmosphere CH4 exchange, we measured soil-atmosphere CH4 exchange at high-temporal resolution (< 2 h) in a dry temperate eucalypt forest in Victoria (Wombat State Forest, precipitation 870 mm yr-1) and in a wet temperature eucalypt forest in Tasmania (Warra Long-Term Ecological Research site, 1700 mm yr-1). Both forest soil systems were continuous CH4 sinks of -1.79 kg CH4 ha-1 yr-1 in Victoria and -3.83 kg CH4 ha-1 yr-1 in Tasmania. Soil CH4 uptake showed substantial temporal variation and was strongly controlled by soil moisture at both forest sites. Soil CH4 uptake increased when soil moisture decreased and this relationship explained up to 90 % of the temporal variability. Furthermore, the relationship between soil moisture and soil CH4 flux was near-identical at both forest sites when soil moisture was expressed as soil air-filled porosity (AFP). Soil temperature only had a minor influence on soil CH4 uptake. Soil nitrogen concentrations were generally low and fluctuations in nitrogen availability did not influence soil CH4 uptake at either forest site. Our data suggest that soil MOB activity in the two forests was similar and that differences in soil CH4 exchange between the two forests were related to differences in soil moisture and

  2. Nature of organo-mineral particles across density fractions in a volcanic-ash soil: air-drying and sonication effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagai, R.; Kajiura, M.; Shirato, Y.; Uchida, M.

    2011-12-01

    Interactions of plant- and microbially-derived organic matter with mineral phases exert significant controls on the stabilization of organic matter (OM) as well as other biogeochemical processes in soil. Density fractionation techniques have been successful in distinguishing soil organo-mineral particles of different degrees of microbial alteration, turnover rate of C, mineral associations. A major methodological difference among the density fractionation studies is the choice of sample pre-treatment. Presence or absence of sonication to disrupt and disperse soil particles and aggregates is a particularly important choice which could significantly alter the nature and distribution of organo-mineral particle and thus the resultant elemental concentration in each density fraction. Soil moisture condition (air-dry vs. field-moist) may also have strong impact especially for soils rich in Fe oxides/hydroxides and/or poorly-crystalline minerals that are prone for (possibly irreversible) aggregation. We thus tested these two effects on the concentration and distribution of C, N, and extractable phases of Fe and Al (by pyrophosphate and acid oxalate) across six density fractions (from <1.6 to >2.5 g/cm^3) using a surface-horizon of volcanic-ash soil which contained large amounts of poorly-crystalline minerals and organo-metal complexes. Compared to field-moist sample, air-drying had little effects on the elemental concentration or distribution across the fractions. In contrast, sonication on air-dried sample at each density cutoff during fractionation process caused significant changes. In addition to well-known increase in low-density material due to the liberation of plant detritus upon aggregate disruption, we found clear increase in C, N, and metals in 2.0-2.3 g/cm^3 fraction, which was largely compensated by the reduction in 1.8-2.0 g/cm^3 and, to a less extent, 2.3-2.5 g/cm^3 particles. Overall, sonication led to the redistribution of C and N by 15-20% and that of

  3. Storage Stability of Keratinocyte Growth Factor-2 in Lyophilized Formulations: Effects of Formulation Physical Properties and Protein Fraction at the Solid-Air Interface

    PubMed Central

    Devineni, Dilip; Gonschorek, Christoph; Cicerone, Marcus T; Xu, Yemin; Carpenter, John F.; Randolph, Theodore W.

    2014-01-01

    Lyophilized formulations of keratinocyte growth factor-2 (KGF-2) were prepared with a range of disaccharide (sucrose or trehalose) and hydroxyethyl starch (HES) mass ratios. Protein degradation was assessed as a function of time of storage of the dried formulations at 40, 50 and 60 °C. Lyophilized and stored samples were rehydrated, and protein degradation was quantified by measuring loss of monomeric protein with size exclusion chromatography and by determining chemical degradation in the soluble fraction with reverse-phase chromatography. The secondary structure of the protein in the lyophilized formulations was studied with infrared spectroscopy. The magnitudes of degradation were compared the key physical properties of the formulations including retention of protein native secondary structure, glass transition temperature (Tg), inverse mean square displacements −1 for hydrogen atoms (fast β relaxation), and the relaxation time τβ, which correlates with relaxation due to fast Johari-Goldstein motions in the glass[1]. In addition, specific surface areas of the lyophilized formulations were determined by Brunauer-Emmet-Teller analysis of krypton adsorption isotherms and used to estimate the fraction of the KGF-2 molecules residing at the solid-air interface. KGF-2 degradation rates were highest in formulations wherein the protein’s structure was most perturbed, and wherein β relaxations were fastest, but the dominant factor governing KGF-2 degradation in freeze-dried formulations was the fraction of the protein found at the glass solid-air interface. PMID:24859390

  4. Effect of initial moisture content on the in-vessel composting under air pressure of organic fraction of municipal solid waste in Morocco.

    PubMed

    Makan, Abdelhadi; Assobhei, Omar; Mountadar, Mohammed

    2013-01-03

    This study aimed to evaluate the effect of initial moisture content on the in-vessel composting under air pressure of organic fraction of municipal solid waste in Morocco in terms of internal temperature, produced gases quantity, organic matter conversion rate, and the quality of the final composts.For this purpose, in-vessel bioreactor was designed and used to evaluate both appropriate initial air pressure and appropriate initial moisture content for the composting process. Moreover, 5 experiments were carried out within initial moisture content of 55%, 65%, 70%, 75% and 85%. The initial air pressure and the initial moisture content of the mixture showed a significant effect on the aerobic composting. The experimental results demonstrated that for composting organic waste, relatively high moisture contents are better at achieving higher temperatures and retaining them for longer times.This study suggested that an initial moisture content of around 75%, under 0.6 bar, can be considered as being suitable for efficient composting of organic fraction of municipal solid waste. These last conditions, allowed maximum value of temperature and final composting product with good physicochemical properties as well as higher organic matter degradation and higher gas production. Moreover, final compost obtained showed good maturity levels and can be used for agricultural applications.

  5. A Streamline-Upwind Model for Filling Front Advection in Powder Injection Moulding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, Guillaume; Cheng, Zhi Qiang; Barriere, Thierry; Liu, Bao Sheng; Gelin, Jean-Claude

    2010-06-01

    The filling process of powder injection molding is modeled by the flows of two variably adjacent domains in the mold cavity. The feedstock is filled into the cavity while the air is expelled out by the injected feedstock [1]. Eulerian description is adopted. The filling patterns are determined by the solution of an advection equation, governed by the velocity field in both the feedstock flow and air flow [2]. In the real physics, the advance of filling front depends mainly on the flow of feedstock that locates behind the front. The flow of air in front of the injected material plays in fact no meaningful effect. However, the actual algorithm for solution of the advection equation takes equally the importance for both the flow of viscous feedstock and that of the slight air. Under such a condition, the injection flow of feedstock in simulation may be misdirected unrealistically by the velocity field in the air portion of the mold cavity. To correct this defect, an upwind scheme is proposed to reinforce the effect of upwind flow and reduce the effect of downstream flow. The present paper involves the investigation of an upwind algorithm for simulation of the filling state during powder injection molding. A Petrov-Galerkin upwind based method (SUPG) is adopted for numerical simulation of the transport equation instead of the Taylor-Galerkin method in previous work. In the proposed implementation of the Streamline-Upwind/Petrov-Galerkin (SUPG) approach. A stabilization method is used to prevent oscillations in the convection-dominated problems. It consists in the introduction of an artificial diffusion in streamline direction. Suitable modification of the test function is the important issue. It ensures the stable simulation of filling process and results in the more realistic prediction of filling patterns. The implementation of upwind scheme in mould filling state simulation, based on an advection equation and the whole velocity field of feedstock and air flow, makes

  6. Size-fractionated sampling and chemical analysis by total-reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry of PMx in ambient air and emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, A. C.; Kuhlbusch, T. A. J.; Fissan, H.; Schmidt, K.-G.

    2001-11-01

    concentrations obtained in two different processes (steel industry) show that the new PM 10/PM 2.5 cascade impactor and measurements with TXRF give characteristic fingerprints for different sources. Size-fractionated ambient air and emission sampling, together with multi-element analysis, prove to be a useful approach to derive information for source-receptor modeling, a method necessary to set up effective abatement strategies to reduce PMx mass concentrations.

  7. Flow pattern, void fraction and pressure drop of two-phase air-water flow in a horizontal circular micro-channel

    SciTech Connect

    Saisorn, Sira; Wongwises, Somchai

    2008-01-15

    Adiabatic two-phase air-water flow characteristics, including the two-phase flow pattern as well as the void fraction and two-phase frictional pressure drop, in a circular micro-channel are experimentally studied. A fused silica channel, 320 mm long, with an inside diameter of 0.53 mm is used as the test section. The test runs are done at superficial velocity of gas and liquid ranging between 0.37-16 and 0.005-3.04 m/s, respectively. The flow pattern map is developed from the observed flow patterns i.e. slug flow, throat-annular flow, churn flow and annular-rivulet flow. The flow pattern map is compared with those of other researchers obtained from different working fluids. The present single-phase experiments also show that there are no significant differences in the data from the use of air or nitrogen gas, and water or de-ionized water. The void fraction data obtained by image analysis tends to correspond with the homogeneous flow model. The two-phase pressure drops are also used to calculate the frictional multiplier. The multiplier data show a dependence on flow pattern as well as mass flux. A new correlation of two-phase frictional multiplier is also proposed for practical application. (author)

  8. COMPARISON OF 24H AVERAGE VOC MONITORING RESULTS FOR RESIDENTIAL INDOOR AND OUTDOOR AIR USING CARBOPACK X-FILLED DIFFUSIVE SAMPLERS AND ACTIVE SAMPLING - A PILOT STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Analytical results obtained by thermal desorption GC/MS for 24h diffusive sampling of 11 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are compared with results of time-averaged active sampling at a known constant flow rate. Air samples were collected with co-located duplicate diffusive samp...

  9. Performance of a combined three-hole conductivity probe for void fraction and velocity measurement in air-water flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borges, João Eduardo; Pereira, Nuno H. C.; Matos, Jorge; Frizell, Kathleen H.

    2010-01-01

    The development of a three-hole pressure probe with back-flushing combined with a conductivity probe, used for measuring simultaneously the magnitude and direction of the velocity vector in complex air-water flows, is described in this paper. The air-water flows envisaged in the current work are typically those occurring around the rotors of impulse hydraulic turbines (like the Pelton and Cross-Flow turbines), where the flow direction is not known prior to the data acquisition. The calibration of both the conductivity and three-hole pressure components of the combined probe in a rig built for the purpose, where the probe was placed in a position similar to that adopted for the flow measurements, will be reported. After concluding the calibration procedure, the probe was utilized in the outside region of a Cross-Flow turbine rotor. The experimental results obtained in the present study illustrate the satisfactory performance of the combined probe, and are encouraging toward its use for characterizing the velocity field of other complex air-water flows.

  10. Fractionally charged skyrmions in fractional quantum Hall effect.

    PubMed

    Balram, Ajit C; Wurstbauer, U; Wójs, A; Pinczuk, A; Jain, J K

    2015-11-26

    The fractional quantum Hall effect has inspired searches for exotic emergent topological particles, such as fractionally charged excitations, composite fermions, abelian and nonabelian anyons and Majorana fermions. Fractionally charged skyrmions, which support both topological charge and topological vortex-like spin structure, have also been predicted to occur in the vicinity of 1/3 filling of the lowest Landau level. The fractional skyrmions, however, are anticipated to be exceedingly fragile, suppressed by very small Zeeman energies. Here we show that, slightly away from 1/3 filling, the smallest manifestations of the fractional skyrmion exist in the excitation spectrum for a broad range of Zeeman energies, and appear in resonant inelastic light scattering experiments as well-defined resonances slightly below the long wavelength spin wave mode. The spectroscopy of these exotic bound states serves as a sensitive tool for investigating the residual interaction between composite fermions, responsible for delicate new fractional quantum Hall states in this filling factor region.

  11. Fractionally charged skyrmions in fractional quantum Hall effect

    SciTech Connect

    Balram, Ajit C.; Wurstbauer, U.; Wójs, A.; Pinczuk, A.; Jain, J. K.

    2015-11-26

    The fractional quantum Hall effect has inspired searches for exotic emergent topological particles, such as fractionally charged excitations, composite fermions, abelian and nonabelian anyons and Majorana fermions. Fractionally charged skyrmions, which support both topological charge and topological vortex-like spin structure, have also been predicted to occur in the vicinity of 1/3 filling of the lowest Landau level. The fractional skyrmions, however, are anticipated to be exceedingly fragile, suppressed by very small Zeeman energies. Here we show that, slightly away from 1/3 filling, the smallest manifestations of the fractional skyrmion exist in the excitation spectrum for a broad range of Zeeman energies, and appear in resonant inelastic light scattering experiments as well-defined resonances slightly below the long wavelength spin wave mode. The spectroscopy of these exotic bound states serves as a sensitive tool for investigating the residual interaction between composite fermions, responsible for delicate new fractional quantum Hall states in this filling factor region.

  12. Evaluation of the Flush/Fill and High-Pressure Air Purge Procedures for Converting Army Vehicles to Silicone Brake Fluid.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-02-01

    dispersed spray/ fog . 4 100 Acetylene 50 The initial spray was ignited by the torch Torch and burned until the fluid/air ratio be- came too low to support... burning . 5 150 None 40 A spray ot large droplets followed by a very finely dispersed spray/ fog . 6 150 Acetylene 40 The initial spray was ignited by...Results ! 50 None 60 Initially a spray of large droplets followed by a very fine mist/ fog . 2 50 Acetylene 60 The initial mist was ignited by the torch

  13. The effects of channel diameter on flow pattern, void fraction and pressure drop of two-phase air-water flow in circular micro-channels

    SciTech Connect

    Saisorn, Sira; Wongwises, Somchai

    2010-05-15

    Two-phase air-water flow characteristics are experimentally investigated in horizontal circular micro-channels. Test sections are made of fused silica. The experiments are conducted based on three different inner diameters of 0.53, 0.22 and 0.15 mm with the corresponding lengths of 320, 120 and 104 mm, respectively. The test runs are done at superficial velocities of gas and liquid ranging between 0.37-42.36 and 0.005-3.04 m/s, respectively. The flow visualisation is facilitated by systems mainly including stereozoom microscope and high-speed camera. The flow regime maps developed from the observed flow patterns are presented. The void fractions are determined based on image analysis. New correlation for two-phase frictional multiplier is also proposed for practical applications. (author)

  14. Evaluation of In Vitro Cytoxicity and Genotoxicity of Size-Fractionated Air Particles Sampled during Road Tunnel Construction

    PubMed Central

    Dominici, Luca; Guerrera, Elena; Villarini, Milena; Fatigoni, Cristina; Moretti, Massimo; Blasi, Paolo; Monarca, Silvano

    2013-01-01

    In tunnel construction, workers exposed to dust from blasting, gases, diesel exhausts, and oil mist have shown higher risk for pulmonary diseases. A clear mechanism to explain how these pollutants determine diseases is lacking, and alveolar epithelium's capacity to ingest inhaled fine particles is not well characterized. The objective of this study was to assess the genotoxic effect exerted by fine particles collected in seven tunnels using the cytokinesis-block micronuclei test in an in vitro model on type II lung epithelium A549 cells. For each tunnel, five fractions with different aerodynamic diameters of particulate matter were collected with a multistage cascade sampler. The human epithelial cell line A549 was exposed to 0.2 m3/mL equivalent of particulate for 24 h before testing. The cytotoxic effects of particulate matter on A549 cells were also evaluated in two different viability tests. In order to evaluate the cells' ability to take up fine particles, imaging with transmission electron microscopy of cells after exposure to particulate matter was performed. Particle endocytosis after 24 h exposure was observed as intracellular aggregates of membrane-bound particles. This morphologic evidence did not correspond to an increase in genotoxicity detected by the micronucleus test. PMID:24069598

  15. Getting a prescription filled

    MedlinePlus

    ... prescription filled; Drugs - how to get prescription filled; Pharmacy - mail order; Pharmacy - internet; Types of pharmacies ... paper prescription that you take to a local pharmacy Calling or e-mailing a pharmacy to order ...

  16. Merging of OMI and AIRS Ozone Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labow, Gordon J.; Fisher, Bradford; Susskind, Joel

    2014-01-01

    The OMI Instrument measures ozone using the backscattered light in the UV part of the spectrum. In polar night there are no OMI measurements so we hope to incorporate the AIRS ozone data to fill in these missing regions. AIRS is on the Aqua platform and has been operating since May 2002. AIRS is a multi-detector array grating spectrometer containing 2378 IR channels between 650 per centimeter and 2760 per centimeter which measures atmospheric temperature, precipitable water, water vapor, CO, CH4, CO2 and ozone profiles and column amount. It can also measure effective cloud fraction and cloud top pressure for up to two cloud layers and sea-land skin temperature. Since 2008, OMI has had part of its aperture occulted with a piece of the thermal blanket resulting in several scan positions being unusable. We hope to use the AIRS data to fill in the missing ozone values for those missing scan positions.

  17. Film fill for power plant cooling towers

    SciTech Connect

    Mirsky, G.R. ); Monjoie, M. )

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on film fill, which is the use of flat or formed sheets to provide a surface upon which liquid and air come in contact with each other to affect the exchange of heat. The only other fill options available to a cooling tower designer is the use of splash fill or combinations whereby heat exchange occurs on the surface of water droplets, or both. As film fill allows the designer the opportunity to build a more compact, cost effective, energy efficient cooling tower; this type of fill material is receiving ever increasing acceptance and finding it way into more and more cooling tower applications. film fill is used to both counterflow and crossflow cooling towers, from small air conditioning applications to large natural draft towers serving 1300 to 1500 M.W. power plants around the world. It is being used in applications using unfiltered water high in suspended solids, high concentrations of dissolved salts, water carrying fibers, silt, mud, treated and untreated waste effluent, scale etc. These situations are caused by users who are: trying to reduce water make-up, using untreated or unfiltered water, or trying to save on the cost of chemical treatment.

  18. A hypothetical model of organic matter sea-to-air exchange processes based on stable carbon fractionation in the Southern Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceburnis, D.; Masalaite, A.; Garbaras, A.; Ovadnevaite, J.; Maenhaut, W.; Claeys, M.; Sciare, J.; O'Dowd, C. D. D.; Remeikis, V.

    2015-12-01

    Marine aerosol contributes significantly to the global aerosol loading and consequently has a significant impact on both the Earth's albedo and climate. Biological productivity in the global ocean is often resulting in significant amounts of primary organic matter in the aerosol phase. The North Atlantic Ocean is among the most productive oceanic regions and is the most studied ocean on Earth. The Southern Ocean, on the other hand, has been far less studied, even though similar organic matter enrichment patterns have been observed in marine aerosol. While numerous processes can contribute to organic matter in marine aerosols, carbon isotope analysis offers the most unambiguous estimates of the contributing sources. The stable carbon isotope ratios in marine aerosol samples collected during austral summer of 2007 at Amsterdam Island (Southern Indian Ocean) were examined. The measured δ13C values in the fine (Da <2.5µm) and coarse (Da >2.5µm) particle fractions were found to be evenly distributed between -28.2‰ and -20.0‰. These values are far lower than the previously reported ones as typical of unperturbed marine aerosol (-20‰). The δ13C values in the fine and coarse particle fractions were correlated with organic matter enrichment in sea spray. It was attempted to explain the variation of the δ13C values by the competition of the "fresh" and "old" organic matter pools in sea water during transfer into the aerosol phase, thereby implicating trophic level interactions. The hypothetical model suggests that fresh organic matter readily results in organic matter enrichment in sea spray particles and likely contains fresh colloidal and nanogel particulate matter, while the old organic matter is largely dissolved and unable to significantly enrich sea spray. Air mass back trajectory analysis suggests that the most productive regions, where sea spray particles are the most enriched in organic matter, are associated with low sea-water temperatures around the

  19. Floquet Fractional Chern Insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grushin, Adolfo G.; Gómez-León, Álvaro; Neupert, Titus

    2014-04-01

    We show theoretically that periodically driven systems with short range Hubbard interactions offer a feasible platform to experimentally realize fractional Chern insulator states. We exemplify the procedure for both the driven honeycomb and the square lattice, where we derive the effective steady state band structure of the driven system by using the Floquet theory and subsequently study the interacting system with exact numerical diagonalization. The fractional Chern insulator state equivalent to the 1/3 Laughlin state appears at 7/12 total filling (1/6 filling of the upper band). The state also features spontaneous ferromagnetism and is thus an example of the spontaneous breaking of a continuous symmetry along with a topological phase transition. We discuss light-driven graphene and shaken optical lattices as possible experimental systems that can realize such a state.

  20. A bench evaluation of fraction of oxygen in air delivery and tidal volume accuracy in home care ventilators available for hospital use

    PubMed Central

    Baboi, Loredana; Subtil, Fabien

    2016-01-01

    Background Turbine-powered ventilators are not only designed for long-term ventilation at home but also for hospital use. It is important to verify their capabilities in delivering fraction of oxygen in air (FIO2) and tidal volume (VT). Methods We assessed the FIO2 accuracy and the VT delivery in four home care ventilators (HCV) on the bench. The four HCV were Astral 150, Elisée 150, Monnal T50 and Trilogy 200 HCV, which were connected to a lung model (ASL 5000). For assessing FIO2 accuracy, lung model was set to mimic an obstructive lung and HCV were set in volume controlled mode (VC). They supplied with air, 3 or 15 L/min oxygen and FIO2 was measured by using a ventilator tester (Citrex H4TM). For the VT accuracy, the lung model was set in a way to mimic three adult configurations (normal, obstructive, or restrictive respiratory disorder) and one pediatric configuration. Each HCV was set in VC. Two VT (300 and 500 mL) in adult lung configuration and one 50 mL VT in pediatric lung configuration, at two positive end expiratory pressures 5 and 10 cmH2O, were tested. VT accuracy was measured as volume error (the relative difference between set and measured VT). Statistical analysis was performed by suing one-factor ANOVA with a Bonferroni correction for multiple tests. Results For Astral 150, Elisée 150, Monnal T50 and Trilogy 200, FIO2 averaged 99.2%, 93.7%, 86.3%, and 62.1%, respectively, at 15 L/min oxygen supplementation rate (P<0.001). Volume error was 0.5%±0%, −38%±0%, −9%±0%, −29%±0% and −36%±0% for pediatric lung condition (P<0.001). In adult lung configurations, Monnal T50 systematically over delivered VT and Trilogy 150 was sensitive to lung configuration when VT was set to 300 mL at either positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP). Conclusions HCV are different in terms of FIO2 efficiency and VT delivery. PMID:28149559

  1. Influence of entrapped air pockets on hydraulic transients in water pipelines

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Ling; Liu, Prof. Deyou; Karney, Professor Byran W.; Zhang, Qin Fen

    2011-01-01

    The pressure variations associated with a filling undulating pipeline containing an entrapped air pocket are investigated both experimentally and numerically. The influence of entrapped air on abnormal transient pressures is often ambiguous since the compressibility of the air pocket permits the liquid flow to accelerate but also partly cushions the system, with the balance of these tendencies being associated with the initial void fraction of the air pocket. Earlier experimental research involved systems with an initial void fraction greater than 5.8%; this paper focuses on initial void fractions ranging from 0% to 10%, in order to more completely characterize the transient response. Experimental results show that the maximum pressure increases and then decreases as the initial void fraction decreases. A simplified model is developed by neglecting the liquid inertia and energy loss of a short water column near the air-water interface. Comparisons of the calculated and observed results show the model is able to accurately predict peak pressures as a function of void fraction and filling conditions. Rigid water column models, however, perform poorly with small void fractions.

  2. Fractional randomness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tapiero, Charles S.; Vallois, Pierre

    2016-11-01

    The premise of this paper is that a fractional probability distribution is based on fractional operators and the fractional (Hurst) index used that alters the classical setting of random variables. For example, a random variable defined by its density function might not have a fractional density function defined in its conventional sense. Practically, it implies that a distribution's granularity defined by a fractional kernel may have properties that differ due to the fractional index used and the fractional calculus applied to define it. The purpose of this paper is to consider an application of fractional calculus to define the fractional density function of a random variable. In addition, we provide and prove a number of results, defining the functional forms of these distributions as well as their existence. In particular, we define fractional probability distributions for increasing and decreasing functions that are right continuous. Examples are used to motivate the usefulness of a statistical approach to fractional calculus and its application to economic and financial problems. In conclusion, this paper is a preliminary attempt to construct statistical fractional models. Due to the breadth and the extent of such problems, this paper may be considered as an initial attempt to do so.

  3. Building 930, oblique view to southeast from fill slope covering ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Building 930, oblique view to southeast from fill slope covering building 932, 135 mm lens. - Travis Air Force Base, Snack Bar, North of W Street, Armed Forces Special Weapons Project Q Area, Fairfield, Solano County, CA

  4. Loose-fill insulations

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    Whether you are increasing the insulation levels in your current home or selecting insulation for a new home, choosing the right insulation material can be challenging. Fibrous loose-fill insulations such as cellulose, fiberglass, and rock wool are options you may wish to consider. This publication will introduce you to these materials--what they are, how they are applied, how they compare with each other, and other considerations regarding their use--so that you can decide whether loose fills are right for your home.

  5. Fractionally charged skyrmions in fractional quantum Hall effect

    DOE PAGES

    Balram, Ajit C.; Wurstbauer, U.; Wójs, A.; ...

    2015-11-26

    The fractional quantum Hall effect has inspired searches for exotic emergent topological particles, such as fractionally charged excitations, composite fermions, abelian and nonabelian anyons and Majorana fermions. Fractionally charged skyrmions, which support both topological charge and topological vortex-like spin structure, have also been predicted to occur in the vicinity of 1/3 filling of the lowest Landau level. The fractional skyrmions, however, are anticipated to be exceedingly fragile, suppressed by very small Zeeman energies. Here we show that, slightly away from 1/3 filling, the smallest manifestations of the fractional skyrmion exist in the excitation spectrum for a broad range of Zeemanmore » energies, and appear in resonant inelastic light scattering experiments as well-defined resonances slightly below the long wavelength spin wave mode. The spectroscopy of these exotic bound states serves as a sensitive tool for investigating the residual interaction between composite fermions, responsible for delicate new fractional quantum Hall states in this filling factor region.« less

  6. Filled nanoporous surfaces: controlled formation and wettability.

    PubMed

    Bittoun, Eyal; Marmur, Abraham; Ostblom, Mattias; Ederth, Thomas; Liedberg, Bo

    2009-10-20

    The controlled filling of hydrophobic nanoporous surfaces with hydrophilic molecules and their wetting properties are described and demonstrated by using thiocholesterol (TC) self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on gold and mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUA) as the filling agent. A novel procedure was developed for filling the nanopores in the TC SAMs by immersing them into a "cocktail" solution of TC and MUA, with TC in huge excess. This procedure results in an increasing coverage of MUA with increasing immersion time up to an area fraction of approximately 23%, while the amount of TC remains almost constant. Our findings strongly support earlier observations where linear omega-substituted alkanethiols selectively fill defects (nanopores) in the TC SAM (Yang et al. Langmuir 1997, 12, 1704-1707). They also support the formation of a homogeneously mixed SAM, given by the distribution of TC on the gold surface, rather than of a phase-segregated overlayer structure with domains of varying size, shape, and composition. The wetting properties of the filled SAMs were investigated by measuring the most stable contact angle as well as contact angle hysteresis. It is shown that the most stable contact angle is very well described by the Cassie equation, since the drops are much larger than the scale of chemical heterogeneity of the SAM surfaces. In addition, it is demonstrated that contact angle hysteresis is sensitive to the chemical heterogeneity of the surface, even at the nanometric scale.

  7. Gas filled panel insulation

    DOEpatents

    Griffith, B.T.; Arasteh, D.K.; Selkowitz, S.E.

    1993-12-14

    A structural or flexible highly insulative panel which may be translucent, is formed from multi-layer polymeric material in the form of an envelope surrounding a baffle. The baffle is designed so as to minimize heat transfer across the panel, by using material which forms substantially closed spaces to suppress convection of the low conductivity gas fill. At least a portion of the baffle carries a low emissivity surface for suppression of infrared radiation. 18 figures.

  8. Gas filled panel insulation

    DOEpatents

    Griffith, Brent T.; Arasteh, Dariush K.; Selkowitz, Stephen E.

    1993-01-01

    A structural or flexible highly insulative panel which may be translucent, is formed from multi-layer polymeric material in the form of an envelope surrounding a baffle. The baffle is designed so as to minimize heat transfer across the panel, by using material which forms substantially closed spaces to suppress convection of the low conductivity gas fill. At least a portion of the baffle carries a low emissivity surface for suppression of infrared radiation.

  9. Release Fraction Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Bamberger, Judith A.; Glissmeyer, John A.

    2004-01-01

    This document presents results of experiments conducted to measure release fractions during certain tank retrieval processes. The tests were performed in a 1/4 scale model of a waste storage tank. The retrieval processes simulated were: (1) Discharging liquid or slurry from the mouth of a vertically oriented two-in. Schedule 40 pipe. The discharging material was in free-fall from the mouth of the pipe near the top of the tank into a liquid or slurry pool at the bottom of the tank. (2) The jet from a 9/16-in.-diameter nozzle transferring liquid or slurry waste from one side of the tank to the other. The discharging liquid was aimed at the opposite side of the tank from the nozzle and either impacted the tank wall or fell into a liquid or slurry pool in the bottom of the tank. (3) A high pressure fan jet of liquid striking a steel plate or simulated waste from a stand-off distance of a few inches. For each process, a water-soluble fluorescent dye was added to the liquid fraction as a tracer. Kaolin clay was used to represent the solids. The tank was covered and there was no forced ventilation in the tank during the tests. Six air samples were collected during each test. The air samples were collected at fixed positions in the tank. The air sample filters were dried and weighed to determine the solids collection. The fluorescent dye was then leached from each filter and quantified with a fluorometer to determine the collection of liquid. Samples of the slurry and liquid simulants were also collected to determine the quantities of simulant used in each test. To calculate the release fraction, the quantity collected on each air sample was adjusted for the fraction of the tank volume sampled and divided by the quantity of material exposed in the simulation. The method was not as sensitive for the solids content as it was for the liquid content, but in those instances where a solids release fraction was determined, it was in relatively good agreement with that of the

  10. Air-water centrifugal convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrada, Miguel; Shtern, Vladimir

    2014-07-01

    A sealed cylindrical container is filled with air and water. The container rotation and the axial gradient of temperature induce the steady axisymmetric meridional circulation of both fluids due to the thermal buoyancy and surface-tension (Marangoni) effects. If the temperature gradient is small, the water circulation is one-cellular while the air circulation can be one- or two-cellular depending on water fraction Wf. The numerical simulations are performed for the cylinder length-to-radius ratio l = 1 and l = 4. The l = 4 results and the analytical solution for l → ∞ agree in the cylinder's middle part. As the temperature gradient increases, the water circulation becomes one-, two-, or three-cellular depending on Wf. The results are of fundamental interest and can be applied for bioreactors.

  11. Methane mole fraction and δ13C above and below the trade wind inversion at Ascension Island in air sampled by aerial robotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brownlow, R.; Lowry, D.; Thomas, R. M.; Fisher, R. E.; France, J. L.; Cain, M.; Richardson, T. S.; Greatwood, C.; Freer, J.; Pyle, J. A.; MacKenzie, A. R.; Nisbet, E. G.

    2016-11-01

    Ascension Island is a remote South Atlantic equatorial site, ideal for monitoring tropical background CH4. In September 2014 and July 2015, octocopters were used to collect air samples in Tedlar bags from different heights above and below the well-defined Trade Wind Inversion (TWI), sampling a maximum altitude of 2700 m above mean sea level. Sampling captured both remote air in the marine boundary layer below the TWI and also air masses above the TWI that had been lofted by convective systems in the African tropics. Air above the TWI was characterized by higher CH4, but no distinct shift in δ13C was observed compared to the air below. Back trajectories indicate that lofted CH4 emissions from Southern Hemisphere Africa have bulk δ13CCH4 signatures similar to background, suggesting mixed emissions from wetlands, agriculture, and biomass burning. The campaigns illustrate the usefulness of unmanned aerial system sampling and Ascension's value for atmospheric measurement in an understudied region.

  12. Dye filled security seal

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Dennis C. W.

    1982-04-27

    A security seal for providing an indication of unauthorized access to a sealed object includes an elongate member to be entwined in the object such that access is denied unless the member is removed. The elongate member has a hollow, pressurizable chamber extending throughout its length that is filled with a permanent dye under greater than atmospheric pressure. Attempts to cut the member and weld it together are revealed when dye flows through a rupture in the chamber wall and stains the outside surface of the member.

  13. Fluid Dynamics of Bottle Filling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGough, Patrick; Gao, Haijing; Appathurai, Santosh; Basaran, Osman

    2011-11-01

    Filling of bottles is a widely practiced operation in a large number of industries. Well known examples include filling of ``large'' bottles with shampoos and cleaners in the household products and beauty care industries and filling of ``small'' bottles in the pharmaceutical industry. Some bottle filling operations have recently drawn much attention from the fluid mechanics community because of the occurrence of a multitude of complex flow regimes, transitions, and instabilities such as mounding and coiling that occur as a bottle is filled with a fluid. In this talk, we present a primarily computational study of the fluid dynamical challenges that can arise during the rapid filling of bottles. Given the diversity of fluids used in filling applications, we consider four representative classes of fluids that exhibit Newtonian, shear-thinning, viscoelastic, and yield-stress rheologies. The equations governing the dynamics of bottle filling are solved either in their full 3D but axisymmetric form or using the slender-jet approximation.

  14. Understanding Multiplication of Fractions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweetland, Robert D.

    1984-01-01

    Discussed the use of Cuisenaire rods in teaching the multiplication of fractions. Considers whole number times proper fraction, proper fraction multiplied by proper fraction, mixed number times proper fraction, and mixed fraction multiplied by mixed fractions. (JN)

  15. Hydrogen Filling Station

    SciTech Connect

    Boehm, Robert F; Sabacky, Bruce; Anderson II, Everett B; Haberman, David; Al-Hassin, Mowafak; He, Xiaoming; Morriseau, Brian

    2010-02-24

    future. Project partners also conducted a workshop on hydrogen safety and permitting. This provided an opportunity for the various permitting agencies and end users to gather to share experiences and knowledge. As a result of this workshop, the permitting process for the hydrogen filling station on the Las Vegas Valley Water District’s land was done more efficiently and those who would be responsible for the operation were better educated on the safety and reliability of hydrogen production and storage. The lessons learned in permitting the filling station and conducting this workshop provided a basis for future hydrogen projects in the region. Continuing efforts to increase the working pressure of electrolysis and efficiency have been pursued. Research was also performed on improving the cost, efficiency and durability of Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) hydrogen technology. Research elements focused upon PEM membranes, electrodes/catalysts, membrane-electrode assemblies, seals, bipolar plates, utilization of renewable power, reliability issues, scale, and advanced conversion topics. Additionally, direct solar-to-hydrogen conversion research to demonstrate stable and efficient photoelectrochemistry (PEC) hydrogen production systems based on a number of optional concepts was performed. Candidate PEC concepts included technical obstacles such as inefficient photocatalysis, inadequate photocurrent due to non-optimal material band gap energies, rapid electron-hole recombination, reduced hole mobility and diminished operational lifetimes of surface materials exposed to electrolytes. Project Objective 1: Design, build, operate hydrogen filling station Project Objective 2: Perform research and development for utilizing solar technologies on the hydrogen filling station and convert two utility vehicles for use by the station operators Project Objective 3: Increase capacity of hydrogen filling station; add additional vehicle; conduct safety workshop; develop a roadmap for

  16. Thermotropic nematic order upon nanocapillary filling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Patrick; Busch, Mark; Całus, Sylwia; Kityk, Andriy V.

    2013-04-01

    Optical birefringence and light absorption measurements reveal four regimes for the thermotropic behavior of a nematogen liquid (7CB) upon sequential filling of parallel-aligned capillaries of 12 nm diameter in a monolithic, mesoporous silica membrane. No molecular reorientation is observed for the first adsorbed monolayer. In the film-condensed state (up to 1 nm thickness), a weak, continuous paranematic-to-nematic (P-N) transition is found, which is shifted by 10 K below the discontinuous bulk transition at TIN=305 K. The capillary-condensed state exhibits a more pronounced, albeit still continuous P-N reordering, located 4 K below TIN. This shift vanishes abruptly upon complete filling of the capillaries. It could originate in competing anchoring conditions at the free inner surfaces and at the pore walls or result from the 10-MPa tensile pressure release associated with the disappearance of concave menisci in the confined liquid upon complete filling. The study documents that the thermo-optical properties of nanoporous systems (or single nanocapillaries) can be tailored over a surprisingly wide range simply by variation of the filling fraction with liquid crystals.

  17. Space-filling percolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Abhijit; Manna, S. S.

    2014-03-01

    A region of two-dimensional space has been filled randomly with a large number of growing circular disks allowing only a "slight" overlapping among them just before their growth stops. More specifically, each disk grows from a nucleation center that is selected at a random location within the uncovered region. The growth rate δ is a continuously tunable parameter of the problem which assumes a specific value while a particular pattern of disks is generated. When a growing disk overlaps for the first time with at least one other disk, its growth is stopped and is said to be frozen. In this paper we study the percolation properties of the set of frozen disks. Using numerical simulations we present evidence for the following: (i) The order parameter appears to jump discontinuously at a certain critical value of the area coverage; (ii) the width of the window of the area coverage needed to observe a macroscopic jump in the order parameter tends to vanish as δ →0; and on the contrary (iii) the cluster size distribution has a power-law-decaying functional form. While the first two results are the signatures of a discontinuous transition, the third result is indicative of a continuous transition. Therefore we refer to this transition as a sharp but continuous transition similar to what has been observed in the recently introduced Achlioptas process of explosive percolation. It is also observed that in the limit of δ →0, the critical area coverage at the transition point tends to unity, implying that the limiting pattern is space filling. In this limit, the fractal dimension of the pore space at the percolation point has been estimated to be 1.42(10) and the contact network of the disk assembly is found to be a scale-free network.

  18. Mystery Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhattacharyya, Sonalee; Namakshi, Nama; Zunker, Christina; Warshauer, Hiroko K.; Warshauer, Max

    2016-01-01

    Making math more engaging for students is a challenge that every teacher faces on a daily basis. These authors write that they are constantly searching for rich problem-solving tasks that cover the necessary content, develop critical-thinking skills, and engage student interest. The Mystery Fraction activity provided here focuses on a key number…

  19. Pitch Fractionation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-12-15

    13 3. Solvent Fractionation Experiments .................................... 15 4. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectra for A240 Petrolem Pitch AG 12...34 and Mesophase Pitch AG 164B ............................... 21 5. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectra ................................... 23 6...compared by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) analysis using a Digilab Model FTS 14 spectrophotometer (Rockwell International, Anaheim, California

  20. Lava-Filled Craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 12 June 2003

    Craters and hills form high standing streamlined plateaus or islands in a channeled area. The plateaus are rounded in the upstream direction and taper to a point in the downstream direction, indicating that the direction of flow in this area was roughly south to north, or bottom to top. The channels appear to be filled with lava flow deposits that are raised above the channel in some areas. A lava flow diverges around a small streamlined hill near the bottom of the image and then merges again around the northern end of it. Near the top of the image is a crater with a breach on the east (right) side that allowed the lava to flow in, leaving a lobate, high standing deposit. The channels may have been formed by the lava flows that currently fill them or there may have been flow of liquid water that created them before the lava was emplaced.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 16, Longitude 183 East (177 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built

  1. Model Fractional Chern Insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrmann, Jörg; Liu, Zhao; Bergholtz, Emil J.

    2016-05-01

    We devise local lattice models whose ground states are model fractional Chern insulators—Abelian and non-Abelian topologically ordered states characterized by exact ground state degeneracies at any finite size and infinite entanglement gaps. Most saliently, we construct exact parent Hamiltonians for two distinct families of bosonic lattice generalizations of the Zk parafermion quantum Hall states: (i) color-entangled fractional Chern insulators at band filling fractions ν =k /(C +1 ) and (ii) nematic states at ν =k /2 , where C is the Chern number of the lowest band. In spite of a fluctuating Berry curvature, our construction is partially frustration free: the ground states reside entirely within the lowest band and exactly minimize a local (k +1 ) body repulsion term by term. In addition to providing the first known models hosting intriguing states such as higher Chern number generalizations of the Fibonacci anyon quantum Hall states, the remarkable stability and finite-size properties make our models particularly well suited for the study of novel phenomena involving, e.g., twist defects and proximity induced superconductivity, as well as being a guide for designing experiments.

  2. Fraction Reduction through Continued Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carley, Holly

    2011-01-01

    This article presents a method of reducing fractions without factoring. The ideas presented may be useful as a project for motivated students in an undergraduate number theory course. The discussion is related to the Euclidean Algorithm and its variations may lead to projects or early examples involving efficiency of an algorithm.

  3. Defining filled and empty space: reassessing the filled space illusion for active touch and vision.

    PubMed

    Collier, Elizabeth S; Lawson, Rebecca

    2016-09-01

    In the filled space illusion, an extent filled with gratings is estimated as longer than an equivalent extent that is apparently empty. However, researchers do not seem to have carefully considered the terms filled and empty when describing this illusion. Specifically, for active touch, smooth, solid surfaces have typically been used to represent empty space. Thus, it is not known whether comparing gratings to truly empty space (air) during active exploration by touch elicits the same illusionary effect. In Experiments 1 and 2, gratings were estimated as longer if they were compared to smooth, solid surfaces rather than being compared to truly empty space. Consistent with this, Experiment 3 showed that empty space was perceived as longer than solid surfaces when the two were compared directly. Together these results are consistent with the hypothesis that, for touch, the standard filled space illusion only occurs if gratings are compared to smooth, solid surfaces and that it may reverse if gratings are compared to empty space. Finally, Experiment 4 showed that gratings were estimated as longer than both solid and empty extents in vision, so the direction of the filled space illusion in vision was not affected by the nature of the comparator. These results are discussed in relation to the dual nature of active touch.

  4. Isotope fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Peter M.

    A rash of new controversy has emerged around the subject of mass-independent isotope fractionation effects, particularly in the case of the oxygen isotopes. To be sure, the controversy has been around for awhile, but it has been given new impetus by the results of a recent study by Mark H. Thiemens and John E. Heidenreich III of the University of California, San Diego (Science, March 4, 1983).Gustav Arrhenius has been trying to convince the planetary science community that chemical effects in isotope fractionation processes could explain observations in meteorites that appear to be outside of the traditionally understood mass-dependent fractionations (G. Arrhenius, J . L. McCrumb, and N. F. Friedman, Astrophys. Space Sci, 65, 297, 1974). Robert Clayton had made the basic observations of oxygen in carbonaceous chondrites that the slope of the δ17 versus δ18 line was 1 instead of the slope of ½ characteristic of terrestrial rocks and lunar samples (Ann. Rev. Nucl. Part. Sci., 28, 501, 1978). The mass-independent effects were ascribed to the apparent contribution of an ancient presolar system component of O16.

  5. Intermittent Surface Water Connectivity: Fill and Spill vs. Fill ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Intermittent surface connectivity can influence aquatic systems, since chemical and biotic movements are often associated with water flow. Although often referred to as fill and spill, wetlands also fill and merge. We examined the effects of these connection types on water levels, ion concentrations, and biotic communities of eight prairie pothole wetlands between 1979 and 2015. Fill and spill caused pulsed surface water connections that were limited to periods following spring snow melt. In contrast, two wetlands connected through fill and merge experienced a nearly continuous, 20-year surface water connection and had completely coincident water levels. Fill and spill led to minimal convergence in dissolved ions and macroinvertebrate composition, while these constituents converged under fill and merge. The primary factor determining difference in responses was duration of the surface water connection between wetland pairs. Our findings suggest that investigations into the effects of intermittent surface water connections should not consider these connections generically, but need to address the specific types of connections. In particular, fill and spill promotes external water exports while fill and merge favors internal storage. The behaviors of such intermittent connections will likely be accentuated under a future with more frequent and severe climate extremes. Under the Safe and Sustainable Water Resources National Program, work is being done to qu

  6. Explanation of ν=−12 fractional quantum Hall state in bilayer graphene

    PubMed Central

    Jacak, L.

    2016-01-01

    The commensurability condition is applied to determine the hierarchy of fractional filling of Landau levels for fractional quantum Hall effect (FQHE) in monolayer and bilayer graphene. Good agreement with experimental data is achieved. The presence of even-denominator filling fractions in the hierarchy of the FQHE in bilayer graphene is explained, including the state at ν=−12. PMID:27118883

  7. Rigid-plug elastic-water model for transient pipe flow with entrapped air pocket

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Ling; Liu, Prof. Deyou; Karney, Professor Byran W.; Zhang, Qin Fen; OU, CHANGQI

    2011-01-01

    Pressure transients in a rapidly filling pipe with an entrapped air pocket are investigated analytically. A rigid-plug elastic water model is developed by applying elastic water hammer to the majority of the water column while applying rigid water analysis to a small portion near the air-water interface, which avoids effectively the interpolation error of previous approaches. Moreover, another two simplified models are introduced respectively based on constant water length and by neglecting water elasticity. Verification of the three models is confirmed by experimental results. Calculations show that the simplification of constant water length is feasible for small air pockets. The complete rigid water model is appropriate for cases with large initial air volume. The rigid-plug elastic model can predict all the essential features for the entire range of initial air fraction considered in this study, and it is the effective model for analysis of pressure transients of entrapped air.

  8. Oil fill procesure for seismic marine streamer

    SciTech Connect

    Buckles, J.J.

    1990-08-21

    This patent describes a method for improving signal quality in urethane foam mounts utilized on hydrophones in conjunction with a seismic streamer. It comprises: purging a urethane foam mount with a fluid miscible with air and hydrocarbonaceous liquid having a selected density which liquid is used to dampen noise in a hydrophone where the fluid is a member selected from the group consisting of carbon dioxide, fluorocarbons, C{sub 1}{minus}C{sub 4} hydrocarbons, and mixtures thereof which member alone substantially displaces air from the streamer; and thereafter filling the seismic streamer with the hydrocarbonaceous liquid which mixes with the fluid and substantially retains the density of the liquid thereby maintaining neutral buoyancy of the streamer, substantially isolating the hydrophones from noise, and improving signal quality.

  9. Unconventional fractional quantum Hall effect in monolayer and bilayer graphene

    PubMed Central

    Jacak, Janusz; Jacak, Lucjan

    2016-01-01

    The commensurability condition is applied to determine the hierarchy of fractional fillings of Landau levels in monolayer and in bilayer graphene. The filling rates for fractional quantum Hall effect (FQHE) in graphene are found in the first three Landau levels in one-to-one agreement with the experimental data. The presence of even denominator filling fractions in the hierarchy for FQHE in bilayer graphene is explained. Experimentally observed hierarchy of FQHE in the first and second Landau levels in monolayer graphene and in the zeroth Landau level in bilayer graphene is beyond the conventional composite fermion interpretation but fits to the presented nonlocal topology commensurability condition. PMID:27877866

  10. Measurements of N2O and SF6 mole fraction between 1977 and 1998 in archived air samples from Cape Meares, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolfe, T.; Rice, A. L.; Radda, J.

    2015-12-01

    The quantification of greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere is important for monitoring imbalances in their global budgets between sources and sinks and their changes in time. Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a strong radiative trace gas with a GWP of ~300 times CO2 over a 100 year period and an atmospheric lifetime of ~100 years. The preindustrial revolution background concentration of N2O was ~270 ppb. Today, the concentration is ~330 ppb. Sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) is another potent greenhouse gas with a long lifetime (800 to 3200 years) and very large GWP (~23000 times CO2 over a 100 year period). Its current atmospheric concentration is low (~8 ppt today). Direct measurements of N2O and SF6 in air prior to the mid-1990s are few. Over 200 archived atmospheric gas samples collected at Cape Meares, Oregon between 1977 and 1998 were analyzed for their N2O and SF6 concentrations using an Agilent (model 6890 N) gas chromatograph fitted with an electron capture detector using a two column "heart-cut" technique. Precision of measurement of N2O and SF6 is calculated at 0.13% (1σ) and 1.35% (1σ) respectively. N2O concentrations in the late 1970s and early 1980s average around 303 ppb, rising to 309 ppb in the early 1990s. Between 1980 and 1990, the increase in N2O concentrations is found to be ~0.5 ppb/yr. SF6 concentrations during the late 1970s and early 1980s average around 0.9 ppt and rise slowly, reaching 1.6 ppt in the 1990s. We find that the increase in SF6 between 1980 and 1990 to be ~0.07 ppt/yr. We also discuss sample integrity in storage and observed temporal trends of N2O and SF6.

  11. Effect of feeding low-fiber fraction of air-classified sunflower (Helianthus annus L.) meal on laying hen productive performance and egg yolk cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Laudadio, V; Ceci, E; Lastella, N M B; Tufarelli, V

    2014-11-01

    The present study was designed to determine the effect on laying performance and egg quality resulting from total substitution of soybean meal (SBM) with low-fiber sunflower meal (SFM; Helianthus annus L.) meal in diet of hens. ISA Brown layers, 28 wk of age, were randomly allocated to 2 dietary treatments and fed for 10 wk. The hens were kept in a free-range environment and fed 2 wheat middling-based diets consisting of a control diet, which contained SBM (153 g/kg of diet), and a test diet containing low-fiber SFM (160 g/kg of diet) as the main protein source. Each dietary treatment was replicated 4 times. Low-fiber SFM was obtained by a combination of sieving and air classification processes. Feed consumption was recorded daily and egg production was calculated on a hen-day basis; eggs from each group were collected weekly to evaluate egg components and quality. The total substitution of SBM with low-fiber SFM had no adverse effect on growth performance of laying hens. Egg production and none of egg quality traits examined were influenced by dietary treatment, except for yolk color (P < 0.05) and percentage of large-size eggs (P < 0.05) that were improved in hens fed the low-fiber SFM diet. Including low-fiber SFM decreased serum and egg yolk total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations (P < 0.001), and increased high-density lipoprotein cholesterol level. Our results suggest that the replacement of conventional soybean with low-fiber sunflower meal may be a valid alternative in diets for laying hens to improve egg quality and to develop low-cholesterol eggs.

  12. Method and apparatus for filling thermal insulating systems

    DOEpatents

    Arasteh, D.K.

    1992-01-14

    A method for filling insulated glazing units is disclosed. The method utilizes a vacuum chamber in which the insulated glazing units are placed. The insulated glazing units and vacuum chamber are evacuated simultaneously. The units are then refilled with a low conductance gas such as Krypton while the chamber is simultaneously refilled with air. 3 figs.

  13. Method and apparatus for filling thermal insulating systems

    DOEpatents

    Arasteh, Dariush K.

    1992-01-01

    A method for filling insulated glazing units is disclosed. The method utilizes a vacuum chamber in which the insulated glazing units are placed. The insulated glazing units and vacuum chamber are evacuated simultaneously. The units are then refilled with a low conductance gas such as Krypton while the chamber is simultaneously refilled with air.

  14. Fuel-air munition and device

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, Gary A.

    1976-01-01

    An aerially delivered fuel-air munition consisting of an impermeable tank filled with a pressurized liquid fuel and joined at its two opposite ends with a nose section and a tail assembly respectively to complete an aerodynamic shape. On impact the tank is explosively ruptured to permit dispersal of the fuel in the form of a fuel-air cloud which is detonated after a preselected time delay by means of high explosive initiators ejected from the tail assembly. The primary component in the fuel is methylacetylene, propadiene, or mixtures thereof to which is added a small mole fraction of a relatively high vapor pressure liquid diluent or a dissolved gas diluent having a low solubility in the primary component.

  15. Detection of coronary artery disease by analysis of ventricular filling

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, T.R.; Fountos, A.; Biello, D.R.; Ludbrook, P.A.

    1987-05-01

    Rapid left-ventricular (LV) diastolic filling assessed by radionuclide ventriculography is reevaluated in patients with coronary artery disease and normal LV systolic function considering the effects of age and heart rate. Thirty normal subjects were studied along with 44 patients with coronary artery disease and normal LV ejection fractions. The peak filling rate was not quite significantly different between the controls and patients (2.67 +/- 0.95 EDV/sec versus 2.25 +/- 0.65 EDV/sec, p = 0.08), and the time to peak filling rate was not different. When an inappropriate young control group was compared with coronary disease patients aged 40-65 yr, large differences in peak filling rate were seen. Sensitivity for detection of disease was very low (0%-9%) except when the inappropriate young control group was used. Thus, analysis of rapid diastolic filling cannot detect individual patients with coronary disease who have normal LV ejection fractions. Previous reports to the contrary may have suffered from failure to include the effects of age and heart rate.

  16. Melting and crystallization of ice in partially filled nanopores.

    PubMed

    Solveyra, Estefanía González; de la Llave, Ezequiel; Scherlis, Damián A; Molinero, Valeria

    2011-12-08

    We investigate the melting and formation of ice in partially filled hydrophilic and hydrophobic nanopores of 3 nm diameter using molecular dynamics simulations with the mW water model. Above the melting temperature, the partially filled nanopores contain two water phases in coexistence: a condensed liquid plug and a surface-adsorbed phase. It has been long debated in the literature whether the surface-adsorbed phase is involved in the crystallization. We find that only the liquid plug crystallizes on cooling, producing ice I with stacks of hexagonal and cubic layers. The confined ice is wetted by a premelted liquid layer that persists in equilibrium with ice down to temperatures well below its melting point. The liquid-ice transition is first-order-like but rounded. We determine the temperature and enthalpy of melting as a function of the filling fraction of the pore. In agreement with experiments, we find that the melting temperature of the nanoconfined ice is strongly depressed with respect to the bulk T(m), it depends weakly on the filling fraction and is insensitive to the hydrophobicity of the pore wall. The state of water in the crystallized hydrophilic and hydrophobic pores, however, is not the same: the hydrophobic pore has a negligible density of the surface-adsorbed phase and higher fraction of water in the ice phase than the hydrophilic pore. The widths of the ice cores are nevertheless comparable for the hydrophobic and hydrophilic pores, and this may explain their almost identical melting temperatures. The enthalpy of melting ΔH(m), when normalized by the actual amount of ice in the pore, is indistinguishable for the hydrophobic and hydrophilic pores, insensitive to the filling fraction, and within the error bars, the same as the difference in enthalpy between bulk liquid and bulk ice evaluated at the temperature of melting of ice in the nanopores.

  17. Hierarchy of fillings for the FQHE in monolayer graphene

    PubMed Central

    Łydżba, Patrycja; Jacak, Lucjan; Jacak, Janusz

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the commensurability conditions, which originated from the unique topology of two-dimensional systems, are applied to determine the quantum Hall effect hierarchy in the case of a monolayer graphene. The fundamental difference in a definition of a typical semiconductor and a monolayer graphene filling factor is pointed out. The calculations are undertaken for all spin-valley branches of two lowest Landau levels, since only they are currently experimentally accessible. The obtained filling factors are compared with the experimental data and a very good agreement is achieved. The work also introduces a concept of the single-loop fractional quantum Hall effect. PMID:26392385

  18. Mineralogical, chemical and toxicological characterization of urban air particles.

    PubMed

    Čupr, Pavel; Flegrová, Zuzana; Franců, Juraj; Landlová, Linda; Klánová, Jana

    2013-04-01

    Systematic characterization of morphological, mineralogical, chemical and toxicological properties of various size fractions of the atmospheric particulate matter was a main focus of this study together with an assessment of the human health risks they pose. Even though near-ground atmospheric aerosols have been a subject of intensive research in recent years, data integrating chemical composition of particles and health risks are still scarce and the particle size aspect has not been properly addressed yet. Filling this gap, however, is necessary for reliable risk assessment. A high volume ambient air sampler equipped with a multi-stage cascade impactor was used for size specific particle collection, and all 6 fractions were a subject of detailed characterization of chemical (PAHs) and mineralogical composition of the particles, their mass size distribution and genotoxic potential of organic extracts. Finally, the risk level for inhalation exposure associated to the carcinogenic character of the studied PAHs has been assessed. The finest fraction (<0.45 μm) exhibited the highest mass, highest active surface, highest amount of associated PAHs and also highest direct and indirect genotoxic potentials in our model air sample. Risk assessment of inhalation scenario indicates the significant cancer risk values in PM 1.5 size fraction. This presented new approach proved to be a useful tool for human health risk assessment in the areas with significant levels of air dust concentration.

  19. Pairing in half-filled Landau level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhiqiang; Mandal, Ipsita; Chung, Suk Bum; Chakravarty, Sudip

    2015-03-01

    Pairing of composite fermions in half-filled Landau level state is reexamined by solving the BCS gap equation with full frequency dependent current-current interactions. Our results show that there can be a continuous transition from the Halperin-Lee-Read state to a chiral odd angular momentum Cooper pair state for short-range contact interaction. This is at odds with the previously established conclusion of first order pairing transition, in which the low frequency effective interaction was assumed for the entire frequency range. We find that even if the low frequency effective interaction is repulsive, it is compensated by the high frequency regime, which is attractive. We construct the phase diagrams and show that l = 1 angular momentum channel is quite different from higher angular momentum channel l >= 3 . Remarkably, the full frequency dependent analysis applied to the bilayer Hall system with a total filling fraction ν =1/2 +1/2 is quantitatively changed from the previously established results but not qualitatively. This work was supported by US NSF under the Grant DMR-1004520, the funds from the David S. Saxon Presidential Chair at UCLA(37952), and by the Institute for Basic Science in Korea through the Young Scientist grant (5199-2014003).

  20. Pairing in half-filled Landau level

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhiqiang; Mandal, Ipsita; Chung, Suk Bum; Chakravarty, Sudip

    2014-12-15

    Pairing of composite fermions in half-filled Landau level state is reexamined by solving the BCS gap equation with full frequency dependent current–current interactions. Our results show that there can be a continuous transition from the Halperin–Lee–Read state to a chiral odd angular momentum Cooper pair state for short-range contact interaction. This is at odds with the previously established conclusion of first order pairing transition, in which the low frequency effective interaction was assumed for the entire frequency range. We find that even if the low frequency effective interaction is repulsive, it is compensated by the high frequency regime, which is attractive. We construct the phase diagrams and show that ℓ=1 angular momentum channel is quite different from higher angular momenta ℓ≥3. Remarkably, the full frequency dependent analysis applied to the bilayer Hall system with a total filling fraction ν=1/2 +1/2 is quantitatively changed from the previously established results but not qualitatively.

  1. Magneto-optical properties of magnetic photonic crystal fiber of terbium gallium garnet filled with magnetic fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otmani, Hamza; Bouchemat, Mohamed; Bouchemat, Touraya; Lahoubi, Mahieddine; Pu, Shengli; Deghdak, Rachid

    2016-11-01

    We present in this work, magneto-optical (MO) properties of a magnetophotonic crystal fiber (MPCF) based on terbium gallium garnet Tb3Ga5O12 or TGG. The air holes of a periodic triangular lattice are filled with magnetic fluid (MF). With a light which can be confined in the core area of this MF filled MPCF we obtain a confinement corresponding to the propagation of the single mode by assuming an effective index (neff). The variations of neff as a function of the gyrotropy parameter (g) and magnetic nanoparticle volume fraction concentrations are well established at the telecommunication wavelength λ = 1.55 μm. The TE-TM mode conversion based on the Faraday rotation and modal birefringence are then numerically simulated. Faraday rotation exhibits largest value of 8700.08°/cm at MF concentration of 0.25% and g = 0.0144, whereas the modal birefringence is reduced to 0.00177 at the same conditions. These results could be helpful for experimentally designing and realizing isolators with these filled MF-MPCFs based on this TGG material. They appear to possess significant potential for the practical applications due to their unique MO properties.

  2. Filling carbon nanotubes with particles.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byong M; Qian, Shizhi; Bau, Haim H

    2005-05-01

    The filling of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with fluorescent particles was studied experimentally and theoretically. The fluorescent signals emitted by the particles were visible through the walls of the nanotubes, and the particles inside the tubes were observable with an electron microscope. Taking advantage of the template-grown carbon nanotubes' transparency to fluorescent light, we measured the filling rate of the tubes with particles at room conditions. Liquids such as ethylene glycol, water, and ethylene glycol/water mixtures, laden with 50 nm diameter fluorescent particles, were brought into contact with 500 nm diameter CNTs. The liquid and the particles' transport were observed, respectively, with optical and fluorescence microscopy. The CNTs were filled controllably with particles by the complementary action of capillary forces and the evaporation of the liquid. The experimental results were compared and favorably agreed with theoretical predictions. This is the first report on fluorescence studies of particle transport in carbon nanotubes.

  3. Paleovalley fills: Trunk vs. tributary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kvale, E.P.; Archer, A.W.

    2007-01-01

    A late Mississippian-early Pennsylvanian eustatic sea level drop resulted in a complex lowstand drainage network being eroded across the Illinois Basin in the eastern United States. This drainage system was filled during the early part of the Pennsylvanian. Distinct differences can be recognized between the trunk and tributary paleovalley fills. Fills preserved within the trunk systems tend to be fluvially dominated and consist of bed-load deposits of coarse- to medium-grained sandstone and conglomerate. Conversely, the incised valleys of tributary systems tend to be filled with dark mudstone, thinly interbedded sandstones, and mudstones and siltstones. These finer grained facies exhibit marine influences manifested by tidal rhythmites, certain traces fossils, and macro- and microfauna. Examples of tributary and trunk systems, separated by no more than 7 km (4.3 mi) along strike, exhibit these styles of highly contrasting fills. Useful analogs for understanding this Pennsylvanian system include the Quaternary glacial sluiceways present in the lower Ohio, White, and Wabash river valleys of Indiana (United States) and the modern Amazon River (Brazil). Both the Amazon River and the Quaternary rivers of Indiana have (or had) trunk rivers that are (were) dominated by large quantities of bed load relative to their tributaries. The trunk valley systems of these analogs aggraded much more rapidly than their tributary valleys, which evolved into lakes because depositional rates along the trunk are (were) so high that the mouths of the tributaries have been dammed by bed-load deposits. These Holocene systems illustrate that sediment yields can significantly influence the nature of fill successions within incised valleys independent of rates of sea level changes or proximity to highstand coastlines. Copyright ?? 2007. The American Association of Petroleum Geologists. All rights reserved.

  4. Weaving and bonding method to prevent warp and fill distortion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Gary L. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A method to prevent fiber distortion in textile materials employed in a modified weaving process. In a first embodiment, a tacifier in powder form is applied to the yarn and melted while on the fabric. Cool air is then supplied after the tacifier has melted to expedite the solidification of the tacifier. In a second embodiment, a solution form of a tacifier is used by dissolving the tacifier into a solvent that has a high evaporation rate. The solution is then sprayed onto the fabric or fill yarn as each fill yarn is inserted into a shed of the fabric. A third embodiment applies the tacifier in a liquid form that has not been dissolved in a solvent. That is, the tacifier is melted and is sprayed as a liquid onto the fabric or fill yarn as it is being extracted from a fill yarn spool prior to the fill yarn being inserted into the shed of the fabric. A fourth embodiment employs adhesive yarns contained as an integral part of the warp or fill yarn. Additional tacifier material is not required because a matrix is used as the tacifier. The matrix is then locally melted using heating elements on clamping bars or take-up rollers, is cooled, if necessary, and solidified.

  5. Gas-Filled Capillary Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinhauer, L. C.; Kimura, W. D.

    2006-11-01

    We have developed a 1-D, quasi-steady-state numerical model for a gas-filled capillary discharge that is designed to aid in selecting the optimum capillary radius in order to guide a laser beam with the required intensity through the capillary. The model also includes the option for an external solenoid B-field around the capillary, which increases the depth of the parabolic density channel in the capillary, thereby allowing for propagation of smaller laser beam waists. The model has been used to select the parameters for gas-filled capillaries to be utilized during the Staged Electron Laser Acceleration — Laser Wakefield (STELLA-LW) experiment.

  6. QENS investigation of filled rubbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triolo, A.; Lo Celso, F.; Negroni, F.; Arrighi, V.; Qian, H.; Lechner, R. E.; Desmedt, A.; Pieper, J.; Frick, B.; Triolo, R.

    The polymer segmental dynamics is investigated in a series of silica-filled rubbers. The presence of inert fillers in polymers greatly affects the mechanical and physical performance of the final materials. For example, silica has been proposed as a reinforcing agent of elastomers in tire production. Results from quasielastic neutron scattering and Dynamic Mechanical Thermal Analysis (DMTA) measurements are presented on styrene-ran-butadiene rubber filled with silica. A clear indication is obtained of the existence of a bimodal dynamics, which can be rationalized in terms of the relaxation of bulk rubber and the much slower relaxation of the rubber adsorbed on the filler surface.

  7. Can-Filled Crash Barrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, A. H.

    1983-01-01

    Crash barrier composed largely of used aluminum beverage cans protects occupants of cars in collisions with poles or trees. Lightweight, can-filled barrier very effective in softening impact of an automobile in head-on and off-angle collisions. Preliminary results indicate barrier is effective in collisions up to 40 mi/h (64 km/h).

  8. Filling in the retinal image

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larimer, James; Piantanida, Thomas

    1990-01-01

    The optics of the eye form an image on a surface at the back of the eyeball called the retina. The retina contains the photoreceptors that sample the image and convert it into a neural signal. The spacing of the photoreceptors in the retina is not uniform and varies with retinal locus. The central retinal field, called the macula, is densely packed with photoreceptors. The packing density falls off rapidly as a function of retinal eccentricity with respect to the macular region and there are regions in which there are no photoreceptors at all. The retinal regions without photoreceptors are called blind spots or scotomas. The neural transformations which convert retinal image signals into percepts fills in the gaps and regularizes the inhomogeneities of the retinal photoreceptor sampling mosaic. The filling-in mechamism plays an important role in understanding visual performance. The filling-in mechanism is not well understood. A systematic collaborative research program at the Ames Research Center and SRI in Menlo Park, California, was designed to explore this mechanism. It was shown that the perceived fields which are in fact different from the image on the retina due to filling-in, control some aspects of performance and not others. Researchers have linked these mechanisms to putative mechanisms of color coding and color constancy.

  9. Space-filling polyhedral sorbents

    DOEpatents

    Haaland, Peter

    2016-06-21

    Solid sorbents, systems, and methods for pumping, storage, and purification of gases are disclosed. They derive from the dynamics of porous and free convection for specific gas/sorbent combinations and use space filling polyhedral microliths with facial aplanarities to produce sorbent arrays with interpenetrating interstitial manifolds of voids.

  10. Unsteady Capillary Filling By Electrocapillarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, In Seok; Lee, Jung A.

    2016-11-01

    Unsteady filling of electrolyte solution inside a nanochannel by the electrocapillarity effect is studied. The filling rate is predicted as a function of the bulk concentration of the electrolyte, the surface potential (or surface charge density), and the cross sectional shape of the channel. Since the driving force of the flow is the electrocapillarity, it is first analyzed by using the solution of the Poisson-Boltzmann equation. From the analysis, it is found that the results for many different cross sectional shapes can be unified with good accuracy if the hydraulic radius is adopted as the characteristic length scale of the problem. Especially in the case of constant surface potential, for both limits of κh -> 0 and κh -> ∞ , it can be shown theoretically that the electrocapillarity is independent of the cross sectional shape if the hydraulic radius is the same. In order to analyze the geometric effects more systematically, we consider the regular N-polygons with the same hydraulic radius and the rectangles of different aspect ratios. Washburn's approach is then adopted to predict the filling rate of electrolyte solution inside a nanaochannel. It is found that the average filling velocity decreases as N increases in the case of regular N-polygons with the same hydraulic radius. This is because of that the regular N-polygons of the same hydraulic radius share the same inscribing circle. This work has been supported by BK21+ program.

  11. Fractional tunnelling resonance in plasmonic media

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Ji-Hun; -Han Park, Q.

    2013-01-01

    Metals can transmit light by tunnelling when they possess skin-depth thickness. Tunnelling can be resonantly enhanced if resonators are added to each side of a metal film, such as additional dielectric layers or periodic structures on a metal surface. Here we show that, even with no additional resonators, tunnelling resonance can arise if the metal film is confined and fractionally thin. In a slit waveguide filled with a negative permittivity metallic slab of thickness L, resonance is shown to arise at fractional thicknesses (L = Const./m; m = 1,2,3,…) by the excitation of ‘vortex plasmons'. We experimentally demonstrate fractional tunnelling resonance and vortex plasmons using microwave and negative permittivity metamaterials. The measured spectral peaks of the fractional tunnelling resonance and modes of the vortex plasmons agree with theoretical predictions. Fractional tunnelling resonance and vortex plasmons open new perspectives in resonance physics and promise potential applications in nanotechnology. PMID:23939460

  12. Constitutive parameter de-embedding using inhomogeneously-filled rectangular waveguides with longitudinal section modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, A.; Dominek, A. K.

    1990-01-01

    Constitutive parameter extraction from S parameter data using a rectangular waveguide whose cross section is partially filled with a material sample as opposed to being completely filled was examined. One reason for studying a partially filled geometry is to analyze the effect of air gaps between the sample and fixture for the extraction of constitutive parameters. Air gaps can occur in high temperature parameter measurements when the sample was prepared at room temperature. Single port and two port measurement approaches to parameter extraction are also discussed.

  13. Air emissions from exposed contaminated sediments and dredged material

    SciTech Connect

    Valsaraj, K.T.; Ravikrishna, R.; Reible, D.D.; Thibodeaux, L.J.; Choy, B.; Price, C.B.; Brannon, J.M.; Myers, T.E.; Yost, S.

    1999-01-01

    The sediment-to-air fluxes of two polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (phenanthrene and pyrene) and a heterocyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (dibenzofuran) from a laboratory-contaminated sediment and those of three polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (naphthalene, phenanthrene, and pyrene) from three field sediments were investigated in experimental microcosms. The flux was dependent on the sediment moisture content, air-filled porosity, and the relative humidity of the air flowing over the sediment surface. The mathematical model predictions of flux from the laboratory-spiked sediment agreed with observed values. The fluxes of compounds with higher hydrophobicity were more air-side resistance controlled. Conspicuous differences were observed between the fluxes from the laboratory-spiked and two of the three field sediments. Two field sediments showed dramatic increases in mass-transfer resistances with increasing exposure time and had significant fractions of oil and grease. The proposed mathematical model was inadequate for predicting the flux from the latter field sediments. Sediment reworking enhanced the fluxes from the field sediments due to exposure of fresh solids to the air. Variations in flux from the lab-spiked sediment as a result of change in air relative humidity were due to differences in retardation of chemicals on a dry or wet surface sediment. High moisture in the air over the dry sediment increased the competition for sorption sites between water and contaminant and increased the contaminant flux.

  14. Understanding the Relationship Between Filling Pattern and Part Quality in Die Casting

    SciTech Connect

    Jerald Brevick; R. Allen Miller

    2004-03-15

    The overall objective of this research project was to investigate phenomena involved in the filling of die cavities with molten alloy in the cold chamber die-casting process. It has long been recognized that the filling pattern of molten metal entering a die cavity influences the quality of die-cast parts. Filling pattern may be described as the progression of molten metal filling the die cavity geometry as a function of time. The location, size and geometric configuration of points of metal entry (gates), as well as the geometry of the casting cavity itself, have great influence on filling patterns. Knowledge of the anticipated filling patterns in die-castings is important for designers. Locating gates to avoid undesirable flow patterns that may entrap air in the casting is critical to casting quality - as locating vents to allow air to escape from the cavity (last places to fill). Casting quality attributes that are commonly flow related are non-fills, poor surface finish, internal porosity due to trapped air, cold shuts, cold laps, flow lines, casting skin delamination (flaking), and blistering during thermal treatment.

  15. Particle-filled microporous materials

    DOEpatents

    McAllister, Jerome W.; Kinzer, Kevin E.; Mrozinski, James S.; Johnson, Eric J.

    1992-07-14

    A microporous particulate-filled thermoplastic polymeric article is provided. The article can be in the form of a film, a fiber, or a tube. The article has a thermoplastic polymeric structure having a plurality of interconnected passageways to provide a network of communicating pores. The microporous structure contains discrete submicron or low micron-sized particulate filler, the particulate filler being substantially non-agglomerated.

  16. Particle-filled microporous materials

    DOEpatents

    McAllister, Jerome W.; Kinzer, Kevin E.; Mrozinski, James S.; Johnson, Eric J.; Dyrud, James F.

    1990-01-01

    A microporous particulate-filled thermoplastic polymeric article is provided. The article can be in the form of a film, a fiber, or a tube. The article has a thermoplastic polymeric structure having a plurality of interconnected passageways to provide a network of communicating pores. The microporous structure contains discrete submicron or low micron-sized particulate filler, the particulate filler being substantially non-agglomerated.

  17. Particle-filled microporous materials

    DOEpatents

    McAllister, J.W.; Kinzer, K.E.; Mrozinski, J.S.; Johnson, E.J.; Dyrud, J.F.

    1990-09-18

    A microporous particulate-filled thermoplastic polymeric article is provided. The article can be in the form of a film, a fiber, or a tube. The article has a thermoplastic polymeric structure having a plurality of interconnected passageways to provide a network of communicating pores. The microporous structure contains discrete submicron or low micron-sized particulate filler, the particulate filler being substantially non-agglomerated. 3 figs.

  18. Safety in Royal Filling Factories

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1950-10-01

    factories and certain special trials were staged to ascertain effect of explosion on underground Magazines. (See C.S.A.R*s report, Glascoed trials). On...spacing were the result of long experience of the effects of explosions in filling, and incidentally resulted in a considerable economy in cost of...etc (9) Any ignition is quenched in its initial stages and/or an explosive effect kept to a minimum. (10) Operatives are made fully aware of the

  19. 24. BUILDING NO. 452, ORDNANCE FACILITY (BAG CHARGE FILLING PLANT), ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. BUILDING NO. 452, ORDNANCE FACILITY (BAG CHARGE FILLING PLANT), INTERIOR VIEW LOOKING WEST AT NORTH END OF CENTRAL CORRIDOR (ROOM 3). STAIRWAY WORKBENCH WITH COMPRESSED-AIR POWERED CARTRIDGE LOADER. ARMORED PASS-THROUGH OF TRANSFER BOX FOR PASSING EXPLOSIVES MATERIALS THROUGH TO NEXT ROOM TO THE NORTH. - Picatinny Arsenal, 400 Area, Gun Bag Loading District, State Route 15 near I-80, Dover, Morris County, NJ

  20. Fractional vector calculus and fractional Maxwell's equations

    SciTech Connect

    Tarasov, Vasily E.

    2008-11-15

    The theory of derivatives and integrals of non-integer order goes back to Leibniz, Liouville, Grunwald, Letnikov and Riemann. The history of fractional vector calculus (FVC) has only 10 years. The main approaches to formulate a FVC, which are used in the physics during the past few years, will be briefly described in this paper. We solve some problems of consistent formulations of FVC by using a fractional generalization of the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. We define the differential and integral vector operations. The fractional Green's, Stokes' and Gauss's theorems are formulated. The proofs of these theorems are realized for simplest regions. A fractional generalization of exterior differential calculus of differential forms is discussed. Fractional nonlocal Maxwell's equations and the corresponding fractional wave equations are considered.

  1. Initialized Fractional Calculus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzo, Carl F.; Hartley, Tom T.

    2000-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the need for a nonconstant initialization for the fractional calculus and establishes a basic definition set for the initialized fractional differintegral. This definition set allows the formalization of an initialized fractional calculus. Two basis calculi are considered; the Riemann-Liouville and the Grunwald fractional calculi. Two forms of initialization, terminal and side are developed.

  2. Tempered fractional calculus

    SciTech Connect

    Sabzikar, Farzad; Meerschaert, Mark M.; Chen, Jinghua

    2015-07-15

    Fractional derivatives and integrals are convolutions with a power law. Multiplying by an exponential factor leads to tempered fractional derivatives and integrals. Tempered fractional diffusion equations, where the usual second derivative in space is replaced by a tempered fractional derivative, govern the limits of random walk models with an exponentially tempered power law jump distribution. The limiting tempered stable probability densities exhibit semi-heavy tails, which are commonly observed in finance. Tempered power law waiting times lead to tempered fractional time derivatives, which have proven useful in geophysics. The tempered fractional derivative or integral of a Brownian motion, called a tempered fractional Brownian motion, can exhibit semi-long range dependence. The increments of this process, called tempered fractional Gaussian noise, provide a useful new stochastic model for wind speed data. A tempered fractional difference forms the basis for numerical methods to solve tempered fractional diffusion equations, and it also provides a useful new correlation model in time series.

  3. Filling of carbon nanotubes and nanofibres

    PubMed Central

    Gately, Reece D

    2015-01-01

    Summary The reliable production of carbon nanotubes and nanofibres is a relatively new development, and due to their unique structure, there has been much interest in filling their hollow interiors. In this review, we provide an overview of the most common approaches for filling these carbon nanostructures. We highlight that filled carbon nanostructures are an emerging material for biomedical applications. PMID:25821693

  4. 7 CFR 58.923 - Filling containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Filling containers. 58.923 Section 58.923 Agriculture... Procedures § 58.923 Filling containers. (a) The filling of small containers with product shall be done in a sanitary manner. The containers shall not contaminate or detract from the quality of the product in any...

  5. Fractional quantum Hall effect in the absence of Landau levels.

    PubMed

    Sheng, D N; Gu, Zheng-Cheng; Sun, Kai; Sheng, L

    2011-07-12

    It is well known that the topological phenomena with fractional excitations, the fractional quantum Hall effect, will emerge when electrons move in Landau levels. Here we show the theoretical discovery of the fractional quantum Hall effect in the absence of Landau levels in an interacting fermion model. The non-interacting part of our Hamiltonian is the recently proposed topologically non-trivial flat-band model on a checkerboard lattice. In the presence of nearest-neighbouring repulsion, we find that at 1/3 filling, the Fermi-liquid state is unstable towards the fractional quantum Hall effect. At 1/5 filling, however, a next-nearest-neighbouring repulsion is needed for the occurrence of the 1/5 fractional quantum Hall effect when nearest-neighbouring repulsion is not too strong. We demonstrate the characteristic features of these novel states and determine the corresponding phase diagram.

  6. Experimental study of the intraventricular filling vortex in diastolic dysfunction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santhanakrishnan, Arvind; Samaee, Milad; Nelsen, Nicholas

    2016-11-01

    Heart failure with normal ejection fraction (HFNEF) is a clinical syndrome that is prevalent in over half of heart failure patients. HFNEF patients typically show diastolic dysfunction, caused by a decrease in relaxation capability of the left ventricular (LV) muscle tissue and/or an increase in LV chamber stiffness. Numerous studies using non-invasive medical imaging have shown that an intraventricular filling vortex is formed in the LV during diastole. We conducted 2D particle image velocimetry and hemodynamics measurements on a left heart simulator to investigate diastolic flow under increasing LV wall stiffness, LV wall thickness and heart rate (HR) conditions. Flexible-walled, optically clear LV physical models cast from silicone were fitted within a fluid-filled acrylic chamber. Pulsatile flow within the LV model was generated using a piston pump and 2-component Windkessel elements were used to tune the least stiff (baseline) LV model to physiological conditions. The results show that peak circulation of the intraventricular filling vortex is diminished in conditions of diastolic dysfunction as compared to the baseline case. Increasing HR exacerbated the circulation of the filling vortex across all cases.

  7. Stratospheric Air Sub-sampler (SAS) and its application to analysis of Δ17O(CO2) from small air samples collected with an AirCore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janina Mrozek, Dorota; van der Veen, Carina; Hofmann, Magdalena E. G.; Chen, Huilin; Kivi, Rigel; Heikkinen, Pauli; Röckmann, Thomas

    2016-11-01

    We present the set-up and a scientific application of the Stratospheric Air Sub-sampler (SAS), a device to collect and to store the vertical profile of air collected with an AirCore (Karion et al., 2010) in numerous sub-samples for later analysis in the laboratory. The SAS described here is a 20 m long 1/4 inch stainless steel tubing that is separated by eleven valves to divide the tubing into 10 identical segments, but it can be easily adapted to collect smaller or larger samples. In the collection phase the SAS is directly connected to the outlet of an optical analyzer that measures the mole fractions of CO2, CH4 and CO from an AirCore sampler. The stratospheric part (or if desired any part of the AirCore air) is then directed through the SAS. When the SAS is filled with the selected air, the valves are closed and the vertical profile is maintained in the different segments of the SAS. The segments can later be analysed to retrieve vertical profiles of other trace gas signatures that require slower instrumentation. As an application, we describe the coupling of the SAS to an analytical system to determine the 17O excess of CO2, which is a tracer for photochemical processing of stratospheric air. For this purpose the analytical system described by Mrozek et al. (2015) was adapted for analysis of air directly from the SAS. The performance of the coupled system is demonstrated for a set of air samples from an AirCore flight in November 2014 near Sodankylä, Finland. The standard error for a 25 mL air sample at stratospheric CO2 mole fraction is 0.56 ‰ (1σ) for δ17O and 0.03 ‰ (1σ) for both δ18O and δ13C. Measured Δ17O(CO2) values show a clear correlation with N2O in agreement with already published data.

  8. Comparing three gap filling methods for eddy covariance crop evapotranspiration measurements within a hilly agricultural catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudhina, Nissaf; Prévot, Laurent; Zitouna Chebbi, Rim; Mekki, Insaf; Jacob, Frédéric; Ben Mechlia, Netij; Masmoudi, Moncef

    2015-04-01

    Hilly watersheds are widespread throughout coastal areas around the Mediterranean Basin. They experience agricultural intensification since hilly topographies allow water-harvesting techniques that compensate for rainfall storage, water being a strong limiting factor for crop production. Their fragility is likely to increase with climate change and human pressure. Within semi-arid hilly watershed conditions, evapotranspiration (ETR) is a major term of both land surface energy and water balances. Several methods allow determining ETR, based either on direct measurements, or on estimations and forecast from weather and soil moisture data using simulation models. Among these methods, eddy covariance technique is based on high-frequency measurements of fluctuations of wind speed and air temperature / humidity, to directly determine the convective fluxes between land surface and atmosphere. In spite of experimental and instrumental progresses, datasets of eddy covariance measurements often experience large portions of missing data. The latter results from energy power failure, experimental maintenance, instrumental troubles such as krypton hygrometer malfunctioning because of air humidity, or quality assessment based filtering in relation to spatial homogeneity and temporal stationarity of turbulence within surface boundary layer. This last item is all the more important as hilly topography, when combined with strong winds, tends to increase turbulence within surface boundary layer. The main objective of this study is to establish gap-filling procedures to provide complete chronicles of eddy-covariance measurements of crop evapotranspiration (ETR) within a hilly agricultural watershed. We focus on the specific conditions induced by the combination of hilly topography and wind direction, by discriminating between upslope and downslope winds. The experiment was set for three field configurations within hilly conditions: two flux measurement stations (A, B) were installed

  9. Fraction Sense: Foundational Understandings.

    PubMed

    Fennell, Francis Skip; Karp, Karen

    2016-08-09

    The intent of this commentary is to identify elements of fraction sense and note how the research studies provided in this special issue, in related but somewhat different ways, validate the importance of such understandings. Proficiency with fractions serves as a prerequisite for student success in higher level mathematics, as well as serving as a gateway to many occupations and varied contexts beyond the mathematics classroom. Fraction sense is developed through instructional opportunities involving fraction equivalence and magnitude, comparing and ordering fractions, using fraction benchmarks, and computational estimation. Such foundations are then extended to operations involving fractions and decimals and applications involving proportional reasoning. These components of fraction sense are all addressed in the studies provided in this issue, with particular consideration devoted to the significant importance of the use of the number line as a central representational tool for conceptually understanding fraction magnitude.

  10. TEMPERED FRACTIONAL CALCULUS

    PubMed Central

    MEERSCHAERT, MARK M.; SABZIKAR, FARZAD; CHEN, JINGHUA

    2014-01-01

    Fractional derivatives and integrals are convolutions with a power law. Multiplying by an exponential factor leads to tempered fractional derivatives and integrals. Tempered fractional diffusion equations, where the usual second derivative in space is replaced by a tempered fractional derivative, govern the limits of random walk models with an exponentially tempered power law jump distribution. The limiting tempered stable probability densities exhibit semi-heavy tails, which are commonly observed in finance. Tempered power law waiting times lead to tempered fractional time derivatives, which have proven useful in geophysics. The tempered fractional derivative or integral of a Brownian motion, called a tempered fractional Brownian motion, can exhibit semi-long range dependence. The increments of this process, called tempered fractional Gaussian noise, provide a useful new stochastic model for wind speed data. A tempered difference forms the basis for numerical methods to solve tempered fractional diffusion equations, and it also provides a useful new correlation model in time series. PMID:26085690

  11. The Cardiac Cycle and the Physiological Basis of Left Ventricular Contraction, Ejection, Relaxation, and Filling

    PubMed Central

    Fukuta, Hidekatsu; Little, William C.

    2008-01-01

    Synopsis Heart failure is defined as the pathological state in which the heart is unable to pump blood at a rate required by the metabolizing tissues or can do so only with an elevated filling pressure. Heart failure in adults most frequently results from the inability of the left ventricle to fill (diastolic performance) and/or eject (systolic performance) blood. The severity of heart failure and its prognosis are more closely related to the degree of diastolic filling abnormalities than the ejection fraction. This underscores the importance of understanding the mechanisms of diastolic abnormalities in heart failure. PMID:18313620

  12. Thermal Performance Evaluation of Walls with Gas Filled Panel Insulation

    SciTech Connect

    Shrestha, Som S.; Desjarlais, Andre Omer; Atchley, Jerald Allen

    2014-11-01

    Gas filled insulation panels (GFP) are very light weight and compact (when uninflated) advanced insulation products. GFPs consist of multiple layers of thin, low emittance (low-e) metalized aluminum. When expanded, the internal, low-e aluminum layers form a honeycomb structure. These baffled polymer chambers are enveloped by a sealed barrier and filled with either air or a low-conductivity gas. The sealed exterior aluminum foil barrier films provide thermal resistance, flammability protection, and properties to contain air or a low conductivity inert gas. This product was initially developed with a grant from the U.S. Department of Energy. The unexpanded product is nearly flat for easy storage and transport. Therefore, transportation volume and weight of the GFP to fill unit volume of wall cavity is much smaller compared to that of other conventional insulation products. This feature makes this product appealing to use at Army Contingency Basing, when transportation cost is significant compared to the cost of materials. The objective of this study is to evaluate thermal performance of walls, similar to those used at typical Barracks Hut (B-Hut) hard shelters, when GFPs are used in the wall cavities. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) tested performance of the wall in the rotatable guarded hotbox (RGHB) according to the ASTM C 1363 standard test method.

  13. Defect-enhanced void filling and novel filled phases of open-structure skutterudites

    DOE PAGES

    Xi, Lili; Qiu, Yuting; Shi, Xun; ...

    2015-05-14

    Here, we report the design of novel filled CoSb3 skutterudite phases based on a combination of filling and Sb-substituted Ga/In defects. Ga/In doped skutterudite phases with Li-, Nd-, and Sm-fillings can be formed via this strategy, which can have relatively wider ranges of carrier concentration than other conventional filled skutterudite phases.

  14. 30 CFR 816.72 - Disposal of excess spoil: Valley fills/head-of-hollow fills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... incorporated into the design and construction of the fill as follows. (1) The fill shall have, along the... spoil fill and from seeps and springs in the foundation of the disposal area. Rocks used in the rock... maintained at the head of the fill during and after construction, to intercept surface runoff and...

  15. Defect-enhanced void filling and novel filled phases of open-structure skutterudites

    SciTech Connect

    Xi, Lili; Qiu, Yuting; Shi, Xun; Zhang, Wenqing; Chen, Lidong; Singh, David J.; Yang, Jihui

    2015-05-14

    Here, we report the design of novel filled CoSb3 skutterudite phases based on a combination of filling and Sb-substituted Ga/In defects. Ga/In doped skutterudite phases with Li-, Nd-, and Sm-fillings can be formed via this strategy, which can have relatively wider ranges of carrier concentration than other conventional filled skutterudite phases.

  16. Investigation and calculation of filling factor of SnO2 inverse opal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jinquan; Wu, Shimin; Ji, Xiaoyuan; Li, Jinpeng; Zhang, Rong; Zhang, Ming

    2016-04-01

    In the process of preparing inverse opal, the structure of inverse opal is affected by many factors, and the filling factor of inverse opal is difficult to directly test. In this paper, SnO2 inverse opal was prepared with the sol-gel method by cooperative opal template. The repetition times of the infiltrating precursor into the opal templates were investigated in detail. The band-gap positions of SnO2 inverse opal were tested. In order to prepare perfect inverse opal structure, the filling quantity of the precursor is greater, as the diameter of the PS microsphere of opal is bigger. The filling factor of air in inverse opal can be calculated with a formula derived from Bragg’s law. For inverse opal, the filling factor of air in inverse opal gradually enlarges as the diameter of the void increases.

  17. Effects of the air pressure on the wave-packet dynamics of gaseous iodine molecules at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Rongwei; He, Ping; Chen, Deying; Xia, Yuanqin; Yu, Xin; Wang, Jialing; Jiang, Yugang

    2013-02-01

    Based on ultrafast laser pulses, time-resolved resonance enhancement coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (RE-CARS) is applied to investigate wave-packet dynamics in gaseous iodine. The effects of air pressure on the wave-packet dynamics of iodine molecules are studied at pressures ranging from 1.5 Torr to 750 Torr. The RE-CARS signals are recorded in a gas cell filled with a mixture of about 0.3 Torr iodine in air buffer gas at room temperature. The revivals and fractional revival structures in the wave-packet signal are found to gradually disappear with rising air pressure up to 750 Torr, and the decay behaviors of the excited B-state and ground X-state become faster with increasing air pressure, which is due to the collision effects of the molecules and the growing complexity of the spectra at high pressures.

  18. Request for approval, vented container annual release fraction

    SciTech Connect

    HILL, J.S.

    1999-10-12

    In accordance with the approval conditions for Modification to the Central Waste Complex (CWC) Radioactive Air Emissions Notice of Construction (NOC). dated August 24,1998, a new release fraction has been developed for submittal to the Washington State Department of Health (WDOH). The proposed annual release fraction of 2.50 E-14 is proposed for use in future NOCs involving the storage and handling operations associated with vented containers on the Hanford Site. The proposed annual release fraction was the largest release fraction calculated from alpha measurements of the NucFil filters from 10 vented containers consisting of nine 55-gallon drums and one burial box with dimensions of 9.3 x 5.7 x 6.4 feet. An annual release fraction of 2.0 E-09 was used in the modification to the CWC radioactive air emissions NOC. This study confirmed that the release fraction used in the CWC radioactive air emissions NOC was conservative.

  19. Experimental determination of the filling coefficient for an aspirated spark-ignition engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raţiu, S.; Alexa, V.; Kiss, I.; Cioată, V.

    2017-01-01

    This study aims at determining, by experiment, the filling coefficient of a spark-ignition, normal aspirated engine, with carburettor. For this purpose, a pilot plant was designed for measuring the pressure at various points on the route, simulating a stationary air flow regime by means of a vacuum pump. Measurements were made for various lifting heights of the intake valve and various opening positions of the throttle body, thus highlighting how their influence on the pressure loss and on the filling coefficient.

  20. DIY Fraction Pack.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Alan; Graham, Louise

    2003-01-01

    Describes a very successful attempt to teach fractions to year 5 pupils based on pupils making their own fraction pack. Children decided for themselves how to make the fractional slices used in the activity using colored cardboard sheets and templates of a paper circle consisting of 24 equal slices. (Author/NB)

  1. Highly sensitive temperature sensor based on an isopropanol-filled photonic crystal fiber long period grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Chao; Wang, Qi; Zhao, Yong; Li, Jin

    2017-03-01

    A high sensitivity measurement method for temperature has been proposed and investigated based on an isopropanol-filled photonic crystal fiber long period grating (PCF-LPG). Due to the high thermo-optic coefficient (TOC) of isopropanol, the sensitivity of the proposed temperature sensor could be effectively improved by filling isopropanol in the air waveguides of PCF. It can be found that the resonant dip will be split in two dips after filling isopropanol and the two dips have different sensitivities to surrounding temperature. Because of PCF-LPG is sensitive to the refractive index (RI) of internal filled liquid, the isopropanol-filled PCF-LPG temperature sensor has a high sensitivities of 1.356 nm/°C in the range of 20-50 °C. The simplicity and the excellent performance of our proposed device make it potential for the applications of high-precision temperature measurement is required.

  2. Solid-Sorbent Air Sampler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galen, T. J.

    1986-01-01

    Portable unit takes eight 24-hour samples. Volatile organic compounds in air collected for analysis by portable, self-contained sampling apparatus. Sampled air drawn through sorbent material, commercial porous polymer of 2, 3-diphenyl-p-phenylene oxide. High-boiling-point organic compounds adsorbed onto polymer, while low-boiling-point organics pass through and returned to atmosphere. Sampler includes eight sample tubes filled with polymeric sorbent. Organic compounds in atmosphere absorbed when air pumped through sorbent. Designed for checking air in spacecraft, sampler adaptable to other applications as leak detection, gas-mixture analysis, and ambient-air monitoring.

  3. Pitch fractionation. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Weinberg, V.L.; White, J.L.

    1981-12-15

    Petroleum pitch (Ashland A240) has been subjected to thermal treatment and solvent fractionation to produce refined pitches to be evaluated as impregnants for carbon-carbon composites. The solvent fractions were obtained by sequential Soxhlet extraction with solvents such as hexane, cyclohexane, toluene, and pyridine. The most severe thermal treatment produced a mesophase pitch (approximately 50% mesophase); an appreciable portion of the mesophase was soluble in strong solvents. There were substantial differences in chemical composition and in pyrolysis behavior of the fractions. As the depth of fraction increased, the pyrolysis yield and bloating increased, and the microstructure of the coke became finer until glassy microconstituents were formed in the deepest fractions.

  4. Classification of munition fill using laser acoustics

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, J.G.; Blackwood, L.G.

    1997-08-01

    Identification of a munition fill is easier if one can determine if there is fill material present (empty versus full), and if so, the phase (solid or liquid) of the fill. Previous munition inspection efforts by the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) determined that resonance information could determine the fill. A portable, noncontacting laser-acoustic system was developed by INEEL that uses a low-power laser system to measure the container`s vibration characteristics in response to an acoustic excitation. These vibration characteristics were shown to be functions of the fill material and munition geometry. The laser acoustic system was used to characterize the fill of over one hundred 155-mm munitions. Additional research and development using this system is being performed for the Mobile Munitions Assessment System.

  5. Filling of orbital fluid management systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merino, F.; Blatt, M. H.; Thies, N. C.

    1978-01-01

    A study was performed with three objectives: (1) analyze fluid management system fill under orbital conditions; (2) determine what experimentation is needed; and (3) develop an experimental program. The fluid management system was a 1.06m (41.7 in) diameter pressure vessel with screen channel device. Analyses were conducted using liquid hydrogen and N2O4. The influence of helium and autogenous pressurization systems was considered. Analyses showed that fluid management system fill will be more difficult with a cryogen than with an earth storable. The key to a successful fill with cryogens is in devising techniques for filling without vent liquid, and removing trapped vapor from the screen device at tank fill completion. This will be accomplished with prechill, fill, and vapor condensation processes. Refill will require a vent and purge process, to dilute the residual helium, prior to introducing liquid. Neither prechill, chill, nor purge processes will be required for earth storables.

  6. Grain-filling problem in 'super' rice.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jianchang; Zhang, Jianhua

    2010-01-01

    Modern rice (Oryza sativa L.) cultivars, especially the newly bred 'super' rice, have numerous spikelets on a panicle with a large yield capacity. However, these cultivars often fail to achieve their high yield potential due to poor grain-filling of later-flowering inferior spikelets (in contrast to the earlier-flowering superior spikelets). Conventional thinking to explain the poor grain-filling is the consequence of carbon limitation. Recent studies, however, have shown that carbohydrate supply should not be the major problem because they have adequate sucrose at their initial grain-filling stage. The low activities of key enzymes in carbon metabolism may contribute to the poor grain-filling. Proper field practices, such as moderate soil drying during mid- and late grain-filling stages, could solve some problems in poor grain-filling. Further studies are needed by molecular approaches to investigate the signal transport, the hormonal action, the gene expressions, and the biochemical processes in inferior spikelets.

  7. Effective use of fly ash slurry as fill material.

    PubMed

    Horiuchi, S; Kawaguchi, M; Yasuhara, K

    2000-09-15

    A lot of effort has been put into increasing coal ash utilization; however, 50% of total amount is disposed of on land and in the sea. Several attempts have been reported recently concerning slurried coal fly ash use for civil engineering materials, such as for structural fill and backfill. The authors have studied this issue for more than 15 years and reported its potential for (1) underwater fills, (2) light weight backfills, and (3) light weight structural fills, through both laboratory tests and construction works. This paper is an overview of the results obtained for slurry, focusing on the following. (1) Coal fly ash reclaimed by slurry placement shows lower compressibility, higher ground density, and higher strength than by the other methods. This higher strength increases stability against liquefaction during earthquake. (2) Higher stability of the fly ash ground formed by slurry placement is caused by higher density and its self-hardening property. (3) Stability of fly ash reclaimed ground can be increased by increasing density and also by strength enhancement by cement addition. (4) Technical data obtained through a man-made island construction project shows the advantages of fly ash slurry in terms of mechanical properties such as higher stability against sliding failure, sufficient ground strength, and also in terms of cost saving. (5) Concentration in leachates from the placed slurry is lower than the Japanese environmental law. (6) In order to enlarge the fly ash slurry application toward a lightweight fill, mixtures of air foam, cement and fly ash were examined. Test results shows sufficient durability of this material against creep failure. This material was then used as lightweight structural fill around a high-rise building, and showed sufficient quality. From the above data, it can be concluded that coal fly ash slurry can be effectively utilized in civil engineering projects.

  8. Development of a southern oceanic air standard reference material.

    PubMed

    Rhoderick, George C; Kelley, Michael E; Miller, Walter R; Brailsford, Gordon; Possolo, Antonio

    2016-02-01

    In 2009, the United States Congress charged the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) with supporting climate change research. As part of this effort, the Gas Sensing Metrology Group at NIST began developing new gas standard mixtures for greenhouse gas mixtures relevant to atmospheric measurements. Suites of gravimetrically prepared primary standard mixtures (PSMs) were prepared at ambient concentration levels for carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), and nitrous oxide (N2O) in a dry-air balance. In parallel, 30 gas cylinders were filled, by the National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research (NIWA) in Wellington, New Zealand, to high pressure from pristine southern oceanic air at Baring Head, New Zealand, and shipped to NIST. Using spectroscopic instrumentation, NIST analyzed the 30 cylinder samples for mole fractions of CO2, CH4, and N2O. Certified values were assigned to these mixtures by calibrating the instrumentation with the PSM suites that were recently developed at NIST. These mixtures became NIST Standard Reference Material (SRM) 1721 Southern Oceanic Air and are certified for ambient mole fraction, the first of their kind for NIST. The relative expanded uncertainties corresponding to coverage intervals with 95% probability are no larger than 0.06% of the certified values, representing the smallest uncertainties to date ever assigned to an NIST gas SRM.

  9. High-Field Fractional Quantum Hall Effect in Optical Lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, R.N.; Jaksch, D.

    2006-05-12

    We consider interacting bosonic atoms in an optical lattice subject to a large simulated magnetic field. We develop a model similar to a bilayer fractional quantum Hall system valid near simple rational numbers of magnetic flux quanta per lattice cell. Then we calculate its ground state, magnetic lengths, fractional fillings, and find unexpected sign changes in the Hall current. Finally we study methods for detecting these novel features via shot noise and Hall current measurements.

  10. Mekong Floods Fill Tonle Sap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The monsoon season in Southeast Asia brings recurring, often devastating floods to countries in the region, but these floods also play a necessary role in the region's water cycle. These MODIS images centered on Cambodia reveal extensive flooding of the Mekong River, which comes in from Laos in the north, to the right of center in the images, and flows south through Cambodia and southeast through Vietnam to empty into the South China Sea. The true-color image shows the brownish, sediment-laden floodwaters filling the Mekong Delta in southern Cambodia and Vietnam on September 15, 2001. The false color image above has been enhanced to bring out the contrast between the floodwaters and the lands, with sediment-carrying floodwaters in purple. Sediment can be seen flowing into the South China Sea as well. This year's floods have affected over a million people, and 100 people have been killed in Vietnam alone. The monsoon floods bring not only devastation, but renewal. The large body of water just left of center in Cambodia is the Tonle Sap. This shallow lake plays a changing role in the regional water cycle. During the dry season, the stream-fed Tonle Sap drains via the Tonle Sab River into the Mekong River. During the wet season (June-November), flooding of the Mekong reverses the course of the Tonle Sab, roughly tripling the lake's size from about 3000 km2 to about 10,000. When the dry season returns, the lake once again begins to drain into the Mekong Delta, where it provides a flow of fresh water that balances the intrusion of salty seawater into the delta's agricultural lands. Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  11. Dividing Fractions: A Pedagogical Technique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Robert

    2016-01-01

    When dividing one fraction by a second fraction, invert, that is, flip the second fraction, then multiply it by the first fraction. To multiply fractions, simply multiply across the denominators, and multiply across the numerators to get the resultant fraction. So by inverting the division of fractions it is turned into an easy multiplication of…

  12. FRACTIONAL PEARSON DIFFUSIONS.

    PubMed

    Leonenko, Nikolai N; Meerschaert, Mark M; Sikorskii, Alla

    2013-07-15

    Pearson diffusions are governed by diffusion equations with polynomial coefficients. Fractional Pearson diffusions are governed by the corresponding time-fractional diffusion equation. They are useful for modeling sub-diffusive phenomena, caused by particle sticking and trapping. This paper provides explicit strong solutions for fractional Pearson diffusions, using spectral methods. It also presents stochastic solutions, using a non-Markovian inverse stable time change.

  13. FRACTIONAL PEARSON DIFFUSIONS

    PubMed Central

    Leonenko, Nikolai N.; Meerschaert, Mark M.

    2013-01-01

    Pearson diffusions are governed by diffusion equations with polynomial coefficients. Fractional Pearson diffusions are governed by the corresponding time-fractional diffusion equation. They are useful for modeling sub-diffusive phenomena, caused by particle sticking and trapping. This paper provides explicit strong solutions for fractional Pearson diffusions, using spectral methods. It also presents stochastic solutions, using a non-Markovian inverse stable time change. PMID:23626377

  14. Influence of template fill in graphoepitaxy DSA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doise, Jan; Bekaert, Joost; Chan, Boon Teik; Hong, SungEun; Lin, Guanyang; Gronheid, Roel

    2016-03-01

    Directed self-assembly (DSA) of block copolymers (BCP) is considered a promising patterning approach for the 7 nm node and beyond. Specifically, a grapho-epitaxy process using a cylindrical phase BCP may offer an efficient solution for patterning randomly distributed contact holes with sub-resolution pitches, such as found in via and cut mask levels. In any grapho-epitaxy process, the pattern density impacts the template fill (local BCP thickness inside the template) and may cause defects due to respectively over- or underfilling of the template. In order to tackle this issue thoroughly, the parameters that determine template fill and the influence of template fill on the resulting pattern should be investigated. In this work, using three process flow variations (with different template surface energy), template fill is experimentally characterized as a function of pattern density and film thickness. The impact of these parameters on template fill is highly dependent on the process flow, and thus pre-pattern surface energy. Template fill has a considerable effect on the pattern transfer of the DSA contact holes into the underlying layer. Higher fill levels give rise to smaller contact holes and worse critical dimension uniformity. These results are important towards DSA-aware design and show that fill is a crucial parameter in grapho-epitaxy DSA.

  15. A dual mode breath sampler for the collection of the end-tidal and dead space fractions.

    PubMed

    Salvo, P; Ferrari, C; Persia, R; Ghimenti, S; Lomonaco, T; Bellagambi, F; Di Francesco, F

    2015-06-01

    This work presents a breath sampler prototype automatically collecting end-tidal (single and multiple breaths) or dead space air fractions (multiple breaths). This result is achieved by real time measurements of the CO2 partial pressure and airflow during the expiratory and inspiratory phases. Suitable algorithms, used to control a solenoid valve, guarantee that a Nalophan(®) bag is filled with the selected breath fraction even if the subject under test hyperventilates. The breath sampler has low pressure drop (<0.5 kPa) and uses inert or disposable components to avoid bacteriological risk for the patients and contamination of the breath samples. A fully customisable software interface allows a real time control of the hardware and software status. The performances of the breath sampler were evaluated by comparing (a) the CO2 partial pressure calculated during the sampling with the CO2 pressure measured off-line within the Nalophan(®) bag; (b) the concentrations of four selected volatile organic compounds in dead space, end-tidal and mixed breath fractions. Results showed negligible deviations between calculated and off-line CO2 pressure values and the distributions of the selected compounds into dead space, end-tidal and mixed breath fractions were in agreement with their chemical-physical properties.

  16. Air Research

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA's air research provides the critical science to develop and implement outdoor air regulations under the Clean Air Act and puts new tools and information in the hands of air quality managers and regulators to protect the air we breathe.

  17. 30 CFR 817.72 - Disposal of excess spoil: Valley fill/head-of-hollow fills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    .... Uncontrolled surface drainage may not be directed over the outslope of the fill. (2) Runoff from areas above the fill and runoff from the surface of the fill shall be diverted into stabilized diversion channels designed to meet the requirements of § 817.43 and to safely pass the runoff from a 100-year,...

  18. 30 CFR 816.72 - Disposal of excess spoil: Valley fills/head-of-hollow fills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    .... Uncontrolled surface drainage may not be directed over the outslope of the fill. (2) Runoff from areas above the fill and runoff from the surface of the fill shall be diverted into stabilized diversion channels designed to meet the requirements of § 816.43 and, in addition, to safely pass the runoff from a...

  19. 30 CFR 816.72 - Disposal of excess spoil: Valley fills/head-of-hollow fills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... such that the final slope after settlement will be toward properly designed drainage channels.... The maximum slope of the top of the fill shall be 33h:1v (3 percent). A drainage pocket may be.... Terraces on the fill shall be graded with a 3 to 5 percent grade toward the fill and a 1 percent...

  20. 30 CFR 817.72 - Disposal of excess spoil: Valley fill/head-of-hollow fills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... such that the final slope after settlement will be toward properly designed drainage channels... slope of the top of the fill shall be 33h:lv (3 percent). A drainage pocket may be maintained at the... fill shall be graded with a 3 to 5 percent grade toward the fill and a 1 percent slope toward the...

  1. 30 CFR 817.72 - Disposal of excess spoil: Valley fill/head-of-hollow fills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... into the design and construction of the fill as follows: (1) The fill shall have, along the vertical... and from seeps and springs in the foundation of the disposal area. Rocks used in the rock core and... head of the fill during and after construction, to intercept surface runoff and discharge the...

  2. Droplet Measurement below Single-Layer Grid Fill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitkovic, Pavol

    2016-03-01

    The main part of the heat transfer in a cooling tower is in a fill zone. This one is consist of a cooling fill. For the cooling tower is used a film fill or grid fill or splash fill in the generally. The grid fill has lower heat transfer performance like film fill usually. But their advantage is high resistance to blockage of the fill. The grid fill is consisted with independent layers made from plastic usually. The layers consist of several bars connected to the different shapes. For experiment was used the rhombus shape. The drops diameter was measured above and below the Grid fill.

  3. Can Kindergartners Do Fractions?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cwikla, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Mathematics professor Julie Cwikla decided that she needed to investigate young children's understandings and see what precurricular partitioning notions young minds bring to the fraction table. Cwikla realized that only a handful of studies have examined how preschool-age and early elementary school-age students solve fraction problems (Empson…

  4. An Appetite for Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkerson, Trena L.; Bryan, Tommy; Curry, Jane

    2012-01-01

    This article describes how using candy bars as models gives sixth-grade students a taste for learning to represent fractions whose denominators are factors of twelve. Using paper models of the candy bars, students explored and compared fractions. They noticed fewer different representations for one-third than for one-half. The authors conclude…

  5. On fractional programming

    SciTech Connect

    Bajona-Xandri, C.; Martinez-Legaz, J.E.

    1994-12-31

    This paper studies the minimax fractional programming problem, assuming quasiconvexity of the objective function, under the lower subdifferentiability viewpoint. Necessary and sufficient optimality conditions and dual properties are found. We present applications of this theory to find the Pareto efficient solutions of a multiobjective fractional problem and to solve several economic models.

  6. (Carbon isotope fractionation inplants)

    SciTech Connect

    O'Leary, M.H.

    1990-01-01

    The objectives of this research are: To develop a theoretical and experimental framework for understanding isotope fractionations in plants; and to develop methods for using this isotope fractionation for understanding the dynamics of CO{sub 2} fixation in plants. Progress is described.

  7. Fractional dissipative standard map.

    PubMed

    Tarasov, Vasily E; Edelman, M

    2010-06-01

    Using kicked differential equations of motion with derivatives of noninteger orders, we obtain generalizations of the dissipative standard map. The main property of these generalized maps, which are called fractional maps, is long-term memory. The memory effect in the fractional maps means that their present state of evolution depends on all past states with special forms of weights. Already a small deviation of the order of derivative from the integer value corresponding to the regular dissipative standard map (small memory effects) leads to the qualitatively new behavior of the corresponding attractors. The fractional dissipative standard maps are used to demonstrate a new type of fractional attractors in the wide range of the fractional orders of derivatives.

  8. Nematic wetting and filling of crenellated surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvestre, N. M.; Eskandari, Z.; Patrício, P.; Romero-Enrique, J. M.; Telo da Gama, M. M.

    2012-07-01

    We investigate nematic wetting and filling transitions of crenellated surfaces (rectangular gratings) by numerical minimization of the Landau-de Gennes free energy as a function of the anchoring strength, for a wide range of the surface geometrical parameters: depth, width, and separation of the crenels. We have found a rich phase behavior that depends in detail on the combination of the surface parameters. By comparison to simple fluids, which undergo a continuous filling or unbending transition, where the surface changes from a dry to a filled state, followed by a wetting or unbinding transition, where the thickness of the adsorbed fluid becomes macroscopic and the interface unbinds from the surface, nematics at crenellated surfaces reveal an intriguingly rich behavior: in shallow crenels only wetting is observed, while in deep crenels, only filling transitions occur; for intermediate surface geometrical parameters, a new class of filled states is found, characterized by bent isotropic-nematic interfaces, which persist for surfaces structured on large scales, compared to the nematic correlation length. The global phase diagram displays two wet and four filled states, all separated by first-order transitions. For crenels in the intermediate regime re-entrant filling transitions driven by the anchoring strength are observed.

  9. First third filling parameters of left ventricle assessed from gated equilibrium studies in patients with various heart diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Adatepe, M.H.; Nichols, K.; Powell, O.M.; Isaacs, G.H.

    1984-01-01

    The authors determined the first third filling fraction (1/3 FF), the maximum filling rate (1/3 FR) and the mean filling rate (1/3 MFR) for the first third diastolic filling period of the left ventricle in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), valvular heart disease (VHD), pericardial effusion (PE), cardiomyopathies (CM), chronic obstructive lung disease (COPD) and in 5 normals-all from resting gated equilibrium studies. Parameters are calculated from the third order Fourier fit to the LV volume curve and its derivative. 1/3 FF% = 1/3 diastolic count - end systolic count / 1/3 diastolic count x 100. Patients with CAD are divided into two groups: Group I with normal ejection fraction (EF) and wall motion (WM); Group II with abnormal EF and WM. Results are shown in the table. Abnormal filling parameters are found not only in CAD but in VHD, PE and CM. The authors conclude that the first third LV filling parameters are sensitive but non-specific indicators of filling abnormalities caused by diverse etiologic factors. Abnormal first third filling parameters may occur in the presence of a normal resting EF and WM in CAD.

  10. Post-flight Analysis of the Argon Filled Ion Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tai, H.; Goldhagen, P.; Jones, I. W.; Wilson, J. W.; Maiden, D. L.; Shinn, J. L.

    2003-01-01

    Atmospheric ionizing radiation is a complex mixture of primary galactic and solar cosmic rays and a multitude of secondary particles produced in collision with air nuclei. The first series of Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation (AIR) measurement flights on the NASA research aircraft ER-2 took place in June 1997. The ER-2 flight package consisted of fifteen instruments from six countries and were chosen to provide varying sensitivity to specific components. These AIR ER-2 flight measurements are to characterize the AIR environment during solar minimum to allow the continued development of environmental models of this complex mixture of ionizing radiation. This will enable scientists to study the ionizing radiation health hazard associated with the high-altitude operation of a commercial supersonic transport and to allow estimates of single event upsets for advanced avionics systems design. The argon filled ion chamber representing about 40 percent of the contributions to radiation risks are analyzed herein and model discrepancies for solar minimum environment are on the order of 5 percent and less. Other biologically significant components remain to be analyzed.

  11. [Amalgam fillings and T-lymphocyte changes].

    PubMed

    Giuliani, M; Rumi, C; Marciani, F; Boari, A; Rumi, G; Di Felice, R

    1990-07-01

    Dental amalgam and nickel alloys have been considered quite safe. Previous authors reported the effect of dental amalgam and nickel alloys on human T-lymphocytes modifications after amalgam dental fillings, into dose-dependence of any modifications and into possible temporary. Eight patients were subjected to dental care with amalgam dental fillings. Drawings of blood were executed at start, fifteen days after late fillings and two months later. The results about modifications of T-lymphocytes were not univocal. We believe, at now, that temporary modifications of the immunity seem to be related to a cytotoxic mechanism.

  12. REMEDIATION OF TCE-CONTAMINATED GROUNDWATER BY A PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIER FILLED WITH PLANT MULCH (BIOWALL)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A pilot-scale permeable reactive barrier filled with plant mulch was installed at Altus Air Force Base (in Oklahoma, USA) to treat trichloroethylene (TCE) contamination in ground water emanating from a landfill. The barrier was constructed in June 2002. It was 139 meters long, 7 ...

  13. MTR, TRA603. SUBPILE ROOM PLAN AND SECTIONS. CONCRETE FILL AT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MTR, TRA-603. SUB-PILE ROOM PLAN AND SECTIONS. CONCRETE FILL AT TWO ELEVATIONS. EXIT AIR DUCT. EXIT AND INLET WATER. PEBBLE CUBICLE AND BIN. BLAW-KNOX 3150-803-45, 9/1950. INL INDEX NO. 531-0603-62-098-100601, REV. 1. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  14. Fractional calculus in bioengineering.

    PubMed

    Magin, Richard L

    2004-01-01

    Fractional calculus (integral and differential operations of noninteger order) is not often used to model biological systems. Although the basic mathematical ideas were developed long ago by the mathematicians Leibniz (1695), Liouville (1834), Riemann (1892), and others and brought to the attention of the engineering world by Oliver Heaviside in the 1890s, it was not until 1974 that the first book on the topic was published by Oldham and Spanier. Recent monographs and symposia proceedings have highlighted the application of fractional calculus in physics, continuum mechanics, signal processing, and electromagnetics, but with few examples of applications in bioengineering. This is surprising because the methods of fractional calculus, when defined as a Laplace or Fourier convolution product, are suitable for solving many problems in biomedical research. For example, early studies by Cole (1933) and Hodgkin (1946) of the electrical properties of nerve cell membranes and the propagation of electrical signals are well characterized by differential equations of fractional order. The solution involves a generalization of the exponential function to the Mittag-Leffler function, which provides a better fit to the observed cell membrane data. A parallel application of fractional derivatives to viscoelastic materials establishes, in a natural way, hereditary integrals and the power law (Nutting/Scott Blair) stress-strain relationship for modeling biomaterials. In this review, I will introduce the idea of fractional operations by following the original approach of Heaviside, demonstrate the basic operations of fractional calculus on well-behaved functions (step, ramp, pulse, sinusoid) of engineering interest, and give specific examples from electrochemistry, physics, bioengineering, and biophysics. The fractional derivative accurately describes natural phenomena that occur in such common engineering problems as heat transfer, electrode/electrolyte behavior, and sub

  15. Microleakage of root-end filling materials.

    PubMed

    Fogel, H M; Peikoff, M D

    2001-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the microleakage of various root-end filling materials using a fluid filtration system. Sixty extracted human single-rooted teeth were used. The crowns were removed, the canals prepared, and root-end fillings placed. The samples were divided into two control and five experimental groups. The root-end filling materials tested were: amalgam, Intermediate Restorative Material (IRM), a dentin-bonded resin, Super-EBA, and mineral trioxide aggregate. The results showed that amalgam root-end fillings demonstrated significantly more microleakage than Super-EBA, dentin-bonded resin, or mineral trioxide aggregate. There was no significant difference between amalgam and IRM. However IRM was also not significantly different from the other three groups. There were no significant differences between the other three groups.

  16. 5 CFR 362.303 - Filling positions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... possesses a Ph.D. or equivalent degree directly related to the STEM position the agency is seeking to fill... candidate possesses a Ph.D. or equivalent degree directly related to the position the agency is seeking...

  17. 5 CFR 362.303 - Filling positions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... possesses a Ph.D. or equivalent degree directly related to the STEM position the agency is seeking to fill... candidate possesses a Ph.D. or equivalent degree directly related to the position the agency is seeking...

  18. PERVAPORATION USING ADSORBENT-FILLED MEMBRANES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Membranes containing selective fillers, such as zeolites and activated carbon, can improve the separation by pervaporation. Applications of adsorbent-filled membranes in pervaporation have been demonstrated by a number of studies. These applications include removal of organic co...

  19. Autocorrelation spectra of an air-fluidized granular system measured by NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasic, S.; Stepisnik, J.; Mohoric, A.; Sersa, I.; Planinsic, G.

    2006-09-01

    A novel insight into the dynamics of a fluidized granular system is given by a nuclear magnetic resonance method that yields the spin-echo attenuation proportional to the spectrum of the grain positional fluctuation. Measurements of the air-fluidized oil-filled spheres and mustard seeds at different degrees of fluidization and grain volume fractions provide the velocity autocorrelation that differs from the commonly anticipated exponential Enskog decay. An empiric formula, which corresponds to the model of grain caging at collisions with adjacent beads, fits well to the experimental data. Its parameters are the characteristic collision time, the free path between collisions and the cage-breaking rate or the diffusion-like constant, which decreases with increasing grain volume fraction. Mean-squared displacements calculated from the correlation spectrum clearly show transitions from ballistic, through sub-diffusion and into diffusion regimes of grain motion.

  20. Left ventricular diastolic filling with an implantable ventricular assist device: beat to beat variability with overall improvement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakatani, S.; Thomas, J. D.; Vandervoort, P. M.; Zhou, J.; Greenberg, N. L.; Savage, R. M.; McCarthy, P. M.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We studied the effects of left ventricular (LV) unloading by an implantable ventricular assist device on LV diastolic filling. BACKGROUND: Although many investigators have reported reliable systemic and peripheral circulatory support with implantable LV assist devices, little is known about their effect on cardiac performance. METHODS: Peak velocities of early diastolic filling, late diastolic filling, late to early filling ratio, deceleration time of early filling, diastolic filling period and atrial filling fraction were measured by intraoperative transesophageal Doppler echocardiography before and after insertion of an LV assist device in eight patients. A numerical model was developed to simulate this situation. RESULTS: Before device insertion, all patients showed either a restrictive or a monophasic transmitral flow pattern. After device insertion, transmitral flow showed rapid beat to beat variation in each patient, from abnormal relaxation to restrictive patterns. However, when the average values obtained from 10 consecutive beats were considered, overall filling was significantly normalized from baseline, with early filling velocity falling from 87 +/- 31 to 64 +/- 26 cm/s (p < 0.01) and late filling velocity rising from 8 +/- 11 to 32 +/- 23 cm/s (p < 0.05), resulting in an increase in the late to early filling ratio from 0.13 +/- 0.18 to 0.59 +/- 0.38 (p < 0.01) and a rise in the atrial filling fraction from 8 +/- 10% to 26 +/- 17% (p < 0.01). The deceleration time (from 112 +/- 40 to 160 +/- 44 ms, p < 0.05) and the filling period corrected by the RR interval (from 39 +/- 8% to 54 +/- 10%, p < 0.005) were also significantly prolonged. In the computer model, asynchronous LV assistance produced significant beat to beat variation in filling indexes, but overall a normalization of deceleration time as well as other variables. CONCLUSIONS: With LV assistance, transmitral flow showed rapidly varying patterns beat by beat in each patient, but

  1. Capillarity in metal casting mold filling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilden, Jon L.

    In metal casting processes, surface tension of the molten metal typically resists filling of the metal into the mold. The effects are greater for smaller mold cavities, and ultimately, the smallest cavities may not be filled. Surface tension forces can be overcome by applying pressure (head) to the molten metal, thus forcing metal into the cavities. However, a pressure-window will exist, too little pressure resulting in non-filled cavities and too much pressure resulting in penetration of the mold, which is itself porous. Filling-pressure windows are investigated for cylindrical-shaped mold cavities on both a theoretical and experimental basis. The lower bound of the filling pressure window is examined by treating cylindrical mold cavities as cylinders lined with packed spheres representing mold particles. The upper bound is examined by treating the mold as a 3-D array of close-packed spheres. The experimental work concerns industrial-scale vacuum investment casting of superalloy IN718 into molds containing various cylindrical mold cavities at various heights (heads). The experimental results are found to be in good agreement with the numerical modeling predictions for filling of rough (sphere-lined) cylindrical mold cavities.

  2. Fractional market dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskin, Nick

    2000-12-01

    A new extension of a fractality concept in financial mathematics has been developed. We have introduced a new fractional Langevin-type stochastic differential equation that differs from the standard Langevin equation: (i) by replacing the first-order derivative with respect to time by the fractional derivative of order μ; and (ii) by replacing “white noise” Gaussian stochastic force by the generalized “shot noise”, each pulse of which has a random amplitude with the α-stable Lévy distribution. As an application of the developed fractional non-Gaussian dynamical approach the expression for the probability distribution function (pdf) of the returns has been established. It is shown that the obtained fractional pdf fits well the central part and the tails of the empirical distribution of S&P 500 returns.

  3. Catalytic reforming of naphtha fractions

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, K.C.; Vorhis, F.H.

    1980-09-16

    Production of motor gasoline and a btx-enriched reformate by fractionating a naphtha feedstock into a mid-boiling btxprecursor fraction, a relatively high-boiling fraction and a relatively low-boiling fraction; catalytically reforming the btxprecursor fraction in a first reforming zone; combining the relatively high-boiling and low-boiling fractions and catalytically reforming the combined fractions in a second reforming zone.

  4. Intracellular Cadmium Isotope Fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horner, T. J.; Lee, R. B.; Henderson, G. M.; Rickaby, R. E.

    2011-12-01

    Recent stable isotope studies into the biological utilization of transition metals (e.g. Cu, Fe, Zn, Cd) suggest several stepwise cellular processes can fractionate isotopes in both culture and nature. However, the determination of fractionation factors is often unsatisfactory, as significant variability can exist - even between different organisms with the same cellular functions. Thus, it has not been possible to adequately understand the source and mechanisms of metal isotopic fractionation. In order to address this problem, we investigated the biological fractionation of Cd isotopes within genetically-modified bacteria (E. coli). There is currently only one known biological use or requirement of Cd, a Cd/Zn carbonic anhydrase (CdCA, from the marine diatom T. weissfloggii), which we introduce into the E. coli genome. We have also developed a cleaning procedure that allows for the treating of bacteria so as to study the isotopic composition of different cellular components. We find that whole cells always exhibit a preference for uptake of the lighter isotopes of Cd. Notably, whole cells appear to have a similar Cd isotopic composition regardless of the expression of CdCA within the E. coli. However, isotopic fractionation can occur within the genetically modified E. coli during Cd use, such that Cd bound in CdCA can display a distinct isotopic composition compared to the cell as a whole. Thus, the externally observed fractionation is independent of the internal uses of Cd, with the largest Cd isotope fractionation occurring during cross-membrane transport. A general implication of these experiments is that trace metal isotopic fractionation most likely reflects metal transport into biological cells (either actively or passively), rather than relating to expression of specific physiological function and genetic expression of different metalloenzymes.

  5. Thermodynamics in Fractional Calculus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meilanov, R. P.; Magomedov, R. A.

    2014-11-01

    A generalization of thermodynamics in the formalism of fractional-order derivatives is given. Results of the traditional thermodynamics of Carnot, Clausius, and Helmholtz are obtained in the particular case where the exponent of a fractional-order derivative is equal to unity. A one-parametric "fractal" equation of state is obtained with account of the second virial coefficient. The application of the resulting equation of state in the case of the gas argon is considered.

  6. Symmetric continued fractions

    SciTech Connect

    Panprasitwech, Oranit; Laohakosol, Vichian; Chaichana, Tuangrat

    2010-11-11

    Explicit formulae for continued fractions with symmetric patterns in their partial quotients are constructed in the field of formal power series. Similar to the work of Cohn in 1996, which generalized the so-called folding lemma to {kappa}-fold symmetry, the notion of {kappa}-duplicating symmetric continued fractions is investigated using a modification of the 1995 technique due to Clemens, Merrill and Roeder.

  7. Chromatographic methods of fractionation.

    PubMed

    Friesen, A D

    1987-01-01

    Chromatography's functional versatility, separation efficiency, gentle non-denaturing separating process and ease of automation and scale-up make it attractive for industrial scale protein purification. The Winnipeg Rh Institute's new Plasma Fractionation facility is an example of the use of chromatography for the large scale purification of plasma protein fractions. The fractionation facility has a capacity to process 800 litres of plasma per batch into blood clotting factor VIII and IX, albumin and intravenous immune serum globulin (i.v. ISG). Albumin and i.v. ISG are purified using ion exchange columns of DEAE-Sepharose (230 litre size), DEAE-Biogel (150 litre size) and CM-Sepharose (150 litre size). The chromatographic process is automated using a Modicon 584 Programmable Logic Controller to regulate valves, pumps and sensors which control plasma flow during fractionation. The stainless steel tanks and piping are automatically cleaned-in-place. The high degree of automation and cleaning provides efficient operation and sanitary processing. Chromatographic methods (DEAE-Sepharose and metal chelation) are also being used at the pilot scale to purify the human blood products superoxide dismutase and hemoglobin from outdated red blood cells. Characterization of the protein fractions produced by chromatography has shown them to be of equal or higher quality than fractions produced by other techniques.

  8. Fractional laser skin resurfacing.

    PubMed

    Alexiades-Armenakas, Macrene R; Dover, Jeffrey S; Arndt, Kenneth A

    2012-11-01

    Laser skin resurfacing (LSR) has evolved over the past 2 decades from traditional ablative to fractional nonablative and fractional ablative resurfacing. Traditional ablative LSR was highly effective in reducing rhytides, photoaging, and acne scarring but was associated with significant side effects and complications. In contrast, nonablative LSR was very safe but failed to deliver consistent clinical improvement. Fractional LSR has achieved the middle ground; it combined the efficacy of traditional LSR with the safety of nonablative modalities. The first fractional laser was a nonablative erbium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Er:YAG) laser that produced microscopic columns of thermal injury in the epidermis and upper dermis. Heralding an entirely new concept of laser energy delivery, it delivered the laser beam in microarrays. It resulted in microscopic columns of treated tissue and intervening areas of untreated skin, which yielded rapid reepithelialization. Fractional delivery was quickly applied to ablative wavelengths such as carbon dioxide, Er:YAG, and yttrium scandium gallium garnet (2,790 nm), providing more significant clinical outcomes. Adjustable laser parameters, including power, pitch, dwell time, and spot density, allowed for precise determination of percent surface area, affected penetration depth, and clinical recovery time and efficacy. Fractional LSR has been a significant advance to the laser field, striking the balance between safety and efficacy.

  9. Charge filling factors in clean and disordered arrays of tunnel junctions

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Kelly A.; Vogt, Nicolas; Cole, Jared H.

    2015-01-01

    We simulate one-dimensional arrays of tunnel junctions using the kinetic Monte Carlo method to study charge filling behaviour in the large charging energy limit. By applying a small fixed voltage bias and varying the offset voltage, we investigate this behaviour in clean and disordered arrays (both weak and strong disorder effects). The offset voltage dependent modulation of the current is highly sensitive to background charge disorder and exhibits substantial variation depending on the strength of the disorder. We show that while small fractional charge filling factors are likely to be washed out in experimental devices due to strong background charge disorder, larger factors may be observable. PMID:26627327

  10. Charge filling factors in clean and disordered arrays of tunnel junctions.

    PubMed

    Walker, Kelly A; Vogt, Nicolas; Cole, Jared H

    2015-12-02

    We simulate one-dimensional arrays of tunnel junctions using the kinetic Monte Carlo method to study charge filling behaviour in the large charging energy limit. By applying a small fixed voltage bias and varying the offset voltage, we investigate this behaviour in clean and disordered arrays (both weak and strong disorder effects). The offset voltage dependent modulation of the current is highly sensitive to background charge disorder and exhibits substantial variation depending on the strength of the disorder. We show that while small fractional charge filling factors are likely to be washed out in experimental devices due to strong background charge disorder, larger factors may be observable.

  11. Air Pollution

    MedlinePlus

    Air pollution is a mixture of solid particles and gases in the air. Car emissions, chemicals from factories, ... Ozone, a gas, is a major part of air pollution in cities. When ozone forms air pollution, it's ...

  12. Effects of composition on the mechanical response of alumina-filled epoxy.

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, Stephen Tedford

    2009-10-01

    The effect of composition on the elastic responses of alumina particle-filled epoxy composites is examined using isotropic elastic response models relating the average stresses and strains in a discretely reinforced composite material consisting of perfectly bonded and uniformly distributed particles in a solid isotropic elastic matrix. Responses for small elastic deformations and large hydrostatic and plane-strain compressions are considered. The response model for small elastic deformations depends on known elastic properties of the matrix and particles, the volume fraction of the particles, and two additional material properties that reflect the composition and microstructure of the composite material. These two material properties, called strain concentration coefficients, are characterized for eleven alumina-filled epoxy composites. It is found that while the strain concentration coefficients depend strongly on the volume fraction of alumina particles, no significant dependence on particle morphology and size is observed for the compositions examined. Additionally, an analysis of the strain concentration coefficients reveals a remarkably simple dependency on the alumina volume fraction. Responses for large hydrostatic and plane-strain compressions are obtained by generalizing the equations developed for small deformation, and letting the alumina volume fraction in the composite increase with compression. The large compression plane-strain response model is shown to predict equilibrium Hugoniot states in alumina-filled epoxy compositions remarkably well.

  13. Polystyrene Foam Products Equation of State as a Function of Porosity and Fill Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulford, R. N.; Swift, D. C.

    2009-12-01

    An accurate EOS for polystyrene foam is necessary for analysis of numerous experiments in shock compression, inertial confinement fusion, and astrophysics. Plastic to gas ratios vary between various samples of foam, according to the density and cell-size of the foam. A matrix of compositions has been investigated, allowing prediction of foam response as a function of the plastic-to-air ratio. The EOS code CHEETAH allows participation of the air in the decomposition reaction of the foam. Differences between air-filled, Ar-blown, and CO2-blown foams are investigated, to estimate the importance of allowing air to react with products of polystyrene decomposition. O2-blown foams are included in some comparisons, to amplify any consequences of reaction with oxygen in air. He-blown foams are included in some comparisons, to provide an extremum of density. Product pressures are slightly higher for oxygen-containing fill gases than for non-oxygen-containing fill gases. Examination of product species indicates that CO2 decomposes at high temperatures.

  14. Polystyrene foam products equation of state as a function of porosity and fill gas

    SciTech Connect

    Mulford, Roberta N; Swift, Damian C

    2009-01-01

    An accurate EOS for polystyrene foam is necessary for analysis of numerous experiments in shock compression, inertial confinement fusion, and astrophysics. Plastic to gas ratios vary between various samples of foam, according to the density and cell-size of the foam. A matrix of compositions has been investigated, allowing prediction of foam response as a function of the plastic-to-air ratio. The EOS code CHEETAH allows participation of the air in the decomposition reaction of the foam. Differences between air-filled, Ar-blown, and CO{sub 2}-blown foams are investigated, to estimate the importance of allowing air to react with products of polystyrene decomposition. O{sub 2}-blown foams are included in some comparisons, to amplify any consequences of reaction with oxygen in air. He-blown foams are included in some comparisons, to provide an extremum of density. Product pressures are slightly higher for oxygen-containing fill gases than for non-oxygen-containing fill gases. Examination of product species indicates that CO{sub 2} decomposes at high temperatures.

  15. Measuring Fractional Statistics with Fabry-Perot Quantum Hall Interferometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, Vladimir J.

    2008-03-01

    Laughlin quasiparticles are the elementary excitations of a highly-correlated fractional quantum Hall electron fluid. They have fractional charge and obey fractional statistics. The quasiparticles can propagate quantum-coherently in chiral edge channels, and constructively or destructively interfere. Unlike electrons, the interference condition for Laughlin quasiparticles has a non-vanishing statistical contribution that can be observed experimentally. Two kinds of interferometer devices have been realized. In the primary-filling interferometer, the entire device has filling 1/3, and the e/3 edge channel quasiparticles encircle identical e/3 island quasiparticles. Here the flux period is h/e, same as for electrons, but the back-gate charge period is e/3. In the second kind of interferometer, a lower density edge channel at filling 1/3 forms around a higher density island at filling 2/5, so that e/3 edge quasiparticles encircle e/5 island quasiparticles. Here we observe superperiodic oscillations with 5h/e flux and 2e charge periods, both corresponding to excitation of ten island quasiparticles. These periods can be understood as imposed by the anyonic braiding statistics of Laughlin quasiparticles. This work was done in collaboration with Fernando E. Camino, Ping Lin and Wei Zhou.

  16. Microwave permeability of composites filled with thin Fe films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iakubov, Igor T.; Lagarkov, Andrey N.; Maklakov, Sergey A.; Osipov, Alexey V.; Rozanov, Konstantin N.; Ryzhikov, Ilya A.; Starostenko, Sergey N.

    2006-05-01

    The microwave permeability of regular composites filled with thin ferromagnetic discs with in-plane anisotropy is studied. The samples are made of patterned, multi-layered Fe films stacked together to comprise a bulk composite. The permeability is measured in the frequency range of 0.1-10 GHz, and is discussed in terms of constraints to the microwave performance of such composites. The technology suggested allows a composite sample to be produced with the permeability of 2.8, and low magnetic loss at frequencies below 1 GHz, the volume fraction of Fe is as low as 0.77%. Such composites can be useful in the design of microwave inductors, miniaturized wideband antennas, etc.

  17. Investigation of the formation of Fe-filled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reuther, H.; Müller, C.; Leonhardt, A.; Kutz, M. C.

    2010-03-01

    The formation of Fe-filled carbon nanotubes by thermal decomposition of ferrocene combined with a Fe-catalyst-nanostructuring on an oxidized Si substrate is investigated in the temperature range of 1015 - 1200 K. The optimal growth conditions for aligned and homogeneous carbon nanotubes are found at 1103 K. Mössbauer spectroscopy (both in transmission geometry and CEMS) was used to analyze and quantify the different formed Fe-phases. In general, α-Fe, γ-Fe and Fe3C are found to form within the carbon nanotubes. Depending on the growth conditions their fractions vary strongly. Moreover, an alignment of the α-Fe in the tubes could be detected.

  18. Production, characterization, and modeling of mineral filled polypropylene filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Brian Robert

    1999-11-01

    This research produced mineral filled polypropylene filaments using a variety of fillers, characterized these filaments, and attempted to model their mechanical properties with current composite models. Also, these filaments were compared with bone to determine if they are suitable for modeling the mechanical properties of bone. Fillers used consist of wollastonite, talc, calcium carbonate, titanium dioxide, and hydroxyapatite. Fillers and polypropylene chips were combined and extruded into rods with the use of a mixer. The rods were chipped up and then formed into filaments through melt extrusion utilizing a piston extruder. Filaments with volume fractions of filler of 0.05, 0.10, 0.15, and 0.20 were produced. Additionally, some methods of trying to improve the properties of these filaments were attempted, but did not result in any significant property improvements. The fillers and filaments were visually characterized with a scanning electron microscope. Cross-sections, filament outer surfaces, fracture surfaces, and longitudinal cut open surfaces were viewed in this manner. Those filaments with anisotropic filler had some oriented filler particles, while all filaments suffered from poor adhesion between the polypropylene and the filler as well as agglomerations of filler particles. Twenty specimens of each filament were tensile tested and the average tenacity, strain, and modulus were calculated. Filaments containing talc, talc and wollastonite, titanium dioxide, or hydroxyapatite suffered from a drastic transition from ductile to brittle with the addition of 0.05 volume fraction of filler. This is evidenced by the sharp decrease in strain at this volume fraction of filler when compared to the strain of the unfilled polypropylene filament. Additionally, these same filaments suffered a sharp decrease in tenacity at the same volume fraction. These instant decreases are attributed to the agglomerations of filler in the filament. Generally, the modulus of the

  19. A study of random resistor-capacitor-diode networks to assess the electromagnetic properties of carbon nanotube filled polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bychanok, D. S.; Paddubskaya, A. G.; Kuzhir, P. P.; Maksimenko, S. A.; Brosseau, C.; Macutkevic, J.; Bellucci, S.

    2013-12-01

    We determined the frequency dependent effective permittivity of a large ternary network of randomly positioned resistors, capacitors, and diodes. A linear circuit analysis of such systems is shown to match the experimental dielectric response of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) filled polymers. This modeling method is able to reproduce the two most important features of SWCNT filled composites, i.e., the low frequency dispersion and dipolar relaxation. As a result of the modeling important physical conclusion proved by the experimental data was done: the low frequency behavior of SWCNT-filled polymer composites is mostly caused by the fraction of semiconducting SWCNTs.

  20. Realistic Models for Filling Factors in HII Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spangler, Steven R.; Costa, Allison H.; Bergerud, Brandon M.; Beauchamp, Kara M.

    2017-01-01

    One of the parameters used to describe HII regions and other ionized parts of the interstellar medium is the filling factor, defined as the volume fraction of an HII region occupied by matter. The best observational evidence for the existence of a filling factor less than unity is a discrepancy between the electron density derived from density-sensitive line ratios and the root mean square density obtained from emission measure measurements. Following the early, influential study by Osterbrock and Flather (ApJ 129, 26, 1959), most investigations of HII regions envision these objects as a group of isolated cells of high gas density embedded in a vacuum. This picture is at serious odds with more direct measurements of other astrophysical plasmas like the solar wind, where the density follows a less extreme probability distribution function (pdf) such as an exponential or lognormal. We have carried out a set of simulations in which model HII regions are created with different density pdfs such as exponential and lognormal as well as the extreme case of two delta functions. We calculate the electron density as inferred from spectroscopic line ratios and emission measures for all lines of sight through the model nebulas. In the cases of exponential and lognormal pdfs, the spectroscopically derived densities are higher than those obtained by the emission measures by factors of 20 to 100 percent. These are considerably smaller than values often reported in the literature, which can be an order of magnitude or greater. We will discuss possible ways to reconcile realistic density pdfs such as measured in space and laboratory plasmas with the results from astronomical spectroscopic measurements. Finally, we point out that for the Orion Nebula, the density discrepancy is due to geometry, not filling factor (O'Dell, ARAA 39, 99, 2001).

  1. A model for the beam-filling effect associated with the microwave retrieval of rain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graves, Charles E.

    1993-01-01

    Estimating rain rate from environmental microwave emissions is hampered by several difficulties. One of these difficulties is known as the beam-filling effect. Beam filling is the systematic error introduced when the microwave radiometer's field of view is not filled with uniform rain. Beam filling can have dramatic effects on rain-rate estimation, causing rain rates to be underestimated by as much as a factor of 2. The present study derives an approximate expression for beam filling that provides, in principle, a way to estimate this effect. In addition, this study deals only with single-channel microwave rain estimation over the ocean. The final results reveal that beam filling is essentially determined by the freezing level, the mean fraction of the footprint raining, and the footprint-averaged rain rate. Also, the numerical results appear to agree with other empirical studies. Furthermore, the analysis brings to light an interesting connection with rain threshold techniques for estimating area-averaged rain rates.

  2. Surfactant recovery from water using foam fractionation

    SciTech Connect

    Tharapiwattananon, N.; Osuwan, S.; Scamehorn, J.F.

    1996-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the use of foam fractionation to recover surfactant from water. A simple continuous mode foam fractionation was used and three surfactants were studied (two anionic and one cationic). The effects of air flow rate, foam height, liquid height, liquid feed surfactant concentration, and sparger porosity were studied. This technique was shown to be effective in either surfactant recovery or the reduction of surfactant concentration in water to acceptable levels. As an example of the effectiveness of this technique, the cetylpyridinium chloride concentration in water can be reduced by 90% in one stage with a liquid residence time of 375 minutes. The surfactant concentration in the collapsed foam is 21.5 times the feed concentration. This cationic surfactant was easier to remove from water by foam fractionation than the anionic surfactants studied.

  3. Identifying Fractions on Number Lines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bright, George W.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    This study investigated the ways students represented fractions on number lines and the effects of instruction on those representations. The instruction primarily concerned representing fractions and ordering fractions on number lines. (Author/PK)

  4. Slotted Polyimide-Aerogel-Filled-Waveguide Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez-Solis, Rafael A.; Pacheco, Hector L.; Miranda, Felix A.; Meador, Mary Ann B.

    2013-01-01

    Polyimide aerogels were considered to serve as a filling for millimeter-wave waveguides. While these waveguides present a slightly higher loss than hollow waveguides, they have less losses than Duroid substrate integrated waveguides (less than 0.15 dB at Ka-band, in a 20 mm section), and exhibit an order of magnitude of mass reduction when compared to commercial waveguides. A Ka-band slotted aerogel-filled-waveguide array was designed, which provided the same gain (9 dBi) as its standard waveguide counterpart, and a slotted aerogel-filled-waveguide array using folded-slots was designed for comparison, obtaining a gain of 9 dB and a bandwidth of 590 MHz.

  5. One-dimensional Gromov minimal filling problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Alexandr O.; Tuzhilin, Alexey A.

    2012-05-01

    The paper is devoted to a new branch in the theory of one-dimensional variational problems with branching extremals, the investigation of one-dimensional minimal fillings introduced by the authors. On the one hand, this problem is a one-dimensional version of a generalization of Gromov's minimal fillings problem to the case of stratified manifolds. On the other hand, this problem is interesting in itself and also can be considered as a generalization of another classical problem, the Steiner problem on the construction of a shortest network connecting a given set of terminals. Besides the statement of the problem, we discuss several properties of the minimal fillings and state several conjectures. Bibliography: 38 titles.

  6. FRACTIONAL CRYSTALLIZATION FEED ENVELOPE

    SciTech Connect

    HERTING DL

    2008-03-19

    Laboratory work was completed on a set of evaporation tests designed to establish a feed envelope for the fractional crystallization process. The feed envelope defines chemical concentration limits within which the process can be operated successfully. All 38 runs in the half-factorial design matrix were completed successfully, based on the qualitative definition of success. There is no feed composition likely to be derived from saltcake dissolution that would cause the fractional crystallization process to not meet acceptable performance requirements. However, some compositions clearly would provide more successful operation than other compositions.

  7. Polarization splitter based on dual core liquid crystal-filled holey fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Er-Lei; Jiang, Hai-Ming; Xie, Kang; Chen, Chun; Hu, Zhi-Jia

    2016-09-01

    Through filling the liquid crystal into the air holes of a dual-core holey fiber with a simple structure, the transmission mechanism of the fiber is changed from total internal reflection to photonic bandgap (PBG), and a polarization splitter based on the liquid crystal-filled dual-core PBG holey fiber is investigated. The results demonstrate that, by setting appropriate geometrical parameters, the polarization splitter possesses a short length of 890.5 μm, and its wide bandwidth of ˜150 nm almost covers all the S, C, and L communication bands. Besides, it has an excellent electro-interference-resistance property and certain sensitivity to temperature.

  8. Coupled discrete element and smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of the die filling process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breinlinger, Thomas; Kraft, Torsten

    2016-11-01

    Die filling is an important part of the powder compaction process chain, where defects in the final part can be introduced—or prevented. Simulation of this process is therefore a goal for many part producers and has been studied by some researchers already. In this work, we focus on the influence of the surrounding air on the powder flow. We demonstrate the implementing and coupling of the discrete element method for the granular powder and the smoothed particle hydrodynamics method for the gas flow. Application of the method to the die filling process is demonstrated.

  9. 30 CFR 816.72 - Disposal of excess spoil: Valley fills/head-of-hollow fills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., 6-hour precipitation event. (b) Rock-core chimney drains. A rock-core chimney drain may be used in a... as the fill is not located in an area containing intermittent or perennial streams. A rock-core... upstream drainage is diverted around the fill. The alternative rock-core chimney drain system shall...

  10. 30 CFR 816.72 - Disposal of excess spoil: Valley fills/head-of-hollow fills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., 6-hour precipitation event. (b) Rock-core chimney drains. A rock-core chimney drain may be used in a... as the fill is not located in an area containing intermittent or perennial streams. A rock-core... upstream drainage is diverted around the fill. The alternative rock-core chimney drain system shall...

  11. Intermittent Surface Water Connectivity: Fill and Spill vs. Fill and Merge Dynamics

    EPA Science Inventory

    Intermittent surface connectivity can influence aquatic systems, since chemical and biotic movements are often associated with water flow. Although often referred to as fill and spill, wetlands also fill and merge. We examined the effects of these connection types on water level...

  12. Intermittent surface water connectivity: Fill and spill vs. fill and merge dynamics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leibowitz, Scott G.; Mushet, David M.; Newton, Wesley E.

    2016-01-01

    Intermittent surface connectivity can influence aquatic systems, since chemical and biotic movements are often associated with water flow. Although often referred to as fill and spill, wetlands also fill and merge. We examined the effects of these connection types on water levels, ion concentrations, and biotic communities of eight prairie pothole wetlands between 1979 and 2015. Fill and spill caused pulsed surface water connections that were limited to periods following spring snow melt. In contrast, two wetlands connected through fill and merge experienced a nearly continuous, 20-year surface water connection and had completely coincident water levels. Fill and spill led to minimal convergence in dissolved ions and macroinvertebrate composition, while these constituents converged under fill and merge. The primary factor determining differences in response was duration of the surface water connection between wetland pairs. Our findings suggest that investigations into the effects of intermittent surface water connections should not consider these connections generically, but need to address the specific types of connections. In particular, fill and spill promotes external water exports while fill and merge favors internal storage. The behaviors of such intermittent connections will likely be accentuated under a future with more frequent and severe climate extremes.

  13. Alkaline earth filled nickel skutterudite antimonide thermoelectrics

    DOEpatents

    Singh, David Joseph

    2013-07-16

    A thermoelectric material including a body centered cubic filled skutterudite having the formula A.sub.xFe.sub.yNi.sub.zSb.sub.12, where A is an alkaline earth element, x is no more than approximately 1.0, and the sum of y and z is approximately equal to 4.0. The alkaline earth element includes guest atoms selected from the group consisting of Be, Mb, Ca, Sr, Ba, Ra and combinations thereof. The filled skutterudite is shown to have properties suitable for a wide variety of thermoelectric applications.

  14. Experimental study on capillary filling in nanochannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Min; Cao, Bing-Yang; Wang, Wei; Yun, He-Ming; Chen, Bao-Ming

    2016-10-01

    We investigated the capillary filling kinetics of deionized water in nanochannels with heights of 50-120 nm. The measured position of the moving meniscus was proportional to the square root of time, as predicted by the LW equation. However, the extracted slopes were significantly smaller than the predictions based on the bulk properties. This unusual behavior was found to be mainly caused by the electro-viscous effect and dynamic contact angle, which was significantly larger than the static angle. In addition, when the filling distance reached about 600 μm, bubbles tended to be formed, leading to the main meniscus was almost immobile.

  15. 62. VIEW LOOKING NORTHWEST AT THE OIL FILLED CIRCUIT BREAKER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    62. VIEW LOOKING NORTHWEST AT THE OIL FILLED CIRCUIT BREAKER FOR GENERATOR NUMBER 1. CIRCUIT BREAKERS ARE AUTOMATED SWITCHES WHICH DISCONNECT THE GENERATORS FROM THE LINE WHEN SHORT CIRCUITS OCCUR. WHEN CIRCUITS INVOLVING HIGH CURRENTS AND VOLTAGES ARE BROKEN, THE AIR SURROUNDING MECHANICAL PARTS OF THE SWITCH BECOMES IONIZED AND CONTINUES TO CONDUCT ELECTRIC POWER ACROSS ANY GAP IN THE SWITCH CONTACTS. TO PREVENT THIS AND INSURE A POSITIVE INTERRUPTION OF CURRENT, THE SWITCH CONTACTS ARE IMMERSED IN A CONTAINER OF OIL. THE OIL DOES NOT SUPPORT THE FORMATION OF AN ARC AND EFFECTIVELY CUTS OFF THE CURRENT WHEN THE SWITCH CONTACTS ARE OPENED. - New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Cos Cob Power Plant, Sound Shore Drive, Greenwich, Fairfield County, CT

  16. Characterization of a liquid-filled turbulence simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Christopher C.; Zhang, Yimin; Plett, Mark L.; Polak-Dingels, Penelope; Barbier, Pierre R.; Rush, David W.

    1998-10-01

    The development of high performance line-of-sight optical communication links through the turbulent atmosphere is facilitated by laboratory tests of schemes involving adaptive optics, beam tracking, modulation and coding, aperture averaging, fading statistics, and transmitter/receiver diversity. A water-filled turbulence tube has been implemented to simulate, in some respects, the effects produced on a laser beam when it propagates several kilometers through the air. This tube is being used to investigate on a laboratory scale: aperture averaging, fluctuation statistics, optical path difference, high data rate modulation, and various coding schemes. The liquid- filled turbulence tube causes fluctuations on a slower time scale than does the atmosphere. At low turbulence levels it produces log-normal fluctuation statistics, causes tip-tilt errors similar to those previously observed for atmospheric paths, and has already allowed evaluation of aperture averaging and fade statistics. It also allows the testing of various technological schemes to deal with atmospheric turbulence effects without any specific assumptions, such as weak Kolmogorov turbulence, being built into the model.

  17. Microconcentrators to recover fill-factor in image photodetectors with pixel on-board processing circuits.

    PubMed

    Donati, Silvano; Martini, Giuseppe; Norgia, Michele

    2007-12-24

    We propose an array of non-imaging micro-concentrators as a mean to recover the loss of sensitivity due to area fill-factor. This is particularly important for those image photo detectors in which complex circuit functions are required and a substantial fraction of the pixel area is consumed, like e.g., 3D camera, SPAD arrays, fluorescence analyzers, etc., but also in CMOS sensors. So far, the low fill-factor was an unacceptable loss of sensitivity precluding from the development of such devices, whereas by using a concentrator array a recovery is possible, up to the inverse square of numerical aperture of the objective lens. By ray tracing, we calculate the concentration factors of several geometries of non-imaging concentrator, i.e., truncated cone, parabolic and compound parabolic, both reflective and refractive. The feasibility of a sizeable recovery of fill-factor (up to 50) is demonstrated.

  18. The structure of filled skutterudites and the local vibration behavior of the filling atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiaojuan; Zong, Peng-an; Chen, Xihong; Tao, Juzhou; Lin, He

    2017-02-01

    Both of atomic pair distribution function (PDF) and extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) experiments have been carried out on unfilled and Yb-filled skutterudites YbxCo4Sb12 (x=0, 0.15, 0.2 and 0.25) samples. The structure refinements on PDF data confirm the large amplitude vibration of Yb atom and the dependence of Yb vibration amplitude on the filling content. Temperature dependent EXAFS experiment on filled skutterudites have been carried out at Yb LⅢ-edge in order to explore the local vibration behavior of filled atom. EXAFS experiments show that the Einstein temperature of the filled atom is very low (70.9 K) which agrees with the rattling behavior.

  19. Disorder-induced heating of ultracold neutral plasmas created from atoms in partially filled optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, D.; Sparkes, B. M.

    2016-08-01

    We quantify the disorder-induced heating (DIH) of ultracold neutral plasmas (UCNPs) created from cold atoms in optical lattices with partial filling fractions, using a conservation of energy model involving the spatial correlations of the initial state and the equation of state in thermal equilibrium for a one-component plasma. We show, for experimentally achievable filling fractions, that the ionic Coulomb coupling parameter could be increased to a degree comparable to other proposed DIH-mitigation schemes. Molecular dynamics simulations were performed with compensation for finite-size and periodic boundary effects, which agree with calculations using the model. Reduction of DIH using optical lattices will allow for the study of strongly coupled plasma physics using low-density, low-temperature, laboratory-based plasmas, and lead to improved brightness in UCNP-based cold electron and ion beams, where DIH is otherwise a fundamental limitation to beam focal sizes and diffraction imaging capability.

  20. Left ventricular filling in dilated cardiomyopathy: relation to functional class and hemodynamics.

    PubMed

    Vanoverschelde, J L; Raphael, D A; Robert, A R; Cosyns, J R

    1990-05-01

    Left ventricular systolic function does not correlate well with functional class in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy. To determine whether the correlation is better with Doppler indexes of left ventricular diastolic function, 34 patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (M-mode echocardiographic end-diastolic dimension greater than 60 mm, fractional shortening less than 25%, increased E point-septal separation) were studied. Patients were classified into two groups according to functional class. Group 1 consisted of 16 patients in New York Heart Association functional class I or II; group 2 included 18 patients in functional class III or IV. Left ventricular dimensions, fractional shortening, left ventricular mass, meridional end-systolic wall stress, peak early and late transmitral filling velocities and their ratio, isovolumetric relaxation period and time to peak filling rate were computed from pulsed wave Doppler and M-mode echocardiograms and calibrated carotid pulse tracings. Right heart catheterization was performed in 20 of 34 patients. No differences were observed between groups with regard to age, gender distribution, heart rate, blood pressure and M-mode echocardiographic-derived indexes of systolic function. Peak early filling velocity (72 +/- 13 versus 40 +/- 10 cm/s, p less than 0.001) was higher and atrial filling fraction (27 +/- 4% versus 46 +/- 8%, p less than 0.001) was lower in group 2 than in group 1. The ratio of early to late transmitral filling velocities was higher in group 2 patients (2.3 +/- 0.5 versus 0.7 +/- 0.2, p less than 0.001).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Realization of a primary-filling e/3 quasiparticle interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camino, F. E.; Zhou, W.; Goldman, V. J.

    2007-03-01

    We report experiments on a quasiparticle interferometer where the entire system is on the f=1/3 primary fractional quantum Hall plateau. Electron-beam lithography is used to define an electron island separated from the 2D bulk by two wide constrictions, much less depleted than in our prior work [1]. This results in the entire electron island being at filling f=1/3 under quantum-coherent tunneling conditions. For the first time in such devices we report interferometric Aharonov-Bohm-like conductance oscillations. The flux and charge periods of the interferometer device are calibrated with electrons in the integer regime. In the fractional regime, we observe magnetic flux and charge periods h/e and e/3, respectively, corresponding to creation of one quasielectron in the island. These periods are the same as in quantum antidots, but the quasiparticle path encloses no electron vacuum in the interferometer. Quantum theory predicts a 3h/e flux period for charge e/3, integer statistics particles. Accordingly, the observed periods demonstrate anyonic statistics of Laughlin quasiparticles. [1] F. E. Camino et al., PRL 95, 246802 (2005); PRB 72, 075342 (2005).

  2. Simultaneous measurement of temperature and force with high sensitivities based on filling different index liquids into photonic crystal fiber.

    PubMed

    Liang, Hu; Zhang, Weigang; Geng, Pengcheng; Liu, Yange; Wang, Zhi; Guo, Junqi; Gao, Shecheng; Yan, Suyuan

    2013-04-01

    A double-filled photonic crystal fiber (PCF) was fabricated by filling liquids of different indexes into two air holes in the cladding. The core mode coupled to the local cladding modes LP(01) and LP(11) in the 1310 and 1550 nm wavebands, respectively. Due to the unique characteristics of the mode coupling, the resonant peaks in different resonance areas shifted to the opposite directions with the variations of the temperature or the force. The double-filled PCFs achieved in this work showed useful applications in the simultaneous measurement of both the temperature and the force.

  3. Momentum fractionation on superstrata

    SciTech Connect

    Bena, Iosif; Martinec, Emil; Turton, David; Warner, Nicholas P.

    2016-05-11

    Superstrata are bound states in string theory that carry D1, D5, and momentum charges, and whose supergravity descriptions are parameterized by arbitrary functions of (at least) two variables. In the D1-D5 CFT, typical three-charge states reside in highdegree twisted sectors, and their momentum charge is carried by modes that individually have fractional momentum. Understanding this momentum fractionation holographically is crucial for understanding typical black-hole microstates in this system. We use solution-generating techniques to add momentum to a multi-wound supertube and thereby construct the first examples of asymptotically-flat superstrata. The resulting supergravity solutions are horizonless and smooth up to well-understood orbifold singularities. Upon taking the AdS3 decoupling limit, our solutions are dual to CFT states with momentum fractionation. We give a precise proposal for these dual CFT states. Lastly, our construction establishes the very nontrivial fact that large classes of CFT states with momentum fractionation can be realized in the bulk as smooth horizonless supergravity solutions.

  4. Momentum fractionation on superstrata

    DOE PAGES

    Bena, Iosif; Martinec, Emil; Turton, David; ...

    2016-05-11

    Superstrata are bound states in string theory that carry D1, D5, and momentum charges, and whose supergravity descriptions are parameterized by arbitrary functions of (at least) two variables. In the D1-D5 CFT, typical three-charge states reside in highdegree twisted sectors, and their momentum charge is carried by modes that individually have fractional momentum. Understanding this momentum fractionation holographically is crucial for understanding typical black-hole microstates in this system. We use solution-generating techniques to add momentum to a multi-wound supertube and thereby construct the first examples of asymptotically-flat superstrata. The resulting supergravity solutions are horizonless and smooth up to well-understood orbifoldmore » singularities. Upon taking the AdS3 decoupling limit, our solutions are dual to CFT states with momentum fractionation. We give a precise proposal for these dual CFT states. Lastly, our construction establishes the very nontrivial fact that large classes of CFT states with momentum fractionation can be realized in the bulk as smooth horizonless supergravity solutions.« less

  5. Sweet Work with Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vinogradova, Natalya; Blaine, Larry

    2013-01-01

    Almost everyone loves chocolate. However, the same cannot be said about fractions, which are loved by markedly fewer. Middle school students tend to view them with wary respect, but little affection. The authors attempt to sweeten the subject by describing a type of game involving division of chocolate bars. The activity they describe provides a…

  6. Field-Flow Fractionation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caldwell, Karin D.

    1988-01-01

    Describes a technique for separating samples that range over 15 orders of magnitude in molecular weight. Discusses theory, apparatus, and sample preparation techniques. Lists several types of field-flow fractionation (FFF) and their uses: sedimentation FFF, thermal FFF, flow FFF, electrical FFF, and steric FFF. (ML)

  7. Fraction collector for electrophoresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bier, M.

    1977-01-01

    Rotating-tube electrophoresis apparatus employs rotating jet of eluting buffer to reduce effects of convection during separation. Designed for separation of microorganisms and biological species, system combines gravity/gradient compensating of lumen with buffer flush at fraction outlet to increase separation efficiency.

  8. Modeling and experimental study of a honeycomb beam filled with damping particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Nazeer; Ranganath, R.; Ghosal, Ashitava

    2017-03-01

    Honeycomb sandwich laminates which are the basic structural element of spacecraft have inherently low damping. In this paper, we propose to improve the damping characteristics of such structures by adding damping particles in the cells of the honeycomb. This paper presents modeling of a cantilever beam constructed with honeycomb structure with the hexagonal honeycomb cells, filled with particles. The beam is subjected to external dynamic loads and the interactions of damping particles with the walls of the cells and its overall effect on the frequency response function (FRF) and the damping of the beam are obtained. The discrete-element-method (DEM) is used to model the dynamics of the particles in conjunction with the governing equations of motion of the beam and the cell-walls. The particle-particle and particle-wall impact is modeled using Hertz's non-linear dissipative contact model for normal component and Coulomb's laws of friction for tangential component. Contiguous block of cells near the tip of the cantilever beam were filled with the damping particles and the beam was excited with a random signal near the fixed end. The damping and transfer functions obtained experimentally are compared to those obtained from the mathematical model and they are found to match very well. Further the model was used to study the effect of fill fraction, mass ratio, and the level of excitation signal on transfer function. Depending on the mass ratio and fill fraction, significant reductions in vibration levels are observed.

  9. Electrical transport properties of Co-based skutterudites filled with Ag and Au

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoica, Maria; Lo, Cynthia S.

    2012-09-01

    This work presents theoretical calculations of the electrical transport properties of the Ag, Au, and La fractionally filled bulk skutterudites: CoSb3, CoAs3, and CoP3. Density functional theory, along with projector augmented wave potentials, was used to calculate bulk band structures and partial density of states. The Seebeck coefficient (S), electrical conductivity (σ), and power factor (S2σ) were calculated as a function of temperature and filling fraction using the momentum matrix method along the entire first Brillouin zone. Calculated trends in the electrical transport properties agree with previously published experimental measurements for p-type unfilled and La-filled CoSb3. The calculated S and σ values for the Ag- and Au-filled compounds indicate that the most promising electronic properties are exhibited by p-type Au0.125(CoSb3)4, Au0.25(CoSb3)4, and Au(CoSb3)4. Au is therefore recommended as a promising filler for improved thermoelectric properties in cobalt antimonides. Ag is also a good filler for cobalt phosphides; the creation of a negative indirect band gap is observed in Ag(CoP3)4, which indicates semimetallic behavior, so this compound may possibly exhibit lower thermal conductivity than metallic CoP3. Finally, we recommend future directions for improving the thermoelectric figure of merit of these materials.

  10. Cotton-Fiber-Filled Rubber Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Floyd A.

    1987-01-01

    Carbonization of fibers at high temperatures improves strength and erosion resistance. Cotton linters tested as replacement for asbestos filler currently used in rubber insulation in solid rocket motors. Cotton-filled rubber insulation has industrial uses; in some kinds of chemical- or metal-processing equipment, hoses, and protective clothing.

  11. 7 CFR 58.730 - Filling containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Procedures § 58.730 Filling containers. Hot fluid cheese from the cookers may be held in hotwells or hoppers to assure a constant and even supply of processed cheese to the filler or slice former. Filler valves... and shall cut off sharply without drip or drag of cheese across the opening. An effective system...

  12. Banach spaces that realize minimal fillings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bednov, B. B.; Borodin, P. A.

    2014-04-01

    It is proved that a real Banach space realizes minimal fillings for all its finite subsets (a shortest network spanning a fixed finite subset always exists and has the minimum possible length) if and only if it is a predual of L_1. The spaces L_1 are characterized in terms of Steiner points (medians). Bibliography: 25 titles.

  13. Irregularly Shaped Space-Filling Truncated Octahedra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, John Robert

    2008-01-01

    For any parent tetrahedron ABCD, centroids of selected sub-tetrahedra form the vertices of an irregularly shaped space-filling truncated octahedron. To reflect these properties, such a figure will be called an ISTO. Each edge of the ISTO is parallel to and one-eighth the length of one of the edges of tetrahedron ABCD and the volume of the ISTO is…

  14. The Chemistry of Modern Dental Filling Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicholson, John W.; Anstice, H. Mary

    1999-01-01

    Discusses materials used by dentists to restore teeth after decay has been removed. Shows how dental-material science is an interdisciplinary field in which chemistry plays a major part. Reviews the many developments polymer chemistry has contributed to the field of dental fillings. (CCM)

  15. SOIL AND FILL LABORATORY SUPPORT - 1991

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of soil analysis laboratory work by the University of Florida in Support of the Florida Radon Research Program (FRRP). Analyses were performed on soil and fill samples collected during 1991 by the FRRP Research House program and the New House Evaluation P...

  16. Banach spaces that realize minimal fillings

    SciTech Connect

    Bednov, B. B.; Borodin, P. A. E-mail: pborodin@inbox.ru

    2014-04-30

    It is proved that a real Banach space realizes minimal fillings for all its finite subsets (a shortest network spanning a fixed finite subset always exists and has the minimum possible length) if and only if it is a predual of L{sub 1}. The spaces L{sub 1} are characterized in terms of Steiner points (medians). Bibliography: 25 titles. (paper)

  17. 5 CFR 362.203 - Filling positions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... applications from individuals outside its own workforce, it must provide OPM information concerning... position, and (iii) How to apply. A public source (e.g., a link to the agency's Web site with information... subject-matter expertise, or to fill traditional summer jobs. The agency may extend these...

  18. 5 CFR 362.203 - Filling positions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... applications from individuals outside its own workforce, it must provide OPM information concerning... position, and (iii) How to apply. A public source (e.g., a link to the agency's Web site with information... subject-matter expertise, or to fill traditional summer jobs. The agency may extend these...

  19. Biomineral nanoparticles are space-filling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Li; Killian, Christopher E.; Kunz, Martin; Tamura, Nobumichi; Gilbert, P. U. P. A.

    2011-02-01

    Sea urchin biominerals have been shown to form from aggregating nanoparticles of amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC), which then crystallize into macroscopic single crystals of calcite. Here we measure the surface areas of these biominerals and find them to be comparable to those of space-filling macroscopic geologic calcite crystals. These biominerals differ from synthetic mesocrystals, which are invariably porous. We propose that space-filling ACC is the structural precursor for echinoderm biominerals.Sea urchin biominerals have been shown to form from aggregating nanoparticles of amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC), which then crystallize into macroscopic single crystals of calcite. Here we measure the surface areas of these biominerals and find them to be comparable to those of space-filling macroscopic geologic calcite crystals. These biominerals differ from synthetic mesocrystals, which are invariably porous. We propose that space-filling ACC is the structural precursor for echinoderm biominerals. This article was submitted as part of a Themed Issue on Crystallization and Formation Mechanisms of Nanostructures. Other papers on this topic can be found in issue 11 of vol. 2 (2010). This issue can be found from the Nanoscale homepage [http://www.rsc.org/nanoscale

  20. New Skeletal-Space-Filling Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Frank H.

    1977-01-01

    Describes plastic, skeletal molecular models that are color-coded and can illustrate both the conformation and overall shape of small molecules. They can also be converted to space-filling counterparts by the additions of color-coded polystyrene spheres. (MLH)

  1. Postscript: Filling-in Models of Completion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Barton L.

    2007-01-01

    Presents some additional comments from the current author regarding his original article "Filling-in models of completion: Rejoinder to Kellman, Garrigan, Shipley, and Keane (2007) and Albert (2007)." Despite repeated assertions by Kellman et al., I have never claimed that luminance constraints block modal completion; rather, they merely weaken…

  2. 27 CFR 19.360 - Filling packages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Filling packages. 19.360 Section 19.360 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL DISTILLED SPIRITS PLANTS Processing of Distilled Spirits Rules for...

  3. 27 CFR 19.390 - Filling packages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Filling packages. 19.390 Section 19.390 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS DISTILLED SPIRITS PLANTS Processing Operations Other Than Denaturation...

  4. 27 CFR 19.360 - Filling packages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Filling packages. 19.360 Section 19.360 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS DISTILLED SPIRITS PLANTS Processing of Distilled Spirits Rules for...

  5. 27 CFR 19.360 - Filling packages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Filling packages. 19.360 Section 19.360 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL DISTILLED SPIRITS PLANTS Processing of Distilled Spirits Rules for...

  6. 27 CFR 19.360 - Filling packages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Filling packages. 19.360 Section 19.360 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS DISTILLED SPIRITS PLANTS Processing of Distilled Spirits Rules for...

  7. Effect of drying on heavy metal fraction distribution in rice paddy soil.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yanbing; Huang, Biao; Darilek, Jeremy Landon

    2014-01-01

    An understanding of how redox conditions affect soil heavy metal fractions in rice paddies is important due to its implications for heavy metal mobility and plant uptake. Rice paddy soil samples routinely undergo oxidation prior to heavy metal analysis. Fraction distribution of Cu, Pb, Ni, and Cd from paddy soil with a wide pH range was investigated. Samples were both dried according to standard protocols and also preserved under anaerobic conditions through the sampling and analysis process and heavy metals were then sequentially extracted for the exchangeable and carbonate bound fraction (acid soluble fraction), iron and manganese oxide bound fraction (reducible fraction), organic bound fraction (oxidizable fraction), and residual fraction. Fractions were affected by redox conditions across all pH ranges. Drying decreased reducible fraction of all heavy metals. Curesidual fraction, Pboxidizable fraction, Cdresidual fraction, and Niresidual fraction increased by 25%, 33%, 35%, and >60%, respectively. Pbresidual fraction, Niacid soluble fraction, and Cdoxidizable fraction decreased 33%, 25%, and 15%, respectively. Drying paddy soil prior to heavy metal analysis overestimated Pb and underestimated Cu, Ni, and Cd. In future studies, samples should be stored after injecting N2 gas to maintain the redox potential of soil prior to heavy metal analysis, and investigate the correlation between heavy metal fraction distribution under field conditions and air-dried samples.

  8. Numerical recipes for mold filling simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Kothe, D.; Juric, D.; Lam, K.; Lally, B.

    1998-07-01

    Has the ability to simulate the filling of a mold progressed to a point where an appropriate numerical recipe achieves the desired results? If results are defined to be topological robustness, computational efficiency, quantitative accuracy, and predictability, all within a computational domain that faithfully represents complex three-dimensional foundry molds, then the answer unfortunately remains no. Significant interfacial flow algorithm developments have occurred over the last decade, however, that could bring this answer closer to maybe. These developments have been both evolutionary and revolutionary, will continue to transpire for the near future. Might they become useful numerical recipes for mold filling simulations? Quite possibly. Recent progress in algorithms for interface kinematics and dynamics, linear solution methods, computer science issues such as parallelization and object-oriented programming, high resolution Navier-Stokes (NS) solution methods, and unstructured mesh techniques, must all be pursued as possible paths toward higher fidelity mold filling simulations. A detailed exposition of these algorithmic developments is beyond the scope of this paper, hence the authors choose to focus here exclusively on algorithms for interface kinematics. These interface tracking algorithms are designed to model the movement of interfaces relative to a reference frame such as a fixed mesh. Current interface tracking algorithm choices are numerous, so is any one best suited for mold filling simulation? Although a clear winner is not (yet) apparent, pros and cons are given in the following brief, critical review. Highlighted are those outstanding interface tracking algorithm issues the authors feel can hamper the reliable modeling of today`s foundry mold filling processes.

  9. Experimental verification of enhanced sound transmission from water to air at low frequencies.

    PubMed

    Calvo, David C; Nicholas, Michael; Orris, Gregory J

    2013-11-01

    Laboratory measurements of enhanced sound transmission from water to air at low frequencies are presented. The pressure at a monitoring hydrophone is found to decrease for shallow source depths in agreement with the classical theory of a monopole source in proximity to a pressure release interface. On the other hand, for source depths below 1/10 of an acoustic wavelength in water, the radiation pattern in the air measured by two microphones becomes progressively omnidirectional in contrast to the classical geometrical acoustics picture in which sound is contained within a cone of 13.4° half angle. The measured directivities agree with wavenumber integration results for a point source over a range of frequencies and source depths. The wider radiation pattern owes itself to the conversion of evanescent waves in the water into propagating waves in the air that fill the angular space outside the cone. A ratio of pressure measurements made using an on-axis microphone and a near-axis hydrophone are also reported and compared with theory. Collectively, these pressure measurements are consistent with the theory of anomalous transparency of the water-air interface in which a large fraction of acoustic power emitted by a shallow source is radiated into the air.

  10. Young Children's Notations for Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brizuela, Barbara M.

    2006-01-01

    This paper focuses on the kinds of notations young children make for fractional numbers. The extant literature in the area of fractional numbers acknowledges children's difficulties in conceptualizing fractional numbers. Some of the research suggests possibly delaying an introduction to conventional notations for algorithms and fractions until…

  11. Creating, Naming, and Justifying Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siebert, Daniel; Gaskin, Nicole

    2006-01-01

    For students to develop meaningful conceptions of fractions and fraction operations, they need to think of fractions in terms other than as just whole-number combinations. In this article, we suggest two powerful images for thinking about fractions that move beyond whole-number reasoning. (Contains 5 figures.)

  12. Laser-filamentation-induced water condensation and snow formation in a cloud chamber filled with different ambient gases.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yonghong; Sun, Haiyi; Liu, Jiansheng; Liang, Hong; Ju, Jingjing; Wang, Tiejun; Tian, Ye; Wang, Cheng; Liu, Yi; Chin, See Leang; Li, Ruxin

    2016-04-04

    We investigated femtosecond laser-filamentation-induced airflow, water condensation and snow formation in a cloud chamber filled respectively with air, argon and helium. The mass of snow induced by laser filaments was found being the maximum when the chamber was filled with argon, followed by air and being the minimum with helium. We also discussed the mechanisms of water condensation in different gases. The results show that filaments with higher laser absorption efficiency, which result in higher plasma density, are beneficial for triggering intense airflow and thus more water condensation and precipitation.

  13. Filling the blanks in temporal intervals: the type of filling influences perceived duration and discrimination performance

    PubMed Central

    Horr, Ninja K.; Di Luca, Massimiliano

    2015-01-01

    In this work we investigate how judgments of perceived duration are influenced by the properties of the signals that define the intervals. Participants compared two auditory intervals that could be any combination of the following four types: intervals filled with continuous tones (filled intervals), intervals filled with regularly-timed short tones (isochronous intervals), intervals filled with irregularly-timed short tones (anisochronous intervals), and intervals demarcated by two short tones (empty intervals). Results indicate that the type of intervals to be compared affects discrimination performance and induces distortions in perceived duration. In particular, we find that duration judgments are most precise when comparing two isochronous and two continuous intervals, while the comparison of two anisochronous intervals leads to the worst performance. Moreover, we determined that the magnitude of the distortions in perceived duration (an effect akin to the filled duration illusion) is higher for tone sequences (no matter whether isochronous or anisochronous) than for continuous tones. Further analysis of how duration distortions depend on the type of filling suggests that distortions are not only due to the perceived duration of the two individual intervals, but they may also be due to the comparison of two different filling types. PMID:25717310

  14. Edge reconstructions in fractional quantum Hall systems.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joglekar, Yogesh; Nguyen, Hoang; Murthy, Ganpathy

    2003-03-01

    Two dimensional electron systems exhibiting fractional quantum Hall effects are characterized by a quantized Hall conductance and a dissipationless bulk. The transport in these systems occurs only at the edges where gapless excitations are possible [1]. We present a microscopic calculation of these egde-states at filling factors ν=1/3 and ν=2/5 using the Hamiltonian theory of the fractional quantum Hall effect [2]. We find that the quantum Hall egde undergoes a reconstruction as the confining potential, produced by the background charge density, softens [3,4]. Our results have implications to the tunneling experiments into the edge of a fractional quantum Hall system [5]. 1: X. G.Wen, Phys. Rev. Lett. 64, 2206 (1990). 2: R. Shankar and G. Murthy, Phys. Rev. Lett. 79, 4437 (1997). 3: C. de C. Chamon and X. G. Wen, Phys. Rev. B 49, 8227 (1994). 4: X. Wan, K. Yang, and E. H. Razayi, Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 056802 (2002). 5: A.M.Chang et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 86, 143 (2000).

  15. Arbitrage with fractional Gaussian processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xili; Xiao, Weilin

    2017-04-01

    While the arbitrage opportunity in the Black-Scholes model driven by fractional Brownian motion has a long history, the arbitrage strategy in the Black-Scholes model driven by general fractional Gaussian processes is in its infancy. The development of stochastic calculus with respect to fractional Gaussian processes allowed us to study such models. In this paper, following the idea of Shiryaev (1998), an arbitrage strategy is constructed for the Black-Scholes model driven by fractional Gaussian processes, when the stochastic integral is interpreted in the Riemann-Stieltjes sense. Arbitrage opportunities in some fractional Gaussian processes, including fractional Brownian motion, sub-fractional Brownian motion, bi-fractional Brownian motion, weighted-fractional Brownian motion and tempered fractional Brownian motion, are also investigated.

  16. Effective Field Theory of Fractional Quantized Hall Nematics

    SciTech Connect

    Mulligan, Michael; Nayak, Chetan; Kachru, Shamit; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC

    2012-06-06

    We present a Landau-Ginzburg theory for a fractional quantized Hall nematic state and the transition to it from an isotropic fractional quantum Hall state. This justifies Lifshitz-Chern-Simons theory - which is shown to be its dual - on a more microscopic basis and enables us to compute a ground state wave function in the symmetry-broken phase. In such a state of matter, the Hall resistance remains quantized while the longitudinal DC resistivity due to thermally-excited quasiparticles is anisotropic. We interpret recent experiments at Landau level filling factor {nu} = 7/3 in terms of our theory.

  17. Numerical study of sidewall filling for gas-fed pulse detonation engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rongrat, Wunnarat

    Pulse detonation engines for aerospace propulsion are required to operate at 50-100 Hz meaning that each pulse is 10-20 ms long. Filling of the engine and the related purging process become dominant due to their long duration compared to ignition and detonation wave propagation. This study uses ANSYS FLUENT to investigate the filling of a 1 m long tube with an internal diameter of 100 mm. Six different configurations were investigated with an endwall port and various sidewall arrangements, including stagger and inclination. A stoichiometric mixture of gaseous octane and air at STP was used to fill the tube at injection rates of 40, 150 and 250 m/s. Phase injection was also investigated and it showed performance improvements such as reduced lling time and reduced propellant escape from the exit.

  18. Testing fractional action cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shchigolev, V. K.

    2016-08-01

    The present work deals with a combined test of the so-called Fractional Action Cosmology (FAC) on the example of a specific model obtained by the author earlier. In this model, the effective cosmological term is proportional to the Hubble parameter squared through the so-called kinematic induction. The reason of studying this cosmological model could be explained by its ability to describe two periods of accelerated expansion, that is in agreement with the recent observations and the cosmological inflation paradigm. First of all, we put our model through the theoretical tests, which gives a general conception of the influence of the model parameters on its behavior. Then, we obtain some restrictions on the principal parameters of the model, including the fractional index, by means of the observational data. Finally, the cosmography parameters and the observational data compared to the theoretical predictions are presented both analytically and graphically.

  19. Fractional lattice charge transport

    PubMed Central

    Flach, Sergej; Khomeriki, Ramaz

    2017-01-01

    We consider the dynamics of noninteracting quantum particles on a square lattice in the presence of a magnetic flux α and a dc electric field E oriented along the lattice diagonal. In general, the adiabatic dynamics will be characterized by Bloch oscillations in the electrical field direction and dispersive ballistic transport in the perpendicular direction. For rational values of α and a corresponding discrete set of values of E(α) vanishing gaps in the spectrum induce a fractionalization of the charge in the perpendicular direction - while left movers are still performing dispersive ballistic transport, the complementary fraction of right movers is propagating in a dispersionless relativistic manner in the opposite direction. Generalizations and the possible probing of the effect with atomic Bose-Einstein condensates and photonic networks are discussed. Zak phase of respective band associated with gap closing regime has been computed and it is found converging to π/2 value. PMID:28102302

  20. Fractional Trajectories: Decorrelation Versus Friction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-27

    from the integration of fractional differential equations in time. In Section 2 we provide a general demonstration of the new perspective on fractional ...section we demonstrate the equivalence between a fractional trajectory that is the solution of a Caputo fractional differential equation , and the... fractional differential equation dα dtα V(t) = OV(t), (1) where 0 < α < 1 and O is an operator, either linear or nonlinear, acting on the vector V(t

  1. Fractional Galilean symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseiny, Ali; Rouhani, Shahin

    2016-09-01

    We generalize the differential representation of the operators of the Galilean algebras to include fractional derivatives. As a result a whole new class of scale invariant Galilean algebras are obtained. The first member of this class has dynamical index z = 2 similar to the Schrödinger algebra. The second member of the class has dynamical index z = 3 / 2, which happens to be the dynamical index Kardar-Parisi-Zhang equation.

  2. New Dry Fractionation Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKay, David S.; Cooper, Bonnie L.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation describes new fractionation methods that are used to create dust that is respirable for testing the effects of inhalation of lunar dust in preparation for future manned lunar exploration. Because lunar dust is a very limited commodity, a method that does not result in loss of the material had to be developed. The dust separation system that is described incorporates some traditional methods, while preventing the dust from being contaminated or changed in reactivity properties while also limiting losses.

  3. SEMICONDUCTOR TECHNOLOGY Dummy fill effect on CMP planarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junxiong, Zhou; Lan, Chen; Wenbiao, Ruan; Zhigang, Li; Weixiang, Shen; Tianchun, Ye

    2010-10-01

    With the use of a chemical-mechanical polishing (CMP) simulator verified by testing data from a foundry, the effect of dummy fill characteristics, such as fill size, fill density and fill shape, on CMP planarity is analyzed. The results indicate that dummy density has a significant impact on oxide erosion, and copper dishing is in proportion to dummy size. We also demonstrate that cross shape dummy fill can have the best dishing performance at the same density.

  4. [Mutagenicity of 3 organic fractions of atmospheric dust and gas chromatographic analysis of the basic fraction].

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, A; Schleibinger, H; Ketseridis, G; Wullenweber, M; Rüden, H

    1983-01-01

    Suspended particulate matter (PM) with a Dae less than 0.4 micron was collected from July 1981 till January 1982. The ether/benzene soluble extract (EEOM) and the acidic, basic and neutral fractions were determined and investigated for their mutagenic activities in the Ames bioassay. In addition particles (Dae) less than 10.2 micron derived in January were investigated. Five compounds of the basic fraction were determined by gaschromatography. The following results were obtained: Suspended particulate matter (Dae less than 0.4 micron) and the ether/benzene extract increase from July to January. The lowest rates occur in July (PM: 16.9 micron/m3) and August (EEOM: 3.0 micrograms/m3), the highest in January (PM: 48.9 micrograms/m3, EEOM: 10.5 micrograms/m3). The ether/benzene soluble portion of the suspended particulate matter increases from the average rate of 16.3% (July-September) to 22.7% (November-January). The neutral fraction amounts to 44.9%, the acidic fraction to 27.3% and the basic fraction to 3.5% of the organic matter (on an average). In experiments with metabolic activation 99% of the total mutagenicity during the period of July till September can be demonstrated by summing up the mutagenicity of the three fractions on the other hand only 59.7% from November till January. The EEOMs derived from winter exhibit without metabolic activation (250 micrograms/plate) distinctively higher numbers of revertants than the single fractions. Dose-response curves of extracts derived from back-up filters (Dae less than 0.4 micron) in January show that the acidic fraction has a slightly higher mutagenic activity than the neutral fraction (mean values of tests with and without S9-mix). The basic fraction shows no mutagenicity without S9-mix, with activation the mutagenic activity is lower than that of the other fractions. Mutagenicity expressed as rev./m3 air shows, that the neutral fraction is most efficient. The number of revertants per plate reveals-in relation to

  5. Complex Filling Dynamics in Mesoporous Thin Films.

    PubMed

    Mercuri, Magalí; Pierpauli, Karina; Bellino, Martín G; Berli, Claudio L A

    2017-01-10

    The fluid-front dynamics resulting from the coexisting infiltration and evaporation phenomena in nanofluidic systems has been investigated. More precisely, water infiltration in both titania and silica mesoporous films was studied through a simple experiment: a sessile drop was deposited over the film and the advancement of the fluid front into the porous structure was optically followed and recorded in time. In the case of titania mesoporous films, capillary infiltration was arrested at a given distance, and a steady annular region of the wetted material was formed. A simple model that combines Lucas-Washburn infiltration and surface evaporation was derived, which appropriately describes the observed filling dynamics and the annulus width in dissimilar mesoporous morphologies. In the case of wormlike mesoporous morphologies, a remarkable phenomenon was found: instead of reaching a steady infiltration-evaporation balance, the fluid front exhibits an oscillating behavior. This complex filling dynamics opens interesting possibilities to study the unusual nanofluidic phenomena and to discover novel applications.

  6. Rubber elasticity: From topology to filled elastomers

    SciTech Connect

    Heinrich, G.; Vilgis, T.A.

    1993-12-31

    Various new aspects in the elasticity of rubbers and statistics of unfilled and filled elastomers, together with various consequences for practical application are discussed. It is shown that the role of network topology is crucial in the statistics of rubbers. This is seen mostly on the influence of heterogeneities of crosslink density which determine the elastic modulus, ultimate properties as well as the dynamical behavior. The filler effects, entanglements in filled rubbers, and the filler/bound rubber/mobile rubber problem are discussed from a novel point of view. A localization model is adopted, where it can be shown that on a rough (filler) surface more polymer can be adsorbed compared to a flat surface with similar energetic properties. The role of carbon black networking and fractal properties of the filler are discussed in relation to the dynamic-mechanical properties of the elastomer.

  7. Liquid-filled Canyons on Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poggiali, Valerio; Mastrogiuseppe, Marco; Hayes, Alexander; Seu, Roberto; Birch, Samuel; Lorenz, Ralph; Grima, Cyril; Kargel, Jeffrey; Hofgartner, Jason

    2016-04-01

    During a close flyby, Cassini's RADAR altimeter observed a system of channels pertaining to the Vid Flumina system that drain into Titan's Ligeia Mare. While SAR images have been used to identify fluvial valleys in networks that extend for hundreds of kilometers, they can't directly prove the presence and/or physical extent of liquid channels filling them. Analysis of altimeter echoes shows that the channels are located in deep (~500 m) canyons and have strongly specular surface reflections that indicate they are currently liquid-filled. Liquid elevations in Vid Flumina and its lower tributaries are at the same level of Ligeia Mare to within the altimeter's vertical accuracy of ~15m, which is a function of both the RADAR instrument as well as the precision of Cassini's reconstructed ephemeris. Specular reflections are also observed in higher order tributaries that occur hundred meters above the level of Ligeia Mare, consistent with drainage feeding into the main channel system.

  8. Antibacterial properties of temporary filling materials.

    PubMed

    Slutzky, Hagay; Slutzky-Goldberg, I; Weiss, E I; Matalon, S

    2006-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the antibacterial properties of temporary fillings. The direct contact test (DCT) was used to evaluate the antibacterial properties of Revoltek LC, Tempit, Systemp inlay, and IRM. These were tested in contact with Streptococcus mutans and Enterococcus faecalis. The materials were examined immediately after setting, 1, 7, 14, and 30 days after aging in phosphate buffered saline (PBS). Statistical analysis included two-way ANOVA, one-way ANOVA, and Tukey multiple comparison. Systemp inlay, Tempit, and IRM exhibited antibacterial properties when in contact with S. mutans for at least 7 days, Tempit and IRM sustained this ability for at least 14 days. When in contact with E. faecalis Tempit and IRM were antibacterial immediately after setting, IRM sustained this ability for at least 1 day. Our study suggests that the difference in temporary filling materials may influence which microorganism will be able to invade the root canal system.

  9. Ag-Air Service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Econ, Inc.'s agricultural aerial application, "ag-air," involves more than 10,000 aircraft spreading insecticides, herbicides, fertilizer, seed and other materials over millions of acres of farmland. Difficult for an operator to estimate costs accurately and decide what to charge or which airplane can handle which assignment most efficiently. Computerized service was designed to improve business efficiency in choice of aircraft and determination of charge rates based on realistic operating cost data. Each subscriber fills out a detailed form which pertains to his needs and then receives a custom-tailored computer printout best suited to his particular business mix.

  10. Slotted Polyimide-Aerogel-Filled-Waveguide Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez-Solis, Rafael A.; Pacheco, Hector L.; Miranda, Felix A.; Meador, Mary Ann B.

    2013-01-01

    This presentation discussed the potential advantages of developing Slotted Waveguide Arrays using polyimide aerogels. Polyimide (PI) aerogels offer great promise as an enabling technology for lightweight aerospace antenna systems. PI aerogels are highly porous solids possessing low density and low dielectric permittivity combined with good mechanical properties. For slotted waveguide array applications, there are significant advantages in mass that more than compensate for the slightly higher loss of the aerogel filled waveguide when compared to state of practice commercial waveguide.

  11. Microscopic justification of the equal filling approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Martin, Sara; Robledo, L. M.

    2008-07-15

    The equal filling approximation, a procedure widely used in mean-field calculations to treat the dynamics of odd nuclei in a time-reversal invariant way, is justified as the consequence of a variational principle over an average energy functional. The ideas of statistical quantum mechanics are employed in the justification. As an illustration of the method, the ground and lowest-lying states of some octupole deformed radium isotopes are computed.

  12. Orofacial granulomatosis related to amalgam fillings.

    PubMed

    Ellison, R; Green, C; Gibson, J; Ghaffar, S

    2013-11-01

    This paper reports on a case of Orofacial Granulomatosis (OFG) in which the presence of amalgam fillings appears to have played a part in the aetiology. Once these restorations were removed and replaced with an alternative composite restorative material, all symptoms and signs of OFG resolved completely. This case highlights the necessity to include dental metals in the patch test battery when performing delayed patch testing on patients with OFG.

  13. Filled Landau levels in neutral quantum gases

    SciTech Connect

    Oehberg, P.; Juzeliunas, G.; Ruseckas, J.; Fleischhauer, M.

    2005-11-15

    We consider the signatures of the integer quantum Hall effect in a degenerate gas of electrically neutral atomic fermions. An effective magnetic field is achieved by applying two incident light beams with a high orbital angular momentum. We show how states corresponding to completely filled Landau levels are obtained and discuss various possibilities to measure the incompressible nature of the trapped two-dimensional gas.

  14. Abandoned Channel Fill Sequences in Tidal Estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, A. B.; Pasternack, G. B.; Goni, M. A.; Watson, E. B.

    2014-12-01

    This study proposes a modification of the current model for abandoned channel fill stratigraphy produced in unidirectional flow river reaches to incorporate seasonal tidal deposition. Evidence supporting this concept came from a study of two consecutive channel abandonment sequences in Ropers Slough of the lower Eel River Estuary in northern California. Aerial photographs showed that Ropers Slough was abandoned around 1943, reoccupied after the 1964 flood, and abandoned again in 1974 with fill continuing to the present. Planform geomorphic characteristics derived from these images were used in conjunction with sub-cm resolution stratigraphic analyses to describe the depositional environment processes and their resultant sedimentary deposits. Results showed that both abandonment sequences recorded quasi-annual scale fluvial/tidal deposition couplets. In both cases tidal deposits contained very little sand, and were higher in organic and inorganic carbon content than the sandier fluvial through-flow deposits. However, the two abandonment fills differed significantly in terms of the temporal progression of channel narrowing and fluvial sediment deposition characteristics. The first abandonment sequence led to a more rapid narrowing of Ropers Slough and produced deposits with a positive relationship between grain size/deposit thickness and discharge. The second abandonment resulted in a much slower narrowing of Ropers Slough and generally thinner fluvial deposits with no clear relationship between grain size/deposit thickness and discharge. The δ13C values and organic nitrogen to organic carbon ratios of deposits from the first phase overlapped with Eel River suspended sediment characteristics found for low flows (1-5 times mean discharge), while those of the second phase were consistent suspended sediment from higher flows (7-10 times mean discharge). The abandoned channel fill sequences appeared to differ due to the topographic steering of bed sediment transport and

  15. COMSOL MULTIPHYSICS MODEL FOR DWPF CANISTER FILLING

    SciTech Connect

    Kesterson, M.

    2011-03-31

    The purpose of this work was to develop a model that can be used to predict temperatures of the glass in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canisters during filling and cooldown. Past attempts to model these processes resulted in large (>200K) differences in predicted temperatures compared to experimentally measured temperatures. This work was therefore intended to also generate a model capable of reproducing the experimentally measured trends of the glass/canister temperature during filling and subsequent cooldown of DWPF canisters. To accomplish this, a simplified model was created using the finite element modeling software COMSOL Multiphysics which accepts user defined constants or expressions to describe material properties. The model results were compared to existing experimental data for validation. A COMSOL Multiphysics model was developed to predict temperatures of the glass within DWPF canisters during filling and cooldown. The model simulations and experimental data were in good agreement. The largest temperature deviations were {approx}40 C for the 87inch thermocouple location at 3000 minutes and during the initial cooldown at the 51 inch location occurring at approximately 600 minutes. Additionally, the model described in this report predicts the general trends in temperatures during filling and cooling observed experimentally. However, the model was developed using parameters designed to fit a single set of experimental data. Therefore, Q-loss is not currently a function of pour rate and pour temperature. Future work utilizing the existing model should include modifying the Q-loss term to be variable based on flow rate and pour temperature. Further enhancements could include eliminating the Q-loss term for a user defined convection where Navier-Stokes does not need to be solved in order to have convection heat transfer.

  16. Moon - 'Ghost' craters formed during Mare filling.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruikshank, D. P.; Hartmann, W. K.; Wood, C. A.

    1973-01-01

    This paper discusses formation of 'pathological' cases of crater morphology due to interaction of craters with molten lavas. Terrestrial observations of such a process are discussed. In lunar maria, a number of small impact craters (D less than 10 km) may have been covered by thin layers of fluid lavas, or formed in molten lava. Some specific lunar examples are discussed, including unusual shallow rings resembling experimental craters deformed by isostatic filling.

  17. Statistical evaluation of metal fill widths for emulated metal fill in parasitic extraction methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    J-Me, Teh; Noh, Norlaili Mohd.; Aziz, Zalina Abdul

    2015-05-01

    In the chip industry today, the key goal of a chip development organization is to develop and market chips within a short time frame to gain foothold on market share. This paper proposes a design flow around the area of parasitic extraction to improve the design cycle time. The proposed design flow utilizes the usage of metal fill emulation as opposed to the current flow which performs metal fill insertion directly. By replacing metal fill structures with an emulation methodology in earlier iterations of the design flow, this is targeted to help reduce runtime in fill insertion stage. Statistical design of experiments methodology utilizing the randomized complete block design was used to select an appropriate emulated metal fill width to improve emulation accuracy. The experiment was conducted on test cases of different sizes, ranging from 1000 gates to 21000 gates. The metal width was varied from 1 x minimum metal width to 6 x minimum metal width. Two-way analysis of variance and Fisher's least significant difference test were used to analyze the interconnect net capacitance values of the different test cases. This paper presents the results of the statistical analysis for the 45 nm process technology. The recommended emulated metal fill width was found to be 4 x the minimum metal width.

  18. Polystyrene Foam EOS as a Function of Porosity and Fill Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulford, Roberta; Swift, Damian

    2009-06-01

    An accurate EOS for polystyrene foam is necessary for analysis of numerous experiments in shock compression, inertial confinement fusion, and astrophysics. Plastic to gas ratios vary between various samples of foam, according to the density and cell-size of the foam. A matrix of compositions has been investigated, allowing prediction of foam response as a function of the plastic-to-air ratio. The EOS code CHEETAH allows participation of the air in the decomposition reaction of the foam, Differences between air-filled, nitrogen-blown, and CO2-blown foams are investigated, to estimate the importance of allowing air to react with plastic products during decomposition. Results differ somewhat from the conventional EOS, which are generated from values for plastic extrapolated to low densities.

  19. Capillary filling in nanostructured porous silicon.

    PubMed

    Acquaroli, Leandro N; Urteaga, Raúl; Berli, Claudio L A; Koropecki, Roberto R

    2011-03-01

    An experimental study on the capillary filling of nanoporous silicon with different fluids is presented. Thin nanoporous membranes were obtained by electrochemical anodization, and the filling dynamics was measured by laser interferometry, taking advantage of the optical properties of the system, related with the small pore radius in comparison to light wavelength. This optical technique is relatively simple to implement and yields highly reproducible data. A fluid dynamic model for the filling process is also proposed including the main characteristics of the porous matrix (tortuosity, average hydraulic radius). The model was tested for different ambient pressures, porous layer morphology, and fluid properties. It was found that the model reproduces well the experimental data according to the different conditions. The predicted pore radii quantitatively agree with the image information from scanning electron microscopy. This technique can be readily used as nanofluidic sensor to determine fluid properties such as viscosity and surface tension of a small sample of liquid. Besides, the whole method can be suitable to characterize a porous matrix.

  20. Metal-Filled Boron Nitride Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golberg, Dmitri; Bando, Yoshio

    2002-10-01

    We present the results on filling multi-walled BN nanotubes with 3d-transition metal nanorods. The nanorods made of either Fe-Ni Invar alloy (Fe˜60 at.%; Ni˜40 at.%) or pure Co were embedded into nanotubular channels via a two-stage process: first, C nanotubes containing Fe-Ni or Co nanoparticles at the tube-tips were synthesized by plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on a Fe-Ni Invar or Co substrates, respectively, and, secondly, the material was heated to the melting points of the corresponding metals in a flow of B2O3 and N2 gases and held for 0.5 h. During this second stage, simultaneous filling of nanotubes with the Fe-Ni or Co melt through capillarity and chemical modification of C tubular shells to form BN nanotubes occurred. The nanotubular shells and the fillings were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), high-resolution analytical transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), electron diffraction, electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) and energy dispersion X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). The synthesized nanostructures are supposed to perform as "nanocables" having conducting metallic cores (Fe-Ni; Co) and insulating nanotubular shields (BN) with high environmental stability.

  1. Liquid-Filled Channels On Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poggiali, V.; Mastrogiuseppe, M.; Hayes, A.; Seu, R.; Birch, S. P.; Hofgartner, J. D.; Flamini, E.; Lorenz, R. D.; Grima, C.; Kargel, J. S.; Mullen, J.

    2015-12-01

    Saturn's largest moon, Titan, has an active methane-based hydrologic cycle that drives processes and formation of landforms bearing striking similarities to hydrogeologic and meteorological processes and features on Earth. During a close flyby (~1400 km) in May 2013, Cassini's RADAR instrument observed the hydrocarbon sea Ligeia Mare using its altimetry mode. In addition to observing the sea, these observations also covered a sequence of channels pertaining to the Vid Flumina drainage basin. While radar images have been used to identify fluvial valleys in networks that extend for hundreds of kilometers, these images do not directly probe the existence or extent of any liquid-filled channels in the valleys. Herein, we use the Cassini altimetry over Vid Flumina to, for the first time, directly detect the presence of liquid-filled channels on Titan and characterize their width and geomorphologic context. Our discovery confirms that Titan does indeed have liquid filled channels in the present epoch. Steep-sided channels extend hundreds of meters below the surrounding terrain and in some cases exhibit canyon morphology. Liquid elevations in Vid Flumina and its lower tributaries are at the same level of Ligeia Mare to within the instrument vertical accuracy (~15m). We also find higher order tributaries that occur several hundred meters above the level of Ligeia Mare, consistent with drainage feeding into the main channel system.

  2. Protective supplied-breathing-air garment

    DOEpatents

    Childers, E.L.; von Hortenau, E.F.

    1982-05-28

    A breathing-air garment for isolating a wearer from hostile environments containing toxins or irritants is disclosed. The garment includes a suit and a separate head-protective enclosure or hood engaging a suit collar in sealing attachment. The hood and suit collar are cylindrically shaped and dimensioned to enable the wearer to withdraw his hands from the suit sleeves to perform manual tasks within the hood interior. Breathing air is supplied from an external air line with an air-delivery hose attached to the hood interior. The hose feeds air into an annular halo-like fiber-filled plenum having spaced discharge orifices attached to the hood top wall. A plurality of air exhaust/check valves located at the suit extremities cooperate with the hood air-delivery system to provide a cooling flow of circulating air from the hood throughout the suit interior. A suit entry seal provided on the suit sealed with an adhesive sealing flap.

  3. [Ablative and fractional lasers].

    PubMed

    Beylot, C; Grognard, C; Michaud, T

    2009-10-01

    The use of pulsed or scanning Carbon Dioxide, and pulsed Erbium-YAG lasers allows the programmable and reproducible photocoagulation of thin layers of the epidermis and superficial dermis. Thermal damage depends on the type of laser and is greater with CO(2) lasers. The degree of neocollagenesis is proportional to the thermal damage and is better with CO(2) lasers. Their main indication is the correction of photoaged facial skin but they can also be used for corrective dermatology, e.g. for scars and genodermatosis. Results are highly satisfactory but the technique is invasive and the patient experiences a social hindrance of around two weeks. Fractionated techniques treat 25% of the defective skin area at each session in noncontiguous microzones; four sessions are therefore necessary to treat the entire cutaneous surface. The treatment is given under topical anesthesia and is much less invasive, particularly with nonablative fractional laser treatment in which photothermolysis does not penetrate below the epidermis and/or the effects are slight, with no or very little social isolation. However, the results are much less satisfactory than the results of ablative laser and there is no firming effect. Other zones than the face can be treated. With the fractional CO(2) and Erbium ablative lasers, which have multiplied over the past 2 years, the much wider impacts cause perforation of the epidermis and there is a zone of ablation by laser photovaporization, with a zone of thermal damage below. The results are better in correcting photoaging of the face, without, however, achieving the efficacy of ablative lasers, which remain the reference technique. However, the effects are not insignificant, requiring at least 5 days of social isolation.

  4. Fractional channel multichannel analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Brackenbush, Larry W.; Anderson, Gordon A.

    1994-01-01

    A multichannel analyzer incorporating the features of the present invention obtains the effect of fractional channels thus greatly reducing the number of actual channels necessary to record complex line spectra. This is accomplished by using an analog-to-digital converter in the asynscronous mode, i.e., the gate pulse from the pulse height-to-pulse width converter is not synchronized with the signal from a clock oscillator. This saves power and reduces the number of components required on the board to achieve the effect of radically expanding the number of channels without changing the circuit board.

  5. Fractional channel multichannel analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Brackenbush, L.W.; Anderson, G.A.

    1994-08-23

    A multichannel analyzer incorporating the features of the present invention obtains the effect of fractional channels thus greatly reducing the number of actual channels necessary to record complex line spectra. This is accomplished by using an analog-to-digital converter in the asynchronous mode, i.e., the gate pulse from the pulse height-to-pulse width converter is not synchronized with the signal from a clock oscillator. This saves power and reduces the number of components required on the board to achieve the effect of radically expanding the number of channels without changing the circuit board. 9 figs.

  6. Solvent Fractionation of Lignin

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, Sabornie; Saito, Tomonori

    2014-01-01

    Lignin is a highly abundant source of renewable carbon that can be considered as a valuable sustainable source of biobased materials. The major issues for the commercial production of value added high performance lignin products are lignin s physical and chemical heterogenities. To overcome these problems, a variety of procedures have been developed to produce pure lignin suitable for high performace applications such as lignin-derived carbon materials. However, most of the isolation procedures affect lignin s properties and structure. In this chapter, a short review of the effect of solvent fractionation on lignin s properties and structure is presented.

  7. Body Fractions: A Physical Approach to Fraction Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Judith

    2011-01-01

    Many students experience great difficulty understanding the meaning of fractions. For many students who have spent their early mathematics lessons focusing on counting (whole) numbers, recognising that there are many numbers between those whole numbers called fractional numbers, is quite revolutionary. The foundation of understanding fractions is…

  8. Effects of verapamil and propranolol on left ventricular systolic function and diastolic filling in patients with coronary artery disease: radionuclide angiographic studies at rest and during exercise

    SciTech Connect

    Bonow, R.O.; Leon, M.B.; Rosing, D.R.; Kent, K.M.; Lipson, L.C.; Bacharach, S.L.; Green, M.V.; Epstein, S.E.

    1982-06-01

    To determine the effects of verapamil on left ventricular (LV) systolic function and diastolic filling in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), researchers performed gated radionuclide angiography at rest and during exercise in 16 symptomatic patients before and during oral verapamil therapy (480 mg/day). Twelve patients were also studied during oral propranolol. LV ejection fraction at rest was normal in 13 patients, but abnormal diastolic filling at rest, defined as peak filling rate (PFR) less than 2.5 end-diastolic volumes (EDV)/sec or time to PFR greater than 180 msec, was present in 15. During verapamil, resting ejection fraction decreased, but resting diastolic filling improved: PFR increased and time to PFR decreased. Exercise ejection fraction did not change during verapamil, but exercise PFR increased, and exercise time to PFR decreased. In contrast, propranolol did not alter ejection fraction, PFR, or time to PFR at rest or during exercise. Thus, LV ejection fraction is decreased by verapamil at rest but is unchanged during exercise. While LV systolic function is not improved by verapamil, LV diastolic filling is enhanced by verapamil, both at rest and during exercise. These mechanisms may account in part for the symptomatic improvement in many patients during verapamil therapy.

  9. [Apical thickness of root fillings in upper premolars. A comparison of orthograde-filled, apicoectomized and retrograde-filled teeth].

    PubMed

    Reister, Jan Philip; Staribratova-Reister, Kamelia; Kielbassa, Andrej M

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the apical leakage in root canal filled, apicectomised and retrogradely filled maxillary single rooted premolars with two canals of type II configuration. For this purpose the root canals of 51 maxillary type II premolars were shaped to size ISO #55, followed by a step-back preparation to size ISO #80. Subsequently, all teeth were obturated by means of lateral condensation and randomly divided into three groups, 17 teeth each. Group I was used as a control, whereas in group II and III an apicoectomy was performed. Retrograde glass ionomer restorations (Ketac Fil) were placed additionally in group III. The specimens were exposed to methylene blue for 24 hours, then cross-sectioned, and the deepness of dye penetration was measured. Data were analyzed and tested for significant differences between the various groups (Mann-Whitney test; alpha = 0.05). The teeth in group II showed the lowest mean dye penetration. The differences were statistically significant, if compared to group I (p < 0.001) and group III (p < 0.001). The dye penetration in group I was significantly lower than in group III (p = 0.024). In teeth with lateral canals, the mean dye penetration was higher (3,557 microns +/- 1,337 microns) than in teeth without lateral canals (3,096 microns +/- 1,931 microns). The teeth in group III showed a circular dye penetration in nearly all cases. For clinical purposes, the application of retrograde glass ionomer fillings must be considered very critically.

  10. Water Tank with Capillary Air/Liquid Separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ungar, Eugene K.; Smith, Frederick; Edeen, Gregg; Almlie, Jay C.

    2010-01-01

    A bladderless water tank (see figure) has been developed that contains capillary devices that allow it to be filled and emptied, as needed, in microgravity. When filled with water, the tank shields human occupants of a spacecraft against cosmic radiation. A membrane that is permeable by air but is hydrophobic (neither wettable nor permeable by liquid water) covers one inside surface of the tank. Grooves between the surface and the membrane allow air to flow through vent holes in the surface as the tank is filled or drained. A margin of wettable surface surrounds the edges of the membrane, and all the other inside tank surfaces are also wettable. A fill/drain port is located in one corner of the tank and is covered with a hydrophilic membrane. As filling begins, water runs from the hydrophilic membrane into the corner fillets of the tank walls. Continued filling in the absence of gravity will result in a single contiguous air bubble that will be vented through the hydrophobic membrane. The bubble will be reduced in size until it becomes spherical and smaller than the tank thickness. Draining the tank reverses the process. Air is introduced through the hydrophobic membrane, and liquid continuity is maintained with the fill/drain port through the corner fillets. Even after the tank is emptied, as long as the suction pressure on the hydrophilic membrane does not exceed its bubble point, no air will be drawn into the liquid line.

  11. Ejection Fraction Heart Failure Measurement

    MedlinePlus

    ... Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Ejection Fraction Heart Failure Measurement Updated:Feb 15,2017 The ejection fraction (EF) is an important measurement in determining how well your heart is pumping ...

  12. Pressure distribution evaluation of different filling methods for deposition of powders in dies: Measurement and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayyar Roudsari, Saed

    The aim of this research was to measure, analyze, and model the pressure distribution characteristics of powder deposition into rectangular and circular shallow dies using four filling methods. The feed shoe, the rotational rainy, the point feed, and the pneumatic filling methods were used to investigate the deposition characteristics into shallow dies. In order to evaluate the pressure distribution during filling of shallow dies, factors influencing powder deposition were studied. The factors included particle size and shape, particle size distribution, feed shoe speed, and tube cross-section (in case of feed shoe filling) and deposition rates (in case of rotational rainy, point feed, and pneumatic filling). A battery powder mixture (BPM) and microcrystalline cellulose (Avicel PH102) with median size of 84 and 600mum, respectively, were used to fill a shallow rectangular die 32x30 mm and 6.5 mm deep and a shallow circular die 35 mm in diameter and 6.5 mm deep. The second generation of pressure deposition tester (PDT-II) with circular and square feed shoe tube cross-sections was used to measure the two powders' pressure distribution characteristics. An innovative rotational rainy filling device was designed and fabricated. This versatile device can be used to measure filling characteristics at different rotational speeds (1-10 rpm) for various powders. The point feed (funnel fill) method with a funnel of 30 mm inlet diameter and 4.2 mm outlet diameter opening was used to fill the rectangular and circular shallow dies. The pneumatic filling method was designed and fabricated to fill the die using air as the conveying medium in a rectangular cross-section tube. The pneumatic filling device was limited to using only the BPM powder, since the Avicel powder generated substantial quantity of airborne dust during the test. Symmetry analysis, variance metrics, and uniformity analysis were used to quantify the deposition characteristics. The results showed that: (1) filled

  13. Fractional Hopfield Neural Networks: Fractional Dynamic Associative Recurrent Neural Networks.

    PubMed

    Pu, Yi-Fei; Yi, Zhang; Zhou, Ji-Liu

    2016-07-14

    This paper mainly discusses a novel conceptual framework: fractional Hopfield neural networks (FHNN). As is commonly known, fractional calculus has been incorporated into artificial neural networks, mainly because of its long-term memory and nonlocality. Some researchers have made interesting attempts at fractional neural networks and gained competitive advantages over integer-order neural networks. Therefore, it is naturally makes one ponder how to generalize the first-order Hopfield neural networks to the fractional-order ones, and how to implement FHNN by means of fractional calculus. We propose to introduce a novel mathematical method: fractional calculus to implement FHNN. First, we implement fractor in the form of an analog circuit. Second, we implement FHNN by utilizing fractor and the fractional steepest descent approach, construct its Lyapunov function, and further analyze its attractors. Third, we perform experiments to analyze the stability and convergence of FHNN, and further discuss its applications to the defense against chip cloning attacks for anticounterfeiting. The main contribution of our work is to propose FHNN in the form of an analog circuit by utilizing a fractor and the fractional steepest descent approach, construct its Lyapunov function, prove its Lyapunov stability, analyze its attractors, and apply FHNN to the defense against chip cloning attacks for anticounterfeiting. A significant advantage of FHNN is that its attractors essentially relate to the neuron's fractional order. FHNN possesses the fractional-order-stability and fractional-order-sensitivity characteristics.

  14. How Weird Are Weird Fractions?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuffelbeam, Ryan

    2013-01-01

    A positive rational is a weird fraction if its value is unchanged by an illegitimate, digit-based reduction. In this article, we prove that each weird fraction is uniquely weird and initiate a discussion of the prevalence of weird fractions.

  15. The random continued fraction transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalle, Charlene; Kempton, Tom; Verbitskiy, Evgeny

    2017-03-01

    We introduce a random dynamical system related to continued fraction expansions. It uses random combinations of the Gauss map and the Rényi (or backwards) continued fraction map. We explore the continued fraction expansions that this system produces, as well as the dynamical properties of the system.

  16. Fractional diffusion on bounded domains

    DOE PAGES

    Defterli, Ozlem; D'Elia, Marta; Du, Qiang; ...

    2015-03-13

    We found that the mathematically correct specification of a fractional differential equation on a bounded domain requires specification of appropriate boundary conditions, or their fractional analogue. In this paper we discuss the application of nonlocal diffusion theory to specify well-posed fractional diffusion equations on bounded domains.

  17. Numerical approaches to fractional calculus and fractional ordinary differential equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Changpin; Chen, An; Ye, Junjie

    2011-05-01

    Nowadays, fractional calculus are used to model various different phenomena in nature, but due to the non-local property of the fractional derivative, it still remains a lot of improvements in the present numerical approaches. In this paper, some new numerical approaches based on piecewise interpolation for fractional calculus, and some new improved approaches based on the Simpson method for the fractional differential equations are proposed. We use higher order piecewise interpolation polynomial to approximate the fractional integral and fractional derivatives, and use the Simpson method to design a higher order algorithm for the fractional differential equations. Error analyses and stability analyses are also given, and the numerical results show that these constructed numerical approaches are efficient.

  18. A Performance Map for Ideal Air Breathing Pulse Detonation Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paxson, Daniel E.

    2001-01-01

    The performance of an ideal, air breathing Pulse Detonation Engine is described in a manner that is useful for application studies (e.g., as a stand-alone, propulsion system, in combined cycles, or in hybrid turbomachinery cycles). It is shown that the Pulse Detonation Engine may be characterized by an averaged total pressure ratio, which is a unique function of the inlet temperature, the fraction of the inlet flow containing a reacting mixture, and the stoichiometry of the mixture. The inlet temperature and stoichiometry (equivalence ratio) may in turn be combined to form a nondimensional heat addition parameter. For each value of this parameter, the average total enthalpy ratio and total pressure ratio across the device are functions of only the reactant fill fraction. Performance over the entire operating envelope can thus be presented on a single plot of total pressure ratio versus total enthalpy ratio for families of the heat addition parameter. Total pressure ratios are derived from thrust calculations obtained from an experimentally validated, reactive Euler code capable of computing complete Pulse Detonation Engine limit cycles. Results are presented which demonstrate the utility of the described method for assessing performance of the Pulse Detonation Engine in several potential applications. Limitations and assumptions of the analysis are discussed. Details of the particular detonative cycle used for the computations are described.

  19. Old Basin Filled by Smooth Plains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Old basin, 190 km in diameter, filled by smooth plains at 43 degrees S, 55 degrees W. The basin's hummocky rim is partly degraded and cratered by later events. Mariner 10 frame 166607.

    The Mariner 10 mission, managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory for NASA's Office of Space Science, explored Venus in February 1974 on the way to three encounters with Mercury-in March and September 1974 and in March 1975. The spacecraft took more than 7,000 photos of Mercury, Venus, the Earth and the Moon.

    Image Credit: NASA/JPL/Northwestern University

  20. Rapid graph layout using space filling curves.

    PubMed

    Muelder, Chris; Ma, Kwan-Liu

    2008-01-01

    Network data frequently arises in a wide variety of fields, and node-link diagrams are a very natural and intuitive representation of such data. In order for a node-link diagram to be effective, the nodes must be arranged well on the screen. While many graph layout algorithms exist for this purpose, they often have limitations such as high computational complexity or node colocation. This paper proposes a new approach to graph layout through the use of space filling curves which is very fast and guarantees that there will be no nodes that are colocated. The resulting layout is also aesthetic and satisfies several criteria for graph layout effectiveness.

  1. AGU member running to fill congressional seat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crum, Emily

    John F Mink, an AGU member (Hydrology) for 50 years, and husband of the late Representative Patsy T. Mink (D-Hawaii), will run in a special election on 30 November to fill the remainder of his wife's unexpired congressional term. Patsy Mink, who represented the 2nd Congressional District of Hawaii, passed away on 28 September after battling pneumonia.Her name will appear on the 5 November election ballot as a candidate for Hawaii's 2nd District in the 108th Congress. If she is elected posthumously, the state of Hawaii will hold a special election in January to select an official to serve the full two-year term.

  2. Fractional chemotaxis diffusion equations.

    PubMed

    Langlands, T A M; Henry, B I

    2010-05-01

    We introduce mesoscopic and macroscopic model equations of chemotaxis with anomalous subdiffusion for modeling chemically directed transport of biological organisms in changing chemical environments with diffusion hindered by traps or macromolecular crowding. The mesoscopic models are formulated using continuous time random walk equations and the macroscopic models are formulated with fractional order differential equations. Different models are proposed depending on the timing of the chemotactic forcing. Generalizations of the models to include linear reaction dynamics are also derived. Finally a Monte Carlo method for simulating anomalous subdiffusion with chemotaxis is introduced and simulation results are compared with numerical solutions of the model equations. The model equations developed here could be used to replace Keller-Segel type equations in biological systems with transport hindered by traps, macromolecular crowding or other obstacles.

  3. Soot Volume Fraction Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenberg, Paul S.; Ku, Jerry C.

    1994-01-01

    A new technique is described for the full-field determination of soot volume fractions via laser extinction measurements. This technique differs from previously reported point-wise methods in that a two-dimensional array (i.e., image) of data is acquired simultaneously. In this fashion, the net data rate is increased, allowing the study of time-dependent phenomena and the investigation of spatial and temporal correlations. A telecentric imaging configuration is employed to provide depth-invariant magnification and to permit the specification of the collection angle for scattered light. To improve the threshold measurement sensitivity, a method is employed to suppress undesirable coherent imaging effects. A discussion of the tomographic inversion process is provided, including the results obtained from numerical simulation. Results obtained with this method from an ethylene diffusion flame are shown to be in close agreement with those previously obtained by sequential point-wise interrogation.

  4. Functional fractionation of platelets.

    PubMed

    Haver, V M; Gear, A R

    1981-02-01

    Studies of platelet populations suggest that they are heterogeneous in size, age, and metabolic parameters. In an attempt to correlate these parameters with efficiency of aggregation, a new technique, functional fractionation, was developed. Platelet populations are separated by their differential reactivity to aggregating agents. For example, low doses of ADP (0.1 to 0.7 microM) are added to stirred PRP, after which gentle centrifugation is used to remove aggregates from single unreacted platelets. The loose aggregates can be readily dispersed for comparison of the physical or biochemical properties of the reacted versus unreacted platelets. It was found that reactive platelets were larger (6.5 micrometer3) than unreacted platelets (5.51 micrometer3). No significant difference in density existed between the two populations, and no release of [14C]serotonin from prelabeled platelets occurred during functional fractionation. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy confirmed the size difference and revealed that in both populations platelets were structurally intact with a normal discoid shape and no significant difference in organelle content. Human platelets most reactive to ADP were also enriched in glycogen (3.6-fold), ATP (1.6-fold), and ADP (twofold), compared with less reactive cells. These "reactive" cells took up more 51[Cr] and contained 1.9 times more surface sialic acid. In an in vivo aging experiment, rats were injected with 75[Se]methionine. Shortly after labeling (1 day), the most reactive platelets possessed the highest amount of 75[Se]. These results reveal that functionally active platelets, which are also larger, are more active metabolically than less reactive platelets, possess a higher negative surface charge, and may be a younger population.

  5. Calibration of Dissolved Noble Gas Mass Spectrometric Measurements by an Air-Water Equilibration System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillegonds, Darren; Matsumoto, Takuya; Jaklitsch, Manfred; Han, Liang-Feng; Klaus, Philipp; Wassenaar, Leonard; Aggarwal, Pradeep

    2013-04-01

    Precise measurements by mass spectrometry of dissolved noble gases (He, Ar, Ne, Kr, Xe) in water samples require careful calibration against laboratory standards with known concentrations. Currently, air pipettes are used for day-to-day calibrations, making estimation of overall analytical uncertainties for dissolved noble gas measurements in water difficult. Air equilibrated water (AEW) is often used as a matrix-equivalent laboratory standard for dissolved gases in groundwater, because of the well-known and constant fractions of noble gases in the atmosphere. AEW standards, however, are only useful if the temperature and pressure of the gas-water equilibrium can be controlled and measured precisely (i.e., to better than 0.5%); contamination and partial sample degassing must also be prevented during sampling. Here we present the details of a new custom air-water equilibration system which consists of an insulated 600 liter tank filled with deionized water, held isothermally at a precise target temperature (<0.05 °C) through the use of a heat exchanger. The temperature and total dissolved gas of the water in the tank are monitored continually, as are atmospheric pressure and air temperature in the laboratory. Different noble gas concentration standards can be reliably produced by accurately controlling the water temperature of the equilibration system. Equilibration characteristics and reproducibility of this system for production of copper tubes containing known amounts of noble gases will be presented.

  6. Intraventricular filling in physical models of the left ventricle: influence of aortic pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelsen, Nicholas; Samaee, Milad; Santhanakrishnan, Arvind

    2016-11-01

    Clinical studies using medical imaging have provided evidence on the formation of an intraventricular vortex in the left ventricle (LV) during diastolic phase of the cardiac cycle. However, the question of how the vortex characteristics are altered with aortic pressure remains unclear. This is of relevance to hypertensive heart disease and heart failure with normal ejection fraction. Using an experimental left heart simulator, we have previously shown that increasing LV wall stiffness results in reduction of the filling vortex circulation. In this study, we investigate the effects of varying aortic pressure in addition to wall stiffness. A series of flexible-walled LV models with varying wall stiffness were tested in a pulsatile flow loop. 2D particle image velocimetry was used to visualize intraventricular flow and calculate filling vortex circulation. The flow circuit was first setup with the least stiffness LV physical model, and tuned to physiological aortic pressure, cardiac output and ejection fraction. We then iteratively tested LV models with increasing stiffness without changing circuit variables. Comparisons of the filling vortex circulation with changing aortic pressure relative to the baseline and increased LV stiffness models will be presented.

  7. Intraventricular filling under increasing left ventricular wall stiffness and heart rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samaee, Milad; Lai, Hong Kuan; Schovanec, Joseph; Santhanakrishnan, Arvind; Nagueh, Sherif

    2015-11-01

    Heart failure with normal ejection fraction (HFNEF) is a clinical syndrome that is prevalent in over 50% of heart failure patients. HFNEF patients show increased left ventricle (LV) wall stiffness and clinical diagnosis is difficult using ejection fraction (EF) measurements. We hypothesized that filling vortex circulation strength would decrease with increasing LV stiffness irrespective of heart rate (HR). 2D PIV and hemodynamic measurements were acquired on LV physical models of varying wall stiffness under resting and exercise HRs. The LV models were comparatively tested in an in vitro flow circuit consisting of a two-element Windkessel model driven by a piston pump. The stiffer LV models were tested in comparison with the least stiff baseline model without changing pump amplitude, circuit compliance and resistance. Increasing stiffness at resting HR resulted in diminishing cardiac output without lowering EF below 50% as in HFNEF. Increasing HR to 110 bpm in addition to stiffness resulted in lowering EF to less than 50%. The circulation strength of the intraventricular filling vortex diminished with increasing stiffness and HR. The results suggest that filling vortex circulation strength could be potentially used as a surrogate measure of LV stiffness. This research was supported by the Oklahoma Center for Advancement of Science and Technology (HR14-022).

  8. Collective edge modes in fractional quantum Hall systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Hoang K.; Joglekar, Yogesh N.; Murthy, Ganpathy

    2004-07-01

    Over the past few years one of us (Murthy) in collaboration with Shankar has developed an extended Hamiltonian formalism capable of describing the ground-state and low-energy excitations in the fractional quantum Hall regime. The Hamiltonian, expressed in terms of composite fermion operators, incorporates all the nonperturbative features of the fractional Hall regime, so that conventional many-body approximations such as Hartree-Fock and time-dependent Hartree-Fock are applicable. We apply this formalism to develop a microscopic theory of the collective edge modes in fractional quantum Hall regime. We present the results for edge mode dispersions at principal filling factors ν=1/3 , 1/5 , and 2/5 for systems with unreconstructed edges. The primary advantage of the method is that one works in the thermodynamic limit right from the beginning, thus avoiding the finite-size effects which ultimately limit exact diagonalization studies.

  9. Gapless modes of fractional quantum Hall edges: a Hamiltonian study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Hoang; Joglekar, Yogesh; Murthy, Ganpathy

    2004-03-01

    We study the collective modes of the fractional quantum Hall edge states using the Hamiltonian formalism [1]. In this theory, the composite fermions are fully interacting; the collective modes are obtained within a conserving approximation which respects the constraints [2]. We present the gapless edge-mode dispersions at 1/3 and 2/5 filling fractions of unreconstructed and reconstructed edges. The dispersions are found to be nonlinear due to the variation of the effective magnetic field on the composite fermions. The implications of our study to the tunneling experiments into the edge of a fractional quantum Hall system [3] are discussed*. 1. R. Shankar and G. Murthy, Phys. Rev. Lett. 79, 4437 (1997). 2. G. Murthy, Phys. Rev. B 64, 195310 (2001). 3. A.M.Chang et. al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 86, 143 (2000). * Work supported by the NSF, Grant number DMR 031176.

  10. Fraction Reduction in Membrane Systems

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Fraction reduction is a basic computation for rational numbers. P system is a new computing model, while the current methods for fraction reductions are not available in these systems. In this paper, we propose a method of fraction reduction and discuss how to carry it out in cell-like P systems with the membrane structure and the rules with priority designed. During the application of fraction reduction rules, synchronization is guaranteed by arranging some special objects in these rules. Our work contributes to performing the rational computation in P systems since the rational operands can be given in the form of fraction. PMID:24772037

  11. Assessing regional intake fractions in North America.

    PubMed

    Humbert, Sebastien; Manneh, Rima; Shaked, Shanna; Wannaz, Cédric; Horvath, Arpad; Deschênes, Louise; Jolliet, Olivier; Margni, Manuele

    2009-08-15

    This paper develops the IMPACT North America model, a spatially resolved multimedia, multi-pathway, fate, exposure and effect model that includes indoor and urban compartments. IMPACT North America allows geographic differentiation of population exposure of toxic emissions for comparative risk assessment and life cycle impact assessment within U.S. and Canada. It looks at air, water, soil, sediment and vegetation media, and divides North America into several hundred zones. It is nested within a single world box to account for emissions leaving North America. It is a multi-scale model, covering three different spatial scales--indoor, urban and regional--in all zones in North America. Model results are evaluated against monitored emissions and concentrations of benzo(a)pyrene, 2,3,7,8-TCDD and mercury. Most of the chemical concentrations predicted by the model fall within two orders of magnitude of the monitored data. The model shows that urban intake fractions are one order of magnitude higher than rural intake fractions. The model application and importance is demonstrated by a case study on spatially-distributed emissions over the life cycle of diesel fuel. Depending on population densities and agricultural intensities, intake fractions can vary by eight orders of magnitudes, and even limited indoor emissions can lead to intakes comparable to those from outdoor emissions. To accurately assess these variations in intake fraction, we require the essential three original features described in the present paper: i) inclusion of the continental model within a world box for persistent pollutants, ii) addition of an urban box for short- and medium-lived substances (for grid size larger than 100 km), and iii) assess indoor emissions. This model can therefore be used to screen chemicals and assess regionalized intake fractions within North America for population-based human exposure assessment, life cycle impact assessment, and comparative risk assessment. The model can be

  12. Mullins effect in a filled elastomer under uniaxial tension

    SciTech Connect

    Maiti, A.; Small, W.; Gee, R. H.; Weisgraber, T. H.; Chinn, S. C.; Wilson, T. S.; Maxwell, R. S.

    2014-01-16

    Modulus softening and permanent set in filled polymeric materials due to cyclic loading and unloading, commonly known as the Mullins effect, can have a significant impact on their use as support cushions. The quantitative analysis of such behavior is essential to ensure the effectiveness of such materials in long-term deployment. In this work we combine existing ideas of filler-induced modulus enhancement, strain amplification, and irreversible deformation within a simple non-Gaussian constitutive model to quantitatively interpret recent measurements on a relevant PDMS-based elastomeric cushion. Also, we find that the experimental stress-strain data is consistent with the picture that during stretching (loading) two effects take place simultaneously: (1) the physical constraints (entanglements) initially present in the polymer network get disentangled, thus leading to a gradual decrease in the effective cross-link density, and (2) the effective filler volume fraction gradually decreases with increasing strain due to the irreversible pulling out of an initially occluded volume of the soft polymer domain.

  13. Mullins effect in a filled elastomer under uniaxial tension

    DOE PAGES

    Maiti, A.; Small, W.; Gee, R. H.; ...

    2014-01-16

    Modulus softening and permanent set in filled polymeric materials due to cyclic loading and unloading, commonly known as the Mullins effect, can have a significant impact on their use as support cushions. The quantitative analysis of such behavior is essential to ensure the effectiveness of such materials in long-term deployment. In this work we combine existing ideas of filler-induced modulus enhancement, strain amplification, and irreversible deformation within a simple non-Gaussian constitutive model to quantitatively interpret recent measurements on a relevant PDMS-based elastomeric cushion. Also, we find that the experimental stress-strain data is consistent with the picture that during stretching (loading)more » two effects take place simultaneously: (1) the physical constraints (entanglements) initially present in the polymer network get disentangled, thus leading to a gradual decrease in the effective cross-link density, and (2) the effective filler volume fraction gradually decreases with increasing strain due to the irreversible pulling out of an initially occluded volume of the soft polymer domain.« less

  14. Kinetic Modeling of Sunflower Grain Filling and Fatty Acid Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Durruty, Ignacio; Aguirrezábal, Luis A N; Echarte, María M

    2016-01-01

    Grain growth and oil biosynthesis are complex processes that involve various enzymes placed in different sub-cellular compartments of the grain. In order to understand the mechanisms controlling grain weight and composition, we need mathematical models capable of simulating the dynamic behavior of the main components of the grain during the grain filling stage. In this paper, we present a non-structured mechanistic kinetic model developed for sunflower grains. The model was first calibrated for sunflower hybrid ACA855. The calibrated model was able to predict the theoretical amount of carbohydrate equivalents allocated to the grain, grain growth and the dynamics of the oil and non-oil fraction, while considering maintenance requirements and leaf senescence. Incorporating into the model the serial-parallel nature of fatty acid biosynthesis permitted a good representation of the kinetics of palmitic, stearic, oleic, and linoleic acids production. A sensitivity analysis showed that the relative influence of input parameters changed along grain development. Grain growth was mostly affected by the specific growth parameter (μ') while fatty acid composition strongly depended on their own maximum specific rate parameters. The model was successfully applied to two additional hybrids (MG2 and DK3820). The proposed model can be the first building block toward the development of a more sophisticated model, capable of predicting the effects of environmental conditions on grain weight and composition, in a comprehensive and quantitative way.

  15. Kinetic Modeling of Sunflower Grain Filling and Fatty Acid Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Durruty, Ignacio; Aguirrezábal, Luis A. N.; Echarte, María M.

    2016-01-01

    Grain growth and oil biosynthesis are complex processes that involve various enzymes placed in different sub-cellular compartments of the grain. In order to understand the mechanisms controlling grain weight and composition, we need mathematical models capable of simulating the dynamic behavior of the main components of the grain during the grain filling stage. In this paper, we present a non-structured mechanistic kinetic model developed for sunflower grains. The model was first calibrated for sunflower hybrid ACA855. The calibrated model was able to predict the theoretical amount of carbohydrate equivalents allocated to the grain, grain growth and the dynamics of the oil and non-oil fraction, while considering maintenance requirements and leaf senescence. Incorporating into the model the serial-parallel nature of fatty acid biosynthesis permitted a good representation of the kinetics of palmitic, stearic, oleic, and linoleic acids production. A sensitivity analysis showed that the relative influence of input parameters changed along grain development. Grain growth was mostly affected by the specific growth parameter (μ′) while fatty acid composition strongly depended on their own maximum specific rate parameters. The model was successfully applied to two additional hybrids (MG2 and DK3820). The proposed model can be the first building block toward the development of a more sophisticated model, capable of predicting the effects of environmental conditions on grain weight and composition, in a comprehensive and quantitative way. PMID:27242809

  16. Liquid crystal filled surface plasmon resonance thermometer.

    PubMed

    Lu, Mengdi; Zhang, Xinpu; Liang, Yuzhang; Li, Lixia; Masson, Jean-Francois; Peng, Wei

    2016-05-16

    A novel surface plasmon resonance (SPR) thermometer based on liquid crystal (LC) filled hollow fiber is demonstrated in this paper. A hollow fiber was internally coated with silver and then filled with LC. The SPR response to temperature was studied using modeling and verified experimentally. The results demonstrated that the refractive index of LC decreases with the increasing temperature and the variation can be detected by the resonance wavelength shift of the plasmon resonance. The temperature sensitivities were 4.72 nm/°C in the temperature range of 20 to 34.5 °C and 0.55 nm/°C in the temperature range of 36 to 50 °C, At the phase transition temperature between nematic and isotropic phases of the LC, the temperature sensitivity increased by one order of magnitude and a shift of more than 46 nm was observed with only a 1.5 °C temperature change. This sensor can be used for temperature monitoring and alarming, and can be extended for other physical parameter measurement.

  17. Liquid-filled ionization chamber temperature dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco, L.; Gómez, F.; Iglesias, A.; Pardo, J.; Pazos, A.; Pena, J.; Zapata, M.

    2006-05-01

    Temperature and pressure corrections of the read-out signal of ionization chambers have a crucial importance in order to perform high-precision absolute dose measurements. In the present work the temperature and pressure dependences of a sealed liquid isooctane filled ionization chamber (previously developed by the authors) for radiotherapy applications have been studied. We have analyzed the thermal response of the liquid ionization chamber in a ˜20C interval around room temperature. The temperature dependence of the signal can be considered linear, with a slope that depends on the chamber collection electric field. For example, a relative signal slope of 0.27×10-2 K-1 for an operation electric field of 1.67×106 V m-1 has been measured in our detector. On the other hand, ambient pressure dependence has been found negligible, as expected for liquid-filled chambers. The thermal dependence of the liquid ionization chamber signal can be parametrized within the Onsager theory on initial recombination. Considering that changes with temperature of the detector response are due to variations in the free ion yield, a parametrization of this dependence has been obtained. There is a good agreement between the experimental data and the theoretical model from the Onsager framework.

  18. Isotropical conductive adhesives filled with silver nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Y.; Xia, Y. P.; Zhang, G. Q.; Wu, H. P.; Tao, G. L.

    2009-07-01

    In this study, a solution-phase method was demonstrated to generate silver (Ag) nanowires with diameters in the range of 30~50nm and lengths of up to ~50μm, which was proceed by reducing silver nitrate with ethylene glycol in the presence of poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) (PVP). Fundamental material characterizations including X-ray diffraction transmission electro microscopy (TEM) and scanning electro microscopy (SEM) were conducted on these Ag nanowires. A novel kind of isotropical conductive adhesives (ICA) was prepared by using these Ag nanowires as conductive filler. Electrical property including bulk resistivity and mechanical property including shear strength were investigated and compared with that of conventional ICA filled with micrometer-sized Ag particles or nanometer-sized Ag particles. The average diameter of these Ag particles is about 1μm and 100 nm respectively. The results shown that ICA filled Ag nanowires exhibited higher conductivity, higher shear strength and low percolation threshold value than traditional ICA. Possible conductive mechanism was discussed based on theory calculation.

  19. Filling behaviour of wood plastic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duretek, I.; Lucyshyn, T.; Holzer, C.

    2017-01-01

    Wood plastic composites (WPC) are a young generation of composites with rapidly growing usage within the plastics industry. The advantages are the availability and low price of the wood particles, the possibility of partially substituting the polymer in the mixture and sustainable use of the earth’s resources. The current WPC products on the market are to a large extent limited to extruded products. Nowadays there is a great interest in the market for consumer products in more use of WPC as an alternative to pure thermoplastics in injection moulding processes. This work presents the results of numerical simulation and experimental visualisation of the mould filling process in injection moulding of WPC. The 3D injection moulding simulations were done with the commercial software package Autodesk® Moldflow® Insight 2016 (AMI). The mould filling experiments were conducted with a box-shaped test part. In contrast to unfilled polymers the WPC has reduced melt elasticity so that the fountain flow often does not develop. This results in irregular flow front shapes in the moulded part, especially at high filler content.

  20. Protective supplied breathing air garment

    DOEpatents

    Childers, E.L.; Hortenau, E.F. von.

    1984-07-10

    A breathing air garment is disclosed for isolating a wearer from hostile environments containing toxins or irritants includes a suit and a separate head protective enclosure or hood engaging a suit collar in sealing attachment. The hood and suit collar are cylindrically shaped and dimensioned to enable the wearer to withdraw his hands from the suit sleeves to perform manual tasks within the hood interior. Breathing air is supplied from an external air line with an air delivery hose attached to the hood interior. The hose feeds air into an annular halo-like fiber-filled plenum having spaced discharge orifices attached to the hood top wall. A plurality of air exhaust/check valves located at the suit extremities cooperate with the hood air delivery system to provide a cooling flow of circulating air from the hood throughout the suit interior. A suit entry seal provided on the suit rear torso panel permits access into the suit and is sealed with an adhesive sealing flap. 17 figs.

  1. Protective supplied breathing air garment

    DOEpatents

    Childers, Edward L.; von Hortenau, Erik F.

    1984-07-10

    A breathing air garment for isolating a wearer from hostile environments containing toxins or irritants includes a suit and a separate head protective enclosure or hood engaging a suit collar in sealing attachment. The hood and suit collar are cylindrically shaped and dimensioned to enable the wearer to withdraw his hands from the suit sleeves to perform manual tasks within the hood interior. Breathing air is supplied from an external air line with an air delivery hose attached to the hood interior. The hose feeds air into an annular halo-like fiber-filled plenum having spaced discharge orifices attached to the hood top wall. A plurality of air exhaust/check valves located at the suit extremities cooperate with the hood air delivery system to provide a cooling flow of circulating air from the hood throughout the suit interior. A suit entry seal provided on the suit rear torso panel permits access into the suit and is sealed with an adhesive sealing flap.

  2. 40 CFR 53.64 - Test procedure: Static fractionator test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Test procedure: Static fractionator test. 53.64 Section 53.64 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Performance Characteristics of Class II Equivalent Methods for PM2.5 § 53.64 Test procedure:...

  3. 21 CFR 872.3310 - Coating material for resin fillings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Coating material for resin fillings. 872.3310... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3310 Coating material for resin fillings. (a) Identification. A coating material for resin fillings is a device intended to be applied to...

  4. 21 CFR 872.3310 - Coating material for resin fillings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Coating material for resin fillings. 872.3310... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3310 Coating material for resin fillings. (a) Identification. A coating material for resin fillings is a device intended to be applied to...

  5. 27 CFR 19.482 - Age and fill date.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Age and fill date. 19.482... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS DISTILLED SPIRITS PLANTS Spirits from Customs Custody § 19.482 Age and fill date. For the purpose of this part, the age and fill date for spirits that are imported or brought...

  6. 27 CFR 19.410 - Age and fill date.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Age and fill date. 19.410... Spirits from Customs Custody § 19.410 Age and fill date. For purposes of this part, the age and fill date for spirits imported or brought into the United States will be: (a) The claimed age, as shown on...

  7. 27 CFR 19.410 - Age and fill date.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Age and fill date. 19.410... Spirits from Customs Custody § 19.410 Age and fill date. For purposes of this part, the age and fill date for spirits imported or brought into the United States will be: (a) The claimed age, as shown on...

  8. 27 CFR 19.410 - Age and fill date.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Age and fill date. 19.410... Spirits from Customs Custody § 19.410 Age and fill date. For purposes of this part, the age and fill date for spirits imported or brought into the United States will be: (a) The claimed age, as shown on...

  9. 27 CFR 19.410 - Age and fill date.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Age and fill date. 19.410... Spirits from Customs Custody § 19.410 Age and fill date. For purposes of this part, the age and fill date for spirits imported or brought into the United States will be: (a) The claimed age, as shown on...

  10. 21 CFR 872.3820 - Root canal filling resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Root canal filling resin. 872.3820 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3820 Root canal filling resin. (a) Identification. A root canal filling resin is a device composed of material, such as methylmethacrylate,...

  11. 21 CFR 872.3820 - Root canal filling resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Root canal filling resin. 872.3820 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3820 Root canal filling resin. (a) Identification. A root canal filling resin is a device composed of material, such as methylmethacrylate,...

  12. 21 CFR 872.3820 - Root canal filling resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Root canal filling resin. 872.3820 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3820 Root canal filling resin. (a) Identification. A root canal filling resin is a device composed of material, such as methylmethacrylate,...

  13. 33 CFR 183.564 - Fuel tank fill system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fuel tank fill system. 183.564...) BOATING SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Fuel Systems Manufacturer Requirements § 183.564 Fuel tank fill system. (a) Each fuel fill opening must be located so that a gasoline overflow of up to...

  14. 7 CFR 52.774 - Fill of container.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...—Recommended Minimum Drained Weights for Canned Red Tart Pitted Cherries Container designation Packed in water... United States Standards for Grades of Canned Red Tart Pitted Cherries 1 Fill of Container § 52.774 Fill of container. (a) FDA requirements. Canned red tart pitted cherries shall meet the fill of...

  15. Using habit reversal to decrease filled pauses in public speaking.

    PubMed

    Mancuso, Carolyn; Miltenberger, Raymond G

    2016-03-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of simplified habit reversal in reducing filled pauses that occur during public speaking. Filled pauses consist of "uh," "um," or "er"; clicking sounds; and misuse of the word "like." After baseline, participants received habit reversal training that consisted of awareness training and competing response training. During postintervention assessments, all 6 participants exhibited an immediate decrease in filled pauses.

  16. 7 CFR 51.902 - Fairly well filled.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Fairly well filled. 51.902 Section 51.902 Agriculture... Standards for Grades of Table Grapes (European or Vinifera Type) 1 Definitions § 51.902 Fairly well filled. Fairly well filled means that the berries are reasonably closely spaced on main and lateral stems...

  17. 7 CFR 51.902 - Fairly well filled.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Fairly well filled. 51.902 Section 51.902 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Definitions § 51.902 Fairly well filled. Fairly well filled means that the berries are reasonably...

  18. 7 CFR 51.902 - Fairly well filled.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Fairly well filled. 51.902 Section 51.902 Agriculture... Standards for Grades of Table Grapes (European or Vinifera Type) 1 Definitions § 51.902 Fairly well filled. Fairly well filled means that the berries are reasonably closely spaced on main and lateral stems...

  19. 7 CFR 51.902 - Fairly well filled.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fairly well filled. 51.902 Section 51.902 Agriculture... Standards for Grades of Table Grapes (European or Vinifera Type) 1 Definitions § 51.902 Fairly well filled. Fairly well filled means that the berries are reasonably closely spaced on main and lateral stems...

  20. 7 CFR 51.902 - Fairly well filled.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Fairly well filled. 51.902 Section 51.902 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Definitions § 51.902 Fairly well filled. Fairly well filled means that the berries are reasonably...

  1. 7 CFR 52.774 - Fill of container.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... United States Standards for Grades of Canned Red Tart Pitted Cherries 1 Fill of Container § 52.774 Fill of container. (a) FDA requirements. Canned red tart pitted cherries shall meet the fill of container... red tart pitted cherries is determined by emptying the contents of the container upon a U.S....

  2. 7 CFR 52.774 - Fill of container.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Cherries 1 Fill of Container § 52.774 Fill of container. (a) FDA requirements. Canned red tart pitted cherries shall meet the fill of container requirements as set forth in the regulations of the Food and Drug... ascertaining drained weight. The drained weight of canned red tart pitted cherries is determined by...

  3. 21 CFR 872.3310 - Coating material for resin fillings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Coating material for resin fillings. 872.3310... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3310 Coating material for resin fillings. (a) Identification. A coating material for resin fillings is a device intended to be applied to...

  4. 21 CFR 872.3310 - Coating material for resin fillings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Coating material for resin fillings. 872.3310... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3310 Coating material for resin fillings. (a) Identification. A coating material for resin fillings is a device intended to be applied to...

  5. 21 CFR 872.3310 - Coating material for resin fillings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Coating material for resin fillings. 872.3310... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3310 Coating material for resin fillings. (a) Identification. A coating material for resin fillings is a device intended to be applied to...

  6. 7 CFR 52.774 - Fill of container.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... United States Standards for Grades of Canned Red Tart Pitted Cherries 1 Fill of Container § 52.774 Fill of container. (a) FDA requirements. Canned red tart pitted cherries shall meet the fill of container... red tart pitted cherries is determined by emptying the contents of the container upon a U.S....

  7. Multiple-filled skutterudites: high thermoelectric figure of merit through separately optimizing electrical and thermal transports.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xun; Yang, Jiong; Salvador, James R; Chi, Miaofang; Cho, Jung Y; Wang, Hsin; Bai, Shengqiang; Yang, Jihui; Zhang, Wenqing; Chen, Lidong

    2011-05-25

    Skutterudites CoSb(3) with multiple cofillers Ba, La, and Yb were synthesized and very high thermoelectric figure of merit ZT = 1.7 at 850 K was realized. X-ray diffraction of the densified multiple-filled bulk samples reveals all samples are phase pure. High-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analysis confirm that multiple guest fillers occupy the nanoscale-cages in the skutterudites. The fillers are further shown to be uniformly distributed and the Co-Sb skutterudite framework is virtually unperturbed from atomic scale to a few micrometers. Our results firmly show that high power factors can be realized by adjusting the total filling fraction of fillers with different charge states to reach the optimum carrier density, at the same time, lattice thermal conductivity can also be significantly reduced, to values near the glass limit of these materials, through combining filler species of different rattling frequencies to achieve broad-frequency phonon scattering. Therefore, partially filled skutterudites with multiple fillers of different chemical nature render unique structural characteristics for optimizing electrical and thermal transports in a relatively independent way, leading to continually enhanced ZT values from single- to double-, and finally to multiple-filled skutterudites. The idea of combining multiple fillers with different charge states and rattling frequencies for performance optimization is also expected to be valid for other caged TE compounds.

  8. [The experience of using Filtek Bulk Fill (3M ESPE) - the advantages of bulk fill flowable restoratives].

    PubMed

    Sharova, T N

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents clinical cases illustrating the advantages of bulk fill flowable restoratives, such as Filtek Bulk Fill (3M ESPE). The material showed good clinical results for class I and class II restorations.

  9. Air Pollution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilpin, Alan

    A summary of one of our most pressing environmental problems, air pollution, is offered in this book by the Director of Air Pollution Control for the Queensland (Australia) State Government. Discussion of the subject is not restricted to Queensland or Australian problems and policies, however, but includes analysis of air pollution the world over.…

  10. Air Pollution

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Climate Change on Children's Health: Session Two: Air Quality Impacts MODERATOR: Susan Anenberg, EPA Meredith McCormack, Johns ... University • Effects of Climate Change on Children’s Health: Air Quality Impacts Frederica Perera, Columbia University • Air quality Impacts ...

  11. Partially-Filled Macropores in Swelling and Nonswelling Media: Flow Modes Requiring Supplementation of Darcy's Law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nimmo, J. R.; Perkins, K. S.; Gaten-Slahor, L.

    2015-12-01

    A traditional assumption for unsaturated flow is that the pores are either water-filled and conducting or empty and nonconducting. Evidence from lab and field investigations, however, shows that substantial preferential flow can occur in macropores that are partially filled. Such flow can transmit large fluxes of water. Rates of transport can exceed the saturated hydraulic conductivity, because of possible reductions of friction and buoyancy effects. These conditions reduce the influence of capillarity on energy state, driving force, and the configuration of water-filled space. Influences such as gravity, inertia, and chaotic liquid-phase irregularities then take on increased importance. Perhaps most important is that with partial filling, the flux of water entering the pore is a determining influence on the configuration of air and water phases. Hence the incoming flux itself influences the pore's conductance, and Darcy's law cannot be expected to apply. Flow through partially-filled macropores thus requires new or revised concepts of flow pathways in unsaturated soil, and new ways of quantifying their effect. Flow modes can include free-surface films, rivulets that are not fully confined by capillarity, pulse flow, and sliding drops. Gravity dominates the driving force. Because capillarity does not establish complete geometrical confinement for these modes of flow, the mathematical relation between flux and force is not the direct Darcian proportionality, but rather a mode-specific relation involving incoming flux and flow-stream dimensions. In swelling soils there is the further complication that flow may switch from one mode to another because macropore size, shape, and connectedness vary dynamically with changing water content. This presentation evaluates commonalities and divergences among different partially-filled flow modes and compares them with commonly-assumed Poiseuille flow modes. Mathematical relations for the physical processes of these flow modes

  12. Diastolic filling abnormalities by color kinesis in newborns exposed to intrauterine cocaine.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Sudhir Ken; Super, Dennis M; Salvator, Ann; Singer, Lynn; Connuck, David; Fradley, Linda Goetz; Harcar-Sevcik, Rose A; Thomas, James D; Sun, Jing Ping

    2002-05-01

    Because cocaine crosses the placenta, we prospectively evaluated global and segmental systolic and diastolic cardiac function by color kinesis in clinically asymptomatic newborns who were exposed to cocaine in utero (group 1, n = 82). Their data were compared with normal controls (group 3, n = 87) and newborns exposed to drugs other than cocaine (group 2, n = 108). During left ventricular filling, newborns exposed to cocaine, compared with groups 2 and 3, had significantly (P <.05) higher global fractional area change (%) (76 +/- 10.3 vs 72 +/- 9.4 and 72 +/- 9.1, respectively), regional fractional area changes (%) for the anterior, septal, inferior, and lateral wall, and in the index of asynchrony (at 50% filling 13.2 +/- 5.8 vs 11.3 +/- 4.1 and 11.6 +/- 4.2, respectively). There were no significant differences in systolic function among the 3 groups. Prenatal cocaine exposure in asymptomatic infants leads to higher global and segmental fractional area changes and asynchrony during diastole. The significance and course of these alterations require further investigation.

  13. Fractional variational calculus in terms of Riesz fractional derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, O. P.

    2007-06-01

    This paper presents extensions of traditional calculus of variations for systems containing Riesz fractional derivatives (RFDs). Specifically, we present generalized Euler-Lagrange equations and the transversality conditions for fractional variational problems (FVPs) defined in terms of RFDs. We consider two problems, a simple FVP and an FVP of Lagrange. Results of the first problem are extended to problems containing multiple fractional derivatives, functions and parameters, and to unspecified boundary conditions. For the second problem, we present Lagrange-type multiplier rules. For both problems, we develop the Euler-Lagrange-type necessary conditions which must be satisfied for the given functional to be extremum. Problems are considered to demonstrate applications of the formulations. Explicitly, we introduce fractional momenta, fractional Hamiltonian, fractional Hamilton equations of motion, fractional field theory and fractional optimal control. The formulations presented and the resulting equations are similar to the formulations for FVPs given in Agrawal (2002 J. Math. Anal. Appl. 272 368, 2006 J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 39 10375) and to those that appear in the field of classical calculus of variations. These formulations are simple and can be extended to other problems in the field of fractional calculus of variations.

  14. Carbon monoxide fractions in cigarette and hookah (hubble bubble) smoke.

    PubMed

    Sajid, K M; Akhter, M; Malik, G Q

    1993-09-01

    We studied the carbon monoxide (CO) fractions in hookah and cigarette smoke, using a carbon monoxide micro smokerlyzer (model EC50, BEDFONT, U.K.). Mean carbon monoxide fractions (% by volume) of hookah smoke, using domestic charcoal were 0.38 +/- 0.07 (large hookah; unfiltered); 1.40 +/- 0.43 (small hookah; unfiltered); 0.34 +/- 0.06 (large hookah; filtered); 1.36 +/- 0.35 (small hookah; filtered) and 0.41 +/- 0.08 (cigarette smoke). The highest fractions were obtained with small size hookah and increase in size of hookah (i.e., volume of air in water base, fire bowl volume, pipe length, etc.) reduced the CO fraction significantly (P < 0.001). The fractions of cigarette lie between large and small hookah. The fractions vary slightly with different varieties of tobacco, e.g., CO fractions with Dera wala tobacco are significantly low (P < 0.05). Use of commercial charcoal gives significant rise in CO fractions (P < 0.001). Comparison of filtered and unfiltered smoke shows no significant difference in values. We conclude that the CO hazard is as high with hookah smoking as with cigarette smoking.

  15. Use of the channel fill level in defining a design space for twin screw wet granulation.

    PubMed

    Gorringe, L J; Kee, G S; Saleh, M F; Fa, N H; Elkes, R G

    2017-03-15

    Twin screw wet granulation is a key process in the continuous manufacture of oral solid dosage forms. Previous research has qualitatively suggested that the channel fill level influences the granules produced. In this paper a quantitative measure of the total volumetric fraction of the conveying element channels of the screw filled with powder (φ) was used. Experimental results are shown which demonstrate that very similar particle size distributions can be obtained at the same φ with the same material and screw configuration but radically different solids feed rates and screw speeds. Morphology of the granules also correlates with φ. This is consistent with previous observations in the literature correlating granule attributes with powder feed rate and screw speed but also considers the two parameters in combination. A process design space approach based on φ is proposed. This can be determined empirically, and potentially has value in setting process control strategies, assuring process robustness and allowing process flexibility during the product lifecycle.

  16. Liquid-filled simplified hollow-core photonic crystal fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shengnan; Gao, Wei; Li, Hongwei; Dong, Yongkang; Zhang, Hongying

    2014-12-01

    We report on a novel type of liquid-filled simplified hollow-core photonic crystal fibers (HC-PCFs), and investigate their transmission properties with various filling liquids, including water, ethanol and FC-40. The loss and dispersion characterizations are calculated for different fiber parameters including strut thickness and core diameter. The results show that there are still low-loss windows existing for liquid-filled simplified HC-PCFs, and the low-loss windows and dispersions can be easily tailored by filling different liquids. Such liquid-filled simplified HC-PCFs open up many possibilities for nonlinear fiber optics, optical, biochemical and medical sensing.

  17. 30 CFR 817.72 - Disposal of excess spoil: Valley fill/head-of-hollow fills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... precipitation event. (b) Rock-core chimney drains. A rock-core chimney drain may be used in a head-of-hollow... not located in an area containing intermittent or perennial streams. A rock-core chimney drain may be... is diverted around the fill. The alternative rock-core chimney drain system shall be...

  18. 30 CFR 817.72 - Disposal of excess spoil: Valley fill/head-of-hollow fills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... precipitation event. (b) Rock-core chimney drains. A rock-core chimney drain may be used in a head-of-hollow... not located in an area containing intermittent or perennial streams. A rock-core chimney drain may be... is diverted around the fill. The alternative rock-core chimney drain system shall be...

  19. Prediction of changes in important physical parameters during composting of separated animal slurry solid fractions.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Md Albarune; de Neergaard, Andreas; Jensen, Lars Stoumann

    2014-01-01

    Solid-liquid separation of animal slurry, with solid fractions used for composting, has gained interest recently. However, efficient composting of separated animal slurry solid fractions (SSFs) requires a better understanding of the process dynamics in terms of important physical parameters and their interacting physical relationships in the composting matrix. Here we monitored moisture content, bulk density, particle density and air-filled porosity (AFP) during composting of SSF collected from four commercially available solid-liquid separators. Composting was performed in laboratory-scale reactors for 30 days (d) under forced aeration and measurements were conducted on the solid samples at the beginning of composting and at 10-d intervals during composting. The results suggest that differences in initial physical properties of SSF influence the development of compost maximum temperatures (40-70 degreeC). Depending on SSF, total wet mass and volume losses (expressed as % of initial value) were up to 37% and 34%, respectively. After 30 d of composting, relative losses of total solids varied from 17.9% to 21.7% and of volatile solids (VS) from 21.3% to 27.5%, depending on SSF. VS losses in all composts showed different dynamics as described by the first-order kinetic equation. The estimated component particle density of 1441 kg m-3 for VS and 2625 kg m-3 for fixed solids can be used to improve estimates of AFP for SSF within the range tested. The linear relationship between wet bulk density and AFP reported by previous researchers held true for SSF.

  20. Acute gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicity of image-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy for prostate cancer using a daily water-filled endorectal balloon

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Our purpose was to report acute gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicity rates for prostate cancer patients undergoing image-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy (IG-IMRT) with a daily endorectal water-filled balloon (ERBH2O), and assess associations with planning parameters and pretreatment clinical characteristics. Methods The first 100 patients undergoing prostate and proximal seminal vesicle IG-IMRT with indexed-lumen 100 cc ERBH2O to 79.2 Gy in 1.8 Gy fractions at our institution from 12/2008- 12/2010 were assessed. Pretreatment characteristics, organ-at-risk dose volume histograms, and maximum GU and GI toxicities (CTCAE 3.0) were evaluated. Logistic regression models evaluated univariate association between toxicities and dosimetric parameters, and uni- and multivariate association between toxicities and pretreatment characteristics. Results Mean age was 68 (range 51–88). Thirty-two, 49, and 19 patients were low, intermediate, and high-risk, respectively; 40 received concurrent androgen deprivation. No grade 3 or greater toxicities were recorded. Maximum GI toxicity was grade 0, 1, and 2 in 69%, 23%, and 8%, respectively. Infield (defined as 1 cm above/below the CTV) rectal mean/median doses, D75, V30, and V40 and hemorrhoid history were associated with grade 2 GI toxicity (Ps < 0.05). Maximum acute GU toxicity was grade 0, 1, and 2 for 17%, 41%, and 42% of patients, respectively. Infield bladder V20 (P = 0.03) and pretreatment International Prostate Symptom Scale (IPSS) (P = 0.003) were associated with grade 2 GU toxicity. Conclusion Prostate IG-IMRT using a daily ERBH2O shows low rates of acute GI toxicity compared to previous reports of air-filled ERB IMRT when using stringent infield rectum constraints and comparable GU toxicities. PMID:22621764

  1. LLE'S high-pressure DT-fill process control system

    SciTech Connect

    Duffy, T.; Shmayda, W. T.; Janezic, R.; Loucks, S. J.; Reid, J.

    2008-07-15

    The OMEGA laser at the Univ. of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics (UR/LLE) implodes fusion targets that contain cryogenic solid deuterium-tritium (DT) ice layers. These ICF targets are fabricated in a high-pressure DT-fill process. This paper describes the integration and control of this DT-fill process. The appropriate safety-control response during the DT-fill process depends on the location of the tritium inventory and where the containment alarm is detected. A control response that is deemed appropriate earlier in the fill process could be a dangerous action at a later point in the fill process. The control system must adapt as the DT inventory moves through the process train. This is achieved by defining eight 'fill states' in the fill process. The control system transitions to the appropriate fill state as the DT fill progresses. The fill state reflects the tritium location, pressure, and temperature. Steps are taken to ensure that the tritium location and the fill state are in agreement. The control system monitors the containment system's integrity and will take the appropriate action, based on the tritium location and the type of containment failure. This approach not only ensures process safety, but also maximizes the productivity by executing process pauses (in lieu of aborts) when conditions allow. (authors)

  2. LLE's High-Pressure DT-Fill Process Control System

    SciTech Connect

    Duffy, T.; Shmayda, W.T.; Janezic, R.; Loucks, S.J.; Reid, J.

    2008-07-18

    The OMEGA Laser at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics (UR/LLE) implodes fusion targets that contain cryogenic solid deuterium-tritium (DT) ice layers. These ICF targets are fabricated in a high-pressure DT-fill process. This paper describes the integration and control of this DT-fill process. The appropriate safety-control response during the DT-fill process depends on the location of the tritium inventory and where the containment alarm is detected. A control response that is deemed appropriate earlier in the fill process could be a dangerous action at a later point in the fill process. The control system must adapt as the DT inventory moves through the process train. This is achieved by defining eight "fill states" in the fill process. The control system transitions to the appropriate fill state as the DT fill progesses. The fill state reflects the tritium location, pressure, and temperature. Steps are taken to ensure that the tritium location and the fill state are in agreement. The control system monitors the containment system's integrity and will take the appropriate action, based on the tritium location and the type of containment failure. This approach not only ensures process safety, but also maximizes the productivity by executing process pauses (in lieu of aborts) when conditions allow.

  3. Aging Studies of Filled and Unfilled VCE

    SciTech Connect

    Letant, S; Herberg, J; Alviso, C; Small, W; Mulcahy, H; Pearson, M; Wilson, T; Chinn, S; Maxwell, R

    2009-11-10

    This report presents data on the effects of temperature and gamma radiation on the chemical and structural properties of both filled and unfilled VCE material produced by the Kansas City Plant using WR-qualified processes. Thermal effects up to 300 C and gamma irradiation doses of 1 MRad and 25 MRad were investigated under atmospheric conditions. Characterization techniques used in the study comprise Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA), Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Tensile Testing, Solid Phase MicroExtraction - Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry (SPME-GC/MS), phenol extraction followed by HPLC, and various Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) techniques including: {sup 13}C, {sup 13}C {l_brace}{sup 1}H{r_brace} cross polarization (CP), {sup 1}H magic angle spinning (MAS), 13C{l_brace}{sup 1}H{r_brace} Wide-line-Separation (2D-WISE) and development of Center band-Only Detection of Exchange (CODEX).

  4. The Chemistry of Modern Dental Filling Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, John W.; Anstice, H. Mary

    1999-11-01

    The chemistry underpinning modern tooth-colored dental fillings is described. Two broad groups of material are covered, the so-called composite resins and the glass-ionomer cements. Composite resins consist of bulky difunctional monomers together with high loadings of powdered inorganic fillers, and they set by addition polymerization. Glass-ionomers consist of aqueous polymeric acids, such as polyacrylic acid, plus basic glass powders. They set by a neutralization reaction, but leave a substantial amount of the glass unreacted, to act as reinforcing filler. Various attempts have been made to combine the attractive properties of these materials, and the different types of hybrids of them are described. The importance of chemistry to this important branch of health care is emphasized.

  5. Constrained ceramic-filled polymer armor

    DOEpatents

    Sandstrom, D.J.; Calkins, N.C.; Gac, F.D.

    1990-11-13

    An armor system is disclosed in which a plurality of constraint cells are mounted on a surface of a substrate, which is metal armor plate or a similar tough material, such that the cells almost completely cover the surface of the substrate. Each constraint cell has a projectile-receiving wall parallel to the substrate surface and has sides which are perpendicular to and surround the perimeter of the receiving wall. The cells are mounted such that, in one embodiment, the substrate surface serves as a sixth side or closure for each cell. Each cell has inside of it a plate, termed the front plate, which is parallel to and in contact with substantially all of the inside surface of the receiving wall. The balance of each cell is completely filled with a projectile-abrading material, which is a ceramic material in particulate form dispersed in a polymeric matrix. 5 figs.

  6. The Filled Arm Fizeau Telescope (FFT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Synnott, S. P.

    1991-01-01

    Attention is given to the design of a Mills Cross imaging interferometer in which the arms are fully filled with mirror segments of a Ritchey-Chretien primary and which has sensitivity to 27th magnitude per pixel and resolution a factor of 10 greater than Hubble. The optical design, structural configuration, thermal disturbances, and vibration, material, control, and metrology issues, as well as scientific capabilities are discussed, and technology needs are identified. The technologies under consideration are similar to those required for the development of the other imaging interferometers that have been proposed over the past decade. A comparison of the imaging capabilities of a 30-m diameter FFT, an 8-m telescope with a collecting area equal to that of the FFT, and the HST is presented.

  7. Constrained ceramic-filled polymer armor

    DOEpatents

    Sandstrom, Donald J.; Calkins, Noel C.; Gac, Frank D.

    1990-01-01

    An armor system in which a plurality of constraint cells are mounted on a surface of a substrate, which is metal armor plate or a similar tough material, such that the cells almost completely cover the surface of the substrate. Each constraint cell has a projectile-receiving wall parallel to the substrate surface and has sides which are perpendicular to and surround the perimeter of the receiving wall. The cells are mounted such that, in one embodiment, the substrate surface serves as a sixth side or closure for each cell. Each cell has inside of it a plate, termed the front plate, which is parallel to and in contact with substantially all of the inside surface of the receiving wall. The balance of each cell is completely filled with a projectile-abrading material, which is a ceramic material in particulate form dispersed in a polymeric matrix.

  8. The Filled Arm Fizeau Telescope (FFT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Synnott, S. P.

    1991-09-01

    Attention is given to the design of a Mills Cross imaging interferometer in which the arms are fully filled with mirror segments of a Ritchey-Chretien primary and which has sensitivity to 27th magnitude per pixel and resolution a factor of 10 greater than Hubble. The optical design, structural configuration, thermal disturbances, and vibration, material, control, and metrology issues, as well as scientific capabilities are discussed, and technology needs are identified. The technologies under consideration are similar to those required for the development of the other imaging interferometers that have been proposed over the past decade. A comparison of the imaging capabilities of a 30-m diameter FFT, an 8-m telescope with a collecting area equal to that of the FFT, and the HST is presented.

  9. Flow in a partially filled rotating cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shadday, M. A., Jr.

    Axial flow in a rapidly rotating cylinder, partially filled with a viscous, incompressible fluid is measured with a laser-Doppler velocimeter. The cylinder has a vertical axis of rotation, and the axial circulation is induced by rotating a coaxially mounted disk at the top endcap slightly faster than the cylinder. The experimental results are compared with the predictions of a finite-difference model of the flow, and the correlation is qualitatively good. The axial circulation in the fluid layer is confined primarily to E(1/3) shear layers along the lateral boundaries, where E is the Ekman number. The radial transport in the Ekman layers is essentially unaffected by the presence of the free surface. It will be shown that this leads to axial transport in an E(1/3) boundary layer along the free surface.

  10. Flow in a partially filled rotating cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shadday, M. A., Jr.

    1982-05-01

    Axial flow in a rapidly rotating cylinder, partially filled with a viscous, incompressible fluid is measured with a laser Doppler velocimeter. The cylinder has a vertical axis of rotation, and the axial circulation is induced by rotating a coaxially mounted disk at the top endcap slightly faster than the cylinder. The experimental results are compared with the prediction of a finite difference model of the flow, and the correlation is qualitatively good. The axial circulation in the fluid layer is confined primarily to E/sup 1/3/ shear layers along the lateral boundaries, where E is the Ekman number. The radial transport in the Ekman layers is essentially unaffected by the presence of the free surface. It will be shown that this leads to axial transport in an E/sup 1/3/ boundary layer along the free surface.

  11. Boron-Filled Hybrid Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Patel, Rajen B; Chou, Tsengming; Kanwal, Alokik; Apigo, David J; Lefebvre, Joseph; Owens, Frank; Iqbal, Zafar

    2016-07-27

    A unique nanoheterostructure, a boron-filled hybrid carbon nanotube (BHCNT), has been synthesized using a one-step chemical vapor deposition process. The BHCNTs can be considered to be a novel form of boron carbide consisting of boron doped, distorted multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) encapsulating boron nanowires. These MWCNTs were found to be insulating in spite of their graphitic layered outer structures. While conventional MWCNTs have great axial strength, they have weak radial compressive strength, and do not bond well to one another or to other materials. In contrast, BHCNTs are shown to be up to 31% stiffer and 233% stronger than conventional MWCNTs in radial compression and have excellent mechanical properties at elevated temperatures. The corrugated surface of BHCNTs enables them to bond easily to themselves and other materials, in contrast to carbon nanotubes (CNTs). BHCNTs can, therefore, be used to make nanocomposites, nanopaper sheets, and bundles that are stronger than those made with CNTs.

  12. Single-pole ladder at quarter filling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aristov, D. N.; Kiselev, M. N.; Kikoin, K.

    2007-06-01

    We study the ground state and excitation spectrum of a quasi-one-dimensional system consisting of a pole and rungs oriented in opposite directions (“centipede ladder,” CL) at quarter filling. The spin and charge excitation spectra are found in the limits of small and large longitudinal hoppings t‖ compared to the on-rung hopping rate t⊥ and exchange coupling I⊥ . At small t‖ , the system with ferromagnetic on-rung exchange demonstrates instability against dimerization. Coherent propagation of charge-transfer excitons is possible in this limit. At large t‖ , CL behaves like two-orbital Hubbard chain, but the gap opens in the charge excitation spectrum, thus reducing the symmetry from SU(4) to SU(2). The spin excitations are always gapless and their dispersion changes from quadratic magnonlike for ferromagnetic on-rung exchange to linear spinonlike for antiferromagnetic on-rung exchange in weak longitudinal hopping limit.

  13. Method of filling a microchannel separation column

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, Don W.

    2002-01-01

    A method for packing a stationary phase into a small diameter fluid passageway or flow channel. Capillary action is employed to distribute a stationary phase uniformly along both the length and diameter of the flow channel. The method disclosed here: 1) eliminates the need for high pressure pumps and fittings and the safety hazards associated therewith; 2) allows the use of readily available commercial microparticles, either coated or uncoated, as the stationary phase; 3) provides for different types of particles, different particle sizes, and different particle size distributions to be packed in sequence, or simultaneously; 4) eliminates the need for plugging the flow channel prior to adding the stationary phase to retain the packing particles; and 5) many capillaries can be filled simultaneously.

  14. Boron-Filled Hybrid Carbon Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Rajen B.; Chou, Tsengming; Kanwal, Alokik; Apigo, David J.; Lefebvre, Joseph; Owens, Frank; Iqbal, Zafar

    2016-01-01

    A unique nanoheterostructure, a boron-filled hybrid carbon nanotube (BHCNT), has been synthesized using a one-step chemical vapor deposition process. The BHCNTs can be considered to be a novel form of boron carbide consisting of boron doped, distorted multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) encapsulating boron nanowires. These MWCNTs were found to be insulating in spite of their graphitic layered outer structures. While conventional MWCNTs have great axial strength, they have weak radial compressive strength, and do not bond well to one another or to other materials. In contrast, BHCNTs are shown to be up to 31% stiffer and 233% stronger than conventional MWCNTs in radial compression and have excellent mechanical properties at elevated temperatures. The corrugated surface of BHCNTs enables them to bond easily to themselves and other materials, in contrast to carbon nanotubes (CNTs). BHCNTs can, therefore, be used to make nanocomposites, nanopaper sheets, and bundles that are stronger than those made with CNTs. PMID:27460526

  15. Liquid-filled canyons on Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poggiali, V.; Mastrogiuseppe, M.; Hayes, A. G.; Seu, R.; Birch, S. P. D.; Lorenz, R.; Grima, C.; Hofgartner, J. D.

    2016-08-01

    In May 2013 the Cassini RADAR altimeter observed channels in Vid Flumina, a drainage network connected to Titan's second largest hydrocarbon sea, Ligeia Mare. Analysis of these altimeter echoes shows that the channels are located in deep (up to 570 m), steep-sided, canyons and have strong specular surface reflections that indicate they are currently liquid filled. Elevations of the liquid in these channels are at the same level as Ligeia Mare to within a vertical precision of about 0.7 m, consistent with the interpretation of drowned river valleys. Specular reflections are also observed in lower order tributaries elevated above the level of Ligeia Mare, consistent with drainage feeding into the main channel system.

  16. Thermal resistance of attic loose-fill insulations decreases under simulated winter conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Graves, R.S.; Wilkes, K.E.; McElroy, D.L.

    1994-05-01

    Two absolute techniques were used to measure the thermal resistance of attic loose-fill insulations: the Large Scale Climate Simulator (LSCS) and the Unguarded Thin-Heater Apparatus (UTHA). Two types of attic loose-fill insulations (unbonded and bonded/cubed) were tested under simulated winter conditions. To simulate winter conditions for an attic insulation, the specimens were tested with heat flow up, large temperature differences, and an air gap. The specimens were tested either with a constant mean temperature (30 or 21{degrees}C) and an increasing temperature difference or with a constant base temperature (21{degrees}C) and an increasing temperature difference (i.e., a decreasing mean temperature). The UTHA test specimens had a nominal thickness of 0.2 m of loose-fill insulation. The LSCS test specimens had a nominal thickness of 0.3 m of loose-fill insulation contained in a 4.2 by 5 m attic test module with a gypsum board base. The module had a gabled attic with a 5 in 12 slope roof. The tests yielded the surface-to-surface thermal resistance, R, which includes the thermal resistance due to gypsum, insulation, and any wood joists. Tests with and without an air gap were conducted in the UTHA. Surface-to-surface thermal resistance results from the LSCS and the UTHA show similar trends for these two types of loose-fill insulation when tested under simulated winter conditions. Tests with no air gap gave values of R that agreed with the bag label R-value for the insulations; R increased with lower mean temperatures. These no-gap values of R were 2 to 5% greater than the values of R obtained with an air gap for temperature differences of less than 22{degrees}C. For larger temperature differences R decreased, and at temperature differences of over 40{degrees}C, the R values were 50% less than those at small temperature differences.

  17. Accessible solitons of fractional dimension

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, Wei-Ping; Belić, Milivoj; Zhang, Yiqi

    2016-05-15

    We demonstrate that accessible solitons described by an extended Schrödinger equation with the Laplacian of fractional dimension can exist in strongly nonlocal nonlinear media. The soliton solutions of the model are constructed by two special functions, the associated Legendre polynomials and the Laguerre polynomials in the fraction-dimensional space. Our results show that these fractional accessible solitons form a soliton family which includes crescent solitons, and asymmetric single-layer and multi-layer necklace solitons. -- Highlights: •Analytic solutions of a fractional Schrödinger equation are obtained. •The solutions are produced by means of self-similar method applied to the fractional Schrödinger equation with parabolic potential. •The fractional accessible solitons form crescent, asymmetric single-layer and multilayer necklace profiles. •The model applies to the propagation of optical pulses in strongly nonlocal nonlinear media.

  18. Changes in Left Ventricular Filling in Patients with Persistent Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Naji, Franjo; Pagliaruzzi, Mihael; Penko, Meta; Kanic, Vojko; Vokac, Damijan

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Former studies showed possible interrelationship between altered ventricular filling patterns and atrial fibrillation (AF). HYPOTHESIS: Long term persistent AF has a negative impact on left ventricular filling in patients with preserved ejection fraction of left ventricle. METHODS: Our study was designed as a prospective case control study. We included 40 patients with persistent AF and preserved ejection fraction after successful electrical cardioversion and 43 control patients. Persistent AF was defined as AF lasting more than 4 weeks. Cardiac ultrasound was performed in all patients 24 hours after the procedure. Appropriate mitral flow and tissue Doppler velocities as well as standard echocardiographic measurements were obtained. RESULTS: There were no significant differences between both groups' parameters regarding age, sex, commorbidities or drug therapy. Analysis of mitral flow velocities showed significant increase of E value in AF group (0.96±0.27 vs.0.70±0.14; p = 0.001). Tissue Doppler measurements didn't reveal any differences in early diastolic movement, however there was a statistically significant difference in E/Em values of both groups, respectively (12.0±4.0 vs. 9.0±2.1; p= 0.001). CONCLUSION: Our study shows that in patients with preserved systolic function and persistent AF shortly after cardioversion diastolic ventricular filling patterns are altered mainly due to increased left atrial pressure and not due to impaired diastolic relaxation of left ventricle. Further studies are needed in order to define the interplay between diminished atrial function and impaired ventricular filling. PMID:24324364

  19. Factors that affect the efficiency of antisense oligodeoxyribonucleotide transfection by insonated gas-filled lipid microbubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ying-Zheng; Lu, Cui-Tao

    2008-03-01

    Objective: To investigate the factors that affect the efficiency of antisense oligodeoxyribonucleotide(AS-ODNs) transfection by insonated gas-filled lipid microbubbles. Methods: Lipid microbubbles filled with two types of gases-air and C3F8, were prepared respectively. An AS-ODNs sequence HA824 and a breast cancer cell line SK-BR-3 were used to define the various operating variables determining the transfection efficiency of insonated microbubbles. Two mixing methods, three levels of mixing speed, different mixing durations and various ultrasound initiation time after mixing were examined respectively. Transfection efficiency was detected by fluorescence microscopy. Results: C3F8 microbubbles gave higher levels of AS-ODNs transfection efficiency than air microbubbles in all test conditions. Transfection efficiency resulted from mixing method A (incubation of HA824 and microbubbles before mixing cells) did not show significant difference with that of mixing method B (without incubation of HA824 and microbubbles before mixing cells). Mixing speed, duration of mixing and ultrasound initiation time after mixing were central to determining HA824 transfection efficiency in vitro. The optimum parameters for SK-BR-3 cells were found at a mixing speed of 40-50 rpm for 30-60 s with less than 60 s delay before ultrasound. Conclusion: Ultrasound-mediated AS-ODNs transfection enhanced by C3F8-filled lipid microbubbles represents an effective avenue for AS-ODNs transfer.

  20. USE OF BIOCERAMICS IN FILLING BONE DEFECTS

    PubMed Central

    Garrido, Carlos Antõnio; Sampaio, Tania Clarete Fonseca Vieira Sales

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To present the results from using biological ceramics for filling bone defects resulting from post-traumatic or orthopedic injuries. Methods: Thirty-six patients with bone defects caused by trauma or orthopedic injury were evaluated. Nineteen patients were male (52.8%) and 17 were female (47.2%). Their ages ranged from 19 to 84 years, with a mean of 45.7 years and median of 37 years. Only patients with defects that required at least five grams of biological ceramic were included. Eighteen cases were classified as orthopedic: bone defects were observed in 11 cases of total hip arthroplasty; one case of primary total hip arthroplasty, due to coxarthrosis; five cases of femoral or tibial open wedge osteotomy; and one case of tarsal arthrodesis. There were 18 cases of trauma-related defects; uninfected pseudarthrosis, eight cases; recent fractures of the tibial plateau with compression of the spongy bone, three cases; and exposed fractures treated with external fixators, seven cases. The surgical technique consisted of curetting and debriding the injury until bone suitable for grafting was found. Biological ceramic was then used to fill the defect and some kind of fixation was applied. Results: Among the 36 patients evaluated, it was seen that 35 (97.2%) presented integration of the biological ceramic, while one case of open fracture treated with external fixation had poor integration of the biological ceramic. Conclusion: Treatment of bone defects of orthopedic or post-traumatic etiology using a phosphocalcium ceramic composed of hydroxyapatite was shown to be a practical, effective and safe method. PMID:27022576

  1. Two variants of minimum discarded fill ordering

    SciTech Connect

    D'Azevedo, E.F. ); Forsyth, P.A.; Tang, Wei-Pai . Dept. of Computer Science)

    1991-01-01

    It is well known that the ordering of the unknowns can have a significant effect on the convergence of Preconditioned Conjugate Gradient (PCG) methods. There has been considerable experimental work on the effects of ordering for regular finite difference problems. In many cases, good results have been obtained with preconditioners based on diagonal, spiral or natural row orderings. However, for finite element problems having unstructured grids or grids generated by a local refinement approach, it is difficult to define many of the orderings for more regular problems. A recently proposed Minimum Discarded Fill (MDF) ordering technique is effective in finding high quality Incomplete LU (ILU) preconditioners, especially for problems arising from unstructured finite element grids. Testing indicates this algorithm can identify a rather complicated physical structure in an anisotropic problem and orders the unknowns in the preferred'' direction. The MDF technique may be viewed as the numerical analogue of the minimum deficiency algorithm in sparse matrix technology. At any stage of the partial elimination, the MDF technique chooses the next pivot node so as to minimize the amount of discarded fill. In this work, two efficient variants of the MDF technique are explored to produce cost-effective high-order ILU preconditioners. The Threshold MDF orderings combine MDF ideas with drop tolerance techniques to identify the sparsity pattern in the ILU preconditioners. These techniques identify an ordering that encourages fast decay of the entries in the ILU factorization. The Minimum Update Matrix (MUM) ordering technique is a simplification of the MDF ordering and is closely related to the minimum degree algorithm. The MUM ordering is especially for large problems arising from Navier-Stokes problems. Some interesting pictures of the orderings are presented using a visualization tool. 22 refs., 4 figs., 7 tabs.

  2. Experimental and Numerical Study of Water-Filled Vessel Impacted by Flat Projectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Ren, Peng; Huang, Wei; Gao, Yubo

    2013-06-01

    To understand the failure patterns and impact resistance of watertight vessel, a flat-nosed projectile was accelerated by a two-stage light gas gun against a vessel filled with water which was placed in an air-filled tank. The targets were the 5A06 aluminum which were installed on two opposite sides of the vessel. The penetration process was recorded by a digital high-speed camera. In order to compare, numerical simulations for the vessel with and without water impacted by projectiles were conducted by AUTODYN-3D. The material parameters of targets and projectiles used in the simulation were obtained from several previous studies. The result indicated that experimental and numerical results were in good agreement. Numerical simulations were capable to capture the main physical behavior. It was also found that the impact resistance of targets in the water-filled vessel was lager than that of the empty vessel. Tearing was the main failure models of the water-filled vessel targets which was different from that of the empty vessel where the shear plugging was in dominate. National Natural Science Foundation of China (NO.:11072072).

  3. Experimental and Numerical Study of Water-Filled Vessel Impacted by Flat Projectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Peng; Zhang, Wei; Guo, Zitao; Wei, Gang

    2011-06-01

    To understand the failure patterns and impact resistance of watertight vessel, a flat-nosed projectile was accelerated by a two-stage light gas gun against a vessel filled with water which was placed in an air-filled tank. The targets were the 5A06 aluminum which were installed on two opposite sides of the vessel. The penetration process was recorded by a digital high-speed camera. In order to compare, numerical simulations for the vessel with and without water impacted by projectiles were conducted by AUTODYN-3D. The material parameters of targets and projectiles used in the simulation were obtained from several previous studies. The result indicated that experimental and numerical results were in good agreement. Numerical simulations were capable to capture the main physical behavior. It was also found that the impact resistance of targets in the water-filled vessel was lager than that of the empty vessel. Tearing was the main failure models of the water-filled vessel targets which was different from that of the empty vessel where the shear plugging was in dominate.

  4. Trigonometric Integrals via Partial Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, H.; Fulford, M.

    2005-01-01

    Parametric differentiation is used to derive the partial fractions decompositions of certain rational functions. Those decompositions enable us to integrate some new combinations of trigonometric functions.

  5. Fractional-time quantum dynamics.

    PubMed

    Iomin, Alexander

    2009-08-01

    Application of the fractional calculus to quantum processes is presented. In particular, the quantum dynamics is considered in the framework of the fractional time Schrödinger equation (SE), which differs from the standard SE by the fractional time derivative: partial differential/partial differentialt --> partial differential(alpha)/partial differentialt(alpha). It is shown that for alpha=1/2 the fractional SE is isospectral to a comb model. An analytical expression for the Green's functions of the systems are obtained. The semiclassical limit is discussed.

  6. A new approach to quantitatively describe permafrost core using multi-energy CT scanning: composition fraction and morphological analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, C.; McKnight, C.; Kneafsey, T. J.

    2014-12-01

    Composition discernment, fraction calculation and morphological analysis of a shallow core retrieved from Barrow, AK as part of the Next Generation Ecosystem Experiments in the Arctic (NGEE-Arctic) were conducted to give a quantitative description of the core. Imaging of the core was performed using a medical X-ray computed tomography (CT) scanner, which gives a 3D image with a resolution of 0.195×0.195×0.625mm3. The core consists mainly of mineral, ice, organic matter and air and composition discernment and fraction calculation focus on the first three materials. Four scans with different energies were performed because materials with different density show different responses on scans with varying energies. A calibration curve showing the relationship between density and CT value was built by scanning standard materials having a wide range of density. CT value of the three compositions under four energies was determined by the calibration curve and the core scan. Composition fraction was calculated on the assumption that the core CT value is linearly proportional to the composition fraction and by solving linear least-squares problems with bounds. Comparison of the estimated and measured core CT value shows that the correlation coefficient is more than 0.99, indicating the accuracy of the calculation. Two regions with relatively high fraction of organic matter (10%) were distinguished, which are located at the top of the core and ice filled fractures at the bottom of the active layer. Morphological analysis was applied to the mineral and ice because of low fraction of organic matter. Three segmentations corresponding to ice-rich (with a density of 0.86 to 1.24 g/cm3), transition from ice to mineral (1.24 to 1.47 g/cm3) and mineral-rich (1.47 to 2.65 g/cm3) were applied to the core, and two area (area and area standard deviation) and three morphological (circulatory, roundness and rectangularity) parameters were analysed. By conducting Principle Component

  7. Fracture behavior of silica nanoparticle filled epoxy resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittanet, Peerapan

    , matrix void growth, and matrix shear banding, which are credited for the increases in toughness for nanosilica-filled epoxy systems. Epoxy containing mixtures of two different size distributions of silica particles (42 micrometer and 23 nm-170nm particles) was explored for possible multiplicative toughening effect and to further understand the particle-epoxy interactions and toughening mechanisms of bimodal particle size distribution systems. The fracture toughness was improved by approximately 30% compared to that of the epoxy containing only one particle size of silica particles. The toughness improvement from the interaction of particle debonding from large particles and plastic void growth from small particles was clearly observed. The improvement in toughness occurred when the volume fraction ratio of the large and small particles was more than 50:50 ratios. The increased toughness was found to be additive not multiplicative effect.

  8. Commensurability condition and hierarchy of fillings for FQHE in higher Landau levels in conventional 2DEG systems and in graphene—monolayer and bilayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacak, Janusz; Jacak, Lucjan

    2016-01-01

    The structure of the filling rate hierarchy referred to as the fractional quantum Hall effect is studied in higher Landau levels using the commensurability condition. The hierarchy of fillings that are derived in this manner is consistent with the experimental observations of the first three Landau levels in conventional semiconductor Hall systems. The relative poverty of the fractional structure in higher Landau levels compared with the lowest Landau level is explained using commensurability topological arguments. The commensurability criterion for correlated states for higher Landau levels (with n≥slant 1) including the paired states at half fillings of the spin-subbands of these levels is formulated. The commensurability condition is applied to determine the hierarchy of the fractional fillings of Landau levels in the monolayer and bilayer graphene. Good agreement with current experimental observations of fractional quantum Hall effect in the graphene monolayer and bilayer is achieved. The presence of even denominator rates in the hierarchy for fractional quantum Hall effect in the bilayer graphene is also explained.

  9. Teaching Science: Air Pressure "Eggs-periments."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leyden, Michael B.

    1994-01-01

    Discusses how teachers can introduce students to various scientific concept concerning motion, air composition, and heat by conducting an experiment: A peeled, hard-boiled egg is sucked into a bottle neck slightly smaller than the egg, after the bottle has been filled and emptied of hot water. Also discusses how students' understanding of the…

  10. Separation of the metallic and non-metallic fraction from printed circuit boards employing green technology.

    PubMed

    Estrada-Ruiz, R H; Flores-Campos, R; Gámez-Altamirano, H A; Velarde-Sánchez, E J

    2016-07-05

    The generation of electrical and electronic waste is increasing day by day; recycling is attractive because of the metallic fraction containing these. Nevertheless, conventional techniques are highly polluting. The comminution of the printed circuit boards followed by an inverse flotation process is a clean technique that allows one to separate the metallic fraction from the non-metallic fraction. It was found that particle size and superficial air velocity are the main variables in the separation of the different fractions. In this way an efficient separation is achieved by avoiding the environmental contamination coupled with the possible utilization of the different fractions obtained.

  11. Aerodynamical sealing by air curtains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Daria; Linden, Paul

    2015-11-01

    Air curtains are artificial high-velocity plane turbulent jets which are installed in a doorway in order to reduce the heat and the mass exchange between two environments. The performance of an air curtain is assessed in terms of the sealing effectiveness E, the fraction of the exchange flow prevented by the air curtain compared to the open-door situation. The main controlling parameter for air curtain dynamics is the deflection modulus Dm representing the ratio of the momentum flux of the air curtain and the transverse forces acting on it due to the stack effect. In this talk, we examine the influence of two factors on the performance of an air curtain: the presence of an additional ventilation pathway in the room, such as a small top opening, and the effects of an opposing buoyancy force which for example arises if a downwards blowing air curtain is heated. Small-scale experiments were conducted to investigate the E (Dm) -curve of an air curtain in both situations. We present both experimental results and theoretical explanations for our observations. We also briefly illustrate how simplified models developed for air curtains can be used for more complex phenomena such as the effects of wind blowing around a model building on the ventilation rates through the openings.

  12. Determination of degradation rates of organic substances in the unsaturated soil zone depending on the grain size fractions of various soil types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fichtner, Thomas; Stefan, Catalin; Goersmeyer, Nora

    2015-04-01

    Rate and extent of the biological degradation of organic substances during transport through the unsaturated soil zone is decisively influenced by the chemical and physical properties of the pollutants such as water solubility, toxicity and molecular structure. Furthermore microbial degradation processes are also influenced by soil-specific properties. An important parameter is the soil grain size distribution on which the pore volume and the pore size depends. Changes lead to changes in air and water circulation as well as preferred flow paths. Transport capacity of water inclusive nutrients is lower in existing bad-drainable fine pores in soils with small grain size fractions than in well-drainable coarse pores in a soil with bigger grain size fractions. Because fine pores are saturated with water for a longer time than the coarse pores and oxygen diffusion in water is ten thousand times slower than in air, oxygen is replenished much slower in soils with small grain size fractions. As a result life and growth conditions of the microorganisms are negatively affected. This leads to less biological activity, restricted degradation/mineralization of pollutants or altered microbial processes. The aim of conducted laboratory column experiments was to study the correlation between the grain size fractions respectively pore sizes, the oxygen content and the biodegradation rate of infiltrated organic substances. Therefore two columns (active + sterile control) were filled with different grain size fractions (0,063-0,125 mm, 0,2-0,63 mm and 1-2 mm) of soils. The sterile soil was inoculated with a defined amount of a special bacteria culture (sphingobium yanoikuae). A solution with organic substances glucose, oxalic acid, sinaphylic alcohol and nutrients was infiltrated from the top in intervals. The degradation of organic substances was controlled by the measurement of dissolved organic carbon in the in- and outflow of the column. The control of different pore volumes

  13. Fractional random walk lattice dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michelitsch, T. M.; Collet, B. A.; Riascos, A. P.; Nowakowski, A. F.; Nicolleau, F. C. G. A.

    2017-02-01

    We analyze time-discrete and time-continuous ‘fractional’ random walks on undirected regular networks with special focus on cubic periodic lattices in n  =  1, 2, 3,.. dimensions. The fractional random walk dynamics is governed by a master equation involving fractional powers of Laplacian matrices {{L}\\fracα{2}}} where α =2 recovers the normal walk. First we demonstrate that the interval 0<α ≤slant 2 is admissible for the fractional random walk. We derive analytical expressions for the transition matrix of the fractional random walk and closely related the average return probabilities. We further obtain the fundamental matrix {{Z}(α )} , and the mean relaxation time (Kemeny constant) for the fractional random walk. The representation for the fundamental matrix {{Z}(α )} relates fractional random walks with normal random walks. We show that the matrix elements of the transition matrix of the fractional random walk exihibit for large cubic n-dimensional lattices a power law decay of an n-dimensional infinite space Riesz fractional derivative type indicating emergence of Lévy flights. As a further footprint of Lévy flights in the n-dimensional space, the transition matrix and return probabilities of the fractional random walk are dominated for large times t by slowly relaxing long-wave modes leading to a characteristic {{t}-\\frac{n{α}} -decay. It can be concluded that, due to long range moves of fractional random walk, a small world property is emerging increasing the efficiency to explore the lattice when instead of a normal random walk a fractional random walk is chosen.

  14. Channel fill characteristics in submarine fans and deltas

    SciTech Connect

    Bouma, A.H.; Goddard, D. )

    1993-02-01

    Excellent data sources may not answer all pertinent questions and multifold seismic data usually cannot resolve internal characteristics of channel fills, even when it can detect the channel. Well log correlations can be wrong, especially when dealing with thin channel fills and outcrops are seldom sufficiently large to reveal a complete channel fill. In the final analysis, integration of all these types of data is necessary. Although not well understood, a lot of similarities exist between the channel fills from submarine fans and those from deltas. It is definitely beneficial to compare data from both environments. Channels and their fills can be: (1) primarily the result of major erosion forming an incisement that becomes gradually filled; (2) primarily the result of deposition, maintaining a channel, gradually filling it and simultaneously building its levees; (3) massive fill; (4) a bedded fill with or without an upward and/or lateral thinning or fining; or (5) a combination of thick bedded and thin bedded. Many channels alternate between erosional and depositional activities. Often an erosional cut is lined with shale, reducing fluid flow between channel sandstones and those of the levees. Also, a thorough knowledge of all of these varied processes is essential for the understanding of why [open quotes]massive[close quotes] channel fills can be wet and [open quotes]thin-bedded levees[close quotes] deposits oil prone.

  15. Filled aperture concepts for the Terrestrial Planet Finder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridgway, Stephen T.

    2003-02-01

    Filled aperture telescopes can deliver a real, high Strehl image which is well suited for discrimination of faint planets in the vicinity of bright stars and against an extended exo-zodiacal light. A filled aperture offers a rich variety of PSF control and diffraction suppression techniques. Filled apertures are under consideration for a wide spectral range, including visible and thermal-IR, each of which offers a significant selection of biomarker molecular bands. A filled aperture visible TPF may be simpler in several respects than a thermal-IR nuller. The required aperture size (or baseline) is much smaller, and no cryogenic systems are required. A filled aperture TPF would look and act like a normal telescope - vendors and users alike would be comfortable with its design and operation. Filled aperture telescopes pose significant challenges in production of large primary mirrors, and in very stringent wavefront requirements. Stability of the wavefront control, and hence of the PSF, is a major issue for filled aperture systems. Several groups have concluded that these and other issues can be resolved, and that filled aperture options are competitive for a TPF precursor and/or for the full TPF mission. Ball, Boeing-SVS and TRW have recently returned architecture reviews on filled aperture TPF concepts. In this paper, I will review some of the major considerations underlying these filled aperture concepts, and suggest key issues in a TPF Buyers Guide.

  16. [The developmental history of the dental filling materials].

    PubMed

    Gong, Yi

    2008-10-01

    Caries may cause substantial defects in the hard tissue of teeth. The dental filling for defects is an effective method to resume teeth complete form and masticatory function as well as aesthetic effects. The filling material is artificial restorative material to fill the dental defects. Tracing back the developing process of dental filling materials, we can see the advancement of stomotology of human beings. There was a revolutionary change in the filling materials from filling dental cavity with Chinese medicinal herbs to silver paste, from establishing the composition and proportion standardization of the silver amalgam filling materials to the application of new macromolecule compound resin. This is a continuous improvement and renewal in the idea and technology of dental filling treatment so that perfects the dental filling method and enables the retention of more healthy dental tissue. In addition, it pushes the development of dental aesthetics, adhesives and technology. With the improvement of people's health standard, aesthetic demands and environmental awareness, compound resin restorative materials has become clinically preferred dental filling materials of doctors and patients in clinic.

  17. Vision-based level control for beverage-filling processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ley, Dietmar; Braune, Ingolf

    1994-11-01

    This paper presents a vision-based on-line level control system which is used in beverage filling machines. Motivation for the development of this sensor system was the need for an intelligent filling valve, which can provide constant filling levels for all container/product combinations (i.e. juice, milk, beer, water, etc. in glass or PET bottles with various transparency and shape) by using a non-tactile and completely sterile measurement method. The sensor concept being presented in this paper is based on several CCD-cameras imaging the moving containers from the outside. The stationary lighting system illuminating the bottles is located within the filler circle. The field of view covers between 5 and 8 bottles depending on the bottle diameter and the filler partitioning. Each filling element's number is identified by the signals of an angular encoder. The electro-pneumatic filling valves can be opened and closed by computer control The cameras continuously monitor the final stages of the filling process, i.e. after the filling height has reached the upper half of the bottle. The sensor system measures the current filling height and derives the filling speed. Based on static a priori- knowledge and dynamic process knowledge the sensor system generates a best estimate of the particular time when the single valve is to be closed. After every new level measurement the system updates the closing time. The measurement process continues until the result of the next level calculation would be available after the estimated closing time would have been passed. The vision-based filling valve control enables the filling machine to adapt the filling time of each valve to the individual bottle shape. Herewith a standard deviation between 2 and 4 mm (depending on the slew rate in the bottle neck) can be accomplished, even at filling speed > 70.000 bottles per hour. 0

  18. Current fouling problems of PVC film fills and research into new designs to eliminate fouling

    SciTech Connect

    Whittemore, M.R. ); Massey, T. )

    1992-01-01

    The fouling of film fills in power plant cooling towers represents a major problem in loss of performance of the cooling tower and loss of efficiency of the power plant. The results of this loss in performance is higher energy consumption to drive the fans to move air through the cooling tower in mechanical draft towers. Higher fuel consumption in plant operations or reduced peak load output and the discharge of warmer water which poses environmental concerns to our rivers and lakes. This paper discusses the effects of fouling on cooling tower performance and the current knowledge of how this fouling may occur, industry practices of controlling cleaning and eliminating the problem using new film fill products.

  19. Whole-body imaging of the distribution of mercury released from dental fillings into monkey tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, L.J.; Kloiber, R.; Leininger, R.W.; Vimy, M.J.; Lorscheider, F.L. )

    1990-11-01

    The fate of mercury (Hg) released from dental silver amalgam tooth fillings into human mouth air is uncertain. A previous report about sheep revealed uptake routes and distribution of amalgam Hg among body tissues. The present investigation demonstrates the bodily distribution of amalgam Hg in a monkey whose dentition, diet, feeding regimen, and chewing pattern closely resemble those of humans. When amalgam fillings, which normally contain 50% Hg, are made with a tracer of radioactive {sup 203}Hg and then placed into monkey teeth, the isotope appears in high concentration in various organs and tissues within 4 wk. Whole-body images of the monkey revealed that the highest levels of Hg were located in the kidney, gastrointestinal tract, and jaw. The dental profession's advocacy of silver amalgam as a stable tooth restorative material is not supported by these findings.

  20. Unwrapping Students' Ideas about Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Rebecca M.; Gibbons, Lynsey K.; Kazemi, Elham; Lind, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Supporting students to develop an understanding of the meaning of fractions is an important goal of elementary school mathematics. This involves developing partitioning strategies, creating representations, naming fractional quantities, and using symbolic notation. This article describes how teachers can use a formative assessment problem to…

  1. Rational Exponentials and Continued Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denny, J. K.

    2012-01-01

    Using continued fraction expansions, we can approximate constants, such as pi and e, using an appropriate integer n raised to the power x[superscript 1/x], x a suitable rational. We review continued fractions and give an algorithm for producing these approximations.

  2. Understanding Magnitudes to Understand Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gabriel, Florence

    2016-01-01

    Fractions are known to be difficult to learn and difficult to teach, yet they are vital for students to have access to further mathematical concepts. This article uses evidence to support teachers employing teaching methods that focus on the conceptual understanding of the magnitude of fractions.

  3. Air Policing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    Iraq. To provide a background for understanding why Britain commenced the policy of air policing, this paper begins with a review of contemporary...7 Omissi, Air Power, XV. 8 policing actions or the pushing home of advantages gained by the air.” Within the context of this paper , the...control operations, and therefore within the context of this paper , the term coercive airpower refers to the threat of harming a population or the threat

  4. Radiating subdispersive fractional optical solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujioka, J.; Espinosa, A.; Rodríguez, R. F.; Malomed, B. A.

    2014-09-01

    It was recently found [Fujioka et al., Phys. Lett. A 374, 1126 (2010)] that the propagation of solitary waves can be described by a fractional extension of the nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation which involves a temporal fractional derivative (TFD) of order α > 2. In the present paper, we show that there is also another fractional extension of the NLS equation which contains a TFD with α < 2, and in this case, the new equation describes the propagation of radiating solitons. We show that the emission of the radiation (when α < 2) is explained by resonances at various frequencies between the pulses and the linear modes of the system. It is found that the new fractional NLS equation can be derived from a suitable Lagrangian density, and a fractional Noether's theorem can be applied to it, thus predicting the conservation of the Hamiltonian, momentum and energy.

  5. Radiating subdispersive fractional optical solitons

    SciTech Connect

    Fujioka, J. Espinosa, A.; Rodríguez, R. F.; Malomed, B. A.

    2014-09-01

    It was recently found [Fujioka et al., Phys. Lett. A 374, 1126 (2010)] that the propagation of solitary waves can be described by a fractional extension of the nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation which involves a temporal fractional derivative (TFD) of order α > 2. In the present paper, we show that there is also another fractional extension of the NLS equation which contains a TFD with α < 2, and in this case, the new equation describes the propagation of radiating solitons. We show that the emission of the radiation (when α < 2) is explained by resonances at various frequencies between the pulses and the linear modes of the system. It is found that the new fractional NLS equation can be derived from a suitable Lagrangian density, and a fractional Noether's theorem can be applied to it, thus predicting the conservation of the Hamiltonian, momentum and energy.

  6. A new fractional wavelet transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Hongzhe; Zheng, Zhibao; Wang, Wei

    2017-03-01

    The fractional Fourier transform (FRFT) is a potent tool to analyze the time-varying signal. However, it fails in locating the fractional Fourier domain (FRFD)-frequency contents which is required in some applications. A novel fractional wavelet transform (FRWT) is proposed to solve this problem. It displays the time and FRFD-frequency information jointly in the time-FRFD-frequency plane. The definition, basic properties, inverse transform and reproducing kernel of the proposed FRWT are considered. It has been shown that an FRWT with proper order corresponds to the classical wavelet transform (WT). The multiresolution analysis (MRA) associated with the developed FRWT, together with the construction of the orthogonal fractional wavelets are also presented. Three applications are discussed: the analysis of signal with time-varying frequency content, the FRFD spectrum estimation of signals that involving noise, and the construction of fractional Harr wavelet. Simulations verify the validity of the proposed FRWT.

  7. Fractional active disturbance rejection control.

    PubMed

    Li, Dazi; Ding, Pan; Gao, Zhiqiang

    2016-05-01

    A fractional active disturbance rejection control (FADRC) scheme is proposed to improve the performance of commensurate linear fractional order systems (FOS) and the robust analysis shows that the controller is also applicable to incommensurate linear FOS control. In FADRC, the traditional extended states observer (ESO) is generalized to a fractional order extended states observer (FESO) by using the fractional calculus, and the tracking differentiator plus nonlinear state error feedback are replaced by a fractional proportional-derivative controller. To simplify controller tuning, the linear bandwidth-parameterization method has been adopted. The impacts of the observer bandwidth ωo and controller bandwidth ωc on system performance are then analyzed. Finally, the FADRC stability and frequency-domain characteristics for linear single-input single-output FOS are analyzed. Simulation results by FADRC and ADRC on typical FOS are compared to demonstrate the superiority and effectiveness of the proposed scheme.

  8. Comparison of Gutta Percha Filling Techniques. Part 2. Three Chloroform-Gutta Percha Filling Techniques.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-06-01

    Inlo Di-5r7W~f~ IU* Report) DTIC illE LECTE f_ IS. KEY WORDS (Conthue on revere* side It necessay and Identify by block numbei) -. , endodontics ...TECHNIQUES. PART 2: THREE CHLOROFORM-GUTTA PERCHA FILLING TECHNIQUES M. Wong, DDS Resident, Endodontics Dept. of Dentistry - PO Box 59 Madigan Army Medical...Center Tacoma, Washington 98431 D. 0. Peters, BA, DDS, MS Mentor, Endodontics US Army Institute of Dental Research Walter Reed Army Medical Center

  9. Optical frequency standard using acetylene-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fibers.

    PubMed

    Triches, Marco; Michieletto, Mattia; Hald, Jan; Lyngsø, Jens K; Lægsgaard, Jesper; Bang, Ole

    2015-05-04

    Gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fibers are used to stabilize a fiber laser to the 13C2H2 P(16) (ν1+ν3) transition at 1542 nm using saturated absorption. Four hollow-core fibers with different crystal structure are compared in terms of long term lock-point repeatability and fractional frequency instability. The locked fiber laser shows a fractional frequency instability below 4 × 10(-12) for averaging time up to 10(4) s. The lock-point repeatability over more than 1 year is 1.3 × 10(-11), corresponding to a standard deviation of 2.5 kHz. A complete experimental investigation of the light-matter interaction between the spatial modes excited in the fibers and the frequency of the locked laser is presented. A simple theoretical model that explains the interaction is also developed.

  10. Large deformation micromechanics of particle filled acrylics at elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunel, Eray Mustafa

    The main aim of this study is to investigate stress whitening and associated micro-deformation mechanism in thermoformed particle filled acrylic sheets. For stress whitening quantification, a new index was developed based on image histograms in logarithmic scale of gray level. Stress whitening levels in thermoformed acrylic composites was observed to increase with increasing deformation limit, decreasing forming rate and increasing forming temperatures below glass transition. Decrease in stress whitening levels above glass transition with increasing forming temperature was attributed to change in micro-deformation behavior. Surface deformation feature investigated with scanning electron microscopy showed that source of stress whitening in thermoformed samples was a combination of particle failure and particle disintegration depending on forming rate and temperature. Stress whitening level was strongly correlated to intensity of micro-deformation features. On the other hand, thermoformed neat acrylics displayed no surface discoloration which was attributed to absence of micro-void formation on the surface of neat acrylics. Experimental damage measures (degradation in initial, secant, unloading modulus and strain energy density) have been inadequate in describing damage evolution in successive thermoforming applications on the same sample at different levels of deformation. An improved version of dual-mechanism viscoplastic material model was proposed to predict thermomechanical behavior of neat acrylics under non-isothermal conditions. Simulation results and experimental results were in good agreement and failure of neat acrylics under non-isothermal conditions ar low forming temperatures were succesfully predicted based on entropic damage model. Particle and interphase failure observed in acrylic composites was studied in a multi-particle unit cell model with different volume fractions. Damage evolution due to particle failure and interphase failure was simulated

  11. Fatigue behaviour of mineral filled polyamide 6-6

    SciTech Connect

    Trotignon, J.P.; Demdoum, L.; Verdu, J.

    1993-12-31

    The flexural fatigue at 10Hz, 23 {+-} 2{degree}C and various deformation amplitudes ({var_epsilon} = 1.4, 2.2 and 3.1%) was studied for various PA 66 samples containing mineral fillers in low (<5%) weight fraction. The fillers were talc, mica and wollastonite having a very different granulometry and aspect ratio. A preliminary DSC investigation showed that all these minerals display a nucleation effect of PA 66 crystallization, their efficiency being in the order talc>mica>wollastonite. Stress recording during the fatigue testing allows to detect the rupture, which occurs generally in a brittle (sudden) mode. When fatigue testing is made in dry state, the sample compliance remains constant during the whole test duration, for low stress levels. For high stress levels, in the case of unfilled and mica filled samples, the stress decreases rapidly in the first 10% of the lifetime and reaches a plateau value corresponding to about 50% of the initial stress amplitude. In situ measurements of the surface temperature show that the initial stress decrease is due to self heating above the glass transition temperature (60{degree}C) of the polymer. In all the cases, the presence of a filler-despite its very low concentration-reduces significantly the lifetime. Similar tests were made in wet state (2,5 % absorbed water). In this case, the behavior observed only for high stress levels in mica and unfilled samples in dry state appears in all the cases here, which is obviously linked to the lower Tg value due to plasticization of PA 66 by water. The role of fillers in fatigue damage and rupture will be discussed on the basis of the above results and complementary SEM observations.

  12. Laser-plasma interactions in large gas-filled hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, R.E.; Powers, L.V.; Berger, R.L.

    1996-06-01

    Indirect-drive targets planned for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser consist of spherical fuel capsules enclosed in cylindrical Au hohlraums. Laser beams, arranged in cylindrical rings, heat the inside of the Au wall to produce x rays that in turn heat and implode the capsule to produce fusion conditions in the fuel. Detailed calculations show that adequate implosion symmetry can be maintained by filling the hohlraum interior with low-density, low-Z gases. The plasma produced from the heated gas provides sufficient pressure to keep the radiating Au surface from expanding excessively. As the laser heats this gas, the gas becomes a relatively uniform plasma with small gradients in velocity and density. Such long-scale-length plasmas can be ideal mediums for stimulated Brillouin Scattering (SBS). SBS can reflect a large fraction of the incident laser light before it is absorbed by the hohlraum; therefore, it is undesirable in an inertial confinement fusion target. To examine the importance of SBS in NIF targets, the authors used Nova to measure SBS from hohlraums with plasma conditions similar to those predicted for high-gain NIF targets. The plasmas differ from the more familiar exploding foil or solid targets as follows: they are hot (3 keV); they have high electron densities (n{sub e}=10{sup 21}cm{sup {minus}3}); and they are nearly stationary, confined within an Au cylinder, and uniform over large distances (>2 mm). These hohlraums have <3% peak SBS backscatter for an interaction beam with intensities of 1-4 x 10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}, a laser wavelength of 0.351{micro}m, f/4 or f/8 focusing optics, and a variety of beam smoothing implementations. Based on these conditions the authors conclude that SBS does not appear to be a problem for NIF targets.

  13. Water Vapor Isotopic Fractionation and Strat/trop Exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jucks, K. W.; Johnson, D. G.; Traub, W. A.; Chance, K. V.

    We will present atmospheric observations of the isotopic fractionation for water vapor as observed by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory far-infrared spectrometer (FIRS-2). The stratospheric observations are corrected with a photochemical model to account for methane oxidation to determine the "entry level" isotopic fractionation of water in the stratosphere. These values are then compared to a simple Rayleigh frac- tionation model that includes estimations of convection, radiative heating, and mixing to infer relative contributions to stratosphere/troposphere exchange. The observations of water vapor fractionation are most consistent with a model that mixes air uplifted from roughly 11 km with significantly more air that has been dehydrated by convec- tion to an effective temperature that is much cooler than the tropopause temperature. The water vapor mixing ratio in the stratosphere results from a combination of radia- tive heating, recirculation of stratospheric air, and deep convection that supplies the air to the upper tropical troposphere. We believe that these types of observations could be a powerful tool for constraining circulation models.

  14. The Performance of Gas Filled Multilayer Insulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, G. L.; Zeller, C. M.

    2008-03-01

    The NASA Exploration Program is currently planning to use liquid oxygen, methane and hydrogen for propulsion in future spacecraft for the human exploration of the Moon and Mars. This will require the efficient long term, on-orbit storage of these cryogens. Multilayer insulation (MLI) will be critical to achieving the required thermal performance since it has much lower heat transfer than any other insulation when used in a vacuum. However, the size and mass constraints of these propulsion systems will not allow a structural shell to be used to provide vacuum for the MLI during ground hold and launch. One approach is to purge the MLI during ground hold with an inert gas which is then vented during launch ascent and on-orbit. In this paper, we report on experimental tests and modeling that we have done on MLI used to insulate a cryogenic tank. These include measurements of the heat transfer of gas filled insulation, evacuated insulation and during the transition in between.

  15. Handbook for Gas Filled RF Cavity Aficionados'

    SciTech Connect

    Tollestrup, A.V.; Chung, Moses; Yonehara, Katsuya; /Fermilab

    2009-05-01

    The use of hydrogen gas filled RF cavities in muon cooling channels has been proposed by Rolland Johnson. Impressive results have been obtained toward attaining high voltage gradients and rapid training in preliminary tests done at the FNAL MTA facility. However, so far it has not been possible to test them under conditions where they were subject to the transversal of a high intensity particle beam. This note is an attempt to bring together a description of some of the pertinent physical processes that take place in the dilute plasma that is generated in the hydrogen gas by the beam. Two effects dominate. The first is that the free electrons generated can load down the cavity and transfer its energy to heating the gas. The second is a question of what happens to the plasma in the longer term. There is an enormous literature on the subject of the subject of dilute hydrogen plasmas and we can tap into this information in order to understand and predict the behavior of the cavity.

  16. ARE PLANETARY SYSTEMS FILLED TO CAPACITY? A STUDY BASED ON KEPLER RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Julia; Margot, Jean-Luc

    2013-04-20

    We used a sample of Kepler candidate planets with orbital periods less than 200 days and radii between 1.5 and 30 Earth radii (R{sub Circled-Plus }) to determine the typical dynamical spacing of neighboring planets. To derive the intrinsic (i.e., free of observational bias) dynamical spacing of neighboring planets, we generated populations of planetary systems following various dynamical spacing distributions, subjected them to synthetic observations by the Kepler spacecraft, and compared the properties of observed planets in our simulations with actual Kepler detections. We found that, on average, neighboring planets are spaced 21.7 mutual Hill radii apart with a standard deviation of 9.5. This dynamical spacing distribution is consistent with that of adjacent planets in the solar system. To test the packed planetary systems hypothesis, the idea that all planetary systems are dynamically packed or filled to capacity, we determined the fraction of systems that are dynamically packed by performing long-term (10{sup 8} years) numerical simulations. In each simulation, we integrated a system with planets spaced according to our best-fit dynamical spacing distribution but containing an additional planet on an intermediate orbit. The fraction of simulations exhibiting signs of instability provides an approximate lower bound on the fraction of systems that are dynamically packed; we found that {>=}31%, {>=}35%, and {>=}45% of two-planet, three-planet, and four-planet systems are dynamically packed, respectively. Such sizeable fractions suggest that many planetary systems are indeed filled to capacity. This feature of planetary systems is another profound constraint that formation and evolution models must satisfy.

  17. Dynamics of exogenous nitrogen partitioning and nitrogen remobilization from vegetative organs in pea revealed by 15N in vivo labeling throughout seed filling.

    PubMed

    Schiltz, Séverine; Munier-Jolain, Nathalie; Jeudy, Christian; Burstin, Judith; Salon, Christophe

    2005-04-01

    The fluxes of (1) exogenous nitrogen (N) assimilation and (2) remobilization of endogenous N from vegetative plant compartments were measured by 15N labeling during the seed-filling period in pea (Pisum sativum L. cv Cameor), to better understand the mechanism of N remobilization. While the majority (86%) of exogenous N was allocated to the vegetative organs before the beginning of seed filling, this fraction decreased to 45% at the onset of seed filling, the remainder being directed to seeds. Nitrogen remobilization from vegetative parts contributed to 71% of the total N in mature seeds borne on the first two nodes (first stratum). The contribution of remobilized N to total seed N varied, with the highest proportion at the beginning of filling; it was independent of the developmental stage of each stratum of seeds, suggesting that remobilized N forms a unique pool, managed at the whole-plant level and supplied to all filling seeds whatever their position on the plant. Once seed filling starts, N is remobilized from all vegetative organs: 30% of the total N accumulated in seeds was remobilized from leaves, 20% from pod walls, 11% from roots, and 10% from stems. The rate of N remobilization was maximal when seeds of all the different strata were filling, consistent with regulation according to the N demand of seeds. At later stages of seed filling, the rate of remobilization decreases and may become controlled by the amount of residual N in vegetative tissues.

  18. Dynamics of Exogenous Nitrogen Partitioning and Nitrogen Remobilization from Vegetative Organs in Pea Revealed by 15N in Vivo Labeling throughout Seed Filling1

    PubMed Central

    Schiltz, Séverine; Munier-Jolain, Nathalie; Jeudy, Christian; Burstin, Judith; Salon, Christophe

    2005-01-01

    The fluxes of (1) exogenous nitrogen (N) assimilation and (2) remobilization of endogenous N from vegetative plant compartments were measured by 15N labeling during the seed-filling period in pea (Pisum sativum L. cv Caméor), to better understand the mechanism of N remobilization. While the majority (86%) of exogenous N was allocated to the vegetative organs before the beginning of seed filling, this fraction decreased to 45% at the onset of seed filling, the remainder being directed to seeds. Nitrogen remobilization from vegetative parts contributed to 71% of the total N in mature seeds borne on the first two nodes (first stratum). The contribution of remobilized N to total seed N varied, with the highest proportion at the beginning of filling; it was independent of the developmental stage of each stratum of seeds, suggesting that remobilized N forms a unique pool, managed at the whole-plant level and supplied to all filling seeds whatever their position on the plant. Once seed filling starts, N is remobilized from all vegetative organs: 30% of the total N accumulated in seeds was remobilized from leaves, 20% from pod walls, 11% from roots, and 10% from stems. The rate of N remobilization was maximal when seeds of all the different strata were filling, consistent with regulation according to the N demand of seeds. At later stages of seed filling, the rate of remobilization decreases and may become controlled by the amount of residual N in vegetative tissues. PMID:15793068

  19. Confined combustion of TNT explosion products in air

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, J; Ferguson, R E; Forbes, J; Kuhl, A L; Oppenheim, A K; Spektor, R

    1998-08-31

    Effects of turbulent combustion induced by explosion of a 0.8 kg cylindrical charge of TNT in a 17 m3 chamber filled with air, are investigated. The detonation wave in the charge transforms the solid explosive (C7H5N3O6) to gaseous products, rich (~20% each) in carbon dust and carbon monoxide. The detonation pressure (~210 kb) thereby engendered causes the products to expand rapidly, driving a blast wave into the surrounding air. The interface between the products and air, being essentially unstable as a consequence of strong acceleration to which it is subjected within the blast wave, evolves into a turbulent mixing layer-a process enhanced by shock reflections from the walls. Under such circumstances rapid combustion takes place where the expanded detonation products play the role of fuel. Its dynamic effect is manifested by the experimental measurement of ~3 bar pressure increase in the chamber, in contrast to ~1bar attained by a corresponding TNT explosion in nitrogen. The experiments were modeled as a turbulent combustion in an unmixed system at infinite Reynolds, Peclet and DamkGhler numbers. The CFD solution was obtained by a high-order Godunov scheme using an AMR (Adaptive Mesh Refinement) to trace the turbulent mixing on the computational grid in as much detail as possible. The evolution of the mass fraction of fuel consumed by combustion thus determined exhibited the properties of an exponential decay following a sharp initiation. The results reveal all the dynamic features of the exothermic process of combustion controlled by fluid mechanic transport in a highly turbulent field, in contrast to those elucidated by the conventional reaction-diffusion model.

  20. Laser absorption, power transfer, and radiation symmetry during the first shock of inertial confinement fusion gas-filled hohlraum experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pak, A.; Dewald, E. L.; Landen, O. L.; Milovich, J.; Strozzi, D. J.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Bradley, D. K.; Divol, L.; Ho, D. D.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Meezan, N. B.; Michel, P.; Moody, J. D.; Moore, A. S.; Schneider, M. B.; Town, R. P. J.; Hsing, W. W.; Edwards, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    Temporally resolved measurements of the hohlraum radiation flux asymmetry incident onto a bismuth coated surrogate capsule have been made over the first two nanoseconds of ignition relevant laser pulses. Specifically, we study the P2 asymmetry of the incoming flux as a function of cone fraction, defined as the inner-to-total laser beam power ratio, for a variety of hohlraums with different scales and gas fills. This work was performed to understand the relevance of recent experiments, conducted in new reduced-scale neopentane gas filled hohlraums, to full scale helium filled ignition targets. Experimental measurements, matched by 3D view factor calculations, are used to infer differences in symmetry, relative beam absorption, and cross beam energy transfer (CBET), employing an analytic model. Despite differences in hohlraum dimensions and gas fill, as well as in laser beam pointing and power, we find that laser absorption, CBET, and the cone fraction, at which a symmetric flux is achieved, are similar to within 25% between experiments conducted in the reduced and full scale hohlraums. This work demonstrates a close surrogacy in the dynamics during the first shock between reduced-scale and full scale implosion experiments and is an important step in enabling the increased rate of study for physics associated with inertial confinement fusion.

  1. Laser absorption, power transfer, and radiation symmetry during the first shock of inertial confinement fusion gas-filled hohlraum experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Pak, A.; Dewald, E. L.; Landen, O. L.; Milovich, J.; Strozzi, D. J.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Bradley, D. K.; Divol, L.; Ho, D. D.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Meezan, N. B.; Michel, P.; Moody, J. D.; Moore, A. S.; Schneider, M. B.; Town, R. P. J.; Hsing, W. W.; Edwards, M. J.

    2015-12-15

    Temporally resolved measurements of the hohlraum radiation flux asymmetry incident onto a bismuth coated surrogate capsule have been made over the first two nanoseconds of ignition relevant laser pulses. Specifically, we study the P2 asymmetry of the incoming flux as a function of cone fraction, defined as the inner-to-total laser beam power ratio, for a variety of hohlraums with different scales and gas fills. This work was performed to understand the relevance of recent experiments, conducted in new reduced-scale neopentane gas filled hohlraums, to full scale helium filled ignition targets. Experimental measurements, matched by 3D view factor calculations, are used to infer differences in symmetry, relative beam absorption, and cross beam energy transfer (CBET), employing an analytic model. Despite differences in hohlraum dimensions and gas fill, as well as in laser beam pointing and power, we find that laser absorption, CBET, and the cone fraction, at which a symmetric flux is achieved, are similar to within 25% between experiments conducted in the reduced and full scale hohlraums. This work demonstrates a close surrogacy in the dynamics during the first shock between reduced-scale and full scale implosion experiments and is an important step in enabling the increased rate of study for physics associated with inertial confinement fusion.

  2. Acoustic fill factors for a 120 inch diameter fairing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Y. Albert

    1992-01-01

    Data from the acoustic test of a 120-inch diameter payload fairing were collected and an analysis of acoustic fill factors were performed. Correction factors for obtaining a weighted spatial average of the interior sound pressure level (SPL) were derived based on this database and a normalized 200-inch diameter fairing database. The weighted fill factors were determined and compared with statistical energy analysis (VAPEPS code) derived fill factors. The comparison is found to be reasonable.

  3. Critical Appraisal: Bulk-fill Composites, Part I.

    PubMed

    Swift, Edward J

    2015-01-01

    The Journal of Esthetic and Restorative Dentistry published a Critical Appraisal of bulk-fill flowable composite resins by Dr. Ricardo Walter in early 2013 (JERD 2013;25(1):72-6). Since then, new bulk-fill composite options have become available and have rapidly achieved great popularity. This two-part Critical Appraisal reviews some of the more recent information on the various bulk-fill options.

  4. Application of the TEMPEST computer code to canister-filling heat transfer problems

    SciTech Connect

    Farnsworth, R.K.; Faletti, D.W.; Budden, M.J.

    1988-03-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) researchers used the TEMPEST computer code to simulate thermal cooldown behavior of nuclear waste glass after it was poured into steel canisters for long-term storage. The objective of this work was to determine the accuracy and applicability of the TEMPEST code when used to compute canister thermal histories. First, experimental data were obtained to provide the basis for comparing TEMPEST-generated predictions. Five canisters were instrumented with appropriately located radial and axial thermocouples. The canister were filled using the pilot-scale ceramic melter (PSCM) at PNL. Each canister was filled in either a continous or a batch filling mode. One of the canisters was also filled within a turntable simulant (a group of cylindrical shells with heat transfer resistances similar to those in an actual melter turntable). This was necessary to provide a basis for assessing the ability of the TEMPEST code to also model the transient cooling of canisters in a melter turntable. The continous-fill model, Version M, was found to predict temperatures with more accuracy. The turntable simulant experiment demonstrated that TEMPEST can adequately model the asymmetric temperature field caused by the turntable geometry. Further, TEMPEST can acceptably predict the canister cooling history within a turntable, despite code limitations in computing simultaneous radiation and convection heat transfer between shells, along with uncertainty in stainless-steel surface emissivities. Based on the successful performance of TEMPEST Version M, development was initiated to incorporate 1) full viscous glass convection, 2) a dynamically adaptive grid that automatically follows the glass/air interface throughout the transient, and 3) a full enclosure radiation model to allow radiation heat transfer to non-nearest neighbor cells. 5 refs., 47 figs., 17 tabs.

  5. Gas-Filled Panels: An update on applications in the building thermal envelope

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, B.T.; Arasteh, D.; Tuerler, D.

    1995-10-01

    This paper discusses the application of Gas-Filled Panels to the building thermal envelope. Gas-Filled Panels, or GFPs, are thermal insulating devices that retain a high concentration of a low- conductivity gas, at atmospheric pressure, within a multilayer infrared reflective baffle. The thermal performance of the panel depends on the type of gas fill and the baffle configuration. Heat- flow meter apparatus measurements have shown effective apparent thermal conductivities of 0.194 Btu{center_dot}in/h{center_dot}ft{sup 2}{center_dot}{degree}F with air as the gas fill, 0.138 Btu{center_dot}in/h{center_dot}ft{sup 2}{center_dot}{degree}F with argon, and 0.081 Btu{center_dot}in/h{center_dot}ft{sup 2}{center_dot}{degree}F with krypton. Calorimetric measurements have also shown total resistance levels of about R-12.6 h{center_dot}ft{sup 2}{center_dot}{degree}F/Btu for a 1.0-inch thick krypton panel, R-25.7 h{center_dot}ft{sup 2}{center_dot}{degree}F/Btu for a 2.0-inch krypton panel, and R-18.4 f{center_dot}ft{sup 2}{center_dot}{degree}F/Btu for a 10-inch xenon panel. GFPs are flexible, self-supporting and can be made in a variety of shapes and sizes to thoroughly fill most types of cavities in building walls and roofs, although the modular nature of the panels can lead to complications in installing them, especially for irregularly shaped cavities. We present computer simulation results showing the improvement in thermal resistance resulting from using an argon-GFP in place of glass fiber batt insulation in wood-frame construction. This report also presents estimates of the quantity and cost of material components needed to manufacture GFPs using current prototype designs.

  6. Acetabular pneumatocyst containing air-fluid level.

    PubMed

    Narváez, J A; Narváez, J; Rodríguez-Mijarro, M; Quintero, J C

    1999-01-01

    The presence of intraosseous gas most commonly occurs in osteomyelitis, vacuum phenomenon, and postsurgery or posttraumatic states. Several cases of subchondral gas-filled lesions, called pneumatocysts, have also been described in the sacroiliac joint and clavicle, none of them with intralesional air-fluid level. These pneumatocysts are innocuous lesions of uncertain origin. We describe one case of acetabular pneumatocyst containing air-fluid level in a 62-year-old man with long-standing ankylosing spondylitis involving hip joint. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a pneumatocyst in an acetabular location containing air-fluid level.

  7. 26. VIEW, LOOKING NORTHWEST INSIDE TRANSFORMER ROOM, SHOWING OIL FILLED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. VIEW, LOOKING NORTHWEST INSIDE TRANSFORMER ROOM, SHOWING OIL- FILLED TRANSFORMER POTS - Sacramento River Bridge, Spanning Sacramento River at California State Highway 275, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  8. Air transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Page, F Handley

    1924-01-01

    I purpose (sic) in this paper to deal with the development in air transport which has taken place since civil aviation between England and the Continent first started at the end of August 1919. A great deal of attention has been paid in the press to air services of the future, to the detriment of the consideration of results obtained up to the present.

  9. Air Pollution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Donald L.

    1989-01-01

    Materials related to air pollution are reviewed for the period January 1987, to October 1988. The topics are pollution monitoring, air pollution, and environmental chemistry. The organization consists of two major analytical divisions: (1) gaseous methods; and (2) aerosol and particulate methods. (MVL)

  10. Air Pollution.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Air quality is affected by many types of pollutants that are emitted from various sources, including stationary and mobile. These sources release both criteria and hazardous air pollutants, which cause health effects, ecological harm, and material damage. They are generally categ...

  11. Recalcitrant dissolved organic carbon fractions.

    PubMed

    Hansell, Dennis A

    2013-01-01

    Marine dissolved organic carbon (DOC) exhibits a spectrum of reactivity, from very fast turnover of the most bioavailable forms in the surface ocean to long-lived materials circulating within the ocean abyss. These disparate reactivities group DOC by fractions with distinctive functions in the cycling of carbon, ranging from support of the microbial loop to involvement in the biological pump to a hypothesized major source/sink of atmospheric CO(2) driving paleoclimate variability. Here, the major fractions constituting the global ocean's recalcitrant DOC pool are quantitatively and qualitatively characterized with reference to their roles in carbon biogeochemistry. A nomenclature for the fractions is proposed based on those roles.

  12. Modified spontaneous emission of organic molecules in-filled in inverse opals.

    PubMed

    Deng, Lier; Wang, Yongsheng; He, Dawei

    2011-11-01

    Inverse opals were prepared by replication of colloidal crystal templates made from silica spheres 298 nm in diameter. The air between the silica spheres was filled with the mixture of the monomer poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and the organic molecule Alq3 that can be subsequently polymerized. After removing the silica sphere templates, the photonic bandgap effect on the spontaneous emission of Alq3 were investigated. The dip in the fluorescence spectrum was interpreted in terms of redistribution of the photon density of states in the photonic crystal.

  13. Impact of Filling Gas on Subharmonic Emissions of Phospholipid Ultrasound Contrast Agents.

    PubMed

    Kanbar, Emma; Fouan, Damien; Sennoga, Charles A; Doinikov, Alexander A; Bouakaz, Ayache

    2017-02-14

    Subharmonic signals backscattered from gas-filled lipid-shelled microbubbles have generated significant research interest because they can improve the detection and sensitivity of contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging. However, the emission of subharmonic signals is strongly characterized by a temporal dependence, the origins of which have not been sufficiently elucidated. The features that influence subharmonic emissions need to be identified not only to better develop next-generation microbubble contrast agents, but also to develop more efficient subharmonic imaging (SHI) modes and therapeutic strategies. We examined the effect of microbubble filling gas on subharmonic emissions. Phospholipid shelled-microbubbles with different gaseous compositions such as sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), octafluoropropane (C3F8) or decafluorobutane (C4F10), nitrogen (N2)/C4F10 or air were insonated using a driving frequency of 10 MHz and peak negative pressure of 450 kPa, and their acoustic responses were tracked by monitoring both second harmonic and subharmonic emissions. Microbubbles were first acoustically characterized with their original gas and then re-characterized after substitution of the original gas with air, SF6 or C4F10. A measureable change in intensity of the subharmonic emissions with a 20- to 40-min delayed onset and increasing subharmonic emissions of the order 12-18 dB was recorded for microbubbles filled with C4F10. Substitution of C4F10 with air eliminated the earlier observed delay in subharmonic emissions. Significantly, substitution of SF6 for C4F10 successfully triggered a delay in the subharmonic emissions of the resultant agents, whereas substitution of C4F10 for SF6 eliminated the earlier observed suppression of subharmonic emissions, clearly suggesting that the type of filling gas contained in the microbubble agent influences subharmonic emissions in a time-dependent manner. Because our agents were dispersed in air-stabilized phosphate-buffered saline

  14. Surface waves in a magnetized ferrite slab filled with a wire medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nefedov, I. S.; Soloviev, A. S.; Tarot, A. C.; Abdouni, W.

    2009-06-01

    Novel metamaterial, based on wire medium embedded into magnetized ferrite, is studied. Waves in unbounded ferrites filled with wire media, surface wave at the interface of this metamaterial and the air as well as waves in a ferrite slab adjacent to a wire medium are considered. Different geometries of wires arrangement and different magnetization directions are discussed. Effective permeability was introduced for the case where both plasma and magnetic properties take place. Dispersion diagrams and applicability of the Drude model for the description of the wire medium in a host matrix, possessing high permittivity and permeability, are discussed.

  15. Design and Use of a Novel Apparatus for Measuring Capsule Fill Hole Conductance

    SciTech Connect

    Seugling, R M; Nederbragt, W W; Klingmann, J L; Edson, S; Reynolds, J; Cook, R

    2006-11-27

    Description and results of a novel apparatus for determining the flow conductance through a laser drilled hole in a spherical shell for inertial confinement fusion experiments are described. The instrument monitors the pressure of an enclosed volume containing the laser pressure drilled capsule as air bleeds through the hole into the shell. From these measurements one obtains the conductance of the fill hole. This system has proven to be a valuable tool for verifying the conduct conductance into the capsule in a timely and nondestructive manner.

  16. Solar energy storage via liquid filled cans - Test data and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saha, H.

    1978-01-01

    This paper describes the design of a solar thermal storage test facility with water-filled metal cans as heat storage medium and also presents some preliminary tests results and analysis. This combination of solid and liquid mediums shows unique heat transfer and heat contents characteristics and will be well suited for use with solar air systems for space and hot water heating. The trends of the test results acquired thus far are representative of the test bed characteristics while operating in the various modes.

  17. Properties and testing of loose-fill cellulosic insulation

    SciTech Connect

    Yarbrough, D.W.; McElroy, D.L.; Harris, W.W.

    1982-02-01

    New methods for measuring thermal resistance, permeability to air, settled density, and compressibility of loose-fill cellulosic insulation (LFCI) are described. The resultant property measurements are discussed. Chemical analyses were completed on the LFCI in the sampling. The results represent a first attempt to assess the variability of products and fire-retardant formulations. Chemical characteristics have been compared with test performance. Compounds present in the insulations tested were not identified directly but were deduced from elemental analyses. The amount of water-soluble fire retardant in LFCI products were found to vary from 14 to 36 wt %. Formulations containing from one to five separate compounds were identified. It was observed that products containing above 20 wt % fire-retardant chemicals had the highest acceptance (pass) rate for the combustion tests specified by federal specification HH-I-515D. The overall performance of the LFCI materials tested was poor as measured by HH-I-515D methods. Results for the important smoldering-combustion test yielded passing rates from 30.6 to 62.7%. Seventy-five percent of the LFCI specimens passed the radiant panel test. The percentage of the sample that passed both the smoldering-combustion and the radiant panel test ranged from 42 to 50%. The blower-cyclone-shaker (BCS) test for settled density has been subjected to continued interlaboratory evaluation.Laboratory results have been compared with field measurements to determine the applicability of the test as a predictor. The average of the results of the BCS Test compares very closely (<1%) with field data from four cities. Individual materials, however, can show differences between field and laboratory results of up to 20%.

  18. Temperature sensing using the bandgap-like effect in a selectively liquid-filled photonic crystal fiber.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yang; Hou, Jing; Zhang, Yang; Huang, Zhihe; Xiao, Rui; Lu, Qisheng

    2013-02-01

    A compact temperature sensor based on a selectively liquid-filled photonic crystal fiber (PCF) is proposed using controlled hole collapse in PCF post-processing. The first ring around the core is filled with liquid of higher refractive index than the matrix, while the outer rings of holes are filled with air. The bandgap (BG)-like effect of the high refractive index ring is analyzed. Absorption loss spectra of the fiber are found to be quite sensitive to the refractive index of liquid when the liquid is lossy. Using the BG-like effect, a fiber temperature sensor is fabricated by selectively injecting a mixture of dimethyl sulfoxide and aqueous gold colloids with a high thermo-optic coefficient to the PCF. Temperature sensitivity up to -5.5 nm/°C is experimentally confirmed.

  19. An improved bifunctional oxygen (air) electrode for reversible alkaline fuel cell systems and for rechargeable metal-air batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordesch, K.; Steininger, K.-H.; Tomantschger, K.

    1988-10-01

    Electrodes with a nickel layer of dual pore structure on the electrolyte side and a PTFE-bonded carbon layer on the oxygen (air) side are discussed, with application to space energy storage. During the electrolyis stage, the oxygen fills the large pores of the porous Ni structure with gas. During the discharge cycle, the iron/air or zinc/air cell of the carbon layer operates as a regular oxygen electrode.

  20. Shockley-Read-Hall recombination in pre-filled and photo-filled intermediate band solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mayani, Maryam Gholami; Reenaas, Turid Worren

    2014-08-18

    In this work, we study how Shockley-Read-Hall (SRH) recombination via energy levels in the bandgap, caused by defects or impurities, affects the performance of both photo-filled and pre-filled intermediate band solar cells (IBSCs). For a pre-filled cell, the IB is half-filled in equilibrium, while it is empty for the photo-filled cell in equilibrium. The energy level, density, and capture cross-sections of the defects/impurities are varied systematically. We find that the photo-filled cells are, in general, less efficient than pre-filled cells, except when the defect level is between the conduction band and the IB. In that case, for a range of light intensities, the photo-filled cell performs better than the pre-filled. When the defect level is at the same energy as the IB, the efficiency is above 82% of the defect-free case, when less than 50% of the states at the IB lead to SRH recombination. This shows that even if SRH recombination via the IB takes place, high efficiencies can be achieved. We also show that band gap optimization can be used to reduce the SRH recombination.

  1. Application of dynamic mechanical testing to characterize the viscoelastic properties of powder-filled semisolids.

    PubMed

    Radebaugh, G W; Simonelli, A P

    1984-05-01

    A nondestructive technique, dynamic mechanical testing, was used to characterize the viscoelastic properties of dispersions of powdered starch in anhydrous lanolin. The elastic shear modulus (G'), viscous shear modulus (G"), and loss tangent (damping; tan delta) were determined as a function of shear frequency, temperature, and the volume fraction of starch. The results of these studies show that constitutive mathematical models, derived to predict the mechanical behavior of solid-filled polymeric materials, can be applied to solid-filled semisolid pharmaceuticals. In particular, the Kerner equation was useful in describing the influence of starch on the G' of the dispersions. Even though the Kerner equation was unable to predict viscoelastic behavior at all shear frequencies, temperatures, and starch volume fractions, it proved beneficial in postulating mechanisms for starch-starch and starch-anhydrous lanolin interactions within the dispersions. In addition, damping was able to differentiate the influence of temperature. Data obtained from three temperature ranges, where anhydrous lanolin exists in three different structural states, shows that the influence of starch on damping is dictated by the structural state of anhydrous lanolin.

  2. Australia's Next Top Fraction Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gould, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Peter Gould suggests Australia's next top fraction model should be a linear model rather than an area model. He provides a convincing argument and gives examples of ways to introduce a linear model in primary classrooms.

  3. Laboratory Characterization of Cemented Rock Fill for Underhand Cut and Fill Method of Mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Dinesh; Singh, Upendra Kumar; Singh, Gauri Shankar Prasad

    2016-10-01

    Backfilling with controlled specifications is employed for improved ground support and pillar recovery in underground metalliferous mine workings. This paper reports the results of a laboratory study to characterise various mechanical properties of cemented rock fill (CRF) formulations for different compaction levels and cement content percentage for use in underhand cut and fill method of mining. Laboratory test set ups and procedures have been described for conducting compressive and bending tests of CRF block samples. A three dimensional numerical modelling study has also been carried out to overcome the limitations arising due to non-standard dimension of test blocks used in flexural loading test and the test setup devised for this purpose. Based on these studies, specific relations have been established between the compressive and the flexural properties of the CRF. The flexural strength of the wire mesh reinforced CRF is also correlated with its residual strength and the Young's modulus of elasticity under flexural loading condition. The test results of flexural strength, residual flexural strength and modulus show almost linear relations with cement content in CRF. The compressive strength of the CRF block samples is estimated as seven times the flexural strength whereas the compressive modulus is four times the flexural modulus. It has been found that the strengths of CRF of low compaction and no compaction are 75 and 60 % respectively to that of the medium compaction CRF. The relation between the strength and the unit weight of CRF as obtained in this study is significantly important for design and quality control of CRF during its large scale application in underhand cut and fill stopes.

  4. Robust fractional quantum Hall effect in the N=2 Landau level in bilayer graphene.

    PubMed

    Diankov, Georgi; Liang, Chi-Te; Amet, François; Gallagher, Patrick; Lee, Menyoung; Bestwick, Andrew J; Tharratt, Kevin; Coniglio, William; Jaroszynski, Jan; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Goldhaber-Gordon, David

    2016-12-21

    The fractional quantum Hall effect is a canonical example of electron-electron interactions producing new ground states in many-body systems. Most fractional quantum Hall studies have focussed on the lowest Landau level, whose fractional states are successfully explained by the composite fermion model. In the widely studied GaAs-based system, the composite fermion picture is thought to become unstable for the N≥2 Landau level, where competing many-body phases have been observed. Here we report magneto-resistance measurements of fractional quantum Hall states in the N=2 Landau level (filling factors 4<|ν|<8) in bilayer graphene. In contrast with recent observations of particle-hole asymmetry in the N=0/N=1 Landau levels of bilayer graphene, the fractional quantum Hall states we observe in the N=2 Landau level obey particle-hole symmetry within the fully symmetry-broken Landau level. Possible alternative ground states other than the composite fermions are discussed.

  5. Robust fractional quantum Hall effect in the N=2 Landau level in bilayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diankov, Georgi; Liang, Chi-Te; Amet, François; Gallagher, Patrick; Lee, Menyoung; Bestwick, Andrew J.; Tharratt, Kevin; Coniglio, William; Jaroszynski, Jan; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Goldhaber-Gordon, David

    2016-12-01

    The fractional quantum Hall effect is a canonical example of electron-electron interactions producing new ground states in many-body systems. Most fractional quantum Hall studies have focussed on the lowest Landau level, whose fractional states are successfully explained by the composite fermion model. In the widely studied GaAs-based system, the composite fermion picture is thought to become unstable for the N≥2 Landau level, where competing many-body phases have been observed. Here we report magneto-resistance measurements of fractional quantum Hall states in the N=2 Landau level (filling factors 4<|ν|<8) in bilayer graphene. In contrast with recent observations of particle-hole asymmetry in the N=0/N=1 Landau levels of bilayer graphene, the fractional quantum Hall states we observe in the N=2 Landau level obey particle-hole symmetry within the fully symmetry-broken Landau level. Possible alternative ground states other than the composite fermions are discussed.

  6. Use of Air2Air Technology to Recover Fresh-Water from the Normal Evaporative Cooling Loss at Coal-Based Thermoelectric Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Ken Mortensen

    2009-06-30

    This program was undertaken to build and operate the first Air2Air{trademark} Water Conservation Cooling Tower at a power plant, giving a validated basis and capability for water conservation by this method. Air2Air{trademark} water conservation technology recovers a portion of the traditional cooling tower evaporate. The Condensing Module provides an air-to-air heat exchanger above the wet fill media, extracting the heat from the hot saturated moist air leaving in the cooling tower and condensing water. The rate of evaporate water recovery is typically 10%-25% annually, depending on the cooling tower location (climate).

  7. Xenon fractionation in porous planetesimals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahnle, Kevin; Pollack, James B.; Kasting, James F.

    1990-01-01

    The distinctively fractionated Xe on Mars and earth may have its root in a common source from which both planets accreted. Beginning with Ozima and Nakazawa's (1980) hypothesis that terrestrial Xe fractionation was caused by gravitational separation of adsorbed solar nebular gases inside large porous planetesimals, it is pointed out that Xe would have been trapped as the planetesimal grew and pores were squeezed shut by lithostatic pressure. It is shown that enough fractionated Xe to supply the earth could have been trapped this way. The degree of fractionation is controlled by the lithostatic pressure at the pore-closing front and so would have been roughly the same for all large planetesimals. The predicted degree of fractionation agrees well with that preserved in terrestrial and Martian Xe. Relative to Xe, this source is strongly depleted in other noble gases. In contrast to the original Ozima and Nakazawa hypothesis, the present hypothesis predicts the observed fractionation, and it allows planetary accretion to occur after the dissipation of the solar nebula.

  8. Xenon fractionation in porous planetesimals.

    PubMed

    Zahnle, K; Pollack, J B; Kasting, J F

    1990-01-01

    The distinctively fractionated Xe on Mars and Earth may have its root in a common source from which both planets accreted. We begin with Ozima and Nakazawa's hypothesis that terrestrial Xe fractionation was caused by gravitational separation of adsorbed solar nebular gases inside large porous planetesimals. We point out that Xe would have been trapped as the planetesimal grew and pores were squeezed shut by lithostatic pressure. We show that enough fractionated Xe to supply the Earth could have been trapped this way. The degree of fractionation is controlled by the lithostatic pressure at the pore-closing front and so would have been roughly the same for all large planetesimals. The predicted degree of fractionation agrees well with that preserved in terrestrial and martian Xe. Relative to Xe, this source is strongly depleted in other noble gases. In contrast to the original Ozima and Nakazawa hypothesis, our hypothesis predicts the observed fractionation, and it allows planetary accretion to occur after the dissipation of the solar nebula. The required planetesimals are large, representing a class of object now extinct in the solar system.

  9. Influence of template fill in graphoepitaxy directed self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doise, Jan; Bekaert, Joost; Chan, Boon Teik; Hong, SungEun; Lin, Guanyang; Gronheid, Roel

    2016-07-01

    Directed self-assembly (DSA) of block copolymers (BCP) is considered a promising patterning approach for the 7-nm node and beyond. Specifically, a graphoepitaxy process using a cylindrical phase BCP may offer an efficient solution for patterning randomly distributed contact holes with subresolution pitches, such as found in via and cut mask levels. In any graphoepitaxy process, the pattern density impacts the template fill (local BCP thickness inside the template) and may cause defects due to over- or underfilling of the template. In order to tackle this issue thoroughly, the parameters that determine template fill and the influence of template fill on the resulting pattern should be investigated. Using three process flow variations (with different template surface energy), template fill is experimentally characterized as a function of pattern density and film thickness. The impact of these parameters on template fill is highly dependent on the process flow, and thus prepattern surface energy. Template fill has a considerable effect on the pattern transfer of the DSA contact holes into the underlying layer. Higher fill levels give rise to smaller contact holes and worse critical dimension uniformity. These results are important for DSA-aware design and show that fill is a crucial parameter in graphoepitaxy DSA.

  10. 46 CFR 151.03-21 - Filling density.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Filling density. 151.03-21 Section 151.03-21 Shipping... BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Definitions § 151.03-21 Filling density. The ratio, expressed as a percentage, of the weight of cargo that may be loaded into a tank compared to the weight of...

  11. 46 CFR 151.03-21 - Filling density.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Filling density. 151.03-21 Section 151.03-21 Shipping... BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Definitions § 151.03-21 Filling density. The ratio, expressed as a percentage, of the weight of cargo that may be loaded into a tank compared to the weight of...

  12. 46 CFR 151.03-21 - Filling density.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Filling density. 151.03-21 Section 151.03-21 Shipping... BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Definitions § 151.03-21 Filling density. The ratio, expressed as a percentage, of the weight of cargo that may be loaded into a tank compared to the weight of...

  13. 46 CFR 151.03-21 - Filling density.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Filling density. 151.03-21 Section 151.03-21 Shipping... BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Definitions § 151.03-21 Filling density. The ratio, expressed as a percentage, of the weight of cargo that may be loaded into a tank compared to the weight of...

  14. 46 CFR 151.03-21 - Filling density.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Filling density. 151.03-21 Section 151.03-21 Shipping... BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Definitions § 151.03-21 Filling density. The ratio, expressed as a percentage, of the weight of cargo that may be loaded into a tank compared to the weight of...

  15. Diversions: Hilbert and Sierpinski Space-Filling Curves, and beyond

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gough, John

    2012-01-01

    Space-filling curves are related to fractals, in that they have self-similar patterns. Such space-filling curves were originally developed as conceptual mathematical "monsters", counter-examples to Weierstrassian and Reimannian treatments of calculus and continuity. These were curves that were everywhere-connected but…

  16. Theory Of Dewetting In A Filled Elastomer Under Stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peng, Steven T. J.

    1993-01-01

    Report presents theoretical study of dewetting between elastomeric binder and filler particles of highly filled elastomer under multiaxial tension and resulting dilatation of elastomer. Study directed toward understanding and predicting nonlinear stress-vs.-strain behavior of filled elastomeric rocket propellant, also applicable to rubber in highly loaded tire or in damping pad.

  17. Gap filling strategies and error in estimating annual soil respiration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil respiration (Rsoil) is one of the largest CO2 fluxes in the global carbon (C) cycle. Estimation of annual Rsoil requires extrapolation of survey measurements or gap-filling of automated records to produce a complete time series. While many gap-filling methodologies have been employed, there is ...

  18. Using Habit Reversal to Decrease Filled Pauses in Public Speaking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mancuso, Carolyn; Miltenberger, Raymond G.

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of simplified habit reversal in reducing filled pauses that occur during public speaking. Filled pauses consist of "uh," "um," or "er"; clicking sounds; and misuse of the word "like." After baseline, participants received habit reversal training that consisted of…

  19. 7 CFR 3201.20 - Fluid-filled transformers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...-conducting) fluid to provide insulating and cooling properties. (2) Vegetable oil-based fluid-filled transformers. Electric power transformers that are designed to utilize a vegetable oil-based dielectric (non... transformers—66 percent. (2) Vegetable oil-based fluid-filled transformers—95 percent. (c)...

  20. 7 CFR 3201.20 - Fluid-filled transformers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...-conducting) fluid to provide insulating and cooling properties. (2) Vegetable oil-based fluid-filled transformers. Electric power transformers that are designed to utilize a vegetable oil-based dielectric (non... transformers—66 percent. (2) Vegetable oil-based fluid-filled transformers—95 percent. (c)...